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Sample records for bovine respiratory disease

  1. Pasteurella multocida and bovine respiratory disease.

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    Dabo, S M; Taylor, J D; Confer, A W

    2007-12-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium that has been classified into three subspecies, five capsular serogroups and 16 serotypes. P. multocida serogroup A isolates are bovine nasopharyngeal commensals, bovine pathogens and common isolates from bovine respiratory disease (BRD), both enzootic calf pneumonia of young dairy calves and shipping fever of weaned, stressed beef cattle. P. multocida A:3 is the most common serotype isolated from BRD, and these isolates have limited heterogeneity based on outer membrane protein (OMP) profiles and ribotyping. Development of P. multocida-induced pneumonia is associated with environmental and stress factors such as shipping, co-mingling, and overcrowding as well as concurrent or predisposing viral or bacterial infections. Lung lesions consist of an acute to subacute bronchopneumonia that may or may not have an associated pleuritis. Numerous virulence or potential virulence factors have been described for bovine respiratory isolates including adherence and colonization factors, iron-regulated and acquisition proteins, extracellular enzymes such as neuraminidase, lipopolysaccharide, polysaccharide capsule and a variety of OMPs. Immunity of cattle against respiratory pasteurellosis is poorly understood; however, high serum antibodies to OMPs appear to be important for enhancing resistance to the bacterium. Currently available P. multocida vaccines for use in cattle are predominately traditional bacterins and a live streptomycin-dependent mutant. The field efficacy of these vaccines is not well documented in the literature.

  2. Viral and Bacterial Pathogens in Bovine Respiratory Disease in Finland

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    Soveri T

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens causing bovine respiratory tract disease in Finland were investigated. Eighteen cattle herds with bovine respiratory disease were included. Five diseased calves from each farm were chosen for closer examination and tracheobronchial lavage. Blood samples were taken from the calves at the time of the investigation and from 86 calves 3–4 weeks later. In addition, 6–10 blood samples from animals of different ages were collected from each herd, resulting in 169 samples. Serum samples were tested for antibodies to bovine parainfluenza virus-3 (PIV-3, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV, bovine coronavirus (BCV, bovine adenovirus-3 (BAV-3 and bovine adenovirus-7 (BAV-7. About one third of the samples were also tested for antibodies to bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV with negative results. Bacteria were cultured from lavage fluid and in vitro susceptibility to selected antimicrobials was tested. According to serological findings, PIV-3, BAV-7, BAV-3, BCV and BRSV are common pathogens in Finnish cattle with respiratory problems. A titre rise especially for BAV-7 and BAV-3, the dual growth of Mycoplasma dispar and Pasteurella multocida, were typical findings in diseased calves. Pasteurella sp. strains showed no resistance to tested antimicrobials. Mycoplasma bovis and Mannheimia haemolytica were not found.

  3. Bovine respiratory disease model based on dual infections with infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine corona virus

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    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the leading cause of economic loss in the U.S. cattle industry. BRDC likely results from simultaneous or sequential infections with multiple pathogens including both viruses and bacteria. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine corona virus (BoCV...

  4. Novel Interventions for Bovine Respiratory Disease.

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    Two treatments were evaluated in commercial feedlot heifers to determine the effects of a yeast supplement on immune and metabolic responses to a combined viral-bacterial respiratory disease challenge. Beef heifers (n = 32; 324 ± 19.2 kg BW) were selected and randomly assigned to one of two treatmen...

  5. Bovine rhinitis viruses are common in U.S. cattle with bovine respiratory disease.

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    Hause, Ben M; Collin, Emily A; Anderson, Joe; Hesse, Richard A; Anderson, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Bovine rhinitis viruses (BRV) are established etiological agents of bovine respiratory disease complex however little research into their epidemiology and ecology has been published for several decades. In the U.S., only bovine rhinitis A virus 1 (BRAV1) has been identified while bovine rhinitis A virus 2 (BRAV2) and bovine rhinitis B virus (BRBV) were previously only identified in England and Japan, respectively. Metagenomic sequencing of a nasal swab from a bovine respiratory disease (BRD) diagnostic submission from Kansas identified contigs with approximately 90% nucleotide similarity to BRAV2 and BRBV. A combination of de novo and templated assemblies using reference genomes yielded near complete BRAV2 and BRBV genomes. The near complete genome of bovine rhinitis A virus 1 (BRAV1) was also determined from a historical isolate to enable further molecular epidemiological studies. A 5'-nuclease reverse transcription PCR assay targeting the 3D polymerase gene was designed and used to screen 204 archived BRD clinical specimens. Thirteen (6.4%) were positive. Metagenomic sequencing of six positive samples identified mixed BRAV1/BRAV2, BRAV1/BRBV and BRAV2/BRBV infections for five samples. One sample showed infection only with BRAV1. Seroprevalence studies using a cell culture adapted BRBV found immunofluorescence assay-reactive antibodies were common in the herds analyzed. Altogether, these results demonstrate that BRV infections are common in cattle with respiratory disease and that BRAV1, BRAV2 and BRBV co-circulate in U.S. cattle and have high similarity to viruses isolated more than 30 years ago from diverse locations.

  6. Bovine respiratory disease associated with Histophilus somni and bovine respiratory syncytial virus in a beef cattle feedlot from Southeastern Brazil

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    Selwyn Arligton Headley

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory disease (BRD is a complex multifactorial and multi-etiological disease entity that is responsible for the morbidity and mortality particularly in feedlot cattle from North America. Information relative to the occurrence of BRD in Brazil and the associated infectious agents are lacking. This study investigated the participation of infectious agents of BRD in a beef cattle feedlot from Southeastern Brazil. Nasopharyngeal swabs of 11% (10/90 of cattle (n, 450 with clinical manifestations of respiratory distress were analyzed by targeting specific genes of the principal infectious pathogens of BRD. In addition, pulmonary fragments of one the animals that died were collected for histopathological and molecular diagnoses. The nucleic acids of Histophilus somni and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV were identified in 20% (2/10 of the nasopharyngeal swabs of the animals with respiratory distress; another contained only BRSV RNA. Moreover, the nucleic acids of both infectious agents were amplified from the pulmonary fragments of the animal that died with histopathological evidence of bronchopneumonia and interstitial pneumonia; the nasopharyngeal swab of this animal also contained the nucleic acids of both pathogens. Additionally, all PCR and/or RT-PCR assays designed to detect the specific genes of Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Mycoplasma bovis, bovine viral diarrhea virus, bovine herpesvirus -1, bovine parainfluenza virus-3, and bovine coronavirus yielded negative results. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the isolates of H. somni circulating in Brazil are similar to those identified elsewhere, while there seem to be diversity between the isolates of BRSV within cattle herds from different geographical locations of Brazil.

  7. Bovine coronavirus antibody titers at weaning negatively correlate with incidence of bovine respiratory disease in the feed yard

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    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is a multifactorial disease caused by complex interactions among viral and bacterial pathogens, stressful management practices and host genetic variability. Although vaccines and antibiotic treatments are readily available to prevent and treat infection caus...

  8. Detection and characterization of viruses as field and vaccine strains in feedlot cattle with bovine respiratory disease

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    This study investigated viruses in bovine respiratory disease (BRD) cases in feedlots, including bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine coronaviruses (BoCV) and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V). Nasal swabs were collected fro...

  9. Occurrence and phylogenetic analysis of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in outbreaks of respiratory disease in Norway.

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    Klem, Thea B; Rimstad, Espen; Stokstad, Maria

    2014-01-14

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is one of the major pathogens involved in the bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex. The seroprevalence to BRSV in Norwegian cattle herds is high, but its role in epidemics of respiratory disease is unclear. The aims of the study were to investigate the etiological role of BRSV and other respiratory viruses in epidemics of BRD and to perform phylogenetic analysis of Norwegian BRSV strains. BRSV infection was detected either serologically and/or virologically in 18 (86%) of 21 outbreaks and in most cases as a single viral agent. When serology indicated that bovine coronavirus and/or bovine parainfluenza virus 3 were present, the number of BRSV positive animals in the herd was always higher, supporting the view of BRSV as the main pathogen. Sequencing of the G gene of BRSV positive samples showed that the current circulating Norwegian BRSVs belong to genetic subgroup II, along with other North European isolates. One isolate from an outbreak in Norway in 1976 was also investigated. This strain formed a separate branch in subgroup II, clearly different from the current Scandinavian sequences. The currently circulating BRSV could be divided into two different strains that were present in the same geographical area at the same time. The sequence variations between the two strains were in an antigenic important part of the G protein. The results demonstrated that BRSV is the most important etiological agent of epidemics of BRD in Norway and that it often acts as the only viral agent. The phylogenetic analysis of the Norwegian strains of BRSV and several previously published isolates supported the theory of geographical and temporal clustering of BRSV.

  10. The association between serological titers in infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, bovine virus diarrhea virus, parainfluenza-3 virus, respiratory syncytial virus and treatment for respiratory disease in Ontario feedlot calves.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, S W; Bohac, J G

    1986-01-01

    A seroepidemiological study of the association between antibody titers to infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, parainfluenza-3, bovine virus diarrhea and bovine respiratory syncytial viruses, and treatment for bovine respiratory disease was conducted. A total of 322 calves from five different groups were bled on arrival, then one month later all cases (cattle treated for bovine respiratory disease) were rebled together with an equal number of controls (cattle not treated for any disease). Titer...

  11. Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex.

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    Laurel J Gershwin

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in cattle; costing the dairy and beef industries millions of dollars annually, despite the use of vaccines and antibiotics. BRDC is caused by one or more of several viruses (bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpes type 1 also known as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, and bovine viral diarrhea virus, which predispose animals to infection with one or more bacteria. These include: Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, and Histophilus somni. Some cattle appear to be more resistant to BRDC than others. We hypothesize that appropriate immune responses to these pathogens are subject to genetic control. To determine which genes are involved in the immune response to each of these pathogens it was first necessary to experimentally induce infection separately with each pathogen to document clinical and pathological responses in animals from which tissues were harvested for subsequent RNA sequencing. Herein these infections and animal responses are described.

  12. Single Pathogen Challenge with Agents of the Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex.

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    Gershwin, Laurel J; Van Eenennaam, Alison L; Anderson, Mark L; McEligot, Heather A; Shao, Matt X; Toaff-Rosenstein, Rachel; Taylor, Jeremy F; Neibergs, Holly L; Womack, James

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in cattle; costing the dairy and beef industries millions of dollars annually, despite the use of vaccines and antibiotics. BRDC is caused by one or more of several viruses (bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpes type 1 also known as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, and bovine viral diarrhea virus), which predispose animals to infection with one or more bacteria. These include: Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, and Histophilus somni. Some cattle appear to be more resistant to BRDC than others. We hypothesize that appropriate immune responses to these pathogens are subject to genetic control. To determine which genes are involved in the immune response to each of these pathogens it was first necessary to experimentally induce infection separately with each pathogen to document clinical and pathological responses in animals from which tissues were harvested for subsequent RNA sequencing. Herein these infections and animal responses are described.

  13. Calculation of genomic predicted transmitting abilities for bovine respiratory disease complex in Holsteins

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    Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex is a disease that is very costly to the dairy industry. Genomic selection may be an effective tool to improve host resistance to the pathogens that cause this disease. Use of genomic predicted transmitting abilities (GPTA) for selection has had a dramatic effect on...

  14. Three viruses of the bovine respiratory disease complex apply different strategies to initiate infection.

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    Kirchhoff, Jana; Uhlenbruck, Sabine; Goris, Katherina; Keil, Günther M; Herrler, Georg

    2014-02-18

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the major cause of serious respiratory tract infections in calves. The disease is multifactorial, with either stress or reduced immunity allowing several pathogens to emerge. We investigated the susceptibility of bovine airway epithelial cells (BAEC) to infection by the three major viruses associated with the BRDC: bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) and bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3). For this purpose, two culture systems for well-differentiated BAEC were used: the air-liquid interface (ALI) system, where filter-grown BAEC differentiate into a pseudostratified respiratory epithelium and precision-cut lung slices (PCLS) where BAEC are maintained in the original tissue organisation. Comparative infection studies demonstrated that entry and release of BPIV3 occurred specifically via the apical membrane with ciliated cells being the major target cells. By contrast, airway epithelial cells were largely resistant to infection by BHV-1. When the epithelial barrier was abolished by opening tight junctions or by injuring the cell monolayer, BHV-1 infected mainly basal cells. Respiratory epithelial cells were also refractory to infection by BRSV. However, this virus infected neither differentiated epithelial cells nor basal cells when the integrity of the epithelial barrier was destroyed. In contrast to cells of the airway epithelium, subepithelial cells were susceptible to infection by BRSV. Altogether, these results indicate that the three viruses of the same disease complex follow different strategies to interact with the airway epithelium. Possible entry mechanisms are discussed.

  15. Respiratory disease associated with bovine coronavirus infection in cattle herds in Southern Italy.

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    Decaro, Nicola; Campolo, Marco; Desario, Costantina; Cirone, Francesco; D'Abramo, Maria; Lorusso, Eleonora; Greco, Grazia; Mari, Viviana; Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Elia, Gabriella; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2008-01-01

    Four outbreaks of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with bovine coronavirus (BCoV) infection in Italian cattle herds were reported. In 3 outbreaks, BRD was observed only in 2-3-month-old feedlot calves, whereas in the remaining outbreak, lactating cows, heifers, and calves were simultaneously affected. By using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), BCoV RNA was detected in all outbreaks without evidence of concurrent viral pathogens (i.e., bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus type 1, bovine viral diarrhea virus, bovine parainfluenza virus). Common bacteria of cattle were recovered only from 2 outbreaks of BRD: Staphylococcus spp. and Proteus mirabilis (outbreak 1) and Mannheimia haemolytica (outbreak 4). A recently established real-time RT-PCR assay showed that viral RNA loads in nasal secretions ranged between 3.10 x 10(2) and 7.50 x 10(7) RNA copies/microl of template. Bovine coronavirus was isolated from respiratory specimens from all outbreaks except outbreak 1, in which real-time RT-PCR found very low viral titers in nasal swabs.

  16. Closed genomes of seven histophilus somni isolates from beef calves with bovine respiratory disease complex

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    Histophilus somni is a fastidious gram-negative opportunistic pathogenic Pasteurellacea that affects multiple organ systems and is one of the principle bacterial species contributing to bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) in feed yard cattle. Here we present seven closed genomes isolated from...

  17. A metagenomics and case-control study to identify viruses associated with bovine respiratory disease.

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    Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Kondov, Nikola O; Deng, Xutao; Van Eenennaam, Alison; Neibergs, Holly L; Delwart, Eric

    2015-05-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is a common health problem for both dairy and beef cattle, resulting in significant economic loses. In order to identify viruses associated with BRD, we used a metagenomics approach to enrich and sequence viral nucleic acids in the nasal swabs of 50 young dairy cattle with symptoms of BRD. Following deep sequencing, de novo assembly, and translated protein sequence similarity searches, numerous known and previously uncharacterized viruses were identified. Bovine adenovirus 3, bovine adeno-associated virus, bovine influenza D virus, bovine parvovirus 2, bovine herpesvirus 6, bovine rhinitis A virus, and multiple genotypes of bovine rhinitis B virus were identified. The genomes of a previously uncharacterized astrovirus and picobirnaviruses were also partially or fully sequenced. Using real-time PCR, the rates of detection of the eight viruses that generated the most reads were compared for the nasal secretions of 50 animals with BRD versus 50 location-matched healthy control animals. Viruses were detected in 68% of BRD-affected animals versus 16% of healthy control animals. Thirty-eight percent of sick animals versus 8% of controls were infected with multiple respiratory viruses. Significantly associated with BRD were bovine adenovirus 3 (P metagenomics and real-time PCR detection approach in carefully matched cases and controls can provide a rapid means to identify viruses associated with a complex disease, paving the way for further confirmatory tests and ultimately to effective intervention strategies. Bovine respiratory disease is the most economically important disease affecting the cattle industry, whose complex root causes include environmental, genetics, and infectious factors. Using an unbiased metagenomics approach, we characterized the viruses in respiratory secretions from BRD cases and identified known and previously uncharacterized viruses belonging to seven viral families. Using a case-control format with location

  18. Molecular and epidemiological characterization of a respiratory disease outbreak in pre-weaned beef calves associated with bovine coronavirus

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    Bovine coronavirus (BCV) is associated with respiratory tract infections in cattle of all ages; however, a temporal study to evaluate the effect of BCV immunity on virus shedding and bovine respiratory disease (BRD) incidence in pre-weaned beef calves has not been reported. Thus, we report here a pr...

  19. Pathogens of bovine respiratory disease in North American feedlots conferring multidrug resistance via integrative conjugative elements.

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    Klima, Cassidy L; Zaheer, Rahat; Cook, Shaun R; Booker, Calvin W; Hendrick, Steve; Alexander, Trevor W; McAllister, Tim A

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we determined the prevalence of bovine respiratory disease (BRD)-associated viral and bacterial pathogens in cattle and characterized the genetic profiles, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and nature of antimicrobial resistance determinants in collected bacteria. Nasopharyngeal swab and lung tissue samples from 68 BRD mortalities in Alberta, Canada (n = 42), Texas (n = 6), and Nebraska (n = 20) were screened using PCR for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus 1, parainfluenza type 3 virus, Mycoplasma bovis, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni. Excepting bovine herpesvirus 1, all agents were detected. M. haemolytica (91%) and BVDV (69%) were the most prevalent, with cooccurrence in 63% of the cattle. Isolates of M. haemolytica (n = 55), P. multocida (n = 8), and H. somni (n = 10) from lungs were also collected. Among M. haemolytica isolates, a clonal subpopulation (n = 8) was obtained from a Nebraskan feedlot. All three bacterial pathogens exhibited a high rate of antimicrobial resistance, with 45% exhibiting resistance to three or more antimicrobials. M. haemolytica (n = 18), P. multocida (n = 3), and H. somni (n = 3) from Texas and Nebraska possessed integrative conjugative elements (ICE) that conferred resistance for up to seven different antimicrobial classes. ICE were shown to be transferred via conjugation from P. multocida to Escherichia coli and from M. haemolytica and H. somni to P. multocida. ICE-mediated multidrug-resistant profiles of bacterial BRD pathogens could be a major detriment to many of the therapeutic antimicrobial strategies currently used to control BRD.

  20. Seroprevalence of some bovine viral respiratory diseases among non vaccinated cattle in Saudi Arabia

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    Mohamed Abd El Fatah Mahmoud

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Four viral pathogens, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV, and bovine herpes virus type 1 (BHV-1, bovine parainfluenza type 3 virus (PI-3V, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV are mainly associated with bovine respiratory diseases that cause major economic losses in the dairy cattle industry. This study aimed to document exposure of cattle in Saudi Arabia to infectious BVDV, BHV-1, PI-3V and BRSV viruses in non vaccinated cattle in order to obtain epidemiological and immunological information. Materials and Methods: In the present study, 460 random serum samples obtained from non vaccinated cattle in five districts (Riyadh, Eastern Province, Jizan, Najran, Asir of Saudi Arabia between January to March 2011. These samples were tested for presence of antibodies against BVDV, BHV-1, BRSV and PIV-3 by commercial indirect ELISA kits. Results: Our findings displayed that Seropositivity rates were 26 % for BVD, 17.4 % for BHV-1, 69.1 % for PI-3V and 75.6 % for BRSV in the sampled population. In addition, coinfections with more than one virus were considerably common among non-vaccinated dairy cattle. Conclusion: These results indicate that exposure to these agents is common within the study areas. Preventive and control measures against these infectious agents should therefore be adopted. [Vet World 2013; 6(1.000: 1-4

  1. Use of metaphylactic protocols based on the risk to develop bovine respiratory diseases in feedlot cattle

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    Magalhães, Layane Queiroz; Baptista, Anderson Lopes; Fonseca, Pedro de Almeida; Menezes, Guilherme Lobato; Nogueira,Geison Morel; Headley, Selwyn Arlington; Fritzen, Juliana Torres Tomazi; Alfieri,Amauri Alcindo; Saut, João Paulo Elsen

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Bovine respiratory diseases (BRD) affect production rates negatively because it compromise health and well-being of the affected animal. The hypothesis of this study was that the use of metaphylactic protocols based on the risk to develop BRD would reduce morbidity and pulmonary lesions. For this purpose, the aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of two metaphylactic protocols on the morbidity of feedlot cattle with a known sanitary history, occurrence of pulmonary lesions ...

  2. Observations on macrolide resistance and susceptibility testing performance in field isolates collected from clinical bovine respiratory disease cases

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    The objectives of this study were; first, to describe gamithromycin susceptibility of Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni isolated from cattle diagnosed with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and previously treated with either gamithromycin for control of BRD (mass me...

  3. EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF BAN HUANG ORAL LIQUID FOR TREATING BOVINE RESPIRATORY DISEASES.

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    Li, Bing; Zhou, Xu-Zheng; Niu, Jian-Rong; Wei, Xiao-Juan; Li, Jian-Yong; Yang, Ya-Jun; Liu, Xi-Wang; Cheng, Fu-Sheng; Zhang, Ji-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Ban Huang oral liquid was developed as a veterinary compound preparation by the Lanzhou Institute of Husbandry and Pharmaceutical Sciences of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS). The purpose of this study was to determine whether the oral liquid preparation of traditional Chinese medicine, Ban Huang, is safe and effective for treating respiratory diseases in cattle. Acute oral toxicity experiments were conducted in Wistar rats and Kunming mice via oral administration. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the drug against Mycoplasma bovis in vitro with the double dilution method was 500 mg/mL, indicating good sensitivity. The results of laboratory pathogen testing, analysis of clinical symptoms, and analysis of pathological anatomy were combined to diagnose bovine respiratory diseases in 147 Simmental cattle caused by mixed infections of M. bovis , bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine parainfluenza virus type 3, and Mannheimia haemolytica . These cattle were randomly divided into three groups: drug treatment group 1 (treated via Tilmicosin injection), drug treatment group 2 (treated with Shuang Huang Lian oral liquid combined with Tilmicosin injection), and drug treatment group 3 (treated with Ban Huang oral liquid combined with Tilmicosin injection). Treatment effects were observed within 7 days. The results showed no toxicity and a maximum tolerated dose greater than 20 g/kg BW. For the 87 cattle in drug-treatment group, the cure rate was 90.80%, whereas the response rate was 94.25%. The cure rate of drug treatment group was increased by 14.13% in comparison with that of drug control group 1 and by 7.47% in comparison with that of drug control group 2 (both P bovine respiratory diseases, especially for mixed infection caused by M. bovis , bacteria, and viruses.

  4. Associations between exposure to viruses and bovine respiratory disease in Australian feedlot cattle.

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    Hay, K E; Barnes, T S; Morton, J M; Gravel, J L; Commins, M A; Horwood, P F; Ambrose, R C; Clements, A C A; Mahony, T J

    2016-05-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most important cause of clinical disease and death in feedlot cattle. Respiratory viral infections are key components in predisposing cattle to the development of this disease. To quantify the contribution of four viruses commonly associated with BRD, a case-control study was conducted nested within the National Bovine Respiratory Disease Initiative project population in Australian feedlot cattle. Effects of exposure to Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 (BVDV-1), Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and Bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3), and to combinations of these viruses, were investigated. Based on weighted seroprevalences at induction (when animals were enrolled and initial samples collected), the percentages of the project population estimated to be seropositive were 24% for BoHV-1, 69% for BVDV-1, 89% for BRSV and 91% for BPIV-3. For each of the four viruses, seropositivity at induction was associated with reduced risk of BRD (OR: 0.6-0.9), and seroincrease from induction to second blood sampling (35-60 days after induction) was associated with increased risk of BRD (OR: 1.3-1.5). Compared to animals that were seropositive for all four viruses at induction, animals were at progressively increased risk with increasing number of viruses for which they were seronegative; those seronegative for all four viruses were at greatest risk (OR: 2.4). Animals that seroincreased for one or more viruses from induction to second blood sampling were at increased risk (OR: 1.4-2.1) of BRD compared to animals that did not seroincrease for any viruses. Collectively these results confirm that prior exposure to these viruses is protective while exposure at or after feedlot entry increases the risk of development of BRD in feedlots. However, the modest increases in risk associated with seroincrease for each virus separately, and the progressive increases in risk with multiple viral exposures highlights

  5. Bacterial pathogens of the bovine respiratory disease complex.

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    Griffin, Dee; Chengappa, M M; Kuszak, Jennifer; McVey, D Scott

    2010-07-01

    Pneumonia caused by the bacterial pathogens discussed in this article is the most significant cause of morbidity and mortality of the BRDC. Most of these infectious bacteria are not capable of inducing significant disease without the presence of other predisposing environmental factors, physiologic stressors, or concurrent infections. Mannheimia haemolytica is the most common and serious of these bacterial agents and is therefore also the most highly characterized. There are other important bacterial pathogens of BRD, such as Pasteurella multocida, Histophulus somni, and Mycoplasma bovis. Mixed infections with these organisms do occur. These pathogens have unique and common virulence factors but the resulting pneumonic lesions may be similar. Although the amount and quality of research associated with BRD has increased, vaccination and therapeutic practices are not fully successful. A greater understanding of the virulence mechanisms of the infecting bacteria and pathogenesis of pneumonia, as well as the characteristics of the organisms that allow tissue persistence, may lead to improved management, therapeutics, and vaccines. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Duration of immunity of a four-valent vaccine against bovine respiratory diseases

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    Corinne Philippe-Reversat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrated the duration of immunity over 6 months of a vaccine against key bovine respiratory disease pathogens: Parainfluenza 3, Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Bovine Viral Diarrhoea and Mannheimia haemolytica. This was performed by challenge on colostrum-deprived calves at the age of 2 weeks. Recent European field isolates were used as challenge strains. Clinical signs and pathogen excretion or presence were monitored. Field relevance of the viral challenge strains was analysed using phylogenic analysis. Significant reduction of excretion of the 3 viruses in vaccinated animals was a consistent finding, demonstrating the efficacy of the vaccine. Reducing shedding is indeed key to interrupting the infection transmission chain and helping to achieve the protective effects of immunisation that extend beyond the individual. A significant reduction of clinical signs and lung lesions following the Mannheimia haemolytica challenge was also observed in vaccinated animals versus controls. Comparison of the challenge strains to an array of global and European strains, including recent ones, demonstrated a high genetic proximity, supporting the potential for the vaccine to maintain similar levels of efficacy in the field over a 6-month period post vaccination.

  7. Infection of differentiated airway epithelial cells from caprine lungs by viruses of the bovine respiratory disease complex.

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    Kirchhoff, Jana; Uhlenbruck, Sabine; Keil, Günther M; Schwegmann-Wessels, Christel; Ganter, Martin; Herrler, Georg

    2014-05-14

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) and bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) are important pathogens associated with the bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). Non-bovine ruminants such as goats may also be infected and serve as a virus reservoir to be considered in the development of control strategies. To evaluate the susceptibility of caprine airway epithelial cells to infection by viruses of BRDC, we established a culture system for differentiated caprine epithelial cells. For this purpose, we generated precision-cut lung slices (PCLS), in which cells are retained in their original structural configuration and remain viable for more than a week. The three bovine viruses were found to preferentially infect different cell types. Ciliated epithelial cells were the major target cells of BPIV3, whereas BHV-1 preferred basal cells. Cells infected by BRSV were detected in submucosal cell layers. This spectrum of susceptible cells is the same as that reported recently for infected bovine PCLS. While infection of caprine cells by BRSV and BPIV3 was as efficient as that reported for bovine cells, infection of caprine cells by BHV-1 required a tenfold higher dose of infectious virus as compared to infection of bovine airway cells. These results support the notion that non-bovine ruminants may serve as a reservoir for viruses of BRDC and introduce a culture system to analyze virus infection of differentiated airway epithelial cells from the caprine lung. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Antiviral effects of bovine interferons on bovine respiratory tract viruses.

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    Fulton, R W; Downing, M M; Cummins, J M

    1984-01-01

    The antiviral effects of bovine interferons on the replication of bovine respiratory tract viruses were studied. Bovine turbinate monolayer cultures were treated with bovine interferons and challenged with several bovine herpesvirus 1 strains, bovine viral diarrhea virus, parainfluenza type 3 virus, goat respiratory syncytial virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine adenovirus type 7, or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with bovine interferons reduced viral yield for each of the...

  9. Evaluating the metagenome of two sampling locations in the nasal cavity of cattle with bovine respiratory disease complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is a multi-factor disease, and disease incidence may be associated with an animal’s commensal microbiota (metagenome). Evaluation of the animal’s resident microbiota in the nasal cavity may help us to understand the impact of the metagenome on incidence of ...

  10. Systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of commercially available vaccines against bovine herpesvirus, bovine viral diarrhea virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza type 3 virus for mitigation of bovine respiratory disease complex in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurer, Miles E; Larson, Robert L; White, Brad J

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate and analyze data from controlled studies on the effectiveness of vaccinating cattle with commercially available viral antigen vaccines for mitigation of the effects of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). Systematic review and meta-analysis. 31 studies comprising 88 trials. Studies that reported the effectiveness of commercially available bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), and parainfluenza type 3 virus (PI3) vaccines for protection of cattle against BRDC or its components were included in the analysis. Studies or trials were categorized as natural exposure or experimental challenge and were further divided by the viral antigen evaluated and vaccine type (modified-live virus [MLV] or inactivated vaccine). Meta-analysis was performed; summary Mantel-Haenszel risk ratios were determined, and Forest plots were generated. In natural exposure trials, beef calves vaccinated with various antigen combinations had a significantly lower BRDC morbidity risk than did nonvaccinated control calves. In trials evaluating BHV-1 and MLV BVDV vaccines in experimental challenge models, vaccinated calves had a lower BRDC morbidity risk than did control calves; however, in experimental challenge trials evaluating MLV BRSV and PI3 vaccines, no significant difference in morbidity or mortality risk was found between vaccinated and control calves. Estimating clinical efficacy from results of experimental challenge studies requires caution because these models differ substantially from those involving natural exposure. The literature provides data but does not provide sufficiently strong evidence to guide definitive recommendations for determining which virus components are necessary to include in a vaccination program for prevention or mitigation of BRDC in cattle.

  11. Effects on productivity and risk factors of Bovine respiratory disease in dairy heifers : a review for the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.; Martin, S.W.; Nielen, M.; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a literature review about the impact of Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) on the productivity of dairy heifers and about risk factors for the disease, as far as these are relevant to commercial dairy farming in the Netherlands. The review includes peerreviewed publications over

  12. The nasopharyngeal microbiota of feedlot cattle that develop bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Devin B; McAllister, Tim A; Topp, Edward; Wright, André-Denis G; Alexander, Trevor W

    2015-10-22

    Bovine respiratory disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in feedlot cattle. The objective of this study was to compare the nasopharyngeal bacterial microbiota of healthy cattle and cattle treated for BRD in a commercial feedlot setting using a high-density 16S rRNA gene microarray (Phylochip). Samples were taken from both groups of animals (n=5) at feedlot entry (day 0) and ≥60 days after placement. Cattle diagnosed with BRD had significantly less bacterial diversity and fewer OTUs in their nasopharynx at both sampling times. The predominant phyla in both groups were Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. The relative abundance of the phylum Actinobacteria was lower in cattle treated for BRD. At the family-level there was a greater relative abundance (Pbovine nasopharyngeal microbiota is relatively unstable during the first 60 days in the feedlot. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Evaluation of bovine coronavirus antibody levels, virus shedding, and respiratory disease incidence throughout the beef cattle production cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective- Determine how levels of serum antibody to bovine coronavirus (BCV) are related to virus shedding patterns and respiratory disease incidence in beef calves at various production stages. Animals- 890 crossbred beef calves from four separately managed herds at the U.S. Meat Animal Research C...

  14. Closed genomes and phenotypes of seven Histophilus somni isolates from beef calves with bovine respiratory disease complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Histophilus somni is a fastidious gram-negative opportunistic pathogenic Pasteurellacea that affects multiple organ systems and is one of three principle bacterial species contributing to bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) in North American feed yard cattle. BRDC outbreaks accoun...

  15. Survey of management practices related to bovine respiratory disease in preweaned calves on California dairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, W J; Lehenbauer, T W; Karle, B M; Hulbert, Lindsey E; Anderson, Randall J; Van Eenennaam, A L; Farver, T B; Aly, S S

    2016-02-01

    In the spring of 2013, a survey of California (CA) dairies was performed to characterize management practices related to bovine respiratory disease in preweaned calves, compare these practices across geographic regions of the state, and determine the principal components that explain the variability in management between herds. The questionnaire consisted of 53 questions divided into 6 sections to assess management practices affecting dairy calves from precalving to weaning. The questionnaire was mailed to 1,523 grade A licensed dairies in CA and 224 responses (14.7%) were collected. Survey response rates were similar over the 3 defined regions of CA: northern CA, northern San Joaquin Valley, and the greater southern CA region. The mean size of respondent herds was 1,423 milking cows. Most dairies reported raising preweaned calves on-site (59.7%). In 93.3% of dairies, preweaned calves were raised in some form of individual housing. Nonsaleable milk was the most frequent liquid diet fed to preweaned heifers (75.2%). Several important differences were identified between calf-raising practices in CA and practices reported in recent nationwide studies, including herd sizes, housing practices, and sources of milk fed to heifers. The differences between the CA and nationwide studies may be explained by differences in herd size. Regional differences within CA were also identified. Compared with the 2 other regions, northern CA dairies were found to have smaller herds, less Holstein cattle, calves remained with dams for longer periods of time after calving, were more likely to be certified organic dairies, and raised their own calves more often. Principal component analysis was performed and identified 11 components composed of 28 variables (questions) that explained 66.5% of the variability in the data. The identified components and questions will contribute to developing a risk assessment tool for bovine respiratory disease in preweaned dairy calves. Copyright © 2016

  16. Immunoprophylaxis of bovine respiratory syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogan Dragan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Respiratory Syndrome (BRS is a multifactorial disease caused by the interaction of infective agents, the environment and the individual immunological response of animals in the herd. Despite five decades of research on BRS, no clear understanding of how environmental factors influence pathogenic outcomes of the disease has been defined. As such, the development of immunoprophylaxis and vaccine programmes to prevent outbreaks of BRS in cattle has not been successful. The current paper discusses vaccination programmes for all categories of cattle and presents a review of existing vaccines being used for immunoprophylaxis of respiratory syndrome in cattle and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the currently used vaccines and vaccination programmes. Lastly, a discussion detailing the design of future perfect vaccines is presented.

  17. The Use of Kosher Phenotyping for Mapping QTL Affecting Susceptibility to Bovine Respiratory Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehud Lipkin

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory disease (BRD is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in feedlot cattle, caused by multiple pathogens that become more virulent in response to stress. As clinical signs often go undetected and various preventive strategies failed, identification of genes affecting BRD is essential for selection for resistance. Selective DNA pooling (SDP was applied in a genome wide association study (GWAS to map BRD QTLs in Israeli Holstein male calves. Kosher scoring of lung adhesions was used to allocate 122 and 62 animals to High (Glatt Kosher and Low (Non-Kosher resistant groups, respectively. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip according to the Infinium protocol. Moving average of -logP was used to map QTLs and Log drop was used to define their boundaries (QTLRs. The combined procedure was efficient for high resolution mapping. Nineteen QTLRs distributed over 13 autosomes were found, some overlapping previous studies. The QTLRs contain polymorphic functional and expression candidate genes to affect kosher status, with putative immunological and wound healing activities. Kosher phenotyping was shown to be a reliable means to map QTLs affecting BRD morbidity.

  18. The Use of Kosher Phenotyping for Mapping QTL Affecting Susceptibility to Bovine Respiratory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkin, Ehud; Strillacci, Maria Giuseppina; Eitam, Harel; Yishay, Moran; Schiavini, Fausta; Soller, Morris; Bagnato, Alessandro; Shabtay, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in feedlot cattle, caused by multiple pathogens that become more virulent in response to stress. As clinical signs often go undetected and various preventive strategies failed, identification of genes affecting BRD is essential for selection for resistance. Selective DNA pooling (SDP) was applied in a genome wide association study (GWAS) to map BRD QTLs in Israeli Holstein male calves. Kosher scoring of lung adhesions was used to allocate 122 and 62 animals to High (Glatt Kosher) and Low (Non-Kosher) resistant groups, respectively. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip according to the Infinium protocol. Moving average of -logP was used to map QTLs and Log drop was used to define their boundaries (QTLRs). The combined procedure was efficient for high resolution mapping. Nineteen QTLRs distributed over 13 autosomes were found, some overlapping previous studies. The QTLRs contain polymorphic functional and expression candidate genes to affect kosher status, with putative immunological and wound healing activities. Kosher phenotyping was shown to be a reliable means to map QTLs affecting BRD morbidity.

  19. Molecular survey of infectious agents associated with bovine respiratory disease in a beef cattle feedlot in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, Selwyn A; Okano, Werner; Balbo, Luciana C; Marcasso, Rogério A; Oliveira, Thalita E; Alfieri, Alice F; Negri Filho, Luiz C; Michelazzo, Mariana Z; Rodrigues, Silvio C; Baptista, Anderson L; Saut, João Paulo E; Alfieri, Amauri A

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the occurrence of infectious pathogens during an outbreak of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in a beef cattle feedlot in southern Brazil that has a high risk of developing BRD. Nasopharyngeal swabs were randomly collected from steers ( n = 23) and assessed for the presence of infectious agents of BRD by PCR and/or RT-PCR assays. These included: Histophilus somni, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Mycoplasma bovis, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine coronavirus (BCoV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine alphaherpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), and bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3). Pulmonary sections of one steer that died with clinical BRD were submitted for pathology and molecular testing. The frequencies of the pathogens identified from the nasopharyngeal swabs were: H. somni 39% (9 of 23), BRSV 35% (8 of 23), BCoV 22% (5 of 23), and M. haemolytica 13% (3 of 23). PCR or RT-PCR assays did not identify P. multocida, M. bovis, BoHV-1, BVDV, or BPIV-3 from the nasopharyngeal swabs. Single and concomitant associations of infectious agents of BRD were identified. Fibrinous bronchopneumonia was diagnosed in one steer that died; samples were positive for H. somni and M. haemolytica by PCR. H. somni, BRSV, and BCoV are important disease pathogens of BRD in feedlot cattle in Brazil, but H. somni and BCoV are probably under-reported.

  20. Use of metaphylactic protocols based on the risk to develop bovine respiratory diseases in feedlot cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layane Queiroz Magalhães

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Bovine respiratory diseases (BRD affect production rates negatively because it compromise health and well-being of the affected animal. The hypothesis of this study was that the use of metaphylactic protocols based on the risk to develop BRD would reduce morbidity and pulmonary lesions. For this purpose, the aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of two metaphylactic protocols on the morbidity of feedlot cattle with a known sanitary history, occurrence of pulmonary lesions at slaughter, and the possible participation of Mannheimia haemolytica, Histophilus somni, Bovine alphaherpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1 and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV in the development of BRD. An experimental study was designed in which 3,094 adult, male, cattle, were grouped according to the risk to develop BRD: a group without metaphylaxis (n=2,104, low-risk animals; b metaphylaxis group with oxytetracycline (n=789, moderate-risk animals; c metaphylaxis group with tildipirosin (n=201, high-risk animals. All cattle were immunized against pathogens associated with BRD (BoHV-1, BVDV, BRSV, PI3. The morbidity for BRD was 8.2% (253/3,094; cattle within the moderate-risk group for BRD had the lowest frequency (6.1%, followed by high-risk animals with tildipirosin metaphylaxis (6.5% and low-risk without metaphylaxis (9.1% (P=0.019. At the abattoir, 1.2% of lungs with lesions were found. There was a difference (P=0.036 in the frequency of pulmonary lesions between healthy animals (1.1% and those diagnosed with BRD (2.8%. Two agents associated with BRD were identified by PCR assays in the lungs (n=37 of cattle: M. haemolytica (16.2% and H. somni (5.4%. In addition, concomitant infections involving these pathogens were identified in the lungs of two steers. These results demonstrate that the use of metaphylactic protocols, based on the risk to develop BRD, reduces morbidity and pulmonary lesions in affected cattle. Furthermore, pulmonary lesions were more

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for bovine respiratory disease: getting more from diagnostic results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Brian V; Turnidge, John

    2015-02-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is one of the most common diseases of cattle worldwide. Given the significant bacterial component of this disease, antimicrobial agents remain one of the mainstays of therapy. However, the potential welfare and economic impact resulting from the selection of inappropriate antimicrobial therapy for BRD poses significant risks to both animal and animal owner. To determine the 'best' antimicrobial agent for a specific case, the decision-making process needs to incorporate all available evidence, often including the results of bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. While antimicrobial susceptibility testing can be a valuable diagnostic tool, integrating the test results into the clinical decision making process can be a challenging experience. This review details the process by which interpretive criteria for susceptibility tests are developed. Principles for how to best integrate antimicrobial susceptibility testing, both at the individual animal test and aggregate test levels, into the clinical decision making process are discussed. Non-traditional testing methodologies and how they may improve susceptibility testing in the future are also reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Market Impacts of Reducing the Prevalence of Bovine Respiratory Disease in United States Beef Cattle Feedlots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamina Keiko Johnson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory disease (BRD is a common endemic disease among North American feedlot cattle. BRD can lead to significant economic losses for individual beef cattle feedlot producers through mortality and morbidity. With promising new management and technology research that could reduce BRD prevalence, this study evaluates the potential impacts of a reduction of BRD in the US beef cattle feedlot sector. Using a multi-market, multi-commodity partial equilibrium economic model of the US agricultural industry, we evaluate the market impacts of reduced BRD to producers from various livestock, meat, and feedstuffs industries. We find that as morbidity and mortality is reduced, beef cattle producers experience losses due to increased supplies (lower beef cattle prices and increased demand for feedstuff (higher feedstuff prices. Beef cattle processors see gains as the price of beef cattle is lower, whereas feedstuff producers gain from higher feedstuff prices. Producers in the allied industries (pork, lamb, poultry, and eggs see a small reduction in returns as consumers substitute with less expensive beef products. Consumers see gains in welfare as the increase in beef cattle supply results in lower beef prices. These lower beef prices more than offset the small increases in pork, lamb, poultry, and egg prices. Overall, the potential economic welfare change due to management and technologies that reduce BRD is a net gain for the US society as a whole.

  3. Association of bovine respiratory disease or vaccination with serologic response in dairy heifer calves up to three months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windeyer, M Claire; Leslie, Ken E; Godden, Sandra M; Hodgins, Douglas C; Lissemore, Kerry D; LeBlanc, Stephen J

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the association of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) or vaccination with serologic response in calves. 94 Holstein calves. To assess the association between BRD and antibody titers, 38 calves bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus types 1 and 2, bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV1), and parainfluenza virus type 3 at 2 weeks of age (n = 6), 5 weeks of age (6), and both 2 and 5 weeks of age (6) or were assigned to be unvaccinated controls (6). Blood samples were obtained at I, 2, 5, and 12 weeks for determination of serum neutralization antibody titers against the vaccine viruses, bovine coronavirus, and Mannheimia haemolytica. Antibody rates of decay were calculated. Calves with initial antibody titers against BRSV < 1:64 that were treated for BRD had a slower rate of anti-BRSV antibody decay than did similar calves that were not treated for BRD. Calves with high initial antibody titers against BRSV and BHV1 had lower odds of BRD than did calves with low initial antibody titers against those 2 pathogens. Vaccination at 2 or 5 weeks of age had no effect on the rate of antibody decay. Clinical BRD and the serologic response of dairy calves were associated with initial antibody titers against BRSV and BHV1. Serologic or clinical responses to viral exposure may differ in calves with low passive immunity.

  4. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV): A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in calves during the first year of life. The study of the virus has been difficult because of its lability and very poor growth in cell culture. However, during the last decade, the introduction of new...... complex and unpredictable which makes the diagnosis and subsequent therapy very difficult. BRSV is closely related to human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) which is an important cause of respiratory disease in young children. In contrast to BRSV, the recent knowledge of HRSV is regularly extensively...

  5. A randomised clinical trial of a metaphylactic treatment with tildipirosin for bovine respiratory disease in veal calves

    OpenAIRE

    Berman, J.; Francoz, D.; Dubuc, J.; Buczinski, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is a major problem in veal calf rearing units. The objective of this randomised clinical trial was to assess the effectiveness of tildipirosin as a metaphylactic treatment in veal calves on the number of BRD treatments, lung consolidation on thoracic ultrasonography (TUS) and average daily gain (ADG). A total of 209 veal calves from a pre-weaning fattening unit were randomly allocated to receive one of two treatments (tildipirosin 4?mg/kg, subcutane...

  6. Structured literature review of responses of cattle to viral and bacterial pathogens causing bovine respiratory disease complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissett, G P; White, B J; Larson, R L

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is an economically important disease of cattle and continues to be an intensely studied topic. However, literature summarizing the time between pathogen exposure and clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion is minimal. A structured literature review of the published literature was performed to determine cattle responses (time from pathogen exposure to clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion) in challenge models using common BRD viral and bacterial pathogens. After review a descriptive analysis of published studies using common BRD pathogen challenge studies was performed. Inclusion criteria were single pathogen challenge studies with no treatment or vaccination evaluating outcomes of interest: clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion. Pathogens of interest included: bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1), parainfluenza-3 virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, Pastuerella multocida, and Histophilus somni. Thirty-five studies and 64 trials were included for analysis. The median days to the resolution of clinical signs after BVDV challenge was 15 and shedding was not detected on day 12 postchallenge. Resolution of BHV-1 shedding resolved on day 12 and clinical signs on day 12 postchallenge. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus ceased shedding on day 9 and median time to resolution of clinical signs was on day 12 postchallenge. M. haemolytica resolved clinical signs 8 days postchallenge. This literature review and descriptive analysis can serve as a resource to assist in designing challenge model studies and potentially aid in estimation of duration of clinical disease and shedding after natural pathogen exposure. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  7. New interpretive criteria for danofloxacin antibacterial susceptibility testing against Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida associated with bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Michael T; Papich, Mark G; Watts, Jeffrey L

    2017-03-01

    Danofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent approved for use in veterinary medicine to treat and control bovine respiratory disease caused by Mannheimia haemolytica or Pasteurella multocida. Susceptible minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoint (≤0.25 µg/mL) and disk diffusion interpretive criteria (≥22 mm) values for danofloxacin against M. haemolytica and P. multocida were first approved by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) in 2003. However, intermediate and resistant breakpoint values were not established because only susceptible wild-type populations were evident at the time of breakpoint approvals. Since then, nonsusceptible isolates of M. haemolytica and P. multocida have been identified. We report danofloxacin intermediate MIC breakpoint (0.5 µg/mL) and disk diffusion interpretive criteria (18-21 mm), as well as danofloxacin-resistant MIC breakpoint (≥1 µg/mL) and disk diffusion interpretive criteria (≤17 mm), based on scattergram plots of MIC values versus disk zone diameters and calculated error-bound rates using M. haemolytica and P. multocida isolates recovered from bovine respiratory disease in North America in 2004-2014. These newly established intermediate and resistant clinical breakpoint values have been endorsed by CLSI and can be used for interpreting results from antibacterial susceptibility testing of danofloxacin against M. haemolytica and P. multocida isolated from bovine respiratory disease.

  8. Safety, bioavailability and mechanism of action of nitric oxide to control Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex in calves entering a feedlot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev-Shoshani, G; Vimalanathan, S; Prema, D; Church, J S; Reudink, M W; Nation, N; Miller, C C

    2014-04-01

    Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex (BRDc), a multi-factorial disease, negatively impacts the cattle industry. Nitric oxide (NO), a naturally occurring molecule, may have utility controlling incidence of BRDc. Safety, bioavailability, toxicology and tolerance/stress of administering NO to cattle is evaluated herein. Thirteen, crossbred, multiple-sourced, commingled commercial weaned beef calves were treated multiple times intranasally over a 4 week period with either a nitric oxide releasing solution (treatment) or saline (control). Exhaled NO, methemoglobin percent (MetHg) and serum nitrites demonstrated biological availability as a result of treatment. Cortisol levels, tissue nitrites, behavior and gross and macroscopic pathology of organs were all normal. Moreover, preliminary in vitro studies using Mannheimia haemolytica, Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis, Bovine Parainfluenza-3 and Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus, suggest a potential explanation for the previously demonstrated efficacy for BRDc. These data confirm the bioavailability, safety and lack of residual of NO treatment to cattle, along with the bactericidal and virucidal effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Population-level effects of risk factors for bovine respiratory disease in Australian feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, K E; Morton, J M; Clements, A C A; Mahony, T J; Barnes, T S

    2017-05-01

    Results obtained from a nationwide longitudinal study were extended to estimate the population-level effects of selected risk factors on the incidence of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) during the first 50days at risk in medium-sized to large Australian feedlots. Population attributable fractions (PAF) and population attributable risks (PAR) were used to rank selected risk factors in order of importance from the perspective of the Australian feedlot industry within two mutually exclusive categories: 'intervention' risk factors had practical strategies that feedlot managers could implement to avoid exposure of cattle to adverse levels of the risk factor and a precise estimate of the population-level effect while 'others' did not. An alternative method was also used to quantify the expected effects of simultaneously preventing exposure to multiple management-related factors whilst not changing exposure to factors that were more difficult to modify. The most important 'intervention' risk factors were shared pen water (PAF: 0.70, 95% credible interval: 0.45-0.83), breed (PAF: 0.67, 95% credible interval: 0.54-0.77), the animal's prior lifetime history of mixing with cattle from other herds (PAF: 0.53, 95% credible interval: 0.30-0.69), timing of the animal's move to the vicinity of the feedlot (PAF: 0.45, 95% credible interval: 0.17-0.68), the presence of Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 (BVDV-1) in the animal's cohort (PAF: 0.30, 95% credible interval: 0.04-0.50), the number of study animals in the animal's group 13days before induction (PAF: 0.30, 95% credible interval: 0.10-0.44) and induction weight (PAF: 0.16, 95% credible interval: 0.09-0.23). Other important risk factors identified and prioritised for further research were feedlot region, season of induction and cohort formation patterns. An estimated 82% of BRD incidence was attributable to management-related risk factors, whereby the lowest risk category of a composite management-related variable comprised

  10. Characteristics of clinical trials assessing antimicrobial treatment of bovine respiratory disease, 1970-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Annette M; Wellman, Nickolas G; Rice, Michael; Funk, Lucas

    2010-09-15

    To evaluate reporting of key study design features and study outcomes in trials of antimicrobial treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in North American feedlots. Systematic review. 29 manuscripts (41 studies) reporting antimicrobial treatment of BRD in North American feedlot cattle. A search of the electronic citation databases AGRICOLA, Commonwealth Agricultural Bureau, and PubMed was conducted to identify relevant manuscripts published between 1970 and 2005. Key study design features were extracted by 2 reviewers. 12 of 29 (41%) manuscripts did not disclose a funding source, and 21 (72%) had an author clearly identified as an employee of a pharmaceutical company. At the study level, 36 of 41 (88%) studies reported a random method of treatment allocation, 9 (22%) described the method of allocation sequence generation, 20 (49%) reported that study investigators were blinded to treatment, and 3 (7%) included a study size justification. No studies described the null hypothesis to be tested. Thirty-seven (90%) studies reported at least 3 outcomes; the largest number of outcomes reported was 14. It was not possible to conduct the statistical analysis as originally planned because it was not possible to discern the primary outcome for the majority of studies. Many studies did not report key study design features that would assist critical evaluation by readers. It was not clear whether the studies failed to use the design features or failed to report them. Several nondesign features, such as reporting of the null hypothesis, a primary outcome, and sample size rationale, represent relatively new standards for reporting; however, reporting these features would substantially clarify the study objective.

  11. A literature review of antimicrobial resistance in Pathogens associated with bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeDonder, K D; Apley, M D

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this paper was to perform a critical review of the literature as it pertains to the current status of antimicrobial resistance in pathogens associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in beef cattle and to provide a concise yet informative narrative on the most relevant publications available. As such, the scientific literature contained in PubMed, AGRICOLA, and CAB were searched in February of 2014 for articles related to susceptibility testing of Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni from cases of BRD. Titles and abstracts were read and 105 articles that were relevant to the subject of BRD antibiotic resistance were attained for further review. After the application of exclusion criterion (publications must have originated from North America, be in English, adhere to standards set forth by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and be concerning antimicrobial resistance in BRD in beef cattle), 16 articles remained and are the focus of this publication. Due to the disparate data from the few studies that investigate susceptibility testing of BRD pathogens, a quantitative assessment or meta-analysis was not performed on the studies presented in this review. However, considering diagnostic lab data, there appears to be a clear trend of a decrease in susceptibility of the three major BRD pathogens to the antimicrobials used commonly for treatment and control of BRD. Studies performing sensitivity testing on healthy cattle report much lower resistance, but it remains unclear if this is because of a true lack of resistance mechanisms, or if the isolates do contain quiescent genes for resistance that are only phenotypically expressed following the administration of an antimicrobial for either treatment or control of BRD. Future research to address this question of genotype and phenotypic expression before and after antimicrobial administration will further advance our knowledge in this area.

  12. Implementing Precision Antimicrobial Therapy for the Treatment of Bovine Respiratory Disease: Current Limitations and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhermie, Guillaume; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; El Garch, Farid; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain; Assié, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of an early treatment protocol with an infection-stage adjusted fluoroquinolone regimen was evaluated in a field study on young bulls (YBs) presenting signs of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). A total of 195 YB (Charolais, Limousin, and Rouge-des-Prés breeds) from 6 farms implementing or not prophylactic antimicrobial treatments (PROPHY or absence) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 experiment groups based on time of detection of BRD and first-line marbofloxacin regimen, early adjusted dose [Early 2 (E2)] or late standard dose [Late 10 (L10)]. Each YB was administered orally a reticulo-rumen bolus, allowing continuous monitoring of ruminal temperature. In the E2 group, YB presenting early signs of BRD, i.e., an increase in ruminal temperature over 40.2°C and persisting more than 12 h, confirmed by a clinical examination showing no or mild signs of BRD, were given 2 mg/kg of marbofloxacin. In the L10 group, YBs presenting moderate or severe signs of BRD at visual inspection, confirmed at clinical examination, were given 10 mg/kg of marbofloxacin. If needed, YBs were given a relapse treatment. The YBs were followed for 30 days. The proportions of first and relapse treatments were calculated, as well as the therapeutic efficacy at day 10. In the E2 group, the first-line treatments’ proportion was significantly higher (P < 0.05), while the relapse treatments’ proportion tended to be higher (P = 0.08), than in the L10 group. Evolution of clinical scores (CSs) of diseased YB was followed for 10 days. In both groups, CS and rectal temperature decreased significantly 24 h after treatment (P < 0.05). Treatment incidences (TI) representing antimicrobial consumption assessed on used daily doses (UDD) were calculated. Antimicrobial consumption of marbofloxacin and relapse treatments were not significantly different between the groups. These values were strongly influenced by the recourse to a prophylactic antimicrobial

  13. Implementing Precision Antimicrobial Therapy for the Treatment of Bovine Respiratory Disease: Current Limitations and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Lhermie

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic efficacy of an early treatment protocol with an infection-stage adjusted fluoroquinolone regimen was evaluated in a field study on young bulls (YBs presenting signs of bovine respiratory disease (BRD. A total of 195 YB (Charolais, Limousin, and Rouge-des-Prés breeds from 6 farms implementing or not prophylactic antimicrobial treatments (PROPHY or absence were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 experiment groups based on time of detection of BRD and first-line marbofloxacin regimen, early adjusted dose [Early 2 (E2] or late standard dose [Late 10 (L10]. Each YB was administered orally a reticulo-rumen bolus, allowing continuous monitoring of ruminal temperature. In the E2 group, YB presenting early signs of BRD, i.e., an increase in ruminal temperature over 40.2°C and persisting more than 12 h, confirmed by a clinical examination showing no or mild signs of BRD, were given 2 mg/kg of marbofloxacin. In the L10 group, YBs presenting moderate or severe signs of BRD at visual inspection, confirmed at clinical examination, were given 10 mg/kg of marbofloxacin. If needed, YBs were given a relapse treatment. The YBs were followed for 30 days. The proportions of first and relapse treatments were calculated, as well as the therapeutic efficacy at day 10. In the E2 group, the first-line treatments’ proportion was significantly higher (P < 0.05, while the relapse treatments’ proportion tended to be higher (P = 0.08, than in the L10 group. Evolution of clinical scores (CSs of diseased YB was followed for 10 days. In both groups, CS and rectal temperature decreased significantly 24 h after treatment (P < 0.05. Treatment incidences (TI representing antimicrobial consumption assessed on used daily doses (UDD were calculated. Antimicrobial consumption of marbofloxacin and relapse treatments were not significantly different between the groups. These values were strongly influenced by the recourse to a prophylactic

  14. Whole-Genome Sequencing and Concordance Between Antimicrobial Susceptibility Genotypes and Phenotypes of Bacterial Isolates Associated with Bovine Respiratory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R. Owen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Extended laboratory culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing timelines hinder rapid species identification and susceptibility profiling of bacterial pathogens associated with bovine respiratory disease, the most prevalent cause of cattle mortality in the United States. Whole-genome sequencing offers a culture-independent alternative to current bacterial identification methods, but requires a library of bacterial reference genomes for comparison. To contribute new bacterial genome assemblies and evaluate genetic diversity and variation in antimicrobial resistance genotypes, whole-genome sequencing was performed on bovine respiratory disease–associated bacterial isolates (Histophilus somni, Mycoplasma bovis, Mannheimia haemolytica, and Pasteurella multocida from dairy and beef cattle. One hundred genomically distinct assemblies were added to the NCBI database, doubling the available genomic sequences for these four species. Computer-based methods identified 11 predicted antimicrobial resistance genes in three species, with none being detected in M. bovis. While computer-based analysis can identify antibiotic resistance genes within whole-genome sequences (genotype, it may not predict the actual antimicrobial resistance observed in a living organism (phenotype. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing on 64 H. somni, M. haemolytica, and P. multocida isolates had an overall concordance rate between genotype and phenotypic resistance to the associated class of antimicrobials of 72.7% (P < 0.001, showing substantial discordance. Concordance rates varied greatly among different antimicrobial, antibiotic resistance gene, and bacterial species combinations. This suggests that antimicrobial susceptibility phenotypes are needed to complement genomically predicted antibiotic resistance gene genotypes to better understand how the presence of antibiotic resistance genes within a given bacterial species could potentially impact optimal bovine respiratory

  15. Comparison of single vaccination versus revaccination with a modified-live virus vaccine containing bovine herpesvirus-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus (types 1a and 2a), parainfluenza type 3 virus, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the prevention of bovine respiratory disease in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Step, Douglas L; Krehbiel, Clinton R; Burciaga-Robles, Luis O; Holland, Ben P; Fulton, Robert W; Confer, Anthony W; Bechtol, David T; Brister, David L; Hutcheson, John P; Newcomb, Harold L

    2009-09-01

    Objective-To compare effects of administration of a modified-live respiratory virus vaccine once with administration of the same vaccine twice on the health and performance of cattle. Design-Randomized, controlled trial. Animals-612 mixed-breed male cattle with unknown health histories. Procedures-Cattle were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups (single vaccination treatment group [SVAC group] vs revaccination treatment group [REVAC group]) during the preconditioning phase of production. All cattle were given a modified-live respiratory virus vaccine. Eleven days later, REVAC group cattle received a second injection of the same vaccine. During the finishing phase of production, cattle from each treatment group were either vaccinated a third time with the modified-live respiratory virus vaccine or given no vaccine. Health observations were performed daily. Blood and performance variables were measured throughout the experiment. Results-During preconditioning, no significant differences were observed in performance or antibody production between groups. Morbidity rate from bovine respiratory disease was lower for SVAC group cattle; however, days to first treatment for bovine respiratory disease were not different between groups. No significant differences in body weights, daily gains, or dry-matter intake between groups were observed during the finishing phase. Revaccination treatment group cattle had improved feed efficiency regardless of vaccination protocol in the finishing phase. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Vaccination once with a modified-live respiratory virus vaccine was as efficacious as vaccination twice in the prevention of bovine respiratory disease of high-risk cattle, although feed efficiency was improved in REVAC group cattle during the finishing period.

  16. Comparison of thoracic auscultation, clinical score, and ultrasonography as indicators of bovine respiratory disease in preweaned dairy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczinski, S; Forté, G; Francoz, D; Bélanger, A-M

    2014-01-01

    The diagnostic tools for bovine respiratory disease diagnosis include clinical inspection, thoracic auscultation, and ultrasonography. Thoracic auscultation and clinical examination have limitations in the detection of lung consolidation in dairy calves. Prospective cohort of 106 preweaned calves from 13 different dairy herds (10 with a history of active bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in calves and 3 without suspected BRD problems). Each preweaned calf was clinically inspected using the Wisconsin calf respiratory scoring chart (CRSC) and treatment history was noted. Systematic thoracic auscultation and ultrasonography then were performed, the latter focusing on lung consolidation. Mortality was recorded over a 30-day period. A total of 56 of 106 calves had ultrasonographic evidence of lung consolidation. The sensitivity of thoracic auscultation to detect consolidation was 5.9% (range, 0-16.7%). Only 41.1% (23/33) of calves with consolidated lungs had been treated previously by the producers. When adding CRSC and previous BRD treatment by the producer, sensitivity of detection increased to 71.4% (40/56). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.809 (95% CI, 0.721-0.879) for the number of areas within the lungs with consolidation and 0.743 (95% CI, 0.648-0.823) for the maximal depth of consolidation as predictors of death within 1 month after examination. These were not significantly different (P = .06). This study shows that thoracic auscultation is of limited value in diagnosing lung consolidation in calves. Ultrasonographic assessment of the thorax could be a useful tool to assess BRD detection efficiency on dairy farms. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  17. Detection and characterization of viruses as field and vaccine strains in feedlot cattle with bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, R W; d'Offay, J M; Landis, C; Miles, D G; Smith, R A; Saliki, J T; Ridpath, J F; Confer, A W; Neill, J D; Eberle, R; Clement, T J; Chase, C C L; Burge, L J; Payton, M E

    2016-06-24

    This study investigated viruses in bovine respiratory disease (BRD) cases in feedlots, including bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine coronaviruses (BoCV) and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V). Nasal swabs were collected from 114 cattle on initial BRD treatment. Processing included modified live virus (MLV) vaccination. Seven BRD necropsy cases were included for 121 total cases. Mean number of days on feed before first sample was 14.9 days. Swabs and tissue homogenates were tested by gel based PCR (G-PCR), quantitative-PCR (qPCR) and quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) and viral culture. There were 87/114 (76.3%) swabs positive for at least one virus by at least one test. All necropsy cases were positive for at least one virus. Of 121 cases, positives included 18/121 (14.9%) BoHV-1; 19/121 (15.7%) BVDV; 76/121 (62.8%) BoCV; 11/121 (9.1%) BRSV; and 10/121 (8.3%) PI3V. For nasal swabs, G-PCR (5 viruses) detected 44/114 (38.6%); q-PCR and qRT-PCR (4 viruses) detected 81/114 (71.6%); and virus isolation detected 40/114 (35.1%). Most were positive for only one or two tests, but not all three tests. Necropsy cases had positives: 5/7 G-PCR, 5/7 q-PCR and qRT-PCR, and all were positive by cell culture. In some cases, G-PCR and both real time PCR were negative for BoHV-1, BVDV, and PI3V in samples positive by culture. PCR did not differentiate field from vaccines strains of BoHV-1, BVDV, and PI3V. However based on sequencing and analysis, field and vaccine strains of culture positive BoHV-1, BoCV, BVDV, and PI3V, 11/18 (61.1%) of BoHV-1 isolates, 6/17 (35.3%) BVDV isolates, and 1/10 (10.0%) PI3V identified as vaccine. BRSV was only identified by PCR testing. Interpretation of laboratory tests is appropriate as molecular based tests and virus isolation cannot separate field from vaccine strains. Additional testing using sequencing appears appropriate for identifying vaccine

  18. Assessment of nebulisation of sodium ceftiofur in the treatment of calves naturally infected with bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vivek; Gupta, V K; Dimri, U; Kumar, O R Vinodh; Sharma, D K; Bhanuprakash, A G

    2017-03-01

    Twelve screened cases of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in calves were enrolled. Six of the calves were treated intramuscularly with sodium ceftiofur (1 mg/kg), and six were treated with nebulised sodium ceftiofur (1 mg/kg). Comparative evaluation of the two therapeutic modalities was based on repetitive analysis of hematological profile of calves on days 0, 5, and 10 post-therapy. The mortality rate in the group of calves treated with the nebulised sodium ceftiofur was significantly (p < 0.001) lower, and their clinical and hematological parameters returned to normal significantly (p < 0.001) faster than in calves treated intramuscularly. Nebulisation of sodium ceftiofur is the most effective treatment in calves with BRD under field conditions. Nasal lavage fluid analysis indicating a high rise of neutrophil count and macrophages may be used as an alternative method to detect pulmonary inflammation in BRD-affected calves.

  19. Genome sequencing, metabolic and antibiotic resistance phenotyping of diverse nasopharyngeal bacteria isolated from cattle in an epidemiological study of bovine respiratory disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Problem: Despite over 100 years of research to reduce the incidence and impact of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) in North American feed yard cattle, outbreaks still occur accounting for up to 75% of feed yard cattle morbidity. BRDC is the primary driver of health-related antibiotic trea...

  20. Mycoplasma detection by triplex real-time PCR in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from bovine respiratory disease complex cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Jan B W J; de Bree, Freddy M; van der Wal, Fimme J; Kooi, Engbert A; Koene, Miriam G J; Bossers, Alex; Smid, Bregtje; Antonis, Adriaan F; Wisselink, Henk J

    2017-04-08

    In this study we evaluated the RespoCheck Mycoplasma triplex real-time PCR for the detection in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of Mycoplasma (M.) dispar, M. bovis and M. bovirhinis, all three associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Primers and probes of the RespoCheck Mycoplasma triplex real-time PCR are based on the V3/V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of the three Mycoplasma species. The analytical sensitivity of the RespoCheck triplex real-time PCR was, as determined by spiking experiments of the Mycoplasma strains in Phosphate Buffered Saline, 300 colony forming units (cfu)/mL for M. dispar, and 30 cfu/mL for M. bovis or M. bovirhinis. The analytical sensitivity of the RespoCheck Mycoplasma triplex real-time PCRwas, as determined on purified DNA, 10 fg DNA per assay for M. dispar and 100 fg fo rM. bovis and M. bovirhinis. The analytical specificity of the RespoCheck Mycoplasma triplex real-time PCR was, as determined by testing Mycoplasmas strains (n = 17) and other bacterial strains (n = 107), 100, 98.2 and 99.1% for M. bovis, M. dispar and M. bovirhinis respectively. The RespoCheck Mycoplasma triplex real-time PCR was compared with the PCR/DGGE analysis for M. bovis, M. dispar and M. bovirhinis respectively by testing 44 BALF samples from calves. In conclusion, the RespoCheck PCR assay can be a valuable tool for timely and accurate detection of three Mycoplasma species associated with in bovine respiratory disease.

  1. Metagenomic characterization of the virome associated with bovine respiratory disease in feedlot cattle identified novel viruses and suggests an etiologic role for influenza D virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Namita; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Torres, Siddartha; Li, Feng; Hause, Ben M

    2016-08-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most costly disease affecting the cattle industry. The pathogenesis of BRD is complex and includes contributions from microbial pathogens as well as host, environmental and animal management factors. In this study, we utilized viral metagenomic sequencing to explore the virome of nasal swab samples obtained from feedlot cattle with acute BRD and asymptomatic pen-mates at six and four feedlots in Mexico and the USA, respectively, in April-October 2015. Twenty-one viruses were detected, with bovine rhinitis A (52.7 %) and B (23.7 %) virus, and bovine coronavirus (24.7 %) being the most commonly identified. The emerging influenza D virus (IDV) tended to be significantly associated (P=0.134; odds ratio=2.94) with disease, whereas viruses commonly associated with BRD such as bovine viral diarrhea virus, bovine herpesvirus 1, bovine respiratory syncytial virus and bovine parainfluenza 3 virus were detected less frequently. The detection of IDV was further confirmed using a real-time PCR assay. Nasal swabs from symptomatic animals had significantly more IDV RNA than those collected from healthy animals (P=0.04). In addition to known viruses, new genotypes of bovine rhinitis B virus and enterovirus E were identified and a newly proposed species of bocaparvovirus, Ungulate bocaparvovirus 6, was characterized. Ungulate tetraparvovirus 1 was also detected for the first time in North America to our knowledge. These results illustrate the complexity of the virome associated with BRD and highlight the need for further research into the contribution of other viruses to BRD pathogenesis.

  2. The bovine paranasal sinuses: Bacterial flora, epithelial expression of nitric oxide and potential role in the in-herd persistence of respiratory disease pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Gerard M; O'Neill, Rónan G; Lee, Alison M; McElroy, Máire C; More, Simon J; Monagle, Aisling; Earley, Bernadette; Cassidy, Joseph P

    2017-01-01

    The bovine paranasal sinuses are a group of complex cavernous air-filled spaces, lined by respiratory epithelium, the exact function of which is unclear. While lesions affecting these sinuses are occasionally reported in cattle, their microbial flora has not been defined. Furthermore, given that the various bacterial and viral pathogens causing bovine respiratory disease (BRD) persist within herds, we speculated that the paranasal sinuses may serve as a refuge for such infectious agents. The paranasal sinuses of clinically normal cattle (n = 99) and of cattle submitted for post-mortem examination (PME: n = 34) were examined by microbial culture, PCR and serology to include bacterial and viral pathogens typically associated with BRD: Mycoplasma bovis, Histophilus somni, Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and bovine parainfluenza-3 virus (BPIV-3). Overall, the paranasal sinuses were either predominantly sterile or did not contain detectable microbes (83.5%: 94.9% of clinically normal and 50.0% of cattle submitted for PME). Bacteria, including BRD causing pathogens, were identified in relatively small numbers of cattle (bovine sinus as it does in humans.

  3. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic testing of marbofloxacin administered as a single injection for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallé, M; Schneider, M; Galland, D; Giboin, H; Woehrlé, F

    2012-12-01

    New approaches in Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) integration suggested that marbofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone already licensed for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease at a daily dosage of 2 mg/kg for 3-5 days, would be equally clinically effective at 10 mg/kg once (Forcyl(®)), whilst also reducing the risk of resistance. This marbofloxacin dosage regimen was studied using mutant prevention concentration (MPC), PK simulation, PK/PD integration and an in vitro dynamic system. This system simulated the concentration-time profile of marbofloxacin in bovine plasma established in vivo after a single 10 mg/kg intramuscular dose and killing curves of field isolated Pasteurellaceae strains of high (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) MIC ≤ 0.03 μg/mL), average (MIC of 0.12-0.25 μg/mL) and low (MIC of 1 μg/mL) susceptibility to marbofloxacin. The marbofloxacin MPC values were 2- to 4-fold the MIC values for all Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida tested. Marbofloxacin demonstrated a concentration-dependent killing profile with bactericidal activity observed within 1 h for most strains. No resistance development (MIC ≥ 4 μg/mL) was detected in the dynamic tests. Target values for risk of resistance PK/PD surrogates (area under the curve (AUC) AUC(24 h) /MPC and T(>MPC) /T(MSW) ratio) were achieved for all clinically susceptible pathogens. The new proposed dosing regimen was validated in vitro and by PK/PD integration confirming the single-injection short-acting antibiotic concept. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Serological investigations of a bovine respiratory disease ("urner pneumonie") resembling farmer's lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolet, J; de Haller, R; Herzog, J

    1972-07-01

    The immunological response of cattle exposed to moldy hay was examined by agar gel diffusion with standard farmer's lung hay antigens. A high incidence of precipitins against Micropolyspora faeni (60%) and moldy hay antigen (80%) was detected in exposed but apparently healthy cattle from a region with a high incidence of bovine farmer's lung. In comparison, in the plains, a low incidence area, we found only 1 animal of 164 harboring precipitins against M. faeni. We further observed that many animals from exposed populations lost their precipitins during pasturing and regained them during winter housing. Thirty-nine clinical cases of bovine farmer's lung ("Urner Pneumonie") were investigated serologically. Only 49% of these animals showed precipitins against M. faeni and 54% showed precipitins against moldy hay antigen. We discuss in this paper the probable causes of this apparent lack of immunological response.

  5. Serological Investigations of a Bovine Respiratory Disease (“Urner Pneumonie”) Resembling Farmer's Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolet, J.; de Haller, R.; Herzog, J.

    1972-01-01

    The immunological response of cattle exposed to moldy hay was examined by agar gel diffusion with standard farmer's lung hay antigens. A high incidence of precipitins against Micropolyspora faeni (60%) and moldy hay antigen (80%) was detected in exposed but apparently healthy cattle from a region with a high incidence of bovine farmer's lung. In comparison, in the plains, a low incidence area, we found only 1 animal of 164 harboring precipitins against M. faeni. We further observed that many animals from exposed populations lost their precipitins during pasturing and regained them during winter housing. Thirty-nine clinical cases of bovine farmer's lung (“Urner Pneumonie”) were investigated serologically. Only 49% of these animals showed precipitins against M. faeni and 54% showed precipitins against moldy hay antigen. We discuss in this paper the probable causes of this apparent lack of immunological response. PMID:4628862

  6. Prophylactic nitric oxide treatment reduces incidence of bovine respiratory disease complex in beef cattle arriving at a feedlot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev-Shoshani, G; Church, J S; Cook, N J; Schaefer, A L; Miller, C

    2013-10-01

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDc), is a challenging multi-factorial health issue caused by viral/bacterial pathogens and stressors linked with the transport and mixing of cattle, negatively impacting the cattle feedlot industry. Nitric oxide (NO) is a naturally occurring molecule with antimicrobial attributes. This study tests whether NO can prevent the symptoms associated with BRDc. Eighty-five, crossbred, multiple-sourced, commingled commercial weaned beef calves were monitored and scored for temperature, white blood count, clinical score, hematology, cortisol levels and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio. NO treatment or placebo were given once on arrival to the stockyard. After one week 87.5% of sick animals were from the control while 12.5% from treatment groups and after two weeks 72% and 28% respectively. Treatment was shown to be safe, causing neither distress nor adverse effects on the animals. These data show that NO treatment on arrival to the feedlot significantly decreased the incidence of BRDc in this study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A randomised clinical trial of a metaphylactic treatment with tildipirosin for bovine respiratory disease in veal calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, J; Francoz, D; Dubuc, J; Buczinski, S

    2017-06-14

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is a major problem in veal calf rearing units. The objective of this randomised clinical trial was to assess the effectiveness of tildipirosin as a metaphylactic treatment in veal calves on the number of BRD treatments, lung consolidation on thoracic ultrasonography (TUS) and average daily gain (ADG). A total of 209 veal calves from a pre-weaning fattening unit were randomly allocated to receive one of two treatments (tildipirosin 4 mg/kg, subcutaneously, n = 109; placebo 0.9% saline, subcutaneously, n = 100) at day 12 after entry in the pre-weaned unit. The calves were followed for a 70-day period. Occurrence of mortality and BRD treatments were recorded during the pre-weaning period. At days 1, 12 and 30, TUS and clinical scores were performed and ADG was measured during the first and second months of feeding. The use of a metaphylactic treatment of tildipirosin 12 days after arrival of the veal calves was not associated with the number of BRD treatments performed by the producer, ultrasonographic lung consolidation or weight gain (P tildipirosin as a metaphylactic treatment of BRD at day 12 after arrival based on BRD treatments, TUS, and ADG.

  8. Evaluation of the diagnostic and prognostic utility of ultrasonography at first diagnosis of presumptive bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abutarbush, Sameeh M; Pollock, Colleen M; Wildman, Brian K; Perrett, Tye; Schunicht, Oliver C; Fenton, R Kent; Hannon, Sherry J; Vogstad, Amanda R; Jim, G Kee; Booker, Calvin W

    2012-01-01

    This project investigated the use of ultrasonography at first diagnosis of presumptive early bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in feedlot cattle from western Canada. One hundred seventy-four cattle (116 cases and 58 controls) at high risk of developing BRD were enrolled in a prospective longitudinal study over 2 y (2006-2007). Cattle with clinical signs relating to the respiratory system and assessed as sick at the time of feedlot arrival (arrival fever cases) or assessed as sick in the pen 3 to 30 d post-arrival (post-arrival fever cases, post-arrival no fevers cases) were eligible for enrollment. Control animals were identified at the time of case enrollments. Ultrasonography was done using a 3.5 sector transducer at enrollment and at 2, 4, and 6 wk post-enrollment. Lung lesions were identified at least 1 time over the course of the trial in 32/116 (28%) cases and 9/58 (16%) controls. At enrollment, lung lesions were identified in 20/115 (17%) cases and 2/55 (4%) controls (data unreadable n = 4). Post-arrival fever cases (14/48) were the most likely to have a lesion identified using ultrasound. In arrival fever cases, average daily gain (enrollment to last ultrasound, average 34 d) was improved (P = 0.007) in cattle identified with a lesion at enrollment using ultrasound compared with those not identified with a lesion at that time, potentially demonstrating the effects of gut fill at arrival weighing, as these sicker animals may have eaten less prior to arrival and, therefore, had more room for improvement in weight over time due to restoration of normal gut fill. None of the ultrasound time points explored (enrollment, 2, 4, or 6 wk post-enrollment) were associated with the animal health outcomes of interest (subsequent treatment, chronicity, wastage, or mortality) for cattle enrolled at arrival or post-arrival.Ultrasonography using a 3.5 sector transducer was not particularly effective as a prognostic/diagnostic tool for early detection of BRD, but may be

  9. Bayesian estimation of the accuracy of the calf respiratory scoring chart and ultrasonography for the diagnosis of bovine respiratory disease in pre-weaned dairy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczinski, Sébastien; L Ollivett, Terri; Dendukuri, Nandini

    2015-05-01

    There is currently no gold standard method for the diagnosis of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex in Holstein pre-weaned dairy calves. Systematic thoracic ultrasonography (TUS) has been used as a proxy for BRD, but cannot be directly used by producers. The Wisconsin calf respiratory scoring chart (CRSC) is a simpler alternative, but with unknown accuracy. Our objective was to estimate the accuracy of CRSC, while adjusting for the lack of a gold standard. Two cross sectional study populations with a high BRD prevalence (n=106 pre-weaned Holstein calves) and an average BRD prevalence (n=85 pre-weaned Holstein calves) from North America were studied. All calves were simultaneously assessed using CRSC (cutoff used ≥ 5) and TUS (cutoff used ≥ 1cm of lung consolidation). Bayesian latent class models allowing for conditional dependence were used with informative priors for BRD prevalence and TUS accuracy (sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp)) and non-informative priors for CRSC accuracies. Robustness of the model was tested by relaxing priors for prevalence or TUS accuracy. The SeCRSC (95% credible interval (CI)) and SpCRSC were 62.4% (47.9-75.8) and 74.1% (64.9-82.8) respectively. The SeTUS was 79.4% (66.4-90.9) and SpTUS was 93.9% (88.0-97.6). The imperfect accuracy of CRSC and TUS should be taken into account when using those tools to assess BRD status. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The bovine paranasal sinuses: Bacterial flora, epithelial expression of nitric oxide and potential role in the in-herd persistence of respiratory disease pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard M Murray

    Full Text Available The bovine paranasal sinuses are a group of complex cavernous air-filled spaces, lined by respiratory epithelium, the exact function of which is unclear. While lesions affecting these sinuses are occasionally reported in cattle, their microbial flora has not been defined. Furthermore, given that the various bacterial and viral pathogens causing bovine respiratory disease (BRD persist within herds, we speculated that the paranasal sinuses may serve as a refuge for such infectious agents. The paranasal sinuses of clinically normal cattle (n = 99 and of cattle submitted for post-mortem examination (PME: n = 34 were examined by microbial culture, PCR and serology to include bacterial and viral pathogens typically associated with BRD: Mycoplasma bovis, Histophilus somni, Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV and bovine parainfluenza-3 virus (BPIV-3. Overall, the paranasal sinuses were either predominantly sterile or did not contain detectable microbes (83.5%: 94.9% of clinically normal and 50.0% of cattle submitted for PME. Bacteria, including BRD causing pathogens, were identified in relatively small numbers of cattle (<10%. While serology indicated widespread exposure of both clinically normal and cattle submitted for PME to BPIV-3 and BRSV (seroprevalences of 91.6% and 84.7%, respectively, PCR identified BPIV-3 in only one animal. To further explore these findings we investigated the potential role of the antimicrobial molecule nitric oxide (NO within paranasal sinus epithelium using immunohistochemistry. Expression of the enzyme responsible for NO synthesis, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, was detected to varying degrees in 76.5% of a sub-sample of animals suggesting production of this compound plays a similar protective role in the bovine sinus as it does in humans.

  11. Estimation of nasal shedding and seroprevalence of organisms known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease in Australian live export cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S Jo; O'Dea, Mark A; Perkins, Nigel; O'Hara, Amanda J

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of organisms known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) was investigated in cattle prior to export. A quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay was used to detect nucleic acids from the following viruses and bacteria in nasal swab samples: Bovine coronavirus (BoCV; Betacoronavirus 1), Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), Bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1), Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), Bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3), Histophilus somni, Mycoplasma bovis, Mannheimia haemolytica, and Pasteurella multocida. Between 2010 and 2012, nasal swabs were collected from 1,484 apparently healthy cattle destined for export to the Middle East and Russian Federation. In addition, whole blood samples from 334 animals were tested for antibodies to BoHV-1, BRSV, BVDV-1, and BPIV-3 using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The nasal prevalence of BoCV at the individual animal level was 40.1%. The nasal and seroprevalence of BoHV-1, BRSV, BVDV-1, and BPIV-3 was 1.0% and 39%, 1.2% and 46%, 3.0% and 56%, and 1.4% and 87%, respectively. The nasal prevalence of H. somni, M. bovis, M. haemolytica, and P. multocida was 42%, 4.8%, 13.4%, and 26%, respectively. Significant differences in nasal and seroprevalence were detected between groups of animals from different geographical locations. The results of the current study provide baseline data on the prevalence of organisms associated with BRD in Australian live export cattle in the preassembly period. This data could be used to develop strategies for BRD prevention and control prior to loading. © 2014 The Author(s).

  12. Treatment of naturally occurring bovine respiratory disease in juvenile calves with a single administration of a florfenicol plus flunixin meglumine formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, J; González-Martín, J V; Elvira, L; Pagot, E; Voisin, F; Lequeux, G; Weingarten, A; de Haas, V

    2014-04-26

    The efficacy and safety of a florfenicol plus flunixin meglumine formulation in the treatment of respiratory disease was evaluated in calves less than six weeks of age, compared with a positive control group treated with a well-established florfenicol formulation. A total of 210 calves, selected from nine sites in Belgium, France and Spain, showing severe signs of respiratory disease, were randomly assigned to treatment with either florfenicol plus flunixin meglumine (Resflor; MSD Animal Health) or florfenicol (Nuflor; MSD Animal Health), both administered subcutaneously once. Animals were clinically observed daily for 10 days following treatment initiation. The predominant respiratory pathogens were Pasteurella multocida, Mycoplasma bovis, Mannheimia haemolytica and Histophilus somni. All isolates were subject to in vitro sensitivity testing and found susceptible to florfenicol. In both groups, rectal temperature dropped and clinical index (depression and respiratory signs) significantly improved after treatment. Specifically, for the change in rectal temperature from pretreatment to six hours post-treatment, the florfenicol-flunixin formulation was found significantly superior to florfenicol. Moreover, the florfenicol-flunixin formulation alleviated the clinical signs of disease more rapidly, and was demonstrated to be non-inferior to florfenicol on days 4 and 10. The use of the product combining florfenicol and flunixin in calves is safe and efficacious in the treatment of outbreaks of bovine respiratory disease.

  13. The reporting characteristics of bovine respiratory disease clinical intervention trials published prior to and following publication of the REFLECT statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totton, Sarah C; Cullen, Jonah N; Sargeant, Jan M; O'Connor, Annette M

    2018-02-01

    The goal of the REFLECT Statement (Reporting guidElines For randomized controLled trials in livEstoCk and food safeTy) (published in 2010) was to provide the veterinary research community with reporting guidelines tailored for randomized controlled trials for livestock and food safety. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of REFLECT Statement reporting of items 1-19 in controlled trials published in journals between 1970 and 2017 examining the comparative efficacy of FDA-registered antimicrobials against naturally acquired BRD (bovine respiratory disease) in weaned beef calves in Canada or the USA, and to compare the prevalence of reporting before and after 2010, when REFLECT was published. We divided REFLECT Statement, items 3, 5, 10, and 11 into subitems, because each dealt with multiple elements requiring separate assessment. As a result, 28 different items or subitems were evaluated independently. We searched MEDLINE ® and CABI (CAB Abstracts ® and Global Health ® ) (Web of Science™) in April 2017 and screened 2327 references. Two reviewers independently assessed the reporting of each item and subitem. Ninety-five references were eligible for the study. The reporting of the REFLECT items showed a point estimate for the prevalence ratio >1 (i.e. a higher proportion of studies published post-2010 reported this item compared to studies published pre-2010), apart from items 10.3, i.e., item 10, subitem 3 (who assigned study units to the interventions), 13 (the flow of study units through the study), 16 (number of study units in analysis), 18 (multiplicity), and 19 (adverse effects). Fifty-three (79%) of 67 studies published before 2010 and all 28 (100%) papers published after 2010 reported using a random allocation method in either the title, abstract, or methods (Prevalence ratio = 1.25; 95% CI (1.09,1.43)). However, 8 studies published prior to 2010 and 7 studies published post-2010 reported the term "systematic randomization" or variations of

  14. Serological responses in calves to vaccines against bovine respiratory syncytial, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, bovine viral diarrhoea and parainfluenza-3 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollis, M; Di Trani, L; Cordioli, P; Vignolo, E; Di Pasquale, I

    1996-01-01

    The Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Italy, is in charge of assessing the quality, safety and efficacy of veterinary vaccines before and after licensing. To evaluate the relative potency of several vaccines against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV), bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V), the serological responses in vaccinated calves were studied. Vaccination with any of the vaccines under study induced specific antibody titres against the different viral antigens. The differences of the mean antibody titres within and among the test group vaccines were statistically significant. The results confirm and support those obtained by other authors in similar studies, suggesting that serological responses in vaccinated calves can be used as a helpful means of assessing the relative potency of vaccines against viral respiratory diseases of cattle. The criteria allowing such an evaluation are discussed.

  15. Seroprevalence of viral and bacterial diseases among the bovines in Himachal Pradesh, India

    OpenAIRE

    Shailja Katoch; Shweta Dohru; Mandeep Sharma; Vikram Vashist; Rajesh Chahota; Prasenjit Dhar; Aneesh Thakur; Subhash Verma

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The study was designed to measure the seroprevalence of viral and bacterial diseases: Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, bovine viral diarrhea, bovine leukemia, bovine parainfluenza, bovine respiratory syncytial disease, brucellosis, and paratuberculosis among bovine of Himachal Pradesh during the year 2013-2015. Materials and Methods: The serum samples were collected from seven districts of state, namely, Bilaspur, Kangra, Kinnaur, Lahul and Spiti, Mandi, Sirmour, and Solan. The sam...

  16. Evolution of Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valarcher, Jean-François; Schelcher, François; Bourhy, Hervé

    2000-01-01

    Until now, the analysis of the genetic diversity of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) has been based on small numbers of field isolates. In this report, we determined the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of regions of the nucleoprotein (N protein), fusion protein (F protein), and glycoprotein (G protein) of 54 European and North American isolates and compared them with the sequences of 33 isolates of BRSV obtained from the databases, together with those of 2 human respiratory syncytial viruses and 1 ovine respiratory syncytial virus. A clustering of BRSV sequences according to geographical origin was observed. We also set out to show that a continuous evolution of the sequences of the N, G, and F proteins of BRSV has been occurring in isolates since 1967 in countries where vaccination was widely used. The exertion of a strong positive selective pressure on the mucin-like region of the G protein and on particular sites of the N and F proteins is also demonstrated. Furthermore, mutations which are located in the conserved central hydrophobic part of the ectodomain of the G protein and which result in the loss of four Cys residues and in the suppression of two disulfide bridges and an α helix critical to the three-dimensional structure of the G protein have been detected in some recent French BRSV isolates. This conserved central region, which is immunodominant in BRSV G protein, thus has been modified in recent isolates. This work demonstrates that the evolution of BRSV should be taken into account in the rational development of future vaccines. PMID:11044116

  17. Short communication: ultrasonographic assessment of the thorax as a fast technique to assess pulmonary lesions in dairy calves with bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczinski, S; Forté, G; Bélanger, A M

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess inter- and intraoperator agreement when assessing lung consolidation secondary to bovine respiratory disease (BRD) by thoracic ultrasonography. Ten calves were blindly assessed by 3 operators with varying expertise in thoracic ultrasound to look for lung consolidation and the presence of comet-tail artifacts (COMT). Systematic ultrasonography of the thorax was performed using an 18-site per side assessment with a linear 8.5-MHz probe. The status of the calves [healthy (n=4) vs. treated for BRD (n=6)] was not known by the operators. The interoperator kappa agreement for detecting consolidation was moderate to almost perfect (from 0.6 to 1.0) depending on the operator's experience (diagnosis of consolidation if depth ≥1cm). The intraclass correlation coefficient for consistency was 0.71 for a single measurement and 0.88 for average measurement. The intraclass correlation coefficient for agreement was 0.73 for single measurements and 0.89 for average measurements. These values were considered good for single measurements and excellent for average measurements. Systematic ultrasonography of the thorax can be used routinely to assess lung consolidation in dairy calves and can therefore be of importance, especially for assessment of subclinical BRD. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Seroprevalence of viral and bacterial diseases among the bovines in Himachal Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailja Katoch

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was designed to measure the seroprevalence of viral and bacterial diseases: Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, bovine viral diarrhea, bovine leukemia, bovine parainfluenza, bovine respiratory syncytial disease, brucellosis, and paratuberculosis among bovine of Himachal Pradesh during the year 2013-2015. Materials and Methods: The serum samples were collected from seven districts of state, namely, Bilaspur, Kangra, Kinnaur, Lahul and Spiti, Mandi, Sirmour, and Solan. The samples were screened using indirect ELISA kits to measure the seroprevalence of viral and bacterial diseases. Results: The overall seroprevalence of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis was 24.24%, bovine viral diarrhea 1.52%, bovine leukemia 9.09%, bovine parainfluenza 57.58%, bovine respiratory syncytial disease 50%, brucellosis 19.69%, and paratuberculosis 9.09% in Himachal Pradesh. The seroprevalence of bovine rhinotracheitis, bovine leukemia, bovine parainfluenza, bovine respiratory syncytial disease, and paratuberculosis in the state varied significantly (p0.01. Multiple seropositivity has been observed in this study. Bovine parainfluenza virus 3 was observed commonly in mixed infection with almost all viruses and bacteria under study. Conclusion: The viral and bacterial diseases are prevalent in the seven districts of Himachal Pradesh investigated in the study. Therefore, appropriate management practices and routine vaccination programs should be adopted to reduce the prevalence of these diseases.

  19. Evaluation of the effect of serum antibody abundance against bovine coronavirus on bovine coronavirus shedding and risk of respiratory tract disease in beef calves from birth through the first five weeks in a feedlot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Aspen M; Kuehn, Larry A; McDaneld, Tara G; Clawson, Michael L; Chitko-McKown, Carol G; Loy, John Dustin

    2017-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of serum antibody abundance against bovine coronavirus (BCV) on BCV shedding and risk of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in beef calves from birth through the first 5 weeks in a feedlot. ANIMALS 890 natural-service crossbred beef calves from 4 research herds. PROCEDURES Serial blood samples for measurement of serum anti-BCV antibody abundance by an ELISA and nasal swab specimens for detection of BCV and other viral and bacterial BRD pathogens by real-time PCR methods were collected from all calves or subsets of calves at predetermined times from birth through the first 5 weeks after feedlot entry. Test results were compared among herds, over time, and between calves that did and did not develop BRD. The associations of various herd and calf factors with test results were also evaluated. RESULTS At the calf level, serum anti-BCV antibody abundance was not associated with BCV shedding, but BCV shedding was positively associated with BRD incidence before and after weaning. The mean serum anti-BCV antibody abundance at weaning for a group of calves was inversely related with the subsequent incidence of BRD in that group; however, the serum anti-BCV antibody abundance at weaning for individual calves was not predictive of which calves would develop BRD after feedlot entry. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that serum anti-BCV antibody abundance as determined with ELISA were not associated with BCV shedding or risk of BRD in individual beef calves from birth through the first 5 weeks after feedlot entry.

  20. Bovine coronaviruses from the respiratory tract: Antigenic and genetic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine corona viruses (BoCV) isolated from respiratory tract, nasal swab and broncho alveolar washing fluid samples were evaluated for genetic and antigenic differences. These BoCV from the respiratory tract of healthy and clinically ill cattle with BRD signs were compared to reference and vaccine ...

  1. Brazilian strain of bovine respiratory coronavirus is derived from dual enteric and respiratory tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuttemmuller, E A; Alfieri, A F; Headley, S A; Alfieri, A A

    2017-04-05

    Bovine coronavirus (BCoV) is a pathogen related to enteric and respiratory diseases in cattle worldwide. Enteric (BECoV) strains of BCoV are predominant in South America, and genetic investigations have been conducted to identify its relationship with isolates of respiratory origin (BRCoV). In this study, we used a BRCoV strain (BR-UEL11) derived from an outbreak of respiratory disease in feedlot cattle in southern Brazil, and compared the partial sequence of the polymorphic region of Spike (which was detected and sequenced by two distinct reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions) with those of other BCoV strains. The phylogenetic relationship of BR-UEL11 with Brazilian BCoV, which is associated with calf diarrhea and winter dysentery (enteric, BECoV; respiratory, BRCoV), and classical reference prototypes was analyzed. The analysis showed that the BRCoV strains from Brazil clustered with a clade that was distinct from most isolates associated with calf diarrhea (BECoV) and ancestral prototype strains such as Mebus, Nebraska, and LYVB. Furthermore, the BRCoV strains from Brazil clustered with a clade that contained recent strains associated with winter dysentery, showing 98-99% nucleotide identity with those strains. These results suggested that the Brazilian BCoV evolved from being solely enteric to a dual enteric and respiratory tropic virus.

  2. Managing respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Sarah; Restrick, Louise; Stern, Myra

    2017-02-01

    The diverse and evolving role of a psychologist within a respiratory multidisciplinary team (MDT) is described, providing a working model for service provision. The rationale for appointing a psychologist within a respiratory MDT is presented first, citing relevant policy and research and outlining the wider psychosocial impact of respiratory disease. This is followed by an insight into the psychologist's role by highlighting important areas, including key therapy themes and the challenge of patient engagement. The way in which the psychologist supports the collective aims and aspirations of respiratory colleagues to provide a more holistic package of care is illustrated throughout.

  3. Evaluating the cost implications of a radio frequency identification feeding system for early detection of bovine respiratory disease in feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfger, Barbara; Manns, Braden J; Barkema, Herman W; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, Karen S; Dorin, Craig; Orsel, Karin

    2015-03-01

    New technologies to identify diseased feedlot cattle in early stages of illness have been developed to reduce costs and welfare impacts associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). However, the economic value of early BRD detection has never been assessed. The objective was to simulate cost differences between two BRD detection methods during the first 61 d on feed (DOF) applied in moderate- to large-sized feedlots using an automated recording system (ARS) for feeding behavior and the current industry standard, pen-checking (visual appraisal confirmed by rectal temperature). Economic impact was assessed with a cost analysis in a simple decision model. Scenarios for Canadian and US feedlots with high- and low-risk cattle were modeled, and uncertainty was estimated using extensive sensitivity analyses. Input costs and probabilities were mainly extracted from publicly accessible market observations and a large-scale US feedlot study. In the baseline scenario, we modeled high-risk cattle with a treatment rate of 20% within the first 61 DOF in a feedlot of >8000 cattle in Canada. Early BRD detection was estimated to result in a relative risk of 0.60 in retreatment and 0.66 in mortality compared to pen-checking (based on previously published estimates). The additional cost of monitoring health with ARS in Canadian dollar (CAD) was 13.68 per steer. Scenario analysis for similar sized US feedlots and low-risk cattle with a treatment rate of 8% were included to account for variability in costs and probabilities in various cattle populations. Considering the cost of monitoring, all relevant treatment costs and sale price, ARS was more costly than visual appraisal during the first 61 DOF by CAD 9.61 and CAD 9.69 per steer in Canada and the US, respectively. This cost difference increased in low-risk cattle in Canada to CAD 12.45. Early BRD detection with ARS became less expensive if the costs for the system decreased to less than CAD 4.06/steer, or if the underlying true

  4. Increased pulmonary secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in calves experimentally infected with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rontved, C. M.; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is an important cause of respiratory disease among calves in the Danish cattle industry. An experimental BRSV infection model was used to study the pathogenesis of the disease in calves. Broncho alveolar lung lavage (BAL) was performed on 28 Jersey calves...

  5. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) pneumonia in beef calf herds despite vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tegtmeier, C.; Pedersen, E.

    2001-01-01

    The present report describes the clinical, pathological, serological and virological findings in calves from 2 larger Danish beef herds experiencing outbreaks of pneumonia. The calves had been vaccinated with an inactivated bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) vaccine 2 months prior to the o...... beef herds failed to protect the calves against severe or even fatal BRSV mediated respiratory disease 2 months later.......The present report describes the clinical, pathological, serological and virological findings in calves from 2 larger Danish beef herds experiencing outbreaks of pneumonia. The calves had been vaccinated with an inactivated bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) vaccine 2 months prior...... to the outbreak. The clinical signs comprised nasal discharge, pyrexia, cough and increased respiratory rates. A total of 28 calves died in the 2 herds. The laboratory investigations revealed that BRSV was involved and probably initiated both outbreaks. Furthermore, the serological results suggested...

  6. Replication and clearance of respiratory syncytial virus - Apoptosis is an important pathway of virus clearance after experimental infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, B.; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2002-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus is an important cause of severe respiratory disease in young children, the elderly, and in immunocompromised adults. Similarly, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is causing severe, sometimes fatal, respiratory disease in calves. Both viruses are pneumovirus...... and the infections with human respiratory syncytial. virus and BRSV have similar clinical, pathological, and epidemiological characteristics. In this study we used experimental BRSV infection in calves as a model of respiratory syncytial virus infection to demonstrate important aspects of viral replication...... and clearance in a natural target animal. Replication of BRSV was demonstrated in the luminal part of the respiratory epithelial cells and replication in the upper respiratory tract preceded the replication in the lower respiratory tract. Virus excreted to the lumen of the respiratory tract was cleared...

  7. Treatment history and antimicrobial susceptibility results for Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni isolates from bovine respiratory disease cases submitted to the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory from 2013 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magstadt, Drew R; Schuler, Adlai M; Coetzee, Johann F; Krull, Adam C; O'Connor, Annette M; Cooper, Vickie L; Engelken, Terry J

    2017-10-01

    Bovine respiratory disease is the most costly disease facing the cattle industry. Increasing resistance to antimicrobial treatment has been presented as a significant contributing factor, often through summarized susceptibility testing data. We assessed the relationship between previous antimicrobial treatment and antimicrobial susceptibility results from isolates of Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni cultured from bovine respiratory cases submitted to the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory from 2013 to 2015. Antimicrobial susceptibility data from 1,251 bacterial isolates were included for analysis. More bacterial isolates from cattle that received antimicrobial treatment showed resistance compared to isolates from untreated cattle, and the percentage of resistant isolates increased as the number of antimicrobial treatments increased. Resistance to enrofloxacin, spectinomycin, tilmicosin, and tulathromycin was present in >75% of M. haemolytica isolates from cattle that had received 3 or more antimicrobial treatments; resistance to each of those 4 antimicrobials was present in ≤10% of M. haemolytica isolates from untreated cattle. Similar but less dramatic trends were apparent for isolates of P. multocida and H. somni. The percentage of multi-drug resistant bacterial isolates also increased with the number of treatments. Results of our study suggest that previous antimicrobial treatment may have a profound effect on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Summarized susceptibility results from diagnostic laboratories should not be used to make generalized statements regarding trends in antimicrobial resistance without providing context regarding antimicrobial treatment history.

  8. Obesity and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Zammit

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Zammit, Helen Liddicoat, Ian Moonsie, Himender MakkerSleep and Ventilation Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, North Middlesex University Hospital, London, UKAbstract: The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ producing systemic inflammation and effecting central respiratory control. Obesity plays a key role in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Asthma is more common and often harder to treat in the obese population, and in this study, we review the effects of obesity on airway inflammation and respiratory mechanics. We also discuss the compounding effects of obesity on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and the paradoxical interaction of body mass index and COPD severity. Many practical challenges exist in caring for obese patients, and we highlight the complications faced by patients undergoing surgical procedures, especially given the increased use of bariatric surgery. Ultimately, a greater understanding of the effects of obesity on the respiratory disease and the provision of adequate health care resources is vital in order to care for this increasingly important patient population.Keywords: obesity, lung function, obstructive sleep apnea, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, anesthesia

  9. Histophilus somni Stimulates Expression of Antiviral Proteins and Inhibits BRSV Replication in Bovine Respiratory Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lin

    Full Text Available Our previous studies showed that bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV followed by Histophilus somni causes more severe bovine respiratory disease and a more permeable alveolar barrier in vitro than either agent alone. However, microarray analysis revealed the treatment of bovine alveolar type 2 (BAT2 epithelial cells with H. somni concentrated culture supernatant (CCS stimulated up-regulation of four antiviral protein genes as compared with BRSV infection or dual treatment. This suggested that inhibition of viral infection, rather than synergy, may occur if the bacterial infection occurred before the viral infection. Viperin (or radical S-adenosyl methionine domain containing 2--RSAD2 and ISG15 (IFN-stimulated gene 15--ubiquitin-like modifier were most up-regulated. CCS dose and time course for up-regulation of viperin protein levels were determined in treated bovine turbinate (BT upper respiratory cells and BAT2 lower respiratory cells by Western blotting. Treatment of BAT2 cells with H. somni culture supernatant before BRSV infection dramatically reduced viral replication as determined by qRT PCR, supporting the hypothesis that the bacterial infection may inhibit viral infection. Studies of the role of the two known H. somni cytotoxins showed that viperin protein expression was induced by endotoxin (lipooligosaccharide but not by IbpA, which mediates alveolar permeability and H. somni invasion. A naturally occurring IbpA negative asymptomatic carrier strain of H. somni (129Pt does not cause BAT2 cell retraction or permeability of alveolar cell monolayers, so lacks virulence in vitro. To investigate initial steps of pathogenesis, we showed that strain 129Pt attached to BT cells and induced a strong viperin response in vitro. Thus colonization of the bovine upper respiratory tract with an asymptomatic carrier strain lacking virulence may decrease viral infection and the subsequent enhancement of bacterial respiratory infection in vivo.

  10. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus-Associated Disease in Feedlot Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDv) is associated with bovine respiratory disease complex and other diseases of feedlot cattle. Although occasionally a primary pathogen, BVDv's impact on cattle health is through the immunosuppressive effects of the virus and its synergism with other pathogens. The simple presence or absence of BVDv does not result in consistent health outcomes because BVDv is only one of many risk factors that contribute to disease syndromes. Current interventions have limitations and the optimum strategy for their uses to limit the health, production, and economic costs associated with BVDv have to be carefully considered for optimum cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. One-step multiplex real time RT-PCR for the detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus 1 and bovine parainfluenza virus 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonur, Leenadevi; Maley, Madeleine; Gilray, Janice; Crook, Tara; Laming, Ellie; Turnbull, Dylan; Nath, Mintu; Willoughby, Kim

    2012-03-28

    Detection of respiratory viruses in veterinary species has traditionally relied on virus detection by isolation or immunofluorescence and/or detection of circulating antibody using ELISA or serum neutralising antibody tests. Multiplex real time PCR is increasingly used to diagnose respiratory viruses in humans and has proved to be superior to traditional methods. Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in housed cattle and virus infections can play a major role. We describe here a one step multiplex reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (mRT-qPCR) to detect the viruses commonly implicated in BRD. A mRT-qPCR assay was developed and optimised for the simultaneous detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine herpes virus type 1 (BoHV-1) and bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPI3 i & ii) nucleic acids in clinical samples from cattle. The assay targets the highly conserved glycoprotein B gene of BoHV-1, nucleocapsid gene of BRSV and nucleoprotein gene of BPI3. This mRT-qPCR assay was assessed for sensitivity, specificity and repeatability using in vitro transcribed RNA and recent field isolates. For clinical validation, 541 samples from clinically affected animals were tested and mRT-qPCR result compared to those obtained by conventional testing using virus isolation (VI) and/or indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). The mRT-qPCR assay was rapid, highly repeatable, specific and had a sensitivity of 97% in detecting 102 copies of BRSV, BoHV-1 and BPI3 i & ii. This is the first mRT-qPCR developed to detect the three primary viral agents of BRD and the first multiplex designed using locked nucleic acid (LNA), minor groove binding (MGB) and TaqMan probes in one reaction mix. This test was more sensitive than both VI and IFAT and can replace the aforesaid methods for virus detection during outbreaks of BRD.

  12. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus and bovine coronavirus in Swedish organic and conventional dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Cecilia; Emanuelson, Ulf; Ohlson, Anna; Alenius, Stefan; Fall, Nils

    2015-01-13

    Infections with bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and bovine coronavirus (BoCV) are endemic to the cattle populations in most countries, causing respiratory and/or enteric disease. It has been demonstrated that herds can remain free from these infections for several years also in high prevalence areas. Organically managed (OM) dairy herds have been shown to have lower seroprevalence of both viruses compared to conventionally managed (CM) herds. The objective of this study was to challenge the hypothesis of a lower occurrence of BRSV and BoCV in OM compared to CM dairy herds. In November 2011, May 2012 and May 2013 milk samples from four homebred primiparous cows were collected in 75 to 65 OM and 69 to 62 CM herds. The antibody status regarding BRSV and BoCV was analysed with commercial indirect ELISAs. Herds were classified as positive if at least one individual sample was positive. The prevalence of positive herds ranged from 73.4% to 82.3% for BRSV and from 76.8% to 85.3% for BoCV among OM and CM herds, over the three sampling occasions. There was no statistically significant difference between OM and CM herds at any sampling occasion. The incidence risk of newly infected herds did not differ statistically between OM and CM herds at any sampling occasion, neither for BRSV nor for BoCV. The incidence of herds turning sero-negative between samplings corresponded to the incidence of newly infected. Bulk tank milk (BTM) samples were also sampled in the herds and analysed. Several herds were negative on individual samples but positive in BTM. Herd-level data on production, health and reproduction were retrieved from VÄXA Sweden and the study herds were representative of the source population. There was no difference in prevalence of or incidence risk for BRSV or BoCV between Swedish OM and CM herds. Because the incidence of herds becoming seropositive was balanced by herds becoming seronegative it should be possible to lower the prevalence of these two

  13. [Asbestos and respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherpereel, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Previous occupational asbestos exposure (more rarely environmental or domestic exposure) may induce various pleural and/or pulmonary, benign or malignant diseases, sometimes with a very long latency for malignant mesothelioma (MM). Asbestos has been widely extracted and used in Western countries and in emerging or developing countries, resulting in a peak of MM incidence in France around 2020 and likely in a world pandemic of asbestos-induced diseases. These patients have mostly benign respiratory diseases (pleural plugs) but may also be diagnosed with lung cancer or malignant pleural mesothelioma, and have a global poor outcome. New therapeutic tools (targeted therapies, immunotherapy…) with first promising results are developed. However, it is crucial to obtain a full ban of asbestos use worldwide, and to do a regular follow-up of asbestos-exposed subjects, mostly if they are already diagnosed with benign respiratory diseases. Finally, new cancers (larynx and ovary) were recently added to the list of asbestos-induced tumors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus ISCOMs - protection in the presence of maternal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägglund, Sara; Hu, Ke-Fei; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2004-01-01

    The protection induced by immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) was evaluated and compared to that of a commercial inactivated vaccine (CV) in calves with BRSV-specific maternal antibodies. Following experimental challenge, controls (n = 4......) and animals immunized with CV (n = 5) developed moderate to severe respiratory disease, whereas calves immunized with ISCOMS (17 = 5) remained clinically healthy. BRSV was re-isolated from the nasopharynx of all controls and from all calves immunized with CV, but from none of the calves immunized with ISCOMs...... of maternal antibodies in calves and induced strong clinical and virological protection against a BRSV challenge....

  15. Expression of the Bovine NK-Lysin Gene Family and Activity against Respiratory Pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfeng Chen

    Full Text Available Unlike the genomes of many mammals that have a single NK-lysin gene, the cattle genome contains a family of four genes, one of which is expressed preferentially in the lung. In this study, we compared the expression of the four bovine NK-lysin genes in healthy animals to animals challenged with pathogens known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq. The expression of several NK-lysins, especially NK2C, was elevated in challenged relative to control animals. The effects of synthetic peptides corresponding to functional region helices 2 and 3 of each gene product were tested on both model membranes and bio-membranes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that these peptides adopted a more helical secondary structure upon binding to an anionic model membrane and liposome leakage assays suggested that these peptides disrupt membranes. Bacterial killing assays further confirmed the antimicrobial effects of these peptides on BRD-associated bacteria, including both Pasteurella multocida and Mannhemia haemolytica and an ultrastructural examination of NK-lysin-treated P. multocida cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed the lysis of target membranes. These studies demonstrate that the expanded bovine NK-lysin gene family is potentially important in host defense against pathogens involved in bovine respiratory disease.

  16. Respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsney, K M; Forsyth, D

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory dysfunction has been associated with Parkinson's disease since it was first described in 1817. The respiratory symptoms observed in Parkinson's disease patients vary greatly. Most patients remain asymptomatic, whereas others present with acute shortness of breath and even stridor. In August 2016, an electronic literature search was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar. Results were screened and studies reporting on respiratory dysfunction associated with Parkinson's disease were included. Respiratory dysfunction is due to a combination of factors including restrictive changes, upper airway obstruction, abnormal ventilatory drive and response to medications. Much debate surrounds the mechanism underlying respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease, its prevalence and the effect of levodopa on respiration. It is clear from this review that larger studies, comparing patients of similar disease duration and severity using the same pulmonary function parameters, are required to provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology underlying respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

  17. Immunogenicity of a modified-live virus vaccine against bovine viral diarrhea virus types 1 and 2, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, bovine parainfluenza-3 virus, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus when administered intranasally in young calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wenzhi; Ellis, John; Mattick, Debra; Smith, Linda; Brady, Ryan; Trigo, Emilio

    2010-05-14

    The immunogenicity of an intranasally-administered modified-live virus (MLV) vaccine in 3-8 day old calves was evaluated against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) types 1 and 2, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus, parainfluenza-3 (PI-3) virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). Calves were intranasally vaccinated with a single dose of a multivalent MLV vaccine and were challenged with one of the respective viruses three to four weeks post-vaccination in five separate studies. There was significant sparing of diseases in calves intranasally vaccinated with the MLV vaccine, as indicated by significantly fewer clinical signs, lower rectal temperatures, reduced viral shedding, greater white blood cell and platelet counts, and less severe pulmonary lesions than control animals. This was the first MLV combination vaccine to demonstrate efficacy against BVDV types 1 and 2, IBR, PI-3 and BRSV in calves 3-8 days of age. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. One-step multiplex real time RT-PCR for the detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus 1 and bovine parainfluenza virus 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thonur Leenadevi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detection of respiratory viruses in veterinary species has traditionally relied on virus detection by isolation or immunofluorescence and/or detection of circulating antibody using ELISA or serum neutralising antibody tests. Multiplex real time PCR is increasingly used to diagnose respiratory viruses in humans and has proved to be superior to traditional methods. Bovine respiratory disease (BRD is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in housed cattle and virus infections can play a major role. We describe here a one step multiplex reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (mRT-qPCR to detect the viruses commonly implicated in BRD. Results A mRT-qPCR assay was developed and optimised for the simultaneous detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV, bovine herpes virus type 1 (BoHV-1 and bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPI3 i & ii nucleic acids in clinical samples from cattle. The assay targets the highly conserved glycoprotein B gene of BoHV-1, nucleocapsid gene of BRSV and nucleoprotein gene of BPI3. This mRT-qPCR assay was assessed for sensitivity, specificity and repeatability using in vitro transcribed RNA and recent field isolates. For clinical validation, 541 samples from clinically affected animals were tested and mRT-qPCR result compared to those obtained by conventional testing using virus isolation (VI and/or indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT. Conclusions The mRT-qPCR assay was rapid, highly repeatable, specific and had a sensitivity of 97% in detecting 102 copies of BRSV, BoHV-1 and BPI3 i & ii. This is the first mRT-qPCR developed to detect the three primary viral agents of BRD and the first multiplex designed using locked nucleic acid (LNA, minor groove binding (MGB and TaqMan probes in one reaction mix. This test was more sensitive than both VI and IFAT and can replace the aforesaid methods for virus detection during outbreaks of BRD.

  19. Respiratory disease in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Niharika; Chen, Kenneth; Hardy, Erica; Powrie, Raumond

    2015-07-01

    Many physiological and anatomical changes of pregnancy affect the respiratory system. These changes often affect the presentation and management of the various respiratory illnesses in pregnancy. This article focuses on several important respiratory issues in pregnancy. The management of asthma, one of the most common chronic illnesses in pregnancy, remains largely unchanged compared to the nonpregnant state. Infectious respiratory illness, including pneumonia and tuberculosis, are similarly managed in pregnancy with antibiotics, although special attention may be needed for antibiotic choices with more pregnancy safety data. When mechanical ventilation is necessary, consideration should be given to the maternal hemodynamics of pregnancy and fetal oxygenation. Maintaining maternal oxygen saturation above 95% is recommended to sustain optimal fetal oxygenation. Cigarette smoking has known risks in pregnancy, and current practice guidelines recommend offering cognitive and pharmacologic interventions to pregnant women to assist in smoking cessation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Histophilus somni biofilm formation in cardiopulmonary tissue of the bovine host following respiratory challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandal, Indra; Shao, Jian Q.; Annadata, Satish

    2009-01-01

    cultured with H. somni from heart and lung samples. Transposon mutagenesis of H. somni strain 2336 resulted in the generation of mutants that expressed more or less biofilm. than the parent strain. Six mutants deficient in biofilm formation had an insertion in the gene encoding for a homolog of filamentous...... haemagglutinin (FHA), predicted to be involved in attachment. Thus, this investigation demonstrated that H. somni is capable of forming a biofilm in its natural host, that such a biofilm may be capable of harboring other bovine respiratory disease pathogens, and that the genes responsible for biofilm formation...

  1. Vaccination with recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing bovine respiratory syncytial virus (bRSV) proteins protects calves against RSV challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonis, A.F.G.; Most, van der R.G.; Suezer, Y.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Daus, F.J.; Sutter, G.; Schrijver, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe respiratory disease in infants and calves. Bovine RSV (bRSV) is a natural pathogen for cattle, and bRSV infection in calves shares many features with the human infection. Thus, bRSV infection in cattle provides the ideal setting to

  2. Detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus infections in young dairy and beef cattle in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Wernicki, Andrzej; Puchalski, Andrzej; Dec, Marta; Stęgierska, Diana; Grooms, Daniel L; Barbu, Nicolas I

    2015-03-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is a major contributor to bovine respiratory disease complex in dairy and beef calves, especially during the first year of life. There is a lack of comprehensive information about the prevalence of infection in cattle herds in Poland as well as in European countries outside the European Union. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of BRSV infections in young beef and dairy cattle in southeastern Poland, a region that has direct contact with non-EU countries. Animals & methods: Nasal swabs and sera (n = 120) were obtained from young cattle aged 6-12 months from 45 farms in eastern and southeastern Poland. BRSV antigen detection in the nasal swabs was carried out using a rapid immunomigration assay used in diagnosing human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) infections in humans, while antibodies to BRSV were detected in the sera by ELISA antibody detection. The study confirmed the presence of BRSV infections in young cattle under 12 months of age from both dairy and beef herds. BRSV was detected in 27 of the 45 herds (60%) sampled. Findings from this study indicate a high prevalence of BRSV infections in cattle in Poland, which may have a significant influence on health status and animal performance. The prevalence of infection is similar to that in other parts of Poland and other countries in Europe. Development of strategies to reduce BRSV infections is needed to improve health and productivity.

  3. Seroepidemiological study of bovine respiratory viruses (BRSV, BoHV-1, PI-3V, BVDV, and BAV-3) in dairy cattle in central region of Iran (Esfahan province).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirvani, Edris; Lotfi, Mohsen; Kamalzadeh, Morteza; Noaman, Vahid; Bahriari, Masumeh; Morovati, Hasan; Hatami, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory diseases in calves are responsible for major economic losses in both beef and dairy production. Several viruses, such as bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine herpes virus-1 (BoHV-1), bovine parainfluenza virus-3 (BPI-3V), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and bovine adenoviruses (BAV), are detected in most clinical cases with respiratory signs. The aim of this study is to define seroprevalences of five major viral causes of bovine respiratory infections in cattle in central region of Iran (Esfahan province). The population targeted was 642 dairy cows (Holstein-Friesian) from 25 farms. Samples of blood serum from female cattle were examined. Sera were tested by commercial ELISA kits to detect antibody against BRSV, BoHV-1, BPI-3V, BVDV, and BAV-3. The results were analyzed by Chi-square test. In the present study, seroprevalences of BRSV, BoHV-1, PI3V, BVDV, and BAV-3 were 51.1%, 72%, 84.4%, 49.2%, and 55.6%, respectively. The present study shows that infections of bovine respiratory viruses are very common in cattle in Esfahan.

  4. Seroprevalence and risk factors of several bovine viral diseases in dairy farms of San Pedro de los Milagros, Antioquia, Colombia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicolás Fernando Ramírez Vásquez; David Villar Argaiz; Jorge Arturo Fernández Silva; Julián Londoño Pino; Jenny Jovanna Chaparro Gutiérrez; Martha Eufemia Olivera Ángel

    2016-01-01

    .... All farms were up to date on the annual official vaccinations against brucellosis and foot and mouth disease, and 5 out of 29 farms used vaccines against viruses of the bovine respiratory complex...

  5. Macrophage Heterogeneity in Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carian E. Boorsma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are among the most abundant cells in the respiratory tract, and they can have strikingly different phenotypes within this environment. Our knowledge of the different phenotypes and their functions in the lung is sketchy at best, but they appear to be linked to the protection of gas exchange against microbial threats and excessive tissue responses. Phenotypical changes of macrophages within the lung are found in many respiratory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper will give an overview of what macrophage phenotypes have been described, what their known functions are, what is known about their presence in the different obstructive and restrictive respiratory diseases (asthma, COPD, pulmonary fibrosis, and how they are thought to contribute to the etiology and resolution of these diseases.

  6. [Respiratory treatments in neuromuscular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Cols Roig, M; Salcedo Posadas, A; Sardon Prado, O; Asensio de la Cruz, O; Torrent Vernetta, A

    2014-10-01

    In a previous article, a review was presented of the respiratory pathophysiology of the patient with neuromuscular disease, as well as their clinical evaluation and the major complications causing pulmonary deterioration. This article presents the respiratory treatments required to preserve lung function in neuromuscular disease as long as possible, as well as in special situations (respiratory infections, spinal curvature surgery, etc.). Special emphasis is made on the use of non-invasive ventilation, which is changing the natural history of many of these diseases. The increase in survival and life expectancy of these children means that they can continue their clinical care in adult units. The transition from pediatric care must be an active, timely and progressive process. It may be slightly stressful for the patient before the adaptation to this new environment, with multidisciplinary care always being maintained. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Enteric disease in postweaned beef calves associated with a Bovine coronavirus clade 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine coronavirus (BoCV) infections are associated with varied clinical presentations including neonatal diarrhea, winter dysentery in dairy cattle, and respiratory disease in various ages of cattle. This report presents information on BoCV infections associated with enteric disease of postweaned b...

  8. Bioinformatics and molecular analysis of the evolutionary relationship between bovine rhinitis A viruses and foot-and-mouth disease virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine rhinitis viruses (BRV) cause mild respiratory disease of cattle. In this study, a near full length genome sequence of a virus named RS3X, formerly classified as bovine rhinovirus type 1, isolated from infected cattle from the United Kingdom in the 1960s, was obtained and analyzed. Phylogeneti...

  9. Respiratory diseases and muscle dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gea, Joaquim; Casadevall, Carme; Pascual, Sergi; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Barreiro, Esther

    2012-02-01

    Many respiratory diseases lead to impaired function of skeletal muscles, influencing quality of life and patient survival. Dysfunction of both respiratory and limb muscles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been studied in depth, and seems to be caused by the complex interaction of general (inflammation, impaired gas exchange, malnutrition, comorbidity, drugs) and local factors (changes in respiratory mechanics and muscle activity, and molecular events). Some of these factors are also present in cystic fibrosis and asthma. In obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, repeated exposure to hypoxia and the absence of reparative rest are believed to be the main causes of muscle dysfunction. Deconditioning appears to be crucial for the functional impairment observed in scoliosis. Finally, cachexia seems to be the main mechanism of muscle dysfunction in advanced lung cancer. A multidimensional therapeutic approach is recommended, including pulmonary rehabilitation, an adequate level of physical activity, ventilatory support and nutritional interventions.

  10. The global burden of respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkol, Thomas; Schraufnagel, Dean

    2014-03-01

    The Forum of International Respiratory Societies has released a report entitled Respiratory Disease in the World: Realities of Today-Opportunities for Tomorrow. The report identifies five conditions that primarily contribute to the global burden of respiratory disease (asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute respiratory infections, tuberculosis, and lung cancer), and offers an action plan to prevent and treat those diseases. It describes the staggering magnitude of the global burden of lung disease: hundreds of millions of people suffer and four million people die prematurely from respiratory diseases each year. The situation is not hopeless, because most major respiratory illnesses are avoidable. Much of the disease burden can be mitigated by reducing exposure to indoor and outdoor air pollution, restraining tobacco use, and relieving urban overcrowding. Implementation of the strategies described in the Forum of International Respiratory Societies respiratory diseases report would have a profound effect on respiratory health, reduce economic costs, and enhance health equality in the world.

  11. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Investigacao]. E-mail: prmrocco@biof.ufrj.br

    2008-12-15

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  12. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow Disease Note: ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy) is a progressive neurological disorder of ...

  13. [Respiratory diseases in metallurgy production workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shliapnikov, D M; Vlasova, E M; Ponomareva, T A

    2012-01-01

    The authors identified features of respiratory diseases in workers of various metallurgy workshops. Cause-effect relationships are defined between occupational risk factors and respiratory diseases, with determining the affection level.

  14. Comparative analysis of Pasteurella multocida strains isolated from bovine respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellyei, Boglárka; Rónai, Zsuzsanna; Jánosi, Szilárd; Makrai, László

    2015-12-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the leading cause of significant economic losses in the intensive beef industry worldwide. Beside numerous risk factors Pasteurella multocida, which is regarded as a secondary pathogen, may play a role in the development of the disease. Previous studies of strains from swine pneumonia revealed that there are a few clones associated with clinical disease, suggesting that some strains may be more virulent than others. This linkage may be true in the BRD, however composition of P. multocida populations in the herds are slightly characterized. Thus, we decided to perform phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of strains isolated from calves with respiratory infection at 31 different herds in Hungary. The results demonstrated the presence of two dominant strain types. At the identical taxonomic background (P. multocida subsp. multocida) with slight phenotypic variability they could be separated by trehalose fermentation capacity, α-glucosidase activity and molecular fingerprint patterns of ERIC- and M13-PCR. Independent prevalence and geographical origin of the strain types may refer to their significance in the illness, but their comparison with strains isolated from healthy individuals is taken into consideration.

  15. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE, Mad Cow Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Bruckner

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Mad Cow Disease or BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy became a household name internationally and also in South Africa. International hysteria resulted following reports of a possible link between a disease diagnosed in cattle in Britain and a variant of the disease diagnosed in humans after the presumed ingestion or contact with meat from infected cattle. The European Union instituted a ban on the importation of beef from the United Kingdom during March 1996 that had a severe effect on the beef industry in the UK and also resulted in a world wide consumer resistance against beef consumption.

  16. Non-inferiority of nitric oxide releasing intranasal spray compared to sub-therapeutic antibiotics to reduce incidence of undifferentiated fever and bovine respiratory disease complex in low to moderate risk beef cattle arriving at a commercial feedlot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev-Shoshani, G; McMullin, B; Nation, N; Church, J S; Dorin, C; Miller, C

    2017-03-01

    Undifferentiated fever, or bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDc), is a challenging multi-factorial health issue caused by viral/bacterial pathogens and stressors linked to the transport and mixing of cattle, negatively impacting the cattle feedlot industry. Common practice during processing at feedlots is administration of antibiotic metaphylaxis to reduce the incidence of BRDc. Nitric oxide (NO) is a naturally occurring nano-molecule with a wide range of physiological attributes. This study evaluated the metaphylactic use of intranasal NO releasing spray (NORS) to control BRDc incidence in calves at low-moderate risk of developing BRDc, arriving at a commercial feedlot as compared to conventional antibiotic metaphylaxis. One thousand and eighty crossbred, multiple-sourced, commingled, commercial, weaned beef calves were screened, enrolled, randomized and treated upon arrival. Animals appearing sick were pulled (from their pen) by blinded pen keepers then assessed for BRDc symptoms; blood samples were taken for haptoglobin quantification and the animals were rescued with an antibiotic. After 35 days both groups showed no significant difference in BRDc incidence (5.2% of animals from NORS group and 3.2% from antibiotic group). Average daily weight gain of animals at day 150 for the NORS cohort was 1.17kg compared to 1.18kg for the antibiotic group (p>0.05). There was no significant difference in mortality in the first 35 days (p=0.7552), however, general mortality over 150 days trended higher in the antibiotic cohort. NORS treatment was shown to be safe, causing neither distress nor adverse effects on the animals. This large randomized controlled study in low-moderate BRDc incidence risk calves demonstrates that NORS treatment, as compared to conventional metaphylactic antibiotics, is non-inferior based on BRDc incidence and other metrics like weight and mortality. These data justify further studies in higher BRDc incidence risk populations to evaluate NORS as

  17. Antimicrobial activity of bovine NK-lysin-derived peptides on bovine respiratory pathogen Histophilus somni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine NK-lysins, which are functionally and structurally similar to human granulysin and porcine NK-lysin, are predominantly found in the granules of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and NK-cells. Although antimicrobial activity of bovine NK-lysin has been assessed for several bacterial pathogens, not all t...

  18. Linking microbiota and respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Matthias; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2016-11-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates the relevance of microbiota for pulmonary health and disease. Independent investigations recently demonstrated that the lung harbors a resident microbiota. Therefore, it is intriguing that a lung microbiota can shape pulmonary immunity and epithelial barrier functions. Here, we discuss the ways how the composition of the microbial community in the lung may influence pulmonary health and vice versa, factors that determine community composition. Prominent microbiota at other body sites such as the intestinal one may also contribute to pulmonary health and disease. However, it is difficult to discriminate between influences of lung vs. gut microbiota due to systemic mutuality between both communities. With focuses on asthma and respiratory infections, we discuss how microbiota of lung and gut can determine pulmonary immunity and barrier functions. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  19. Quantitative trait loci associated with the immune response to a bovine respiratory syncytial virus vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Leach

    Full Text Available Infectious disease is an important problem for animal breeders, farmers and governments worldwide. One approach to reducing disease is to breed for resistance. This linkage study used a Charolais-Holstein F2 cattle cross population (n = 501 which was genotyped for 165 microsatellite markers (covering all autosomes to search for associations with phenotypes for Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV specific total-IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 concentrations at several time-points pre- and post-BRSV vaccination. Regions of the bovine genome which influenced the immune response induced by BRSV vaccination were identified, as well as regions associated with the clearance of maternally derived BRSV specific antibodies. Significant positive correlations were detected within traits across time, with negative correlations between the pre- and post-vaccination time points. The whole genome scan identified 27 Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL on 13 autosomes. Many QTL were associated with the Thymus Helper 1 linked IgG2 response, especially at week 2 following vaccination. However the most significant QTL, which reached 5% genome-wide significance, was on BTA 17 for IgG1, also 2 weeks following vaccination. All animals had declining maternally derived BRSV specific antibodies prior to vaccination and the levels of BRSV specific antibody prior to vaccination were found to be under polygenic control with several QTL detected.Heifers from the same population (n = 195 were subsequently immunised with a 40-mer Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus peptide (FMDV in a previous publication. Several of these QTL associated with the FMDV traits had overlapping peak positions with QTL in the current study, including the QTL on BTA23 which included the bovine Major Histocompatibility Complex (BoLA, and QTL on BTA9 and BTA24, suggesting that the genes underlying these QTL may control responses to multiple antigens. These results lay the groundwork for future investigations to identify the

  20. Application of combined SMRT and long-read pyrosequencing to produce reference genome sequences of bacteria associated with respiratory disease outbreaks in beef cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effectiveness of comparing complete genomes for elucidating mechanisms of virulence in pathogenic organisms has been demonstrated recently in foodborne and waterborne human disease outbreaks. We built upon this concept to investigate virulence mechanisms in bovine respiratory disease complex (B...

  1. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia Carvalho Abreu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases.As células-tronco têm uma infinidade de implicações clínicas no pulmão. Este artigo é uma revisão crítica que inclui estudos clínicos e experimentais advindos do banco de dados do MEDLINE e SciElo nos últimos 10 anos, onde foram destacados os efeitos da terapia celular na síndrome do desconforto respiratório agudo ou doenças mais crônicas, como fibrose pulmonar e enfisema. Apesar de muitos estudos demonstrarem os efeitos benéficos das células-tronco no desenvolvimento, reparo e remodelamento pulmonar; algumas questões ainda precisam ser respondidas para um melhor entendimento dos mecanismos que controlam a divisão celular e diferenciação, permitindo o uso da terapia celular nas doenças respiratórias.

  2. A Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial of Ibuprofen for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in a Bovine Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Walsh

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and hospital admission in infants. An analogous disease occurs in cattle and costs US agriculture a billion dollars a year. RSV causes much of its morbidity indirectly via adverse effects of the host response to the virus. RSV is accompanied by elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 which is followed by neutrophil led inflammation in the lung. Ibuprofen is a prototypical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that decreases PGE2 levels by inhibiting cyclooxygenase.We hypothesized that treatment of RSV with ibuprofen would decrease PGE2 levels, modulate the immune response, decrease clinical illness, and decrease the histopathological lung changes in a bovine model of RSV. We further hypothesized that viral replication would be unaffected.We performed a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen in 16 outbred Holstein calves that we infected with RSV. We measured clinical scores, cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and endocannabinoid products in plasma and mediastinal lymph nodes and interleukin (Il-4, Il-13, Il-17 and interferon-γ in mediastinal lymph nodes. RSV shedding was measured daily and nasal Il-6, Il-8 and Il-17 every other day. The calves were necropsied on Day 10 post inoculation and histology performed.One calf in the ibuprofen group required euthanasia on Day 8 of infection for respiratory distress. Clinical scores (p<0.01 and weight gain (p = 0.08 seemed better in the ibuprofen group. Ibuprofen decreased cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and cytochrome P450 products, and increased monoacylglycerols in lung lymph nodes. Ibuprofen modulated the immune response as measured by narrowed range of observed Il-13, Il-17 and IFN-γ gene expression in mediastinal lymph nodes. Lung histology was not different between groups, and viral shedding was increased in calves randomized to ibuprofen.Ibuprofen decreased PGE2, modulated the immune response, and improved clinical outcomes

  3. DETECTION OF BOVINE RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS IN CALVES OF RIO GRANDE DO SUL, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Paulo Demartini Gonçalves

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available During 20 months of the 1987-1990 period, lung tissue samples from 351 calves were obtained at a slaughterhouse. These calves were from counties nearby Porto Alegre. The direct and indirect fluorescent antibody tests (FAT using polyclonal and monoclonal antibody conjugates were performed on frozen lung sections. Eighteen (5.13% of the calf lung samples were positive for the Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV. The BRSV was isolated from FAT positive samples.

  4. Parainfluenza-3 and bovine respiratory syncytial virus: intraherd correlation adjusted for sensitivity and specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Segura C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to compare the intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC and design effects (D estimates adjusted or unadjusted for sensibility (Se and specificity (Sp of the diagnostic tests using a Bayesian procedure. Materials and methods. Sera from 232 animals from 44 randomly selected herds, to detect antibodies against parainfluenza-3 virus (PIV3 from non-vaccinated dual-purpose cattle from Colima Mexico, were used. Only 176 animals from 33 herds were used to evaluate the presence of the bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV. Results. The ICC and D values adjusted and unadjusted for PIV3 were 0.33, 2.73, 0.32, and 2.71, respectively. For BRSV the values were 0.31, 2.64, 0.28 and 2.49. Conclusions. The adjusted or unadjusted ICC and D estimates were similar because of the high Se and Sp of the diagnostic tests and the relatively high prevalence of the diseases here studied.

  5. Investigation of the presence of human or bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the lungs of mink (Neovison vison) with hemorrhagic pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte Mark; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemorrhagic pneumonia is a disease of farmed mink (Neovison vison) caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The disease is highly seasonal in Danish mink with outbreaks occurring almost exclusively in the autumn. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been shown to augment infection with P....... aeruginosa in mice and to promote adhesion of P. aeruginosa to human respiratory cells. Findings We tested 50 lung specimens from mink with hemorrhagic pneumonia for bovine RSV by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for human RSV by a commercial real-time PCR. RSV was not found...

  6. Fabry disease, respiratory symptoms, and airway limitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Camilla Kara; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Backer, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    . The remaining 27 articles were relevant for this review. RESULTS: The current literature concerning lung manifestations describes various respiratory symptoms such as dyspnoea or shortness of breath, wheezing, and dry cough. These symptoms are often related to cardiac involvement in Fabry disease as respiratory...

  7. Epidemiology of Respiratory Disease in Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Respiratory Disease in Malawi 135. Pneumonia is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected children." HIV infection of children alters the pattern of respiratory il,l.ness.('*l>8 HIV .... infection, Vitamin A deficiency and concomitant viral ..... d ifferences between developing and developed countriesi.

  8. Investigation of the presence of human or bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the lungs of mink (Neovison vison with hemorrhagic pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomonsen Charlotte M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemorrhagic pneumonia is a disease of farmed mink (Neovison vison caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The disease is highly seasonal in Danish mink with outbreaks occurring almost exclusively in the autumn. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV has been shown to augment infection with P. aeruginosa in mice and to promote adhesion of P. aeruginosa to human respiratory cells. Findings We tested 50 lung specimens from mink with hemorrhagic pneumonia for bovine RSV by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR and for human RSV by a commercial real-time PCR. RSV was not found. Conclusions This study indicates that human and bovine RSV is not a major co-factor for development of hemorrhagic pneumonia in Danish mink.

  9. Investigation of the presence of human or bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the lungs of mink (Neovison vison) with hemorrhagic pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte M; Breum, Solvej Ø; Larsen, Lars E; Jakobsen, Jeanette; Høiby, Niels; Hammer, Anne S

    2012-11-26

    Hemorrhagic pneumonia is a disease of farmed mink (Neovison vison) caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The disease is highly seasonal in Danish mink with outbreaks occurring almost exclusively in the autumn. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been shown to augment infection with P. aeruginosa in mice and to promote adhesion of P. aeruginosa to human respiratory cells. We tested 50 lung specimens from mink with hemorrhagic pneumonia for bovine RSV by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for human RSV by a commercial real-time PCR. RSV was not found. This study indicates that human and bovine RSV is not a major co-factor for development of hemorrhagic pneumonia in Danish mink.

  10. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus ISCOMs-Immunity, protection and safety in young conventional calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglund, Sara; Hu, Kefei; Vargmar, Karin; Poré, Lesly; Olofson, Ann-Sophie; Blodörn, Krister; Anderson, Jenna; Ahooghalandari, Parvin; Pringle, John; Taylor, Geraldine; Valarcher, Jean-François

    2011-11-03

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is a major cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in cattle and causes yearly outbreaks with high morbidity in Europe. Commercial vaccines against this virus needs improvement of efficacy, especially in calves with BRSV-specific maternally derived antibodies (MDA). We previously reported that an experimental BRSV-ISCOM vaccine, but not a commercial vaccine, induced strong clinical and virological protection in calves with MDA, immunized at 7-15 weeks of age. The aim of the present study was to characterize the immune responses, as well as to investigate the efficacy and safety in younger animals, representing the target population for vaccination. Four groups of five 3-8 week old calves with variable levels of BRSV-specific MDA were immunized s.c. twice at a 3 weeks interval with (i) BRSV immunostimulating complexes (BRSV-ISCOMs), (ii) BRSV-protein, (iii) adjuvant, or (iv) PBS. All calves were challenged with virulent BRSV by aerosol 2 weeks later and euthanized on day 6 after infection. The cellular and humoral responses were monitored as well as the clinical signs, the viral excretion and the pathology following challenge. Despite presence of MDA at the time of the immunization, only a minimum of clinical signs were observed in the BRSV-ISCOM group after challenge. In contrast, in all control groups, clinical signs of disease were observed in most of the animals (respiratory rates up to 76min(-1) and rectal temperatures up to 41°C). The clinical protection was associated to a highly significant reduction of virus replication in the upper and lower respiratory tract of calves, rapid systemic and local antibody responses and T helper cell responses dominated by IFNγ production. Animals that did not shed virus detectable by PCR or cell culture following challenge possessed particularly high levels of pulmonary IgA. The protective immunological responses to BRSV proteins and the ability to overcome the inhibiting effect of

  11. Association of herd BHV-1 seroprevalence with respiratory disease in youngstock in Estonian dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaperi, K; Bougeard, S; Aleksejev, A; Orro, T; Viltrop, A

    2012-10-01

    The associations between herd bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) seroprevalence, along with other infectious and farm management factors with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in dairy calves and heifers, were investigated. Serum samples from 103 dairy cattle herds were analyzed for antibodies against BHV-1, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis). A questionnaire was used to record herd management practices. A high occurrence of respiratory disease in unweaned calves was associated with low to moderate and high prevalence of BHV-1 among cows (OR=14.8, p=0.005 and OR=19.2, p=0.002, respectively) and positive BVDV status of a herd (OR=5.1, p=0.02). The presence of BVDV in a herd was related to a high incidence of respiratory disease in heifers 3-16 months old (OR=4.3, p=0.027). Based on the results of multiple correspondence analysis, holding youngstock separately from cows until pregnancy, introducing new animals and the activities of on-farm employees may contribute to a higher incidence of BRD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pneumococcal vaccination and chronic respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Froes F

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Filipe Froes,1 Nicolas Roche,2 Francesco Blasi3,4 1Chest Department, Hospital Pulido Valente, North Lisbon Hospital Center, Lisbon, Portugal; 2Department of Respiratory and Intensive Care Medicine, Cochin Hospital, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France; 3Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, 4Internal Medicine Department, Respiratory Unit and Adult Cystic Fibrosis Center, Fondazione IRCCS ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy Abstract: Patients with COPD and other chronic respiratory diseases are especially vulnerable to viral and bacterial pulmonary infections, which are major causes of exacerbations, hospitalization, disease progression, and mortality in COPD patients. Effective vaccines could reduce the burden of respiratory infections and acute exacerbations in COPD patients, but what is the evidence for this? This article reviews and discusses the existing evidence for pneumococcal vaccination efficacy and its changing role in patients with chronic respiratory diseases, especially COPD. Specifically, the recent Community-Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults (CAPITA showed the efficacy of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in older adults, many of whom had additional risk factors for pneumococcal disease, including chronic lung diseases. Taken together, the evidence suggests that pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations can prevent community-acquired pneumonia and acute exacerbations in COPD patients, while pneumococcal vaccination early in the course of COPD could help maintain stable health status. Despite the need to prevent pulmonary infections in patients with chronic respiratory diseases and evidence for the efficacy of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, pneumococcal vaccine coverage and awareness are low and need to be improved. Respiratory physicians need to communicate the benefits of vaccination more effectively to their patients who suffer from chronic respiratory diseases

  13. Macrophage Heterogeneity in Respiratory Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boorsma, Carian E.; Draijer, Christina; Melgert, Barbro N.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are among the most abundant cells in the respiratory tract, and they can have strikingly different phenotypes within this environment. Our knowledge of the different phenotypes and their functions in the lung is sketchy at best, but they appear to be linked to the protection of gas

  14. Respiratory muscle function in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterspacher, Stephan; Schlager, Daniel; Walker, David J; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Windisch, Wolfram; Kabitz, Hans-Joachim

    2013-07-01

    Interstitial lung diseases limit daily activities, impair quality of life and result in (exertional) dyspnoea. This has mainly been attributed to a decline in lung function and impaired gas exchange. However, the contribution of respiratory muscle dysfunction to these limitations remains to be conclusively investigated. Interstitial lung disease patients and matched controls performed body plethysmography, a standardised 6-min walk test, volitional tests (respiratory drive (P0.1), global maximal inspiratory mouth occlusion pressure (PImax), sniff nasal pressure (SnPna) and inspiratory muscle load) and nonvolitional tests on respiratory muscle function and strength (twitch mouth and transdiaphragmatic pressure during bilateral magnetic phrenic nerve stimulation (TwPmo and TwPdi)). 25 patients and 24 controls were included in the study. PImax and SnPna remained unaltered (both p>0.05), whereas P0.1 and the load on the inspiratory muscles were higher (both pdisease patients compared with controls. TwPmo and TwPdi were lower in interstitial lung disease patients (mean±sd TwPmo 0.86±0.4 versus 1.32±0.4, pdisease patients while global respiratory muscle strength remains preserved. Central respiratory drive and the load imposed on the inspiratory muscles are increased. Whether impaired respiratory muscle function impacts morbidity and mortality in interstitial lung disease patients needs to be investigated in future studies.

  15. Spatial patterns of Bovine Corona Virus and Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus in the Swedish beef cattle population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björkman Camilla

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both bovine coronavirus (BCV and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV infections are currently wide-spread in the Swedish dairy cattle population. Surveys of antibody levels in bulk tank milk have shown very high nationwide prevalences of both BCV and BRSV, with large variations between regions. In the Swedish beef cattle population however, no investigations have yet been performed regarding the prevalence and geographical distribution of BCV and BRSV. A cross-sectional serological survey for BCV and BRSV was carried out in Swedish beef cattle to explore any geographical patterns of these infections. Methods Blood samples were collected from 2,763 animals located in 2,137 herds and analyzed for presence of antibodies to BCV and BRSV. Moran's I was calculated to assess spatial autocorrelation, and identification of geographical cluster was performed using spatial scan statistics. Results Animals detected positive to BCV or BRSV were predominately located in the central-western and some southern parts of Sweden. Moran's I indicated global spatial autocorrelation. BCV and BRSV appeared to be spatially related: two areas in southern Sweden (Skaraborg and Skåne had a significantly higher prevalence of BCV (72.5 and 65.5% respectively; almost the same two areas were identified as being high-prevalence clusters for BRSV (69.2 and 66.8% respectively. An area in south-east Sweden (Kronoberg-Blekinge had lower prevalences for both infections than expected (23.8 and 20.7% for BCV and BRSV respectively. Another area in middle-west Sweden (Värmland-Dalarna had also a lower prevalence for BRSV (7.9%. Areas with beef herd density > 10 per 100 km2 were found to be at significantly higher risk of being part of high-prevalence clusters. Conclusion These results form a basis for further investigations of between-herds dynamics and risk factors for these infections in order to design effective control strategies.

  16. Prevalence, characterization and antibiotic resistance of Pasteurella multocida isolated from bovine respiratory infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Hossein; Rezagholipour, Mojtaba; Fallah, Sepideh; Dadrasnia, Arezoo; Chelliah, Shamini; Velappan, Rita Devi; Wei, Kelvin Swee Chuan; Ismail, Salmah

    2014-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence, characterization and antibiotic resistance of Pasteurella multocida isolated from calves with respiratory infection in Iran. P. multocida was detected in 141/169 bovine respiratory infection cases on Iranian dairy and beef farms. P. multocida were grouped into serogroups A (126/141), D (12/141), and B (3/141). Of the P.  multocida isolates, all harboured the psl, ompH, oma87, fimA, ptfA, nanB, and nanH genes, 139/141 had hsf-2, and 115/141 pfhA, and tadD. The isolates were most frequently resistant to penicillin G (43/141 resistant isolates; 30.5%) and streptomycin (31/141; 22%). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Extensive sequence divergence among bovine respiratory syncytial viruses isolated during recurrent outbreaks in closed herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.

    2000-01-01

    The nucleotides coding for the extracellular part of the G glycoprotein and the full SH protein of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) were sequenced from viruses isolated from numerous outbreaks of BRSV infection. The isolates included viruses isolated from the same herd (closed dairy farms......, however, the most likely explanation was that BRSV was (re)introduced into the herd prior to each new outbreak These findings are highly relevant for the understanding of the transmission patterns of BRSV among calves and human respiratory syncytial virus among humans....... and veal calf production units) in different years and from all confirmed outbreaks in Denmark within a short period. The results showed that identical viruses were isolated within a herd during outbreaks and that viruses from recurrent infections varied by up to 11% in sequence even in closed herds...

  18. An experimental infection model for reproduction of calf pneumonia with bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) based on one combined exposure of calves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Uttenthal, Åse; Viuff, B.

    2003-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) has been recognised as an important pathogen in calf pneumonia for 30 years, but surprisingly few effective infection models for studies of the immune response and the pathogenesis in the natural host have been established. We present a reproducible...... experimental infection model for BRSV in 2-5-month-old, conventionally reared Jersey calves. Thirty-four colostrum-fed calves were inoculated once by aerosol and intratracheal injection with BRSV. Respiratory disease was recorded in 91% of the BRSV-inoculated calves, 72% had an accompanying rise in rectal...... temperature and 83% exhibited >5%, consolidation of the lung tissue. The disease closely resembled natural outbreaks of BRSV-related pneumonia, and detection of BRSV in nasal secretions and lung tissues confirmed the primary role of BRSV. Nine mock-inoculated control calves failed to develop respiratory...

  19. [Respiratory diseases in black African carceral area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloba, Y; Soumaré, D; Ouattara, K; Kanouté, T; Boré, O; Dolo, O; Baya, B; Berthé, G; Diallo, S

    2017-09-01

    The measures for people in specific situations such as prisoners are part of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The objective of this study was to assess respiratory pathologies in a black African carceral center. Retrospective study about the prevalence of respiratory pathologies in the arrest central house for men in Bamako (Mali), from May 2012 to April 2013. The admission records have served as data checking support on detainee's records. Statistical significance was investigated by the SAS 9.3 software with a threshold of 5%. Of 2740 admissions, 207 concerned respiratory pathologies (7.5%). All men, were of mean age 30±13 years (range 19-71). The respiratory diseases found were: pneumonia (33.8%), chronic bronchitis (26.6%), acute respiratory infection (14%), asthma (13.5%) and tuberculosis (5.3%). A definite diagnosis was made in 42% of cases. A tobacco intoxication was found in all age groups (CI 95%, R-square=0.01), without significant difference between the occurrence of cough in smoking and non-smoking men. According to their relative frequencies, the management of respiratory diseases requires collaboration between carceral health facilities and pneumological specialized services. Copyright © 2017 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Sarcopenia and frailty in chronic respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, Anna E; Hepgul, Nilay; Kon, Samantha; Maddocks, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    Sarcopenia and frailty are geriatric syndromes characterized by multisystem decline, which are related to and reflected by markers of skeletal muscle dysfunction. In older people, sarcopenia and frailty have been used for risk stratification, to predict adverse outcomes and to prompt intervention aimed at preventing decline in those at greatest risk. In this review, we examine sarcopenia and frailty in the context of chronic respiratory disease, providing an overview of the common assessments tools and studies to date in the field. We contrast assessments of sarcopenia, which consider muscle mass and function, with assessments of frailty, which often additionally consider social, cognitive and psychological domains. Frailty is emerging as an important syndrome in respiratory disease, being strongly associated with poor outcome. We also unpick the relationship between sarcopenia, frailty and skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic respiratory disease and reveal these as interlinked but distinct clinical phenotypes. Suggested areas for future work include the application of sarcopenia and frailty models to restrictive diseases and population-based samples, prospective prognostic assessments of sarcopenia and frailty in relation to common multidimensional indices, plus the investigation of exercise, nutritional and pharmacological strategies to prevent or treat sarcopenia and frailty in chronic respiratory disease.

  1. Burden of allergic respiratory disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan René; Dam Petersen, K; Hahn-Pedersen, J

    2016-01-01

    the disease-specific rhinitis quality of life questionnaire or generic instruments (SF-36 and SF-12). Summary estimates obtained by meta-analysis showed that HRQL in patients with perennial HDM allergy was significantly worse than that of patients with seasonal pollen allergy, when measured by both disease......; there was little or no evidence of increasing or decreasing cost trends. Increased awareness of the detrimental effects of AR and/or AA on patients' HRQL and its considerable cost burden might encourage early diagnosis and treatment, in order to minimize the disease burden and ensure beneficial and cost...

  2. Pathogens, patterns of pneumonia, and epidemiologic risk factors associated with respiratory disease in recently weaned cattle in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Gerard M; More, Simon J; Sammin, Dónal; Casey, Mìcheàl J; McElroy, Máire C; O'Neill, Rónan G; Byrne, William J; Earley, Bernadette; Clegg, Tracy A; Ball, Hywel; Bell, Colin J; Cassidy, Joseph P

    2017-01-01

    We examined the pathogens, morphologic patterns, and risk factors associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in 136 recently weaned cattle ("weanlings"), 6-12 mo of age, that were submitted for postmortem examination to regional veterinary laboratories in Ireland. A standardized sampling protocol included routine microbiologic investigations as well as polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Lungs with histologic lesions were categorized into 1 of 5 morphologic patterns of pneumonia. Fibrinosuppurative bronchopneumonia (49%) and interstitial pneumonia (48%) were the morphologic patterns recorded most frequently. The various morphologic patterns of pulmonary lesions suggest the involvement of variable combinations of initiating and compounding infectious agents that hindered any simple classification of the etiopathogenesis of the pneumonias. Dual infections were detected in 58% of lungs, with Mannheimia haemolytica and Histophilus somni most frequently recorded in concert. M. haemolytica (43%) was the most frequently detected respiratory pathogen; H. somni was also shown to be frequently implicated in pneumonia in this age group of cattle. Bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3) and Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (16% each) were the viral agents detected most frequently. Potential respiratory pathogens (particularly Pasteurella multocida, BPIV-3, and H. somni) were frequently detected (64%) in lungs that had neither gross nor histologic pulmonary lesions, raising questions regarding their role in the pathogenesis of BRD. The breadth of respiratory pathogens detected in bovine lungs by various detection methods highlights the diagnostic value of parallel analyses in respiratory disease postmortem investigation.

  3. Establishing presence of antibodies against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV, parainfluenza virus 3 (PI3 and bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV 1 in blood serum of cattle using indirect immunoenzyme probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šamanc Horea

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 92 samples of bovine blood serum were examined for the presence of antibodies against the bovine respiratory syncytial virus using indirect immunoenzyme probe - iELISA. Specific antibodies against the bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV were established in 46, or 50% blood serum samples. Investigations of the 92 blood serum samples of cattle for the presence of antibodies against the parainfluenza virus 3 (PI 3, revealed their presence in 77, or 83.69% of the samples, and the presence of antibodies against the bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV 1 was established in 19, or 20.65% of the samples.

  4. Antibody responses against epitopes on the F protein of bovine respiratory syncytial virus differ in infected or vaccinated cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, R.S.; Hensen, E.J.; Langedijk, J.P.M.; Daus, F.; Middel, W.G.J.; Kramps, J.A.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    1997-01-01

    The fusion protein F of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is an important target for humoral and cellular immune responses, and antibodies against the F protein have been associated with protection. However, the F protein can induce antibodies with different biological activity, possibly

  5. [Pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in chronic respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas Maldonado, F; Alfageme Michavila, I; Barchilón Cohen, V S; Peis Redondo, J I; Vargas Ortega, D A

    2014-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is an acute respiratory infectious disease which has an incidence of 3-8 cases/1,000 inhabitants, and increases with age and comorbidities. The pneumococcus is the organism most frequently involved in community-acquired pneumonia in the adult (30-35%). Around 40% of patients with community-acquired pneumonia require hospital admission, and around 10% need to be admitted to an intensive care unit. The most serious forms of pneumococcal infection include invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), which covers cases of bacteremia (associated or not to pneumonia), meningitis, pleuritis, arthritis, primary peritonitis and pericarditis. Currently, the biggest problem with the pneumococcus is the emergence of resistance to antimicrobial agents, and its high morbimortality, despite the use of appropriate antibiotics and proper medical treatment. Certain underlying medical conditions increase the risk of IPD and its complications, especially, from the respiratory diseases point of view, smoking and chronic respiratory diseases. Pneumococcal disease, according to the WHO, is the first preventable cause of death worldwide in children and adults. Among the strategies to prevent IPD is vaccination. WHO considers that its universal introduction and implementation against pneumococcus is essential and a priority in all countries. There are currently 2 pneumococcal vaccines for adults: the 23 serotypes polysaccharide and conjugate 13 serotypes. The scientific societies represented here have worked to develop some recommendations, based on the current scientific evidence, regarding the pneumococcal vaccination in the immunocompetent adult with chronic respiratory disease and smokers at risk of suffering from IPD. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Respiratory diseases in the late middle ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlikowska-Sroka, A; Kwiatkowska, B; Dąbrowski, P; Dzięciołowska-Baran, E; Szczurowski, J; Nowakowski, D

    2013-06-01

    Respiratory diseases have beset humanity from the earliest times. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of respiratory diseases in the inhabitants of a large medieval city. We analyzed 110 skeletons, coming from 12 to 17th century of individuals of either gender. In order to assess pneumatisation of paranasal sinuses and nasal septum curvature, radiographs were performed in the PA projection. Nasal septum deviation was found in 50% of individuals, asymmetry of the frontal sinuses and their aplasia in 11% of individuals. There was no significant relationship between the curvature of the nasal septum and frontal sinus aplasia. One case of tuberculosis and one case of periradicular abscess causing perforation of the maxillary sinus were noted. Developmental variation of the sternum was present in two individuals. In another two individuals, rib fractures with bone union were observed. Analysis of the presence of respiratory disease in bone material is particularly difficult, but the use of modern methods: X-rays, CT scans and endoscopy significantly extends the capability to unravel the underlying causes of bygone diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of a single-tube fluorogenic RT-PCR assay for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in clinical samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakhverdyan, Mikhayil; Hägglund, Sara; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2005-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) causes severe disease in naive cattle of all ages and is a common pathogen in the respiratory disease complex of calves. Simplified methods for rapid BRSV diagnosis would encourage sampling during outbreaks and would consequently lead to an extended......, antigen ELISA (Ag-ELISA) and virus isolation (VI). Interspersed negative control samples, samples from healthy animals and eight symptomatically or genetically related viruses were all negative, confirming a high specificity of the assay. Taken together, the data indicated that the fRT-PCR assay can...... understanding of the virus. In this study, a BRSV fluorogenic reverse transcription PCR (fRT-PCR) assay, based on TaqMan principle, was developed and evaluated on a large number of clinical samples, representing various cases of natural and experimental BRSV infections. By using a single-step closed-tube format...

  8. Association of preweaning and weaning serum cortisol and metabolites with ADG and incidence of respiratory disease in beef cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this experiment were to determine the association of circulating cortisol, lactate, and glucose early in life on ADG and incidences of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in cattle. A blood sample was collected approximately 3 wk prior to weaning and at weaning from genetically diver...

  9. 28 CFR 79.46 - Proof of nonmalignant respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of nonmalignant respiratory disease... nonmalignant respiratory disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed a nonmalignant respiratory disease following pertinent employment as a miner, the Assistant Director shall resolve all reasonable...

  10. Acute phase proteins in naturally occurring respiratory disease of feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idoate, Ignacio; Vander Ley, Brian; Schultz, Loren; Heller, Meera

    2015-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate three acute phase proteins (APP) [haptoglobin (HPT), lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) and transferrin (Tf)] in feedlot cattle with naturally occurring respiratory disease diagnosed by a calf health scoring chart (CHSC). Seventy-seven beef calves were observed for signs of Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) during the first 28 days after arrival at the feedlot. Fourteen cases and pen matched controls were selected based on the CHSC. BRD cases were defined as a score of ≥ 5, while controls were defined as a score ≤ 4. The mean CHSC score in cases was 6.9 which was significantly greater than the controls 2.8 (P respiratory disease in feedlot conditions. Transferrin concentrations between the two groups were not statistically different. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reported occupational respiratory diseases in Catalonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orriols, R; Costa, R; Albanell, M; Alberti, C; Castejon, J; Monso, E; Panades, R; Rubira, N; Zock, J‐P

    2006-01-01

    Objectives A voluntary surveillance system was implemented in Catalonia (Spain) to ascertain the feasibility, incidence, and characteristics of occupational respiratory diseases and compare them with those of the compulsory official system. Methods In 2002, in collaboration with the Occupational and Thoracic Societies of Catalonia, occupational and chest physicians and other specialists were invited to report, on a bimonthly basis, newly diagnosed cases of occupational respiratory diseases. Information requested on each case included diagnosis, age, sex, place of residence, occupation, suspected agent, and physician's opinion on the likelihood that the condition was work related. Compulsory official system data derived from statistics on work related diseases for possible disability benefits declared by insurance companies, which are responsible for declaring these diseases to the Autonomous Government of Catalonia. Results Of 142 physicians seeing patients with occupational respiratory diseases approached, 102 (74%) participated. Three hundred and fifty nine cases were reported, of which asthma (48.5%), asbestos related diseases (14.5%), and acute inhalations (12.8%) were the most common. Physicians rated 63% of suspected cases as highly likely, 28% as likely, and 8% as low likelihood. The most frequent suspected agents reported for asthma were isocyanates (15.5%), persulphates (12.1%), and cleaning products (8.6%). Mesothelioma (5.9%) was the most frequent diagnosis among asbestos related diseases. The number of acute inhalations reported was high, with metal industries (26%), cleaning services (22%), and chemical industries (13%) being the most frequently involved. The frequency of occupational respiratory diseases recorded by this voluntary surveillance system was four times higher than that reported by the compulsory official system. Conclusions The compulsory scheme for reporting occupational lung diseases is seriously underreporting in Catalonia. A

  12. A randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen for respiratory syncytial infection in a bovine model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and hospital admission in infants. An analogous disease occurs in cattle and costs US agriculture a billion dollars a year. RSV causes much of its morbidity indirectly via adverse effects of the host response to ...

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus disease: prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Helen Y; Englund, Janet A

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most clinically important viruses infecting young children, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. Over the past decade, the most significant advance in the prevention of RSV disease has been the development of high-titered antibody products. Infection control is the only other strategy to prevent RSV disease. A humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the fusion (F) protein palivizumab, (Synagis®, MedImmune, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD), is given routinely on a monthly basis to premature infants and young children less than 24 months of age with underlying medical problems including prematurity, chronic lung disease, or cardiac disease to prevent RSV disease and hospitalization. Other products utilizing polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies or antibody fragments against the F protein have been developed and some already tested in patient populations. The only licensed antiviral treatment available today is ribavirin, a guanosine analogue generally administered as a small particle aerosol to immunocompromised patients with lower respiratory tract disease due to RSV. This drug has also been utilized in oral and intravenous forms, again mainly in immunocompromised patients. Promising new antiviral agents under development by multiple pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies include small molecule fusion inhibitors, attachment inhibitors, inhibitors of RNA synthesis, and small interfering RNA particles (siRNA).

  14. Efficacy and safety of Ban Huang oral liquid for treating bovine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of laboratory pathogen testing, analysis of clinical symptoms, and analysis of pathological anatomy were combined to diagnose bovine respiratory diseases in 147 Simmental cattle caused by mixed infections of M. bovis, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine parainfluenza virus type 3, and Mannheimia ...

  15. [Inpatients days in patients with respiratory diseases and periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Plata, Rosario; Olmedo-Torres, Daniel; Martínez-Briseño, David; González-Cruz, Herminia; Casa-Medina, Guillermo; García-Sancho, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory gingival process that has been associated with the severity of respiratory diseases. In Mexico a prevalence of 78% was found in population with social security and > 60 years old. The aim of this study is to establish the association between periodontal disease and respiratory diseases according to the inpatient days. A cross-sectional study was conducted from January to December 2011. We included hospitalized patients, ≥ 18 years of age, without sedation or intubated. A dentist classified patients into two groups according to the severity of the periodontal disease: mild-to-moderate and severe. We estimated medians of inpatient days by disease and severity. Negative binomial models were adjusted to estimate incidence rate ratios and predicted inpatient days. 3,059 patients were enrolled. The median of observed and predicted inpatient days was higher in the group of severe periodontal disease (p disease, tuberculosis, and influenza had the highest incidence rates ratios of periodontal disease (p periodontal disease is positively -associated with inpatient days of patients with respiratory diseases.

  16. Chronic Respiratory Disease (Crd of Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soeripto

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic respiratory disease (CRD of chicken is the most costly disease confronting poultry industries in the world. The economic losses due to CRD was estimated up to billions rupiahs per year in Indonesia, and in the USA was estimated up to hundred millions dollars per year. The losses mainly due to decreases of body weight gain, egg production, feed efficiencies, hatchabilities and increases of embryo mortality. The main causative agent of CRD is Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG. Respiratory disturbances, excretion of nasal exudate, coughing, sneezing and hyperaemic of the conjunctiva are very often seen as the clinical signs. Pathological lesions are often found as inflammation of respiratory organs and more specific lesions are seen as inflammation and thickening of the airsac membranes with foci cheesy materials scattered around the airsacs. Diagnosis of CRD can be made by clinical symptoms, serology examination dan isolation of MG. Treatment, prevention and controls of CRD have been carried out for years, but cases of CRD are still present up to now. The MGTS11 vaccine as the third generation of CRD vaccine was reported to be effective for controlling CRD of chickens and potentially used as a tool for eradication programme of CRD in the future.

  17. HEART DISEASE IN CHILDREN WITH RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Babachenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The link between heart disease and infectious pathogens is well known. Despite the high frequency of cardiac pathology in infectious diseases, it is rarely diagnosed because of lack of specific clinical  and  laboratory  symptoms. It is especially  difficult to diagnose in  children. Airborne  infections in the structure of infectious morbidity of children occupy a leading place.The aim of this work was to study the nature of the lesions of the heart  in children suffering from acute infection of the respiratory tract.Materials and  methods: 341 children with acute respiratory infection of moderate severity were surveyed by a method of ECG dispersion mapping. Cardiac  pathology has not previously been determined in these children. Signs of disease of the heart was identified in 76 children (22%. Further study included instrumental (ECG, ECHO-KG,  daily monitoring of ECG, biochemical and  etiological (ELISA, PCR, immunocytochemical research  methods for determining the nature of the damage to the heart and the etiology of the disease.Results. Myocarditis was diagnosed in 2%  of children, a violation of repolarization – in 21%,  heart  rhythm disorders  – in 35%  (AV – blockade in 4%.  Most  often  signs  of heart disease were detected in children with Epstein-Barr virus (32%, streptococcal (28%, cytomegalovirus (25%, herpesvirus type  6 infection (24%. Pathogens from the  group of acute respiratory virus infections were identified in 28%, enterovirus – in  10%,  Haemophilus influenzae – in  10%, Mycoplasma pneumonia – in 10%,  Pneumococcus – in 9%, Chlamydia – in 9%, Parvovirus B19 – in 6%.Conclusion. Sensitive screening test  to  detect cardiac pathology is the method of ECG dispersion mapping. Heart damage in children with respiratory diseases in 60% of cases is associated with  mixed infections. Timely  diagnosis of lesions of the heart in infectious diseases in children allows to adjust the

  18. Isolation and properties of reovirus from cattle in an outbreak of acute respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurogi, H; Inaba, Y; Tanaka, Y; Ito, Y; Sato, K; Omori, T

    1976-01-01

    A cytopathogenic virus was isolated in the primary culture of bovine kidney cells from a nasal swab of affected calves in an outbreak of acute respiratory disease in Japan in 1971. It agglutinated human type O erythrocytes and produced cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Viral replication was inhibited by 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine, indicating that the viral nucleic acid was RNA. The virus was resistant to ether, chloroform, sodium deoxycholate, and acid, and passed readily through Sartorius' membrane filter 100 nm in pore size, but not through the filter 50 nm in pore size. Electron microscopy showed many spherical particles 60 approximately 75 nm in diameter with a double-layered capsid in a sample taken at a buoyant density of 1.34 produced by CaCl equilibrium centrifugation. The virus suspended in 1M MgCl2 solution was stable against heating at 50 degrees C for 30 minutes, but not against freezing at -20 degrees C for 60 minutes. The virus was resistant to, and increased in infectivity after, treatment with 0.063 approximately 1.0% trypsin. These properties were consistent with those established for the reoviruses. Most affected cattle showed a significant rise of antibody titer against reovirus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus, whereas only a few of them presented a serological evidence for recent infection with parainfluenza virus type 3, bovine adenovirus type 7, and bovine parovirus.

  19. Respiratory diseases registries in the national registry of rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara Gallego, Beatriz; Abaitua Borda, Ignacio; Galán Gil, Genaro; Castillo Villegas, Diego; Casanova Espinosa, Álvaro; Cano Jiménez, Esteban; Ojanguren Arranz, Iñigo; Posada de la Paz, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the general characteristics, objectives and organizational aspects of the registries of rare respiratory diseases included in the National Registry of Rare Diseases of the Research Institute for Rare Diseases (ISCIII), in order to publicize their existence and encourage the participation of professionals. Information is collected on the following conditions: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, idiopathic tracheal stenosis, adult pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis, lymphangioleiomyomatosis, alveolar proteinosis, and sarcoidosis. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular and Phylogenetic Analyses of Bovine Rhinovirus Type 2 Shows it is Closely Related to Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine rhinovirus 2 (BRV2), a causative agent of respiratory disease in cattle, is currently an unclassified species tentatively assigned to the genus rhinovirus in the family Picornaviridae. A nearly full-length cDNA of the BRV2 genome was cloned and the nucleotide sequence from the poly(C) to the ...

  1. Neonatal Calf Infection with Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Drawing Parallels to the Disease in Human Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A. Reinhardt

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common viral cause of childhood acute lower respiratory tract infections. It is estimated that RSV infections result in more than 100,000 deaths annually worldwide. Bovine RSV is a cause of enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia in nursing beef calves. Furthermore, bovine RSV plays a significant role in bovine respiratory disease complex, the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality among feedlot cattle. Infection of calves with bovine RSV shares features in common with RSV infection in children, such as an age-dependent susceptibility. In addition, comparable microscopic lesions consisting of bronchiolar neutrophilic infiltrates, epithelial cell necrosis, and syncytial cell formation are observed. Further, our studies have shown an upregulation of pro-inflammatory mediators in RSV-infected calves, including IL-12p40 and CXCL8 (IL-8. This finding is consistent with increased levels of IL-8 observed in children with RSV bronchiolitis. Since rodents lack IL-8, neonatal calves can be useful for studies of IL-8 regulation in response to RSV infection. We have recently found that vitamin D in milk replacer diets can be manipulated to produce calves differing in circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. The results to date indicate that although the vitamin D intracrine pathway is activated during RSV infection, pro-inflammatory mediators frequently inhibited by the vitamin D intacrine pathway in vitro are, in fact, upregulated or unaffected in lungs of infected calves. This review will summarize available data that provide parallels between bovine RSV infection in neonatal calves and human RSV in infants.

  2. Neonatal Calf Infection with Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Drawing Parallels to the Disease in Human Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Randy E.; McGill, Jodi L.; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Lippolis, John D.; Reinhardt, Timothy A.; Nonnecke, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of childhood acute lower respiratory tract infections. It is estimated that RSV infections result in more than 100,000 deaths annually worldwide. Bovine RSV is a cause of enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia in nursing beef calves. Furthermore, bovine RSV plays a significant role in bovine respiratory disease complex, the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality among feedlot cattle. Infection of calves with bovine RSV shares features in common with RSV infection in children, such as an age-dependent susceptibility. In addition, comparable microscopic lesions consisting of bronchiolar neutrophilic infiltrates, epithelial cell necrosis, and syncytial cell formation are observed. Further, our studies have shown an upregulation of pro-inflammatory mediators in RSV-infected calves, including IL-12p40 and CXCL8 (IL-8). This finding is consistent with increased levels of IL-8 observed in children with RSV bronchiolitis. Since rodents lack IL-8, neonatal calves can be useful for studies of IL-8 regulation in response to RSV infection. We have recently found that vitamin D in milk replacer diets can be manipulated to produce calves differing in circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. The results to date indicate that although the vitamin D intracrine pathway is activated during RSV infection, pro-inflammatory mediators frequently inhibited by the vitamin D intacrine pathway in vitro are, in fact, upregulated or unaffected in lungs of infected calves. This review will summarize available data that provide parallels between bovine RSV infection in neonatal calves and human RSV in infants. PMID:23342375

  3. Is Previous Respiratory Disease a Risk Factor for Lung Cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denholm, Rachel; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt; Stücker, Isabelle; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Brenner, Darren R; De Matteis, Sara; Boffetta, Paolo; Guida, Florence; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Siemiatycki, Jack; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Zaridze, David; Field, John K; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Dumitru, Rodica Stanescu; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Kendzia, Benjamin; Peters, Susan; Behrens, Thomas; Vermeulen, Roel; Brüning, Thomas; Kromhout, Hans; Olsson, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Previous respiratory diseases have been associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Respiratory conditions often co-occur and few studies have investigated multiple conditions simultaneously. Objectives: Investigate lung cancer risk associated with chronic bronchitis, emphysema,

  4. bovine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of various breeds under local conditions of management. (Hale, 1974b). AdditionaIly, this procedure has been used to assess the production of LH by the bovine anterior pituitary in vitro and to study the relationships between this production and the activity of the pineal- hypothalamic axis (Hayes, Knight & Symington, 1974;.

  5. Association of herd BRSV and BHV-1 seroprevalence with respiratory disease and reproductive performance in adult dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raaperi Kerli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to detect the associations between bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1 status of a herd and respiratory disease (BRD occurrence and reproductive performance in pregnant heifers and cows. The association between management-related factors and higher BRD occurrence was also estimated. Methods Serum samples, collected from cows and youngstock from 103 dairy cattle herds, were analyzed for antibodies against BHV-1, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV, bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV, and Mycoplasma bovis. A questionnaire was used to collect data concerning herd management factors and reproductive performance, as well as the occurrence of clinical signs of respiratory disease in the last two years, as evaluated by the veterinarian or farm manager. Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA and logistic regression analysis were performed to identify and quantify the risk factors. Results A low to moderate prevalence (1-49% of BRSV antibodies among youngstock was associated with a high occurrence of respiratory disease (OR = 6.2, p = 0.010 in cows and in-calf heifers. Employees of the farm may participate in the spread of such disease. Larger herd size, loose-housing of cows, housing youngstock separately from cows until pregnancy, and purchasing new animals were factors possibly related to a high occurrence of respiratory disease symptoms in pregnant heifers and cows. The highest risk of abortions (> 1.3% and increased insemination index (number of inseminations per pregnancy (> 1.9 occurred in herds with a moderate prevalence of BHV-1 antibodies (1-49% in cows. Conclusions BHV-1 was not associated with acute respiratory disease in adult dairy cattle, however was significantly related to reproductive performance. BRSV possesses the main role in respiratory disease complex in adult dairy cattle.

  6. Nanoparticle-based therapy for respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADRIANA L. DA SILVA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is an emerging science with the potential to create new materials and strategies involving manipulation of matter at the nanometer scale (<100 nm. With size-dependent properties, nanoparticles have introduced a new paradigm in pharmacotherapy – the possibility of cell-targeted drug delivery with minimal systemic side effects and toxicity. The present review provides a summary of published findings, especially regarding to nanoparticle formulations for lung diseases. The available data have shown some benefits with nanoparticle-based therapy in the development of the disease and lung remodeling in respiratory diseases. However, there is a wide gap between the concepts of nanomedicine and the published experimental data and clinical reality. In addition, studies are still required to determine the potential of nanotherapy and the systemic toxicity of nanomaterials for future human use.

  7. Phytotherapy of Acute Respiratory Viral Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.B. Ershova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays phytotherapy is increasingly being implemented into medical practice, especially for the prevention and treatment of many diseases. Acute respiratory viral infections are most common in childhood and in adults. Acute rhinitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, sinusitis, nasopharyngitis and acute laryngitis refer to diseases of the upper respiratory tract. The main reason for respiratory diseases in recurrent respiratory infection child is disorders of mucociliary and immune protection. The therapeutic value of medicinal plants is determined by their biologically active substances. The method of application of phytotherpy is an integral part of traditional medicine. Herbal medicine can be used at home and does not require special equipment. The main indications for the herbal medicine use in pediatrics are the initial stage of the disease as a primary method of treatment due to mild and low toxicity; as a supporting treatment for enhancing the protective forces of the child’s body during the disease deterioration. During the recovery period herbal medicine again occupies a leading position, especially in case of chronic diseases because it can be used for a long time and is well combined with synthetic drugs. The terms of appointment of herbs for children: prescription of medicinal plants for children must be individual according to indications, taking into account the child’s age; it is recommended to take into account the form and nature of the course of the main disease and comorbidities as well; at the initial stage of the treatment it is better to use some medicinal plants or species consisting of 2–3 plants and in the future a more complex composition; therapy with medicinal plants requires a long period to be used use, especially in chronic diseases; in the treatment of chronic diseases a good effect preventive courses of herbal medicine was revealed, which are appointed during seasonal exacerbations; in case of intolerance

  8. (Npro) protein of bovine viral d

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an economically important pathogen of cattle and sheep, and causes significant respiratory and reproductive disease worldwide. Bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1 (BVDV-1), BVDV-2 along with the border disease virus (BDV) and classical swine fever virus (CSFV) belong to the genus ...

  9. Abnormal respiratory drive in vibroacoustic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, João Reis; Albuquerque e Sousa, José; Foreld, Peter; Antunes, Marco; Cardoso, Sofia; Alves-Pereira, Mariana; Castelo Branco, Nuno A A

    2006-01-01

    Central nervous system disorders in workers exposed to low frequency noise (LFN, vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is defined as the systemic pathology caused by excessive exposure to LFN. The respiratory tract continues to be under heavy scrutiny in both LFN-exposed humans and animal models and has been confirmed as a major target for LFN-induced damage. Given that both the respiratory and central nervous systems were compromised in these workers, it became pertinent to investigate the status of the neurological control of breathing in VAD patients. The P- 0.1 value, a measure of the suction pressure developed at the mouth 0.1 seconds after the start of inspiration, depends on the respiratory centres and the autonomic nervous system pathway of the neural control of respiratory function. By rebreathing CO2, (6% in air) normal individuals present an average seven-fold increase in P0.1 (CO2) as compared to basal P- 0.1. Twenty-two male VAD patients (ave. age 50.5 +/- 8.5 years, range: 36-66 years) underwent the P0.1(CO2) index respiratory drive tests, as well as standard pulmonary function tests. Seven individuals (ave. age 42.4 +/-14 years, range: 25- 61 years) with reduced LFN exposure served as controls. Pulmonary function tests were normal in both VAD patients and controls. The P0.1 (CO2) in- dex was below average value in VAD patients (average: 22.9%) while it presented normal values in the control group (average > 60%). In the involuntary response to increased PCO2 levels, central chemoreceptors are responsible for 70% of the ventilatory stimulus. In VAD patients, this dysfunction may originate in the brainstem. This is corroborated by the fact that VAD patients register abnormal values for auditory brainstem evoked potentials, and disclose lesions with magnetic resonance imaging. The neurological control of breathing is compromised in VAD patients. The P0.1 (CO2) index may be a useful clinical indicator for VAD diagnosis and follow-up.

  10. Physical training in chronic respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Cecilia Vargas

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Title: Exercise Training in Chronic RespiratoryDisease.Patients with chronic pulmonary disease havean inactive lifestyle with a progressive viciouscycle of physical inactivity, deconditioning andmore dyspnea. Physical Therapy attempts toimprove cardiopulmonary function andphysical conditioning. In PulmonaryRehabilitation, exercise training is consideredthe most important aspect because improvesaerobic exercise capacity and skeletal muscle function, and reduces breathlessness. Endurancetraining can include lower extremity trainingwith treadmill or cycle ergometer and upperlimbs exercises specialy in patients that haveproblems with arms movement. The use of highintensity training has showed better results,including less dyspnea and more functionalcapacity.Complementary therapies include ventilatoryassistance with pressure support or proportionalventilatory assistance during training, anabolichormones, nutritional support and functionalelectric stimulation.

  11. APPLICATION OF PIDOTIMOD FOR OFTEN RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS PROPHYLAXIS IN CHILDREN WITH ALLERGIC RESPIRATORY DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Gaiduk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of pidotimod application in children with often respiratory infections are presented in the review and updated with the data collected by St. Petersburg Allergologic Society. The course application of pidotimod in children with allergic respiratory diseases (allergic rhinitis, bronchial asthma is effective for often respiratory infections prophylaxis. Good medication tolerability and safety was noted in children with concomitant allergic diseases.

  12. Infection of the upper respiratory tract of hamsters by the bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 BN-1 strain expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Takashi; Minakuchi, Moeko; Sagai, Mami; Kokuho, Takehiro; Konishi, Misako; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Takeuchi, Kaoru

    2015-02-01

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is an important pathogen associated with bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). We have generated a recombinant BPIV3 expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (rBPIV3-EGFP) based on the BN-1 strain isolated in Japan. After intranasal infection of hamsters with rBPIV3-EGFP, EGFP fluorescence was detected in the upper respiratory tract including the nasal turbinates, pharynx, larynx, and trachea. In the nasal turbinates, rBPIV3-EGFP attained high titers (>10(6) TCID50/g of tissue) 2-4 days after infection. Ciliated epithelial cells in the nasal turbinates and trachea were infected with rBPIV3-EGFP. Histopathological analysis indicated that mucosal epithelial cells in bronchi were shed by 6 days after infection, leaving non-ciliated cells, which may have increased susceptibility to bacterial infection leading to the development of BRDC. These data indicate that rBPIV3-EGFP infection of hamsters is a useful small animal model for studying the development of BPIV3-associated BRDC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of levels and duration of detection of antibodies to bovine viral diarrhea virus 1, bovine viral diarrhea virus 2, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus 1, and bovine parainfluenza virus 3 in calves fed maternal colostrum or a colostrum-replacement product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Manuel F; Walz, Paul H; Haines, Deborah M; Passler, Thomas; Earleywine, Thomas; Palomares, Roberto A; Riddell, Kay P; Galik, Patricia; Zhang, Yijing; Givens, M Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Colostrum-replacement products are an alternative to provide passive immunity to neonatal calves; however, their ability to provide adequate levels of antibodies recognizing respiratory viruses has not been described. The objective of this study was to compare the serum levels of IgG at 2 d of age and the duration of detection of antibodies to bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 (BVDV-2), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), and bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3) in calves fed maternal colostrum (MC) or a colostrum replacement (CR) at birth. Forty newborn male Holstein calves were assigned to the CR or the MC group. Group CR (n = 20) received 2 packets of colostrum replacement (100 g of IgG per 470-g packet), while group MC (n = 20) received 3.8 L of maternal colostrum. Blood samples for detection of IgG and virus antibodies were collected from each calf at birth, at 2 and 7 d, and monthly until the calves became seronegative. Calves in the MC group had greater IgG concentrations at 2 d of age. The apparent efficiency of absorption of IgG was greater in the MC group than in the CR group, although the difference was not significant. Calves in the CR group had greater concentrations of BVDV neutralizing antibodies during the first 4 mo of life. The levels of antibodies to BRSV, BHV-1, and BPIV-3 were similar in the 2 groups. The mean time to seronegativity was similar for each virus in the 2 groups; however, greater variation was observed in the antibody levels and in the duration of detection of immunity in the MC group than in the CR group. Thus, the CR product provided calves with more uniform levels and duration of antibodies to common bovine respiratory viruses.

  14. Respiratory disease and the role of oral bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac S. Gomes-Filho

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between oral health and systemic conditions, including the association between poor oral hygiene, periodontal disease, and respiratory disease, has been increasingly debated over recent decades. A considerable number of hypotheses have sought to explain the possible role of oral bacteria in the pathogenesis of respiratory diseases, and some clinical and epidemiological studies have found results favoring such an association. This review discusses the effect of oral bacteria on respiratory disease, briefly introduces the putative biological mechanisms involved, and the main factors that could contribute to this relationship. It also describes the role of oral care for individuals who are vulnerable to respiratory infections.

  15. Sites of replication of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in naturally infected calves as determined by in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, B.; Uttenthal, Åse; Tegtmeier, C.

    1996-01-01

    Replication of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) was studied in three naturally infected calves by in situ hybridization using strand-specific RNA probes. One of the calves was a 5-month-old Friesian, the other two calves were a 3-month-old and a 2-week-old Jersey. Two Jersey calves, 3...... months and 3 weeks of age, served as controls. Replication of BRSV took place in the luminal lining of the respiratory tract. In one of the BRSV infected animals (calf No. 1), replication was especially seen in the bronchi, whereas in the two other animals (calf Nos. 2 and 3) replication of BRSV...... was detected. In tissue outside the respiratory tract neither BRSV antigen nor replication of BRSV could be demonstrated....

  16. Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) expressing the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) attachment and fusion proteins protects hamsters from challenge with human PIV3 and RSV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Aurelia A; Mitiku, Misrach; MacPhail, Mia

    2003-08-01

    Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are the main causes of ubiquitous acute respiratory diseases of infancy and early childhood, causing 20-25 % of pneumonia and 45-50 % of bronchiolitis in hospitalized children. The primary goal of this study was to create an effective and safe RSV vaccine based on utilizing attenuated bovine PIV3 (bPIV3) as a virus vector backbone. bPIV3 had been evaluated in human clinical trials and was shown to be attenuated and immunogenic in children as young as 2 months of age. The ability of bPIV3 to function as a virus vaccine vector was explored further by introducing the RSV attachment (G) and fusion (F) genes into the bPIV3 RNA genome. The resulting virus, bPIV3/RSV(I), contained an insert of 2900 nt, comprising two translationally competent transcription units. Despite this increase in genetic material, the virus replicated to high titres in Vero cells. This recombinant virus expressed the RSV G and F proteins sufficiently to evoke a protective immune response in hamsters upon challenge with RSV or human PIV3 and to elicit RSV neutralizing and PIV3 haemagglutinin inhibition serum antibodies. In effect, a bivalent vaccine was produced that could protect vaccinees from RSV as well as PIV3. Such a vaccine would vastly reduce the respiratory disease burden, the associated hospitalization costs and, most importantly, decrease morbidity and mortality of infants, immunocompromised individuals and the elderly.

  17. Acute Respiratory Distress: from syndrome to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal-Fernández, P; Correger, E; Villanueva, J; Rios, F

    2016-04-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is currently one of the most important critical entities given its high incidence, rate of mortality, long-term sequelae and non-specific pharmacological treatment. The histological hallmark of ARDS is diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Approximately 50% of ARDS patients present DAD, the rest is made up of a heterogeneous group of histological patterns, many of which correspond to a well-recognized disease. For that reason, if these patterns could be diagnosed, patients could benefit from a treatment. Recently, the effect of DAD in clinical and analytical evolution of ARDS has been demonstrated, so the classical approach to ARDS as an entity defined solely by clinical, radiological and gasometrical variables should be reconsidered. This narrative review aims to examine the need to evolve from the concept of ARDS as a syndrome to ARDS as a specific disease. So we have raised 4 critical questions: a) What is a disease?; b) what is DAD?; c) how is DAD considered according to ARDS definition?, and d) what is the relationship between ARDS and DAD? Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  18. The methylome and virulence of bovine respiratory disease bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the advent of single molecule, real-time (SMRT®) sequencing, it is now possible to study complete microbial epigenomes. It has been known for decades that methylation and other types of epigenetic modifications in bacteria are responsible for much more than restriction-modification mechanics, b...

  19. Chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Ellen Fischer; Hannerz, Harald; Tüchsen, Finn

    2013-01-01

    To estimate standardised hospitalisation ratios (SHR) for chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers in Denmark, 1995-2009.......To estimate standardised hospitalisation ratios (SHR) for chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers in Denmark, 1995-2009....

  20. Respiratory Diseases in Children: studies in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.J.M. Uijen (Hans)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe work presented in this thesis covers various aspects of the epidemiology, diagnosis and management of various respiratory symptoms and diseases in children frequently encountered in general practice. These respiratory tract symptoms and diseases can be categorized into symptoms and

  1. Animal models of human respiratory syncytial virus disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bem, Reinout A.; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2011-01-01

    Infection with the human pneumovirus pathogen, respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), causes a wide spectrum of respiratory disease, notably among infants and the elderly. Laboratory animal studies permit detailed experimental modeling of hRSV disease and are therefore indispensable in the search for

  2. Chronic Respiratory Diseases of School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, John P.

    1976-01-01

    The author examines the problems of chronic respiratory disease in school-age children from a medical viewpoint, including recognition and diagnosis, commonly encountered diseases, their effect on participation in physical exercise, emotional factors, medication, and emergency care. (MB)

  3. Gene editing as a promising approach for respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yichun; Liu, Yang; Su, Zhenlei; Ma, Yana; Ren, Chonghua; Zhao, Runzhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2018-01-04

    Respiratory diseases, which are leading causes of mortality and morbidity in the world, are dysfunctions of the nasopharynx, the trachea, the bronchus, the lung and the pleural cavity. Symptoms of chronic respiratory diseases, such as cough, sneezing and difficulty breathing, may seriously affect the productivity, sleep quality and physical and mental well-being of patients, and patients with acute respiratory diseases may have difficulty breathing, anoxia and even life-threatening respiratory failure. Respiratory diseases are generally heterogeneous, with multifaceted causes including smoking, ageing, air pollution, infection and gene mutations. Clinically, a single pulmonary disease can exhibit more than one phenotype or coexist with multiple organ disorders. To correct abnormal function or repair injured respiratory tissues, one of the most promising techniques is to correct mutated genes by gene editing, as some gene mutations have been clearly demonstrated to be associated with genetic or heterogeneous respiratory diseases. Zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) and clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) systems are three innovative gene editing technologies developed recently. In this short review, we have summarised the structure and operating principles of the ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 systems and their preclinical and clinical applications in respiratory diseases. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Detection of antibodies and risk factors for infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus 3 in dual-purpose farms in Colima, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Chávez, Daniel; Segura-Correa, José C; García-Márquez, Luís Jorge; Pescador-Rubio, Alfonso; Valdivia-Flores, Arturo Gerardo

    2012-10-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out, from November 2007 to March 2008, to estimate the prevalence of and to determine risk factors associated with bovine syncytial respiratory virus (BRSV) and parainfluenza 3 virus (PIV3) in dual-purpose herds in Colima, México. One hundred and seventy-six sera from 33 herds for PIV3 and 232 sera from 44 herds for BRSV were used. Sera were analyzed by indirect ELISA for the detection of antibodies against BRSV and PIV3 in cattle herds to determine the seroprevalence of respiratory diseases. The apparent and true prevalences for PIV3 were 60.8% and 54.4% and for BRSV 52.2% and 50.8%, respectively. The percentage of herds showing at least one positive animal was 78.7% for PIV3, and 93.2% for BRSV. Age (≤ 12, 13-48, and >48 months old) and respiratory signs (no, yes) showed significant association (P < 0.05) with PIV3 and age with BRSV. This study showed that animals were exposed to both viruses and that age was the main risk factor. The need to establish new vaccination plans to effectively protect cattle against those infections in the state of Colima, Mexico is suggested.

  5. Incidence of skin and respiratory diseases among Danish hairdressing apprentices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss-Skiftesvik, Majken H.; Winther, Lone; Johnsen, Claus R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hairdressing is one of the professions with the highest risk of occupational skin and respiratory diseases. The incidence of these diseases in hairdressing apprentices has been studied only sparsely. Objective: To determine the incidence of skin and respiratory diseases in hairdressing.......8% of the hairdressing apprentices had left the trade, and 70.3% of these had left because of health complaints. The most frequently reported reasons for leaving were musculoskeletal pain (47.4%) and skin diseases (47.4%), followed by respiratory symptoms (23.7%). Conclusions: Hairdressing apprentices are at increased...

  6. New and emerging pathogens in canine infectious respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestnall, S L; Mitchell, J A; Walker, C A; Erles, K; Brownlie, J

    2014-03-01

    Canine infectious respiratory disease is a common, worldwide disease syndrome of multifactorial etiology. This review presents a summary of 6 viruses (canine respiratory coronavirus, canine pneumovirus, canine influenza virus, pantropic canine coronavirus, canine bocavirus, and canine hepacivirus) and 2 bacteria (Streptococcus zooepidemicus and Mycoplasma cynos) that have been associated with respiratory disease in dogs. For some pathogens a causal role is clear, whereas for others, ongoing research aims to uncover their pathogenesis and contribution to this complex syndrome. Etiology, clinical disease, pathogenesis, and epidemiology are described for each pathogen, with an emphasis on recent discoveries or novel findings.

  7. [Neuromuscular disease: respiratory clinical assessment and follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Villa Asensi, J R; Luna Paredes, M C; Osona Rodríguez de Torres, F B; Peña Zarza, J A; Larramona Carrera, H; Costa Colomer, J

    2014-10-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disease are an important group at risk of frequently suffering acute or chronic respiratory failure, which is their main cause of death. They require follow-up by a pediatric respiratory medicine specialist from birth or diagnosis in order to confirm the diagnosis and treat any respiratory complications within a multidisciplinary context. The ventilatory support and the cough assistance have improved the quality of life and long-term survival for many of these patients. In this paper, the authors review the pathophysiology, respiratory function evaluation, sleep disorders, and the most frequent respiratory complications in neuromuscular diseases. The various treatments used, from a respiratory medicine point of view, will be analyzed in a next paper. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Respiratory Protection against Pandemic and Epidemic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Ilaria; Choi, Hyo-Jick

    2017-10-01

    Respiratory protection against airborne pathogens is crucial for pandemic/epidemic preparedness in the context of personal protection, healthcare systems, and governance. We expect that the development of technologies that overcome the existing challenges in current respiratory protective devices will lead to a timely and effective response to the next outbreak. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Expert Patient and Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Philippe Boulet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “expert patient” has been developed in the last two decades to define a patient who has a significant knowledge of his/her disease and treatment in addition to self-management skills. However, this concept has evolved over the last years, and these patients are now considered, not only to be more efficient in the management of their own condition and communicating effectively with health professionals, but to also act as educators for other patients and as resources for the last, provide feedback on care delivery, and be involved in the production and implementation of practice guidelines, as well as in the development and conduct of research initiatives. There are some barriers, however, to the integration of this new contributor to the health care team, and specific requirements need to be considered for an individual to be considered as an expert. This new player has, however, a potentially important role to improve current care, particularly in respiratory health.

  10. Effect of physiotherapy in respiratory diseases during healing stays

    OpenAIRE

    Schneebergerová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Title: Effect of physiotherapy in respiratory diseases during healing stays Objective: The main objective of this work is to analyze the importance of physiotherapy as one of the treatments used in the care of pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Method: In the theoretic part of the dissertation anatomy and physiology of the respiratory tract, respiratory biomechanics, problems of asthma bronchiale, possibilities of asthma treatment, prevention and improvement of quality of life in child...

  11. Prospective evaluation for respiratory pathogens in children with sickle cell disease and acute respiratory illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Wang, Winfred C; Gaur, Aditya; Smith, Teresa; Gu, Zhengming; Kang, Guolian; Leung, Wing; Hayden, Randall T

    2014-03-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV), human coronavirus (hCoV), human bocavirus (hBoV), and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infections in children with sickle cell disease have not been well studied. Nasopharyngeal wash specimens were prospectively collected from 60 children with sickle cell disease and acute respiratory illness, over a 1-year period. Samples were tested with multiplexed-PCR, using an automated system for nine respiratory viruses, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Bordetella pertussis. Clinical characteristics and distribution of respiratory viruses in patients with and without acute chest syndrome (ACS) were evaluated. A respiratory virus was detected in 47 (78%) patients. Nine (15%) patients had ACS; a respiratory virus was detected in all of them. The demographic characteristics of patients with and without ACS were similar. HRV was the most common virus, detected in 29 of 47 (62%) patients. Logistic regression showed no association between ACS and detection of HRV, hCoV, hBoV, hMPV, and other respiratory pathogens. Co-infection with at least one additional respiratory virus was seen in 14 (30%) infected patients, and was not significantly higher in patients with ACS (P = 0.10). Co-infections with more than two respiratory viruses were seen in seven patients, all in patients without ACS. Bacterial pathogens were not detected. HRV was the most common virus detected in children with sickle cell disease and acute respiratory illness, and was not associated with increased morbidity. Larger prospective studies with asymptomatic controls are needed to study the association of these emerging respiratory viruses with ACS in children with sickle cell disease. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Respiratory squamous cell carcinomas in vibroacoustic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis Ferreira, José; Mendes, Carla P; Alves-Pereira, Mariana; Castelo Branco, Nuno A A

    2006-01-01

    In 1987, the autopsy of a vibroacoustic disease (VAD) patient disclosed two tumours: a renal cell carcinoma and a malignant glioma in the brain. Since 1987, malignancy in VAD patients has been under close surveillance. To date, in a universe of 945 individuals, there are 46 cases of malignancies, of which 11 are multiple. Of the 11 cases of respiratory tract tumours, all were squamous cell carcinomas (SqCC). This report focuses on the morphological features of these tumours. Tumour fragments were collected (endoscopic biopsy or surgery) from 11 male VAD patients (ave. age: 58+/-9 years, 3 non-smokers): 2 in glottis and 9 in the lung. In the 3 non-smokers, 2 had lung tumours and 1 had a glottis tumour. All were employed as or retired aircraft technicians, military or commercial pilots. Fragments were fixed either for light and electron microscopy. Immunohistochemistry studies used chromagranine and synaptophysine staining. All lung tumours were located in the upper right lobe bronchi and were histologically poorly differentiated SqCC (Figs. 1, 2). The search with neuroendocrine markers was negative. The average age of tumour onset in helicopter pilots was below 50 years old while for the other professional groups it was above 50. Nine patients are deceased. The 2 surviving patients are heavy smokers (> 2 packs/day). Smoking habits had no influence on tumour outcome and progression. Epidemiological studies indicate that squamous cell carcinomas account for approximately 40% of all lung tumours in men. It seems to be highly relevant that all VAD patient respiratory tract tumours are squamous cell carcinomas. It is not surprising that helicopter pilots are the ones who are affected the earliest because previous studies have shown that helicopter pilots exhibited the highest values for the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges. Generally, epidemiological tumor studies do not take histological tumor type into account, but given the results herein, it would seem of the

  13. 76 FR 28789 - Draft Alert Entitled “Preventing Occupational Respiratory Disease From Dampness in Office...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-18

    ... Respiratory Disease From Dampness in Office Buildings, Schools, and Other Nonindustrial Buildings'' AGENCY... Occupational Respiratory Disease from Dampness in Office Buildings, Schools, and other Nonindustrial Buildings... is to provide workers and employers with information necessary for prevention of respiratory disease...

  14. Nasal isolation of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida as predictors of respiratory disease in shipped calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J D; Holland, B P; Step, D L; Payton, M E; Confer, A W

    2015-04-01

    Three hundred ninety five calves were purchased from sale barns and delivered to the Willard Sparks Beef Research Center. Nasal swabs were collected to determine if presence of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida in the upper respiratory tract (URT) can facilitate diagnosis of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Samples were collected at arrival and at treatment for BRD. Clinically healthy control calves were sampled at time of treatment of sick calves. M. haemolytica was more commonly isolated from calves at treatment than at time of arrival or from control calves. M. haemolytica was more common in calves requiring treatment than in those never treated. Need for treatment and number of treatments were negatively associated with average daily gain, supporting the accuracy of diagnosis. These results suggest that URT sampling, when combined with clinical diagnosis, may assist in providing greater diagnostic accuracy, improving ability to evaluate risk factors, interventions, and treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Imaging of respiratory muscles in neuromuscular disease: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlaar, L; Ciet, P; van der Ploeg, A T; Brusse, E; van der Beek, N A M E; Wielopolski, P A; de Bruijne, M; Tiddens, H A W M; van Doorn, P A

    2017-11-24

    Respiratory muscle weakness frequently occurs in patients with neuromuscular disease. Measuring respiratory function with standard pulmonary function tests provides information about the contribution of all respiratory muscles, the lungs and airways. Imaging potentially enables the study of different respiratory muscles, including the diaphragm, separately. In this review, we provide an overview of imaging techniques used to study respiratory muscles in neuromuscular disease. We identified 26 studies which included a total of 573 patients with neuromuscular disease. Imaging of respiratory muscles was divided into static and dynamic techniques. Static techniques comprise chest radiography, B-mode (brightness mode) ultrasound, CT and MRI, and are used to assess the position and thickness of the diaphragm and the other respiratory muscles. Dynamic techniques include fluoroscopy, M-mode (motion mode) ultrasound and MRI, used to assess diaphragm motion in one or more directions. We discuss how these imaging techniques relate with spirometric values and whether these can be used to study the contribution of the different respiratory muscles in patients with neuromuscular disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. [Clinical features of respiratory diseases in late preterm neonates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yun-Pu; Tong, Xiao-Mei; Han, Tong-Yan; Tang, Ya-Nan

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical features of respiratory diseases of late preterm neonates. Six hundred and thirty late preterm infant(gestational age: 34~36+6weeks),4401 cases of term infants and 328 early preterm infants who were born at the obstetrical department of Peking University 3rd Hospital from January 2009 to December 2010 were enrolled. Among them 84 late preterm infants, 135 term infants and 182 early preterm infants developed respiratory diseases. The incidence of respiratory diseases,clinical features and the severity of the diseases were compared among the three groups. The incidence and mortality rates of respiratory diseases and the percentage of severe cases were significantly higher in the late preterm group than in the term group, but lower than in the early preterm group (Parterial oxyhemoglobin saturation, systolic arterial pressure, 5 minute Apgar score and gestational age, and increased blood urea nitrogen, heart rate and respiratory rate. Late preterm infants are more likely to develop respiratory diseases than term infants, and to develop a more severe condition and need a more intensive respiratory support treatment. Tachypnea is a common presentation of dyspnea in late preterm infants and occurs earlier than in term infants but later than in early preterm infants. It may usually indicate a serious condition when dyspnea, abnormal heart rate and blood pressure, and multisystem damages occur in late preterm infants.

  17. Treatment of congestion in upper respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli O Meltzer

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Eli O Meltzer1, Fernan Caballero2, Leonard M Fromer3, John H Krouse4, Glenis Scadding51Allergy and Asthma Medical Group and Research Center, San Diego, CA and Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, USA; 2Allergy and Clinical Immunology Service, Centro Medico-Docente La Trinidad, Caracas, Venezuela; 3David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, USA; 4Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, USA; 5Department of Allergy and Rhinology, Royal National TNE Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Congestion, as a symptom of upper respiratory tract diseases including seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis, acute and chronic rhinosinusitis, and nasal polyposis, is principally caused by mucosal inflammation. Though effective pharmacotherapy options exist, no agent is universally efficacious; therapeutic decisions must account for individual patient preferences. Oral H1-antihistamines, though effective for the common symptoms of allergic rhinitis, have modest decongestant action, as do leukotriene receptor antagonists. Intranasal antihistamines appear to improve congestion better than oral forms. Topical decongestants reduce congestion associated with allergic rhinitis, but local adverse effects make them unsuitable for long-term use. Oral decongestants show some efficacy against congestion in allergic rhinitis and the common cold, and can be combined with oral antihistamines. Intranasal corticosteroids have broad anti-inflammatory activities, are the most potent long-term pharmacologic treatment of congestion associated with allergic rhinitis, and show some congestion relief in rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. Immunotherapy and surgery may be used in some cases refractory to pharmacotherapy. Steps in congestion management include (1 diagnosis of the cause(s, (2 patient education and monitoring, (3 avoidance of environmental triggers where possible, (4 pharmacotherapy, and (5 immunotherapy

  18. Respiratory pathology in vibroacoustic disease: 25 years of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Nuno A A Castelo; Ferreira, José Reis; Alves-Pereira, Mariana

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory pathology induced by low frequency noise (LFN, vibroacoustic disease (VAD), a whole-body pathology caused by excessive exposure to LFN, respiratory pathology takes on specific features. Initially, respiratory pathology was not considered a con- sequence of LFN exposure; but today, LFN can be regarded as a major agent of disease that targets the respiratory system. The goal of this report is to put forth what is known to date on the clinical signs of respiratory pathology seen in VAD patients. Data from the past 25 years of research will be taken together and presented. In persons exposed to LFN on the job, respiratory complaints appear af- ter the first 4 years of professional activity. At this stage, they disappear during vacation periods or when the person is removed form his /her workstation for other reasons. With long-term exposure, more serious situations can arise, such as, atypical pleural effusion, respiratory insufficiency, fibrosis and tumours. There is no correlation with smoking habits. In LFN-exposed animal models, morphological changes of the pleura, and loss of the phagocytic ability of pleural mesothelial cells (explaining the atypical pleural effusions). Fibrotic lesions and neo-vascularization were observed along the entire respiratory tract. Fibrosis lesions and neovascularisation were observed through- out the respiratory tract of the animals seen. Pre-malignant lesions, metaplasia e displasia, were also identified. LFN is an agent of disease and the respiratory tract is one of its preferential targets. The respiratory pathology associated with VAD needs further in-depth studies in order to achieve a greater understanding, and develop methods of pharmaco- logical intervention.

  19. A Role for Neutrophils in Viral Respiratory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jeremy V; Jonsson, Colleen B

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are immune cells that are well known to be present during many types of lung diseases associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and may contribute to acute lung injury. Neutrophils are poorly studied with respect to viral infection, and specifically to respiratory viral disease. Influenza A virus (IAV) infection is the cause of a respiratory disease that poses a significant global public health concern. Influenza disease presents as a relatively mild and self-limiting although highly pathogenic forms exist. Neutrophils increase in the respiratory tract during infection with mild seasonal IAV, moderate and severe epidemic IAV infection, and emerging highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). During severe influenza pneumonia and HPAI infection, the number of neutrophils in the lower respiratory tract is correlated with disease severity. Thus, comparative analyses of the relationship between IAV infection and neutrophils provide insights into the relative contribution of host and viral factors that contribute to disease severity. Herein, we review the contribution of neutrophils to IAV disease pathogenesis and to other respiratory virus infections.

  20. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASE AS THE DEBUT OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Ischenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus — a chronic autoimmune disease that is often associated with infectious processes. The paper presents two clinical cases of systemic lupus erythematosus , debuted with acute respiratory infection.

  1. Neural Deficits Contribute to Respiratory Insufficiency in Pompe Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lara R. DeRuisseau; David D. Fuller; Kai Qiu; Keith C. DeRuisseau; William H. Donnelly; Cathryn Mah; Paul J. Reier; Barry J. Byrne; Kenneth I. Berns

    2009-01-01

    .... Respiratory dysfunction is a hallmark of the disease, muscle weakness has been viewed as the underlying cause, and the possibility of an associated neural contribution has not been evaluated previously...

  2. Occupational respiratory diseases in South Africa results from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occupational respiratory diseases in South Africa results from SORDSA, 1997- 1999. TM Esterhuizen, E Hnizdo, D Rees, UG Lalloo, D Kielkowski, EM van Schalkwyk, N White, FCA Smith, B Hoggins, T Curtis ...

  3. ORO-DENTAL PATHOLOGY - CHRONIC RESPIRATORY DISEASES CORRELATIONS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D Munteanu; D Vasincu; P Manea; C Gavrilescu

    2014-01-01

      One of the most common chronic respiratory diseases, incapacitating the development and quality of life of patients and directly correlated with oro-dental cavity is represented by asthma, a chronic...

  4. Advanced Role of Neutrophils in Common Respiratory Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jinping Liu; Zhiqiang Pang,; Guoqiang Wang; Xuewa Guan; Keyong Fang; Ziyan Wang; Fang Wang

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory diseases, always being a threat towards the health of people all over the world, are most tightly associated with immune system. Neutrophils serve as an important component of immune defense barrier linking innate and adaptive immunity. They participate in the clearance of exogenous pathogens and endogenous cell debris and play an essential role in the pathogenesis of many respiratory diseases. However, the pathological mechanism of neutrophils remains complex and obscure. The tra...

  5. Chimeric Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus with Attachment and Fusion Glycoproteins Replaced by Bovine Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase and Fusion Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stope, Matthias B.; Karger, Axel; Schmidt, Ulrike; Buchholz, Ursula J.

    2001-01-01

    Chimeric bovine respiratory syncytial viruses (BRSV) expressing glycoproteins of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV-3) instead of BRSV glycoproteins were generated from cDNA. In the BRSV antigenome cDNA, the open reading frames of the major BRSV glycoproteins, attachment protein G and fusion protein F, were replaced individually or together by those of the BPIV-3 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and/or fusion (F) glycoproteins. Recombinant virus could not be recovered from cDNA when the BRSV F open reading frame was replaced by the BPIV-3 F open reading frame. However, cDNA recovery of the chimeric virus rBRSV-HNF, with both glycoproteins replaced simultaneously, and of the chimeric virus rBRSV-HN, with the BRSV G protein replaced by BPIV-3 HN, was successful. The replication rates of both chimeras were similar to that of standard rBRSV. Moreover, rBRSV-HNF was neutralized by antibodies specific for BPIV-3, but not by antibodies specific to BRSV, demonstrating that the BRSV glycoproteins can be functionally replaced by BPIV-3 glycoproteins. In contrast, rBRSV-HN was neutralized by BRSV-specific antisera, but not by BPIV-3 specific sera, showing that infection of rBRSV-HN is mediated by BRSV F. Hemadsorption of cells infected with rBRSV-HNF and rBRSV-HN proved that BPIV-3 HN protein expressed by rBRSV is functional. Colocalization of the BPIV-3 glycoproteins with BRSV M protein was demonstrated by confocal laser scan microscopy. Moreover, protein analysis revealed that the BPIV-3 glycoproteins were present in chimeric virions. Taken together, these data indicate that the heterologous glycoproteins were not only expressed but were incorporated into the envelope of recombinant BRSV. Thus, the envelope glycoproteins derived from a member of the Respirovirus genus can together functionally replace their homologs in a Pneumovirus background. PMID:11533200

  6. Quality of Life and Economic Burden of Respiratory Disease in Asia-Pacific-Asia-Pacific Burden of Respiratory Diseases Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De Yun; Ghoshal, Aloke Gopal; Bin Abdul Muttalif, Abdul Razak; Lin, Horng-Chyuan; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak; Bagga, Shalini; Faruqi, Rab; Sajjan, Shiva; Brnabic, Alan J M; Dehle, Francis C; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2016-05-01

    Asia-Pacific Burden of Respiratory Diseases is a cross-sectional, observational study examining the burden of disease in adults with respiratory diseases across six countries. The aim of this study was to describe health care resource use (HCRU), work impairment, cost burden, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) associated with respiratory disease in the Asia-Pacific. Consecutive participants aged 18 years or older with a primary diagnosis of asthma, allergic rhinitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or rhinosinusitis were enrolled. Participants completed a survey detailing respiratory symptoms, HCRU, work productivity and activity impairment, and HRQOL. Locally sourced unit costs for each country were used in the calculation of total costs. The study enrolled 5250 patients. Overall, the mean annual cost for patients with a respiratory disease was US $4191 (SGD 8489) per patient. For patients who reported impairment at work, the mean annual cost was US $7315 (SGD 10,244), with productivity loss being the highest cost component for all four diseases (US $6310 [SGD 9100]). On average, patients were impaired for one-third of their time at work and 5% of their work time missed because of respiratory disease, which resulted in a 36% reduction in productivity. Patients with a primary diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease had the greatest impact on HRQOL. In the Asia-Pacific, respiratory diseases have a significant impact on HCRU and associated costs, along with work productivity. Timely and effective management of these diseases has the potential to reduce disease burden and health care costs and improve work productivity and HRQOL. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular aspects of bovine cystic ovarian disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Hugo H; Marelli, Belkis E; Rey, Florencia; Amweg, Ayelen N; Díaz, Pablo U; Stangaferro, Matías L; Salvetti, Natalia R

    2015-06-01

    Cystic ovarian disease (COD) is one of the main causes of reproductive failure in cattle and causes severe economic loss to the dairy farm industry because it increases both days open in the post partum period and replacement rates due to infertility. This disease is the consequence of the failure of a mature follicle to ovulate at the time of ovulation in the estrous cycle. This review examines the evidence for the role of altered steroid and gonadotropin signaling systems and the proliferation/apoptosis balance in the ovary with cystic structures. This evidence suggests that changes in the expression of ovarian molecular components associated with these cellular mechanisms could play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of COD. The evidence also shows that gonadotropin receptor expression in bovine cystic follicles is altered, which suggests that changes in the signaling system of gonadotropins could play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of conditions characterized by altered ovulation, such as COD. Ovaries from animals with COD exhibit a disrupted steroid receptor pattern with modifications in the expression of coregulatory proteins. These changes in the pathways of endocrine action would trigger the changes in proliferation and apoptosis underlying the aberrant persistence of follicular cysts. Free Spanish abstract: A Spanish translation of this abstract is freely available at http://www.reproduction-online.org/content/149/6/R251/suppl/DC1. © 2015 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  8. An inactivated influenza D virus vaccine partially protects cattle from respiratory disease caused by homologous challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Ben M; Huntimer, Lucas; Falkenberg, Shollie; Henningson, Jamie; Lechtenberg, Kelly; Halbur, Tom

    2017-02-01

    Originally isolated from swine, the proposed influenza D virus has since been shown to be common in cattle. Inoculation of IDV to naïve calves resulted in mild respiratory disease histologically characterized by tracheitis. As several studies have associated the presence of IDV with acute bovine respiratory disease (BRD), we sought to investigate the efficacy of an inactivated IDV vaccine. Vaccinated calves seroconverted with hemagglutination inhibition titers 137-169 following two doses. Non-vaccinated calves challenged with a homologous virus exhibited signs of mild respiratory disease from days four to ten post challenge which was significantly different than negative controls at days five and nine post challenge. Peak viral shedding of approximately 5 TCID50/mL was measured in nasal and tracheal swabs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids four to six days post challenge. Viral titers were significantly (Prespiratory epithelium of the nasal turbinates and trachea by immunohistochemistry from all unvaccinated calves but in significantly fewer vaccinates. Inflammation characterized by neutrophils was observed in the nasal turbinate and trachea but not appreciably in lungs. Together these results support an etiologic role for IDV in BRD and demonstrate that partial protection is afforded by an inactivated vaccine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prediction of respiratory disease and diarrhea in veal calves based on immunoglobulin levels and the serostatus for respiratory pathogens measured at arrival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardon, Bart; Alliët, Jeroen; Boone, Randy; Roelandt, Sophie; Valgaeren, Bonnie; Deprez, Piet

    2015-06-15

    Failure of passive transfer is a common problem in calves destined for veal production. At present it is unknown whether the risk for respiratory disease (BRD) or neonatal calf diarrhea (NCD) in the veal herd is associated with total immunoglobulin (Ig) and/or on the serostatus for respiratory pathogens measured at arrival. Therefore, the first objective of this prospective longitudinal cohort study was to determine associations between serum protein fractions as determined by routine electrophoresis (total protein, albumin, alpha-1 and -2 globulins, beta-globulins and Ig's) at arrival and BRD and NCD in the first 3 weeks of the production cycle. The second objective was to determine whether the serostatus (seropositive/seronegative) of seven respiratory pathogens (bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), parainfluenzavirus-3, bovine coronavirus (BCV), bovine herpesvirus-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus, Mannheimia haemolytica and Mycoplasma bovis) of these arrival serum samples could be associated with the risk of having BRD. The third objective was to determine which of the electrophoresis proteins and respiratory serostatuses were associated with average daily gain (ADG) in the study period. The study population consisted of 150 rosé veal calves housed in a single air-space. The study period ended at day 18 post arrival, when BRD incidence was judged to be too high to further postpone a group treatment. A Cox regression model was used to determine the effect of the studied protein fractions and antibodies on the time to BRD and NCD occurrence. The effect of the studied predictors on ADG was determined by linear regression. Calves with Ig levels under 7.5g/L had an increased BRD hazard (hazard ratio (HR)=1.9 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.2-3.0)). NCD was only positively associated with the alpha-2 globulin concentration. Calves with a negative serostatus for BCV (HR=1.7 (95% CI=1.0-2.8)) or BRSV (HR=2.0 (95% CI=1.0-3.9)) had an increased BRD hazard. Average

  10. Effects of global warming on respiratory diseases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abe Olugbenga

    Review Article. ABSTRACT. Background: Global warming is a consequence of air pollution resulting in climate change due to trapping of excess greenhouse gases in the earth's atmosphere that affects biodiversity and constitutes a serious health hazard, especially tothe respiratory system. These greenhouse gases include ...

  11. Epidemiology of Respiratory Disease in Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, UK. 1. Current affiliation: ... hospital in urban areas. An important exception to ... Upper respiratory tract infections are far more common ..... ARl and TB in children world-wide. improved housing has been .... ART is effective in reversing some cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma ...

  12. Clinical COPD Questionnaire in patients with chronic respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavan, Jane L; Dilaver, Deniz; Clark, Amy L; Jones, Sarah E; Nolan, Claire M; Kon, Samantha S C; Man, William D-C

    2014-10-01

    The Clinical Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Questionnaire (CCQ) is an easy to complete, health-related quality of life questionnaire which has been well-validated in COPD. The responsiveness of the CCQ in chronic respiratory disease patients other than COPD has not been previously described. The study aims were to determine if the CCQ in chronic respiratory disease correlates with other health related quality of life questionnaires, to assess the responsiveness of the CCQ to pulmonary rehabilitation and to determine the minimum important difference. The CCQ, COPD Assessment Test (CAT), the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ) and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) were measured in 138 chronic respiratory disease patients completing pulmonary rehabilitation. Change in CCQ with pulmonary rehabilitation was correlated with change in the other questionnaires. The minimum important difference of the CCQ was calculated using distribution and anchor-based approaches. The CCQ, CAT, CRQ and SGRQ improved significantly with rehabilitation with effect sizes of -0.43, -0.26, 0.62, -0.37. Change in CCQ correlated significantly with CAT, CRQ and SGRQ (r = 0.53, -0.64, 0.30, all P respiratory disease patients, with an MID estimated at -0.4 at the individual level. © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  13. Global Considerations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Respiratory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylance, Jamie; Meghji, Jamilah; Miller, Robert F; Ferrand, Rashida A

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory tract infection, particularly tuberculosis, is a major cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has resulted in a dramatic increase in survival, although coverage of HIV treatment remains low in many parts of the world. There is a concurrent growing burden of chronic noninfectious respiratory disease as a result of increased survival. Many risk factors associated with the development of respiratory disease, such as cigarette smoking and intravenous drug use, are overrepresented among people living with HIV. In addition, there is emerging evidence that HIV infection may directly cause or accelerate the course of chronic lung disease. This review summarizes the clinical spectrum and epidemiology of respiratory tract infections and noninfectious pulmonary pathologies, and factors that explain the global variation in HIV-associated respiratory disease. The potential for enhancing diagnoses of noninfective chronic conditions through the use of clinical algorithms is discussed. We also consider issues in assessment and management of HIV-related respiratory disease in view of the increasing global scale up of ART. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Chronic coffee consumption and respiratory disease: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Tiago M; Monteiro, Rita A; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Cordeiro, Carlos Robalo

    2017-07-03

    The widespread consumption of coffee means that any biological effects from its use can lead to significant public health consequences. Chronic pulmonary diseases are extremely prevalent and responsible for one of every six deaths on a global level. Major medical databases for studies reporting on the effects of coffee or caffeine consumption on a wide range of non-malignant respiratory outcomes, including incidence, prevalence, evolution or severity of respiratory disease in adults were searched. Studies on lung function and respiratory mortality were also considered. Fifteen studies, including seven cohort, six cross-sectional, one case control and one randomized control trial were found. Coffee consumption was generally associated with a reduction in prevalence of asthma. The association of coffee with natural honey was an effective treatment for persistent post-infectious cough. One case-control study found higher risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with coffee consumption. No association was found with the evolution of COPD or sarcoidosis. Coffee was associated with a reduction in respiratory mortality, and one study found improved lung function in coffee consumers. Smoking was a significant confounder in most studies. Coffee consumption was associated with some positive effects on the respiratory system. There was however limited available evidence, mostly from cross sectional and retrospective studies. The only prospective cohort studies were those reporting on respiratory mortality. These results suggest that coffee consumption may be a part of a healthy lifestyle leading to reduced respiratory morbidity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Personalized Medicine in Respiratory Disease: Role of Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadharshini, V S; Teran, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases affect humanity globally, with chronic lung diseases (e.g., asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, among others) and lung cancer causing extensive morbidity and mortality. These conditions are highly heterogeneous and require an early diagnosis. However, initial symptoms are nonspecific, and the clinical diagnosis is made late frequently. Over the last few years, personalized medicine has emerged as a medical care approach that uses novel technology aiming to personalize treatments according to the particular patient's medical needs. This review highlights the contributions of proteomics toward the understanding of personalized medicine in respiratory disease and its potential applications in the clinic. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Concurrent bacterial infection and prolonged mechanical ventilation in infants with respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, MCJ; van Oud-Alblas, HB; van Vliet, M; Uiterwaal, CSPM; Kimpen, JLL; van Vught, AJ

    Objective: To identify demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables predictive for a concurrent bacterial pulmonary infection in ventilated infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease (LRTD) and investigate antimicrobial drug use. Design and setting:

  17. Current Understanding of Acute Bovine Liver Disease in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Elizabeth; Edwards, Jacqueline; Deseo, Myrna; Rawlin, Grant; Rochfort, Simone

    2016-12-26

    Acute bovine liver disease (ABLD) is a hepatotoxicity principally of cattle which occurs in southern regions of Australia. Severely affected animals undergo rapid clinical progression with mortalities often occurring prior to the recognition of clinical signs. Less severely affected animals develop photosensitization and a proportion can develop liver failure. The characteristic histopathological lesion in acute fatal cases is severe, with acute necrosis of periportal hepatocytes with hemorrhage into the necrotic areas. Currently there are a small number of toxins that are known to cause periportal necrosis in cattle, although none of these have so far been linked to ABLD. Furthermore, ABLD has frequently been associated with the presence of rough dog's tail grass (Cynosurus echinatus) and Drechslera spp. fungi in the pasture system, but it is currently unknown if these are etiological factors. Much of the knowledge about ABLD is contained within case reports, with very little experimental research investigating the specific cause(s). This review provides an overview of the current and most recently published knowledge of ABLD. It also draws on wider research and unpublished reports to suggest possible fungi and mycotoxins that may give rise to ABLD.

  18. Development and evaluation of a Luminex multiplex serology assay to detect antibodies to bovine herpes virus 1, parainfluenza 3 virus, bovine viral diarrhoea virus, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus, with comparison to existing ELISA detection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Steve; Wakeley, Phil; Wibberley, Guy; Webster, Kath; Sawyer, Jason

    2011-03-07

    Detection of circulating antibodies to bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1), parainfluenza 3 virus (PI3V), bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) using ELISA is widely used for veterinary diagnostics and surveillance. In this paper, the potential of a multiplex serology test based on Luminex technology, where all antibodies are simultaneously detected in a single assay was investigated. The performance of "in-house" separate ELISAs which use relatively crude lysates of cultured virus as capture antigens, was compared to the multiplex assay where the same antigens were covalently bound to the fluorescent beads used in the Luminex platform. A panel of field serum samples was tested by the multiplex assay in parallel with the separate routine ELISAs to provide a comparison between tests. The BHV-1 and PI3V components of the multiplex test showed similar sensitivities and specificities to the separate "in-house" ELISAs. The performance of the BVDV and BRSV components was less successful and was attributed to relatively low signal strength for these antigens, leading to higher assay variability and a reduced ability to distinguish positive and negative samples compared to the "in-house" ELISAs. The results illustrated that antigens commonly used successfully in ELISAs cannot always be transferred for use in alternative assay systems. The use of recombinant BVDV E2 protein was investigated and was shown to lead to an appreciable increase in signal strength compared to the use of crude BVDV antigen in the Luminex system. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Update on Gastroesophageal Reflux and Respiratory Disease in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan R Orenstein

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric respiratory diseases have been linked to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, but evidence regarding the association and its potential mechanisms continues to accumulate, and important aspects remain to be determined. Evidence for the association in two common pediatric respiratory disorders - infantile apnea and asthma in older children - and difficult clinical issues associated with the diagnosis and treatment of these two disorders are reviewed. The provocative embryological and physiological connections between the upper gastrointestinal tract and the respiratory tract, and recent understanding of the compensatory anatomy and physiology that protect the normal individual from respiratory manifestations of GERD are also explored. Dysfunctions of these protections likely underlie the pathophysiology of these disorders.

  20. Antibiotics commonly used to treat mastitis and respiratory burst of bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeben, Dagmar; Burvenich, Christian; Heyneman, Roger

    1998-01-01

    The in vitro effects of six doses (2 x 10(-3) to 2 x 10(-8) M) of antimicrobial drugs that are frequently used in udder infusions on the capacity of bovine blood polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes to generate reactive oxygen species were studied by the measurement of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence after stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. All drugs, except cloxacillin, significantly decreased chemiluminescence at the highest dose. Doxycyline induced the most severe i...

  1. Respiratory disease terminology: Discordance between pulmonologists and patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishtha Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: A number of local dialects and languages exist in India, which leads to a single disease being addressed by a number of names which may overlap with other disease names also. This creates misunderstanding and is a hindrance to effective patient–doctor communication. Aims: The paper aims to find out how effectively the name of the respiratory disease is communicated to the patient. The terminology used by patients to describe their disease was also noted at limited level. Settings and Design: The study was conducted in the form of parallel cross-sectional surveys, among pulmonologists and patients. Methods: Among the members of the Indian Chest Society and those attending the National Conference on Pulmonary Diseases (NAPCON-2015, 1028 pulmonologists participated in the online survey which was the first part of the study. The term used to address the common respiratory disease was inquired in the survey. To find the response of patients, a questionnaire was given to the patients attending four respiratory disease clinics of a city. They were inquired about the name of respiratory disease they were suffering from. Results: Pneumonia was the disease which was communicated with exact terminology by 898 (87.4% doctors to their patients. In contrast, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was communicated with precise terminology by only 171 (16.6% doctors. Pulmonary tuberculosis was exactly told by 708 (69%, asthma by 731 (71.1%, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by 593 (57.7% doctors. However, only 17.6% of the 1122 patients participating in the survey had a knowledge of the name of disease they were suffering from. Conclusions: The exact terminology of the common respiratory diseases is not effectively used by many doctors and most of the patients. The study identifies an important gap in patient–doctor communication, and therefore, highlights the need of effective patient education.

  2. Respiratory disease terminology: Discordance between pulmonologists and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nishtha; Singh, Sheetu; Jain, Nirmal Kumar; Singh, Virendra

    2017-01-01

    A number of local dialects and languages exist in India, which leads to a single disease being addressed by a number of names which may overlap with other disease names also. This creates misunderstanding and is a hindrance to effective patient-doctor communication. The paper aims to find out how effectively the name of the respiratory disease is communicated to the patient. The terminology used by patients to describe their disease was also noted at limited level. The study was conducted in the form of parallel cross-sectional surveys, among pulmonologists and patients. Among the members of the Indian Chest Society and those attending the National Conference on Pulmonary Diseases (NAPCON-2015), 1028 pulmonologists participated in the online survey which was the first part of the study. The term used to address the common respiratory disease was inquired in the survey. To find the response of patients, a questionnaire was given to the patients attending four respiratory disease clinics of a city. They were inquired about the name of respiratory disease they were suffering from. Pneumonia was the disease which was communicated with exact terminology by 898 (87.4%) doctors to their patients. In contrast, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was communicated with precise terminology by only 171 (16.6%) doctors. Pulmonary tuberculosis was exactly told by 708 (69%), asthma by 731 (71.1%), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by 593 (57.7%) doctors. However, only 17.6% of the 1122 patients participating in the survey had a knowledge of the name of disease they were suffering from. The exact terminology of the common respiratory diseases is not effectively used by many doctors and most of the patients. The study identifies an important gap in patient-doctor communication, and therefore, highlights the need of effective patient education.

  3. Genetic Testing for Respiratory Disease: Are We There Yet?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D Paré

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The human genome project promised a revolution in health care – the development of ‘personalized medicine’, where knowledge of an individual’s genetic code enables the prediction of risk for specific diseases and the potential to alter that risk based on preventive measures and lifestyle modification. The present brief review provides a report card on the progress toward that goal with respect to respiratory disease. Should generalized population screening for genetic risk factors for respiratory disease be instituted? Or not?

  4. MUCOLYTIC TREATMENT OF PROLONGED DISEASES OF RESPIRATORY SYSTEM IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.D. Soroka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of morbidity of respiratory system diseases (RSD in children, living in Saint Petersburg, is described in this article; also the role of prolonged types of RSD is indicated. Main etiologic factors of prolonged RSD are presented, and short clinical characteristics of prolonged RSD are given. Main methods of treatment of negative course of bronchopulmonary diseases are indicated. The data of 35=year clinical experience of use of n-acetylcysteine (fluimucil in children is presented. It was marked, that n-acetylcysteine has significant complex mucolytic effect in children with RSD.Key words: children, diseases of respiratory system, prolonged types, n-acetylcysteine, treatment.

  5. Factors affecting the development of respiratory disease complex in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, W B

    1990-01-01

    Factors playing a part in the development of respiratory disease complex in chickens were investigated in a series of experiments. The experimental infection was produced by exposing chickens to Mycoplasma gallisepticum and the B1 vaccine strain of Newcastle disease virus and later exposing them to aerosols containing the O1:K1 serotype of Escherichia coli. Chickens became susceptible (pericarditis or death) to E. coli 8 days after mixed respiratory disease challenge. One day after respiratory disease challenge, lesions consisted of edema and infiltration with lymphoid cells and heterophils. At the time of susceptibility to E. coli, the lesions were strongly lymphoid with many dense follicular areas and very few heterophils. The incidence of pericarditis and death was similar when the concentration of bacteria in the aerosol inoculum ranged between 10(9)/ml and 10(5)/ml. At the time of maximum susceptibility to aerosol challenge, chickens were less susceptible to intravenously administered E. coli than were the uninfected controls. Resistance of chickens that had been selectively bred for a high (HA) or low (LA) antibody response to sheep erythrocytes was compared. HA chickens were more resistant to respiratory agents and less resistant to E. coli than LA line chickens. When the lines were exposed to respiratory disease followed by exposure to aerosols containing E. coli, the HA line had the lowest incidence of pericarditis and death.

  6. Bovine parainfluenza-3 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John A

    2010-11-01

    Bovine parainfluenza-3 virus (bPI(3)V) is a long-recognized, currently underappreciated, endemic infection in cattle populations. Clinical disease is most common in calves with poor passive transfer or decayed maternal antibodies. It is usually mild, consisting of fever, nasal discharge, and dry cough. Caused at least partly by local immunosuppressive effects, bPI(3)V infection is often complicated by coinfection with other respiratory viruses and bacteria, and is therefore an important component of enzootic pneumonia in calves and bovine respiratory disease complex in feedlot cattle. Active infection can be diagnosed by virus isolation from nasal swabs, or IF testing on smears made from nasal swabs. Timing of sampling is critical in obtaining definitive diagnostic test results. Parenteral and intranasal modified live vaccine combination vaccines are available. Priming early in calfhood with intranasal vaccine, followed by boosting with parenteral vaccine, may be the best immunoprophylactic approach. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Whole Genome Sequencing of a Canadian Bovine Gammaherpesvirus 4 Strain and the Possible Link between the Viral Infection and Respiratory and Reproductive Clinical Manifestations in Dairy Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl A. Gagnon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bovine gammaherpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4 is a herpesvirus widespread in cattle populations, and with no clear disease association. Its genome contains a long unique coding region (LUR flanked by polyrepetitive DNA and 79 open reading frames (ORFs, with unique 17 ORFs, named Bo1 to Bo17. In 2009, a BoHV-4 strain was isolated (FMV09-1180503: BoHV-4-FMV from cattle with respiratory disease from Quebec, Canada, and its LUR was sequenced. Despite the overall high similarity, BoHV-4-FMV had the most divergent LUR sequence compared to the two known BoHV-4 reference strain genomes; most of the divergences were in the Bo genes and in the repeat regions. Our phylogenetic analysis based on DNA polymerase and thymidine kinase genes revealed that virus isolate was BoHV-4 gammaherpesvirus and clustered it together with European BoHV-4 strains. Because BoHV-4-FMV was isolated from animals presenting respiratory signs, we have updated the BoHV-4 Canadian cattle seroprevalence data and tried to find out whether there is a link between clinical manifestation and BoHV-4 seropositivity. An indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA was performed with nearly 200 randomized sera of dairy cattle from two Canadian provinces, Quebec (n = 100 and Ontario (n = 91. An additional set of sera obtained from Quebec, from the healthy (n = 48 cows or from the animals experiencing respiratory or reproductive problems (n = 75, was also analyzed by IFA. BoHV-4 seroprevalence in Canadian dairy cattle was 7.9% (Quebec: 6% and Ontario: 9.9%. Among animals from the Quebec-based farms, diseased animals showed higher BoHV-4 seropositivity than healthy animals (P < 0.05, with a significant 2.494 odds ratio of being seropositive in sick compared to healthy animals. Although there is no established direct link between BoHV-4 and specific diseases, these seroprevalence data suggest the possible involvement of BoHV-4 in dairy cattle diseases.

  8. Genes controlling vaccine responses and disease resistance to respiratory viral pathogens in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Elizabeth J; Baxter, Rebecca; Leach, Richard J; Jann, Oliver C

    2012-07-15

    Farm animals remain at risk of endemic, exotic and newly emerging viruses. Vaccination is often promoted as the best possible solution, and yet for many pathogens, either there are no appropriate vaccines or those that are available are far from ideal. A complementary approach to disease control may be to identify genes and chromosomal regions that underlie genetic variation in disease resistance and response to vaccination. However, identification of the causal polymorphisms is not straightforward as it generally requires large numbers of animals with linked phenotypes and genotypes. Investigation of genes underlying complex traits such as resistance or response to viral pathogens requires several genetic approaches including candidate genes deduced from knowledge about the cellular pathways leading to protection or pathology, or unbiased whole genome scans using markers spread across the genome. Evidence for host genetic variation exists for a number of viral diseases in cattle including bovine respiratory disease and anecdotally, foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). We immunised and vaccinated a cattle cross herd with a 40-mer peptide derived from FMDV and a vaccine against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). Genetic variation has been quantified. A candidate gene approach has grouped high and low antibody and T cell responders by common motifs in the peptide binding pockets of the bovine major histocompatibility complex (BoLA) DRB3 gene. This suggests that vaccines with a minimal number of epitopes that are recognised by most cattle could be designed. Whole genome scans using microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers has revealed many novel quantitative trait loci (QTL) and SNP markers controlling both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, some of which are in genes of known immunological relevance including the toll-like receptors (TLRs). The sequencing, assembly and annotation of livestock genomes and is continuing apace. In

  9. Seroprevalence and risk factors associated with bovine herpesvirus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are well known etiological agents of cattle that produce important economic losses due to reproductive failures and calf mortality, as well as enteric and respiratory disease. Tamaulipas is located northeast of Mexico, an important cattle production and ...

  10. Is Previous Respiratory Disease a Risk Factor for Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denholm, Rachel; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt; Stücker, Isabelle; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Brenner, Darren R.; De Matteis, Sara; Boffetta, Paolo; Guida, Florence; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Siemiatycki, Jack; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Zaridze, David; Field, John K.; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Dumitru, Rodica Stanescu; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Kendzia, Benjamin; Peters, Susan; Behrens, Thomas; Vermeulen, Roel; Brüning, Thomas; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Previous respiratory diseases have been associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Respiratory conditions often co-occur and few studies have investigated multiple conditions simultaneously. Objectives: Investigate lung cancer risk associated with chronic bronchitis, emphysema, tuberculosis, pneumonia, and asthma. Methods: The SYNERGY project pooled information on previous respiratory diseases from 12,739 case subjects and 14,945 control subjects from 7 case–control studies conducted in Europe and Canada. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to investigate the relationship between individual diseases adjusting for co-occurring conditions, and patterns of respiratory disease diagnoses and lung cancer. Analyses were stratified by sex, and adjusted for age, center, ever-employed in a high-risk occupation, education, smoking status, cigarette pack-years, and time since quitting smoking. Measurements and Main Results: Chronic bronchitis and emphysema were positively associated with lung cancer, after accounting for other respiratory diseases and smoking (e.g., in men: odds ratio [OR], 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20–1.48 and OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.21–1.87, respectively). A positive relationship was observed between lung cancer and pneumonia diagnosed 2 years or less before lung cancer (OR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.33–4.70 for men), but not longer. Co-occurrence of chronic bronchitis and emphysema and/or pneumonia had a stronger positive association with lung cancer than chronic bronchitis “only.” Asthma had an inverse association with lung cancer, the association being stronger with an asthma diagnosis 5 years or more before lung cancer compared with shorter. Conclusions: Findings from this large international case–control consortium indicate that after accounting for co-occurring respiratory diseases, chronic bronchitis and emphysema continue to have a positive association with lung cancer. PMID:25054566

  11. Respiratory acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory ... Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and COPD ) Diseases of the lung tissue (such as ...

  12. [Mortality due to respiratory diseases in Spain (1977-1985)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Suárez-Varela, M M; Llopis González, A; Sancho Izquierdo, E

    1993-09-01

    A descriptive and comparative epidemiological is made of mortality due to respiratory disease by provinces in Spain. The study period covers 1977 to 1985, this being the last year reported by the Natural Movement of the Spanish Population (Movimiento Natural de la Población Española). In particular, 5 causes of death were analyzed in accordance to the International Classification of Disease (IX Revision): respiratory tuberculosis, influenza, chronic pulmonary disease, pneumonia and other pathologies of the respiratory apparatus. The results reveal an annual increase in these diseases. Standardized mortality ratio in turn reflects the provinces with increased mortality, the distribution of which varies for each pathology studied as a result of the different factors involved. Variation is also seen in terms of sex. Thus, influenza predominates among women, whereas males are more frequent as regards the remaining pathologies. Mortality due to pneumonia is similar in both sexes, this being the disease exhibiting the greatest increase during the study period. The results obtained may be of use in protocolizing resources for better control and prevention of respiratory disease in this country.

  13. Deciphering upper respiratory tract microbiota complexity in healthy calves and calves that develop respiratory disease using shotgun metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeta, Natália C; Lima, Svetlana F; Teixeira, Andre G; Ganda, Erika K; Oikonomou, Georgios; Gregory, Lilian; Bicalho, Rodrigo C

    2017-02-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is a multifactorial disorder responsible for severe economic losses in dairy and feedlot herds. Advances in next-generation sequencing mean that microbial communities in clinical samples, including non-culturable bacteria, can be characterized. Our aim was to evaluate the microbiota of the upper respiratory tract of healthy calves and calves with BRD using whole-genome sequencing (shotgun metagenomics). We performed deep nasopharyngeal swabs on 16 Holstein heifer calves (10 healthy and 6 diagnosed with BRD during the study) at 14 and 28 d of life in 1 dairy herd near Ithaca, New York. Total DNA was extracted, and whole-genome sequencing was performed using the MiSeq Illumina platform (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). Samples included 5 predominant phyla: Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Tenericutes. At the genus level, we observed differences between groups for Pseudomonas spp. At the species level, Mannheimia haemolytica was the most abundant bacterium detected. We detected significant differences between groups of calves in the relative abundance of Pseudomonas fluorescens. Pasteurella multocida was among the 20 most abundant species, and Moraxella catarrhalis, commonly associated with pneumonia in humans, was detected in all groups. Analysis of resistance to antibiotics and compounds profiling revealed differences in cobalt-zinc-cadmium resistance. Further research to elucidate the role of Moraxella catarrhalis in BRD is warranted. Genes that were resistant to cobalt-zinc-cadmium, observed mostly in calves with BRD, might be associated with difficulties in antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. CLARYTROMYCIN IN TREATMENT OF PEDIATRIC ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Simonova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory diseases still occupy leading positions among all pediatric diseases. This article contains modern data upon etiology of acute and recurrent bronchitides, as well as that of out-of-hospital pneumonias in children. Special attention is paid to the choice of antibacterial therapy. We observe modern Russian and international data upon bacterial resistance to antibacterial drugs. This article also contains description of biological, pharmacokinetic and antibacterial traits of macrolides, especially these of clarytromycin with description of its use in treatment of pediatric respiratory disorders.

  15. Oligonucleotide Therapy for Obstructive and Restrictive Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wupeng Liao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled oligonucleotide is an emerging therapeutic modality for various common respiratory diseases, including obstructive airway diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and restrictive airway diseases like idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. The advantage of direct accessibility for oligonucleotide molecules to the lung target sites, bypassing systemic administration, makes this therapeutic approach promising with minimized potential systemic side effects. Asthma, COPD, and IPF are common chronic respiratory diseases, characterized by persistent airway inflammation and dysregulated tissue repair and remodeling, although each individual disease has its unique etiology. Corticosteroids have been widely prescribed for the treatment of asthma, COPD, and IPF. However, the effectiveness of corticosteroids as an anti-inflammatory drug is limited by steroid resistance in severe asthma, the majority of COPD cases, and pulmonary fibrosis. There is an urgent medical need to develop target-specific drugs for the treatment of these respiratory conditions. Oligonucleotide therapies, including antisense oligonucleotide (ASO, small interfering RNA (siRNA, and microRNA (miRNA are now being evaluated both pre-clinically and clinically as potential therapeutics. The mechanisms of action of ASO and siRNA are highly target mRNA specific, ultimately leading to target protein knockdown. miRNA has both biomarker and therapeutic values, and its knockdown by a miRNA antagonist (antagomir has a broader but potentially more non-specific biological outcome. This review will compile the current findings of oligonucleotide therapeutic targets, verified in various respiratory disease models and in clinical trials, and evaluate different chemical modification approaches to improve the stability and potency of oligonucleotides for the treatment of respiratory diseases.

  16. Importance of Social Relationships in Patients with Chronic Respiratory Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpas, Donata; Szwamel, Katarzyna; Mroczek, Bozena

    2016-01-01

    The literature lacks reports on the role of the social relationships domain (SRD) of quality of life (QoL) in shaping care for patients with chronic respiratory diseases in primary care. In this study we examined a group of 582 patients with chronic respiratory diseases and chronic non-respiratory diseases recruited from 199 primary care centers. In the patients with chronic respiratory diseases, higher SRD correlated with more frequent patient visits due to medical issue, fewer district nurse interventions over the past 12 months, less frequent hospitalizations over the past 3 years, and fewer chronic diseases. In these patients, a high SRD was most effectively created by high QoL in the Psychological, Environmental, and Physical domains, and the satisfaction with QoL. Programs for preventing a decline in SRD should include patients with low scores in the Psychological, Environmental, and Physical domains, those who show no improvement in mental or somatic well-being in the past 12 months, those with a low level of positive mental attitudes, unhealthy eating habits, and with low levels of met needs. Such programs should include older widows and widowers without permanent relationships, with only primary education, living far from a primary care center, and those whose visits were not due to a medical issue.

  17. Abnormal respiratory drive in vibroacoustic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Reis Ferreira

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Central nervous system disorders in workers exposed to low frequency noise (LFN, 60%. Discussion: In the involuntary response to increased PCO2 levels, central chemoreceptors are responsible for 70% of the ventilatory stimulus. In VAD patients, this dysfunction may originate in the brainstem. This is corroborated by the fact that VAD patients register abnormal values for auditory brainstem evoked potentials, and disclose lesions with magnetic resonance imaging. The neurological control of breathing is compromised in VAD patients. The P0.1(CO2 index may be a useful clinical indicator for VAD diagnosis and follow-up. Resumo: Enquadramento: As alterações do sistema nervoso central em trabalhadores expostos a ruído de baixa frequência (RBF, 60%. Conclusões: Na resposta reflexa ao acréscimo de PCO2, os quimio-receptores centrais são responsáveis por 70% do estímulo ventilatório. Um estímulo ventilatório diminuído pode traduzir certa disfunção do tronco cerebral. Em doentes com VAD, esta disfunção é corroborada por anomalias dos potenciais evocados auditivos do tronco cerebral, bem como por alterações detectáveis em ressonância magnética. O índice P0.1CO2 pode revelar-se um indicador clínico útil para o diagnóstico e seguimento da VAD. Em resumo, o controlo neurológico da respiração está comprometido em doentes com VAD. Key-words: Low frequency noise, infrasound, respiratory control, P0.1CO2, peak respiratory pressure, Palavras-chave: Ruído de baixa frequência, infra-sons, controlo da respiração, P0.1CO2, pressões respiratórias máximas

  18. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome: an inflammatory disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Christian P

    2011-01-01

    Surfactant substitution has been a major breakthrough in the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), primarily caused by a lack of pulmonary surfactant; it has significantly reduced mortality and acute pulmonary morbidity in preterm infants. Some very immature infants, however, have a poor response to surfactant replacement or an early relapse. This brief article is based on the hypothesis that neonatal RDS has a complex and multifactorial pathogenesis characterized by an injurious inflammatory sequence in the immature lung. Fetal exposure to chorioamnionitis has been shown to initiate an inflammatory reaction beginning in utero. A 'low-grade' inflammatory stimulus in utero may 'prime' the fetal lung for accelerated maturation of the surfactant system, especially in conjunction with prenatal steroids, and may protect the preterm infant from developing moderate to severe RDS. Depending on the severity of inflammatory injury to the alveolar-capillary unit, however, serum proteins will leak into the airways and induce surfactant inactivation. Following this intrauterine 'first hit', the immature infant may develop severe RDS and have a poor response to surfactant substitution. Secondary insults such as traumatic stabilization techniques, oxygen toxicity, initiation of mechanical ventilation and others injure the immature lung immediately after birth and perpetuate and may aggravate the inflammatory process. Observational studies in preterm infants and animal experiments support this concept. Whenever surfactant inactivation is suspected, higher or repetitive doses of natural surfactant may help to overcome surfactant inactivation and to restore lung function. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Overview of respiratory syncytial virus disease in young children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoopes JM

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available J Michael Hoopes1, Veena R Kumar21Medical Information, 2Medical and Scientific Affairs, MedImmune, LLC, Gaithersburg, MD, USAAbstract: Respiratory tract illnesses associated with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV were first reported more than 160 years ago and gained acceptance as a major respiratory pathogen in the late 1950s. Annual epidemics show a seasonal pattern typically beginning in the late fall and ending in early spring, averaging 5 months in length, and varying in time of onset, offset, and duration depending on geographic location. Manifestations of RSV illness primarily involve the upper respiratory tract but can spread to the lower airways and lead to bronchiolitis and/or pneumonia. Initial infection occurs in approximately two-thirds of children during the first year of life; nearly all children are infected at least once by 2 years of age. Reinfection is common throughout life, but initial illness during infancy generally presents with the most severe symptoms. Medical risk conditions that consistently predispose young children to serious lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI include congenital heart disease, chronic lung disease, and premature birth. Serious LRTI due to RSV is the leading cause of hospitalization in infants and young children worldwide and annual mean hospital expenses have been estimated to exceed 1 billion dollars in the United States. Young children incur more inpatient and outpatient visits for RSV LRTI than for influenza. RSV has a greater impact than influenza on hospitalization in infants with respect to length of stay, severity/course of disease, and resultant needs for ancillary treatments. Unlike many other childhood illnesses, a vaccine is not currently available for preventing RSV disease.Keywords: bronchopulmonary dysplasia, infants, hospitalization, prematurity, respiratory syncytial virus

  20. CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPIRATORY MECHANICS IN CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, M; Mitu, F; Mitu, O; Roca, Iulia-Cristina; Leon, Maria-Magdalena; Mihăescu, T

    2015-01-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) the changes in respiratory thoracoabdominal mechanics result from both hyperinflation and functional and structural skeletal muscle alterations. Evaluation of the particularities of respiratory movement in COPD and identification of inter-relations between respiratory thoraco-abdominal mechanics and clinical and functional respiratory status. This study comparatively analyzed the respiratory thoracoabdominal mechanics recorded by polygraphy, using piezoelectric film belts, in 34 COPD patients and 30 healthy subjects, during rest, and during 6-minute walk test. In COPD patients, phase angle between direction of thoracic and abdominal respiratory movements presented significantly higher values compared to the control group, for supine (p = 0.023) and sitting position (p = 0.001), revealing the presence of paradoxical respiratory movements. Furthermore, phase angle dynamics increased significantly during walking test compared to sitting position (p = 0.001). Quantitative difference of end-expiratory pulmonary volume (qDEEL) correlated with pack-years (r = 0.372, p = 0.03) in supine position, and with body mass (r = 0.338, p = 0.05) and St. George activity score (r = 0.353, p = 0.041) during walking test. Rib cage inspiratory contribution to tidal volume ratio (%RCi) inversely correlated with pack-years (r = -0.417, p = 0.014) and body mass index (r = - 0.344, p = 0.047) in supine position, and with St. George activity score (r = 0.345, p = 0.046) in sitting position. In COPD patient thoracoabdominal mechanics is characterized by paradoxical respiratory movements, more prominent during exercise. The alteration of thoracoabdominal mechanics correlated with St. George activity score, pack-years and body mass.

  1. The acute phase response of haptoglobin and serum amyloid A (SAA) in cattle undergoing experimental infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Godson, D.L.; Toussaint, M.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of a pure virus infection to induce an acute phase protein response is of interest as viral infections are normally considered to be less efficient in inducing an acute phase protein response than bacterial infections. This was studied in a bovine model for infection with bovine...... respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), analysing the induction of the two most dominant bovine acute phase proteins haptoglobin and serum amyloid A (SAA). Strong and reproducible acute phase responses were detected for both proteins, peaking at around 7-8 days after inoculation of BRSV, while no response...... was seen in mock-inoculated control animals. The serum concentrations reached for SAA and haptoglobin during the BRSV-induced acute phase response were generally the same or higher than previously reported for bacterial infections in calves. The magnitude and the duration of the haptoglobin response...

  2. Respiratory deficits in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuppy, M; Barna, B F; Alves-Dos-Santos, L; Britto, L R G; Chiavegatto, S; Moreira, T S; Takakura, A C

    2015-06-25

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway. In addition to deficits in voluntary movement, PD involves a disturbance of breathing regulation. However, the cause and nature of this disturbance are not well understood. Here, we investigated breathing at rest and in response to hypercapnia (7% CO2) or hypoxia (8% O2), as well as neuroanatomical changes in brainstem regions essential for breathing, in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD. Bilateral injections of 6-OHDA (24μg/μl) into the striatum decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH(+))-neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), transcription factor phox2b-expressing neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus and neurokinin-1 receptors in the ventral respiratory column. In 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, respiratory rate was reduced at rest, leading to a reduction in minute ventilation. These animals also showed a reduction in the tachypneic response to hypercapnia, but not to hypoxia challenge. These results suggest that the degeneration of TH(+) neurons in the SNpc leads to impairment of breathing at rest and in hypercapnic conditions. Our data indicate that respiratory deficits in a 6-OHDA rat model of PD are related to downregulation of neural systems involved in respiratory rhythm generation. The present study suggests a new avenue to better understand the respiratory deficits observed in chronic stages of PD. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comorbidity of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases among the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detrimental associations between comorbidity of the health outcomes and proximity to mine dumps were observed among the elderly in SA. ... training in conducting the interviews using the respiratory health ...... Ibfelt E, Bonde JP, Hansen J. Exposure to metal welding fume particles and risk for cardiovascular disease in ...

  4. Pattern of respiratory diseases seen among adults in an emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is a paucity of information on utilisation of emergency medical services in Nigeria. This study was conducted to determine the pattern of respiratory diseases seen among adults in an emergency room(ER) and their mortality within twenty- four hours in a health facility in Nigeria. Methods: We carried out a ...

  5. Air pollution and hospitalization for respiratory diseases among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Adverse effects of urban air pollution on human health notably the paediatric age group is of great importance. Limited data exist from developing countries. This study investigates the hospitalization of children because of respiratory diseases and air pollu-tion levels in Isfahan, the second large city in Iran.

  6. Medicines used in respiratory diseases only seen in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenney, W.; Boner, A. L.; Bont, L.; Bush, A.; Carlsen, K-H.; Eber, E.; Fauroux, B.; Goetz, M.; Greenough, A.; Grigg, J.; Hull, J.; Kimpen, J.; Sanchez Luna, M.; de Benedictis, F. M.

    Detailed literature searches were carried out in seven respiratory disease areas. Therapeutic evidence for efficacy of medicinal products was assessed using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology, as well as an assessment of safety and side-effects. Systemic

  7. Low hospital admission rates for respiratory diseases in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.J.M. Uijen (Hans); F.G. Schellevis (François); P.J.E. Bindels (Patrick); S.P. Willemsen (Sten); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract BACKGROUND: Population-based data on hospital admissions for children aged 0-17 years concerning all respiratory diseases are scarce. This study examined hospital admissions in relation to the preceding consultations in general practice in this age group. METHODS: Data on

  8. Low hospital admission rates for respiratory diseases in children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijen, J.H.J.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Bindels, P.J.E.; Willemsen, S.P.; Wouden, J.C. van der

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Population-based data on hospital admissions for children aged 0-17 years concerning all respiratory diseases are scarce. This study examined hospital admissions in relation to the preceding consultations in general practice in this age group. METHODS: Data on children aged 0-17 years

  9. Sleep effects on breathing and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary Sumer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand normal sleep pattern and physiological changes during sleep, sleep and breathing interaction, nomenclature and scales used in sleep study, discuss the effect of rapid eye movements and non-rapid eye movements while sleep and to review the effects of obstructive and restrictive lung disease on gas exchange during sleep and sleep architecture.

  10. Genetic Mechanisms in Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha Palikhe, Nami; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Jin, Hyun Jung; Hwang, Eui-Kyung; Nam, Young Hee; Park, Hae-Sim

    2012-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) refers to the development of bronchoconstriction in asthmatics following the exposure to aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The key pathogenic mechanisms associated with AERD are the overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) and increased CysLTR1 expression in the airway mucosa and decreased lipoxin and PGE2 synthesis. Genetic studies have suggested a role for variability of genes in disease susceptibility and the resp...

  11. Codetection of respiratory syncytial virus in habituated wild western lowland gorillas and humans during a respiratory disease outbreak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grützmacher, K. S.; Köndgen, S.; Keil, V.; Todd, A.; Feistner, A.; Herbinger, I.; Petrželková, Klára Judita; Fuh, T.; Leendertz, S. A.; Calvignac-Spencer, S.; Leendertz, F. H.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2016), s. 499-510 ISSN 1612-9202 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : respiratory disease * respiratory syncytial virus * enterovirus * western lowland gorillas * great apes * noninvasive detection Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.252, year: 2016

  12. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic respiratory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappella, Antonio; Durham, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy involves the repeated administration of allergen products in order to induce clinical and immunologic tolerance to the offending allergen. Immunotherapy is the only etiology-based treatment that has the potential for disease modification, as reflected by longterm remission following its discontinuation and possibly prevention of disease progression and onset of new allergic sensitizations. Whereas subcutaneous immunotherapy is of proven value in allergic rhinitis and asthma there is a risk of untoward side effects including rarely anaphylaxis. Recently the sublingual route has emerged as an effective and safer alternative. Whereas the efficacy of SLIT in seasonal allergy is now well-documented in adults and children, the available data for perennial allergies and asthma is less reliable and particularly lacking in children. This review evaluates the efficacy, safety and longterm benefits of SCIT and SLIT and highlights new findings regarding mechanisms, potential biomarkers and recent novel approaches for allergen immunotherapy. PMID:23095870

  13. Manual therapy for childhood respiratory disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepino, Vanessa Carina; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Ribeiro, Maria Angela Gonçalves de Oliveira; de Noronha, Marcos; Mezzacappa, Maria Aparecida; Schivinski, Camila Isabel Santos

    2013-01-01

    This study reviewed the scientific evidence available on the effects of manipulative techniques on children with respiratory diseases. Three databases (SciELO, PEDro, and MEDLINE) were searched for clinical trials on the effects of manual therapy techniques on children and adolescents with respiratory diseases. The relevant studies were chosen by 2 independent researchers who assessed their abstracts and selected the studies that met the criteria for a complete and structured review. Of the 1147 relevant titles, 103 titles were selected for abstract assessment, and of these, 24 were selected for a full-text review. After critical analysis, 8 studies were included in the review and 16 were excluded for the following reasons: 1 covered only conventional therapy, 7 were not about the studied theme, and 8 included adults. Of the 8 studies included in the present review, 5 consisted of asthmatic children and the others of children with the following conditions: cystic fibrosis, bronchiolitis, recurrent respiratory infections, among others. Only 2 studies did not identify positive results with the use of manual therapy. The other 6 studies found some benefit, specifically in spirometric parameters, immunologic tests, anxiety questionnaire, or level of salivary cortisol. The use of manual techniques on children with respiratory diseases seems to be beneficial. Chiropractic, osteopathic medicine, and massage are the most common interventions. The lack of standardized procedures and limited variety of methods used evidenced the need for more studies on the subject. Copyright © 2013 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Respiratory diseases in agate grinding workers in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafeemanesh, E; Majdi, M R; Ehteshamfar, S M; Fahoul, M J; Sadeghian, Z

    2014-07-01

    Agate is a hard silica stone with bands of various colors, which is used in jewelry. The agate grinding workers are exposed to silica dust. To determine the prevalence of respiratory diseases in agate grinding workers and the associated factors. In this cross-sectional study, 170 agate grinding workers from Mashhad, northeastern Iran, were examined. Medical and occupational history for respiratory illnesses was taken using respiratory questionnaire of the national program of silicosis control, lung examination, spirometry and chest radiography. Chest x-rays were interpreted according to the International Labor Office (ILO) classification system, 2000. The mean±SD of age and work duration of the participants were 31.2±10.1 and 13±8.2 years, respectively. The prevalence of silicosis among agate workers was 12.9% (95% CI: 7.9%-18.0%); 18 workers had simple and 4 had complicated silicosis. There was a significant (p<0.05) relationship between contracting silicosis and exposure duration. 20 (11.7%) workers had symptoms consistent with chronic bronchitis and 8 (4.7%) showed asthma and asthma-like symptoms. The most frequent disorder observed in spirometry was the restrictive pattern (n=43, 30%). In the agate grinders, clinical and spirometry findings did not match with radiological findings. Agate grinding workers are at increased risk for respiratory diseases, specifically for silicosis and chronic bronchitis. The disease is related to silica dust exposure, poor ventilation and inappropriate personal protection.

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients: factors determining progression to lower respiratory tract disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yae-Jean; Guthrie, Katherine A; Waghmare, Alpana; Walsh, Edward E; Falsey, Ann R; Kuypers, Jane; Cent, Anne; Englund, Janet A; Boeckh, Michael

    2014-04-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease (LRD) is a life-threatening complication in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Lymphopenia has been associated with an increased risk of progression from upper respiratory tract infection (URI) to LRD. This study retrospectively analyzed the significance of lymphocyte engraftment dynamics, lung function, smoking history, corticosteroids, antiviral treatment, viral subtypes, and RSV-specific neutralizing antibodies for the progression to LRD in 181 HCT recipients with RSV URI. In multivariable models, smoking history, conditioning with high-dose total body irradiation, and an absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) ≤100/mm(3) at the time of URI onset were significantly associated with disease progression. No progression occurred in patients with ALCs of >1000/mm(3) at URI onset. Lymphocyte engraftment dynamics were similar in progressors and nonprogressors. Pre- and posttransplant donor and posttransplant recipient RSV subtype-specific neutralizing antibody levels, RSV viral subtypes, and corticosteroids also were not significantly associated with LRD progression. Host and transplant related factors appear to determine the risk of progression to LRD more than viral factors. Dysfunctional cell-mediated immunity appears to be important in the pathogenesis of progressive RSV disease after HCT. A characterization of RSV-specific T-cell immunity is warranted.

  16. Respiratory muscle strength in children with mild bronchial asthma disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Neumannová

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory muscle strength can be decreased in patients with asthma; however, it is not well-documented whether a mild bronchial asthma disease can affect respiratory muscle strength in children and can be associated with higher presence of breathing difficulties. Objective: The main aim of the present study was to compare respiratory muscle strength between children with asthma and age-matched healthy children. The next aim of this study was to assess the incidence of decreased respiratory muscle strength in children with asthma and healthy children and assess the effect of decreased respiratory muscle strength on the incidence of breathing difficulties. Methods: Children with mild bronchial asthma (n = 167 and age-matched, healthy children (n = 100 were recruited into this study. Pulmonary function tests, maximal inspiratory (PImax and expiratory (PEmax mouth pressures and the incidence of breathing difficulty were evaluated in children with asthma and healthy controls. Results: The inspiratory muscle strength was similar between children with asthma and healthy children. Conversely, the expiratory muscle strength was lower in asthmatic children. There was a statistically significant difference between girls with asthma and healthy girls (PEmax = 81.7 ± 29.8% vs. 100.1 ± 23.7% of predicted, p < .001. PEmax was significantly higher in boys with asthma than in girls with asthma (PEmax = 92.9 ± 26.4 % vs. 81.7 ± 29.8% of predicted, p = .03. A higher incidence of breathing difficulties during physical activity (uphill walking, running, swimming was confirmed in children with asthma with lower respiratory muscle strength. Conclusions: There was a higher prevalence of decreased expiratory muscle strength in children with asthma; therefore, respiratory muscle strength should be tested in these children, especially in those who are symptomatic.

  17. Antibiotics commonly used to treat mastitis and respiratory burst of bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeben, D; Burvenich, C; Heyneman, R

    1998-02-01

    The in vitro effects of six doses (2 x 10(-3) to 2 x 10(-8) M) of antimicrobial drugs that are frequently used in udder infusions on the capacity of bovine blood polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes to generate reactive oxygen species were studied by the measurement of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence after stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. All drugs, except cloxacillin, significantly decreased chemiluminescence at the highest dose. Doxycyline induced the most severe inhibition, followed by neomycin and dihydrostreptomycin. The effect of ampicillin was due to the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and interactions with luminol. The inhibition observed with oleandomycin, neomycin, lincomycin, and dihydrostreptomycin was not due to direct effects on the production of oxidative metabolites but rather to interference with other components involved in the production of light, such as interference with the interaction between luminol and the myeloper-oxidase-H2O2-halide system. The deleterious effects of doxycycline can be explained by several factors: decreased production of superoxide, yellow color, the scavenging of reactive oxygen species, and Ca2+ chelating effect. In conclusion, the results of this study show that antibiotics may affect neutrophil function at concentrations that are reached in the mammary gland after local and repeated administration.

  18. Effect of Antimicrobial Consumption and Production Type on Antibacterial Resistance in the Bovine Respiratory and Digestive Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catry, Boudewijn; Dewulf, Jeroen; Maes, Dominiek; Pardon, Bart; Callens, Benedicte; Vanrobaeys, Mia; Opsomer, Geert; de Kruif, Aart; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between antimicrobial use and the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in the digestive and respiratory tract in three different production systems of food producing animals. A longitudinal study was set up in 25 Belgian bovine herds (10 dairy, 10 beef, and 5 veal herds) for a 2 year monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibilities in E. coli and Pasteurellaceae retrieved from the rectum and the nasal cavity, respectively. During the first year of observation, the antimicrobial use was prospectively recorded on 15 of these farms (5 of each production type) and transformed into the treatment incidences according to the (animal) defined daily dose (TIADD) and (actually) used daily dose (TIUDD). Antimicrobial resistance rates of 4,174 E. coli (all herds) and 474 Pasteurellaceae (beef and veal herds only) isolates for 12 antimicrobial agents demonstrated large differences between intensively reared veal calves (abundant and inconstant) and more extensively reared dairy and beef cattle (sparse and relatively stable). Using linear mixed effect models, a strong relation was found between antimicrobial treatment incidences and resistance profiles of 1,639 E. coli strains (presistance.

  19. Many respiratory viruses have temporal association with meningococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Rodriguez, J A; Jakubson, L; Padilla, O; Gallegos, D; Fasce, R; Bertrand, P; Sanchez, I; Perret, C

    2015-01-01

    Previous ecological studies have shown a temporal and spatial association between influenza epidemics and meningococcal disease (MNG); however, none have examined more than two respiratory viruses. Data were obtained in Chile between 2000 and 2005 on confirmed cases of MNG and all confirmed cases of respiratory viruses (influenza A and B; parainfluenza; adenovirus; and respiratory syncytial virus [RSV]). Both variables were divided by epidemiological weeks, age range, and regions. Models of transference functions were run for rates of MNG. In this period, 1022 reported cases of MNG and 34,737 cases of respiratory virus were identified (25,137 RSV; 4300 parainfluenza; 2527 influenza-A; 356 influenza-B; and 2417 adenovirus). RSV was the major independent virus temporally associated to MNG (it appears one week before MNG), followed by parainfluenza, influenza-B, adenovirus, and influenza-A. The rate of MNG in Chile is temporally associated to all of the respiratory viruses studied, but with variability according age range, and regions. Copyright © 2014 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Biotech innovations in the prevention of respiratory infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cento, Julia Valeria; Barbaliscia, Silvia; Perno, Carlo Federico

    2017-07-01

    Acute respiratory infections place a huge burden on society in terms of disability, premature mortality, and also direct health service costs (drugs prescriptions) and the indirect costs related to lost production. Therefore, prevention of respiratory infections is an important goal for public health interventions. In this context, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) represent an interesting perspective for research and development by virtue of their favorable antimicrobial activity against many respiratory pathogens. One of the latest innovations in the biotech field discussed in this review is the creation of a biocompatible, biogel-based nasal filter enriched with AgNPs. Compared to traditional personal protective equipment (PPE), this type of nasal filter has the advantage of combining the antibacterial and antiviral activity of AgNPs with the common filtration capacity shared by other PPEs. This dual mechanism means that AgNP-enriched nasal filters serve to reduce the infecting microbial-load and protect the lower airways, without interfering with the normal respiratory capacity (airflow-resistance <5%). Given their antimicrobial characteristics and performance, AgNP-enriched nasal filters can meet many community and occupational currently unmet needs in the prevention of airborne infectious diseases, by ensuring an excellent respiratory-comfort and a continuous day-use.

  1. Clinical efficacy of diclofenac sodium and flunixin meglumine as adjuncts to antibacterial treatment of respiratory disease of calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzel, M; Karakurum, M C; Durgut, R; Mamak, N

    2010-06-01

    To compare the efficacy of the non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, diclofenac sodium and flunixin meglumine as adjuncts to the antibiotic treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). We randomly allocated 80 Holstein calves with BRD to three groups. All the calves received a dose of 2.5 mg/kg tulathromycin by single subcutaneous injection and two of the groups received, in addition, either 2.5 mg/kg diclofenac sodium as a single intramuscular injection (diclofenac group, n = 30) or 2.2 mg/kg flunixin meglumine as an intravenous injection on the first three consecutive days after tulathromycin administration (flunixin group, n = 30). All calves were given a clinical score prior to initial treatment (day 0) and after treatment (days 1, 2, 3, 7 and 14) by observing appetite, demeanour, rectal temperature, the rate and type of respiration, presence or absence of coughing, and nasal discharge. During the first 48 h, improvement of adverse signs of respiratory disease, such as pyrexia and elevated respiratory rate, and of a high clinical index score was significant in the two adjunct groups compared with the calves receiving antibiotic alone. The reduction in pyrexia was greatest in the diclofenac group. There were no statically significant differences between treatment groups with regard to eventual perceived recovery from respiratory disease in 14 days. In this trial, a single intramuscular dose of diclofenac sodium was equally effective as three intravenous injections of flunixin meglumine given on consecutive days as adjunctive therapy for BRD.

  2. Determining bovine viral diarrhea virus genotypes and biotypes circulating in cattle populations in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) is the disease in cattle that results from infection with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV). BVDV is found in cattle populations throughout the world. While the term BVD encompasses a wide range of clinical manifestations, including severe respiratory disease, gastroe...

  3. Respiratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The words "respiratory" and "respiration" refer to the lungs and breathing. ... Boron WF. Organization of the respiratory system. In: Boron WF, Boulpaep EL, eds. Medical Physiology . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 26.

  4. The global burden of respiratory disease-impact on child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zar, Heather J; Ferkol, Thomas W

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory disease is the major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with infants and young children especially susceptible. The spectrum of disease ranges from acute infections to chronic non-communicable diseases. Five respiratory conditions dominate-acute respiratory infections, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, tuberculosis (TB), and lung cancer. Pneumonia remains the predominant cause of childhood mortality, causing nearly 1.3 million deaths each year, most of which are preventable. Asthma is the commonest non-communicable disease in children. Pediatric TB constitutes up to 20% of the TB caseload in high incidence countries. Environmental exposures such as tobacco smoke, indoor air pollution, and poor nutrition are common risk factors for acute and chronic respiratory diseases. Pediatric and adult respiratory disease is closely linked. Early childhood respiratory infection or environmental exposures may lead to chronic disease in adulthood. Childhood immunization can effectively reduce the incidence and severity of childhood pneumonia; childhood immunization is also effective for reducing pneumonia in the elderly. The Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS), representing the major respiratory societies worldwide, has produced a global roadmap of respiratory diseases, Respiratory Disease in the World: Realities of Today-Opportunities for Tomorrow. This highlights the burden of respiratory diseases globally and contains specific recommendations for effective strategies. Greater availability and upscaled implementation of effective strategies for prevention and management of respiratory diseases is needed worldwide to improve global health and diminish the current inequities in health care worldwide. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. PROPHYLAXIS OF RECURRENT RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN WITH ALLERGIC DISEASES OF RESPIRATORY TRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.F. Kaznacheeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections of airways are one of significant causes of morbidity in children. Approximately 70% of infections affect upper airways, ear, nose and throat. The problem is special for children with allergic pathology because any intercurrent virus disease can cause exacerbation of allergy. Open uncontrolled study of effectiveness of pidotimod in children with combined forms of allergy (bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis and severe acute respiratory disease was performed in 2008–2010 in Novosibirsk. Pidotimod as a component of complex treatment decreased trigger role of infections and eased clinical course of main disease. This drug decreased the rate of relapses and load of medications in patients. Key words: children with frequent diseases, immunomudulators, pidotimod.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(5:64-66

  6. Treatment of addison disease and subsequent hypophosphatemic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisterling, Leah; Chawla, Lakhmir S; Seneff, Michael G

    2012-01-01

    A 38-year-old man was found unresponsive with hypoglycemia by emergency medical service (EMS) personnel. He was intubated in the emergency department after reports of seizure activity. With supportive care and empiric steroids, the patient was extubated the next day. He reported a diagnosis of Addison disease and noncompliance with his steroid replacement therapy. Within 12 hours, respiratory failure and altered mental status required reintubation. Laboratory studies revealed rhabdomyolysis and hypophosphatemia. The replacement of glucose likely stimulated glycolysis, formation of phosphorylated glucose compounds, and an intracellular shift of phosphorus. This patient required phosphate replacement and was extubated on hospital day 5. We report a unique case of hypoglycemia due to Addison disease, leading to hypophosphatemic respiratory failure.

  7. Oscillation mechanics of the respiratory system: applications to lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczka, David W; Dellacá, Raffaele L

    2011-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1950s, the forced oscillation technique (FOT) and the measurement of respiratory impedance have evolved into powerful tools for the assessment of various mechanical phenomena in the mammalian lung during health and disease. In this review, we highlight the most recent developments in instrumentation, signal processing, and modeling relevant to FOT measurements. We demonstrate how FOT provides unparalleled information on the mechanical status of the respiratory system compared to more widely used pulmonary function tests. The concept of mechanical impedance is reviewed, as well as the various measurement techniques used to acquire such data. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of lower, physiologic frequency ranges (typically less than 10 Hz) that are most sensitive to normal physical processes as well as pathologic structural alterations. Various inverse modeling approaches used to interpret alterations in impedance are also discussed, specifically in the context of three common respiratory diseases: asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and acute lung injury. Finally, we speculate on the potential role for FOT in the clinical arena.

  8. Relation of meteorological elements and air pollutants to respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    László Makra

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper determines the characteristic weather types over the Carpathian Basin for the summer – early autumn period (July 15 – October 15 and the winter months (December, January, and February, with the levels of chemical (CO, NO, NO2, NO2/NO, O3, O3max, SO2, PM10 and biological [Ambrosia (ragweed pollen] air pollutants, and with their effect to the respiratory diseases. Based on the ECMWF data set, daily sea-level pressure fields analysed at 00 UTC (Coordinated Universal Time were prepared for each weather type (cluster in order to detect the relation between, on the one hand, the sea-level pressure patterns and, on the other, the levels of the chemical and biological air pollutants as well as the frequency of the respiratory diseases in Szeged. Objective definition of the characteristic weather types occurred by using the methods of Factor Analysis and Cluster Analysis. As a result, in the summer – early autumn period the total patient number is proportional to the mean monthly temperature, the maximum and minimum temperatures; however, respiratory diseases occur more frequently, when relative humidity is low. On the other hand, in the winter months there is no relation between the meteorological variables and the patient numbers.

  9. Codetection of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Habituated Wild Western Lowland Gorillas and Humans During a Respiratory Disease Outbreak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grützmacher, K. S.; Köndgen, S.; Keil, V.; Todd, A.; Feistner, A.; Herbinger, I.; Petrželková, Klára Judita; Fuh, T.; Leendertz, S. A.; Calvignac-Spencer, S.; Leendertz, F. H.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2016), s. 499-510 ISSN 1612-9202 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : respiratory disease * respiratory syncytial virus * enterovirus * western lowland gorillas * great apes * noninvasive detection Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.252, year: 2016

  10. Occupational respiratory diseases in the South African mining industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gill

    2013-01-24

    Crystalline silica and asbestos are common minerals that occur throughout South Africa, exposure to either causes respiratory disease. Most studies on silicosis in South Africa have been cross-sectional and long-term trends have not been reported. Although much research has been conducted on the health effects of silica dust and asbestos fibre in the gold-mining and asbestos-mining sectors, little is known about their health effects in other mining sectors. The aims of this thesis were to describe silicosis trends in gold miners over three decades, and to explore the potential for diamond mine workers to develop asbestos-related diseases and platinum mine workers to develop silicosis. Mine workers for the three sub-studies were identified from a mine worker autopsy database at the National Institute for Occupational Health. From 1975 to 2007, the proportions of white and black gold mine workers with silicosis increased from 18 to 22% and from 3 to 32% respectively. Cases of diamond and platinum mine workers with asbestos-related diseases and silicosis, respectively, were also identified. The trends in silicosis in gold miners at autopsy clearly demonstrate the failure of the gold mines to adequately control dust and prevent occupational respiratory disease. The two case series of diamond and platinum mine workers contribute to the evidence for the risk of asbestos-related diseases in diamond mine workers and silicosis in platinum mine workers, respectively. The absence of reliable environmental dust measurements and incomplete work history records impedes occupational health research in South Africa because it is difficult to identify and/or validate sources of dust exposure that may be associated with occupational respiratory disease.

  11. Occupational respiratory diseases in the South African mining industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill Nelson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Crystalline silica and asbestos are common minerals that occur throughout South Africa, exposure to either causes respiratory disease. Most studies on silicosis in South Africa have been cross-sectional and long-term trends have not been reported. Although much research has been conducted on the health effects of silica dust and asbestos fibre in the gold-mining and asbestos-mining sectors, little is known about their health effects in other mining sectors. Objective: The aims of this thesis were to describe silicosis trends in gold miners over three decades, and to explore the potential for diamond mine workers to develop asbestos-related diseases and platinum mine workers to develop silicosis. Methods: Mine workers for the three sub-studies were identified from a mine worker autopsy database at the National Institute for Occupational Health. Results: From 1975 to 2007, the proportions of white and black gold mine workers with silicosis increased from 18 to 22% and from 3 to 32% respectively. Cases of diamond and platinum mine workers with asbestos-related diseases and silicosis, respectively, were also identified. Conclusion: The trends in silicosis in gold miners at autopsy clearly demonstrate the failure of the gold mines to adequately control dust and prevent occupational respiratory disease. The two case series of diamond and platinum mine workers contribute to the evidence for the risk of asbestos-related diseases in diamond mine workers and silicosis in platinum mine workers, respectively. The absence of reliable environmental dust measurements and incomplete work history records impedes occupational health research in South Africa because it is difficult to identify and/or validate sources of dust exposure that may be associated with occupational respiratory disease.

  12. VIRAL PATTERN OF RESPIRATORY DISEASES AMONG PILGRIMS OF HAJJ, SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Jafar Panahi, Sajjad Panahi, Arezoo Sabbagh Hadi, Mohamad Reza Havasian*

    2017-01-01

    The respiratory system infections have been one of the biggest problems for the pilgrims and the medical organizations of hajj in the recent years. Viral agents play an important role in these diseases; more than 200 viral agents can cause infection in the respiratory system. This research aimed to study of viral pattern of respiratory diseases among pilgrims of hajj- Mecca. A comprehensive review of all studies conducted on respiratory diseases among Hajj pilgrims from 2000 to 2017 was carri...

  13. PHYTOTHERAPY IN SEASONAL PREVENTION OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASES AMONG SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.I. Garashchenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the research findings of the application efficiency of the complex plant based preparation Sinupret (Bionorica AG, Germany for prevention of the acute respiratory diseases among sickly children. The authors showed that the application of the plant based preparation decreased the sick rate caused by the acute respiratory diseases and influenza, alleviated the run of the acute respiratory diseases, had some really good tolerance and might be recommended for the wide use, for the prevention of the acute respiratory diseases in organized children groups.Key words: acute respiratory diseases, prevention, phytotherapy, children, homeopathic remedies, vaccines.

  14. Isolation of foot-and-mouth disease virus specific bovine antibody fragments from phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Joo; Lebreton, Françoise; Kaiser, Claude; Crucière, Catherine; Rémond, Michelle

    2004-03-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an important veterinary pathogen which can cause widespread epidemics. Due to the high antigenic variability of FMDV, it is important to undertake mutation analysis under immunological pressure. To study the bovine antibody response at a molecular level, phage display technology was used to produce bovine anti-FMDV Fabs. CH1-VH chains with FMDV specific binding could be isolated after selection from a library made from vaccinated cattle. Though their involvement in the bovine immune response remains to be ascertained, it is planned to express the five different selected VH domains in bacterial or insect systems as sequence homologies with integrin beta6 chain could shed light on the basis of FMDV type receptor specificities.

  15. Aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease: Current topics and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Jiménez, José Carlos; Moreno-Paz, Fernanda Judith; Terán, Luis Manuel; Guaní-Guerra, Eduardo

    2018-02-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease is a chronic and treatment-resistant disease, characterized by the presence of eosinophilic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyposis, bronchial asthma, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs hypersensitivity. Alterations in arachidonic acid metabolism may induce an imbalance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory substances, expressed as an overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes and an underproduction of prostaglandin E2. Although eosinophils play a key role, recent studies have shown the importance of other cells and molecules in the development of the disease like mast cells, basophils, lymphocytes, platelets, neutrophils, macrophages, epithelial respiratory cells, IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin, making each of them promissory diagnostic and treatment targets. In this review, we summarize the most important clinical aspects of the disease, including the current topics about diagnosis and treatment, like provocation challenges and aspirin desensitization. We also discuss recent findings in the pathogenesis of the disease, as well as future trends in diagnosis and treatment, including monoclonal antibodies and a low salicylate diet as a treatment option. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Exhaled nitric oxide in diagnosis and management of respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abba Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of biomarkers in exhaled breath constituents has recently become of great interest in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of many respiratory conditions. Of particular interest is the measurement of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO in breath. Its measurement is noninvasive, easy and reproducible. The technique has recently been standardized by both American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society. The availability of cheap, portable and reliable equipment has made the assay possible in clinics by general physicians and, in the near future, at home by patients. The concentration of exhaled nitric oxide is markedly elevated in bronchial asthma and is positively related to the degree of esinophilic inflammation. Its measurement can be used in the diagnosis of bronchial asthma and titration of dose of steroids as well as to identify steroid responsive patients in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In primary ciliary dyskinesia, nasal NO is diagnostically low and of considerable value in diagnosis. Among lung transplant recipients, FENO can be of great value in the early detection of infection, bronchioloitis obliterans syndrome and rejection. This review discusses the biology, factors affecting measurement, and clinical application of FENO in the diagnosis and management of respiratory diseases.

  17. Occupational respiratory diseases: review of HSE's strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naylor, S.; Curran, A.

    2004-07-01

    The workshop was convened to discuss whether or not there is adequate justification for devoting resource to a programme of work aimed at reducing the incidence of non-asthma forms of occupational respiratory disease, and in particular, whether or not work-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) should be a priority within such a programme. This paper provides a summary of the workshop presentations and main discussion points. The presentation 'HSE draft strategy document for non-asthma occupational respiratory disease' concluded there was particular grounds for concern for occupationally related COPD. Occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica and to diesel engine exhaust emissions were also felt to be an important issue that should be addressed. A worrying trend for a possible increase in the incidence of respiratory disease in coal miners was noted, but it was noted that changes to the Respirable Dust Regulations in underground coalmines were being implemented and that no additional actions would be undertaken at this time. The second presentation gave a background to HSE's 'Silica action plan'. Statistics show that there has been no decline in the annual incidence of silicosis in the UK for the last 10-13 years; HSE plans to issue a consultative document proposing a new limit for respirable crystalline silica by the end of 2004. A third presentation introduced key points in the 2003 American Thoracic Society Statement on COPD and occupation and summarised data from recent population studies including UCS's COPPED study. The next presentation introduced key issues requiring consideration in the development of an effective strategy for dealing with work-related COPPED. The final presentation gave an introduction to THOR, the health and occupational reporting network, a surveillance scheme established in the UK for the reporting of cases of occupational related disease, in ten categories. 1 app.

  18. Short communication. Prevalence of antibodies against Parainfluenza virus type 3, Respiratory syncitial virus and bovine Herpesvirus type 1 in sheep from Northern Prefectures of Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Giangaspero

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ovine sera collected in the Prefectures of Hokkaido, Aomori and Iwate in the Northern Japan were examined for the presence of antibodies against Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, bovine Herpesvirus type 1 (infectious bovine rhinotracheitis: IBR and Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3 using serum neutralisation (SN and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA tests. Twenty-three animals (11.73% out of the 196 tested were sero-positive to PIV3. Sixteen animals (8.69% out of the 184 tested reacted to RSV. No animals were positive to IBR antigen. Sero-conversions to PIV3 were detected in Hokkaido and Iwate (14.92% and 8.82%, respectively. Antibodies against RSV were detected in Hokkaido (9.23% and Aomori (14.28%. Although no diagnostic measures were in place, the infections did not appear to be related to any reduction in sheep productivity.

  19. Prevalence of antibodies against Parainfluenza virus type 3, Respiratory syncitial virus and bovine Herpesvirus type 1 in sheep from Northern Prefectures of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangaspero, Massimo; Savini, Giovanni; Orusa, Riccardo; Osawa, Takeshi; Harasawa, Ryô

    2013-01-01

    Ovine sera collected in the Prefectures of Hokkaido, Aomori and Iwate in the Northern Japan were examined for the presence of antibodies against Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), bovine Herpesvirus type 1 (infectious bovine rhinotracheitis: IBR) and Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) using serum neutralisation (SN) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests. Twenty-three animals (11.73%) out of the 196 tested were sero-positive to PIV3. Sixteen animals (8.69%) out of the 184 tested reacted to RSV. No animals were positive to IBR antigen. Sero-conversions to PIV3 were detected in Hokkaido and Iwate (14.92% and 8.82%, respectively). Antibodies against RSV were detected in Hokkaido (9.23%) and Aomori (14.28%). Although no diagnostic measures were in place, the infections did not appear to be related to any reduction in sheep productivity.

  20. Single and multiple respiratory virus infections and severity of respiratory disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goka, Edward Anthony; Vallely, Pamela J; Mutton, Kenneth J; Klapper, Paul E

    2014-12-01

    There are suggestions that virus co-infections may influence the clinical outcome of respiratory virus illness. We performed a systematic review of the literature to summarise the evidence. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid and WEB of Science databases, major organisation websites and reference lists of published studies were searched. The quality of studies was assessed using the STROBE tool (von Elm et al., 1) Individual study data was analyzed using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals as a measure of association between exposure (co-infection), patient outcome and results summarised using forest plots and tables Nineteen (19) studies from all over the world were identified and included in the review. Most of the studies 73.7% (14/19) recruited children ≤ 6 years old. Evidence on the role of co-infection in increasing disease severity was inconclusive. In five out of eight studies, co-infection significantly increased risk of admission to general ward (OR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.3 - 4.4, p = 0.005; OR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.1 - 7.7, P = 0.04; OR: 3.1, 95% CI: 2.0 - 5.1, p = respiratory virus co-infections and risk of bronchiolitis or pneumonia. The influence of co-infections on severe viral respiratory disease is still unclear. The observed conflict in outcomes could be because they were conducted in different seasons and covered different years and periods. It could also be due to bias towards the null, especially in studies where only crude analysis was conducted. Future studies should employ stratified analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Early Fluid Overload Prolongs Mechanical Ventilation in Children With Viral-Lower Respiratory Tract Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingelse, Sarah A.; Wiegers, Hanke M. G.; Calis, Job C.; van Woensel, Job B.; Bem, Reinout A.

    2017-01-01

    Viral-lower respiratory tract disease is common in young children worldwide and is associated with high morbidity. Acute respiratory failure due to viral-lower respiratory tract disease necessitates PICU admission for mechanical ventilation. In critically ill patients in PICU settings, early fluid

  2. Exosomes and Exosomal miRNA in Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamila D. Alipoor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are nanosized vesicles released from every cell in the body including those in the respiratory tract and lungs. They are found in most body fluids and contain a number of different biomolecules including proteins, lipids, and both mRNA and noncoding RNAs. Since they can release their contents, particularly miRNAs, to both neighboring and distal cells, they are considered important in cell-cell communication. Recent evidence has shown their possible importance in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases. The differential expression of exosomes and of exosomal miRNAs in disease has driven their promise as biomarkers of disease enabling noninvasive clinical diagnosis in addition to their use as therapeutic tools. In this review, we summarize recent advances in this area as applicable to pulmonary diseases.

  3. A cross-sectional survey to study the relationship of periodontal disease with cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Harish, Yashoda; Hiremath, Shivalingaswamy; Puranik, Manjunath

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal deterioration has been reported to be associated with systemic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus, respiratory disease, liver cirrhosis, bacterial pneumonia, nutritional deficiencies, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The present study assessed the periodontal disease among patients with systemic conditions such as diabetes, CVD, and respiratory disease. The study population consisted of 220 patients each of CVD, respiratory disease, and diabetes mellitus, making a total of 660 patients in the systemic disease group. A control group of 340 subjects were also included in the study for comparison purpose. The periodontal status of the patients with these confirmed medical conditions was assessed using the community periodontal index of treatment needs (CPITNs) index. The prevalence of CPITN code 4 was found to be greater among the patients with respiratory disease whereas the mean number of sextants with score 4 was found to be greater among the patients with diabetes mellitus and CVD. The treatment need 0 was found to be more among the controls (1.18%) whereas the treatment need 1, 2, and 3 were more among the patients with respiratory disease (100%, 97.73%, and 54.8%), diabetes mellitus (100%, 100% and 46.4%), and CVD (100%, 97.73%, and 38.1%), in comparison to the controls (6.18%). From the findings of the present study, it can be concluded that diabetes mellitus, CVD, and respiratory disease are associated with a higher severity of periodontal disease.

  4. Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease : assessment of respiratory muscle activity and the benefits of noninvasive ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duiverman, Marieke Leontine

    2008-01-01

    This thesis deals with two main topics. First, we investigated respiratory muscle function in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) by surface electromyography. Second, we focused on the benefits of noninvasive ventilation in patients with respiratory failure, both in restrictive pulmonary

  5. Mitochondrial respiratory chain disease presenting as progressive bulbar paralysis of childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeleveld-Versteegh, ABC; Braun, KPJ; Smeitink, JAM; Dorland, L; de Koning, TJ

    2004-01-01

    We report two siblings with a mitochondrial respiratory chain defect who presented with progressive bulbar paralysis of childhood ( Fazio-Londe disease). Mitochondrial respiratory chain defects should be considered in the differential diagnosis of this rare clinical entity.

  6. Mitochondrial respiratory chain disease presenting as progressive bulbar paralysis of childhood.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeleveld-Versteegh, A.B.; Braun, K.P.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Dorland, L.; Koning, T.J.

    2004-01-01

    We report two siblings with a mitochondrial respiratory chain defect who presented with progressive bulbar paralysis of childhood (Fazio-Londe disease). Mitochondrial respiratory chain defects should be considered in differential diagnosis of this rare clinical entity.

  7. Occupational risk factors for chronic respiratory disease in a New Zealand population using lifetime occupational history.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansell, A.; Ghosh, R.E.; Poole, S.; Zock, J.P.; Weatherall, M.; Vermeulen, R.; Kromhout, H.; Travers, J.; Beasley, R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate associations between respiratory disease and occupational exposures in a New Zealand urban population, the Wellington Respiratory Survey. Methods: Multiple regression analyses in a population sample of 1017 individuals aged 25 to 74 years with spirometry and questionnaire

  8. Motor function and respiratory capacity in patients with late-onset pompe disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illes, Zsolt; Mike, Andrea; Trauninger, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The relationship between skeletal muscle strength and respiratory dysfunction in Pompe disease has not been examined by quantitative methods. We investigated correlations among lower extremity proximal muscle strength, respiratory function, and motor performance. Methods: Concentric...

  9. Respiratory pathology in vibroacoustic disease: 25 years of research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno A.A. Castelo Branco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory pathology induced by low frequency noise (LFN, <500 Hz, including infrasound is not a novel subject given that in the 1960's, within the context of U.S. and U.S.S.R. Space Programs, other authors have already reported its existence. Within the scope of vibroacoustic disease (VAD, a whole-body pathology caused by excessive exposure to LFN, respiratory pathology takes on specific features. Initially, respiratory pathology was not considered a consequence of LFN exposure; but today, LFN can be regarded as a major agent of disease that targets the respiratory system. The goal of this report is to put forth what is known to date on the clinical signs of respiratory pathology seen in VAD patients. Methods: Data from the past 25 years of research will be taken together and presented. Results: In persons exposed to LFN on the job, respiratory complaints appear after the first 4 years of professional activity. At this stage, they disappear during vacation periods or when the person is removed form his /her workstation for other reasons. With long-term exposure, more serious situations can arise, such as, atypical pleural effusion, respiratory insufficiency, fibrosis and tumours. There is no correlation with smoking habits. In LFN--exposed animal models, morphological changes of the pleura, and loss of the phagocytic ability of pleural mesothelial cells (explaining the atypical pleural effusions. Fibrotic lesions and neo-vascularization were observed along the entire respiratory tract. Fibrosis lesions and neovascularisation were observed throughout the respiratory tract of the animals seen. Pre-malignant lesions, metaplasia e displasia, were also identified. Discussion: LFN is an agent of disease and the respiratory tract is one of its preferential targets. The respiratory pathology associated with VAD needs further in-depth studies in order to achieve a greater understanding, and develop methods of pharmacological intervention

  10. Simulation modelling to support national policy making in the control of bovine herpesvirus 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk Noordegraaf, A.

    2002-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) is the causative agent of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR), a respiratory disease in cattle. Increased international legislation, together with a high prevalence of BHV1 infected cattle in The Netherlands, put pressure on Dutch

  11. Air pollution and respiratory allergic diseases in schoolchildren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolussi, Francine Heloisa; dos Santos, Ana Paula Milla; André, Sílvia Carla da Silva; Veiga, Tatiane Bonametti; Takayanagui, Angela Maria Magosso

    2014-01-01

    Study on the prevalence of allergic respiratory diseases in schoolchildren between six and seven years old, associated with indicators of air pollution. A questionnaire based on the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood was administered to parents of students from public schools, located in urban areas with differing vehicle flows. There was a positive correlation between monthly frequency of rhinitis and concentration of pollutants, and negative with relative air humidity. Even with levels of air pollutants below that allowed by law, the prevalence of asthma, rhinitis and associated symptoms tended to be higher in the central region school, where there is heavy vehicular traffic. PMID:24897055

  12. Palliative care for respiratory disease: An education model of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Brynn; Meier, Diane E

    2018-02-01

    That palliative care improves quality of life for seriously ill patients and their families is well known - but how can healthcare providers ensure that the palliative needs of all patients are being assessed and addressed? A growing number of curricula in core palliative care practices have been developed to ensure that clinicians from all specialties and disciplines have the necessary training to manage pain and symptoms and discuss care goals with patients and families. Through broad-based training in core palliative care skills, combined with referral to specialty palliative care for high-need patients, providers can improve quality of life for their patients with respiratory disease.

  13. Role of bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5 in diseases of cattle. Recent findings on BoHV-5 association with genital disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. Pérez

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5 belongs to the family Herpesviridae, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae, genus Varicellovirus. This virus is a major causative agent of non-suppurative meningoencephalitis in young cattle. It was first isolated in 1962 from a neurological disease outbreak in Australia. BoHV-5 is genetically and antigenically related to bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1, a highly prevalent virus responsible for respiratory and genital disease in cattle. Initially, BoHV-5 was considered a subtype of BoHV-1 (BoHV-1.3. However, the exclusive presentation of outbreaks of neurological disease suggested that the virus was a new agent with characteristics of neuropathogenicity. Even though both are neurotropic viruses, only BoHV-5 is capable of replicating extensively in the central nervous system and inducing neurological disease. Occasionally, encephalitis caused by BoHV-1 has been reported. Like other alpha-herpesviruses, BoHV-5 can establish latency in nervous ganglia and, by stress factors or glucocorticoid treatment, latent virus can be reactivated. During episodes of reactivation, the virus is excreted in nasal, ocular and genital secretions and transmitted to other susceptible hosts. Recently, BoHV-5 has been associated with infection of the reproductive tract. The virus has been isolated and the presence of viral DNA has been demonstrated in semen samples from Brazil and Australia and natural transmission of the virus through contaminated semen has also been described. Embryos and oocytes are permissive for BoHV-5 infection and BoHV-5 DNA has been detected in the central nervous system of aborted fetuses. The objective of this review is to compile the limited information on the recent association between BoHV-5 and reproductive disorders in cattle.

  14. Diagnosis of enzootic pneumonia in Danish cattle: reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.

    1999-01-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) in lung tissue of naturally and experimentally infected cattle. Primers were selected from the gene coding the F fusion protein, which is relatively conserved...... among BRSV isolates. The RT-PCR assay was highly specific, it yielded positive reactions only when performed on BRSV-infected cell cultures or tissues. The detection limit of the RT-PCR assay was assessed as 5 TCID50. BRSV was detected in tissues of the respiratory tract and in the tracheobroncheal...... lymph node of calves euthanized 2-8 days after experimental infection with BRSV, whereas samples of other tissues and samples from mock-infected animals were negative at all time points. Examination of lung samples from 8 different regions of the lungs revealed that although the virus was most often...

  15. Immortalized Parkinson's disease lymphocytes have enhanced mitochondrial respiratory activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Annesley

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In combination with studies of post-mortem Parkinson's disease (PD brains, pharmacological and genetic models of PD have suggested that two fundamental interacting cellular processes are impaired – proteostasis and mitochondrial respiration. We have re-examined the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in lymphoblasts isolated from individuals with idiopathic PD and an age-matched control group. As previously reported for various PD cell types, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS by PD lymphoblasts was significantly elevated. However, this was not due to an impairment of mitochondrial respiration, as is often assumed. Instead, basal mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis are dramatically elevated in PD lymphoblasts. The mitochondrial mass, genome copy number and membrane potential were unaltered, but the expression of indicative respiratory complex proteins was also elevated. This explains the increased oxygen consumption rates by each of the respiratory complexes in experimentally uncoupled mitochondria of iPD cells. However, it was not attributable to increased activity of the stress- and energy-sensing protein kinase AMPK, a regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and activity. The respiratory differences between iPD and control cells were sufficiently dramatic as to provide a potentially sensitive and reliable biomarker of the disease state, unaffected by disease duration (time since diagnosis or clinical severity. Lymphoblasts from control and PD individuals thus occupy two distinct, quasi-stable steady states; a ‘normal’ and a ‘hyperactive’ state characterized by two different metabolic rates. The apparent stability of the ‘hyperactive’ state in patient-derived lymphoblasts in the face of patient ageing, ongoing disease and mounting disease severity suggests an early, permanent switch to an alternative metabolic steady state. With its associated, elevated ROS production, the ‘hyperactive’ state might not cause

  16. Long-term trends in cardiovascular disease mortality and association with respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, A J

    2016-03-01

    The recent decline in cardiovascular disease mortality in Western countries has been linked with changes in life style and treatment. This study considers periods of decline before effective medical interventions or knowledge about risk factors. Trends in annual age-standardized death rates from cerebrovascular disease, heart disease and circulatory disease, and all cardiovascular disease are reviewed for three phases, 1881-1916, 1920-1939, and 1940-2000. There was a consistent decline in the cerebrovascular disease death rate between 1891 and 2000, apart from brief increases after the two world wars. The heart disease and circulatory disease death rate was declining between 1891 and 1910 before cigarette smoking became prevalent. The early peak in cardiovascular mortality in 1891 coincided with an influenza pandemic and a peak in the death rate from bronchitis, pneumonia and influenza. There is also correspondence between short-term fluctuations in the death rates from these respiratory diseases and cardiovascular disease. This evidence of ecological association is consistent with the findings of many studies that seasonal influenza can trigger acute myocardial infarction and episodes of respiratory infection are followed by increased risk of cardiovascular events. Vaccination studies could provide more definitive evidence of the role in cardiovascular disease and mortality of influenza, other viruses, and common bacterial agents of respiratory infection.

  17. The Rise and Fall of Hyaluronan in Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Lauer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In normal airways, hyaluronan (HA matrices are primarily located within the airway submucosa, pulmonary vasculature walls, and, to a lesser extent, the alveoli. Following pulmonary injury, elevated levels of HA matrices accumulate in these regions, and in respiratory secretions, correlating with the extent of injury. Animal models have provided important insight into the role of HA in the onset of pulmonary injury and repair, generally indicating that the induction of HA synthesis is an early event typically preceding fibrosis. The HA that accumulates in inflamed airways is of a high molecular weight (>1600 kDa but can be broken down into smaller fragments (<150 kDa by inflammatory and disease-related mechanisms that have profound effects on HA pathobiology. During inflammation in the airways, HA is often covalently modified with heavy chains from inter-alpha-inhibitor via the enzyme tumor-necrosis-factor-stimulated-gene-6 (TSG-6 and this modification promotes the interaction of leukocytes with HA matrices at sites of inflammation. The clearance of HA and its return to normal levels is essential for the proper resolution of inflammation. These data portray HA matrices as an important component of normal airway physiology and illustrate its integral roles during tissue injury and repair among a variety of respiratory diseases.

  18. Steroid myopathy in patients with chronic respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Oleg S; Polunina, Anna G; Demyanova, Marina A; Isaev, Fedor V

    2014-03-15

    Corticosteroid-induced myopathy is a well known clinical entity, and experimental studies showed decreased rate of protein synthesis and increased rate of protein breakdown in muscles of chronically treated animals. The present observational study was aimed to evaluate skeletal muscle functions in asthmatics and patients with other chronic respiratory diseases treated by inhaled or oral corticosteroids. Thirty six patients with respiratory diseases were included into the study. The physician-rated peripheral motor deficits scale, stepper test and ankle/wrist index were used for assessment of muscle functions. The effects of length of glucocorticoids intake on muscle functions were evaluated. Sixty five per cent of patients using corticosteroids daily during 1 year and longer reported weakness in legs, and 20% of these patients demonstrated objective signs of the muscle weakness. The performance on the stepper test was significantly worse in patients chronically using corticosteroids in comparison with the control group (10.9 ± 3.4 steps vs 16.1 ± 2.4 steps per 10s, respectively; F=21.6, p<0.001). In addition, a proportion of patients using corticosteroids for at least 18 months were characterized by muscle hypotrophy at a dominant leg. Chronic intake of inhaled corticosteroids induces clinically significant decrease of muscle functions at least after 1-year of daily treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5) in diseases of cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BoHV-1), a highly prevalent virus responsible for respiratory and genital disease in cattle. Initially, BoHV-5 was considered a subtype of BoHV-1 (BoHV-1.3). However, the exclusive presentation of outbreaks of neurological disease suggested that ...

  20. Recombinant Jembrana disease virus proteins as antigens for the detection of antibody to bovine lentiviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkala, E J; Narayani, I; Hartaningsih, N; Kertayadnya, G; Berryman, D I; Wilcox, G E

    1998-09-01

    Jembrana disease virus (JDV) is a recently identified bovine lentivirus causing an acute severe disease syndrome in banteng cattle (Bos javanicus) and a milder disease syndrome in Bos taurus cattle in Indonesia. The virus is closely related genetically to the previously identified bovine lentivirus, bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV). Recombinant clones were produced which contained the capsid (CA) and transmembrane (TM) subunits of the respective gag and env open reading frames of JDV. The proteins were expressed as fusions to the glutathione-s-transferase (GST) enzyme in Escherichia coli and purification was achieved using affinity chromatography via immobilized reduced glutathione. The soluble recombinant CA and TM antigens of JDV were reacted in western immunoblots with both serum antibodies from JDV-infected Bos javanicus cattle and Bos taurus cattle immunized with BIV. The recombinant CA protein of JDV reacted equally well with both the JDV and BIV antisera. The recombinant TM protein of JDV also reacted with antibody from the JDV infected cattle and with the BIV antisera. The results indicated conservation of immunogenic epitopes of the CA and TM proteins of the two viruses. The production of the recombinant proteins should enable the development of rapid and sensitive serological tests for JDV and BIV, and tools for further study of the immune response to JDV and the differential epidemiology of JDV infections in cattle.

  1. Invasive pneumococcal and meningococcal disease : association with influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A G S C; Sanders, E A M; VAN DER Ende, A; VAN Loon, A M; Hoes, A W; Hak, E

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between viral activity and bacterial invasive disease, considering both influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study aimed to assess the potential relationship between invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), meningococcal disease (MD), and

  2. Invasive pneumococcal and meningococcal disease: association with influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A. G. S. C.; Sanders, E. A. M.; van der Ende, A.; van Loon, A. M.; Hoes, A. W.; Hak, E.

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between viral activity and bacterial invasive disease, considering both influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study aimed to assess the potential relationship between invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), meningococcal disease (MD), and

  3. Neutrophil extracellular traps cause airway obstruction during respiratory syncytial virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortjens, Bart; de Boer, Onno J; de Jong, Rineke; Antonis, Adriaan Fg; Sabogal Piñeros, Yanaika S; Lutter, René; van Woensel, Job Bm; Bem, Reinout A

    2016-02-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of severe lower respiratory tract disease (LRTD) in young children worldwide. Extensive neutrophil accumulation in the lungs and occlusion of small airways by DNA-rich mucus plugs are characteristic features of severe RSV-LRTD. Activated neutrophils can release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), extracellular networks of DNA covered with antimicrobial proteins, as part of the first-line defence against pathogens. NETs can trap and eliminate microbes; however, abundant NET formation may also contribute to airway occlusion. In this study, we investigated whether NETs are induced by RSV and explored their potential anti-viral effect in vitro. Second, we studied NET formation in vivo during severe RSV-LRTD in infants and bovine RSV-LRTD in calves, by examining bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue sections, respectively. NETs were visualized in lung cytology and tissue samples by DNA and immunostaining, using antibodies against citrullinated histone H3, elastase and myeloperoxidase. RSV was able to induce NET formation by human neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, NETs were able to capture RSV, thereby precluding binding of viral particles to target cells and preventing infection. Evidence for the formation of NETs in the airways and lungs was confirmed in children with severe RSV-LRTD. Detailed histopathological examination of calves with RSV-LRTD showed extensive NET formation in dense plugs occluding the airways, either with or without captured viral antigen. Together, these results suggest that, although NETs trap viral particles, their exaggerated formation during severe RSV-LRTD contributes to airway obstruction. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. IMMUNIZATION AND GETTING DISEASED FROM SOME RESPIRATORY, VACCINE-PREVENTABLE DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozidar Jovanovic

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Contagious diseases present the leading causes of getting diseased and mortality in different parts of the world, regardless of improved socio-economic life conditions. The most important among them are the diseases which can be spread by air and water. Immunization against contagious diseases presents the most effective form of prevention, ending, elimination and, where possible, eradication of disease. When there are good programs of immunization properly implemented, and when they greatly cover the population which they refer to, the changes in frequency of vaccinable diseases can be observed, eg. contagious nosological entities that could be prevented by vaccination. Certain vaccines protect from bacterial or viral infections and reduce the possibility of infection, that is, prevent its transmission. The objective of the research is to point to the results of conducting the compulsory systematic immunization and to examine the effect of immunization on spreading of some respiratory vaccine-preventable diseases within Sumadija Region. This study shows the scope of immunization and spreading of some respiratory vaccine-preventable diseases, before all morbilli, parottitis epidemica, rubella and pertussis, in Sumadija Region for the last ten years. By means of great scope of compulsory immunization, the aforementioned respiratory vaccine-preventable diseases could be prevented.

  5. The evaluation and management of respiratory disease in children with Down syndrome (DS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubie, Haya S; Rosen, Dennis

    2017-08-23

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have wide range of respiratory problems. Although underlying abnormalities in the respiratory system are important causes of morbidity and mortality in children with DS, particularly in the young, abnormalities in other organ systems may also impact respiratory function. A comprehensive evaluation of the child with DS and respiratory disease may prevent short-term morbidity and mortality, and reduce the incidence of complications in the long term. This review provides an overview of the various causes of respiratory disease, and insight into some of the newer therapies available to treat obstructive sleep apnea, in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Azithromycin does not improve disease course in hospitalized infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease : A randomized equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Woensel, Job B. M.; Uijtendaal, Esther; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Kimpen, Jan L. L.

    Background: Nearly halt of all hospitalized infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease (LRTD) are treated with (parenteral) antibiotics. The present study was designed to test our hypothesis that the use of antibiotics would not lead to a reduced duration of

  7. Methodology in the epidemiological research of respiratory diseases and environmental pollution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simón Barquera; Favio G Rico-Méndez; Víctor Tovar

    2002-01-01

    .... The association of urban growth, industrialization and environmental deterioration with respiratory diseases makes it necessary to pay more attention to this research area with a multidisciplinary approach...

  8. Effect of genetic polymorphism of ALOX15 on aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Song, Young-Sin; Yang, Eun-Mi; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Jin, Hyun Jung; Park, Hae-Sim

    2012-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is a clinical syndrome associated with chronic inflammation in the airways coincident with chronic rhinitis, sinusitis, recurrent polyposis and asthma...

  9. Chronic respiratory disease: an unrecognized risk factor in dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couchoud, Cécile; Béchade, Clémence; Bemrah, Abdelkader; Delarozière, Jean-Christophe; Jean, Guillaume

    2017-12-01

    Few studies have analysed the impact of chronic respiratory disease (CRD) on outcomes in dialysis. We therefore sought to describe patients with CRD and end-stage renal disease and their outcomes after dialysis start, compared with patients without CRD, focusing especially on causes of death, access to renal transplantation and causes of hospital admissions. The study included 52 797 adults aged 18 years and older who began dialysis from 2008 to 2013 and are recorded in the French national REIN registry. Survival, specific mortality and access to the waiting list and to renal transplantation were analysed, with adjustment for various comorbidities and consideration of competitive risks. The numbers of hospitalizations and hospital days, together with their causes, were analysed through an indirect link between the REIN database and the national French hospital discharge database. The frequency of CRD at dialysis start was 12% and was associated with various other comorbidities, including obesity and tobacco use. After adjustment for those comorbidities, CRD remained associated with a higher risk of death [hazard ratio (HR) 1.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.25]. Patients with CRD were 30% less likely to undergo transplantation (HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.6-0.7) than patients without CRD. Their risk of dying from a respiratory disease was 8.8 times higher; their risk of dying from infection was also higher. Patients with CRD had a higher rate of admissions and more hospital days, for all causes and for every cause, except cancer. CRD was associated with higher risks of death and hospital admissions and with lower likelihoods of being wait-listed for and undergoing renal transplantation. Increasing clinical awareness by patients and doctors and encouragement of spirometry use should promote more accurate clinical diagnosis and better preventive care for CRD.

  10. Firing patterns of muscle vasoconstrictor neurones in respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan G Macefield

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Because the cardiovascular system and respiration are so intimately coupled, disturbances in respiratory control often lead to disturbances in cardiovascular control. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD and Bronchiectasis (BE are all associated with a greatly elevated muscle vasoconstrictor drive (muscle sympathetic nerve activity; MSNA. Indeed, the increase in MSNA is comparable to that seen in congestive heart failure (CHF, in which the increase in MSNA compensates for the reduced cardiac output and thereby assists in maintaining blood pressure. However, in OSA – but not COPD or BE – the increase in MSNA can lead to hypertension. Here, the features of the sympathoexcitation in OSA, COPD and BE are reviewed in terms of the firing properties of post-ganglionic muscle vasoconstrictor neurones. Compared to healthy subjects with low levels of resting MSNA, single-unit recordings revealed that the augmented MSNA seen in OSA, BE, COPD and CHF were each associated with an increase in firing probability and mean firing rates of individual neurones. However, unlike patients with heart failure, all patients with respiratory disease exhibited an increase in multiple within-burst firing which, it is argued, reflects an increase in central sympathetic drive. Similar patterns to those seen in OSA, COPD and BE were seen in healthy subjects during an acute increase in muscle vasoconstrictor drive. These observations emphasise the differences by which the sympathetic nervous system grades its output in health and disease, with an increase in firing probability of active neurones and recruitment of additional neurones being the dominant mechanisms.

  11. The role of vitamin D in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and other respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de Tena, Jaime; El Hachem Debek, Abdulkader; Hernández Gutiérrez, Cristina; Izquierdo Alonso, José Luis

    2014-05-01

    There has been growing interest in recent years in the extraosseous effects of vitamin D. In this article, we review the physiology of vitamin D, the physiopathological effects associated with vitamin D deficit and the available evidence on its etiopathogenic role in respiratory diseases. Given the pleiotropic actions of vitamin D, it is biologically plausible that the deficit of this vitamin could play a pathogenic role of in the development of various respiratory diseases. However, the many epidemiological studies that have shown an association between low vitamin D levels and a higher risk of developing various respiratory diseases or a poorer prognosis if they do appear, were unable to show causality. Post-hoc analyses of some clinical trials, particularly in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma, appear to suggest that some patient subtypes may benefit from correction of a vitamin D deficit. In this respect, it would be interesting to determine if the interindividual differences found in the effect of vitamin D deficit and responses to correcting this deficit could be explained by the genetic variants involved in vitamin D metabolism. Ultimately, only appropriately designed clinical trials will determine whether 25-OHD supplements can prevent or improve the course of the various respiratory diseases in which an epidemiological association between prognosis and vitamin D deficit has been described. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of on-arrival versus delayed clostridial or modified live respiratory vaccinations on health, performance, bovine viral diarrhea virus type I titers, and stress and immune measures of newly received beef calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richeson, J T; Kegley, E B; Gadberry, M S; Beck, P A; Powell, J G; Jones, C A

    2009-07-01

    Stress, commonly associated with weaning, marketing, and shipment of feeder cattle, can compromise immune function, and vaccine administration during immunosuppression may reduce vaccine efficacy and calf growth. Four treatments were compared in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement to evaluate the effect of on-arrival (d 0) vs. delayed (d 14) administration of clostridial (CLOS) and respiratory (RESP) vaccines on health, performance, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) antibody titers, and physiological immune measurements of high-risk, newly received calves. Crossbred bull and steer calves (n = 263) were weighed (239 +/- 1.2 kg), stratified by sex, and randomly assigned to vaccination treatment: 1) arrival CLOS, arrival RESP (ACAR); 2) arrival CLOS, delayed RESP (ACDR); 3) delayed CLOS, arrival RESP (DCAR); and 4) delayed CLOS, delayed RESP (DCDR). Body weight and blood samples were collected on d 0, 14, 28, 42, and 56. Average daily gain did not differ (P > or = 0.34), averaging 0.98, 0.93, 0.95, and 0.91 kg/d for ACAR, ACDR, DCAR, and DCDR, respectively, for the entire 56-d trial. Vaccination timing did not affect morbidity (P > or = 0.23); however, there tended to be a CLOS timing effect (P = 0.07) and RESP timing effect (P = 0.09) on days to initial bovine respiratory disease (BRD) treatment. Average days to initial BRD treatment were less for ACAR (6 +/- 0.8 d) compared with DCDR (8 +/- 0.8 d; P = 0.01). Greater white blood cell counts were observed for DCDR than ACDR (P = 0.01), with ACAR and DCAR being intermediate. Serum cortisol concentrations were greater on d 0 than d 14 (P gain or morbidity in high risk, newly received stocker calves. Calves administered RESP vaccine on d 0 developed antibody titers to BVDV type I earlier than delayed RESP treatments. Total white blood cell count was greatest when RESP and CLOS vaccination were delayed (DCDR).

  13. Development and Characterization of a Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out Supplemental Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

    2007-08-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed advanced rapid diagnostics that may be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the potential to improve our nation's ability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect animal populations of high economic importance in the United States. Under 2005 DHS funding we have developed multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based PCR assays that combine foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease (SVD) and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1 or Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitus IBR), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus BPSV, Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). Under 2006 funding we have developed a Multiplexed PCR [MUX] porcine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for VESV and SVD foreign animal diseases in addition to one other domestic vesicular animal disease vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and one domestic animal disease of swine porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). We have also developed a MUX bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine foreign animal diseases malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitus virus (BHV-1), bluetongue virus (BTV), and the Parapox

  14. Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Virology, Reverse Genetics, and Pathogenesis of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearns, Rachel; Graham, Barney S.

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an enveloped, nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus of family Paramyxoviridae. RSV is the most complex member of the family in terms of the number of genes and proteins. It is also relatively divergent and distinct from the prototype members of the family. In the past 30 years, we have seen a tremendous increase in our understanding of the molecular biology of RSV based on a succession of advances involving molecular cloning, reverse genetics, and detailed studies of protein function and structure. Much remains to be learned. RSV disease is complex and variable, and the host and viral factors that determine tropism and disease are poorly understood. RSV is notable for a historic vaccine failure in the 1960s involving a formalin-inactivated vaccine that primed for enhanced disease in RSV naïve recipients. Live vaccine candidates have been shown to be free of this complication. However, development of subunit or other protein-based vaccines for pediatric use is hampered by the possibility of enhanced disease and the difficulty of reliably demonstrating its absence in preclinical studies. PMID:24362682

  15. Respiratory muscle dysfunction in animal models of hypoxic disease: antioxidant therapy goes from strength to strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Ken D; Lewis, Philip

    2017-01-01

    The striated muscles of breathing play a critical role in respiratory homeostasis governing blood oxygenation and pH regulation. Upper airway dilator and thoracic pump muscles retain a remarkable capacity for plasticity throughout life, both in health and disease states. Hypoxia, whatever the cause, is a potent driver of respiratory muscle remodeling with evidence of adaptive and maladaptive outcomes for system performance. The pattern, duration, and intensity of hypoxia are key determinants of respiratory muscle structural-, metabolic-, and functional responses and adaptation. Age and sex also influence respiratory muscle tolerance of hypoxia. Redox stress emerges as the principal protagonist driving respiratory muscle malady in rodent models of hypoxic disease. There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that antioxidant intervention alleviates hypoxia-induced respiratory muscle dysfunction, and that N-acetyl cysteine, approved for use in humans, is highly effective in preventing hypoxia-induced respiratory muscle weakness and fatigue. We posit that oxygen homeostasis is a key driver of respiratory muscle form and function. Hypoxic stress is likely a major contributor to respiratory muscle malaise in diseases of the lungs and respiratory control network. Animal studies provide an evidence base in strong support of the need to explore adjunctive antioxidant therapies for muscle dysfunction in human respiratory disease.

  16. Cigarette Smoking and Respiratory System Diseases in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracen, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory system diseases are common in youngsters, smoking being one of the main cause of them. In this article, results are presented of a survey-type study on smoking and respiratory malady conducted in 3108 high school students from the Mazovian Region in Poland. The questionnaire made for this study contained questions concerning the health status, chronic diseases, and the cigarette smoking habit. The subjects were high school student aged 15-19. Overall, 1694 males and 1414 females were enrolled in the study. Regarding males, 66.4 % of them were non-smokers, 18.1 % smoked up to 20 cigarettes daily, and 15.5 % smoked more than 20 cigarettes daily; 12.5 % of all smokers smoked longer than one year. Overall, 38.5 % of males reported symptoms of chronic bronchitis. When stratified by the smoking habit, chronic bronchitis was reported by 21 % of non-smokers and 71 % of all smokers. Regarding females, 77 % of them were non-smokers, 16 % smoked up to 20 cigarettes daily, and 7 % more than 20 cigarettes daily; 8 % of all smokers smoked longer than one year. Overall, 35 % females reported symptoms of chronic bronchitis. When stratified by the smoking habit, chronic bronchitis was reported by 23 % of non-smokers and 75 % of smokers. Bronchial asthma was reported by 22 (0.7 %) subjects, none of them was a smoker. In conclusion, males more often than females smoked cigarettes. The number of persons complaining of symptoms of chronic bronchitis was markedly higher in the group of smokers. The study shows that smoking is a key cause of chronic bronchitis in adolescents. That implies a need for enhanced educational activity on the adverse effects of smoking and undertaking active anti-smoking campaigns at the level of high school.

  17. Respiratory management of motor neurone disease: a review of current practice and new developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Khizar; Proctor, Alison Ruth; McDermott, Christopher J; Shaw, Pamela J

    2012-06-01

    Motor neurone disease is a neurodegenerative condition with a significant morbidity and shortened life expectancy. Hypoventilatory respiratory failure is the most common cause of death and respiratory function significantly predicts both survival and quality of life in patients with motor neurone disease. Accordingly, supporting and maintaining respiratory function is important in caring for these patients. The most significant advance in motor neurone disease care of recent years has been the domiciliary provision of non-invasive ventilation for treating respiratory failure. Neuromuscular respiratory weakness also leads to ineffective cough and retained airways secretions, predisposing to recurrent chest infections. In this review, we discuss current practice and recent developments in the respiratory management of motor neurone disease, in terms of ventilatory support and cough augmentation.

  18. Pasteurella multocida involved in respiratory disease of wild chimpanzees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Köndgen

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida can cause a variety of diseases in various species of mammals and birds throughout the world but nothing is known about its importance for wild great apes. In this study we isolated P. multocida from wild living, habituated chimpanzees from Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire. Isolates originated from two chimpanzees that died during a respiratory disease outbreak in 2004 as well as from one individual that developed chronic air-sacculitis following this outbreak. Four isolates were subjected to a full phenotypic and molecular characterisation. Two different clones were identified using pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST enabled the identification of previous unknown alleles and two new sequence types, ST68 and ST69, were assigned. Phylogenetic analysis of the superoxide dismutase (sodA gene and concatenated sequences from seven MLST-housekeeping genes showed close clustering within known P. multocida isolated from various hosts and geographic locations. Due to the clinical relevance of the strains described here, these results make an important contribution to our knowledge of pathogens involved in lethal disease outbreaks among endangered great apes.

  19. Pasteurella multocida Involved in Respiratory Disease of Wild Chimpanzees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köndgen, Sophie; Leider, Michaela; Lankester, Felix; Bethe, Astrid; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Ewers, Christa

    2011-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida can cause a variety of diseases in various species of mammals and birds throughout the world but nothing is known about its importance for wild great apes. In this study we isolated P. multocida from wild living, habituated chimpanzees from Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire. Isolates originated from two chimpanzees that died during a respiratory disease outbreak in 2004 as well as from one individual that developed chronic air-sacculitis following this outbreak. Four isolates were subjected to a full phenotypic and molecular characterisation. Two different clones were identified using pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) enabled the identification of previous unknown alleles and two new sequence types, ST68 and ST69, were assigned. Phylogenetic analysis of the superoxide dismutase (sodA) gene and concatenated sequences from seven MLST-housekeeping genes showed close clustering within known P. multocida isolated from various hosts and geographic locations. Due to the clinical relevance of the strains described here, these results make an important contribution to our knowledge of pathogens involved in lethal disease outbreaks among endangered great apes. PMID:21931664

  20. Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S M; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Vitalis, B; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

    2007-08-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed candidate multiplexed assays that may potentially be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the ability to improve our nation's capability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect food and agricultural resources with a diagnostic test which could enhance the nation's capabilities for early detection of a foreign animal disease. In FY2005 with funding from the DHS, LLNL developed the first version (Version 1.0) of a multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based RT-PCR assay that included signatures for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases (FADs) of swine, Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease Virus (SVDV), and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus [BPSV], Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). In FY06, LLNL has developed Bovine and Porcine species-specific panel which included existing signatures from Version 1.0 panel as well as new signatures. The MUX RT-PCR porcine assay for detection of FMDV includes the FADs, VESV and SVD in addition to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). LLNL has also developed a MUX RT-PCR bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine FADs malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis

  1. Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis (Ibr on Cattle in Indonesia and The Strategy For Disease Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Abdul Adjid

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis (IBR caused by Bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1 infects cattle and widely spreads in Indonesia. The disease infected cattle in breeding centers, artificial insemination centers and also holderfarmers. This infectious disease may cause economical losses primarily due to reproductive failure of infected animals. Recommended strategy for disease control is step by step control with priorities, started from upper to downstream, from breeding and artificial insemination (AI centers as the first priority, then village breeding centers as the second priority, and the last priority is in cattle owned by smallholders. In the breeding and AI centers, eradication of the disease is carried out by surveilance, excluding reactors, and applying biosecurity. In the village breeding centers, the use of semen for AI should come from centers that free from IBR, the use of bull that free from IBR, surveilance and application of biosecurity. At the farmer levels, IBR control is bone by using semen from AI centers free from IBR and routine vaccination. The final step is performed after evaluating the successful rate and economic impact of the disease control.

  2. [Update on the respiratory management of patients with chronic neuromuscular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priou, P; Trzepizur, W; Meslier, N; Gagnadoux, F

    2017-12-01

    Neuromuscular diseases include a wide range of conditions that may involve potentially life-threatening respiratory complications (infection, respiratory failure). For patients with neuromuscular diseases, clinical assessment of respiratory function and regular pulmonary function tests are needed to screen for nocturnal respiratory disorders, weakness of the diaphragm and potential restrictive disorders and/or chronic hypercapnic respiratory insufficiency, possibly with couch deficiency. MANAGEMENT OF NOCTURNAL RESPIRATORY DISORDERS AND CHRONIC RESPIRATORY FAILURE: Nocturnal respiratory assistance is an important phase of care for nocturnal respiratory disorders and chronic respiratory failure. This may involve continuous positive airway pressure, adaptative servo-ventilation or non-invasive ventilation with a facial or nasal mask. As needed, diurnal assistance may be proposed by mouthpiece ventilation. Should non-invasive ventilation prove insufficient, or if significant swallowing disorders or recurrent bronchial obstruction develop, or in case of prolonged intubation, tracheotomy may be required. In case of lower airway infection with ineffective cough, physical therapy, associated with air stacking, intermittent positive pressure breathing or mechanical in-exsufflation may be proposed. Care for swallowing disorders, nutritional counseling (cachexia, obesity), vaccinations and therapeutic education are integral elements of patient-centered management aiming to prevent the negative impact of infection and to manage respiratory failure of chronic neuromuscular disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus antigen insertion in two 3' proximal genome positions of bovine/human parainfluenza virus type 3 on virus replication and immunogenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.S. Tang (Roderick); J.H. Schickli (Jeanne); M. MacPhail (Mia); F. Fernandes (Fiona); L. Bicha (Leenas); J. Spaete (Joshua); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R. Spaete (Richard); A.A. Haller (Aurelia)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractA live attenuated bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3), harboring the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) genes of human PIV3, was used as a virus vector to express surface glycoproteins derived from two human pathogens, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and respiratory

  4. Short communication: Automated detection of behavioral changes from respiratory disease in pre-weaned calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, T H; Findlay, A N; Petersson-Wolfe, C S

    2017-11-01

    Group housing of calves can pose a challenge in identifying respiratory disease; therefore, it is necessary to develop tools that can identify these disease events. In this experiment, pre-weaned calves (n = 30) were housed in groups with an automatic calf feeder and were fitted with an accelerometer. Step activity, lying behaviors, and feeding behaviors were recorded to determine the effect of respiratory disease. All calves were health scored twice daily, and calves with respiratory scores ≥5 were diagnosed with respiratory disease (n = 10). Each diseased calf was match paired with a healthy control based on the date of disease diagnosis, breed, and age. Control calves were determined to be healthy if they had respiratory scores ≤4, as well as fecal, navel, and joint scores of 0 or 1. Diseased calves were less active before, on the day of, and after respiratory disease diagnosis. Furthermore, diseased calves had reduced lying frequencies starting 2 d before diagnosis, as well as after diagnosis. Last, diseased calves consumed less milk on the day of diagnosis when compared with healthy controls. Step activity, lying bouts, and milk intake may prove to be a useful tool in identifying respiratory disease under practical farming, but this requires further research. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Circulating microRNAs in serum from cattle challenged with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an RNA virus that is often associated with respiratory disease in cattle. MicroRNAs have been proposed as indicators of exposure to respiratory pathogens. The objective of this study was to identify microRNAs in cattle that had been challenged with a non-cytopat...

  6. Research into acupuncture for respiratory disease in Japan: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masao; Yokoyama, Yoko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2009-06-01

    In Japan, studies on acupuncture therapy for respiratory disease have rarely been reported. Additionally, most of the reports are difficult for overseas researchers to access because they are written in Japanese and cannot be located using Medline. To review studies on acupuncture and moxibustion therapy for respiratory disease conducted in Japan. The results of a literature search using "Igaku Chuo Zasshi Web" and the Medical Online Library, both of which are Japanese databases, covering the period between 1979 and 2006. This study reviewed references cited in retrieved documents and selected original articles and case reports on acupuncture and moxibustion therapy for respiratory disease. The search terms used were "acupuncture" and "respiratory disease", along with "respiratory", "asthma", "COPD", "bronchitis" and "common cold". The study retrieved 34 papers on acupuncture treatment for respiratory disease written in Japanese (9 full papers, 19 case reports and 6 case series). The papers dealt with such conditions as asthma (14 trials), cough variant asthma (one trial), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (seven trials), chronic bronchitis (one trial), usual/idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (one trial) and the common cold (two trials). The study also found eight trials dealing with cold prevention. A small number of reports on acupuncture and moxibustion treatment for respiratory diseases were found in the Japanese databases. Future studies must use more rigorous evaluation methods, such as randomised controlled trials, to measure the effectiveness of acupuncture and moxibustion therapy for treating respiratory diseases.

  7. Diarrhoeal and acute respiratory disease: the current situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    This paper describes the serious effect of diarrheal and acute respiratory (ARI) disease upon children under 5 years old, and international efforts undertaken by the World Health Organization (WHO) to reduce such mortality. Combined, these diseases account for more then 1/2 of all deaths in this age group, and constitute the most serious threat to their health. WHO estimates for 1990 that diarrheal illnesses caused 3.2 million childhood deaths and that ARI caused 4.3 million. While some child deaths are due to measles and pertussis, the majority is caused by pneumonia and the consequences of diarrheal illnesses. These deaths could be readily averted through the timely, effective treatment of trained health workers with essential drugs. Immunization as well as improved nutrition, particularly through the practice of exclusive breast feeding of the child's 1st 4-6 months of life, are addition weapons potentially employed against child mortality. WHO programs for diarrhea and ARI control focus upon simplified treatment guidelines, training, communication messages, drug supplies, and evaluation methodology. Despite obstacles such as the marketing of useless and/or potentially dangerous anti-diarrheal drugs and cough and cold remedies, and inappropriate breastmilk substitutes and unnecessary foods, widespread progress in program development and implementation has been made over the past decade. Increased amounts of oral rehydration therapy and solutions are available and used, while many health workers have benefited from training programs.

  8. CURRENT RESPIRATORY DISEASE PROBLEM AND THE PROBES IN CHICKEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Hasan. K. Ahmad, N. Fawad, B. Siddique and H Rehman

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, high mortality was recorded in broiler flocks in various areas of Pakistan. The samples from six broiler flocks were studied. The blood samples collected were analyzed for antibodies to Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV, Avian Influenza Virus (AIV, Infectious Bronchitis Virus (IBV, Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV, mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG, Mycoplasma synoviae (MS and Salmonella organisms (SPG. It was found that the samples had no antibodies against NDV, AIV, MG, MS and SPG but variable levels of antibodies were recorded against IBV and IBDV. Bacteriological examination of the respiratory organs of clinically sick birds yielded Haemophilus and pathogenic E. coli. The absence of any pathogen activity in filtrates of 0.2 and 0.1 µm inoculated through CAM and CAS routes in embryonated eggs ruled out the possibility of the involvement of AIV and NDV. Unfiltered homogenate and 0.45 µm filtrate activity indicated the presence of Mycoplasma in the homogenate. It is concluded that: I. The problem primarily resulted from the interplay of Mycoplasma, IBDV, IBHV and IBV, 2. Quality of the chicks in carrying vertical Mycoplasma infection played basic role in the development of the problem, 3. The associated bacterial pathogens i.e. Infectious Coryza and Colibacillosis played precipitating role in the problem, 4. Extreme environmental temperature played a conducive role in the episode and 5. Predisposing role of mycotoxins in the malady cannot be overlooked.

  9. Genetic Mechanisms in Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nami Shrestha Palikhe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD refers to the development of bronchoconstriction in asthmatics following the exposure to aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The key pathogenic mechanisms associated with AERD are the overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs and increased CysLTR1 expression in the airway mucosa and decreased lipoxin and PGE2 synthesis. Genetic studies have suggested a role for variability of genes in disease susceptibility and the response to medication. Potential genetic biomarkers contributing to the AERD phenotype include HLA-DPB1, LTC4S, ALOX5, CYSLT, PGE2, TBXA2R, TBX21, MS4A2, IL10, ACE, IL13, KIF3A, SLC22A2, CEP68, PTGER, and CRTH2 and a four-locus SNP set composed of B2ADR, CCR3, CysLTR1, and FCER1B. Future areas of investigation need to focus on comprehensive approaches to identifying biomarkers for early diagnosis.

  10. The Gene-Environment Interactions in Respiratory Diseases (GEIRD) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Marco, R; Accordini, S; Antonicelli, L; Bellia, V; Bettin, M D; Bombieri, C; Bonifazi, F; Bugiani, M; Carosso, A; Casali, L; Cazzoletti, L; Cerveri, I; Corsico, A G; Ferrari, M; Fois, A G; Lo Cascio, V; Marcon, A; Marinoni, A; Olivieri, M; Perbellini, L; Pignatti, P; Pirina, P; Poli, A; Rolla, G; Trabetti, E; Verlato, G; Villani, S; Zanolin, M E

    2010-01-01

    The role of genetic and environmental factors, as well as their interaction, in the natural history of asthma, allergic rhinitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is largely unknown. This is mainly due to the lack of large-scale analytical epidemiological/genetic studies aimed at investigating these 3 respiratory conditions simultaneously. The GEIRD project is a collaborative initiative designed to collect information on biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress, individual and ecological exposures, diet, early-life factors, smoking habits, genetic traits and medication use in large and accurately defined series of asthma, allergic rhinitis and COPD phenotypes. It is a population-based multicase-control design, where cases and controls are identified through a 2-stage screening process (postal questionnaire and clinical examination) in pre-existing cohorts or new samples of subjects. It is aimed at elucidating the role that modifiable and genetic factors play in the occurrence, persistence, severity and control of inflammatory airway diseases, by way of the establishment of a historical multicentre standardized databank of phenotypes, contributed by and openly available to international epidemiologists. Researchers conducting population-based surveys with standardized methods may contribute to the public-domain case-control database, and use the resulting increased power to answer their own scientific questions. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Postoperative acute respiratory failure caused by adult-onset Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dingyu; Xu, Jun; Yang, Yi; Gu, Ming; Yu, Xuezhong

    2018-01-01

    Pompe disease, which leads to dysfunction of the enzyme acid a-glucosidase, is a genetic disorder seen in 1 in 40000 births. Adult-onset Pompe disease is known as a slowly progressive myasthenia with or without respiratory dysfunction. We herein report two cases of adult-onset Pompe disease, in which postoperative acute respiratory failure was the the initial manifestation. The two patients showed no symptoms of ambulatory and respiratory dysfunction before operation. The diagnosis of Pompe disease was determined by muscle biopsy and acid a-glucosidase assay in the blood. Rapid deterioration of already struggling diaphragmatic function induced by stress of surgery and anesthesia were thought to be the main reason of postoperative acute respiratory failure. Physicians should be aware of the existence of an adult form of Pompe disease which may present with postoperative acute respiratory failure. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [Genetic screening for risk factors in the development of respiratory diseases caused by fiberglass dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artamonova, V G; Kuznetsov, N F; Gadzhiev, A S

    1995-01-01

    The article represents results of genetic screening among workers engaged into fiber glass production. Propensity and resistance to occupational pulmonary diseases were believed to depend on genotype. Applied methods of genetic screening enabled to improve primary prophylaxis of respiratory diseases.

  13. Potential application of emerging diagnostic techniques to the diagnosis of bovine Johne's disease (paratuberculosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Louise E; Cassidy, Joseph P; O'Donovan, Jim; Gordon, Stephen V; Markey, Bryan

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease (paratuberculosis), a chronic wasting disease in cattle with important welfare, economic and potential public health implications. Current tests are unable to recognise all stages of the disease, which makes it difficult to diagnose and control. This review explores emerging diagnostic techniques that could complement and enhance the diagnosis of MAP infection, including bacteriophage analysis, new MAP-specific antigens, host protein expression in response to infection, transcriptomic studies, analysis of microRNAs and investigation of the gastrointestinal microbiome. It emphasises the inherent challenges of diagnosing bovine Johne's disease and investigates novel areas which may have the potential both to advance our understanding of the immunopathology of MAP infection and to augment current diagnostic tests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A discrete epidemic model for bovine Babesiosis disease and tick populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Diego F.; Trejos, Deccy Y.; Valverde, Jose C.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we provide and study a discrete model for the transmission of Babesiosis disease in bovine and tick populations. This model supposes a discretization of the continuous-time model developed by us previously. The results, here obtained by discrete methods as opposed to continuous ones, show that similar conclusions can be obtained for the discrete model subject to the assumption of some parametric constraints which were not necessary in the continuous case. We prove that these parametric constraints are not artificial and, in fact, they can be deduced from the biological significance of the model. Finally, some numerical simulations are given to validate the model and verify our theoretical study.

  15. Interaction between IGF1 and IGFBPs in bovine cystic ovarian disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez, Fernanda Mariel; Salvetti, Natalia Raquel; Colombero, M.; Stangaferro, M.; Barbeito, Claudio Gustavo; Ortega, Hugo Hector; Rey, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    Cystic ovarian disease (COD) is one of the main factors responsible for reproductive disorders in cattle. Although the pathogenesis and mechanism of cyst formation are not fully understood, it has been proposed that the IGF system could play an essential role, as it is a key intraovarian regulator. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the altered levels in IGF1 detected in bovines with COD are associated with changes at mRNA level or with differential modulation by IGFBPs. Th...

  16. Bovine tuberculosis in Iran: The past, present and future of a national disease control program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Tadayon

    2015-01-01

    Bovine TB was initially reported in Iran by a French veterinarian in local breeds of cattle. An official attempt to control the disease was started in the 1940s, which runs today on a national scale. This mini-review addresses a variety of different epidemiological issues in bTb control in the world and in Iran from an immunologist's eye to find the cure for human cases infected with M. bovis. In addition, the benefits and drawbacks of this control scheme are discussed.

  17. Respiratory disease associated with occupational inhalation to hop (Humulus lupulus) during harvest and processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeb-Whitaker, Carolyn K; Bonauto, David K

    2014-11-01

    There is little published evidence for occupational respiratory disease caused by hop dust inhalation. In the United States, hops are commercially produced in the Pacific Northwest region. To describe occupational respiratory disease in hop workers. Washington State workers' compensation claims filed by hop workers for respiratory disease were systematically identified and reviewed. Incidence rates of respiratory disease in hop workers were compared with rates in field vegetable crop farm workers. Fifty-seven cases of respiratory disease associated with hop dust inhalation were reported from 1995 to 2011. Most cases (61%) were diagnosed by the attending health care practitioner as having work-related asthma. Seven percent of cases were diagnosed as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the remaining cases were diagnosed as allergic respiratory disorders (eg, allergic rhinitis) or asthma-associated symptoms (eg, dyspnea). Cases were associated with hop harvesting, secondary hop processing, and indirect exposure. The incidence rate of respiratory disease in hop workers was 15 cases per 10,000 full-time workers, which was 30 times greater than the incidence rate for field vegetable crop workers. A strong temporal association between hop dust exposure and respiratory symptoms and a clear association between an increase in hop dust concentrations and the clinical onset of symptoms were apparent in 3 cases. Occupational exposure to hop dust is associated with respiratory disease. Respiratory disease rates were higher in hop workers than in a comparison group of agricultural workers. Additional research is needed before hop dust can be confirmed as a causative agent for occupational asthma. Copyright © 2014 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Prevalence of severe periodontal disease and its association with respiratory disease in hospitalized adult patients in a tertiary care center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Plata, Rosario; Olmedo-Torres, Daniel; Martínez-Briseño, David; García-Sancho, Cecilia; Franco-Marina, Francisco; González-Cruz, Herminia

    2015-01-01

    Severe periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory gingival process associated with systemic diseases. To determine the prevalence of severe periodontal disease and its association with respiratory diseases among hospitalized patients at the Institute of Respiratory Diseases "Ismael Cosio Villegas" (INER) in 2011. A cross-sectional study was developed. The severe periodontal disease was diagnosed by the Department of Stomatology. The International Classification of Diseases 10th revision was used. A multinomial logistic was fit to estimate relative-risk. Three thousand and fifty-nine patients were included; 772/3,059 (25.2%) had severe periodontal disease. After controlling for age, sex, inpatient days, death, and socioeconomic status, the infectious respiratory diseases that were significantly associated with severe periodontal disease were: HIV/AIDS (RR: 10.6; 95% CI: 9.1-23.3; p diseases were also significantly associated with severe periodontal disease. High prevalence of severe periodontal disease was observed in the different respiratory diseases. Severe periodontal disease was associated with both infectious and non-infectious respiratory diseases. It is important to study an oral health intervention.

  19. Spectrum of neonatal diseases requiring respiratory support in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: In Nigeria, eighty two percent of the three leading causes of neonatal mortality may require respiratory support for their management, yet this is unavailable. Objective: To review the spectrum of respiratory disorders that were ventilated, their outcomes and the contribution of such support to survival. Methods: A ...

  20. VITAMIN D EFFECTS ON LUNG IMMUNITY AND RESPIRATORY DISEASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansdottir, Sif; Monick, Martha M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Our understanding of vitamin D metabolism and biological effects has grown exponentially in recent years and it has become clear that vitamin D has extensive immunomodulatory effects. The active vitamin D generating enzyme, 1α-hydroxylase, is expressed by the airway epithelium, alveolar macrophages, dendritic cells and lymphocytes indicating that active vitamin D can be produced locally within the lungs. Vitamin D generated in tissues is responsible for many of the immunomodulatory actions of vitamin D. The effects of vitamin D within the lungs include increased secretion of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin, decreased chemokine production, inhibition of dendritic cell activation and alteration of T cell activation. These cellular effects are important for host responses against infection and the development of allergic lung diseases like asthma. Epidemiological studies do suggest that vitamin D deficiency predisposes to viral respiratory tract infections and mycobacterial infections and that vitamin D may play a role in the development and treatment of asthma. Randomized, placebo controlled trials are lacking but ongoing. PMID:21419273

  1. Ebola virus disease: Effects of respiratory protection on healthcare workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Mohammed Mohammed

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa sends an alarming message to all countries in the world, to increase the level of coordination and application of preventive measures globally to avoid a disastrous epidemic in the World, as the current situation in West Africa is critical especially after the World Health Organization increased the alarming level to an emergency in public health all over the world. Viral hemorrhagic fevers are important because they can readily spread within a hospital or mortuary setting, there is no effective cure or vaccine, they have a high mortality rate and they are difficult to recognize and diagnose rapidly. WHO has recommended respiratory protection for HCWs performing certain tasks such as aerosol-generating procedures, laboratory procedures, and autopsies. Particulate respirators are designed to help reduce the wearer’s exposure to certain airborne particles. The most effective way to block aerosolized particles is to use either a half-face or a full-face respirator. HCWs still need shoe covers, a full face respirator and latex or nitrile gloves to decrease the risk of Ebola virus contamination.

  2. Chronic Respiratory Disease: Considerations within the Public Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Durán Palomino

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Respiratory Disease (CRD is a publichealth problem in Colombia. Its severity increasesby the presence of risk factors like firesmoke, which tend to prevail in young populationand that leads consequences at physical,social and mental level in the long run. The CRDincludes a series of clinical entities with theirown characteristics, caused by the suffering, socialisolation, physiological deterioration andthe associated morbidity. All these contributeto the functional limitation, the lost quality oflife and, ultimately, can turn the individual thatsuffers it in a dependent being without future.All this takes to a greater consumption of healthresources without this means one better attention,since in many opportunities the isolated efforts, the lack of clear rules, sustained proposalsand the non use of clinical guidelines amongother causes, allow that the intervention wouldbe destined to only palliate the present symptoms,but is far from including an integral, effectivehandling and that responds to individualnecessities. This article analyze the public norms and policies that cover patients with CRD, theaspects related to the rights to an integral, safeand real treatment in the affected individualalong with the obstacles for its accomplishment.

  3. Prophylactic intranasal alpha 2 interferon and viral exacerbations of chronic respiratory disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Wiselka, M. J.; Nicholson, K G; Kent, J.; Cookson, J B; Tyrrell, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND As respiratory virus infections often lead to exacerbations of chronic bronchitis and asthma an effective antiviral drug may be helpful in such patients. Alpha 2 interferon has been shown to give protection against rhinovirus infections in field studies. METHODS Patients with chronic respiratory disease exposed to close contacts with symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection were randomly allocated to receive nasal sprays of recombinant alpha 2 interferon (3 x 10(6) IU) or plac...

  4. Respiratory muscle dysfunction in animal models of hypoxic disease: antioxidant therapy goes from strength to strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Halloran KD

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ken D O’Halloran,1 Philip Lewis2 1Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland; 2Institute and Policlinic for Occupational Medicine, Environmental Medicine and Preventative Research, University Hospital of Cologne, Germany Abstract: The striated muscles of breathing play a critical role in respiratory homeostasis governing blood oxygenation and pH regulation. Upper airway dilator and thoracic pump muscles retain a remarkable capacity for plasticity throughout life, both in health and disease states. Hypoxia, whatever the cause, is a potent driver of respiratory muscle remodeling with evidence of adaptive and maladaptive outcomes for system performance. The pattern, duration, and intensity of hypoxia are key determinants of respiratory muscle structural-, metabolic-, and functional responses and adaptation. Age and sex also influence respiratory muscle tolerance of hypoxia. Redox stress emerges as the principal protagonist driving respiratory muscle malady in rodent models of hypoxic disease. There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that antioxidant intervention alleviates hypoxia-induced respiratory muscle dysfunction, and that N-acetyl cysteine, approved for use in humans, is highly effective in preventing hypoxia-induced respiratory muscle weakness and fatigue. We posit that oxygen homeostasis is a key driver of respiratory muscle form and function. Hypoxic stress is likely a major contributor to respiratory muscle malaise in diseases of the lungs and respiratory control network. Animal studies provide an evidence base in strong support of the need to explore adjunctive antioxidant therapies for muscle dysfunction in human respiratory disease. Keywords: respiratory muscle, diaphragm, upper airway, hypoxia, antioxidants, N-acetyl-cysteine, OSA, COPD

  5. Wheezing lower respiratory disease and vaccination of premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullooly, John P; Schuler, Roberleigh; Mesa, Jill; Drew, Lois; DeStefano, Frank

    2011-10-13

    Premature infants are at increased risk of wheezing in association with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus infections. We assess possible associations between wheezing and routine vaccinations of premature infants. We conducted a self-controlled case series (SCCS) study of premature infants born at five health maintenance organizations (HMO's) from 1997 to 2002 (N=18,628). Episodes of medically attended wheezing lower respiratory diseases (WLRD) were ascertained from ICD-9 coded database records. Relative risks of WLRD during post-vaccination exposure windows were estimated by Cox proportional hazard regression with time-dependent vaccine exposure variables, adjusted for age, season, and frequency of well-baby visits. WLRD hazard ratios (HR) were not significantly elevated for any vaccine type among non-fragile or fragile premature infants. Among non-fragile infants the 8-14 days HR was significantly reduced for live attenuated MMR (0.68, 0.52-0.88) and Varicella (0.71, 0.53-0.94) vaccines, and similarly but insignificantly reduced for infrequently used live attenuated OPV vaccine (0.70, 0.46-1.06). There was a smaller significant reduction (0.83, 0.69-0.998) in the 15-30 days HR for MMR and a similar but not significant reduction (0.86, 0.71-1.05) in the 31-44 days HR for MMR. Hepatitis B vaccine (HBV), which is not a live vaccine, had significantly reduced 8-14 days (0.84, 0.72-0.98) and 31-44 days (0.88, 0.78-0.98) HRs among non-fragile infants. The apparent protective effect of HBV may be confounded by live vaccines administered simultaneously with the third dose of HBV. Among fragile infants there was a large significant reduction in the 8-14 days HR for live attenuated OPV vaccine (0.40, 0.23-0.70) and smaller significant reductions in the 8-14 days HR for inactivated DTaP (0.82, 0.71-0.95), Hib (0.83, 0.73-0.96), and PCV7 (0.84, 0.70-0.997) vaccines. Delays in vaccinating fragile infants may have made simultaneous administration of live

  6. Effect of bovine lactoferrin from iron-fortified formulas on diarrhea and respiratory tract infections of weaned infants in a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ke; Chai, Lingying; Li, Hua; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Hu-Mina; Shang, Jia; Tian, Weizheng; Yang, Ping; Jiang, Alice C

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of supplementation with bovine lactoferrin (bLf) from iron-fortified formulas on diarrhea and respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in weaned infants. In this prospective, multicenter, controlled intervention study, 260 infants ages 4 to 6 mo who previously were exclusively breastfed but weaned were randomized into two groups: a lactoferrin-fortified formula milk group (fortified group, FG, containing lactoferrin 38 mg/100 g milk) and a no lactoferrin-fortified milk (control group, CG); breastfed infants were enrolled and served as a reference group (breastfed group, BG). The intervention duration was 3 mo. The morbidity of diarrhea and RTIs were collected during supplementation. The results of the study demonstrated evidence of a lower incidence rate of respiratory-related illnesses and fewer symptoms of running nose, cough, and wheezing for infants in the FG and BG groups compared with those in the CG (P < 0.05). Despite the undistinguished incidence rate of vomiting, nausea, and colic, the occurrences of diarrhea-related illnesses were significantly lower for children in the FG and BG than for those in CG (P < 0.05). The beneficial effects on infectious morbidity over 3 mo highlighted the potential of bLF supplementation for previously weaned infants; these findings may be applicable to other infants living in similar socioeconomic districts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Stimulation of Respiratory Motor Output and Ventilation in a Murine Model of Pompe Disease by Ampakines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElMallah, Mai K; Pagliardini, Silvia; Turner, Sara M; Cerreta, Anthony J; Falk, Darin J; Byrne, Barry J; Greer, John J; Fuller, David D

    2015-09-01

    Pompe disease results from a mutation in the acid α-glucosidase gene leading to lysosomal glycogen accumulation. Respiratory insufficiency is common, and the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment, enzyme replacement, has limited effectiveness. Ampakines are drugs that enhance α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor responses and can increase respiratory motor drive. Recent work indicates that respiratory motor drive can be blunted in Pompe disease, and thus pharmacologic stimulation of breathing may be beneficial. Using a murine Pompe model with the most severe clinical genotype (the Gaa(-/-) mouse), our primary objective was to test the hypothesis that ampakines can stimulate respiratory motor output and increase ventilation. Our second objective was to confirm that neuropathology was present in Pompe mouse medullary respiratory control neurons. The impact of ampakine CX717 on breathing was determined via phrenic and hypoglossal nerve recordings in anesthetized mice and whole-body plethysmography in unanesthetized mice. The medulla was examined using standard histological methods coupled with immunochemical markers of respiratory control neurons. Ampakine CX717 robustly increased phrenic and hypoglossal inspiratory bursting and reduced respiratory cycle variability in anesthetized Pompe mice, and it increased inspiratory tidal volume in unanesthetized Pompe mice. CX717 did not significantly alter these variables in wild-type mice. Medullary respiratory neurons showed extensive histopathology in Pompe mice. Ampakines stimulate respiratory neuromotor output and ventilation in Pompe mice, and therefore they have potential as an adjunctive therapy in Pompe disease.

  8. [The curative action of Monticelli Term's water in upper respiratory tract diseases (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, R; Jemmi, G; Barani, B

    1976-01-01

    The Authors study the action of the sodio bromide-iodic water of Monticelli Terme in upper respiratory tract disease and particularly assert that is not to neglect the organic ground on which establishes mucosa's disease. Therman treatment gives the best therapeutic results in every patient presenting chronic inflammatory processes of the upper respiratory trach alternating periods of quiescency and of activity, and poor therapeutic action in patients presenting chronic inveterate diseases with great alterations in vascular and glandular components of the mucosa.

  9. A 10-year prospective study of respiratory disease and depression and anxiety in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Renee D; Scheckner, Bari; Pena, Lillian; Feldman, Jonathan M; Taha, Farah; Lipsitz, Joshua D

    2014-11-01

    Several cross-sectional studies have found an association between respiratory disease and increased mood or anxiety disorders among adults. Little is known about the nature of these associations over time or the role of potential confounders in these links. To investigate the association between respiratory disease and incident and persistent depression or anxiety disorders 10 years later and to examine potential pathways of these associations. Data were drawn from the Midlife Development in the United States survey, a representative sample of adults in the United States ages 18 to 74 years. Participants (N = 2,101) were interviewed on a range of health domains at baseline at wave 1 (1994) and again at wave 2 (2005). Respiratory disease was associated with increased odds of depression and anxiety disorders cross-sectionally at both time points. Respiratory disease at wave 1 was not associated with incident depression or anxiety disorders at wave 2. Respiratory disease at wave 1 was associated with increased odds of persistent depression or anxiety disorders 10 years later among those with depression or anxiety disorders at wave 1. Associations were not explained by differences in demographic characteristics, secondhand smoke exposure, cigarette smoking, or history of exposure to childhood maltreatment. Findings shed new light on the association between respiratory disease and depression or anxiety disorders. Individuals with respiratory disease appear to have higher prevalence of concurrent depression or anxiety disorders and persistent depression or anxiety disorders compared with those without respiratory disease. However, a history of respiratory disease does not appear to confer increased risk of new onset of depression or anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2014 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Economic losses due to important diseases of bovines in central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Singh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyze the factors associated with morbidity and mortality rates as well as to evaluate economic losses due to important diseases of bovines, viz. mastitis, HS and surra in Purvanchal Region of Uttar Pradesh. Materials and Methods: A sample of 300 livestock owners were selected from each of five divisions of Purvanchal region of the state of Uttar Pradesh using multistage stratified sampling with simple random sampling without replacement at village level. The morbidity, mortality and case fatality rates due to different diseases were determined using standard statistical indices. Association between cattle morbidity and mortality rates and different factors was calculated by χ2 Test. The total economic loss due to diseases in bovines was worked out as sum of mortality loss, loss in milk yield and cost of treatment of affected animals. Results: The overall morbidity rates of mastitis, HS and surra in cattle and buffaloes were 15.5%, 7.1% and 5.3%, respectively. The mortality and case fatality due to HS was found higher in the young calves as compared to the adults in case of both buffaloes and cattle. Mortality and case fatality due to surra was greater in the adult animals as compared to the younger ones in case of both buffaloes and cattle. Total losses due to mastitis per lactation in ND cow, CB cow and buffalo were INR 868.34, INR 1, 314.10 and INR 1, 272.36, respectively. Total losses due to HS per animal in ND cows, CB cows and buffaloes were INR 2, 355.78, INR 3, 228.52 and INR 4, 262.57, respectively. Total losses due to surra per animal in ND cow, CB cow and buffalo were INR 3, 328.18, INR 6, 193 and INR 9, 872.33, respectively. Conclusion: The study thus revealed significant losses due to diseases in large ruminants on. There is thus ample scope for preventive measures to control the disease bovines.

  11. PROGRAM RATIONALE OF TREATMENT AND PREVENTION IN CHILDREN WITH FREQUENT RESPIRATORY DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Deryusheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of complex clinical and laboratory examination of 146 children aged 2—3 years attending kindergarten were presented. The leading predictors of frequent respiratory disease: disturbance of microbiocenosis oropharyngeal mucosa, immunoglobulins decrease, respiratory allergic pathology were established and scientifically substantiated. The results obtained prove the main directions of therapeutic and preventive measures.

  12. Timely diagnosis of dairy calf respiratory disease using a standardized scoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuirk, Sheila M; Peek, Simon F

    2014-12-01

    Respiratory disease of young dairy calves is a significant cause of morbidity, mortality, economic loss, and animal welfare concern but there is no gold standard diagnostic test for antemortem diagnosis. Clinical signs typically used to make a diagnosis of respiratory disease of calves are fever, cough, ocular or nasal discharge, abnormal breathing, and auscultation of abnormal lung sounds. Unfortunately, routine screening of calves for respiratory disease on the farm is rarely performed and until more comprehensive, practical and affordable respiratory disease-screening tools such as accelerometers, pedometers, appetite monitors, feed consumption detection systems, remote temperature recording devices, radiant heat detectors, electronic stethoscopes, and thoracic ultrasound are validated, timely diagnosis of respiratory disease can be facilitated using a standardized scoring system. We have developed a scoring system that attributes severity scores to each of four clinical parameters; rectal temperature, cough, nasal discharge, ocular discharge or ear position. A total respiratory score of five points or higher (provided that at least two abnormal parameters are observed) can be used to distinguish affected from unaffected calves. This can be applied as a screening tool twice-weekly to identify pre-weaned calves with respiratory disease thereby facilitating early detection. Coupled with effective treatment protocols, this scoring system will reduce post-weaning pneumonia, chronic pneumonia, and otitis media.

  13. Daytime napping and increased risk of incident respiratory diseases: symptom, marker, or risk factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yue; Wainwright, Nick W J; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Surtees, Paul G; Hayat, Shabina; Luben, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2016-07-01

    We have identified a strong association between daytime napping and increased mortality risk from respiratory diseases, but little is known about the relationship between daytime napping and respiratory morbidity. Data were drawn from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Norfolk cohort. Participants reported napping habits during 1998-2000 and were followed up for respiratory disease hospital admissions until March 2009. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the association between daytime napping and respiratory disease incidence risk. The study sample included 10,978 men and women with a mean age of 61.9 years, and a total of 946 incident respiratory disease cases were recorded. After adjustment for age, sex, social class, education, marital status, employment status, nightshift work, body mass index, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake, self-reported general health, hypnotic drug use, habitual sleep duration, and preexisting health conditions, daytime napping was associated with an increase in the overall respiratory disease incidence risk (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.32, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15, 1.52 for napping napping ≥1 h). This association was more pronounced for lower respiratory diseases, especially for the risk of chronic lower respiratory diseases (HR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.18, 1.96 for napping napping ≥1 h, overall p = 0.003). Excessive daytime napping might be a useful marker of future respiratory disease incidence risk. Further studies are required to confirm these findings and help understand potential mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Patient Factors Influencing Respiratory-Related Clinician Actions in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadland, William C; Zubek, Valentina Bayer; Clerisme-Beaty, Emmanuelle M; Ríos-Bedoya, Carlos F; Yawn, Barbara P

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify patient-related factors that may explain the increased likelihood of receiving a respiratory-related clinician action in patients identified to be at risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a U.S.-based pragmatic study of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease screening. This post hoc analysis (conducted in 2014-2015) of the Screening, Evaluating and Assessing Rate Changes of Diagnosing Respiratory Conditions in Primary Care 1 (SEARCH1) study (conducted in 2010-2011), used the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Population Screener questionnaire in 112 primary care practices. Anyone with a previous chronic obstructive pulmonary disease diagnosis was excluded. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was used to assess patient factors associated with the likelihood of receiving an respiratory-related clinician action following positive screening. Overall, 994 of 6,497 (15%) screened positive and were considered at risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, only 187 of the 994 patients (19%) who screened positive received a respiratory-related clinician action. The chances of receiving a respiratory-related clinician action were significantly increased in patients who visited their physician with a respiratory issue (prespiratory medication (prespiratory-related clinician action had one or more comorbidity, including cardiovascular disease (68%), diabetes (30%), depression/anxiety (26%), asthma (11%), and cancer (9%). Routine chronic obstructive pulmonary disease screening appears to promote respiratory-related clinician actions in patients with a high likelihood for disease who have respiratory complaints or already use prescribed respiratory medication. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Exonic variants associated with development of aspirin exacerbated respiratory diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Woo Shin

    Full Text Available Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD is one phenotype of asthma, often occurring in the form of a severe and sudden attack. Due to the time-consuming nature and difficulty of oral aspirin challenge (OAC for AERD diagnosis, non-invasive biomarkers have been sought. The aim of this study was to identify AERD-associated exonic SNPs and examine the diagnostic potential of a combination of these candidate SNPs to predict AERD. DNA from 165 AERD patients, 397 subjects with aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA, and 398 normal controls were subjected to an Exome BeadChip assay containing 240K SNPs. 1,023 models (210-1 were generated from combinations of the top 10 SNPs, selected by the p-values in association with AERD. The area under the curve (AUC of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves was calculated for each model. SNP Function Portal and PolyPhen-2 were used to validate the functional significance of candidate SNPs. An exonic SNP, exm537513 in HLA-DPB1, showed the lowest p-value (p = 3.40×10-8 in its association with AERD risk. From the top 10 SNPs, a combination model of 7 SNPs (exm537513, exm83523, exm1884673, exm538564, exm2264237, exm396794, and exm791954 showed the best AUC of 0.75 (asymptotic p-value of 7.94×10-21, with 34% sensitivity and 93% specificity to discriminate AERD from ATA. Amino acid changes due to exm83523 in CHIA were predicted to be "probably damaging" to the structure and function of the protein, with a high score of '1'. A combination model of seven SNPs may provide a useful, non-invasive genetic marker combination for predicting AERD.

  16. Is recurrent respiratory papillomatosis a manageable or curable disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Tae; Baizhumanova, Aigul Saparadievna

    2016-06-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a relatively rare disease with potentially devastating consequences for the patient. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patterns of recurrence of RRP after surgery and determine the effectiveness of combined concurrent adjuvant therapy. A total of 86 patients were diagnosed with and operated on for RRP. The clinical characteristics of 29 of the 86 patients who had undergone operations at other hospitals and who were followed up for >2 years were evaluated retrospectively. A combined concurrent adjuvant therapy was performed with microlaryngeal surgery, 585-nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) application, and an intralesional cidofovir injection. To evaluate the recurrence pattern, the larynx was divided into 10 subsites, and patients were investigated for the frequency of recurrence at the subsites after the operation. Twenty-nine subjects required a mean of 3.0 operations to achieve complete remission for 2 years. The most common subsites for recurrence were the anterior commissure, subglottis, and epiglottis according to increasing number of operations. The subsites of recurrence tended to be closely correlated with the laryngeal submucosal glandular density distribution. A complete en-bloc layer excision, including the submucosal glands, using cold instruments decreased the recurrence rate of RRP. Applying PDL minimized scarring and provided significant posttreatment voice-quality improvement. The results of the recurrent pattern analysis suggest that a combined concurrent adjunctive treatment might be promising as a cure for RRP and restoration of vocal function after treatment. 4. Laryngoscope, 126:1359-1364, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Death from respiratory diseases and temperature in Shiraz, Iran (2006-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadbakhsh, Manizhe; Khanjani, Narges; Bahrampour, Abbas; Haghighi, Pegah Shoae

    2017-02-01

    Some studies have suggested that the number of deaths increases as temperatures drops or rises above human thermal comfort zone. The present study was conducted to evaluate the relation between respiratory-related mortality and temperature in Shiraz, Iran. In this ecological study, data about the number of respiratory-related deaths sorted according to age and gender as well as average, minimum, and maximum ambient air temperatures during 2007-2011 were examined. The relationship between air temperature and respiratory-related deaths was calculated by crude and adjusted negative binomial regression analysis. It was adjusted for humidity, rainfall, wind speed and direction, and air pollutants including CO, NOx, PM10, SO2, O3, and THC. Spearman and Pearson correlations were also calculated between air temperature and respiratory-related deaths. The analysis was done using MINITAB16 and STATA 11. During this period, 2598 respiratory-related deaths occurred in Shiraz. The minimum number of respiratory-related deaths among all subjects happened in an average temperature of 25 °C. There was a significant inverse relationship between average temperature- and respiratory-related deaths among all subjects and women. There was also a significant inverse relationship between average temperature and respiratory-related deaths among all subjects, men and women in the next month. The results suggest that cold temperatures can increase the number of respiratory-related deaths and therefore policies to reduce mortality in cold weather, especially in patients with respiratory diseases should be implemented.

  18. Current trends in the management of pulmonary hypertension associated with respiratory disease in institutions approved by the Japanese Respiratory Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsujino, Ichizo; Sakamaki, Fumio; Emoto, Noriaki; Kimura, Hiroshi; Miyaji, Katsumasa; Takamura, Kei; Hayashi, Shinichi; Hanaoka, Masayuki; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2014-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) often correlates with respiratory disease severity. Right heart catheterization (RHC) is recommended for the definitive diagnosis of PH associated with respiratory disease (R-PH). However, no previous studies have evaluated the perceived necessity for pulmonologists to use RHC for R-PH diagnosis, or the management of R-PH in Japan. Questionnaires were mailed to 855 institutions, approved by the Japanese Respiratory Society. Questions included the prevalence and necessity of RHC and other methods in R-PH diagnosis, and current trends in the treatment of R-PH. Questionnaires were returned from 289 institutions (34%). Patients with R-PH were examined by pulmonologists in 89% of institutions; some pulmonologists performed echocardiography (15%) and some RHC (13%). Echocardiography was used to diagnose R-PH in 99% of institutions and RHC was used in 36%. RHC was considered in cases of suspected PH in 49% of institutions and prior to initiation of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)-specific therapy in 57%. Of patients diagnosed with R-PH, 47% were treated with ambulatory oxygen therapy. Furthermore, 98 of 145 institutions used PAH-specific therapy to treat R-PH. Of the 1355 patients who underwent RHC as a part of PH evaluation, 29% were confirmed to have PH, and 8% had severe PH with a mean pulmonary arterial pressure of ≥35mmHg. The current diagnostic and treatment modalities for R-PH in Japan were evaluated. Although few pulmonologists perform RHC for R-PH diagnosis in Japan, more than half consider using RHC for patients before initiating PAH-specific therapy. © 2013 Published by The Japanese Respiratory Society on behalf of The Japanese Respiratory Society.

  19. Afghanistan and Iraq War Veterans: Mental Health Diagnoses are Associated with Respiratory Disease Diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatore, Christopher G; Falvo, Michael J; Nugent, Shannon; Carlson, Kathleen

    2018-02-06

    Many veterans of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have concomitant respiratory conditions and mental health conditions. We wanted to evaluate the association of mental health diagnoses with respiratory disease diagnoses among post-deployment veterans. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans who were discharged from the military or otherwise became eligible to receive Veterans Health Administration services. The primary exposure was receipt of a mental health diagnosis and the primary outcome was receipt of a respiratory diagnosis as recorded in the electronic health record. We used multivariable adjusted logistic regression to measure the associations of mental health diagnoses with respiratory diagnoses and conducted several analyses exploring the timing of the diagnoses. Among 182,338 post-deployment veterans, 14% were diagnosed with a respiratory condition, 77% of whom had a concomitant mental health diagnosis. The incidence rates were 5,363/100,000 person-years (p-y), 587/100,000 p-y, 1,450/100,000 p-y, and 233/100,000 p-y for any respiratory disease diagnosis, bronchitis, asthma, and chronic obstructive lung disease diagnoses, respectively, after the date of first Veterans Health Administration utilization. Any mental health diagnosis was associated with increased odds for any respiratory diagnosis (adjusted odds ratio 1.41, 95% confidence interval 1.37-1.46). The association of mental health diagnoses and subsequent respiratory disease diagnoses was stronger and more consistent than the converse. Many Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans are diagnosed with both respiratory and mental illnesses. Comprehensive plans that include care coordination with mental health professionals and treatments for mental illnesses may be important for many veterans with respiratory diseases.

  20. Within-breath respiratory impedance and airway obstruction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Kristine Dames da Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Recent work has suggested that within-breath respiratory impedance measurements performed using the forced oscillation technique may help to noninvasively evaluate respiratory mechanics. We investigated the influence of airway obstruction on the within-breath forced oscillation technique in smokers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and evaluated the contribution of this analysis to the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. METHODS: Twenty healthy individuals and 20 smokers were assessed. The study also included 74 patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We evaluated the mean respiratory impedance (Zm as well as values for the inspiration (Zi and expiration cycles (Ze at the beginning of inspiration (Zbi and expiration (Zbe, respectively. The peak-to-peak impedance (Zpp=Zbe-Zbi and the respiratory cycle dependence (ΔZrs=Ze-Zi were also analyzed. The diagnostic utility was evaluated by investigating the sensitivity, the specificity and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01888705. RESULTS: Airway obstruction increased the within-breath respiratory impedance parameters that were significantly correlated with the spirometric indices of airway obstruction (R=−0.65, p90%. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude the following: (1 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease introduces higher respiratory cycle dependence, (2 this increase is proportional to airway obstruction, and (3 the within-breath forced oscillation technique may provide novel parameters that facilitate the diagnosis of respiratory abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  1. Within-breath respiratory impedance and airway obstruction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Karla Kristine Dames da; Faria, Alvaro Camilo Dias; Lopes, Agnaldo José; Melo, Pedro Lopes de

    2015-07-01

    Recent work has suggested that within-breath respiratory impedance measurements performed using the forced oscillation technique may help to noninvasively evaluate respiratory mechanics. We investigated the influence of airway obstruction on the within-breath forced oscillation technique in smokers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and evaluated the contribution of this analysis to the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Twenty healthy individuals and 20 smokers were assessed. The study also included 74 patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We evaluated the mean respiratory impedance (Zm) as well as values for the inspiration (Zi) and expiration cycles (Ze) at the beginning of inspiration (Zbi) and expiration (Zbe), respectively. The peak-to-peak impedance (Zpp=Zbe-Zbi) and the respiratory cycle dependence (ΔZrs=Ze-Zi) were also analyzed. The diagnostic utility was evaluated by investigating the sensitivity, the specificity and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01888705. Airway obstruction increased the within-breath respiratory impedance parameters that were significantly correlated with the spirometric indices of airway obstruction (R=-0.65, pdisease patients presented significant expiratory-inspiratory differences (p90%). We conclude the following: (1) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease introduces higher respiratory cycle dependence, (2) this increase is proportional to airway obstruction, and (3) the within-breath forced oscillation technique may provide novel parameters that facilitate the diagnosis of respiratory abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  2. Clinical and immunological effects of Newcastle disease virus vaccine on bovine papillomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avki, Sirri; Turutoglu, Hulya; Simsek, Atilla; Unsal, Ayhan

    2004-03-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has antineoplastic and immunostimulatory properties, and it is currently being clinically tested in anticancer therapy. In order to analyze the immunostimulatory effects of NDV on bovine papillomatosis, we inoculated 14 cows subcutaneously with an attenuated vaccine containing the LaSota strain of NDV (LS-NDV). Four cows with papillomatosis served as controls. Serum samples were collected from each animal 1 h before and, 7 and 21 days after inoculation. In inoculated cows, on days 7 and 21 the mean antibody titers were log2 2.43 +/- 0.92 and log2 5.57 +/- 0.72 by haemagglutination inhibition (HI), and the mean levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were 5.80 +/- 4.19 and 5.39 +/- 2.66 ng/ml by WEHI-164 cytotoxicity assay. Significant differences between inoculated and control animals were evident for antibody titers on day 21 and clinical scores on day 60. A correlation was evident between the TNF-alpha activities and clinical scores on day 21. The clinical observations at day 60 showed that the papillomas in five cows were completely resolved (36%), one animal had no alterations on clinical appearance of the tumor (7%), and papillomas in eight cows were regressed (57%). In conclusion, these results demonstrated that inoculation of LS-NDV vaccine stimulates an antibody response and limited increase in TNF-alpha activity and may enhance clinical recovery in bovine papillomatosis.

  3. A review of bovine Johne's disease control activities in 6 endemically infected countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, Timothy; Graham, David A; Mullowney, Peter; More, Simon J

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is endemic in the bovine populations of many countries and can cause a significant reduction in animal welfare and production efficiency making control desirable. Effective control has proved very difficult to achieve despite multiple regionally coordinated programmes being in existence since the 1920s. The international community increasingly recognises the value in learning from the collective experiences of existing programmes to improve the effectiveness of control. The aim of this review is to outline key aspects of bovine Johne's disease control activities across 6 endemically infected countries to facilitate comparison of current international practice. The background, control activities and monitoring components of programmes in Australia, Canada, Denmark, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States of America were individually reviewed. Factual accuracy of each review was checked by individuals involved in the respective programmes before the reviews were condensed and combined into a single document presented here, with the complete reviews of each programme available as supplementary material. There was considerable heterogeneity in key aspects of control activity design including goals, responses to declining participation, herd classification, recommended control measures and associated test requirements. The data presented will be of interest to organisations that are involved in developing new or existing regionally coordinated BJD control activities. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Seasonal incidence of parasitic diseases in bovines of south western Gujarat (Junagadh), India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Binod; Maharana, B R; Prasad, Amit; Joseph, Joice P; Patel, Bhavika; Patel, J S

    2016-12-01

    The current study was conducted to investigate the incidence of parasitic diseases in bovines which were sick and brought at veterinary hospital for treatment. A total of 366 samples were investigated from cattle (n = 175) and buffaloes (n = 191) presented at Teaching Veterinary Clinical Complex (TVCC), Veterinary College, Junagadh, Gujarat during January to December 2014. Examination of Giemsa-stained peripheral blood smears exhibited that 58.6 % of cattle and 41.2 % of buffaloes were infected with haemoparasites comprising Babesia bigemina, Theileria annulata, and Anaplasma marginale @ of 54.0, 3.4 and 1.1 in cattle and 38.8, 1.2 and 1.2 percent in buffaloes, respectively. The incidence of total haemoparasites and B. bigemina infections was significantly higher (p  0.05). Seasonal prevalence of GI parasites was highest in summer in both cattle and buffaloes, the data being statistically non-significant (p > 0.05). However, the incidence of B. sulcata in both cattle (19.3 %) and buffaloes (28.3 %) was higher in comparisons to other GI parasites. The present investigation emphasized that B. bigemina and B. sulcata are the most important parasites of bovines of this region.

  5. An association between Helicobacter pylori and upper respiratory tract disease: Fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariya, Shin; Okano, Mitsuhiro; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major cause of chronic gastritis and gastric ulcers and considerable evidence supports the notion that infection with this bacterium is also associated with gastric malignancy in addition to various other conditions including pulmonary, vascular and autoimmune disorders. Gastric juice infected with H. pylori might play an important role in upper respiratory tract infection. Although direct and/or indirect mechanisms might be involved in the association between H. pylori and upper respiratory tract diseases, the etiological role of H. pylori in upper respiratory tract disorders has not yet been fully elucidated. Although various studies over the past two decades have suggested a relationship between H. pylori and upper respiratory tract diseases, the findings are inconsistent. The present overview describes the outcomes of recent investigations into the impact of H. pylori on upper respiratory tract and adjacent lesions. PMID:24587622

  6. IL-17A in Human Respiratory Diseases: Innate or Adaptive Immunity? Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique M. A. Bullens

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of IL-17 in 1995 as a T-cell cytokine, inducing IL-6 and IL-8 production by fibroblasts, and the report of a separate T-cell lineage producing IL-17(A, called Th17 cells, in 2005, the role of IL-17 has been studied in several inflammatory diseases. By inducing IL-8 production and subsequent neutrophil attraction towards the site of inflammation, IL-17A can link adaptive and innate immune responses. More specifically, its role in respiratory diseases has intensively been investigated. We here review its role in human respiratory diseases and try to unravel the question whether IL-17A only provides a link between the adaptive and innate respiratory immunity or whether this cytokine might also be locally produced by innate immune cells. We furthermore briefly discuss the possibility to reduce local IL-17A production as a treatment option for respiratory diseases.

  7. Human Metapneumovirus Infection is Associated with Severe Respiratory Disease in Preschool Children with History of Prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Pancham

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: Our study suggests that HMPV infection causes significant disease burden among preschool children with a history of prematurity leading to severe respiratory infections and increasing health care resource utilization due to prolonged hospitalizations.

  8. Contribution of the Bordetella Bps Polysaccharide to Biofilm Formation and Respiratory Disease in Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is pervasive in swine populations and plays multiple roles in respiratory disease. Additionally, B. bronchiseptica is capable of establishing long-term or chronic infections in swine. Bacterial biofilms are increasingly recognized as important contributors to chronic bacter...

  9. Environmental urban factors (air pollution and allergens) and the rising trends in allergic respiratory diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Amato, G

    2002-01-01

    Respiratory allergic diseases such as rhinitis and bronchial asthma appear to be increasing worldwide, affecting in particular subjects living in urban areas, and the reasons for this increase are still largely unknown...

  10. Update on the approach of respiratory therapy in patients with neuromuscular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Barreto Paula

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the role of physiotherapy in approaching neuromuscular disease (NMD, with emphasis on preventive and therapeutic aspects of respiratory therapy. Methods: A nonsystematic literature review covering the past twenty years, using the databases MEDLINE and LILACS through the following descriptors: neuromuscular diseases, physical therapy, vital capacity and respiratory failure. Results: The studies reviewed show the need to establish a routine periodic evaluation of respiratory function in order to introduce physical therapy measures relevant to each stage of the disease. The monitoring should include pulmonary function tests and specific techniques of chest physiotherapy, in order to avoid complications such as respiratory failure. Conclusion: The introduction of regular monitoring and preventive physiotherapy measures have helped to increase survival and improve quality of life of patients with neuromuscular diseases.

  11. Mortality from respiratory infections and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and associations with environmental quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory infections (RI) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been identified by the World Health Organization as conditions which may be strongly influenced by environmental factors. We examined the associations between environmental quality and U.S. county m...

  12. The effect of obesity on chronic respiratory diseases: pathophysiology and therapeutic strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Poulain, Magali; Doucet, Mariève; Major, Geneviève C; Drapeau, Vicky; Sériès, Frédéric; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Tremblay, Angelo; Maltais, François

    2006-01-01

    ...), asthma, obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Obesity has emerged as an important risk factor for these respiratory diseases, and in many instances weight loss is associated with important symptomatic improvement...

  13. Differentiated Approach to the Mucolytic Therapy for Respiratory Diseases in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.I. Yulish

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the mechanisms of disorders of mucociliary clearance in the tracheobronchial tree in respiratory diseases in children. The authors considered differentiated approach to the prescription of mucoactive and mucolytic drugs, in particular ambroxol.

  14. Differentiated Approach to the Mucolytic Therapy for Respiratory Diseases in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Ye.I. Yulish

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the mechanisms of disorders of mucociliary clearance in the tracheobronchial tree in respiratory diseases in children. The authors considered differentiated approach to the prescription of mucoactive and mucolytic drugs, in particular ambroxol.

  15. Air pollution and hospital admissions for respiratory diseases in the subequatorial Amazon: a time series approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eliane Ignotti; Sandra de Souza Hacon; Washington Leite Junger; Dennys Mourão; Karla Longo; Saulo Freitas; Paulo Artaxo; Antônio Carlos Monteiro Ponce de Leon

    2010-01-01

    ... da Serra in the Brazilian Amazon in 2005. This is an ecological time series study that uses data on daily number of hospitalizations of children and the elderly for respiratory diseases, and estimated concentration of PM2.5...

  16. Viral respiratory infections in patients with chronic non-specific lung disease (CNSLD)

    OpenAIRE

    Roldaan, A.C.

    1981-01-01

    textabstractIt is a well known clinical phenomenon that patients suffering from bronchial obstructive disorders, usually covered by the term chronic non-specific lung disease (CNSLD) tend to react with exacerbations of their disease in the course of respiratory infections, especially if a viral or mycoplasmal agent is involved. However, there is no uniform opinion about the relative importance of viral respiratory infections in this respect, and much of the background of the features observed...

  17. Update on the approach of respiratory therapy in patients with neuromuscular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Priscilla Barreto Paula; Laura Maria de Lima Belizário Facury Lasmar; Maria Teresa Mohallem Fonseca; Marina Belisário Carvalhais; Maria da Glória Rodrigues Machado

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the role of physiotherapy in approaching neuromuscular disease (NMD), with emphasis on preventive and therapeutic aspects of respiratory therapy. Methods: A nonsystematic literature review covering the past twenty years, using the databases MEDLINE and LILACS through the following descriptors: neuromuscular diseases, physical therapy, vital capacity and respiratory failure. Results: The studies reviewed show the need to establish a routine periodic evaluation of respirato...

  18. Statistical Methodological Issues in Studies of Air Pollution and Respiratory Disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Hyndman, R. J.; Erbas, B.

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have consistently shown short term associations between levels of air pollution and respiratory disease in countries of diverse populations, geographical locations and varying levels of air pollution and climate. The aims of this paper are: (1) to assess the sensitivity of the observed pollution effects to model specification, with particular emphasis on the inclusion of seasonally adjusted covariates; and (2) to study the effect of air pollution on respiratory disease...

  19. Practical Recommendations for Diagnosis and Management of Respiratory Muscle Weakness in Late-Onset Pompe Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boentert, Matthias; Prigent, Hélène; Várdi, Katalin; Jones, Harrison N; Mellies, Uwe; Simonds, Anita K; Wenninger, Stephan; Barrot Cortés, Emilia; Confalonieri, Marco

    2016-10-17

    Pompe disease is an autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by progressive myopathy with proximal muscle weakness, respiratory muscle dysfunction, and cardiomyopathy (in infants only). In patients with juvenile or adult disease onset, respiratory muscle weakness may decline more rapidly than overall neurological disability. Sleep-disordered breathing, daytime hypercapnia, and the need for nocturnal ventilation eventually evolve in most patients. Additionally, respiratory muscle weakness leads to decreased cough and impaired airway clearance, increasing the risk of acute respiratory illness. Progressive respiratory muscle weakness is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in late-onset Pompe disease even if enzyme replacement therapy has been established. Practical knowledge of how to detect, monitor and manage respiratory muscle involvement is crucial for optimal patient care. A multidisciplinary approach combining the expertise of neurologists, pulmonologists, and intensive care specialists is needed. Based on the authors' own experience in over 200 patients, this article conveys expert recommendations for the diagnosis and management of respiratory muscle weakness and its sequelae in late-onset Pompe disease.

  20. Practical Recommendations for Diagnosis and Management of Respiratory Muscle Weakness in Late-Onset Pompe Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Boentert

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is an autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by progressive myopathy with proximal muscle weakness, respiratory muscle dysfunction, and cardiomyopathy (in infants only. In patients with juvenile or adult disease onset, respiratory muscle weakness may decline more rapidly than overall neurological disability. Sleep-disordered breathing, daytime hypercapnia, and the need for nocturnal ventilation eventually evolve in most patients. Additionally, respiratory muscle weakness leads to decreased cough and impaired airway clearance, increasing the risk of acute respiratory illness. Progressive respiratory muscle weakness is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in late-onset Pompe disease even if enzyme replacement therapy has been established. Practical knowledge of how to detect, monitor and manage respiratory muscle involvement is crucial for optimal patient care. A multidisciplinary approach combining the expertise of neurologists, pulmonologists, and intensive care specialists is needed. Based on the authors’ own experience in over 200 patients, this article conveys expert recommendations for the diagnosis and management of respiratory muscle weakness and its sequelae in late-onset Pompe disease.

  1. Long-term efficacy of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with occupational respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochmann, Uta; Kotschy-Lang, Nicola; Raab, Wolfgang; Kellberger, Jessica; Nowak, Dennis; Jörres, Rudolf A

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is a well-recognized treatment option in chronic obstructive lung disease improving exercise performance, respiratory symptoms and quality of life. In occupational respiratory diseases, which can be rather cost-intensive due to the compensation needs, very little information is available. This study aims at the evaluation of the usefulness of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with occupational respiratory diseases, partly involving complex alterations of lung function and of the sustainability of effects. We studied 263 patients with occupational respiratory diseases (asthma, silicosis, asbestosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) using a 4-week inpatient rehabilitation program and follow-up examinations 3 and 12 months later. The outcomes evaluated were lung function, 6-min walking distance (6MWD), maximum exercise capacity (Wmax), skeletal muscle strength, respiratory symptoms, exacerbations and associated medical consultations, quality of life (SF-36, SGRQ), anxiety/depression (HADS) and Medical Research Council and Baseline and Transition Dyspnea Index scores. Compared to baseline, there were significant (p rehabilitation, and these were maintained over 12 months (p rehabilitation. No changes were seen in the questionnaire outcomes. Pulmonary rehabilitation is effective even in the complex settings of occupational respiratory diseases, providing sustained improvement of functional capacity and reducing health care utilization. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Burden of Respiratory Disease in Korea: An Observational Study on Allergic Rhinitis, Asthma, COPD, and Rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Kwang Ha; Ahn, Hae Ryun; Park, Jae Kyoung; Kim, Jong Woong; Nam, Gui Hyun; Hong, Soon Kwan; Kim, Mee Ja; Ghoshal, Aloke Gopal; Muttalif, Abdul Razak Bin Abdul; Lin, Horng Chyuan; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak; Bagga, Shalini; Faruqi, Rab; Sajjan, Shiva; Baidya, Santwona; Wang, De Yun; Cho, Sang Heon

    2016-11-01

    The Asia-Pacific Burden of Respiratory Diseases (APBORD) study is a cross-sectional, observational one which has used a standard protocol to examine the disease and economic burden of allergic rhinitis (AR), asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), and rhinosinusitis across the Asia-Pacific region. Here, we report on symptoms, healthcare resource use, work impairment, and associated costs in Korea. Consecutive participants aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of asthma, AR, COPD, or rhinosinusitis were enrolled. Participants and their treating physician completed a survey detailing respiratory symptoms, healthcare resource use, and work productivity and activity impairment. Costs included direct medical cost and indirect cost associated with lost work productivity. The study enrolled 999 patients. Patients were often diagnosed with multiple respiratory disorders (42.8%), with asthma/AR and AR/rhinosinusitis the most frequently diagnosed combinations. Cough or coughing up phlegm was the primary reason for the medical visit in patients with a primary diagnosis of asthma and COPD, whereas nasal symptoms (watery runny nose, blocked nose, and congestion) were the main reasons in those with AR and rhinosinusitis. The mean annual cost for patients with a respiratory disease was US$8,853 (SD 11,245) per patient. Lost productivity due to presenteeism was the biggest contributor to costs. Respiratory disease has a significant impact on disease burden in Korea. Treatment strategies for preventing lost work productivity could greatly reduce the economic burden of respiratory disease.

  3. Severe respiratory changes at end stage in a FUS-induced disease state in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kasey L; Dhaibar, Hemangini A; Dayton, Robert D; Cananzi, Sergio G; Mayhan, William G; Glasscock, Edward; Klein, Ronald L

    2016-10-28

    Fused in sarcoma (FUS) is an RNA-binding protein associated with the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. ALS manifests in patients as a progressive paralysis which leads to respiratory dysfunction and failure, the primary cause of death in ALS. We expressed human FUS in rats to determine if FUS would induce ALS relevant respiratory changes to serve as an early stage disease indicator. The FUS expression was initiated in adult rats by way of an intravenously administered adeno-associated virus vector serotype 9 (AAV9) providing an adult onset model. The rats developed progressive motor impairments observed as early as 2-3 weeks post gene transfer. Respiratory abnormalities manifested 4-7 weeks post gene transfer including increased respiratory frequency and decreased tidal volume. Rats with breathing abnormalities also had arterial blood acidosis. Similar detailed plethysmographic changes were found in adult rats injected with AAV9 TDP-43. FUS gene transfer to adult rats yielded a consistent pre-clinical model with relevant motor paralysis in the early to middle stages and respiratory dysfunction at the end stage. Both FUS and TDP-43 yielded a similar consistent disease state. This modeling method yields disease relevant motor and respiratory changes in adult rats. The reproducibility of the data supports the use of this method to study other disease related genes and their combinations as well as a platform for disease modifying interventional strategies.

  4. Characterization of a chimeric foot-and-mouth disease virus bearing bovine rhinitis B virus leader proteinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our recent study has shown that bovine rhinovirus type 2 (BRV2), a new member of the Aphthovirus genus, shares many motifs and sequence similarities with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Despite low sequence conservation (36percent amino acid identity) and N- and C-terminus folding differences,...

  5. Wearable technology: role in respiratory health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In the future, diagnostic devices will be able to monitor a patient’s physiological or biochemical parameters continuously, under natural physiological conditions and in any environment through wearable biomedical sensors. Together with apps that capture and interpret data, and integrated enterprise and cloud data repositories, the networks of wearable devices and body area networks will constitute the healthcare’s Internet of Things. In this review, four main areas of interest for respiratory healthcare are described: pulse oximetry, pulmonary ventilation, activity tracking and air quality assessment. Although several issues still need to be solved, smart wearable technologies will provide unique opportunities for the future or personalised respiratory medicine. PMID:28966692

  6. PECULIARITIES OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASES IN PATIENTS WITH ATOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O. Ponezheva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the work identified clinical and immunological characteristics of the course of ARVI patients with atopy and assessed the clinical efficacy of transfer factor in patients with severe immune deficiency. Emphasized the role of respiratory infections as the most important triggers of exacerbations of atopy and causes more severe and prolonged course. Describes the mechanisms of how respiratory viruses potentiate chronic inflammation and remodeling of the airways. The role of the causative agents of ARVI in patients with atopy deserve more practical attention towards and optimization of therapy.

  7. Respiratory Diseases in University Students Associated with Exposure to Residential Dampness or Mold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanthier-Veilleux, Mathieu; Baron, Geneviève; Généreux, Mélissa

    2016-11-18

    University students are frequently exposed to residential dampness or mold (i.e., visible mold, mold odor, dampness, or water leaks), a well-known contributor to asthma, allergic rhinitis, and respiratory infections. This study aims to: (a) describe the prevalence of these respiratory diseases among university students; and (b) examine the independent contribution of residential dampness or mold to these diseases. An online survey was conducted in March 2014 among the 26,676 students registered at the Université de Sherbrooke (Quebec, Canada). Validated questions and scores were used to assess self-reported respiratory diseases (i.e., asthma-like symptoms, allergic rhinitis, and respiratory infections), residential dampness or mold, and covariates (e.g., student characteristics). Using logistic regressions, the crude and adjusted odd ratios between residential dampness or mold and self-reported respiratory diseases were examined. Results from the participating students (n = 2097; response rate: 8.1%) showed high prevalence of allergic rhinitis (32.6%; 95% CI: 30.6-34.7), asthma-like symptoms (24.0%; 95% CI: 22.1-25.8) and respiratory infections (19.4%; 95% CI: 17.7-21.2). After adjustment, exposure to residential dampness or mold was associated with allergic rhinitis (OR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.01-1.55) and asthma-like symptoms (OR: 1.70; 95% CI: 1.37-2.11), but not with respiratory infections (OR: 1.07; 95% CI: 0.85-1.36). Among symptomatic students, this exposure was also associated with uncontrolled and burdensome respiratory symptoms (p mold, may play a role in increasing atopic respiratory diseases and their suboptimal control in young adults. These results emphasize the importance for public health organizations to tackle poor housing conditions, especially amongst university students who should be considered "at-risk".

  8. Modern features of infants’ feeding and its impact on respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duka K.D.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the problem of infants’ feeding connected with the incidence of respiratory diseases. Rationality and duration of breast feeding does not cause doubts. But unfortunately today, only 60-80% of children under the age of 6 months are exclusively breastfed. Naturally, this causes impact on disease incidence of such children. Formation of bronchopulmonary pathology is of particular interest. The basis of modern research is the concept of programmed impact of nutrition in early childhood on health in lateryears. We have determined the dependence of respiratory diseases incidence in children of early age on duration of exclusively breast feeding. Not only frequent respiratory diseases, but formation of bronchitis, pneumonia or other complications of their course is of importance. The study included questioning of mothers and children under 7 years of age, clinical, radiological and laboratory investigations in the hospital in case of respiratory disease. All studies were conducted in accordance with the characteristics of diet quality of the child in the first year of life with the following biostatistical processing. 601 children aged from 3 months to 7 years were examined. It was found that the duration of breast feeding in the region is 89% only to the age of 6-months, and up to 1 year the percentage of breastfed children reduces to 38%. This affected the resistance of children to respiratory infections, especially in the first year of life. Children exclusively breastfed up to 1 year suffer from respiratory diseases 1-2 times per year. In children over one year of age breast feeding does not affect the frequency of respiratory pathology. Increase of respiratory diseases frequency in children aged 3-5 years is due to attending preschool institutions and increasing contacts between children, which significantly reduces their resistance.

  9. Seasonality of primary care utilization for respiratory diseases in Ontario: A time-series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nie Jason X

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory diseases represent a significant burden in primary care. Determining the temporal variation of the overall burden of respiratory diseases on the health care system and their potential causes are keys to understanding disease dynamics in populations and can contribute to the rational management of health care resources. Methods A retrospective, cross-sectional time series analysis was used to assess the presence and strength of seasonal and temporal patterns in primary care visits for respiratory diseases in Ontario, Canada, for a 10-year period from January 1, 1992 to December 31, 2002. Data were extracted from the Ontario Health Insurance Plan database for people who had diagnosis codes for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, pneumonia, or upper respiratory tract infections. Results The results illustrate a clear seasonal pattern in visits to primary care physicians for all respiratory conditions, with a threefold increase in visits during the winter. Age and sex-specific rates show marked increases in visits of young children and in female adults. Multivariate time series methods quantified the interactions among primary care visits, and Granger causality criterion test showed that the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and influenza virus influenced asthma (p = 0.0060, COPD (p = 0.0038, pneumonia (p = 0.0001, and respiratory diseases (p = 0.0001. Conclusion Primary care visits for respiratory diseases have clear predictable seasonal patterns, driven primarily by viral circulations. Winter visits are threefold higher than summer troughs, indicating a short-term surge on primary health service demands. These findings can aid in effective allocation of resources and services based on seasonal and specific population demands.

  10. Seasonality of primary care utilization for respiratory diseases in Ontario: a time-series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moineddin, Rahim; Nie, Jason X; Domb, Gabrielle; Leong, Alan M; Upshur, Ross E G

    2008-07-28

    Respiratory diseases represent a significant burden in primary care. Determining the temporal variation of the overall burden of respiratory diseases on the health care system and their potential causes are keys to understanding disease dynamics in populations and can contribute to the rational management of health care resources. A retrospective, cross-sectional time series analysis was used to assess the presence and strength of seasonal and temporal patterns in primary care visits for respiratory diseases in Ontario, Canada, for a 10-year period from January 1, 1992 to December 31, 2002. Data were extracted from the Ontario Health Insurance Plan database for people who had diagnosis codes for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, pneumonia, or upper respiratory tract infections. The results illustrate a clear seasonal pattern in visits to primary care physicians for all respiratory conditions, with a threefold increase in visits during the winter. Age and sex-specific rates show marked increases in visits of young children and in female adults. Multivariate time series methods quantified the interactions among primary care visits, and Granger causality criterion test showed that the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza virus influenced asthma (p = 0.0060), COPD (p = 0.0038), pneumonia (p = 0.0001), and respiratory diseases (p = 0.0001). Primary care visits for respiratory diseases have clear predictable seasonal patterns, driven primarily by viral circulations. Winter visits are threefold higher than summer troughs, indicating a short-term surge on primary health service demands. These findings can aid in effective allocation of resources and services based on seasonal and specific population demands.

  11. Surgical Repair of Mitral Valve Disease in Children: Perioperative Changes in Respiratory Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspinas, Iliona; Petak, Ferenc; Chok, Lionel; Perrin, Anne; Martin, Anne-Laure; Beghetti, Maurice; Habre, Walid

    2016-10-01

    To assess the profile of changes in airway and respiratory tissue mechanics within a follow-up study performed in children with mitral valve disease, before and after surgical valve repair. Perioperative measurements in a prospective, consecutive cross-sectional study. University hospital, tertiary care teaching hospital The study comprised 24 children with congenital or post-rheumatic mitral valve insufficiency. Input impedance of the respiratory system during spontaneous breathing was measured before and 5 days and 3 weeks after mitral valve surgery. In addition, airway and respiratory tissue mechanics and pulmonary arterial pressure were assessed with the patient under general anesthesia preoperatively and immediately postoperatively. Respiratory tissue elastance and changes in airway measurements were estimated from forced oscillatory impedance data by fitting an appropriate model. Relating airway and respiratory tissue mechanics to previously established reference values obtained in age-matched healthy control patients revealed abnormal respiratory function (135±6.2% and 148±13% in respiratory elastance and resistance, respectively; pMitral valve disease in children leads to abnormal airway and respiratory tissue mechanics. Even though surgical repair of mitral insufficiency alleviates abnormal airway function, residual lung tissue stiffening may persist even weeks after the surgery, contributing to a sustained impairment in lung function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Satisfaction of patients with Peyronie's disease after plaque surgery and bovine pericardium graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Garretón, A; Santillán, D; Chávez, D; Gioielli, A; Rey-Valzacchi, G; Layús, O; Gueglio, G

    2017-03-01

    Plaque and bovine pericardium graft surgery is a useful tool for treating Peyronie's disease. To determine patient satisfaction following this operation. This was a retrospective, observational and descriptive study. We collected data from the medical records of patients who underwent surgery between 2004 and 2015 and were evaluated through a postoperative satisfaction questionnaire. Twenty-eight operations were performed. Curve correction was achieved in 26 patients (95.3%). One patient (3.57%) required residual curve correction using Yachia's technique, and 1 patient (3.57%) had a severe complication consisting of prosthetic infection and urethrocutaneous fistulae. Twenty-one patients (75%) expressed satisfaction with the surgery. Our results show an acceptable level of satisfaction among our patients, with a low number of complications. However, further prospective, controlled and randomised studies are needed. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Respiratory and allergic diseases: from upper respiratory tract infections to asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Raja

    2002-06-01

    patient, mind-body interventions such as yoga, hypnosis, and biofeedback-assisted relaxation and breathing exercises are beneficial for stress reduction in general and may be helpful in further controlling asthma. Encouraging parents to learn how to massage their asthmatic children may appeal to some parents and provide benefits for parents and children alike. Acupuncture and chiropractic treatment cannot be recommended at this time, although some patients may derive benefit because of the placebo effect. For patients with allergic rhinitis, there are no good clinical research data on the use of quercetin and vitamin C. Similarly, freeze-dried stinging nettle leaves may be tried, but the applicable research evidence also is poor. Further studies are needed to assess the efficacy of these supplements and herbs. Homeopathic remedies based on extreme dilutions of the allergen may be beneficial in allergic rhinitis but require collaboration with an experienced homeopath. There are no research data on constitutional homeopathic approaches to asthma and allergic rhinitis. Patients with COPD are helped by exercise, pulmonary rehabilitation, and increased caloric protein and fat intake. Vitamin C and n-3 supplements are safe and reasonable; however, studies are needed to establish their efficacy in COPD. On the other hand, there are convincing data in favor of N-acetyl-cysteine supplementation for the patient with COPD at doses ranging between 400 and 1200 mg daily. Red blood cell magnesium levels may guide the use of magnesium replacement. The use of L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 in patients with COPD needs further study. The addition of essential oils to the dietary regimen of patients with chronic bronchitis is worth exploring. Patients with upper respiratory tract infections can expect a shorter duration of symptoms by taking high doses of vitamin C (2 g) with zinc supplements, preferably the nasal zinc gel, at the onset of their symptoms. Adding an herb such as echinacea or

  14. Modern approaches to understanding stress and disease susceptibility: A review with special emphasis on respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palok Aich

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Palok Aich, Andrew A Potter, Philip J GriebelVaccine and Infectious Disease Organization, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, CanadaAbstract: Studies in animals and humans link both physical and psychological stress with an increased incidence and severity of respiratory infections. For this manuscript we define stress as the physiological responses an individual undergoes while adjusting to a continually changing environment. It is known that stressors of various types (psychological/physical can alter the physiological levels of certain hormones, chemokines and cytokines. These alterations send information to the central nervous system to take necessary action which then sends messages to appropriate organs/tissues/cells to respond. These messages can either activate or suppress the immune system as needed and failure to compensate for this by the body can lead to serious health-related problems. Little is known how stress affects disease susceptibility, yet understanding this mechanism is important for developing effective treatments, and for improving health and food quality. The current review focuses on (a the effects of psychological stressors in humans and animals, (b various methodologies employed to understand stress responses and their outcomes, and (c the current status of the attempts to correlate stress and disease with respiratory disease as model system. The methodologies included in this review span traditional epidemiological, behavioral and immunological studies to current high throughput genomic, proteomic, metabolomic/metabonomic approaches. With the advent of various newer omics and bioinformatics methodologies we postulate that it will become feasible to understand the mechanisms through which stress can influence disease onset. Although the literature in this area is limited because of the infancy of this research area, the objective of this review is to illustrate the power of new approaches to address complex

  15. 76 FR 30366 - Draft Alert Entitled “Preventing Occupational Respiratory Disease From Dampness in Office...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... No: 2011-12935] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Docket Number NIOSH-238] Draft Alert Entitled ``Preventing Occupational Respiratory Disease From Dampness..., Director, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

  16. Rapid Veterinary Diagnosis of Bovine Reproductive Infectious Diseases from Semen using Paper-Origami DNA Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhugen; Xu, Gaolian; Reboud, Julien; Ali, Syed Atif; Kaur, Gurpreet; McGiven, John; Boby, Nongthombam; Gupta, Praveen; Chaudhuri, Pallab; Cooper, Jonathan Mark

    2018-01-11

    The health and well-being of cattle is a significant concern for global agricultural output. In dairy production within low and middle income countries (LMICs), there is a significant biosensing challenge in detecting sexually transmitted infection (STI) pathogens during animal husbandry, due in part to difficulties associated with the limited infrastructure for veterinary medicine. Here we demonstrate low-cost, multiplexed and sample-to-answer paper-origami tests for the detection of three bovine infectious reproductive diseases in semen samples, collected at a test site in rural India. Pathogen DNA from one viral pathogen, Bovine Herpes virus-1 (BoHV-1) and two bacteria (Brucella and Leptospira) was extracted, amplified (using loop-mediated isothermal amplification, LAMP) and detected fluorescently, enabling DNA to be measured. Data was collected as a fluorescence signal either visually, using a low-cost hand-held torch, or digitally with a mobile-phone camera. Limits of detection and sensitivities of the paper-origami device for the three pathogens were also evaluated using pathogen-inoculated semen samples and were as few as 50 Leptospira organisms, 50 CFU Brucella and 1 TCID50. BoHV-1. Semen samples from elite bulls at a germplasm centre were also tested in double-blind tests, as a demonstrator for a low cost, user-friendly point-of-care sensing platform, for in-the-field resource-limited regions. The sensors showed excellent levels of sensitivity and specificity, and for the first of time a demonstrated ability of the application of paper-origami devices for the diagnosis multiple infectious diseases from semen samples.

  17. Modifications of the National Early Warning Score for patients with chronic respiratory disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, N. E.; Rasmussen, L. S.; Petersen, J. A.

    2017-01-01

    System (CROS), the Chronic Respiratory Early Warning Score (CREWS) and the Salford NEWS (S-NEWS) affected NEWS total scores and NEWS performance. METHODS: In an observational study, we included patients with chronic respiratory disease. The frequency of use of CROS and the NEWS total score changes caused...... and specialist consultation' total score intervals to lower intervals. CONCLUSION: Capital Region of Denmark NEWS Override System was frequently used in patients with chronic respiratory disease. CROS, CREWS and S-NEWS reduced sensitivity for 48-h mortality and ICU admission. Using the methodology prevalent......BACKGROUND: The National Early Warning Score (NEWS) uses physiological variables to detect deterioration in hospitalized patients. However, patients with chronic respiratory disease may have abnormal variables not requiring interventions. We studied how the Capital Region of Denmark NEWS Override...

  18. Treatment of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis : 1995 poll of members of the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimpen, JLL; Schaad, UB

    Background. Among the lower respiratory tract infections during infancy requiring hospitalization, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis is the most frequent disease entity. Nevertheless treatment remains controversial. Methods. A poll among the European Society for Paediatric Infectious

  19. Effects of global warming on respiratory diseases | Tanimowo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Global warming is a consequence of air pollution resulting in climate change due to trapping of excess greenhouse gases in the earth's atmosphere that affects biodiversity and constitutes a serious health hazard, especially to the respiratory system. These greenhouse gases include carbon dioxide, water ...

  20. Exosomes and Exosomal miRNA in Respiratory Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alipoor, Shamila D.; Mortaz, Esmaeil|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/29141320X; Garssen, Johan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/086369962; Movassaghi, Masoud; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Adcock, Ian M.

    Exosomes are nanosized vesicles released from every cell in the body including those in the respiratory tract and lungs. They are found in most body fluids and contain a number of different biomolecules including proteins, lipids, and both mRNA and noncoding RNAs. Since they can release their

  1. Nitric oxide in health and disease of the respiratory system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricciardolo, Fabio L. M.; Sterk, Peter J.; Gaston, Benjamin; Folkerts, Gert

    2004-01-01

    During the past decade a plethora of studies have unravelled the multiple roles of nitric oxide (NO) in airway physiology and pathophysiology. In the respiratory tract, NO is produced by a wide variety of cell types and is generated via oxidation of l-arginine that is catalyzed by the enzyme NO

  2. A previously undescribed coronavirus associated with respiratory disease in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); N.G. Hartwig (Nico); T.M. Bestebroer (Theo); B. Niemeyer (Berend); J.H. Simon (James); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); J.C. de Jong (Jan)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe etiology of acute respiratory tract illnesses is sometimes unclear due to limitations of diagnostic tests or the existence of as-yet-unidentified pathogens. Here we describe the identification and characterization of a not previously recognized coronavirus obtained from an 8-mo-old

  3. Early Upregulation of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome-Associated Cytokines Promotes Lethal Disease in an Aged-Mouse Model of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Rockx, Barry; Baas, Tracey; Zornetzer, Gregory; Haagmans, Bart; Sheahan, Timothy; Frieman, Matthew; Dyer, Matthew; Teal, Thomas; Proll, Sean; Brand, Judith; Baric, Ralph; Katze, Michael

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSeveral respiratory viruses, including influenza virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), produce more severe disease in the elderly, yet the molecular mechanisms governing age-related susceptibility remain poorly studied. Advanced age was significantly associated with increased SARS-related deaths, primarily due to the onset of early- and late-stage acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pulmonary fibrosis. Infection of aged, but not young, mice...

  4. Respiratory infections in adults with atopic disease and IgE antibodies to common aeroallergens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aino Rantala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atopic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, allergic dermatitis and asthma, are common diseases with a prevalence of 30-40% worldwide and are thus of great global public health importance. Allergic inflammation may influence the immunity against infections, so atopic individuals could be susceptible to respiratory infections. No previous population-based study has addressed the relation between atopy and respiratory infections in adulthood. We assessed the relation between atopic disease, specific IgE antibodies and the occurrence of upper and lower respiratory infections in the past 12 months among working-aged adults. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A population-based cross-sectional study of 1008 atopic and non-atopic adults 21-63 years old was conducted. Information on atopic diseases, allergy tests and respiratory infections was collected by a questionnaire. Specific IgE antibodies to common aeroallergens were measured in serum. Adults with atopic disease had a significantly increased risk of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI; including acute bronchitis and pneumonia with an adjusted risk ratio (RR 2.24 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.43, 3.52 and upper respiratory tract infections (URTI; including common cold, sinusitis, tonsillitis, and otitis media with an adjusted RR 1.55 (1.14, 2.10. The risk of LRTIs increased with increasing level of specific IgE (linear trend P = 0.059. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides new evidence that working-aged adults with atopic disease experience significantly more LRTIs and URTIs than non-atopics. The occurrence of respiratory infections increased with increasing levels of specific IgE antibodies to common aeroallergens, showing a dose-response pattern with LRTIs. From the clinical point of view it is important to recognize that those with atopies are a risk group for respiratory infections, including more severe LRTIs.

  5. Detection of antibodies and risk factors for infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus-3 in beef cattle of Yucatan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Calderón, J J; Segura-Correa, J C; Aguilar-Romero, F; Segura-Correa, V M

    2007-11-15

    We collected blood samples from 756 > or =2-year-old cattle in 54 herds in Yucatan, Mexico, and used all of those to determine the antibody seroprevalences (in an indirect enzyme-linked inmunosorbance assay) to bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and risk factors for animal-level seropositivity. We used 728 of the same samples (from 52 of the same herds) to do the same for parainfluenza virus-3 (PIV3). Cattle were selected by two-stage cluster sampling. Herd-level and animal-level risk factors were obtained through a personal interview. We analyzed the data by using a random-effects multivariable logistic regression model for clustered observations. All herds had at least 3 (BRSV) or 5 (PIV3) seropositive animals. The animal-level true seroprevalences were: 90.8% (86.5, 95.2%) and 85.6% (80.9, 90.4%) for BRSV and PIV3, respectively. Animals in large herds and old animals had the highest odds of being seropositives to BRSV, and those risk factors plus animals born on the farm for PIV3 infection.

  6. Relation of air pollution with epidemiology of respiratory diseases in isfahan, Iran from 2005 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Maasoumeh; Ramesht, Mohammad Hossein; Zohary, Moein; Poursafa, Parinaz; Kelishadi, Roya; Rashidi, Zeinab; Rouzbahani, Reza

    2013-12-01

    National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) scientists shows that long-term exposure to air pollutants increases the risk of respiratory diseases such as allergies, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer. Children and the elderly are particularly vulnerable to the health effects of ozone, fine particles, and other airborne toxicants. Air pollution factors are considered as one of the underlying causes of respiratory diseases. This study aimed to determine the association of respiratory diseases documented in medical records and air pollution (Map distribution) of accumulation in Isfahan province, Iran. By plotting the prevalence and spatial distribution maps, important differences from different points can be observed. The geographic information system (GIS), pollutant standards index (PSI) measurements, and remote Sensing (RS) technology were used after entering data in the mapping information table; spatial distribution was mapped and distribution of Geographical Epidemiology of Respiratory Diseases in Isfahan province (Iran) was determined in this case study from 2005 to 2009. Space with tracing the distribution of respiratory diseases was scattered based on the distribution of air pollution in the points is an important part of this type of diseases in Isfahan province where air pollution was more abundant. The findings of this study emphasis on the importance of preventing the exposure to air pollution, and to control air pollution product industries, to improve work environmental health, and to increase the health professionals and public knowledge in this regard.

  7. Relation of air pollution with epidemiology of respiratory diseases in isfahan, Iran from 2005 to 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maasoumeh Rashidi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS scientists shows that long-term exposure to air pollutants increases the risk of respiratory diseases such as allergies, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer. Children and the elderly are particularly vulnerable to the health effects of ozone, fine particles, and other airborne toxicants. Air pollution factors are considered as one of the underlying causes of respiratory diseases. This study aimed to determine the association of respiratory diseases documented in medical records and air pollution (Map distribution of accumulation in Isfahan province, Iran. By plotting the prevalence and spatial distribution maps, important differences from different points can be observed. Materials and Methods: The geographic information system (GIS, pollutant standards index (PSI measurements, and remote Sensing (RS technology were used after entering data in the mapping information table; spatial distribution was mapped and distribution of Geographical Epidemiology of Respiratory Diseases in Isfahan province (Iran was determined in this case study from 2005 to 2009. Results: Space with tracing the distribution of respiratory diseases was scattered based on the distribution of air pollution in the points is an important part of this type of diseases in Isfahan province where air pollution was more abundant. Conclusion: The findings of this study emphasis on the importance of preventing the exposure to air pollution, and to control air pollution product industries, to improve work environmental health, and to increase the health professionals and public knowledge in this regard.

  8. [Air pollution and respiratory diseases among children in the city of Curitiba, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakonyi, Sonia Maria Cipriano; Danni-Oliveira, Inês Moresco; Martins, Lourdes Conceição; Braga, Alfésio Luís Ferreira

    2004-10-01

    To assess the effects of air pollution levels on respiratory morbidity among children from 1999 to 2000. Daily records of health center attendance due to respiratory diseases among children were obtained from the public health system in Curitiba, State of Paraná, Brazil. Daily levels of particulate matter (PM10), smoke, NO2 and O3 were obtained from both Paraná State Environmental Institute and the Development Technology Institute, a non-governmental agency. Daily measurements of temperature and relative humidity were obtained from the National Institute of Meteorology. Generalized additive Poisson regression models were used to assess the relationship between respiratory diseases and air pollution, controlling for long-term seasonality using loess (a non-parametric smoothing function), weather and weekdays. A significance level of 5% was adopted in all the analyses. All pollutants presented an effect on respiratory diseases among children. An increase of 40.4 mg/m3 in the 3-day moving average of smoke was associated with an increase of 4.5% (95% CI: 1.5-7.6) in the attendance of children with respiratory diseases. The results suggest that air pollution promotes adverse effects on children's respiratory health even when pollutant levels are lower than the air quality standards.

  9. Infectious respiratory disease outbreaks and pregnancy: occupational health and safety concerns of Canadian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Karen P; O'Sullivan, Tracey L; Dow, Darcie; Amaratunga, Carol A

    2011-04-01

    This paper is a report of a qualitative study of emergency and critical care nurses' perceptions of occupational response and preparedness during infectious respiratory disease outbreaks including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and influenza. Healthcare workers, predominantly female, face occupational and personal challenges in their roles as first responders/first receivers. Exposure to SARS or other respiratory pathogens during pregnancy represents additional occupational risk for healthcare workers. Perceptions of occupational reproductive risk during response to infectious respiratory disease outbreaks were assessed qualitatively by five focus groups comprised of 100 Canadian nurses conducted between 2005 and 2006. Occupational health and safety issues anticipated by Canadian nurses for future infectious respiratory disease outbreaks were grouped into four major themes: (1) apprehension about occupational risks to pregnant nurses; (2) unknown pregnancy risks of anti-infective therapy/prophylaxis; (3) occupational risk communication for pregnant nurses; and (4) human resource strategies required for pregnant nurses during outbreaks. The reproductive risk perceptions voiced by Canadian nurses generally were consistent with reported case reports of pregnant women infected with SARS or emerging influenza strains. Nurses' fears of fertility risks posed by exposure to infectious agents or anti-infective therapy and prophylaxis are not well supported by the literature, with the former not biologically plausible and the latter lacking sufficient data. Reproductive risk assessments should be performed for each infectious respiratory disease outbreak to provide female healthcare workers and in particular pregnant women with guidelines regarding infection control and use of anti-infective therapy and prophylaxis.

  10. Respiratory muscle function in patients with asbestos-related pleural disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarad, N A; Carroll, M P; Laroche, C; Poulakis, N; Moxham, J; Green, M; Rudd, R M

    1994-02-01

    The effect of asbestos-related pleural disease (ARPD) on the generation of maximum respiratory pressure was investigated in 11 male patients with ARPD mean age 57 years, range 45-74, and mean duration of asbestos exposure of 9.9 years, range 5-16. There were three smokers, seven ex-smokers and one non-smoker. Breathlessness ranged from grade 1-3 on the MRC score. The extent of pleural disease was calculated using a score based on the ILO score for pleural disease. Full respiratory function tests, global respiratory muscle strength and diaphragmatic strength were assessed. Respiratory muscle strength, including diaphragm strength, was normal. Recoil pressure was high or at the upper limit of normal in four patients and correlated with chest radiograph score for pleural disease (r = 0.65, P < 0.02). There was no difference in either global respiratory muscle or diaphragmatic strength between patients with and without involvement of one or both costophrenic angles or between patients with mild or severe breathlessness. We conclude that respiratory muscle strength is not importantly reduced in ARPD, and it is unlikely that weakness contributes to breathlessness in these patients. By contrast reduced chest wall compliance is likely to be an important factor in breathlessness in some cases.

  11. Blunted Hypercapnic Respiratory Drive Response in Subjects With Late-Onset Pompe Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito, Eduardo L; Monteiro, Sergio G; Aruj, Patricia K

    2016-07-01

    Patients with late-onset Pompe disease develop progressive hypercapnic respiratory failure that can be disproportionate to the respiratory muscle compromise and/or thoracic restriction. Although recent studies have reported the presence of a blunted hypercapnic respiratory response in some subjects with neuromuscular disorders and chronic hypercapnia, no study has evaluated the integrity of the respiratory drive in subjects with late-onset Pompe disease. Thus, we endeavor to determine the CO2 rebreathing response in subjects with late-onset Pompe disease. Respiratory muscle strength was assessed by measuring the maximum inspiratory pressure, and the maximum expiratory pressure. The maximum inspiratory pressure reflects the strength of the diaphragm and other inspiratory muscles, whereas the maximum expiratory pressure reflects the strength of the abdominal muscles and other expiratory muscles. We studied the hypercapnic drive response (measured as the ratio of the change in airway-occlusion pressure 0.1 s after the start of inspiration and end-tidal PCO2 in 13 subjects with late-onset Pompe disease and 51 healthy controls. Overall inspiratory muscle strength was within normal limits or slightly diminished in the late-onset Pompe disease group. Five subjects (38.5%) were chronically hypercapnic, and 9 (69.2%) had an increased breath-holding time. Compared with controls, the change in airway-occlusion pressure 0.1 s/change in end-tidal CO2 pressure slope (hypercapnic respiratory drive) was lower in the late-onset Pompe disease group (median 0.050 [interquartile range 0.027-0.118] vs 0.183 [0.153-0.233], P disease had an impaired hypercapnic respiratory drive response. The clinical impact of this phenomenon in this subject subset deserves further investigation. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  12. Electrical impedance in bovine skeletal muscle as a model for the study of neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarulli, Andrew W; Chin, Anne B; Partida, Ramon A; Rutkove, Seward B

    2006-12-01

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) consists of a set of bioimpedance methods configured for neuromuscular disease assessment, in which high-frequency electrical current is applied to a limb and the consequent surface voltage pattern over a muscle is evaluated. Prior human work has shown that the EIM parameters of resistance, reactance and phase change in different neuromuscular disease states including neurogenic and myopathic conditions. These parameters are also sensitive to the angle at which current is applied and measured relative to muscle fiber direction, a characteristic known as anisotropy. In order to obtain insights into the impedance characteristics of mammalian skeletal muscle without the confounding effects of an overlying skin-fat layer, bone and irregular muscle shape, we performed EIM on three 'nearly ideal' round 16 cm diameter, 1 cm equal thickness pieces of bovine rectus abdominis muscle. Using a standardized tetrapolar electrode array with 50 kHz electrical current, we identified strong anisotropy in the measured reactance and phase, with weaker anisotropy identified for resistance. We also found that increasing amounts of muscle maceration, a rough model of myopathic or traumatic muscle fiber injury, reduced phase and muscle anisotropy when current was injected perpendicular to the muscle fibers. These findings support that EIM parameters, including muscle anisotropy, are likely to be sensitive to the pathological changes that occur in neuromuscular disease states.

  13. Bovine Endotoxicosis – Some Aspects of Relevance to Production Diseases. A Review*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Pia

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available This review describes some circumstances where endotoxins of Gram negative bacteria may be related to the pathogenesis of some common production diseases. Decisive evidence for the pathogentical role of endotoxins remains scarce, and therefore an interdisciplinary background covering epidemiological, biological, biochemical, clinical and experimental aspects is given. Several authors have suggested that endotoxins play a significant role for the development of diseases such as laminitis, abomasal displacement, sudden death syndrome of feed-lot steers ect. While the biological, biochemical and clinical pictures of bovine endotoxicosis is quite well known, and certainly may resemble the clinical and biochemical pictures seen in some of the before mentioned diseases, it is however still not clear how or when endotoxins would gain parenteral access. This review describes excerpts of the biology of endotoxins, key clinical signs and the biochemistry associated to these. It is described how ruminal acidosis may facilitate the translocation of endotoxin from the intestinal/ruminal contents to the portal and eventually the systemic bloodstream. The function of the liver hence becomes central, and the role of hepatic fatty infiltration around parturition is discussed. The review finally suggest that acute ruminal acidosis may be viewed as an analogue to the human syndrome Gut-Derived Infectious Toxic Shock (GITS, where shock is propagated primarily by the translocation of bacterial endotoxin from the gut.

  14. Respiratory muscle function and exercise limitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charususin, Noppawan; Dacha, Sauwaluk; Gosselink, Rik; Decramer, Marc; Von Leupoldt, Andreas; Reijnders, Thomas; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Langer, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction is common and contributes to dyspnea and exercise limitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Improving dynamic function of respiratory muscles during exercise might help to reduce symptoms and improve exercise capacity. Areas covered: The aims of this review are to 1) summarize physiological mechanisms linking respiratory muscle dysfunction to dyspnea and exercise limitation; 2) provide an overview of available therapeutic approaches to better maintain load-capacity balance of respiratory muscles during exercise; and 3) to summarize current knowledge on potential mechanisms explaining effects of interventions aimed at optimizing dynamic respiratory muscle function with a special focus on inspiratory muscle training. Expert commentary: Several mechanisms which are potentially linking improvements in dynamic respiratory muscle function to symptomatic and functional benefits have not been studied so far in COPD patients. Examples of underexplored areas include the study of neural processes related to the relief of acute dyspnea and the competition between respiratory and peripheral muscles for limited energy supplies during exercise. Novel methodologies are available to non-invasively study these mechanisms. Better insights into the consequences of dynamic respiratory muscle dysfunction will hopefully contribute to further refine and individualize therapeutic approaches in patients with COPD.

  15. Upper respiratory tract diseases in workers exposed to chrysotile-asbestos dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostapkovich, E.V.

    A study of morbidity and temporary incapacity to work among workers exposed to chrysotile-asbestos dust combined with examinations of their upper respiratory tract provided the basis for developing scientifically based methods of effective monitoring and treatment for all persons working under dusty conditions. It was found that a 2 mg/m/sup 3/ concentration of chrysotile-asbestos dust causes development of pathologies of the upper respiratory tract in the first years of worker exposure and the pathological processes intensify according to the length of service. The study made it possible to classify workers according to findings from examination of the upper respiratory tract. The classification includes 1 group of workers with low risk of development of upper respiratory pathology from working under dusty conditions and 3 groups which had experienced specific changes in the upper respiratory tract. Group 2 includes persons with catarrhal processes in the upper respiratory tract, chronic tonsillitis and chronic sinusitis; group 3 includes workers with allergic and dystrophic processes in the upper respiratory tract and group 4 includes workers with diffuse hyperplasia (pre-cancerous processes) of the throat. Development of serious changes in the upper respiratory tract of workers exposed to dust must be considered to be an occupational disease, especially in workers with long service. 12 references.

  16. Early upregulation of acute respiratory distress syndrome-associated cytokines promotes lethal disease in an aged-mouse model of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Rockx (Barry); T. Baas (Tracey); G.A. Zornetzer (Gregory); B.L. Haagmans (Bart); T. Sheahan (Timothy); M. Frieman (Matthew); M.D. Dyer (Matthew); T.H. Teal (Thomas); S. Proll (Sean); J.M.A. van den Brand (Judith); R. Baric (Ralph); M.G. Katze (Michael)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSeveral respiratory viruses, including influenza virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), produce more severe disease in the elderly, yet the molecular mechanisms governing age-related susceptibility remain poorly studied. Advanced age was significantly

  17. Genetics of bovine respiratory disease in cattle: can breeding programs reduce the problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Donagh P

    2014-12-01

    Genetics is responsible for approximately half the observed change in performance internationally in well-structured cattle breeding programs. Almost all, if not all, individual characteristics, including animal health, have a genetic basis. Once genetic variation exists then breeding for improvement is possible. Although the heritability of most health traits is low to moderate, considerable exploitable genetic variation does exist. From the limited studies undertaken, and mostly from limited datasets, the direct heritability of susceptibility to BRD varied from 0.07 to 0.22 and the maternal heritability (where estimated) varied from 0.05 to 0.07. Nonetheless, considerable genetic variation clearly exists; the genetic standard deviation for the direct component (binary trait), although differing across populations, varied from 0.08 to 0.20 while the genetic standard deviation for the maternal component varied from 0.04 to 0.07. Little is known about the genetic correlation between genetic predisposition to BRD and animal performance; the estimation of these correlations should be prioritized. (Long-term) Breeding strategies to reduce the incidence of BRD in cattle should be incorporated into national BRD eradication or control strategies.

  18. Work-Related Respiratory Symptoms and Airway Disease in Hairdressers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GI Skoufi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hairdressers are occupationally exposed to a number of agents in their workplace that result in respiratory symptoms and changes in pulmonary function. Objective: To evaluate associations between occupational exposure and respiratory function and reported symptoms in a group of hairdressers compared to a control group. Methods: A questionnaire on respiratory symptoms and workplace characteristics was completed by 94 hairdressers and 39 age- and sex-matched controls. Spirometry and exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO measurements were also performed. Results: Hairdressers reported more severe dyspnea (p=0.03 and eye (p=0.001 and throat (p=0.007 irritation, compared to the control group, at the workplace; no differences were noted at home. Lower FEV1/FVC (p<0.001 and higher FeNO values (p=0.012 were observed in hairdressers. A larger working area and presence of window ventilation were associated with better pulmonary function. Conclusion: Worsening of symptoms and pulmonary function at workplace, and alleviating the symptoms at home, indicate that they may be related to occupational exposure.

  19. Occupational risk factors for chronic respiratory disease in a New Zealand population using lifetime occupational history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansell, Anna; Ghosh, Rebecca E; Poole, Suzanne; Zock, Jan-Paul; Weatherall, Mark; Vermeulen, Roel; Kromhout, Hans; Travers, Justin; Beasley, Richard

    2014-03-01

    To investigate associations between respiratory disease and occupational exposures in a New Zealand urban population, the Wellington Respiratory Survey. Multiple regression analyses in a population sample of 1017 individuals aged 25 to 74 years with spirometry and questionnaire information, including a lifetime occupational history. Chronic bronchitis symptoms were associated with self-reported exposure to hairdressing, paint manufacturing, insecticides, welding, detergents and with ALOHA Job Exposure Matrix-assessed gases/fumes exposure. The strongest association was for hairdressing (odds ratio 6.91; 95% confidence interval: 2.02 to 23.70). Cumulative exposure to mineral dust and gases/fumes was associated with higher FEV₁% (forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration) predicted. Analyses were limited by relatively small numbers of cases. Increased risks of objectively defined respiratory disease, which have been previously documented, were not seen. Nevertheless, the study suggested increased risk of respiratory symptoms with various occupational exposures as well as likely healthy worker effect.

  20. [Organization of prophylaxis and treatment of respiratory diseases in military personnel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, Iu V; Azarov, I I; Kuvshinov, K É; Ogarkov, P I; Zhdanov, K V; Zaĭtsev, A A; Afonaskov, O V

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory diseases for many years in the Armed Forces of the Russian occupy the leading position in the structure of the pathology of internal organs. Preventive measures to prevention of the emergence and spread of acute respiratory infections among soldiers can help to reduce the incidence of community-acquired pneumonia in the armed forces. Particular attention is drawn to the control of the conditions of accommodation, food and combat training of military personnel, as well as the implementation of the commanders of their duties. Shows typical action plans for the prevention of outbreaks of infectious diseases of the respiratory tract in military units and algorithms for the treatment of respiratory infections in military personnel in military units and hospitals.

  1. An Investigation of the Pathology and Pathogens Associated with Porcine Respiratory Disease Complex in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette Sif; Pors, S. E.; Jensen, H. E.

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory infections are among the most important diseases of growing pigs. In order to elucidate the multifactorial aetiology of porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) in Denmark, lungs from 148 finishing pigs with cranioventral bronchopneumonia (case group) and 60 pigs without lung lesions......), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (both European and US type), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine respiratory coronavirus, porcine cytomegalovirus, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma hyorhinis. All cases had cranioventral lobular bronchopneumonia consistent with PRDC....... There was a broad range of microscopical lesions and the cases were characterized as acute (n=10), subacute (n=24) or chronic (n=114) bronchopneumonia. Five bacterial species, five viruses and two Mycoplasma spp. were detected in different combinations. PCV2, M. hyopneumoniae, M. hyorhinis and Pasteurella multocida...

  2. Survey of farmer knowledge and attitudes to endemic disease management in South Australia, with a focus on bovine viral diarrhoea (bovine pestivirus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyon, S R; Anderson, M L; Reichel, M P

    2015-05-01

    We aimed to establish the attitudes of South Australian cattle farmers towards endemic animal disease prevention and control, with a particular focus on the awareness of and attitudes towards bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD). This cross-sectional postal survey involved mailing a questionnaire to all South Australian cattle owners with 35 or more head of cattle. Worms and lice were the most common animal disease concerns. Less than half of responding farmers were adequately vaccinating their herds against clostridial diseases, but 53.0% stated that they utilised quarantine procedures. Less than 20% of respondents had actively taken part in BVD educational opportunities, or had vaccinated or tested their herd for BVD; less than 20% of respondents were actively involved in any systematic control of Johne's disease. Overall, farmers' actual knowledge of BVD was lower than their perceived understanding, although their interest in BVD and its control was high. Disease prevention measures such as vaccination, quarantine and participation in systematic control schemes were used by a minority of respondents. The results suggest that respondents acknowledge BVD as an important and relevant disease, despite many believing it was not a problem in their herd. Interest in BVD appears to be high and it is likely that an education program would be well received. © 2015 Australian Veterinary Association.

  3. Advance care planning for patients with chronic respiratory diseases: a systematic review of preferences and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbarian, Lea J; Zwakman, Marieke; van der Heide, Agnes; Kars, Marijke C; Janssen, Daisy J A; van Delden, Johannes J; Rietjens, Judith A C; Korfage, Ida J

    2017-11-06

    Advance care planning (ACP) supports patients in identifying and documenting their preferences and timely discussing them with their relatives and healthcare professionals (HCPs). Since the British Thoracic Society encourages ACP in chronic respiratory disease, the objective was to systematically review ACP practice in chronic respiratory disease, attitudes of patients and HCPs and barriers and facilitators related to engagement in ACP. We systematically searched 12 electronic databases for empirical studies on ACP in adults with chronic respiratory diseases. Identified studies underwent full review and data extraction. Of 2509 studies, 21 were eligible: 10 were quantitative studies. Although a majority of patients was interested in engaging in ACP, ACP was rarely carried out. Many HCPs acknowledged the importance of ACP but were hesitant to initiate it. Barriers to engagement in ACP were the complex disease course of patients with chronic respiratory diseases, HCPs' concern of taking away patients' hopes and lack of continuity of care. The identification of trigger points and training of HCPs on how to communicate sensitive topics were identified as facilitators to engagement in ACP. In conclusion, ACP is surprisingly uncommon in chronic respiratory disease, possibly due to the complex disease course of chronic respiratory diseases and ambivalence of both patients and HCPs to engage in ACP. Providing patients with information about their disease can help meeting their needs. Additionally, support of HCPs through identification of trigger points, training and system-related changes can facilitate engagement in ACP. CRD42016039787. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. The antibacterial psoriasin is induced by infection in the bovine udder

    OpenAIRE

    Regenhard, Petra; Petzl, Wolfram; Zerbe, Holm; Sauerwein, Helga

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Human psoriasin (S100A7) has been described as a member of the family of S100 calcium-binding proteins and is over-expressed in patients suffering from psoriasis. The bovine homolog was first identified as a cow-derived respiratory allergen. Human psoriasin as well as its bovine homolog exhibit antibacterial activity especially against Escherichia coli. During E. coli mastitis, the host defence status is a cardinal factor influencing systemic disease severity, and Escheric...

  5. Evolution of pulmonary surfactants for the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome and paediatric lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazela, Jan; Merritt, T Allen; Gadzinowski, Janusz; Sinha, Sunil

    2006-09-01

    This review documents the evolution of surfactant therapy, beginning with observations of surfactant deficiency in respiratory distress syndrome, the basis of exogenous surfactant treatment and the development of surfactant-containing novel peptides patterned after SP-B. We critically analyse the molecular interactions of surfactant proteins and phospholipids contributing to surfactant function. Peptide-containing surfactant provides clinical efficacy in the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome and offers promise for treating other lung diseases in infancy.

  6. TLR-4 and CD14 Polymorphisms in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Associated Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Puthothu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common viral respiratory pathogen during infancy world wide. It induces innate and adaptive immune response in host cells. The toll like receptor 4 (TLR4/CD14 complex is particularly important for the initiation of an innate immune response to RSV. Thus we were interested whether an association exists between severe RSV associated diseases and polymorphisms within TLR4 and CD14.

  7. Chronic respiratory disease, inhaled corticosteroids and risk of non-tuberculous mycobacteriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andréjak, Claire; Nielsen, Rikke; Thomsen, Vibeke Ø; Duhaut, Pierre; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich

    2013-03-01

    Chronic respiratory disease and inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) increase the risk of pneumonia. Few data are available on the association of these risk factors with non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) pulmonary disease. This study examined chronic respiratory diseases and ICS use as risk factors in a population-based case-control study encompassing all adults in Denmark with microbiologically confirmed NTM pulmonary disease between 1997 and 2008. The study included 10 matched population controls per case. Conditional logistic regression was used to compute adjusted ORs for NTM pulmonary disease with regard to chronic respiratory disease history. Overall, chronic respiratory disease was associated with a 16.5-fold (95% CI 12.2 to 22.2) increased risk of NTM pulmonary disease. The adjusted OR for NTM disease was 15.7 (95% CI 11.4 to 21.5) for COPD, 7.8 (95% CI 5.2 to 11.6) for asthma, 9.8 (95% CI 2.03 to 52.8) for pneumoconiosis, 187.5 (95% CI 24.8 to 1417.4) for bronchiectasis, and 178.3 (95% CI 55.4 to 574.3) for tuberculosis history. ORs were 29.1 (95% CI 13.3 to 63.8) for patients with COPD on current ICS therapy and 7.6 (95% CI 3.4 to 16.8) for patients with COPD who had never received ICS therapy. Among patients with COPD, ORs increased according to ICS dose, from 28.1 for low-dose intake to 47.5 for high-dose intake (more than 800 μg/day). The OR was higher for fluticasone than for budesonide. Chronic respiratory disease, particularly COPD treated with ICS therapy, is a strong risk factor for NTM pulmonary disease.

  8. ROLE OF AZITHROMYCIN IN COMPLEX TREATMENT OF RESPIRATORY DISEASES IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Sereda

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the analysis of the role of azithromycin (sumamed in treatment of respiratory diseases in children. It is noted that azithromycin is an efficient antibacterial drug for treatment of extramural and uncomplicated pneumonia and is the drug of choice for atypical mycoplasmal and chlamidia trachomatis pneumonia, as well as for relapses of chronic bronchopulmonary diseases in children. High sensitivity to azithromycin of main pneumotropic and atypical agents, convenience of application, presence of children's pharmaceutical forms, reduction of administration to 1 time per day in case of short treatment schedules, high efficiency and absence of serious adverse events make it possible to recommend this antibiotic as an available means for treatment of respiratory diseases in infants and senior children not only as in patients but as out patients as well.Key words: children, azithromycin, treatment, respiratory diseases.

  9. Nurses' perceptions of risk from emerging respiratory infectious diseases: a Singapore study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Yiwen; Hegney, Desley; Drury, Vicki

    2012-04-01

    The recent emergence of virulent respiratory infectious diseases such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Influenza A/H1N1 viruses predisposes nurses to occupational risks. This qualitative study investigated how Chinese Singaporean nurses perceived the risks of exposure to these infectious diseases and the factors that influenced this risk perception. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews and were analyzed using Braun and Clarke's process of thematic analysis. Three themes emerged: living with risk; the experience of SARS; and acceptance of risk. The nature of nursing work was perceived to place participants at risk of infection. Another significant finding of this study is that the government's, organizations' and nurses' perceptions of new emerging respiratory infectious diseases were influenced by their previous experience with SARS. Similar to previous studies, nurses working at the 'front line' believed that infection from these diseases was an unavoidable occupational hazard. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus hospitalisation in children with heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, K; Stensballe, L G; Bjerre, J

    2009-01-01

    hospitalisation predictors of the need for respiratory support (supplemental oxygen, nasal continuous positive airway pressure or mechanical ventilation) were young age (relative risk (RR) 0.47, 95% CI 0.32 to 0.67 per additional year of age) and cardiac decompensation (RR 1.81, 95% CI 1.02 to 3......OBJECTIVE: To assess the risk and risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalisation and determinants of the severity of RSV disease in children with heart disease. METHODS: By using a database on RSV tests in Denmark all children with RSV diagnosed with heart disease in Denmark...

  11. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE – Infectious, Contagious, Zoonotic or Production Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doherr Marcus G

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1986, a new progressive neurological condition similar to scrapie of sheep and goats was recognised in cattle in the United Kingdom (UK, and was named bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE. There is an ongoing discussion whether BSE should be classified as infectious, contagious, or zoonotic, and if it fits the definition of a production disease. The objective of this work is to briefly describe the main characteristics of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE, to review the epidemiology of BSE, and to address the question of how to classify BSE. TSEs are characterised as chronic wasting diseases with spongiform vacuolation and the accumulation of infectious prion protein (PrPSc in the central nervous system. TSE infectivity is very difficult to inactivate. Cattle BSE most likely originated from sheep scrapie, although this will remain to be an issue for debate. The disease can be transmitted from cattle to a range of species, and has resulted in smaller TSE epidemics in domestic cats, zoo cats and zoo ruminants, and in humans. Transmission in the field occurred through feed containing ruminant-derived protein, and measures to prevent the recycling of infectivity have proven effective to reduce the number of new infections. Mandatory reporting of clinical suspects combined with targeted screening of risk populations is needed to assess the BSE status of a country. Infection studies and the transmissibility to other species classify BSE as infectious and zoonotic. Absence of excretion of the agent, and therefor of horizontal transmission, categorise BSE as non-contagious. However, BSE is a multifactorial infectious disease that is dependent on management factors (mainly feeding, and therefore fits into the broader definition of production diseases.

  12. Comparative efficacy of enrofloxacin and tulathromycin for treatment of preweaning respiratory disease in dairy heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heins, B D; Nydam, D V; Woolums, A R; Berghaus, R D; Overton, M W

    2014-01-01

    Preweaning respiratory disease continues to have a substantial effect on the current and future productivity of dairy replacement animals. Establishing an effective treatment plan for the preweaned calf may have a significant effect on well-being and lifetime productivity by limiting any early development of chronic disease. The primary objective of this study was to examine the efficacy of treatment with tulathromycin (TUL) or enrofloxacin (ENR) on the risk of re-treatment, with a secondary objective of investigating the effect of disease and subsequent treatment choice on average daily gain (ADG). A total of 1,141 Holstein heifers from 4 farms were observed and systematically scored for evidence of respiratory disease from birth through weaning or the time of death. At the time of diagnosis, calves were randomly and blindly allocated into 2 treatment groups. The overall incidence of respiratory disease was 60.9%. In the univariable analysis, the incidence of re-treatment between 7 and 10d of initial therapy for calves treated with ENR was greater than that in calves treated with TUL (27.6 vs. 21.2%). After adjusting for farm ID, clinical score at first treatment, and weight at first treatment, the odds of re-treatment were 1.5 times higher for calves treated with ENR than with TUL. The percentage of calves that required more than one re-treatment was higher for calves that received ENR compared with those that received TUL (9.3 vs. 4.1%). We observed no difference in ADG between calves treated with ENR or TUL, and no difference in ADG between calves that were treated for respiratory disease and those that were not treated for respiratory disease. Appropriate drug therapy for preweaning respiratory disease may have an important role in reducing the odds of re-treatment during the preweaning period. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical study of respiratory function in patients with late-onset glycogen storage disease typeⅡ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-na JIN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Late-onset glycogen storage disease typeⅡ(GSDⅡ, Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive disease exhibiting progressive proximal skeletal muscle weakness and respiratory muscle involvement, caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase (GAA. Most of patients died of respiratory failure.  Methods Eleven patients with late-onset glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ underwent respiratory function evaluation, whose diagnosis was confirmed by muscle pathology, GAA activity assay and gene analysis. Respiratory function evaluation included upright and supine position of forced vital capacity (FVC, forced expiratory volume at the first second (FEV1, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP, maximal expiratory pressure (MEP and cough peak flow (CPF. All data were compared with predicted value. The decreased value between upright and supine position FVC ( △ FVC were calculated. The correlation between respiratory function and the age of onset, disease course, motor function, GAA activity were analyzed.  Results All of 11 patients with late-onset glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ showed declined respiratory function compared with predicted value. The upright FVC, upright FEV1, △ FVC, MIP, MEP and CPF declined in 10, 10, 8, 11, 10, and 10 patients, respectively. All patients had normal FEV1/FVC in both upright and supine position. There was no correlation between upright FVC, △ FVC and the onset age, disease course, motor function, GAA activity statistically.  Conclusions Pulmonary dysfunction is common in late-onset glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ, with restrictive ventilatory impairment more predominant, which is caused by inspiratory muscle weakness. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.05.007

  14. Canadian Practice Assessment in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Respiratory Specialist Physician Perception Versus Patient Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Hernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a common respiratory condition and the fourth leading cause of death in Canada. Optimal COPD management requires patients to participate in their care and physician knowledge of patients’ perceptions of their disease.

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus prophylaxis in children with cardiac disease: a retrospective single-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Michelle; Symington, Amanda; Janes, Marianne; Steele, Susan; Elliott, Louann; Chant-Gambacort, Catherine; Mondal, Tapas; Paes, Bosco

    2014-04-01

    To examine the characteristics of congenital heart disease patients hospitalised with respiratory syncytial virus infection after prophylaxis and determine the associated comorbidities and the incidence of breakthrough respiratory syncytial virus infections. This is a retrospective, single-centre study that was conducted over a period of 7 years. Respiratory syncytial virus infection was identified by classification codes and confirmed by virological tests. Data on baseline demographics, cardiac anomalies, other underlying disease, criteria for hospitalisation, type of respiratory illness and management, complications, and palivizumab prophylaxis were analysed by standard descriptive methods and comparative statistics. A total of 30 patients were enrolled. The majority were ≤ 2 years (n = 24). The mean admission age was 15.1 months (standard deviation = 18.3). In all, 90% were acyanotic, 40% had haemodynamically significant disease, and 60% had ≥ 1 underlying medical illness. Patients were admitted with: respiratory distress (86.7%), hypoxaemia (66.7%), fever (60%), inability to maintain oral intake (36.7%), and apnoea (16.7%). More than 50% required mechanical ventilation and intensive care with a median stay of 11 days (range: 1-43); the length of hospital stay for all children was 10 days (range: 1-65). Complications included: concurrent bacterial sepsis (20%), electrolyte abnormalities (16.7%), and worsening pulmonary hypertension (13.3%). Of 10 infants ≤ 2 years with haemodynamically significant heart disease, four had received prophylaxis. There was one death, which was attributed to respiratory syncytial virus infection. Overall, 185 infants ≤ 2 years with haemodynamically significant cardiac disease received prophylaxis. In all, six qualifying infants missed immunisation and were hospitalised. Breakthrough respiratory syncytial virus infections occurred in 2.2%, demonstrating good efficacy of palivizumab in this population compared with the original

  16. Early Fluid Overload Prolongs Mechanical Ventilation in Children With Viral-Lower Respiratory Tract Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingelse, Sarah A; Wiegers, Hanke M G; Calis, Job C; van Woensel, Job B; Bem, Reinout A

    2017-03-01

    Viral-lower respiratory tract disease is common in young children worldwide and is associated with high morbidity. Acute respiratory failure due to viral-lower respiratory tract disease necessitates PICU admission for mechanical ventilation. In critically ill patients in PICU settings, early fluid overload is common and associated with adverse outcomes such as prolonged mechanical ventilation and increased mortality. It is unclear, however, if this also applies to young children with viral-lower respiratory tract disease induced acute respiratory failure. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relation of early fluid overload with adverse outcomes in mechanically ventilated children with viral-lower respiratory tract disease in a retrospective dataset. Retrospective cohort study. Single, tertiary referral PICU. One hundred thirty-five children (mechanical ventilation admitted to the PICU of the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam between 2008 and 2014. None. The cumulative fluid balance on day 3 of mechanical ventilation was compared against duration of mechanical ventilation (primary outcome) and daily mean oxygen saturation index (secondary outcome), using uni- and multivariable linear regression. In 132 children, the mean cumulative fluid balance on day 3 was + 97.9 (49.2) mL/kg. Higher cumulative fluid balance on day 3 was associated with a longer duration of mechanical ventilation in multivariable linear regression (β = 0.166; p = 0.048). No association was found between the fluid status and oxygen saturation index during the period of mechanical ventilation. Early fluid overload is an independent predictor of prolonged mechanical ventilation in young children with viral-lower respiratory tract disease. This study suggests that avoiding early fluid overload is a potential target to reduce duration of mechanical ventilation in these children. Prospective testing in a clinical trial is warranted to support this hypothesis.

  17. Advances in Remote Respiratory Assessments for People with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroi, Sidney; McNamara, Renae J; McKenzie, David K; Gandevia, Simon; Brodie, Matthew A

    2017-10-30

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of mortality. Advances in remote technologies and telemedicine provide new ways to monitor respiratory function and improve chronic disease management. However, telemedicine does not always include remote respiratory assessments, and the current state of knowledge for people with COPD has not been evaluated. Systematically review the use of remote respiratory assessments in people with COPD, including the following questions: What devices have been used? Can acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) be predicted by using remote devices? Do remote respiratory assessments improve health-related outcomes? The review protocol was registered (PROSPERO 2016:CRD42016049333). MEDLINE, EMBASE, and COMPENDEX databases were searched for studies that included remote respiratory assessments in people with COPD. A narrative synthesis was then conducted by two reviewers according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Forced expiratory volume assessed daily by using a spirometer was the most common modality. Other measurements included resting respiratory rate, respiratory sounds, and end-tidal carbon dioxide level. Remote assessments had high user satisfaction. Benefits included early detection of AECOPD, improved health-related outcomes, and the ability to replace hospital care with a virtual ward. Remote respiratory assessments are feasible and when combined with sufficient organizational backup can improve health-related outcomes in some but not all cohorts. Future research should focus on the early detection, intervention, and rehabilitation for AECOPD in high-risk people who have limited access to best care and investigate continuous as well as intermittent monitoring.

  18. Immunization with an Attenuated Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Deleted in E Protein Protects Against Lethal Respiratory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netland, Jason; DeDiego, Marta L.; Zhao, Jincun; Fett, Craig; Álvarez, Enrique; Nieto-Torres, José L.; Enjuanes, Luis; Perlman, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) caused substantial morbidity and mortality in 2002-2003. Deletion of the envelope (E) protein modestly diminished virus growth in tissue culture but abrogated virulence in animals. Here, we show that immunization with rSARS-CoV-ΔE or SARS-CoV-Δ[E,6-9b] (deleted in accessory proteins (6,7a,7b,8a,8b,9b) in addition to E) nearly completely protected BALB/c mice from fatal respiratory disease caused by mouse-adapted SARS-CoV and partly protected hACE2 Tg mice from lethal disease. hACE2 Tg mice, which express the human SARS-CoV receptor, are extremely susceptible to infection. We also show that rSARS-CoV-ΔE and rSARS-CoV-Δ[E,6-9b] induced anti-virus T cell and antibody responses. Further, the E-deleted viruses were stable after 16 blind passages through tissue culture cells, with only a single mutation in the surface glycoprotein detected. The passaged virus remained avirulent in mice. These results suggest that rSARS-CoV-ΔE is an efficacious vaccine candidate that might be useful if SARS recurred. PMID:20110095

  19. Temperature effects on outpatient visits of respiratory diseases, asthma, and chronic airway obstruction in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Lin, Yu-Kai

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluated the risk of outpatient visits for respiratory diseases, asthma, and chronic airway obstruction not elsewhere classified (CAO) associated with ambient temperatures and extreme temperature events from 2000 to 2008 in Taiwan. Based on geographical and socioeconomics characteristics, this study divided the whole island into seven areas. A distributed lag non-linear model was used to estimate the area-disease-specific cumulative relative risk (RR), and random-effect meta-analysis was used to estimate the pooled RR of outpatient visits, from lag 0 to lag 7 days, associated with daily temperature, and added effects of prolonged extreme heat and cold for population of all ages, the elderly and younger than 65 years. Pooled analyses showed that younger population had higher outpatient visits for exposing to low temperature of 18 °C, with cumulative 8-day RRs of 1.36 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.31-1.42) for respiratory diseases, 1.10 (95 % CI 1.03-1.18) for asthma, and 1.12 (95 % CI 1.02-1.22) for CAO. The elderly was more vulnerable to high temperature of 30 °C with the cumulative 8-day RR of 1.08 (95 % CI 1.03-1.13) for CAO. Elevated outpatient visits for all respiratory diseases and asthma were associated with extreme heat lasting for 6 to 8 days. On the contrary, the extreme cold lasting more than 8 days had significant negative association with outpatient visits of all respiratory diseases. In summary, elderly patients of respiratory diseases and CAO are vulnerable to high temperature. Cold temperature is associated with all types of respiratory diseases for younger patients.

  20. Epidemiology of bovine brucellosis in Costa Rica: Lessons learned from failures in the control of the disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Hernández-Mora

    Full Text Available Brucellosis, caused by Brucella abortus is a major disease of cattle and a zoonosis. In order to estimate the bovine brucellosis prevalence in Costa Rica (CR, a total 765 herds (13078 bovines from six regions of CR were randomly sampled during 2012-2013. A non-random sample of 7907 herds (532199 bovines of the six regions, arriving for diagnoses during 2014-2016 to the Costa Rican Animal Health Service was also studied. The prevalence estimated by Rose Bengal test (RBT ranged from 10.5%-11.4%; alternatively, the prevalence estimated by testing the RBT positives in iELISA, ranged from 4.1%-6.0%, respectively. However, cattle in CR are not vaccinated with B. abortus S19 but with RB51 (vaccination coverage close to 11%, and under these conditions the RBT displays 99% specificity and 99% sensitivity. Therefore, the RBT herd depicted in the random analysis stands as a feasible assessment and then, the recommended value in case of planning an eradication program in CR. Studies of three decades reveled that bovine brucellosis prevalence has increased in CR. B. abortus was identified by biochemical and molecular studies as the etiological agent of bovine brucellosis. Multiple locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis-16 revealed four B. abortus clusters. Cluster one and three are intertwined with isolates from other countries, while clusters two and four have only representatives from CR. Cluster one is widely distributed in all regions of the country and may be the primary B. abortus source. The other clusters seem to be restricted to specific areas in CR. The implications of our findings, in relation to the control of the disease in CR, are critically discussed.

  1. Weaning management of newly received beef calves with or without exposure to a persistently infected bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1b calf: Effects on health, performance, BVDV type 1a titers, and circulating leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a major culprit in the development of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) either directly via acute clinical illness or indirect effects of immunosuppression. Calves born persistently infected (PI) with BVDV are the primary transmission source of the virus; however...

  2. Respiratory Diseases in University Students Associated with Exposure to Residential Dampness or Mold

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    Mathieu Lanthier-Veilleux

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available University students are frequently exposed to residential dampness or mold (i.e., visible mold, mold odor, dampness, or water leaks, a well-known contributor to asthma, allergic rhinitis, and respiratory infections. This study aims to: (a describe the prevalence of these respiratory diseases among university students; and (b examine the independent contribution of residential dampness or mold to these diseases. An online survey was conducted in March 2014 among the 26,676 students registered at the Université de Sherbrooke (Quebec, Canada. Validated questions and scores were used to assess self-reported respiratory diseases (i.e., asthma-like symptoms, allergic rhinitis, and respiratory infections, residential dampness or mold, and covariates (e.g., student characteristics. Using logistic regressions, the crude and adjusted odd ratios between residential dampness or mold and self-reported respiratory diseases were examined. Results from the participating students (n = 2097; response rate: 8.1% showed high prevalence of allergic rhinitis (32.6%; 95% CI: 30.6–34.7, asthma-like symptoms (24.0%; 95% CI: 22.1–25.8 and respiratory infections (19.4%; 95% CI: 17.7–21.2. After adjustment, exposure to residential dampness or mold was associated with allergic rhinitis (OR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.01–1.55 and asthma-like symptoms (OR: 1.70; 95% CI: 1.37–2.11, but not with respiratory infections (OR: 1.07; 95% CI: 0.85–1.36. Among symptomatic students, this exposure was also associated with uncontrolled and burdensome respiratory symptoms (p < 0.01. University students report a high prevalence of allergic rhinitis, asthma-like symptoms and respiratory infections. A common indoor hazard, residential dampness or mold, may play a role in increasing atopic respiratory diseases and their suboptimal control in young adults. These results emphasize the importance for public health organizations to tackle poor housing conditions, especially amongst university

  3. Respiratory function in patients with coronary heart disease in combination with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. С. Клинкова

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to assess the state of respiratory function (RF in patients with CHD and in patients with CHD combined with COPD. Also evaluated was the efficiency of pulmonary gas exchange, while taking into account the oxygen-utilization coefficient (OUC. RF was investigated in 73 patients with coronary heart disease (CHD and in 51 patients with CHD combined with COPD by means of a bodyplethysmography approach. In patients with CHD and COPD there was a significant reduction of the efficiency of pulmonary ventilation (OUC decreased by 24% as compared to the normal value against a background of bronchial conductivity. The patients with CHD without COPD showed a moderate decrease in RF reserves, with the effectiveness of pulmonary ventilation maintained at an optimal level.

  4. Veterans with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease achieve clinically relevant improvements in respiratory health after pulmonary rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Stephen; Moreno, Marcella; Shelton, John; Panos, Ralph J

    2014-01-01

    To measure respiratory health and respiratory-related (RR) health care utilization in veterans with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease referred to pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) at the Cincinnati Veterans Administration (VA) Medical Center. We reviewed the records of 430 patients referred for PR from 2008 to 2010: 78 met inclusion criteria and completed PR (PR group); 92 qualified for PR but declined participation (referral group). All PR participants completed the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), BODE index, 6-minute walk test (6MWT), UCSD Shortness of Breath Questionnaire (UCSDSOBQ), Pulmonary Disease Knowledge Test, and self-reported use of short-acting bronchodilators before and after PR. All VA health care encounters during the 12 months before and after PR (PR group) or referral (referral group) were reviewed. Respiratory health improved after PR: SGRQ (60.6 ± 15.1, 51.1 ± 16.7), BODE (4.65 ± 1.93, 3.41 ± 1.84), 6MWT (497 ± 367 m, 572 ± 397 m), UCSDSOBQ (68.3 ± 21.1, 61.0 ± 20.9), Pulmonary Disease Knowledge Test (75.9 ± 12.4%, 85.9 ± 11.1%), short-acting bronchodilator (22.5 ± 25.3, 12.8 ± 15.6 inhalations per week) (before, after PR; P rehabilitation improves respiratory health in veterans with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and decreases RR health care utilization.

  5. Use of MMP-8 and MMP-9 to assess disease severity in children with viral lower respiratory tract infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, K.H.; Ahout, I.M.L.; Groot, R. de; Warris, A.; Ferwerda, G.; Hermans, P.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an important role in respiratory inflammatory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It was hypothesized that MMP-8 and MMP-9 may function as biological markers to assess disease severity in viral lower respiratory tract infections

  6. Disease severity and viral load are correlated in infants with primary respiratory syncytial virus infection in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, M. L.; Coenjaerts, F. E. J.; Rossen, J. W. A.; Belderbos, M. E.; Hofland, R. W.; Kimpen, J. L. L.; Bont, L.

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory tract infections in infants, with remarkable variability in disease severity. Factors determining severity of disease in previously healthy infants are still unclear. It was hypothesized that disease severity is correlated with viral

  7. Effect of 12-month rehabilitation with low loading program on chronic respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Yasuhiro; Dobashi, Kunio; Uga, Daisuke; Kato, Daigo; Nakazawa, Rie; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Fueki, Makoto; Makino, Sohei

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of 12-month rehabilitation with low loading program on chronic respiratory disease. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve patients with chronic respiratory disease participated in this study, in which the effect of long-term rehabilitation for 12 months was assessed. Nine patients had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, two had asthma, and one had interstitial pneumonia. In all patients, symptoms, lower-extremity strength, walking distance, activities of daily living, and quality of life were investigated to examine the effect of respiratory rehabilitation. [Results] After 12 months, the isometric knee extension strength and weight-bearing index both showed a significant increase. [Conclusion] The findings of this study suggested that improvement in lower-limb muscle strength can be achieved through long-term intervention, and indicated the validity of repetitive standing and walking exercises.

  8. Impact of air pollution on respiratory diseases in children with recurrent wheezing or asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Galeone, Carlotta; Lelii, Mara; Longhi, Benedetta; Ascolese, Beatrice; Senatore, Laura; Prada, Elisabetta; Montinaro, Valentina; Malerba, Stefano; Patria, Maria Francesca; Principi, Nicola

    2014-08-07

    Air pollution has many negative health effects on the general population, especially children, subjects with underlying chronic disease and the elderly. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of traffic-related pollution on the exacerbation of asthma and development of respiratory infections in Italian children suffering from asthma or wheezing compared with healthy subjects and to estimate the association between incremental increases in principal pollutants and the incidence of respiratory symptoms. This prospective study enrolled 777 children aged 2 to 18 years (375 with recurrent wheezing or asthma and 402 healthy subjects). Over 12 months, parents filled out a daily clinical diary to report information about respiratory symptoms, type of medication used and healthcare utilization. Clinical data were combined with the results obtained using an air pollution monitoring system of the five most common pollutants. Among the 329 children with recurrent wheezing or asthma and 364 healthy subjects who completed follow-up, children with recurrent wheezing or asthma reported significantly more days of fever (p=0.005) and cough (ppollution and the development of asthma exacerbations and respiratory infections in children born to atopic parents and in those suffering from recurrent wheezing or asthma. These findings suggest that environmental control may be crucial for respiratory health in children with underlying respiratory disease.

  9. Prematurity and the burden of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, Bernhard; Kurath-Koller, Stefan; Eibisberger, Monika; Zenz, Werner

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory morbidity of former preterm infants and especially those with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is high during infancy and early childhood. We performed a review based on a literature search including EMBASE, MEDLINE, and CINAHL databases to identify all relevant papers published in the English and German literature on influenza and respiratory syncytial virus infection associated with preterm infant, prematurity, and BPD between 1980 and 2014. Recurrent respiratory symptoms remain common at preschool age, school age and even into young adulthood. Acute viral respiratory tract infections due to different pathogens cause significant morbidity and necessitate rehospitalizations during the first years of life. Influenza virus infection plays a minor role compared to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) associated respiratory tract infection during infancy and early childhood. Nevertheless, particular morbidity to both viruses is high. The particular burden of both viral diseases in preterm infants is dominated by RSV and its associated rehospitalizations during the first two years of life. Prophylactic measures include vaccination against influenza virus of family members and caregivers and active immunization starting at the age of 6 months, and monthly injections of palivizumab during the cold season to avoid severe RSV disease and its sequelae.

  10. Evidence of lateral gene transfer among strains of Streptococcus zooepidemicus in weanling horses with respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velineni, Sridhar; Breathnach, Cormac C; Timoney, John F

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus zooepidemicus (Sz) is a tonsillar commensal of healthy horses but with potential to opportunistically invade the lower respiratory tract. Sz is genetically variable and recombinogenic based on analysis of gene sequences including szp, szm and MLST data. Although a variety of serovars of the protective SzP are commonly harbored in the tonsils of the same horse, lower respiratory infections usually involve a single clone. Nevertheless, isolation of specific clones from epizootics of respiratory disease has been recently reported in horses and dogs in N. America, Europe and Asia. In this report, we provide evidence suggestive of lateral gene exchange and recombination between strains of Sz from cases of respiratory disease secondary to experimental equine herpes 1 virus infection in an isolated group of weanling horses and ponies. Nasal swabs of 13 of 18 weanlings with respiratory disease yielded mucoid colonies of Sz following culture. Comparison of arcC, nrdE, proS, spi, tdk, tpi and yqiL of these Sz revealed 3 Clades. Clade-1 (ST-212) and 2 (ST-24) were composed of 7 and 3 isolates, respectively. ST-24 and 212 differed in all 7 housekeeping as well as szp and szm alleles. Two isolates of Clade-1 were assigned to ST-308, a single locus variant of ST-212 that contained the proS-16 allele sequenced in ST-24. One isolate of ST-308 contained szm-2, the same allele sequenced in Clade 2 isolates; the other was positive for the szp-N2HV2 allele of Clade 2. These observations are consistent with gene transfer between Sz in the natural host and may explain formation of novel clones that invade the lower respiratory tract or cause epizootics of respiratory disease in dogs and horses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antenatal Determinants of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia and Late Respiratory Disease in Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Lindsey A; Wagner, Brandie D; Ingram, David A; Poindexter, Brenda B; Schibler, Kurt; Cotten, C Michael; Dagle, John; Sontag, Marci K; Mourani, Peter M; Abman, Steven H

    2017-08-01

    Mechanisms contributing to chronic lung disease after preterm birth are incompletely understood. To identify antenatal risk factors associated with increased risk for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and respiratory disease during early childhood after preterm birth, we performed a prospective, longitudinal study of 587 preterm infants with gestational age less than 34 weeks and birth weights between 500 and 1,250 g. Data collected included perinatal information and assessments during the neonatal intensive care unit admission and longitudinal follow-up by questionnaire until 2 years of age. After adjusting for covariates, we found that maternal smoking prior to preterm birth increased the odds of having an infant with BPD by twofold (P = 0.02). Maternal smoking was associated with prolonged mechanical ventilation and respiratory support during the neonatal intensive care unit admission. Preexisting hypertension was associated with a twofold (P = 0.04) increase in odds for BPD. Lower gestational age and birth weight z-scores were associated with BPD. Preterm infants who were exposed to maternal smoking had higher rates of late respiratory disease during childhood. Twenty-two percent of infants diagnosed with BPD and 34% of preterm infants without BPD had no clinical signs of late respiratory disease during early childhood. We conclude that maternal smoking and hypertension increase the odds for developing BPD after preterm birth, and that maternal smoking is strongly associated with increased odds for late respiratory morbidities during early childhood. These findings suggest that in addition to the BPD diagnosis at 36 weeks, other factors modulate late respiratory outcomes during childhood. We speculate that measures to reduce maternal smoking not only will lower the risk for preterm birth but also will improve late respiratory morbidities after preterm birth.

  12. Parental environmental tobacco smoking and the prevalence of respiratory diseases in primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arghir, Oana Cristina; Danteş, Elena; Stoicescu, Ramona; Baicu, Irina; Halichidis, Stela; Ciobotaru, Camelia; Man, Milena Adina; Cambrea, Simona Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The inhaling tobacco smoke to which a child is exposed, in a home environmental area, could affect respiratory system. The aim of the study consists in detecting the prevalence of respiratory diseases in home exposure to secondhand smoke among primary school children. A 6-month prospective case-control study based on questionnaire survey was carried out among school children of "Spiru Haret" Primary School, Medgidia, Romania, with absences for respiratory diseases, related to exposure to parental passive smoking, in their home environmental. 136 school children and their families informed, consented to complete the questionnaire and were surveyed for respiratory diseases and domestic environmental tobacco smoking, from the 1st of October, 2011 to the 31st March, 2012. The method consists in collecting data about any respiratory illness events, correlating them with the questionnaire --reports of parental smoking in home environmental. Participants were divided in 88 cases exposed to SHS (E) and 48 controls without exposure (NE). The most sick children with more than one episode of respiratory illness were among cases (n = 61/88; 69.31% vs 19/48; 39.58%; OR = 3.45; RR = 1.62; chi2 = 12.25; p smoking is the father (n = 67/88; 76.13%), being a single parent in most of the cases (n = 46/88; 57.95%). The prevalence of bronchial asthma was 0.34% in cases, being related with prenatal maternal smoking exposure (1.11%). The prevalence of respiratory diseases is higher among children with environmental parental tobacco exposure, in particular, smoking father.

  13. High rates of detection of respiratory viruses in tonsillar tissues from children with chronic adenotonsillar disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luiz Proenca-Modena

    Full Text Available Chronic tonsillar diseases are an important health problem, leading to large numbers of surgical procedures worldwide. Little is known about pathogenesis of these diseases. In order to investigate the role of respiratory viruses in chronic adenotonsillar diseases, we developed a cross-sectional study to determine the rates of viral detections of common respiratory viruses detected by TaqMan real time PCR (qPCR in nasopharyngeal secretions, tonsillar tissues and peripheral blood from 121 children with chronic tonsillar diseases, without symptoms of acute respiratory infections. At least one respiratory virus was detected in 97.5% of patients. The viral co-infection rate was 69.5%. The most frequently detected viruses were human adenovirus in 47.1%, human enterovirus in 40.5%, human rhinovirus in 38%, human bocavirus in 29.8%, human metapneumovirus in 17.4% and human respiratory syncytial virus in 15.7%. Results of qPCR varied widely between sample sites: human adenovirus, human bocavirus and human enterovirus were predominantly detected in tissues, while human rhinovirus was more frequently detected in secretions. Rates of virus detection were remarkably high in tonsil tissues: over 85% in adenoids and close to 70% in palatine tonsils. In addition, overall virus detection rates were higher in more hypertrophic than in smaller adenoids (p = 0.05, and in the particular case of human enteroviruses, they were detected more frequently (p = 0.05 in larger palatine tonsils than in smaller ones. While persistence/latency of DNA viruses in tonsillar tissues has been documented, such is not the case of RNA viruses. Respiratory viruses are highly prevalent in adenoids and palatine tonsils of patients with chronic tonsillar diseases, and persistence of these viruses in tonsils may stimulate chronic inflammation and play a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  14. High rates of detection of respiratory viruses in tonsillar tissues from children with chronic adenotonsillar disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proenca-Modena, Jose Luiz; Pereira Valera, Fabiana Cardoso; Jacob, Marcos Gerhardinger; Buzatto, Guilherme Pietrucci; Saturno, Tamara Honorato; Lopes, Lucia; Souza, Jamila Mendonça; Escremim Paula, Flavia; Silva, Maria Lucia; Carenzi, Lucas Rodrigues; Tamashiro, Edwin; Arruda, Eurico; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma Terezinha

    2012-01-01

    Chronic tonsillar diseases are an important health problem, leading to large numbers of surgical procedures worldwide. Little is known about pathogenesis of these diseases. In order to investigate the role of respiratory viruses in chronic adenotonsillar diseases, we developed a cross-sectional study to determine the rates of viral detections of common respiratory viruses detected by TaqMan real time PCR (qPCR) in nasopharyngeal secretions, tonsillar tissues and peripheral blood from 121 children with chronic tonsillar diseases, without symptoms of acute respiratory infections. At least one respiratory virus was detected in 97.5% of patients. The viral co-infection rate was 69.5%. The most frequently detected viruses were human adenovirus in 47.1%, human enterovirus in 40.5%, human rhinovirus in 38%, human bocavirus in 29.8%, human metapneumovirus in 17.4% and human respiratory syncytial virus in 15.7%. Results of qPCR varied widely between sample sites: human adenovirus, human bocavirus and human enterovirus were predominantly detected in tissues, while human rhinovirus was more frequently detected in secretions. Rates of virus detection were remarkably high in tonsil tissues: over 85% in adenoids and close to 70% in palatine tonsils. In addition, overall virus detection rates were higher in more hypertrophic than in smaller adenoids (p = 0.05), and in the particular case of human enteroviruses, they were detected more frequently (p = 0.05) in larger palatine tonsils than in smaller ones. While persistence/latency of DNA viruses in tonsillar tissues has been documented, such is not the case of RNA viruses. Respiratory viruses are highly prevalent in adenoids and palatine tonsils of patients with chronic tonsillar diseases, and persistence of these viruses in tonsils may stimulate chronic inflammation and play a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  15. Text mining and medicine: usefulness in respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedra, David; Ferrer, Antoni; Gea, Joaquim

    2014-03-01

    It is increasingly common to have medical information in electronic format. This includes scientific articles as well as clinical management reviews, and even records from health institutions with patient data. However, traditional instruments, both individual and institutional, are of little use for selecting the most appropriate information in each case, either in the clinical or research field. So-called text or data «mining» enables this huge amount of information to be managed, extracting it from various sources using processing systems (filtration and curation), integrating it and permitting the generation of new knowledge. This review aims to provide an overview of text and data mining, and of the potential usefulness of this bioinformatic technique in the exercise of care in respiratory medicine and in research in the same field. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Association between Smokefree Legislation and Hospitalizations for Cardiac, Cerebrovascular and Respiratory Diseases: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Crystal E.; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Secondhand smoke causes cardiovascular and respiratory disease. Smokefree legislation is associated with a lower risk of hospitalization and death from these diseases. Methods and Results Random effects meta-analysis was conducted by law comprehensiveness to determine the relationship between smokefree legislation and hospital admission or death from cardiac, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases. Studies were identified using a systematic search for studies published before November 30, 2011 using Science Citation Index, Google Scholar, PubMed, and Embase and references in identified papers. Change in hospital admissions (or deaths) in the presence of a smokefree law, duration of follow-up, and law comprehensiveness (workplaces only; workplaces and restaurants; or workplaces, restaurants, and bars) were recorded. Forty-five studies of 33 smokefree laws with median follow-up of 24 months (range 2–57 months) were included. Comprehensive smokefree legislation was associated with significantly lower rates of hospital admissions (or deaths) for all 4 diagnostic groups: coronary events (RR .848, 95% CI .816–.881), other heart disease (RR .610, 95% CI .440–.847), cerebrovascular accidents (RR .840, 95% CI .753–.936), and respiratory disease (RR .760, 95% CI .682–.846). The difference in risk following comprehensive smokefree laws does not change with longer follow-up. More comprehensive laws were associated with larger changes in risk. Conclusions Smokefree legislation was associated with a lower risk of smoking-related cardiac, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases, with more comprehensive laws associated with greater changes in risk. PMID:23109514

  17. Heart and lung, a dangerous liaison-Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy and respiratory diseases: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Roberto; Fabbian, Fabio; Giorgi, Alfredo De; Pala, Marco; Menegatti, Alessandra Mallozzi; Parisi, Claudia; Misurati, Elisa; Tiseo, Ruana; Gallerani, Massimo; Salmi, Raffaella; Bossone, Eduardo

    2014-05-26

    To investigate the possible association between Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC)-a reversible clinical condition mimicking an acute myocardial infarction characterized by multifactorial pathophysiologic mechanisms- and respiratory system diseases. We systematically searched PubMed and EMBASE medical information sources, to identify the different triggering causes, limiting our search to articles in English. The search keywords were: "tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy", "takotsubo", "takotsubo cardiomyopathy", "broken heart syndrome", "stress-induced cardiomyopathy", "apical ballooning syndrome", and "ampulla cardiomyopathy in combination with respiratory diseases, lung, pulmonary disease. For each kind of disease, we registered: author, year and country of study, patient sex, age, concurring situation, and outcome. Out of a total of 1725 articles found, we selected 37 papers reporting a total of 38 patients. As expected, most patients were women (81.6%), mean age was 65 ± 10 years. Outcome was favorable in 100% of cases, and all the patients have been discharged uneventfully in a few days. An association between respiratory diseases and TTC is likely to exist. Patients with severe respiratory diseases, due to the high dosages of β2-agonists used or to the need of invasive procedures, are highly exposed to the risk of developing TTC.

  18. Microbiomes in respiratory health and disease: An Asia-Pacific perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotirmall, Sanjay H; Gellatly, Shaan L; Budden, Kurtis F; Mac Aogain, Micheál; Shukla, Shakti D; Wood, David L A; Hugenholtz, Philip; Pethe, Kevin; Hansbro, Philip M

    2017-02-01

    There is currently enormous interest in studying the role of the microbiome in health and disease. Microbiome's role is increasingly being applied to respiratory diseases, in particular COPD, asthma, cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis. The changes in respiratory microbiomes that occur in these diseases and how they are modified by environmental challenges such as cigarette smoke, air pollution and infection are being elucidated. There is also emerging evidence that gut microbiomes play a role in lung diseases through the modulation of systemic immune responses and can be modified by diet and antibiotic treatment. There are issues that are particular to the Asia-Pacific region involving diet and prevalence of specific respiratory diseases. Each of these issues is further complicated by the effects of ageing. The challenges now are to elucidate the cause and effect relationships between changes in microbiomes and respiratory diseases and how to translate these into new treatments and clinical care. Here we review the current understanding and progression in these areas. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  19. Viral infections and bovine mastitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellenberg, G J; van der Poel, W H M; Van Oirschot, J T

    2002-08-02

    This review deals with the role of viruses in the aetiology of bovine mastitis. Bovine herpesvirus 1, bovine herpesvirus 4, foot-and-mouth disease virus, and parainfluenza 3 virus have been isolated from milk from cows with clinical mastitis. Intramammary inoculations of bovine herpesvirus 1 or parainfluenza 3 virus-induced clinical mastitis, while an intramammary inoculation of foot-and-mouth disease virus resulted in necrosis of the mammary gland. Subclinical mastitis has been induced after a simultaneous intramammary and intranasal inoculation of lactating cows with bovine herpesvirus 4. Bovine leukaemia virus has been detected in mammary tissue of cows with subclinical mastitis, but whether this virus was able to induce bovine mastitis has not been reported. Bovine herpesvirus 2, vaccinia, cowpox, pseudocowpox, vesicular stomatitis, foot-and-mouth disease viruses, and bovine papillomaviruses can play an indirect role in the aetiology of bovine mastitis. These viruses can induce teat lesions, for instance in the ductus papillaris, which result in a reduction of the natural defence mechanisms of the udder and indirectly in bovine mastitis due to bacterial pathogens. Bovine herpesvirus 1, bovine viral diarrhoea virus, bovine immunodeficiency virus, and bovine leukaemia virus infections may play an indirect role in bovine mastitis, due to their immunosuppressive properties. But, more research is warranted to underline their indirect role in bovine mastitis. We conclude that viral infections can play a direct or indirect role in the aetiology of bovine mastitis; therefore, their importance in the aetiology of bovine mastitis and their economical impact needs further attention.

  20. Genomic Dissection of an Icelandic Epidemic of Respiratory Disease in Horses and Associated Zoonotic Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Björnsdóttir, Sigríður; Harris, Simon R; Svansson, Vilhjálmur; Gunnarsson, Eggert; Sigurðardóttir, Ólöf G.; Gammeljord, Kristina; Steward, Karen F.; Newton, J. Richard; Robinson, Carl; Charbonneau, Amelia R. L.; Parkhill, Julian; Holden, Matthew T. G.; Waller, Andrew S.

    2017-01-01

    Iceland is free of the major infectious diseases of horses. However, in 2010 an epidemic of respiratory disease of unknown cause spread through the country’s native horse population of 77,000. Microbiological investigations ruled out known viral agents but identified the opportunistic pathogen Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) in diseased animals. We sequenced the genomes of 257 isolates of S. zooepidemicus to differentiate epidemic from endemic strains. We found that...

  1. The effects of bovine viral diarrhoea virus on cattle reproduction in relation to disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fray, M D; Paton, D J; Alenius, S

    2000-07-02

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is a major reproductive pathogen in cattle. Infection of the bull can lead to a fall in semen quality and the isolation of infectious virus in the ejaculate, while infection in the cow leads to poor conception rates, abortions and congenital defects. BVDV also reduces the animal's resistance to other respiratory and enteric pathogens. The prevalence of BVDV is primarily due to the efficiency with which the virus crosses the placenta of susceptible females. Calves that survive infection during the first trimester of pregnancy are born with a persistent and lifelong infection. These persistently infected (PI) animals represent between 1.0% and 2.0% of the cattle population and continuously shed infectious virus. The availability of reliable diagnostic ELISA and PCR techniques, which can test milk or serum samples for virus or antibodies, has simplified BVDV surveillance and improved the prospects for control. Although PI animals are the principal vectors within and between herds, they can be readily identified and removed. By contrast, cows carrying a PI foetus are particularly problematic. These animals have been compared to 'Trojan Horses' because they are virus-negative and antibody-positive but they deliver PI calves. In general, acutely infected cattle are much less efficient vectors but infections at the onset of puberty have resulted in a localised and persistent infection within the testes. Under these circumstances, virus shedding into the semen may remain undetected. Transmission of BVDV can be controlled through vaccination or eradication. BVDV vaccine technology has been developing over the past 30 years, but currently available vaccines are still of the conventional inactivated or attenuated sort. In general, vaccination has not been applied with sufficient rigor to make a significant impact on the level of circulating virus, unlike the national and regional eradication programmes established in areas such as

  2. Interaction between IGF1 and IGFBPs in bovine cystic ovarian disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, F M; Salvetti, N R; Colombero, M; Stangaferro, M L; Barbeito, C G; Ortega, H H; Rey, F

    2013-07-01

    Cystic ovarian disease (COD) is one of the main factors responsible for reproductive disorders in cattle. Although the pathogenesis and mechanism of cyst formation are not fully understood, it has been proposed that the IGF system could play an essential role, as it is a key intraovarian regulator. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the altered levels in IGF1 detected in bovines with COD are associated with changes at mRNA level or with differential modulation by IGFBPs. The mRNA levels of the IGF components studied were analyzed by real time PCR and in situ hybridization, and IGFBP expression and activity were assayed by immunohistochemistry and ligand blot, respectively. Results showed a decreased IGF1 mRNA level due to a lower granulosa cell gene expression in cystic follicles (Pfollicular fluid, and suggest that IGFBP3 is a key regulator of intrafollicular IGF1 in animals with COD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. State of progress in treating cystic fibrosis respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flume Patrick A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since the discovery of the gene associated with cystic fibrosis (CF, there has been tremendous progress in the care of patients with this disease. New therapies have entered the market and are part of the standard treatment of patients with CF, and have been associated with marked improvement in survival. Now there are even more promising therapies directed at different components of the pathophysiology of this disease. In this review, our current knowledge of the pathophysiology of lung disease in patients with CF is described, along with the current treatment of CF lung disease, and the therapies in development that offer great promise to our patients.

  4. Relationship of Respiratory Diseases and the Lead Level in Tiran & Karvan Region, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghias M. PhD,

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims: Lead is emerged as one of the most hazardous elements, existing in the air and soil, which can create irreparable outcomes in the human body due to its highly severe damages. the aim of this study was to determine the relationship between Lead level and the respiratory diseases in Tiran & Karvan Region, Iran. Instrument & Methods: The research methodology was analytical based on the documents and evidence, and library studies and was performed during 2011 to 2015 in Tiran & Karvan Region, Isfahan Province, Iran. The respiratory diseases statistics regarding the studied area was gathered from the information and statistics of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and Iran Management Center for Diseases during 2007 to 2009 documents (3215 cases. 110 soil samples and 55 water samples were collected from different positions at Summer 2011, randomly. The variation map of the respiratory diseases and lead spatial distribution for research area were drawn by Arc GIS 10.2 software. Findings: The concentration of lead was 59.4±7.9ppm in soil and 48.2±4.1ppm in water of the region. The lead variation map showed that the soil in the eastern, northern and western areas consists of a relatively high portion of lead. Also special distribution of the respiratory diseases in Tiran & Karvan showed that the disease variation is in a cluster manner and that the disease follows a special centralization. Conclusion: There is a direct relation between respiratory diseases distribution and the existence of lead in Tiran & Karvan Region, Isfahan Province, Iran.

  5. Fine Particulate Matter Pollution and Hospital Admissions for Respiratory Diseases in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiulin Xiong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fine particulate matter has become the premier air pollutant of Beijing in recent years, enormously impacting the environmental quality of the city and the health of the residents. Fine particles with aerodynamic diameters of 0~0.3 μm, 0.3~0.5 μm, and 0.5~1.0 μm, from the yeasr 2007 to 2012, were monitored, and the hospital data about respiratory diseases during the same period was gathered and calculated. Then the correlation between respiratory health and fine particles was studied by spatial analysis and grey correlation analysis. The results showed that the aerial fine particulate matter pollution was mainly distributed in the Zizhuyuan sub-district office. There was a certain association between respiratory health and fine particles. Outpatients with respiratory system disease in this study area were mostly located in the southeastern regions (Balizhuang sub-district office, Ganjiakou sub-district office, Wanshoulu sub-district office, and Yongdinglu sub-district office and east-central regions (Zizhuyuan sub-district office and Shuangyushu sub-district office of the study area. Correspondingly, PM1 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 1.0 um concentrations in these regions were higher than those in any other regions. Grey correlation analysis results showed that the correlation degree of the fine particle concentration with the number of outpatients is high, and the smaller fine particles had more obvious effects on respiratory system disease than larger particles.

  6. Fine Particulate Matter Pollution and Hospital Admissions for Respiratory Diseases in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qiulin; Zhao, Wenji; Gong, Zhaoning; Zhao, Wenhui; Tang, Tao

    2015-09-22

    Fine particulate matter has become the premier air pollutant of Beijing in recent years, enormously impacting the environmental quality of the city and the health of the residents. Fine particles with aerodynamic diameters of 0~0.3 μm, 0.3~0.5 μm, and 0.5~1.0 μm, from the yeasr 2007 to 2012, were monitored, and the hospital data about respiratory diseases during the same period was gathered and calculated. Then the correlation between respiratory health and fine particles was studied by spatial analysis and grey correlation analysis. The results showed that the aerial fine particulate matter pollution was mainly distributed in the Zizhuyuan sub-district office. There was a certain association between respiratory health and fine particles. Outpatients with respiratory system disease in this study area were mostly located in the southeastern regions (Balizhuang sub-district office, Ganjiakou sub-district office, Wanshoulu sub-district office, and Yongdinglu sub-district office) and east-central regions (Zizhuyuan sub-district office and Shuangyushu sub-district office) of the study area. Correspondingly, PM₁ (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 1.0 um) concentrations in these regions were higher than those in any other regions. Grey correlation analysis results showed that the correlation degree of the fine particle concentration with the number of outpatients is high, and the smaller fine particles had more obvious effects on respiratory system disease than larger particles.

  7. Outcome of Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease Treated with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudzinski, Franziska C; Kaestner, Franziska; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim; Fähndrich, Sebastian; Seiler, Frederik; Böhmer, Philip; Linn, Oliver; Kaiser, Ralf; Haake, Hendrik; Langer, Frank; Bals, Robert; Wilkens, Heinrike; Lepper, Philipp M

    2016-03-01

    Patients with interstitial lung disease and acute respiratory failure have a poor prognosis especially if mechanical ventilation is required. To investigate the outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure in interstitial lung disease undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as a bridge to recovery or transplantation. This was a retrospective analysis of all patients with interstitial lung disease and acute respiratory failure treated with or without ECMO from March 2012 to August 2015. Forty patients with interstitial lung disease referred to our intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure were included in the analysis. Twenty-one were treated with ECMO. Eight patients were transferred by air from other hospitals within a range of 320 km (linear distance) for extended intensive care including the option of lung transplant. In total, 13 patients were evaluated, and eight were finally found to be suitable for lung transplantation from an ECMO bridge. Four patients from external hospitals were de novo listed during acute respiratory failure. Six patients underwent lung transplant, and two died on the waiting list after 9 and 63 days on ECMO, respectively. A total of 14 of 15 patients who did not undergo lung transplantation (93.3%) died after 40.3 ± 27.8 days on ECMO. Five out of six patients (83.3%) receiving a lung transplant could be discharged from hospital. ECMO is a lifesaving option for patients with interstitial lung disease and acute respiratory failure provided they are candidates for lung transplantation. ECMO is not able to reverse the poor prognosis in patients that do not qualify for lung transplantation.

  8. Heat-related emergency hospitalizations for respiratory diseases in the Medicare population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G Brooke; Dominici, Francesca; Wang, Yun; McCormack, Meredith C; Bell, Michelle L; Peng, Roger D

    2013-05-15

    The heat-related risk of hospitalization for respiratory diseases among the elderly has not been quantified in the United States on a national scale. With climate change predictions of more frequent and more intense heat waves, it is of paramount importance to quantify the health risks related to heat, especially for the most vulnerable. To estimate the risk of hospitalization for respiratory diseases associated with outdoor heat in the U.S. elderly. An observational study of approximately 12.5 million Medicare beneficiaries in 213 United States counties, January 1, 1999 to December 31, 2008. We estimate a national average relative risk of hospitalization for each 10°F (5.6°C) increase in daily outdoor temperature using Bayesian hierarchical models. We obtained daily county-level rates of Medicare emergency respiratory hospitalizations (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, 464-466, 480-487, 490-492) in 213 U.S. counties from 1999 through 2008. Overall, each 10°F increase in daily temperature was associated with a 4.3% increase in same-day emergency hospitalizations for respiratory diseases (95% posterior interval, 3.8, 4.8%). Counties' relative risks were significantly higher in counties with cooler average summer temperatures. We found strong evidence of an association between outdoor heat and respiratory hospitalizations in the largest population of elderly studied to date. Given projections of increasing temperatures from climate change and the increasing global prevalence of chronic pulmonary disease, the relationship between heat and respiratory morbidity is a growing concern.

  9. Trends and Patterns of Differences in Chronic Respiratory Disease Mortality Among US Counties, 1980-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer-Lindgren, Laura; Bertozzi-Villa, Amelia; Stubbs, Rebecca W; Morozoff, Chloe; Shirude, Shreya; Naghavi, Mohsen; Mokdad, Ali H; Murray, Christopher J L

    2017-09-26

    Chronic respiratory diseases are an important cause of death and disability in the United States. To estimate age-standardized mortality rates by county from chronic respiratory diseases. Validated small area estimation models were applied to deidentified death records from the National Center for Health Statistics and population counts from the US Census Bureau, National Center for Health Statistics, and Human Mortality Database to estimate county-level mortality rates from 1980 to 2014 for chronic respiratory diseases. County of residence. Age-standardized mortality rates by county, year, sex, and cause. A total of 4 616 711 deaths due to chronic respiratory diseases were recorded in the United States from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2014. Nationally, the mortality rate from chronic respiratory diseases increased from 40.8 (95% uncertainty interval [UI], 39.8-41.8) deaths per 100 000 population in 1980 to a peak of 55.4 (95% UI, 54.1-56.5) deaths per 100 000 population in 2002 and then declined to 52.9 (95% UI, 51.6-54.4) deaths per 100 000 population in 2014. This overall 29.7% (95% UI, 25.5%-33.8%) increase in chronic respiratory disease mortality from 1980 to 2014 reflected increases in the mortality rate from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (by 30.8% [95% UI, 25.2%-39.0%], from 34.5 [95% UI, 33.0-35.5] to 45.1 [95% UI, 43.7-46.9] deaths per 100 000 population), interstitial lung disease and pulmonary sarcoidosis (by 100.5% [95% UI, 5.8%-155.2%], from 2.7 [95% UI, 2.3-4.2] to 5.5 [95% UI, 3.5-6.1] deaths per 100 000 population), and all other chronic respiratory diseases (by 42.3% [95% UI, 32.4%-63.8%], from 0.51 [95% UI, 0.48-0.54] to 0.73 [95% UI, 0.69-0.78] deaths per 100 000 population). There were substantial differences in mortality rates and changes in mortality rates over time among counties, and geographic patterns differed by cause. Counties with the highest mortality rates were found primarily in central Appalachia

  10. Respiratory syncytial virus hospitalisation trends in children with haemodynamically significant heart disease, 1997-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Patricia Y; Hornik, Christoph P; Li, Jennifer S; Campbell, Michael J; Hill, Kevin D

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the trends in respiratory syncytial virus-related hospitalisations and associated outcomes in children with haemodynamically significant heart disease in the United States of America. Study design The Kids' Inpatient Databases (1997-2012) were used to estimate the incidence of respiratory syncytial virus hospitalisation among children ⩽24 months with or without haemodynamically significant heart disease. Weighted multivariable logistic regression and chi-square tests were used to evaluate the trends over time and factors associated with hospitalisation, comparing eras before and after publication of the 2003 American Academy of Pediatrics palivizumab immunoprophylaxis guidelines. Secondary outcomes included in-hospital mortality, morbidity, length of stay, and cost. Overall, 549,265 respiratory syncytial virus-related hospitalisations were evaluated, including 2518 (0.5%) in children with haemodynamically significant heart disease. The incidence of respiratory syncytial virus hospitalisation in children with haemodynamically significant heart disease decreased by 36% when comparing pre- and post-palivizumab guideline eras versus an 8% decline in children without haemodynamically significant heart disease (prespiratory syncytial virus-associated mortality (4.9 versus 0.1%, prespiratory syncytial virus hospitalisation in 2009 was $58,166 (95% CI:$46,017, $70,315). These data provide stakeholders with a means to evaluate the cost-utility of various immunoprophylaxis strategies.

  11. How air pollution influences clinical management of respiratory diseases. A case-crossover study in Milan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santus Pierachille

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Environmental pollution is a known risk factor for multiple diseases and furthermore increases rate of hospitalisations. We investigated the correlation between emergency room admissions (ERAs of the general population for respiratory diseases and the environmental pollutant levels in Milan, a metropolis in northern Italy. Methods We collected data from 45770 ERAs for respiratory diseases. A time-stratified case-crossover design was used to investigate the association between air pollution levels and ERAs for acute respiratory conditions. The effects of air pollutants were investigated at lag 0 to lag 5, lag 0–2 and lag 3–5 in both single and multi-pollutant models, adjusted for daily weather variables. Results An increase in ozone (O3 levels at lag 3–5 was associated with a 78% increase in the number of ERAs for asthma, especially during the warm season. Exposure to carbon monoxide (CO proved to be a risk factor for pneumonia at lag 0–2 and in the warm season increased the risk of ERA by 66%. A significant association was found between ERAs for COPD exacerbation and levels of sulphur dioxide (SO2, CO, nitrate dioxide (NO2, and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5. The multipollutant model that includes all pollutants showed a significant association between CO (26% and ERA for upper respiratory tract diseases at lag 0–2. For chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD exacerbations, only CO (OR 1.19 showed a significant association. Conclusions Exposure to environmental pollution, even at typical low levels, can increase the risk of ERA for acute respiratory diseases and exacerbation of obstructive lung diseases in the general population.

  12. How air pollution influences clinical management of respiratory diseases. A case-crossover study in Milan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santus, Pierachille; Russo, Antonio; Madonini, Enzo; Allegra, Luigi; Blasi, Francesco; Centanni, Stefano; Miadonna, Antonio; Schiraldi, Gianfranco; Amaducci, Sandro

    2012-10-18

    Environmental pollution is a known risk factor for multiple diseases and furthermore increases rate of hospitalisations. We investigated the correlation between emergency room admissions (ERAs) of the general population for respiratory diseases and the environmental pollutant levels in Milan, a metropolis in northern Italy. We collected data from 45770 ERAs for respiratory diseases. A time-stratified case-crossover design was used to investigate the association between air pollution levels and ERAs for acute respiratory conditions. The effects of air pollutants were investigated at lag 0 to lag 5, lag 0-2 and lag 3-5 in both single and multi-pollutant models, adjusted for daily weather variables. An increase in ozone (O(3)) levels at lag 3-5 was associated with a 78% increase in the number of ERAs for asthma, especially during the warm season. Exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) proved to be a risk factor for pneumonia at lag 0-2 and in the warm season increased the risk of ERA by 66%. A significant association was found between ERAs for COPD exacerbation and levels of sulphur dioxide (SO(2)), CO, nitrate dioxide (NO(2)), and particulate matter (PM(10) and PM(2.5)). The multipollutant model that includes all pollutants showed a significant association between CO (26%) and ERA for upper respiratory tract diseases at lag 0-2. For chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations, only CO (OR 1.19) showed a significant association. Exposure to environmental pollution, even at typical low levels, can increase the risk of ERA for acute respiratory diseases and exacerbation of obstructive lung diseases in the general population.

  13. Leptin as regulator of pulmonary immune responses: involvement in respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernooy, Juanita H J; Ubags, Niki D J; Brusselle, Guy G; Tavernier, Jan; Suratt, Benjamin T; Joos, Guy F; Wouters, Emiel F M; Bracke, Ken R

    2013-08-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone, recognized as a critical mediator of the balance between food intake and energy expenditure by signalling through its functional receptor (Ob-Rb) in the hypothalamus. Structurally, leptin belongs to the long-chain helical cytokine family, and is now known to have pleiotropic functions in both innate and adaptive immunity. The presence of the functional leptin receptor in the lung together with evidence of increased airspace leptin levels arising during pulmonary inflammation, suggests an important role for leptin in lung development, respiratory immune responses and eventually pathogenesis of inflammatory respiratory diseases. The purpose of this article is to review our current understanding of leptin and its functional role on the different resident cell types of the lung in health as well as in the context of three major respiratory conditions being chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and pneumonia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Disease spectrum and management of children admitted with acute respiratory infection in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T K P; Nguyen, D V; Truong, T N H; Tran, M D; Graham, S M; Marais, B J

    2017-06-01

    To assess the acute respiratory infection (ARI) disease spectrum, duration of hospitalisation and outcome in children hospitalised with an ARI in Viet Nam. We conducted a retrospective descriptive study of ARI admissions to primary (Hoa Vang District Hospital), secondary (Da Nang Hospital for Women and Children) and tertiary (National Hospital of Paediatrics in Ha Noi) level hospitals in Viet Nam over 12 months (01/09/2015 to 31/08/2016). Acute respiratory infections accounted for 27.9% (37 436/134 061) of all paediatric admissions; nearly half (47.6%) of all children admitted to Hoa Vang District Hospital. Most (64.6%) of children hospitalised with an ARI were Acute respiratory infection is a major cause of paediatric hospitalisation in Viet Nam, characterised by prolonged hospitalisation for relatively mild disease. There is huge potential to reduce unnecessary hospital admission and cost. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Major affective disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease compared with other chronic respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothirat, Chaicharn; Chaiwong, Warawut; Phetsuk, Nittaya; Pisalthanapuna, Sangnual; Chetsadaphan, Nonglak; Inchai, Juthamas

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs) have significant impacts on quality of life including psychomotor domain. To evaluate three major affective disorders in subjects with COPD compared with other CRDs and nonill population. The Thai version of Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) was used as a diagnostic instrument for three major affective disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive disorder, and panic disorder) by face-to-face interview in assessing patients with CRDs [COPD, asthma, rhinasthma, all asthma (asthma and rhinasthma), and chronic rhinitis], and nonill subjects. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine the relation between major affective disorders and CRDs adjusting for age, sex, and disease severity. Major affective disorders were more prevalent in CRDs than nonill groups (adjusted OR =2.6 [95% CI, 1.8-3.9], Pdisorder (adjusted OR =4.0 [95% CI, 1.4-11.9], P=0.011, and 4.4 [95% CI, 1.1-18.1], P=0.038, respectively) but not major depressive disorder (adjusted OR =2.7 [95% CI, 0.8-9.0, P=0.105]) than nonill group. Comparing with all asthma, COPD patients had lower occurrence of major depressive and panic disorders (adjusted OR =0.1 [95% CI, 0.0-0.4], P=0.002, and 0.1 [95% CI, 0.0-0.9], P=0.043, respectively). There was no difference in major mood disorders in COPD, rhinasthma, and chronic rhinitis patients. Major affective disorders were not increased by disease severity in COPD. Major affective disorders were significantly higher in CRDs than nonill population. Generalized anxiety and panic disorders were significantly high in COPD patients. Moreover, major depressive and panic disorders in COPD were significantly lower than all asthma. The prevalence of major affective disorders may not be related to severity of COPD.

  16. Mucosal immunization of rhesus monkeys against respiratory syncytial virus subgroups A and B and human parainfluenza virus type 3 by using a live cDNA-derived vaccine based on a host range-attenuated bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 vector backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Alexander C; Wenzke, Daniel R; McAuliffe, Josephine M; St Claire, Marisa; Elkins, William R; Murphy, Brian R; Collins, Peter L

    2002-02-01

    Reverse genetics was used to develop a two-component, trivalent live attenuated vaccine against human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) subgroups A and B. The backbone for each of the two components of this vaccine was the attenuated recombinant bovine/human PIV3 (rB/HPIV3), a recombinant BPIV3 in which the bovine HN and F protective antigens are replaced by their HPIV3 counterparts (48). This chimera retains the well-characterized host range attenuation phenotype of BPIV3, which appears to be appropriate for immunization of young infants. The open reading frames (ORFs) for the G and F major protective antigens of RSV subgroup A and B were each placed under the control of PIV3 transcription signals and inserted individually or in homologous pairs as supernumerary genes in the promoter proximal position of rB/HPIV3. The level of replication of rB/HPIV3-RSV chimeric viruses in the respiratory tract of rhesus monkeys was similar to that of their parent virus rB/HPIV3, and each of the chimeras induced a robust immune response to both RSV and HPIV3. RSV-neutralizing antibody titers induced by rB/HPIV3-RSV chimeric viruses were equivalent to those induced by infection with wild-type RSV, and HPIV3-specific antibody responses were similar to, or slightly less than, after infection with the rB/HPIV3 vector itself. This study describes a novel vaccine strategy against RSV in which vaccine viruses with a common attenuated backbone, specifically rB/HPIV3 derivatives expressing the G and/or F major protective antigens of RSV subgroup A and of RSV subgroup B, are used to immunize by the intranasal route against RSV and HPIV3, which are the first and second most important viral agents of pediatric respiratory tract disease worldwide.

  17. Identification of respiratory virus in infants with congenital heart disease by comparison of different methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Mitiko Kanashiro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory virus infections are the main cause of infant hospitalization and are potentially severe in children with congenital heart disease (CHD. Rapid and sensitive diagnosis is very important to early introduction of antiviral treatment and implementation of precautions to control transmission, reducing the risk of nosocomial infections. In the present study we compare different techniques in the diagnosis of respiratory viruses in CHD infants. Thirty-nine samples of nasopharyngeal aspirate were obtained from CHD infants with symptoms of respiratory infection. The Multiplex PCR (Seeplex® RV 12 ACE Detection driven to the detection of 12 respiratory viruses was compared with the direct immunofluorescence assay (DFA and PCR, both targeting seven respiratory viruses. The positivity found by DFA, Multiplex and PCR was 33.3%, 51.3% and 48.7%, respectively. Kappa index comparing DFA and Multiplex, DFA and PCR and PCR and Multiplex PCR was 0.542, 0.483 and 0.539, respectively. The concordance between techniques was considered moderate. Both Multiplex PCR (p = 0.001 and PCR (p = 0.002 detected significantly more respiratory virus than DFA. As the performance of the tests may vary, the combination of two or more techniques may increase diagnostic sensitivity favoring the diagnosis of co-infections, early introduction of antiviral therapy and implementation of appropriate measures.

  18. Fabry disease, respiratory symptoms, and airway limitation ? a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, Camilla Kara; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Backer, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme ?-galactosidase A, resulting in accumulation of glycosphingolipids in multiple organs, primarily heart, kidneys, skin, CNS, and lungs. Materials and method A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed database, leading to a total number of 154 hits. Due to language restriction, this number was reduced to 135; 53 papers did not concern Fabry disease, 19 were either animal studies or...

  19. Risk factors for respiratory failure of motor neuron disease in a multiracial Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiao; Hao, Ying; Xiao, Bin; Tan, Eng-King; Lo, Yew-Long

    2017-05-01

    Motor neuron disease (MND) is a devastating degenerative disorder. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is the most common and severe form of MND. Respiratory failure arising from ventilator musculature atrophy is the most common cause of death for ALS patients. Exploring the factors correlated with respiratory failure can contribute to disease management. To characterize the clinical features of MND and determine the factors that may affect respiratory failure of MND patients. The case records of all MND patients seen in Singapore General Hospital (SGH) between January 2004 and December 2014 were examined. Demographic, clinical information were collected by reviewing case records. Mortality data, if not available from records, were obtained via phone call interview of family members. Demographic data and clinical treatments were compared between Respiratory support group and Non-respiratory support group. There were 73 patients included in our study. 49 (67.1%) patients died during follow-up. The mean age of onset was 58±11.1years. With regard to treatment, 63% needed feeding support, and 42.5% required ventilation aid. The median overall survival was 36months from symptom onset. Chi-square tests showed there was significantly higher percentage of respiratory support needed in Chinese than in other races (P=0.016). Compared with non-feeding support patients, patients with feeding support were more likely to require assisted ventilation (P=0.001). We report for the first time that the need of feeding support is significantly associated with assisted ventilation. Chinese MND patients may be more inclined to require respiratory support. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Musculoskeletal comorbidities in cardiovascular disease, diabetes and respiratory disease: the impact on activity limitations; a representative population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perruccio Anthony V

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to quantify the contribution of comorbidity to activity limitations in populations with chronic cardiovascular disease, diabetes or respiratory disease (index conditions, with emphasis on musculoskeletal comorbidity (arthritis or back problems. Methods Analysis of the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey 3.1 (age 20+ years, n = 115,915. Prevalence ratios for activity limitations in people with the index conditions and co-occurring musculoskeletal disease, adjusted for age, gender, and socioeconomic factors, were used to estimate population associated fractions (PAF. Results Comorbid arthritis and back problems significantly increased the risk of activity limitations across all index conditions with prevalence ratios of 1.60 and 1.46 for cardiovascular disease, 1.51 and 1.36 for diabetes, and 1.38 and 1.44 for respiratory disease for arthritis and back problems respectively. Arthritis and back problems accounted for at least 13% and 9% of activity limitations in the index populations. Conclusions While chronic musculoskeletal conditions are not always considered priorities in chronic disease prevention, they account for a substantial proportion of activity restrictions seen in people with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and respiratory disease, with implications for prevention and control strategies.

  1. Non-linear increase of respiratory diseases and their costs under severe air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying; Wu, Yiyun; Chen, Guangdi; Van Grinsven, Hans J M; Wang, Xiaofeng; Gu, Baojing; Lou, Xiaoming

    2017-05-01

    China is experiencing severe and persistent air pollution, with concentrations of fine particulate matters (PM 2.5 ) reaching unprecedentedly high levels in many cities. Quantifying the detrimental effects on health and their costs derived from high PM 2.5 levels is crucial because of the unsolved challenges to mitigate air pollution in the following decades. Using the daily monitoring data on PM 2.5 concentrations and clinic visits, we found a non-linear increase of respiratory diseases, but not for other diseases (e.g., digestive diseases) under severe air pollution. We found an increase of respiratory diseases by 1% for each 10 μg m -3 increase in PM 2.5 when the annual average daily PM 2.5 concentration was less than 50 μg m -3 ; while this ratio was doubled (around 2%) with the daily PM 2.5 concentration larger than 50 μg m -3 . Under severe air pollution (PM 2.5 concentration >150 μg m -3 ), the respiratory diseases increased by over 50% compared to that in clean days. Children are more sensitive to the severe air pollution. The increase of clinic visits, especially for adults, was observed mainly in bigger (>500 beds) hospitals. Re-allocating medical resources (e.g., doctors) from big hospitals to community hospitals can benefit the respiratory patients due to air pollution. The total medical cost of clinic visits of respiratory diseases derived from PM 2.5 pollution was estimated at 17.2-57.0 billion Yuan in 2014 in China, accounting for 0.5-1.6% of national total health expenditure. Because these medical costs only represent a small part of total health cost derived from air pollution, the reduction of associated health costs would be an important co-benefit of implementation of air pollution preventive strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effectiveness and safety of seasonal influenza vaccination in children with underlying respiratory diseases and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin-Han

    2014-04-01

    Influenza causes acute respiratory infections and various complications. Children in the high-risk group have higher complication and hospitalization rates than high-risk elderly individuals. Influenza prevention in children is important, as they can be a source infection spread in their communities. Influenza vaccination is strongly recommended for high-risk children with chronic underlying circulatory and respiratory disease, immature infants, and children receiving long-term immunosuppressant treatment or aspirin. However, vaccination rates in these children are low because of concerns regarding the exacerbation of underlying diseases and vaccine efficacy. To address these concerns, many clinical studies on children with underlying respiratory diseases have been conducted since the 1970s. Most of these reported no differences in immunogenicity or adverse reactions between healthy children and those with underlying respiratory diseases and no adverse effects of the influenza vaccine on the disease course. Further to these studies, the inactivated split-virus influenza vaccine is recommended for children with underlying respiratory disease, in many countries. However, the live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) is not recommended for children younger than 5 years with asthma or recurrent wheezing. Influenza vaccination is contraindicated in patients with severe allergies to egg, chicken, or feathers, because egg-cultivated influenza vaccines may contain ovalbumin. There has been no recent report of serious adverse events after influenza vaccination in children with egg allergy. However, many experts recommend the trivalent influenza vaccine for patients with severe egg allergy, with close observation for 30 minutes after vaccination. LAIV is still not recommended for patients with asthma or egg allergy.

  3. Molecular surveillance of traditional and emerging pathogens associated with canine infectious respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaro, Nicola; Mari, Viviana; Larocca, Vittorio; Losurdo, Michele; Lanave, Gianvito; Lucente, Maria Stella; Corrente, Marialaura; Catella, Cristiana; Bo, Stefano; Elia, Gabriella; Torre, Giorgio; Grandolfo, Erika; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2016-08-30

    A molecular survey for traditional and emerging pathogens associated with canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) was conducted in Italy between 2011 and 2013 on a total of 138 dogs, including 78 early acute clinically ill CIRD animals, 22 non-clinical but exposed to clinically ill CIRD dogs and 38 CIRD convalescent dogs. The results showed that canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV) was the most commonly detected CIRD pathogen, followed by canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycoplasma cynos, Mycoplasma canis and canine pneumovirus (CnPnV). Some classical CIRD agents, such as canine adenoviruses, canine distemper virus and canid herpesvirus 1, were not detected at all, as were not other emerging respiratory viruses (canine influenza virus, canine hepacivirus) and bacteria (Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus). Most severe forms of respiratory disease were observed in the presence of CPIV, CRCoV and M. cynos alone or in combination with other pathogens, whereas single CnPnV or M. canis infections were detected in dogs with no or very mild respiratory signs. Interestingly, only the association of M. cynos (alone or in combination with either CRCoV or M. canis) with severe clinical forms was statistically significant. The study, while confirming CPIV as the main responsible for CIRD occurrence, highlights the increasing role of recently discovered viruses, such as CRCoV and CnPnV, for which effective vaccines are not available in the market. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among patients with systemic arterial hypertension without respiratory symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabahi, Marcelo Fouad; Pereira, Sheila Alves; Silva Júnior, José Laerte Rodrigues; de Rezende, Aline Pacheco; Castro da Costa, Adeliane; de Sousa Corrêa, Krislainy; Conde, Marcus Barreto

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often delayed until later stages of the disease. The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of COPD among adults on treatment for systemic arterial hypertension independently of the presence of respiratory symptoms. This cross-sectional study included adults age