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Sample records for bovine respiratory syncytial

  1. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV): A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in calves during the first year of life. The study of the virus has been difficult because of its lability and very poor growth in cell culture. However, during the last decade, the introduction of new...... complex and unpredictable which makes the diagnosis and subsequent therapy very difficult. BRSV is closely related to human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) which is an important cause of respiratory disease in young children. In contrast to BRSV, the recent knowledge of HRSV is regularly extensively...

  2. Characterization of an Experimental Vaccine for Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hägglund, Sara; Hu, Kefei; Blodörn, Krister; Makabi-Panzu, Boby; Gaillard, Anne-Laure; Ellencrona, Karin; Chevret, Didier; Hellman, Lars; Bengtsson, Karin Lövgren; Riffault, Sabine; Taylor, Geraldine; Valarcher, Jean François; Eléouët, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) are major causes of respiratory disease in calves and children, respectively, and are priorities for vaccine development. We previously demonstrated that an experimental vaccine, BRSV-immunostimulating complex (ISCOM), is effective in calves with maternal antibodies. The present study focuses on the antigenic characterization of this vaccine for the design of new-generation subunit vaccines. The results of ...

  3. Epidemiology, Molecular Epidemiology and Evolution of Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Gilberto Vaughan; Yuko Nakamura-Lopez; Rosa Elena Sarmiento-Silva

    2012-01-01

    The bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is an enveloped, negative sense, single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the pneumovirus genus within the family Paramyxoviridae. BRSV has been recognized as a major cause of respiratory disease in young calves since the early 1970s. The analysis of BRSV infection was originally hampered by its characteristic lability and poor growth in vitro. However, the advent of numerous immunological and molecular methods has facilitated the study of BRSV enor...

  4. Human and bovine respiratory syncytial virus vaccine research and development

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Gilles; Deplanche, Martine; Schelcher, François

    2008-01-01

    Human (HRSV) and bovine (BRSV) respiratory syncytial viruses (RSV) are two closely related viruses, which are the most important causative agents of respiratory tract infections of young children and calves, respectively. BRSV vaccines have been available for nearly 2 decades. They probably have reduced the prevalence of RSV infection but their efficacy needs improvement. In contrast, despite decades of research, there is no currently licensed vaccine for the prevention of HRSV disease. Devel...

  5. Occurrence and phylogenetic analysis of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in outbreaks of respiratory disease in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Klem, Thea; Rimstad, Espen; Stokstad, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is one of the major pathogens involved in the bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex. The seroprevalence to BRSV in Norwegian cattle herds is high, but its role in epidemics of respiratory disease is unclear. The aims of the study were to investigate the etiological role of BRSV and other respiratory viruses in epidemics of BRD and to perform phylogenetic analysis of Norwegian BRSV strains. Results BRSV infection was detected either serol...

  6. Epidemiology, Molecular Epidemiology and Evolution of Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Vaughan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV is an enveloped, negative sense, single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the pneumovirus genus within the family Paramyxoviridae. BRSV has been recognized as a major cause of respiratory disease in young calves since the early 1970s. The analysis of BRSV infection was originally hampered by its characteristic lability and poor growth in vitro. However, the advent of numerous immunological and molecular methods has facilitated the study of BRSV enormously. The knowledge gained from these studies has also provided the opportunity to develop safe, stable, attenuated virus vaccine candidates. Nonetheless, many aspects of the epidemiology, molecular epidemiology and evolution of the virus are still not fully understood. The natural course of infection is rather complex and further complicates diagnosis, treatment and the implementation of preventive measures aimed to control the disease. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms by which BRSV is able to establish infection is needed to prevent viral and disease spread. This review discusses important information regarding the epidemiology and molecular epidemiology of BRSV worldwide, and it highlights the importance of viral evolution in virus transmission.

  7. Replication and clearance of respiratory syncytial virus - Apoptosis is an important pathway of virus clearance after experimental infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, B.; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Larsen, Lars Erik; Røntved, C.M.; Uttenthal, Åse; Rønsholt, L.; Alexandersen, Søren

    2002-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus is an important cause of severe respiratory disease in young children, the elderly, and in immunocompromised adults. Similarly, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is causing severe, sometimes fatal, respiratory disease in calves. Both viruses are pneumovirus...... replication and clearance in a natural target animal. Replication of BRSV was demonstrated in the luminal part of the respiratory epithelial cells and replication in the upper respiratory tract preceded the replication in the lower respiratory tract. Virus excreted to the lumen of the respiratory tract was...... and the infections with human respiratory syncytial. virus and BRSV have similar clinical, pathological, and epidemiological characteristics. In this study we used experimental BRSV infection in calves as a model of respiratory syncytial virus infection to demonstrate important aspects of viral...

  8. In vivo evidence for quasispecies distributions in the bovine respiratory syncytial virus genome

    OpenAIRE

    Deplanche, Martine; Lemaire, Mylène; Mirandette, Carole; Bonnet, Marion; Schelcher, François; Meyer, Gilles

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the genetic evolution of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) isolate W2-00131, from its isolation in bovine turbinate (BT) cells to its inoculation in calves. Results showed that the BRSV genomic region encoding the highly variable glycoprotein G remains genetically stable after virus isolation and over 10 serial infections in BT cells, as well as following experimental inoculation in calves. This remarkable genetic stability led us to examine the mutant spectrum of several ...

  9. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) pneumonia in beef calf herds despite vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tegtmeier, C.; Pedersen, E.

    2001-01-01

    The present report describes the clinical, pathological, serological and virological findings in calves from 2 larger Danish beef herds experiencing outbreaks of pneumonia. The calves had been vaccinated with an inactivated bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) vaccine 2 months prior to the o...... beef herds failed to protect the calves against severe or even fatal BRSV mediated respiratory disease 2 months later.......The present report describes the clinical, pathological, serological and virological findings in calves from 2 larger Danish beef herds experiencing outbreaks of pneumonia. The calves had been vaccinated with an inactivated bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) vaccine 2 months prior to the...... outbreak. The clinical signs comprised nasal discharge, pyrexia, cough and increased respiratory rates. A total of 28 calves died in the 2 herds. The laboratory investigations revealed that BRSV was involved and probably initiated both outbreaks. Furthermore, the serological results suggested that the...

  10. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) pneumonia in beef calf herds despite vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tegtmeier, C.; Pedersen, E.

    2001-01-01

    to the outbreak. The clinical signs comprised nasal discharge, pyrexia, cough and increased respiratory rates. A total of 28 calves died in the 2 herds. The laboratory investigations revealed that BRSV was involved and probably initiated both outbreaks. Furthermore, the serological results suggested......The present report describes the clinical, pathological, serological and virological findings in calves from 2 larger Danish beef herds experiencing outbreaks of pneumonia. The calves had been vaccinated with an inactivated bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) vaccine 2 months prior...... beef herds failed to protect the calves against severe or even fatal BRSV mediated respiratory disease 2 months later....

  11. Antibody Tracing, Seroepidemiology and Risk Factors of Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Bovine Adenovirus-3 in Dairy Holstein Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa FARZINPOUR

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibody tracing, risk factors and seroepidemiology of bovine respiratory syncytial virus and bovine adenovirus-3 were investigated in 22 Industrial and Semi-Industrial dairy Holstein farms. Serum samples (n=736 from various ages of unvaccinated cows were collected from May to September 2012. Risk factors including age, past history of respiratory diseases, amount of milk production, husbandry type and herd size were considered. Data were analyzed by Chi-square and logistic regression. Results indicated that the infection with some of individual viruses was related to past history of respiratory disease and herd size. No specific pattern was seen on the effect of level of milk production on seropositivity of animals. The seroprevalence for BRSV and BAV-3 were 89.1% and 88%, respectively. The present study indicates that infections of bovine respiratory viruses frequently occur in cattle of Fars province and the main viral cause of primary occurrence of respiratory diseases may be due to aforementioned viruses.

  12. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus ISCOMs - protection in the presence of maternal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägglund, Sara; Hu, Ke-Fei; Larsen, Lars Erik;

    2004-01-01

    The protection induced by immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) was evaluated and compared to that of a commercial inactivated vaccine (CV) in calves with BRSV-specific maternal antibodies. Following experimental challenge, controls (n = 4) and...... animals immunized with CV (n = 5) developed moderate to severe respiratory disease, whereas calves immunized with ISCOMS (17 = 5) remained clinically healthy. BRSV was re-isolated from the nasopharynx of all controls and from all calves immunized with CV, but from none of the calves immunized with ISCOMs...

  13. The detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in formalin fixed bovine lung with commercially available monoclonal antibodies and avidin biotin complex immunohistochemistry.

    OpenAIRE

    Haines, D M; Clark, E.G.; Chelack, B J

    1989-01-01

    Eight commercially available monoclonal antibodies directed against respiratory syncytial virus antigens were tested for ability to detect bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) antigen in formalin fixed, paraffin embedded bovine lung using avidin-biotin complex immunohistochemical staining. Monoclonal antibodies from clone 18B2 purchased from Biosoft, Paris, France and those from clone 8G12 purchased from the Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska sta...

  14. Comparative serological response in calves to eight commercial vaccines against infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, parainfluenza-3, bovine respiratory syncytial, and bovine viral diarrhea viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Van Donkersgoed, Joyce; van den Hurk, Jan V.; McCartney, Duane; Harland, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    A field trial was conducted to compare the serological responses in calves to eight commercial vaccines against infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV), parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), and/or bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Calves given IBRV, P13V, BRSV, and BVDV vaccines had significantly higher antibodies to these viruses than unvaccinated controls; however, serological responses to killed BVDV vaccines were low. Calves with preexisting an...

  15. Synergistic effects of bovine respiratory syncytial virus and non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus infection on selected bovine alveolar macrophage functions.

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, L.; Lehmkuhl, H D; Kaeberle, M L

    1999-01-01

    The effect of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (ncpBVDV) infection on selected bovine alveolar macrophage (AM) functions was investigated. Alveolar macrophages were harvested from 2- to 6-month-old calves seronegative for BRSV and BVDV and inoculated with approximately 1 median cell culture infective dose of virus per AM. Control, BRSV infected, ncpBVDV-infected and BRSV-ncpBVDV coinfected AM cultures were evaluated for Fc receptor expre...

  16. Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Respiratory Syncytial Virus KidsHealth > For Parents > Respiratory Syncytial Virus Print A A A Text Size What's in ... RSV When to Call the Doctor en español Virus respiratorio sincitial About RSV Respiratory syncytial (sin-SISH- ...

  17. Quantitative Trait Loci Associated with the Immune Response to a Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Leach, R J; O'Neill, R. G.; Fitzpatrick, J.L; Williams, J.L.; Glass, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Infectious disease is an important problem for animal breeders, farmers and governments worldwide. One approach to reducing disease is to breed for resistance. This linkage study used a Charolais-Holstein F2 cattle cross population (n = 501) which was genotyped for 165 microsatellite markers (covering all autosomes) to search for associations with phenotypes for Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV) specific total-IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 concentrations at several time-points pre- and post-BRSV...

  18. Quantitative Trait Loci Associated with the Immune Response to a Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Leach, Richard J; O'Neill, Ronan G; Fitzpatrick, Julie L.; Williams, John L; Glass, Elizabeth J

    2012-01-01

    Infectious disease is an important problem for animal breeders, farmers and governments worldwide. One approach to reducing disease is to breed for resistance. This linkage study used a Charolais-Holstein F2 cattle cross population (n = 501) which was genotyped for 165 microsatellite markers (covering all autosomes) to search for associations with phenotypes for Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV) specific total-IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 concentrations at several time-points pre- and post-BRSV...

  19. Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV Pneumonia in Beef Calf Herds Despite Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen E

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes the clinical, pathological, serological and virological findings in calves from 2 larger Danish beef herds experiencing outbreaks of pneumonia. The calves had been vaccinated with an inactivated bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV vaccine 2 months prior to the outbreak. The clinical signs comprised nasal discharge, pyrexia, cough and increased respiratory rates. A total of 28 calves died in the 2 herds. The laboratory investigations revealed that BRSV was involved and probably initiated both outbreaks. Furthermore, the serological results suggested that the vaccine induced only sparse levels of antibodies probably due to the presence of maternally derived antibodies at the time of vaccination. Necropsy findings in 5 calves revealed changes typical for infectious pneumonia with involvment of BRSV. In conclusion, vaccination of calves against BRSV in 2 Danish beef herds failed to protect the calves against severe or even fatal BRSV mediated respiratory disease 2 months later.

  20. Sites of replication of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in naturally infected calves as determined by in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, B.; Uttenthal, Åse; Tegtmeier, C.; Alexandersen, Søren

    1996-01-01

    Replication of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) was studied in three naturally infected calves by in situ hybridization using strand-specific RNA probes. One of the calves was a 5-month-old Friesian, the other two calves were a 3-month-old and a 2-week-old Jersey. Two Jersey calves, 3 mo...

  1. Prevalence of antibodies to infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, parainfluenza 3, bovine respiratory syncytial, and bovine viral diarrhea viruses in cattle in Saskatchewan and Alberta

    OpenAIRE

    Durham, Peter J.K.; Hassard, Lori E.

    1990-01-01

    A total of 1745 healthy cattle from 295 farms in Saskatchewan and Alberta was tested by ELISA for antibodies to four viruses. Antibodies to infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus were found in 37.8% of sera (59.5% of properties), to parainfluenza 3 (PI3) virus in 93.9% of sera (99.7% of properties), to bovine respiratory syncytial (BRS) virus in 78.5% of sera (86.6% of properties), and to bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) virus in 40.6% of sera (66.7% of properties)

  2. Antiviral Efficacy of a Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Fusion Inhibitor in a Bovine Model of RSV Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Robert; Shao, Matt; Mackman, Richard L.; Perron, Michel; Cihlar, Tomas; Lewis, Sandy A.; Eisenberg, Eugene J.; Carey, Anne; Strickley, Robert G.; Chien, Jason W.; Anderson, Mark L.; McEligot, Heather A.; Behrens, Nicole E.; Gershwin, Laurel J.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants. Effective treatment for RSV infection is a significant unmet medical need. While new RSV therapeutics are now in development, there are very few animal models that mimic the pathogenesis of human RSV, making it difficult to evaluate new disease interventions. Experimental infection of Holstein calves with bovine RSV (bRSV) causes a severe respiratory infection that is similar to human RSV infecti...

  3. Detection of an untyped strain of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in a dairy herd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Bortolin Affonso

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV causes important lower respiratory tract illness in calves. According to F and G proteins genetic sequences, three BRSV subgroups have been reported and characterized in several countries, showing differences in its distribution. In Brazil, the virus is widely disseminated throughout the herds and the few characterized isolates revealed the solely occurrence of the subgroup B. This study describes the detection and characterization of an untyped BRSV strain from a twenty-days-old calf from a herd without clinical respiratory disease. Nasal swabs were analyzed by RT-nested PCR for the F and G proteins genes. One sample has amplified the F protein gene. Sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic reconstruction were accomplished, revealing that the strain could not be grouped with any other BRSV subgroups reported. This result may suggest that the BRSV is in constantly evolution, even in Brazil, where the vaccination is not a common practice. More detailed studies about BRSV characterization are necessary to know the virus subgroups distribution among the Brazilian herds to recommend appropriated immunoprophylaxis.

  4. Sites of replication of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in naturally infected calves as determined by in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, B.; Uttenthal, Åse; Tegtmeier, C.; Alexandersen, Søren

    1996-01-01

    Replication of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) was studied in three naturally infected calves by in situ hybridization using strand-specific RNA probes. One of the calves was a 5-month-old Friesian, the other two calves were a 3-month-old and a 2-week-old Jersey. Two Jersey calves, 3...... months and 3 weeks of age, served as controls. Replication of BRSV took place in the luminal lining of the respiratory tract. In one of the BRSV infected animals (calf No. 1), replication was especially seen in the bronchi, whereas in the two other animals (calf Nos. 2 and 3) replication of BRSV was...

  5. A randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen for respiratory syncytial infection in a bovine model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and hospital admission in infants. An analogous disease occurs in cattle and costs US agriculture a billion dollars a year. RSV causes much of its morbidity indirectly via adverse effects of the host response to ...

  6. Antiviral effects of bovine interferons on bovine respiratory tract viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, R W; Downing, M M; Cummins, J M

    1984-01-01

    The antiviral effects of bovine interferons on the replication of bovine respiratory tract viruses were studied. Bovine turbinate monolayer cultures were treated with bovine interferons and challenged with several bovine herpesvirus 1 strains, bovine viral diarrhea virus, parainfluenza type 3 virus, goat respiratory syncytial virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine adenovirus type 7, or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with bovine interferons reduced viral yield for each of the...

  7. A Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial of Ibuprofen for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in a Bovine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Paul; Behrens, Nicole; Carvallo Chaigneau, Francisco R.; McEligot, Heather; Agrawal, Karan; Newman, John W.; Anderson, Mark; Gershwin, Laurel J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and hospital admission in infants. An analogous disease occurs in cattle and costs US agriculture a billion dollars a year. RSV causes much of its morbidity indirectly via adverse effects of the host response to the virus. RSV is accompanied by elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) which is followed by neutrophil led inflammation in the lung. Ibuprofen is a prototypical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that decreases PGE2 levels by inhibiting cyclooxygenase. Hypotheses We hypothesized that treatment of RSV with ibuprofen would decrease PGE2 levels, modulate the immune response, decrease clinical illness, and decrease the histopathological lung changes in a bovine model of RSV. We further hypothesized that viral replication would be unaffected. Methods We performed a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen in 16 outbred Holstein calves that we infected with RSV. We measured clinical scores, cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and endocannabinoid products in plasma and mediastinal lymph nodes and interleukin (Il)-4, Il-13, Il-17 and interferon-γ in mediastinal lymph nodes. RSV shedding was measured daily and nasal Il-6, Il-8 and Il-17 every other day. The calves were necropsied on Day 10 post inoculation and histology performed. Results One calf in the ibuprofen group required euthanasia on Day 8 of infection for respiratory distress. Clinical scores (p<0.01) and weight gain (p = 0.08) seemed better in the ibuprofen group. Ibuprofen decreased cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and cytochrome P450 products, and increased monoacylglycerols in lung lymph nodes. Ibuprofen modulated the immune response as measured by narrowed range of observed Il-13, Il-17 and IFN-γ gene expression in mediastinal lymph nodes. Lung histology was not different between groups, and viral shedding was increased in calves randomized to ibuprofen. Conclusions Ibuprofen decreased PGE2, modulated the immune

  8. Quantitative trait loci associated with the immune response to a bovine respiratory syncytial virus vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Leach

    Full Text Available Infectious disease is an important problem for animal breeders, farmers and governments worldwide. One approach to reducing disease is to breed for resistance. This linkage study used a Charolais-Holstein F2 cattle cross population (n = 501 which was genotyped for 165 microsatellite markers (covering all autosomes to search for associations with phenotypes for Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV specific total-IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 concentrations at several time-points pre- and post-BRSV vaccination. Regions of the bovine genome which influenced the immune response induced by BRSV vaccination were identified, as well as regions associated with the clearance of maternally derived BRSV specific antibodies. Significant positive correlations were detected within traits across time, with negative correlations between the pre- and post-vaccination time points. The whole genome scan identified 27 Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL on 13 autosomes. Many QTL were associated with the Thymus Helper 1 linked IgG2 response, especially at week 2 following vaccination. However the most significant QTL, which reached 5% genome-wide significance, was on BTA 17 for IgG1, also 2 weeks following vaccination. All animals had declining maternally derived BRSV specific antibodies prior to vaccination and the levels of BRSV specific antibody prior to vaccination were found to be under polygenic control with several QTL detected.Heifers from the same population (n = 195 were subsequently immunised with a 40-mer Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus peptide (FMDV in a previous publication. Several of these QTL associated with the FMDV traits had overlapping peak positions with QTL in the current study, including the QTL on BTA23 which included the bovine Major Histocompatibility Complex (BoLA, and QTL on BTA9 and BTA24, suggesting that the genes underlying these QTL may control responses to multiple antigens. These results lay the groundwork for future investigations to identify the

  9. Evaluation of a single-tube fluorogenic RT-PCR assay for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in clinical samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakhverdyan, Mikhayil; Hägglund, Sara; Larsen, Lars Erik;

    2005-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) causes severe disease in naive cattle of all ages and is a common pathogen in the respiratory disease complex of calves. Simplified methods for rapid BRSV diagnosis would encourage sampling during outbreaks and would consequently lead to an extended...

  10. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-04

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.  Created: 2/4/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases (DVD).   Date Released: 2/13/2013.

  11. Radiographic and radionuclide lung perfusion imaging in healthy calves and calves naturally infected with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine calves between three and 18 weeks old with serologically confirmed natural bovine respiratory syncytial virus infection were examined clinically, radiographically and by radionuclide lung perfusion imaging. The results were compared with those from seven healthy calves. The diseased calves were euthanased and examined pathologically, virologically and bacteriologically. The clinical signs indicated that the disease was in an acute stage. Radiography of the diseased animals revealed cysts, corresponding morphologically with bullous emphysema, and infiltrations roughly corresponding in distribution with atelectatic and, or, pneumonic areas. Radionuclide lung perfusion imaging revealed no perfusion shifts between the left and right lungs and a normal perfusion pattern in five of the nine diseased calves. The abnormalities in the perfusion patterns of three calves were probably caused by anatomical disorders such as cysts and pleural adhesions, but no cause of the abnormality could be found in one calf. These findings suggest that in calves infected with bovine respiratory syncytial virus, the normal perfusion pattern is maintained until anatomical disorders occur. The pathological examination and radiography revealed that the cranioventral lung fields were particularly poorly ventilated. This finding and the normal perfusion pattern indicate that these parts of the lungs are probably the sites where shuntings and perfusion-ventilation mismatchings occur

  12. Comparison of levels and duration of detection of antibodies to bovine viral diarrhea virus 1, bovine viral diarrhea virus 2, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus 1, and bovine parainfluenza virus 3 in calves fed maternal colostrum or a colostrum-replacement product

    OpenAIRE

    Chamorro, Manuel F; Walz, Paul H.; Haines, Deborah M.; Passler, Thomas; Earleywine, Thomas; Palomares, Roberto A.; Riddell, Kay P; Galik, Patricia; Zhang, Yijing; Givens, M. Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Colostrum-replacement products are an alternative to provide passive immunity to neonatal calves; however, their ability to provide adequate levels of antibodies recognizing respiratory viruses has not been described. The objective of this study was to compare the serum levels of IgG at 2 d of age and the duration of detection of antibodies to bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 (BVDV-2), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1)...

  13. 牛呼吸道合胞体病毒检测方法研究进展%Progress on the Detection Methods for Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨洺扬; 王炜; 李真光; 董鹏; 胡桂学; 武华; 陈立志; 程世鹏; 冷雪

    2014-01-01

    牛呼吸道合胞体病毒是引起牛呼吸道疾病的主要病原之一。进行牛呼吸道合胞体病诊断时,首先通过临床症状观察以及病理剖检变化进行初诊,然后再进行实验室诊断。其实验室检测主要依赖于病原学诊断和血清学诊断,病原学诊断方法主要包括细胞分离培养鉴定、聚合酶链反应。血清学方法包括中和试验、免疫荧光试验、酶联免疫吸附试验等。近年来聚合酶链反应!酶联免疫吸附试验等方法得到快速发展,凭借其高效、快速、灵敏性高的特点成为牛呼吸道合胞体病毒检测的常用方法。牛呼吸道合胞体病在全球范围内流行,对各国养牛业造成极大危害。论文综述了牛呼吸道合胞体病毒检测方法的研究进展,为牛呼吸道合胞体病的诊断和预防提供参考。%Bovine respiratory syncytial virus is recognized as one of the crucial causes of bovine respiratory disease,which has a marked impact on the cattle industry and the dairy industry.Bovine respiratory syncy-tial virus is preliminarily diagnosed based on the clinical symptoms and pathological anatomy changes,and then through the laboratory tests.The laboratory tests of bovine respiratory syncytial virus mainly rely on etiology diagnosis and serological diagnosis.The methods for etiology diagnosis consists of cell-culture iso-lation techniques,polymerase chain reaction.And the serological methods consists of neutralization tests, immunofluorescence method,enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.For the past few years,the experimen-tal methods,such as polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were developed rapidly,and became the main methods for the diagnosis of bovine respiratory syncytial virus due to their high efficiency,rapidness and high sensitivity.The bovine respiratory syncytial disease has spread world-wide and impacted production and animal welfare in the cattle industry.The article

  14. 牛呼吸道合胞体病毒检测方法研究进展%Progress on the Detection Methods for Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨洺扬; 王炜; 李真光; 董鹏; 胡桂学; 武华; 陈立志; 程世鹏; 冷雪

    2014-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus is recognized as one of the crucial causes of bovine respiratory disease,which has a marked impact on the cattle industry and the dairy industry.Bovine respiratory syncy-tial virus is preliminarily diagnosed based on the clinical symptoms and pathological anatomy changes,and then through the laboratory tests.The laboratory tests of bovine respiratory syncytial virus mainly rely on etiology diagnosis and serological diagnosis.The methods for etiology diagnosis consists of cell-culture iso-lation techniques,polymerase chain reaction.And the serological methods consists of neutralization tests, immunofluorescence method,enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.For the past few years,the experimen-tal methods,such as polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were developed rapidly,and became the main methods for the diagnosis of bovine respiratory syncytial virus due to their high efficiency,rapidness and high sensitivity.The bovine respiratory syncytial disease has spread world-wide and impacted production and animal welfare in the cattle industry.The article summarized the re-search progress on the laboratory test methods of bovine respiratory syncytial virus.The overview of thesis will provide some references for the diagnosis and prevention of the bovine respiratory syncytial disease.%牛呼吸道合胞体病毒是引起牛呼吸道疾病的主要病原之一。进行牛呼吸道合胞体病诊断时,首先通过临床症状观察以及病理剖检变化进行初诊,然后再进行实验室诊断。其实验室检测主要依赖于病原学诊断和血清学诊断,病原学诊断方法主要包括细胞分离培养鉴定、聚合酶链反应。血清学方法包括中和试验、免疫荧光试验、酶联免疫吸附试验等。近年来聚合酶链反应!酶联免疫吸附试验等方法得到快速发展,凭借其高效、快速、灵敏性高的特点成为牛呼吸道合胞体病毒检测的常用方

  15. Evaluation of a Nested Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay Based on the Nucleoprotein Gene for Diagnosis of Spontaneous and Experimental Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Valarcher, Jean-François; Bourhy, Hervé; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Schelcher, François

    1999-01-01

    The first nested reverse transcription (RT)-PCR based on the nucleoprotein gene (n RT-PCR-N) of the bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) has been developed and optimized for the detection of BRSV in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells of calves. This test is characterized by a low threshold of detection (0.17 PFU/ml), which is 506 times lower than that obtained by an enzyme immunosorbent assay (EIA) test (RSV TESTPACK ABBOTT). During an experimental infection of 17 immunocompetent calves ...

  16. Investigation of the presence of human or bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the lungs of mink (Neovison vison with hemorrhagic pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomonsen Charlotte M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemorrhagic pneumonia is a disease of farmed mink (Neovison vison caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The disease is highly seasonal in Danish mink with outbreaks occurring almost exclusively in the autumn. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV has been shown to augment infection with P. aeruginosa in mice and to promote adhesion of P. aeruginosa to human respiratory cells. Findings We tested 50 lung specimens from mink with hemorrhagic pneumonia for bovine RSV by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR and for human RSV by a commercial real-time PCR. RSV was not found. Conclusions This study indicates that human and bovine RSV is not a major co-factor for development of hemorrhagic pneumonia in Danish mink.

  17. An experimental infection model for reproduction of calf pneumonia with bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) based on one combined exposure of calves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Uttenthal, Åse; Viuff, B.; Larsen, Lars Erik; Rontved, C.; Ronsholt, L.

    2003-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) has been recognised as an important pathogen in calf pneumonia for 30 years, but surprisingly few effective infection models for studies of the immune response and the pathogenesis in the natural host have been established. We present a reproducible...... experimental infection model for BRSV in 2-5-month-old, conventionally reared Jersey calves. Thirty-four colostrum-fed calves were inoculated once by aerosol and intratracheal injection with BRSV. Respiratory disease was recorded in 91% of the BRSV-inoculated calves, 72% had an accompanying rise in rectal...... temperature and 83% exhibited >5%, consolidation of the lung tissue. The disease closely resembled natural outbreaks of BRSV-related pneumonia, and detection of BRSV in nasal secretions and lung tissues confirmed the primary role of BRSV. Nine mock-inoculated control calves failed to develop respiratory...

  18. The relationship between antibody status to bovine corona virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus and disease incidence, reproduction and herd characteristics in dairy herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tråvén Madeleine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV and bovine corona virus (BCV affects cattle worldwide. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of these infections on general health and reproduction parameters measurable on herd level and to explore the association between antibody status and some herd characteristics. Methods We collected a pooled milk sample from five primiparous cows from 79 Swedish dairy herds in September 2006. The samples were analysed for immunoglobulin G antibodies to BCV and BRSV with indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Herd level data from 1 September 2005 to 30 August 2006 were accessed retrospectively. The location of the herds was mapped using a geographical information system. Results Ten herds were antibody negative to both viruses and were compared with 69 herds positive to BCV or BRSV or both. Positive herds had a higher (P = 0.001 bulk tank milk somatic cell count (BMSCC compared with negative herds. The medians for all other analyzed health and reproductive parameters were consistently in favour of the herds negative to both viruses although the differences were not statistically significant. A higher proportion (P = 0.01 of herds used professional technicians for artificial insemination, rather than farm personnel, amongst the 33 herds negative to BCV compared with the 46 positive herds. Conclusions Our result shows that herds that were antibody positive to BCV and/or BRSV had a higher BMSCC compared with herds negative to BCV and BRSV. There was also tendency that negative herds had a better general herd health compared with positive. A higher proportion amongst the BCV negative herds used external technicians for AI instead of farm personnel, indicating that it is possible to avoid infection although having regular visits. Negative herds were located in close proximity to positive herds, indicating that local spread and airborne transmission between herds might not be of great

  19. DETECTION OF ANTIBODIES AGAINST BOVINE HERPES VIRUS 1, BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUS AND BOVINE RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS IN EARLY AND ULTRA-EARLY WEANED BEEF CALVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Daniel Gonzalez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in weaned calves. In Argentina, two weaning practices have been implemented. In the early weaning, the calf is removed from the cow at 60-70 days of age while in ultra-early weaning the calf is weaned at 30-45 days of age. The purposes of both systems is to improve cow body condition, calf performance, conception rates and forage availability for the cow. In this study we evaluated the antibody response against BVDV and BoHV1 in early and ultra-early weaned calves that had received a conventional vaccination schedule (first dose at weaning and a booster 21 days post-weaning. Passively acquired immunity may provide protection against disease caused by these viruses. The presence of antibodies against BRSV, a virus that was not present in the vaccines used, was also evaluated as an indirect indicator of viral circulation in the herd. At the time of vaccination, calves presented a wide range of maternally-derived antibody titers. Vaccination against BoHV-1 did not evoke seroconvertion and antibody titers continued to decay throughout the experience. After vaccination, seroconversion to BVDV could be detected in calves with low antibody titers, while higher antibody titers exerted an inhibitory effect of the active humoral response.

  20. Experimental pneumonia in gnotobiotic calves produced by respiratory syncytial virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, L. H.; Slott, E. J.; Collins, A. P.; Jebbett, J.

    1984-01-01

    A bovine isolate of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), when inoculated intranasally into eight gnotobiotic calves produced significant macroscopic lesions of the lung (2-25% consolidation) but failed to produce any clinical signs of disease. The microscopic lesions comprised proliferative and exudative bronchiolitis with accompanying alveolar collapse and infiltration by mononuclear cells of the peribronchiolar tissue and alveolar walls. Virus was recovered from the nasopharynx between days 2...

  1. Neonatal Calf Infection with Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Drawing Parallels to the Disease in Human Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Reinhardt, Timothy A.; Nonnecke, Brian J.; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Lippolis, John D.; Jodi L McGill; Sacco, Randy E.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of childhood acute lower respiratory tract infections. It is estimated that RSV infections result in more than 100,000 deaths annually worldwide. Bovine RSV is a cause of enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia in nursing beef calves. Furthermore, bovine RSV plays a significant role in bovine respiratory disease complex, the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality among feedlot cattle. Infection of ...

  2. Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Chakravarti; Bineeta Kashyap

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Acute lower respiratory infections lead to high morbidity and mortality rates in children from developing countries. The aim of this study was to look into the extent of respiratory syncytial virus infections in children with special reference to the role of specific immunoglobulins in protection against infection as well as the association with bacterial pathogens. Material & Methods: Nasopharyngeal aspirates were tested for respiratory syncytial virus antigen by enzyme immunoassa...

  3. Diagnosing and treating respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napierkowski, Daria B

    2016-09-22

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the major causes of respiratory tract illness in children and can lead to significant infection and death. This article discusses the incidence, clinical presentation, diagnosis, current treatment, and prevention options to successfully diagnose and treat infections caused by RSV. PMID:27552683

  4. Association of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus with Multiple Viral Infections in Bovine Respiratory Disease Outbreaks

    OpenAIRE

    Richer, Lisette; Marois, Paul; Lamontagne, Lucie

    1988-01-01

    We investigated eleven outbreaks of naturally occurring bovine respiratory diseases in calves and adult animals in the St-Hyacinthe area of Quebec. Specific antibodies to bovine herpesvirus-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza type 3 virus, reovirus type 3, and serotypes 1 to 7 of bovine adenovirus were found in paired sera from diseased animals. Several bovine viruses with respiratory tropism were involved concomitantly in herds during an outbreak of bov...

  5. Live-Attenuated Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Karron, Ruth A.; Buchholz, Ursula J.; Collins, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Live-attenuated respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccines offer several advantages for immunization of infants and young children: (1) they do not cause vaccine-associated enhanced RSV disease; (2) they broadly stimulate innate, humoral, and cellular immunity, both systemically and locally in the respiratory tract; (3) they are delivered intranasally; and (4) they replicate in the upper respiratory tract of young infants despite the presence of passively acquired maternally derived RSV neutr...

  6. Generation of Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV) from cDNA: BRSV NS2 Is Not Essential for Virus Replication in Tissue Culture, and the Human RSV Leader Region Acts as a Functional BRSV Genome Promoter

    OpenAIRE

    Buchholz, Ursula J.; Finke, Stefan; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus

    1999-01-01

    In order to generate recombinant bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), the genome of BRSV strain A51908, variant ATue51908, was cloned as cDNA. We provide here the sequence of the BRSV genome ends and of the entire L gene. This completes the sequence of the BRSV genome, which comprises a total of 15,140 nucleotides. To establish a vaccinia virus-free recovery system, a BHK-derived cell line stably expressing T7 RNA polymerase was generated (BSR T7/5). Recombinant BRSV was reproducibly re...

  7. Prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Samson, L

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in young children, with significant numbers of premature infants and those with other risk factors requiring hospitalization in Canada each year. Palivizumab, an RSV-specific monoclonal antibody, can reduce the hospitalization rate and severity of illness for a small group of high-risk or premature infants during their first RSV season. The present statement reviews the published literature a...

  8. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus: immunohistochemichal detection in mouse and bovine tissues using a Mab against human respiratory syncytial virus Vírus respiratório sincicial bovino: detecção por imunoistoquímica em tecidos de camundongos e bovinos usando AcM contra o vírus respiratório sincicial humano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Almeida

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available An immunoistochemical (IHC test was developed to detect bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV in cell cultures and tissues of experimentally infected mice and calves, using a commercial monoclonal antibody (Mab against human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV, as a less expensive alternative, instead of producing specific monoclonal antibodies to BRSV. Clinical samples from calves suffering respiratory disease were also submitted to this test. IHC detected BRSV antigens in mouse tracheas (3, 5 and 7 days post-infection and lungs (5 and 7 days post-infection, and in one of three lungs from experimentally infected calves. Lungs samples from two naturally infected calves were tested and resulted positive for BRSV by the IHC test. These results suggest that this test may be used in the future for diagnosis as well as a useful tool to assess the distribution of BRSV infections in Brazilian herds.Desenvolveu-se um teste de imunohistoquímica (IHQ para detecção do vírus respiratório sincicial bovino (BRSV multiplicado em cultivo celular e em tecidos de camundongos e bezerros infectados experimentalmente, utilizando um anticorpo monoclonal comercial contra o vírus respiratório sincicial humano (HRSV, como uma alternativa para eliminar os custos de produção de anticorpos monoclonais específicos para o BRSV. Amostras clínicas de bezerros com sintomatologia respiratória foram analisadas. A técnica mostrou-se eficiente na detecção de antígenos do BRSV em traquéias (3, 5 e 7 dias pós-infecção e pulmões (5 e 7 dias pós-infecção dos camundongos infectados e em uma das três amostras de pulmões dos bezerros infectados experimentalmente. Amostras de pulmões de dois animais com infecção natural foram positivas para BRSV. Conclui-se que o teste de IHQ pode ser usado no diagnóstico das infecções por BRSV e na avaliação da distribuição dessas infecções nos rebanhos bovinos brasileiros.

  9. Neonatal calf infection with respiratory syncytial virus: drawing parallels to the disease in human infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of childhood acute lower respiratory tract infections. It is estimated that RSV infections result in more than 100,000 deaths annually worldwide. Bovine RSV is a cause of enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia ...

  10. Neonatal calf infection with respiratory syncytial virus: drawing parallels to the disease in human infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of childhood acute lower respiratory tract infections. It is estimated that RSV infections result in more than 100,000 deaths annually worldwide. Bovine RSV is a cause of enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia in...

  11. A retrospective search for bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) antigens in histological specimens by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry Pesquisa retrospectiva de antígenos do Vírus Respiratório Sincicial Bovino (BRSV) em cortes histológicos por imunofluorescência e imunohistoquímica

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, Eduardo F; Rudi Weiblen; Margareti Medeiros; Sônia A. Botton; Luiz F. Irigoyen; David Driemeier; Luis F. Schuch; Mauro Moraes

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) has been only sporadically identified as a causative agent of respiratory disease in Brazil. This contrasts with frequent reports of clinical and histopathological findings suggestive of BRSV-associated disease. In order to examine a possible involvement of BRSV in cases of calf pneumonia, a retrospective search was performed for BRSV antigens in histological specimens submitted to veterinary diagnostic services from the states of Rio Grande do Sul an...

  12. Hibridación in situ del virus respiratorio syncytial bovino en pulmón de cordero a diferentes tiempos postinfección Bovine respiratory syncytial virus in-situ hybridization from sheep lungs at different times postinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. REDONDO

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió, mediante la técnica de hibridación in situ, la distribución del ARN viral del virus respiratorio Sincicial Bovino (VRSB en pulmón de corderos infectados en forma experimental, a diferentes tiempos postinoculación. La sonda usada para la hibridación in situ se preparó mediante transcripción reversa del ARN del VRSB, seguida de la amplificación mediante PCR de cADN. 25 corderos de raza Merino de ambos sexos y de un peso vivo de 55 (+/- 10 Kg, fueron inoculados por vía intratraqueal con 40 ml de solución salina que contenía 1.26 x 10(6 DIM50 por ml (cepa viral NMK7. Los corderos se sacrificaron los días 1, 3, 7, 11 y 15 postinoculación. Las células epiteliales bronquiales y bronquiolares resultaron positivas a los ácidos nucleicos de VRSB los días 1, 3, 7 y 11 postinoculación. A su vez, el epitelio alveolar contenía células positivas los días 1, 3, y 7 postinoculación. Se detectaron células que contenían el ARN viral en las luces bronquiales y bronquilares del día 1 al 11 postinoculación, y en el exudadado alveolar en los días 3 y 7 postinoculación. Se identificaron señales positivas de hibridación desde el día 3 al 11 postinoculación, tanto en las células intersticiales mononucleares como en el tejido linfoide asociado a los bronquios. Las señales de hibridación más intensas se detectaron a los días 3 y 7 postinoculación, lo que coincidió con las lesiones histopatológicas de mayor consideraciónWe studied the distribution of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV RNA in lungs of experimentally infected sheep by in situhybridization at different times postinfection. The probe used for in-situ hybridization was prepared by reverse transcription of BRSV RNA, followed by PCR amplification of the cDNA. Twenty five Merino sheeps of both sexes with a live weight of 55± 10 Kg, received a intratracheal inoculation of 40 ml saline solution containing 1.26 x 10(6 TCID50 BRSV (strain NMK7 per ml. Sheep

  13. Three viruses of the bovine respiratory disease complex apply different strategies to initiate infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchhoff, Jana; Uhlenbruck, Sabine; Goris, Katherina; Keil, Günther M.; Herrler, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the major cause of serious respiratory tract infections in calves. The disease is multifactorial, with either stress or reduced immunity allowing several pathogens to emerge. We investigated the susceptibility of bovine airway epithelial cells (BAEC) to infection by the three major viruses associated with the BRDC: bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) and bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3). For this pu...

  14. Respiratory syncytial virus neutralizing antibodies in cord blood, respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization, and recurrent wheeze

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Ravn, Henrik; Kristensen, Kim;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalization is associated with wheeze. OBJECTIVE: To examine the influence of maternally derived RSV neutralizing antibodies in cord blood on RSV hospitalization and recurrent wheeze in infancy. METHODS: Among children from the Danish National Birth...... as predictors for (1) RSV hospitalization, (2) RSV hospitalization after recurrent wheeze, (3) recurrent wheeze, and (4) recurrent wheeze after RSV hospitalization. RESULTS: Neutralizing antibody levels were inversely associated with RSV hospitalization in infants below 6 months of age (adjusted incidence rate...

  15. Gold nanorod vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of pneumonia and wheezing in infants and the elderly, but to date there is no licensed vaccine. We developed a gold nanorod construct that displayed the major protective antigen of the virus, the fusion protein (F). Nanorods conjugated to RSV F were formulated as a candidate vaccine preparation by covalent attachment of viral protein using a layer-by-layer approach. In vitro studies using ELISA, electron microscopy and circular dichroism revealed that conformation-dependent epitopes were maintained during conjugation, and transmission electron microscopy studies showed that a dispersed population of particles could be achieved. Human dendritic cells treated with the vaccine induced immune responses in primary human T cells. These results suggest that this vaccine approach may be a potent method for immunizing against viruses such as RSV with surface glycoproteins that are targets for the human immune response. (paper)

  16. Vaccine Safety and Efficacy Evaluation of a Recombinant Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV) with Deletion of the SH Gene and Subunit Vaccines Based On Recombinant Human RSV Proteins: N-nanorings, P and M2-1, in Calves with Maternal Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Blodorn, Krister; Hagglund, Sara; Fix, Jenna; Dubuquoy, Catherine; Makabi-Panzu, Boby; Thom, Michelle; Karlsson, Per; Roque, Jean-Louis; Karlstam, Erika; Pringle, John; Eleouet, Jean Francois; Riffault, Sabine; Taylor, Geraldine; Valarcher, Jean Francois

    2014-01-01

    The development of safe and effective vaccines against both bovine and human respiratory syncytial viruses (BRSV, HRSV) to be used in the presence of RSV-specific maternally-derived antibodies (MDA) remains a high priority in human and veterinary medicine. Herein, we present safety and efficacy results from a virulent BRSV challenge of calves with MDA, which were immunized with one of three vaccine candidates that allow serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA): a...

  17. Respiratory syncytial virus and recurrent wheeze in healthy preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanken, M.O.; Rovers, M.M.; Molenaar, J.M.; Winkler-Seinstra, P.L.; Meijer, A.; Kimpen, J.L.L.; Bont, L.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is associated with subsequent recurrent wheeze. Observational studies cannot determine whether RSV infection is the cause of recurrent wheeze or the first indication of preexistent pulmonary vulnerability in preterm infants. The monoclonal anti

  18. Respiratory syncytial virus epidemiology in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanra, Güler; Tezcan, Sabahat; Yilmaz, Gülden

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children worldwide. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of RSV among high-risk children admitted with respiratory symptoms in a developing country. This is a multicenter study conducted among children less than 24 months of age and admitted to the hospital with respiratory symptoms. The inclusion criteria included: lower respiratory tract symptoms on admission, gestational age less than 35 weeks, and admission age less than six months, or children less than 24 months of age with a diagnosis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia requiring medical treatment or intervention during the last six months or with an uncorrected congenital heart disease (other than patent ductus arteriosus). Nasopharyngeal samples were obtained with one of the three standard methods: nasopharyngeal aspirate, nasopharyngeal wash or nasopharyngeal swab. RSV antigen was determined by enzyme immunoassay using Abbott TESTPACK RSV (No. 8100/2027-16). Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test and chi-square test. In this study, 332 children (135 females, 40.7%; 197 males, 59.3%) were included, and the nasopharyngeal specimens of 98 (29.5%) children were determined to be RSV-positive. There were no differences in sex, age of gestation, age of admission, family education, number of siblings and smoking at home for RSV-positive and -negative cases. Furthermore, underlying disease and duration of hospital and intensive care unit stay were similar among groups. Only otitis media was more common among RSV-positive cases. No fatality at hospital was recorded. Frozen samples revealed more negative results. Most cases presented during winter and the number of RSV-positive cases was higher in cold and economically poor areas. Premature children and children with underlying medical condition acquire RSV irrespective of other sociodemographic risk factors, and most of them

  19. Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Gershwin, LJ; Van Eenennaam, AL; Anderson, ML; McEligot, HA; Shao, MX; Toaff-Rosenstein, R; Taylor, JF; Neibergs, HL; Womack, J.; Complex, BRD

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in cattle; costing the dairy and beef industries millions of dollars annually, despite the use of vaccines and antibiotics. BRDC is caused by one or more of several viruses (bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpes type 1 also known as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, and bovine viral diarrhea virus), which predispose animals to infection with one or more bacteria. These include: Pasteurella ...

  20. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechan

  1. Respiratory syncytial virus, infants and intensive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Ieda Aparecida Correa; Riccetto, Adriana Gut Lopes; Morcillo, André Moreno; Arns, Clarice Weis; Baracat, Emílio Carlos Elias

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the presence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and to assess the clinical features of the disease in infants with acute low respiratory tract infection hospitalized at pediatric intensive care units (PICU) of two university teaching hospitals in São Paulo State, Brazil. Nasopharyngeal secretions were tested for the RSV by the polymerase chain reaction. Positive and negative groups for the virus were compared in terms of evolution under intensive care (mechanical pulmonary ventilation, medications, invasive procedures, complications and case fatality). Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann Whitney and Fisher's exact tests. A total of 21 infants were assessed, 8 (38.1%) of whom were positive for RSV. The majority of patients were previously healthy while 85.7% required mechanical pulmonary ventilation, 20/21 patients presented with at least one complication, and the fatality rate was 14.3%. RSV positive and negative groups did not differ for the variables studied. Patients involved in this study were critically ill and needed multiple PICU resources, independently of the presence of RSV. Further studies involving larger cohorts are needed to assess the magnitude of the impact of RSV on the clinical evolution of infants admitted to the PICU in our settings. PMID:22358363

  2. Respiratory syncytial virus, infants and intensive therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieda Aparecida Correa Bueno

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to determine the presence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and to assess the clinical features of the disease in infants with acute low respiratory tract infection hospitalized at pediatric intensive care units (PICU of two university teaching hospitals in São Paulo State, Brazil. Nasopharyngeal secretions were tested for the RSV by the polymerase chain reaction. Positive and negative groups for the virus were compared in terms of evolution under intensive care (mechanical pulmonary ventilation, medications, invasive procedures, complications and case fatality. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann Whitney and Fisher's exact tests. A total of 21 infants were assessed, 8 (38.1% of whom were positive for RSV. The majority of patients were previously healthy while 85.7% required mechanical pulmonary ventilation, 20/21 patients presented with at least one complication, and the fatality rate was 14.3%. RSV positive and negative groups did not differ for the variables studied. Patients involved in this study were critically ill and needed multiple PICU resources, independently of the presence of RSV. Further studies involving larger cohorts are needed to assess the magnitude of the impact of RSV on the clinical evolution of infants admitted to the PICU in our settings.

  3. Detection, pathogenesis, and therapy of respiratory syncytial virus infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Welliver, R C

    1988-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a major cause of serious lower respiratory disease in infancy and early childhood. The unique pathogenesis of lower respiratory illness due to RSV offers some intriguing clues to the role of the human immune system in both protection against and development of respiratory illness. More than any other virus, rapid diagnostic techniques have been especially successful in identifying RSV infection. Many of these techniques could be easily adaptable ...

  4. Animal models of human respiratory syncytial virus disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Bem; J.B. Domachowske; H.F. Rosenberg

    2011-01-01

    Infection with the human pneumovirus pathogen, respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), causes a wide spectrum of respiratory disease, notably among infants and the elderly. Laboratory animal studies permit detailed experimental modeling of hRSV disease and are therefore indispensable in the search for n

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsey, Ann R; Walsh, Edward E

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is now recognised as a significant problem in elderly adults. Epidemiological evidence indicates the impact of RSV in older adults may be similar to non-pandemic influenza, both in the community and in long-term care facilities. Attack rates in nursing homes are approximately 5-10% per year with significant rates of pneumonia (10-20%) and death (2-5%). Estimates using US health care databases and viral surveillance results over a 9-year period indicate that RSV infection causes approximately 10,000 all-cause deaths annually among persons >64 years of age. In contrast, influenza A accounted for approximately 37,000 yearly deaths in the same age group. The clinical features of RSV infection may be difficult to distinguish from those of influenza but include nasal congestion, cough, wheezing and low-grade fever. Older persons with underlying heart and lung disease and immunocompromised patients are at highest risk for RSV infection-related pneumonia and death. Diagnosis of RSV infection in adults is difficult because viral culture and antigen detection are insensitive, presumably because of low viral titres. The combination of serology and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay offers the best sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of RSV but unfortunately these techniques are not widely available; consequently, most adult RSV disease goes unrecognised. Although treatment of RSV infection in the elderly is largely supportive, early therapy with ribavirin and intravenous gamma-globulin improves survival in immunocompromised persons. An effective RSV vaccine has not yet been developed. Therefore, prevention of RSV is limited to standard infection control practices, such as hand washing and the use of gowns and gloves. PMID:16038573

  6. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Kneijber, M.C.J.; Heerde, van, H.J.W; Twisk, J W R; Plotz, F.; Markhorst, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechanical ventilation with heliox in these patients is unclear. The objective of this prospective cross-over study was to determine the effects of mechanical ventilation with heliox 60/40 versus convent...

  7. Need for a safe vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Joo-Young Kim; Jun Chang

    2012-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major cause of severe respiratory tract illnesses in infants and young children worldwide. Despite its importance as a respiratory pathogen, there is currently no licensed vaccine for HRSV. Following failure of the initial trial of formalin-inactivated virus particle vaccine, continuous efforts have been made for the development of safe and efficacious vaccines against HRSV. However, several obstacles persist that delay the development of HRSV vac...

  8. Innate immune recognition of respiratory syncytial virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Heung Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of respiratory infection in infants and young children. Severe clinical manifestation of RSV infection is a bronchiolitis, which is common in infants under six months of age. Recently, RSV has been recognized as an important cause of respiratory infection in older populations with cardiovascular morbidity or immunocompromised patients. However, neither a vaccine nor an effective antiviral therapy is currently available. Moreover, the inte...

  9. The acute phase response of haptoglobin and serum amyloid A (SAA) in cattle undergoing experimental infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Godson, D.L.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Larsen, Lars Erik; Viuff, B.; Rønsholt, Leif

    The ability of a pure virus infection to induce an acute phase protein response is of interest as viral infections are normally considered to be less efficient in inducing an acute phase protein response than bacterial infections. This was studied in a bovine model for infection with bovine respi...

  10. Caesarean Section and Hospitalization for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kim; Fisker, Niels; Haerskjold, Ann;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:: Hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and asthma share common determinants, and meta-analyses indicate that children delivered by caesarean section (CS) are at increased risk of asthma. We aimed to investigate whether birth by CS is associated ...

  11. Production of interferon in respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacs, D

    1989-01-01

    Production of interferon alfa in vitro was significantly reduced during acute respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis but subsequently returned to normal. Nasopharyngeal and endotracheal interferon alfa were detected intermittently and in low concentrations. The degree of impairment of in vitro production and poor in vivo production of interferon alfa suggest the need for a therapeutic trial of nebulised or systemic interferon in acute bronchiolitis.

  12. Influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses: Efficacy of different diagnostic assays

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, M.M.; K K Wong; Alfizah, H.; Hussin, S.; Isahak, I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of cell culture, immunoflourescence Assay (IFA) and real time polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) in relation to diagnosis of influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV). Methods: Total 2781 specimens of throat swabs and nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained from patients suspected of respiratory viruses’ infections from January 2009 to December 2011 at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre(UKMMC). The specimens were processed by cell culture ...

  13. Pulmonary immunity and immunopathology: lessons from respiratory syncytial virus

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Matthew R.; Varga, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe respiratory disease in infants and is an important source of morbidity and mortality in the elderly and immunocompromised. This review will discuss the humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses to RSV infection and how these responses are shaped in the immature immune system of the infant and the aged environment of the elderly. Furthermore, we will provide an overview of our current understanding of the role the various ar...

  14. Safety and pharmacokinetics of vitamin A therapy for infants with respiratory syncytial virus infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Neuzil, K M; Gruber, W C; Chytil, F; Stahlman, M. T.; Graham, B S

    1995-01-01

    Infants with respiratory syncytial virus infection have low serum vitamin A levels. We treated 21 respiratory syncytial virus-infected children with 12,500 to 25,000 IU of oral vitamin A. Vitamin A levels were normalized at 6 h, and none of the children experienced vitamin A toxicity or exacerbation of respiratory illness. Vitamin A treatment of previously healthy respiratory syncytial virus-infected infants at these doses is safe and well tolerated.

  15. [Serological studies of the role of the respiratory syncytial virus in acute respiratory diseases in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancea, D; Saşcă, C; Matinca, D; Ivanof, A

    1975-01-01

    The presence of the syncytial respiratory virus was determined by CF in 281 children admitted with acute respiratory diseases between 15 Sept. 1971 and 30 Dec. 1973, using the Long antigen prepared in the "St. Nicolau" Institute of Virology, Bucharest. In 38 children (13.5%) a serologic diagnosis of infection with the syncytial virus was established; in the other cases of respiratory infection of different etiology, antibodies to the syncytial virus were found in low but constant titers in both serum samples. The presence of these antibodies in a high proportion of the children points to the wide circulation of the syncytial virus in the infantile population, with all its clinico-epidemiologic implications. PMID:173009

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus rhinosinusitis in intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Rodrigues da Silva

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This study reported a case of rhinosinusitis for Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Intensive Care Unit patient. The settings were Intensive Care Unit at Hospital das Clínicas, University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, Brazil. One female HIV-infected patient with respiratory failure and circulatory shock due to splenic and renal abscesses, who developed rhinosinusitis caused by RSV and bacteria. Respiratory viruses can play a pathogenic role in airways infection allowing secondary bacterial overgrowth.

  17. Neonatal Calf Infection with Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Drawing Parallels to the Disease in Human Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A. Reinhardt

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common viral cause of childhood acute lower respiratory tract infections. It is estimated that RSV infections result in more than 100,000 deaths annually worldwide. Bovine RSV is a cause of enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia in nursing beef calves. Furthermore, bovine RSV plays a significant role in bovine respiratory disease complex, the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality among feedlot cattle. Infection of calves with bovine RSV shares features in common with RSV infection in children, such as an age-dependent susceptibility. In addition, comparable microscopic lesions consisting of bronchiolar neutrophilic infiltrates, epithelial cell necrosis, and syncytial cell formation are observed. Further, our studies have shown an upregulation of pro-inflammatory mediators in RSV-infected calves, including IL-12p40 and CXCL8 (IL-8. This finding is consistent with increased levels of IL-8 observed in children with RSV bronchiolitis. Since rodents lack IL-8, neonatal calves can be useful for studies of IL-8 regulation in response to RSV infection. We have recently found that vitamin D in milk replacer diets can be manipulated to produce calves differing in circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. The results to date indicate that although the vitamin D intracrine pathway is activated during RSV infection, pro-inflammatory mediators frequently inhibited by the vitamin D intacrine pathway in vitro are, in fact, upregulated or unaffected in lungs of infected calves. This review will summarize available data that provide parallels between bovine RSV infection in neonatal calves and human RSV in infants.

  18. Perinatal Lamb Model of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Ackermann, Mark R.; Rachel J. Derscheid

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most frequent cause of bronchiolitis in infants and children worldwide. Many animal models are used to study RSV, but most studies investigate disease in adult animals which does not address the unique physiology and immunology that makes infants more susceptible. The perinatal (preterm and term) lamb is a useful model of infant RSV disease as lambs have similar pulmonary structure including airway branching, Clara and type II cells, submucosal glands ...

  19. The ovine respiratory syncytial virus F gene sequence and its diagnostic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleraky, N Z; Kania, S A; Potgieter, L N

    2001-11-01

    Ruminant respiratory syncytial viruses (RSVs) are classified into 2 subgroups, ovine RSV and bovine RSV. Although ovine RSV infects cattle, its contribution to bovine respiratory tract disease has not been established, which is an important issue for vaccine development in cattle. Diagnosis by virus isolation or serology has low or variable sensitivity and/or specificity and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been recommended as a rapid and sensitive technique for RSV detection. A simple procedure has been developed to detect and identify bovine and ovine RSVs. First, the nucleotide sequence of the ovine RSV fusion (F) gene was determined and compared with representative strains of bovine RSV and human RSV subgroups A and B. The ovine RSV F gene has 85 and 72-73% nucleotide identity with those of bovine RSV and human RSV, respectively. The predicted amino acid sequence of the ovine RSV F gene has 94 and 83-84% amino acid identity with those of bovine RSV and human RSV, respectively. Then PCR primers targeting a specific F gene fragment of bovine and ovine RSV were designed. The primers represented bases 85-103 and the complementary sequence to bases 510-493 of the ovine RSV F gene. A similar PCR product (426 bp) was obtained on agarose gel electrophoresis from bovine RSV and from ovine RSV. The products, however, were unique to the parent virus and could be distinguished by EcoRI or MspI restriction endonuclease cleavage. EcoRI cleaved the ovine product into 2 bands (285 and 141 bp) but failed to affect the bovine RSV PCR product. However, MspI cleaved the bovine product into 2 bands (229 and 197 bp) but had no effect on the ovine product. Also, this assay did not amplify any PCR product with human RSV. The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) followed by restriction enzyme digestion is a useful and practical approach for detection and differentiation of ruminant respiratory syncytial viruses. PMID:11724134

  20. Atypical Presentations of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection; Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawal Al-Maskari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV usually causes a lower respiratory tract infection in affected patients. RSV has also been infrequently linked to extrapulmonary diseases in children. We report four children who had unusually severe clinical manifestations of RSV infections requiring critical care admission. These patients presented to the Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in December 2013 with acute necrotising encephalopathy (ANE, acute fulminant hepatic failure with encephalopathy, pneumatoceles and croup. A unique presentation of ANE has not previously been reported in association with an RSV infection. All patients had a positive outcome and recovered fully with supportive management.

  1. Radiological features of lower respiratory infection by respiratory syncytial virus in infants and young children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory syncytial virus is the most common cause of lower respiratory infection (bronchiolitis and pneumonia) of infancy and early childhood. We analyzed clinical and radiological features of 76 patients with lower respiratory infections by respiratory syncytial virus, which were diagnosed by indirect immunofluorescent test or culture of nasal aspirate in Hep-2-cell monolayer, during the period of January- December, 1991. There were peaks of incidences in March-May and November- December, accounting for 87% of eases. Sixty-two cases (82%) were under 1 year of age. Fifty cases (66%) had underlying diseases. Major radiographical findings were overaeration (83%), parahilar peribronchial infiltrates (67%), segmental or subsegmental atelectasis (32%), and segmental or lobar consolidation (16%). In 15 cases (20%), overaeration was the only radiological findings. There was no evidence of pleural effusion or lymph node enlargement in all cases. By considering clinical features (symptoms, age, underlying diseases, epidemic seasons) in addition to the radiological findings, radiologists would be familiar with lower respiratory infection by respiratory syncytial virus. Air space consolidation, which is generally thought to represent bacterial pneumonia, is also observed not infrequently in respiratory syncytial virus infection

  2. RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTION AMONG YOUNG CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Milani, M

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants,and also an important factor for hospitalization during the winter months. To determine the prevalence and importance of RSV as a cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection, we carried out a prospective study during 5 months period from November to March 1998 in 6 pediatric hospitals. A nasopharyngeal aspirate was obtained for detection of RSV in all cases. Sociodemographic data, clinic...

  3. Comparison of direct and indirect immunofluorescence staining of clinical specimens for detection of respiratory syncytial virus antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Minnich, L L; Ray, C G

    1982-01-01

    Immunofluorescence staining methods for respiratory syncytial virus antigen detection were compared. Of 50 specimens originally positive for respiratory syncytial virus by direct immunofluorescence and culture, 49 were positive by repeat direct immunofluorescence and 32 were positive by indirect immunofluorescence. Additional results obtained on specimens originally negative for respiratory syncytial virus by direct immunofluorescence, culture, or both indicate that direct immunofluorescence ...

  4. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV): A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik

    2000-01-01

    reviewed in several books and journals. The present paper contains an updated review on BRSV covering most aspects of the structure, molecular biology, pathogenesis, pathology, clinical features, epidemiology, diagnosis and immunology based on approximately 140 references from international research...

  5. Need for a safe vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo-Young Kim

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is a major cause of severe respiratory tract illnesses in infants and young children worldwide. Despite its importance as a respiratory pathogen, there is currently no licensed vaccine for HRSV. Following failure of the initial trial of formalin-inactivated virus particle vaccine, continuous efforts have been made for the development of safe and efficacious vaccines against HRSV. However, several obstacles persist that delay the development of HRSV vaccine, such as the immature immune system of newborn infants and the possible Th2-biased immune responses leading to subsequent vaccine-enhanced diseases. Many HRSV vaccine strategies are currently being developed and evaluated, including live-attenuated viruses, subunit-based, and vector-based candidates. In this review, the current HRSV vaccines are overviewed and the safety issues regarding asthma and vaccine-induced pathology are discussed.

  6. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Larsen, Hans Henrik; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...... children 1-6 months of age. Asthmatic bronchitis was diagnosed in 66.7% of hMPV and 10.6% of RSV-infected children (p < 0.001). Overall symptoms and clinical findings were similar among hMPV and RSV positive episodes, but more RSV-infected children required respiratory support. hMPV is present in young...

  7. Prevalence of respiratory syncytial virus-associated lower respiratory infection and apnea in infants presenting to the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staat, Mary Allen; Henrickson, Kelly; Elhefni, Hanaa; Groothuis, Jessie; Makari, Doris

    2013-08-01

    The prevalence of respiratory syncytial virus in children presenting to US emergency departments with lower respiratory tract infection or apnea (N = 4172) was evaluated outside the traditional respiratory syncytial virus season (September to October and April to May) relative to January to February. The Mid-Atlantic and Southeast demonstrated positivity rates in September to October comparable with rates observed during January to February. PMID:23429553

  8. Bovine viral diarrhea virus in postweaned calves in a feedlot after vaccination and from fatal respiratory cases: isolation and differentiation of MLV BVDV and field strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viral infections are important etiologies in BRD cases. Calves at stocker/feedlot entry usually receive modified live viral (MLV) vaccines containing bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1), parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V), bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV), and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). In...

  9. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Henrik Larsen, Hans; Koch, Anders; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Nordmann Winther, Thilde; Meyer, Anne-Marie; Westh, Henrik Torkil; Lundgren, Bettina; Melbye, Mads; Høgh, Birthe

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection.......6%) ARTI episodes by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction using primers targeting the hMPV N gene and the RSV L gene. Two children were co-infected with hMPV and RSV. They were excluded from statistical analysis. Hospitalization for ARTI caused by hMPV was restricted to very young...

  10. Vaccines against respiratory syncytial virus: The time has finally come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Barney S

    2016-06-24

    Respiratory syncytial virus causes a significant public health burden, particularly in very young infants and the frail elderly. The legacy of enhanced RSV disease (ERD) from a whole formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine, and the complex biology of the virus and the neonate have delayed the development of effective vaccines. However, new insights into factors associated with ERD and breakthroughs in understanding the antigenic structure of the fusion (F) glycoprotein have increased optimism that vaccine development is possible. This has led to investment of time and resources by industry, regulatory authorities, governments, and nonprofit organizations to develop the infrastructure needed to make the advanced clinical development of RSV vaccine candidates a reality. PMID:27182820

  11. Peptide-based candidate vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusibov, Vidadi; Mett, Vadim; Mett, Valentina; Davidson, Carley; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Gilliam, Suzan; Farese, Ann; Macvittie, Thomas; Mann, Dean

    2005-03-18

    We engineered a 21-mer peptide representing amino acids 170-190 of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) G protein as a fusion with the Alfalfa mosaic virus (AlMV) coat protein (CP), produced recombinant AlMV particles presenting this peptide (VMR-RSV) on their surfaces and tested the immunogenicity in vitro in human dendritic cells and in vivo in non-human primates. Significant pathogen-specific immune responses were generated in both systems: (i) human dendritic cells armed with VMR-RSV generated vigorous CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses; (ii) non-human primates that received these particles responded by mounting strong cellular and humoral immune responses. This approach may validate the use of a novel RSV vaccine delivery vehicle in humans. PMID:15755607

  12. Hospital admission of high risk infants for respiratory syncytial virus infection: implications for palivizumab prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Heikkinen, T.; Valkonen, H; Lehtonen, L; Vainionpaa, R; Ruuskanen, O.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the rates of hospital admission for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection among children born at different gestational ages. To assess the theoretical impact of palivizumab prophylaxis on admissions for RSV infection.

  13. Causal direction between respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis and asthma studied in monozygotic twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poorisrisak, Porntiva; Halkjaer, Liselotte Brydensholt; Thomsen, Simon Francis;

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis has been associated with later development of asthma, wheezing, abnormal pulmonary function, and sensitization. Our aim was to determine the differential effect within monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs discordant for severe RSV bronchiolitis in infancy on...

  14. Motavizumab for prophylaxis of respiratory syncytial virus in high-risk children: a noninferiority trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier; Simões, Eric A F; Dagan, Ron;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Palivizumab reduces respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalization in children at high risk by approximately 50% compared with placebo. We compared the efficacy and safety of motavizumab, an investigational monoclonal antibody with enhanced anti-RSV activity in preclinical studies...

  15. Increased concordance of severe respiratory syncytial virus infection in identical twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon Francis; Stensballe, Lone Graff; Skytthe, Axel;

    2008-01-01

    (concordance rate: 0.66 vs 0.53), which suggests genetic influences on disease severity. Genetic factors accounted for 16%, family environment for 73%, and nonshared environment for 11% of the individual susceptibility to develop severe respiratory syncytial virus infection. CONCLUSIONS: The severity......OBJECTIVE: We estimated differences in the severity of respiratory syncytial virus infection attributable to genetic and environmental factors. METHODS: Record linkage data on hospitalizations attributable to respiratory syncytial virus infection were gathered on all twins (12,346 pairs) born...... in Denmark between 1994 and 2003. Latent-factor models of genetic and environmental effects were fitted to the observed data by using maximal likelihood methods. RESULTS: Identical twins resembled each other significantly more than did fraternal twins for respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization...

  16. [Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis following adenovirus and respiratory syncytial virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Suremain, A; Somrani, R; Bourdat-Michel, G; Pinel, N; Morel-Baccard, C; Payen, V

    2015-05-01

    Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) is responsible for nearly 10% of acute renal failure (ARF) cases in children. It is mostly drug-induced, but in a few cases viruses are involved, probably by an indirect mechanism. An immune-competent 13-month-old boy was admitted to the intensive care unit for severe ARF with anuria in a context of fever, cough, and rhinorrhea lasting 1 week. The kidney biopsy performed early brought out tubulointerstitial damage with mild infiltrate of lymphocytes, without any signs of necrosis. There were no virus inclusion bodies, no interstitial hemorrhage, and no glomerular or vascular damage. Other causes of TIN were excluded: there was no biological argument for an immunological, immune, or drug-induced cause. Adenovirus (ADV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) were positive in respiratory multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in nasal aspirate but not in blood, urine, and renal tissue. The patient underwent dialysis for 10 days but the response to corticosteroid therapy was quickly observed within 48 h. The mechanism of TIN associated with virus infection is unknown. However, it may be immune-mediated to be able to link severe renal dysfunction and ADV and/or RSV invasion of the respiratory tract. PMID:25842199

  17. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Infants Affected by Primary Immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Lanari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary immunodeficiencies are rare inherited disorders that may lead to frequent and often severe acute respiratory infections. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is one of the most frequent pathogens during early infancy and the infection is more severe in immunocompromised infants than in healthy infants, as a result of impaired T- and B-cell immune response unable to efficaciously neutralize viral replication, with subsequent increased viral shedding and potentially lethal lower respiratory tract infection. Several authors have reported a severe clinical course after RSV infections in infants and children with primary and acquired immunodeficiencies. Environmental prophylaxis is essential in order to reduce the infection during the epidemic season in hospitalized immunocompromised infants. Prophylaxis with palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the RSV F protein, is currently recommended in high-risk infants born prematurely, with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease. Currently however the prophylaxis is not routinely recommended in infants with primary immunodeficiency, although some authors propose the extension of prophylaxis to this high risk population.

  18. Inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus-host cell interactions by mono- and diamidines.

    OpenAIRE

    Dubovi, E. J.; Geratz, J. D.; Shaver, S R; Tidwell, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Several aromatic mono- and diamidines were found to block cell fusion induced by respiratory syncytial virus. The best inhibitors were able to achieve complete suppression of syncytium formation at a concentration of 1.0 microM. Inhibition occurred in respiratory syncytial virus-infected HEp-2 and CV-1 cells, but the same inhibitors were ineffective in preventing fusion induced by parainfluenza virus type 3. The fusion inhibitors did not reduce single-cycle virus yields, but did reduce multip...

  19. GS-5806 Inhibits Pre- to Postfusion Conformational Changes of the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel, Dharmaraj; Xing, Weimei; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Wong, Jinny S; Hung, Magdeleine; Brendza, Katherine M.; Perron, Michel; Jordan, Robert; Sperandio, David; Liu, Xiaohong; Mackman, Richard; Sakowicz, Roman

    2015-01-01

    GS-5806 is a small-molecule inhibitor of human respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein-mediated viral entry. During viral entry, the fusion protein undergoes major conformational changes, resulting in fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane. This process is reproduced in vitro using a purified, truncated respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion protein. GS-5806 blocked these conformational changes, suggesting a possible mechanism for antiviral activity.

  20. Handwashing and cohorting in prevention of hospital acquired infections with respiratory syncytial virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacs, D; Dickson, H; O'Callaghan, C; Sheaves, R; Winter, A.; Moxon, E R

    1991-01-01

    Hospital acquired infections with respiratory syncytial virus are a major problem. The virus is spread predominantly by infected nasal secretions and we investigated whether we could reduce its incidence by cohorting babies on each ward into designated areas and encouraging staff and parents to wash their hands. We examined the incidence of hospital acquired infection due to respiratory syncytial virus in all children less than 2 years old and in those with congenital heart disease. In 1986-7...

  1. Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 Expressing the Native or Soluble Fusion (F) Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Confers Protection from RSV Infection in African Green Monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Roderick S.; MacPhail, Mia; Schickli, Jeanne H; Kaur, Jasmine; Robinson, Christopher L.; Lawlor, Heather A.; Guzzetta, Jeanne M.; Spaete, Richard R.; Haller, Aurelia A.

    2004-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes respiratory disease in young children, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals, often resulting in hospitalization and/or death. After more than 40 years of research, a Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccine for RSV is still not available. In this study, a chimeric bovine/human (b/h) parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) expressing the human PIV3 (hPIV3) fusion (F) and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) proteins from an otherwise bovine PIV3 (b...

  2. Respiratory syncytial virus infection: a decade of contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco del Val, Alfredo; Eiros Bouza, José María; Mayo Iscar, Agustín; Bachillar Luque, M Rosario; Blanco del Val, Beatriz; Sánchez Porto, Antonio; Ortiz de Lejarzu, Raúl

    2012-09-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the main cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections in children under 2 years, its distribution is worldwide and even in very different climatic conditions, it appears to have similar features, certainly knowing it will produce a significant amount of infections each year. We present the results of a retrospective review of positive cases for RSV detected in the Microbiology Laboratory of the Hospital Clinico Universitario of Valladolid in the period between 1990 and 2000, dealing with its presentation at the given time with the weather variables of temperature and humidity. Every year, we have observed as the clustering of cases was associated with two outbreaks, one at the beginning and the other at the end of the year, coinciding with the coldest and wettest months. This pattern has been repeated every revised year, according to an annual rate, with the onset of the first insulation between the months of October and February, and of the last ending between March and June, showing the highest peaks of isolation during the month of February. Therefore, every year we observe a break or seasonal slip matching the months with higher temperatures and lower humidity. PMID:22992556

  3. Study of montelukast for the treatment of respiratory symptoms of post-respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H.; Flores-Nunez, A.; Goh, A.; Azimi, P.; Halkas, A.; Malice, M.P.; Marchal, J.L.; Dass, S.B.; Reiss, T.F.; Knorr, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    RATIONALE: A pilot study (Bisgaard H; Study Group on Montelukast and Respiratory Syncytial Virus. A randomized trial of montelukast in respiratory syncytial virus postbronchiolitis. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2003;167:379-383) reported the efficacy of montelukast in post-respiratory syncytial virus...... (RSV) bronchiolitic respiratory symptoms. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of montelukast, 4 and 8 mg, in treating recurrent respiratory symptoms of post-RSV bronchiolitis in children in a large, multicenter study. METHODS: This was a double-blind study of 3- to 24-month-old children who...... had been hospitalized for a first or second episode of physician-diagnosed RSV bronchiolitis and who tested positive for RSV. Patients (n = 979) were randomized to placebo or to montelukast at 4 or 8 mg/day for 4 weeks (period I) and 20 weeks (period II). The primary end point was percentage symptom...

  4. Study of montelukast for the treatment of respiratory symptoms of post-respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Flores-Nunez, Alejandro; Goh, Anne;

    2008-01-01

    (RSV) bronchiolitic respiratory symptoms. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of montelukast, 4 and 8 mg, in treating recurrent respiratory symptoms of post-RSV bronchiolitis in children in a large, multicenter study. METHODS: This was a double-blind study of 3- to 24-month-old children who......RATIONALE: A pilot study (Bisgaard H; Study Group on Montelukast and Respiratory Syncytial Virus. A randomized trial of montelukast in respiratory syncytial virus postbronchiolitis. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2003;167:379-383) reported the efficacy of montelukast in post-respiratory syncytial virus...... were generally well tolerated. During the first two treatment weeks, average %SFD was approximately 29%. In post hoc analyses of patients (n = 523) with persistent symptoms (%SFD < or = 30% over Weeks 1-2), differences in %SFD were seen between montelukast and placebo over Weeks 3-24: difference were 5...

  5. The Insertion of Fluorescent Proteins in a Variable Region of Respiratory Syncytial Virus L Polymerase Results in Fluorescent and Functional Enzymes But with Reduced Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Fix, Jenna; Galloux, Marie; Blondot, Marie-Lise; Eléouët, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) Large protein L is the catalytic subunit of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex. Currently, no structural information is available for RSV L. Sequence alignments of L protein from human and bovine strains of RSV revealed the existence of two variable regions, VR1 and VR2. Following comparison with morbillivirus and rhabdovirus L genes, VR2, which is located between domains V and VI, was chosen as an insertion site for sequences encoding the epitope t...

  6. A role for airway remodeling during respiratory syncytial virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimina Dawn M

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe respiratory syncytial virus infection (RSV during infancy has been shown to be a major risk factor for the development of subsequent wheeze. However, the reasons for this link remain unclear. The objective of this research was to determine the consequences of early exposure to RSV and allergen in the development of subsequent airway hyperreactivity (AHR using a developmental time point in the mouse that parallels that of the human neonate. Methods Weanling mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (Ova and/or infected with RSV. Eight days after the last allergen challenge, various pathophysiological endpoints were examined. Results AHR in response to methacholine was enhanced only in weanling mice exposed to Ova and subsequently infected with RSV. The increase in AHR appeared to be unrelated to pulmonary RSV titer. Total bronchoalveolar lavage cellularity in these mice increased approximately two-fold relative to Ova alone and was attributable to increases in eosinophil and lymphocyte numbers. Enhanced pulmonary pathologies including persistent mucus production and subepithelial fibrosis were observed. Interestingly, these data correlated with transient increases in TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-5, and IL-2. Conclusion The observed changes in pulmonary structure may provide an explanation for epidemiological data suggesting that early exposure to allergens and RSV have long-term physiological consequences. Furthermore, the data presented here highlight the importance of preventative strategies against RSV infection of atopic individuals during neonatal development.

  7. Sequential MRI, SPECT and PET in respiratory syncytial virus encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirayama, K.; Sakazaki, Hiromi; Murakami, Seiko; Yonezawa, Sumiko [Department of Paediatrics, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Fujimoto, Keiji [Dept. of Radiology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Seto, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Katsuji; Hattori, Hideji; Matsuoka, Osamu [Dept. of Paediatrics, Osaka City University Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Murata, Ryosuke [Children`s Medical Centre, Osaka City General Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    We report on a 3-year-old girl with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) encephalitis manifested by disturbance of consciousness, conjugate eye deviation, anuria, truncal ataxia and intention tremor. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hyperintense areas in the cerebellar cortex. No lesion was detected in the cerebral cortex, pons or spinal cord. The hyperintense areas in the cerebellar cortex diminished with recovery from the clinical manifestations and had resolved 2 months after onset. The MRI lesions in the cerebellum were considered to be due to oedema. SPECT and positron emission tomography (PET), performed 3 months after onset, disclosed areas of hypoperfusion and hypometabolism at the same sites. One year after onset, MRI showed mild atrophy of the cerebellum. Hypoperfusion on SPECT and hypometabolism on PET remained. Neuroimaging showed that ataxia and tremor in this case were the result of cerebellitis. The patient has no neurological deficit except for mild truncal ataxia. This patient is a rare example of RSV encephalitis. (orig.) With 4 figs., 16 refs.

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus, an ongoing medical dilemma: an expert commentary on respiratory syncytial virus prophylactic and therapeutic pharmaceuticals currently in clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Broadbent, Lindsay; Groves, Helen; Shields, Michael D; Power, Ultan F.

    2015-01-01

    As the most important viral cause of severe respiratory disease in infants and increasing recognition as important in the elderly and immunocompromised, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is responsible for a massive health burden worldwide. Prophylactic antibodies were successfully developed against RSV. However, their use is restricted to a small group of infants considered at high risk of severe RSV disease. There is still no specific therapeutics or vaccines to combat RSV. As such, it rema...

  9. Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershwin, Laurel J; Van Eenennaam, Alison L; Anderson, Mark L; McEligot, Heather A; Shao, Matt X; Toaff-Rosenstein, Rachel; Taylor, Jeremy F; Neibergs, Holly L; Womack, James

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in cattle; costing the dairy and beef industries millions of dollars annually, despite the use of vaccines and antibiotics. BRDC is caused by one or more of several viruses (bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpes type 1 also known as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, and bovine viral diarrhea virus), which predispose animals to infection with one or more bacteria. These include: Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, and Histophilus somni. Some cattle appear to be more resistant to BRDC than others. We hypothesize that appropriate immune responses to these pathogens are subject to genetic control. To determine which genes are involved in the immune response to each of these pathogens it was first necessary to experimentally induce infection separately with each pathogen to document clinical and pathological responses in animals from which tissues were harvested for subsequent RNA sequencing. Herein these infections and animal responses are described. PMID:26571015

  10. Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel J Gershwin

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in cattle; costing the dairy and beef industries millions of dollars annually, despite the use of vaccines and antibiotics. BRDC is caused by one or more of several viruses (bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpes type 1 also known as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, and bovine viral diarrhea virus, which predispose animals to infection with one or more bacteria. These include: Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, and Histophilus somni. Some cattle appear to be more resistant to BRDC than others. We hypothesize that appropriate immune responses to these pathogens are subject to genetic control. To determine which genes are involved in the immune response to each of these pathogens it was first necessary to experimentally induce infection separately with each pathogen to document clinical and pathological responses in animals from which tissues were harvested for subsequent RNA sequencing. Herein these infections and animal responses are described.

  11. Functional correlations of respiratory syncytial virus proteins to intrinsic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Jillian N; Reddy, Krishna D; Uversky, Vladimir N; Teng, Michael N

    2016-04-26

    Protein intrinsic disorder is an important characteristic demonstrated by the absence of higher order structure, and is commonly detected in multifunctional proteins encoded by RNA viruses. Intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins exhibit high flexibility and solvent accessibility, which permit several distinct protein functions, including but not limited to binding of multiple partners and accessibility for post-translational modifications. IDR-containing viral proteins can therefore execute various functional roles to enable productive viral replication. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a globally circulating, non-segmented, negative sense (NNS) RNA virus that causes severe lower respiratory infections. In this study, we performed a comprehensive evaluation of predicted intrinsic disorder of the RSV proteome to better understand the functional role of RSV protein IDRs. We included 27 RSV strains to sample major RSV subtypes and genotypes, as well as geographic and temporal isolate differences. Several types of disorder predictions were applied to the RSV proteome, including per-residue (PONDR®-FIT and PONDR® VL-XT), binary (CH, CDF, CH-CDF), and disorder-based interactions (ANCHOR and MoRFpred). We classified RSV IDRs by size, frequency and function. Finally, we determined the functional implications of RSV IDRs by mapping predicted IDRs to known functional domains of each protein. Identification of RSV IDRs within functional domains improves our understanding of RSV pathogenesis in addition to providing potential therapeutic targets. Furthermore, this approach can be applied to other NNS viruses that encode essential multifunctional proteins for the elucidation of viral protein regions that can be manipulated for attenuation of viral replication. PMID:27062995

  12. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Infants: Detel1ninants of Clinical Severity

    OpenAIRE

    Brandenburg, Afke

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn 1955 a virus was isolated by Morris et al. from a chimpanzee with an upper respiratory tract infection. This apparently new virus was originally called chimpanzee coryza agent. Soon aftclwards, when it was isolated from children with respiratory disease, it became clear that this virus was a major human pathogen. The virus was from then onward called respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) because of its ability to caLise respiratory disease and to induce large syncytia in cell cultu...

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Isolated in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Medina, J. E.; Monroy-Muñoz, I. E.; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, A.; Meza-Chávez, A.; Ángeles-Martínez, J.; Anguiano-Hernández, Y. M.; Santacruz-Tinoco, C. E.; González-Ibarra, J.; Martínez-Miguel, B.; Alvarado-Yaah, J. E.; Palomec-Nava, I. D.; Ortiz-Alcántara, J. M.; Garcés-Ayala, F.; Díaz-Quiñonez, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, which causes lower respiratory tract infections in neonates and children younger than 5 years. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of HRSV, isolated from a nasopharyngeal swab of a pregnant woman with cardiac complications. PMID:26769933

  14. Enhanced adherence of Strontococcus pneumoniae to human epithelial cells infected with respiratory syncytial virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hament, JM; Aerts, PC; Fleer, A; Van Dijk, H; Kimpen, JLL; Wolfs, TFW

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the effect of a preceding respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection of human respiratory epithelial cells on the adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae tested by means of a cytometric fluorescence assay. Adherence of clinically relevant pneumococcal serotypes 3, 9,

  15. Viral Load Drives Disease in Humans Experimentally Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    OpenAIRE

    DeVincenzo, John P.; Wilkinson, Tom; Vaishnaw, Akshay; Cehelsky, Jeff; Meyers, Rachel; Nochur, Saraswathy; Harrison, Lisa; Meeking, Patricia; Mann, Alex; Moane, Elizabeth; Oxford, John; Pareek, Rajat; Moore, Ryves; Walsh, Ed; Studholme, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of childhood lower respiratory infection, yet viable therapies are lacking. Two major challenges have stalled antiviral development: ethical difficulties in performing pediatric proof-of-concept studies and the prevailing concept that the disease is immune-mediated rather than being driven by viral load.

  16. Nasal mucosal microRNA expression in children with respiratory syncytial virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Inchley, Christopher S; Sonerud, Tonje; Fjærli, Hans O; Nakstad, Britt

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a common cause of pediatric hospitalization. microRNA, key regulators of the immune system, have not previously been investigated in respiratory specimens during viral infection. We investigated microRNA expression in the nasal mucosa of 42 RSV-positive infants, also comparing microRNA expression between disease severity subgroups. Methods Nasa...

  17. RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTION AMONG YOUNG CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Milani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants,and also an important factor for hospitalization during the winter months. To determine the prevalence and importance of RSV as a cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection, we carried out a prospective study during 5 months period from November to March 1998 in 6 pediatric hospitals. A nasopharyngeal aspirate was obtained for detection of RSV in all cases. Sociodemographic data, clinical signs, diagnosis and hospital admissions were documented. During this study period, 365 young infants (51.5% male, 48.5% female with respiratory tract infection were visited in 6 hospitals. The median age of patients was 24 months (range: 1 month to 5 years.RSV infection was found in 70 out of 365 patients (19.18%.Among the 70 children with RSV infection, 29 patients (41.42% were under 12 months of age.The main clinical manifestations of RSV infection were cough (88.57% and coryza (78.57%. There were no significant differences between patients who were tested positive for RSV and those who were tested negative with regard to demographic variables and clinical diagnoses. This study indicates that RSV is an important cause of respiratory tract infection in infants and young children .Distinguishing RSV from other respiratory infection is difficult because of the similarity in clinical presentation among children.

  18. Respiratory syncytial virus detection by immunofluorescence in nasal secretions with monoclonal antibodies against selected surface and internal proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, H W; Wyatt, R G; Fernie, B F; Brandt, C D; Arrobio, J O; Jeffries, B C; Parrott, R H

    1983-01-01

    Specimens containing respiratory tract epithelial cells from infants and children with acute respiratory disease were evaluated by using an indirect immunofluorescence technique with two specific respiratory syncytial virus monoclonal antibodies. One (RS/HN 13-1) was directed against a cell surface viral antigen, and the other (RS/HN 25-2) was directed against viral antigen present in large cytoplasmic inclusions. The same results on presence or absence of respiratory syncytial virus were obt...

  19. Best practice in the prevention and management of paediatric respiratory syncytial virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Drysdale, Simon B.; Green, Christopher A; Sande, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is ubiquitous with almost all infants having been infected by 2 years of age and lifelong repeated infections common. It is the second largest cause of mortality, after malaria, in infants outside the neonatal period and causes up to 200,000 deaths per year worldwide. RSV results in clinical syndromes that include upper respiratory tract infections, otitis media, bronchiolitis (up to 80% of cases) and lower respiratory tract disease including pneumo...

  20. Molecular evolution of the fusion protein gene in human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hirokazu; Nagasawa, Koo; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Matsushima, Yuki; Fujita, Kiyotaka; Yoshida, Lay Myint; Tanaka, Ryota; Ishii, Haruyuki; Shimojo, Naoki; Kuroda, Makoto; Ryo, Akihide

    2016-09-01

    We studied the molecular evolution of the fusion protein (F) gene in the human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup A (HRSV-A). We performed time-scaled phylogenetic analyses using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. We also conducted genetic distance (p-distance), positive/negative selection, and Bayesian skyline plot analyses. Furthermore, we mapped the amino acid substitutions of the protein. The MCMC-constructed tree indicated that the HRSV F gene diverged from the bovine RSV (BRSV) gene approximately 550years ago and had a relatively low substitution rate (7.59×10(-4) substitutions/site/year). Moreover, a common ancestor of HRSV-A and -B diverged approximately 280years ago, which has since formed four distinct clusters. The present HRSV-A strains were assigned six genotypes based on F gene sequences and attachment glycoprotein gene sequences. The present strains exhibited high F gene sequence similarity values and low genetic divergence. No positive selection sites were identified; however, 50 negative selection sites were identified. F protein amino acid substitutions at 17 sites were distributed in the F protein. The effective population size of the gene has remained relatively constant, but the population size of the prevalent genotype (GA2) has increased in the last 10years. These results suggest that the HRSV-AF gene has evolved independently and formed some genotypes. PMID:27291709

  1. Respiratory syncytial virus infection of the lower respiratory tract: radiological findings in 108 children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For years the typical appearance of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced infection of the lower respiratory tract has been discussed. All available studies have led to different results. The aim of this study was to control these results, with 108 children. The age range was 1 day to 10 years (median 7 months). Within 72 h of admission, all children developed an RSV infection of the lower respiratory tract. Chest X-rays (pa-view) of 55 children under, and 53 children over, the age of 6 months (10/53>24 months) were evaluated. The diagnosis of RSV and the chest X-ray were mostly done on the same day. The major radiological findings of the two age-groups were compared by Wilcoxon's unpaired rank sum test. Major radiological findings were: normal chest X-ray (30%), central pneumonia (32%) or peribronchitis (26%). There was no statistical significance between the age-groups. Other findings were emphysema (11%), pleural effusion (6%), lobar- or broncho-pneumonia (each 6%), atelectasis (5%) or pneumothorax in one case. Therefore, the most common radiological findings in RSV-induced infection of the lower respiratory tract, supported by our results (RSV infection without bacterial superinfection) are central pneumonia, peribronchitis or normal chest X-ray. Thus an age-group separation into under or over 6 months is no longer necessary. (orig.)

  2. Radiological findings in children with respiratory syncytial virus infection: Relationship to clinical and bacteriological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a frequent cause of bronchiolitis leading to acute admission to hospital in the winter months. A wide range of findings accompanies this disease and the appearances are seldom completely diagnostic. Associated bacterial co-infections are common and we have shown an association with atelectasis among patients with pathogenic bacteria in the nasopharynx. (orig.)

  3. Role of bibersteinia trehalosi, respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza-3 virus in bighorn sheep pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS) have been found to be culture- and/or sero-positive for Bibersteinia trehalosi, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI-3). The objective of this study was to determine whether these pathogens can cause fatal pneumonia in BHS. In the first study...

  4. Chronic diseases, chromosomal abnormalities, and congenital malformations as risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kim; Hjuler, Thomas; Ravn, Henrik;

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about how chronic conditions other than prematurity, heart disease, and Down syndrome affect the risk and severity of hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). We assess the risk and severity of RSV hospitalization in children with chronic conditions in this register...

  5. Peroxidase-antiperoxidase assay for rapid detection of respiratory syncytial virus in nasal epithelial specimens from infants and children.

    OpenAIRE

    Jalowayski, A A; England, B L; Temm, C J; Nunemacher, T J; Bastian, J. F.; MacPherson, G A; Dankner, W M; Straube, R C; Connor, J D

    1987-01-01

    A peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) assay for the rapid detection of respiratory syncytial virus was compared with the indirect immunofluorescence method and with viral culture. Nasal epithelial specimens from 147 infants and children with acute respiratory infections were obtained and evaluated for the presence of respiratory syncytial virus antigens. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy by PAP were 91.7, 84.8, and 87.1%, respectively, and 87.0, 88.5, and 88.0%, respectively, by immunofluore...

  6. Respiratory Watch: Development of a Provincial System for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Surveillance in Nova Scotia, 2005–2008

    OpenAIRE

    Assaad Al-Assam; Langley, Joanne M.; Shelly Sarwal

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in young children and is increasingly recognized as a cause of influenza-like illness in those older than 65 years of age. A surveillance system to provide timely local information about RSV activity in Nova Scotia (NS) is described.METHODS: A case report form was developed for weekly reporting of all laboratory isolates of RSV at diagnostic laboratories around the province. Labor...

  7. Respiratory syncytial virus infection results in airway hyperresponsiveness and enhanced airway sensitization to allergen.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarze, J.; Hamelmann, E; Bradley, K L; Takeda, K.; Gelfand, E. W.

    1997-01-01

    Viral respiratory infections can predispose to the development of asthma by mechanisms that are presently undetermined. Using a murine model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, acute infection is associated with airway hyperresponsiveness as well as enhanced responses to subsequent sensitization to allergen. We demonstrate that acute viral infection results in increased airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine and pulmonary neutrophilic and eosinophilic inflammation. This res...

  8. Comparison of indirect and direct immunofluorescence for the detection of Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Gambarino; Massimiliano Bergallo; Maria Elena Terlizzi; Sara Astegiano; Antonio Curtoni; Francesca Sidoti; Samantha Mantovani; Rossana Cavallo; Cristina Costa

    2009-01-01

    The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of respiratory infection in children, with bronchopneumonia and bronchiolitis. In the adult the clinical manifestation is lighter than in infant, however, in the case of immunocompromised patients (transplant recipients or patients in immunosuppressive treatment) infection can lead to death. Immunofluorescence is a diagnostic procedures which can detect RSV infection and the presence of viable virus in the biological sample of the patie...

  9. The promise and progress of RNA-interference-based antiviral therapy for respiratory syncytial virus.

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Vysochinskayа; E. V. Esaulenko; Bogdanov, A A; D. N. Ghorab; N. A. Кnyazev; Dubina, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of morbidity in infants, young children, and the elderly worldwide. Presently, there are no explicit recommendations for RSV treatment apart from supportive care. Recent progress in studies of the mechanism of RNA interference suggests the formation of a new class of antiviral drugs in the treatment of RSV infection and related respiratory diseases.

  10. KLF6 and iNOS regulates apoptosis during respiratory syncytial virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Mgbemena, Victoria; Segovia, Jesus; Chang, Te-Hung; Bose, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a highly pathogenic lung-tropic virus that causes severe respiratory diseases. Enzymatic activity of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) is required for NO generation. Although NO contributes to exaggerated lung disease during RSV infection, the role of NO in apoptosis during infection is not known. In addition, host trans-activator(s) required for iNOS gene expression during RSV infection is unknown. In the current study we have uncovered the mechanism of...

  11. The promise and progress of RNA-interference-based antiviral therapy for respiratory syncytial virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Vysochinskayа

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a major cause of morbidity in infants, young children, and the elderly worldwide. Presently, there are no explicit recommendations for RSV treatment apart from supportive care. Recent progress in studies of the mechanism of RNA interference suggests the formation of a new class of antiviral drugs in the treatment of RSV infection and related respiratory diseases.

  12. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) RNA loads in peripheral blood correlates with disease severity in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Juan; Gomez Ana M; Khokhar Shama; Bhoj Vijay G; Tagliabue Claudia; Chang Michael L; Kiener Peter A; Revell Paula A; Ramilo Octavio; Mejias Asuncion

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) infection is usually restricted to the respiratory epithelium. Few studies have documented the presence of RSV in the systemic circulation, however there is no consistent information whether virus detection in the blood correlates with disease severity. Methods Balb/c mice were inoculated with live RSV, heat-inactivated RSV or medium. A subset of RSV-infected mice was treated with anti-RSV antibody 72 h post-inoculation. RSV RNA loads were...

  13. Differential response of BDCA-1+ and BDCA-3+ myeloid dendritic cells to respiratory syncytial virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Meera R Gupta; Kolli, Deepthi; Garofalo, Roberto P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of respiratory infections in children, elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. Severe infection is associated with short- and long-term morbidity including pneumonia, recurrent wheezing, and abnormal pulmonary function, and several lines of evidence indicate that impaired adaptive immune responses during infection are critical in the pathophysiology of RSV-mediated disease. Myeloid Dendritic cells (mDCs) play a pivotal role...

  14. Neutrophil extracellular traps cause airway obstruction during respiratory syncytial virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortjens, Bart; de Boer, Onno J; de Jong, Rineke; Antonis, Adriaan Fg; Sabogal Piñeros, Yanaika S; Lutter, René; van Woensel, Job Bm; Bem, Reinout A

    2016-02-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of severe lower respiratory tract disease (LRTD) in young children worldwide. Extensive neutrophil accumulation in the lungs and occlusion of small airways by DNA-rich mucus plugs are characteristic features of severe RSV-LRTD. Activated neutrophils can release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), extracellular networks of DNA covered with antimicrobial proteins, as part of the first-line defence against pathogens. NETs can trap and eliminate microbes; however, abundant NET formation may also contribute to airway occlusion. In this study, we investigated whether NETs are induced by RSV and explored their potential anti-viral effect in vitro. Second, we studied NET formation in vivo during severe RSV-LRTD in infants and bovine RSV-LRTD in calves, by examining bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue sections, respectively. NETs were visualized in lung cytology and tissue samples by DNA and immunostaining, using antibodies against citrullinated histone H3, elastase and myeloperoxidase. RSV was able to induce NET formation by human neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, NETs were able to capture RSV, thereby precluding binding of viral particles to target cells and preventing infection. Evidence for the formation of NETs in the airways and lungs was confirmed in children with severe RSV-LRTD. Detailed histopathological examination of calves with RSV-LRTD showed extensive NET formation in dense plugs occluding the airways, either with or without captured viral antigen. Together, these results suggest that, although NETs trap viral particles, their exaggerated formation during severe RSV-LRTD contributes to airway obstruction. PMID:26468056

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in immunocompetent and immunocompromised murine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JUAN ZHOU; YU XIA CUI; XI QIANG YANG; ZHOU FU; LI PING JIANG; LI JIA WANG

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to distinguish respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and immunology between immunocompetent and immunocompromised murine and to explore immune mechanism of RSV infection. At various time points after RSV infection of BALB/c mice and nude mice, pulmonary viral titers were assayed, RSV antigen was tested by direct immunofluorescent assay and immunohistochemistry. Pulmonary mRNA expressions of Toll like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 were assayed by RT-PCR. CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells in peripheral blood were examined by flow cytometry and plasma total IgE was assayed by ELISA. Leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and pulmonary histology were identified to reflect airway inflammation. It was found that RSV titers of both mice peaked on the 3rd day post infection with a much higher level of viral titer in nude mice than in BALB/c mice and a longer viral duration in nude mice (over 9 days post infection) than in BALB/c mice (6 days post infection). RSV infection induced higher viral antigen expression in nude mice (0.267 ±0.045) than in BALB/c mice (0. 168 ± 0.031). RSV infection enhanced pulmonary TLR4 expression of BALB/c mice (51.96% ± 11.34%) and nude mice (48.96% ± 12.35%) compared with each control (34.04% ± 10.06% and 32.37% ± 9.87% respectively). CD4+ peripheral blood cells increased in RSV infected BALB/c mice (66.51% ± 2.09% ) compared with the control BALB/c mice (51.63% ± 5.90% ), and CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells were deficient in nude mice. RSV infection increased plasma total IgE in both mice, and BALB/c mice had a larger amount of IgE on the 7th day post infection (9.02 ng/ml ± 2.90 ng/ml) and on the 14th day post infection (12.76 ng/ml ± 4.15 ng/ml) than corresponding nude mice (3.72 ng/ml ± 1.06 ng/ml and 7.62 ng/ml ± 3.08 ng/ml respectively on the 7th and 14th day post infection). RSV infected nude mice had more severe airway inflammation than infected BALB/c mice. It is concluded that BALB/c mice and

  16. Vaccine safety and efficacy evaluation of a recombinant bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV with deletion of the SH gene and subunit vaccines based on recombinant human RSV proteins: N-nanorings, P and M2-1, in calves with maternal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krister Blodörn

    Full Text Available The development of safe and effective vaccines against both bovine and human respiratory syncytial viruses (BRSV, HRSV to be used in the presence of RSV-specific maternally-derived antibodies (MDA remains a high priority in human and veterinary medicine. Herein, we present safety and efficacy results from a virulent BRSV challenge of calves with MDA, which were immunized with one of three vaccine candidates that allow serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA: an SH gene-deleted recombinant BRSV (ΔSHrBRSV, and two subunit (SU formulations based on HRSV-P, -M2-1, and -N recombinant proteins displaying BRSV-F and -G epitopes, adjuvanted by either oil emulsion (Montanide ISA71VG, SUMont or immunostimulating complex matrices (AbISCO-300, SUAbis. Whereas all control animals developed severe respiratory disease and shed high levels of virus following BRSV challenge, ΔSHrBRSV-immunized calves demonstrated almost complete clinical and virological protection five weeks after a single intranasal vaccination. Although mucosal vaccination with ΔSHrBRSV failed to induce a detectable immunological response, there was a rapid and strong anamnestic mucosal BRSV-specific IgA, virus neutralizing antibody and local T cell response following challenge with virulent BRSV. Calves immunized twice intramuscularly, three weeks apart with SUMont were also well protected two weeks after boost. The protection was not as pronounced as that in ΔSHrBRSV-immunized animals, but superior to those immunized twice subcutaneously three weeks apart with SUAbis. Antibody responses induced by the subunit vaccines were non-neutralizing and not directed against BRSV F or G proteins. When formulated as SUMont but not as SUAbis, the HRSV N, P and M2-1 proteins induced strong systemic cross-protective cell-mediated immune responses detectable already after priming. ΔSHrBRSV and SUMont are two promising DIVA-compatible vaccines, apparently inducing

  17. Investigation of Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Associated Deaths Among US Children Aged <2 Years, 2004-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prill, Mila M; Iwane, Marika K; Little, Delmar; Gerber, Susan I

    2016-09-01

    We validated the respiratory syncytial virus-coded deaths of children aged death data and medical records. There were 48 deaths in 4 states, and hospital records for 32 of them were available; 26 of those 32 (81%) had a laboratory finding of respiratory syncytial virus, and 21 of those 26 (81%) had a potential high-risk condition, most commonly preterm birth (35%). PMID:27534673

  18. Social, economic, and health impact of the respiratory syncytial virus: a systematic search

    OpenAIRE

    Díez-Domingo, Javier; González Pérez-Yarza, Eduardo; Melero, José A; Sánchez-Luna, Manuel; Aguilar, María Dolores; Blasco, Antonio Javier; Alfaro, Noelia; Lázaro, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bronchiolitis caused by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and its related complications are common in infants born prematurely, with severe congenital heart disease, or bronchopulmonary dysplasia, as well as in immunosuppressed infants. There is a rich literature on the different aspects of RSV infection with a focus, for the most part, on specific risk populations. However, there is a need for a systematic global analysis of the impact of RSV infection in terms of use of reso...

  19. Surfactant protein C-deficient mice are susceptible to respiratory syncytial virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Glasser, Stephan W.; Witt, Teah L.; Senft, Albert P; Baatz, John E.; Folger, Dusti; Melissa D. Maxfield; Akinbi, Henry T.; Newton, Danforth A.; Prows, Daniel R.; Korfhagen, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with mutations in the pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C) gene develop interstitial lung disease and pulmonary exacerbations associated with viral infections including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Pulmonary infection with RSV caused more severe interstitial thickening, air space consolidation, and goblet cell hyperplasia in SP-C-deficient (Sftpc−/−) mice compared with SP-C replete mice. The RSV-induced pathology resolved more slowly in Sftpc−/− mice with lung inflammation per...

  20. Genetic replacement of surfactant protein-C reduces respiratory syncytial virus induced lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Glasser, Stephan W.; Senft, Albert P; Melissa D. Maxfield; Ruetschilling, Teah L.; Baatz, John E.; Page, Kristen; Korfhagen, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals with deficiencies of pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C) develop interstitial lung disease (ILD) that is exacerbated by viral infections including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). SP-C gene targeted mice (Sftpc -/-) lack SP-C, develop an ILD-like disease and are susceptible to infection with RSV. Methods In order to determine requirements for correction of RSV induced injury we have generated compound transgenic mice where SP-C expression can be induced on the Sftpc...

  1. Ginseng Protects Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus by Modulating Multiple Immune Cells and Inhibiting Viral Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Jong Seok Lee; Yu-Na Lee; Young-Tae Lee; Hye Suk Hwang; Ki-Hye Kim; Eun-Ju Ko; Min-Chul Kim; Sang-Moo Kang

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng has been used in humans for thousands of years but its effects on viral infection have not been well understood. We investigated the effects of red ginseng extract (RGE) on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection using in vitro cell culture and in vivo mouse models. RGE partially protected human epithelial (HEp2) cells from RSV-induced cell death and viral replication. In addition, RGE significantly inhibited the production of RSV-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α) in murin...

  2. Leukemia inhibitory factor protects the lung during respiratory syncytial viral infection

    OpenAIRE

    Foronjy, Robert F.; Dabo, Abdoulaye J.; Cummins, Neville; Geraghty, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects the lung epithelium where it stimulates the production of numerous host cytokines that are associated with disease burden and acute lung injury. Characterizing the host cytokine response to RSV infection, the regulation of host cytokines and the impact of neutralizing an RSV-inducible cytokine during infection were undertaken in this study. Methods A549, primary human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells and wild-type, TIR-domain-containing ...

  3. Comparison of three rapid diagnostic techniques for detection of respiratory syncytial virus from nasal wash specimens.

    OpenAIRE

    Chonmaitree, T; Bessette-Henderson, B J; Hepler, R E; Lucia, H L

    1987-01-01

    We report results of three rapid tests for respiratory syncytial virus antigen detection. An immunofluorescence assay using commercial antibody and two commercial enzyme immunoassays (Ortho Diagnostics, Inc., Raritan, N.J., and Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Ill.) were applied to 199 nasal wash specimens. The Abbott enzyme immunoassay was the most sensitive technique, with a sensitivity of 93.8%. The specificities of the three techniques were comparable and greater than 95%. The availabi...

  4. Detection of respiratory syncytial virus antigen in nasal washings by Abbott TestPack enzyme immunoassay.

    OpenAIRE

    Wren, C G; Bate, B J; Masters, H B; Lauer, B A

    1990-01-01

    We compared the new Abbott TestPack (TP) respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) enzyme immunoassay (EIA) with cell culture and two commercial RSV EIAs (from Abbott Diagnostics and Kallestad Laboratories) by using split samples of fresh nasal washings from children with suspected RSV disease. Two tubes of HEp-2 cells were inoculated and observed for cytopathic effect for 14 days, and isolates were confirmed by immunofluorescence. The TP EIA was performed by following the manufacturer's instructions...

  5. The use of a neonatal mouse model to study respiratory syncytial virus infections

    OpenAIRE

    Cormier, Stephania A.; You, Dahui; Honnegowda, Srinivasa

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is the most significant cause of viral death in infants worldwide. The significant morbidity and mortality associated with this disease underscores the urgent need for the development of an RSV vaccine. The development of an RSV vaccine has been hampered by our limited understanding of the human host immune system, which plays a significant role in RSV pathogenesis, susceptibility and vaccine efficacy. As a result, animal models have been developed ...

  6. Antigen mimicry involving measles virus hemagglutinin and human respiratory syncytial virus nucleoprotein.

    OpenAIRE

    Norrby, E; Sheshberadaran, H; Rafner, B

    1986-01-01

    Intergenic antigenic relationships between measles virus and respiratory syncytial (RS) virus-specific structural components were studied by using monoclonal antibodies. Of 75 monoclonal antibodies against these components, only one, an anti-measles virus hemagglutinin monoclonal antibody, cross-reacted. Immunofluorescence analysis of measles virus- and RS virus-infected cells with this monoclonal antibody showed qualitatively different staining patterns which indicated that the antigen invol...

  7. Interferon Escape of Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Functional Analysis of Nonstructural Proteins NS1 and NS2

    OpenAIRE

    Marozin, Sabrina

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is recognised as the most frequent cause of severe lung infections in infants and cattle worldwide. Currently, no effective treatments are available and the development of a successful vaccine has been hampered by the fact that natural infection does not provide complete and durable protection. RSV nonstructural proteins, NS1 and NS2, are strong inhibitors of IFN α/β-production by specifically preventing interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3 pho...

  8. Exposure of health care workers to ribavirin during therapy for respiratory syncytial virus infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley, J S; Connor, J. D.; Compogiannis, L S; Eiger, L L

    1990-01-01

    Health care workers (HCW) are exposed to ribavirin aerosol during therapy of infants with respiratory syncytial virus infections. To assess the degree of HCW exposure, we analyzed air samples from patient rooms and HCW personal breathing zones during ribavirin aerosol delivery by ventilator (two samples), oxygen hood (two samples), and a new vacuum exhaust hood (four samples). HCW exposure to ribavirin during aerosol delivery by ventilator or vacuum exhaust hood system was substantially lower...

  9. Altered cardiac rhythm in infants with bronchiolitis and respiratory syncytial virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Galeone Carlotta; Barbier Paolo; Gualtieri Laura; Tagliabue Claudia; Tremolati Elena; Ghiglia Silvia; Bosis Samantha; Salice Patrizia; Esposito Susanna; Marchisio Paola; Principi Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Although the most frequent extra-pulmonary manifestations of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection involve the cardiovascular system, no data regarding heart function in infants with bronchiolitis associated with RSV infection have yet been systematically collected. The aim of this study was to verify the real frequency of heart involvement in patients with bronchiolitis associated with RSV infection, and whether infants with mild or moderate disease also risk heart ...

  10. FC GAMMA RECEPTORS IN RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR INNATE IMMUNITY

    OpenAIRE

    Jans, Jop; Vissers, Marloes; Heldens, Jacco G. M.; de Jonge, Marien I.; Levy, Ofer; Ferwerda, Gerben

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus infections are a major burden in infants less than 3 months of age. Newborns and infants express a distinct immune system that is largely dependent on innate immunity and passive immunity from maternal antibodies. Antibodies can regulate immune responses against viruses through interaction with Fc gamma receptors leading to enhancement or neutralization of viral infections. The mechanisms underlying the immunomodulatory effect of Fc gamma receptors on viral infecti...

  11. Bovine Rhinitis Viruses Are Common in U.S. Cattle with Bovine Respiratory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hause, Ben M.; Collin, Emily A.; Anderson, Joe; Hesse, Richard A.; Anderson, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Bovine rhinitis viruses (BRV) are established etiological agents of bovine respiratory disease complex however little research into their epidemiology and ecology has been published for several decades. In the U.S., only bovine rhinitis A virus 1 (BRAV1) has been identified while bovine rhinitis A virus 2 (BRAV2) and bovine rhinitis B virus (BRBV) were previously only identified in England and Japan, respectively. Metagenomic sequencing of a nasal swab from a bovine respiratory disease (BRD) ...

  12. Clinical relevance of prevention of respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract infection in preterm infants born between 33 and 35 weeks gestational age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbonell-Estrany, X.; Bont, L.; Doering, G.; Gouyon, J-B; Lanari, M.

    2008-01-01

    Premature infants are vulnerable to severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) resulting in hospitalisation and the potential for longer-term respiratory morbidity. Whilst the severity and consequence of RSV LRTI are generally accepted and recognised in infants

  13. Structured literature review of responses of cattle to viral and bacterial pathogens causing bovine respiratory disease complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissett, G P; White, B J; Larson, R L

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is an economically important disease of cattle and continues to be an intensely studied topic. However, literature summarizing the time between pathogen exposure and clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion is minimal. A structured literature review of the published literature was performed to determine cattle responses (time from pathogen exposure to clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion) in challenge models using common BRD viral and bacterial pathogens. After review a descriptive analysis of published studies using common BRD pathogen challenge studies was performed. Inclusion criteria were single pathogen challenge studies with no treatment or vaccination evaluating outcomes of interest: clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion. Pathogens of interest included: bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1), parainfluenza-3 virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, Pastuerella multocida, and Histophilus somni. Thirty-five studies and 64 trials were included for analysis. The median days to the resolution of clinical signs after BVDV challenge was 15 and shedding was not detected on day 12 postchallenge. Resolution of BHV-1 shedding resolved on day 12 and clinical signs on day 12 postchallenge. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus ceased shedding on day 9 and median time to resolution of clinical signs was on day 12 postchallenge. M. haemolytica resolved clinical signs 8 days postchallenge. This literature review and descriptive analysis can serve as a resource to assist in designing challenge model studies and potentially aid in estimation of duration of clinical disease and shedding after natural pathogen exposure. PMID:25929158

  14. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection (RSV): Transmission and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... References & Resources Infographic Related Links Related Links Unexplained Respiratory Disease ... infected with RSV are usually contagious for 3 to 8 days. However, some infants and people with weakened immune systems can be contagious for as long as 4 ...

  15. Differential Mucin Expression by Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus Infection in Human Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Del Rocío Baños-Lara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucins (MUC constitute an important component of the inflammatory and innate immune response. However, the expression of these molecules by respiratory viral infections is still largely unknown. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and human metapneumovirus (hMPV are two close-related paramyxoviruses that can cause severe low respiratory tract disease in infants and young children worldwide. Currently, there is not vaccine available for neither virus. In this work, we explored the differential expression of MUC by RSV and hMPV in human epithelial cells. Our data indicate that the MUC expression by RSV and hMPV differs significantly, as we observed a stronger induction of MUC8, MUC15, MUC20, MUC21, and MUC22 by RSV infection while the expression of MUC1, MUC2, and MUC5B was dominated by the infection with hMPV. These results may contribute to the different immune response induced by these two respiratory viruses.

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus shedding by children hospitalized with lower respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeyama, Aya; Hashimoto, Koichi; Sato, Masatoki; Kawashima, Ryoko; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-06-01

    Children with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection shed virus for variable periods. The aim of this study was to quantify the viral load in nasopharyngeal aspirates of children with RSV throughout their hospitalization. This study included 37 children who were admitted with a diagnosis of RSV infection based on a positive rapid diagnostic test. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from patients every day, from admission to discharge. Viral detection and quantification were performed using quantitative real-time PCR. Of the 37 patients, RSV-A was detected in 29 and RSV-B in 6. Two patients were PCR-negative for any type of RSV. RSV-A was detected in 12 of 16 patients (75%) 6 days after admission. These patients shed detectable virus from days 1 to 12, and for a significantly longer period (mean 5.7 days) than RSV-B (mean 3.8 days) patients. Half of the RSV-A patients were also positive on day 14 following onset. RSV-A was detected in patients <12 months of age for significantly longer periods after onset than in patients ≥12 months of age. RSV-A viral load was negatively correlated with days from admission and days from onset. Because RSV shedding was frequently prolonged, the hospitalized children may have contracted RSV as a nosocomial infection. To prevent nosocomial RSV infections in hospital wards, healthcare workers must take appropriate infection control measures and provide adequate guidance on hand washing to the family of the patient. J. Med. Virol. 88:938-946, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26588816

  17. Viral-mediated Inhibition of Antioxidant Enzymes Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Bronchiolitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hosakote, Yashoda M.; Jantzi, Paul D.; Esham, Dana L.; Spratt, Heidi; Kurosky, Alexander; Casola, Antonella; Garofalo, Roberto P.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children, for which no specific treatment or vaccine is currently available. We have previously shown that RSV induces reactive oxygen species in cultured cells and oxidative injury in the lungs of experimentally infected mice. The mechanism(s) of RSV-induced oxidative stress in vivo is not known.

  18. A Model of the Costs of Community and Nosocomial Pediatric Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Canadian Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Jacobs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately one in 10 hospitalized patients will acquire a nosocomial infection (NI after admission to hospital, of which 71% are due to respiratory viruses, including the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV. NIs are concerning and lead to prolonged hospitalizations. The economics of NIs are typically described in generalized terms and specific cost data are lacking.

  19. Histophilus somni Stimulates Expression of Antiviral Proteins and Inhibits BRSV Replication in Bovine Respiratory Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lin

    Full Text Available Our previous studies showed that bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV followed by Histophilus somni causes more severe bovine respiratory disease and a more permeable alveolar barrier in vitro than either agent alone. However, microarray analysis revealed the treatment of bovine alveolar type 2 (BAT2 epithelial cells with H. somni concentrated culture supernatant (CCS stimulated up-regulation of four antiviral protein genes as compared with BRSV infection or dual treatment. This suggested that inhibition of viral infection, rather than synergy, may occur if the bacterial infection occurred before the viral infection. Viperin (or radical S-adenosyl methionine domain containing 2--RSAD2 and ISG15 (IFN-stimulated gene 15--ubiquitin-like modifier were most up-regulated. CCS dose and time course for up-regulation of viperin protein levels were determined in treated bovine turbinate (BT upper respiratory cells and BAT2 lower respiratory cells by Western blotting. Treatment of BAT2 cells with H. somni culture supernatant before BRSV infection dramatically reduced viral replication as determined by qRT PCR, supporting the hypothesis that the bacterial infection may inhibit viral infection. Studies of the role of the two known H. somni cytotoxins showed that viperin protein expression was induced by endotoxin (lipooligosaccharide but not by IbpA, which mediates alveolar permeability and H. somni invasion. A naturally occurring IbpA negative asymptomatic carrier strain of H. somni (129Pt does not cause BAT2 cell retraction or permeability of alveolar cell monolayers, so lacks virulence in vitro. To investigate initial steps of pathogenesis, we showed that strain 129Pt attached to BT cells and induced a strong viperin response in vitro. Thus colonization of the bovine upper respiratory tract with an asymptomatic carrier strain lacking virulence may decrease viral infection and the subsequent enhancement of bacterial respiratory infection in vivo.

  20. O polietilenoglicol aumenta a penetração do vírus da diarréia viral bovina, do vírus da estomatite vesicular e do vírus sincicial respiratório bovino em células de cultivo Polyethylene glycol increases the penetration of bovine viral diarrhea virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus in cultured cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Dezengrini

    2009-06-01

    bovine enveloped viruses in culture cells. Penetration efficiency was measured by counting the number of viral plaques produced in bovine kidney cells (MDBK. The addition of 5% PEG (molecular weight 6.000 to the viral inoculum containing 100 TCID50 mL-1 (tissue culture median infectious dosis of each virus, during adsorption for 2h at 37°C, resulted in a significant increase in the number of plaques for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV (increase of 3.4-fold, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV (2.2-fold and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV (1.5-fold. The addition of 5% PEG to the inoculum of bovine herpesviruses 1, 2 and 5 (BoHV-1, BoHV-2 and BoHV-5 did not increase the number of viral plaques. On the other hand, PEG produced a reduction in the number of plaques by bovine parainfluenza virus (bPI-3V (1.4-fold. Furthermore, the addition of 5% PEG produced a 10- to 1000-fold increase in the sensitivity of BVDV detection in the serum of three persistently infected calves; and doubled the sensitivity of detection of BRSV in nasal secretions of two experimentally infected sheep. These results demonstrate that PEG enhances the efficiency of infection by BVDV, VSV and BRSV in cultured bovine cells and therefore may be used to increase the sensitivity of virus detection in clinical samples (viral isolation, and/or to increase virus titers in cell cultures.

  1. Seroprevalence of some bovine viral respiratory diseases among non vaccinated cattle in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abd El Fatah Mahmoud

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Four viral pathogens, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV, and bovine herpes virus type 1 (BHV-1, bovine parainfluenza type 3 virus (PI-3V, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV are mainly associated with bovine respiratory diseases that cause major economic losses in the dairy cattle industry. This study aimed to document exposure of cattle in Saudi Arabia to infectious BVDV, BHV-1, PI-3V and BRSV viruses in non vaccinated cattle in order to obtain epidemiological and immunological information. Materials and Methods: In the present study, 460 random serum samples obtained from non vaccinated cattle in five districts (Riyadh, Eastern Province, Jizan, Najran, Asir of Saudi Arabia between January to March 2011. These samples were tested for presence of antibodies against BVDV, BHV-1, BRSV and PIV-3 by commercial indirect ELISA kits. Results: Our findings displayed that Seropositivity rates were 26 % for BVD, 17.4 % for BHV-1, 69.1 % for PI-3V and 75.6 % for BRSV in the sampled population. In addition, coinfections with more than one virus were considerably common among non-vaccinated dairy cattle. Conclusion: These results indicate that exposure to these agents is common within the study areas. Preventive and control measures against these infectious agents should therefore be adopted. [Vet World 2013; 6(1.000: 1-4

  2. Bacteremia in Children Hospitalized with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia-Grande, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Pinnock, Elli; Salas, Antonio; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of bacteremia is considered low in children with acute bronchiolitis. However the rate of occult bacteremia in infants with RSV infection is not well established. The aim was to determine the actual rate and predictive factors of bacteremia in children admitted to hospital due to confirmed RSV acute respiratory illness (ARI), using both conventional culture and molecular techniques. Methods A prospective multicenter study (GENDRES-network) was conducted between 2011–2013 in children under the age of two admitted to hospital because of an ARI. Among those RSV-positive, bacterial presence in blood was assessed using PCR for Meningococcus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus, in addition to conventional cultures. Results 66 children with positive RSV respiratory illness were included. In 10.6% patients, bacterial presence was detected: H. influenzae (n = 4) and S. pneumoniae (n = 2). In those patients with bacteremia, there was a previous suspicion of bacterial superinfection and had received empirical antibiotic treatment 6 out of 7 (85.7%) patients. There were significant differences in terms of severity between children with positive bacterial PCR and those with negative results: PICU admission (100% vs. 50%, P-value = 0.015); respiratory support necessity (100% vs. 18.6%, P-value < 0.001); Wood-Downes score (mean = 8.7 vs. 4.8 points, P-value < 0.001); GENVIP scale (mean = 17 vs. 10.1, P-value < 0.001); and length of hospitalization (mean = 12.1 vs. 7.5 days, P-value = 0.007). Conclusion Bacteremia is not frequent in infants hospitalized with RSV respiratory infection, however, it should be considered in the most severe cases. PMID:26872131

  3. Epidemiological changes of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infections in Israel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira Hirsh

    Full Text Available RSV is the leading cause of lower respiratory-tract infections in infants and therefore demands in-depth epidemiological characterization. We investigated here the distribution of RSV types in Israel between the years 2005-2012. Clinical samples were collected from 11,018 patients hospitalized due to respiratory illnesses and were evaluated for the presence of various respiratory viruses, including RSV A and RSV B. Until 2008, each year was characterized by the presence of one dominant type of RSV. However, from 2008, both RSV A and B types were detected at significant levels, particularly among infants aged 0-2 years. Furthermore, significant changes in the RSV A and RSV B subtypes circulating in Israel since 2008 were observed. Finally, we demonstrate that, irrespectively of the changes observed in RSV epidemiology, when the pandemic H1N1pdm09 influenza virus appeared in 2009, RSV infections were delayed and were detected when infection with H1N1pdm09 had declined.

  4. Respiratory syncytial virus reverses airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine in ovalbumin-sensitized mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Famke Aeffner

    Full Text Available Each year, approximately 20% of asthmatics in the United States experience acute symptom exacerbations, which commonly result from pulmonary viral infections. The majority of asthma exacerbations in very young children follow infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV. However, pathogenic mechanisms underlying induction of asthma exacerbations by RSV are not well understood. We therefore investigated the effect of post-sensitization RSV infection on lung function in ovalbumin (OVA-sensitized BALB/c mice as a model of RSV asthma exacerbations. OVA sensitization of uninfected female BALB/c mice increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF eosinophil levels and induced airway hyperresponsiveness to the muscarinic agonist methacholine, as measured by the forced-oscillation technique. In contrast, intranasal infection with replication-competent RSV strain A2 for 2-8 days reduced BALF eosinophil counts and reversed airway hyperresponsiveness in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. BALF levels of the chemokine keratinocyte cytokine (KC; a murine homolog of interleukin-8 were elevated in OVA-sensitized, RSV-infected mice and reversal of methacholine hyperresponsiveness in these animals was rapidly inhibited by KC neutralization. Hyporesponsiveness could be induced in OVA-sensitized, uninfected mice by recombinant KC or the Gαi agonist melittin. These data suggest that respiratory syncytial virus induces KC-mediated activation of Gαi, resulting in cross-inhibition of Gαq-mediated M(3-muscarinic receptor signaling and reversal of airway hyperresponsiveness. As in unsensitized mice, KC therefore appears to play a significant role in induction of airway dysfunction by respiratory syncytial virus. Hence, interleukin-8 may be a promising therapeutic target to normalize lung function in both asthmatics and non-asthmatics with bronchiolitis. However, the OVA-sensitized, RSV-infected mouse may not be an appropriate model for investigating the pathogenesis

  5. Outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in immunocompromised adults on a hematology ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Tomas Ostergaard; Stelzer-Braid, Sacha; Willenborg, Christiana; Cheung, Carol; Andresen, David; Rawlinson, William; Clezy, Kate

    2016-10-01

    We describe an outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on a hematology ward without allogeneic stem cell transplant patients. Twelve patients and one staff member infected with RSV were identified from the laboratory database. Five patients had lower respiratory tract infection, seven had upper respiratory tract infection, one was asymptomatic, and there were two (15.4%) deaths. Most patients had overlapping periods of potential infectiousness on the ward. Sequencing was possible on eight specimens and five of these had identical sequences. Results were consistent with transmission occurring both on the ward and by introduction of RSV from the community. J. Med. Virol. 88:1827-1831, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990584

  6. Azithromycin does not improve disease course in hospitalized infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease : A randomized equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Woensel, Job B. M.; Uijtendaal, Esther; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Kimpen, Jan L. L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Nearly halt of all hospitalized infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease (LRTD) are treated with (parenteral) antibiotics. The present study was designed to test our hypothesis that the use of antibiotics would not lead to a reduced duration of hospi

  7. Review of palivizumab in the prophylaxis of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV in high-risk infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asunción Mejías

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Asunción Mejías, Octavio RamiloDivision of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Children’s Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USAAbstract: In respiratory syncytial virus (RSV disease the balance between the innate and adaptive immune responses determines the expression of the pathological phenotype favoring the development of acute bronchiolitis, and in certain children the development of recurrent wheezing. While humoral antibody plays a major role in protection against disease, T-cell immunity targeted to viral proteins appears to terminate viral infection. At the moment, treatment modalities for acute RSV infection do not effectively modify the course of the disease, and RSV vaccine development has shown conflicting results. To date, however, passive immunoprophylaxis with monoclonal antibodies is the only strategy that has demonstrated consistent efficacy in reducing RSV hospitalizations in high-risk children. The potential benefit of new strategies for prevention and treatment of RSV infections should be evaluated with respect to both the acute infection as well as the chronic respiratory manifestations induced by RSV.Keywords: respiratory syncytial virus, palivizumab, infants

  8. Effect of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection on Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Regulation of Allergic Airway Inflammation.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuchida, Tomoko; Matsuse, Hiroto; Fukahori, Susumu; Kawano, Tetsuya; Tomari, Shinya; Fukushima, Chizu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    Background: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can infect myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) and regulate their function in the development of allergy. It has been widely reported that plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) play a critical role in antiviral innate immunity. In contrast, not much is known about the role of pDCs in the interaction between allergy and viral infection. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of RSV infection on pDC function in the regulation of allergic airway...

  9. A Case of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in an HIV-Positive Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakriti Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is commonly known to cause an influenza-like illness. However, it can also cause more severe disease in young children and older adults comprising of organ transplant patients with immunocompromised status. Till date, only four cases of RSV infections have been reported in HIV-positive adults. We describe here a case of HIV-positive female with relatively preserved immune function who presented with RSV infection requiring ventilation and showed improvement after prompt treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin.

  10. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infects Neuronal Cells and Processes That Innervate the Lung by a Process Involving RSV G Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xia-qing; Fu, Zhen F.; Alvarez, Rene; Henderson, Christine; Ralph A. Tripp

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a primary cause of morbidity and life-threatening lower respiratory tract disease in infants and young children. Children with acute RSV bronchiolitis often develop respiratory sequelae, but the disease mechanisms are poorly understood. Mounting evidence suggests that RSV may mediate persistent infection. Using immunohistochemistry to identify RSV and RSV-infected cell types, we show that RSV infects primary neurons and neuronal processes that innervate th...

  11. Antibody responses in mice after immunization with inactivated bovine respiratory syncytial virus using different adjuvants Respostas de anticorpos em camundongos após imunização com vírus respiratório sincicial bovino inativado utilizando diferentes adjuvantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Rosado Spilki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV causes pneumonia in young cattle. Modified-live-virus (MLV and inactivated vaccines are currently used for the control of clinical effects of BRSV infections in cattle. On the present research, the stimulation of specific anti-BRSV immunoglobulin isotypes was investigated, through the use of different commercially available adjuvants (Water-in-oil emulsion, Quil A, Aluminum-hydroxide in inbred mice (Balb/C and C57BL/6. BRSV antibodies were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and the results were compared to the antibody levels induced by immunization of animals using live-BRSV-virus. Water-in-oil emulsion and alum- adjuvant preparations induced higher levels of IgG1 immunoglobulins, whereas Quil A favored the production of IgG2 antibodies, this last being a more appropriate response profile for the specific case of BRSV. Not using adjuvants resulted in poor levels of specific antibodies. The isotype profile of specific antibodies obtained varied greatly depending on the adjuvants used. This information may be useful for the formulation of more effective BRSV inactivated vaccines; however, these findings have to be confirmed in cattle.O vírus respiratório sincicial bovino (BRSV causa pneumonia em bovinos jovens. Vacinas de vírus vivo modificado (MLV e vacinas inativadas são atualmente utilizadas para o controle dos efeitos clínicos de infecções pelo BRSV em bovinos. No presente trabalho, investigou-se a estimulação dos isotipos de imunoglobulinas específicas anti-BRSV, através da utilização de diferentes adjuvantes disponíveis comercialmente (água em óleo de emulsão, Quil A, hidróxido de alumínio em camundongos isogênicos (Balb/C e C57BL/6. Anticorpos contra o BRSV foram medidos usando-se um ensaio imunoenzimático (ELISA, e os resultados foram comparados com os níveis de anticorpos induzidos pela imunização de animais utilizando-se o BRSV vivo. As prepara

  12. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of severe respiratory syncytial virus-associated acute lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Bo Zhang; Li-Juan Liu; Li-Ling Qian; Gao-Li Jiang; Chuan-Kai Wang; Pin Jia; Peng Shi; Jin Xu; Li-Bo Wang

    2014-01-01

    Background: To investigate the clinical characteristics and analyze risk factors for severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in hospitalized infants with acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRIs). Methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of infants with RSV-associated ALRIs between March 1st, 2011 and February 29th, 2012 was conducted. Subjects were followed up over the phone or by outpatient visit six and twelve months after discharge. Results: Among 913 RSV-associated ALRIs infants, 288 (31.5%) had severe infections, which accounted for 4.2% of hospitalized children. The hospital RSV mortality rate was 1.0%. The proportions of cases with tachypnea, apnea, cyanosis, and fine rales were significantly higher in the severe ALRIs group (all P Conclusions: Younger age, low birth weight and underlying disease are associated with severe RSVassociated ALRIs. Furthermore, severe RSV infections may be associated with a higher frequency of subsequent bronchitis, pneumonia and re-hospitalization in the following year.

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in infants and correlation with meteorological factors and air pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandini Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is the most important cause of severe respiratory infections in infants with seasonal epidemics. Environmental factors (temperature, humidity, air pollution could influence RSV epidemics through their effects on virus activity and diffusion. Methods We conducted a retrospective study on a paediatric population who referred to our Paediatric Emergency Unit in order to analyze the correlation between weekly incidence of RSV positive cases during winter season in Bologna and meteorological factors and air pollutants concentration. Results We observed a significant correlation between the incidence of RSV infections and the mean minimum temperature registered during the same week and the previous weeks. The weekly number of RSV positive cases was also correlated to the mean PM10 concentration of the week before. Conclusions RSV epidemic trend in Bologna (Italy is related to the mean minimum temperature, and the mean PM10 concentration.

  14. Spontaneous Pneumothorax With Subcutaneous Emphysema: A Rare Complication of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carmen; Almeida, Ana Filipe; Ferraz, Catarina; Nunes, Teresa; Guedes Vaz, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    Viral bronchiolitis is the most common lower respiratory tract infection in infants and children under the age of 2. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the infecting agent in more than 50% of the cases. Usually the clinical course is uneventful and complications are uncommon. Secondary air leaks are a recognized rare complication of bronchiolitis, although the real incidence remains unknown. We report a case of a 21-month-old female that developed a spontaneous pneumothorax (PNO) with subcutaneous emphysema (SE) late in the course of RSV acute bronchiolitis. Additional investigation ruled out any underlying disease predisposing to spontaneous PNO. Physicians, especially those who work with small children, must be aware of this uncommon complication of bronchiolitis that may appear late in the course of the disease despite an initial clinical improvement. PMID:26858803

  15. In Hot Pursuit of the First Vaccine Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Young

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection, such as bronchiolitis, bronchitis, or pneumonia, in both infants and the elderly. Despite the global burden of diseases attributable to RSV infection, no clinically approved vaccine is available, and a humanized monoclonal antibody for prophylaxis is not readily affordable in developing countries. There are several hurdles to the successful development of RSV vaccines: immune-vulnerable target populations such as premature infants, pregnant women, and immunocompromised people; safety concerns associated with vaccine-enhanced diseases; repeated infection; and waning memory. To develop successful strategies for the prevention of RSV infection, it is necessary to understand the protective and pathologic roles of host immune responses to RSV infection. In this review, we will summarize the positive and negative relationship between RSV infection and host immunity and discuss strategies for the development of the first successful RSV vaccine. PMID:27189271

  16. Measles-mumps-rubella vaccination and respiratory syncytial virus-associated hospital contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Christine Stabell; Sørup, Signe; Stensballe, Lone Graff;

    2015-01-01

    was strongest for admissions with lower respiratory infections. OBJECTIVE: To examine whether measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination was associated with reduced rate of hospital contact related to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in a high-income country. METHODS: Nationwide cohort study of laboratory......BACKGROUND: The live measles vaccine has been associated with lower non-measles mortality and admissions in low-income countries. The live measles-mumps-rubella vaccine has also been associated with lower rate of admissions with any type of infection in Danish children; the association...... included 888 RSV hospital contacts in 128,588 person years of follow up (rate 6.8/1000 person years). Having MMR as the most recent vaccine was associated with a reduced rate of RSV hospital contacts compared with having DTaP-IPV-Hib as the most recent vaccine (Incidence rate ratio (IRR), 0.75; 95...

  17. Risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus hospitalisation in children with heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kim; Stensballe, LG; Fisker, Niels;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the risk and risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalisation and determinants of the severity of RSV disease in children with heart disease. METHODS: By using a database on RSV tests in Denmark all children with RSV diagnosed with heart disease in Denmark...... hospitalisation predictors of the need for respiratory support (supplemental oxygen, nasal continuous positive airway pressure or mechanical ventilation) were young age (relative risk (RR) 0.47, 95% CI 0.32 to 0.67 per additional year of age) and cardiac decompensation (RR 1.81, 95% CI 1.02 to 3.......23). The incidence rate of RSV hospitalisation among children with any heart disease aged 0-23 months was 5.65 per 100 child-years. CONCLUSION: In children with heart disease risk factors for RSV admission are Down syndrome, cardiomyopathy and haemodynamically significant heart disease. Young age and cardiac...

  18. In Hot Pursuit of the First Vaccine Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Young; Chang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection, such as bronchiolitis, bronchitis, or pneumonia, in both infants and the elderly. Despite the global burden of diseases attributable to RSV infection, no clinically approved vaccine is available, and a humanized monoclonal antibody for prophylaxis is not readily affordable in developing countries. There are several hurdles to the successful development of RSV vaccines: immune-vulnerable target populations such as premature infants, pregnant women, and immunocompromised people; safety concerns associated with vaccine-enhanced diseases; repeated infection; and waning memory. To develop successful strategies for the prevention of RSV infection, it is necessary to understand the protective and pathologic roles of host immune responses to RSV infection. In this review, we will summarize the positive and negative relationship between RSV infection and host immunity and discuss strategies for the development of the first successful RSV vaccine. PMID:27189271

  19. Mechanism of antibody-mediated viral clearance in immunotherapy of respiratory syncytial virus infection of cotton rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Prince, G A; Hemming, V G; Horswood, R L; Baron, P A; Murphy, B R; Chanock, R M

    1990-01-01

    Antibody-mediated clearance of respiratory syncytial virus from cotton rat pulmonary tissues occurs in the absence of complement and in the absence of the Fc portion of the immunoglobulin G molecule, suggesting that complement-independent, cell-independent neutralization is the major mechanism of clearance.

  20. Evaluation of a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Scala, Alessia; Tagliabue, Claudia; Zampiero, Alberto; Bianchini, Sonia; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal swabs from 424 children were used to compare the performances of the new multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) RIDA®GENE Flu & RSV kit and monospecific RT-PCR assays in detecting respiratory syncytial and influenza viruses. The easy-to-use kit was highly sensitive and specific and is recommended for routine practice. PMID:26458277

  1. Erişkinlerde Respiratory Syncytial Virus (Rsv) Nötralizan Antikor Prevalansının Araştırılması

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZSAN,, M.; ÖZKUL, A.; CENGİZ, A.T.

    2010-01-01

    Investigation of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Neutralization Antibody Prevalence in Adults Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes respiratory system infections in humans and has a worldwide distribution. These infections can be severe and rarely fatal especially in infants. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of neutralizing antibody levels against RSV among adults. 134 sera that were sent to Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and...

  2. Respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth through dysregulation of nutritional immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Matthew R; Lashua, Lauren P; Fischer, Douglas K; Flitter, Becca A; Eichinger, Katherine M; Durbin, Joan E; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Coyne, Carolyn B; Empey, Kerry M; Bomberger, Jennifer M

    2016-02-01

    Clinical observations link respiratory virus infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in chronic lung disease, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The development of P. aeruginosa into highly antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities promotes airway colonization and accounts for disease progression in patients. Although clinical studies show a strong correlation between CF patients' acquisition of chronic P. aeruginosa infections and respiratory virus infection, little is known about the mechanism by which chronic P. aeruginosa infections are initiated in the host. Using a coculture model to study the formation of bacterial biofilm formation associated with the airway epithelium, we show that respiratory viral infections and the induction of antiviral interferons promote robust secondary P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. We report that the induction of antiviral IFN signaling in response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection induces bacterial biofilm formation through a mechanism of dysregulated iron homeostasis of the airway epithelium. Moreover, increased apical release of the host iron-binding protein transferrin during RSV infection promotes P. aeruginosa biofilm development in vitro and in vivo. Thus, nutritional immunity pathways that are disrupted during respiratory viral infection create an environment that favors secondary bacterial infection and may provide previously unidentified targets to combat bacterial biofilm formation. PMID:26729873

  3. The Contribution of Infections with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Viruses to Bovine Respiratory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The contribution of bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) to the development of bovine respiratory disease is the sum of a number of different factors. These factors include the contribution of acute uncomplicated BVDV infections, the high incidence of respiratory disease in animals persistently inf...

  4. Systemic signature of the lung response to respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen L A Pennings

    Full Text Available Respiratory Syncytial Virus is a frequent cause of severe bronchiolitis in children. To improve our understanding of systemic host responses to RSV, we compared BALB/c mouse gene expression responses at day 1, 2, and 5 during primary RSV infection in lung, bronchial lymph nodes, and blood. We identified a set of 53 interferon-associated and innate immunity genes that give correlated responses in all three murine tissues. Additionally, we identified blood gene signatures that are indicative of acute infection, secondary immune response, and vaccine-enhanced disease, respectively. Eosinophil-associated ribonucleases were characteristic for the vaccine-enhanced disease blood signature. These results indicate that it may be possible to distinguish protective and unfavorable patient lung responses via blood diagnostics.

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus pneumonia treated with lower-dose palivizumab in a heart transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodin, J L; Wu, K S; Kitchell, E E; Le, J; Mishkin, J D; Drazner, M H; Markham, D W

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important community-acquired pathogen that can cause significant morbidity and mortality in patients who have compromised pulmonary function, are elderly, or are immunosuppressed. This paper describes a 70-year-old man with a remote history of heart transplantation who presented with signs and symptoms of pneumonia. Chest computed tomography (CT) imaging demonstrated new patchy ground glass infiltrates throughout the upper and lower lobes of the left lung, and the RSV direct fluorescence antibody (DFA) was positive. The patient received aerosolized ribavirin, one dose of intravenous immunoglobulin, and one dose of palivizumab. After two months of followup, the patient had improved infiltrates on chest CT, improved pulmonary function testing, and no evidence of graft rejection or dysfunction. There are few data on RSV infections in heart transplant patients, but this case highlights the importance of considering this potentially serious infection and introduces a novel method of treatment. PMID:24826271

  6. The influence of diurnal temperature range on the incidence of respiratory syncytial virus in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, D

    2015-03-01

    The incidence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been reported to exhibit seasonal variation. However, the impact of diurnal temperature range (DTR) on RSV has not been investigated. After acquiring data related to cases of RSV and weather parameters of DTR in Fukuoka, Japan, between 2006 and 2012, we used negative binomial generalized linear models and distributed lag nonlinear models to assess the possible relationship between DTR and RSV cases, adjusting for confounding factors. Our analysis revealed that the weekly number of RSV cases increased with a relative risk of 3·30 (95% confidence interval 1·65-6·60) for every 1°C increase in DTR. Our study provides quantitative evidence that the number of RSV cases increased significantly with increasing DTR. We suggest that preventive measures for limiting the spread of RSV should be considered during extended periods of high DTR. PMID:25092407

  7. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Pneumonia Treated with Lower-Dose Palivizumab in a Heart Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Grodin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is an important community-acquired pathogen that can cause significant morbidity and mortality in patients who have compromised pulmonary function, are elderly, or are immunosuppressed. This paper describes a 70-year-old man with a remote history of heart transplantation who presented with signs and symptoms of pneumonia. Chest computed tomography (CT imaging demonstrated new patchy ground glass infiltrates throughout the upper and lower lobes of the left lung, and the RSV direct fluorescence antibody (DFA was positive. The patient received aerosolized ribavirin, one dose of intravenous immunoglobulin, and one dose of palivizumab. After two months of followup, the patient had improved infiltrates on chest CT, improved pulmonary function testing, and no evidence of graft rejection or dysfunction. There are few data on RSV infections in heart transplant patients, but this case highlights the importance of considering this potentially serious infection and introduces a novel method of treatment.

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus escape mutant derived in vitro resists palivizumab prophylaxis in cotton rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palivizumab (PZ) is the only monoclonal antibody in human use against an infectious disease. PZ is a humanized monoclonal antibody that recognizes the fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). PZ prophylaxis reduces the likelihood of hospitalization for young children at risk for severe RSV infections. The quasispecies nature of RNA viruses allows rapid emergence of viruses with a selective advantage. A PZ resistant virus was selected by passage of RSV in the presence of PZ in cell culture. The cell culture-derived virus was completely resistant to PZ prophylaxis in cotton rats. The increasing use of PZ, and in particular, the use of PZ in immunosuppressed patients, provide opportunities for resistant viruses to emerge. Whether such viruses will appear and be of clinical significance for humans is unknown. Preclinical studies in cotton rats predicted the efficacy of PZ in humans; these results suggest that if PZ resistant viruses arise in humans, PZ prophylaxis may be ineffective

  9. The causal direction in the association between respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Simonsen, Jacob Brunbjerg; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Larsen, Anne-Marie Hellesøe; Lysdal, Susan Hovmand; Aaby, Peter; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Skytthe, Axel; Backer, Vibeke; Bisgaard, Hans

    2009-01-01

    hyperresponsiveness; and asthma is associated with a long-term increased susceptibility for severe RSV disease, suggesting a host factor being responsible for the severe response to RSV infection. This suggests that severe RSV infection and asthma may share a common genetic predisposition and/or environmental......BACKGROUND: Earlier studies have reported an increased risk of asthma after respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalization. Other studies found that asthmatic disposition and propensity to wheeze increase the risk of RSV hospitalization. OBJECTIVE: The current study examined the causal direction...... of the associations between RSV hospitalization and asthma in a population-based cohort of twins. METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study examining the associations between RSV hospitalization and asthma by using registry information on RSV hospitalization and asthma among 18,614 Danish...

  10. Perceived Risk of Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease and Immunoprophylaxis Use Among US Pediatric Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Deborah M; Domachowske, Joseph B; Wong, Pierre C; Parimi, Prabhu S; Garcia, Daniel F; Marcus, Michael G; La Via, William V; Syed, Iqra A; Szabo, Shelagh M; McLaurin, Kimmie K; Kumar, Veena R

    2016-07-01

    This study was conducted to assess the perception of US pediatric specialists of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease risk and determine their clinical practices regarding immunoprophylaxis for high-risk children. Separate surveys were sent to neonatologists, pediatricians, pediatric pulmonologists, and pediatric cardiologists. Data were collected using structured questions requiring quantitative responses. Most neonatologists and pediatricians (>82.7%) reported a high clinical need for RSV immunoprophylaxis in preterm infants Pediatric pulmonologists and pediatric cardiologists suggested that health conditions indicative of chronic lung disease of prematurity and hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease, respectively, confer eligibility for RSV immunoprophylaxis. Agreement with the changes in the 2014 American Academy of Pediatrics guidance for RSV immunoprophylaxis was mixed among respondents from the 4 specialties. Survey findings may provide a basis to improve education about risk for severe RSV disease and evaluate changes in physician use of RSV immunoprophylaxis based on the 2014 guidance. PMID:26400767

  11. Bovine respiratory disease model based on dual infections with infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine corona virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the leading cause of economic loss in the U.S. cattle industry. BRDC likely results from simultaneous or sequential infections with multiple pathogens including both viruses and bacteria. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine corona virus (BoCV...

  12. Streptococcus pneumoniae Enhances Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Tien Nguyen

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV and Streptococcus pneumoniae are important causative agents of respiratory tract infections. Both pathogens are associated with seasonal disease outbreaks in the pediatric population, and can often be detected simultaneously in infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis or pneumonia. It has been described that respiratory virus infections may predispose for bacterial superinfections, resulting in severe disease. However, studies on the influence of bacterial colonization of the upper respiratory tract on the pathogenesis of subsequent respiratory virus infections are scarce. Here, we have investigated whether pneumococcal colonization enhances subsequent HRSV infection. We used a newly generated recombinant subgroup B HRSV strain that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein and pneumococcal isolates obtained from healthy children in disease-relevant in vitro and in vivo model systems. Three pneumococcal strains specifically enhanced in vitro HRSV infection of primary well-differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells grown at air-liquid interface, whereas two other strains did not. Since previous studies reported that bacterial neuraminidase enhanced HRSV infection in vitro, we measured pneumococcal neuraminidase activity in these cultures but found no correlation with the observed infection enhancement in our model. Subsequently, a selection of pneumococcal strains was used to induce nasal colonization of cotton rats, the best available small animal model for HRSV. Intranasal HRSV infection three days later resulted in strain-specific enhancement of HRSV replication in vivo. One S. pneumoniae strain enhanced HRSV both in vitro and in vivo, and was also associated with enhanced syncytium formation in vivo. However, neither pneumococci nor HRSV were found to spread from the upper to the lower respiratory tract, and neither pathogen was transmitted to naive cage mates by direct contact. These

  13. Engineering and expression of a RhoA peptide against respiratory syncytial virus infection in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Berlanga, Benita; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Shoji, Yoko; Chichester, Jessica A; Yusibov, Vidadi; Patiño-Rodríguez, Omar; Noyola, Daniel E; Alpuche-Solís, Ángel G

    2016-02-01

    MAIN CONCLUSION : A RhoA-derived peptide fused to carrier molecules from plants showed enhanced biological activity of in vitro assays against respiratory syncytial virus compared to the RhoA peptide alone or the synthetic RhoA peptide. A RhoA-derived peptide has been reported for over a decade as a potential inhibitor of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection both in vitro and in vivo and is anticipated to be a promising alternative to monoclonal antibody-based therapy against RSV infection. However, there are several challenges to furthering development of this antiviral peptide, including improvement in the peptide’s bioavailability, development of an efficient delivery system and identification of a cost-effective production platform. In this study, we have engineered a RhoA peptide as a genetic fusion to two carrier molecules, either lichenase (LicKM) or the coat protein (CP) of Alfalfa mosaic virus. These constructs were introduced into Nicotiana benthamiana plants using a tobacco mosaic virus-based expression vector and targets purified. The results demonstrated that the RhoA peptide fusion proteins were efficiently expressed in N. benthamiana plants, and that two of the resulting fusion proteins, RhoA-LicKM and RhoA2-FL-d25CP, inhibited RSV growth in vitro by 50 and 80 %, respectively. These data indicate the feasibility of transient expression of this biologically active antiviral RhoA peptide in plants and the advantage of using a carrier molecule to enhance target expression and efficacy. PMID:26474991

  14. Acute lower respiratory tract infection due to respiratory syncytial virus in a group of Egyptian children under 5 years of age

    OpenAIRE

    El-kholy Amany A; El-anany Mervat G; Mansi Yasmeen A; Fattouh Aya M; El-karaksy Hanaa M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background and aim Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most important causes of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTI) in infants and young children. This study was conducted to describe the epidemiology of ALRTI associated with RSV among children ≤ 5 years old in Egypt. Patients and Methods We enrolled 427 children ≤ 5 years old diagnosed with ALRTI attending the outpatient clinic or Emergency Department (ED) of Children Hospital, Cairo University during a one-...

  15. A sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering enzyme-catalyzed immunoassay of respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Lei; Zhen, Shu Jun; Wan, Xiao Yan; Gao, Peng Fei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory viruses have become a major global health challenge which would benefit from advances in screening methods for early diagnosis. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most important pathogen causing severe lower respiratory tract infections. Here we present a novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enzyme-catalyzed immunoassay of RSV by employing peroxidase substrate 3, 3'-5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) as Raman molecule. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) attached to the detection antibody in a novel sandwich immunoassay catalyzes the oxidation of TMB by H2O2 to give a radical cation (TMB(+)), which could be easily adsorbed on the negatively charged surface of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) through electrostatic interaction, inducing the aggregation of AgNPs and thus giving a strong SERS signal. A linear relationship was obtained between the Raman intensity and the amount of RSV in the range from 0.5 to 20 pg/mL, and the minimum detectable concentration of this SERS-based enzyme immunoassay was 0.05 pg/mL, which was 20 times lower than that found in the colorimetric method. PMID:26653454

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus prevention in children with congenital heart disease: who and how?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Kyun Kim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a major cause of respiratory infection in children. Most of the pediatric population have RSV infection before the age of 2, and recurrent infections are common even within one season. Chronic lung disease, prematurity, along with congenital heart disease (CHD are major risk factors in severe lower respiratory infection. In hemo-dynamically significant CHD patients with RSV infection, hospitalization is usually needed and the possibility of treatment in intensive care unit and the use of mechanical ventilator support are known to increase. Therefore the prevention of RSV infection in CHD patients is mandatory. The current standard for RSV prevention is immunoprophylaxis by palivizumab. Immunoprophylaxis is recommended monthly in hemodynamically significant CHD patients, up to 5 months. Motabizumab, a second generation drug and newly developing RSV vaccines are also expected to play a key role in RSV prevention in the future. The prophylaxis of RSV infection in CHD patients is cost-effective in both the medical aspect of the patients as well as the socio-economic aspect. Therefore an effort to promote prevention should be made by not only the family of the patients but also by the government.

  17. Lamb model of respiratory syncytial virus-associated lung disease: insights to pathogenesis and novel treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is a risk factor for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis and hospitalization. The pathogenesis underlying this is not fully understood, and in vivo studies are needed to better clarify essential cellular features and molecular mechanisms. Such studies include analysis of lung tissue from affected human infants and various animal models. The preterm and newborn lamb lung has developmental, structural, cellular, physiologic, and immunologic features similar to that of human infants. Also, the lamb lung is susceptible to various strains of RSV that infect infants and cause similar bronchiolar lesions. Studies in lambs suggest that viral replication in airways (especially bronchioles) is extensive by 4 days after infection, along with bronchiolitis characterized by degeneration and necrosis of epithelial cells, syncytial cell formation, neutrophil infiltration, epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and innate and adaptive immune responses. RSV bronchiolitis greatly affects airflow and gaseous exchange. RSV disease severity is increased in preterm lambs compared with full-term lambs; similar to human infants. The lamb is conducive to experimental assessment of novel, mechanistic therapeutic interventions such as delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor and enhancement of airway epithelial oxidative responses, Club (Clara) cell protein 10, and synthesized compounds such as nanobodies. In contrast, exposure of the fetal ovine lung in vivo to ethanol, a risk factor for preterm birth, reduces pulmonary alveolar development and surfactant protein A expression. Because the formalin-inactivated RSV vaccination enhances some inflammatory responses to RSV infection in lambs, this model has the potential to assess mechanisms of formalin-inactivated RSV enhanced disease as well as newly developed vaccines. PMID:24936027

  18. Clinical Presentation and Birth Outcomes Associated with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Y Chu

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most important cause of viral pneumonia in children worldwide. A maternal vaccine may protect both the mother and infant from RSV illness. The epidemiology and clinical presentation of RSV in pregnant and postpartum women is not well-described.Data were collected from a prospective, randomized trial of influenza immunization in pregnant women in rural southern Nepal. Women were enrolled in their second trimester of pregnancy and followed until six months postpartum. Active weekly home-based surveillance for febrile respiratory illness was performed. Mid-nasal swabs collected with episodes of respiratory illness were tested for RSV by real-time polymerase chain reaction.RSV was detected in 14 (0.4% illness episodes in 3693 women over 3554 person-years of surveillance from 2011-2014. RSV incidence was 3.9/1000 person-years overall, and 11.8/1000 person-years between September and December. Seven (50% women sought care for RSV illness; none died. Of the 7 (50% illness episodes during pregnancy, all had live births with 2 (29% preterm births and a median birthweight of 3060 grams. This compares to 469 (13% preterm births and a median birthweight of 2790 grams in women without RSV during pregnancy. Of the 7 mothers with postpartum RSV infection, RSV was detected in 4 (57% of their infants.RSV was an uncommon cause of febrile respiratory illness in mothers during pregnancy in Nepal. These data will inform prevention and therapeutic strategies against RSV in resource-limited settings.

  19. Best practice in the prevention and management of paediatric respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, Simon B; Green, Christopher A; Sande, Charles J

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is ubiquitous with almost all infants having been infected by 2 years of age and lifelong repeated infections common. It is the second largest cause of mortality, after malaria, in infants outside the neonatal period and causes up to 200,000 deaths per year worldwide. RSV results in clinical syndromes that include upper respiratory tract infections, otitis media, bronchiolitis (up to 80% of cases) and lower respiratory tract disease including pneumonia and exacerbations of asthma or viral-induced wheeze. For the purposes of this review we will focus on RSV bronchiolitis in infants in whom the greatest disease burden lies. For infants requiring hospital admission, the identification of the causative respiratory virus is used to direct cohorting or isolation and infection control procedures to minimize nosocomial transmission. Nosocomial RSV infections are associated with poorer clinical outcomes, including increased mortality, the need for mechanical ventilation and longer length of hospital stay. Numerous clinical guidelines for the management of infants with bronchiolitis have been published, although none are specific for RSV bronchiolitis. Ribavirin is the only licensed drug for the specific treatment of RSV infection but due to drug toxicity and minimal clinical benefit it has not been recommended for routine clinical use. There is currently no licensed vaccine to prevent RSV infection but passive immunoprophylaxis using a monoclonal antibody, palivizumab, reduces the risk of hospitalization due to RSV infection by 39-78% in various high-risk infants predisposed to developing severe RSV disease. The current management of RSV bronchiolitis is purely supportive, with feeding support and oxygen supplementation until the infant immune system mounts a response capable of controlling the disease. The development of a successful treatment or prophylactic agent has the potential to revolutionize the care and outcome for

  20. A Cross-Study Biomarker Signature of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardinassi, Luiz Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children, elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. Despite of advances in diagnosis and treatment, biomarkers of RSV infection are still unclear. To understand the host response and propose signatures of RSV infection, previous studies evaluated the transcriptional profile of the human bronchial epithelial cell line—BEAS-2B—infected with different strains of this virus. However, the evolution of statistical methods and functional analysis together with the large amount of expression data provide opportunities to uncover novel biomarkers of inflammation and infections. In view of those facts publicly available microarray datasets from RSV-infected BEAS-2B cells were analyzed with linear model-based statistics and the platform for functional analysis InnateDB. The results from those analyses argue for the reevaluation of previously reported transcription patterns and biological pathways in BEAS-2B cell lines infected with RSV. Importantly, this study revealed a biosignature constituted by genes such as ABCC4, ARMC8, BCLAF1, EZH1, FAM118A, FAM208B, FUS, HSPH1, KAZN, MAP3K2, N6AMT1, PRMT2, S100PBP, SERPINA1, TLK2, ZNF322, and ZNF337 which should be considered in the development of new molecular diagnosis tools.

  1. Respiratory syncytial virus is present in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homaira, Nusrat; Sheils, Joanne; Stelzer-Braid, Sacha; Lui, Kei; Oie, Ju-Lee; Snelling, Tom; Jaffe, Adam; Rawlinson, William

    2016-02-01

    Nosocomial transmission of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) occurs in children within the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). During peak community RSV transmission, three swabs were collected from the nose, hand and personal clothing of visitors and health care workers (HCW) in NICU once every week for eight weeks. Nasal swabs were collected from every third neonate and from any neonate clinically suspected of having a respiratory infection. Environmental sampling of high touch areas was done once during the study period. All swabs were tested for RSV using real time RT-PCR. There were 173 (519 total) and 109 (327 total) swabs, each of nose, hand and dress from 84 HCWs and 80 visitors respectively and 81 nasal swabs from 55 neonates collected. Thirty five environmental swabs from surfaces of the beds, side tables, counter tops, chairs, tables and computers were collected. Overall 1% of nasal swabs from each of HCWs, visitors and neonates, 4% of dress specimens from visitors and 9% of environmental swabs were positive for RSV-RNA. The results suggest that though the risk for RSV in the NICU remains low, personnel clothing are contaminated with RSV-RNA and may have a role in transmission. PMID:26174559

  2. Respiratory syncytial virus seasonality in Brazil: implications for the immunisation policy for at-risk populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, André Ricardo Ribas; Donalisio, Maria Rita

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is the leading cause of hospitalisation for respiratory diseases among children under 5 years old. The aim of this study was to analyse RSV seasonality in the five distinct regions of Brazil using time series analysis (wavelet and Fourier series) of the following indicators: monthly positivity of the immunofluorescence reaction for RSV identified by virologic surveillance system, and rate of hospitalisations per bronchiolitis and pneumonia due to RSV in children under 5 years old (codes CID-10 J12.1, J20.5, J21.0 and J21.9). A total of 12,501 samples with 11.6% positivity for RSV (95% confidence interval 11 - 12.2), varying between 7.1 and 21.4% in the five Brazilian regions, was analysed. A strong trend for annual cycles with a stable stationary pattern in the five regions was identified through wavelet analysis of the indicators. The timing of RSV activity by Fourier analysis was similar between the two indicators analysed and showed regional differences. This study reinforces the importance of adjusting the immunisation period for high risk population with the monoclonal antibody palivizumab taking into account regional differences in seasonality of RSV. PMID:27120006

  3. Development of two salmonella-based oral vaccines against human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi Jalilian, F; Yusoff, K; Suhaimi, S; Amini, R; Sekawi, Z; Jahanshiri, F

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and other respiratory infections in infants and the elderly worldwide. We have developed two new oral vaccines using Salmonella typhi TY21a to carry and express the immunogenic epitopes of RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins on its surface, separately. To evaluate the efficacy of the designed vaccines, BALB/c mice were orally immunized and then infected with RSV. Immune response analyses showed that cellmediated, mucosal and humoral immunity in the vaccinated mice were significantly enhanced compared to the control group. Both vaccines generated a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response which is crucial for efficiency of vaccines against RSV. Furthermore, histopathological examination proved that these vaccines were safe as they did not cause any Th2-associated adverse effects in the lungs of RSV-infected mice. The findings of this research suggest that Salmonella-F and Salmonella-G vaccine candidates may have strong potential to prevent RSV infection. PMID:25864737

  4. Performance evaluation of four rapid antigen tests for the detection of Respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Bo Kyeung; Choi, Sung Hyuk; Lee, Jong Han; Lee, JungHwa; Lim, Chae Seung

    2016-10-01

    Rapid identification of Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is important in the management of infected patients. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) are widely used for this purpose. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical performance of four RSV antigen tests including the BinaxNow RSV Card test, SD Bioline RSV test, BD Veritor RSV test, and Humasis RSV antigen test in comparison with real-time RT-PCR as the reference method. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 280 patients with symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection and stored at -80°C. All swabs were tested for RSV using four rapid antigen tests and real time RT-PCR. The sensitivity of the BinaxNow RSV Card test, SD Bioline RSV test, BD Veritor RSV test, and Humasis RSV Antigen tests were 62.5%, 61.3%, 65.0%, and 67.5% for RSV A, and 61.3%, 65.0%, 61.3%, and 67.5% for RSV B compared to real time RT-PCR, respectively. The specificity of BD Veritor RSV test was 95.8% and those of the other three RDTs was 100%. Commercial RSV antigen detection assays are useful tools for the rapid diagnosis of RSV infection. However, confirmatory testing is always recommended. J. Med. Virol. 88:1720-1724, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990654

  5. Differentiation of Th subsets inhibited by nonstructural proteins of respiratory syncytial virus is mediated by ubiquitination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Qin

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, a major cause of severe respiratory diseases, constitutes an important risk factor for the development of subsequent asthma. However, the mechanism underlying RSV-induced asthma is poorly understood. Viral non-structural proteins NS1 and NS2 are critically required for RSV virulence; they strongly suppress IFN-mediated innate immunity of the host cells. In order to understand the effects of NS1 and NS2 on differentiation of Th subsets, we constructed lentiviral vectors of NS1 or NS2 to infect 16 HBE and analyzed the expression of HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86 and differentiation of Th1, Th2 and Th17 by Flow Cytometric Analysis and real-time PCR. The results showed that NS1 inhibited expression of HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86 and differentiation of Th1, Th2 and Th17 lymphocytes, which could be reversed by deleting elongin C binding domain. NS2 inhibited the differentiation of Th2 and Th17, which was reversed by proteasome inhibitors of PS-341. Our results indicated that NS1 inhibited the differentiation of T lymphocytes through its mono-ubiquitination to interacted proteins, while NS2 inhibited differentiation of Th2 and Th17 through ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, which may be related with the susceptibility to asthma after RSV infection.

  6. An epidemiological study of respiratory syncytial virus associated hospitalizations in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stensballe Lone

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common viral pathogen that causes lower respiratory tract infections in infants. Studies have implicated severe RSV infections early in life as a risk factor for subsequent development of reactive airway disease. We are conducting a study to validate RSV-associated diagnoses in the Danish National Patient Registry, to assess whether the incidence of severe RSV infection is increasing in Denmark, to identify predisposing and protective factors for RSV-associated hospitalization in Denmark, and to examine the association of severe RSV infection with reactive airway disease. The influence of various biological, social and environmental factors on hospitalization for RSV infection will be studied through several population-based registers, including the Danish National Birth Cohort: 'Better health for mothers and children'. The RSV hospitalization cases will be compared with control individuals selected within the same population groups on a case–control or a cohort basis in order to produce estimates of age-adjusted and sex-adjusted relative risks (odds ratio and relative risk for hospitalization associated with various risk factors. Using register linkage and unique registration of exposures collected through interviews and blood samples from the Danish National Birth Cohort, we will be able to resolve the issues referred to above in a very large sample of Danish children.

  7. An improved respiratory syncytial virus neutralization assay based on the detection of green fluorescent protein expression and automated plaque counting

    OpenAIRE

    van Remmerden Yvonne; Xu Fang; van Eldik Mandy; Heldens Jacco GM; Huisman Willem; Widjojoatmodjo Myra N

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Virus neutralizing antibodies against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are considered important correlates of protection for vaccine evaluation. The established plaque reduction assay is time consuming, labor intensive and highly variable. Methods Here, a neutralization assay based on a modified RSV strain expressing the green fluorescent protein in combination with automated detection and quantification of plaques is described. Results The fluorescence plaque reduction a...

  8. Evaluation of the Abbott TESTPACK RSV enzyme immunoassay for detection of respiratory syncytial virus in nasopharyngeal swab specimens.

    OpenAIRE

    Swierkosz, E M; Flanders, R; Melvin, L; Miller, J D; Kline, M W

    1989-01-01

    The Abbott TESTPACK RSV assay (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Ill.), a rapid (20-min) enzyme immunoassay, was compared with culture and direct immunofluorescence (DFA) of nasopharyngeal cells for the detection of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in nasopharyngeal swab specimens. Nasopharyngeal swab specimens, collected from 234 infants, were placed in viral transport medium. Portions of specimen in transport medium were used for each test. Of 234 specimens, 70 (30%) were culture positiv...

  9. Early infection with respiratory syncytial virus impairs regulatory T cell function and increases susceptibility to allergic asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamoorthy, Nandini; Khare, Anupriya; Oriss, Timothy B.; Raundhal, Mahesh; Morse, Christina; Yarlagadda, Manohar; Wenzel, Sally E.; Moore, Martin L.; Peebles, R. Stokes; Ray, Anuradha; Ray, Prabir

    2012-01-01

    Immune tolerance is instituted early in life, during which time regulatory T (Treg) cells have an important role. Recurrent infections with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in early life increase the risk for asthma in adult life. Repeated infection of infant mice tolerized to ovalbumin (OVA) through their mother’s milk with RSV induced allergic airway disease in response to OVA sensitization and challenge, including airway inflammation, hyper-reactivity and higher OVA-specific IgE, as compa...

  10. Regulatory T Cells Prevent Th2 Immune Responses and Pulmonary Eosinophilia during Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Durant, Lydia R.; Makris, Spyridon; Voorburg, Cornelia Maaike; Loebbermann, Jens; Johansson, Cecilia; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2013-01-01

    During viral infection, inflammation and recovery are tightly controlled by competing proinflammatory and regulatory immune pathways. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading global cause of infantile bronchiolitis, which is associated with recurrent wheeze and asthma diagnosis in later life. Th2-driven disease has been well described under some conditions for RSV-infected mice. In the present studies, we used the Foxp3 DTR mice (which allow specific conditional depletion of Foxp3+ T ...

  11. Risk of nosocomial respiratory syncytial virus infection and effectiveness of control measures to prevent transmission events: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    French, Clare E; McKenzie, Bruce C.; Coope, Caroline; Rajanaidu, Subhadra; Paranthaman, Karthik; Pebody, Richard; Nguyen‐Van‐Tam, Jonathan S.; ,; Higgins, Julian P. T; Beck, Charles R

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes a significant public health burden, and outbreaks among vulnerable patients in hospital settings are of particular concern. We reviewed published and unpublished literature from hospital settings to assess: (i) nosocomial RSV transmission risk (attack rate) during outbreaks, (ii) effectiveness of infection control measures. We searched the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, together with key websites, journals and grey lite...

  12. Associations between exposure to viruses and bovine respiratory disease in Australian feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, K E; Barnes, T S; Morton, J M; Gravel, J L; Commins, M A; Horwood, P F; Ambrose, R C; Clements, A C A; Mahony, T J

    2016-05-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most important cause of clinical disease and death in feedlot cattle. Respiratory viral infections are key components in predisposing cattle to the development of this disease. To quantify the contribution of four viruses commonly associated with BRD, a case-control study was conducted nested within the National Bovine Respiratory Disease Initiative project population in Australian feedlot cattle. Effects of exposure to Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 (BVDV-1), Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and Bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3), and to combinations of these viruses, were investigated. Based on weighted seroprevalences at induction (when animals were enrolled and initial samples collected), the percentages of the project population estimated to be seropositive were 24% for BoHV-1, 69% for BVDV-1, 89% for BRSV and 91% for BPIV-3. For each of the four viruses, seropositivity at induction was associated with reduced risk of BRD (OR: 0.6-0.9), and seroincrease from induction to second blood sampling (35-60 days after induction) was associated with increased risk of BRD (OR: 1.3-1.5). Compared to animals that were seropositive for all four viruses at induction, animals were at progressively increased risk with increasing number of viruses for which they were seronegative; those seronegative for all four viruses were at greatest risk (OR: 2.4). Animals that seroincreased for one or more viruses from induction to second blood sampling were at increased risk (OR: 1.4-2.1) of BRD compared to animals that did not seroincrease for any viruses. Collectively these results confirm that prior exposure to these viruses is protective while exposure at or after feedlot entry increases the risk of development of BRD in feedlots. However, the modest increases in risk associated with seroincrease for each virus separately, and the progressive increases in risk with multiple viral exposures highlights

  13. Curcumin modified silver nanoparticles for highly efficient inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao Xi; Li, Chun Mei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between nanoparticles and viruses have attracted increasing attention due to the antiviral activity of nanoparticles and the resulting possibility to be employed as biomedical interventions. In this contribution, we developed a very simple route to prepare uniform and stable silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with antiviral properties by using curcumin, which is a member of the ginger family isolated from rhizomes of the perennial herb Curcuma longa and has a wide range of biological activities like antioxidant, antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects, and acts as reducing and capping agents in this synthetic route. The tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) assay showed that the curcumin modified silver nanoparticles (cAgNPs) have a highly efficient inhibition effect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, giving a decrease of viral titers about two orders of magnitude at the concentration of cAgNPs under which no toxicity was found to the host cells. Mechanism investigations showed that cAgNPs could prevent RSV from infecting the host cells by inactivating the virus directly, indicating that cAgNPs are a novel promising efficient virucide for RSV.Interactions between nanoparticles and viruses have attracted increasing attention due to the antiviral activity of nanoparticles and the resulting possibility to be employed as biomedical interventions. In this contribution, we developed a very simple route to prepare uniform and stable silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with antiviral properties by using curcumin, which is a member of the ginger family isolated from rhizomes of the perennial herb Curcuma longa and has a wide range of biological activities like antioxidant, antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects, and acts as reducing and capping agents in this synthetic route. The tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) assay showed that the curcumin modified silver nanoparticles (cAgNPs) have a highly efficient inhibition

  14. Olfactomedin 4 Serves as a Marker for Disease Severity in Pediatric Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H K Brand

    Full Text Available Respiratory viral infections follow an unpredictable clinical course in young children ranging from a common cold to respiratory failure. The transition from mild to severe disease occurs rapidly and is difficult to predict. The pathophysiology underlying disease severity has remained elusive. There is an urgent need to better understand the immune response in this disease to come up with biomarkers that may aid clinical decision making.In a prospective study, flow cytometric and genome-wide gene expression analyses were performed on blood samples of 26 children with a diagnosis of severe, moderate or mild Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV infection. Differentially expressed genes were validated using Q-PCR in a second cohort of 80 children during three consecutive winter seasons. FACS analyses were also performed in the second cohort and on recovery samples of severe cases in the first cohort.Severe RSV infection was associated with a transient but marked decrease in CD4+ T, CD8+ T, and NK cells in peripheral blood. Gene expression analyses in both cohorts identified Olfactomedin4 (OLFM4 as a fully discriminative marker between children with mild and severe RSV infection, giving a PAM cross-validation error of 0%. Patients with an OLFM4 gene expression level above -7.5 were 6 times more likely to develop severe disease, after correction for age at hospitalization and gestational age.By combining genome-wide expression profiling of blood cell subsets with clinically well-annotated samples, OLFM4 was identified as a biomarker for severity of pediatric RSV infection.

  15. Detection of respiratory syncytial virus by reverse transcription-PCR and hybridization with a DNA enzyme immunoassay.

    OpenAIRE

    Freymuth, F.; Eugene, G; Vabret, A.; Petitjean, J.; Gennetay, E; Brouard, J; Duhamel, J F; Guillois, B

    1995-01-01

    Nasal aspirates from 238 infants hospitalized with acute respiratory infections during the winter of 1994 and 1995 were tested for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and the viral isolation technique (VIT) and by two PCR and hybridization methods: reverse transcription PCR 1 (RT-PCR1), which amplifies the RNAs of all RSV strains, and RT-PCR-2, which allows subgroup classification of RSV. RT-PCR-1 and RT-PCR-2 detected viral sequences in 56.7% (135 of 238) and ...

  16. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Matrix Protein Induces Lung Epithelial Cell Cycle Arrest through a p53 Dependent Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Bian, Tao; John D Gibbs; Örvell, Claes; Imani, Farhad

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of viral respiratory infections in children. Our previous study showed that the RSV infection induced lung epithelial cell cycle arrest, which enhanced virus replication. To address the mechanism of RSV-induced cell cycle arrest, we examined the contribution of RSV-matrix (RSV-M) protein. In this report, we show that in both the A549 cell line and primary human bronchial epithelial (PHBE) cells, transfection with RSV-M protein caused the ce...

  17. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: involvement in bovine respiratory disease and diagnostic challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reviews the contribution of bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) to the development of Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD). Veterinarians and producers generally consider BRD as one of the most significant diseases affecting production in the cattle industry. BRD can affect the performance (...

  18. Surfactant protein C-deficient mice are susceptible to respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Stephan W; Witt, Teah L; Senft, Albert P; Baatz, John E; Folger, Dusti; Maxfield, Melissa D; Akinbi, Henry T; Newton, Danforth A; Prows, Daniel R; Korfhagen, Thomas R

    2009-07-01

    Patients with mutations in the pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C) gene develop interstitial lung disease and pulmonary exacerbations associated with viral infections including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Pulmonary infection with RSV caused more severe interstitial thickening, air space consolidation, and goblet cell hyperplasia in SP-C-deficient (Sftpc(-/-)) mice compared with SP-C replete mice. The RSV-induced pathology resolved more slowly in Sftpc(-/-) mice with lung inflammation persistent up to 30 days postinfection. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte and macrophage counts were increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of Sftpc(-/-) mice. Viral titers and viral F and G protein mRNA were significantly increased in both Sftpc(-/-) and heterozygous Sftpc(+/-) mice compared with controls. Expression of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) mRNA was increased in the lungs of Sftpc(-/-) mice relative to Sftpc(+/+) mice before and after RSV infection. Consistent with the increased TLR3 expression, BAL inflammatory cells were increased in the Sftpc(-/-) mice after exposure to a TLR3-specific ligand, poly(I:C). Preparations of purified SP-C and synthetic phospholipids blocked poly(I:C)-induced TLR3 signaling in vitro. SP-C deficiency increases the severity of RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation through regulation of TLR3 signaling. PMID:19304906

  19. Respiratory syncytial virus increases lung cellular bioenergetics in neonatal C57BL/6 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously reported that lung cellular bioenergetics (cellular respiration and ATP) increased in 4–10 week-old BALB/c mice infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study examined the kinetics and changes in cellular bioenergetics in ≤2-week-old C57BL/6 mice following RSV infection. Mice (5–14 days old) were inoculated intranasally with RSV and the lungs were examined on days 1–10 post-infection. Histopathology and electron microscopy revealed preserved pneumocyte architectures and organelles. Increased lung cellular bioenergetics was noted from days 1–10 post-infection. Cellular GSH remained unchanged. These results indicate that the increased lung cellular respiration (measured by mitochondrial O2 consumption) and ATP following RSV infection is independent of either age or genetic background of the host. - Highlights: • RSV infection increases lung cellular respiration and ATP in neonatal C57BL/6 mice. • Increased lung cellular bioenergetics is a biomarker of RSV infection. • Lung cellular glutathione remains unchanged in RSV infection

  20. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target. - Highlights: • A yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) detected BAP31 as a binder of RSV SH protein. • Transfected SH and BAP31 co-localize in lung epithelial cells. • Endogenous BAP31 is pulled down by RSV SH protein. • BAP31 endodomain interacts with the N-terminal α-helix of SH protein in micelles. • This interaction is proposed to be a potential drug target

  1. Ginseng Protects Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus by Modulating Multiple Immune Cells and Inhibiting Viral Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Seok Lee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ginseng has been used in humans for thousands of years but its effects on viral infection have not been well understood. We investigated the effects of red ginseng extract (RGE on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection using in vitro cell culture and in vivo mouse models. RGE partially protected human epithelial (HEp2 cells from RSV-induced cell death and viral replication. In addition, RGE significantly inhibited the production of RSV-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α in murine dendritic and macrophage-like cells. More importantly, RGE intranasal pre-treatment prevented loss of mouse body weight after RSV infection. RGE treatment improved lung viral clearance and enhanced the production of interferon (IFN-γ in bronchoalveolar lavage cells upon RSV infection of mice. Analysis of cellular phenotypes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids showed that RGE treatment increased the populations of CD8+ T cells and CD11c+ dendritic cells upon RSV infection of mice. Taken together, these results provide evidence that ginseng has protective effects against RSV infection through multiple mechanisms, which include improving cell survival, partial inhibition of viral replication and modulation of cytokine production and types of immune cells migrating into the lung.

  2. Ameliorating Effect of Dietary Xylitol on Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (hRSV) Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mei Ling; Wi, Ga Ram; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants. The lack of proper prophylactics and therapeutics for controlling hRSV infection has been of great concern worldwide. Xylitol is a well-known sugar substitute and its effect against bacteria in the oral cavity is well known. However, little is known of its effect on viral infections. In this study, the effect of dietary xylitol on hRSV infection was investigated in a mouse model for the first time. Mice received xylitol for 14 d prior to virus challenge and for a further 3 d post challenge. Significantly larger reductions in lung virus titers were observed in the mice receiving xylitol than in the controls receiving phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). In addition, fewer CD3(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) lymphocytes, whose numbers reflect inflammatory status, were recruited in the mice receiving xylitol. These results indicate that dietary xylitol can ameliorate hRSV infections and reduce inflammation-associated immune responses to hRSV infection. PMID:27040626

  3. Bronchiectasis exacerbations: The role of atypical bacteria and respiratory syncytial virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaxas, Eugenios I; Balis, Evangelos; Papaparaskevas, Joseph; Spanakis, Nicholas E; Tatsis, Georgios; Tsakris, Athanasios

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aside from the known role of common bacteria, there is a paucity of data regarding the possible role of atypical bacteria and viruses in exacerbations of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. OBJECTIVE: To explore the possible role of atypical bacteria (namely, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) as causative agents of bronchiectasis exacerbations. METHODS: A cohort of 33 patients was studied over a two-year period (one year follow-up for each patient). Polymerase chain reaction for the detection of M pneumoniae, C pneumoniae and RSV in bronchoalveolar lavage samples were performed during all visits. Antibody titres (immunoglobulin [Ig]M and IgG) against the aforementioned pathogens were also measured. In addition, cultures for common bacteria and mycobacteria were performed from the bronchoalveolar lavage samples. RESULTS: Fifteen patients experienced a total of 19 exacerbations during the study period. Although RSV was detected by polymerase chain reaction during stable visits in four patients, it was never detected during an exacerbation. M pneumoniae and C pneumoniae were never detected at stable visits or during exacerbations. IgM antibody titres for these three pathogens were negative in all patient visits. CONCLUSIONS: Atypical pathogens and RSV did not appear to be causative agents of bronchiectasis exacerbations. PMID:25874735

  4. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein

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    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Quistgaard, Esben M. [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordlund, Par [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Thanabalu, Thirumaran [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Torres, Jaume, E-mail: jtorres@ntu.edu.sg [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore)

    2015-08-15

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target. - Highlights: • A yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) detected BAP31 as a binder of RSV SH protein. • Transfected SH and BAP31 co-localize in lung epithelial cells. • Endogenous BAP31 is pulled down by RSV SH protein. • BAP31 endodomain interacts with the N-terminal α-helix of SH protein in micelles. • This interaction is proposed to be a potential drug target.

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus increases lung cellular bioenergetics in neonatal C57BL/6 mice

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    Alsuwaidi, Ahmed R., E-mail: alsuwaidia@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Albawardi, Alia, E-mail: alia.albawardi@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pathology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Almarzooqi, Saeeda, E-mail: saeeda.almarzooqi@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pathology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Benedict, Sheela, E-mail: sheela.benedict@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Othman, Aws R., E-mail: aws.rashad@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Hartwig, Stacey M., E-mail: stacey-hartwig@uiowa.edu [Department of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Immunology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Varga, Steven M., E-mail: steven-varga@uiowa.edu [Department of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Immunology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Souid, Abdul-Kader, E-mail: asouid@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2014-04-15

    We have previously reported that lung cellular bioenergetics (cellular respiration and ATP) increased in 4–10 week-old BALB/c mice infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study examined the kinetics and changes in cellular bioenergetics in ≤2-week-old C57BL/6 mice following RSV infection. Mice (5–14 days old) were inoculated intranasally with RSV and the lungs were examined on days 1–10 post-infection. Histopathology and electron microscopy revealed preserved pneumocyte architectures and organelles. Increased lung cellular bioenergetics was noted from days 1–10 post-infection. Cellular GSH remained unchanged. These results indicate that the increased lung cellular respiration (measured by mitochondrial O{sub 2} consumption) and ATP following RSV infection is independent of either age or genetic background of the host. - Highlights: • RSV infection increases lung cellular respiration and ATP in neonatal C57BL/6 mice. • Increased lung cellular bioenergetics is a biomarker of RSV infection. • Lung cellular glutathione remains unchanged in RSV infection.

  6. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease Is Mediated by Age-Variable IL-33.

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    Jordy Saravia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common cause of infant hospitalizations and severe RSV infections are a significant risk factor for childhood asthma. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for RSV induced immunopathophysiology remain elusive. Using an age-appropriate mouse model of RSV, we show that IL-33 plays a critical role in the immunopathogenesis of severe RSV, which is associated with higher group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s specifically in neonates. Infection with RSV induced rapid IL-33 expression and an increase in ILC2 numbers in the lungs of neonatal mice; this was not observed in adult mice. Blocking IL-33 with antibodies or using an IL-33 receptor knockout mouse during infection was sufficient to inhibit RSV immunopathogenesis (i.e., airway hyperresponsiveness, Th2 inflammation, eosinophilia, and mucus hyperproduction; whereas administration of IL-33 to adult mice during RSV infection was sufficient to induce RSV disease. Additionally, elevated IL-33 and IL-13 were observed in nasal aspirates from infants hospitalized with RSV; these cytokines declined during convalescence. In summary, IL-33 is necessary, either directly or indirectly, to induce ILC2s and the Th2 biased immunopathophysiology observed following neonatal RSV infection. This study provides a mechanism involving IL-33 and ILC2s in RSV mediated human asthma.

  7. Experimental animal model for analyzing immunobiological responses following vaccination with formalin-inactivated respiratory syncytial virus.

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    Sawada, Akihito; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    Formalin-inactivated respiratory syncytial virus (FI-RSV) vaccine was developed in the 1960s. However, this vaccine does not prevent infection in RSV-naïve recipients and has the paradoxical effect of increasing the severity of RSV illness following natural infection, which has been a major obstacle to developing RSV vaccines. Several experimental animal models for determining the cause of the severe symptoms in FI-RSV recipients have been developed. In the present study, cotton rats immunized with FI-RSV were challenged with RSV and histopathological findings and recovery of infectious virus were studied. Copy numbers of mRNA of Th1 and Th2 cytokines were measured in lung tissues to gain better understanding of their immune responses. Infiltration of inflammatory cells and prominent interstitial pneumonitis were observed in the FI-RSV group, as was induction of mRNA of Th2 cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10, IL-13 and RANTES. Rats immunized with recombinant measles virus expressing the RSV F protein (MVAIK/RSV/F) and those treated with anti-RSV mAb (palivizumab) showed very mild interstitial pneumonitis. Amounts of mRNA of IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-4 were higher in the MVAIK/RSV/F group. Administration of palivizumab before RSV challenge decreased the severity of interstitial pneumonitis in the FI-RSV group. FI-RSV induced skewed Th2 responses, resulting in severe inflammatory responses. PMID:26865035

  8. Development of Acquired Immunity following Repeated Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Cotton Rats.

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    Yoshiaki Yamaji

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infections occur every year worldwide. Most infants are infected with RSV by one year of age and are reinfected because immune responses after the first infection are too weak to protect against subsequent infections. In the present study, immune responses against RSV were investigated in order to obtain a better understanding of repetitive RSV infections in cotton rats. No detectable neutralizing antibody (NT was developed after the first infection, and the second infection was not prevented. The results of histological examinations revealed severe inflammation, viral antigens were detected around bronchial epithelial cells, and infectious viruses were recovered from lung homogenates. Following the second infection neutralizing antibodies were significantly elevated, and CD8+ cells were activated in response to RSV-F253-265. No viral antigens was detected thereafter in lung tissues and infectious viruses were not recovered. Similar results were obtained in the present study using the subgroups A and B. These results support the induction of humoral and cellular immune responses following repetitive infections with RSV; however, these responses were insufficient to eliminate viruses in the first and second infections.

  9. Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Role of Innate Immunity in Clearance and Disease Progression.

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    Farrag, Mohamed A; Almajhdi, Fahad N

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infections have worldwide records. The virus is responsible for bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and asthma in humans of different age groups. Premature infants, young children, and immunocompromised individuals are prone to severe HRSV infection that may lead to death. Based on worldwide estimations, millions of cases were reported in both developed and developing countries. In fact, HRSV symptoms develop mainly as a result of host immune response. Due to inability to establish long lasting adaptive immunity, HRSV infection is recurrent and hence impairs vaccine development. Once HRSV attached to the airway epithelia, interaction with the host innate immune components starts. HRSV interaction with pulmonary innate defenses is crucial in determining the disease outcome. Infection of alveolar epithelial cells triggers a cascade of events that lead to recruitment and activation of leukocyte populations. HRSV clearance is mediated by a number of innate leukocytes, including macrophages, natural killer cells, eosinophils, dendritic cells, and neutrophils. Regulation of these cells is mediated by cytokines, chemokines, and other immune mediators. Although the innate immune system helps to clear HRSV infection, it participates in disease progression such as bronchiolitis and asthma. Resolving the mechanisms by which HRSV induces pathogenesis, different possible interactions between the virus and immune components, and immune cells interplay are essential for developing new effective vaccines. Therefore, the current review focuses on how the pulmonary innate defenses mediate HRSV clearance and to what extent they participate in disease progression. In addition, immune responses associated with HRSV vaccines will be discussed. PMID:26679242

  10. Local interleukin-10 production during respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis is associated with post-bronchiolitis wheeze

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    Hodemaekers Hennie M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common cause of bronchiolitis in infants. Following RSV bronchiolitis, 50% of children develop post-bronchiolitis wheeze (PBW. Animal studies have suggested that interleukin (IL-10 plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of RSV bronchiolitis and subsequent airway hyperresponsiveness. Previously, we showed that ex vivo monocyte IL-10 production is a predictor of PBW. Additionally, heterozygosity of the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs1800872 in the IL10 promoter region was associated with protection against RSV bronchiolitis. Methods This study aimed to determine the in vivo role of IL-10 in RSV pathogenesis and recurrent wheeze in a new cohort of 235 infants hospitalized for RSV bronchiolitis. IL-10 levels in nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs were measured at the time of hospitalization and the IL10 SNP rs1800872 genotype was determined. Follow-up data were available for 185 children (79%. Results Local IL-10 levels during RSV infection turned out to be higher in infants that later developed physician diagnosed PBW as compared to infants without PBW in the first year after RSV infection (958 vs 692 pg/ml, p = 0.02. The IL10 promoter SNP rs1800872 was not associated with IL-10 concentration in NPAs. Conclusion The relationship between high local IL-10 levels during the initial RSV infection and physician diagnosed PBW provides further evidence of the importance of the IL-10 response during RSV bronchiolitis.

  11. Chimpanzee adenovirus- and MVA-vectored respiratory syncytial virus vaccine is safe and immunogenic in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher A; Scarselli, Elisa; Sande, Charles J; Thompson, Amber J; de Lara, Catherine M; Taylor, Kathryn S; Haworth, Kathryn; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Angus, Brian; Siani, Loredana; Di Marco, Stefania; Traboni, Cinzia; Folgori, Antonella; Colloca, Stefano; Capone, Stefania; Vitelli, Alessandra; Cortese, Riccardo; Klenerman, Paul; Nicosia, Alfredo; Pollard, Andrew J

    2015-08-12

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes respiratory infection in annual epidemics, with infants and the elderly at particular risk of developing severe disease and death. However, despite its importance, no vaccine exists. The chimpanzee adenovirus, PanAd3-RSV, and modified vaccinia virus Ankara, MVA-RSV, are replication-defective viral vectors encoding the RSV fusion (F), nucleocapsid (N), and matrix (M2-1) proteins for the induction of humoral and cellular responses. We performed an open-label, dose escalation, phase 1 clinical trial in 42 healthy adults in which four different combinations of prime/boost vaccinations were investigated for safety and immunogenicity, including both intramuscular (IM) and intranasal (IN) administration of the adenovirus-vectored vaccine. The vaccines were safe and well tolerated, with the most common reported adverse events being mild injection site reactions. No vaccine-related serious adverse events occurred. RSV neutralizing antibody titers rose in response to IM prime with PanAd3-RSV and after IM boost for individuals primed by the IN route. Circulating anti-F immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) were observed after the IM prime and IM boost. RSV-specific T cell responses were increased after the IM PanAd3-RSV prime and were most efficiently boosted by IM MVA-RSV. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion after boost was from both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, without detectable T helper cell 2 (TH2) cytokines that have been previously associated with immune pathogenesis following exposure to RSV after the formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine. In conclusion, PanAd3-RSV and MVA-RSV are safe and immunogenic in healthy adults. These vaccine candidates warrant further clinical evaluation of efficacy to assess their potential to reduce the burden of RSV disease. PMID:26268313

  12. Antibody response to respiratory syncytial virus infection in children <18 months old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Scarselli, Elisa; Lelii, Mara; Scala, Alessia; Vitelli, Alessandra; Capone, Stefania; Fornili, Marco; Biganzoli, Elia; Orenti, Annalisa; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Principi, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    The development of a safe and effective respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine might be facilitated by knowledge of the natural immune response to this virus. The aims of this study were to evaluate the neutralizing antibody response of a cohort of healthy children <18 months old to RSV infection. During the RSV season, 89 healthy children <18 months old were enrolled and followed up weekly for 12 weeks. At each visit, a nasopharyngeal swab was obtained for RSV detection by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). During the study period, 2 blood samples were drawn and they were used to determine RSV geometric mean neutralizing antibody titres (GMT) against RSV. A total of 35 (39.3%) children had RSV detected during the study period. Among RSV-positive patients, children ≥7 months showed a significantly higher increase in antibody response (p<0.001). A significantly higher number of patients with a ≥4 -fold increase in GMT were ≥7 months old (p = 0.02) and presented lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) during the study period (p = 0.01). Viral shedding was longer among children aged ≥7 months (p = 0.06), those with viral load ≥10(6) copies/mL (p = 0.03), and those with LRTIs during the study period (p = 0.03), but it was not associated with the immune response (p = 0.41). In conclusion, natural RSV infection seems to evoke a low immune response in younger children. To be effective in this infant population, which is at highest risk of developing severe LRTIs, vaccines must be able to induce in the first months of life a stronger immune response than that produced by the natural infection. PMID:26901128

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus-related encephalitis: magnetic resonance imaging findings with diffusion-weighted study

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    Park, Arim; Suh, Sang-il; Seol, Hae-Young [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Gyu-Ri; Lee, Nam-Joon [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Hen; Seo, Hyung Suk [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Baik-Lin [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common pathogen causing acute respiratory infection in children. Herein, we describe the incidence and clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of RSV-related encephalitis, a major neurological complication of RSV infection. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and imaging findings of the patients over the past 7 years who are admitted to our medical center and are tested positive for RSV-RNA by reverse transcriptase PCR. In total, 3,856 patients were diagnosed with RSV bronchiolitis, and 28 of them underwent brain MRI for the evaluation of neurologic symptoms; 8 of these 28 patients had positive imaging findings. Five of these 8 patients were excluded because of non-RSV-related pathologies, such as subdural hemorrhage, brain volume loss due to status epilepticus, periventricular leukomalacia, preexisting ventriculomegaly, and hypoxic brain injury. The incidence of RSV-related encephalitis was as follows: 3/3,856 (0.08 %) of the patients are positive for RSV RNA, 3/28 (10.7 %) of the patient underwent brain MRI for neurological symptom, and 3/8 (37.5 %) of patients revealed abnormal MR findings. The imaging findings were suggestive of patterns of rhombenmesencephalitis, encephalitis with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and limbic encephalitis. They demonstrated no diffusion abnormality on diffusion-weighted image and symptom improvement on the follow-up study. Encephalitis with RSV bronchiolitis occurs rarely. However, on brain MRI performed upon suspicion of neurologic involvement, RSV encephalitis is not infrequently observed among the abnormal MR findings and may mimic other viral and limbic encephalitis. Physicians should be aware of this entity to ensure proper diagnosis and neurologic care of RSV-positive patients. (orig.)

  14. Surfactant protein B polymorphisms are associated with severe respiratory syncytial virus infection, but not with asthma

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    Heinzmann Andrea

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surfactant proteins (SP are important for the innate host defence and essential for a physiological lung function. Several linkage and association studies have investigated the genes coding for different surfactant proteins in the context of pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or respiratory distress syndrome of preterm infants. In this study we tested whether SP-B was in association with two further pulmonary diseases in children, i. e. severe infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus and bronchial asthma. Methods We chose to study five polymorphisms in SP-B: rs2077079 in the promoter region; rs1130866 leading to the amino acid exchange T131I; rs2040349 in intron 8; rs3024801 leading to L176F and rs3024809 resulting in R272H. Statistical analyses made use of the Armitage's trend test for single polymorphisms and FAMHAP and FASTEHPLUS for haplotype analyses. Results The polymorphisms rs3024801 and rs3024809 were not present in our study populations. The three other polymorphisms were common and in tight linkage disequilibrium with each other. They did not show association with bronchial asthma or severe RSV infection in the analyses of single polymorphisms. However, haplotypes analyses revealed association of SP-B with severe RSV infection (p = 0.034. Conclusion Thus our results indicate a possible involvement of SP-B in the genetic predisposition to severe RSV infections in the German population. In order to determine which of the three polymorphisms constituting the haplotypes is responsible for the association, further case control studies on large populations are necessary. Furthermore, functional analysis need to be conducted.

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus outbreak in neonatal intensive care unit: Impact of infection control measures plus palivizumab use

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    Silva Camila de A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The occurrence of a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV outbreak in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU is related to unfavorable outcomes, as this infection can lead to respiratory distress and death in premature in infants. Report the successful control of an outbreak that occurred in April 2010 in a NICU. Methods After the index case, of 18 premature infants placed in the same room 10 infants were infected. Of those 10, 6 developed mild to moderate respiratory symptoms, 4 persisted asymptomatic and no death occurred. Contact and respiratory precautions were rapidly initiated, the infants were cohorted in 3 different rooms and palivizumab was administered to all contacts. Results The outbreak was controlled and no new cases were subsequently indentified. Conclusion Standard infection control measures plus palivizumab prophylaxis were efficient in rapid control of the outbreak.

  16. Application of Functional Genomics for Bovine Respiratory Disease Diagnostics

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    Rai, Aswathy N.; William B. Epperson; Bindu Nanduri

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most common economically important disease affecting cattle. For developing accurate diagnostics that can predict disease susceptibility/resistance and stratification, it is necessary to identify the molecular mechanisms that underlie BRD. To study the complex interactions among the bovine host and the multitude of viral and bacterial pathogens, as well as the environmental factors associated with BRD etiology, genome-scale high-throughput functional ge...

  17. Environmental drivers of the spatiotemporal dynamics of respiratory syncytial virus in the United States.

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    Virginia E Pitzer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemics of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV are known to occur in wintertime in temperate countries including the United States, but there is a limited understanding of the importance of climatic drivers in determining the seasonality of RSV. In the United States, RSV activity is highly spatially structured, with seasonal peaks beginning in Florida in November through December and ending in the upper Midwest in February-March, and prolonged disease activity in the southeastern US. Using data on both age-specific hospitalizations and laboratory reports of RSV in the US, and employing a combination of statistical and mechanistic epidemic modeling, we examined the association between environmental variables and state-specific measures of RSV seasonality. Temperature, vapor pressure, precipitation, and potential evapotranspiration (PET were significantly associated with the timing of RSV activity across states in univariate exploratory analyses. The amplitude and timing of seasonality in the transmission rate was significantly correlated with seasonal fluctuations in PET, and negatively correlated with mean vapor pressure, minimum temperature, and precipitation. States with low mean vapor pressure and the largest seasonal variation in PET tended to experience biennial patterns of RSV activity, with alternating years of "early-big" and "late-small" epidemics. Our model for the transmission dynamics of RSV was able to replicate these biennial transitions at higher amplitudes of seasonality in the transmission rate. This successfully connects environmental drivers to the epidemic dynamics of RSV; however, it does not fully explain why RSV activity begins in Florida, one of the warmest states, when RSV is a winter-seasonal pathogen. Understanding and predicting the seasonality of RSV is essential in determining the optimal timing of immunoprophylaxis.

  18. Environmental drivers of the spatiotemporal dynamics of respiratory syncytial virus in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzer, Virginia E; Viboud, Cécile; Alonso, Wladimir J; Wilcox, Tanya; Metcalf, C Jessica; Steiner, Claudia A; Haynes, Amber K; Grenfell, Bryan T

    2015-01-01

    Epidemics of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are known to occur in wintertime in temperate countries including the United States, but there is a limited understanding of the importance of climatic drivers in determining the seasonality of RSV. In the United States, RSV activity is highly spatially structured, with seasonal peaks beginning in Florida in November through December and ending in the upper Midwest in February-March, and prolonged disease activity in the southeastern US. Using data on both age-specific hospitalizations and laboratory reports of RSV in the US, and employing a combination of statistical and mechanistic epidemic modeling, we examined the association between environmental variables and state-specific measures of RSV seasonality. Temperature, vapor pressure, precipitation, and potential evapotranspiration (PET) were significantly associated with the timing of RSV activity across states in univariate exploratory analyses. The amplitude and timing of seasonality in the transmission rate was significantly correlated with seasonal fluctuations in PET, and negatively correlated with mean vapor pressure, minimum temperature, and precipitation. States with low mean vapor pressure and the largest seasonal variation in PET tended to experience biennial patterns of RSV activity, with alternating years of "early-big" and "late-small" epidemics. Our model for the transmission dynamics of RSV was able to replicate these biennial transitions at higher amplitudes of seasonality in the transmission rate. This successfully connects environmental drivers to the epidemic dynamics of RSV; however, it does not fully explain why RSV activity begins in Florida, one of the warmest states, when RSV is a winter-seasonal pathogen. Understanding and predicting the seasonality of RSV is essential in determining the optimal timing of immunoprophylaxis. PMID:25569275

  19. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Persistence in Murine Macrophages Impairs IFN-β Response but Not Synthesis

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    Rivera-Toledo, Evelyn; Torres-González, Laura; Gómez, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Type-I interferon (IFN-I) production is an early response to viral infection and pathogenic viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade this cellular defense. Some viruses can establish and maintain persistent infections by altering the IFN-I signaling pathway. Here, we studied IFN-I synthesis and response in an in vitro model of persistent infection by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in a murine macrophage-like cell line. In this model, interferon regulatory factor 3 was constitutively active and located at nuclei of persistently infected cells, inducing expression of IFN-beta mRNA and protein. However, persistently infected macrophages did not respond in an autocrine manner to the secreted-IFN-beta or to recombinant-IFN-beta, since phosphorylated-STAT1 was not detected by western blot and transcription of the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) Mx1 and ISG56 was not induced. Treatment of non-infected macrophages with supernatants from persistently infected cells induced STAT1 phosphorylation and ISGs expression, mediated by the IFN-I present in the supernatants, because blocking the IFN-I receptor inhibited STAT1 phosphorylation. Results suggest that the lack of autocrine response to IFN-I by the host cell may be one mechanism for maintenance of RSV persistence. Furthermore, STAT1 phosphorylation and ISGs expression induced in non-infected cells by supernatants from persistently infected macrophages suggest that RSV persistence may trigger a proinflammatory phenotype in non-infected cells as part of the pathogenesis of RSV infection. PMID:26501312

  20. Duration of shedding of respiratory syncytial virus in a community study of Kenyan children

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    Ngama Mwanajuma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our understanding of the transmission dynamics of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection will be better informed with improved data on the patterns of shedding in cases not limited only to hospital admissions. Methods In a household study, children testing RSV positive by direct immunofluorescent antibody test (DFA were enrolled. Nasal washings were scheduled right away, then every three days until day 14, every 7 days until day 28 and every 2 weeks until a maximum of 16 weeks, or until the first DFA negative RSV specimen. The relationship between host factors, illness severity and viral shedding was investigated using Cox regression methods. Results From 151 families a total of 193 children were enrolled with a median age of 21 months (range 1-164 months, 10% infants and 46% male. The rate of recovery from infection was 0.22/person/day (95% CI 0.19-0.25 equivalent to a mean duration of shedding of 4.5 days (95%CI 4.0-5.3, with a median duration of shedding of 4 days (IQR 2-6, range 1-14. Children with a history of RSV infection had a 40% increased rate of recovery i.e. shorter duration of viral shedding (hazard ratio 1.4, 95% CI 1.01-1.86. The rate of cessation of shedding did not differ significantly between males and females, by severity of infection or by age. Conclusion We provide evidence of a relationship between the duration of shedding and history of infection, which may have a bearing on the relative role of primary versus re-infections in RSV transmission in the community.

  1. Sub-nucleocapsid nanoparticles: a nasal vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus.

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    Xavier Roux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bronchiolitis caused by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV in infants less than two years old is a growing public health concern worldwide, and there is currently no safe and effective vaccine. A major component of RSV nucleocapsid, the nucleoprotein (N, has been so far poorly explored as a potential vaccine antigen, even though it is a target of protective anti-viral T cell responses and is remarkably conserved between human RSV A and B serotypes. We recently reported a method to produce recombinant N assembling in homogenous rings composed of 10-11 N subunits enclosing a bacterial RNA. These nanoparticles were named sub-nucleocapsid ring structure (N SRS. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The vaccine potential of N SRS was evaluated in a well-characterized and widely acknowledged mouse model of RSV infection. BALB/c adult mice were immunized intranasally with N SRS adjuvanted with the detoxified E. coli enterotoxin LT(R192G. Upon RSV challenge, vaccinated mice were largely protected against virus replication in the lungs, with a mild inflammatory lymphocytic and neutrophilic reaction in their airways. Mucosal immunization with N SRS elicited strong local and systemic immunity characterized by high titers of IgG1, IgG2a and IgA anti-N antibodies, antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells and IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+ T cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of using nanoparticles formed by the recombinant nucleocapsid protein as an efficient and safe intra-nasal vaccine against RSV.

  2. Specific dietary oligosaccharides increase Th1 responses in a mouse respiratory syncytial virus infection model.

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    Schijf, Marcel A; Kruijsen, Debby; Bastiaans, Jacqueline; Coenjaerts, Frank E J; Garssen, Johan; van Bleek, Grada M; van't Land, Belinda

    2012-11-01

    Breast feeding reduces the risk of developing severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in infants. In addition to maternal antibodies, other immune-modulating factors in human milk contribute to this protection. Specific dietary prebiotic oligosaccharides, similar to oligosaccharides present in human milk, were evaluated in a C57BL/6 mouse RSV infection model. During primary RSV infection, increased numbers of RSV-specific CD4(+) T cells producing gamma interferon (IFN-γ) were found in the lungs at days 8 to 10 postinfection in mice receiving diet containing short-chain galactooligosacharides, long-chain fructooligosaccharides, and pectin-derived acidic oligosaccharides (termed scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS). In a Th2-skewed formalin-inactivated (FI)-RSV vaccination model, the prebiotic diet reduced RSV-specific Th2 cytokine (interleukin-4 [IL-4], IL-5, and IL-13)-producing CD4(+) T cells in the lung and the magnitude of airway eosinophilia at day 4 and 6 after infection. This was accompanied by a decreased influx of inflammatory dendritic cells (CD11b(+)/CD11c(+)) and increased numbers of IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells at day 8 after viral challenge. These findings suggest that specific dietary oligosaccharides can influence trafficking and/or effector functions of innate immune, CD4(+), and CD8(+) T cell subsets in the lungs of RSV-infected mice. In our models, scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS had no effect on weight but increased viral clearance in FI-RSV-vaccinated mice 8 days after infection. The increased systemic Th1 responses potentiated by scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS might contribute to an accelerated Th1/Th2 shift of the neonatal immune system, which might favor protective immunity against viral infections with a high attack rate in early infancy, such as RSV. PMID:22896622

  3. Modelling the seasonal epidemics of respiratory syncytial virus in young children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah C Moore

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a major cause of paediatric morbidity. Mathematical models can be used to characterise annual RSV seasonal epidemics and are a valuable tool to assess the impact of future vaccines. OBJECTIVES: Construct a mathematical model of seasonal epidemics of RSV and by fitting to a population-level RSV dataset, obtain a better understanding of RSV transmission dynamics. METHODS: We obtained an extensive dataset of weekly RSV testing data in children aged less than 2 years, 2000-2005, for a birth cohort of 245,249 children through linkage of laboratory and birth record datasets. We constructed a seasonally forced compartmental age-structured Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered-Susceptible (SEIRS mathematical model to fit to the seasonal curves of positive RSV detections using the Nelder-Mead method. RESULTS: From 15,830 specimens, 3,394 were positive for RSV. RSV detections exhibited a distinct biennial seasonal pattern with alternating sized peaks in winter months. Our SEIRS model accurately mimicked the observed data with alternating sized peaks using disease parameter values that remained constant across the 6 years of data. Variations in the duration of immunity and recovery periods were explored. The best fit to the data minimising the residual sum of errors was a model using estimates based on previous models in the literature for the infectious period and a slightly lower estimate for the immunity period. CONCLUSIONS: Our age-structured model based on routinely collected population laboratory data accurately captures the observed seasonal epidemic curves. The compartmental SEIRS model, based on several assumptions, now provides a validated base model. Ranges for the disease parameters in the model that could replicate the patterns in the data were identified. Areas for future model developments include fitting climatic variables to the seasonal parameter, allowing parameters to vary according to

  4. Exposure of neonates to Respiratory Syncytial Virus is critical in determining subsequent airway response in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daly Melissa

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common cause of acute bronchiolitis in infants and the elderly. Furthermore, epidemiological data suggest that RSV infection during infancy is a potent trigger of subsequent wheeze and asthma development. However, the mechanism by which RSV contributes to asthma is complex and remains largely unknown. A recent study indicates that the age of initial RSV infection is a key factor in determining airway response to RSV rechallenge. We hypothesized that severe RSV infection during neonatal development significantly alters lung structure and the pulmonary immune micro-environment; and thus, neonatal RSV infection is crucial in the development of or predisposition to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Methods To investigate this hypothesis the present study was conducted in a neonatal mouse model of RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation and airway dysfunction. Seven-day-old mice were infected with RSV (2 × 105 TCID50/g body weight and allowed to mature to adulthood. To determine if neonatal RSV infection predisposed adult animals to enhanced pathophysiological responses to allergens, these mice were then sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Various endpoints including lung function, histopathology, cytokine production, and cellularity in bronchoalveolar lavage were examined. Results RSV infection in neonates alone led to inflammatory airway disease characterized by airway hyperreactivity, peribronchial and perivascular inflammation, and subepithelial fibrosis in adults. If early RSV infection was followed by allergen exposure, this pulmonary phenotype was exacerbated. The initial response to neonatal RSV infection resulted in increased TNF-α levels in bronchoalveolar lavage. Interestingly, increased levels of IL-13 and mucus hyperproduction were observed almost three months after the initial infection with RSV. Conclusion Neonatal RSV exposure results in long term

  5. An adjuvanted respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein induces protection in aged BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherukuri Anu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV causes significant disease in the elderly, in part, because immunosenescence impairs protective immune responses to infection in this population. Despite previous and current efforts, there is no RSV vaccine currently licensed in infants or elderly adults. Adjuvanted RSV subunit vaccines have the potential to boost waning immune responses and reduce the burden of RSV disease in the elderly population. Results We used an aged BALB/c mouse model to evaluate immune responses to RSV Fusion (F protein in the absence and presence of an alum adjuvant. We demonstrate that aged BALB/c mice immunized with alum-adjuvanted RSV F protein had significantly reduced lung viral titers at day 4 following challenge with wild-type (wt RSV. Serum neutralizing antibody titers measured on day 27 correlated with protection in both young and aged vaccinated mice, although the magnitude of antibody titers was lower in aged mice. Unlike young mice, in aged mice, alum-adjuvanted RSV F did not induce lung TH2-type cytokines or eosinophil infiltration compared to non-adjuvanted F protein following wt RSV challenge. Conclusion Our studies demonstrate that neutralizing anti-RSV antibody titers correlate with protection in both young and aged BALB/c mice vaccinated with RSV F protein vaccines. The F + alum formulation mediated greater protection compared to the non-adjuvanted F protein in both young and aged mice. However, while alum can boost F-specific antibody responses in aged mice, it does not completely overcome the reduced ability of a senescent immune system to respond to the RSV F antigen. Thus, our data suggest that a stronger adjuvant may be required for the prevention of RSV disease in immunosenescent populations, to achieve the appropriate balance of protective neutralizing antibodies and effective TH1-type cytokine response along with minimal lung immunopathology.

  6. Respiratory syncytial virus groups A and B in Porto Alegre, Brazil, from 1990 to 1995 and 1998

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    Straliotto Selir M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV groups and their epidemiological pattern that were detected over the course of seven years in southern Brazil. The two RSV groups co-circulated each year, but frequencies of groups A and B varied both between and within yearly outbreaks. In 1991, group A predominated over group B (p=0.0016. RSV outbreaks analyzed showed a temperature-dependent pattern and no association with rainfall, similarly to other countries from southern South America. Knowledge of the variants is important in terms of both diagnosis and definition of a vaccine composition.

  7. The Real-Life Effectiveness of Palivizumab for Reducing Hospital Admissions for Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Infants Residing in Nunavut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Banerji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Nunavut has the highest hospitalization rates for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV worldwide, with rates of 166 per 1000 live births per year <1 year of age. Palivizumab was implemented in Nunavut primarily for premature infants, or those with hemodynamically significant cardiac or chronic lung disease; however, the effectiveness of the program is unknown. The objective of the present multisite, hospital-based surveillance study was to estimate the effectiveness of palivizumab in infants <6 months of age in Nunavut for the 2009 and 2010 RSV seasons.

  8. Veterinary college's researchers receive grant to explore bovine respiratory disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Christy

    2008-01-01

    Dr. Thomas J. Inzana of Blacksburg, Va., the Tyler J. and Frances F. Young Professor of Bacteriology in the Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology in the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech, has been awarded a grant from the United States Department of Agriculture to study the role biofilm plays in the development of Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex.

  9. Comparison of Cepheid Xpert Flu/RSV XC and BioFire FilmArray for Detection of Influenza A, Influenza B, and Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahrenbrock, Mark G; Matushek, Scott; Boonlayangoor, Sue; Tesic, Vera; Beavis, Kathleen G; Charnot-Katsikas, Angella

    2016-07-01

    The Xpert Flu/RSV XC was compared to the FilmArray respiratory panel for detection of influenza (Flu) A, Flu B, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), using 128 nasopharyngeal swabs. Positive agreements were 100% for Flu A and RSV and 92.3% for Flu B. The Xpert may be useful in clinical situations when extensive testing is not required and may serve an important role in laboratories already performing broader respiratory panel testing. PMID:27098956

  10. Elevated temperature triggers human respiratory syncytial virus F protein six-helix bundle formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants, immunocompromised patients, and the elderly. The RSV fusion (F) protein mediates fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane during virus entry and is a primary target for antiviral drug and vaccine development. The F protein contains two heptad repeat regions, HR1 and HR2. Peptides corresponding to these regions form a six-helix bundle structure that is thought to play a critical role in membrane fusion. However, characterization of six-helix bundle formation in native RSV F protein has been hindered by the fact that a trigger for F protein conformational change has yet to be identified. Here we demonstrate that RSV F protein on the surface of infected cells undergoes a conformational change following exposure to elevated temperature, resulting in the formation of the six-helix bundle structure. We first generated and characterized six-helix bundle-specific antibodies raised against recombinant peptides modeling the RSV F protein six-helix bundle structure. We then used these antibodies as probes to monitor RSV F protein six-helix bundle formation in response to a diverse array of potential triggers of conformational changes. We found that exposure of 'membrane-anchored' RSV F protein to elevated temperature (45-55 deg. C) was sufficient to trigger six-helix bundle formation. Antibody binding to the six-helix bundle conformation was detected by both flow cytometry and cell-surface immunoprecipitation of the RSV F protein. None of the other treatments, including interaction with a number of potential receptors, resulted in significant binding by six-helix bundle-specific antibodies. We conclude that native, untriggered RSV F protein exists in a metastable state that can be converted in vitro to the more stable, fusogenic six-helix bundle conformation by an increase in thermal energy. These findings help to better define the mechanism of

  11. Structure-Based Design of Head-Only Fusion Glycoprotein Immunogens for Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyington, Jeffrey C.; Chen, Man; Kong, Wing-Pui; Ngwuta, Joan O.; Thomas, Paul V.; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Chen, Lei; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Ko, Kiyoon; Zhou, Tongqing; Mascola, John R.; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a significant cause of severe respiratory illness worldwide, particularly in infants, young children, and the elderly. Although no licensed vaccine is currently available, an engineered version of the metastable RSV fusion (F) surface glycoprotein—stabilized in the pre-fusion (pre-F) conformation by “DS-Cav1” mutations—elicits high titer RSV-neutralizing responses. Moreover, pre-F-specific antibodies, often against the neutralization-sensitive antigenic site Ø in the membrane-distal head region of trimeric F glycoprotein, comprise a substantial portion of the human response to natural RSV infection. To focus the vaccine-elicited response to antigenic site Ø, we designed a series of RSV F immunogens that comprised the membrane-distal head of the F glycoprotein in its pre-F conformation. These “head-only” immunogens formed monomers, dimers, and trimers. Antigenic analysis revealed that a majority of the 70 engineered head-only immunogens displayed reactivity to site Ø-targeting antibodies, which was similar to that of the parent RSV F DS-Cav1 trimers, often with increased thermostability. We evaluated four of these head-only immunogens in detail, probing their recognition by antibodies, their physical stability, structure, and immunogenicity. When tested in naïve mice, a head-only trimer, half the size of the parent RSV F trimer, induced RSV titers, which were statistically comparable to those induced by DS-Cav1. When used to boost DS-Cav1-primed mice, two head-only RSV F immunogens, a dimer and a trimer, boosted RSV-neutralizing titers to levels that were comparable to those boosted by DS-Cav1, although with higher site Ø-directed responses. Our results provide proof-of-concept for the ability of the smaller head-only RSV F immunogens to focus the vaccine-elicited response to antigenic site Ø. Decent primary immunogenicity, enhanced physical stability, potential ease of manufacture, and potent immunogenicity

  12. Incidence of Medically Attended Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Influenza Illnesses in Children 6–59 Months Old During Four Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Melissa D.; Kieke, Burney A.; Sundaram, Maria E.; McClure, David L.; Meece, Jennifer K.; Sifakis, Frangiscos; Gasser, Robert A.; Belongia, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza are significant causes of seasonal respiratory illness in children. The incidence of influenza and RSV hospitalization is well documented, but the incidence of medically attended, laboratory-confirmed illness has not been assessed in a well defined community cohort. Methods. Children aged 6–59 months with medically attended acute respiratory illness were prospectively enrolled during the 2006–2007 through 2009–2010 influenza seasons in a Wisconsin community cohort. Nasal swabs were tested for RSV and influenza by multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The population incidence of medically attended RSV and influenza was estimated separately and standardized to weeks 40 through 18 of each season. Results. The cohort included 2800–3073 children each season. There were 2384 children enrolled with acute respiratory illness; 627 (26%) were positive for RSV and 314 (13%) for influenza. The mean age was 28 months (standard deviation [SD] = 15) for RSV-positive and 38 months (SD = 16) for influenza-positive children. Seasonal incidence (cases per 10 000) was 1718 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1602–1843) for RSV and 768 (95% CI, 696–848) for influenza. Respiratory syncytial virus incidence was highest among children 6–11 (2927) and 12–23 months old (2377). Influenza incidence was highest (850) in children 24–59 months old. The incidence of RSV was higher than influenza across all seasons and age groups. Conclusions. The incidence of medically attended RSV was highest in children 6–23 months old, and it was consistently higher than influenza. The burden of RSV remains high throughout the first 2 years of life. PMID:27419158

  13. Effect of respiratory syncytial virus on the activity of matrix metalloproteinase in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wen; SHEN Hua-hao

    2007-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common pathogen in the lower respiratory tract of infants and children. Recent studies have shown that in adults, especially in the elderly population who have relatively weak immunity, lower respiratory tract infection is not uncommon. RSV was detected in 22% hospitalized patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and the detection rate was only next to that of parvovirus and influenza virus respectively. Further studies revealed that lung infection of RSV could lead to inflammatory destruction and structural remodeling. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of infection with RSV on matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) in mice, and to explore the role of RSV in the pathogenesis of pulmonary diseases. Methods Twenty BALB/c mice were divided randomly into an RSV infection group and a blank control group. The mice in the RSV infection group were given 100 μl liquid containing 106 PFU of RSV by intranasal instillation. Three days after the infection, the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was harvested and RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to detect MMP-9 and the expression of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 mRNA in lung tissues. Gelatin zymography was employed to detect the activities of MMP-9 and MMP-2 in BALF. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expressions of E-cadherin (E-cd) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the lung tissues. Results In the BALF of the mice infected with RSV, the activities of MMP-9 and MMP-2 were significantly increased (t=6.08, P<0.01 and t=5.68, P<0.01). The levels of mRNA and proteins of MMP-9 in the lung tissues of the mice infected with RSV were significantly elevated, and the mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher than those of the blank controls. Though the ratio of MMP-9/TIMP-1 mRNA in the lung tissues of the infected mice was not significantly different from that of the

  14. Molecular Evolutionary Dynamics of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Group A in Recurrent Epidemics in Coastal Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoti, Charles N.; Gitahi, Caroline W.; Bett, Ann; Ngama, Mwanajuma; Medley, Graham F.; Cane, Patricia A.; Nokes, D. James

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The characteristic recurrent epidemics of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) within communities may result from the genetic variability of the virus and associated evolutionary adaptation, reducing the efficiency of preexisting immune responses. We analyzed the molecular evolutionary changes in the attachment (G) glycoprotein of RSV-A viruses collected over 13 epidemic seasons (2000 to 2012) in Kilifi (n = 649), Kenya, and contemporaneous sequences (n = 1,131) collected elsewhere within Kenya and 28 other countries. Genetic diversity in the G gene in Kilifi was dynamic both within and between epidemics, characterized by frequent new variant introductions and limited variant persistence between consecutive epidemics. Four RSV-A genotypes were detected in Kilifi: ON1 (11.9%), GA2 (75.5%), GA5 (12.3%), and GA3 (0.3%), with predominant genotype replacement of GA5 by GA2 and then GA2 by ON1. Within these genotypes, there was considerable variation in potential N-glycosylation sites, with GA2 and ON1 viruses showing up to 15 different patterns involving eight possible sites. Further, we identified 15 positively selected and 34 genotype-distinguishing codon sites, with six of these sites exhibiting both characteristics. The mean substitution rate of the G ectodomain for the Kilifi data set was estimated at 3.58 × 10−3 (95% highest posterior density interval = 3.04 to 4.16) nucleotide substitutions/site/year. Kilifi viruses were interspersed in the global phylogenetic tree, clustering mostly with Kenyan and European sequences. Our findings highlight ongoing genetic evolution and high diversity of circulating RSV-A strains, locally and globally, with potential antigenic differences. Taken together, these provide a possible explanation on the nature of recurrent local RSV epidemics. IMPORTANCE The mechanisms underlying recurrent epidemics of RSV are poorly understood. We observe high genetic diversity in circulating strains within and between epidemics in

  15. Comparison of rapid immunofluorescence procedure with TestPack RSV and Directigen FLU-A for diagnosis of respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Todd, S J; Minnich, L; Waner, J L

    1995-01-01

    A rapid immunofluorescence format requiring 20 min for completion was as effective as conventional indirect and direct immunofluorescence procedures for detecting respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus antigens in clinical specimens. Rapid immunofluorescence was more sensitive than TestPack RSV and comparable to Directigen FLU-A immunosorbent assays, which require 20 min for completion.

  16. Population based external validation of a European predictive model for respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization of premature infants born 33 to 35 weeks of gestational age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Lone G; Fullarton, John R; Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier;

    2010-01-01

    Prospectively collected population-based data on 2529 Danish infants born at 33 to 35 weeks of gestation were used to validate an European predictive model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalization. The model was found to be robust with a diagnostic accuracy of 65.9% to distinguish bet...

  17. Comparison of rapid immunofluorescence procedure with TestPack RSV and Directigen FLU-A for diagnosis of respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, S J; Minnich, L; Waner, J L

    1995-01-01

    A rapid immunofluorescence format requiring 20 min for completion was as effective as conventional indirect and direct immunofluorescence procedures for detecting respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus antigens in clinical specimens. Rapid immunofluorescence was more sensitive than TestPack RSV and comparable to Directigen FLU-A immunosorbent assays, which require 20 min for completion. PMID:7650206

  18. Comparison of nasopharyngeal aspirate and nasal swab specimens for detection of respiratory syncytial virus in different settings in a developing country

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, L G; Trautner, S; Kofoed, P-E;

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare detection of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) for diagnostic purposes using nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) and nasal swabs (NS) in different clinical settings in a community study in Guinea-Bissau. METHOD: During 1996-98 paired specimens were obtained from 635 children under 5...

  19. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Related Readmission in Preterm Infants Less than 34 weeks' Gestation Following Discharge from a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jang Hoon; Kim, Chun Soo; Chang, Yun Sil; Choi, Jung-Hwan; ,

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to evaluate respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) related readmission (RRR) and risk factors of RRR in preterm infants 1 yr after discharge from the NICU, were enrolled. The average GA and birth weight of the infants was 30+5 ± 2+5 we...

  20. Bovine rhinitis viruses are common in U.S. cattle with bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Ben M; Collin, Emily A; Anderson, Joe; Hesse, Richard A; Anderson, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Bovine rhinitis viruses (BRV) are established etiological agents of bovine respiratory disease complex however little research into their epidemiology and ecology has been published for several decades. In the U.S., only bovine rhinitis A virus 1 (BRAV1) has been identified while bovine rhinitis A virus 2 (BRAV2) and bovine rhinitis B virus (BRBV) were previously only identified in England and Japan, respectively. Metagenomic sequencing of a nasal swab from a bovine respiratory disease (BRD) diagnostic submission from Kansas identified contigs with approximately 90% nucleotide similarity to BRAV2 and BRBV. A combination of de novo and templated assemblies using reference genomes yielded near complete BRAV2 and BRBV genomes. The near complete genome of bovine rhinitis A virus 1 (BRAV1) was also determined from a historical isolate to enable further molecular epidemiological studies. A 5'-nuclease reverse transcription PCR assay targeting the 3D polymerase gene was designed and used to screen 204 archived BRD clinical specimens. Thirteen (6.4%) were positive. Metagenomic sequencing of six positive samples identified mixed BRAV1/BRAV2, BRAV1/BRBV and BRAV2/BRBV infections for five samples. One sample showed infection only with BRAV1. Seroprevalence studies using a cell culture adapted BRBV found immunofluorescence assay-reactive antibodies were common in the herds analyzed. Altogether, these results demonstrate that BRV infections are common in cattle with respiratory disease and that BRAV1, BRAV2 and BRBV co-circulate in U.S. cattle and have high similarity to viruses isolated more than 30 years ago from diverse locations. PMID:25789939

  1. Bovine rhinitis viruses are common in U.S. cattle with bovine respiratory disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben M Hause

    Full Text Available Bovine rhinitis viruses (BRV are established etiological agents of bovine respiratory disease complex however little research into their epidemiology and ecology has been published for several decades. In the U.S., only bovine rhinitis A virus 1 (BRAV1 has been identified while bovine rhinitis A virus 2 (BRAV2 and bovine rhinitis B virus (BRBV were previously only identified in England and Japan, respectively. Metagenomic sequencing of a nasal swab from a bovine respiratory disease (BRD diagnostic submission from Kansas identified contigs with approximately 90% nucleotide similarity to BRAV2 and BRBV. A combination of de novo and templated assemblies using reference genomes yielded near complete BRAV2 and BRBV genomes. The near complete genome of bovine rhinitis A virus 1 (BRAV1 was also determined from a historical isolate to enable further molecular epidemiological studies. A 5'-nuclease reverse transcription PCR assay targeting the 3D polymerase gene was designed and used to screen 204 archived BRD clinical specimens. Thirteen (6.4% were positive. Metagenomic sequencing of six positive samples identified mixed BRAV1/BRAV2, BRAV1/BRBV and BRAV2/BRBV infections for five samples. One sample showed infection only with BRAV1. Seroprevalence studies using a cell culture adapted BRBV found immunofluorescence assay-reactive antibodies were common in the herds analyzed. Altogether, these results demonstrate that BRV infections are common in cattle with respiratory disease and that BRAV1, BRAV2 and BRBV co-circulate in U.S. cattle and have high similarity to viruses isolated more than 30 years ago from diverse locations.

  2. A prospective, open-label, non-comparative study of palivizumab prophylaxis in children at high risk of serious respiratory syncytial virus disease in the Russian Federation

    OpenAIRE

    Turti Tatyana V; Baibarina Elena N; Degtiareva Elena A; Keshishyan Elena S; Lobzin Yurii V; Namazova-Вaranova Leyla S; Prodeus Andrey P; Gudkov Konstantin M; Kruglova Anna I; Schulz Gregory A; Notario Gerard F

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in children globally. Predisposing conditions for the development of serious RSV disease include preterm infants and those with cardiopulmonary illness, including congenital heart disease (CHD) and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). No vaccine is currently approved for the prevention of RSV infection. It is recommended that children at high risk be prophylactically administere...

  3. Respiratory syncytial virus infection is associated with an altered innate immunity and a heightened pro-inflammatory response in the lungs of preterm lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzich JoAnn

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Factors explaining the greater susceptibility of preterm infants to severe lower respiratory infections with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV remain poorly understood. Fetal/newborn lambs are increasingly appreciated as a model to study key elements of RSV infection in newborn infants due to similarities in lung alveolar development, immune response, and susceptibility to RSV. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that preterm lambs had elevated viral antigen and developed more severe lesions compared to full-term lambs at seven days post-infection. Here, we compared the pathogenesis and immunological response to RSV infection in lungs of preterm and full-term lambs. Methods Lambs were delivered preterm by Caesarian section or full-term by natural birth, then inoculated with bovine RSV (bRSV via the intratracheal route. Seven days post-infection, lungs were collected for evaluation of cytokine production, histopathology and cellular infiltration. Results Compared to full-term lambs, lungs of preterm lambs had a heightened pro-inflammatory response after infection, with significantly increased MCP-1, MIP-1α, IFN-γ, TNF-α and PD-L1 mRNA. RSV infection in the preterm lung was characterized by increased epithelial thickening and periodic acid-Schiff staining, indicative of glycogen retention. Nitric oxide levels were decreased in lungs of infected preterm lambs compared to full-term lambs, indicating alternative macrophage activation. Although infection induced significant neutrophil recruitment into the lungs of preterm lambs, neutrophils produced less myeloperoxidase than those of full-term lambs, suggesting decreased functional activation. Conclusions Taken together, our data suggest that increased RSV load and inadequate immune response may contribute to the enhanced disease severity observed in the lungs of preterm lambs.

  4. Ferrets as a Novel Animal Model for Studying Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Immunocompetent and Immunocompromised Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stittelaar, Koert J.; de Waal, Leon; van Amerongen, Geert; Veldhuis Kroeze, Edwin J.B.; Fraaij, Pieter L.A.; van Baalen, Carel A.; van Kampen, Jeroen J.A.; van der Vries, Erhard; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; de Swart, Rik L.

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is an important cause of severe respiratory tract disease in immunocompromised patients. Animal models are indispensable for evaluating novel intervention strategies in this complex patient population. To complement existing models in rodents and non-human primates, we have evaluated the potential benefits of an HRSV infection model in ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Nine- to 12-month-old HRSV-seronegative immunocompetent or immunocompromised ferrets were infected with a low-passage wild-type strain of HRSV subgroup A (105 TCID50) administered by intra-tracheal or intra-nasal inoculation. Immune suppression was achieved by bi-daily oral administration of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisolone. Throat and nose swabs were collected daily and animals were euthanized four, seven, or 21 days post-infection (DPI). Virus loads were determined by quantitative virus culture and qPCR. We observed efficient HRSV replication in both the upper and lower respiratory tract. In immunocompromised ferrets, virus loads reached higher levels and showed delayed clearance as compared to those in immunocompetent animals. Histopathological evaluation of animals euthanized 4 DPI demonstrated that the virus replicated in the respiratory epithelial cells of the trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles. These animal models can contribute to an assessment of the efficacy and safety of novel HRSV intervention strategies. PMID:27314379

  5. Ferrets as a Novel Animal Model for Studying Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Immunocompetent and Immunocompromised Hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koert J. Stittelaar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is an important cause of severe respiratory tract disease in immunocompromised patients. Animal models are indispensable for evaluating novel intervention strategies in this complex patient population. To complement existing models in rodents and non-human primates, we have evaluated the potential benefits of an HRSV infection model in ferrets (Mustela putorius furo. Nine- to 12-month-old HRSV-seronegative immunocompetent or immunocompromised ferrets were infected with a low-passage wild-type strain of HRSV subgroup A (105 TCID50 administered by intra-tracheal or intra-nasal inoculation. Immune suppression was achieved by bi-daily oral administration of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisolone. Throat and nose swabs were collected daily and animals were euthanized four, seven, or 21 days post-infection (DPI. Virus loads were determined by quantitative virus culture and qPCR. We observed efficient HRSV replication in both the upper and lower respiratory tract. In immunocompromised ferrets, virus loads reached higher levels and showed delayed clearance as compared to those in immunocompetent animals. Histopathological evaluation of animals euthanized 4 DPI demonstrated that the virus replicated in the respiratory epithelial cells of the trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles. These animal models can contribute to an assessment of the efficacy and safety of novel HRSV intervention strategies.

  6. Prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infections Prevenção das infecções pelo vírus sincicial respiratório

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Ferro Bricks

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus is the most important cause of viral lower respiratory illness in infants and children worldwide. By the age of 2 years, nearly every child has become infected with respiratory syncytial virus and re-infections are common throughout life. Most infections are mild and can be managed at home, but this virus causes serious diseases in preterm children, especially those with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Respiratory syncytial virus has also been recognized as an important pathogen in people with immunossupressive and other underlying medical problems and institutionalizated elderly, causing thousands of hospitalizations and deaths every year. The burden of these infections makes the development of vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus highly desirable, but the insuccess of a respiratory syncytial virus formalin-inactivated vaccine hampered the progress in this field. To date, there is no vaccine available for preventing respiratory syncytial virus infections, however, in the last years, there has been much progress in the understanding of immunology and immunopathologic mechanisms of respiratory syncytial virus diseases, which has allowed the development of new strategies for passive and active prophylaxis. In this article, the author presents a review about novel approaches to the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infections, such as: passive immunization with human polyclonal intravenous immune globulin and humanized monoclonal antibodies (both already licensed for use in premature infants and children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and many different vaccines that are potential candidates for active immunization against respiratory syncytial virus.Em todo o mundo, o vírus sincicial respiratório é o principal agente de infecções agudas das vias aéreas baixas em lactentes jovens e crianças. Aos dois anos de idade, praticamente todas as crianças já foram infectadas, e as reinfeções são comuns

  7. The effects of disodium cromoglycate on enhanced adherence of Haemophilus influenzae to A549 cells infected with respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukasawa, Chie; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Ogita, Junko; Hishiki, Haruka; Kohno, Yoichi

    2009-08-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) secondary infection often complicates respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections. Previous studies have revealed that RSV infections enhance NTHi adherence to airway epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) and corticosteroids, which are frequently used for the treatment of wheezing often related to RSV infections, on the adherence of NTHi to RSV-infected A549 cells. DSCG inhibited enhanced adherence of NTHi to RSV-infected A549 cells, whereas dexamethasone (Dex) and fluticasone propionate (Fp) did not. DSCG suppressed the expression of ICAM-1, which is one of the NTHi receptors. Furthermore, DSCG exhibited an inhibitory effect on RSV infections. It is suggested that DSCG exerts an anti-RSV effect, and consequently attenuates the expression of NTHi receptors. PMID:19390482

  8. An improved respiratory syncytial virus neutralization assay based on the detection of green fluorescent protein expression and automated plaque counting

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    van Remmerden Yvonne

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virus neutralizing antibodies against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV are considered important correlates of protection for vaccine evaluation. The established plaque reduction assay is time consuming, labor intensive and highly variable. Methods Here, a neutralization assay based on a modified RSV strain expressing the green fluorescent protein in combination with automated detection and quantification of plaques is described. Results The fluorescence plaque reduction assay in microplate format requires only two days to complete and is simple and reproducible. A good correlation between visual and automated counting methods to determine RSV neutralizing serum antibody titers was observed. Conclusions The developed virus neutralization assay is suitable for high-throughput testing and can be used for both animal studies and (large scale vaccine clinical trials.

  9. Experiments toward the development of a radioimmunoassay for the detection of serum antibodies for the respiratory syncytial virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to detect an infection by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) quickly and safely, a radioimmunassay (RIA) should be developed. Various antigen preparations were compared to one another. The immune serums used in the RIA came from guinea pigs with a RSV antibody titer of up to 320 in the complement binding reaction. A number of observations lead to the discussion of the possibility of the formation (incomplete) of cross-reactive antibodies between virus and host cell. This hypothesis could be well supported through references in the literature. Under the assumption of the existence of cross-reactive antibodies, a further model of the pathogenesis of the RSV illness allows itself to be developed, which could be preceived as an illness with autoimmune components. With this model the varying courses of this disease in different age groups can be easily explained. (orig.)

  10. Epidemiologic, socioeconomic, and clinical factors associated with severity of respiratory syncytial virus infection in previously healthy infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somech, Raz; Tal, Guy; Gilad, Eli; Mandelberg, Avigdor; Tal, Asher; Dalal, Ilan

    2006-09-01

    We prospectively quantified disease severity associated with epidemiologic and socioeconomic parameters as well as the clinical factors in 195 previously healthy infants with confirmed respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Infants were enrolled into three subgroups according to disease severity: outpatients (82 patients), inpatients (100 patients), and intensive care unit patients (13 patients). Epidemiologic parameters such as gestational age, birth weight, chronologic age at presentation, and gender as well as socioeconomic factors such as ethnic origin, family history of asthma, exposure to cigarette smoke, number of family members, presence of pets at home, breast-feeding, and day-care attendance were not found to predict the severity of RSV illness in previously healthy infants. Our results emphasize the complexity of predicting disease severity in previously healthy infants with RSV infection and suggest that other parameters such as host genetic background might explain the clinical variability. PMID:16928839

  11. Évaluation expérimentale de l'efficacité d'un candidat vaccin sous-unitaire contre le virus respiratoire syncytial bovin

    OpenAIRE

    Soulestin , Marion

    2009-01-01

    Une étude récente a démontré qu’un candidat vaccin sous unitaire composé d’anneaux formés par la nucléoprotéine recombinante du virus respiratoire syncytial humain (nanoparticules N-SRS) pouvait protéger des souris contre une inoculation d’épreuve (Roux et al., 2008). L’objectif de ce projet était d’évaluer l’efficacité de ce vaccin chez le veau, espèce cible naturelle du virus respiratoire syncytial bovin. Pour cela, 24 veaux séronégatifs vis-à-vis du virus et indemnes d’infectio...

  12. Application of Functional Genomics for Bovine Respiratory Disease Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Aswathy N; Epperson, William B; Nanduri, Bindu

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most common economically important disease affecting cattle. For developing accurate diagnostics that can predict disease susceptibility/resistance and stratification, it is necessary to identify the molecular mechanisms that underlie BRD. To study the complex interactions among the bovine host and the multitude of viral and bacterial pathogens, as well as the environmental factors associated with BRD etiology, genome-scale high-throughput functional genomics methods such as microarrays, RNA-seq, and proteomics are helpful. In this review, we summarize the progress made in our understanding of BRD using functional genomics approaches. We also discuss some of the available bioinformatics resources for analyzing high-throughput data, in the context of biological pathways and molecular interactions. Although resources for studying host response to infection are avail-able, the corresponding information is lacking for majority of BRD pathogens, impeding progress in identifying diagnostic signatures for BRD using functional genomics approaches. PMID:26526746

  13. Short communication. Prevalence of antibodies against Parainfluenza virus type 3, Respiratory syncitial virus and bovine Herpesvirus type 1 in sheep from Northern Prefectures of Japan

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    Massimo Giangaspero

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ovine sera collected in the Prefectures of Hokkaido, Aomori and Iwate in the Northern Japan were examined for the presence of antibodies against Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, bovine Herpesvirus type 1 (infectious bovine rhinotracheitis: IBR and Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3 using serum neutralisation (SN and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA tests. Twenty-three animals (11.73% out of the 196 tested were sero-positive to PIV3. Sixteen animals (8.69% out of the 184 tested reacted to RSV. No animals were positive to IBR antigen. Sero-conversions to PIV3 were detected in Hokkaido and Iwate (14.92% and 8.82%, respectively. Antibodies against RSV were detected in Hokkaido (9.23% and Aomori (14.28%. Although no diagnostic measures were in place, the infections did not appear to be related to any reduction in sheep productivity.

  14. Structures of respiratory syncytial virus nucleocapsid protein from two crystal forms: details of potential packing interactions in the native helical form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structures of the nucleocapsid protein of human respiratory syncytial virus have been obtained from two crystal forms. The packing in one crystal form suggests that ionic interactions contribute to the stability of the native helical form of HRSVN. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a frequent cause of respiratory illness in infants, but there is currently no vaccine nor effective drug treatment against this virus. The RSV RNA genome is encapsidated and protected by a nucleocapsid protein; this RNA–nucleocapsid complex serves as a template for viral replication. Interest in the nucleocapsid protein has increased owing to its recent identification as the target site for novel anti-RSV compounds. The crystal structure of human respiratory syncytial virus nucleocapsid (HRSVN) was determined to 3.6 Å resolution from two crystal forms belonging to space groups P212121 and P1, with one and four decameric rings per asymmetric unit, respectively. In contrast to a previous structure of HRSVN, the addition of phosphoprotein was not required to obtain diffraction-quality crystals. The HRSVN structures reported here, although similar to the recently published structure, present different molecular packing which may have some biological implications. The positions of the monomers are slightly shifted in the decamer, confirming the adaptability of the ring structure. The details of the inter-ring contacts in one crystal form revealed here suggest a basis for helical packing and that the stabilization of native HRSVN is via mainly ionic interactions

  15. Clinical patterns and seasonal trends in respiratory syncytial virus hospitalizations in São Paulo, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Sandra E; Klaus E. STEWIEN; Divina A. O. QUEIROZ; Durigon, Edison L.; Török, Thomas J.; Anderson, Larry J.; MIYAO Cristina R.; Hein, Noely; BOTOSSO Viviane F.; Márcia M. PAHL; Gilio, Alfredo E.; EJZENBERG Bernardo; OKAY Yassuhiko

    2001-01-01

    The respiratory viruses are recognized as the most frequent lower respiratory tract pathogens for infants and young children in developed countries but less is known for developing populations. The authors conducted a prospective study to evaluate the occurrence, clinical patterns, and seasonal trends of viral infections among hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract disease (Group A). The presence of respiratory viruses in children's nasopharyngeal was assessed at admission in a pe...

  16. The incidence and clinical burden of respiratory syncytial virus disease identified through hospital outpatient presentations in Kenyan children.

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    Emelda A Okiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is little information that describe the burden of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV associated disease in the tropical African outpatient setting. METHODS: We studied a systematic sample of children aged <5 years presenting to a rural district hospital in Kenya with acute respiratory infection (ARI between May 2002 and April 2004. We collected clinical data and screened nasal wash samples for RSV antigen by immunofluorescence. We used a linked demographic surveillance system to estimate disease incidence. RESULTS: Among 2143 children tested, 166 (8% were RSV positive (6% among children with upper respiratory tract infection and 12% among children with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI. RSV was more likely in LRTI than URTI (p<0.001. 51% of RSV cases were aged 1 year or over. RSV cases represented 3.4% of hospital outpatient presentations. Relative to RSV negative cases, RSV positive cases were more likely to have crackles (RR = 1.63; 95% CI 1.34-1.97, nasal flaring (RR = 2.66; 95% CI 1.40-5.04, in-drawing (RR = 2.24; 95% CI 1.47-3.40, fast breathing for age (RR = 1.34; 95% CI 1.03-1.75 and fever (RR = 1.54; 95% CI 1.33-1.80. The estimated incidence of RSV-ARI and RSV-LRTI, per 100,000 child years, among those aged <5 years was 767 and 283, respectively. CONCLUSION: The burden of childhood RSV-associated URTI and LRTI presenting to outpatients in this setting is considerable. The clinical features of cases associated with an RSV infection were more severe than cases without an RSV diagnosis.

  17. Detection of influenza vaccine effectiveness among nursery school children: Lesson from a season with cocirculating respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Keiko; Fujieda, Megumi; Miki, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Wakaba; Ohfuji, Satoko; Maeda, Akiko; Kase, Tetsuo; Hirota, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    In the winter influenza epidemic season, patients with respiratory illnesses including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections increase among young children. Therefore, we evaluated the effectiveness of influenza vaccine against influenza-like illness (ILI) using a technique to identify outbreaks of RSV infection and to distinguish those patients from ILI patients. The study subjects were 101 children aged 12 to 84 months attending nursery school. We classified the cases into 6 levels based on the definitions of ILI for outcomes. We established observation periods according to information obtained from regional surveillance and rapid diagnostic tests among children. Multivariate odds ratios (ORs) for each case classification were obtained using a logistic regression model for each observation period. For the entire observation period, ORs for cases with fever plus respiratory symptoms were reduced marginally significantly. For the local influenza epidemic period, only the OR for the most serious cases was significantly decreased (0.20 [95%CI: 0.04-0.94]). During the influenza outbreak among the nursery school children, multivariate ORs for fever plus respiratory symptoms decreased significantly (≥ 38.0°C plus ≥ one symptoms: 0.23 [0.06-0.91), ≥ 38.0°C plus ≥ 2 symptoms: 0.21 [0.05-0.85], ≥ 39.0°C plus ≥ one symptoms: 0.18 [0.04-0.93] and ≥ 39.0°C plus ≥ 2 symptoms: 0.16 [0.03-0.87]). These results suggest that confining observation to the peak influenza epidemic period and adoption of a strict case classification system can minimize outcome misclassification when evaluating the effectiveness of influenza vaccine against ILI, even if influenza and RSV cocirculate in the same season. PMID:25714791

  18. Clinical and epidemiological aspects related to the detection of adenovirus or respiratory syncytial virus in infants hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo A. Ferone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize and compare clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory aspects ofinfants with acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI associated with the detection of adenovirus(ADV or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV. METHODS: A preliminary respiratory infection surveillance study collected samples of nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA for viral research, linked to the completion of a standard protocol, from children younger than two years admitted to a university hospital with ALRI, between March of 2008 and August of 2011. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used for eight viruses: ADV, RSV, metapneumovirus, Parainfluenza 1, 2, and 3, and Influenza A and B. Cases with NPA collectedduring the first 24 hours of admission, negative results of blood culture, and exclusive detection of ADV (Gadv group or RSV (Grsv group were selected for comparisons. RESULTS: The preliminary study included collection of 1,121 samples of NPA, 813 collected in thefirst 24 hours of admission, of which 50.3% were positive for at least one virus; RSV was identifiedin 27.3% of cases surveyed, and ADV was identified in 15.8%. Among the aspects analyzed inthe Gadv (n = 58 and Grsv (n = 134 groups, the following are noteworthy: the higher meanage, more frequent prescription of antibiotics, and the highest median of total white blood cellcount and C-reactive protein values in Gadv. CONCLUSIONS: PCR can detect persistent/latent forms of ADV, an aspect to be considered wheninterpreting results. Additional studies with quantitative diagnostic techniques could elucidatethe importance of the high frequency observed.

  19. Cyclopiazonic acid, an inhibitor of calcium-dependent ATPases with antiviral activity against human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Rui; Wang, Yizhuo; Wang, Liu; Li, Guiming; Lan, Ke; Altmeyer, Ralf; Zou, Gang

    2016-08-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children worldwide, yet no vaccine or effective antiviral treatment is available. To search for new anti-RSV agents, we developed a cell-based assay that measures inhibition of RSV-induced cytopathic effect (CPE) and identified cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), an intracellular calcium ATPase inhibitor as a RSV inhibitor (EC50 values 4.13 μM) by screening of natural product library. CPA inhibited the replication of RSV strains belonging to both A and B subgroups and human parainfluenza virus type 3, but not Enterovirus 71. Mechanism of action study by time-of-addition assay and minigenome assay revealed that CPA acts at the step of virus genome replication and/or transcription. Moreover, two other calcium ATPase inhibitors (Thapsigargin and BHQ) and calcium ionophores (A23187 and ionomycin), but not calcium channel blockers (nifedipine, nimodipine, and tetrandrine), also had similar effect. These results indicate that an increase in intracellular calcium concentration is detrimental to RSV replication. Thus, our findings provide a new strategy for anti-RSV therapy via increasing intracellular calcium concentration. PMID:27210812

  20. Seasonal incidence of medically attended respiratory syncytial virus infection in a community cohort of adults ≥50 years old.

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    David L McClure

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diagnostic testing for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is not routinely performed in adults. We estimated medically attended RSV seasonal incidence in a community cohort of adults ≥50 years old during four influenza seasons (2006-07 through 2009-10. METHODS: Patients seeking care for acute respiratory illness (ARI were prospectively enrolled and tested for RSV by multiplex RT-PCR. Results from enrolled patients were used to estimate projected cases among non-enrolled patients with ARI. The seasonal incidence of medically attended RSV was the sum of actual and projected cases divided by the community cohort denominator. Since each enrollment period did not include the entire RSV season, incidence estimates were adjusted to account for the statewide proportion of RSV occurring outside the study enrollment period. RESULTS: There were 16,088 to 17,694 adults in the cohort each season and 164 RSV cases in all 4 seasons. The overall seasonal incidence of medically attended RSV was 154 episodes (95% CI, 132-180 per 10,000 persons; the incidence was highest in 2007-08 (179 and lowest in 2006-07 (110. Among persons 50-59, 60-69, and ≥70 years old, RSV incidence was 124 (95% CI, 99-156, 147 (95% CI, 110-196, and 199 (95% CI, 153-258, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of medically attended RSV increased with age and was similar during four seasons.

  1. Positive selection results in frequent reversible amino acid replacements in the G protein gene of human respiratory syncytial virus.

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    Viviane F Botosso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children under 5 years of age and the elderly, causing annual disease outbreaks during the fall and winter. Multiple lineages of the HRSVA and HRSVB serotypes co-circulate within a single outbreak and display a strongly temporal pattern of genetic variation, with a replacement of dominant genotypes occurring during consecutive years. In the present study we utilized phylogenetic methods to detect and map sites subject to adaptive evolution in the G protein of HRSVA and HRSVB. A total of 29 and 23 amino acid sites were found to be putatively positively selected in HRSVA and HRSVB, respectively. Several of these sites defined genotypes and lineages within genotypes in both groups, and correlated well with epitopes previously described in group A. Remarkably, 18 of these positively selected tended to revert in time to a previous codon state, producing a "flip-flop" phylogenetic pattern. Such frequent evolutionary reversals in HRSV are indicative of a combination of frequent positive selection, reflecting the changing immune status of the human population, and a limited repertoire of functionally viable amino acids at specific amino acid sites.

  2. Respiratory syncytial virus matrix protein induces lung epithelial cell cycle arrest through a p53 dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Tao; Gibbs, John D; Örvell, Claes; Imani, Farhad

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of viral respiratory infections in children. Our previous study showed that the RSV infection induced lung epithelial cell cycle arrest, which enhanced virus replication. To address the mechanism of RSV-induced cell cycle arrest, we examined the contribution of RSV-matrix (RSV-M) protein. In this report, we show that in both the A549 cell line and primary human bronchial epithelial (PHBE) cells, transfection with RSV-M protein caused the cells to proliferate at a slower rate than in control cells. The cell cycle analysis showed that RSV-M protein induced G1 phase arrest in A549 cells, and G1 and G2/M phase arrest in PHBE cells. Interestingly, RSV-M expression induced p53 and p21 accumulation and decreased phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb). Further, induction of cell cycle arrest by RSV-M was not observed in a p53-deficient epithelial cell line (H1299). However, cell cycle arrest was restored after transfection of p53 cDNA into H1299 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that RSV-M protein regulates lung epithelial cell cycle through a p53-dependent pathway, which enhances RSV replication. PMID:22662266

  3. Respiratory syncytial virus matrix protein induces lung epithelial cell cycle arrest through a p53 dependent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Bian

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the major cause of viral respiratory infections in children. Our previous study showed that the RSV infection induced lung epithelial cell cycle arrest, which enhanced virus replication. To address the mechanism of RSV-induced cell cycle arrest, we examined the contribution of RSV-matrix (RSV-M protein. In this report, we show that in both the A549 cell line and primary human bronchial epithelial (PHBE cells, transfection with RSV-M protein caused the cells to proliferate at a slower rate than in control cells. The cell cycle analysis showed that RSV-M protein induced G1 phase arrest in A549 cells, and G1 and G2/M phase arrest in PHBE cells. Interestingly, RSV-M expression induced p53 and p21 accumulation and decreased phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb. Further, induction of cell cycle arrest by RSV-M was not observed in a p53-deficient epithelial cell line (H1299. However, cell cycle arrest was restored after transfection of p53 cDNA into H1299 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that RSV-M protein regulates lung epithelial cell cycle through a p53-dependent pathway, which enhances RSV replication.

  4. Independent lung ventilation in a newborn with asymmetric acute lung injury due to respiratory syncytial virus: a case report

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    Di Nardo Matteo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Independent lung ventilation is a form of protective ventilation strategy used in adult asymmetric acute lung injury, where the application of conventional mechanical ventilation can produce ventilator-induced lung injury and ventilation-perfusion mismatch. Only a few experiences have been published on the use of independent lung ventilation in newborn patients. Case presentation We present a case of independent lung ventilation in a 16-day-old infant of 3.5 kg body weight who had an asymmetric lung injury due to respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis. We used independent lung ventilation applying conventional protective pressure controlled ventilation to the less-compromised lung, with a respiratory frequency proportional to the age of the patient, and a pressure controlled high-frequency ventilation to the atelectatic lung. This was done because a single tube conventional ventilation protective strategy would have exposed the less-compromised lung to a high mean airways pressure. The target of independent lung ventilation is to provide adequate gas exchange at a safe mean airways pressure level and to expand the atelectatic lung. Independent lung ventilation was accomplished for 24 hours. Daily chest radiograph and gas exchange were used to evaluate the efficacy of independent lung ventilation. Extubation was performed after 48 hours of conventional single-tube mechanical ventilation following independent lung ventilation. Conclusion This case report demonstrates the feasibility of independent lung ventilation with two separate tubes in neonates as a treatment of an asymmetric acute lung injury.

  5. Prevalence and clinical features of respiratory syncytial virus in children hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia in northern Brazil

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    Lamarão Letícia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood pneumonia and bronchiolitis is a leading cause of illness and death in young children worldwide with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV as the main viral cause. RSV has been associated with annual respiratory disease outbreaks and bacterial co-infection has also been reported. This study is the first RSV epidemiological study in young children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in Belém city, Pará (Northern Brazil. Methods With the objective of determining the prevalence of RSV infection and evaluating the patients’ clinical and epidemiological features, we conducted a prospective study across eight hospitals from November 2006 to October 2007. In this study, 1,050 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples were obtained from hospitalized children up to the age of three years with CAP, and tested for RSV antigen by direct immunofluorescence assay and by Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR for RSV Group identification. Results RSV infection was detected in 243 (23.1% children. The mean age of the RSV-positive group was lower than the RSV-negative group (12.1 months vs 15.5 months, pppppp Conclusion The present study highlights the relevance of RSV infection in hospitalized cases of CAP in our region; our findings warrant the conduct of further investigations which can help design strategies for controlling the disease.

  6. Biomarkers of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection: specific neutrophil and cytokine levels provide increased accuracy in predicting disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Paul M; Schneeberger, Dana L; Piedimonte, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    Despite fundamental advances in the research on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) since its initial identification almost 60 years ago, recurring failures in developing vaccines and pharmacologic strategies effective in controlling the infection have allowed RSV to become a leading cause of global infant morbidity and mortality. Indeed, the burden of this infection on families and health care organizations worldwide continues to escalate and its financial costs are growing. Furthermore, strong epidemiologic evidence indicates that early-life lower respiratory tract infections caused by RSV lead to the development of recurrent wheezing and childhood asthma. While some progress has been made in the identification of reliable biomarkers for RSV bronchiolitis, a "one size fits all" biomarker capable of accurately and consistently predicting disease severity and post-acute outcomes has yet to be discovered. Therefore, it is of great importance on a global scale to identify useful biomarkers for this infection that will allow pediatricians to cost-effectively predict the clinical course of the disease, as well as monitor the efficacy of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26074450

  7. The preventive effect of vaccine prophylaxis on severe respiratory syncytial virus infection:A meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tongna; Zhu; Chuanlong; Zhang; Li; Yu; Jingxian; Chen; Huan; Qiu; Weiwei; Lyu; Shenghai; Huang

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus(RSV) is the key underlying cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection in infants; however, no licensed vaccine against RSV infection is currently available. This study was undertaken to assess the preventive effect of vaccine on RSV infection. In this metaanalysis, 1,792 published randomized clinical trials of RSV vaccines from Jan 1973 to Sep 2015 were examined. Among thirteen studies that met the inclusion criteria, eleven studies estimated the impact of RSV vaccines and four studies estimated the effect of adjuvants. The odds ratios(ORs) were 0.31(95% CI, 0.15–0.67) and 0.62(95% CI, 0.29–1.34), respectively. We found that RSV subunit vaccines can significantly reduce the incidence of RSV infection and that whether vaccination with adjuvant therapy was an effective strategy still remained to be studied. This analysis of the preventive effect of vaccines on RSV infection has direct applications for the prevention of RSV infections.

  8. Human cytotoxic T cells stimulated by antigen on dendritic cells recognize the N, SH, F, M, 22K, and 1b proteins of respiratory syncytial virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Cherrie, A H; Anderson, K.; Wertz, G W; Openshaw, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the human cytotoxic T-cell repertoire of nine adults to 9 of the 10 proteins of respiratory syncytial (RS) virus. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from normal adults were stimulated with RS virus in vitro. The resulting polyclonal cultures were tested for lysis of B-lymphoblastoid cell lines infected with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing each of nine individual RS virus proteins. The use of peripheral blood dendritic cells to present antigen gave more easily reproducible ...

  9. Prospective and retrospective evaluation of the Cepheid Xpert® Flu/RSV XC assay for rapid detection of influenza A, influenza B, and respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salez, Nicolas; Nougairede, Antoine; Ninove, Laetitia; Zandotti, Christine; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Charrel, Remi N

    2015-04-01

    A total of 281 clinical specimens (nasal swabs and nasopharyngeal aspirates) were tested with the Xpert® Flu/RSV XC. The results were compared to those obtained with the real-time retro transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assays routinely used in our laboratory. The Xpert® Flu/RSV XC showed sensitivity/specificity of 97.8%/100% and 97.9%/100% for flu and respiratory syncytial virus, respectively. PMID:25662018

  10. Modeling the Potential Impact of the 2014 American Academy of Pediatrics Respiratory Syncytial Virus Prophylaxis Guidance on Preterm Infant RSV Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    McLaurin, Kimmie K.; Chatterjee, Archana; Makari, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Committee on Infectious Diseases issued updated guidance on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) prophylaxis in 2014. This report models the potential impact of the new guidance on RSV outcomes in preterm infants 29–34 weeks’ gestational age (wGA) without chronic lung disease in the United States. Methods The number of preterm infants was estimated using 2012 natality data. Palivizumab utilization prior to the 2014 guidance update was estimat...

  11. The first two nucleotides of the respiratory syncytial virus antigenome RNA replication product can be selected independently of the promoter terminus

    OpenAIRE

    Noton, Sarah L.; Fearns, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which unsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses initiate genome replication is poorly understood. Using respiratory syncytial virus as an example, this paper shows that RSV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase can correctly initiate antigenome synthesis even if the first two nucleotides of the template are deleted. The nontemplated addition of the nucleotides suggests a model for how the RSV polymerase initiates antigenome synthesis.

  12. Inflammation and emphysema in cigarette smoke-exposed mice when instilled with poly (I:C) or infected with influenza A or respiratory syncytial viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Mebratu, Yohannes A.; Smith, Kevin R.; Agga, Getahun E.; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes

    2016-01-01

    Background The length of time for cigarette smoke (CS) exposure to cause emphysema in mice is drastically reduced when CS exposure is combined with viral infection. However, the extent of inflammatory responses and lung pathologies of mice exposed to CS and infected with influenza A virus (IAV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), or treated with the viral derivative dsRNA (polyinosine-polycytidylic acid [poly (I:C)] have not been compared. Methods Mice were exposed to CS or filtered air for 4...

  13. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Induces a Reactive Oxygen Species-MSK1-Phospho-Ser-276 RelA Pathway Required for Cytokine Expression▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Tian, Bing; Boldogh, Istvan; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Allan R Brasier

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a human pathogen that induces airway inflammation, at least in part, by modulating gene expression programs in airway epithelial cells. The presence of RSV replication is detected by the intracellular retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) RNA helicase that forms a productive signaling complex with the mitochondrion-anchored MAVS protein, resulting in nuclear translocation of the NF-κB transcription factor. Although nuclear translocation is a prerequisite ...

  14. Persistent recurring wheezing in the fifth year of life after laboratory-confirmed, medically attended respiratory syncytial virus infection in infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Escobar, Gabriel J; Masaquel, Anthony S; Li, Sherian X; Walsh, Eileen M.; Kipnis, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in infancy is associated with subsequent recurrent wheezing. Methods A retrospective cohort study examined children born at ≥32 weeks gestation between 1996–2004. All children were enrolled in an integrated health care delivery system in Northern California and were followed through the fifth year of life. The primary endpoint was recurrent wheezing in the fifth year of life and its association with laboratory-confirmed, medically-attende...

  15. Long-Term Shedding of Influenza Virus, Parainfluenza Virus, Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Nosocomial Epidemiology in Patients with Hematological Disorders.

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    Nicola Lehners

    Full Text Available Respiratory viruses are a cause of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI, but can be associated with severe lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI in immunocompromised patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic variability of influenza virus, parainfluenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and the duration of viral shedding in hematological patients. Nasopharyngeal swabs from hematological patients were screened for influenza, parainfluenza and RSV on admission as well as on development of respiratory symptoms. Consecutive swabs were collected until viral clearance. Out of 672 tested patients, a total of 111 patients (17% were infected with one of the investigated viral agents: 40 with influenza, 13 with parainfluenza and 64 with RSV; six patients had influenza/RSV or parainfluenza/RSV co-infections. The majority of infected patients (n = 75/111 underwent stem cell transplantation (42 autologous, 48 allogeneic, 15 autologous and allogeneic. LRTI was observed in 48 patients, of whom 15 patients developed severe LRTI, and 13 patients with respiratory tract infection died. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a variety of influenza A(H1N1pdm09, A(H3N2, influenza B, parainfluenza 3 and RSV A, B viruses. RSV A was detected in 54 patients, RSV B in ten patients. The newly emerging RSV A genotype ON1 predominated in the study cohort and was found in 48 (75% of 64 RSV-infected patients. Furthermore, two distinct clusters were detected for RSV A genotype ON1, identical RSV G gene sequences in these patients are consistent with nosocomial transmission. Long-term viral shedding for more than 30 days was significantly associated with prior allogeneic transplantation (p = 0.01 and was most pronounced in patients with RSV infection (n = 16 with a median duration of viral shedding for 80 days (range 35-334 days. Long-term shedding of respiratory viruses might be a catalyzer of nosocomial transmission and must be considered for

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus inhibits ciliagenesis in differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells: effectiveness of N-acetylcysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Manuel; Sarrion, Irene; Armengot, Miguel; Carda, Carmen; Martinez, Isidoro; Melero, Jose A; Cortijo, Julio

    2012-01-01

    Persistent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections have been associated with the exacerbation of chronic inflammatory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This virus infects the respiratory epithelium, leading to chronic inflammation, and induces the release of mucins and the loss of cilia activity, two factors that determine mucus clearance and the increase in sputum volume. These alterations involve reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanisms. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has proven useful in the management of COPD, reducing symptoms, exacerbations, and accelerated lung function decline. NAC inhibits RSV infection and mucin release in human A549 cells. The main objective of this study was to analyze the effects of NAC in modulating ciliary activity, ciliagenesis, and metaplasia in primary normal human bronchial epithelial cell (NHBEC) cultures infected with RSV. Our results indicated that RSV induced ultrastructural abnormalities in axonemal basal bodies and decreased the expression of β-tubulin as well as two genes involved in ciliagenesis, FOXJ1 and DNAI2. These alterations led to a decrease in ciliary activity. Furthermore, RSV induced metaplastic changes to the epithelium and increased the number of goblet cells and the expression of MUC5AC and GOB5. NAC restored the normal functions of the epithelium, inhibiting ICAM1 expression, subsequent RSV infection through mechanisms involving nuclear receptor factor 2, and the expression of heme oxygenase 1, which correlated with the restoration of the antioxidant capacity, the intracellular H(2)O(2) levels and glutathione content of NHBECs. The results presented in this study support the therapeutic use of NAC for the management of chronic respiratory diseases, including COPD. PMID:23118923

  17. Core bead chromatography for preparation of highly pure, infectious respiratory syncytial virus in the negative purification mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundle, Sophia T; Kishko, Michael; Groppo, Rachel; DiNapoli, Joshua; Hamberger, John; McNeil, Bryan; Kleanthous, Harry; Parrington, Mark; Zhang, Linong; Anderson, Stephen F

    2016-07-12

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important human pathogen, and is the most frequent viral cause of severe respiratory disease in infants. In addition, it is increasingly being recognized as an important cause of respiratory disease in the elderly and immunocompromised. Although a passive prophylactic treatment does exist for high-risk neonates and children, the overall disease burden warrants the development of a safe and effective prophylactic vaccine for use in otherwise healthy newborns and children. RSV is known to be an extremely labile virus, prone to aggregation and loss of infectious titer during virus handling and preparation procedures. To date infective RSV virions have been prepared by methods which are not readily scalable, such as density gradient ultracentrifugation. In this study we describe a scalable, chromatography-based purification procedure for preparation of highly pure, infectious RSV. The purification scheme is based on core bead technology and hollow fiber tangential flow filtration (TFF) and results in a ∼60% recovery of infectious virus titer. This method can be used to prepare highly purified wild type or live-attenuated vaccine strain viruses with titers as high as 1×10(8) plaque forming units per mL. A live-attenuated RSV vaccine prepared by this method was found to be immunogenic and protective in vivo, and its purity was 50-200-fold greater with respect to host cell dsDNA and Vero host cell proteins, than the raw feed stream. The results presented here can be considered a starting point for downstream process development of a live-attenuated vaccine approach for prevention of disease by RSV. PMID:27238375

  18. Respiratory syncytial virus inhibits ciliagenesis in differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells: effectiveness of N-acetylcysteine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Mata

    Full Text Available Persistent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infections have been associated with the exacerbation of chronic inflammatory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. This virus infects the respiratory epithelium, leading to chronic inflammation, and induces the release of mucins and the loss of cilia activity, two factors that determine mucus clearance and the increase in sputum volume. These alterations involve reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanisms. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC has proven useful in the management of COPD, reducing symptoms, exacerbations, and accelerated lung function decline. NAC inhibits RSV infection and mucin release in human A549 cells. The main objective of this study was to analyze the effects of NAC in modulating ciliary activity, ciliagenesis, and metaplasia in primary normal human bronchial epithelial cell (NHBEC cultures infected with RSV. Our results indicated that RSV induced ultrastructural abnormalities in axonemal basal bodies and decreased the expression of β-tubulin as well as two genes involved in ciliagenesis, FOXJ1 and DNAI2. These alterations led to a decrease in ciliary activity. Furthermore, RSV induced metaplastic changes to the epithelium and increased the number of goblet cells and the expression of MUC5AC and GOB5. NAC restored the normal functions of the epithelium, inhibiting ICAM1 expression, subsequent RSV infection through mechanisms involving nuclear receptor factor 2, and the expression of heme oxygenase 1, which correlated with the restoration of the antioxidant capacity, the intracellular H(2O(2 levels and glutathione content of NHBECs. The results presented in this study support the therapeutic use of NAC for the management of chronic respiratory diseases, including COPD.

  19. RelA Ser276 Phosphorylation-Coupled Lys310 Acetylation Controls Transcriptional Elongation of Inflammatory Cytokines in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Allan R Brasier; Tian, B.; Jamaluddin, M; Kalita, Mridul K.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Lu, Muping

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus responsible for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in humans. In experimental models of RSV LRTI, the actions of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) transcription factor mediate inflammation and pathology. We have shown that RSV replication induces a mitogen-and-stress-related kinase 1 (MSK-1) pathway that activates NF-κB RelA transcriptional activity by a process involving serine phosphorylation at serine (Ser)...

  20. Acute lower respiratory tract infection due to respiratory syncytial virus in a group of Egyptian children under 5 years of age

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    El-kholy Amany A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aim Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is one of the most important causes of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTI in infants and young children. This study was conducted to describe the epidemiology of ALRTI associated with RSV among children ≤ 5 years old in Egypt. Patients and Methods We enrolled 427 children ≤ 5 years old diagnosed with ALRTI attending the outpatient clinic or Emergency Department (ED of Children Hospital, Cairo University during a one- year period. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained from the patients, kept on ice and processed within 2 hours of collection. Immunoflourescent assay (IFA for RSV was performed. Results 91 cases (21.3% had viral etiology with RSV antigens detected in 70 cases (16.4%. The RSV positive cases were significantly younger than other non-RSV cases (mean age 8.2 months versus 14.2 months, p Conclusion RSV is the most common viral etiology of ALRTI in children below 5 years of age, especially in young infants below 6 months of age. It is more prevalent in winter and tends to cause severe infection.

  1. The relationship between the occurrence of undifferentiated bovine respiratory disease and titer changes to bovine coronavirus and bovine viral diarrhea virus in 3 Ontario feedlots.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, A; Martin, S W; Nagy, E.; Menzies, P; Harland, R

    2001-01-01

    Serological evidence of previous viral exposure (titer at arrival) and current viral exposure (titer increase) during a 28-day study period, was used to determine if bovine coronavirus (BCV) or bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) was associated with the occurrence of undifferentiated bovine respiratory disease (UBRD) in feedlot calves. Neutralizing antibody titers to BCV and BVDV were determined for 852 animals from 3 Ontario feedlots. Calves at 2 of the 3 feedlots (n = 753) received a modifie...

  2. Kinetics of antibody-induced modulation of respiratory syncytial virus antigens in a human epithelial cell line

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    Gómez-Garcia Beatriz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of viral-specific antibodies to cell-surface antigens usually results in down modulation of the antigen through redistribution of antigens into patches that subsequently may be internalized by endocytosis or may form caps that can be expelled to the extracellular space. Here, by use of confocal-laser-scanning microscopy we investigated the kinetics of the modulation of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV antigen by RSV-specific IgG. RSV-infected human epithelial cells (HEp-2 were incubated with anti-RSV polyclonal IgG and, at various incubation times, the RSV-cell-surface-antigen-antibody complexes (RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins were detected by indirect immunoflourescence. Results Interaction of anti-RSV polyclonal IgG with RSV HEp-2 infected cells induced relocalization and aggregation of viral glycoproteins in the plasma membrane formed patches that subsequently produced caps or were internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis participation. Moreover, the concentration of cell surface RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins showed a time dependent cyclic variation and that anti-RSV IgG protected HEp-2 cells from viral-induced death. Conclusion The results from this study indicate that interaction between RSV cell surface proteins and specific viral antibodies alter the expression of viral antigens expressed on the cells surface and intracellular viral proteins; furthermore, interfere with viral induced destruction of the cell.

  3. Vaccination against respiratory syncytial virus in pregnancy: a suitable tool to combat global infant morbidity and mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saso, Anja; Kampmann, Beate

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important viral cause of pneumonia in early childhood (ie, younger than 2 years), responsible for high infant morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is widely accepted that an effective vaccine against RSV would have a major impact on child health globally. Despite the setbacks of the clinical trials in the 1960s, there has been a recent and significant revival of interest in vaccines against RSV, with several promising candidates undergoing evaluation. In this Review, we describe the epidemiological and immunological background to RSV infection and subsequently focus on the promising pipeline of RSV vaccine development. We discuss the potential for implementation of a safe and immunogenic RSV vaccine within the context of global health and with regards to a range of strategies, including vaccination of women during pregnancy, which is likely to emerge as a beneficial and feasible public health tool. This approach would provide interim protection to vulnerable, RSV-naive infants and other high risk groups, in which the burden of admission to hospital and death is greatest. Extending research and implementation from resource-rich to resource-poor settings is required to enhance our understanding of RSV immunity and inform vaccine development and delivery strategies for all settings. We summarise key outstanding issues for researchers and policy makers to understand the interplay of biological and non-biological factors affecting design and distribution of a successful RSV vaccine globally. PMID:27317449

  4. A Preliminary Assessment of the Role of Ambient Nitric Oxide Exposure in Hospitalization with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Bronchiolitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Nuredin I.; Everard, Mark L.; Ayres, Jon G.; Barker, Nicola J.; Litchfield, Ian J.

    2016-01-01

    Some in vitro studies have indicated a possible link between respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and exposure to Nitric Oxide (NO). However, these studies used much higher NO concentrations than normally found in the ambient environment. This preliminary study explored whether an association was present with short-term exposure to NO in the environment. RSV-related admission data between November 2011 and February 2012 were obtained from Sheffield Children’s Hospital. The dates of admission were linked to contemporaneous ambient NO derived from sentinel air monitors. The case-crossover design was used to study the relationship between daily RSV admissions and NO, controlling for temperature and relative humidity. We found little evidence of association between daily RSV admission rates and exposure to ambient NO at different lags or average exposure across several lags. The findings should, however, be viewed with caution due to the low number of events observed during the time frame. It is possible that the apparent lack of association may be accounted for by the timing of the seasonal RSV epidemic in relation to peaks in NO concentrations. A larger study incorporating a wider range of RSV and NO peaks would determine whether said peaks enhanced the number of RSV hospitalizations in children. PMID:27294948

  5. Contribution of cysteine residues in the extracellular domain of the F protein of human respiratory syncytial virus to its function

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    Melero José A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mature F protein of all known isolates of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV contains fifteen absolutely conserved cysteine (C residues that are highly conserved among the F proteins of other pneumoviruses as well as the paramyxoviruses. To explore the contribution of the cysteines in the extracellular domain to the fusion activity of HRSV F protein, each cysteine was changed to serine. Mutation of cysteines 37, 313, 322, 333, 343, 358, 367, 393, 416, and 439 abolished or greatly reduced cell surface expression suggesting these residues are critical for proper protein folding and transport to the cell surface. As expected, the fusion activity of these mutations was greatly reduced or abolished. Mutation of cysteine residues 212, 382, and 422 had little to no effect upon cell surface expression or fusion activity at 32°C, 37°C, or 39.5°C. Mutation of C37 and C69 in the F2 subunit either abolished or reduced cell surface expression by 75% respectively. None of the mutations displayed a temperature sensitive phenotype.

  6. A Preliminary Assessment of the Role of Ambient Nitric Oxide Exposure in Hospitalization with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Bronchiolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuredin I. Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Some in vitro studies have indicated a possible link between respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection and exposure to Nitric Oxide (NO. However, these studies used much higher NO concentrations than normally found in the ambient environment. This preliminary study explored whether an association was present with short-term exposure to NO in the environment. RSV-related admission data between November 2011 and February 2012 were obtained from Sheffield Children’s Hospital. The dates of admission were linked to contemporaneous ambient NO derived from sentinel air monitors. The case-crossover design was used to study the relationship between daily RSV admissions and NO, controlling for temperature and relative humidity. We found little evidence of association between daily RSV admission rates and exposure to ambient NO at different lags or average exposure across several lags. The findings should, however, be viewed with caution due to the low number of events observed during the time frame. It is possible that the apparent lack of association may be accounted for by the timing of the seasonal RSV epidemic in relation to peaks in NO concentrations. A larger study incorporating a wider range of RSV and NO peaks would determine whether said peaks enhanced the number of RSV hospitalizations in children.

  7. Structure of a Major Antigenic Site on the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in Complex with Neutralizing Antibody 101F

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    McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Man; Chang, Jung-San; Yang, Yongping; Kim, Albert; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D. (NIH)

    2010-11-19

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in infants and elderly people. Currently there is no effective vaccine against RSV, but passive prophylaxis with neutralizing antibodies reduces hospitalizations. To investigate the mechanism of antibody-mediated RSV neutralization, we undertook structure-function studies of monoclonal antibody 101F, which binds a linear epitope in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Crystal structures of the 101F antigen-binding fragment in complex with peptides from the fusion glycoprotein defined both the extent of the linear epitope and the interactions of residues that are mutated in antibody escape variants. The structure allowed for modeling of 101F in complex with trimers of the fusion glycoprotein, and the resulting models suggested that 101F may contact additional surfaces located outside the linear epitope. This hypothesis was supported by surface plasmon resonance experiments that demonstrated 101F bound the peptide epitope {approx}16,000-fold more weakly than the fusion glycoprotein. The modeling also showed no substantial clashes between 101F and the fusion glycoprotein in either the pre- or postfusion state, and cell-based assays indicated that 101F neutralization was not associated with blocking virus attachment. Collectively, these results provide a structural basis for RSV neutralization by antibodies that target a major antigenic site on the fusion glycoprotein.

  8. Structural and Nonstructural Viral Proteins Are Targets of T-Helper Immune Response against Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Elena; Barriga, Alejandro; Barnea, Eilon; Mir, Carmen; Gebe, John A; Admon, Arie; López, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Proper antiviral humoral and cellular immune responses require previous recognition of viral antigenic peptides that are bound to HLA class II molecules, which are exposed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. The helper immune response is critical for the control and the clearance of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infection, a virus with severe health risk in infected pediatric, immunocompromised, and elderly populations. In this study, using a mass spectrometry analysis of complex HLA class II-bound peptide pools that were isolated from large amounts of HRSV-infected cells, 19 naturally processed HLA-DR ligands, most of them included in a complex nested set of peptides, were identified. Both the immunoprevalence and the immunodominance of the HLA class II response to HRSV were focused on one nonstructural (NS1) and two structural (matrix and mainly fusion) proteins of the infective virus. These findings have clear implications for analysis of the helper immune response as well as for antiviral vaccine design. PMID:27090790

  9. Olfactomedin 4 Serves as a Marker for Disease Severity in Pediatric Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Brand, H.K.; Ahout, I.M.; D de Ridder; A van Diepen; Li, Y.; Zaalberg, M.; Andeweg, A.; Roeleveld, N.; de Groot, R.; Warris, A.; Hermans, P W; Ferwerda, G.; Staal, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundRespiratory viral infections follow an unpredictable clinical course in young children ranging from a common cold to respiratory failure. The transition from mild to severe disease occurs rapidly and is difficult to predict. The pathophysiology underlying disease severity has remained elusive. There is an urgent need to better understand the immune response in this disease to come up with biomarkers that may aid clinical decision making.MethodsIn a prospective study, flow cytometric...

  10. Novel Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Like Particle Vaccine Composed of the Postfusion and Prefusion Conformations of the F Glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boigard, Hélène; Bhatia, Bipin; Fallon, John T.; Alimova, Alexandra; Gottlieb, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe respiratory disease in infants and children and represents an important global health burden for the elderly and the immunocompromised. Despite decades of research efforts, no licensed vaccine for RSV is available. We have developed virus-like particle (VLP)-based RSV vaccines assembled with the human metapneumovirus (hMPV) matrix protein (M) as the structural scaffold and the RSV fusion glycoprotein (F) in either the postfusion or prefusion conformation as its prime surface immunogen. Vaccines were composed of postfusion F, prefusion F, or a combination of the two conformations and formulated with a squalene-based oil emulsion as adjuvant. Immunization with these VLP vaccines afforded full protection against RSV infection and prevented detectable viral replication in the mouse lung after challenge. Analyses of lung cytokines and chemokines showed that VLP vaccination mostly induced the production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), a marker of the Th1-mediated immune response, which is predominantly required for viral protection. Conversely, immunization with a formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) vaccine induced high levels of inflammatory chemokines and cytokines of the Th2- and Th17-mediated types of immune responses, as well as severe lung inflammation and histopathology. The VLP vaccines showed restricted production of these immune mediators and did not induce severe bronchiolitis or perivascular infiltration as seen with the FI-RSV vaccine. Remarkably, analysis of the serum from immunized mice showed that the VLP vaccine formulated using a combination of postfusion and prefusion F elicited the highest level of neutralizing antibody and enhanced the Th1-mediated immune response. PMID:27030590

  11. EGFR Interacts with the Fusion Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Strain 2-20 and Mediates Infection and Mucin Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stobart, Christopher C.; Hotard, Anne L.; Villenave, Remi; Meng, Jia; Pretto, Carla D.; Shields, Michael D.; Nguyen, Minh Trang; Todd, Sean O.; Chi, Michael H.; Hammonds, Jason; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Spearman, Paul; Plemper, Richard K.; Sakamoto, Kaori; Peebles, R. Stokes; Power, Ultan F.; Moore, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of viral lower respiratory tract illness in children. In contrast to the RSV prototypic strain A2, clinical isolate RSV 2–20 induces airway mucin expression in mice, a clinically relevant phenotype dependent on the fusion (F) protein of the RSV strain. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a role in airway mucin expression in other systems; therefore, we hypothesized that the RSV 2–20 F protein stimulates EGFR signaling. Infection of cells with chimeric strains RSV A2-2-20F and A2-2-20GF or over-expression of 2–20 F protein resulted in greater phosphorylation of EGFR than infection with RSV A2 or over-expression of A2 F, respectively. Chemical inhibition of EGFR signaling or knockdown of EGFR resulted in diminished infectivity of RSV A2-2-20F but not RSV A2. Over-expression of EGFR enhanced the fusion activity of 2–20 F protein in trans. EGFR co-immunoprecipitated most efficiently with RSV F proteins derived from “mucogenic” strains. RSV 2–20 F and EGFR co-localized in H292 cells, and A2-2-20GF-induced MUC5AC expression was ablated by EGFR inhibitors in these cells. Treatment of BALB/c mice with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib significantly reduced the amount of RSV A2-2-20F-induced airway mucin expression. Our results demonstrate that RSV F interacts with EGFR in a strain-specific manner, EGFR is a co-factor for infection, and EGFR plays a role in RSV-induced mucin expression, suggesting EGFR is a potential target for RSV disease. PMID:27152417

  12. The respiratory syncytial virus G protein conserved domain induces a persistent and protective antibody response in rodents.

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    Thien N Nguyen

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is an important cause of severe upper and lower respiratory disease in infants and in the elderly. There are 2 main RSV subtypes A and B. A recombinant vaccine was designed based on the central domain of the RSV-A attachment G protein which we had previously named G2Na (aa130-230. Here we evaluated immunogenicity, persistence of antibody (Ab response and protective efficacy induced in rodents by: (i G2Na fused to DT (Diphtheria toxin fragments in cotton rats. DT fusion did not potentiate neutralizing Ab responses against RSV-A or cross-reactivity to RSV-B. (ii G2Nb (aa130-230 of the RSV-B G protein either fused to, or admixed with G2Na. G2Nb did not induce RSV-B-reactive Ab responses. (iii G2Na at low doses. Two injections of 3 µg G2Na in Alum were sufficient to induce protective immune responses in mouse lungs, preventing RSV-A and greatly reducing RSV-B infections. In cotton rats, G2Na-induced RSV-reactive Ab and protective immunity against RSV-A challenge that persisted for at least 24 weeks. (iv injecting RSV primed mice with a single dose of G2Na/Alum or G2Na/PLGA [poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide]. Despite the presence of pre-existing RSV-specific Abs, these formulations effectively boosted anti-RSV Ab titres and increased Ab titres persisted for at least 21 weeks. Affinity maturation of these Abs increased from day 28 to day 148. These data indicate that G2Na has potential as a component of an RSV vaccine formulation.

  13. Molecular Basis for the Selective Inhibition of Respiratory Syncytial Virus RNA Polymerase by 2'-Fluoro-4'-Chloromethyl-Cytidine Triphosphate.

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    Jerome Deval

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV causes severe lower respiratory tract infections, yet no vaccines or effective therapeutics are available. ALS-8176 is a first-in-class nucleoside analog prodrug effective in RSV-infected adult volunteers, and currently under evaluation in hospitalized infants. Here, we report the mechanism of inhibition and selectivity of ALS-8176 and its parent ALS-8112. ALS-8176 inhibited RSV replication in non-human primates, while ALS-8112 inhibited all strains of RSV in vitro and was specific for paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses. The antiviral effect of ALS-8112 was mediated by the intracellular formation of its 5'-triphosphate metabolite (ALS-8112-TP inhibiting the viral RNA polymerase. ALS-8112 selected for resistance-associated mutations within the region of the L gene of RSV encoding the RNA polymerase. In biochemical assays, ALS-8112-TP was efficiently recognized by the recombinant RSV polymerase complex, causing chain termination of RNA synthesis. ALS-8112-TP did not inhibit polymerases from host or viruses unrelated to RSV such as hepatitis C virus (HCV, whereas structurally related molecules displayed dual RSV/HCV inhibition. The combination of molecular modeling and enzymatic analysis showed that both the 2'F and the 4'ClCH2 groups contributed to the selectivity of ALS-8112-TP. The lack of antiviral effect of ALS-8112-TP against HCV polymerase was caused by Asn291 that is well-conserved within positive-strand RNA viruses. This represents the first comparative study employing recombinant RSV and HCV polymerases to define the selectivity of clinically relevant nucleotide analogs. Understanding nucleotide selectivity towards distant viral RNA polymerases could not only be used to repurpose existing drugs against new viral infections, but also to design novel molecules.

  14. Detection and characterization of viruses as field and vaccine strains in feedlot cattle with bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, R W; d'Offay, J M; Landis, C; Miles, D G; Smith, R A; Saliki, J T; Ridpath, J F; Confer, A W; Neill, J D; Eberle, R; Clement, T J; Chase, C C L; Burge, L J; Payton, M E

    2016-06-24

    This study investigated viruses in bovine respiratory disease (BRD) cases in feedlots, including bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine coronaviruses (BoCV) and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V). Nasal swabs were collected from 114 cattle on initial BRD treatment. Processing included modified live virus (MLV) vaccination. Seven BRD necropsy cases were included for 121 total cases. Mean number of days on feed before first sample was 14.9 days. Swabs and tissue homogenates were tested by gel based PCR (G-PCR), quantitative-PCR (qPCR) and quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) and viral culture. There were 87/114 (76.3%) swabs positive for at least one virus by at least one test. All necropsy cases were positive for at least one virus. Of 121 cases, positives included 18/121 (14.9%) BoHV-1; 19/121 (15.7%) BVDV; 76/121 (62.8%) BoCV; 11/121 (9.1%) BRSV; and 10/121 (8.3%) PI3V. For nasal swabs, G-PCR (5 viruses) detected 44/114 (38.6%); q-PCR and qRT-PCR (4 viruses) detected 81/114 (71.6%); and virus isolation detected 40/114 (35.1%). Most were positive for only one or two tests, but not all three tests. Necropsy cases had positives: 5/7 G-PCR, 5/7 q-PCR and qRT-PCR, and all were positive by cell culture. In some cases, G-PCR and both real time PCR were negative for BoHV-1, BVDV, and PI3V in samples positive by culture. PCR did not differentiate field from vaccines strains of BoHV-1, BVDV, and PI3V. However based on sequencing and analysis, field and vaccine strains of culture positive BoHV-1, BoCV, BVDV, and PI3V, 11/18 (61.1%) of BoHV-1 isolates, 6/17 (35.3%) BVDV isolates, and 1/10 (10.0%) PI3V identified as vaccine. BRSV was only identified by PCR testing. Interpretation of laboratory tests is appropriate as molecular based tests and virus isolation cannot separate field from vaccine strains. Additional testing using sequencing appears appropriate for identifying vaccine

  15. Characterization of hospital and community-acquired respiratory syncytial virus in children with severe lower respiratory tract infections in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, Tran Anh; Thanh, Tran Tan; Hai, Nguyen thi Thanh; Tinh, Le Binh Bao; Kim, Le thi Ngoc; Do, Lien Anh Ha; Chinh B'Krong, Nguyen thi Thuy; Tham, Nguyen thi; Hang, Vu thi Ty; Merson, Laura; Farrar, Jeremy; Thuong, Tang Chi; de Jong, Menno D; Schultsz, Constance; van Doorn, H Rogier

    2015-01-01

    Background Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important community and nosocomial pathogen in developed countries but data regarding the importance of RSV in developing countries are relatively scarce. Methods During a 1-year surveillance study in 2010, we took serial samples from children admitted to the Emergency Unit of the Respiratory Ward of Children's Hospital 1 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. RSV was detected within 72 hours of admission to the ward in 26% (376/1439; RSV A: n = 320; RSV B: n = 54; and RSV A and B: n = 2). Among those negative in the first 72 hours after admission, 6·6% (25/377) acquired nosocomial RSV infection during hospitalization (RSV A: n = 22; and RSV B: n = 3). Results Children with nosocomial RSV infection were younger (P = 0·001) and had a longer duration of hospitalization (P < 0·001). The rate of incomplete recovery among children with nosocomial RSV infection was significantly higher than among those without (P < 0·001). Phylogenetic analysis of partial G gene sequences obtained from 79% (316/401) of positive specimens revealed the co-circulation of multiple genotypes with RSV A NA1 being predominant (A NA1: n = 275; A GA5: n = 5; B BA3: n = 3; B BA9: n = 26; and B BA10: n = 7). The RSV A GA5 and RSV B BA3 genotypes have not been reported from Vietnam, previously. Conclusion Besides emphasizing the importance of RSV as a cause of respiratory infection leading to hospitalization in young children and as a nosocomial pathogen, data from this study extend our knowledge on the genetic diversity of RSV circulating in Vietnam. PMID:25702707

  16. Detection of Human Metapneumovirus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Among Hospitalized Young Children in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsania, Masoud; Poopak, Behzad; Pouriayevali, Mohammad Hassan; Haghighi, Sama; Amirkhani, Aref; Nateghian, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infection plays an important role in hospitalization of children in developing countries; detection of viral causes in such infections is very important. The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common etiological agent of viral lower respiratory tract infection in children, and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is associated with both upper and lower respiratory tract infections among infants and children. Objectives This study evaluated the frequency and seasonal prevalence of hMPV and RSV in hospitalized children under the age of five, who were admitted to Aliasghar children’s hospital of Iran University of Medical Sciences from March 2010 until March 2013. Patients and Methods Nasopharyngeal or throat swabs from 158 hospitalized children with fever and respiratory distress were evaluated for RSV and hMPV RNA by the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Results Among the 158 children evaluated in this study, 49 individuals (31.1%) had RSV infection while nine individuals (5.7%) had hMPV infection. Five (55.5%) of the hMPV-infected children were male while four (44.5%) were female and 27 (55.2%) of the RSV-infected patients were females and 22 (44.8%) were males. The RSV infections were detected in mainly one year old children. Both RSV and hMPV infections had occurred mainly during winter and spring seasons. Conclusions Respiratory syncytial virus was the major cause of acute respiratory infection in children under one-year of age while human metapneumovirus had a low prevalence in this group. The seasonal occurrence of both viruses was the same.

  17. Immunogenicity of an adeno-vector vaccine expressing the F protein of a respiratory syncytial virus manufactured from serum-free suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hsiao-Yun; Hsu, Huai-Sheng; Yu, Shu-Ling; Wu, Shang-Rung; Hu, Kai-Chieh; Chang, Ching-Kun; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Chow, Yen-Hung

    2016-06-01

    We have developed an efficient cell culture process to scale up the production of a recombinant adenovirus that expresses the membrane-trunked fusion protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV; Ad-F0ΔTM). Adherent cells of human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293-derived cell, 293A, which supports the production of E1/E3-deleted Ad-F0ΔTM when cultured in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS), were adapted to suspension growth under serum-free medium. In doing so, we studied the immunogenicity of Ad-F0ΔTMsus, which propagated in a bioreactor that was cultured with serum-free suspension of 293A, in comparison with Ad-F0ΔTMadh, which was produced from parental 293A cells that were adherently cultured in medium containing FBS. The size and morphology of Ad-F0ΔTMsus and Ad-F0ΔTMadh virions were identical upon inspection with electron microscopy. The results showed that anti-F IgG and RSV-neutralizing titer were raised in the serum of both mice that were intranasally immunized twice with Ad-F0ΔTMsus or Ad-F0ΔTMadh at two-week injection intervals. Furthermore, the immune responses persisted for six months after vaccination. Activation of F protein-specific CD8(+) T cell's epitope associated IFN-ɣ and IL-4 was induced in both Ad-F0ΔTMsus- and Ad-F0ΔTMadh, but not in Ad-LacZsus, -immunized mouse splenocytes. No vaccine-enhanced lung inflammation, airway mucus occlusion or eosinophils infiltration were observed in Ad-immunized mice followed by RSV challenge; however, these symptoms were observed following immunization with formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine. These results indicate that the safety and potency of Ad-F0ΔTM produced from either adherent cells or suspension and serum-free cells are the same. PMID:27001351

  18. Immunological Response to Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex: An RNA-Sequence Analysis of the Bronchial Lymph Node Transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizioto, Polyana C; Kim, JaeWoo; Seabury, Christopher M; Schnabel, Robert D; Gershwin, Laurel J; Van Eenennaam, Alison L; Toaff-Rosenstein, Rachel; Neibergs, Holly L; Taylor, Jeremy F

    2015-01-01

    Susceptibility to bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is multi-factorial and is influenced by stress in conjunction with infection by both bacterial and viral pathogens. While vaccination is broadly used in an effort to prevent BRD, it is far from being fully protective and cases diagnosed from a combination of observed clinical signs without any attempt at identifying the causal pathogens are usually treated with antibiotics. Dairy and beef cattle losses from BRD are profound worldwide and genetic studies have now been initiated to elucidate host loci which underlie susceptibility with the objective of enabling molecular breeding to reduce disease prevalence. In this study, we employed RNA sequencing to examine the bronchial lymph node transcriptomes of controls and beef cattle which had individually been experimentally challenged with bovine respiratory syncytial virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, bovine viral diarrhea virus, Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica or Mycoplasma bovis to identify the genes that are involved in the bovine immune response to infection. We found that 142 differentially expressed genes were located in previously described quantitative trait locus regions associated with risk of BRD. Mutations affecting the expression or amino acid composition of these genes may affect disease susceptibility and could be incorporated into molecular breeding programs. Genes involved in innate immunity were generally found to be differentially expressed between the control and pathogen-challenged animals suggesting that variation in these genes may lead to a heritability of susceptibility that is pathogen independent. However, we also found pathogen-specific expression profiles which suggest that host genetic variation for BRD susceptibility is pathogen dependent. PMID:26121276

  19. Immunological Response to Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex: An RNA-Sequence Analysis of the Bronchial Lymph Node Transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polyana C Tizioto

    Full Text Available Susceptibility to bovine respiratory disease (BRD is multi-factorial and is influenced by stress in conjunction with infection by both bacterial and viral pathogens. While vaccination is broadly used in an effort to prevent BRD, it is far from being fully protective and cases diagnosed from a combination of observed clinical signs without any attempt at identifying the causal pathogens are usually treated with antibiotics. Dairy and beef cattle losses from BRD are profound worldwide and genetic studies have now been initiated to elucidate host loci which underlie susceptibility with the objective of enabling molecular breeding to reduce disease prevalence. In this study, we employed RNA sequencing to examine the bronchial lymph node transcriptomes of controls and beef cattle which had individually been experimentally challenged with bovine respiratory syncytial virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, bovine viral diarrhea virus, Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica or Mycoplasma bovis to identify the genes that are involved in the bovine immune response to infection. We found that 142 differentially expressed genes were located in previously described quantitative trait locus regions associated with risk of BRD. Mutations affecting the expression or amino acid composition of these genes may affect disease susceptibility and could be incorporated into molecular breeding programs. Genes involved in innate immunity were generally found to be differentially expressed between the control and pathogen-challenged animals suggesting that variation in these genes may lead to a heritability of susceptibility that is pathogen independent. However, we also found pathogen-specific expression profiles which suggest that host genetic variation for BRD susceptibility is pathogen dependent.

  20. Risk of nosocomial respiratory syncytial virus infection and effectiveness of control measures to prevent transmission events: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Clare E; McKenzie, Bruce C; Coope, Caroline; Rajanaidu, Subhadra; Paranthaman, Karthik; Pebody, Richard; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S; Higgins, Julian P T; Beck, Charles R

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes a significant public health burden, and outbreaks among vulnerable patients in hospital settings are of particular concern. We reviewed published and unpublished literature from hospital settings to assess: (i) nosocomial RSV transmission risk (attack rate) during outbreaks, (ii) effectiveness of infection control measures. We searched the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, together with key websites, journals and grey literature, to end of 2012. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool or Newcastle-Ottawa scale. A narrative synthesis was conducted. Forty studies were included (19 addressing research question one, 21 addressing question two). RSV transmission risk varied by hospital setting; 6-56% (median: 28·5%) in neonatal/paediatric settings (n = 14), 6-12% (median: 7%) in adult haematology and transplant units (n = 3), and 30-32% in other adult settings (n = 2). For question two, most studies (n = 13) employed multi-component interventions (e.g. cohort nursing, personal protective equipment (PPE), isolation), and these were largely reported to be effective in reducing nosocomial transmission. Four studies examined staff PPE; eye protection appeared more effective than gowns and masks. One study reported on RSV prophylaxis for patients (RSV-Ig/palivizumab); there was no statistical evidence of effectiveness although the sample size was small. Overall, risk of bias for included studies tended to be high. We conclude that RSV transmission risk varies widely during hospital outbreaks. Although multi-component control strategies appear broadly successful, further research is required to disaggregate the effectiveness of individual components including the potential role of palivizumab prophylaxis. PMID:26901358

  1. Profilin is required for viral morphogenesis, syncytium formation, and cell-specific stress fiber induction by respiratory syncytial virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barik Sailen

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is required for the gene expression and morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, a clinically important Pneumovirus of the Paramyxoviridae family. In HEp-2 cells, RSV infection also induces actin stress fibers, which may be important in the immunopathology of the RSV disease. Profilin, a major regulator of actin polymerization, stimulates viral transcription in vitro. Thus, we tested the role of profilin in RSV growth and RSV-actin interactions in cultured cells (ex vivo. Results We tested three cell lines: HEp-2 (human, A549 (human, and L2 (rat. In all three, RSV grew well and produced fused cells (syncytium, and two RSV proteins, namely, the phosphoprotein P and the nucleocapsid protein N, associated with profilin. In contrast, induction of actin stress fibers by RSV occurred in HEp-2 and L2 cells, but not in A549. Knockdown of profilin by RNA interference had a small effect on viral macromolecule synthesis but strongly inhibited maturation of progeny virions, cell fusion, and induction of stress fibers. Conclusions Profilin plays a cardinal role in RSV-mediated cell fusion and viral maturation. In contrast, interaction of profilin with the viral transcriptional proteins P and N may only nominally activate viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Stress fiber formation is a cell-specific response to infection, requiring profilin and perhaps other signaling molecules that are absent in certain cell lines. Stress fibers per se play no role in RSV replication in cell culture. Clearly, the cellular architecture controls multiple steps of host-RSV interaction, some of which are regulated by profilin.

  2. Ten Years of Global Evolution of the Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus BA Genotype with a 60-Nucleotide Duplication in the G Protein Gene▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Trento, Alfonsina; Casas, Inmaculada; Calderón, Ana; Garcia-Garcia, Maria L.; Calvo, Cristina; Perez-Breña, Pilar; Melero, José A

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of natural isolates of human respiratory syncytial virus group B (HRSV-B) with a 60-nucleotide (nt) duplication in the G protein gene in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1999 (A. Trento et al., J. Gen. Virol. 84:3115-3120, 2003) and their dissemination worldwide allowed us to use the duplicated segment as a natural tag to examine in detail the evolution of HRSV during propagation in its natural host. Viruses with the duplicated segment were all clustered in a new genotype, named BA (...

  3. Evaluation by Survival Analysis on Effect of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Treating Children with Respiratory Syncytial Viral Pneumonia of Phlegm-Heat Blocking Fei Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨燕; 汪受传; 白文静; 李瑞丽; 艾军

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To objectively evaluate the clinical effect of traditional Chinese medicine in treating children's respiratory syncytial viral pneumonia(RSVP) of phlegm-heat blocking Fei(肺) syndrome(PHBFS). Methods:A single-blinded multi-center,blocked,randomized and parallel-controlled method was adopted.The clinical study was carried out on 206 children with RSVP-PHBFS who were assigned to two groups,108 in the test group treated through intravenous dripping of Qingkailing Injection(清开灵注射液) in combination of...

  4. Comparative evaluation of the Nanosphere Verigene RV+ assay and the Simplexa Flu A/B & RSV kit for detection of influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alby, Kevin; Popowitch, Elena B; Miller, Melissa B

    2013-01-01

    Using retrospective (n = 200) and prospective (n = 150) nasopharyngeal specimens, we evaluated the Nanosphere Verigene RV+ and the Focus Diagnostics Simplexa Flu A/B & RSV tests. Overall, RV+ demonstrated sensitivities and specificities of 96.6% and 100% for influenza A virus, 100% and 99.7% for influenza B virus, and 100% and 100% for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), while the Simplexa test sensitivities and specificities were 82.8 and 99.7%, 76.2 and 100%, and 94.6 and 100%, respectively. PMID:23152547

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus infection facilitates acute colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vrankrijker, Angélica M M; Wolfs, Tom F W; Ciofu, Oana;

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes opportunistic infections in immunocompromised individuals and patients ventilated mechanically and is the major pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis, in which it causes chronic infections. Epidemiological, in vitro and animal data suggest a role for respiratory...... the lung homogenates when compared to mice which were only infected with P. aeruginosa and lung function changes were more severe in co-infected mice. Control mice receiving RSV alone showed no significant changes in lung function or cytokine production, and no inflammatory changes in the lung...

  6. Age-dependent differences in cytokine and antibody responses after experimental RSV infection in a bovine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grell, S.N.; Riber, Ulla; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten;

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe respiratory disease in both infants and calves. As in humans, bovine RSV (BRSV) infections are most severe in the first 6 months of life. In this study, experimental infection with BRSV was performed in calves aged 1-5, 9-16 or 32-37 weeks. Compared...

  7. Epidemiology of respiratory syncytial virus in children ≤2 years of age hospitalized with lower respiratory tract infections in the Russian Federation: a prospective, multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Tatochenko

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Vladimir Tatochenko1, Vasily Uchaikin2, Aleksandr Gorelov3, Konstantin Gudkov4, Andrew Campbell5, Gregory Schulz5, Rebecca Prahl5, Gerard Notario51Scientific Centre of Children’s Health, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Lomonosovskiy Prospect, Moscow, Russia; 2Russian State Medical University of Roszdrav, Moscow, Russia; 3Central Scientific Research Institution of Epidemiology, Moscow, Russia; 4Abbott Laboratories LLC, Khimki, Moscow, Russia; 5Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL, USABackground: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections among infants and young children, and is responsible for an estimated four million deaths per year globally. A monthly injection of palivizumab has been used for prophylaxis of serious RSV infections among high-risk children in 71 countries since 1998 and approval for use in the Russian Federation was obtained in February 2010. A recommendation for RSV prophylaxis in the Russian Federation would require knowledge of the prevalence and seasonality of RSV in that country.Methods: In a prospective, multicenter, epidemiological study of the prevalence, seasonality, and peak occurrence of RSV infection, children aged ≤2 years hospitalized for lower respiratory tract infections in three regions of the Russian Federation, from September 2008 through April 2009, were screened and tested for RSV using rapid immunochromatography of nasopharyngeal lavage. For subjects who were tested positive, hospitalization data were collected.Results: Of 519 children aged ≤2 years enrolled from September 11, 2008 through April 26, 2009, 197 tested positive for RSV (38.0%, 95% CI: 33.8, 42.3. The onset of the 2008–2009 RSV season in the Russian Federation occurred in late October 2008, similar to what is observed in other northern temperate zones. Peak activity occurred in early April 2009, when 62% of children enrolled tested positive for RSV.Conclusion: The prevalence

  8. Extensive sequence divergence among bovine respiratory syncytial viruses isolated during recurrent outbreaks in closed herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.

    2000-01-01

    and veal calf production units) in different years and from all confirmed outbreaks in Denmark within a short period. The results showed that identical viruses were isolated within a herd during outbreaks and that viruses from recurrent infections varied by up to 11% in sequence even in closed herds...

  9. BTA2 and BTA26 are linked with bovine respiratory disease and associated with persistent infection of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is a pathogen associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). BRD causes 28% of all cattle deaths and an annual U.S. loss over $692 million. The objective of this study was to refine the linkage of BRD and association of bovine viral diarrhea-persistent infection (BVD-P...

  10. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV disease – new data needed to guide future policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Bont

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available RSV is the main cause of childhood lower respiratory infections, globally, an important cause of childhood wheeze and may be responsible for a substantial burden of disease in the very elderly and in adults with chronic medical problems, such as COPD. It is thus responsible for substantial healthcare and social costs. There are currently many companies and academic groups developing and testing candidate vaccines and there is an expectation that these will lead to effective and safe vaccines which will be available to health systems globally in the short- medium term. Despite this, there is an incomplete understanding of RSV disease, especially in adult groups, and large scale data are only available from a few countries and settings leading to low levels of awareness of the importance of this pathogen. We discuss the need for widespread national sentinel systems of RSV surveillance and some means by which this could be achieved. These data will be needed by national policy makers and immunisation advisory groups to guide future priority setting and decision making.

  11. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the six-helix bundle of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein as probes of the protein post-fusion conformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) has two major surface glycoproteins (G and F) anchored in the lipid envelope. Membrane fusion promoted by hRSVF occurs via refolding from a pre-fusion form to a highly stable post-fusion state involving large conformational changes of the F trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of hRSVF, we have prepared polyclonal (α-6HB) and monoclonal (R145) rabbit antibodies specific for the 6HB. Among other applications, these antibodies were used to explore the requirements of 6HB formation by isolated protein segments or peptides and by truncated mutants of the F protein. Site-directed mutagenesis and electron microscopy located the R145 epitope in the post-fusion hRSVF at a site distantly located from previously mapped epitopes, extending the repertoire of antibodies that can decorate the F molecule. - Highlights: • Antibodies specific for post-fusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein are described. • Polyclonal antibodies were obtained in rabbit inoculated with chimeric heptad repeats. • Antibody binding required assembly of a six-helix bundle in the post-fusion protein. • A monoclonal antibody with similar structural requirements is also described. • Binding of this antibody to the post-fusion protein was visualized by electron microscopy

  12. Morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus in human primary nasal ciliated epithelial cells occurs at surface membrane microdomains that are distinct from cilia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of cilia and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) nucleocapsid (N) protein, fusion (F) protein, attachment (G) protein, and M2-1 protein in human ciliated nasal epithelial cells was examined at between 1 and 5 days post-infection (dpi). All virus structural proteins were localized at cell surface projections that were distinct from cilia. The F protein was also trafficked into the cilia, and while its presence increased as the infection proceeded, the N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time of infection. The presence of the F protein in the cilia correlated with cellular changes in the cilia and reduced cilia function. At 5 dpi extensive cilia loss and further reduced cilia function was noted. These data suggested that although RSV morphogenesis occurs at non-cilia locations on ciliated nasal epithelial cells, RSV infection induces changes in the cilia body that leads to extensive cilia loss. - Highlights: • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects nasal ciliated epithelial cells. • Virus morphogenesis occurs within filamentous projections distinct from cilia. • The RSV N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time during infection. • Trafficking of the F protein into the cilia occurred early in infection. • Presence of the F protein in cilia correlated with impaired cilia function

  13. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the six-helix bundle of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein as probes of the protein post-fusion conformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga [Unidad de Biología Viral, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain); Luque, Daniel; Terrón, María C. [Unidad de Microscopía Electrónica y Confocal, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain); Calder, Lesley J. [National Institute for Medical Research, MRC, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA (United Kingdom); Melero, José A., E-mail: jmelero@isciii.es [Unidad de Biología Viral, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-15

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) has two major surface glycoproteins (G and F) anchored in the lipid envelope. Membrane fusion promoted by hRSV{sub F} occurs via refolding from a pre-fusion form to a highly stable post-fusion state involving large conformational changes of the F trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of hRSV{sub F}, we have prepared polyclonal (α-6HB) and monoclonal (R145) rabbit antibodies specific for the 6HB. Among other applications, these antibodies were used to explore the requirements of 6HB formation by isolated protein segments or peptides and by truncated mutants of the F protein. Site-directed mutagenesis and electron microscopy located the R145 epitope in the post-fusion hRSV{sub F} at a site distantly located from previously mapped epitopes, extending the repertoire of antibodies that can decorate the F molecule. - Highlights: • Antibodies specific for post-fusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein are described. • Polyclonal antibodies were obtained in rabbit inoculated with chimeric heptad repeats. • Antibody binding required assembly of a six-helix bundle in the post-fusion protein. • A monoclonal antibody with similar structural requirements is also described. • Binding of this antibody to the post-fusion protein was visualized by electron microscopy.

  14. Morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus in human primary nasal ciliated epithelial cells occurs at surface membrane microdomains that are distinct from cilia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jumat, Muhammad Raihan [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Yan, Yan [Department of Otolaryngology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119228 (Singapore); Ravi, Laxmi Iyer [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Wong, Puisan [Detection and Diagnostics Laboratory, DSO National Laboratories, 27 Medical Drive, Singapore 117510 (Singapore); Huong, Tra Nguyen [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Li, Chunwei [Department of Otolaryngology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119228 (Singapore); Tan, Boon Huan [Detection and Diagnostics Laboratory, DSO National Laboratories, 27 Medical Drive, Singapore 117510 (Singapore); Wang, De Yun [Department of Otolaryngology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119228 (Singapore); Sugrue, Richard J., E-mail: rjsugrue@ntu.edu.sg [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore)

    2015-10-15

    The distribution of cilia and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) nucleocapsid (N) protein, fusion (F) protein, attachment (G) protein, and M2-1 protein in human ciliated nasal epithelial cells was examined at between 1 and 5 days post-infection (dpi). All virus structural proteins were localized at cell surface projections that were distinct from cilia. The F protein was also trafficked into the cilia, and while its presence increased as the infection proceeded, the N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time of infection. The presence of the F protein in the cilia correlated with cellular changes in the cilia and reduced cilia function. At 5 dpi extensive cilia loss and further reduced cilia function was noted. These data suggested that although RSV morphogenesis occurs at non-cilia locations on ciliated nasal epithelial cells, RSV infection induces changes in the cilia body that leads to extensive cilia loss. - Highlights: • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects nasal ciliated epithelial cells. • Virus morphogenesis occurs within filamentous projections distinct from cilia. • The RSV N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time during infection. • Trafficking of the F protein into the cilia occurred early in infection. • Presence of the F protein in cilia correlated with impaired cilia function.

  15. Risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus associated with acute lower respiratory infection in children under five years: Systematic review and meta–analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Shi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common pathogen identified in young children with acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI as well as an important cause of hospital admission. The high incidence of RSV infection and its potential severe outcome make it important to identify and prioritise children who are at higher risk of developing RSV–associated ALRI. We aimed to identify risk factors for RSV–associated ALRI in young children. We carried out a systematic literature review across 4 databases and obtained unpublished studies from RSV Global Epidemiology Network (RSV GEN collaborators. Quality of all eligible studies was assessed according to modified GRADE criteria. We conducted meta–analyses to estimate odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CI for individual risk factors. We identified 20 studies (3 were unpublished data with “good quality” that investigated 18 risk factors for RSV–associated ALRI in children younger than five years old. Among them, 8 risk factors were significantly associated with RSV–associated ALRI. The meta–estimates of their odds ratio (ORs with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI are prematurity 1.96 (95% CI 1.44–2.67, low birth weight 1.91 (95% CI 1.45–2.53, being male 1.23 (95% CI 1.13–1.33, having siblings 1.60 (95% CI 1.32–1.95, maternal smoking 1.36 (95% CI 1.24–1.50, history of atopy 1.47 (95% CI 1.16–1.87, no breastfeeding 2.24 (95% CI 1.56–3.20 and crowding 1.94 (95% CI 1.29–2.93. Although there were insufficient studies available to generate a meta–estimate for HIV, all articles (irrespective of quality scores reported significant associations between HIV and RSV–associated ALRI. This study presents a comprehensive report of the strength of association between various socio–demographic risk factors and RSV–associated ALRI in young children. Some of these amenable risk factors are similar to those that have been identified for (all cause ALRI and

  16. ROLE OF PREEXISTING VIRUS-SPECIFIC IgG IN PRIMARY DISEASE AND IN REINFECTION WITH RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Z. Krivitskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the study is evaluation of links between presence in blood of specific pre-existing IgG to respiratory-syncytial virus (RSV, clinical course of RSV infection and character specific to RSV humoral immune response in patients of different ages. The antibodies were detected by ELISA using whole RS virus or synthetic peptides corresponded to the selected determinants of the envelope RSV proteins. It was shown that RS specific maternal IgG antibodies passively transferred to babies in utero can circulate in the blood up to 10 months of life. The analysis of paired sera of 45 babies in the age of 1–10 months revealed firstly that presence of maternal IgG specific antibodies to the conservative B-cell immunogenic determinants of the F-protein (amino acids 221–232 and/or the G-protein (amino acids 152–164 and 184–198 is coupled with more high morbidity of primary RSV infection (89% versus 56%, p = 0.023, and also with more high frequency of complicated by bronchus obstruction course of the disease (81% versus 20%, р = 0.001 in compare with babies who were serologically negative to the maternal determinants specific antibodies. The correlation analysis has shown that the high presence of maternal determinant-specific IgG in the blood in babies till 10 months of life is associated in the case of primary infection with disbalance of humoral anti-viral immune response: intensive synthesis of serum RSV IgA. This is evidence of complicated course of infection with simultaneous suppression of response to RSV specific IgG. As opposed to the primary RSV infection in patients older than 3 years (n = 121 it was not detected links between anamnestic determinant-specific IgG synthesized by own immune system as the results of previous disease episodes and synthesis of anti-RSV IgG, IgM, IgE and IgA in RSV re-infections. In the contrast to babies in more older patients the feedback connection between level of pre-existing determinant

  17. Hyperresponsiveness to inhaled but not intravenous methacholine during acute respiratory syncytial virus infection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colasurdo Giuseppe N

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To characterise the acute physiological and inflammatory changes induced by low-dose RSV infection in mice. Methods BALB/c mice were infected as adults (8 wk or weanlings (3 wk with 1 × 105 pfu of RSV A2 or vehicle (intranasal, 30 μl. Inflammation, cytokines and inflammatory markers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and airway and tissue responses to inhaled methacholine (MCh; 0.001 – 30 mg/ml were measured 5, 7, 10 and 21 days post infection. Responsiveness to iv MCh (6 – 96 μg/min/kg in vivo and to electrical field stimulation (EFS and MCh in vitro were measured at 7 d. Epithelial permeability was measured by Evans Blue dye leakage into BALF at 7 d. Respiratory mechanics were measured using low frequency forced oscillation in tracheostomised and ventilated (450 bpm, flexiVent mice. Low frequency impedance spectra were calculated (0.5 – 20 Hz and a model, consisting of an airway compartment [airway resistance (Raw and inertance (Iaw] and a constant-phase tissue compartment [coefficients of tissue damping (G and elastance (H] was fitted to the data. Results Inflammation in adult mouse BALF peaked at 7 d (RSV 15.6 (4.7 SE vs. control 3.7 (0.7 × 104 cells/ml; p 200 Raw adults: RSV 0.02 (0.005 vs. control 1.1 (0.41 mg/ml; p = 0.003 (PC200 Raw weanlings: RSV 0.19 (0.12 vs. control 10.2 (6.0 mg/ml MCh; p = 0.001. Increased responsiveness to aerosolised MCh was matched by elevated levels of cysLT at 5 d and elevated VEGF and PGE2 at 7 d in BALF from both adult and weanling mice. Responsiveness was not increased in response to iv MCh in vivo or EFS or MCh challenge in vitro. Increased epithelial permeability was not detected at 7 d. Conclusion Infection with 1 × 105 pfu RSV induced extreme hyperresponsiveness to aerosolised MCh during the acute phase of infection in adult and weanling mice. The route-specificity of hyperresponsiveness suggests that epithelial mechanisms were important in determining the physiological

  18. Bovine Gamma Delta T Cells Contribute to Exacerbated IL-17 Production in Response to Co-Infection with Bovine RSV and Mannheimia haemolytica

    OpenAIRE

    Jodi L McGill; Rusk, Rachel A.; Guerra-Maupome, Mariana; Briggs, Robert E.; Sacco, Randy E.

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in children under five years of age. IL-17 and Th17 responses are increased in children infected with HRSV and have been implicated in both protective and pathogenic roles during infection. Bovine RSV (BRSV) is genetically closely related to HRSV and is a leading cause of severe respiratory infections in young cattle. While BRSV infection in the calf parallels many aspects of human infectio...

  19. Histophilus somni biofilm formation in cardiopulmonary tissue of the bovine host following respiratory challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandal, Indra; Shao, Jian Q.; Annadata, Satish; Apicella, Michael A.; Boye, Mette; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Saunders, Geoffrey K.; Inzana, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Biofilms form in a variety of host sites following infection with many bacterial species. However, the study of biofilms in a host is hindered due to the lack of protocols for the proper experimental investigation of biofilms in vivo. Histophilus somni is an agent of respiratory and systemic...... diseases in bovines, and readily forms biofilms in vitro. In the present study the capability of H. somni to form biofilms in cardiopulmonary tissue following experimental respiratory infection in the bovine host was examined by light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy...... filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA), predicted to be involved in attachment. Thus, this investigation demonstrated that H. somni is capable of forming a biofilm in its natural host, that such a biofilm may be capable of harboring other bovine respiratory disease pathogens, and that the genes responsible for...

  20. Purification of Active Respiratory Supercomplex from Bovine Heart Mitochondria Enables Functional Studies*

    OpenAIRE

    Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Shimomura, Harunobu; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Shimada, Satoru; Takahashi, Ryoko; Oosaki, Marika; Ogura, Takashi; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2015-01-01

    To understand the roles of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes, methods for consistently separating and preparing supercomplexes must be established. To this end, we solubilized supercomplexes from bovine heart mitochondria with digitonin and then replaced digitonin with amphipol (A8–35), an amphiphilic polymer. Afterward, supercomplexes were separated from other complexes by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Twenty-six grams of bovine myocardium yielded 3.2 mg of amphipol-s...

  1. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... report card Careers Archives Pregnancy Before or between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & fitness Prenatal care Body & lifestyle changes Is it safe? ... Careers Archives Health Topics Pregnancy Before or between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & fitness Prenatal care Body & lifestyle changes Is it safe? ...

  2. Association of herd BRSV and BHV-1 seroprevalence with respiratory disease and reproductive performance in adult dairy cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Raaperi Kerli; Bougeard Stephanie; Aleksejev Annely; Orro Toomas; Viltrop Arvo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to detect the associations between bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) status of a herd and respiratory disease (BRD) occurrence and reproductive performance in pregnant heifers and cows. The association between management-related factors and higher BRD occurrence was also estimated. Methods Serum samples, collected from cows and youngstock from 103 dairy cattle herds, were analyzed for antibodies against BHV-1, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV),...

  3. Induction of IL-6 and CCL5 (RANTES in human respiratory epithelial (A549 cells by clinical isolates of respiratory syncytial virus is strain specific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levitz Ruth

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the major respiratory pathogen of infants and young children. During each seasonal epidemic, multiple strains of both subgroup A and B viruses circulate in the community. Like other RNA viruses, RSV genome replication is prone to errors that results in a heterogeneous population of viral strains some of which may possess differences in virulence. We sought to determine whether clinical isolates of RSV differ in their capacity to induce inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and CCL5 (previously known as RANTES [regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted protein], which are known to be induced in vitro and in vivo in response to RSV, during infection of A549 cells. Results Screening of subgroup A and B isolates revealed heterogeneity among strains to induce IL-6 and CCL5. We chose two subgroup B strains, New Haven (NH1067 and NH1125, for further analysis because of their marked differences in cytokine inducing properties and because subgroup B strains, in general, are less genetically heterogeneous as compared to subgroup A strains. At 12 and 24 hours post infection RSV strains, NH1067 and NH1125 differed in their capacity to induce IL-6 by an order of magnitude or more. The concentrations of IL-6 and CCL5 were dependent on the dose of infectious virus and the concentration of these cytokines induced by NH1125 was greater than that of those induced by NH1067 when the multiplicity of infection of NH1067 used was as much as 10-fold higher than that of NH1125. The induction of IL-6 was dependent on viable virus as infection with UV-inactivated virus did not induce IL-6. The difference in IL-6 induction most likely could not be explained by differences in viral replication kinetics. The intracellular level of RSV RNA, as determined by quantitative RT-PCR, was indistinguishable between the 2 strains though the titer of progeny virus produced by NH1125 was greater than that produced by

  4. Susceptibility loci revealed for bovine respiratory disease complex in pre-weaned holstein calves

    OpenAIRE

    Neibergs, Holly L.; Seabury, Christopher M.; Wojtowicz, Andrzej J.; Wang, Zeping; Scraggs, Erik; Kiser, Jennifer N; Neupane, Mahesh; Womack, James E.; Van Eenennaam, Alison; Hagevoort, Gerald Robert; Lehenbauer, Terry W.; Aly, Sharif; Davis, Jessica; Taylor, Jeremy F; ,

    2014-01-01

    Background Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is an infectious disease of cattle that is caused by a combination of viral and/or bacterial pathogens. Selection for cattle with reduced susceptibility to respiratory disease would provide a permanent tool for reducing the prevalence of BRDC. The objective of this study was to identify BRDC susceptibility loci in pre-weaned Holstein calves as a prerequisite to using genetic improvement as a tool for decreasing the prevalence of BRDC. High ...

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in infants with acute leukemia: a retrospective survey of the Japanese Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Michiki; Miyamura, Takako; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Taga, Takashi; Tawa, Akio; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kajihara, Ryosuke; Adachi, Souichi; Ishii, Eiichi; Tomizawa, Daisuke

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can cause life-threatening complications of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in young children with malignancies, but reports remain limited. We performed a retrospective nationwide survey to clarify the current status of RSV disease among infants with hematological malignancies. Clinical course, treatment, and outcome of patients with hematological malignancies who suffered from RSV infections at the age of Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group (JPLSG). Twelve patients with acute leukemia were identified as having experienced RSV disease. The primary diseases were acute myeloid leukemia (n = 8) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 4). RSV infection occurred pre- or during induction therapy (n = 8) and during consolidation therapy (n = 4). Eight patients developed LRTI, four of whom had severe pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome; these four patients died despite receiving intensive care. In our survey, the prognosis of RSV disease in pediatric hematological malignancies was poor, and progression of LRTI in particular was associated with high mortality. In the absence of RSV-specific therapy, effective prevention and treatment strategies for severe RSV disease must be investigated. PMID:26520649

  6. Lower respiratory tract infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus in infants: the role played by specific antibodies Infecção por virus sincicial respiratório: o papel dos anticorpos séricos específicos

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Sandra E; Alfredo E. Gilio; Durigon, Edison L.; Bernardo Ejzenberg

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major etiological agent of lower respiratory tract infection in infants. Genotypes of this virus and the role of the infants' serum antibodies have yet to be fully clarified. This knowledge is important for the development of effective therapeutic and prophylactic measures. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the types and genotypes of RSV causing respiratory tract infection in infants, to analyze the association of subtype-specific serum antibodies wi...

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Mannheimia haemolytica Strain 42548 from a Case of Bovine Respiratory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Eidam, Christopher; Poehlein, Anja; Brenner Michael, Geovana; Kadlec, Kristina; Liesegang, Heiko; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Daniel, Rolf; Sweeney, Michael T.; Murray, Robert W.; Watts, Jeffrey L.; Schwarz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is the major bacterial component in the bovine respiratory disease complex, which accounts for considerable economic losses to the cattle industry worldwide. The complete genome sequence of M. haemolytica strain 42548 was determined. It has a size of 2.73 Mb and contains 2,888 genes, including several antibiotic resistance genes.

  8. Limited efficacy of Fever Tag® temperature sensing ear tags in calves with naturally occurring bovine respiratory disease or induced bovine viral diarrhea virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    McCorkell, Robert; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine; Windeyer, Claire; Schaefer, Al

    2014-01-01

    Temperature sensing ear tags were tested in 1) auction-derived calves with 50% incidence of bovine respiratory disease, and 2) specific pathogen-free calves infected with bovine virus diarrhea virus. There were no false positives, but tag placement, probe displacement, and a high threshold for activation all contributed to failure to reliably detect sick calves.

  9. Design and validation of small interfering RNA on respiratory syncytial virus M2-2 gene: A potential approach in RNA interference on viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, V K; Atika Aziz, Nur A; Hudu, Shuaibu A; Harmal, Nabil S; Syahrilnizam, A; Jalilian, Farid A; Zamberi, S

    2016-10-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants and young children globally and is a significant pathogen of the elderly and immunocompromised. The M2-2 protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is particularly important in regulation of viral RNA transcription and replication that could be a potential anti-viral candidate against RSV infection. In this study, we designed and validated siRNAs that specifically target the RSV M2-2 gene. Four siRNAs targeting different regions of the M2-2 gene were designed using web tool. In-vitro evaluation of silencing effect was performed by using RSV infected Vero cell line. Viral M2-2 linked GFP recombinant plasmid was co-transfected with non-targeted siRNA, Pooled siRNA, siRNA 1, siRNA 2, siRNA 3 and siRNA 4 using synthetic cationic polymer. The silencing effect of M2-2 gene at the protein level was measured both qualitatively and quantitatively by using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Meanwhile, the silencing effect at the mRNA level was assessed by using RT-qPCR. This study showed that all four designed siRNAs can effectively and efficiently silence M2-2 gene. siRNA 2 showed the highest (98%) silencing effect on protein level and siRNA 4 with 83.1% at the mRNA level. The viral assay showed no significant cytopathic effects observed after 6days post-infection with siRNAs. In conclusion, this study showed the effectiveness of siRNA in silencing M2-2 gene both at the protein and mRNA level which could potentially be used as a novel therapeutic agent in the treatment of RSV infection. However, further study is warranted to investigate the silencing effect of M2-2 protein and inhibition of RSV infection. PMID:27432115

  10. Respiratory Syncytial Virus whole-genome sequencing identifies convergent evolution of sequence duplication in the C-terminus of the G gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobel, Seth A.; Stucker, Karla M.; Moore, Martin L.; Anderson, Larry J.; Larkin, Emma K.; Shankar, Jyoti; Bera, Jayati; Puri, Vinita; Shilts, Meghan H.; Rosas-Salazar, Christian; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Fedorova, Nadia; Shrivastava, Susmita; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Peebles, R. Stokes; Hartert, Tina V.; Das, Suman R.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide and is the most important respiratory viral pathogen in infants. Extensive sequence variability within and between RSV group A and B viruses and the ability of multiple clades and sub-clades of RSV to co-circulate are likely mechanisms contributing to the evasion of herd immunity. Surveillance and large-scale whole-genome sequencing of RSV is currently limited but would help identify its evolutionary dynamics and sites of selective immune evasion. In this study, we performed complete-genome next-generation sequencing of 92 RSV isolates from infants in central Tennessee during the 2012–2014 RSV seasons. We identified multiple co-circulating clades of RSV from both the A and B groups. Each clade is defined by signature N- and O-linked glycosylation patterns. Analyses of specific RSV genes revealed high rates of positive selection in the attachment (G) gene. We identified RSV-A viruses in circulation with and without a recently reported 72-nucleotide G gene sequence duplication. Furthermore, we show evidence of convergent evolution of G gene sequence duplication and fixation over time, which suggests a potential fitness advantage of RSV with the G sequence duplication. PMID:27212633

  11. Genetic variability in G2 and F2 region between biological clones of human respiratory syncytial virus with or without host immune selection pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Trigo Pedroso Moraes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is an important respiratory pathogens among children between zero-five years old. Host immunity and viral genetic variability are important factors that can make vaccine production difficult. In this work, differences between biological clones of HRSV were detected in clinical samples in the absence and presence of serum collected from children in the convalescent phase of the illness and from their biological mothers. Viral clones were selected by plaque assay in the absence and presence of serum and nucleotide sequences of the G2 and F2 genes of HRSV biological clones were compared. One non-synonymous mutation was found in the F gene (Ile5Asn in one clone of an HRSV-B sample and one non-synonymous mutation was found in the G gene (Ser291Pro in four clones of the same HRSV-B sample. Only one of these clones was obtained after treatment with the child's serum. In addition, some synonymous mutations were determined in two clones of the HRSV-A samples. In conclusion, it is possible that minor sequences could be selected by host antibodies contributing to the HRSV evolutionary process, hampering the development of an effective vaccine, since we verify the same codon alteration in absence and presence of human sera in individual clones of BR-85 sample.

  12. Intranasal immunization with a replication-deficient adenoviral vector expressing the fusion glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus elicits protective immunity in BALB/c mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yuanhui [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); He, Jinsheng, E-mail: jshhe@bjtu.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Zheng, Xianxian [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wu, Qiang [Department of Pathology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Zhang, Mei; Wang, Xiaobo [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wang, Yan [Department of Pathology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Xie, Can; Tang, Qian; Wei, Wei [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wang, Min; Song, Jingdong; Qu, Jianguo [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xin [College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); Hong, Tao [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China)

    2009-04-17

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a serious pediatric pathogen of the lower respiratory tract worldwide. There is currently no clinically approved vaccine against RSV infection. Recently, it has been shown that a replication-deficient first generation adenoviral vector (FGAd), which encodes modified RSV attachment glycoprotein (G), elicits long-term protective immunity against RSV infection in mice. The major problem in developing such a vaccine is that G protein lacks MHC-I-restricted epitopes. However, RSV fusion glycoprotein (F) is a major cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope in humans and mice, therefore, an FGAd-encoding F (FGAd-F) was constructed and evaluated for its potential as an RSV vaccine in a murine model. Intranasal (i.n.) immunization with FGAd-F generated serum IgG, bronchoalveolar lavage secretory IgA, and RSV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in BALB/c mice, with characteristic balanced or mixed Th1/Th2 CD4+ T-cell responses. Serum IgG was significantly elevated after boosting with i.n. FGAd-F. Upon challenge, i.n. immunization with FGAd-F displayed an effective protective role against RSV infection. These results demonstrate FGAd-F is able to induce effective protective immunity and is a promising vaccine regimen against RSV infection.

  13. Direct whole-genome deep-sequencing of human respiratory syncytial virus A and B from Vietnamese children identifies distinct patterns of inter- and intra-host evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Lien Anh Ha; Wilm, Andreas; Van Doorn, H Rogier; Lam, Ha Minh; Sim, Shuzhen; Sukumaran, Rashmi; Tran, Anh Tuan; Nguyen, Bach Hue; Tran, Thi Thu Loan; Tran, Quynh Huong; Vo, Quoc Bao; Dac, Nguyen Anh Tran; Trinh, Hong Nhien; Nguyen, Thi Thanh Hai; Binh, Bao Tinh Le; Le, Khanh; Nguyen, Minh Tien; Thai, Quang Tung; Vo, Thanh Vu; Ngo, Ngoc Quang Minh; Dang, Thi Kim Huyen; Cao, Ngoc Huong; Tran, Thu Van; Ho, Lu Viet; Farrar, Jeremy; Jong, Menno de; Chen, Swaine; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Bryant, Juliet E; Hibberd, Martin L

    2015-12-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children ,2 years of age. Little is known about RSV intra-host genetic diversity over the course of infection or about the immune pressures that drive RSV molecular evolution. We performed whole-genome deep-sequencing on 53 RSV-positive samples (37 RSV subgroup A and 16 RSV subgroup B) collected from the upper airways of hospitalized children in southern Vietnam over two consecutive seasons. RSV A NA1 and RSV B BA9 were the predominant genotypes found in our samples, consistent with other reports on global RSV circulation during the same period. For both RSV A and B, the M gene was the most conserved, confirming its potential as a target for novel therapeutics. The G gene was the most variable and was the only gene under detectable positive selection. Further, positively selected sites inG were found in close proximity to and in some cases overlapped with predicted glycosylation motifs, suggesting that selection on amino acid glycosylation may drive viral genetic diversity. We further identified hotspots and coldspots of intra-host genetic diversity in the RSV genome, some of which may highlight previously unknown regions of functional importance. PMID:26407694

  14. The respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein formulated with a novel combination adjuvant induces balanced immune responses in lambs with maternal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R; Latimer, L; Gerdts, V; Potter, A; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, S

    2015-03-10

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe respiratory illness in infants. There are no licensed vaccines to prevent RSV infection. The neonate receives short-term protection from maternally derived antibodies, which, however, can also interfere with the active response to vaccination. A RSV vaccine consisting of a truncated version of the fusion protein formulated with polyI:C, innate defense regulator peptide and polyphosphazene (ΔF/TriAdj), was evaluated in two to three week-old lambs. When delivered intrapulmonary, ΔF/TriAdj elicited IgA production in the lung in addition to a robust systemic response similar to that induced by intramuscular immunization. To investigate potential interference by maternal antibodies, pregnant ewes were vaccinated with ΔF/TriAdj. Lambs born to RSV F-immune or non-immune ewes were then given three vaccinations with ΔF/TriAdj at 3 days, 4 weeks and 8 weeks post-birth. Lambs immunized intramuscularly with ΔF/TriAdj vaccine developed high-affinity ΔF-specific serum IgG and virus neutralizing antibodies, and displayed an increase in the frequency of IFN-γ-secreting cells by in vitro restimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Maternal antibodies did not interfere with the development of an immune response to ΔF/TriAdj in the newborn lambs. These results indicate that immunization of neonates with ΔF/TriAdj is effective even in the face of maternal antibodies. PMID:25637860

  15. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Related Readmission in Preterm Infants Less than 34 weeks' Gestation Following Discharge from a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang Hoon; Kim, Chun Soo; Chang, Yun Sil; Choi, Jung-Hwan

    2015-10-01

    This study was done to evaluate respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) related readmission (RRR) and risk factors of RRR in preterm infants 1 yr after discharge from the NICU, were enrolled. The average GA and birth weight of the infants was 30(+5) ± 2(+5) weeks and 1,502 ± 474 g, respectively. The RRR rate of enrolled infants was 8.4% (96/1,140), and RSV accounted for 58.2% of respiratory readmissions of infants who had laboratory tests confirming etiological viruses. Living with elder siblings (odd ratio [OR], 2.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.68-4.28; P RRR. Palivizumab prophylaxis (OR, 0.06; 95% CI, 0.03-0.13; P RRR. The risk of RRR of infants of 32-33 weeks' gestation was lower than that of infants RRR in Korean preterm infants. Preterm infants with BPD or living with siblings should be supervised, and administration of palivizumab to prevent RRR should be considered. PMID:26566351

  16. Intranasal immunization with a replication-deficient adenoviral vector expressing the fusion glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus elicits protective immunity in BALB/c mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a serious pediatric pathogen of the lower respiratory tract worldwide. There is currently no clinically approved vaccine against RSV infection. Recently, it has been shown that a replication-deficient first generation adenoviral vector (FGAd), which encodes modified RSV attachment glycoprotein (G), elicits long-term protective immunity against RSV infection in mice. The major problem in developing such a vaccine is that G protein lacks MHC-I-restricted epitopes. However, RSV fusion glycoprotein (F) is a major cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope in humans and mice, therefore, an FGAd-encoding F (FGAd-F) was constructed and evaluated for its potential as an RSV vaccine in a murine model. Intranasal (i.n.) immunization with FGAd-F generated serum IgG, bronchoalveolar lavage secretory IgA, and RSV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in BALB/c mice, with characteristic balanced or mixed Th1/Th2 CD4+ T-cell responses. Serum IgG was significantly elevated after boosting with i.n. FGAd-F. Upon challenge, i.n. immunization with FGAd-F displayed an effective protective role against RSV infection. These results demonstrate FGAd-F is able to induce effective protective immunity and is a promising vaccine regimen against RSV infection.

  17. Fine Mapping of Loci on BTA2 and BTA26 Associated with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Persistent Infection and Linked with Bovine Respiratory Disease in Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Zanella, Ricardo; Casas, Eduardo; Snowder, Gary; Neibergs, Holly L.

    2011-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is considered to be the most costly infectious disease in the cattle industry. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is one of the pathogens involved with the BRD complex of disease. BVDV infection also negatively impacts cow reproduction and calf performance. Loci associated with persistently infected animals (BVD-PI) and linked with BRD have previously been identified near 14 Mb on bovine chromosome 2 (BTA2) and 15.3 Mb on bovine chromosome 26 (BTA26). The obje...

  18. A prospective, open-label, non-comparative study of palivizumab prophylaxis in children at high risk of serious respiratory syncytial virus disease in the Russian Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turti Tatyana V

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs in children globally. Predisposing conditions for the development of serious RSV disease include preterm infants and those with cardiopulmonary illness, including congenital heart disease (CHD and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD. No vaccine is currently approved for the prevention of RSV infection. It is recommended that children at high risk be prophylactically administered palivizumab, a monoclonal antibody that has been shown in a number of clinical studies to reduce hospitalization rates due to serious RSV infection. The objective of the current study was to determine the safety and effectiveness of palivizumab in preventing serious RSV disease in high-risk children in the Russian Federation. Children at high risk of serious RSV disease (ie, born at ≤35 wk gestational age and ≤6 mo of age, and/or aged ≤24 mo with BPD or hemodynamically significant CHD were enrolled. Subjects were to receive 3 to 5 monthly injections of palivizumab 15 mg/kg (depending on the month of the initial injection over the RSV season. The primary endpoint was RSV-related hospitalizations. Adverse events (AEs were reported through 100 days following the final injection. Results One hundred subjects received ≥1 injection of palivizumab; 94 completed their dosing schedule. There were no RSV hospitalizations or deaths. Six of 7 subjects hospitalized for respiratory/cardiac conditions had an RSV test, which was negative in all cases. Three non-serious AEs (acute intermittent rhinitis and rhinitis, 1 subject; atopic dermatitis, 1 subject were considered possibly related to palivizumab. All other AEs were mild or moderate and considered not related/probably not related to palivizumab. Conclusion Palivizumab was generally well tolerated and effectively prevented serious RSV infection in a mixed population of high-risk children in the Russian

  19. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection, TLR3 Ligands, and Proinflammatory Cytokines Induce CD161 Ligand LLT1 Expression on the Respiratory Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Satkunanathan, Stifani; Kumar, Naveenta; Bajorek, Monika; Purbhoo, Marco A.; Culley, Fiona J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT During respiratory-virus infection, excessive lymphocyte activation can cause pathology both in acute infection and in exacerbations of chronic respiratory diseases. The costimulatory molecule CD161 is expressed on lymphocyte subsets implicated in promoting respiratory inflammation, including Th2, Th17, mucosally associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, and type 2 innate lymphoid cells. We asked whether the CD161 ligand LLT1 could be expressed on respiratory epithelial cells following re...

  20. Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC): Viral and bacterial pathogens in Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Kurćubić V.; Đoković R.; Vidanović D.; Šekler M.; Matović K.; Ilić Z.; Stojković J.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogens causing BRDC in Serbia were investigated. Two herds of beef cattle with bovine respiratory disease were included, with twenty diseased calves (10 from each farm) were chosen for isolation of bacteria on artificial culture media and determination by aerobic cultivation. The most common bacterial pathogen was isolated was Pasteurella multocida. Diffusion method of sensitivity to antibiotics (antibiogram), revealed that Enrofloxacin and Floron were m...

  1. A Metagenomics and Case-Control Study To Identify Viruses Associated with Bovine Respiratory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Kondov, Nikola O.; Deng, Xutao; Van Eenennaam, Alison; Neibergs, Holly L.; Delwart, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is a common health problem for both dairy and beef cattle, resulting in significant economic loses. In order to identify viruses associated with BRD, we used a metagenomics approach to enrich and sequence viral nucleic acids in the nasal swabs of 50 young dairy cattle with symptoms of BRD. Following deep sequencing, de novo assembly, and translated protein sequence similarity searches, numerous known and previously uncharacterized viruses were identified. Bovi...

  2. Transcriptome profile of a bovine respiratory disease pathogen: Mannheimia haemolytica PHL213

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background Computational methods for structural gene annotation have propelled gene discovery but face certain drawbacks with regards to prokaryotic genome annotation. Identification of transcriptional start sites, demarcating overlapping gene boundaries, and identifying regulatory elements such as small RNA are not accurate using these approaches. In this study, we re-visit the structural annotation of Mannheimia haemolytica PHL213, a bovine respiratory disease pathogen. M. haemolytica is on...

  3. Characterization of the CD8+ T cell responses directed against respiratory syncytial virus during primary and secondary infection in C57BL/6 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BALB/c mouse model for human respiratory syncytial virus infection has contributed significantly to our understanding of the relative role for CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to immune protection and pathogenic immune responses. To enable comparison of RSV-specific T cell responses in different mouse strains and allow dissection of immune mechanisms by using transgenic and knockout mice that are mostly available on a C57BL/6 background, we characterized the specificity, level and functional capabilities of CD8+ T cells during primary and secondary responses in lung parenchyma, airways and spleens of C57BL/6 mice. During the primary response, epitopes were recognized originating from the matrix, fusion, nucleo- and attachment proteins, whereas the secondary response focused predominantly on the matrix epitope. C57BL/6 mice are less permissive for hRSV infection than BALB/c mice, yet we found CD8+ T cell responses in the lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage, comparable to the responses described for BALB/c mice

  4. Baculovirus-expressed virus-like particle vaccine in combination with DNA encoding the fusion protein confers protection against respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Seok; Kwon, Young-Man; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Yu-Na; Ko, Eun-Ju; Yoo, Si-Eun; Kim, Min-Chul; Kim, Ki-Hye; Cho, Min Kyoung; Lee, Young-Tae; Lee, You Ri; Quan, Fu-Shi; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major viral agent causing significant morbidity and mortality in young infants and the elderly. There is no licensed vaccine against RSV and it is a high priority to develop a safe RSV vaccine. We determined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of combined virus-like particle and DNA vaccines presenting RSV glycoproteins (Fd.VLP) in comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV). Immunization of mice with Fd.VLP induced higher ratios of IgG2a/IgG1 antibody responses compared to those with FI-RSV. Upon live RSV challenge, Fd.VLP and FI-RSV vaccines were similarly effective in clearing lung viral loads. However, FI-RSV immunized mice showed a substantial weight loss and high levels of T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines as well as extensive lung histopathology and eosinophil infiltration. In contrast, Fd.VLP immunized mice did not exhibit Th2 type cytokines locally and systemically, which might contribute to preventing vaccine-associated RSV lung disease. These results indicate that virus-like particles in combination with DNA vaccines represent a potential approach for developing a safe and effective RSV vaccine. PMID:25173478

  5. Decrease in formalin-inactivated respiratory syncytial virus (FI-RSV enhanced disease with RSV G glycoprotein peptide immunization in BALB/c mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertrud U Rey

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a high priority target for vaccine development. One concern in RSV vaccine development is that a non-live virus vaccine would predispose for enhanced disease similar to that seen with the formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV vaccine. Since a mAb specific to RSV G protein can reduce pulmonary inflammation and eosinophilia seen after RSV infection of FI-RSV vaccinated mice, we hypothesized that RSV G peptides that induce antibodies with similar reactivity may limit enhanced disease after subunit or other non-live RSV vaccines. In support of this hypothesis, we show that FI-RSV vaccinated mice administered RSV G peptide vaccines had a significant reduction in enhanced disease after RSV challenge. These data support the importance of RSV G during infection to RSV disease pathogenesis and suggest that use of appropriately designed G peptide vaccines to reduce the risk of enhanced disease with non-live RSV vaccines merits further study.

  6. Combined virus-like particle and fusion protein-encoding DNA vaccination of cotton rats induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus without causing vaccine-enhanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Park, Soojin; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Youri; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Yu-Jin; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Cho, Minkyoung; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-07-01

    A safe and effective vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) should confer protection without causing vaccine-enhanced disease. Here, using a cotton rat model, we investigated the protective efficacy and safety of an RSV combination vaccine composed of F-encoding plasmid DNA and virus-like particles containing RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins (FFG-VLP). Cotton rats with FFG-VLP vaccination controlled lung viral replication below the detection limit, and effectively induced neutralizing activity and antibody-secreting cell responses. In comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) causing severe RSV disease after challenge, FFG-VLP vaccination did not cause weight loss, airway hyper-responsiveness, IL-4 cytokines, histopathology, and infiltrates of proinflammatory cells such as eosinophils. FFG-VLP was even more effective in preventing RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation than live RSV infections. This study provides evidence that FFG-VLP can be developed into a safe and effective RSV vaccine candidate. PMID:27123586

  7. Epidemiology of laboratory-confirmed respiratory syncytial virus infection in young children in England, 2010-2014: the importance of birth month.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, R M; Hardelid, P; Gilbert, R; Ellis, J; Zhao, H; Donati, M; Pebody, R

    2016-07-01

    The epidemiology of laboratory-confirmed respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in young children has not recently been described in England, and is an essential step in identifying optimal target groups for future licensed RSV vaccines. We used two laboratory surveillance systems to examine the total number and number of positive RSV tests in children aged <5 years in England from 2010 to 2014. We derived odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) comparing children by birth month, using multivariable logistic regression models adjusted for age, season and sex. Forty-seven percent of RSV tests (29 851/63 827) and 57% (7405/13 034) of positive results in children aged <5 years were in infants aged <6 months. Moreover, 38% (4982/13 034) of positive results were in infants aged <3 months. Infants born in September, October and November had the highest odds of a positive RSV test during their first year of life compared to infants born in January (OR 2·1, 95% CI 1·7-2·7; OR 2·4, 95% CI 2·1-2·8; and OR 2·4, 95% CI 2·1-2·7, respectively). Our results highlight the importance of young age and birth month near the beginning of the RSV season to the risk of laboratory-confirmed RSV infection. Future control measures should consider protection for these groups. PMID:26916807

  8. Antigen-dependent proliferation and cytokine induction in respiratory syncytial virus-infected cotton rats reflect the presence of effector-memory T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of lower airway disease in infants and children. Immunity to RSV is not long lasting, resulting in re-occurring infections throughout life. Effective long-lived immunity results when central-memory T cells that proliferate vigorously and secrete IL-2 are present. In contrast, effector-memory T cells that mainly produce IFN-γ, facilitate virus clearance but are not long lived. To identify the type of memory response induced after RSV-A (Long) infection, we characterized the kinetics of the antigen-specific immune response and identified the types of cytokines induced. RSV-specific lymphocytic proliferation following primary and secondary infection was similar, and in both cases responses waned within a short period of time. In addition, mRNA for IFN-γ but not IL-2 was induced in RSV-specific CD4+ T cells. This supports the idea that the presence of effector-memory rather than central-memory T cells contributes to the ineffectiveness of the immune response to RSV

  9. TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB pathway, reactive oxygen species, potassium efflux activates NLRP3/ASC inflammasome during respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Segovia

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV constitute highly pathogenic virus that cause severe respiratory diseases in newborn, children, elderly and immuno-compromised individuals. Airway inflammation is a critical regulator of disease outcome in RSV infected hosts. Although "controlled" inflammation is required for virus clearance, aberrant and exaggerated inflammation during RSV infection results in development of inflammatory diseases like pneumonia and bronchiolitis. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β plays an important role in inflammation by orchestrating the pro-inflammatory response. IL-1β is synthesized as an immature pro-IL-1β form. It is cleaved by activated caspase-1 to yield mature IL-1β that is secreted extracellularly. Activation of caspase-1 is mediated by a multi-protein complex known as the inflammasome. Although RSV infection results in IL-1β release, the mechanism is unknown. Here in, we have characterized the mechanism of IL-1β secretion following RSV infection. Our study revealed that NLRP3/ASC inflammasome activation is crucial for IL-1β production during RSV infection. Further studies illustrated that prior to inflammasome formation; the "first signal" constitutes activation of toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB pathway. TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB signaling is required for pro-IL-1β and NLRP3 gene expression during RSV infection. Following expression of these genes, two "second signals" are essential for triggering inflammasome activation. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and potassium (K(+ efflux due to stimulation of ATP-sensitive ion channel promote inflammasome activation following RSV infection. Thus, our studies have underscored the requirement of TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB pathway (first signal and ROS/potassium efflux (second signal for NLRP3/ASC inflammasome formation, leading to caspase-1 activation and subsequent IL-1β release during RSV infection.

  10. Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Other Viral Infections among Children under Two Years Old in Southern Vietnam 2009-2010: Clinical Characteristics and Disease Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Juliet E.; Tran, Anh Tuan; Nguyen, Bach Hue; Tran, Thi Thu Loan; Tran, Quynh Huong; Vo, Quoc Bao; Tran Dac, Nguyen Anh; Trinh, Hong Nhien; Nguyen, Thi Thanh Hai; Le Binh, Bao Tinh; Le, Khanh; Nguyen, Minh Tien; Thai, Quang Tung; Vo, Thanh Vu; Ngo, Ngoc Quang Minh; Dang, Thi Kim Huyen; Cao, Ngoc Huong; Tran, Thu Van; Ho, Lu Viet; Farrar, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno; van Doorn, H. Rogier

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite a high burden of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections among children, data on demographic and clinical characteristics of RSV are scarce in low and middle income countries. This study aims to describe the viral etiologies, the demographic, epidemiological, and clinical characteristics of children under two years of age who were hospitalized with a lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), focusing on RSV (prevalence, seasonality, subgroups, viral load) and its association with disease severity. Methods A prospective study among children under two years of age, hospitalized with LRTI was conducted in two referral pediatric hospitals in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, from May 2009 to December 2010. Socio-demographic, clinical data and nasopharyngeal swabs were collected on enrolment and discharge. Multiplex real-time RT-PCR (13 viruses) and quantitative RSV RT-PCR were used to identify viral pathogens, RSV load and subgroups. Results Among 632 cases, 48% were RSV positive. RSV infections occurred at younger age than three other leading viral infections i.e rhinovirus (RV), metapneumovirus (MPV), parainfluenza virus (PIV-3) and were significantly more frequent in the first 6 months of life. Clinical severity score of RSV infection was significantly higher than PIV-3 but not for RV or MPV. In multivariate analysis, RV infection was significantly associated with severity while RSV infection was not. Among RSV infections, neither viral load nor viral co-infections were significantly associated with severity. Young age and having fever at admission were significantly associated with both RSV and LRTI severity. A shift in RSV subgroup predominance was observed during two consecutive rainy seasons but was not associated with severity. Conclusion We report etiologies, the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of LRTI among hospitalized children under two years of age and risk factors of RSV and LRTI severity. PMID:27500954

  11. Sixteen years of evolution of human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup A in Buenos Aires, Argentina: GA2 the prevalent genotype through the years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, M; Goya, S; Mistchenko, A S

    2016-09-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is the main viral cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in children worldwide. In recent years, several preclinical trials with vaccine candidates have been reported. It is in this sense that molecular epidemiological studies become important. Understanding viral dispersion patterns before and after the implementation of a vaccine can provide insight into the effectiveness of the control strategies. In this work we analyzed the molecular epidemiology of HRSV-A over a period of sixteen years (1999-2014) in Buenos Aires. By bioinformatic tools we analyzed 169 sequences of the G glycoprotein gene from hospitalized pediatric patients with LRTI. We found that GA2 was the most prevalent genotype (73.35%). GA5 genotype co-circulated in our region until 2009 when it was no longer detected, except in 2011. The recently globally emerging ON1 lineage with a 72-nt duplication increased its frequency to become the only lineage detected in Buenos Aires in 2014. By discrete phylogeographic analysis of global ON1 strains we could determine that Panama could be the location of the MRCA dated June 20, 2010; and this lineage could be introduced in Argentina from Spain in April 2011. This analysis also showed temporary and geographical clustering of ON1 strains observed as phylogenetic clades with strains exclusively associated from a single country, nevertheless among our 44 ON1 strains from three outbreaks (2012-2014) we could also detect posterior reintroductions and circulation from United States, Cuba, South Korea, and Spain. The continuous phylogeographic analysis of one sublineage of Argentine ON1 strains allowed us to establish that there could be a local clustering of some strains even in neighborhoods. This work shows the potential of this type of bioinformatic tools in the context of a future vaccine surveillance network to trace the spread of new genetic lineages in human populations. PMID:27154330

  12. Humane metapneumovirus (HMPV) associated pulmonary infections in immunocompromised adults—Initial CT findings, disease course and comparison to respiratory-syncytial-virus (RSV) induced pulmonary infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syha, R., E-mail: roland.syha@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str.3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Beck, R. [Institute of Medical Virology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Elfriede-Authorn-Str. 6, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Hetzel, J. [Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Otfried-Müller-Str. 10, 72070 Tübingen (Germany); Ketelsen, D.; Grosse, U.; Springer, F.; Horger, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str.3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Aim: To describe computed tomography (CT)-imaging findings in human metapneumovirus (HMPV)-related pulmonary infection as well as their temporal course and to analyze resemblances/differences to pulmonary infection induced by the closely related respiratory-syncytial-virus (RSV) in immunocompromised patients. Materials and methods: Chest-CT-scans of 10 HMPV PCR-positive patients experiencing pulmonary symptoms were evaluated retrospectively with respect to imaging findings and their distribution and results were then compared with data acquired in 13 patients with RSV pulmonary infection. Subsequently, we analyzed the course of chest-findings in HMPV patients. Results: In HMPV, 8/10 patients showed asymmetric pulmonary findings, whereas 13/13 patients with RSV-pneumonia presented more symmetrical bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Image analysis yielded in HMPV patients following results: ground-glass-opacity (GGO) (n = 6), parenchymal airspace consolidations (n = 5), ill-defined nodular-like centrilobular opacities (n = 9), bronchial wall thickening (n = 8). In comparison, results in RSV patients were: GGO (n = 10), parenchymal airspace consolidations (n = 9), ill-defined nodular-like centrilobular opacities (n = 10), bronchial wall thickening (n = 4). In the course of the disease, signs of acute HMPV interstitial pneumonia regressed transforming temporarily in part into findings compatible with bronchitis/bronchiolitis. Conclusions: Early chest-CT findings in patients with HMPV-related pulmonary symptoms are compatible with asymmetric acute interstitial pneumonia accompanied by signs of bronchitis; the former transforming with time into bronchitis and bronchiolitis before they resolve. On the contrary, RSV-induced pulmonary infection exhibits mainly symmetric acute interstitial pneumonia.

  13. Humane metapneumovirus (HMPV) associated pulmonary infections in immunocompromised adults—Initial CT findings, disease course and comparison to respiratory-syncytial-virus (RSV) induced pulmonary infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To describe computed tomography (CT)-imaging findings in human metapneumovirus (HMPV)-related pulmonary infection as well as their temporal course and to analyze resemblances/differences to pulmonary infection induced by the closely related respiratory-syncytial-virus (RSV) in immunocompromised patients. Materials and methods: Chest-CT-scans of 10 HMPV PCR-positive patients experiencing pulmonary symptoms were evaluated retrospectively with respect to imaging findings and their distribution and results were then compared with data acquired in 13 patients with RSV pulmonary infection. Subsequently, we analyzed the course of chest-findings in HMPV patients. Results: In HMPV, 8/10 patients showed asymmetric pulmonary findings, whereas 13/13 patients with RSV-pneumonia presented more symmetrical bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Image analysis yielded in HMPV patients following results: ground-glass-opacity (GGO) (n = 6), parenchymal airspace consolidations (n = 5), ill-defined nodular-like centrilobular opacities (n = 9), bronchial wall thickening (n = 8). In comparison, results in RSV patients were: GGO (n = 10), parenchymal airspace consolidations (n = 9), ill-defined nodular-like centrilobular opacities (n = 10), bronchial wall thickening (n = 4). In the course of the disease, signs of acute HMPV interstitial pneumonia regressed transforming temporarily in part into findings compatible with bronchitis/bronchiolitis. Conclusions: Early chest-CT findings in patients with HMPV-related pulmonary symptoms are compatible with asymmetric acute interstitial pneumonia accompanied by signs of bronchitis; the former transforming with time into bronchitis and bronchiolitis before they resolve. On the contrary, RSV-induced pulmonary infection exhibits mainly symmetric acute interstitial pneumonia.

  14. Respiratory syncytial virus-like nanoparticle vaccination induces long-term protection without pulmonary disease by modulating cytokines and T-cells partially through alveolar macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee YT

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Young-Tae Lee,1,* Eun-Ju Ko,1,2,* Hye Suk Hwang,1,2 Jong Seok Lee,1,3 Ki-Hye Kim,1 Young-Man Kwon,1 Sang-Moo Kang1,2 1Center for Inflammation, Immunity and Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, 2Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3National Institute of Biological Resources, Incheon, South Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The mechanisms of protection against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV are poorly understood. Virus-like nanoparticles expressing RSV glycoproteins (eg, a combination of fusion and glycoprotein virus-like nanoparticles [FG VLPs] have been suggested to be a promising RSV vaccine candidate. To understand the roles of alveolar macrophages (AMs in inducing long-term protection, mice that were 12 months earlier vaccinated with formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV or FG VLPs were treated with clodronate liposome prior to RSV infection. FI-RSV immune mice with clodronate liposome treatment showed increases in eosinophils, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, interleukin (IL-4+ T-cell infiltration, proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and, in particular, mucus production upon RSV infection. In contrast to FI-RSV immune mice with severe pulmonary histopathology, FG VLP immune mice showed no overt sign of histopathology and significantly lower levels of eosinophils, T-cell infiltration, and inflammatory cytokines, but higher levels of interferon-γ, which are correlated with protection against RSV disease. FG VLP immune mice with depletion of AMs showed increases in inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as eosinophils. The results in this study suggest that FG nanoparticle vaccination induces long-term protection against RSV and that AMs play a role in the RSV protection by modulating eosinophilia, mucus production, inflammatory cytokines, and T-cell infiltration. Keywords: alveolar macrophage, nanoparticle vaccine, VLP, FI-RSV, RSV disease

  15. Recombinant Soluble Respiratory Syncytial Virus F Protein That Lacks Heptad Repeat B, Contains a GCN4 Trimerization Motif and Is Not Cleaved Displays Prefusion-Like Characteristics.

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    Ivy Widjaja

    Full Text Available The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV fusion protein F is considered an attractive vaccine candidate especially in its prefusion conformation. We studied whether recombinant soluble RSV F proteins could be stabilized in a prefusion-like conformation by mutation of heptad repeat B (HRB. The results show that soluble, trimeric, non-cleaved RSV F protein, produced by expression of the furin cleavage site-mutated F ectodomain extended with a GCN4 trimerization sequence, is efficiently recognized by pre- as well as postfusion-specific antibodies. In contrast, a similar F protein completely lacking HRB displayed high reactivity with prefusion-specific antibodies recognizing antigenic site Ø, but did not expose postfusion-specific antigenic site I, in agreement with this protein maintaining a prefusion-like conformation. These features were dependent on the presence of the GCN4 trimerization domain. Absence of cleavage also contributed to binding of prefusion-specific antibodies. Similar antibody reactivity profiles were observed when the prefusion form of F was stabilized by the introduction of cysteine pairs in HRB. To study whether the inability to form the 6HB was responsible for the prefusion-like antibody reactivity profile, alanine mutations were introduced in HRB. Although introduction of alanine residues in HRB inhibited the formation of the 6HB, the exposure of postfusion-specific antigenic site I was not prevented. In conclusion, proteins that are not able to form the 6HB, due to mutation of HRB, may still display postfusion-specific antigenic site I. Replacement of HRB by the GCN4 trimerization domain in a non-cleaved soluble F protein resulted, however, in a protein with prefusion-like characteristics, suggesting that this HRB-lacking protein may represent a potential prefusion F protein subunit vaccine candidate.

  16. Bovine Respiratory Disease: from clinic to etiologic diagnosis, a short step

    OpenAIRE

    Guyot, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    Bovine Respiratory Disease, or BRD, are common in young cattle in the first year of life but occurs mainly before 6 months. A peak of incidence is noticed between 2-10 weeks, due to a decline of immunity. BRD is associated with the well-known shipping-fever that may come from cumulative stress. This condition can reach 5-20% case fatality rate and a morbidity rate up to 100%. Most of the time, the treatment administered is effective. In other cases, a relapse within 2 weeks, associated or not...

  17. Use of palivizumab and infection control measures to control an outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus in a neonatal intensive care unit confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, K

    2011-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a potentially life-threatening infection in premature infants. We report an outbreak involving four infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of our hospital that occurred in February 2010. RSV A infection was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Palivizumab was administered to all infants in the NICU. There were no additional symptomatic cases and repeat RSV surveillance confirmed that there was no further cross-transmission within the unit. The outbreak highlighted the infection control challenge of very high bed occupancy in the unit and the usefulness of molecular methods in facilitating detection and management.

  18. Comparison of the Simplexa™ Flu A/B & RSV kit (nucleic acid extraction-dependent assay) and the Prodessa ProFlu+™ assay for detecting influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraju, Suresh B; Bambach, Adrienne V; Leber, Amy L; Patru, Maria-Magdalena; Patel, Anami; Menegus, Marilyn A

    2014-09-01

    The relative performance of 2 widely used reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays, the Focus diagnostics Simplexa™ Flu A/B & RSV kit (nucleic acid extraction-dependent assay) and the Prodessa Proflu+™ assay, was evaluated using 735 prospectively and retrospectively collected nasopharyngeal swab specimens. Overall, the assays showed positive and negative agreements of 100% and 99.7% for influenza A, 98.1% and 99.9% for influenza B, and 99.3% and 99.5% for respiratory syncytial virus. The relative analytical sensitivity of the 2 assays was also similar. PMID:25209363

  19. Trends in Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Bronchiolitis Hospitalization Rates in High-Risk Infants in a United States Nationally Representative Database, 1997–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Abigail; Jiang, Xiaohui; Fryzek, Jon; Coalson, Jenna; McLaurin, Kimmie; Ambrose, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes significant pediatric morbidity and is the most common cause of bronchiolitis. Bronchiolitis hospitalizations declined among US infants from 2000‒2009; however, rates in infants at high risk for RSV have not been described. This study examined RSV and unspecified bronchiolitis (UB) hospitalization rates from 1997‒2012 among US high-risk infants. Methods The Kids’ Inpatient Database (KID) infant annual RSV (ICD-9 079.6, 466.11, 480.1) and UB (ICD-9 466.19, 466.1) hospitalization rates were estimated using weighted counts. Denominators were based on birth hospitalizations with conditions associated with high-risk for RSV: chronic perinatal respiratory disease (chronic lung disease [CLD]); congenital airway anomalies (CAA); congenital heart disease (CHD); Down syndrome (DS); and other genetic, metabolic, musculoskeletal, and immunodeficiency conditions. Preterm infants could not be identified. Hospitalizations were characterized by mechanical ventilation, inpatient mortality, length of stay, and total cost (2015$). Poisson and linear regression were used to test statistical significance of trends. Results RSV and UB hospitalization rates were substantially elevated for infants with higher-risk CHD, CLD, CAA and DS without CHD compared with all infants. RSV rates declined by 47.0% in CLD and 49.7% in higher-risk CHD infants; no other declines in high-risk groups were observed. UB rates increased in all high-risk groups except for a 22.5% decrease among higher-risk CHD. Among high-risk infants, mechanical ventilation increased through 2012 to 20.4% and 13.5% of RSV and UB hospitalizations; geometric mean cost increased to $31,742 and $25,962, respectively, and RSV mortality declined to 0.9%. Conclusions Among high-risk infants between 1997 and 2012, RSV hospitalization rates declined among CLD and higher-risk CHD infants, coincident with widespread RSV immunoprophylaxis use in these populations. UB

  20. Effects of human respiratory syncytial virus, metapneumovirus, parainfluenza virus 3 and influenza virus on CD4+ T cell activation by dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Le Nouën

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV, and to a lesser extent human metapneumovirus (HMPV and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3, re-infect symptomatically throughout life without antigenic change, suggestive of incomplete immunity. One causative factor is thought to be viral interference with dendritic cell (DC-mediated stimulation of CD4+ T cells. METHODOLOGY, PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We infected human monocyte-derived DC with purified HRSV, HMPV, HPIV3, or influenza A virus (IAV and compared their ability to induce activation and proliferation of autologous CD4+ T cells in vitro. IAV was included because symptomatic re-infection without antigenic change is less frequent, suggesting that immune protection is more complete and durable. We examined virus-specific memory responses and superantigen-induced responses by multiparameter flow cytometry. Live virus was more stimulatory than inactivated virus in inducing DC-mediated proliferation of virus-specific memory CD4+ T cells, suggesting a lack of strong suppression by live virus. There were trends of increasing proliferation in the order: HMPVrespiratory viruses are similar in their ability to induce DC to activate CD4+ T cells. Thus, the results do not support the common model in which viral suppression of CD4+ T cell activation and

  1. Increased pulmonary secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in calves experimentally infected with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rontved, C. M.; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.;

    2000-01-01

    , of which 23 were experimentally infected with BRSV and five were given a mock inoculum. The presence of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in the BAL fluids was detected and quantified by a capture ELISA. TNF-alpha was detected in 21 of the infected animals. The amount of TNF...... levels of TNF-alpha appeared on the days where severe lung lesions and clinical signs were obvious and the amounts of BRSV-antigen were at their greatest. Although Pasteurellaceae were isolated from some of the BRSV-infected calves, calves treated with antibiotics before and through the whole period of...

  2. [Differentiation of influenza (Flu) type A, type B, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) by QuickNavi™-Flu+RSV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohiyama, Risa; Miyazawa, Takashi; Shibano, Nobuko; Inano, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Because it is not easy to differentiate Influenza virus (Flu) from RS virus (RSV) just by clinical symptoms, to accurately diagnose those viruses in conjunction with patient's clinical symptoms, rapid diagnostic kits has been used separately for each of those viruses. In our new study, we have developed a new rapid diagnostic kit, QuickNavi™-Flu+RSV. The kit can detect Flu A, Flu B, and RSV antigens with a single sample collection and an assay. Total of 2,873 cases (including nasopharyngeal swabs and nasopharyngeal aspirates specimens) in 2010/2011 and 2011/2012 seasons were evaluated with QuickNavi™-Flu+RSV and a commercially available kit. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of Flu type A, type B, and RSV were above 95% when compared to commercially available kits (QuickNavi™-Flu and QuickNavi™-RSV) and considered to be equivalent to the commercially available kits. In 2011/2012 season, RSV infections increased prior to Flu season and continued during the peak of the Flu season. The kit can contribute to accurate diagnosis of Flu and RSV infections since co-infection cases have also been reported during the 2011/2012 season. QuickNavi™-Flu+RSV is useful for differential diagnosis of respiratory infectious diseases since it can detect Flu type A, type B, and RSV virus antigens with a single sample collection. PMID:24694242

  3. Comparison of Penicillin, Oxytetracycline, and Trimethoprim-Sulfadoxine in the Treatment of Acute Undifferentiated Bovine Respiratory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mechor, Gerald D.; Jim, G. Kee; Janzen, Eugene D.

    1988-01-01

    Penicillin, oxytetracycline, and a trimethoprimsulfadoxine combination were compared as first choice antibiotics for the treatment of acute bovine respiratory disease in weaned beef calves. There was no statistical difference in the mortality losses due to respiratory disease; however, the case fatality rate in the trimethoprim-sulfadoxine treatment group (3%) was markedly lower than in the penicillin (10%) and oxytetracycline (8%) treatment groups. The trimethoprim-sulfadoxine group also had...

  4. Hospitalisations for respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis in Akershus, Norway, 1993–2000: a population-based retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bratlid Dag

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RSV is recognized as the most important cause of serious lower respiratory tract illness in infants and young children worldwide leading to hospitalisation in a great number of cases, especially in certain high-risk groups. The aims of the present study were to identify risk groups, outcome and incidences of hospitalisation for RSV bronchiolitis in Norwegian children under two years of age and to compare the results with other studies. Methods We performed a population-based retrospective survey for the period 1993–2000 in children under two years of age hospitalised for RSV bronchiolitis. Results 822 admissions from 764 patients were identified, 93% had one hospitalisation, while 7% had two or more hospitalisations. Mean annual hospitalisation incidences were 21.7 per 1.000 children under one year of age, 6.8 per 1.000 children at 1–2 years of age and 14.1 per 1.000 children under two years of age. 77 children (85 admissions belonged to one or more high-risk groups such as preterm birth, trisomy 21 and congenital heart disease. For preterm children under one year of age, at 1–2 years of age and under two years of age hospitalisation incidences per 1.000 children were 23.5, 8.7 and 16.2 respectively. The incidence for children under two years of age with trisomy 21 was 153.8 per 1.000 children. Conclusion While the overall hospitalisation incidences and outcome of RSV bronchiolitis were in agreement with other studies, hospitalisation incidences for preterm children were lower than in many other studies. Age on admission for preterm children, when corrected for prematurity, was comparable to low-risk children. Length of hospitalisation and morbidity was high in both preterm children, children with a congenital heart disease and in children with trisomy 21, the last group being at particular high risk for severe disease.

  5. The upper respiratory tract microbiome and its potential role in bovine respiratory disease and otitis media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Svetlana F.; Teixeira, Andre Gustavo V.; Higgins, Catherine H.; Lima, Fabio S.; Bicalho, Rodrigo C.

    2016-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract (URT) hosts a complex microbial community of commensal microorganisms and potential pathogens. Analyzing the composition and nature of the healthy URT microbiota and how it changes over time will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of pneumonia and otitis. A longitudinal study was conducted including 174 Holstein calves that were divided in four groups: healthy calves, calves diagnosed with pneumonia, otitis or both diseases. Deep pharyngeal swabs were collected on days 3, 14, 28, and 35 of life, and next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene as well as quantitative PCR was performed. The URT of Holstein dairy calves aged 3 to 35 days revealed to host a highly diverse bacterial community. The relative abundances of the bacterial genera Mannheimia, Moraxella, and Mycoplasma were significantly higher in diseased versus healthy animals, and the total bacterial load of newborn calves at day 3 was higher for animals that developed pneumonia than for healthy animals. Our results corroborate the existing knowledge that species of Mannheimia and Mycoplasma are important pathogens in pneumonia and otitis. Furthermore, they suggest that species of Moraxella can potentially cause the same disorders (pneumonia and otitis), and that high neonatal bacterial load is a key contributor to the development of pneumonia. PMID:27363739

  6. A phase 2, randomized, double-blind safety and pharmacokinetic assessment of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV prophylaxis with motavizumab and palivizumab administered in the same season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffin M Pamela

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is an important pathogen causing annual epidemics of bronchiolitis and pneumonia among infants worldwide. High-risk infants currently receive RSV prophylaxis with palivizumab, a humanized RSV monoclonal antibody (MAb. In preclinical in vitro and in vivo (cotton-rat model studies, motavizumab, a new RSV MAb, was shown to have greater anti-RSV activity than palivizumab. Motavizumab is currently under review for licensing approval. Since both MAbs may be available concurrently, this study evaluated their safety and tolerability when administered sequentially during the same RSV season. Methods Between April 2006 and May 2006, 260 high-risk infants were randomly assigned 1:1:1 to receive monthly intramuscular injections: 2 doses of motavizumab followed by 3 doses of palivizumab (M/P; 2 doses of palivizumab followed by 3 doses of motavizumab (P/M; or 5 doses of motavizumab (control. Adverse events (AEs, serious AEs [SAEs], development of antidrug antibody (ADA, and serum drug trough concentrations were assessed. Results Most children received all 5 doses (246/260 [94.6%] and completed the study (241/260 [92.7%]. While overall AE rates were similar (mostly level 1 or 2 in severity, SAEs and level 3 AEs occurred more frequently in the M/P group (SAEs: 22.9% M/P, 8.4% P/M, 11.8% motavizumab only; level 3 AEs: 15.7% M/P, 6.0% P/M, 6.5% motavizumab only. This trend in AE rates occurred before and after switching from motavizumab to palivizumab, suggesting a cause other than the combined regimen. Frequencies of AEs judged by the investigator to be related to study drug were similar among groups. Two deaths occurred on study (both in the M/P group, before palivizumab administration; neither was considered by the site investigator to be related to study drug. Mean serum drug trough concentrations were comparable among groups; ADA detection was infrequent (5.1% or less of any group. Conclusions The

  7. Oncolytic targeting of androgen-sensitive prostate tumor by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV): consequences of deficient interferon-dependent antiviral defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment utilizes viruses for selective infection and death of cancer cells without any adverse effect on normal cells. We previously reported that the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a novel oncolytic virus against androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. The present study extends the result to androgen-dependent prostate cancer, and explores the underlying mechanism that triggers RSV-induced oncolysis of prostate cancer cells. The oncolytic effect of RSV on androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate cancer cells and on androgen-independent RM1 murine prostate cancer cells was studied in vitro in culture and in vivo in a xenograft or allograft tumor model. In vitro, cell viability, infectivity and apoptosis were monitored by MTT assay, viral plaque assay and annexin V staining, respectively. In vivo studies involved virus administration to prostate tumors grown in immune compromised nude mice and in syngeneic immune competent C57BL/6J mice. Anti-tumorogenic oncolytic activity was monitored by measuring tumor volume, imaging bioluminescent tumors in live animals and performing histopathological analysis and TUNEL assay with tumors We show that RSV imposes a potent oncolytic effect on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. RSV infectivity was markedly higher in LNCaP cells compared to the non-tumorigenic RWPE-1 human prostate cells. The enhanced viral burden led to LNCaP cell apoptosis and growth inhibition of LNCaP xenograft tumors in nude mice. A functional host immune response did not interfere with RSV-induced oncolysis, since growth of xenograft tumors in syngeneic C57BL/6J mice from murine RM1 cells was inhibited upon RSV administration. LNCaP cells failed to activate the type-I interferon (IFNα/β)-induced transcription factor STAT-1, which is required for antiviral gene expression, although these cells could produce IFN in response to RSV infection. The essential role of IFN in restricting infection was further

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in sheep bronchial explants is associated with enhanced ETB receptor-mediate contractile functional and autoradiographic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important precipitant of asthma in children. The impact of RSV infection on endothelin (ET) receptor density and function in airways is unknown. In the present study, sheep bronchial rings were maintained as explants in culture for up to 48 h. During this time, both the structural integrity of the epithelium and carbachol responsiveness were preserved. Bronchial rings in culture were exposed to non-infected culture medium or to RSV (1/50 TCID50) for 0, 24 and 48 h which caused marked damage to and loss of the epithelium. RSV infection did not significantly alter responsiveness to ET-1 at either 24 (Control EC40 = 102 nM, 95% confidence limits, 76-138 nM vs RSV EC40 = 66 nM, 95% confidence limits, 48-91 nM, n=5-6, P>0.05) or 48 h (Control EC40 35 nM, 95% confidence limits, 19-66 nM vs RSV EC40 = 55 nM, 95% confidence limits, 32-93 nM, n=8, P>0.05). As seen previously (Goldie et al., 1994), sarafotoxin S6c (StxS6c, ETB-selective) did not cause contraction in non-infected sheep bronchial explants. In contrast, StxS6c (300 nM) increased tone by 8±3% carbachol Emax (n=6-8) in explants exposed to RSV for 24 or 48 h. Light microscopic autoradiography was used to determine the relative distribution of ETA and ETB receptors using [125I]-ET-1, BQ-123 (ETA-selective) and StxS6c. Sheep airway smooth muscle contains a homogeneous population of ETA receptors (Goldie et al., 1994). Since StxS6c caused significant contraction in RSV-infected bronchial explants, it was surprising that autoradiographic techniques failed to detect airway smooth muscle ETB receptors in these preparations. It is likely that ETB receptors fell below the level of detection of autoradiography. The significant StxS6c-induced contraction of sheep bronchi suggests the novel expression of ETB receptors triggered by RSV which might be relevant to RSV-associated asthma. Copyright (2001) Australasian Society of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacologists and

  9. Oncolytic targeting of androgen-sensitive prostate tumor by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV: consequences of deficient interferon-dependent antiviral defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubbard Gene B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment utilizes viruses for selective infection and death of cancer cells without any adverse effect on normal cells. We previously reported that the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a novel oncolytic virus against androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. The present study extends the result to androgen-dependent prostate cancer, and explores the underlying mechanism that triggers RSV-induced oncolysis of prostate cancer cells. Methods The oncolytic effect of RSV on androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate cancer cells and on androgen-independent RM1 murine prostate cancer cells was studied in vitro in culture and in vivo in a xenograft or allograft tumor model. In vitro, cell viability, infectivity and apoptosis were monitored by MTT assay, viral plaque assay and annexin V staining, respectively. In vivo studies involved virus administration to prostate tumors grown in immune compromised nude mice and in syngeneic immune competent C57BL/6J mice. Anti-tumorogenic oncolytic activity was monitored by measuring tumor volume, imaging bioluminescent tumors in live animals and performing histopathological analysis and TUNEL assay with tumors Results We show that RSV imposes a potent oncolytic effect on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. RSV infectivity was markedly higher in LNCaP cells compared to the non-tumorigenic RWPE-1 human prostate cells. The enhanced viral burden led to LNCaP cell apoptosis and growth inhibition of LNCaP xenograft tumors in nude mice. A functional host immune response did not interfere with RSV-induced oncolysis, since growth of xenograft tumors in syngeneic C57BL/6J mice from murine RM1 cells was inhibited upon RSV administration. LNCaP cells failed to activate the type-I interferon (IFNα/β-induced transcription factor STAT-1, which is required for antiviral gene expression, although these cells could produce IFN in response to RSV infection. The

  10. Narcissus tazetta lectin shows strong inhibitory effects against respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A (H1N1, H3N2, H5N1) and B viruses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Linda S M Ooi; Wing-Shan Ho; Karry L K Ngai; Li Tian; Paul K S Chan; Samuel S M Sun; Vincent E C Ooi

    2010-03-01

    Amannose-binding lectin (Narcissus tazetta lectin [NTL]) with potent antiviral activity was isolated and purified from the bulbs of the Chinese daffodil Narcissus tazetta var. chinensis, using ion exchange chromatography on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-cellulose, affinity chromatography on mannose–agarose and fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)-gel filtration on Superose 12. The purified lectin was shown to have an apparent molecular mass of 26 kDa by gel filtration and 13 kDa by SDS–PAGE, indicating that it is probably a dimer with two identical subunits. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequence of NTL as determined by molecular cloning also reveals that NTL protein contains a mature polypeptide consisting of 105 amino acids and a C-terminal peptide extension. Three-dimensional modelling study demonstrated that the NTL primary polypeptide contains three subdomains, each with a conserved mannose-binding site. It shows a high homology of about 60%–80% similarity with the existing monocot mannose-binding lectins. NTL could significantly inhibit plaque formation by the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) with an IC50 of 2.30 g/ml and exhibit strong antiviral properties against influenza A (H1N1, H3N2, H5N1) and influenza B viruses with IC50 values ranging from 0.20 g/ml to 1.33 g/ml in a dose-dependent manner. It is worth noting that the modes of antiviral action of NTL against RSV and influenza A virus are significantly different. NTL is effective in the inhibition of RSV during the whole viral infection cycle, but the antiviral activity of NTL is mainly expressed at the early stage of the viral cycle of influenza A (H1N1) virus. NTL with a high selective index (SI=CC50/IC50 ≥ 141) resulting from its potent antiviral activity and low cytotoxicity demonstrates a potential for biotechnological development as an antiviral agent.

  11. Effects of exposure to Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 on risk of bovine respiratory disease in Australian feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, K E; Ambrose, R C K; Morton, J M; Horwood, P F; Gravel, J L; Waldron, S; Commins, M A; Fowler, E V; Clements, A C A; Barnes, T S; Mahony, T J

    2016-04-01

    Viruses play a key role in the complex aetiology of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 (BVDV-1) is widespread in Australia and has been shown to contribute to BRD occurrence. As part of a prospective longitudinal study on BRD, effects of exposure to BVDV-1 on risk of BRD in Australian feedlot cattle were investigated. A total of 35,160 animals were enrolled at induction (when animals were identified and characteristics recorded), held in feedlot pens with other cattle (cohorts) and monitored for occurrence of BRD over the first 50days following induction. Biological samples collected from all animals were tested to determine which animals were persistently infected (PI) with BVDV-1. Data obtained from the Australian National Livestock Identification System database were used to determine which groups of animals that were together at the farm of origin and at 28days prior to induction (and were enrolled in the study) contained a PI animal and hence to identify animals that had probably been exposed to a PI animal prior to induction. Multi-level Bayesian logistic regression models were fitted to estimate the effects of exposure to BVDV-1 on the risk of occurrence of BRD. Although only a total of 85 study animals (0.24%) were identified as being PI with BVDV-1, BVDV-1 was detected on quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 59% of cohorts. The PI animals were at moderately increased risk of BRD (OR 1.9; 95% credible interval 1.0-3.2). Exposure to BVDV-1 in the cohort was also associated with a moderately increased risk of BRD (OR 1.7; 95% credible interval 1.1-2.5) regardless of whether or not a PI animal was identified within the cohort. Additional analyses indicated that a single quantitative real-time PCR test is useful for distinguishing PI animals from transiently infected animals. The results of the study suggest that removal of PI animals and/or vaccination, both before feedlot entry, would reduce the impact of BVDV-1 on BRD risk

  12. A novel p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitor suppresses respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus replication by inhibiting virus-induced p38 MAPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Myung-Soo; Heo, Jinyuk; Yi, Chae-Min; Ban, Junsu; Lee, Noh-Jin; Lee, Na-Rae; Kim, Sang Won; Kim, Nam-Jung; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2016-08-26

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A virus are leading causes of acute lower respiratory infectious disease. Respiratory diseases caused by RSV and influenza A virus result in serious economic burden and life-threatening disease for immunocompromised people. With the revelation that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity in host cells is crucial for infection and replication of RSV and influenza A virus, inhibition of p38 MAPK activity has been suggested as a potential antiviral therapeutic strategy. However, the low selectivity and high toxicity of the p38 MAPK inhibitors necessitate the development of better inhibitors. Herein, we report the synthesis of a novel p38 MAPK inhibitor, NJK14047, with high kinase selectivity. In this work, it was demonstrated that NJK14047 inhibits RSV- and influenza A-mediated p38 MAPK activation in epithelial cells. Subsequently, NJK14047 treatment resulted in decreased viral replication and viral mRNA synthesis. In addition, secretion of interleukin-6 from infected cells was greatly diminished by NJK14047, suggesting that it can ameliorate immunopathological responses to RSV and influenza A. Collectively, the results suggest that NJK14047 has therapeutic potential to treat respiratory viral infection through the suppression of p38 MAPK activation, which is suggested to be an essential step for respiratory virus infection. PMID:27346133

  13. Effect of Parachlamydia acanthamoebae on pulmonary function parameters in a bovine respiratory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, M; Prohl, A; Ostermann, C; Diller, R; Greub, G; Reinhold, P

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pulmonary dysfunction induced by experimental infection with Parachlamydia acanthamoebae in calves. Intrabronchial inoculation with P. acanthamoebae was performed in 31 calves aged 2-3 months old at two different challenge doses of 10(8) and 10(10) inclusion-forming units (IFU) per animal. Control animals received heat inactivated bacteria. The effects on pulmonary gas exchange were determined by arterial blood gas analysis and haemoximetry during the 7 days post inoculation (DPI). For pulmonary function testing (PFT), impulse oscillometry, capnography, and measurement of O2 uptake were undertaken in spontaneously breathing animals 7 and 3 days before inoculation and were repeated until 10 DPI. In the early phase after challenge (1-3 DPI), mild hypoxaemia occurred, which was accompanied by a significant reduction in both tidal and alveolar volumes (each related to bodyweight, BW). In parallel, expiratory flow rate and specific ventilation (i.e. minute ventilation related to O2 uptake) were significantly increased. Minute and alveolar ventilations (each related to metabolic BW) increased significantly due to higher respiratory rates, lasting until 4 and 5 DPI, respectively. Oxygen uptake was slightly reduced during the first 2 days after challenge, but increased significantly during the recovery phase, from 4 to 8 DPI. No deterioration in respiratory mechanics or acid-base balance was observed. Respiratory infection with 10(10) IFU P. acanthamoebae per calf induced mild respiratory dysfunction, mainly characterised by hypoxaemia. The study's findings do not indicate severe pathophysiological consequences of P. acanthamoebae infection on pulmonary function in the bovine host. PMID:27240907

  14. Survey of management practices related to bovine respiratory disease in preweaned calves on California dairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, W J; Lehenbauer, T W; Karle, B M; Hulbert, Lindsey E; Anderson, Randall J; Van Eenennaam, A L; Farver, T B; Aly, S S

    2016-02-01

    In the spring of 2013, a survey of California (CA) dairies was performed to characterize management practices related to bovine respiratory disease in preweaned calves, compare these practices across geographic regions of the state, and determine the principal components that explain the variability in management between herds. The questionnaire consisted of 53 questions divided into 6 sections to assess management practices affecting dairy calves from precalving to weaning. The questionnaire was mailed to 1,523 grade A licensed dairies in CA and 224 responses (14.7%) were collected. Survey response rates were similar over the 3 defined regions of CA: northern CA, northern San Joaquin Valley, and the greater southern CA region. The mean size of respondent herds was 1,423 milking cows. Most dairies reported raising preweaned calves on-site (59.7%). In 93.3% of dairies, preweaned calves were raised in some form of individual housing. Nonsaleable milk was the most frequent liquid diet fed to preweaned heifers (75.2%). Several important differences were identified between calf-raising practices in CA and practices reported in recent nationwide studies, including herd sizes, housing practices, and sources of milk fed to heifers. The differences between the CA and nationwide studies may be explained by differences in herd size. Regional differences within CA were also identified. Compared with the 2 other regions, northern CA dairies were found to have smaller herds, less Holstein cattle, calves remained with dams for longer periods of time after calving, were more likely to be certified organic dairies, and raised their own calves more often. Principal component analysis was performed and identified 11 components composed of 28 variables (questions) that explained 66.5% of the variability in the data. The identified components and questions will contribute to developing a risk assessment tool for bovine respiratory disease in preweaned dairy calves. PMID:26709177

  15. Purification of Active Respiratory Supercomplex from Bovine Heart Mitochondria Enables Functional Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Shimomura, Harunobu; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Shimada, Satoru; Takahashi, Ryoko; Oosaki, Marika; Ogura, Takashi; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2016-02-19

    To understand the roles of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes, methods for consistently separating and preparing supercomplexes must be established. To this end, we solubilized supercomplexes from bovine heart mitochondria with digitonin and then replaced digitonin with amphipol (A8-35), an amphiphilic polymer. Afterward, supercomplexes were separated from other complexes by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Twenty-six grams of bovine myocardium yielded 3.2 mg of amphipol-stabilized supercomplex. The purified supercomplexes were analyzed based on their absorption spectra as well as Q10 (ubiquinone with ten isoprene units) and lipid assays. The supercomplex sample did not contain cytochrome c but did contain complexes I, III, and IV at a ratio of 1:2:1, 6 molecules of Q10, and 623 atoms of phosphorus. When cytochrome c was added, the supercomplex exhibited KCN-sensitive NADH oxidation; thus, the purified supercomplex was active. Reduced complex IV absorbs at 444 nm, so we measured the resonance Raman spectrum of the reduced amphipol-solubilized supercomplex and the mixture of amphipol-solubilized complexes I1, III2, and IV1 using an excitation wavelength of 441.6 nm, allowing measurement precision comparable with that obtained for complex IV alone. Use of the purified active sample provides insights into the effects of supercomplex formation. PMID:26698328

  16. The Use of Kosher Phenotyping for Mapping QTL Affecting Susceptibility to Bovine Respiratory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkin, Ehud; Strillacci, Maria Giuseppina; Eitam, Harel; Yishay, Moran; Schiavini, Fausta; Soller, Morris; Bagnato, Alessandro; Shabtay, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in feedlot cattle, caused by multiple pathogens that become more virulent in response to stress. As clinical signs often go undetected and various preventive strategies failed, identification of genes affecting BRD is essential for selection for resistance. Selective DNA pooling (SDP) was applied in a genome wide association study (GWAS) to map BRD QTLs in Israeli Holstein male calves. Kosher scoring of lung adhesions was used to allocate 122 and 62 animals to High (Glatt Kosher) and Low (Non-Kosher) resistant groups, respectively. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip according to the Infinium protocol. Moving average of -logP was used to map QTLs and Log drop was used to define their boundaries (QTLRs). The combined procedure was efficient for high resolution mapping. Nineteen QTLRs distributed over 13 autosomes were found, some overlapping previous studies. The QTLRs contain polymorphic functional and expression candidate genes to affect kosher status, with putative immunological and wound healing activities. Kosher phenotyping was shown to be a reliable means to map QTLs affecting BRD morbidity. PMID:27077383

  17. The Use of Kosher Phenotyping for Mapping QTL Affecting Susceptibility to Bovine Respiratory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitam, Harel; Yishay, Moran; Schiavini, Fausta; Soller, Morris; Bagnato, Alessandro; Shabtay, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in feedlot cattle, caused by multiple pathogens that become more virulent in response to stress. As clinical signs often go undetected and various preventive strategies failed, identification of genes affecting BRD is essential for selection for resistance. Selective DNA pooling (SDP) was applied in a genome wide association study (GWAS) to map BRD QTLs in Israeli Holstein male calves. Kosher scoring of lung adhesions was used to allocate 122 and 62 animals to High (Glatt Kosher) and Low (Non-Kosher) resistant groups, respectively. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip according to the Infinium protocol. Moving average of -logP was used to map QTLs and Log drop was used to define their boundaries (QTLRs). The combined procedure was efficient for high resolution mapping. Nineteen QTLRs distributed over 13 autosomes were found, some overlapping previous studies. The QTLRs contain polymorphic functional and expression candidate genes to affect kosher status, with putative immunological and wound healing activities. Kosher phenotyping was shown to be a reliable means to map QTLs affecting BRD morbidity. PMID:27077383

  18. Comparative analysis of Pasteurella multocida strains isolated from bovine respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellyei, Boglárka; Rónai, Zsuzsanna; Jánosi, Szilárd; Makrai, László

    2015-12-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the leading cause of significant economic losses in the intensive beef industry worldwide. Beside numerous risk factors Pasteurella multocida, which is regarded as a secondary pathogen, may play a role in the development of the disease. Previous studies of strains from swine pneumonia revealed that there are a few clones associated with clinical disease, suggesting that some strains may be more virulent than others. This linkage may be true in the BRD, however composition of P. multocida populations in the herds are slightly characterized. Thus, we decided to perform phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of strains isolated from calves with respiratory infection at 31 different herds in Hungary. The results demonstrated the presence of two dominant strain types. At the identical taxonomic background (P. multocida subsp. multocida) with slight phenotypic variability they could be separated by trehalose fermentation capacity, α-glucosidase activity and molecular fingerprint patterns of ERIC- and M13-PCR. Independent prevalence and geographical origin of the strain types may refer to their significance in the illness, but their comparison with strains isolated from healthy individuals is taken into consideration. PMID:26689880

  19. Efficacy of intranasal vaccination with a multivalent vaccine containing temperature-sensitive modified-live bovine herpesvirus type 1 for protection of seronegative and seropositive calves against respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Suman M; Sobecki, Brian; Johnson, John; Oien, Nancee L; Meinert, Todd R; Verhelle, Sarah; Mattern, Sally J; Bowersock, Terry L; Leyh, Randy D

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate efficacy and duration of immunity of the bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) fraction of a trivalent vaccine also containing parainfluenza virus-3 and bovine respiratory syncytial virus fractions administered intranasally (IN) for protection of calves against infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR). DESIGN Controlled challenge study. ANIMALS 120 dairy calves (3 to 8 days old) seronegative for antibody against BHV-1 (experiments 1 and 2) or seropositive for maternally derived antibody against BHV-1 (experiment 3). PROCEDURES In 3 separate experiments, calves were vaccinated IN via 2 nostrils (experiment 1) or 1 nostril (experiments 2 and 3) with a vaccine containing or not containing a BHV-1 fraction. For seronegative calves, the test vaccine contained a minimum immunizing dose of BHV-1; for seropositive calves, it contained a commercial dose of BHV-1. Calves were challenged IN with virulent BHV-1 on day 28 or 193 (seronegative calves) or day 105 (seropositive calves) after vaccination to evaluate vaccine efficacy. Frequency and duration of clinical signs, rectal temperatures, virus shedding, and serologic responses were compared between treatment groups within experiments. RESULTS In all experiments, BHV-1 vaccinated calves had lower frequencies or shorter durations of clinical signs of IBR than did control calves. Following viral challenge, peak rectal temperatures and degrees of virus shedding were lower and serologic responses were higher in vaccinated versus control calves. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE IN vaccination against BHV-1 protected all calves against clinical IBR disease, regardless of serologic status at the time of vaccination, and suppressed virus shedding. A single dose of this IN vaccine has the potential to protect seronegative calves for at least 193 days and override maternally derived antibody to protect seropositive calves for at least 105 days. PMID:27172345

  20. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV): Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Treatment To treat RSV is to treat its symptoms. Drinking electrolyte-replacing fluids—not sugary sodas or sports drinks—regularly will prevent dehydration (abnormal loss of body fluids). Acetaminophen (Tylenol, for ...

  1. A bovine model of respiratory Chlamydia psittaci infection: challenge dose titration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Reinhold

    Full Text Available This study aimed to establish and evaluate a bovine respiratory model of experimentally induced acute C. psittaci infection. Calves are natural hosts and pathogenesis may resemble the situation in humans. Intrabronchial inoculation of C. psittaci strain DC15 was performed in calves aged 2-3 months via bronchoscope at four different challenge doses from 10(6 to 10(9 inclusion-forming units (ifu per animal. Control groups received either UV-inactivated C. psittaci or cell culture medium. While 10(6 ifu/calf resulted in a mild respiratory infection only, the doses of 10(7 and 10(8 induced fever, tachypnea, dry cough, and tachycardia that became apparent 2-3 days post inoculation (dpi and lasted for about one week. In calves exposed to 10(9 ifu C. psittaci, the respiratory disease was accompanied by severe systemic illness (apathy, tremor, markedly reduced appetite. At the time point of most pronounced clinical signs (3 dpi the extent of lung lesions was below 10% of pulmonary tissue in calves inoculated with 10(6 and 10(7 ifu, about 15% in calves inoculated with 10(8 and more than 30% in calves inoculated with 10(9 ifu C. psittaci. Beside clinical signs and pathologic lesions, the bacterial load of lung tissue and markers of pulmonary inflammation (i.e., cell counts, concentration of proteins and eicosanoids in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid were positively associated with ifu of viable C. psittaci. While any effect of endotoxin has been ruled out, all effects could be attributed to infection by the replicating bacteria. In conclusion, the calf represents a suitable model of respiratory chlamydial infection. Dose titration revealed that both clinically latent and clinically manifest infection can be reproduced experimentally by either 10(6 or 10(8 ifu/calf of C. psittaci DC15 while doses above 10(8 ifu C. psittaci cannot be recommended for further studies for ethical reasons. This defined model of different clinical expressions of chlamydial

  2. Predicting cumulative risk of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) using feedlot arrival data and daily morbidity and mortality counts

    OpenAIRE

    Babcock, Abram H.; White, Brad J.; Renter, David G.; Dubnicka, Suzanne R.; Scott, H. Morgan

    2013-01-01

    Although bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is common in post-weaning cattle, BRDC prediction models are seldom analyzed. The objectives of this study were to assess the ability to predict cumulative cohort-level BRDC morbidity using on-arrival risk factors and to evaluate whether or not adding BRDC risk classification and daily BRDC morbidity and mortality data to the models enhanced their predictive ability. Retrospective cohort-level and individual animal health data were used to cr...

  3. Comparison of two formulations of oxytetracycline given prophylactically to reduce the incidence of bovine respiratory disease in feedlot calves

    OpenAIRE

    Guichon, P. Timothy; Booker, Calvin W.; Jim, G. Kee

    1993-01-01

    A trial involving 1,803 feedlot calves was conducted under commercial feedlot conditions in western Canada to compare the relative effectiveness of a new oxytetracycline formulation, administered either intramuscularly (BMI) or subcutaneously (BMS), to a currently available oxytetracycline formulation, administered intramuscularly (LAB), for the prevention of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in feedlot calves. All experimental treatments were administered upon arrival at the feedlot and again...

  4. Fine mapping of Loci on BTA2 and BTA26 Associated with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Persistent Infection and Linked with Bovine Respiratory Disease in Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo eZanella

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory disease (BRD is considered to be the most costly infectious disease in the cattle industry. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV is one of the pathogens involved with the BRD complex of disease. Bovine viral diarrhea virus infection also negatively impacts cow reproduction and calf performance. Loci associated with persistently infected animals (BVD-PI and linked with BRD have previously been identified near 14 Mb on bovine chromosome 2 (BTA2 and 15.3 Mb on bovine chromosome 26 (BTA26. The objective of this study was to refine the loci associated with BVD-PIand linked with BRD. Association testing for BVD-PI was performed on a population of 65 BVD-PI calves, 51 of their dams, and 60 unaffected calves (controls with 175 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on BTA2 and 209 SNPs on BTA26. Comparisons were made between BVD-PI calves and controls calves and the dams of BVD-PI calves and controls calves. For the linkage analysis of BRD, the same markers were used to genotype 2 half sib-families consisting of the sires and 72 BRD positive and 148 BRD negative offspring. Using an allelic chi-square test, 11 loci on BTA2 and 8 loci on BTA26 were associated with the dams of the BVD-PI calves (P < 0.05 and 5 loci on BTA2 and 10 loci on BTA26 were associated with BVD-PI calves. One locus on BTA2 and two loci on BTA26 were found to be linked (P < 0.05 with BRD. These results further refined the loci associated and linked with BVD-PI and BRD, respectively.

  5. CX3CR1 Is Expressed in Differentiated Human Ciliated Airway Cells and Co-Localizes with Respiratory Syncytial Virus on Cilia in a G Protein-Dependent Manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Il Jeong

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the principal cause of bronchiolitis in infants and a significant healthcare problem. The RSV Glycoprotein (G mediates attachment of the virus to the cell membrane, which facilitates interaction of the RSV Fusion (F protein with nucleolin, thereby triggering fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. However, a host protein ligand for G has not yet been identified. Here we show that CX3CR1 is expressed in the motile cilia of differentiated human airway epithelial (HAE cells, and that CX3CR1 co-localizes with RSV particles. Upon infection, the distribution of CX3CR1 in these cells is significantly altered. Complete or partial deletion of RSV G results in viruses binding at least 72-fold less efficiently to cells, and reduces virus replication. Moreover, an antibody targeting an epitope near the G protein's CX3CR1-binding motif significantly inhibits binding of the virus to airway cells. Given previously published evidence of the interaction of G with CX3CR1 in human lymphocytes, these findings suggest a role for G in the interaction of RSV with ciliated lung cells. This interpretation is consistent with past studies showing a protective benefit in immunizing against G in animal models of RSV infection, and would support targeting the CX3CR1-G protein interaction for prophylaxis or therapy. CX3CR1 expression in lung epithelial cells may also have implications for other respiratory diseases such as asthma.

  6. Comparison of Mannheimia haemolytica isolates from an outbreak of bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainbolt, S; Pillai, D K; Lubbers, B V; Moore, M; Davis, R; Amrine, D; Mosier, D

    2016-01-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the clonal relatedness of Mannheimia haemolytica isolates responsible for an outbreak of bovine respiratory disease in a commercial feedlot. The isolates were obtained from the lungs of 21 calves with fatal pneumonia that were part of a group of 206 total calves. All isolates were serotyped and analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and for antibiotic sensitivity patterns. ELISA and immunoblotting assays were performed to compare serum antibody levels to M. haemolytica antigens in calves with fatal pneumonia to those calves that survived the outbreak. Isolates were categorized into 14 different PFGE groups based on 90% similarity. Two Group D isolates (1 and 6), and 3 Group H isolates (14, 15, and 16) were characterized as 100% similar. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles defined 8 groups based on differences in patterns of resistance between isolates. The two 100% similar isolates from PFGE Group D were both in susceptibility Group 1. All but isolate 14 from PFGE Group H (3, 15, 16, and 19) were in susceptibility Group 4a. Serum antibody levels to M. haemolytica antigens in the dead calves were not different than the antibody levels in the 185 calves that survived the outbreak. Immunoblots of selected isolates from each of the PFGE groups demonstrated only minimal differences in antigenic profiles between strains when reacted with serum from calves that either died from or survived the outbreak. Based on the characteristics of these isolates, multiple strains of M. haemolytica were responsible for fatal pneumonia during this outbreak. PMID:26711032

  7. Feeding behavior as an early predictor of bovine respiratory disease in North American feedlot systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfger, B; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K S; Barkema, H W; Pajor, E A; Levy, M; Orsel, K

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD), which can cause substantial losses for feedlot operations, is often difficult to detect based solely on visual observations. The objectives of the current study were to determine a BRD case identification based on clinical and laboratory parameters and assess the value of feeding behavior for early detection of BRD. Auction-derived, mixed-breed beef steers (n = 213) with an average arrival weight of 294 kg were placed at a southern Alberta commercial feedlot equipped with an automated feed bunk monitoring system. Feeding behavior was recorded continuously (1-s intervals) for 5 wk after arrival and summarized into meals. Meals were defined as feeding events that were interrupted by less than 300 s nonfeeding. Meal intake (g) and meal time (min) were further summarized into daily mean, minimum, maximum, and sum and, together with frequency of meals per day, were fit into a discrete survival time analysis with a conditional log-log link. Feedlot staff visually evaluated (pen-checked) health status twice daily. Within 35 d after arrival, 76% (n = 165) of the steers had 1 or more clinical signs of BRD (reluctance to move, crusted nose, nasal or ocular discharge, drooped ears or head, and gaunt appearance). Whereas 41 blood samples could not be processed due to immediate freezing, for 124 of these steers, complete and differential blood cell count, total serum protein, plasma fibrinogen, serum concentration of haptoglobin (HP), and serum amyloid A (SAA) were determined. The disease definition for BRD was a rectal temperature ≥ 40.0°C, at least 2 clinical signs of BRD, and HP > 0.15 mg/mL. It was noteworthy that 94% of the 124 steers identified by the feedlot staff with clinical signs of BRD had HP > 0.15 mg/mL. An increase in mean meal intake, frequency, and mean inter-meal interval was associated with a decreased hazard for developing BRD 7 d before visual identification (P detection and could be considered in commercial feedlot

  8. Effect of bovine respiratory disease and overall pathogenic disease incidence on carcass traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, M D; Thallman, R M; Wheeler, T L; Shackelford, S D; Casas, E

    2010-02-01

    The objective this study was to evaluate the effects of incidence of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and overall incidence of pathogenic diseases (IPD) on carcass traits. Two independent populations were used. The first population included crossbred steers (GPE7; n = 642) derived from sires of 7 Bos taurus breeds: Angus, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Hereford, Limousin, Red Angus, and Simmental. The second population included crossbred steers (GPE8; n = 621) derived from tropically adapted Bos taurus breeds and Bos indicus-influenced breeds: Beefmaster, Brangus, Bonsmara, and Romosinuano, as well as Hereford and Angus. Treatment records for BRD, infectious keratoconjunctivitis, and infectious pododermatitis were available for these populations. Incidence of BRD was treated as an independent effect. Incidences of the 3 microbial pathogenic diseases were pooled into a single trait to represent overall pathogenic disease incidence. Traits evaluated were HCW; KPH; LM area; marbling score; fat thickness; dressing percentage; yield grade; retail, fat, and bone yields; and meat tenderness. Both BRD and IPD were associated with differences in yield grade in GPE7 and GPE8 steers. Animals treated for BRD had decreased yield grades (P = 0.003 and P = 0.02, in GPE7 and GPE8, respectively) compared with untreated animals. Animals treated for IPD had decreased yield grades (P = 0.0006 and P = 0.004, in GPE7 and GPE8, respectively) compared with untreated animals. Incidence of BRD and IPD were associated with a reduction in fat thickness in GPE7 and GPE8 steers. Animals treated for BRD had reduced adjusted fat measurements (P = 0.0007 and P = 0.01, in GPE7 and GPE8) compared with untreated animals. Animals treated for IPD also had reduced adjusted fat measurements (P = 0.0003 and P = 0.002, in GPE7 and GPE8) compared with untreated animals. Animals treated for BRD (P yield (P yield (P yield (P < 0.01) measurements than unaffected animals. The relationship between disease and carcass

  9. Chimeric virus-like particles containing a conserved region of the G protein in combination with a single peptide of the M2 protein confer protection against respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Lei; Zhang, Yuan; Chai, Feng; Tan, Yiluo; Huo, Chunling; Pan, Zishu

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of a virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine composed of the conserved antigenic epitopes of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the chimeric RSV VLPs HBcΔ-tG and HBcΔ-tG/M282-90 were generated based on the truncated hepatitis B virus core protein (HBcΔ). HBcΔ-tG consisted of HBcΔ, the conserved region (aa 144-204) of the RSV G protein. HBcΔ-tG was combined with a single peptide (aa 82-90) of the M2 protein to generate HBcΔ-tG/M282-90. Immunization of mice with the HBcΔ-tG or HBcΔ-tG/M282-90 VLPs elicited RSV-specific IgG and neutralizing antibody production and conferred protection against RSV infection. Compared with HBcΔ-tG, HBcΔ-tG/M282-90 induced decreased Th2 cytokine production (IL-4 and IL-5), increased Th1 cytokine response (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2), and increased ratios of IgG2a/IgG1 antibodies, thereby relieving pulmonary pathology upon subsequent RSV infection. Our results demonstrated that chimeric HBcΔ-tG/M282-90 VLPs represented an effective RSV subunit vaccine candidate. PMID:27154395

  10. Risk factors for acute respiratory syncytial virus infection of lower respiratory tract in hospitalized infants%婴儿急性下呼吸道呼吸道合胞病毒感染的危险因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓波; 刘丽娟; 施鹏; 蒋高立; 贾品; 王传凯; 王立波; 钱莉玲

    2014-01-01

    染的风险大为增加.%Objective To investigate the clinical epidemiologic characteristics and analyze risk factors for acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in hospitalized infants with acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI).Method ALRI infants admitted to Children's Hospital of Fudan University from March 1 st,2011 to February 29th,2012,were enrolled in this study.Patient information included demographic characteristics,feeding history,family status,clinical presentation,accessory examination,treatment and prognosis.According to the etiology of ALRI infants,we compared the seasonal distribution,demographic characteristics,household characteristics and underlying diseases between RSV-positive patients and RSV-negative patients.Univariate and multiple Logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors that were associated with risk of RSV infection.Result Among 1 726 ALRI infants,there were 913 RSV-positive infants (52.9%).The occurrence of RSV infection had a seasonal variation,with a peak in winter (59.1%).The median (P25,P75) age of RSV infants was 64 (21-155) days.The gestational age (GA) and body weight (BW) was (37.5 ± 2.4) weeks and (3.07 ±0.66) kg,respectively.The male/female ratio among these was 1.9:1.RSV infection was more popular among infants in the families with smoking members,crowded living conditions,history of atopic mother.Differences of the proportion of patients with underlying disease between RSV-positive and negative groups were statistically significant (59.4% vs.54.2%,P < 0.05).Univariate logistic regression demonstrated that factors increasing the risk of RSV infection were:GA < 37weeks (OR =1.346,95% CI:1.037-1.748),birth weight < 2 500 g (OR =1.447,95 % CI:1.103-1.898),underlying diseases (OR =1.232,95 % CI:1.018-1.492),underlying CHD (OR =1.391,95% CI:1.120-1.728),environmental tobacco smoke exposure (OR =1.254,95% CI:1.035-1.519),mother with atopic diseases (OR =1.827,95% CI:1.296-2.573),crowded house with four or

  11. Bayesian estimation of the accuracy of the calf respiratory scoring chart and ultrasonography for the diagnosis of bovine respiratory disease in pre-weaned dairy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczinski, Sébastien; L Ollivett, Terri; Dendukuri, Nandini

    2015-05-01

    There is currently no gold standard method for the diagnosis of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex in Holstein pre-weaned dairy calves. Systematic thoracic ultrasonography (TUS) has been used as a proxy for BRD, but cannot be directly used by producers. The Wisconsin calf respiratory scoring chart (CRSC) is a simpler alternative, but with unknown accuracy. Our objective was to estimate the accuracy of CRSC, while adjusting for the lack of a gold standard. Two cross sectional study populations with a high BRD prevalence (n=106 pre-weaned Holstein calves) and an average BRD prevalence (n=85 pre-weaned Holstein calves) from North America were studied. All calves were simultaneously assessed using CRSC (cutoff used ≥ 5) and TUS (cutoff used ≥ 1cm of lung consolidation). Bayesian latent class models allowing for conditional dependence were used with informative priors for BRD prevalence and TUS accuracy (sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp)) and non-informative priors for CRSC accuracies. Robustness of the model was tested by relaxing priors for prevalence or TUS accuracy. The SeCRSC (95% credible interval (CI)) and SpCRSC were 62.4% (47.9-75.8) and 74.1% (64.9-82.8) respectively. The SeTUS was 79.4% (66.4-90.9) and SpTUS was 93.9% (88.0-97.6). The imperfect accuracy of CRSC and TUS should be taken into account when using those tools to assess BRD status. PMID:25794838

  12. Evaluation of Simplexa Flu A/B & RSV for direct detection of influenza viruses (A and B) and respiratory syncytial virus in patient clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindiyeh, Musa; Kolet, Liat; Meningher, Tal; Weil, Merav; Mendelson, Ella; Mandelboim, Michal

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated the performance of the Simplexa Flu A/B & RSV kit on 170 prospective respiratory samples using a modified protocol, supplied by the manufacturer, that eliminates the RNA extraction step. Overall, compared against our laboratory-developed assay, the assay's sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 95.1%, 99.6%, 98.7%, and 98.6%, respectively. PMID:23658256

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and asthma : a study on the impact of RSV infection on allergic airway inflammation in a mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Barends, Marion

    2004-01-01

    textabstractFor many years animal studies are performed to investigate the immunity induced by an RSV infection and the immune regulatory role of RSV infections on the development and exacerbation of respiratory allergies. Since different strategies of allergen sensitisation and challenge, moments of virus infection during allergen-sensitisation and -challenge, and timing of analysis after challenge are chosen, the precise role of RSV infection in allergic inflammation is still not clear. The...

  14. Evaluation of Simplexa Flu A/B & RSV for Direct Detection of Influenza Viruses (A and B) and Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Patient Clinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolet, Liat; Meningher, Tal; Weil, Merav; Mendelson, Ella; Mandelboim, Michal

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of the Simplexa Flu A/B & RSV kit on 170 prospective respiratory samples using a modified protocol, supplied by the manufacturer, that eliminates the RNA extraction step. Overall, compared against our laboratory-developed assay, the assay's sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 95.1%, 99.6%, 98.7%, and 98.6%, respectively. PMID:23658256

  15. Rapid identification of subtypes of respiratory syncytial virus by real-time PCR%实时逆转录PCR快速鉴别呼吸道合胞病毒亚型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林虹; 郑晓群

    2005-01-01

    目的:建立SYBR Green Ⅰ实时RT-PCR快速检测呼吸道合胞病毒(respiratory syncytial virus,RSV)A、B亚型的方法.方法:根据RSV G蛋白编码基因的核苷酸序列设计三条引物,其中P1为RSV通用引物,P2、P3分别为A、B亚型特异性引物.使用SYBR Green Ⅰ荧光染料结合熔解曲线分析进行检测,根据产物特征性熔解温度(melting temperatures Tm)鉴别RSV A、B亚型.结果:本法对RSV Long株(A亚型)和CH18375株(B亚型)进行检测,其Tm值分别为84.06和89.06℃;与常见呼吸道病毒间无交叉反应;48例临床标本中检出RSV阳性29例,其中A亚型占72.4%(21/29),B亚型占27.6%(8/29).结论:SYBR Green Ⅰ实时RT-PCR结合熔解曲线分析检测RSV亚型具有快速、简便、特异等特点,可对临床标本直接分型.

  16. Effect of Antimicrobial Consumption and Production Type on Antibacterial Resistance in the Bovine Respiratory and Digestive Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catry, Boudewijn; Dewulf, Jeroen; Maes, Dominiek; Pardon, Bart; Callens, Benedicte; Vanrobaeys, Mia; Opsomer, Geert; de Kruif, Aart; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between antimicrobial use and the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in the digestive and respiratory tract in three different production systems of food producing animals. A longitudinal study was set up in 25 Belgian bovine herds (10 dairy, 10 beef, and 5 veal herds) for a 2 year monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibilities in E. coli and Pasteurellaceae retrieved from the rectum and the nasal cavity, respectively. During the first year of observation, the antimicrobial use was prospectively recorded on 15 of these farms (5 of each production type) and transformed into the treatment incidences according to the (animal) defined daily dose (TIADD) and (actually) used daily dose (TIUDD). Antimicrobial resistance rates of 4,174 E. coli (all herds) and 474 Pasteurellaceae (beef and veal herds only) isolates for 12 antimicrobial agents demonstrated large differences between intensively reared veal calves (abundant and inconstant) and more extensively reared dairy and beef cattle (sparse and relatively stable). Using linear mixed effect models, a strong relation was found between antimicrobial treatment incidences and resistance profiles of 1,639 E. coli strains (p<0.0001) and 309 Pasteurellaceae (p≤0.012). These results indicate that a high antimicrobial selection pressure, here found to be represented by low dosages of oral prophylactic and therapeutic group medication, converts not only the commensal microbiota from the digestive tract but also the opportunistic pathogenic bacteria in the respiratory tract into reservoirs of multi-resistance. PMID:26820134

  17. Effect of Antimicrobial Consumption and Production Type on Antibacterial Resistance in the Bovine Respiratory and Digestive Tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boudewijn Catry

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between antimicrobial use and the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in the digestive and respiratory tract in three different production systems of food producing animals. A longitudinal study was set up in 25 Belgian bovine herds (10 dairy, 10 beef, and 5 veal herds for a 2 year monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibilities in E. coli and Pasteurellaceae retrieved from the rectum and the nasal cavity, respectively. During the first year of observation, the antimicrobial use was prospectively recorded on 15 of these farms (5 of each production type and transformed into the treatment incidences according to the (animal defined daily dose (TIADD and (actually used daily dose (TIUDD. Antimicrobial resistance rates of 4,174 E. coli (all herds and 474 Pasteurellaceae (beef and veal herds only isolates for 12 antimicrobial agents demonstrated large differences between intensively reared veal calves (abundant and inconstant and more extensively reared dairy and beef cattle (sparse and relatively stable. Using linear mixed effect models, a strong relation was found between antimicrobial treatment incidences and resistance profiles of 1,639 E. coli strains (p<0.0001 and 309 Pasteurellaceae (p≤0.012. These results indicate that a high antimicrobial selection pressure, here found to be represented by low dosages of oral prophylactic and therapeutic group medication, converts not only the commensal microbiota from the digestive tract but also the opportunistic pathogenic bacteria in the respiratory tract into reservoirs of multi-resistance.

  18. Effects of injectable trace minerals on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to Bovine viral diarrhea virus, Bovine herpes virus 1 and Bovine respiratory syncytial virus following administration of a modified-live virus vaccine in dairy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, R A; Hurley, D J; Bittar, J H J; Saliki, J T; Woolums, A R; Moliere, F; Havenga, L J; Norton, N A; Clifton, S J; Sigmund, A B; Barber, C E; Berger, M L; Clark, M J; Fratto, M A

    2016-10-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effect of an injectable trace mineral (ITM) supplement containing zinc, manganese, selenium, and copper on the humoral and cell mediated immune (CMI) responses to vaccine antigens in dairy calves receiving a modified-live viral (MLV) vaccine containing BVDV, BHV1, PI3V and BRSV. A total of 30 dairy calves (3.5 months of age) were administered a priming dose of the MLV vaccine containing BHV1, BVDV1 & 2, BRSV, PI3V, and an attenuated-live Mannheimia-Pasteurella bacterin subcutaneously (SQ). Calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups: (1) administration of ITM SQ (ITM, n=15) or (2) injection of sterile saline SQ (Control; n=15). Three weeks later, calves received a booster of the same vaccine combination SQ, and a second administration of ITM, or sterile saline, according to the treatment group. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, 56, and 90 post-vaccination for determination of antibody titer, viral recall antigen-induced IFN-γ production, and viral antigen-induced proliferation by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Administration of ITM concurrently with MLV vaccination resulted in higher antibody titers to BVDV1 on day 28 after priming vaccination compared to the control group (P=0.03). Calves treated with ITM showed an earlier enhancement in PBMC proliferation to BVDV1 following vaccination compared to the control group. Proliferation of PBMC after BVDV stimulation tended to be higher on day 14 after priming vaccination in calves treated with ITM than in the control group (P=0.08). Calves that received ITM showed higher PBMC proliferation to BRSV stimulation on day 7 after priming vaccination compared to the control group (P=0.01). Moreover, calves in the ITM group also had an enhanced production IFN-γ by PBMC after stimulation with BRSV on day 21 after priming vaccination compared to day 0 (P<0.01). In conclusion, administration of ITM concurrently with MLV vaccination in dairy calves resulted in increased antibody titer to BVDV1, and greater PBMC proliferation to BVDV1 and BRSV recall stimulation compared to the control group, suggesting that ITM might represent a promising tool to enhance the humoral and CMI responses to MLV vaccines in cattle. PMID:27496747

  19. Hibridación in situ del virus respiratorio syncytial bovino en pulmón de cordero a diferentes tiempos postinfección Bovine respiratory syncytial virus in-situ hybridization from sheep lungs at different times postinfection

    OpenAIRE

    Redondo, E. (Emilio); Gomez, L.; Kelling, C. L.; A. GAZQUEZ; A. J. MASOT

    2003-01-01

    Se estudió, mediante la técnica de hibridación in situ, la distribución del ARN viral del virus respiratorio Sincicial Bovino (VRSB) en pulmón de corderos infectados en forma experimental, a diferentes tiempos postinoculación. La sonda usada para la hibridación in situ se preparó mediante transcripción reversa del ARN del VRSB, seguida de la amplificación mediante PCR de cADN. 25 corderos de raza Merino de ambos sexos y de un peso vivo de 55 (+/- 10) Kg, fueron inoculados por vía intratraquea...

  20. Research of impact of Zinc salt on in vitro respiratory syncytial virus%锌盐对体外呼吸道合胞病毒的作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建英; 温柏平; 吴茜; 赵琴

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the impact of Zinc salt on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Methods The cytopathic inhibition assay was used to observe the inhibiting effect of Zinc salt on RSV in the HEP-2 cells, with the inhibition index as the evaluation indictor. Results Zinc sulfate and Zinc acetate at the concentrations of 10-100 (Jun/mL had no toxic effects on the cells. Earlier virus and later Zinc salt test showed that the inhibiting indicator of Zinc sulfate and Zinc acetate at the concentration of 50 (Jum/mL was 2. Earlier Zinc salt and later virus test showed that the inhibiting indicator of Zinc sulfate and Zinc acetate at the concentration of 25 (Jun/mL was 4. Conclusion Zinc has a direct killing effect on the RSV and therefore regular Zinc supplement can prevent RSV infection.%目的 研究锌盐抗呼吸道合胞病毒的作用.方法 采用细胞病变抑制实验,观察锌盐在HEP-2细胞中对呼吸道合胞病毒的抑制作用,以抑制指数为评价指标.结果 硫酸锌和醋酸锌在10~100 μm/mL时,对细胞无毒性作用.先病毒后锌盐试验50 μm/mL浓度的硫酸锌和醋酸锌,抑制指数为2.先锌盐后病毒试验结果显示:25 μm/mL浓度的硫酸锌和醋酸锌,抑制指数为4.结论 锌对呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)有直接杀伤作用,规律补锌可以预防呼吸道合胞病毒感染.

  1. Immunological Response to Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex: An RNA-Sequence Analysis of the Bronchial Lymph Node Transcriptome

    OpenAIRE

    Tizioto, Polyana C; Kim, JaeWoo; Seabury, Christopher M.; Schnabel, Robert D; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Van Eenennaam, Alison L; Toaff-Rosenstein, Rachel; Neibergs, Holly L.; ,; Taylor, Jeremy F

    2015-01-01

    Susceptibility to bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is multi-factorial and is influenced by stress in conjunction with infection by both bacterial and viral pathogens. While vaccination is broadly used in an effort to prevent BRD, it is far from being fully protective and cases diagnosed from a combination of observed clinical signs without any attempt at identifying the causal pathogens are usually treated with antibiotics. Dairy and beef cattle losses from BRD are profound worldwide and gene...

  2. Effects of adriamycin on respiratory chain activities in mitochondria from rat liver, rat heart and bovine heart. Evidence for a preferential inhibition of complex III and IV

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolay, K.; de Kruijff, B.

    1987-01-01

    The inhibition of respiratory chain activities in rat liver, rat heart and bovine heart mitochondria by the anthracycline antibiotic adriamycin was measured in order to determine the adriamycin-sensitive sites. It appeared that complex III and IV are efficiently affected such that their activities were reduced to 50% of control values at 175 ± 25 μM adriamycin. Complex I displayed a minor sensitivity to the drug. Of the complex-I-related activities tested, only duroquinone oxidation appeared ...

  3. Evaluation of an intranasal virosomal vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus in mice: effect of TLR2 and NOD2 ligands on induction of systemic and mucosal immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shafique

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: RSV infection remains a serious threat to newborns and the elderly. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent RSV infection. A mucosal RSV vaccine would be attractive as it could induce mucosal as well as systemic antibodies, capable of protecting both the upper and lower respiratory tract. Previously, we reported on a virosomal RSV vaccine for intramuscular injection with intrinsic adjuvant properties mediated by an incorporated lipophilic Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 ligand. However, it has not been investigated whether this virosomal RSV vaccine candidate would be suitable for use in mucosal immunization strategies and if additional incorporation of other innate receptor ligands, like NOD2-ligand, could further enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the vaccine. OBJECTIVE: To explore if intranasal (IN immunization with a virosomal RSV vaccine, supplemented with TLR2 and/or NOD2-ligands, is an effective strategy to induce RSV-specific immunity. METHODS: We produced RSV-virosomes carrying TLR2 (Pam3CSK4 and/or NOD2 (L18-MDP ligands. We tested the immunopotentiating properties of these virosomes in vitro, using TLR2- and/or NOD2-ligand-responsive murine and human cell lines, and in vivo by assessing induction of protective antibody and cellular responses upon IN immunization of BALB/c mice. RESULTS: Incorporation of Pam3CSK4 and/or L18-MDP potentiates the capacity of virosomes to activate (antigen-presenting cells in vitro, as demonstrated by NF-κB induction. In vivo, incorporation of Pam3CSK4 in virosomes boosted serum IgG antibody responses and mucosal antibody responses after IN immunization. While L18-MDP alone was ineffective, incorporation of L18-MDP in Pam3CSK4-carrying virosomes further boosted mucosal antibody responses. Finally, IN immunization with adjuvanted virosomes, particularly Pam3CSK4/L18-MDP-adjuvanted-virosomes, protected mice against infection with RSV, without priming for enhanced

  4. Evaluation of the diagnostic and prognostic utility of ultrasonography at first diagnosis of presumptive bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abutarbush, Sameeh M; Pollock, Colleen M; Wildman, Brian K; Perrett, Tye; Schunicht, Oliver C; Fenton, R Kent; Hannon, Sherry J; Vogstad, Amanda R; Jim, G Kee; Booker, Calvin W

    2012-01-01

    This project investigated the use of ultrasonography at first diagnosis of presumptive early bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in feedlot cattle from western Canada. One hundred seventy-four cattle (116 cases and 58 controls) at high risk of developing BRD were enrolled in a prospective longitudinal study over 2 y (2006-2007). Cattle with clinical signs relating to the respiratory system and assessed as sick at the time of feedlot arrival (arrival fever cases) or assessed as sick in the pen 3 to 30 d post-arrival (post-arrival fever cases, post-arrival no fevers cases) were eligible for enrollment. Control animals were identified at the time of case enrollments. Ultrasonography was done using a 3.5 sector transducer at enrollment and at 2, 4, and 6 wk post-enrollment. Lung lesions were identified at least 1 time over the course of the trial in 32/116 (28%) cases and 9/58 (16%) controls. At enrollment, lung lesions were identified in 20/115 (17%) cases and 2/55 (4%) controls (data unreadable n = 4). Post-arrival fever cases (14/48) were the most likely to have a lesion identified using ultrasound. In arrival fever cases, average daily gain (enrollment to last ultrasound, average 34 d) was improved (P = 0.007) in cattle identified with a lesion at enrollment using ultrasound compared with those not identified with a lesion at that time, potentially demonstrating the effects of gut fill at arrival weighing, as these sicker animals may have eaten less prior to arrival and, therefore, had more room for improvement in weight over time due to restoration of normal gut fill. None of the ultrasound time points explored (enrollment, 2, 4, or 6 wk post-enrollment) were associated with the animal health outcomes of interest (subsequent treatment, chronicity, wastage, or mortality) for cattle enrolled at arrival or post-arrival.Ultrasonography using a 3.5 sector transducer was not particularly effective as a prognostic/diagnostic tool for early detection of BRD, but may be

  5. Prokaryotic expression, purification and immunogenicity of truncated G protein of respiratory syncytial virus%呼吸道合胞病毒截短G蛋白的原核表达、纯化及其免疫原性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李光; 井申荣; 田君; 曾韦锟; 魏云林

    2013-01-01

    目的 构建呼吸道合胞病毒(Respiratory syncytial virus,RSV)截短G蛋白的原核表达载体,并对表达、纯化后的蛋白进行免疫原性及相关免疫指标的检测.方法 人工合成G蛋白基因的部分核酸序列,采用重叠PCR法将CX3C模序替换为RSV M蛋白上的CTL表位,构建原核表达载体GCX3C-pET22b和GCTL-pET22b,转化E.coli BL21(DE3),IPTG诱导表达.表达产物经SDS-PAGE鉴定后,采用Ni2+亲和层析柱纯化目的蛋白.纯化产物经SDS-PAGE及Western blot鉴定后,免疫昆明小鼠,实验分GCC组(100μg GCX3C)、GCTL组(100μg GCTL)、阴性对照组(100μl PBS),分别于0、1、4周经小鼠双后侧肌肉注射免疫,经尾梢静脉取血,分离血清,检测IgG水平及嗜酸性粒细胞的数量,并通过小鼠体外淋巴细胞杀伤试验鉴定RSV特异性CTL应答.结果 重组原核表达载体经双酶切及测序鉴定,证明G蛋白基因改造成功;重组蛋白的相对分子质量约14 000,表达量约占菌体总蛋白的40%,主要以可溶性形式表达;纯化的重组蛋白纯度达90%以上,可与抗RSV血清发生特异性反应;小鼠血清中的特异性IgG水平随免疫次数的增加而升高(P<0.01),GCX3C蛋白和GCTL蛋白的几何平均滴度分别为1 584.89和1 995.26; GCX3C组较GCTL组小鼠血清中嗜酸性粒细胞数量明显增加(P<0.01);GCTL蛋白免疫小鼠后可产生RSV特异性的CTL应答效应.结论 已成功原核表达了GCX3C蛋白和GCTL蛋白,两种蛋白均有较好的免疫原性,GCTL蛋白可消除由CX3C模序引起的嗜酸性粒细胞增多,并增强了CTL效应,G蛋白基因的改造达到了预期效果.%Objective To construct a prokaryotic expression vector for truncated G protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and determine the immunogenicity of expressed and purified protein. Methods Overlapping PCR was used to substitute the CX3C motif nucleotides in G protein partly synthesized with one of CTL epitope nucleotides from M protein

  6. Characterization of the reaction of decoupling ubiquinone with bovine mitochondrial respiratory complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuya, Takahiro; Okuda, Kenji; Murai, Masatoshi; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2016-08-01

    We previously produced the unique ubiquinone QT ("decoupling" quinone), the catalytic reduction of which in NADH-quinone oxidoreduction with bovine heart mitochondrial NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is completely decoupled from proton translocation across the membrane domain. This feature is markedly distinct from those of typical short-chain quinones such as ubiquinone-1. To further characterize the features of the QT reaction with complex I, we herein synthesized three QT analogs, QT2-QT4, and characterized their electron transfer reactions. We found that all aspects of electron transfer (e.g. electron-accepting activity and membrane potential formation) vary significantly among these analogs. The features of QT2 as decoupling quinone were slightly superior to those of original QT. Based on these results, we conclude that the bound positions of QTs within the quinone binding cavity susceptibly change depending on their side-chain structures, and the positions, in turn, govern the behavior of QTs as electron acceptors. PMID:27140857

  7. Epidemiological Study of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection In Children of Suzhou Region%苏州地区儿童呼吸道合胞病毒感染的流行病学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾凤珍; 周利兵; 张学兰; 杜晓晨; 谢敏慧

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the epidemiology and influential factors of respiratory syncytial virus infection in children of Suzhou region,thus to guideline the prevention and treatment of RSV infection. Methods To collect 18,170 sputum samples of children who were hospitalized to Children's Hospital Affiliated to Soochow University due to respiratory infection between May 2008 to April 2011 and detect RSV antigen using direct immunofluorescence. Results 2,773 children were found RSV positive,and the positive detection rate was 15.26%,82.87% of RSV infection occurred below 12-month age;Male female ratio was 1.97:1(P <0.001),the morbidity peak was from December to following March.The RSV positive detection rate was lower in breast feeding infants than non-breast feeding infants below 12 months.<6-month age being born in epidemic season,passive smoking,maternal smoking,brother-sister number,etc,can increase the infection rate of RSV. Conclusion The epidemic status quo of RSV infection in children of Suzhou region was consistent with other temperate zone cities home and abroad.The epidemic peak was in winter and spring.0~12 months age group constituted the most in RSV infection.Breast feeding had protective effect.Factors,such as male gender,passive smoking,maternal smoking,multiple brothers or sisters,age below 6 months,being born in epidemic season,can all increase the RSV infection risk.%目的 调查苏州地区儿童呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)感染的流行现状及其影响因素,为RSV感染的防治提供依据.方法 收集苏州大学附属儿童医院2008年5月~2011 年4月三年间因呼吸道感染住院的患儿痰标本18,170例,采用直接免疫荧光法检测RSV抗原.结果 18,170例呼吸道感染患儿中,RSV阳性者2,773例,阳性检出率15.26%,82.87%的RSV感染发生在12月以下患儿;男女比例1.97:1(P<0.001),发病高峰集中在每年的12月至次年的3月;12月以内母乳喂养儿较非母乳喂养儿RSV阳

  8. Cattle with increased severity of bovine respiratory disease complex exhibit decreased capacity to protect against histone cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matera, J A; Wilson, B K; Hernandez Gifford, J A; Step, D L; Krehbiel, C R; Gifford, C A

    2015-04-01

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in feedlot cattle. Significant inflammation and lesions are often observed in lungs of infected cattle. During acute inflammatory responses, histones contribute to mortality in rodents and humans and serum proteins can protect against histone-induced cytotoxicity. We hypothesized that cattle experiencing chronic or fatal cases of BRDC have reduced ability to protect against cytotoxic effects of histones. Serum samples were collected from 66 bull calves at the time of normal feedlot processing procedures. Animals were retrospectively assigned to groups consisting of calves never treated for BRDC (control [CONT]; n = 10), calves treated with antimicrobials once for BRDC (1T; n = 16), calves treated twice for BRDC (2T; n = 13), calves treated 3 times for BRDC (3T; n = 14), or calves treated 4 times for BRDC (4T; n = 13). Samples were also collected each time animals received antimicrobial treatment; animals within a group were further sorted by calves that recovered and calves that died to test histone cytotoxicity. Bovine kidney cells were cultured in duplicate in 96-well plates and exposed to 0 or 50 μg/mL of total histones for 18 h with 1% serum from each animal. Cell viability was assessed by the addition of resazurin for 6 h followed by fluorescent quantification. Fluorescent values from serum alone were subtracted from values obtained for histone treatment for each animal. Serum from CONT, 1T, and 2T at initial processing all exhibited a similar (P > 0.10) response to histone treatment with fluorescent values of -312 ± 557, -1,059 ± 441, and -975 ± 489, respectively. However, 3T and 4T demonstrated an impaired capacity (P < 0.05) to protect against histones (-2,778 ± 471 and -3,026 ± 489) at initial processing when compared to the other groups. When sorted by mortality within group, calves that were treated twice and recovered (-847 ± 331) demonstrated a greater (P

  9. Clinical patterns and seasonal trends in respiratory syncytial virus hospitalizations in São Paulo, Brazil Padrões clínicos e sazonalidade das hospitalizações causadas pelo vírus respiratório sincicial em São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra E. VIEIRA

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The respiratory viruses are recognized as the most frequent lower respiratory tract pathogens for infants and young children in developed countries but less is known for developing populations. The authors conducted a prospective study to evaluate the occurrence, clinical patterns, and seasonal trends of viral infections among hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract disease (Group A. The presence of respiratory viruses in children's nasopharyngeal was assessed at admission in a pediatric ward. Cell cultures and immunofluorescence assays were used for viral identification. Complementary tests included blood and pleural cultures conducted for bacterial investigation. Clinical data and radiological exams were recorded at admission and throughout the hospitalization period. To better evaluate the results, a non- respiratory group of patients (Group B was also constituted for comparison. Starting in February 1995, during a period of 18 months, 414 children were included- 239 in Group A and 175 in Group B. In Group A, 111 children (46.4% had 114 viruses detected while only 5 children (2.9% presented viruses in Group B. Respiratory Syncytial Virus was detected in 100 children from Group A (41.8%, Adenovirus in 11 (4.6%, Influenza A virus in 2 (0.8%, and Parainfluenza virus in one child (0.4%. In Group A, aerobic bacteria were found in 14 cases (5.8%. Respiratory Syncytial Virus was associated to other viruses and/or bacteria in six cases. There were two seasonal trends for Respiratory Syncytial Virus cases, which peaked in May and June. All children affected by the virus were younger than 3 years of age, mostly less than one year old. Episodic diffuse bronchial commitment and/or focal alveolar condensation were the clinical patterns more often associated to Respiratory Syncytial Virus cases. All children from Group A survived. In conclusion, it was observed that Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most frequent pathogen found in hospitalized

  10. Observations on macrolide resistance and susceptibility testing performance in field isolates collected from clinical bovine respiratory disease cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeDonder, Keith D; Harhay, Dayna M; Apley, Michael D; Lubbers, Brian V; Clawson, Michael L; Schuller, Gennie; Harhay, Gregory P; White, Brad J; Larson, Robert L; Capik, Sarah F; Riviere, Jim E; Kalbfleisch, Ted; Tessman, Ronald K

    2016-08-30

    The objectives of this study were; first, to describe gamithromycin susceptibility of Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni isolated from cattle diagnosed with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and previously treated with either gamithromycin for control of BRD (mass medication=MM) or sham-saline injected (control=CON); second, to describe the macrolide resistance genes present in genetically typed M. haemolytica isolates; third, use whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to correlate the phenotypic resistance and genetic determinants for resistance among M. haemolytica isolates. M. haemolytica (n=276), P. multocida (n=253), and H. somni (n=78) were isolated from feedlot cattle diagnosed with BRD. Gamithromycin susceptibility was determined by broth microdilution. Whole-genome sequencing was utilized to determine the presence/absence of macrolide resistance genes and to genetically type M. haemolytica. Generalized linear mixed models were built for analysis. There was not a significant difference between MM and CON groups in regards to the likelihood of culturing a resistant isolate of M. haemolytica or P. multocida. The likelihood of culturing a resistant isolate of M. haemolytica differed significantly by state of origin in this study. A single M. haemolytica genetic subtype was associated with an over whelming majority of the observed resistance. H. somni isolation counts were low and statistical models would not converge. Phenotypic resistance was predicted with high sensitivity and specificity by WGS. Additional studies to elucidate the relationships between phenotypic expression of resistance/genetic determinants for resistance and clinical response to antimicrobials are necessary to inform judicious use of antimicrobials in the context of relieving animal disease and suffering. PMID:27527782

  11. Mechanisms of infection in the respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskerville, A

    1981-12-01

    Related to its potential vulnerability the respiratory tract has a very complex and effective defence apparatus. The interaction between these defence mechanisms and certain characteristics of aetiological agents results in a pattern in which initial infections by these agents tend to occur at specific sites in the tract. Infections in which the primary portal of entry is in the upper respiratory tract include Bordetella bronchiseptica and Haemophilus spp in pigs; Pasteurella spp in cattle, sheep, pigs; Mycoplasma spp in cattle, sheep, pigs and poultry; equine herpesvirus 1 in horses; infectious bovine rhinotracheitis in cattle; parainfluenza 3 in cattle and sheep; infectious laryngo-tracheitis and infectious bronchitis in poultry; feline viral rhinotracheitis and calicivirus in cats; Aujeszky's disease virus and swine influenza in pigs; and equine influenza in horses. Infections in which the primary portal of entry is in the lower respiratory tract include Aspergillus fumigatus in poultry and mammals, respiratory syncytial virus in cattle, distemper virus in dogs and adenovirus in cattle and dogs. A fuller understanding of the interactions between an agent and the host at the point of entry would make it much easier to develop effective vaccines and therapeutic agents. PMID:16030806

  12. Infecções do trato respiratório inferior pelo vírus sincicial respiratório em crianças hospitalizadas menores de um ano de idade Respiratory syncytial vírus - associated lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio D'Elia

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Analisou-se características clínicas e evolutivas em crianças menores de um ano internadas com infecção do trato respiratório inferior por vírus sincicial respiratório (VSR. Feito estudo transversal com 89 lactentes hospitalizados durante as épocas de maior incidência do VSR, em 1997 e 1998, na cidade do Rio de Janeiro. Foram pesquisados antígenos virais, nas secreções de nasofaringe, com anticorpos monoclonais anti-VSR, antiinfluenza A e B e antiparainfluenza tipo 3, por ensaio de imunofluorescência indireta. Formaram-se três grupos: bronquiolite ou bronquite sibilante (n=44, pneumonia (n=26 e bronquiolite e pneumonia (n=19. Houve positividade para o VSR em 42 (47,1% pacientes. Em 1997 a média de dias de oxigenoterapia foi de 5,2 e em 1998, de 2,5 dias (p> 0,05. Não houve diferença de apresentação clínica entre os lactentes que apresentaram positividade para o VSR e aqueles cujo resultado foi negativo. A sensibilidade e especificidade da sibilância em relação ao isolamento de VSR foram 85% e 65%, respectivamente. O VSR foi o principal causador de infeções do trato respiratório inferior em lactentes que necessitaram de hospitalização.For analysis of clinical features and outcome of hospitalized infants with respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract infection, was carried out. Cross-sectional study with 89 infants, hospitalized in two public hospitals during the 1997 and 1998 RSV seasons, in Rio de Janeiro city. Nasopharyngeal secretions were obtained and specimens processed for viral antigens detection by indirect immunofluorescence assay with the use of anti RSV, antiinfluenza A and B and anti parainfluenza type 3 monoclonal antibodies. Patients were allocated into three diagnostic groups: bronchiolitis or wheeze bronchitis (n = 44; Pneumonia (n = 26 and bronchiolitis or wheeze bronchitis and pneumonia (n = 19. Positivity for RSV was found in 42 (47.1% patients. More days of hospitalization were seen in

  13. Infection of the upper respiratory tract of hamsters by the bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 BN-1 strain expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Takashi; Minakuchi, Moeko; Sagai, Mami; Kokuho, Takehiro; Konishi, Misako; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Takeuchi, Kaoru

    2015-02-01

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is an important pathogen associated with bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). We have generated a recombinant BPIV3 expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (rBPIV3-EGFP) based on the BN-1 strain isolated in Japan. After intranasal infection of hamsters with rBPIV3-EGFP, EGFP fluorescence was detected in the upper respiratory tract including the nasal turbinates, pharynx, larynx, and trachea. In the nasal turbinates, rBPIV3-EGFP attained high titers (>10(6) TCID50/g of tissue) 2-4 days after infection. Ciliated epithelial cells in the nasal turbinates and trachea were infected with rBPIV3-EGFP. Histopathological analysis indicated that mucosal epithelial cells in bronchi were shed by 6 days after infection, leaving non-ciliated cells, which may have increased susceptibility to bacterial infection leading to the development of BRDC. These data indicate that rBPIV3-EGFP infection of hamsters is a useful small animal model for studying the development of BPIV3-associated BRDC. PMID:25543964

  14. Serological detection of infection dynamics for respiratory viruses among dairy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Pelin; Yeşilbağ, Kadir

    2015-11-18

    The aim of this study is to reveal infection dynamics of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (PI-3), bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine adenovirus type 3 (BAV-3) and bovine coronavirus (BCoV), which are important viral pathogens of respiratory disease complex in ruminants. Through such an analysis, the regression period of maternally derived antibodies and optimum vaccination time in calves can be recommended. A total of 10 farms were grouped as large (4)-, medium (2)- and small (4)- sized enterprises according to their animal population. Newborn calves (n: 94) delivered during a calendar month on the farms were studied. Blood samples were collected from these calves during their 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 10th and 12th months of age. Blood samples were also taken from their dams during the first sampling. Neutralizing antibody titers were detected using the serum neutralization test (SN50). New PI-3 and BVDV infections at the early stages of life were determined in the calves. Maternal antibodies began to decrease in the 2nd month for BRSV, BHV-1 and BAV-3 (97.8%, 25.5% and 91.4%) and in the 3rd month for PI-3, BVDV and BCoV (85.1%, 67% and 93.6%). It was concluded that maternal antibodies begin to decrease after the 1st month and that the possible first exposure of calves to respiratory viruses is after the 2nd month. Therefore, it is recommended that the first vaccination program including prime and booster doses can be applied between 2 and 4 months of age. Furthermore, re-vaccination of animals at 6 months after the booster dose is also suggested. PMID:26380946

  15. Th17/Treg失衡在呼吸道合胞病毒致支气管哮喘发病机制中的作用%The role of Th17/Treg imbalances in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma caused by respiratory syncytial virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施天昀; 揭志军

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial asthma (asthma) is an immune mediated inflammatory disease with airway hyperresponsiveness which is a serious problem for human health.Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most common pathogens caused lower respiratory tract infection in infants and adults.Many recent studies have found that acute RSV infection in infancy could significantly increase the probability of occurrence of asthma in adults,and its mechanism is quite complex and associated with multiple factors.We reviewed the role of Th17/Treg imbalances in the pathogenesis of asthma caused by RSV in this paper.%支气管哮喘(简称哮喘)是一种免疫介导的气道反应性增高的疾病,呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)是成人及婴幼儿下呼吸道感染最常见的病原体之一.最近许多研究发现婴幼儿时期的急性RSV感染可以显著增加成年后发生哮喘的几率,其机制相当复杂,是多因素作用的结果.本文阐述Th17/Treg失衡在RSV致哮喘发病机制中的作用.

  16. Genetic parameters estimated at receiving for circulating cortisol, immunoglobulin G, interleukin 8, and incidence of bovine respiratory disease in feedlot beef steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrum, R R; Speidel, S E; Salak-Johnson, J L; Chase, C C L; Peel, R K; Weaber, R L; Loneagan, G H; Wagner, J J; Boddhireddy, P; Thomas, M G; Prayaga, K; DeNise, S; Enns, R M

    2016-07-01

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (i.e., shipping fever and bacterial bronchopneumonia) is a multifaceted respiratory illness influenced by numerous environmental factors and microorganisms. Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is just one component of BRD complex. Because BRD is moderately heritable, it may be possible to reduce the incidence of BRD through genetic selection. The objectives of this study were to determine the heritability and associative genetic relationships among immune system traits (i.e., cortisol, total IgG, IgG isotypes, and IL-8) in cattle monitored for BRD incidence. At an average of 83 d after weaning (219 d age and mean = 221.7 kg [SD 4.34]), crossbred steer calves ( = 2,869) were received at a commercial feedlot in southeastern Colorado over a 2-yr period. At receiving, jugular blood samples were collected at 212 (yr 1) and 226 d (yr 2) of age for immune trait analyses. The BRD phenotype was defined as a binomial variable (0 = no and 1 = yes) and compared with immune system traits measured at receiving (prior to illness onset). An animal identified as BRD positive exhibited ≥ 2 clinical signs (i.e., eye or nasal discharge, cough, lethargy, rapid breathing, acute interstitial pneumonia, or acute upper respiratory syndrome and/or a rectal temperature > 39.7°C). Heritability and genetic correlation estimates for categorical variable BRD, cortisol, IgG, IgG1, IgG2, and IL-8 were estimated from a sire model using ASREML. Heritability estimates were low to moderate for BRD (0.17 ± 0.08), cortisol (0.13 ± 0.05), IgG (0.15 ± 0.05), IgG1 (0.11 ± 0.05), IgG2 (0.24 ± 0.06), and IL-8 (0.30 ± 0.06). A moderate negative genetic correlation was determined between BRD and cortisol ( = -0.19 ± 0.32). Moderate positive correlations were found between BRD with IgG (0.42 ± 0.28), IgG1 (0.36 ± 0.32), and IL-8 ( = 0.26 ± 0.26). Variation in the BRD phenotype and immune system traits suggested herd health improvement may be achieved through genetic

  17. Bovine herpesvirus-1: Genetic diversity of field strains from cattle with respiratory disease, genital, fetal disease and systemic neonatal disease and their relationship to vaccine strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, R W; d'Offay, J M; Dubovi, E J; Eberle, R

    2016-09-01

    Bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1) causes disease in cattle with varied clinical forms. In the U.S. there are two BoHV1 subtypes, BoHV-1.1 and BoHV-1.2b. Control programs in North America incorporate modified live (MLV) or killed (KV) viral vaccines. However, BoHV-1 strains continue to be isolated from diseased animals or fetuses after vaccination. It is possible to differentiate BoHV-1 wild-type from MLV vaccine strains by determining their single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) patterns through either whole-genome sequencing or PCR sequencing of genomic regions containing vaccine-defining SNPs. To determine the BoHV-1 subtype in clinical isolates and their relationship to MLV strains, 8 isolates from varied clinical disease at three different laboratories in the U.S. were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. Five samples were isolated within the past 5 years from New York and 3 were archived samples recovered 35 years prior from Oklahoma and Louisiana. Based on phylogenetic analysis, four of the cases appeared to be due to an MLV vaccine: 3 cases of aborted fetuses and one neonate with systemic BoHV-1 disease. One aborted fetus was from a herd with no reported history of MLV vaccination in two years. The remaining four isolates did not group with any MLV vaccines: two were associated with bovine respiratory disease, one with vulvovaginitis, and a fourth was determined to be a BoHV-1.2b respiratory isolate. Recovery of BoHV-1.1 that is very closely related to an MLV vaccine virus from a herd not receiving vaccines in an extended period prior to its isolation suggests that MLV viruses may remain latent or circulate within herds for long periods. PMID:27374060

  18. Assembly of a chimeric respiratory chain from bovine heart submitochondrial particles and cytochrome bd terminal oxidase of Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Gavrikova, Eleonora V.; Grivennikova, Vera G.; Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Cecchini, Gary; Vinogradov, Andrei D.

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome bd is a terminal quinol oxidase in Escherichia coli. Mitochondrial respiration is inhibited at cytochrome bc1 (complex III) by myxothiazol. Mixing purified cytochrome bd oxidase with myxothiazol-inhibited bovine heart submitochondrial particles (SMP) restores up to 50% of the original rotenone-sensitive NADH oxidase and succinate oxidase activities in the absence of exogenous ubiquinone analogues. Complex III bypassed respiration and is saturated at amounts of added cytochrome bd s...

  19. Some viral and bacterial respiratory tract infections of dairy cattle during the summer season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kale M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, dairy cattle with respiratory system problems that were brought to a private slaughterhouse in Burdur province were investigated for viral and bacterial infections present in the summer season. The blood samples were collected from 56 animals. The samples were tested for antibodies against bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV, bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3 and bovine adenovirus 3 (BAV-3 by ELISA. Bacteriological cultivation was carried out from lung samples taken after cutting the same animals. The seropositivity rates which were determined for 5 viruses in cattle (BoHV- 1, BVDV, BRSV, BPIV-3 and BAV-3 were 7.14%, 50%, 94.64%, 94.64% and 82.14% respectively. The presence of antibodies against the viruses was as follows; 5.36% of cattle had antibodies against only one virus, 14.29% against two, 30.36% against three, 44.64% against four and 5.36% against five viruses. A total of 36 bacterial agents were isolated from 30 out of 56 lung samples. From the lung samples, only one bacterium was isolated from 39.3% (22/56 samples, and more than one bacterium from 14.3% (8/56. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus spp. were detected as the most often isolated agents. Compared to bacteria, the rates of viral infections associated with Escherichia coli (BRSV+BPIV-3+BAV- 3+Escherichia coli; 8.92% and BRSV+BPIV-3+Escherichia coli; 5.35% were higher. As a consequence, it was thought that primary agents which were the viruses and bacteria may have attended as secondary factors in respiratory tract infections of dairy cattle.

  20. Bovine Gamma Delta T Cells Contribute to Exacerbated IL-17 Production in Response to Co-Infection with Bovine RSV and Mannheimia haemolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi L McGill

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in children under five years of age. IL-17 and Th17 responses are increased in children infected with HRSV and have been implicated in both protective and pathogenic roles during infection. Bovine RSV (BRSV is genetically closely related to HRSV and is a leading cause of severe respiratory infections in young cattle. While BRSV infection in the calf parallels many aspects of human infection with HRSV, IL-17 and Th17 responses have not been studied in the bovine. Here we demonstrate that calves infected with BRSV express significant levels of IL-17, IL-21 and IL-22; and both CD4 T cells and γδ T cells contribute to this response. In addition to causing significant morbidity from uncomplicated infections, BRSV infection also contributes to the development of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC, a leading cause of morbidity in both beef and dairy cattle. BRDC is caused by a primary viral infection, followed by secondary bacterial pneumonia by pathogens such as Mannheimia haemolytica. Here, we demonstrate that in vivo infection with M. haemolytica results in increased expression of IL-17, IL-21 and IL-22. We have also developed an in vitro model of BRDC and show that co-infection of PBMC with BRSV followed by M. haemolytica leads to significantly exacerbated IL-17 production, which is primarily mediated by IL-17-producing γδ T cells. Together, our results demonstrate that calves, like humans, mount a robust IL-17 response during RSV infection; and suggest a previously unrecognized role for IL-17 and γδ T cells in the pathogenesis of BRDC.

  1. Bovine Gamma Delta T Cells Contribute to Exacerbated IL-17 Production in Response to Co-Infection with Bovine RSV and Mannheimia haemolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Jodi L; Rusk, Rachel A; Guerra-Maupome, Mariana; Briggs, Robert E; Sacco, Randy E

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in children under five years of age. IL-17 and Th17 responses are increased in children infected with HRSV and have been implicated in both protective and pathogenic roles during infection. Bovine RSV (BRSV) is genetically closely related to HRSV and is a leading cause of severe respiratory infections in young cattle. While BRSV infection in the calf parallels many aspects of human infection with HRSV, IL-17 and Th17 responses have not been studied in the bovine. Here we demonstrate that calves infected with BRSV express significant levels of IL-17, IL-21 and IL-22; and both CD4 T cells and γδ T cells contribute to this response. In addition to causing significant morbidity from uncomplicated infections, BRSV infection also contributes to the development of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC), a leading cause of morbidity in both beef and dairy cattle. BRDC is caused by a primary viral infection, followed by secondary bacterial pneumonia by pathogens such as Mannheimia haemolytica. Here, we demonstrate that in vivo infection with M. haemolytica results in increased expression of IL-17, IL-21 and IL-22. We have also developed an in vitro model of BRDC and show that co-infection of PBMC with BRSV followed by M. haemolytica leads to significantly exacerbated IL-17 production, which is primarily mediated by IL-17-producing γδ T cells. Together, our results demonstrate that calves, like humans, mount a robust IL-17 response during RSV infection; and suggest a previously unrecognized role for IL-17 and γδ T cells in the pathogenesis of BRDC. PMID:26942409

  2. Bovine Gamma Delta T Cells Contribute to Exacerbated IL-17 Production in Response to Co-Infection with Bovine RSV and Mannheimia haemolytica

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Jodi L.; Rusk, Rachel A.; Guerra-Maupome, Mariana; Briggs, Robert E.; Sacco, Randy E.

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in children under five years of age. IL-17 and Th17 responses are increased in children infected with HRSV and have been implicated in both protective and pathogenic roles during infection. Bovine RSV (BRSV) is genetically closely related to HRSV and is a leading cause of severe respiratory infections in young cattle. While BRSV infection in the calf parallels many aspects of human infection with HRSV, IL-17 and Th17 responses have not been studied in the bovine. Here we demonstrate that calves infected with BRSV express significant levels of IL-17, IL-21 and IL-22; and both CD4 T cells and γδ T cells contribute to this response. In addition to causing significant morbidity from uncomplicated infections, BRSV infection also contributes to the development of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC), a leading cause of morbidity in both beef and dairy cattle. BRDC is caused by a primary viral infection, followed by secondary bacterial pneumonia by pathogens such as Mannheimia haemolytica. Here, we demonstrate that in vivo infection with M. haemolytica results in increased expression of IL-17, IL-21 and IL-22. We have also developed an in vitro model of BRDC and show that co-infection of PBMC with BRSV followed by M. haemolytica leads to significantly exacerbated IL-17 production, which is primarily mediated by IL-17-producing γδ T cells. Together, our results demonstrate that calves, like humans, mount a robust IL-17 response during RSV infection; and suggest a previously unrecognized role for IL-17 and γδ T cells in the pathogenesis of BRDC. PMID:26942409

  3. Lower respiratory tract infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus in infants: the role played by specific antibodies Infecção por virus sincicial respiratório: o papel dos anticorpos séricos específicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra E. Vieira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a major etiological agent of lower respiratory tract infection in infants. Genotypes of this virus and the role of the infants' serum antibodies have yet to be fully clarified. This knowledge is important for the development of effective therapeutic and prophylactic measures. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the types and genotypes of RSV causing respiratory tract infection in infants, to analyze the association of subtype-specific serum antibodies with the occurrence of infection and to evaluate the presence of subtype-specific antibodies in the infants' mothers and their association with the profile of the childrens' serum antibodies. METHODS: This was a prospective study on infants hospitalized with respiratory infection. Nasopharyngeal secretions were collected for viral investigation using indirect immunofluorescence and viral culture and blood was collected to test for antibodies using the Luminex Multiplex system. RESULTS: 192 infants were evaluated, with 60.9% having RSV (73.5%- A and 20.5% B. Six genotypes of the virus were identified: A5, A2, B3, B5, A7 and B4. The seroprevalence of the subtype-specific serum antibodies was high. The presence and levels of subtype-specific antibodies were similar, irrespective of the presence of infection or the viral type or genotype. The mothers' antibody profiles were similar to their infants'. CONCLUSIONS: Although the prevalence of subtype-specific antibodies was elevated, these antibodies did not provide protection independently of virus type/genotype. The similarity in the profiles of subtype-specific antibodies presented by the mothers and their children was consistent with transplacental passage.INTRODUÇÃO: O vírus sincicial respiratório é um dos principais agentes etiológicos das infecções do aparelho respiratório inferior em lactentes. Os genótipos deste vírus e o papel dos anticorpos séricos ainda não estão esclarecidos. Este

  4. Association of herd BRSV and BHV-1 seroprevalence with respiratory disease and reproductive performance in adult dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raaperi Kerli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to detect the associations between bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1 status of a herd and respiratory disease (BRD occurrence and reproductive performance in pregnant heifers and cows. The association between management-related factors and higher BRD occurrence was also estimated. Methods Serum samples, collected from cows and youngstock from 103 dairy cattle herds, were analyzed for antibodies against BHV-1, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV, bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV, and Mycoplasma bovis. A questionnaire was used to collect data concerning herd management factors and reproductive performance, as well as the occurrence of clinical signs of respiratory disease in the last two years, as evaluated by the veterinarian or farm manager. Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA and logistic regression analysis were performed to identify and quantify the risk factors. Results A low to moderate prevalence (1-49% of BRSV antibodies among youngstock was associated with a high occurrence of respiratory disease (OR = 6.2, p = 0.010 in cows and in-calf heifers. Employees of the farm may participate in the spread of such disease. Larger herd size, loose-housing of cows, housing youngstock separately from cows until pregnancy, and purchasing new animals were factors possibly related to a high occurrence of respiratory disease symptoms in pregnant heifers and cows. The highest risk of abortions (> 1.3% and increased insemination index (number of inseminations per pregnancy (> 1.9 occurred in herds with a moderate prevalence of BHV-1 antibodies (1-49% in cows. Conclusions BHV-1 was not associated with acute respiratory disease in adult dairy cattle, however was significantly related to reproductive performance. BRSV possesses the main role in respiratory disease complex in adult dairy cattle.

  5. Evaluation of pulmonary dysfunctions and acid–base imbalances induced by Chlamydia psittaci in a bovine model of respiratory infection

    OpenAIRE

    Ostermann, Carola; Linde, Susanna; Siegling-Vlitakis, Christiane; Reinhold, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlamydia psittaci (Cp) is a respiratory pathogen capable of inducing acute pulmonary zoonotic disease (psittacosis) or persistent infection. To elucidate the pathogenesis of this infection, a translational large animal model was recently introduced by our group. This study aims at quantifying and differentiating pulmonary dysfunction and acid–base imbalances induced by Cp. Methods Forty-two calves were grouped in (i) animals inoculated with Cp (n = 21) and (ii) controls sham-inocu...

  6. Concentrações de interleucina-2 na secreção nasofaríngea de crianças com bronquiolite viral aguda pelo vírus respiratório sincicial Concentrations of interleukin-2 in the nasopharyngeal secretion of children with acute respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia M. Giugno

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar as concentrações de interleucina-2 (IL-2 na secreção nasofaríngea de crianças (0-24 meses acometidas de bronquiolite viral aguda pelo vírus respiratório sincicial nas primeiras 12 horas de hospitalização e correlacionar os níveis encontrados com a gravidade da doença. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo com amostragem seqüencial realizado no período de junho a agosto de 1999. Foram incluídos 62 pacientes previamente hígidos, internados com diagnóstico de bronquiolite viral aguda caracterizado por pródromos recentes de coriza e/ou obstrução nasal que evoluíram com pelo menos dois dos seguintes sinais: disfunção respiratória, taquipnéia, sibilos ou crepitações. Todos os pacientes tiveram a presença de vírus respiratório sincicial detectada no aspirado nasofaríngeo. As amostras de secreção nasofaríngea foram obtidas nas primeiras 12 horas de hospitalização. As dosagens de IL-2 foram realizadas por ensaio imunoenzimático. A gravidade da doença foi avaliada por: medida da saturação de oxigênio da hemoglobina por oximetria de pulso, sistema de escore clínico modificado, tempo de uso de oxigênio, tempo de hospitalização e necessidade de ventilação mecânica, sendo estas variáveis comparadas em relação às medianas de IL-2 através dos testes de Spearman e Kruskal-Wallis e, para a análise categorizada da interleucina, através do teste de qui-quadrado. RESULTADOS: A mediana de idade dos pacientes foi 2,2 (1,3-4 meses. O sexo masculino foi observado em 54% dos casos. Saturação de oxigênio da hemoglobina por oximetria de pulso na hospitalização foi OBJECTIVE: To assess interleukin-2 concentrations in nasopharyngeal secretion of children (0-24 months with acute respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis, within the first 12 hours of hospital admission, and compare the levels of IL-2 with the severity of the illness. METHODS: Prospective study performed between June and August 1999. The study

  7. Viral respiratory infections : Diagnosis and epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Rotzén Östlund, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Background. Respiratory viral infections are common causes of human morbidity and mortality in children as well as in adults. Adenovirus, influenza virus, parainfluenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) have been recognized for many years. During recent years two main events have influenced both the diagnosis and our knowledge of respiratory virus epidemiology: (1) Five new viruses have been described; (2) the use of molecular methods for the diagnosis of respirato...

  8. Sensitivity and specificity of on-farm scoring systems and nasal culture to detect bovine respiratory disease complex in preweaned dairy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, William J; Lehenbauer, Terry W; Van Eenennaam, Alison L; Drake, Christiana M; Kass, Philip H; Farver, Thomas B; Aly, Sharif S

    2016-03-01

    The California (CA) and Wisconsin (WI) clinical scoring systems have been proposed for bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) detection in preweaned dairy calves. The screening sensitivity (SSe), for estimating BRDC prevalence in a cohort of calves, diagnostic sensitivity (DSe), for confirming BRDC in ill calves, and specificity (Sp) were estimated for each of the scoring systems, as well as for nasal swab cultures for aerobic bacteria and mycoplasma species. Thoracic ultrasound and auscultation were used as the reference standard tests interpreted in parallel. A total of 536 calves (221 with BRDC and 315 healthy) were sampled from 5 premises in California. The SSe of 46.8%, DSe of 72.6%, and Sp of 87.4% was determined for the CA system. The SSe of 46.0%, DSe of 71.1%, and Sp of 91.2% was determined for the WI system. For aerobic culture, the SSe was 43.4%, DSe was 52.6%, and Sp was 71.3%; for Mycoplasma spp. culture, the SSe was 57.5%, DSe was 68.9%, and Sp was 59.7%. The screening and diagnostic sensitivities of the scoring systems were not significantly different but the Sp of the WI system was greater by 3.8%. Scoring systems can serve as rapid on-farm tools to determine the burden of BRDC in preweaned dairy calves. However, users may expect the SSe to be less than the DSe when confirming BRDC in an ill calf. PMID:26796957

  9. Evaluation of multiple ancillary therapies used in combination with an antimicrobial in newly received high-risk calves treated for bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B K; Step, D L; Maxwell, C L; Wagner, J J; Richards, C J; Krehbiel, C R

    2015-07-01

    Ancillary therapy (ANC) is commonly provided in conjunction with an antimicrobial when treating calves for suspected bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in an attempt to improve the response to a suspected BRD challenge. The first experiment evaluated the effects of 3 ANC in combination with an antimicrobial in high-risk calves treated for BRD during a 56-d receiving period. Newly received crossbred steers (n = 516; initial BW = 217 ± 20 kg) were monitored by trained personnel for clinical signs of BRD. Calves that met antimicrobial treatment criteria (n = 320) were then randomly assigned to experimental ANC treatment (80 steers/experimental ANC treatment): intravenous flunixin meglumine injection (NSAID), intranasal viral vaccination (VACC), intramuscular vitamin C injection (VITC), or no ANC (NOAC). Animal served as the experimental unit for all variables except DMI and G:F (pen served as the experimental unit for DMI and G:F). Within calves treated 3 times for BRD, those receiving NOAC had lower (P risk calves receiving antimicrobial treatment for suspected BRD. PMID:26440032

  10. Study on efficacy and influence of montelukast on bronchitis symptoms and wheezing in treatment of bronchiolitis caused by respiratory ;syncytial virus%孟鲁司特治疗呼吸道合胞病毒感染的毛细支气管炎的疗效及对气管炎症和再次喘息的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈英; 李居武; 于飞

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨孟鲁司特治疗呼吸道合胞病毒感染的毛细支气管炎的疗效及对气管炎症和再次喘息的影响。方法选择呼吸道合胞病毒感染的毛细支气管炎患儿120例随机分为观察组与对照组各60例,对照组给予镇咳、平喘、抗病毒等常规治疗,观察组在常规治疗的基础上再给予孟鲁司特维持治疗12周,比较两组患儿治疗有效率、喘息改善时间、平均住院时间,治疗前、后血清半胱氨酰白三烯( CysLTs)、嗜酸粒细胞阳离子蛋白( ECP)水平及再次喘息发生率。结果①观察组治疗有效率为100%,明显高于对照组的88.33%,差异有统计学意义( P ﹤0.05)。②观察组喘息改善时间、平均住院时间较对照组短,差异有统计学意义( P ﹤0.05)。③两组治疗后CysLTs、ECP水平较治疗前明显降低,观察组治疗后CysLTs、ECP水平较对照组降低明显,差异有统计学意义(均P ﹤0.05);④观察组治疗12周再次喘息发生率为18.33%,明显低于对照组的33.33%,比较差异有统计学意义( P ﹤0.05)。结论孟鲁司特治疗呼吸道合胞病毒感染性毛细支气管炎显效较快,可有效抑制气管炎症,减少喘息复发。%Objective To explore the efficacy and influence of montellukast on bronchitis symptoms and wheezing in treatment of bronchi-olitis caused by respiratory syncytial virus. Methods A total of 120 patients with bronchiolitis caused by respiratory syncytial virus were selected, and they were randomly divided into observation group and control group,60 cases in each group. Patients in control group were treated with con-ventional treatment including anti-coughing,anti-asthma,anti-virus,etc,patients in observation group were treated with montelukast mainte-nance treatment for 12 weeks on the basis of conventional therapy,efficiency,duration for improvement of asthma,average length of hospital stay, serum levels of

  11. The effect of leukotriene receptor antagonist on respiratory syncytial virus RSV bronchiolitis and the balance of Thl/Th2%白三烯受体拮抗剂对呼吸道合胞病毒性毛细支气管炎 Thl/Th2细胞平衡的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建江; 黄肖梅; 万学凌

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨白三烯受体拮抗剂对呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)毛细支气管炎气道炎症的作用及对毛细支气管炎后发生哮喘倾向的预防作用。方法选择2012年6月-2014年5月医院内儿科住院的轻中度 RSV 毛细支气管炎患儿186例,随机分为顺尔宁干预组69例,均予孟鲁司特钠(顺尔宁);激素干预组65例,予布地奈德混悬液氧;空白对照组52例,不予任何干预治疗。同时选择30例同期在儿童保健门诊做健康体检的婴幼儿为健康对照组。分别在住院当日、干预前、干预后抽取静脉血,ELISA 试剂盒检测各组患者血清γ-IFN、IL-12、IL-13及 LTE4的浓度,门诊随访1年。结果 RSV 毛细支气管炎患儿 IL-13及 LTE4水平在急性期、恢复期明显升高,而 IL-12及γ-IFN 水平降低。顺尔宁干预组及激素干预组患儿干预结束后 IL-13、LTE4水平均下降,IL-12、γ-IFN 水平上升,其水平基本恢复至正常;顺尔宁干预组及激素干预组患儿干预结束后 LTE4水平较干预前明显下降,顺尔宁干预组基本恢复至正常水平,但激素干预组未恢复至正常水平;顺尔宁干预组喘息再次发作率明显减少,差异均有统计学意义( P <0.05)。结论白三烯受体拮抗剂能够调节 Thl/ Th2的失衡,减少 LTE4的释放,降低嗜酸性粒细胞的活化程度,减轻气道炎症和气道高反应性,减少喘息发作,对呼吸道合胞病毒性毛细支气管炎后发生哮喘倾向有积极的预防作用。%Objective To explore the effect of leukotriene receptor antagonist on respiratory syncytial virus RSV bron-chiolitis airway inflammation and the preventive effect of it on asthma after bronchiolitis. Methods 186 cases of children with respiratory syncytial virus RSV bronchiolitis in our hospital were randomly divided into three groups:the intervention group of singulair was treated with oral montelukast soudium tablets(69 cases

  12. Epidemiologic characteristics and the relationship with disease severity of respiratory syncytial virus genotypes from children with lower respiratory tract infection in the southern Zhejiang province%浙南地区下呼吸道感染儿童呼吸道合胞病毒基因型流行病学特征及与病情的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董琳; 歹丽红; 樊节敏; 陈小芳; 金小红; 张亚丽; 林海玲

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) subtypes and genotypes in southern Zhejiang province,and to determine whether RSV genotypes are correlated with the disease severity of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI).Method Nasopharyngeal secretions (NPS) from children under 5 years of age who were hospitalized with LRTI during 5 consecutive seasons from July 1,2009 to June 30,2014 were collected.RSV antigen was determined using direct immunofluorescence (DIF).Two hundred strains of RSV were randomly selected from each epidemic season.RNA was extracted and identified as subtype A or B by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR),and randomly selected strains of the full length attachment (G) genes of both subtype A and subtype B were amplified by PCR and sequencing.Clinical data were collected,and the disease severity between different genotypes were compared simultaneously.Result Of the total 1 000 randomly selected RSV positive samples,462 (46.2%) and 538 (53.8%) samples were identified as subtype A and B,respectively.It was found that subtype B predominated in the 2009-2010 and 2012-2014 epidemic seasons and subtype A in 2010-2012 epidemic seasons.A total of 112 strains of complete sequences of G genes were obtained,including four subtype A genotypes NA1,NA4,GA2 and ON1,and six subtype B genotypes BA8-10,BA-C,CB1,and GB2.Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 39/52 (75.0%) subtype A strains were classified as NA1 genotype,followed by ON1 genotype (10/52,19.2%) and 44/60(73.3%) subtype B strains were classified as BA9 genotype,followed by BA8 genotype (6/60,10.0%).BA9 was the predominant genotype among subtype B except 2010-2011 epidemic season,while NA1 was the predominant genotype among subtype A except 2013-2014 epidemic season.Only ON1 and BA9 genotypes were checked out during 2013-2014 epidemic season.There was statistically significant difference in the average severity

  13. Multiplex detection of respiratory pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, Mary (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas (Livermore, CA); Birch, James M. (Albany, CA)

    2012-07-31

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of respiratory pathogens (influenza A (including subtyping capability for H1, H3, H5 and H7 subtypes) influenza B, parainfluenza (type 2), respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from the respiratory pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  14. The association between calfhood bovine respiratory disease complex and subsequent departure from the herd, milk production, and reproduction in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Aaron P; Larson, Robert L; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Hanzlicek, Gregg A; Bartle, Steven J; Thomson, Daniel U

    2016-05-15

    OBJECTIVE To describe the frequency of calfhood producer-identified bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) in Holstein replacement heifers on 1 large farm and determine associations between development of BRDC at ≤ 120 days of age (BRDC120) with milk production estimate, calving interval, and risk of departure from the herd (DFH). DESIGN Retrospective, observational study. ANIMALS 14,024 Holstein heifer calves born on 1 farm. PROCEDURES Data were obtained from herd management records. Cox proportional hazard and generalized linear mixed-effects models were used to assess associations for variables of interest (BRDC120 status, demographic data, and management factors) with DFH, milk production estimate, and calving interval. RESULTS Except for the year 2007, animals identified as having BRDC120 were 1.62 to 4.98 times as likely to leave the herd before first calving, compared with those that did not have this designation. Calves identified as having BRDC prior to weaning were 2.62 times as likely to have DFH before first calving as those classified as developing BRDC after weaning. Cows identified as having BRDC120 were 1.28 times as likely to have DFH between the first and second calving as were other cows. The BRDC120 designation was associated with a 233-kg (513-lb) lower 305-day mature equivalent value for first lactation milk production, but was not associated with longer or shorter calving intervals at maturity. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Dairy cattle identified as having BRDC120 had increased risk of DFH before the first or second calving and lower first-lactation milk production estimates, compared with results for cattle without this finding. Further investigation of these associations is warranted. PMID:27135672

  15. Bayesian evaluation of clinical diagnostic test characteristics of visual observations and remote monitoring to diagnose bovine respiratory disease in beef calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Brad J; Goehl, Dan R; Amrine, David E; Booker, Calvin; Wildman, Brian; Perrett, Tye

    2016-04-01

    Accurate diagnosis of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in beef cattle is a critical facet of therapeutic programs through promotion of prompt treatment of diseased calves in concert with judicious use of antimicrobials. Despite the known inaccuracies, visual observation (VO) of clinical signs is the conventional diagnostic modality for BRD diagnosis. Objective methods of remotely monitoring cattle wellness could improve diagnostic accuracy; however, little information exists describing the accuracy of this method compared to traditional techniques. The objective of this research is to employ Bayesian methodology to elicit diagnostic characteristics of conventional VO compared to remote early disease identification (REDI) to diagnose BRD. Data from previous literature on the accuracy of VO were combined with trial data consisting of direct comparison between VO and REDI for BRD in two populations. No true gold standard diagnostic test exists for BRD; therefore, estimates of diagnostic characteristics of each test were generated using Bayesian latent class analysis. Results indicate a 90.0% probability that the sensitivity of REDI (median 81.3%; 95% probability interval [PI]: 55.5, 95.8) was higher than VO sensitivity (64.5%; PI: 57.9, 70.8). The specificity of REDI (median 92.9%; PI: 88.2, 96.9) was also higher compared to VO (median 69.1%; PI: 66.3, 71.8). The differences in sensitivity and specificity resulted in REDI exhibiting higher positive and negative predictive values in both high (41.3%) and low (2.6%) prevalence situations. This research illustrates the potential of remote cattle monitoring to augment conventional methods of BRD diagnosis resulting in more accurate identification of diseased cattle. PMID:26879058

  16. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ANKRA2 and CD180 genes with bovine respiratory disease and presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, E; Garcia, M D; Wells, J E; Smith, T P L

    2011-12-01

    The objective was to determine whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ANKRA2 and CD180 genes are associated with incidence of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in cattle. Two independent populations were used. The first population (BRD-affected; N = 90) was composed of 31 half-sib progeny, from a Brahman × Angus sire, that were treated for BRD. Untreated offspring from the sire were selected to serve as controls. The second population (MAP-infected) of 330 animals of unknown parentage was evaluated for the presence of MAP in ileocecal lymph node and classified as positive or negative. Markers in both genes were assessed for association in these two populations. In the BRD-affected population, five SNPs in the ANKRA2 gene were significantly associated (P < 0.05), and two SNPs were highly associated (P < 0.01) with incidence of BRD. In addition, two SNPs in the CD180 gene were found to be associated with this trait. In the MAP-infected population, one SNP in the ANKRA2 gene was significantly associated (P < 0.05) with the presence or absence of MAP, and a SNP in the CD180 gene was highly associated (P < 0.01) with the trait. Haplotypes, using significant markers, showed a positive association with both incidence of BRD (P = 0.0001) and with the presence of MAP (P = 0.0032). Markers in the ANKRA2 and CD180 genes are associated with the ability of the animal to cope with pathogens. PMID:22034997

  17. Randomized, non-inferiority trial comparing a nitric oxide releasing solution with a macrolide antibiotic for control of bovine respiratory disease in beef feedlot calves at high-risk of developing respiratory tract disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepieux, T; Miller, C; Regev-Shoshani, G; Schaefer, A; Dorin, C; Alexander, T; Timsit, E

    2016-04-01

    Nitric oxide, a molecule produced in most mammalian cells, has bactericidal and virucidal properties. Nasal instillation of a nitric oxide releasing solution (NORS) on arrival at the feedlot was recently reported as non-inferior to a parenteral injection of a macrolide antibiotic, tilmicosin, for control of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in cattle at low-to-moderate risk of developing BRD. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether NORS was non-inferior to tilmicosin for control of BRD in cattle at high-risk of developing BRD (the target population for many BRD control programs). High-risk Angus-cross heifers (n=840) were randomly allocated to 2 treatment groups on arrival at a feedlot and received either NORS or tilmicosin for BRD control. Non-inferiority was assessed by calculating the difference in prevalence of heifers diagnosed with BRD during the first 40d after arrival between NORS and tilmicosin treatment groups. The non-inferiority margin (δ) was set at 8.5%. Thirty-six and 19% of heifers were diagnosed with BRD in the NORS and tilmicosin groups, respectively. Because the lower bound of the 2-sided 95% confidence interval (CI) of the difference in BRD prevalence between the 2 treatment groups (17%; 95% CI=11-23%) was higher than δ, an inferiority of NORS was concluded. Although on-arrival nasal administration of NORS can be viewed as a more rational control strategy than parental injection of antibiotics, further research is needed to improve NORS efficacy before it can be recommended to prevent BRD in high-risk cattle. PMID:27033936

  18. Prediction of respiratory disease and diarrhea in veal calves based on immunoglobulin levels and the serostatus for respiratory pathogens measured at arrival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardon, Bart; Alliët, Jeroen; Boone, Randy; Roelandt, Sophie; Valgaeren, Bonnie; Deprez, Piet

    2015-06-15

    Failure of passive transfer is a common problem in calves destined for veal production. At present it is unknown whether the risk for respiratory disease (BRD) or neonatal calf diarrhea (NCD) in the veal herd is associated with total immunoglobulin (Ig) and/or on the serostatus for respiratory pathogens measured at arrival. Therefore, the first objective of this prospective longitudinal cohort study was to determine associations between serum protein fractions as determined by routine electrophoresis (total protein, albumin, alpha-1 and -2 globulins, beta-globulins and Ig's) at arrival and BRD and NCD in the first 3 weeks of the production cycle. The second objective was to determine whether the serostatus (seropositive/seronegative) of seven respiratory pathogens (bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), parainfluenzavirus-3, bovine coronavirus (BCV), bovine herpesvirus-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus, Mannheimia haemolytica and Mycoplasma bovis) of these arrival serum samples could be associated with the risk of having BRD. The third objective was to determine which of the electrophoresis proteins and respiratory serostatuses were associated with average daily gain (ADG) in the study period. The study population consisted of 150 rosé veal calves housed in a single air-space. The study period ended at day 18 post arrival, when BRD incidence was judged to be too high to further postpone a group treatment. A Cox regression model was used to determine the effect of the studied protein fractions and antibodies on the time to BRD and NCD occurrence. The effect of the studied predictors on ADG was determined by linear regression. Calves with Ig levels under 7.5g/L had an increased BRD hazard (hazard ratio (HR)=1.9 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.2-3.0)). NCD was only positively associated with the alpha-2 globulin concentration. Calves with a negative serostatus for BCV (HR=1.7 (95% CI=1.0-2.8)) or BRSV (HR=2.0 (95% CI=1.0-3.9)) had an increased BRD hazard. Average

  19. Evaluating the cost implications of a radio frequency identification feeding system for early detection of bovine respiratory disease in feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfger, Barbara; Manns, Braden J; Barkema, Herman W; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, Karen S; Dorin, Craig; Orsel, Karin

    2015-03-01

    New technologies to identify diseased feedlot cattle in early stages of illness have been developed to reduce costs and welfare impacts associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). However, the economic value of early BRD detection has never been assessed. The objective was to simulate cost differences between two BRD detection methods during the first 61 d on feed (DOF) applied in moderate- to large-sized feedlots using an automated recording system (ARS) for feeding behavior and the current industry standard, pen-checking (visual appraisal confirmed by rectal temperature). Economic impact was assessed with a cost analysis in a simple decision model. Scenarios for Canadian and US feedlots with high- and low-risk cattle were modeled, and uncertainty was estimated using extensive sensitivity analyses. Input costs and probabilities were mainly extracted from publicly accessible market observations and a large-scale US feedlot study. In the baseline scenario, we modeled high-risk cattle with a treatment rate of 20% within the first 61 DOF in a feedlot of >8000 cattle in Canada. Early BRD detection was estimated to result in a relative risk of 0.60 in retreatment and 0.66 in mortality compared to pen-checking (based on previously published estimates). The additional cost of monitoring health with ARS in Canadian dollar (CAD) was 13.68 per steer. Scenario analysis for similar sized US feedlots and low-risk cattle with a treatment rate of 8% were included to account for variability in costs and probabilities in various cattle populations. Considering the cost of monitoring, all relevant treatment costs and sale price, ARS was more costly than visual appraisal during the first 61 DOF by CAD 9.61 and CAD 9.69 per steer in Canada and the US, respectively. This cost difference increased in low-risk cattle in Canada to CAD 12.45. Early BRD detection with ARS became less expensive if the costs for the system decreased to less than CAD 4.06/steer, or if the underlying true

  20. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of gamithromycin in pulmonary epithelial lining fluid in naturally occurring bovine respiratory disease in multisource commingled feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeDonder, K D; Apley, M D; Li, M; Gehring, R; Harhay, D M; Lubbers, B V; White, B J; Capik, S F; KuKanich, B; Riviere, J E; Tessman, R K

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine (i) whether an association exists between individual pharmacokinetic parameters and treatment outcome when feeder cattle were diagnosed with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and treated with gamithromycin (Zactran(®) ) at the label dose and (ii) whether there was a stronger association between treatment outcome and gamithromycin concentration in plasma or in the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) effect compartment. The study design was a prospective, blinded, randomized clinical trial utilizing three groups of 60 (362-592 lb) steers/bulls randomly allocated within origin to sham injection or gamithromycin mass medication. Cattle were evaluated daily for signs of BRD by a veterinarian blinded to treatment. Animals meeting the BRD case definition were enrolled and allocated to a sample collection scheme consisting of samples for bacterial isolation (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and nasopharyngeal swabs) and gamithromycin concentration determination (PELF and plasma). Gamithromycin susceptibility of M. haemolytica (n = 287) and P. multocida (n = 257) were determined using broth microdilution with frozen panels containing gamithromycin at concentrations from 0.03 to 16 μg/mL. A two-compartment plasma pharmacokinetic model with an additional compartment for gamithromycin in PELF was developed using rich data sets from published and unpublished studies. The sparse data from our study were then fit to this model using nonlinear mixed effects modeling to estimate individual parameter values. The resulting parameter estimates were used to simulate full time-concentration profiles for each animal in this study. These profiles were analyzed using noncompartmental methods so that PK/PD indices (AUC24 /MIC, AUC∞ /MIC, CMAX /MIC) could be calculated for plasma and PELF (also T>MIC) for each individual. The calculated PK/PD indices were indicative that for both M. haemolytica and P. multocida a higher drug

  1. 稳定表达呼吸道合胞病毒非结构蛋白NS1细胞的构建及其生物特性研究%Development and Characterization of a Stable Cell Line expressing Respiratory Syncytial Virus Non-structural Protein NS1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦笙; 周荣; 王玉涛; 杨子峰; 陈俏连; 关文达; 伍时冠; 刘文宽; 郑兆广; 李海涛

    2011-01-01

    To develop a stable cell line that could express the RSV NS1, the full-length RSV NS1 gene was generated by RT-PCR amplification from respiratory syncytial virus. NS1 gene was ligated with pBABE-puro to construct the recombinant retroviral expression plasmid pBABE-NSl, which was cotransfected into 293FT packaging cells with PIK packaging plasmid by calcium phosphate co-precipitation. The supernatant of 293FT was collected to infect Hep-2 cells, the resulting cell clones stably expressing NS1 were screened by puromycin. Using QPCR, CPE staining method and indirect immunofluorescence assay, the expression of NS1 at both gene and protein levels was identified. The recombinant plasmid pBABE-NSl was identified by EcoRI and BamHI endonuclease digestion and the sequence analysis. QPCR results showed that the NS1 gene amplification in Hep-2-NSl cells was 8483 fold higher than that in Hep-2 cells. Although the exogenous interferon was added, all cells were destroyed after 48 hours post infection using CPE staining method, showing that Hep-2-NSl cells remained sensitive to the VSV virus. The results of RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assay showed that the NS1 gene in Hep-2 cells could not only transcribe mR- NA, but also express NS1 protein steadily. We had successfully established Hep-2-NSl cell lines with stable expression of respiratory syncytial virus non-structural protein NS1.%获得稳定表达RSV病毒NS1基因的HEp-2-NS1细胞株并对其生物学特性进行初步研究.采用RT-PCR方法从RSV病毒中获得NS1全长基因,克隆到逆转录病毒载体pBABE-puro中,重组载体与包装质粒PIK通过磷酸钙共沉淀法转染包装细胞293FT细胞,产生的逆转录病毒颗粒感染HEp-2细胞,经嘌呤霉素筛选后得到稳定表达细胞株,用QPCR、细胞病变染色法、RT-PCR和间接免疫荧光法检测细胞中NS1 mRNA和蛋白表达情况.结果表明重组逆转录病毒载体pBABE-NS1经双酶切及测序鉴定正确;筛选获得5株

  2. Construction of adenoviral vectors expressing F and G glycoproteins of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV Construção de vetores adenovirais expressando as glicoproteínas F e G de vírus respiratório sincicial humano (HRSV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ithana Monteiro Kosaka

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (HRSV was first characterized in 1957 and has since been recognized as the most common viral cause of severe respiratory tract infection in young infants worldwide. Despite many years of research there is still no effective treatment or any immediate prospect of a vaccine. The HRSV genome is composed of single stranded negative sense RNA and the virion consists of a nucleocapsid packaged within a lipid envelope. The envelope contains spike-like projections, each being a homo-oligomer of one of three transmembrane viral envelope proteins: the attachment protein G, the fusion protein F involved in viral penetration and the small hydrofobic protein SH. The aim of this work was to construct two recombinant replication-defective adenoviruses carrying separately F and G genes from HRSV. This system was chosen because adenovirus delivers genes into target cells with high efficiency in a variety of cell lines and can be used in vitro and in vivo. In order to obtain the recombinant viruses, we did RT-PCR of RNA extracted from the HRSV A2 strain, the genes F and G were cloned in to pAdeno-X vectors. pAdeno-F and pAdeno-G were transfected in HEK-293 cells for the production of recombinant viruses, that expressed efficiently these two proteins and provide us the means for doing functional assays and immunization tests.O Vírus Sincicial Respiratório Humano (HRSV foi isolado e caracterizado pela primeira vez em 1957 e é considerado como o patógeno viral mais freqüente do trato respiratório de bebês e crianças. Apesar de muitos anos de pesquisa, não há ainda um tratamento específico ou uma vacina licenciada. Seu genoma é composto por uma fita simples de RNA polaridade negativa e o vírion consiste em um nucleocapsídeo empacotado por um envelope lipídico. O envelope contém projeções, chamadas espículas, constituídas de homoligômeros de uma das 3 glicoproteínas de membrana: a proteína de ligação G

  3. Determinación de subtipos del virus respiratorio sincicial en muestras positivas por el virus, aisladas en el Hospital Nacional de Niños Detection of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus subtypes A and B in hospitalized children in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Mora

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: El virus respiratorio sincicial (VRS es un pneumovirus de la familia Paramyxovridae, que causa enfermedad severa del tracto respiratorio inferior en neonatos y niños pequeños, especialmente en los primeros años de vida. Es responsable de constantes hospitalizaciones y visitas a los servicios de emergencias. Se han identificado dos subtipos: VRS-A y VRS-B, mediante anticuerpos monoclonales y técnicas moleculares. El objetivo de este estudio fue establecer por primera vez la circulación de ambos subtipos del VRS, en muestras positivas de niños hospitalizados durante el pico estacional de 2008, en el Hospital Nacional de Niños (HNN. Métodos: Se analizaron 49 muestras de aspirados nasofaríngeos de niños hospitalizados, de un total de 578, de las cuales 197 fueron previamente positivas para VRS por inmunofluorescencia directa. Se realizó cultivo celular, y un RT-PCR múltiple, estandarizado en el laboratorio, para detectar VRS-A y VRS-B. Resultados: La frecuencia del VRS fue del 34% en el HNN, para agosto y septiembre de 2008. De las 49 muestras analizadas por RT-PCR, 41 (84% fueron positivas, 34 (83% por el subtipo A y 7 (17% por el B; 8 fueron negativas. Ningún paciente presentó infección mixta y no hubo diferencia entre los síntomas, la edad o el origen geográfico de los niños. El cultivo fue positivo solo en el 30% de las muestras. Conclusión: La frecuencia del VRS para el periodo en estudio fue del 34% de las muestras analizadas en aspirados nasofaríngeos. Este es el primer reporte de la detección de los subtipos A y B del VRS, en una pequeña cohorte del HNN, confirmados por un RT-PCR múltiple estandarizado en el laboratorio.Aim: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV a Pneumovirus belonging to Paramyxovridae family is a common cause of severe lower respiratory disease in neonates and young children especially in the first years of life. It causes frequent hospitalizations and visits to the emergency rooms. Utilizing

  4. Molecular epidemiology of respiratory viruses in virus-induced asthma

    OpenAIRE

    HiroyukiTsukagoshi; TaiseiIshioka

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory illness (ARI) due to various viruses is not only the most common cause of upper respiratory infection in humans but is also a major cause of morbidity and mortality, leading to diseases such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Previous studies have shown that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human rhinovirus (HRV), human metapneumovirus (HMPV), human parainfluenza virus (HPIV), and human enterovirus (HEV) infections may be associated with virus-induced asthma. For example, it ...

  5. A randomized trial of montelukast in respiratory syncytial virus postbronchiolitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans

    2003-01-01

    subsequent to RSV bronchiolitis. One hundred and thirty infants who were 3 to 36 months old, hospitalized with acute RSV bronchiolitis, were randomized into a double-blind, parallel comparison of 5-mg montelukast chewable tablets or matching placebo given for 28 days starting within 7 days of symptom debut...

  6. Development of a mucosal vaccine against Respiratory Syncytial Virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Shafique, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Het verkoudheidsvirus ‘Respiratoir Synctieel virus’ (RSV) kan ernstige luchtweginfecties veroorzaken. Vaccinatie van pasgeboren kinderen en ouderen met verminderde afweer zou de kans op infectie en complicaties kunnen verkleinen. UMCG-promovendus Muhammad Shafique stelde vast dat een neusspray geschikt is voor toediening van een nieuw type vaccin tegen RSV. Het nieuwe vaccin bestaat uit virosomen, een virusmantel zonder het genetisch materiaal van het virus. Aan de virosomen zijn stoffen geze...

  7. One year duration of immunity of the modified live bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1 and type 2 and bovine herpesvirus-1 fractions of Vista® Once SQ vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtle, Lisa; Mattick, Debra; Schneider, Corey; Smith, Linda; Xue, Wenzhi; Trigo, Emilio

    2016-03-18

    Three studies were performed to determine the duration of immunity of the bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1 and type 2 (BVDV-1 and BVDV-2) and bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) fractions of a commercially prepared modified-live vaccine. Vista® Once SQ (Vista®) vaccine contains five modified-live viruses, BVDV-1, BVDV-2, BHV-1, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, and bovine parainfluenza 3 virus, and two modified-live bacteria, Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica. For all three studies, calves were administered a single dose of vaccine or placebo vaccine subcutaneously, and were challenged with one of the three virulent viruses at least one year following vaccination. Calves were evaluated daily following challenge for clinical signs of disease associated with viral infection, nasal swab samples were evaluated for virus shedding, and serum was tested for neutralizing antibodies. Following the BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 challenges, whole blood was evaluated for white blood cell counts, and for the BVDV-2 study, whole blood was also evaluated for platelet counts. Calves vaccinated with BVDV type 1a, were protected from challenge with BVDV type 1b, and had significant reductions in clinical disease, fever, leukopenia, and virus shedding compared to control calves. Vaccinated calves in the BVDV-2 study were protected from clinical disease, mortality, fever, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and virus shedding compared to controls. Vaccinated calves in the BHV-1 study were protected from clinical disease and fever, and had significantly reduced duration of nasal virus shedding. These three studies demonstrated that a single administration of the Vista® vaccine to healthy calves induces protective immunity against BVDV-1, BVDV-2 and BHV-1 that lasts at least one year following vaccination. PMID:26859238

  8. Respiratory virus infections and aeroallergens in acute bronchial asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Carlsen, K H; Orstavik, I; Leegaard, J; Høeg, H

    1984-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty six attacks of acute bronchial asthma occurring in 169 children aged over 2 years were studied during a two year period. More attacks occurred during spring and autumn than at other times of the year. In 73 patients (29%) a respiratory virus infection was diagnosed, with the same seasonal variation as the asthmatic attacks. Most of the virus infections were caused by rhinovirus (45%) and respiratory syncytial virus (19%). There was no significant correlation between asth...

  9. Clinical patterns and seasonal trends in respiratory syncytial virus hospitalizations in São Paulo, Brazil Padrões clínicos e sazonalidade das hospitalizações causadas pelo vírus respiratório sincicial em São Paulo, Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Sandra E; Klaus E. STEWIEN; Divina A. O. QUEIROZ; Durigon, Edison L.; Török, Thomas J.; Anderson, Larry J.; MIYAO Cristina R.; Hein, Noely; BOTOSSO Viviane F.; Márcia M. PAHL; Gilio, Alfredo E.; EJZENBERG Bernardo; OKAY Yassuhiko

    2001-01-01

    The respiratory viruses are recognized as the most frequent lower respiratory tract pathogens for infants and young children in developed countries but less is known for developing populations. The authors conducted a prospective study to evaluate the occurrence, clinical patterns, and seasonal trends of viral infections among hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract disease (Group A). The presence of respiratory viruses in children's nasopharyngeal was assessed at admission in a pe...

  10. Respiratory Viruses Augment the Adhesion of Bacterial Pathogens to Respiratory Epithelium in a Viral Species- and Cell Type-Dependent Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Avadhanula, Vasanthi; Rodriguez, Carina A.; DeVincenzo, John P.; Wang, Yan; Webby, Richard J; Ulett, Glen C.; Adderson, Elisabeth E.

    2006-01-01

    Secondary bacterial infections often complicate respiratory viral infections, but the mechanisms whereby viruses predispose to bacterial disease are not completely understood. We determined the effects of infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human parainfluenza virus 3 (HPIV-3), and influenza virus on the abilities of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae to adhere to respiratory epithelial cells and how these viruses alter the expression of known recept...

  11. CpG ODN佐剂对呼吸道合胞病毒重组疫苗诱导的细胞免疫应答的作用%Role of CpG ODN adjuvant in the cellular immune response induced by recombinant vaccine of respiratory syncytial virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娜; 刘建勋; 曾瑞红

    2011-01-01

    Objective :To investigate the role of CpG ODN adjuvant in the cellular immune responses induced by recombinant protein vaccine of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV ) .Methods :BALB /c mice were immunized i .n .or i .p .with G1F/M2+ CpG or G1F/M2+Al+ CpG three times .Spleens from the immunized mice were removed two weeks after the third immunization .Specific lytic activity was assessed using a LDH Cytotoxicity Assay Kit .IFN-γ-and IL-4-secreting cells were quantified using a ELISPOT kit .Percentages of CD4+ /CD8+ effector cells or LDH memory cells in the splenic cells of mice were analyzed with flow cytometer .Results :Immunization with G1F/M2+ CpG i .n .or i .p .induced significant specific lytic activity compared to G1F/M2 .The specific lytic activity induced by G1F/M2+Al+CpG (i .p . ) was significantly higher than that by G1F/M2+CpG (i .p .) .G1F/M2+CpG i .n .or i .p .induced significant more IFn-γ-secreting cells and IL-4secreting cells than G1F/M2 i .n .or i .p .significantly .The level of IFN-γ-secreting cells or IL-4-secreting cells in G1F/M2+Al+CpG (i .p . ) group was higher than that in G1F/M2+CpG (i .p . ) group .In addition ,the level of IFN-γ-secreting cells was remarkably higher than that of IL-4-secreting cells in each group ,suggesting a Th1 biased response ,which benefited for defensing virus .G1F/M2+CpG (i .n . ) induced only CD44+ CD62L - cells .G1F/M2+Al+ CpG (i.p .) or G1F/M2+CpG (i.p .) elicited both CD44+ CD62L- cells and CD44 + CD62L+ cells . Conclusion :CpG2216 ,as an adjuvant ,can enhance significantly the cellular immune responses of RSV recombinant vaccine G1F/M2 .%目的:研究CpG2216佐剂对呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)重组蛋白疫苗诱导的细胞免疫应答的作用.方法:重组RSV疫苗G1F/M2与CpG2216佐剂混合,或与CpG2216及常规佐剂Al(OH)3混合,鼻腔(i.n.)或腹腔注射(i.p.)免疫BALB/c小鼠三次,最后一次免疫后2周杀小鼠,取脾细胞,用乳酸脱氢酶(LDH)释放法检测脾

  12. A two year prospective study of hospital-acquired respiratory virus infection on paediatric wards.

    OpenAIRE

    Sims, D G

    1981-01-01

    Over a 24 month period on six paediatric wards of different designs 169 cases of possible hospital-acquired respiratory virus infection were investigated. A variety of viruses was isolated from 82 cases, the most common being respiratory syncytial virus, influenza, parainfluenza, adenoviruses and rhinoviruses. A further 73 children developed respiratory symptoms between 3 and 300 days after administration but viruses were not demonstrable by the techniques used. These children were thought to...

  13. Bovine Tuberculosis, A Zoonotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarmudji

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bovine tuberculosis is caused by the infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis var. bovis (M. bovis. This species is one of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, can infect wide range of hosts: cattle and other domesticated animals, wild mammals and humans (zoonotic. M. bovis bacterium from infected hosts can be transmitted to other susceptible animals and humans through respiratory excretes and secretion materials. Humans can be infected with M. bovis by ingested M. bovis contaminated animal products, unpasteurised milk from tuberculosis cows or through respiratory route of contaminated aerosol. Bovine tuberculosis at the first stage does not show any clinical sign but as the disease progress in the next stage which may take several months or years, clinical signs may arise, suh as: fluctuative body temperature, anorexia, lost body weight, coughing, oedema of lymph nodes, increased respiratory frequencies. Pathological lesion of bovine tuberculosis is characterised by the formation of granulomas (tubercles, in which bacterial cells have been localised, most in lymph nodes and pulmonum, but can occur in other organs. The granulomas usually arise in small nodules or tubercles appear yellowish either caseus, caseo-calcareus or calcified. In Indonesia, bovine tuberculosis occurred in dairy cattle since 1905 through the imported dairy cows from Holland and Australian. It was unfortunate that until recently, there were not many research and surveilances of bovine tuberculosis conducted in this country, so the distribution of bovine tuberculosis is unknown. Early serological diagnosis can be done on live cattle by means of tuberculin tests under field conditions. Confirmation can be done by isolation and identification of excreted and secreted samples from the slaughter house. Antibiotic treatment and vaccination were uneffective, therefore the effective control of bovine tuberculosis is suggested by tuberculin tests and by slaughtering the selected

  14. 布地奈德吸入治疗呼吸道合胞病毒或鼻病毒感染所致婴幼儿第一次喘息的疗效分析%Analysis on the curative effect of budesonide inhalation in treatment of first infantile wheezing induced by respiratory syncytial virus infection or rhinovirus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏煜; 李晓狄; 季正华

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the curative effect of budesonide inhalation in treatment of first infantile wheezing induced by respiratory syncytial virus ( RSV) infection or rhinovirus (RV) infection. Methods; 212 infants with the first mild - moderate onset of wheezing hospitalized in asthma center of children hospital affiliated to Suzhou university from May 2004 to May 2006, then they were divided into treatment group and control group, the infants in control group were treated with inhalation of ventolin atomized liquid by a air pressure pump; the infants in treatment group were treated with budesonide inhalation on the basis of inhalation of ventolin atomized liquid. Direct im-munofluorescent method was used to detect RSV, adenovirus (ADV), influenza virus (IFV) and parainfluenza virus (PIV) in fresh sputum samples. RT - PCR was used to detect RV gene in the samples. Allergen screening test was conducted with UnicaplOO luciferase system. The birth history and family history of atopic diseases of the infants were collected. The average hospitalization times of simple RSV - infected infants or simple RV - infected infants in treatment group and control group were compared; at the same time, the average hospitalization times of simple RSV - infected infants and simple RV - infected infants were compared; the average hospitalization times of simple RV - infected infants in treatment group and control group were compared; the average hospitalization times of simple RSV - infected infants in treatment group and control group were compared. Results: The average hospitalization times of simple RSV - infected infants or simple RV - infected infants in treatment group and control group were (6. 71 ± 1. 79) days and (7. 25 ± 1. 64) days, respectively, there was no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0. 05) . The average hospitalization times of simple RSV - infected infants and simple RV - infected infants were (7. 25 ± 1. 86) days and (6. 64 ± 1. 54) days

  15. Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. The Respiratory System The respiratory system is made up of organs ... and the muscles that enable breathing. The Respiratory System Figure A shows the location of the respiratory ...

  16. Search for the genome of bovine herpesvirus types 1, 4 and 5 in bovine semen

    OpenAIRE

    P.E. Morán; Favier, P.A.; Lomónaco, M.; Catena, M.C.; M.L. Chiapparrone; Odeón, A.C.; Verna, A.E.; S.E. Pérez

    2013-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) causes respiratory and reproductive disorders in cattle. Recently, bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5) and bovine herpesvirus type 4 (BoHV-4) have been identified to be associated with genital disease. In this study, the presence of the genome of BoHV-1, BoHV-4 and BoHV-5 in bovine semen of Argentinean and international origin was analyzed by PCR assays. The most important finding of this study is the detection of the genome of BoHV-1 and BoHV-4 in semen of b...

  17. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwofie Theophilus B

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Method Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Results Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2% were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3% patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%, Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3 in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8% and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3. Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36 of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. Conclusion The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection.

  18. Bovine Tuberculosis, A Zoonotic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tarmudji; Supar

    2008-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis is caused by the infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis var. bovis (M. bovis). This species is one of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, can infect wide range of hosts: cattle and other domesticated animals, wild mammals and humans (zoonotic). M. bovis bacterium from infected hosts can be transmitted to other susceptible animals and humans through respiratory excretes and secretion materials. Humans can be infected with M. bovis by ingested M. bovis contaminated animal p...

  19. Human Metapneumovirus as a Cause of Community-Acquired Respiratory Illness 1

    OpenAIRE

    Stockton, Joanne; Stephenson, Iain; Fleming, Douglas; Zambon, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a recently identified Paramyxovirus first isolated from hospitalized children with acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI). We sought evidence of HMPV infection in patients who had visited general practitioners, had influenzalike illnesses (ILI), and had negative tests for influenza and Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV). As part of national virologic surveillance, sentinel general practices in England and Wales collected samples from patients of all ag...

  20. Respiratory viral infections in infants:causes, clinical symptoms, virology, and immunology

    OpenAIRE

    Tregoning, John S; Schwarze, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    In global terms, respiratory viral infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Infancy, in particular, is a time of increased disease susceptibility and severity. Early-life viral infection causes acute illness and can be associated with the development of wheezing and asthma in later life. The most commonly detected viruses are respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), rhinovirus (RV), and influenza virus. In this review we explore the complete picture from epidemiology and virology to c...

  1. Sequence analysis of a bovine rhinovirus type 1 strain RS3x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine rhinoviruses, known to cause clinical and subclinical upper respiratory infections in bovines worldwide, include three serotypes. Bovine rhinovirus (BRV) 1, 2 and 3 were originally classified as tentative members of the genus Rhinovirus (family Picornaviridae), however, in 2008 this genus was...

  2. Identification of Mannheimia haemolytica Adhesins Involved in Binding to Bovine Bronchial Epithelial Cells▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kisiela, Dagmara I.; Czuprynski, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica, a commensal organism of the upper respiratory tract in cattle, is the principal bacterial pathogen associated with the bovine respiratory disease complex. Adherence to the respiratory mucosa is a crucial event in its pathogenesis. However, the bacterial components that contribute to this process are not fully characterized. In this study, we demonstrated that M. haemolytica adhered to bovine bronchial epithelial cells (BBEC) in vitro and that adherence was inhibited by...

  3. Hospitalization Incidence, Mortality, and Seasonality of Common Respiratory Viruses Over a Period of 15 Years in a Developed Subtropical City

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Paul K.S.; Tam, Wilson W.S.; Lee, Tsz Cheung; Hon, Kam Lun; Lee, Nelson; Martin C W Chan; Mok, Hing Yim; Wong, Martin C.S.; Leung, Ting Fan; Lai, Raymond W.M.; Yeung, Apple C.M.; Wendy C S Ho; Nelson, E. Anthony S.; Hui, David S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Information on respiratory viruses in subtropical region is limited. Incidence, mortality, and seasonality of influenza (Flu) A/B, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus (ADV), and parainfluenza viruses (PIV) 1/2/3 in hospitalized patients were assessed over a 15-year period (1998–2012) in Hong Kong. Male predominance and laterally transversed J-shaped distribution in age-specific incidence was observed. Incidence of Flu A, RSV, and PIV decreased sharply from infants to toddle...

  4. Clinical and molecular epidemiology of human bocavirus in respiratory and fecal samples from children in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, SKP; Yip, CCY; Lau, YL; Woo, PCY; Yuen, KY; Que, TL; Lee, RA; AuYeung, RKH; Zhou, B.; So, LY; Chan, KH

    2007-01-01

    Background. Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a recently discovered parvovirus associated with respiratory tract infections in children. We conducted the first systematic prospective clinical and molecular study using nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) and fecal samples. Methods. NPAs negative for influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, adenovirus, and coronavirus and fecal samples from patients with acute gastroenteritis were included. On the basis of results from a pilot stu...

  5. Modulation of Respiratory TLR3-Anti-Viral Response by Probiotic Microorganisms: Lessons Learned from Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505

    OpenAIRE

    KITAZAWA, Haruki; Villena, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract illness in infants and young children. Host immune response is implicated in both protective and immunopathological mechanisms during RSV infection. Activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-3 in innate immune cells by RSV can induce airway inflammation, protective immune response, and pulmonary immunopathology. A clear understanding of RSV–host interaction is important for the development of novel and effective th...

  6. Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, such ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can't ...

  7. Do pollution and climate influence respiratory tract infections in children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Duarte Passos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To review if pollution and climate changes can influence respiratory tract infections in children. Data source: articles published on the subject in PubMed, SciELO, Bireme, EBSCO and UpTodate were reviewed. The following inclusion criteria were considered: scientific papers between 2002 and 2012, study design, the pediatric population, reference documents such as the CETESB and World Health Organization Summary of the data: We analyzed research that correlated respiratory viruses and climate and/or pollution changes. Respiratory syncytial virus has been the virus related most to changes in climate and humidity. Other "old and new" respiratory viruses such as Human Bocavirus, Metapneumovirus, Parechovirus and Parainfuenza would need to be investigated owing to their clinical importance. Although much has been studied with regard to the relationship between climate change and public health, specific studies about its influence on children's health remain scarce.

  8. Retrospective Serology Study of Respiratory Virus Infections in Captive Great Apes

    OpenAIRE

    Hester Buitendijk; Zahra Fagrouch; Henk Niphuis; Bogers, Willy M.; Warren, Kristin S.; Verschoor, Ernst J.

    2014-01-01

    Great apes are extremely sensitive to infections with human respiratory viruses. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed sera from captive chimpanzees, gorillas and orang-utans. More than 1000 sera (403 chimpanzee, 77 gorilla, and 535 orang-utan sera) were analyzed for antibodies to the human respiratory viruses RSV (respiratory syncytial virus, hMPV (human metapneumovirus), H1N1 and H3N2 influenza A viruses, and influenza B virus. In all ape species high seroprevalences were found for RSV...

  9. Acute respiratory viral infections in pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana C.A. Benites

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to estimate the prevalence of infection by respiratory viruses in pediatric patients with cancer and acute respiratory infection (ARI and/or fever. METHODS: cross-sectional study, from January 2011 to December 2012. The secretions of nasopharyngeal aspirates were analyzed in children younger than 21 years with acute respiratory infections. Patients were treated at the Grupo em Defesa da Criança Com Câncer (Grendacc and University Hospital (HU, Jundiaí, SP. The rapid test was used for detection of influenza virus (Kit Biotrin, Inc. Ireland, and real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction (FTD, Respiratory pathogens, multiplex Fast Trade Kit, Malta for detection of influenza virus (H1N1, B, rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, human parechovirus, bocavirus, metapneumovirus, and human coronavirus. The prevalence of viral infection was estimated and association tests were used (χ2 or Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: 104 samples of nasopharyngeal aspirate and blood were analyzed. The median age was 12 ± 5.2 years, 51% males, 68% whites, 32% had repeated ARIs, 32% prior antibiotic use, 19.8% cough, and 8% contact with ARIs. A total of 94.3% were in good general status. Acute lymphocytic leukemia (42.3% was the most prevalent neoplasia. Respiratory viruses were detected in 50 samples: rhinoviruses (23.1%, respiratory syncytial virus AB (8.7%, and coronavirus (6.8%. Co-detection occurred in 19% of cases with 2 viruses and in 3% of those with 3 viruses, and was more frequent between rhinovirus and coronavirus 43. Fever in neutropenic patients was observed in 13%, of which four (30.7 were positive for viruses. There were no deaths. CONCLUSIONS: the prevalence of respiratory viruses was relevant in the infectious episode, with no increase in morbidity and mortality. Viral co-detection was frequent in patients with cancer and ARIs.

  10. Identification and genome characterization of genotype B and genotype C bovine parainfluenza type 3 viruses isolated in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F.; Valayudhan, Binu T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bovine parainfluenza 3 viruses (BPI3V) are respiratory pathogens of cattle that cause disease singly but are often associated with bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) in conjunction with other viral and bacterial agents. Bovine vaccines currently contain BPI3V to provide protection against the virus, but there is no current information regarding the BPI3V strains that are circulating in the U.S. Results A project was initiated to sequence archival BPI3V isolates to study vira...

  11. Emergency department syndromic surveillance providing early warning of seasonal respiratory activity in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, H E; Morbey, R; Hughes, T C; Locker, T E; Pebody, R; Green, H K; Ellis, J; Smith, G E; Elliot, A J

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal respiratory infections place an increased burden on health services annually. We used a sentinel emergency department syndromic surveillance system to understand the factors driving respiratory attendances at emergency departments (EDs) in England. Trends in different respiratory indicators were observed to peak at different points during winter, with further variation observed in the distribution of attendances by age. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed acute respiratory infection and bronchitis/bronchiolitis ED attendances in patients aged 1-4 years were particularly sensitive indicators for increasing respiratory syncytial virus activity. Using near real-time surveillance of respiratory ED attendances may provide early warning of increased winter pressures in EDs, particularly driven by seasonal pathogens. This surveillance may provide additional intelligence about different categories of attendance, highlighting pressures in particular age groups, thereby aiding planning and preparation to respond to acute changes in EDs, and thus the health service in general. PMID:26415918

  12. Respiratory Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Özyılmaz, Ezgi

    2014-01-01

    The main function of the lungs is to maintain the exchange between the pulmonary capillary and the air in the alveoli. By this way, the arteriel oxygen and carbondioxide tension remains constant. Respiratory failure is a syndrome which is defined as the loss of the ability of respiratory system to exchange oxygen and carbondioxide elimination function. The main pathophysiological causes of respiratory failure include ventilation-perfusion mismatch, alveolar hypoventilation, impaired diffusion...

  13. Serological and genetic characterisation of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) indicates that Danish isolates belong to the intermediate subgroup: no evidence of a selective effect on the variability of G protein nucleotide sequence by prior cell culture adaption and passages in cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Uttenthal, Åse; Arctander, P.;

    1998-01-01

    , respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the Danish isolates formed three lineages within a separate branch of the phylogenetic tree. Nevertheless, the Danish isolates were closely related to the 220-69Bel isolate, the prototype of the intermediate antigenic subgroup. The sequencing of the extracellular...... part of the G gene of additional 11 field BRSV viruses, processed directly from lung samples without prior adaption to cell culture growth. revealed sequence variabilities in the range obtained with the propagated virus. In addition, several passages in cell culture and in calves had no major impact on...

  14. Impact of Pollution, Climate, and Socio-demographic Factors on Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Seasonal Respiratory Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Sloan, Chantel; Moore, Martin L.; Hartert, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Seasonal viruses present a major cause of morbidity and mortality in temperate climates. Through major pandemics and smaller annual epidemics, viruses such as influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human rhinovirus (HRV) result in lost school and work days for most that are infected and more serious complications for the immunocompromised. The reasons for these viruses showing strict seasonality include but are not limited to the influence of cold weather and humidity on virus parti...

  15. Inefficient Lymph Node Sensitization during Respiratory Viral Infection Promotes IL-17–Mediated Lung Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Kallal, Lara E.; Hartigan, Adam J.; Hogaboam, Cory M.; Schaller, Matthew A.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.

    2010-01-01

    Development of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue has been suggested to enhance local antiviral immune responses; however, ectopic lymph node formation often corresponds to chronic inflammatory diseases. These studies investigated the role of ectopic pulmonary lymph nodes upon respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection using CCR7-deficient mice, which develop bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue early in life. CCR7−/− mice exhibited impaired secondary lymph node formation, enhanced effector ...

  16. Expression of a 50 kDa putative receptor for bovine viral diarrhea virus in bovine fetal tissues.

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, L; Zhang, S.; W. Xue; Kapil, S; Minocha, H C

    1998-01-01

    The expression of a 50 kDa bovine viral diarrhea virus putative receptor in different bovine fetal tissues from 3-month old fetuses was studied. The receptor expression was examined by immunocytochemical staining and by immunoblotting using antiidiotypic probe (anti-D89). Intense specific staining in enterocytes of the small and large intestines, cortical tubular epithelial cells of kidneys, respiratory epithelial cells of the trachea and esophageal mucosal epithelial cells was observed, demo...

  17. Additional diagnostic yield of adding serology to PCR in diagnosing viral acute respiratory infections in Kenyan patients 5 years of age and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feikin, Daniel R; Njenga, M Kariuki; Bigogo, Godfrey; Aura, Barrack; Gikunju, Stella; Balish, Amanda; Katz, Mark A; Erdman, Dean; Breiman, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    The role of serology in the setting of PCR-based diagnosis of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) is unclear. We found that acute- and convalescent-phase paired-sample serologic testing increased the diagnostic yield of naso/oropharyngeal swabs for influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus, adenovirus, and parainfluenza viruses beyond PCR by 0.4% to 10.7%. Although still limited for clinical use, serology, along with PCR, can maximize etiologic diagnosis in epidemiologic studies. PMID:23114699

  18. 国产牛肺表面活性物质在预防新生儿呼吸窘迫综合征作用的探讨%Effect of domestic bovine pulmonary surfactant on the prevention of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李郑艳

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the application value of domestic bovine pulmonary surfactant on the prevention of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. Methods Ninety-four cases of premature infants were randomly divided into obser-vation group and control group, with 47 cases in each group. The newborn in the observation group were given the domestic bovine pulmonary surfactant 6 h after birth, the control group were not given. The blood gas, oxygenation index, the inci-dence of respiratory distress syndrome,the mechanical ventilation rate and fatality were compared between the two groups. Results In the observation group,PaO2 at 12, 24 h were (80. 2 ± 11. 6), (88. 6 ± 9. 1)mm Hg respectively, which were significantly higher than that in the control group (P 0. 05), after then that in the observation group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P 0. 05). Conclusions The clinical effect of domestic bovine pulmonary surfactant on the prevention of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome is re-markable, at the same time it can improve the clinical symptoms, reduce the occurrence of respiratory distress rate and im-prove the survival rate of newborn infants.%目的:研究国产牛肺表面活性物质对预防新生儿呼吸窘迫综合征的应用价值。方法将禹州市妇幼保健院94例早产儿随机分为观察组与对照组,每组47例,观察组新生儿出生6 h 后给予国产牛肺表面活性物质,对照组未应用。比较两组血气、氧合指标、呼吸窘迫综合征发生率、机械通气量率及病死率。结果观察组12、24 h PaO2分别为(80.2±11.6)、(88.6±9.1) mm Hg(1 mm Hg =0.133 kPa),显著高于对照组(P 0.05),后观察组显著高于对照组(P 0.05)。结论国产牛肺表面活性物质预防新生儿呼吸窘迫综合征的临床效果显著,同时可改善患儿临床症状,降低呼吸窘迫发生率,提高新生早产儿的存活率。

  19. Pathological and microbiological studies on pneumonic lungs from Danish calves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tegtmeier, Conny; Uttenthal, Åse; Friis, N.F.; Jensen, N.E.; Jensen, H.E.

    1999-01-01

    presence of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), parainfluenza-3 virus (PI-3 virus) and bovine coronavirus, 62 cases for bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVD), 45 cases for bovine adenovirus and 51 cases for mycoplasmas. Based on histopathological examination, the cases were diagnosed as fibrinous and...

  20. Respiratory mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...