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Sample records for bovine pancreatic trypsin

  1. Isolation of pancreatic trypsin inhibitor from bovine pituitary glands.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, C. H.; Chung, D.

    1983-01-01

    A trypsin inhibitor has been isolated from bovine pituitary extracts. From its amino acid composition, NH2-terminal residue, mobility in paper electrophoresis, and behavior in high-performance liquid chromatography and from the tryptic pattern of the performic acid-oxidized material, it appears that the inhibitor is identical to the Kunitz and Northrop pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

  2. Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor-trypsin complex as a detection system for recombinant proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Borjigin, J; Nathans, J

    1993-01-01

    Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) binds to trypsin and anhydrotrypsin (an enzymatically inactive derivative of trypsin) with affinities of 6 x 10(-14) and 1.1 x 10(-13) M, respectively. We have taken advantage of the high affinity and specificity of this binding reaction to develop a protein tagging system in which biotinylated trypsin or biotinylated anhydrotrypsin is used as the reagent to detect recombinant fusion proteins into which BPTI has been inserted. Two proteins, opsin and...

  3. A preliminary neutron crystallography on the trypsin-bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trypsin is one of serine proteases. BPTI (Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor) is a protein inhibitor, which binds trypsin tightly and inhibits cleavage of peptide bonds. X-ray structure determination of trypsin-BPTI complex could make clear the overview of the active site. However, information of hydrogen atoms related to catalytic mechanism has not been satisfied. In this study, the trypsin-BPTI complex structure has been determined by neutron diffraction data at 2.0 A resolution. Deuterium atoms of catalytic triad, hydration structures in the binding pocket of trypsin and hydrogen bonds were observed. We would like to discuss details of hydrogen bonds in the interface between trypsin and BPTI and the adjacent water molecules including hydrogen atoms involved in the enzymatic reaction.

  4. A preliminary neutron crystallography on the trypsin-bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, K; Yamada, T; Kurihara, K; Tamada, T; Kuroki, R; Tanaka, I; Takahashi, H; Niimura, N, E-mail: niimura@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp

    2010-11-01

    Trypsin is one of serine proteases. BPTI (Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor) is a protein inhibitor, which binds trypsin tightly and inhibits cleavage of peptide bonds. X-ray structure determination of trypsin-BPTI complex could make clear the overview of the active site. However, information of hydrogen atoms related to catalytic mechanism has not been satisfied. In this study, the trypsin-BPTI complex structure has been determined by neutron diffraction data at 2.0 A resolution. Deuterium atoms of catalytic triad, hydration structures in the binding pocket of trypsin and hydrogen bonds were observed. We would like to discuss details of hydrogen bonds in the interface between trypsin and BPTI and the adjacent water molecules including hydrogen atoms involved in the enzymatic reaction.

  5. Structural Basis for Accelerated Cleavage of Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor (BPTI) by Human Mesotrypsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salameh,M.; Soares, A.; Hockla, A.; Radisky, E.

    2008-01-01

    Human mesotrypsin is an isoform of trypsin that displays unusual resistance to polypeptide trypsin inhibitors and has been observed to cleave several such inhibitors as substrates. Whereas substitution of arginine for the highly conserved glycine 193 in the trypsin active site has been implicated as a critical factor in the inhibitor resistance of mesotrypsin, how this substitution leads to accelerated inhibitor cleavage is not clear. Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) forms an extremely stable and cleavage-resistant complex with trypsin, and thus provides a rigorous challenge of mesotrypsin catalytic activity toward polypeptide inhibitors. Here, we report kinetic constants for mesotrypsin and the highly homologous (but inhibitor sensitive) human cationic trypsin, describing inhibition by, and cleavage of BPTI, as well as crystal structures of the mesotrypsin-BPTI and human cationic trypsin-BPTI complexes. We find that mesotrypsin cleaves BPTI with a rate constant accelerated 350-fold over that of human cationic trypsin and 150,000-fold over that of bovine trypsin. From the crystal structures, we see that small conformational adjustments limited to several side chains enable mesotrypsin-BPTI complex formation, surmounting the predicted steric clash introduced by Arg-193. Our results show that the mesotrypsin-BPTI interface favors catalysis through (a) electrostatic repulsion between the closely spaced mesotrypsin Arg-193 and BPTI Arg-17, and (b) elimination of two hydrogen bonds between the enzyme and the amine leaving group portion of BPTI. Our model predicts that these deleterious interactions accelerate leaving group dissociation and deacylation.

  6. Effect of glycerol on the interactions and solubility of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    OpenAIRE

    Farnum, M; Zukoski, C

    1999-01-01

    The effects of additives used to stabilize protein structure during crystallization on protein solution phase behavior are poorly understood. Here we investigate the effect of glycerol and ionic strength on the solubility and strength of interactions of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. These two variables are found to have opposite effects on the intermolecular forces; attractions increase with [NaCl], whereas repulsions increase with glycerol concentration. These changes are mirrored...

  7. Solvent exchange of buried water and hydrogen exchange of peptide NH groups hydrogen bonded to buried waters in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solvent exchange of 18O-labeled buried water in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), trypsin, and trypsin-BPTI complex is measured by high-precision isotope ratio mass spectroscopy. Buried water is labeled by equilibrium of the protein in 18O-enriched water. Protein samples are then rapidly dialyzed against water of normal isotope composition by gel filtration and stored. The exchangeable 18O label eluting with the protein in 10-300 s is determined by an H2O-CO2 equilibration technique. Exchange of buried waters with solvent water is complete before 10-15 s in BPTI, trypsin, and BPTI-trypsin, as well as in lysozyme and carboxypeptidase measured as controls. When in-exchange dialysis and storage are carried out at pH ≥ 2.5, trypsin-BPTI and trypsin, but not free BPTI, have the equivalent of one 18O atom that exchanges slowly (after 300 s and before several days). This oxygen is probably covalently bound to a specific site in trypsin. When in-exchange dialysis and storage are carried out at pH 1.1, the equivalent of three to seven 18O atoms per molecule is associated with the trypsin-BPTI complex, apparently due to nonspecific covalent 18O labeling of carboxyl groups at low pH. In addition to 18O exchange of buried waters, the hydrogen isotope exchange of buried NH groups H bonded to buried waters was also measured. Their base-catalyzed exchange rate constants are on the order of NH groups that in the crystal are exposed to solvent and hydrogen-bonded main chain O, and their pH/sub min/ is similar to that for model compounds. The pH dependence of their exchange rate constants suggests that direct exchange with water may significantly contribute to their observed exchange rate

  8. Combining a polarizable force-field and a coarse-grained polarizable solvent model: application to long dynamics simulations of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, Michel; Borgis, Daniel; Cuniasse, Philippe

    2008-08-01

    The dynamic coupling between a polarizable protein force field and a particle-based implicit solvent model is described. The polarizable force field, TCPEp, developed recently to simulate protein systems, is characterized by a reduced number of polarizable sites, with a substantial gain in efficiency for an equal chemical accuracy. The Polarizable Pseudo-Particle (PPP) solvent model represents the macroscopic solvent polarization by induced dipoles placed on mobile Lennard-Jones pseudo-particles. The solvent-induced dipoles are sensitive to the solute electric field, but not to each other, so that the computational cost of solvent-solvent interactions is basically negligible. The solute and solvent induced dipoles are determined self-consistently and the equations of motion are solved using an efficient iterative multiple time step procedure. The solvation cost with respect to vacuum simulations is shown to decrease with solute size: the estimated multiplicative factor is 2.5 for a protein containing about 1000 atoms, and as low as 1.15 for 8000 atoms. The model is tested for six 20 ns molecular dynamics trajectories of a traditional benchmark system: the hydrated Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor (BPTI). Even though the TCPEp parameters have not been refined to be used with the solvent PPP model, we observe a good conservation of the BPTI structure along the trajectories. Moreover, our approach is able to provide a description of the protein solvation thermodynamic at the same accuracy as the standard Poisson-Boltzman continuum methods. It provides in addition a good description of the microscopic structural aspects concerning the solute/solvent interaction. PMID:18351600

  9. Serum immunoreactive trypsin and pancreatic lipase in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, V.; Epstein, O; Katrak, A; Junglee, D; Mikhailidis, D P; McIntyre, N; Dandona, P

    1986-01-01

    Immunoreactive trypsin concentration and pancreatic lipase activity were measured in the sera of 33 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Immunoreactive trypsin was increased (above the normal range) in 16 (48%) and pancreatic lipase activity in 18 (55%) patients. Both enzymes were increased in 10 (30%) patients. Twenty four patients (73%) had an increase of either one or both enzymes. There was a significant correlation between immunoreactive trypsin and pancreatic lipase activity. This a...

  10. Pancreatic endoproteases and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor immunoreactivity in human Paneth cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Bohe, M; Borgström, A; Lindström, C; Ohlsson, K.

    1986-01-01

    Normal and metaplastic gastrointestinal mucosa obtained at surgical resection were studied by light microscopy, using the unlabelled antibody enzyme method for immunohistochemical staining of lysozyme, pancreatic endoproteases, and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI). Paneth cells in the mucosa of normal small intestine, gastric mucosa with intestinal metaplasia, and colonic metaplastic mucosa were found to contain anionic trypsin, cationic trypsin, lysozyme, and PSTI immunoreactivi...

  11. [52-homoserine]-basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) with cyanogen bromide smoothly cleaves the polypeptide chain at the single methionyl residue. The newly formed homoserine lactone and α-amino functions are held in proximity by a disulfide linkage, and in neutral aqueous solution react together spontaneously to reform the peptide chain. The resulting analog, [52-homoserine]-BPTI is very similar to the native molecule in most properties measured. The rate of formation of this analog from the chain-cleaved intermediate has been determined. It is apparent that the facility of analog synthesis is due in large part to the retention of the native protein conformation in the cyanogen bromide-cleaved intermediate. (author)

  12. Tumour-associated trypsin inhibitor, TATI, in patients with pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis and benign biliary diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Haglund, C.; Huhtala, M L; Halila, H.; Nordling, S.; Roberts, P. J.; Scheinin, T. M.; Stenman, U H

    1986-01-01

    The serum and urine concentrations of a tumour-associated trypsin inhibitor, TATI, were determined by radioimmunoassay in patients with pancreatic cancer and with benign pancreatic and biliary diseases. Elevated serum levels (greater than 20 micrograms l-1) were found in 85% of the patients with pancreatic cancer, and elevated urine levels (greater than 50 micrograms g-1 creatinine) in 96% of the patients. Thus low TATI level, especially in urine, makes the possibility of pancreatic cancer le...

  13. Mechanisms and specificity of factor XIa and trypsin inhibition by protease nexin 2 and basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Navaneetham, Duraiswamy; Sinha, Dipali; Walsh, Peter N.

    2010-01-01

    Factor XIa (FXIa) inhibition by protease nexin-2 (PN2KPI) was compared with trypsin inhibition by basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). PN2KPI was a potent inhibitor of FXIa (Ki ∼ 0.81 nM) and trypsin (Ki ∼ 0.03 nM), but not of other coagulation proteases (thrombin, FVIIa, FIXa, FXa, FXIIa, plasmin, kallikrein, Ki > 185 nM). PN2KPI was ∼775-fold more potent than BPTI in FXIa inhibition, but both exhibited similar potencies against trypsin. Studies of FXIa and trypsin inhibition by PN2KPI...

  14. Radioimmunoassay for human pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor: measurement of serum pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor in normal subjects and subjects with pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reliable radioimmunoassay (RIA) for human pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) has been developed. The method is highly sensitive (0.4 ng/ml), reproducible and specific. A good parallel relationship was observed between the standard curve and dilution curves for serum and urine. The PSTI bound to trypsin-α2-macroglobulin complexes was found not to be immunoreactive, whereas a part of the PSTI-trypsin complex was immunoreactive. In healthy individuals, serum PSTI level ranged from 5.4 ng/ml to 16.0 ng/ml, the average being 11.3 ng/ml (S.D. +- 2.7). Elevated values were observed in patients with acute pancreatitis (highest value 3200 ng/ml), and in some patients with chronic relapsing pancreatitis. (Auth.)

  15. Framework for interpretation of trypsin-antitrypsin imbalance and genetic heterogeneity in pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Early intracellular premature trypsinogen activation was interpreted as the key initiator of pancreatitis. When the balance in the homeostasis of trypsin and antitrypsin system is disequilibrated, elevated aggressive enzymes directly attack the pancreatic tissue, which leads to pancreatic destruction and inflammation. However, trypsin alone is not enough to cause complications in pancreatitis, which may play a crucial role in modulating signaling events in the initial phase of the disease. NFκB activation is the major inflammatory pathway involved in the occurrence and development of pancreatitis and it can be induced by intrapancreatic activation of trypsinogen. Synthesis of trypsinogen occurs in endoplasmic reticulum (ER, and ER stress is an important early acinar cell event. Components of ER stress response are known to be able to trigger cell death as well as NFκB signaling cascade. The strongest evidence supporting the trypsin-centered theory is that gene mutations, which lead to the generation of more trypsin, or reduce the activity of trypsin inhibitors or trypsin degradation, are associated with pancreatitis. Thus, trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance may be the first step leading to pancreatic autodigestion and inducing other pathways. Continued experimental studies are necessary to determine the specific relationships between trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance and genetic heterogeneity in pancreatitis. In this article, we review the latest advances that contributed to the understanding of the basic mechanisms behind the occurrence and development of pancreatitis with a focus on the interpretation of trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance and their relationships with other inflammation pathways. We additionally highlight genetic predispositions to pancreatitis and possible mechanisms associated with them.

  16. Evaluation of the Human Host Range of Bovine and Porcine Viruses that may Contaminate Bovine Serum and Porcine Trypsin Used in the Manufacture of Biological Products

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus-Sekura, Carol; Richardson, James C.; Rebecca K. Harston; Sane, Nandini; Sheets, Rebecca L.

    2011-01-01

    Current U.S. requirements for testing cell substrates used in production of human biological products for contamination with bovine and porcine viruses are U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) 9CFR tests for bovine serum or porcine trypsin. 9CFR requires testing of bovine serum for seven specific viruses in six families (immunofluorescence) and at least 2 additional families non-specifically (cytopathicity and hemadsorption). 9CFR testing of porcine trypsin is for porcine parvovirus. Recent ...

  17. Intracellular Trypsin Induces Pancreatic Acinar Cell Death but Not NF-κB Activation*

    OpenAIRE

    JI, BAOAN; Gaiser, Sebastian; Chen, Xueqing; Ernst, Stephen A.; Logsdon, Craig D.

    2009-01-01

    Premature intracellular activation of the digestive enzyme trypsinogen is considered to be the initiating event in pancreatitis. However, the direct consequences of intracellular trypsin activity have not previously been examined. In the current study, a mutant trypsinogen (paired basic amino acid cleaving enzyme (PACE)-trypsinogen), which is activated intracellularly by the endogenous protease PACE, was developed. This new construct allowed for the first time direct examination of the effect...

  18. A radioimmunoassay for measurement of human pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor in different body fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioimmunoassay for measurement of human pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor in nanogram quantities has been developed. The sensitivity of the assay now permits examination of the inhibitor content of various body fluids, wherein other methods exhibit serious shortcomings. In healthy blood donors the serum level was 8.1μg/l. In patients with acute pancreatitis levels as high as 320μg/l have been measured, and patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed an elevated inhibitor level in serum immediately after the examination without any clinical signs of disease, the highest registered value being 128μg/l. In peritoneal lavage fluid from patients with severe acute pancreatitis levels of 5-304μg/l have been measured. In urine the inhibitor level is about 14μg/l in healthy persons. The urine from one patient with proteinuria of glomerulo-tubular type contained 380μg/l. (orig.)

  19. Measurement of serum pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) for the evaluation as a marker for pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical usefulness of measuring PSTI in sera was studied using a new RIA kit produced by Shionogi Pharmaceutical Co. The assessment of the kit performance was satisfactory with good precision (1.6-6.9% in C.V.), reproducibility (5.0-6.0%), sensitivity (>2.Ong/ml), recovery test (98-109%, m101) and linear dilution test results. Serum PSTI levels in 71 normal controls were 12.0 + 5.0 ng/ml(m+S.D.) with higher values in subjects over 60 y.o. (14.2 +- 4.2 in 60-69 y.o. and 18.9 +- 6.5 over 70 y.o.). Serum PSTI levels were measured in 183 patients with various benign diseases (BD) and 251 cancer patients (CA). Among BD relatively high positive (>30ng/ml) ratios were observed in acute pancreatitis(40%, N=15), chronic pancreatitis(23.1%,13), pneumonia(23.5%,23) in contrast to low levels in acute hepatitis (6.7%,15), chronic hepatitis (8.0%, 25), liver cirrhosis (10.3%,29) and others (11.1%,25) including 2 chronic renal failure (220 and 465 ng/ml). In a patient with acute pancreatitis followed from the onset of the attack PSTI levels revealed 2 peaks on the 1st and 4th day. Serum PSTI correlated with clinical courses better than serum amylase which declined faster than PSTI. Among CA relatively high positive ratios were seen in CA of pancreas(46.7%,30), biliary tract (52.6%,19) and primary hepatoma (58.8%,34) in contrast to low levels in CA of esophagus (18.2%,11), stomach (16.7%, 78), colon (21.6%, 37), lung (8.0%, 25) and breast (0%.17). Measurement of PSTI should provide a clinical indicator for pancreatic diseases complementing existing markers such as amylase, lipase, elastase 1 and trypsin

  20. Unbiased analysis by high throughput sequencing of the viral diversity in fetal bovine serum and trypsin used in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnieur, Léa; Cheval, Justine; Gratigny, Marlène; Hébert, Charles; Muth, Erika; Dumarest, Marine; Eloit, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Fetal bovine serum (FBS) and trypsin are reagents used in cell culture and have been the source of viral contamination of pharmaceutical products. We performed high throughput sequencing (HTS) of two pools of commercial batches of FBS and three commercial batches of trypsin. Taxonomies were assigned by comparing sequences of contigs and singletons to the entire NCBI nucleic acid and protein databases. The same major viral species were evidenced between batches of a given reagent but the proportion of viral reads among total reads varied markedly between samples (from 0.002% to 22.7%). In FBS, the sequences found were mainly from bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) 1 to 3 and bovine parvovirus 3 (BPV3). The BVDV sequences derived from FBS showed only minor discrepancies with primers generally used for the screening of BVDV. Viral sequences in trypsin were mainly from porcine circovirus type 2. Other known viral sequences at lower read counts and potential new viral species (bovine parvovirus and bovine pegivirus) were evidenced. The load of some known and new viruses detected by HTS could be quantified by qPCR. Results of HTS provide a framework for evaluating the pertinence of control measures including the design of PCRs, bioassays and inactivation procedures. PMID:24661556

  1. Pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor is a major motogenic and protective factor in human breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchbank, Tania; Weaver, Gillian; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit; Playford, Raymond J

    2009-04-01

    Colostrum is the first milk produced after birth and is rich in immunoglobulins and bioactive molecules. We examined whether human colostrum and milk contained pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI), a peptide of potential relevance for mucosal defense and, using in vitro and in vivo models, determined whether its presence influenced gut integrity and repair. Human milk was collected from individuals over various times from parturition and PSTI concentrations determined with the use of immunoassay. Human milk samples were analyzed for proliferation and promigratory activity (wounded monolayers) and antiapoptotic activity (caspase-3 activity) with the use of intestinal HT29 cells with or without neutralizing antibodies to PSTI and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Rats were restrained and given indomethacin to induce gastric injury. Effect of gavage with human breast milk with or without neutralizing antibodies on amount of injury were compared with animals receiving a commercial formula feed. PSTI is secreted into human milk, with colostrum containing a much higher concentration of PSTI than human milk obtained later. Human milk stimulated migration and proliferation about threefold and reduced indomethacin-induced apoptosis by about 70-80%. Sixty-five percent of the migratory effect of human milk could be removed by immunoneutralization of PSTI. PSTI worked synergistically with EGF in mediating these effects. Gastric damage in rats was reduced by about 75% in the presence of human milk and was more efficacious than the formula feed (P<0.001). Protective effects of the milk were reduced by about 60% by PSTI immunoneutralization. We concluded that PSTI is secreted into human milk at concentrations that have probable pathophysiological relevance. PMID:19147803

  2. Local kallikrein and trypsin responses in the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, A.J.; West, G. B.

    1980-01-01

    1 Locally administered commercial hog pancreatic kallikrein (Depot-Glumorin) and bovine pancreatic trypsin both increased vascular permeability in the skin and paws of rats. 2 By the use of numerous antagonists and enzyme inhibitors, this vascular response was found to be the result not of kinin formation but of a direct action mostly on histamine receptors. 3 Highly purified kallikrein did not increase vascular permeability in rats, suggesting either that the effect was due to an impurity in...

  3. Trypsin radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 29 patients with suspicion of pancreatic disease standard secretin-pancreozymin-test was performed parallel to trypsin determination by radioimmunoassay before and after stimulation with secretin. Mean serum trypsin in normal subjects was 175 ng BIT/ml (range 90-250), the maximum after stimulation being 20 minutes after secreting injection (range 110-550). Preliminary normal values are 270 ng BIT/ml for basal concentration and 650 ng BIT/ml for 20 min after secretin stimulation. In the group of normals there was no case of misinterpretation. In patients with several pathological parameters (n = 10) basal trypsin concentration was increased in 7 cases, the stimulated value was concordant with the definite diagnosis in every case. Significant advantage for diagnostics was derived in patients having had pancreatic diseases before, however being actually normal with respect to standard diagnostic parameters. All these patients revealed increased trypsin concentrations after stimulation and 50% of them showed increased basal values. Equivocal results were seen in patients with endstage pancreatitis as well as in case of obstruction during reduced secretion. (orig.)

  4. Bovine pancreatic polypeptide as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In dispersed acini from rat pancreas, it was found that bovine pancreatic polypeptide (BPP) and its C-fragment hexapeptide amide (PP-6), at concentrations of 0.1 and 30 μM, respectively, could significantly inhibit amylase secretion stimulated by carbachol, and this inhibition by BPP was dose dependent. 45Ca outflux induced by carbachol was also inhibited by BPP or PP-6, but they had no effect on cholecystokinin octapeptide- (CCK-8) or A23187-stimulated 45Ca outflux. BPP was also capable of displacing the specific binding of [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate to its receptors, and it possessed a higher affinity (K/sub i/35nM) than carbachol (K/sub i/ 1.8 μM) in binding with M-receptors. It is concluded from this study that BPP acts as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat pancreatic acini. In addition, BPP inhibited the potentiation of amylase secretion caused by the combination of carbachol plus secretin or vasoactive intestinal peptide. This may be a possible explanation of the inhibitory effect of BPP on secretin-induced pancreatic enzyme secretion shown in vivo, since pancreatic enzyme secretion stimulated by secretin under experimental conditions may be the result of potentiation of enzyme release produced by the peptide in combination with a cholinergic stimulant

  5. Improvement of the stability and activity of immobilized trypsin on modified Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles for hydrolysis of bovine serum albumin and its application in the bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atacan, Keziban; Çakıroğlu, Bekir; Özacar, Mahmut

    2016-12-01

    Trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) was successfully immobilized on the surface of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles that had been pre-treated with gallic acid (GA). Measurements of protein load by using Bradford assay and the trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of Nα-Benzoyl-dl-arginine 4-nitroanilide hydrochloride (BApNA) were made for the immobilized enzyme. By using magnetic nanoparticles, which provides easy separation and decent support material for enzyme immobilization with high surface area to volume ratio, and by employing biocompatible material gallic acid, immobilized enzyme system was synthesized along with improving trypsin activity and stability. Immobilized trypsin (TR) was more stable than the free one and demonstrated higher enzymatic activity at elevated temperatures (45-55°C) and in the alkaline pH region (6-10.5). Fe3O4 NPs-GA-TR retained 92% of its initial activity after 120days of storage at 4°C in sodium phosphate buffer (0.1M, pH 7.5), whereas the free trypsin maintained about 64% of its initial activity during the same storage period. In addition, activity of the immobilized trypsin was preserved 54.5% of its initial activity after eight times successive reuse. The Michaelis-Menten kinetic constant (Km) and maximum reaction velocity (Vmax) for free trypsin were 5.1mM and 23mM/min, respectively, whereas Km and Vmax values of immobilized trypsin were 7.88mM and 18.3mM/min, respectively. The performance of the immobilized trypsin was demonstrated by carrying out the hydrolysis of bovine serum albumin (BSA) within 1h, and the assay was performed by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technique. The hydrolysis of bovine milk as a real food was investigated by immobilized trypsin using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). PMID:27374556

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the complex of Kunitz-type tamarind trypsin inhibitor and porcine pancreatic trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complex of tamarind trypsin inhibitor with porcine trypsin was crystallized and analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The complex of Tamarindus indica Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor and porcine trypsin has been crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium acetate as precipitant and sodium acetate as buffer. The homogeneity of complex formation was checked by size-exclusion chromatography and further confirmed by reducing SDS–PAGE. The crystals diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution and belonged to the tetragonal space group P41, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.1, c = 120.1 Å. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the presence of one unit of inhibitor–trypsin complex per asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 45%

  7. Differences in PAR-2 activating potential by king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus), salmon (Salmo salar), and bovine (Bos taurus) trypsin

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Anett Kristin; Kristiansen, Kurt; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Seternes, Ole Morten; Bang, Berit

    2013-01-01

    Background: Salmon trypsin is shown to increase secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-8 from human airway epithelial cells through activation of PAR-2. Secretion of IL-8 induced by king crab trypsin is observed in a different concentration range compared to salmon trypsin, and seems to be only partially related to PAR-2 activation. This report aim to identify differences in the molecular structure of king crab trypsin (Paralithodes camtschaticus) compared to salmon (S...

  8. Radioimmunoassay of human plasma trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioimmunoassay has been developed for the determination of human trypsin in plasma. It allows the measurement of trypsin concentration in spite of the presence of plasma or pancreatic inhibitors. The human trypsin used as a standard as well as for labelling was isolated from pancreatic tissue and purified by affinity chromatography. The antiserum was obtained from guinea-pigs immunized with partially purified human trypsin. In the radioimmunoassay, the values of trypsin in serial dilutions of plasma were parallel to those of the standard curves. The assay was shown to be reproducible, sensitive and specific. However, the two antisera used did not distinguish between the enzyme and its proenzyme. In normal subjects, plasma values were found to be around 400 ng/ml. They were 10-40 times higher in patients with acute pancreatitis. The method appears to be much more specific for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis than the current determinations of amylase and lipase activity

  9. Beneficial effects of trypsin inhibitors derived from a spider venom peptide in L-arginine-induced severe acute pancreatitis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwen Ning

    Full Text Available HWTI is a 55-residue protein isolated from the venom of the spider Ornithoctonus huwena. It is a potent trypsin inhibitor and a moderate voltage-gated potassium channel blocker. Here, we designed and expressed two HWTI mutants, HWTI-mut1 and HWTI-mut2, in which the potassium channel inhibitory activity was reduced while the trypsin inhibitory activity of the wild type form (approximately 5 EPU/mg was retained. Animal studies showed that these mutants were less toxic than HWTI. The effects of HWTI and HWTI-mut1 were examined in a mouse model of acute pancreatitis induced by intraperitoneal injection of a large dose of L-arginine (4 mg/kg, twice. Serum amylase and serum lipase activities were assessed, and pathological sections of the pancreas were examined. Treatment with HWTI and HWTI-mut1 significantly reduced serum amylase and lipase levels in a dose dependent manner. Compared with the control group, at 4 mg/kg, HWTI significantly reduced serum amylase level by 47% and serum lipase level by 73%, while HWTI-mut1 significantly reduced serum amylase level by 59% and serum lipase level by 72%. Moreover, HWTI and HWTI-mut1 effectively protected the pancreas from acinar cell damage and inflammatory cell infiltration. The trypsin inhibitory potency and lower neurotoxicity of HWTI-mut1 suggest that it could potentially be developed as a drug for the treatment of acute pancreatitis with few side effects.

  10. Radioimmunoassay of trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review describes the development and application of a novel test to determine levels of human immunoreactive trypsin, an enzyme produced solely by the pancreas, in biological fluids. Being organ-specific, the assay of immunoreactive trypsin should be an ideal marker of pancreatic function, and this is supported by the results of a number of clinical and research investigations. Use of this assay in studies of chronic pancreatitis, juvenile-onset diabetes, and cystic fibrosis, has yielded much valuable data, and it is expected that further research will lead to and improved understanding of these and other conditions associated with the pancreas in health and disease. (author)

  11. On the Structure of Bovine Pancreatic Ribonuclease B. Isolation of a Glycopeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, Jr., T. H.; Hirs, C. H.W.

    Ribonuclease B is a constituent of the zymogen granules of bovine pancreatic acinar cells and is secreted in the pancreatic juice of cattle. Its isolation from bovine pancreatic juice has been described. The enzyme is a glycoprotein that possesses an amino acid composition indistinguishable from that of ribonuclease A and contains carbohydrate to the extent of six residues of mannose and two residues of glucosamine per molecule. The experiments to be described in the present communication were designed to provide preliminary structural information about the protein, and, in particular, to furnish an understanding of the distribution of the carbohydrate in the molecule. The experiments have demonstrated that the carbohydrate content is accounted for by a single covalently-bonded oligosaccharide moiety attached at an aspartic acid or asparagine residue, and have provided further presumptive evidence that the structure of the protein is otherwise identical to that of ribonuclease A. (auth)

  12. Characterization of trypsin forms from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    OpenAIRE

    Guðrún Birna Jakobsdóttir 1987

    2012-01-01

    Trypsins from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) are highly active cold-adapted proteases. The purpose of this project was to characterize a benzamidine purified trypsin isolate from Atlantic cod with special emphasis on trypsin Y. Furthermore, the purpose was to compare the kinetic parameters (kcat, KM and kcat/KM) of cod trypsin Y and cod trypsin I towards various chromogenic substrates. The aim was also to compare the ability of cod trypsin and bovine trypsin to degrade native prot...

  13. Immunoreactive trypsin in Shwachman's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Dossetor, J F; Spratt, H C; Rolles, C J; Seem, C P; Heeley, A F

    1989-01-01

    We studied two infants with Shwachman's syndrome in whom the immunoreactive trypsin concentration was found to be abnormally low. Experience with several hundred assays for immunoreactive trypsin has not shown this low concentration. This finding is probably specific for pancreatic acinar deficiency at this age and strongly suggests Shwachman's syndrome.

  14. Characterization of the Interaction Between Pancreatic Trypsin and an Enteric Copolymer as a Tool for Several Biotechnological Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braia, Mauricio Javier; Loureiro, Dana Belén; Tubio, Gisela; Romanini, Diana

    2015-12-01

    Protein-polyelectrolyte complexes are very interesting systems since they can be applied in many long-established and emerging areas of biotechnology. From nanotechnology to industrial processing, these complexes are used for many purposes: to build multilayer particles for biosensors; to entrap and deliver proteins for pharmaceutical applications; to isolate and immobilize proteins. The enteric copolymer poly(methacrylic acid-co-methyl methacrylate) 1:2 (MMA) has been designed for drug delivery although its chemical properties allow to use it for other applications. Understanding the interaction between trypsin and this polymer is very important in order to optimize the mechanism of formation of this complex for different biotechnological applications.The formation of the trypsin-MMA complex was studied by spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry. Structural analysis of trypsin was carried out by catalytic activity assays, circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments showed that the insoluble complex contains 12 trypsin molecules per MMA molecule at pH 5 and they interact with high affinity to form insoluble complexes. Both electrostatic and hydrophobic forces are involved in the formation of the complex. The structure of trypsin is not affected by the presence of MMA, although it interacts with some domains of trypsin affecting its thermal denaturation as seen in the differential scanning calorimetry experiments. Its catalytic activity is not altered. Dynamic light scattering demonstrated the presence of a soluble trypsin-copolymer complex at pH 5 and 8. Turbidimetric assays show that the insoluble complex can be dissolved by low ionic strength and/or pH in order to obtain free native trypsin. PMID:26612727

  15. Structure of Porcine Pancreatic Phospholipase A2 at 2.6 Å Resolution and Comparison with Bovine Phospholipase A2

    OpenAIRE

    Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Renetseder, Roland; Kalk, Kor H.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Drenth, Jan

    1983-01-01

    The previously published three-dimensional structure of porcine pancreatic prophospholipase A2 at 3 Å resolution was found to be incompatible with the structures of bovine phospholipase A2 and bovine prophospholipase A2. This was unexpected because of the very homologous amino acid sequences of these enzymes. Therefore, the crystal structure of the porcine enzyme was redetermined using molecular replacement methods with bovine phospholipase as the parent model. The structure was crystallograp...

  16. Oligomerization and Aggregation of Bovine Pancreatic Ribonuclease A: Characteristic Events Observed by FTIR Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Yong-Bin; Zhang, Jun; He, Hua-Wei; Zhou, Hai-Meng

    2006-01-01

    Nonnative protein aggregation, which is a common feature in biotechnology, is also a clinical feature in more than 20 serious degenerative diseases. We studied the specific events of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A thermal aggregation by a combination of second derivative infrared analysis and two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy. By comparing the events that occur in reversible and irreversible thermal unfolding processes, certain events that were related to protein aggregation...

  17. Genes and Proteins Differentially Expressed during In Vitro Malignant Transformation of Bovine Pancreatic Duct Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jesnowski

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic carcinoma has an extremely bad prognosis due to lack of early diagnostic markers and lack of effective therapeutic strategies. Recently, we have established an in vitro model recapitulating the first steps in the carcinogenesis of the pancreas. SV40 large T antigen-immortalized bovine pancreatic duct cells formed intrapancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors on k-rasmut transfection after orthotopic injection in the nude mouse pancreas. Here we identified genes and proteins differentially expressed in the course of malignant transformation using reciprocal suppression subtractive hybridization and 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, respectively. We identified 34 differentially expressed genes, expressed sequence tags, and 15 unique proteins. Differential expression was verified for some of the genes or proteins in samples from pancreatic carcinoma. Among these genes and proteins, the majority had already been described either to be influenced by a mutated ras or to be differentially expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, thus proving the feasibility of our model. Other genes and proteins (e.g., BBC1, GLTSCR2, and rhoGDlα, up to now, have not been implicated in pancreatic tumor development. Thus, we were able to establish an in vitro model of pancreatic carcinogenesis, which enabled us to identify genes and proteins differentially expressed during the early steps of malignant transformation.

  18. The modifier effects of chymotrypsin and trypsin enzymes on fluorescence lifetime distribution of "N-(1-pyrenyl)maleimide-bovine serum albumin" complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özyiğit, İbrahim Ethem; Karakuş, Emine; Pekcan, Önder

    2016-02-01

    Chymotrypsin and trypsin are the well known proteolytic enzymes, both of which are synthesized in the pancreas as their precursors - the inactive forms; chymotrypsinogen and trypsinogen - and then are released into the duodenum to cut proteins into smaller peptides. In this paper, the effects of activities of chymotrypsin and trypsin enzymes on fluorescence lifetime distributions of the substrat bovine serum albumin (BSA) modified with N-(1-pyrenyl)maleimide (PM) were examined. In the labeling study of BSA with PM, it is aimed to attach PM to the single free thiol (Cys34) and to all the free amine groups in accessible positions in order to produce excimers of pyrene planes of the possible highest amount to form the lifetime distributions in the widest range, that may show specifically distinguishing changes resulting from the activities of the proteases. The time resolved spectrofluorometer was used to monitor fluorescence decays, which were analyzed by using the exponential series method (ESM) to obtain the changes of lifetime distributions. After the exposure of the synthesized substrat PM-BSA to the enzymes, the fluorescence lifetime distributions exhibited different structures which were attributed to the different activities of the proteases.

  19. Clinical value of serum immunoreactive trypsin concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Ruddell, W S J

    1982-01-01

    The clinical value of estimation of serum concentrations of immunoreactive trypsin was evaluated by studying 46 healthy controls, 23 controls in hospital, 44 patients with chronic pancreatic disease, and 184 patients with non-pancreatic conditions in which pancreatic disease commonly enters into the differential diagnosis. Serum trypsin concentration had a log normal distribution in the controls, and the calculated normal range was considerably wider than that previously reported. The concent...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1725 - Trypsin test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... treatment of pancreatic disease. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from... activity of trypsin (a pancreatic enzyme important in digestion for the breakdown of proteins) in blood...

  1. Carbonyl 13C NMR spectrum of basin pancreatic trypsin inhibitor: resonance assignments by selective amide hydrogen isotope labeling and detection of isotope effects on 13C nuclear shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbonyl region of the natural abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor is examined, and 65 of the 66 expected signals are characterized at varying pH and temperature. Assignments are reported for over two-thirds of the signals, including those of all buried backbone amide groups with slow proton exchange and all side-chain carbonyl groups. This is the first extensively assigned carbonyl spectrum for any protein. A method for carbonyl resonance assignments utilizing amide proton exchange and isotope effects on nuclear shielding is described in detail. The assignments are made by establishing kinetic correlation between effects of amide proton exchange observed in the carbonyl 13C region with development of isotope effects and in the amide proton region with disappearance of preassigned resonances. Several aspects of protein structure and dynamics in solution may be investigated by carbonyl 13C NMR spectroscopy. Some effects of side-chain primary amide group hydrolysis are described. The main interest is on information about intramolecular hydrogen-bond energies and changes in the protein due to amino acid replacements by chemical modification or genetic engineering

  2. Serine proteases mediate inflammatory pain in acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ceppa, Eugene P; Lyo, Victoria; Grady, Eileen F.; Knecht, Wolfgang; Grahn, Sarah; Peterson, Anders; Nigel W. Bunnett; Kirkwood, Kimberly S.; Cattaruzza, Fiore

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a life-threatening inflammatory disease characterized by abdominal pain of unknown etiology. Trypsin, a key mediator of pancreatitis, causes inflammation and pain by activating protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2), but the isoforms of trypsin that cause pancreatitis and pancreatic pain are unknown. We hypothesized that human trypsin IV and rat P23, which activate PAR2 and are resistant to pancreatic trypsin inhibitors, contribute to pancreatic inflammation and pain. Inje...

  3. Distinct localization of FMRFamide- and bovine pancreatic polypeptide-like material in the brain, retrocerebral complex and suboesophageal ganglion of the cockroach Periplaneta americana L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhaert, P; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; De Loof, A

    1985-01-01

    One bovine pancreatic polypeptide (BPP) antiserum and two FMRFamide antisera were applied in the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) immunohistochemical technique on a complete series of sections of brains, suboesophageal ganglia (SOG), corpora cardiaca (CC) and corpora allata of Periplaneta americana...

  4. Fecal Chymotrypsin and Trypsin Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. S.; Ediss, I.; Mullinger, M. A.; Bogoch, A.

    1971-01-01

    Trypsin and chymotrypsin concentrations were determined in 180 spot stool specimens from 110 control patients in hospital. The lower limit of normality for each enzyme was placed at the 5% level: 95% of this population excreted feces containing more than 100 μg. of chymotrypsin and 30 μg. of trypsin per g. of feces. Chymotrypsin concentrations appeared to be a more reliable guide to pancreatic function than trypsin concentrations. Fecal chymotrypsin concentrations were subnormal in five patients with chronic pancreatitis, borderline in one patient with relapsing pancreatitis, subnormal in one patient after pancreatectomy, and subnormal in five of nine with carcinoma of the pancreas. Subnormal concentrations of fecal chymotrypsin were found in seven of 21 patients with chronic liver disease related to alcoholism, eight of 32 with a partial gastrectomy, three of 10 with adult celiac disease and five of 16 with psoriasis. It appears that the determination of fecal chymotrypsin concentrations provides a valuable screening test for pancreatic exocrine deficiency. However, normal results may be found in some patients with pancreatic disease and subnormal values may occur in some patients with other conditions. PMID:5550376

  5. Photochemical labeling of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A with 8-azidoadenosine 3',5'-bisphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method has been developed for the preparation of 5'-32P-labeled 8-azidoadenosine 3',5'-bisphosphate (p8N3Ap) for use in photoaffinity labeling studies. Irradiation of a complex between p8N3Ap and bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) with light of 300-350 nm led to the covalent attachment of the nucleotide to the enzyme. RNase A could also be labeled in the dark with prephotolyzed p8N3Ap. In either case, the nucleotide reacted with the same tryptic peptide, encompassing amino acids 67-85 of the protein. The site of labeling was determined to be either Thr-78 or Thr-82, both of which are close to or at the pyrimidine binding site of the enzyme. This result is consistent with recent nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray studies which indicate that 8-substituted adenine nucleotides interact with the pyrimidine binding site of RNase A

  6. pH and temperature effects on the molecular conformation of the porcine pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor as detected by hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1H NMR spectra of the porcine pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) have been recorded vs. pH and temperature. Of the two tyrosines, one titrates with a pK of 1.25, while the resonances from the other are pH insensitive in the investigated range 4.8 less than or equal to pH less than or equal to 12. This is consistent with PSTI having one Tyr solvent exposed (Try-20) and the other buried (Tyr-31). The resonances from the lysyl epsilon-CH2 protons titrate with a pK of 10.95. The titration is accompanied by a pronounced line broadening, which starts near pH 8.5. Between pH 11.5 and pH 12 the epsilon-CH2 resonances recover their low pH line width. Titration curves for the lysines and Tyr-20 reflect single proton ionization equilibria, suggesting that these residues do not interact among themselves. On the basis of double resonance experiments, combined with analysis of chemical shifts, spin-spin couplngs, and line widths, all methyl resonances are identified and followed as functions of pH and temperature. The γ-CH3 doublet from the N-terminal Thr-1 is assigned by comparison between spectra of forms I and II of the inhibitor, the latter lacking the first four residues of form I. The β-CH3 resonance from Ala-7 is also assigned. Proton resonance parameters of methyl groups are shown to afford useful NMR probes for the characterization of local nonbonded interactions, microenvironments, and mobilities

  7. The kinetics of interaction of porcine - alpha-, and porcine - beta -trypsin with intact and modified soybean trypsin inhibitor (kunitz)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The association of porcine trypsin with soybean trypsin inhibitor (Kunitz) resulted in characteristic changes in absorption spectrum, indicating an alteration of the micro environments of the enzyme chromophores as a consequence of the interaction. The rates of formation of the stable trypsin - inhibitor complexes from porcine - alpha - trypsin and soybean trypsin inhibitor and from porcine - beta - trypsin and either intact or modified soybean trypsin inhibitor were measured by mixing the equimolar concentration of the reactants in a Stopped - Flow apparatus at pH (4.5 to 10.0). The reaction of trypsin with soybean trypsin inhibitor was of first order with respect to the concentration of the reactants used. The rates of dissociation of the stable complexes, alpha - trypsin - soybean trypsin inhibitor, beta -trypsin - soybean trypsin inhibitor and beta -trypsin modified soybean trypsin inhibitor were also measured at pH (1.92 to 3.58). The values of first order rate constant, k/sub D/ obtained for the dissociation of all the three complexes were identical with one another. The kinetics results obtained for the porcine trypsin were compared with those of bovine trypsin system and it was suggested that the reaction mechanisms in both these systems were identical. (author)

  8. Measurement of trypsin in duodenal juice by radioimmunoassay.

    OpenAIRE

    Lake-Bakaar, G; McKavanagh, S; Rubio, C E; Epstein, O; Summerfield, J A

    1980-01-01

    Trypsin in duodenal aspirate and pure pancreatic juice samples has been measured by both radioimmunoassay and enzymatic mathods. The radioimmunossay has been shown to be specific and to detect trypsin in the presence of aprotinin (Trasylol). In duodenal juice samples from control subjects and from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis a good correlation was obtained between both immunoreactive trypsin concentration and trypsin activity. The immunoreactive trypsinogen concentration in pure p...

  9. Structure of the bovine pancreatic ribonuclease gene: the unique intervening sequence in the 5' untranslated region contains a promoter-like element.

    OpenAIRE

    Carsana, A; Confalone, E; Palmieri, M; Libonati, M; Furia, A

    1988-01-01

    Although pancreatic ribonucleases are extensively studied proteins, little information is available on nucleic acids coding for these enzymes. Here, for the first time, the structure of a gene coding for such an enzyme, the well known bovine pancreatic ribonuclease, is reported. The coding region of this gene is devoid of introns, whereas the 5' untranslated sequence of the pancreatic transcript contains an intron of 735 nucleotides. This intervening sequence is endowed with signals (CAAT and...

  10. Potential Use of Atlantic Cod Trypsin in Biomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    Ágústa Gudmundsdóttir; Hilmar Hilmarsson; Bjarki Stefansson

    2013-01-01

    Surface proteins of viruses and bacteria used for cell attachment and invasion are candidates for degradation by proteases. Trypsin from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) was previously demonstrated to have efficacy against influenza viruses in vitro and on skin. In this paper, cod trypsin is shown to be 3–12 times more effective in degrading large native proteins than its mesophilic analogue, bovine trypsin. This is in agreement with previous findings where cod trypsin was found to be the most act...

  11. Intestinal free trypsin concentrations fall only transiently when rats are fed raw soya flour.

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, R. G.

    1987-01-01

    Raw soya flour (RSF) is thought to cause pancreatic hypertrophy in rats because trypsin inhibitor in the flour binds trypsin in the gut lumen and this lowering of free trypsin concentrations leads to the release of cholecystokinin (CCK). Intestinal enzyme concentrations were therefore studied in rats fed RSF for from one hour to 400 days to determine whether free trypsin concentrations were depressed during the period of pancreatic growth (up to six to eight weeks after starting RSF). Intesti...

  12. Trypsin is a multifunctional factor in spermatogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Miura, Chiemi; Ohta, Takashi; Ozaki, Yuichi; Tanaka, Hideki; Miura, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    Trypsin is well known as a pancreatic enzyme that is typically secreted into the intestine to digest proteins. We show in our current study, however, that trypsin is also a key factor in the control of spermatogenesis. A progestin in teleost fish, 17α, 20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP), is an essential component of the spermatogenesis pathway, particularly during the initiation of the first meiotic division. In the course of our investigations into the mechanisms underlying progestin-stimul...

  13. Chymotrypsin C (caldecrin) promotes degradation of human cationic trypsin: Identity with Rinderknecht's enzyme Y

    OpenAIRE

    Szmola, Richárd; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2007-01-01

    Digestive trypsins undergo proteolytic breakdown during their transit in the human alimentary tract, which has been assumed to occur through trypsin-mediated cleavages, termed autolysis. Autolysis was also postulated to play a protective role against pancreatitis by eliminating prematurely activated intrapancreatic trypsin. However, autolysis of human cationic trypsin is very slow in vitro, which is inconsistent with the documented intestinal trypsin degradation or a putative protective role....

  14. HYDROLYSIS OF CHEESEWHEY PROTEINSWITH TRYPSIN, CHYMOTRYPSINAND CARBOXYPEPTIDASEA

    OpenAIRE

    M. F. CUSTÓDIO; A. J. GOULART; D. P. MARQUES; R.C. Giordano; R. L. C. Giordano; R. MONTI

    2009-01-01

    This work presents a method for adding value to cheese whey residues by whey proteins hydrolysis, using trypsin, chymotrypsin and carboxypeptidase A as catalysts. Sweet cheese whey was dialyzed and filtered in kaolin. Lactose and protein contents were analyzed after each step. The activities of bovine pancreas trypsin and chymotrypsin were measured at different pHs and temperatures. The optimal pH for the hydrolysis of whey proteins was 9.0 for both enzymes. Optima te...

  15. The Use of Bovine Pericardial Buttress on Linear Stapler Fails to Reduce Pancreatic Fistula Incidence in a Porcine Pancreatic Transection Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Maciver

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effectiveness of buttressing the surgical stapler to reduce postoperative pancreatic fistulae in a porcine model. As a pilot study, pigs (n=6 underwent laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy using a standard stapler. Daily drain output and lipase were measured postoperative day 5 and 14. In a second study, pancreatic transection was performed to occlude the proximal and distal duct at the pancreatic neck using a standard stapler (n=6, or stapler with bovine pericardial strip buttress (n=6. Results. In pilot study, 3/6 animals had drain lipase greater than 3x serum on day 14. In the second series, drain volumes were not significantly different between buttressed and control groups on day 5 (55.3 ± 31.6 and 29.3 ± 14.2 cc, resp., nor on day 14 (9.5 ± 4.2 cc and 2.5 ± 0.8 cc, resp., P=0.13. Drain lipase was not statistically significant on day 5 (3,166 ± 1,433 and 6,063 ± 1,872 U/L, resp., P=0.25 or day 14 (924 ± 541 and 360 ± 250 U/L. By definition, 3/6 developed pancreatic fistula; only one (control demonstrating a contained collection arising from the staple line. Conclusion. Buttressed stapler failed to protect against pancreatic fistula in this rigorous surgical model.

  16. A colostrum trypsin inhibitor gene expressed in the Cape fur seal mammary gland during lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharo, Elizabeth A; Cane, Kylie N; McCoey, Julia; Buckle, Ashley M; Oosthuizen, W H; Guinet, Christophe; Arnould, John P Y

    2016-03-01

    The colostrum trypsin inhibitor (CTI) gene and transcript were cloned from the Cape fur seal mammary gland and CTI identified by in silico analysis of the Pacific walrus and polar bear genomes (Order Carnivora), and in marine and terrestrial mammals of the Orders Cetartiodactyla (yak, whales, camel) and Perissodactyla (white rhinoceros). Unexpectedly, Weddell seal CTI was predicted to be a pseudogene. Cape fur seal CTI was expressed in the mammary gland of a pregnant multiparous seal, but not in a seal in its first pregnancy. While bovine CTI is expressed for 24-48h postpartum (pp) and secreted in colostrum only, Cape fur seal CTI was detected for at least 2-3months pp while the mother was suckling its young on-shore. Furthermore, CTI was expressed in the mammary gland of only one of the lactating seals that was foraging at-sea. The expression of β-casein (CSN2) and β-lactoglobulin II (LGB2), but not CTI in the second lactating seal foraging at-sea suggested that CTI may be intermittently expressed during lactation. Cape fur seal and walrus CTI encode putative small, secreted, N-glycosylated proteins with a single Kunitz/bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) domain indicative of serine protease inhibition. Mature Cape fur seal CTI shares 92% sequence identity with Pacific walrus CTI, but only 35% identity with BPTI. Structural homology modelling of Cape fur seal CTI and Pacific walrus trypsin based on the model of the second Kunitz domain of human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and porcine trypsin (Protein Data Bank: 1TFX) confirmed that CTI inhibits trypsin in a canonical fashion. Therefore, pinniped CTI may be critical for preventing the proteolytic degradation of immunoglobulins that are passively transferred from mother to young via colostrum and milk. PMID:26639991

  17. Clinical usefulness of trypsin radioimmunoassay kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the clinical use of RIA-gnost trypsin kit, the following results were obtained. 1. Standard curve showed a steep and good curve was shown. 2. Incubation: The condition for the first incubation was set at the room temperature for 10-24 hours and that for the second incubation at the room temperature for 3-5 hours. With these settings, satisfactory results were obtained. 3. Reproducibility and recovery: The C.V. of the reproducibility and the recovery were considered superior, and the values were below 10 % and ±3 %, respectively. 4. Correlation between trypsin and serum elestase-1: An excellent positive correlation (coefficient of correlation r = 0.889) was shown. 5. Serum trypsin concentration of normal and pancreatic diseases: The normal range was from 100 to 500 ng/ml. Acute pancreatitis rose obviously. Diabetes mellitus and chronic pancreatitis was below 500 ng/ml and the pancreatic cancer showed a tendency to scatter in the range of 50-1 250 ng/ml. The above results indicated that serum trypsin can be easily measured with high precision by using this method. Thus the method is considered useful for the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. (author)

  18. High efficiency and quantitatively reproducible protein digestion by trypsin-immobilized magnetic microspheres

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Liangliang; Li, Yihan; Yang, Ping; Zhu, Guijie; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2011-01-01

    Aldehyde- and NHS-activated magnetic microspheres were used to immobilize trypsin (CHO-trypsin and NHS-trypsin), and their performance for protein digestion was evaluated by reversed phase liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry using an LTQ Orbitrap Velos instrument. NHS-trypsin provided greater sequence coverage and identified more peptides for the digestion of bovine serum albumin. A one-minute digestion at room temperature using the immobilized trypsin also ...

  19. Nutritional significance of a rice bran concentrate with trypsin inhibitor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Z; Tashiro, M

    1983-06-01

    A rice bran protein concentrate (RBPC) was prepared from de-fatted rice bran by extraction with a 1% sodium chloride solution and by acetone-precipitation. This protein concentrate contained 45% protein, which was as good as casein in terms of protein quality being judged from the results of amino acid analysis. On the other hand, RBPC possessed the trypsin inhibitor activity corresponding to the complete inhibition of about 6 mg of bovine trypsin per 1 g of dry material. The activity was, however, completely destroyed by autoclaving RBPC for 30 min at 121 degrees C. In vitro digestion tests showed that RBPC was easily digested by pepsin but was resistant to the attack by trypsin, compared with autoclaved RBPC. Concerning in vivo digestion, however, there was no significant difference in apparent nitrogen digestibility between RBPC and the heated RBPC. In growth experiments with weanling rats fed a 10% level of protein diet, growth depression and the tendency of slight pancreatic hypertrophy were observed in rats receiving a RBPC diet. It is presumed that one of the reasons which explains these phenomena is the presence of trypsin inhibitor in RBPC. PMID:6619992

  20. Enhancement of plaque formation and cell fusion of an enteropathogenic coronavirus by trypsin treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Storz, J.; Rott, R; Kaluza, G.

    1981-01-01

    Plaque formation, replication, and related cytopathic functions of the enteropathogenic bovine coronavirus strain L9 in bovine fetal thyroid (BFTy) and bovine fetal brain (BFB) cells were investigated in the presence and absence of trypsin. Plaque formation was enhanced in both cell types. Plaques reached a size with an average diameter of 5 mm within 4 days with trypsin in the overlay, whereas their diameter remained less than 1 mm at this time after plating without trypsin in the overlay. F...

  1. Immunoactive trypsins in duodenal juice from children with gastrointestinal disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Borulf, S; Lindberg, T

    1982-01-01

    Duodenal juice contains two trypsins, one anionic and one cationic at pH 8.6. To investigate their distribution, we studied fasting specimens of duodenal juice from 89 children with different gastrointestinal problems. The two trypsins were separately determined with electroimmunoassay parallel with determinations of total trypsin esterolytic activity and total protein. In 81 children with normal pancreatic function the ratio immunoactivity: esterolytic activity averaged 3.25:1. Anionic tryps...

  2. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  3. Hereditary pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard M Charnley

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant condition,which results in recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis,progressing to chronic pancreatitis often at a young age.The majority of patients with hereditary pancreatitis expressone of two mutations (R122H or N29I) in the cationictrypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene). It has been hypothesisedthat one of these mutations, the R122H mutation causespancreatitis by altering a trypsin recognition site sopreventing deactivation of trypsin within the pancreas andprolonging its action, resulting in autodigestion. Families withthese two mutations have been identified in many countriesand there are also other rarer mutations, which have alsobeen linked to hereditary pancreatitis.Patients with hereditary pancreatitis present in the sameway as those with sporadic pancreatitis but at an earlierage. It is common for patients to remain undiagnosed formany years, particularly ifthey present with non-specificsymptoms. Hereditary pancreatitis should always beconsidered in patients who present with recurrent pancreatitiswith a family history of pancreatic disease. If patients withthe 2 common mutations are compared, those with theR122H mutation are more likely to present at a younger ageand are more likely to require surgical intervention than thosewith N29I. Hereditary pancreatitis carries a 40 % lifetimerisk of pancreatic cancer with those patients aged between50 to 70 being most at risk in whom screening tests maybecome important.

  4. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 and pancreatic trypsin in the intestinal wall:a contribution to the understanding of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Rosário, Henrique Baptista Colaço Sobral do, 1971-

    2009-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Medicina (Bioquímica), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Medicina, 2009 Ischemia reperfusion of the intestine produces a set of inflammatory mediators, the origin of which has recently been shown to involve pancreatic digestive enzymes. Matrix metalloproteinase‐9 (MMP‐9) participates in a variety of inflammatory processes including myocardial, hepatic, and pancreatic ischemia reperfusion. In the present study, we explore the role of neutrophil‐derived MMP‐9 in acut...

  5. HYDROLYSIS OF CHEESEWHEY PROTEINSWITH TRYPSIN, CHYMOTRYPSINAND CARBOXYPEPTIDASEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. CUSTÓDIO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    This work presents a method for adding value to cheese whey residues by whey proteins hydrolysis, using trypsin, chymotrypsin and carboxypeptidase A as catalysts. Sweet cheese whey was dialyzed and filtered in kaolin. Lactose and protein contents were analyzed after each step. The activities of bovine pancreas trypsin and chymotrypsin were measured at different pHs and temperatures. The optimal pH for the hydrolysis of whey proteins was 9.0 for both enzymes. Optima temperatures were 60ºC for trypsin, and 50ºC for chymotrypsin. Trypsin exhibited typical Michaelis-Menten behavior, but chymotrypsin did not. Electrophoretic analysis showed that neither trypsin nor chymotrypsin alone hydrolyzed whey proteins in less than three hours. Hydrolysis rates of -lactalbumin by trypsin, and of bovine serum albumin by chymotrypsin were low. When these enzymes were combined, however, all protein fractions were attacked and rates of hydrolysis were enhanced by one order of magnitude. The addition of carboxypeptidase A to the others enzymes did not improve the process yield.

  6. Development of a radioimmunoassay for pig pancreatic kallikrein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioimmunoassay for the determination of pig pancreatic kallikrein was developed. The chloramine-T method was employed for the labelling of the antigen with 125I. The assay allows the determination of kallikrein in concentrations as low as 0.4 μg/l. Pig urinary and pig submandibular kallikreins are indistinguishable from pig pancreatic kallikrein by the assay. No cross reactivity was observed for bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin, porcine trypsin and kallikreins of guinea pig submandibular glands and guinea pig coagulation glands. Because of the high specificity of the assay, which is not attainable with conventional assays based on the enzymatic activity, the radioimmunoassay is highly suited for investigations into the physiological role and the pharmacological mechanism of action of pig glandular kallikreins. (orig.)

  7. Activity of recombinant trypsin isoforms on human proteinase-activated receptors (PAR): mesotrypsin cannot activate epithelial PAR-1, -2, but weakly activates brain PAR-1

    OpenAIRE

    Grishina, Zoryana; Ostrowska, Ewa; Halangk, Walter; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Reiser, Georg

    2005-01-01

    Trypsin-like serine proteinases trigger signal transduction pathways through proteolytic cleavage of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) in many tissues. Three members, PAR-1, PAR-2 and PAR-4, are trypsin substrates, as trypsinolytic cleavage of the extracellular N terminus produces receptor activation. Here, the ability of the three human pancreatic trypsin isoforms (cationic trypsin, anionic trypsin and mesotrypsin (trypsin IV)) as recombinant proteins was tested on PARs.Using fura 2 [Ca2...

  8. HUMAN MESOTRYPSIN DEFIES NATURAL TRYPSIN INHIBITORS. FROM PASSIVE RESISTANCE TO ACTIVE DESTRUCTION.

    OpenAIRE

    Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2005-01-01

    More than twenty years ago Rinderknecht et al. identified a minor trypsin isoform resistant to natural trypsin inhibitors in the human pancreatic juice. At the same time, Estell and Laskowski found that an inhibitor-resistant trypsin from the pyloric caeca of the starfish Dermasterias imbricata rapidly hydrolyzed the reactive-site peptide bonds of trypsin inhibitors. A connection between these two seminal discoveries was made recently, when human mesotrypsin was shown to cleave the reactive-s...

  9. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010355 Oxymatrine enhances the expression of collagen I and α-SMA in rat chronic pancreatitis. WANG Yuliang(王昱良),et al. Dept Gastroenterol ,Huanghe Hosp,Sanmenxia 472000. World Chin J Digestol 2010;18(13):1331-36. Objective To investigate the treatment effects of oxymatrine (OM) against chronic pancreatitis in rats and to explore the potential

  10. Atomic resolution structure of the double mutant (K53,56M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic resolution crystal structure of the double mutant (K53,56M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2 is reported. The structure of the double mutant K53,56M has previously been refined at 1.9 Å resolution using room-temperature data. The present paper reports the crystal structure of the same mutant K53,56M refined against 1.1 Å data collected using synchrotron radiation. A total of 116 main-chain atoms from 29 residues and 44 side chains are modelled in alternate conformations. Most of the interfacial binding residues are found to be disordered and alternate conformations could be recognized. The second calcium ion-binding site residue Glu92 adopts two alternate conformations. The minor and major conformations of Glu92 correspond to the second calcium ion bound and unbound states

  11. Analysis and Optimization of Nutritional Set-up for Murine Pancreatic Acinar Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurup S

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Pancreatic acinar cell cultivation poses a serious problem due to limitations in the in vitro survival time despite variations of dissociation protocols, culture media and nutrient supplements. OBJECTIVE: To establish a long term culture of murine pancreatic acinar cells which retain their viability, monolayer formation and responsiveness to secretagogues. In order to investigate the mechanism of the short-life of acinar cells studied in vitro, we studied their survival under the influence of different supplements on nutrient media. INTERVENTIONS: Dissociated pancreatic acini were prepared from BALB/c mice pancreata by collagenase digestion supplemented with bovine serum albumin fraction V and soybean trypsin inhibitor. A nutrient set-up was designed for their long term survival in vitro. RESULTS: It was observed that mouse pancreatic acinar cells dissociated in presence of bovine serum albumin fraction V and soybean trypsin inhibitor result in 95% viability. Further cultivation of these acinar cells in Waymouth's MB 752/1 medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum (v/v, soybean trypsin inhibitor, bovine serum albumin, dexamethasone, and epidermal growth factor results in their survival for more than 6 days in culture with 85% viability, retention of the secretagogue responsiveness and formation of a monolayer without any extracellular matrix coating. CONCLUSIONS: Our study clearly demonstrates that the addition of soybean trypsin inhibitor to culture medium reduces zymogen granule fragility and acinar cell death, thus increasing their viability for sufficiently long periods. The present study offers an excellent, in vitro model for the investigation of exocrine dysfunction in response to acinar cell injury.

  12. Lactoferrin in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Xiang Jin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The present review is focused on the clinical significance of lactoferrin in pancreatic secretions and stone formation in chronic pancreatitis, and of serum anti-lactoferrin antibody in autoimmune pancreatitis. Lactoferrin secretion is increased in pancreatic secretions in calcified and non-calcified chronic pancreatitis. Lactoferrin, pancreatic stone protein and trypsin are present in pancreatic stones. We cannot conclude which protein is more important for the precipitate and stone formation. The presence of antilactoferrin antibody has been reported in serum in autoimmune diseases, such as autoimmune pancreatitis. The coincidental appearance of autoimmune pancreatitis with extrapancreatic autoimmune diseases strongly suggests a common autoimmune mechanism and lactoferrin is a candidate antigen. Lactoferrin may play an important role as a precipitate protein in pancreatic stone formation in chronic pancreatitis and as an autoantigen in autoimmune pancreatitis. Further studies are required to better understand the role of lactoferin.

  13. Acute pancreatitis: Etiology and common pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Jun Wang; Chun-Fang Gao; Dong Wei; Cun Wang; Si-Qin Ding

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The etiology and pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have been intensively investigated for centuries worldwide. Many causes of acute pancreatitis have been discovered, but the pathogenetic theories are controversial. The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is gallstone impacting the distal common bile-pancreatic duct. The majority of investigators accept that the main factors for acute billiary pancreatitis are pancreatic hyperstimulation and bile-pancreatic duct obstruction which increase pancreatic duct pressure and active trypsin reflux. Acute pancreatitis occurs when intracellular protective mechanisms to prevent trypsinogen activation or reduce trypsin activity are overwhelmed. However, little is known about the other acute pancreatitis. We hypothesize that acute biliary pancreatitis and other causes of acute pancreatitis possess a common pathogenesis. Pancreatic hyperstimulation and pancreatic duct obstruction increase pancreatic duct pressure, active trypsin reflux, and subsequent unregulated activation of trypsin within pancreatic acinar cells. Enzyme activation within the pancreas leads to auto-digestion of the gland and local inflammation. Once the hypothesis is confirmed, traditional therapeutic strategies against acute pancreatitis may be improved. Decompression of pancreatic duct pressure should be advocated in the treatment of acute pancreatitits which may greatly improve its outcome.

  14. The influence of dioxane on the hydration of bovine pancreatic α-chymotrypsin according to isothermal calorimetry and IR spectroscopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, V. A.; Korolev, D. V.

    2006-11-01

    The influence of dioxane on the thermochemical characteristics of the hydration of bovine pancreatic α-chymotrypsin enzyme over the whole range of water thermodynamic activities was studied by comparing the isothermal calorimetry data on the thermochemistry of interaction between the enzyme and water in the presence and absence of dioxane and using the IR spectral data on the adsorption of water and organic solvent vapors on the protein.

  15. Trypsin inhibition by ferrocene

    OpenAIRE

    Kukrić Zoran Z.; Žabić Mirjana M.

    2005-01-01

    Many transition metals and their complexes show inhibitory effect on someproteolytic enzymes, including trypsin. Their inhibitory activity is based on the direct binding to the active site of trypsin, mimicking formation of a five-coordinate transition state required for the reaction. The influence of ferrocene on trypsin activity using N-α-benzoyl-DL-arginine p-nitroanilide as a substrate was investigated. Ferrocene was selected as a potential inhibitor because it belongs to the family oforg...

  16. Serum pancreatic lipase activity in cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Junglee, D; Penketh, A; Katrak, A; Hodson, M.E.; Batten, J C; Dandona, P

    1983-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis have been found to have abnormal serum concentrations of immunoreactive trypsin and abnormal activities of pancreatic isoamylase. A study was undertaken to discover whether activity of pancreatic lipase is also altered in cystic fibrosis. Serum from 23 patients with cystic fibrosis was assayed for immunoreactive trypsin and pancreatic lipase. Median serum pancreatic lipase activity was significantly lower in patients with cystic fibrosis than in controls, as was ...

  17. Induction of pancreatic duct cells of neonatal rats into insulin-producing cells with fetal bovine serum: A natural protocol and its use for patch clamp experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    San-Hua Leng; Fu-Er Lu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To induce the pancreatic duct cells into endocrine cells with a new natural protocol for electrophysiological study.METHODS: The pancreatic duct cells of neonatal rats were isolated, cultured and induced into endocrine oells with 15% fetal bovine serum for a period of 20 d. During this period, insulin secretion, MTT value, and morphological change of neonatal and adult pancreatic islet cells were comparatively investigated. Pancreatic β-cells were identified by morphological and electrophysiological characteristics, while ATP sensitive potassium channels(KATP), voltage-dependent potassium channels (KV), and voltage-dependent calcium channels (KCA) in β-cells were identified by patch clamp technique.RESULTS: After incubation with fetal bovine serum, the neonatal duct cells budded out, changed from duct-like cells into islet clusters. In the first 4 d, MTT value and insulin secretion increased slowly (MTT value from 0.024±0.003 to0.028±0.003, insulin secretion from 2.6±0.6to 3.1±0.8 mIU/L). Then MTT value and insulin secretion increased quickly from d 5 to d 10 (MTT value from 0.028±0.003 to 0.052±0.008, insulin secretion from 3.1±0.8to 18.3±2.6 mIU/L), then reached high plateau (MTT value >0.052±0.008, insulin secretion >18.3±2.6 mIU/L).In contrast, for the isolated adult pancreatic islet cells,both insulin release and MTT value were stable in the first 4 d (MTT value from 0.029±0.01 to 0.031±0.011,insulin secretion from 13.9±3.1 to 14.3±3.3 mIU/L), but afterwards they reduced gradually (MTT value <0.031±0.011, insulin secretion <8.2±1.5 mIU/L), and the pancrearic islet cells became dispersed, broken or atrophied correspondingly. The differentiated neonatal cells were identified as pancreatic islet cells by dithizone staining method, and pancreatic β-cells were further identified by both morphological features and electrophysiological characteristics, i.e. the existence of recording currents from KATP KV, and KCA.CONCLUSION: Islet

  18. Luminal trypsin may regulate enterocytes through proteinase-activated receptor 2

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Wuyi; McConalogue, Karen; Khitin, Lev M.; Hollenberg, Morley D; Payan, Donald G.; Böhm, Stephan K.; Nigel W. Bunnett

    1997-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) is a recently characterized G-protein coupled receptor that is cleaved and activated by pancreatic trypsin. Trypsin is usually considered a digestive enzyme in the intestinal lumen. We examined the hypothesis that trypsin, at concentrations normally present in the lumen of the small intestine, is also a signaling molecule that specifically regulates enterocytes by activating PAR-2. PAR-2 mRNA was highly expressed in the mucosa of the small intestine and...

  19. Prophylactic trypsin inhibition during the isolation procedure guarantees reproducible, high porcine islet yields

    OpenAIRE

    Heiser, A.; Ulrichs, Karin; Müller-Ruchholtz, W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: For isolating islets from the porcine pancreas, we established a semiautomated digestion method. Although the isolation technique was standardized and collagenase of controlled quality was used, until now the reproducibility of high islet yields was unsatisfactory. Our hypothesis was that pancreatic trypsin was responsible for this failure. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of endogenous trypsin on islet yield. Our results demonstrate that a high trypsin level corr...

  20. Porphyrin Induced Laser Deactivation of Trypsinogen-Trypsin Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perido, Joanna; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2015-03-01

    Pancreatitis is caused by the inflammation of the pancreas, where the digestive enzyme trypsin is activated from the precursor enzyme trypsinogen while still in the pancreas. The presence of trypsin in the pancreas causes auto-activation of trypsinogen, resulting in greater inflammation and auto-digestion of the pancreas. In severe cases, this cascade effect can lead to organ failure, diabetes, and pancreatic cancer. Our hypothesis is that if trypsinogen is prevented from auto-activating into trypsin, then this cascade can be stopped. We propose to do this by inducing conformational changes in trypsinogen when bound to a photoactive porphyrin dye. Porphyrins are comprised of four linked heterocyclic groups forming a flat ring, and bind well with proteins such as trypsinogen. In this study we used spectroscopic techniques to probe the binding of meso-tetrakis (4-sulfonatephenyl) porphyrin (TSPP) to trypsinogen in vitro, as a preliminary step to then prompt and characterize conformational changes of trypsinogen through irradiation. If conformational changes are detected the trypsinogen will be tested for trypsin inactivation. This investigation may provide promising initial results to the possible use of porphyrins as an inhibitor of the self-activation of trypsinogen into trypsin, and a potential inhibitor of pancreatitis. MARC*U-STAR.

  1. Enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaushik, Neeraj; Pietraszewski, Marie; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: All forms of commonly practiced enteral feeding techniques stimulate pancreatic secretion, and only intravenous feeding avoids it. In this study, we explored the possibility of more distal enteral infusions of tube feeds to see whether activation of the ileal brake mechanism can result...... in enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation, with particular reference to trypsin, because the avoidance of trypsin stimulation may optimize enteral feeding in acute pancreatitis. METHODS: The pancreatic secretory responses to feeding were studied in 36 healthy volunteers by standard double...... plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that enteral feeding can be given without stimulating pancreatic trypsin secretion provided it is delivered into the mid-distal jejunum. The mechanism may involve activation of the ileal brake mechanism....

  2. Chitosan nanoparticles conjugate with trypsin and trypsin inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanphai, P; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-06-25

    Chitosan-protein conjugates are widely used in therapeutic drug delivery. We report the bindings of chitosan nanoparticles with trypsin (try) and trypsin inhibitor (tryi), using thermodynamic analysis and multiple spectroscopic methods. Thermodynamic parameters ΔS, ΔH and ΔG showed chitosan-protein bindings occur mainly via H-bonding and van der Waals contacts with trypsin inhibitor forming more stable conjugate than trypsin. As chitosan size increased more stable polymer-protein conjugate was formed. Chitosan complexation induces more perturbations of trypsin inhibitor structure than trypsin with reduction of protein alpha-helix and major increase of random structure. The negative value of ΔG indicates spontaneous protein-chitosan complexation at room temperature. Chitosan nanoparticles can be used to transport trypsin and trypsin inhibitor. PMID:27083826

  3. Atomic resolution (0.97 Å) structure of the triple mutant (K53,56,121M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of a triple mutant (K53,56,121M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2 has been solved at atomic resolution (0.97 Å) and the refined model features the presence of a second calcium ion and a chloride ion. The enzyme phospholipase A2 catalyzes the hydrolysis of the sn-2 acyl chain of phospholipids, forming fatty acids and lysophospholipids. The crystal structure of a triple mutant (K53,56,121M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2 in which the lysine residues at positions 53, 56 and 121 are replaced recombinantly by methionines has been determined at atomic resolution (0.97 Å). The crystal is monoclinic (space group P2), with unit-cell parameters a = 36.934, b = 23.863, c = 65.931 Å, β = 101.47°. The structure was solved by molecular replacement and has been refined to a final R factor of 10.6% (Rfree = 13.4%) using 63 926 unique reflections. The final protein model consists of 123 amino-acid residues, two calcium ions, one chloride ion, 243 water molecules and six 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol molecules. The surface-loop residues 60–70 are ordered and have clear electron density

  4. The Activity of Trypsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Salvatore F.; Holzman, Tom

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that illustrates the following points concerning the experimental determination of trypsin activity: (1) there is a difference in basing enzyme concentration on weight, absorbance, or active sites; and (2) the method of expressing enzyme concentration determines the value of specific, molecular, and catalytic center…

  5. Exocrine pancreatic enzyme and calcium secretion in health and pancreatitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Clain, J E; Barbezat, G O; Marks, I N

    1981-01-01

    Calcium, enzyme, and total protein secretion were measured in secretin stimulated pancreatic juice in health, "early" chronic pancreatitis, and in chronic calcific pancreatitis. Increased concentrations of trypsin, total protein, and calcium, and increased outputs of calcium and protein were shown to be present in the "early" stages of the disease, indicating that an environment conducive to the formation of protein plugs and possibly later calcification already exists.

  6. Purification and characterization of trypsins from the digestive tract of Locusta migratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakal, E; Applebaum, S W; Birk, Y

    1989-12-01

    Two trypsin-like enzymes were isolated from the digestive tract of the African migratory locust Locusta migratoria migratorioides. Primary purification was carried out on a DEAE-cellulose column, from which the two trypsins emerged in the anionic fraction. Further purification was achieved by affinity chromatography on a p-aminobenzamidine (PABA)-Sepharose column, which also separated the two trypsins (TLEAff.1. and TLEAff.2.), or by HPLC on an anion exchange column. The purity and homogeneity of the trypsins were demonstrated by electrophoresis of cellulose acetate strips and in polyacrylamide gels, with and without SDS. The molecular weights of TLEAff.1 and TLEAff.2, as determined by SDS-PAGE, were 17,000 and 24,000 respectively. The amino acid compositions of the locust trypsins were similar to those of trypsins from the digestive systems of other insects, which are characterized by the lack or low content of half cystines. The isoelectric points were 3.2 for TLEAff.1 and 3.5 fold for TLEAff.2. Since most of the locust trypsin comprised TLEAff.2, the latter served as the main object of this study. TLEAff.2 was unstable at low pH, differing in this respect from mammalian trypsins. The optimum activity was at pH 8.5-9.0. The Km and kcat, values were similar to those for bovine trypsin. Activation by substrate, a phenomenon in bovine trypsin, was also observed for TLEAff.2. The locust trypsin was full inhibited by the proteinaceous trypsin inhibitors Bowman-Birk (BBI) and Kunitz from soybeans, CI from chickpeas, chicken ovomucoid (COM), and turkey ovomucoid (TOM). It was inactivated by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK), indicating the involvement of serine and histidine in the active site. PMID:2635697

  7. Free radical inactivation of trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactivities of free radical oxidants, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and Cl3COO radical and a reductant, CO2-anion radical, with trypsin and reactive protein components were determined by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions at pH 7, 200C. Highly reactive free radicals, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical, react with trypsin at diffusion controlled rates. Moderately reactive trichloroperoxy radical, k(Cl3COO radical + trypsin) preferentially oxidizes histidine residues. The efficiency of inactivation of trypsin by free radicals is inversely proportional to their reactivity. The yields of inactivation of trypsin by radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical are low, G(inactivation) = 0.6-0.8, which corresponds to ∼ 10% of the initially produced radicals. In contrast, Cl3COO radical inactivates trypsin with ∼ 50% efficiency, i.e. G(inactivation) = 3.2. (author)

  8. Exocrine pancreatic function in diabetes mellitus.

    OpenAIRE

    Dandona, P; Freedman, D B; Foo, Y.; Perkins, J.; Katrak, A; Mikhailidis, D P; Rosalki, S B; Beckett, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation of serum immunoreactive trypsin concentration and pancreatic isoamylase activity in patients with diabetes mellitus has shown that exocrine pancreatic deficit is maximal in insulin dependent diabetics, intermediate in those controlled with sulphonylureas, and absent in patients controlled with biguanides or diet or both. A significant correlation between the serum concentrations of both these pancreatic enzymes and C peptide was found. Serum pancreatic enzyme concentrations w...

  9. Innovation of the preparative process of bovine trypsin and its enzymatic degradation effect on the precursor of genetic engineering human insulin%牛胰蛋白酶制备工艺的改进及其对基因工程人胰岛素前体的酶切作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冷春生; 李庆伟

    2013-01-01

    目的 对牛胰蛋白酶制备工艺进行改进,制备高纯度牛胰蛋白酶,并对其酶切基因工程人胰岛素前体的作用进行考察.方法 采用粗制后先色谱分离再活化的方法对传统工艺进行改进,对传统工艺制备样品和改进工艺制备样品中的胰蛋白酶和胰凝乳蛋白酶的比活力进行测定和比较;进一步采用这2种样品对基因工程人胰岛素前体进行酶切,对酶切作用进行比较.结果 传统工艺制备样品中胰蛋白酶比活力为212.5 U·mg-1,胰凝乳蛋白酶比活力为20.4 U·mg-1;而改进工艺样品中胰蛋白酶比活力为240.4 U·mg-1,胰凝乳蛋白酶比活力为0.14 U·mg-1.传统工艺制备样品酶切基因工程人胰岛素前体目标产物纯度质量分数为16.3%,改进工艺制备样品酶切基因工程人胰岛素前体目标产物纯度质量分数为32.2%.结论 粗制后先进行SP色谱可实现胰蛋白酶原和胰凝乳蛋白酶原较好的分离,该方法适合于高纯度胰蛋白酶的制备,制备的胰蛋白酶适合作为工具酶进行基因工程人胰岛素前体的酶切.%Objective To isolate and purify bovine trypsin with high purity and determine the activation of the genetic engineering human insulin prosoma with it. Methods The traditional preparative process of bovine trypsin was improved. The crude product was firstly separated by column chromatography and then was activated. The activities of trypsin and chymotrypsin of the samples,from the traditional method and the improved way, were assayed and compared. Then the genetic engineering human insulin precursor was enzy-matically degradated by these 2 samples and the target product was detected by HPLC. The effects of these two samples were compared. Results The specific activity was 212.5 and 20.4 U·mg-1 for trypsin and chymotrypsin in traditionally prepared sample, while that was 240.4 and 0. 14 U · mg-1 in the improved method. Conclusions Trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen

  10. Sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsinczky, Michael L J; Schirra, Horst Joachim; Craik, David J

    2004-10-01

    SFTI-1 is a bicyclic 14 amino acid peptide that was originally isolated from the seeds of the sunflower Helianthus annuus. It is a potent inhibitor of trypsin, with a sub-nanomolar K(i) value and is homologous to the active site region of the well-known family of serine protease inhibitors known as the Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitors. It has a cyclic backbone that is cross-braced by a single disulfide bridge and a network of hydrogen bonds that result in a well-defined structure. SFTI-1 is amenable to chemical synthesis, allowing for the creation of synthetic variants. Alterations to the structure such as linearising the backbone or removing the disulfide bridge do not reduce the potency of SFTI-1 significantly, and minimising the peptide to as few as nine residues results in only a small decrease in reactivity. The creation of linear variants of SFTI-1 also provides a tool for investigating putative linear precursor peptides. The mechanism of biosynthesis of SFTI-1 is not yet known but it seems likely that it is a gene-coded product that has arisen from a precursor protein that may be evolutionarily related to classic Bowman-Birk inhibitors. PMID:15544530

  11. Changes of amylase and trypsin activities in pancreas of rats after γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of amylase and trypsin in pancreas of rats decreased significantly after irradiation. The degree of changes in both amylase and trypsin was identical, depending on radiation doses and varying with the weight of pancreas. Within a certain range of doses the weight and enzymic activity of pancreas decreased gradually. The amylase and trypsin activities of pancreas decreased markedly after 6 Gy exposure. These enzymic activities varied with time after exposure and fluctuated around low level for a long time. The recovery of enzymic activity occurred later than that of pancreas weight. These results indicated that the mechanism of decrease and recovery of pancreatic enzyme was complex

  12. Impact of experimental endogenous gram-negative peritonitis on the pancreas of the rat as evaluated by cationic trypsin-like immunoreactivity in peritoneal fluid and serum and by electron microscopy of pancreatic tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endogenous gram-negative peritonitis leading to septic shock was induced in rats by a defined perforation of the coecum. Cationic trypsin-like immunoreactivity (CTLI) was measured in peritoneal fluid and serum by a radioimmunoassay method. 5, 10 and 15 h after the coecal perforation, CTLI in peritoneal fluid was significantly higher than before the coecal perforation and also higher than in the corresponding control rats. Moreover, CTLI in serum was under the same conditions significantly higher 10 and 15 h after the induction of peritonitis. Gel chromatography of peritoneal fluid and serum during peritonitis showed free CTLI and CTLI bound to both alpha-1-antitrypsin and alpha-2-macroglobulin, wheras only free CTLI could be detected in serum from control rats. These findings were accompanied by local ultrastructural changes in the acinar cells as evaluated by electron microscopy. The pathophysiologic implications of the findings are discussed

  13. Laboratory diagnosis of pancreatitis and cancer of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The content of fibrin fibrinogen splitting products (FSP), radioimmune trypsine, C-peptide and carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 in the blood of 82 patients with acute pancreatitis (edematous and hemorrhagic), and chronic recurrent pancreatitis at the stage of exacerbation, 42 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 34 patients with cancer of the pancreas (stages 3-4) and 22 healthy persons were studied. Results indicate a high diagnostic value of determination FSP, trypsin and C-peptide in patients with acute pancreatitis and chronic recurring pancreatitis at the stage of exacerbation, trypsin and C-peptide in patients with chronic pancreatitis associated with severe exocrinous insufficiency of the pancreas, KA 19-9 in patients with cancer of the pancreas

  14. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  15. The changes of amylase and trypsin activities in rat after abdomen gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The changes of amylase and trypsin activities in rat following local abdomen gamma irradiation were studied. The results showed that within a certain dose range, the activities of pancreatic enzymes decreased with the increase of doses and reached half of the normal value five days after local and fractional radiation with 30Gy on the abdomen, and maintained at the level below normal for a long time. The complete recovery of pancreatic enzyme activities occurred 120 days after local abdomen exposure. The mechanism of the decrease and recovery of pancreatic enzyme activity after exposure to radiation is briefly discussed

  16. Long-Standing Pancreatic Hyperenzymemia: Is It a Nonpathological Condition?

    OpenAIRE

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria; Calculli, Lucia; Casadei, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Chronic nonpathological pancreatic hyperenzymemia is characterized by a chronic, abnormal increase in the serum concentrations of the pancreatic enzymes including amylase, pancreatic isoamylase, lipase and trypsin. The diagnostic work-up that the physicians should recommend to subjects with hyperenzymemia to definitively assess this syndrome is still an open question. A 72-year-old female was admitted to our Pancreas Unit in December 2008 for the presence of long-standing pancreatic hyperenzy...

  17. Serum pancreatic lipase as a screening test for cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Adriaenssens, K; Van Riel, L

    1982-01-01

    Pancreatic lipase catalyses the hydrolysis of emulsified triglycerides to form a transparent solution of monoglycerides and fatty acids. Levels of serum pancreatic lipase were measured in neonates known to have cystic fibrosis and compared with levels in control infants. During the first weeks of life infants with cystic fibrosis had raised serum pancreatic lipase values in parallel with raised serum trypsin values. A simple and specific turbidimetric dried blood spot assay for serum pancreat...

  18. Chronic pancreatitis: controversies in etiology, diagnosis and treatment Pancreatitis crónica: controversias respecto a la etiología, el diagnóstico y el tratamiento

    OpenAIRE

    P. Draganov; Toskes, P P

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of idiopathic chronic pancreatitis remains poorly understood despite the high expectations for ascribing the pancreatic damage in affected patients to genetic defects. Mutations in the cationic trypsinogen gene, pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor, and the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator gene do not account for the chronic pancreatitis noted in most patients with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis. Small duct chronic pancreatitis can be best diagnosed with a hormone sti...

  19. Purification and characterization of a trypsin inhibitor from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Junchen; Liu, Yuan; An, Tianchen; Liu, Yujun; Wang, Manchuriga; Song, Yanting; Zheng, Feifei; Wu, Dan; Zhang, Yingxia; Deng, Shiming

    2015-05-01

    A proteinaceous inhibitor against trypsin was isolated from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. by successive ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange, and gel-filtration chromatography. The trypsin inhibitor, named as AHLTI (A. heterophyllus Lam. trypsin inhibitor), consisted of a single polypeptide chain with a molecular weight of 28.5 kDa, which was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel-filtration chromatography. The N-terminal sequence of AHLTI was DEPPSELDAS, which showed no similarity to other known trypsin inhibitor sequence. AHLTI completely inhibited bovine trypsin at a molar ratio of 1:2 (AHLTI:trypsin) analyzed by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, inhibition activity assay, and gel-filtration chromatography. Moreover, kinetic enzymatic studies were carried out to understand the inhibition mechanism of AHLTI against trypsin. Results showed that AHLTI was a competitive inhibitor with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Ki) of 3.7 × 10(-8) M. However, AHLTI showed weak inhibitory activity toward chymotrypsin and elastase. AHLTI was stable over a broad range of pH 4-8 and temperature 20-80°C. The reduction agent, dithiothreitol, had no obvious effect on AHLTI. The trypsin inhibition assays of AHLTI toward digestive enzymes from insect pest guts in vitro demonstrated that AHLTI was effective against enzymes from Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen). These results suggested that AHLTI might be a novel trypsin inhibitor from A. heterophyllus Lam. belonging to Kunitz family, and play an important role in protecting from insect pest. PMID:25851516

  20. Environmental risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Claudia; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich; Fluhr, Gabriele; Weber, Eckhard; Gärtner, Simone; Behn, Claas O; Kraft, Matthias; Ringel, Jörg; Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ∼10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits have been indentified for mutations in different trypsinogen genes, the gene for the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1, chymotrypsinogen C, and the cystic fibrosis transmembane conductance regulator (CFTR). Other factors that have been proposed to contribute to pancreatitis are obesity, diets high in animal protein and fat, as well as antioxidant deficiencies. For the development of pancreatic cancer, preexisting chronic pancreatitis, more prominently hereditary pancreatitis, is a risk factor. The data on environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer are, with the notable exception of tobacco smoke, either sparse, unconfirmed or controversial. Obesity appears to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in the West but not in Japan. Diets high in processed or red meat, diets low in fruits and vegetables, phytochemicals such as lycopene and flavonols, have been proposed and refuted as risk or protective factors in different trials. The best established and single most important risk factor for cancer as well as pancreatitis and the one to clearly avoid is tobacco smoke. PMID:21734390

  1. Establishing a human pancreatic stem cell line and transplanting induced pancreatic islets to reverse experimental diabetes in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The major obstacle in using pancreatic islet transplantation to cure type I and some type II diabetes is the shortage of the donors. One of ways to overcome such obstacle is to isolate and clone pancreatic stem cells as "seed cells" and induce their differentiation into functional islets as an abundant trans-plantation source. In this study, a monoclonal human pancreatic stem cell (mhPSC) line was obtained from abortive fetal pancreatic tissues. Pancreatic tissues were taken from abortive fetus by sterile procedures, and digested into single cells and cell clusters with 0.1% type IV collagenase. Cultured in modified glucose-low DMEM with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), these single cells and cell clusters adhered to culture dishes, and then primary epidermal-like pancreatic stem cells started to clone. After digesting with 0.25% trypsin and 0.04% EDTA, fibroblasts and other cells were gradually eliminated and epithelioid pancreatic stem cells were gradually purified during generations. Using clone-ring selection, the mhPSCs were obtained. After addition of 10 ng/mL epidermal growth factor (EGF) in cell culture medium, the mhPSCs quickly grew and formed a gravelstone-like monolayer. Continuously proliferated, a mhPSC line, which was derived from a male abortive fetus of 4 months old, has been passed through 50 generations. More than 1×109 mhPSCs were cryo-preserved in liquid nitrogen. Karyotype analysis showed that the chromosome set of the mhPSC line was normal diploid. Immunocytochemistry results demonstrated that the mhPSC line was positive for the pdx1, glucagon, nestin and CK19, and negative for the insulin, CD34, CD44 and CD45 protein expression. RT-PCR revealed further that the mhPSCs expressed transcription factors of the pdx1, glucagon, nestin and CK19. Also, in vitro induced with β-mercaptoethanol, the mhPSCs differentiated into nerve cells that expressed the NF protein. Induced with nicotinamide, the mhPSCs differentiated into functional islet

  2. Inhibitory effects of daidzein and genistein on trypsin: Insights from spectroscopic and molecular docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hua-Jin; Wang, Ya-Ping; Yang, Ran; You, Jing; Qu, Ling-Bo

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the inhibitory effect of two isoflavonoids including daidzein and genistein on trypsin and their binding mechanism were determined by spectroscopic and molecular docking approaches. The results indicated that both daidzein and genistein reversibly inhibited trypsin in a competitive manner with IC50 values of 68.01×10(-6)molL(-1) and 64.70×10(-6)molL(-1) and Ki values of 62.12×10(-6)molL(-1) and 59.83×10(-6)molL(-1), respectively. They could spontaneously bind with trypsin mainly through hydrophobic force and electrostatic interactions with a single binding site. Analysis of circular dichrosim spectra and molecular docking revealed that both isoflavonoids bound directly into the catalytic cavity and the microenvironment and secondary structure of trypsin were changed in this process, which caused the inhibition of trypsin activity. All these experimental results and theoretical data in this work would be help in understanding the mechanism of inhibitory effects of daidzein and genistein against trypsin and the potential of isoflavonoid to relieve symptoms of pancreatitis. PMID:27109756

  3. The pros and cons of increased trypsin-to-protein ratio in targeted protein analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Siri Valen; Reubsaet, Léon; Halvorsen, Trine Grønhaug

    2016-05-10

    The effect of increasing the trypsin amount in bottom-up based targeted protein analysis is evaluated. By applying an increased trypsin-to-protein ratio (1:1 (w/w)) after heat denaturation (60°C), reduction and alkylation, the digestion time could be reduced profoundly compared to conventional digestion conditions (ratio 1:40, overnight) without compromising method sensitivity or digestion repeatability. The procedure was obtained after a systematic evaluation of trypsin level and trypsin quality using a set of three model proteins: human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and cytochrome C (CytC). All peptides monitored were produced at similar or higher levels after 45min at trypsin-to-protein ratio 1:1, compared to conventional overnight digestion (exception: CytC using modified trypsin, required up to 4h (at 1:1 ratio) in order achieve this). Peptide decay due to chymotryptic activity was observed at longer digestion times, but the effect was circumvented using digestion times protein hCG to demonstrate its applicability. PMID:26907699

  4. Diagnosis of pancreatitis in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenoulis, P G

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatitis is the most common disorder of the exocrine pancreas in both dogs and cats. Ante-mortem diagnosis of canine and feline pancreatitis can be challenging. The clinical picture of dogs and cats with pancreatitis varies greatly (from very mild to severe or even fatal) and is characterised by non-specific findings. Complete blood count, serum biochemistry profile and urinalysis should always be performed in dogs and cats suspected of having pancreatitis, although findings are not-specific for pancreatitis. Serum amylase and lipase activities and trypsin-like immunoreactivity (TLI) concentrations have no or only limited clinical value for the diagnosis of pancreatitis in either dogs or cats. Conversely, serum pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (PLI) concentration is currently considered to be the clinicopathological test of choice for the diagnosis of canine and feline pancreatitis. Abdominal radiography is a useful diagnostic tool for the exclusion of other diseases that may cause similar clinical signs to those of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasonography can be very useful for the diagnosis of pancreatitis, but this depends largely on the clinician's experience. Histopathological examination of the pancreas is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of pancreatitis, but it is not without limitations. In clinical practice, a combination of careful evaluation of the animal's history, serum PLI concentration and abdominal ultrasonography, together with pancreatic cytology or histopathology when indicated or possible, is considered to be the most practical and reliable means for an accurate diagnosis or exclusion of pancreatitis compared with other diagnostic modalities. PMID:25586803

  5. Thermostable trypsin conjugates immobilized to biogenic magnetite show a high operational stability and remarkable reusability for protein digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, magnetosomes produced by microorganisms were chosen as a suitable magnetic carrier for covalent immobilization of thermostable trypsin conjugates with an expected applicability for efficient and rapid digestion of proteins at elevated temperatures. First, a biogenic magnetite was isolated from Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense and its free surface was coated with the natural polysaccharide chitosan containing free amino and hydroxy groups. Prior to covalent immobilization, bovine trypsin was modified by conjugating with α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrin. Modified trypsin was bound to the magnetic carriers via amino groups using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide as coupling reagents. The magnetic biomaterial was characterized by magnetometric analysis and electron microscopy. With regard to their biochemical properties, the immobilized trypsin conjugates showed an increased resistance to elevated temperatures, eliminated autolysis, had an unchanged pH optimum and a significant storage stability and reusability. Considering these parameters, the presented enzymatic system exhibits properties that are superior to those of trypsin forms obtained by other frequently used approaches. The proteolytic performance was demonstrated during in-solution digestion of model proteins (horseradish peroxidase, bovine serum albumin and hen egg white lysozyme) followed by mass spectrometry. It is shown that both magnetic immobilization and chemical modification enhance the characteristics of trypsin making it a promising tool for protein digestion. (paper)

  6. Thermostable trypsin conjugates immobilized to biogenic magnetite show a high operational stability and remarkable reusability for protein digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečová, M.; Šebela, M.; Marková, Z.; Poláková, K.; Čuda, J.; Šafářová, K.; Zbořil, R.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, magnetosomes produced by microorganisms were chosen as a suitable magnetic carrier for covalent immobilization of thermostable trypsin conjugates with an expected applicability for efficient and rapid digestion of proteins at elevated temperatures. First, a biogenic magnetite was isolated from Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense and its free surface was coated with the natural polysaccharide chitosan containing free amino and hydroxy groups. Prior to covalent immobilization, bovine trypsin was modified by conjugating with α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrin. Modified trypsin was bound to the magnetic carriers via amino groups using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide as coupling reagents. The magnetic biomaterial was characterized by magnetometric analysis and electron microscopy. With regard to their biochemical properties, the immobilized trypsin conjugates showed an increased resistance to elevated temperatures, eliminated autolysis, had an unchanged pH optimum and a significant storage stability and reusability. Considering these parameters, the presented enzymatic system exhibits properties that are superior to those of trypsin forms obtained by other frequently used approaches. The proteolytic performance was demonstrated during in-solution digestion of model proteins (horseradish peroxidase, bovine serum albumin and hen egg white lysozyme) followed by mass spectrometry. It is shown that both magnetic immobilization and chemical modification enhance the characteristics of trypsin making it a promising tool for protein digestion.

  7. Chymotrypsin and trypsin sensitivities of avian reoviruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Drastini, Y; McKenna, P K; Kibenge, F S; Lopez, A

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to examine the chymotrypsin sensitivity and trypsin sensitivity of 13 avian reoviruses, and to determine if there was any correlation with pathogenicity of some chicken reoviruses. A wide variation in the degree of sensitivity of avian reoviruses to chymotrypsin and trypsin was observed. Overall, the infectivity of the 13 avian reoviruses for Vero cells was markedly reduced by treatment with 0.01% chymotrypsin (the lowest concentration tested) while 0.5% trypsin si...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1914 - Trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... 110, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Trypsin. 184.1914 Section 184.1914 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1914 Trypsin. (a) Trypsin (CAS Reg. No. 9002-07-7) is an enzyme...

  9. Antiproteases in the Treatment of Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoji Kitagawa

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis relates to the inappropriate activation of trypsinogen to trypsin and a lack of the prompt elimination of the active trypsin inside the pancreas. Therefore, trypsin is believed to be the key enzyme in the initiation and exacerbation of acute pancreatitis by activating pancreatic zymogens. The activation of digestive enzymes causes pancreatic injury and results in an inflammatory response. The acute inflammatory response in the pancreas induces the systemic production of cytokines causing substantial tissue damage, and may progress beyond the pancreas to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, multi-organ failure (MOF or death [1]. In several studies, protease inhibitors have not been shown to be of significant value in the treatment of acute pancreatitis and are not available in the United States [2]. Several guidelines [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12] on the treatment of acute pancreatitis do not recommend them and the debate about the use of protease inhibitors is mentioned.

  10. [Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noort, R

    1990-07-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is the most common cause of maldigestion in dogs. This is usually caused by irreversible atrophy of the pancreas which subsequently requires life-long substitution therapy. The pathophysiology, symptoms and diagnosis are briefly reviewed in the present paper. The Trypsin-like-immunoreactivity test is recommended for establishing the diagnosis. Finally, treatment and possible causes of the failure of therapy are discussed. PMID:2196714

  11. Production of secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) in human pancreatic beta-cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Nyström, M; Bergenfeldt, M; Ljungcrantz, I.; Lindeheim, A; Ohlsson, K.

    1999-01-01

    Secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is a potent inhibitor of granulocyte elastase and cathepsin G, and also an inhibitor of pancreatic enzymes like trypsin, chymotrypsin and pancreatic elastase. SLPI has also been shown to inhibit HIV-1 infections by blocking viral DNA synthesis. Since SLPI is an inhibitor of pancreatic proteases we wished to investigate whether SLPI was also actually produced in the pancreas. M-RNA from human pancreatic tissue showed evidence of SLPI production usi...

  12. Production of Secretory Leucocyte Protease Inhibitor (SLPI) in Human Pancreatic β-Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Max Nyström; Magnus Bergenfeldt; Irena Ljungcrantz; Èsa Lindeheim; Kjell Ohlsson

    1999-01-01

    Secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is a potent inhibitor of granulocyte elastase and cathepsin G, and also an inhibitor of pancreatic enzymes like trypsin, chymotrypsin and pancreatic elastase. SLPI has also been shown to inhibit HIV-1 infections by blocking viral DNA synthesis. Since SLPI is an inhibitor of pancreatic proteases we wished to investigate whether SLPI was also actually produced in the pancreas. M-RNA from human pancreatic tissue showed evidence of SLPI production usi...

  13. Proteolytic activation of human pancreatitis associated protein is required for peptidoglycan binding and bacterial aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Medveczky, Péter; Szmola, Richárd; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatitis associated protein (PAP) is a 16 kDa lectin-like protein, which becomes robustly upregulated in the pancreatic juice during acute pancreatitis. Trypsin cleaves the N terminus of PAP, which in turn forms insoluble fibrils. PAP and its paralog the pancreatic stone protein induce bacterial aggregation and, more recently, PAP was shown to bind to the peptidoglycan of Gram positive bacteria and exert a direct bactericidal effect. However, the role of N-terminal processing in the antib...

  14. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ayesha Salahuddin; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 relate...

  15. Photoluminescence of trypsin after UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For study purposes of the primary effects of UV light the photoluminescence of trypsin was investigated before and after UV irradiation (lambda = 254 nm). The results were compared with the corresponding relations at equimolar mixtures of the constituent amino acids. The increase of the absorption in the region between 230 nm and 400 nm at UV irradiation of trypsin in aqueous solution is primarily attributed to the ionization of tyrosine. The fluorescence is strongly quenched mainly due to the ionized tyrosine residues. The results are discussed in connection with previous investigations on radical formation and inactivation of trypsin after UV irradiation. (orig.)

  16. Cathepsin B Activity Initiates Apoptosis via Digestive Protease Activation in Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Experimental Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendler, Matthias; Maertin, Sandrina; John, Daniel; Persike, Maria; Weiss, F Ulrich; Krüger, Burkhard; Wartmann, Thomas; Wagh, Preshit; Halangk, Walter; Schaschke, Norbert; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatitis is associated with premature activation of digestive proteases in the pancreas. The lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin B (CTSB) is a known activator of trypsinogen, and its deletion reduces disease severity in experimental pancreatitis. Here we studied the activation mechanism and subcellular compartment in which CTSB regulates protease activation and cellular injury. Cholecystokinin (CCK) increased the activity of CTSB, cathepsin L, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and caspase 3 in vivo and in vitro and induced redistribution of CTSB to a secretory vesicle-enriched fraction. Neither CTSB protein nor activity redistributed to the cytosol, where the CTSB inhibitors cystatin-B/C were abundantly present. Deletion of CTSB reduced and deletion of cathepsin L increased intracellular trypsin activation. CTSB deletion also abolished CCK-induced caspase 3 activation, apoptosis-inducing factor, as well as X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein degradation, but these depended on trypsinogen activation via CTSB. Raising the vesicular pH, but not trypsin inhibition, reduced CTSB activity. Trypsin inhibition did not affect apoptosis in hepatocytes. Deletion of CTSB affected apoptotic but not necrotic acinar cell death. In summary, CTSB in pancreatitis undergoes activation in a secretory, vesicular, and acidic compartment where it activates trypsinogen. Its deletion or inhibition regulates acinar cell apoptosis but not necrosis in two models of pancreatitis. Caspase 3-mediated apoptosis depends on intravesicular trypsinogen activation induced by CTSB, not CTSB activity directly, and this mechanism is pancreas-specific. PMID:27226576

  17. Trypsin coatings on electrospun and alcohol-dispersed polymer nanofibers for trypsin digestion column

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Seung-Hyun; Chang, Mun Seock; Kim, Byoung Chan; An, Hyo Jin; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.; Lee, Sang-Won; Kim, Jungbae

    2010-01-01

    The construction of a trypsin column for rapid and efficient protein digestion in proteomics is described. Electrospun and alcohol-dispersed polymer nanofibers were used for the fabrication of highly stable trypsin coatings, which was prepared by a two-step process of covalent attachment and enzyme crosslinking. In a comparative study with the trypsin coatings on as-spun and non-dispersed nanofibers, it has been observed that a simple step of alcohol dispersion improved not only the enzyme lo...

  18. Co-expression of trypsin and tumour-associated trypsin inhibitor (TATI) in colorectal adenocarcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Solakidi, S.; Tiniakos, D.G.; Petraki, K; STATHOPOULOS, G.P.; Markaki, I.; Androulakis, G.; Sekeris, C E

    2003-01-01

    Trypsin and its specific inhibitor, TATI (tumour-associated trypsin inhibitor), are expressed in normal human pancreas and in a variety of tumours. The aim of the present study was to assess the parallel expression of trypsin and TATI in colorectal cancer, in comparison with their expression in normal epithelial tissue, since proteases and their inhibitors are thought to be co-expressed in malignant neoplasms. We also assessed the possible significance of their...

  19. Purification and characterisation of trypsin-like enzyme from the pyloric caeca of cod (Gadus morhua) II

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Henrique Beirão; Ian Mckintoch Mackie; Evanilda Teixeira; César Damian

    2001-01-01

    A trypsin -like enzyme from the pyloric caeca of cod (Gadus morhua) was purified by affinity chromatography on CHOM Sepharose 4B. Some characteristics were established by its catalytic activity on T.A.M.E., typical enzyme substrate, and serine protease inhibitors. The enzyme had an isoelectric point of 5.30 and 5.89 and was very similar in amino acid composition to bovine trypsin, but differed in having a higher relative amount of acidic amino acids and a lower amount of basic amino acids. Th...

  20. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  1. Acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingest...

  2. Acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion....

  3. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Acute Pancreatitis > Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy test Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  4. Prevalence of S and Z alpha 1-antitrypsin mutations in patients with pancreatic diseases in Serbian population

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolić Aleksandra; Divac Aleksandra; Stanković Marija; Dinić Jelena; Lukić Snežana; Anđelić-Jelić Marina; Popović Dragan; Radojković Dragica

    2010-01-01

    One of the key points in research of pancreatic disease pathology is further elucidation of the role of proteases and antiproteases, since their imbalance can lead to pancreatic injury. Alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) is one of the most important serum inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes, including pancreatic enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase. It is speculated that mutations in the AAT gene may influence the onset and the development of pancreatic disease. The presence of the most common AAT...

  5. Role of genetic disorders in acute recurrent pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Volker Keim

    2008-01-01

    There was remarkable progress in the understanding of the role genetic risk factors in chronic pancreatitis.These factors seem to be much more important than thought in the past.The rare autosomal-dominant mutations N29I and R122H of PRSS1(cationic trypsinogen) as well as the variant N34S of SPINK1(pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor) are associated to a disease onset in childhood or youth.Compared to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis the progression is slow so that for a long time only signs of acute-recurrent pancreatitis are found.Only at later time points(more than 10-15 years) there is evidence for chronic pancreatitis in the majority of patients.Acute recurrent pancreatitis may therefore be regarded as a transition state until definite signs of chronic pancreatitis are detectable.

  6. Structure basis 1/2SLPI and porcine pancreas trypsin interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, Kei; Kamimura, Takashi; Takimoto-Kamimura, Midori, E-mail: m.kamimura@teijin.co.jp [Teijin Institute for Bio-Medical Research, 4-3-2 Asahigaoka, Hino-shi, Tokyo 191-8512 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    1/2SLPI is a C-terminal domain of SLPI (secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor) which inhibits various serine proteases broadly. The present study is the first X-ray structural report on how 1/2SLPI with P1 Leu strongly inhibits trypsin and how it can inhibit multiple serine proteases. SLPI (secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor) is a 107-residue protease inhibitor which inhibits various serine proteases, including elastase, cathepsin G, chymotrypsin and trypsin. SLPI is obtained as a multiple inhibitor in lung defense and in chronic airway infection. X-ray crystal structures have so far reported that they are full-length SLPIs with bovine α-chymotrypsin and 1/2SLPI (recombinant C-terminal domain of SLPI; Arg58–Ala107) with HNE (human neutrophil elastase). To understand the role of this multiple inhibitory mechanism, the crystal structure of 1/2SLPI with porcine pancreas trypsin was solved and the binding modes of two other complexes compared. The Leu residue surprisingly interacts with the S1 site of trypsin, as with chymotrypsin and elastase. The inhibitory mechanism of 1/2SLPI using the wide primary binding site contacts (from P2′ to P5) with various serine proteases is discussed. These inhibitory mechanisms have been acquired in the evolution of the protection system for acute inflammatory diseases.

  7. Structure basis 1/2SLPI and porcine pancreas trypsin interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1/2SLPI is a C-terminal domain of SLPI (secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor) which inhibits various serine proteases broadly. The present study is the first X-ray structural report on how 1/2SLPI with P1 Leu strongly inhibits trypsin and how it can inhibit multiple serine proteases. SLPI (secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor) is a 107-residue protease inhibitor which inhibits various serine proteases, including elastase, cathepsin G, chymotrypsin and trypsin. SLPI is obtained as a multiple inhibitor in lung defense and in chronic airway infection. X-ray crystal structures have so far reported that they are full-length SLPIs with bovine α-chymotrypsin and 1/2SLPI (recombinant C-terminal domain of SLPI; Arg58–Ala107) with HNE (human neutrophil elastase). To understand the role of this multiple inhibitory mechanism, the crystal structure of 1/2SLPI with porcine pancreas trypsin was solved and the binding modes of two other complexes compared. The Leu residue surprisingly interacts with the S1 site of trypsin, as with chymotrypsin and elastase. The inhibitory mechanism of 1/2SLPI using the wide primary binding site contacts (from P2′ to P5) with various serine proteases is discussed. These inhibitory mechanisms have been acquired in the evolution of the protection system for acute inflammatory diseases

  8. Effect of mosquito midgut trypsin activity on dengue-2 virus infection and dissemination in Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Gupta, Lalita; Richardson, Jason; Bennett, Kristine; Black, William; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2005-05-01

    The effect of mosquito midgut trypsins in dengue serotype 2 flavivirus (DENV-2) infectivity to Aedes aegypti was studied. Addition of soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) in a DENV-2 infectious blood meal resulted in a 91-97% decrease in midgut DENV-2 RNA copies (qRT-PCR analysis). STI treatment also resulted in slower DENV-2 replication in the midgut, less DENV-2 E protein expression, and decreased dissemination to the thorax and the head. A second uninfected blood meal, 7 days after the STI-treated infectious meal, significantly increased DENV-2 replication in the midgut and recovered oogenesis, suggesting that the lower viral infection caused by STI was in part due to a nutritional effect. Mosquitoes fed DENV-2 digested in vitro with bovine trypsin (before STI addition) exhibited a transient increase in midgut DENV-2 4 days postinfection. Blood digestion and possibly DENV-2 proteolytic processing, mediated by midgut trypsins, influence the rate of DENV-2 infection, replication, and dissemination in Ae. aegypti. PMID:15891140

  9. Identification of a new soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor mutation and its effect on Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor content in soybean seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean seeds possess anti-nutritional compounds which inactivate digestive proteases, principally corresponding to two families: Kunitz Trypsin Inhibitors (KTi) and Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBI). High levels of raw soybeans/soybean meal in feed mixtures can cause poor weight gain and pancreatic abno...

  10. Using Trypsin & Soybean Trypsin Inhibitor to Teach Principles of Enzyme Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David R.; Herr, Julie; Hollister, Rhiannon

    2006-01-01

    Trypsin and soybean trypsin inhibitor (Kunitz inhibitor) can be used in a relatively simple and inexpensive student exercise to demonstrate the usefulness of enzyme kinetics. The study of enzyme kinetics is essential to biology because enzymes play such a crucial role in the biochemical pathways of all living organisms. The data from enzyme…

  11. Complete disassociation of adult pancreas into viable single cells through cold trypsin-EDTA digestion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan LI; Shi-yun PENG; Zhen-wu ZHANG; Rui-cheng FENG; Lu LI; Jie LIANG; Sheng TAI

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro isolation and analysis of pancreatic stem/progenitor cells are necessary for understanding their properties and function; however,the preparation of high-quality single-cell suspensions from adult pancreas is prerequisite.In this study,we applied a cold trypsin-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) digestion method to disassociate adult mouse pancreata into single cells.The yield of single cells and the viability of the harvested cells were much higher than those obtained via the two commonly used warm digestion methods.Flow cytometric analysis showed that the ratio of ductal or BCRP1-positive cells in cell suspensions prepared through cold digestion was consistent with that found in vivo.Cell culture tests showed that pancreatic epithelial cells prepared by cold digestion maintained proliferative capacity comparable to those derived from warm collagenase digestion.These results indicate that cold trypsin-EDTA digestion can effectively disassociate an adult mouse pancreas into viable single cells with minimal cell loss,and can be used for the isolation and analysis of pancreatic stem/progenitor cells.

  12. Acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions: Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  13. Acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions : Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  14. Diagnosis of onychomycosis by trypsin treatment method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xess Immaculata

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fungal infection of the nails is a common, difficult to treat problem, prevalent worldwide. A discrepancy in the microscopic examination and culture findings can create problems in the diagnosis of this common infection. Aim: This study was designed to evaluate a new method for accurate diagnosis of onychomycosis. Materials and Methods: Nail samples from 25 patients of suspected onychomycosis were taken. A portion of the samples was treated with 2% trypsin before culturing and the rest was processed by the standard mycological technique. Results: A higher number of culture positive samples were obtained by the trypsin treatment method as compared to the standard technique. Conclusion: Trypsin treatment prior to culture increases the isolation of fungi from nail samples.

  15. Preliminary studies on vigna unguiculata trypsin inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation on the presence of trypsin inhibitor in vigna unguiculata at three stages of ripeness, i.e. as young beans obtained from first harvest usually consumed as vegetable, seed from beans picked two weeks after the first harvest and seed from beans picked four weeks after the first harvest, has been carried out. The conclusion drawn from this experiment showed the existence of trypsin inhibitor at those stages of ripeness. It is found that the older the stage of ripeness the greater the specific activity of trypsin inhibitor. Evidently the heated extract loss its antitryptic activity progressively with increasing heatings periods. Extract heated on a water bath at a constant temperature of 78 deg C during 20, 40 and 60 minutes, loss its antitryptic activity of about 53, 78 and 96% respectively. (author)

  16. Chemical repair of trypsin-histidinyl radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxyl radicals, such as hydroxyl, alkoxyl and peroxyl, react with biomolecules to produce bioradicals. Unless chemically repaired by suitable antioxidants, these bioradicals form stable products. This leads to loss of biological function of parent biomolecules with deleterious biological results, such as mutagenesis and cancer. Consequently, the understanding of the mechanisms of oxyl radical damage to biomolecules and chemical repair of such damage is crucial for the development of strategies for anticarcinogenesis and radioprotection. In this study the chemical repair of the histidinyl radical generated upon the trichloromethylperoxyl radical reaction with trypsin vas investigated by gamma radiolysis. The trypsin histidinyl radical is a resonance-stabilized heterocyclic free radical which was found to be unreactive with oxygen. The efficacy of the chemical repair of the trypsin-histidinyl radical by endogenous antioxidants which are electron donors (e.g. 5-hydroxytryptophan, uric acid) is compared to that of antioxidants which are H-atom donors (e. g. glutathione). 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  17. A radioactive method for the measurement of trypsin and trypsin-like activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and highly sensitive method for the assay of trypsin has been developed by making use of the phosphorylated synthetic peptide Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ser-(32P)-Leu-Gly as substrate. The technique has been adapted from the phosphocellulose method of R. Roskoski, Jr. used for measuring of protein kinases. In addition to measuring the activity of trypsin at the microgram level, the 32P-labeled peptide method can be used for measuring other trypsin-like enzymes. It has been successfully utilized for the identification of a new peptidase from the fungus Saccobolus platensis

  18. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  19. Problems associated with the radioimmunoassay of serum trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A commercial trypsin radioimmunoassay (RIA) kit was tested for its ability to measure trypsin bound to the serum protease inhibitors, α2macroglobulin (α2M) and α1 anti-trypsin (α1AT). Only 20% of trypsin bound to α2M and 70% bound to α1AT was detected by the assay system. Recovery of trypsin added to human serum varied from 0 to 20%. Standard curves prepared from purified human cationic trypsin did not exhibit parallelism with the kit standard curves. Inclusion of horse serum in the standard solutions improved the parallelism observed. Immunoreactive trypsin (IRT) levels obtained for serum samples were found to vary considerably depending on the standard curve used to calculate the assay results. Lower IRT levels were observed when trypsin standards prepared in the absence of horse serum were used as reference. (Auth.)

  20. Enzymatic synthesis of gold nanoflowers with trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A one-step and eco-friendly approach for the room-temperature synthesis of trypsin-mediated three-dimensional (3D) gold nanoflowers (AuNFs) with high colloidal stability is demonstrated. To prepare AuNFs, ascorbic acid (AA) was quickly added into the premixed solution of HAuCl4 and trypsin at pH = 5.0. The results show that the molar ratio and feeding order of reactant agents, pH and reaction time play important roles in the formation of NFs. The growth mechanism of AuNFs is suggested as three steps: (1) immobilization of AuCl4- ions with a positively charged trypsin template, (2) spontaneous reduction of AuCl4- ions with AA in situ and capping Au0 by 12 cysteines of trypsin, (3) reduction of more AuCl4- ions on the Au nuclei formed in the initial stages and anisotropic growth into AuNFs.

  1. Trypsin enhancement of rotavirus infectivity: mechanism of enhancement.

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, S M; Roth, J R; Clark, M L; Barnett, B B; Spendlove, R S

    1981-01-01

    The infectivity of most rotaviruses is enhanced by treatment with trypsin. We studied the mechanism of enhancement of examining the effect of trypsin on rotavirus infectivity, aggregation, early interactions with host cells, and structure. The results indicated that trypsin does not increase levels of infectious virus by dispersion of aggregates or affect the efficiency or rate of attachment of virus to cells. A fraction of virus that was not infections without trypsin treatment was found to ...

  2. Cathepsin L inactivates human trypsinogen whereas cathepsin L deletion reduces the severity of pancreatitis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartmann, Thomas; Mayerle, Julia; Kähne, Thilo; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Ruthenbürger, Manuel; Matthias, Rainer; Kruse, Anne; Reinheckel, Thomas; Peters, Christoph; Weiss, F. Ulrich; Sendler, Matthias; Hans-Lippert; Schulz, Hans-Ulrich; Aghdassi, Ali; Dummer, Annegret; Teller, Steffen; Halangk, Walter; Lerch, Markus M.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Acute pancreatitis is characterized by an activation cascade of digestive enzymes in the pancreas. The first of these, trypsinogen, can be converted to active trypsin by the peptidase cathepsin B (CTSB). We investigated whether cathepsin L (CTSL), the second most abundant lysosomal cysteine proteinase, can also process trypsinogen to active trypsin and has a role in pancreatitis. Methods In CTSL-deficient (Ctsl−/−) mice, pancreatitis was induced by injection of cerulein or infusion of taurocholate into the pancreatic duct. Human tissue, pancreatic juice, mouse pancreatitis specimens, and recombinant enzymes were studied by enzyme assay, immunoblot, N-terminal sequencing, immunocytochemistry, and electron microscopy analyses. Isolated acini from Ctsl−/− and Ctsb−/− mice were studied. Results CTSL was expressed in human and mouse pancreas, where it colocalized with trypsinogen in secretory vesicles and lysosomes and was secreted into pancreatic juice. Severity of pancreatitis was reduced in Ctsl−/− mice, compared with wild-type controls, whereas apoptosis and intrapancreatic trypsin activity were increased in Ctsl−/− mice. CTSL induced cleavage of trypsinogen occurred 3 amino acids toward the C terminus from the CTSB activation site and resulted in a truncated, inactive form of trypsin and an elongated propeptide (TAP). This elongated TAP was not detected by ELISA but was effectively converted to an immunoreactive form by CTSB. Levels of TAP thus generated by CTSB were not associated with disease severity, although this is what the TAP-ELISA is used to determine in the clinic. Conclusions CTSL inactivates trypsinogen and counteracts the ability of CTSB to form active trypsin. In mouse models of pancreatitis, absence of CTSL induces apoptosis and reduces disease severity. PMID:19900452

  3. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Salahuddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis.

  4. Bronchoalveolar lavage with trypsin in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagasaka, Y.; Takahashi, M; Ueshima, H; Tohda, Y.; Nakajima, S.

    1996-01-01

    Two cases of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis were treated with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) via a fibreoptic bronchoscope. Additional clinical improvement was seen when trypsin was added to the lavage fluid. Analysis of effluents in the BAL fluid showed marked reduction of protein constituents with clinical improvement after treatment with trypsin in the lavage. BAL with trypsin was well tolerated.

  5. Urinary trypsin inhibitor - an experimental and clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berling, B.M.

    1991-12-31

    The urinary trypsin inhibitor (UTI) is an acid stable proteinase inhibitor present in blood and urine. It was purified from urine using affinity chromatography, ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Two forms of UTI were present in urine, A and B. A radioimmunoassay for measurement of UTI in urine and plasma was performed. The normal level of UTI in plasma and serum was about 2 mg/l. The normal excretion in urine was about 8 mg per 24 hours. The plasma and urine levels of UTI were studied in patients with acute pancreatitis and in patients undergoing cholecystectomy. Uremic patients had a marked increase of UTI in plasma compatible with decreased glomerular filtration. In samples from healthy persons as well as from patients only inhibitor A was found. Inhibitor B has recently been renamed bikunin because of its two Kunitz-type inhibiting domains. Inhibitor A might be called tetrakunin. Radioactively labeled UTI (inhibitor A) was injected intravenously in three male volunteers. The plasma half-life of {sup 125}I UTI was 2 hours. Free biologically active inhibitor was found in the urine during the first four hours after injection. The organ distribution of intravenously injected {sup 125}I UTI was studied in rats. Fifteen minutes after injection the major part of the radioactivity was found in the kidneys, suggesting that the kidneys are the primary site of UTI metabolism. Using immunohistochemical techniques UTI was found in the proximal tubules of the normal human kidney further indicating the tubular reabsorption and methabolisms of UTI.

  6. Urinary trypsin inhibitor - an experimental and clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The urinary trypsin inhibitor (UTI) is an acid stable proteinase inhibitor present in blood and urine. It was purified from urine using affinity chromatography, ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Two forms of UTI were present in urine, A and B. A radioimmunoassay for measurement of UTI in urine and plasma was performed. The normal level of UTI in plasma and serum was about 2 mg/l. The normal excretion in urine was about 8 mg per 24 hours. The plasma and urine levels of UTI were studied in patients with acute pancreatitis and in patients undergoing cholecystectomy. Uremic patients had a marked increase of UTI in plasma compatible with decreased glomerular filtration. In samples from healthy persons as well as from patients only inhibitor A was found. Inhibitor B has recently been renamed bikunin because of its two Kunitz-type inhibiting domains. Inhibitor A might be called tetrakunin. Radioactively labeled UTI (inhibitor A) was injected intravenously in three male volunteers. The plasma half-life of 125I UTI was 2 hours. Free biologically active inhibitor was found in the urine during the first four hours after injection. The organ distribution of intravenously injected 125I UTI was studied in rats. Fifteen minutes after injection the major part of the radioactivity was found in the kidneys, suggesting that the kidneys are the primary site of UTI metabolism. Using immunohistochemical techniques UTI was found in the proximal tubules of the normal human kidney further indicating the tubular reabsorption and methabolisms of UTI

  7. Complicated Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis

  8. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It may also contain tissue from the pancreas, pancreatic enzymes, and blood. ... located behind the stomach. It produces chemicals (called enzymes) ... Pancreatic pseudocysts most often develop after an episode of ...

  9. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... method of medical management. Patients may be prescribed pancreatic enzyme supplements to treat maldigestion, insulin to treat diabetes, ... in carbohydrates and low in protein and fat. Pancreatic enzymes such as Creon, Pancrease, and Violiase are helpful ...

  10. Complicated Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma? ; What is the impact of organ failure on mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis? ; Based on individual patient data from randomized trials, does early enteral tube feedin...

  11. Introduction of α-hydroxymethyamino acid residues in substrate specificity P1 position of trypsin inhibitor SFTI-1 from sunflower seeds retains its activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many complexes formed by serine proteinases and their inhibitors, the hydroxyl group provided by water molecule or by the inhibitor Ser residue is located close to the inhibitor P1-P1' reactive site. In order to investigate the role of this group, we synthesized analogues of trypsin inhibitor SFTI-1 isolated from the seeds of sunflower modified in P1 by α-hydroxymethylserine (HmSer) and both enantiomers of α-hydroxymethylvaline (HmVal). All the synthesized analogues inhibited bovine β-trypsin and human leukocyte elastase. SFTI-1 analogues with HmVal and HmSer appear to be potent inhibitors of bovine β-trypsin, whereas [Val5]SFTI-1 is practically inactive. Also trypsin inhibitory activity of [Ser5]SFTI-1 is significantly lower. Since the electrostatic interaction between protonated ε-NH2 group of the inhibitor P1 position and β-carboxylate of trypsin Asp189 is the main driving force for interaction of both molecules, the results obtained are very interesting. We believe that these SFTI-1 analogues belong to a novel class of serine proteinase inhibitors

  12. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M; Froeling, Fieke EM

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas owing to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects 3–9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  13. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M; Kadaba, Raghu

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas due to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects between 3 and 9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  14. Momordica charantia trypsin inhibitor Ⅱ inhibits growth and development of Helicoverpa armigera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manasi Alok Telang; Prashant Pyati; Mohini Sainani; Vidya Shrikant Gupta; Ashok Prabhakar Giri

    2009-01-01

    Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.) seeds contain several squash-type serine proteinase inhibitors (PIs),which inhibit the digestive proteinases of the polyphagous insect pest Helicoverpa armigera.In the present work isolation of a DNA sequence encoding the mature peptide of a trypsin inhibitor McTI-Ⅱ,its cloning and expression as a recombinant protein using Pichia pastoris have been reported.Recombinant McTI-Ⅱinhibited bovine trypsin at 1:1 molar ratio,as expected,but did not inhibit chymotrypsin or elastase.McTI-Ⅱalso strongly inhibited trypsin-like proteinases (81% inhibition) as well as the total proteolytic activity of digestive proteinases (70% inhibition) from the midgut of H.armigera larvae.The insect larvae fed with McTI-Ⅱ-incorporated artificial diet suffered over 70% reduction in the average larval weight after 12 days of feeding.Moreover,ingestion of McTI-Ⅱresulted in 23% mortality in the larval population.The strong antimetabolic activity of McTI-Ⅱtoward H.armigera indicates its probable use in developing insect tolerance in susceptible plants.

  15. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the autoimmune pancreatitis was introduced in 1995, it has been recognized as a form of chronic pancreatitis, which is always associated with autoimmune manifestations. As the improvement of technical and instrumental made in ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the diagnoses of autoimmune pancreatitis is no longer such difficult. Even though the treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis is available with a conservative therapy, there are many points that are still unclearly. These have stimulated widespread interest in this disease from gastroenterologists, endoscopists, pathologists, and prevalent research. The present article provides with our better understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  16. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the autoimmune pancreatitis was introduced in 1995, it has been recognized as a form of chronic pancreatitis, which is always associated with autoimmune manifestations. As the improvement of technical and instrumental made in ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the diagnoses of autoimmune pancreatitis is no longer such difficult. Even though the treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis is available with a conservative therapy, there are many points that are still unclearly. These have stimulated widespread interest in this disease from gastroenterologists, endoscopists, pathologists, and prevalent research. The present article provides with our better understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  17. Serum immunoreactive trypsin concentrations in diabetic children.

    OpenAIRE

    Moffat, A.; Marks, V.; Gamble, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Serum immunoreactive trypsin (SIT) concentrations measured in 616 children with diabetes of recent onset were low, in both boys and girls, in comparison with reference ranges established in patients with non-diabetic, non-infectious illnesses. The mean SIT concentration was 60% of the mean reference level in children tested within three weeks of the onset of diabetes, and about 40% in patients tested six months after the onset of diabetes. Very low SIT levels were found in about 10% of patien...

  18. Protein Analysis by Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Trypsin-Immobilized Organosiloxane Polymer Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulay, Maria T; Eberlin, Livia S; Zare, Richard N

    2015-12-15

    In the growing field of proteomic research, rapid and simple protein analysis is a crucial component of protein identification. We report the use of immobilized trypsin on hybrid organic-inorganic organosiloxane (T-OSX) polymers for the on-surface, in situ digestion of four model proteins: melittin, cytochrome c, myoglobin, and bovine serum albumin. Tryptic digestion products were sampled, detected, and identified using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) and nanoDESI-MS. These novel, reusable T-OSX arrays on glass slides allow for protein digestion in methanol:water solvents (1:1, v/v) and analysis directly from the same polymer surface without the need for sample preparation, high temperature, and pH conditions typically required for in-solution trypsin digestions. Digestion reactions were conducted with 2 μL protein sample droplets (0.35 mM) at incubation temperatures of 4, 25, 37, and 65 °C and digestion reaction times between 2 and 24 h. Sequence coverages were dependent on the hydrophobicity of the OSX polymer support and varied by temperature and digestion time. Under the best conditions, the sequence coverages, determined by DESI-MS, were 100% for melittin, 100% for cytochrome c, 90% for myoglobin, and 65% for bovine serum albumin. PMID:26567450

  19. Structure of an acyl-enzyme intermediate during catalysis: (Guanidinobenzoyl)trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal and molecular structure of trypsin at a transiently stable intermediate step during catalysis has been determined by X-ray diffraction methods. Bovine trypsin cleaved the substrate p-nitrophenyl p-guanidinobenzoate during crystallization under conditions in which the acyl-enzyme intermediate, (guanidinobenzoyl)trypsin, was stable. Diffraction data were measured with a FAST (Enraf Nonius) diffractometer. The structure was refined to a crystallographic residual of R = 0.16 for data in the resolution range 7.0-2.0 angstrom. The refined model of (guanidinobenzoyl)trypsin provides insight into the structural basis for its slow rate of deacylation, which in solution at 25 degree C and pH 7.4 exhibits a t1/2 of 12h. This allows formation of energetically favorable H bonds and an ion pair between the carboxylate of Asp-189 and the guanidino group of the substrate. This movement is dictated by the rigidity of the aromatic ring in guanidinobenzoate -- model-building indicates that this should not occur when arginine, with its more flexible aliphatic backbone, forms the ester bond with Ser-195. As a consequence, highly ordered water molecules in the active site are no longer close enough to the scissile ester bond to serve as potential nucleophiles for hydrolysis. Coupled with an apparent 35% decrease in the overall temperature factor of the acyl-enzyme relative to the native structure, the tight packing and rigidity of all atoms in the active site, including solvent, prevent disordered water molecules from easily approaching the carbonyl carbon atom via diffusion

  20. Microangiography of the pancreas in experimental hemorrhagic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In experimental hemorrhagic pancreatitis induced with sodium-taurocholate-trypsin, contrast enhancement of the pancreas in computed tomography (CT) has been shown to be decreased in spite of normal pancreatic blood flow. The contrast enhancement in CT depends on blood flow to the organ, capillary permeability and the amount of extracellular fluid in the organ. For further evaluation of the role of microcirculatory changes in our model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis, microangiography was performed in five normal piglets and in ten piglets with acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis. In this experimental model histological studies showed focal necroses, hemorrhages and leucocyte accumulation. In the affected areas microangiography revealed unfilled capillaries and extravasation of contrast medium. Arteries and arterioles were well filled, as in the normal control animals. These severe disturbances in the capillary circulation of the pancreas may explain the decreased contrast enhancement of the pancreas in CT during acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis. (orig.)

  1. [The therapeutic efficacy of the triase preparation in experimental pancreatic exocrine insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliaev, O A

    1994-01-01

    The therapeutical efficiency of the new enzyme preparation Triase which contains microbial lipase, protease, and alpha-amylase was studied in dogs with experimental pancreatic failure. Enzyme maldigestion was made by bandaging the great pancreatic duct with pancreatic trypsin injection. The daily therapeutical dose of Triase (4 tablets) eliminated dyspepsia, creatorrhoea, restored body weight. But steatorrhoea was not abolished completely. The fecal fat content decreased to 22.1% versus 33.2% for untreated dogs following 8 weeks of the experiment. The enzyme therapy led to a more rapid reduction in blood amylase and lipase activities. This testifies that pancreatitis ran less severely. PMID:7756959

  2. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2009-01-01

    bile duct. Obstructive jaundice is a common symptom at presentation, and pancreatic cancer represents an important clinical differential diagnosis. In late stages of the disease, the normal pancreatic parenchyma is often replaced by large amounts of fibrosis. Histologically, there seem to be two...... AIP responds to steroid treatment, also a trial with steroids, can help to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer. OUTLOOK AND DISCUSSION: This review presents the pathological, radiologic and laboratory findings of AIP. Moreover, the treatment and pathogenesis are discussed.......BACKGROUND: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a relatively newly recognized type of pancreatitis that is characterized by diffuse or focal swelling of the pancreas due to lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A PubMed literature search was...

  3. Mechanism of trypsin inactivation by intact Hymenolepis diminuta (Cestoda)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of trypsin inactivation by intact Hymenolepis diminuta has been investigated by biochemical and autoradiographic methods. Although worms inactivate trypsin and chymotrypsin in vitro, no inactivation of other endoproteases (subtilisin, pepsin and papain) could be demonstrated. Trypsin inactivation, as demonstrated by macromolecular substrates (azoalbumin, hemoglobin and casein), could not be detected using low molecular weight synthetic substrates such as N-p-benzoyl-DL-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BAPA) or N-p-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME). In addition, the kinetic parameters (K/sub m/ and k3) for H. diminuta-inactivated trypsin, using BAPA as the substrate, were not different from those of the native enzyme. The number of active sites for both native and inactivated trypsin were determined by titration with p-nitro-phenyl-p'-guanidinobenzoate. Absorbance values for both titrations were found to be identical. Dialysis, heating to 50 C, or repeated freezing and thawing of the inactivated trypsin did not reverse inactivation

  4. Fluorimetric study of interaction of benzidine with trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of benzidine (BEN) with trypsin was studied by fluorescence spectrum. It was shown that BEN has quenched the fluorescence launching from trypsin by reacting with it and forming a certain kind of new complex. The quenching and energy transfer mechanisms were discussed. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters at three different temperatures, the binding locality, and the binding power were obtained. The conformation of trypsin was discussed by synchronous and three-dimensional fluorescence techniques.

  5. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, J D; Morton, D. G.; Neoptolemos, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    The differential diagnosis between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis is very important as the management and prognosis of these two diseases is different. In most patients with pancreatic disease, the diagnosis can be established but there is a subgroup of patients in whom it is difficult to differentiate between these conditions because the clinical presentation is often similar and currently available diagnostic tests may be unable to distinguish between an inflammatory or neoplast...

  6. Action of Antiproteases on the Inflammatory Response in Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chia Chen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of acute pancreatitis ranges from mild edematous disease to a severe necrotizing process which is usually accompanied by local or systemic complications and even mortality. Early deaths (within the first week due to severe acute pancreatitis are generally caused by massive inflammatory responses which result in multiple organ failure. Although the exact mechanisms which trigger the inflammatory and necrotizing processes are not completely understood, it is generally accepted that autodigestion and activated leukocytes play important roles in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Proinflammatory cytokines are associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ failure syndrome in acute pancreatitis. A compensatory anti-inflammatory response occurs in parallel with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Trypsin secreted by the pancreatic acinar cells activates proteaseactivated receptor-2 which can result in the production of cytokines. Protease inhibitors such as aprotinin, gabexate mesilate, nafamostat mesilate, ulinastatin, etc. can inhibit the various enzymes and inflammatory response in experimental and clinical studies. Thus, protease inhibitors have been considered as a potential treatment to inhibit the pancreatic inflammation in acute pancreatitis. The beneficial effects of antiproteases on experimental severe acute pancreatitis may be, in part, due to the modulation of inflammatory cytokine responses. The effect of protease inhibitors on the inflammatory response in human acute pancreatitis deserves further study.

  7. The effect of dietary fiber on human pancreatic enzyme activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaif, G; Schneeman, B O

    1981-06-01

    Human pancreatic juice was used as a source of amylase, lipase, trypsin, and chymotrypsin. The human pancreatic juice was incubated with one of several dietary fibers, including alfalfa, oat bran, pectin. Solka Floc, wheat bran, and xylan. In addition, the human pancreatic juice was incubated without any fiber, which was used as the control. Incubation with Solka Floc (cellulose) and xylan (a hemicellulose) resulted in a substantial loss of activity in all enzymes assayed. Wheat bran and oat bran decreased amylase and chymotrypsin activity, while alfalfa decreased trypsin and chymotrypsin activity. Incubation with pectin significantly increased amylase and chymotrypsin activity. The mechanism by which sources of dietary fiber can alter enzyme activity is currently unknown. This effect of a dietary component on the activity of human pancreatic enzymes emphasizes the need to investigate further the effects of dietary fiber on digestion and absorption in the small intestine to understand fully its effects on metabolism. PMID:6165234

  8. Bombesin-stimulated serum immunoreactive trypsin in the different diagnosis between endocrine and exocrine tumors of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombesin administration was recently found to induce a marked increase in circulating immunoreactive trypsin (IRT), whose magnitude seems to reflect the functional capacity of pancreatic acinar cell mass. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of bombesin infusion on serum IRT concentration in patients with endocrine or exocrine tumors of the pancreas. Fifteen patients with pancreatic endocrine tumor, 17 patients with pancreatic exocrine carcinoma and 15 healty subjects were investigated. Serum IRT was measured by radioimmunoassay before and for 120 minutes after the start of bombesin infusion (9 ng/kg/min over 30 min). The integrated serum IRT response to bombesin administration in patients with endocrine tumor of the pancreas did not differ significantly from controls, but were significantly higher than in patients with exocrine carcinoma. In the latter the integrated IRT responses to bombesin infusion in patients with endocrine tumor can probably be explained by small tumor size and/or little invasion of the glandular parenchyma, resulting in an undetectable impairment of exocrine pancreatic function. The very low IRT responses in patients with exocrine carcinoma could reflect the presence of severe pancreatic damage. The results suggest that this newly proposed bombesin test may be useful in the preoperative differential diagnosis between endocrine and exocrine tumors of the pancreas

  9. Pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Alrawashdeh, Wasfi

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in higher-income countries, with 5-year survival only 10% (range 7%–25%), even in people presenting with early-stage cancer. Risk factors include age, smoking, chronic pancreatitis, a family history, and dietary factors. Diabetes mellitus may also increase the risk.

  10. Pancreatic Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Poras; Bhadana, Utsav; Arora, Mohinder P

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis of the pancreas is extremely rare and in most of the cases mimics pancreatic carcinoma. There are a number of case reports on pancreatic tuberculosis with various different presentations, but only a few case series have been published, and most of our knowledge about this disease comes from individual case reports. Patients of pancreatic tuberculosis may remain asymptomatic initially and manifest as an abscess or a mass involving local lymph nodes and usually present with non-specific features. Pancreatic tuberculosis may present with a wide range of imaging findings. It is difficult to diagnose tuberculosis of pancreas on imaging studies as they may present with masses, cystic lesions or abscesses and mass lesions in most of the cases mimic pancreatic carcinoma. As it is a rare entity, it cannot be recommended but suggested that pancreatic tuberculosis should be considered in cases with a large space occupying lesions associated with necrotic peripancreatic lymph nodes and constitutional symptoms. Ultrasonography/computed tomography/endosonography-guided biopsy is the recommended diagnostic technique. Most patients achieve complete cure with standard antituberculous therapy. The aims of this study are to review clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, and management of pancreatic tuberculosis and to present our experience of 5 cases of pancreatic tuberculosis. PMID:26884661

  11. Pancreatic necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic necrosis is a possible complication of acute pancreatitis. It is characterized by diffuse inflammation associated with exudation or leakage of pancreatic juice with its proteolytic enzymes into the peripancreatic tissues. Colonic complications of acute pancreatitis are uncommon events. Tha main purpose of our study was to correlate radiological findings of pancreatic necrosis as observed during barium enema to CT patterns. A retrospective study was therefore carried out on 40 patients affected with acute pancreatitis with local and systemic complication. The analysis of the results allowed different patterns to be observed, with the two techniques, in the acute and in the chronich phases. In the acute phase, barium enema of the colon showed inflammatory extrinsic processes involving the wall, with a typical localization related to the spread of pancreatic enzymes along mesenteric pathways, as described by Meyers. CT allowed a thorough evaluation of both the pathologic process and its spatial balance. In the chronic phase, barium enema showed fibrotic trictures and fistulas. CT demonstrated pseudoeystic masses and irregular focal areas of decreased attenuation or irregular pancreatic margins. This correlation shows how an extrinsic inflammatory involvement of the colon with a characteristic tomography may help make a diagnosis and plan therapy

  12. Potential effects of PKC or protease inhibitors on acute pancreatitis-induced tissue injury in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Changbin; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Xiangdong; Zhao, Liming; Andersson, Roland

    2007-01-01

    Background: Acute pancreatitis (AP) is still one of the severe diseases, that cause the development of multiple organ dysfunction with a high mortality. Effective therapies for AP are still limited, mainly due to unclear mechanisms by which A-P initiates both pancreatic and extrapancreatic organ injury. Methods: Protease inhibitors (aprotinin, pefabloc, trypsin inhibitor) and PKC inhibitors (polymyxin B, staurosporine) were administrated 30 min before 'induction of AP in rats. To investig...

  13. Biochemical properties of pancreatic colipase from the common stingray Dasyatis pastinaca

    OpenAIRE

    Gargouri Youssef; Bou Ali Madiha; Bouchaala Emna; Daoud Lobna; Karray Aida; Ben Bacha Abir; Ben Ali Yassine

    2011-01-01

    Background Pancreatic colipase is a required co-factor for pancreatic lipase, being necessary for its activity during hydrolysis of dietary triglycerides in the presence of bile salts. In the intestine, colipase is cleaved from a precursor molecule, procolipase, through the action of trypsin. This cleavage yields a peptide called enterostatin knoswn, being produced in equimolar proportions to colipase. Results In this study, colipase from the common stingray Dasyatis pastinaca (CoSPL) was pu...

  14. Pancreatic enzymes in the epithelium of intrahepatic large bile ducts and in hepatic bile in patients with extrahepatic bile duct obstruction.

    OpenAIRE

    Terada, T.; Morita, T; Hoso, M; Nakanuma, Y

    1994-01-01

    AIM--To determine whether pancreatic enzymes are present in hepatic bile and in intrahepatic bile duct epithelium. METHODS--The activity and proteins of pancreatic enzymes (pancreatic alpha-amylase, lipase, trypsin/trypsinogen) in hepatic bile were investigated using biochemical and western blot analyses in 25 patients with extrahepatic bile duct obstruction. Immunolocalization of enzyme proteins was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 20 necropsy livers with extrahepatic bile duct obstructi...

  15. Highly stable trypsin-aggregate coatings on polymer nanofibers for repeated protein digestion

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Byoung Chan; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Lee, Sang-Mok; Ahn, Hye-Kyung; Nair, Sujith; Kim, Seong H; Kim, Beom Soo; Petritis, Konstantinos; Camp, David G.; Grate, Jay W.; Smith, Richard D.; Koo, Yoon-Mo; Gu, Man Bock; Kim, Jungbae

    2009-01-01

    A stable and robust trypsin-based biocatalytic system was developed and demonstrated for proteomic applications. The system utilizes polymer nanofibers coated with trypsin aggregates for immobilized protease digestions. After covalently attaching an initial layer of trypsin to the polymer nanofibers, highly concentrated trypsin molecules are crosslinked to the layered trypsin by way of a glutaraldehyde treatment. This process produced a 300-fold increase in trypsin activity compared with a co...

  16. Immunoreactive trypsin and neonatalscreening for cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunoreactive trypsin (IRT) was measured in dried blood spots from 160.822 five-day-old babies as a part of a regionwide neonatal screening program for cystic fibrosis. A second test was performed for 492 babies in whom blood IRT levels were found greater than 900 μg/l; retesting revealed persistent elevation in 55. Sweat testing confirmed cystic fibrosis in 43 babies, but results were normal in 12. During the course of this study, a total of 51 cystic fibrosis babies were identified: 43 by newborn screening, 6 because they had meconium ileus; so, early diagnosis was achieved in 49 cases out of 51. Two newborn babies did not have elevated IRT and they were missed by the screening test. Our results confirm that elevated blood IRT is characteristic of newborn babies with cystic fibrosis and show that this test has an excellent specificity (99.7%) and a good sensitivity (95%) when used as a neonatal screening test

  17. Imaging of pancreatic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihashi, H.; Hirose, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Kamikita, Y.; Asano, A. (Asahikawa Medical College, Hokkaido (Japan))

    1981-11-01

    Diagnosing pancreatic diseases using non invasive methods such as ultrasound and computed tomography was reviewed. Images characteristic to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer were explained. Pancreatic cancer accompanied with pancreatitis was demonstrated on echograms and scintigrams. The necessity of follow-up observation of pancreatitis was stressed.

  18. Role of intrapancreatic SPINK1/Spink3 expression in the development of pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki eOhmuraya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies on hereditary pancreatitis have provided evidence in favor of central role for trypsin activity in the disease. Identification of genetic variants of trypsinogen linked the protease to the onset of pancreatitis, and biochemical characterization proposed an enzymatic gain of function as the initiating mechanism. Mutations of serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1gene (SPINK1 are shown to be associated with hereditary pancreatitis. We previously reported that Spink3 (a mouse homologue gene of human SPINK1 deficient mice showed excessive autophagy, followed by inappropriate trypsinogen activation in the exocrine pancreas. These data indicate that the role of SPINK1/Spink3 is not only trypsin inhibitor, but also negative regulator of autophagy. On the other hand, recent studies showed that high levels of SPINK1 protein detected in a serum or urine were associated with adverse outcome in various cancer types. It has been suggested that expression of SPINK1 and trypsin is balanced in normal tissue, but this balance could be disrupted during tumor progression. Based on the structural similarity between SPINK1 and epidermal growth factor (EGF, we showed that SPINK1 protein binds and activates EGF receptor, thus acting as a growth factor on tumor cell lines. In this review, we summarize the old and new roles of SPINK1/Spink3 in trypsin inhibition, autophagy, and cancer cell growth. These new functions of SPINK1/Spink3 may be related to the development of chronic pancreatitis.

  19. Acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000287.htm Acute pancreatitis To use the sharing features on this page, ... fatty foods after the attack has improved. Outlook (Prognosis) Most cases go away in a week. However, ...

  20. Acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Mofleh Ibrahim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The past few years have witnessed a tremendous progress in our knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and classification of acute pancreatitis. The role of ischemia, lysosomal enzymes, oxygen free radicals, polymorphnuclear cells-byproducts and inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of pancreatic necrosis and multiple organ failure has been emphasized. Furthermore, the recent knowledge about agents infecting pancreatic necrosis, routes of infection, bacteriological examination of fine needle aspirate and appropriate antibiotics have changed the concept of acute pancreatitis. New diagnostic tests such as rapid urinary trypsinogen-2 test and inflammatory mediators including polymorphnuclear elastase, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 contribute to early diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and initiation of an appropriate therapy.

  1. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body Blockage of the tubes (ducts) that drain enzymes from the pancreas Cystic fibrosis High levels of a fat, called ... Limiting caffeine The health care provider may prescribe pancreatic enzymes. You must take these medicines with every meal. ...

  2. Acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes will be done. These include: Increased blood amylase level Increased serum blood lipase level Increased urine amylase ... include: Abdominal CT scan Abdominal MRI Abdominal ultrasound

  3. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Associated with Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Vecchiarelli, Silvia; Di Marco, Maria Cristina; SERRA, CARLA; Santini, Donatella; Calculli, Lucia; Fabbri, Dario; Rojas Mena, Betzabè; Imbrogno, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), in contrast to other benign chronic pancreatic diseases, can be cured with immunosuppressant drugs, thus the differentiation of AIP from pancreatic cancer is of particular interest in clinical practice. There is the possibility that some patients with AIP may develop pancreatic cancer, and this possibility contributes to increasing our difficulties in differentiating AIP from pancreatic cancer. We herein report the case of a 70-year-old man in whom pancreatic ad...

  4. Interaction of gallic acid with trypsin analyzed by spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Song

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between trypsin and gallic acid (GA were investigated by means of fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering (RLS spectroscopy, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, and enzymatic inhibition assay. It was found that GA can cause the fluorescence quenching of trypsin during the process of formation of GA-trypsin complex, resulting in inhibition of trypsin activity (IC50 = 3.9 × 10−6 mol/L. The fluorescence spectroscopic data showed that the quenching efficiency can reach about 80%. The binding constants were 1.9371 × 104 L/mol, 1.8192 × 104 L/mol, and 1.7465 × 104 L/mol at three temperatures, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters revealed that hydrogen bonds, van der Waals, hydrophobic, and electrostatic interactions were involved in the binding process of GA to trypsin. Molecular modeling studies illustrated a specific display of binding information and explained most of the experiment phenomena. The microenvironments of tryptophan and tyrosine residue in trypsin were changed by the GA. Results indicated that GA was a strong quencher and inhibitor of trypsin.

  5. Comparison of the aggregation behavior of soy and bovine whey protein hydrolysates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, B.J.H.; Alting, A.C.; Gruppen, H.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Soy-derived proteins (soy protein isolate, glycinin, and ß-conglycinin) and bovine whey-derived proteins (whey protein isolate, ¿-lactalbumin, ß-lactoglobulin) were hydrolyzed using subtilisin Carlsberg, chymotrypsin, trypsin, bromelain, and papain. The (in)solubility of the hydrolysates ob

  6. Acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective study was performed on the relationship of CT findings to the clinical course of 148 patients with acute pancreatitis. The type of pancreatic inflammation seen on CT was classified into six categories based on an overall assessment of size, contour and density of the gland, and peripancreatic abnormalities. The majority (94%) of patients in whom CT showed mild pancreatic changes (grades A, B and C) had two or less positive clinical indicaters of severe pancreatitis (Ranson's signs). In contrast, 92% of patients in whom CT showed more severe changes of pancreatitis (grades D, E or F) had three or more positive signs. The nine patients who died with pancreatitis-related complications were in grades D, E or F. We wish to draw attention to a CT appearance which we have called 'fat islets' (low density intrapancreatic or peripancreatic areas, the contents of which approach fat in attenuation values); there was a strong correlation between this appearance and subsequent infection. (author). 24 refs.; 7 figs.; 4 tabs

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  8. Enzyme immunoassay of immunoreactive trypsin in serum and blood spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An enzyme immunoassay method for the assay of serum immunoreactive trypsin (IRT) is described. The method is a two site binding assay carried out on microtitre plates as the solid phase. Wells were coated with affinity purified anti-human trypsin and bioinylated anti-trypsin and avidin-β-galactosidase were used as the second antibody and detection system respectively. The assay was sensitive enough to determine IRT concentrations in either serum or dried blood spots. A good correlation was obtained when the method was compared with the Hoechst radioimmunoassay method. (Author)

  9. Duodenal foreign body mimicking acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the specificity and sensitivity of plasma and urinary trypsinogen activation peptide (TAP) concentrat. Design: Retrospective analysis of clinical cases. Procedure: Dogs were classified into three groups: healthy animals, dogs with confirmed pancreatitis and dogs with nonpancreatic disease, which clinically or biochemically resembled pancreatitis. This last group was further subdivided into dogs with renal and those with nonrenal disease. The plasma and urinary TAP concentration was determined by a competitive enzyme immunoassay. Clinical cases additionally had serum trypsin-like immunoreactivity concentration measured, as well as radiography and ultrasound of the abdomen and further diagnostic procedures. Nonparametric analysis of variance (Kruskal-Wallis test) was performed using Statistix 4.0 program. Results: There was a wide range of urinary TAP concentration in healthy dogs (mean 52.30 nmol/L, standard deviation 55.25) that made interpretation of urinary TAP concentrations difficult in the other groups. There was a narrow reference range for plasma TAP (mean 2.67 nmol/L, standard deviation 0.93). Plasma and urinary TAP concentrations, as well as urinary TAP to creatinine ratio, were all increased in dogs that died with necrotising pancreatitis. Values were not increased in mild, interstitial pancreatitis. Increased plasma TAP concentrations were also present in dogs with severe renal disease. Conclusion: Plasma TAP concentration isa good prognostic indicator in naturally occurring pancreatitis in dogs. The failure of TAP to increase in mild pancreatitis, and the increase present in severe renal disease, suggests its measurement has limited application as a sole diagnostic tool for canine pancreatitis. Further investigations are required in order to explain the large variability of urinary TAP concentration and the presence of circulating TAP in healthy dogs

  10. Flavianate, an amino acid precipitant, is a competitive inhibitor of trypsin at pH 3.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Schneedorf

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Textile dyes bind to proteins leading to selective co-precipitation of a complex involving one protein molecule and more than one dye molecule of opposite charge in acid solutions, in a process of reversible denaturation that can be utilized for protein fractionation. In order to understand what occurs before the co-precipitation, a kinetic study using bovine ß-trypsin and sodium flavianate was carried out based on reaction progress curve techniques. The experiments were carried out using a-CBZ-L-Lys-p-nitrophenyl ester as substrate which was added to 50 mM sodium citrate buffer, pH 3.0, containing varying concentrations of ß-trypsin and dye. The reaction was recorded spectrophotometrically at 340 nm for 30 min, and the families of curves obtained were analyzed simultaneously by fitting integrated Michaelis-Menten equations. The dye used behaved as a competitive inhibitor of trypsin at pH 3.0, with Ki = 99 µM; kinetic parameters for the substrate hydrolysis were: Km = 32 µM, and kcat = 0.38/min. The competitive character of the inhibition suggests a specific binding of the first dye molecule to His-57, the only positively charged residue at the active site of the enzyme.

  11. On the reproducibility of protein crystal structures: five atomic resolution structures of trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Details of five very high-resolution accurate structures of bovine trypsin are compared in the context of the reproducibility of models obtained from crystals grown under identical conditions. Structural studies of proteins usually rely on a model obtained from one crystal. By investigating the details of this model, crystallographers seek to obtain insight into the function of the macromolecule. It is therefore important to know which details of a protein structure are reproducible or to what extent they might differ. To address this question, the high-resolution structures of five crystals of bovine trypsin obtained under analogous conditions were compared. Global parameters and structural details were investigated. All of the models were of similar quality and the pairwise merged intensities had large correlation coefficients. The Cα and backbone atoms of the structures superposed very well. The occupancy of ligands in regions of low thermal motion was reproducible, whereas solvent molecules containing heavier atoms (such as sulfur) or those located on the surface could differ significantly. The coordination lengths of the calcium ion were conserved. A large proportion of the multiple conformations refined to similar occupancies and the residues adopted similar orientations. More than three quarters of the water-molecule sites were conserved within 0.5 Å and more than one third were conserved within 0.1 Å. An investigation of the protonation states of histidine residues and carboxylate moieties was consistent for all of the models. Radiation-damage effects to disulfide bridges were observed for the same residues and to similar extents. Main-chain bond lengths and angles averaged to similar values and were in agreement with the Engh and Huber targets. Other features, such as peptide flips and the double conformation of the inhibitor molecule, were also reproducible in all of the trypsin structures. Therefore, many details are similar in models obtained from

  12. On the reproducibility of protein crystal structures: five atomic resolution structures of trypsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Dauter, Miroslawa [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Brzuszkiewicz, Anna [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); University of Wroclaw, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Dauter, Zbigniew, E-mail: dauter@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Details of five very high-resolution accurate structures of bovine trypsin are compared in the context of the reproducibility of models obtained from crystals grown under identical conditions. Structural studies of proteins usually rely on a model obtained from one crystal. By investigating the details of this model, crystallographers seek to obtain insight into the function of the macromolecule. It is therefore important to know which details of a protein structure are reproducible or to what extent they might differ. To address this question, the high-resolution structures of five crystals of bovine trypsin obtained under analogous conditions were compared. Global parameters and structural details were investigated. All of the models were of similar quality and the pairwise merged intensities had large correlation coefficients. The C{sup α} and backbone atoms of the structures superposed very well. The occupancy of ligands in regions of low thermal motion was reproducible, whereas solvent molecules containing heavier atoms (such as sulfur) or those located on the surface could differ significantly. The coordination lengths of the calcium ion were conserved. A large proportion of the multiple conformations refined to similar occupancies and the residues adopted similar orientations. More than three quarters of the water-molecule sites were conserved within 0.5 Å and more than one third were conserved within 0.1 Å. An investigation of the protonation states of histidine residues and carboxylate moieties was consistent for all of the models. Radiation-damage effects to disulfide bridges were observed for the same residues and to similar extents. Main-chain bond lengths and angles averaged to similar values and were in agreement with the Engh and Huber targets. Other features, such as peptide flips and the double conformation of the inhibitor molecule, were also reproducible in all of the trypsin structures. Therefore, many details are similar in models obtained

  13. Orthosteric and Allosteric Regulation in Trypsin-Like Peptidases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann-Tofting, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Trypsin-like serine peptidases play an important role in many physiological and pathophysiological processes, the latter including cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Binding of natural ligands to functional sites on the peptidase surface balances the level of activity and substrate specificity of...... peptidase and allosterically modulate the function of the active site, represents two important activity-regulating mechanisms in trypsin-like serine peptidases. Development of specific orthosteric agents as therapeutics is a challenge due to similar active site topology within the trypsin-like serine...... peptidase. The thesis describes how X-ray crystal structure analysis and biochemical analysis were used to demonstrate new concepts for orthosteric regulation of activity in the trypsin-like serine peptidase urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), studying two types of orthosteric agents, namely cyclic...

  14. Central role of neutrophil in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Wen; Meng, Xiao-Xiao; Xu, Ping

    2015-11-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is an acute abdominal disease with the strong systemic inflammatory response, and rapidly progresses from a local pancreatic damage into multiple organ dysfunction. For many decades, the contributions of neutrophils to the pathology of SAP were traditionally thought to be the chemokine and cytokine cascades that accompany inflammation. In this review, we focus mainly on those recently recognized aspects of neutrophils in SAP processes. First, emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic interventions targeting neutrophils significantly lower tissue damage and protect against the occurrence of pancreatitis. Second, trypsin activation promotes the initial neutrophils recruitment into local pancreas, and subsequently neutrophils infiltration in turn triggers trypsin production. Finally, neutrophils have the unique ability to release neutrophil extracellular traps even in the absence of pathogens. PMID:26249268

  15. Investigation on potential enzyme toxicity of clenbuterol to trypsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Jun; Xu, Qifei; Dai, Jinping; Liu, Rutao

    2013-03-01

    Clenbuterol (CLB) is a kind of β2-adrenergic agonists which was illegally used as feed additives nowadays. The toxic interaction of CLB with trypsin, an important digestive enzyme, was studied in vitro using multi-spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling methods. CLB was proved to bind with trypsin in S1 pocket, forming a complex driven by the dominant force of H-bond. The binding constant was calculated to be 1.79887 × 105 L mol-1 at 289 K and 0.32584 × 105 L mol-1 at 310 K, respectively. The skeleton of trypsin became loosened and unfolded with the amino residues microenvironment changed. The secondary and tertiary structure of trypsin also varied. Molecular modeling studies illustrated specific display of the binding information and explained most of the experiment phenomena. The binding site of CLB induced the fluorescence quenching as well as inhibition of enzyme activity of trypsin. The study confirmed that CLB had potential toxicity on both the structure and function of trypsin and the effects enhanced with the increasing concentration of CLB.

  16. Genetic susceptibility factors for alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghdassi, Ali A; Weiss, F Ulrich; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Simon, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease of the pancreas and frequently associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. Since only a small proportion of alcoholics eventually develop chronic pancreatitis genetic susceptibility factors have long been suspected to contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Smaller studies in ethnically defined populations have found that not only polymorphism in proteins involved in the metabolism of ethanol, such as Alcohol Dehydrogenase and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase, can confer a risk for developing chronic pancreatitis but also mutations that had previously been reported in association with idiopathic pancreatitis, such as SPINK1 mutations. In a much broader approach employing genome wide search strategies the NAPS study found that polymorphisms in the Trypsin locus (PRSS1 rs10273639), and the Claudin 2 locus (CLDN2-RIPPLY1-MORC4 locus rs7057398 and rs12688220) confer an increased risk of developing alcohol-induced pancreatitis. These results from North America have now been confirmed by a European consortium. In another genome wide approach polymorphisms in the genes encoding Fucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2) non-secretor status and blood group B were not only found in association with higher serum lipase levels in healthy volunteers but also to more than double the risk for developing alcohol-associated chronic pancreatitis. These novel genetic associations will allow to investigate the pathophysiological and biochemical basis of alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis on a cellular level and in much more detail than previously possible. PMID:26149858

  17. Lupeol Protects Against Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Jun; Bae, Gi-Sang; Choi, Sun Bok; Jo, Il-Joo; Kim, Dong-Goo; Shin, Joon-Yeon; Lee, Sung-Kon; Kim, Myoung-Jin; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2015-10-01

    Lupeol is a triterpenoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables and is known to exhibit a wide range of biological activities, including antiinflammatory and anti-cancer effects. However, the effects of lupeol on acute pancreatitis specifically have not been well characterized. Here, we investigated the effects of lupeol on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Acute pancreatitis was induced via an intraperitoneal injection of cerulein (50 µg/kg). In the lupeol treatment group, lupeol was administered intraperitoneally (10, 25, or 50 mg/kg) 1 h before the first cerulein injection. Blood samples were taken to determine serum cytokine and amylase levels. The pancreas was rapidly removed for morphological examination and used in the myeloperoxidase assay, trypsin activity assay, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In addition, we isolated pancreatic acinar cells using a collagenase method to examine the acinar cell viability. Lupeol administration significantly attenuated the severity of pancreatitis, as was shown by reduced pancreatic edema, and neutrophil infiltration. In addition, lupeol inhibited elevation of digestive enzymes and cytokine levels, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1, and interleukin (IL)-6. Furthermore, lupeol inhibited the cerulein-induced acinar cell death. In conclusion, these results suggest that lupeol exhibits protective effects on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:26179197

  18. Cleaning out the Litterbox of Proteomic Scientists’ Favorite Pet: Optimized Data Analysis Avoiding Trypsin Artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    Schittmayer, Matthias; Fritz, Katarina; Liesinger, Laura; Griss, Johannes; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Chemically modified trypsin is a standard reagent in proteomics experiments but is usually not considered in database searches. Modification of trypsin is supposed to protect the protease against autolysis and the resulting loss of activity. Here, we show that modified trypsin is still subject to self-digestion, and, as a result, modified trypsin-derived peptides are present in standard digests. We depict that these peptides commonly lead to false-positive assignments even if native trypsin i...

  19. Radioimmunological determination and characterization of cathodal trypsin-like immunoreactivity in normal human plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioimmunological method for determination of human cathodal trypsin-like immunoreactivity is described. DFP-treated human cathodal trypsin is used as standard and tracer. Freshly drawn normal human plasma contains about 25μg/l of cathodal trypsin-like immunoreactivity measured as DFP-treated cathodal trypsin. The normally circulating cathodal trypsin-like immunoreactivity is shown to consist mainly of cathodal trypsinogen. (Auth.)

  20. Bovine explant model of degeneration of the intervertebral disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivan Sarit

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many new treatments for degeneration of the intervertebral disc are being developed which can be delivered through a needle. These require testing in model systems before being used in human patients. Unfortunately, because of differences in anatomy, there are no ideal animal models of disc degeneration. Bovine explant model systems have many advantages but it is not possible to inject any significant volume into an intact disc. Therefore we have attempted to mimic disc degeneration in an explant bovine model via enzymatic digestion. Methods Bovine coccygeal discs were incubated with different concentrations of the proteolytic enzymes, trypsin and papain, and maintained in culture for up to 3 weeks. A radio-opaque solution was injected to visualise cavities generated. Degenerative features were monitored histologically and biochemically (water and glycosaminoglycan content, via dimethylmethylene blue. Results and Conclusion The central region of both papain and trypsin treated discs was macro- and microscopically fragmented, with severe loss of metachromasia. The integrity of the surrounding tissue was mostly in tact with cells in the outer annulus appearing viable. Biochemical analysis demonstrated greatly reduced glycosaminoglycan content in these compared to untreated discs. We have shown that bovine coccygeal discs, treated with proteolytic enzymes can provide a useful in vitro model system for developing and testing potential new treatments of disc degeneration, such as injectable implants or biological therapies.

  1. Advances in the etiology of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Aghdassi, Ali A; Budde, Christoph; Nitsche, Claudia; Sauter, Gabriele; Persike, Maria; Günther, Annett; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    In the past, chronic pancreatitis has been regarded as a fairly uniform and largely untreatable disorder that most commonly affects patients who both lack gainful employment or adequate insurance coverage and have a tendency to smoke and drink. Large clinical trials suggest that this perception is not only misguided and discriminatory but also not based on facts. We forgot that the perception of chronic liver disease was similar before World War II, and just like liver cirrhosis the fibrosis and cirrhosis of the pancreas--i.e. chronic pancreatitis--is the end result of a range of environmental, inflammatory, infectious and genetic disorders. A growing number of these have only recently been recognized as a distinct entity and several of which are becoming truly treatable. A large proportion of the risk for developing pancreatitis is conveyed by genetic risk factors, and we estimate that less than half of those have been identified so far. The same holds true for protective factors that can prevent pancreatitis, even in the face of excessive alcohol abuse. Various gene mutations and polymorphisms appear to determine an individual's susceptibility for developing pancreatic disease, for the severity of the disease, and for the disease progression. The spectrum of genotype/phenotype associations ranges from straightforward autosomal dominant traits with near-complete penetrance, as for the most common mutations in the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1), to moderate risks factors without mendelian inheritance patterns, as for SPINK1 and CFTR mutations, to very subtle risk associations and disease modifiers that can only be identified in large cohort studies, as for the chymotrypsin C, calcium-sensing receptor and the anionic trypsin (PRSS2) mutations. Only a better understanding of the disease mechanisms that underlie these changes will make an individualized therapy of pancreatic disorders a realistic option. PMID:20814206

  2. Pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeff, Jorg; Korc, Murray; Apte, Minoti; La Vecchia, Carlo; Johnson, Colin D; Biankin, Andrew V; Neale, Rachel E; Tempero, Margaret; Tuveson, David A; Hruban, Ralph H; Neoptolemos, John P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a major cause of cancer-associated mortality, with a dismal overall prognosis that has remained virtually unchanged for many decades. Currently, prevention or early diagnosis at a curable stage is exceedingly difficult; patients rarely exhibit symptoms and tumours do not display sensitive and specific markers to aid detection. Pancreatic cancers also have few prevalent genetic mutations; the most commonly mutated genes are KRAS, CDKN2A (encoding p16), TP53 and SMAD4 - none of which are currently druggable. Indeed, therapeutic options are limited and progress in drug development is impeded because most pancreatic cancers are complex at the genomic, epigenetic and metabolic levels, with multiple activated pathways and crosstalk evident. Furthermore, the multilayered interplay between neoplastic and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment challenges medical treatment. Fewer than 20% of patients have surgically resectable disease; however, neoadjuvant therapies might shift tumours towards resectability. Although newer drug combinations and multimodal regimens in this setting, as well as the adjuvant setting, appreciably extend survival, ∼80% of patients will relapse after surgery and ultimately die of their disease. Thus, consideration of quality of life and overall survival is important. In this Primer, we summarize the current understanding of the salient pathophysiological, molecular, translational and clinical aspects of this disease. In addition, we present an outline of potential future directions for pancreatic cancer research and patient management. PMID:27158978

  3. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samir Habashi; Peter V Draganov

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are complications of acute or chronic pancreatitis. Initial diagnosis is accomplished most often by cross-sectional imaging. Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration has become the preferred test to help distinguish pseudocyst from other cystic lesions of the pancreas. Most pseudocysts resolve spontaneously with supportive care. The size of the pseudocyst and the length of time the cyst has been present are poor predictors for the potential of pseudocyst resolution or complications, but in general, larger cysts are more likely to be symptomatic or cause complications. The main two indications for some type of invasive drainage procedure are persistent patient symptoms or the presence of complications (infection, gastric outlet or biliary obstruction, bleeding). Three different strategies for pancreatic pseudocysts drainage are available: endoscopic (transpapillary or transmural) drainage, percutaneous catheter drainage, or open surgery. To date, no prospective controlled studies have compared directly these approaches. As a result, the management varies based on local expertise, but in general, endoscopic drainage is becoming the preferred approach because it is less invasive than surgery, avoids the need for external drain, and has a high long-term success rate. A tailored therapeutic approach taking into consideration patient preferences and involving multidisciplinary team of therapeutic endoscopist, interventional radiologist and pancreatic surgeon should be considered in all cases.

  4. Pancreatitis - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may ask you to take extra capsules, called pancreatic enzymes. These will help your body absorb fats in ... tell you how many. When you take these enzymes, you may also need to ... stomach. If your pancreas has a lot of damage, you may also ...

  5. The effects of trypsin on rat brain astrocyte activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Fereidoni

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are cells within the central nervous system which are activated in a wide spectrum of infections, and autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases. In pathologic states, they produce inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and nitric oxide (NO, and sometimes they induce apoptosis. Their protease-activated receptors (PARs can be activated by proteases, e.g. thrombin and trypsin, which are important in brain inflammation. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of different concentrations of trypsin (1 to 100U/ml on cultured astrocytes.In the present study, two-day rat infants' brains were isolated and homogenized after meninges removal, then cultivated in DMEM + 10% FBS medium. 10 days later, astrocytes were harvested and recultivated for more purification (up to 95%, using Immunocytochemistry method, in order to be employed for tests. They were affected by different concentrations of trypsin (1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 U/ml. To reveal the inflammation progress, NO concentrations (the Griess test were assessed after 24 and 48 hours.The results showed that trypsin concentration up to 20 U/ml caused a significant increase in NO, in a dose-dependent manner, on cultured astrocytes (P < 0.001. Trypsin 20 U/ml increased NO production fivefold the control group (P < 0.001. At higher concentrations than 20 U/ml, NO production diminished (P < 0.001. At 100 U/ml, NO production was less than the control group (P < 0.001.Inflammatory effects of trypsin 5-20 U/ml are probably due to the stimulation of astrocytes' PAR-2 receptors and the increasing of the activation of NF-κB, PKC, MAPKs. Stimulation of astrocytes' PAR-2 receptors causes an increase in iNOS activation which in turn leads to NO production. However, higher trypsin concentration possibly made astrocyte apoptosis; therefore, NO production diminished. These assumptions need to be further investigated.

  6. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? Cancer of the pancreas is a genetic ... found in cigarette smoke. The genetics of hereditary pancreatic cancer is a focus of research at Johns Hopkins. ...

  7. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes, Gum Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes and Pregnancy Financial Help for Diabetes Care Diabetes Statistics Pancreatic Islet Transplantation What are pancreatic islets? Pancreatic islets, also called ...

  8. Pancreatic tuberculosis masquerading as pancreatic serous cystadenoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seung Goun Hong; Jae Seon Kim; Moon Kyung Joo; Kwang Gyun Lee; Key Hyeon Kim; Cho Rong Oh; Jong-Jae Park; Young-Tae Bak

    2009-01-01

    Solitary pancreatic involvement of tuberculosis is rare,especially in an immunocompetent individual, and it may be misdiagnosed as pancreatic cystic neoplasms.Pancreatic cystic neoplasms are being identified in increasing numbers, probably because of the frequent use of radiology and advances in endoscopic techniques.However, they are composed of a variety of neoplasms with a wide range of malignant potential,and it is often difficult to differentiate pancreatic tuberculosis mimicking cystic neoplasms from benign or malignant pancreatic cystic neoplasms. Non-surgical diagnosis of pancreatic tuberculosis is inconclusive and continues to be a challenge in many cases. If so,then laparotomy should be employed to establish the diagnosis. Therefore, pancreatic tuberculosis should be kept in mind during the differential diagnosis of solitary cystic masses in the pancreas. We report a patient who had solitary pancreatic tuberculosis masquerading as pancreatic serous cystadenoma.

  9. Dietary control of late trypsin gene transcription in Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega, F G; Barillas-Mury, C; Wells, M A

    1994-06-01

    In Aedes aegypti the levels of midgut trypsin activity after feeding are directly proportional to the protein concentration in the meal. The mechanisms of this up-regulatory event were investigated by analyzing the expression of the late trypsin gene under different dietary conditions. Transcription of the gene was dependent on both the quality and quantity of protein in the meal. As measured by Northern blot analysis, the levels of late trypsin gene expression increased up to 100-fold 24 h after feeding on gamma-globulin, hemoglobin or albumin (100 mg/ml). In contrast, gelatin, histone, amino acids, saline or agarose were very poor inducers of transcription. The rates of late trypsin transcription induced during the first 24 h were directly proportional to the concentration of protein in the meal. These data further support the suggestion that the primary mechanism that regulates the synthesis of trypsin in the mosquito midgut is transcriptional regulation of the gene. This regulatory mechanism enables the midgut to maintain the appropriate balance between protease synthesis and the protein content of the meal. PMID:7519098

  10. Influence of long-term keeping on immobilized trypsin subjected to γ-sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proteolytic activity of native trypsin decreased after γ-irradiation. A further decrease in trypsin activity was observed during long-term keeping of irradiated samples of native trypsin. The intensive ESR signal of γ-irradiated native trypsin disappeared after the long-term keeping. The proteolytic activity of trypsin, immobilized on dialdehyde cellulose and irradiated with doses from 5 to 100 kGy, remained virtually invariable after 2-15 months of keeping whereas the ESR signal in the samples of γ-irradiated immobilized trypsin descreased during the long-term keeping

  11. Early trypsin activity is part of the signal transduction system that activates transcription of the late trypsin gene in the midgut of the mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillas-Mury, C V; Noriega, F G; Wells, M A

    1995-02-01

    Trypsin activity during the first hours after feeding is essential to induce late trypsin gene expression. These results are consistent with the idea that free amino acids or other products released during digestion might be the initial signal for transcriptional activation of late trypsin. Besides early trypsin, some other factor(s) have to be translated for induction of late trypsin. This is the first case in which the proteolytic activity of a digestive enzyme is part of the signal transduction system which regulates expression of a second gene. The presence of two trypsins allows the mosquito to assess the quality of the meal and adjust the levels of late trypsin for a particular meal with remarkable flexibility. PMID:7711754

  12. Characterization of a trypsin inhibitor from equine urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraragavan, K; Singh, K; Wachter, E; Hochstrasser, K

    1992-03-01

    A trypsin inhibitor was isolated from pregnant mares' urine by adsorption on bentonite and elution with aqueous pyridine followed by batch DEAE-cellulose treatment and column chromatography. Final purification to an electrophoretically homogenous glycoprotein was achieved by gel permeation chromatography. This equine urinary trypsin inhibitor (E-UTI) is acid- and heat-stable, has a molecular weight of 22 to 23 kDa, an isoelectric point of 4.55, forms a 1:1 molar complex with trypsin and has serine as its N-terminal amino acid. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of this protein is almost identical with that of EI-14, the inhibitor obtained from horse serum by tryptic treatment, except for two extra amino acid residues, Ser-Lys- on the N-terminal end of E-UTI. In its isoelectric point E-UTI differs from EI-14 and the inhibitor from human urine. PMID:1627153

  13. The effect of gamma-rays on immobilized trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of 0.05-10 Msub(rad) ionizing radiation doses on trypsin, immobilized on dialdehydecellulose, has been studied. Whereas the activity of the native trypsin, when irradiated in the doses up to 10 Msub(rad), decreases by 25% as compared with the initial one, the activity of the immobilized trypsin under the same conditions remains stable. The treatment, to which cellulose is subjected in the process of preparation for immobilization, results in reduction of the initial dissemination. During irradiation with the 0.05-0.4 Msub(rad) doses of samples ''infected'' in the experiment by staphylococcus (200 thousand microbe bodies per sample weighing 0.2 g) a distinct correlation between the irradiation dose and the object dissemination is obtained

  14. Genetics of acute and chronic pancreatitis: An update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VV; Ravi; Kanth; D; Nageshwar; Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Progress made in identifying the genetic susceptibility underlying acute and chronic pancreatitis has benefitted the clinicians in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease in a better way. The identification of mutations in cationic trypsinogen gene(PRSS1 gene; functional gain mutations) and serine protease inhibitor kazal type 1(SPINK1 gene; functional loss mutations) and other potential susceptibility factors in genes that play an important role in the pancreatic secretory functions or response to inflammation during pancreatic injury has changed the current concepts and understanding of a complex multifactorial disease like pancreatitis. An indi-vidual’s susceptibility to the disease is governed by ge-netic factors in combination with environmental factors. Candidate gene and genetic linkage studies have iden-tified polymorphisms in cationic trypsinogen(PRSS1), SPINK1, cystic fibrosis trans-membrane conductance regulator(CFTR), Chymotrypsinogen C(CTRC), Ca-thepsin B(CTSB) and calcium sensing receptor(CASR). Individuals with polymorphisms in the mentioned genes and other as yet identified genes are at an enhanced risk for the disease. Recently, polymorphisms in genes other than those involved in "intra-pancreatic trypsin regulatory mechanism" namely Claudin-2(CLDN2) andCarboxypeptidase A1(CPA1) gene have also been iden-tified for their association with pancreatitis. With ever growing number of studies trying to identify the genetic susceptibility in the form of single nucleotide polymor-phisms, this review is an attempt to compile the avail-able information on the topic.

  15. Age-dependent effects of UCP2 deficiency on experimental acute pancreatitis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Müller

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP for many years but experimental evidence is still limited. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2-deficient mice are an accepted model of age-related oxidative stress. Here, we have analysed how UCP2 deficiency affects the severity of experimental AP in young and older mice (3 and 12 months old, respectively triggered by up to 7 injections of the secretagogue cerulein (50 μg/kg body weight at hourly intervals. Disease severity was assessed at time points from 3 hours to 7 days based on pancreatic histopathology, serum levels of alpha-amylase, intrapancreatic trypsin activation and levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO in lung and pancreatic tissue. Furthermore, in vitro studies with pancreatic acini were performed. At an age of 3 months, UCP2-/- mice and wild-type (WT C57BL/6 mice were virtually indistinguishable with respect to disease severity. In contrast, 12 months old UCP2-/- mice developed a more severe pancreatic damage than WT mice at late time points after the induction of AP (24 h and 7 days, respectively, suggesting retarded regeneration. Furthermore, a higher peak level of alpha-amylase activity and gradually increased MPO levels in pancreatic and lung tissue were observed in UCP2-/- mice. Interestingly, intrapancreatic trypsin activities (in vivo studies and intraacinar trypsin and elastase activation in response to cerulein treatment (in vitro studies were not enhanced but even diminished in the knockout strain. Finally, UCP2-/- mice displayed a diminished ratio of reduced and oxidized glutathione in serum but no increased ROS levels in pancreatic acini. Together, our data indicate an aggravating effect of UCP2 deficiency on the severity of experimental AP in older but not in young mice. We suggest that increased severity of AP in 12 months old UCP2-/- is caused by an imbalanced inflammatory response but is unrelated to acinar cell functions.

  16. Antiviral effects of bovine interferons on bovine respiratory tract viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, R W; Downing, M M; Cummins, J M

    1984-01-01

    The antiviral effects of bovine interferons on the replication of bovine respiratory tract viruses were studied. Bovine turbinate monolayer cultures were treated with bovine interferons and challenged with several bovine herpesvirus 1 strains, bovine viral diarrhea virus, parainfluenza type 3 virus, goat respiratory syncytial virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine adenovirus type 7, or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with bovine interferons reduced viral yield for each of the...

  17. ERCP in acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jijo V Cherian; Joye Varghese Selvaraj; Rajesh Natrayan; Jayanthi Venkataraman

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the management of acute pancreatitis has evolved over years since its introduction in 1968. Its importance in diagnosing the etiology of pancreatitis has steadily declined with the advent of less invasive diagnostic tools. The therapeutic implications of ERCP in acute pancreatitis are many fold and are directed towards management of known etiological factors or its related complications. This article highlights the current status of ERCP in acute pancreatitis. DATA SOURCES:An English literature search using PubMed database was conducted on ERCP in acute pancreatitis, the etiologies and complications of pancreatitis amenable to endotherapy and other related subjects, which were reviewed. RESULTS: ERCP serves as a primary therapeutic modality for management of biliary pancreatitis in speciifc situations, pancreatitis due to microlithiasis, speciifc types of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, pancreas divisum, ascariasis and malignancy. In recurrent acute pancreatitis and smoldering pancreatitis it has a deifnite therapeutic utility. Complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic-duct disruptions or leaks, benign pancreatic-lfuid collections and pancreatic necrosis can be beneifcially dealt with. Intraductal ultrasound and pancreatoscopy during ERCP are useful in detecting pancreatic malignancy. CONCLUSIONS:The role of ERCP in acute pancreatitis is predominantly therapeutic and occasionally diagnostic. Its role in the management continues to evolve and advanced invasive procedures should be undertaken only in centers dedicated to pancreatic care.

  18. Prevalence of S and Z alpha 1-antitrypsin mutations in patients with pancreatic diseases in Serbian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key points in research of pancreatic disease pathology is further elucidation of the role of proteases and antiproteases, since their imbalance can lead to pancreatic injury. Alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT is one of the most important serum inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes, including pancreatic enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase. It is speculated that mutations in the AAT gene may influence the onset and the development of pancreatic disease. The presence of the most common AAT mutations Z and S was analyzed in 160 patients with pancreatic diseases (50 patients with pancreatic cancer, 50 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 60 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 129 healthy individuals by PCR-mediated site-directed mutagenesis (PSM method. One patient with pancreatic cancer was found to be a carrier of Z mutation, as well as one patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus. One patient with chronic pancreatitis was found to be a carrier of S mutation. The common AAT mutations were statistically significantly over-represented in patients with pancreatic diseases (3 of 160 patients, allelic frequency 0.9% than in the control group (1 of 129 individuals, allelic frequency 0.4%. The results of this study, requiring confirmation, suggest that common AAT mutations Z and S may be associated with a modest increase in susceptibility to the development of pancreatic disease.

  19. On-chip enzymatic microreactor using trypsin-immobilized superparamagnetic nanoparticles for highly efficient proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junyan; Lin, Shuang; Qi, Dawei; Deng, Chunhui; Yang, Pengyuan; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2007-12-28

    An easily replaceable microchip enzymatic microreactor has been fabricated based on the glass microchip with trypsin-immobilized superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles with small size (50 nm in diameter) and strong magnetism were synthesized. At first, amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with high magnetic responsivity and excellent dispersibility were prepared through a facile one-pot strategy. Then, magnetic nanoparticles were functionalized with numerous aldehyde (-CHO) groups by treating the as-synthesized, amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with glutaraldehyde. Finally, immobilization of trypsin onto the aldehyde-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles was achieved through reaction of the aldehyde groups with amine groups of trypsin. The prepared magnetic nanoparticles were then locally packed onto the glass microchip by the application of a strong magnetic field using a magnet to form an on-chip magnetic nanoparticles packing bed. Capability of the proteolytic microreactor was demonstrated by cytochrome c, bovine serum albumin and myoglobin as model proteins. The digestion products were characterized using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with sequence coverage of 83%, 43% and 79% observed, respectively. Complete protein digestion was achieved in a short time (10 s) under the flow rate of 5 microL/min. These results are expected to open up a new possibility for the proteolysis analysis as well as a new application of magnetic nanoparticles. It is easy to replace the nanoparticles and make the new microreactor. It takes less than 1 min under the condition of extra magnetic to form a new packing bed. The packing bed can be used for at least five times without any treatments. Additionally, since the preparation and surface functionality of magnetic nanoparticles is low-cost and reproducible, the preparation method and application approach of the magnetic nanoparticles may find much

  20. Acute effects of whole body gamma irradiation on exocrine pancreatic secretion in the pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reports on radiation damage to the pancreas deal essentially with long-term morphological changes with few data on pancreatic exocrine function. The aim of this work was to study the acute effects of whole body irradiation on volume and enzyme activities in the pancreatic juice. A whole body gamma irradiation (6 Gy) was investigated in pigs with continuous sampling of pancreatic juice before and after exposure via an indwelling catheter in the pancreatic duct. For each sample collected, total protein concentration and enzyme activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, lipase and amylase were determined. Pancreatic juice volume was monitored during all periods of collection. The volume of pancreatic juice secreted daily decreased one day after irradiation and remained lower than the control values over the experimental period. Total proteins secreted in the pancreatic juice and total activities of pancreatic enzymes were reduced similarly. On the other hand, only specific activities of elastase and lipase were affected by irradiation. Whole body gamma irradiation resulted in a rapid and marked decrease of exocrine pancreatic secretion, in terms of volume as well as secreted enzymes. This may contribute in part to the intestinal manifestations of the acute and/or late radiation syndrome. (author)

  1. Metformin induced acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis frequently presents with abdomen pain but may presents with various skin manifestations as rash and rarely, pancreatic panniculitis. Metformin, one of the most effective and valuable oral hypoglycemic agents in the biguanide class was linked to acute pancreatitis in few cases. Here, we report a case of metformin induce acute pancreatitis in young healthy man with normal renal function.

  2. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective analysis of ultrasonograms of 24 patients with acute pancreatitis and 8 patients with chronic pancreatitis was performed. Nine cases were proven by surgery and 23 cases were diagnosed clinically. Generalized pancreatic enlargement with normal or decreased echogenecity was principal findings in acute pancreatitis, while pancreas was normal in size and echogenecity was normal or slightly altered in chronic pancreatitis. Ultrasonography is considered a simple and accurate method in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and thus it could be an initial test in patients with suspected acute pancreatitis

  3. Trypsin-induced ATPase activity in potato mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, D.W.; Laties, G.G.

    1976-04-01

    Potato mitochondria (Solanum tuberosum var. Russet Burbank), which readily phosphorylate ADP in oxidative phosphorylation, show low levels of ATPase activity which is stimulated neither by Mg/sup 2 +/, 2,4-dinitrophenol, incubation with respiratory substrates, nor disruption by sonication or treatment with Triton X-100, individually or in concert. Treatment of disrupted potato mitochondria with trypsin stimulates Mg/sup 2 +/-dependent, oligomycin-sensitive ATPase activity 10- to 15-fold, suggesting the presence of an ATPase inhibitor protein. Trypsin-induced ATPase activity was unaffected by uncoupler. Oligomycin-sensitive ATPase activity decreases as exposure to trypsin is increased. Incubation at alkaline pH or heating at 60/sup 0/C for 2 minutes also activates ATPase of sonicated potato mitochondria. Disruption of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea), red sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), and carrot (Daucus carota) mitochondria increases ATPase activity, which is further enhanced by treatment with trypsin. The significance of the tight association of the inhibitor protein and ATPase in potato mitochondria is not clear.

  4. Immobilization of trypsin on sub-micron skeletal polymer monolith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new kind of immobilized trypsin reactor based on sub-micron skeletal polymer monolith has been developed. Covalent immobilization of trypsin on this support was performed using the epoxide functional groups in either a one- or a multi-step reaction. The proteolytic activity of the immobilized trypsin was measured by monitoring the formation of N-α-benzoyl-L-arginine (BA) which is the digestion product of a substrate N-α-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester (BAEE). Results showed that the digestion speed was about 300 times faster than that performed in free solution. The performance of such an enzyme reactor was further demonstrated by digesting protein myoglobin. It has been found that the protein digestion could be achieved in 88 s at 30 deg. C, which is comparable to 24 h digestion in solution at 37 oC. Furthermore, the immobilized trypsin exhibits increased stability even after continuous use compared to that in free solution. The present monolithic enzyme-reactor provides a promising platform for the proteomic research.

  5. Expression of Trypsin by Epithelial Cells of Various Tissues, Leukocytes, and Neurons in Human and Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Koshikawa, Naohiko; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Nagashima, Yoji; Mitsuhashi, Keisuke; Tsubota, Yoshiaki; Miyata, Satoshi; Miyagi, Yohei; Yasumitsu, Hidetaro; Miyazaki, Kaoru

    1998-01-01

    It has long been believed that trypsin is normally synthesized only in the pancreas. In the present study, expression of trypsin in human and mouse nonpancreatic tissues was examined. Northern blot analysis of normal human tissues indicated that the trypsin gene is expressed at high levels in the pancreas and spleen and considerably in the small intestine. However, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that trypsin is widely expressed in epithelial cells of the skin, eso...

  6. Trypsin causes platelet activation independently of known protease-activated receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Yingying; Kunapuli, Satya P.

    2013-01-01

    To identify a physiological agonist of PAR3, we used PAR4 null murine platelets, which were known to express only PAR3. In this study, we tested several proteases and found that trypsin, but not heat-inactivated trypsin, activated PAR4 null murine platelets. Even at high concentrations, trypsin caused shape change without increasing intracellular calcium levels in PAR4 null murine platelets. Consistent with this result, the Gq inhibitor YM-254890 had no effect on trypsin-induced shape change....

  7. Biomarkers for pancreatic carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hustinx, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. Most pancreatic cancers (approximately 85%) are diagnosed at a late, incurable stage. The poor prognosis and late presentation of pancreatic cancer patients underscore the importance of early detection, which is the sine qua non for the fight against pancreatic cancer. It is hoped for the future that the understanding of genetic alterations will lead to the rapid discovery of an effective biomarker of pancreatic carcinogenesis. In this thesis we vis...

  8. Complications of pancreatic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2011-01-01

    Many diseases, including pancreatitis benign tumors and cancer, may require pancreas surgery. Pancreatic resection can lead to a prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer and even a potential chance for cure. However, the pancreatic surgery can result in complications, and high postoperative morbidity rates are still presence. This article reviews the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011, which involves the more common complications, their prevention and treatment.

  9. Complications of pancreatic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many diseases, including pancreatitis benign tumors and cancer, may require pancreas surgery. Pancreatic resection can lead to a prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer and even a potential chance for cure. However, the pancreatic surgery can result in complications, and high postoperative morbidity rates are still presence. This article reviews the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011, which involves the more common complications, their prevention and treatment.

  10. Radiolabeled enzyme inhibitors as pancreatic scanning agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolabeled inhibitors of the pancreatic protease enzymes trypsin and chymotrypsin: I-125-soybean inhibitor (SBI), I-125-human antitrypsin (HAT), and 3H-diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) were studied in rats for their uptake in the pancreas. The protease enzyme inhibitor, SBI, was found to retain its enzymatic activity after radio-iodine labeling by iodine-monochloride method. Assay of tissues radioactivity at 5, 15, 30, 60 min and 24 hr after iv injection in rats showed pancreas:liver (P:L) ratios of < 1.4 and pancreas:blood (P:B) ratios of < 1 at all time intervals for each compound. However, ip injection of I-125 SBI showed preferential uptake in pancreas, P:L mean ratios [anti x (range)] of 6.0 (5.5 to 6.3) and P:B mean ratios of [anti x (range)] 2.60 (1.8 to 3.4), up to 60 minutes. These ratios resemble those of Se-75-selenomethionine except that kidney values are higher. Our data suggest that radiolabeled proteins can also show similar good early pancreatic uptake when given ip by escaping immediate liver metabolism. Proteins can readily be tagged with desirable gamma-emitting radionuclides (viz. I-131, I-123, Tc-99m) compared to amino acids and may potentially be suitable for imaging the pancreas. It may be important to study both iv and ip routes of administration in evaluating the specificity/affinity of potential pancreatic radiopharmaceuticals

  11. Effects of chitooligosaccharide and glucosamine conjugation on stability and functionality of bovine trypsin

    OpenAIRE

    Jóhann Grétar Kröyer Gizurarson 1986

    2014-01-01

    Over the past four decades, enzymes have become valuable catalysts for industrial and biotechnological purposes. Like other proteins, mesophilic enzymes are only marginally stable at ambient conditions. However, they are usually catalytically more efficient than commonly used thermophilic enzymes, thereby justifying their application. Utilization of mesophilic enzymes is only practical if they are stabilized against otherwise inactivating and unfolding conditions. It is well documented that g...

  12. Pancreatic transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A pancreas transplant is a surgical procedure to place a healthy pancreas from a donor into a patient whose pancreas no longer functions properly. Exocrine pancreas transplantation remains the standard treatment of choice for patients with diabetes mellitus complicated by end-stage renal disease. The use of pancreas transplantation for type 2 diabetes mellitus is an emerging concept. A pancreas transplant is often done in conjunction with a kidney transplant. Even if pancreas transplantation provides the best glycemic control option for diabetes mellitus, it is associated with significant morbidities related to infectious disease. The present article provides with a review of pancreatic transplantation.

  13. 21 CFR 866.5890 - Inter-alpha trypsin inhibitor immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inter-alpha trypsin inhibitor immunological test... Systems § 866.5890 Inter-alpha trypsin inhibitor immunological test system. (a) Identification. An inter-alpha trypsin inhibitor immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used...

  14. 21 CFR 524.2620 - Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.2620 Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor oil. (a)(1) Specifications... delivered to the wound site contains 0.12 milligram of crystalline trypsin, 87.0 milligrams of Peru...

  15. Immobilization of trypsin onto multifunctional meso-/macroporous core-shell microspheres: A new platform for rapid enzymatic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Gong [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Changchun 130022 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Ping [Key Laboratory of Marine Bioresources and Ecology, College of Life Science, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Wang, Zhi-Gang; Sui, Xiao-Jing [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Changchun 130022 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Ji-Lin, E-mail: zjl@ciac.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Changchun 130022 (China); Ni, Jia-Zuan [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Changchun 130022 (China); Key Laboratory of Marine Bioresources and Ecology, College of Life Science, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2014-02-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A novel microwave-assisted tryptic digestion system. •Characterization with SEM, TEM, EDX, XRD, and FT-IR. •The meso-/macroporous shell structure withthe high affinity and loading capacity of trypsin. •Decrease of digestion time up to less than 1 min. •MALDI-MS and nanoLC-MS analysis with database identification. -- Abstract: A simple, fast, efficient, and reusable microwave-assisted tryptic digestion system which was constructed by immobilization of trypsin onto porous core-shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@fTiO{sub 2} microspheres has been developed. The nanostructure with magnetic core and titania shell has multiple pore sizes (2.4 and 15.0 nm), high pore volume (0.25 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}), and large surface area (50.45 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}). For the proteins, the system can realize fast and efficient microwave-assisted tryptic digestion. Various standard proteins (e.g., cytochrome c (cyt-c), myoglobin (MYO), β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), and bovine serum albumin (BSA)) used can be digested in 45 s under microwave radiation, and they can be confidently identified by mass spectrometry (MS) analysis; even the concentration of substrate is as low as 5 ng μL{sup −1}. Furthermore, the system for the 45 s microwave-assisted tryptic digestion is still effective after the trypsin-immobilized microspheres have been reused for 5 times. Importantly, 1715 unique proteins from 10 μg mouse brain proteins can be identified with high confidence after treatment of 45 s microwave-assisted tryptic digestion.

  16. Immobilization of trypsin onto multifunctional meso-/macroporous core-shell microspheres: A new platform for rapid enzymatic digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A novel microwave-assisted tryptic digestion system. •Characterization with SEM, TEM, EDX, XRD, and FT-IR. •The meso-/macroporous shell structure withthe high affinity and loading capacity of trypsin. •Decrease of digestion time up to less than 1 min. •MALDI-MS and nanoLC-MS analysis with database identification. -- Abstract: A simple, fast, efficient, and reusable microwave-assisted tryptic digestion system which was constructed by immobilization of trypsin onto porous core-shell Fe3O4@fTiO2 microspheres has been developed. The nanostructure with magnetic core and titania shell has multiple pore sizes (2.4 and 15.0 nm), high pore volume (0.25 cm3 g−1), and large surface area (50.45 m2 g−1). For the proteins, the system can realize fast and efficient microwave-assisted tryptic digestion. Various standard proteins (e.g., cytochrome c (cyt-c), myoglobin (MYO), β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), and bovine serum albumin (BSA)) used can be digested in 45 s under microwave radiation, and they can be confidently identified by mass spectrometry (MS) analysis; even the concentration of substrate is as low as 5 ng μL−1. Furthermore, the system for the 45 s microwave-assisted tryptic digestion is still effective after the trypsin-immobilized microspheres have been reused for 5 times. Importantly, 1715 unique proteins from 10 μg mouse brain proteins can be identified with high confidence after treatment of 45 s microwave-assisted tryptic digestion

  17. Thermodynamic evaluation and modeling of proton and water exchange associated with benzamidine and berenil binding to ß-trypsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Pereira

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Serine-proteases are involved in vital processes in virtually all species. They are important targets for researchers studying the relationships between protein structure and activity, for the rational design of new pharmaceuticals. Trypsin was used as a model to assess a possible differential contribution of hydration water to the binding of two synthetic inhibitors. Thermodynamic parameters for the association of bovine ß-trypsin (homogeneous material, observed 23,294.4 ± 0.2 Da, theoretical 23,292.5 Da with the inhibitors benzamidine and berenil at pH 8.0, 25ºC and with 25 mM CaCl2, were determined using isothermal titration calorimetry and the osmotic stress method. The association constant for berenil was about 12 times higher compared to the one for benzamidine (binding constants are K = 596,599 ± 25,057 and 49,513 ± 2,732 M-1, respectively; the number of binding sites is the same for both ligands, N = 0.99 ± 0.05. Apparently the driving force responsible for this large difference of affinity is not due to hydrophobic interactions because the variation in heat capacity (DCp, a characteristic signature of these interactions, was similar in both systems tested (-464.7 ± 23.9 and -477.1 ± 86.8 J K-1 mol-1 for berenil and benzamidine, respectively. The results also indicated that the enzyme has a net gain of about 21 water molecules regardless of the inhibitor tested. It was shown that the difference in affinity could be due to a larger number of interactions between berenil and the enzyme based on computational modeling. The data support the view that pharmaceuticals derived from benzamidine that enable hydrogen bond formation outside the catalytic binding pocket of ß-trypsin may result in more effective inhibitors.

  18. A time-dependent, two-step binding mode of the nitro dye flavianic acid to trypsin in acid media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneedorf J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic dyes bind to proteins causing selective coprecipitation of the complexes in acid aqueous solution by a process of reversible denaturation that can be used as an alternative method for protein fractionation. The events that occur before precipitation were investigated by equilibrium dialysis using bovine trypsin and flavianic acid as a model able to cause coprecipitation. A two-step mode of interaction was found to be dependent on the incubation periods allowed for binding, with pronounced binding occurring after 42 h of incubation. The first step seems to involve hydration effects and conformational changes induced by binding of the first dye molecule, following rapid denaturation due to the binding of six additional flavianate anions to the macromolecule.

  19. Pancreatic Cancer (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Terms of Use ©2016 UpToDate, Inc. Patient information: Pancreatic cancer (Beyond the Basics) Author David P Ryan, MD ... pancreatic juice to the intestines. This type of pancreatic cancer, called "pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma," is discussed in this ...

  20. Interaction of methotrexate with trypsin analyzed by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanqing; Zhang, Hongmei; Cao, Jian; Zhou, Qiuhua

    2013-11-01

    Trypsin is one of important digestive enzymes that have intimate correlation with human health and illness. In this work, the interaction of trypsin with methotrexate was investigated by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The results revealed that methotrexate could interact with trypsin with about one binding site. Methotrexate molecule could enter into the primary substrate-binding pocket, resulting in inhibition of trypsin activity. Furthermore, the thermodynamic analysis implied that electrostatic force, hydrogen bonding, van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions were the main interactions for stabilizing the trypsin-methotrexate system, which agreed well with the results from the molecular modeling study.

  1. Autoimmune Pancreatitis: A Succinct Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Putra; Xiaoying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare type of chronic pancreatitis with characteristic clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic findings. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis is often challenging due to its low incidence and nonspecific clinical and radiologic findings. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer share similar clinical presentations, including obstructive jaundice, abdominal pain and weight loss. Due to these overlapping features, autoimmune pancreatitis patients...

  2. Functionalized magnetic carbonaceous microspheres for trypsin immobilization and the application to fast proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Guoping; Qi, Dawei; Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2008-12-26

    In this study, magnetic carbonaceous (MC) microspheres prepared with a large-scale synthesis approach were developed as the novel substrate for enzyme immobilization, and the trypsin-immobilized MC microspheres were successfully applied to protein fast digestion. Firstly, MC microspheres with small size, strong magnetism, and biological compatibility were prepared through two-step solvothermal reactions. Secondly, MC microsphere surface was modified by 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GLYMO). Finally, the enzyme was immobilized on the GLYMO-functionalized MC microspheres. The enzyme-immobilized magnetic microspheres were applied for fast protein digestion with microwave-assistance. Bovine serum albumin, myoglobin and cytochrome c, were used as model proteins to verify the digestion efficiency, and the digestion products were then characterized using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) with sequence coverage of 43%, 90% and 77%, respectively. The enzyme-immobilized magnetic particles were also successfully applied to the analysis of human pituitary extract. After database search, 485 proteins (p<0.01) were identified when the extract was digested by the microspheres. This opens a route for its future application in bottom-up proteomic analysis. PMID:19026420

  3. Comparative study of the binding of trypsin to caffeine and theophylline by spectrofluorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruiyong, E-mail: wangry@zzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Kang, Xiaohui [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Wang, Ruiqiang [The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Wang, Rui; Dou, Huanjing; Wu, Jing; Song, Chuanjun [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Chang, Junbiao, E-mail: changjunbiao@zzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

    2013-06-15

    The interactions between trypsin and caffeine/theophylline were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV–visible absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy under mimic physiological conditions. The results revealed that the fluorescence quenching of trypsin by caffeine and theophylline was the result of the formed complex of caffeine–trypsin and theophylline–trypsin. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters at three different temperatures were obtained. The hydrophobic interaction was the predominant intermolecular forces to stabilize the complex. Results showed that caffeine was the stronger quencher and bound to trypsin with higher affinity than theophylline. -- Highlights: ► The fluorescence of trypsin can be quenched by caffeine or theophylline via hydrophobic contacts. ► Caffeine binds to trypsin with higher affinity than theophylline. ► The influence of molecular structure on the binding aspects is reported.

  4. Comparative study of the binding of trypsin to caffeine and theophylline by spectrofluorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interactions between trypsin and caffeine/theophylline were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV–visible absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy under mimic physiological conditions. The results revealed that the fluorescence quenching of trypsin by caffeine and theophylline was the result of the formed complex of caffeine–trypsin and theophylline–trypsin. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters at three different temperatures were obtained. The hydrophobic interaction was the predominant intermolecular forces to stabilize the complex. Results showed that caffeine was the stronger quencher and bound to trypsin with higher affinity than theophylline. -- Highlights: ► The fluorescence of trypsin can be quenched by caffeine or theophylline via hydrophobic contacts. ► Caffeine binds to trypsin with higher affinity than theophylline. ► The influence of molecular structure on the binding aspects is reported

  5. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Pleural Fistula in Gallstone Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sala Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra-abdominal complications of pancreatitis such as pancreaticopleural fistulae are rare. A pancreaticopleural fistula occurs when inflammation of the pancreas and pancreatic ductal disruption lead to leakage of secretions through a fistulous tract into the thorax. The underlying aetiology in the majority of cases is alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis. The diagnosis is often delayed given that the majority of patients present with pulmonary symptoms and frequently have large, persistent pleural effusions. The diagnosis is confirmed through imaging and the detection of significantly elevated amylase levels in the pleural exudate. Treatment options include somatostatin analogues, thoracocentesis, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP with pancreatic duct stenting, and surgery. The authors present a case of pancreatic pseudocyst pleural fistula in a woman with gallstone pancreatitis presenting with recurrent pneumonias and bilateral pleural effusions.

  6. 77 FR 29914 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products AGENCY... live bovines and products derived from bovines with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. This.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On March 16, 2012, we published in the Federal Register (77 FR 15848-15913, Docket...

  7. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kanai, Keita; Oguchi, Takaya; Asano, Jumpei; Ito, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Yayoi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; ARAKURA, Norikazu; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into o...

  8. Preparing bioactive surface of polystyrene with hydrophobin for trypsin immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Baolong; Li, Bingzhang; Wang, Huifang; Guo, Ruijie; Liang, HaiXia; Qiao, Mingqiang; Li, Wenfeng

    2016-05-01

    A simple and reliable enzyme immobilization technique which can retain their catalytic activity for a long time is interest in many technologies. Here, the trypsin was immobilized by physisorption on polystyrene (PS) surface coated with a class I hydrophobin recombinant HGFI (rHGFI). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water-contact-angle measurements demonstrated that the hydrophobicity of the PS could be well improved by rHGFI modification, and the self-assembled rHGFI showed an admirable stability on the hydrophobic PS surface against hot SDS rinsing. The enzyme activity assay illustrated that the capacity of rHGFI could enable it to well intermediate trypsin on PS surface and allow its immobilization lasting in an active form. The results obtained in this work show a way that surface modification with rHGFI should be an easy and feasible strategy for applications of enzyme-based catalytic surfaces in biosensing.

  9. The effects of trypsin on rat brain astrocyte activation

    OpenAIRE

    Masoud Fereidoni; Farzaneh Sabouni; Ali Moghimi; Shirin Hosseini

    2013-01-01

    Background Astrocytes are cells within the central nervous system which are activated in a wide spectrum of infections, and autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases. In pathologic states, they produce inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and nitric oxide (NO), and sometimes they induce apoptosis. Their protease-activated receptors (PARs) can be activated by proteases, e.g. thrombin and trypsin, which are important in brain inflammation. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of di...

  10. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with 86RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory

  11. Biochemical characterization of bovine plasma thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Torsten

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TAFI is a plasma protein assumed to be an important link between coagulation and fibrinolysis. The three-dimensional crystal structures of authentic mature bovine TAFI (TAFIa in complex with tick carboxypeptidase inhibitor, authentic full lenght bovine plasma thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI, and recombinant human TAFI have recently been solved. In light of these recent advances, we have characterized authentic bovine TAFI biochemically and compared it to human TAFI. Results The four N-linked glycosylation sequons within the activation peptide were all occupied in bovine TAFI, similar to human TAFI, while the sequon located within the enzyme moiety of the bovine protein was non-glycosylated. The enzymatic stability and the kinetic constants of TAFIa differed somewhat between the two proteins, as did the isoelectric point of TAFI, but not TAFIa. Equivalent to human TAFI, bovine TAFI was a substrate for transglutaminases and could be proteolytically cleaved by trypsin or thrombin/solulin complex, although small differences in the fragmentation patterns were observed. Furthermore, bovine TAFI exhibited intrinsic activity and TAFIa attenuated tPA-mediated fibrinolysis similar to the human protein. Conclusion The findings presented here suggest that the properties of these two orthologous proteins are similar and that conclusions reached using the bovine TAFI may be extrapolated to the human protein.

  12. Purification and characterization of an isoform of protein kinase C from bovine neutrophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein kinase C (PKC) from bovine neutrophils was purified 1,420-fold. Subcellular fractionation analysis of bovine neutrophil homogenate in the presence of EGTA indicated that more than 95% of the PKC activity was present in the soluble fraction. Whereas bovine brain PKC could be resolved into four isoenzymatic forms by chromatography on a hydroxylapatite column, bovine neutrophil PKC was eluted in a single peak, suggesting that it corresponded to a single isoform. The apparent molecular weight of bovine neutrophil PKC was 82,000, as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Bovine neutrophil PKC was autophosphorylated in the presence of [γ-32P]ATP, provided that the medium was supplemented with Mg2+, Ca2+, phosphatidylserine, and diacylglycerol; phorbol myristate acetate could substitute for diacylglycerol. Autophosphorylated PKC could be cleaved by trypsin to generate two radiolabeled peptides of Mr 48,000 and 39,000. The labeled amino acids were serine and threonine. During the course of the purification procedure of bovine neutrophil PKC, a protein of Mr 23,000 was found to exhibit a strong propensity to PKC-dependent phosphorylation in the presence of [γ-32P]ATP, Mg2+, Ca2+, phosphatidylserine, and diacylglycerol. This protein was recovered together with PKC in one of the two active peaks eluted from the Mono Q column at the second step of PKC purification. It is suggested that the Mr 23,000 protein might be a natural substrate for bovine neutrophil PKC

  13. Characterization of trypsin-derived peptides acrylamide-adducted hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even though there are a number of sources for human exposure to acrylamide, reliable biomarkers of exposure are not available. In an effort to develop such a biomarker, the authors are characterizing peptides derived from trypsin digests of acrylamide-adducted hemoglobin. For this, radiolabeled acrylamide was incubated with this, radiolabeled acrylamide was incubated with purified human hemoglobin (Ao) and decomposition products removed by dialysis. When the adducted hemoglobin was separated by reverse-phase HPLC, radioactivity eluted with the α and β subunits, suggesting covalent binding. Digestion of individual subunits with trypsin followed by reverse phase HPLC, indicated that most of the radioactivity associated with the α subunit co-eluted with a single peptide. Similar results were observed for the β subunit except that significant amounts of radioactivity eluted with the solvent front, suggesting that radioactivity was released by trypsin digestion. Currently, these preparation are under further characterization by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. This approach will aid in the identification of the adducted will aid in the identification of the adducted peptide and subsequent preparation of an acrylamide-specific antibody

  14. A novel thermosensitive in-situ gel of gabexate mesilate for treatment of traumatic pancreatitis: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Han-jing; Song, Qing; Lv, Fa-qin; Wang, Shan; Wang, Yi-ru; Luo, Yu-kun; Mei, Xing-guo; Tang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Gabexate mesilate (GM) is a trypsin inhibitor, and mainly used for treatment of various acute pancreatitis, including traumatic pancreatitis (TP), edematous pancreatitis, and acute necrotizing pancreatitis. However, due to the characteristics of pharmacokinetics, the clinical application of GM still needs frequently intravenous administration to keep the blood drug concentration, which is difficult to manage. Specially, when the blood supply of pancreas is directly damaged, intravenous administration is difficult to exert the optimum therapy effect. To address it, a novel thermosensitive in-situ gel of gabexate mesilate (GMTI) was developed, and the optimum formulation of GMTI containing 20.6% (w/w) P-407 and 5.79% (w/w) P188 with different concentrations of GM was used as a gelling solvent. The effective drug concentration on trypsin inhibition was examined after treatment with different concentrations of GMTI in vitro, and GM served as a positive control. The security of GMTI was evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, and its curative effect on grade II pancreas injury was also evaluated by testing amylase (AMS), C-reactive protein (CRP) and trypsinogen activation peptide (TAP), and pathological analysis of the pancreas. The trypsin activity was slightly inhibited at 1.0 and 5.0 mg/mL in GM group and GMTI group, respectively (Pdrug developing and clinic application value. PMID:26489626

  15. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiran; K; Busireddy; Mamdoh; AlObaidy; Miguel; Ramalho; Janaka; Kalubowila; Liu; Baodong; Ilaria; Santagostino; Richard; C; Semelka

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a significant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrastenhanced computed tomography(MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI.

  16. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas, common hepatic artery, and portal vein. Also shown ... and superior mesenteric artery. Stage III pancreatic cancer. Cancer ... near the pancreas. These include the superior mesenteric artery, celiac axis, ...

  17. Surgery for pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007649.htm Surgery for pancreatic cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... surgery are used in the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer. Whipple procedure: This is the most common surgery ...

  18. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a feeding tube or an IV to prevent malnutrition and improve healing. Does my child have to ... intestines. Can my child die from acute pancreatitis? Death from acute pancreatitis is quite rare in children– ...

  19. Diabetes and pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    MUNIRAJ, T.; Chari, S.T.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is complex. Diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance is present in more than 2/3rd of pancreatic cancer patients. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown a modest increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer in type 2 diabetes, with an inverse relationship to duration of disease. Additionally, recent studies suggest that anti-diabetic medications may modulate the risk of pancreatic cancer in type 2 diabetes. Subjects >50 years of age ...

  20. Biomarkers for pancreatic carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hustinx, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. Most pancreatic cancers (approximately 85%) are diagnosed at a late, incurable stage. The poor prognosis and late presentation of pancreatic cancer patients underscore the importance of early detection, which is the sine qua non for the fight against pancr

  1. Stages of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... the cancer cells in the liver are actually pancreatic cancer cells. The disease is metastatic pancreatic cancer, not liver cancer. The ...

  2. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors can affect a person’s chance of getting cancer of the pancreas. Most of these are risk factors for exocrine ... Chronic pancreatitis, a long-term inflammation of the pancreas, is linked with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer (especially in smokers), but most people with pancreatitis ...

  3. Homology of lipoprotein lipase to pancreatic lipase.

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Avram, C M; Ben-Zeev, O; Lee, T.D. (Taunia D.); Haaga, K; Shively, J. E.; Goers, J; Pedersen, M.E; Reeve, J R; Schotz, M C

    1986-01-01

    Bovine milk lipoprotein lipase was subjected to amino acid sequence analysis. The first 19 amino-terminal residues were Asp-Arg-Ile-Thr-Gly-Gly-Lys-Asp-Phe-Arg-Asp-Ile-Glu-Ser-Lys-Phe-Ala-Leu- Arg. In addition, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of a tryptic digest of reduced and alkylated lipase resolved a number of peptides, five of which contained cysteine. Sequence analysis of the tryptic peptides revealed in most instances a close homology to porcine pancreatic lipase....

  4. Sequence of three cDNAs encoding an alkaline midgut trypsin from Manduca sexta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, A M; Barillas-Mury, C V; Wells, M A

    1994-05-01

    We have purified trypsin from the midgut of Manduca sexta and shown it has an alkaline pH optimum of 10.5. In order to clone the midgut trypsin, a DNA probe was generated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with template isolated from a midgut cDNA library phage stock, a mixture of degenerate primers synthesized to code for the highly conserved region around the active site serine found in trypsins, and the T7 sequencing primer. Three different trypsin cDNAs were isolated each of which encodes a preproenzyme of 256 amino acids with a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acids, an activation peptide of seven amino acids and a mature trypsin of 232 amino acids. The encoded midgut trypsins contain the highly conserved residues, Asp, His, Ser, involved in catalysis in serine proteases, along with the residues which define the trypsin specificity pocket. Sequence comparisons show that all sequences are similar to other invertebrate and vertebrate serine proteases, but they differ in that two of the three encoded trypsins have an odd number of cysteines. Northern analysis localizes the trypsin mRNA to the middle third of the midgut. A large number of arginines (19, 20 and 21) are encoded by the three cDNAs which may stabilize the trypsin, by remaining protonated, in the alkaline midgut of M. sexta. PMID:8205142

  5. Carbodiimide modification enhances activity of pig pancreatic phospholipase A2

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, João Paulo M.; Sasisekharan, Ram; Louie, Otway; Langer, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Pig phospholipase A2, pig iso-phospholipase A2 and bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2 were reacted in solution with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide, in the presence of N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide, at pH 7. The influence of micellar protectants was analyzed. In the presence of n-hexadecylphosphocholine, the losses of activity in micellar diheptanoyl-lecithin were 80, 35, and 10% in bovine phospholipase A2, pig iso-phospholipase A2, and pig phospholipase A2, respectively. With 1-ole...

  6. Enzymatic Debridement in Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Cakir, Murat; Tekin, Ahmet; Kucukkartallar, Tevfik; Vatansev, Husamettin; Kartal, Adil

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ failure and pancreatic necrosis are the factors that determine prognosis in acute pancreatitis attacks. We investigated the effects of collagenase on the debridement of experimental pancreatic necrosis. The study covered 4 groups; each group had 10 rats. Group I was the necrotizing pancreatitis group. Group II was the collagenase group with pancreatic loge by isotonic irrigation following necrotizing pancreatitis. Group III was the collagenase group with pancreatic loge followi...

  7. The Course of Genetically Determined Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keim V

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The clinical course of chronic pancreatitis in patients with mutations of cationic trypsinogen and the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1 has not yet been characterized. SETTING: Cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 and the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1, were analyzed in patients with pancreatitis of unclear origin. PATIENTS: Eighty subjects with trypsinogen mutations (21x N29I, 59x R122H and 59 patients with the SPINK1 N34S variant (11 homozygous, 48 heterozygous were included in the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: In patients with mutations of PRSS1 (N29I, R122H and SPINK1 (N34S the parameters such as calcification, dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, diabetes mellitus, hospital treatments, and surgery were recorded. DESIGN: Case control studies were performed to compare both mutational groups, and the follow-up time served as a matching criterion. The Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate the time course of the symptoms. RESULTS: Ten years after the onset of the disease, the probability (+/-SE of symptoms in patients with PRSS1 mutations was as follows: 1st hospital stay: 86+/-4%; calcification: 21+/-4%; duct dilatation: 26+/-9%; surgery: 19+/-5%; diabetes: 6+/-5%. After 25 years, we found the following data: 1st hospital stay: 96+/-3%; calcification: 38+/-8%; duct dilatation: 38+/-8%; surgery: 37+/-10%; diabetes: 28+/-8%. A case-control-study of 38 pairs of patients with either PRSS1 or SPINK1 mutations showed that the probability of duct dilatation, diabetes and calcification was slightly higher in patients having a SPINK1 mutation. There was no difference between those subjects with a homozygous or heterozygous SPINK1 mutation. In comparison to alcoholic chronic pancreatitis patients, the PRSS1 associated disease revealed a lower frequency of calcification and diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: The progression of chronic pancreatitis was slightly more rapid in patients with SPINK1 mutations than in patients with cationic trypsinogen

  8. Primary Pancreatic Choriocarcinoma Presenting as Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biggs Saravanan Ramachandran

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic cancers can present with pancreatitis or its complications. Pancreatic choriocarcinoma is an extremely rare disease to involve pancreas. Case report A 27-year-old married woman presented to our facility with abdominal pain and fullness of 20-day duration. She was clinically diagnosed as acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst as a complication. Serum amylase was elevated with CT scan of abdomen showing a cystic lesion involving the pancreas. We approached the cyst with endoscopic ultrasonography and cyst fluid was aspirated and analyzed. Cyst fluid amylase was elevated and cytology revealed germ cell tumor. Serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin was elevated. She had a swelling over the jaw which also revealed choriocarcinoma in histopathological examination. Patient was started with chemotherapy. Conclusion We report this case of pancreatic choriocarcinoma due to its extreme rarity and the diagnostic dilemma it posed.

  9. Influence of an intravenous infusion of amino acids and glucose on the pancreatic exocrine in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Bo-guang 范博广; (A。)ke Andrén-Sandberg

    2004-01-01

    Background A number of reports based on both animal experiments and clinical investigations have pointed out that total parenteral nutrition (TPN) suppresses the function of the exocrine pancreas. Even though pancreatic hypotrophy and dysfunction resulting from TPN may be explained by several mechanisms, the clinically most important cause is that nutrients in circulation affect pancreatic secretion. The effect of nutrients on the exocrine pancreas is still controversial. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to clarify the influence of intravenous amino acids and hypertonic glucose in TPN solution on the exocrine pancreas. Methods Three mixed TPN solutions, consisting of 30% or 50% glucose or of 14% amino acids, were employed. Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups, six rats in each group, including a control group and one group receiving each of the three TPN solutions. All animals were killed after 10 days of TPN. Body weight, pancreatic content, and enzyme levels in the pancreas were measured. Results Compared with the control group, pancreatic wet weight was lower in all TPN groups. Glucose significantly decreased the content and concentration of pancreatic protein, but amino acids did not alter the concentration of protein. The level of amylase was lower in all parenterally fed groups, with a greater decrease in the groups treated with amino acids and 30% glucose than with 50% glucose. Trypsin levels in all groups receiving TPN were markedly higher than in the control group. Conclusion TPN results in atrophy of the pancreas, but trypsin levels increase with TPN treatment. Glucose elevates the amylase level in the pancreas, while amino acids suppress pancreatic amylase. Amino acids used as a source of protein maintain normal pancreatic protein levels.

  10. Acute effects of irradiation on exocrine pancreatic secretion in the pig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, P.; Scanff, P.; Joubert, C.; Vergnet, M.; Grison, S. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1997-03-01

    Several reports on irradiation damages to the pancreas deal essentially with long-term morphologic changes but give few informations on pancreatic exocrine function. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to study the effects of a whole body gamma irradiation on the volume and enzyme activities of the pancreatic juice. The volume of pancreatic juice daily secreted decreased one day after irradiation (-40%, p < 0.01) and remained lower that the control value all over the experimental period (-65%, p < 0.01). Same response was observed for the total proteins secreted in the pancreatic juice but significant decrease was observed only the fourth and the fifth days after irradiation. Therefore, concentration of total protein secreted in the pancreatic juice was not altered all over the experimental period. Total activities of proteolytic enzymes, lipase and amylase led to decrease on day after irradiation and except for trypsin, the attenuated activity became significant from the third day after exposure. On the other hand, specific activities of the proteolytic enzymes and amylase did not show marked modifications after irradiation, whereas lipase specific activity was decreased. In conclusion, a whole body gamma irradiation resulted in a rapid and marked decrease of exocrine pancreatic secretion, in terms of volume as well as secreted enzymes. These modifications may, in part, contribute to the malabsorption of nutrients and these acute effects may be due to some modifications in the regulation of the exocrine pancreatic secretion

  11. Acute effects of irradiation on exocrine pancreatic secretion in the pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several reports on irradiation damages to the pancreas deal essentially with long-term morphologic changes but give few informations on pancreatic exocrine function. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to study the effects of a whole body gamma irradiation on the volume and enzyme activities of the pancreatic juice. The volume of pancreatic juice daily secreted decreased one day after irradiation (-40%, p < 0.01) and remained lower that the control value all over the experimental period (-65%, p < 0.01). Same response was observed for the total proteins secreted in the pancreatic juice but significant decrease was observed only the fourth and the fifth days after irradiation. Therefore, concentration of total protein secreted in the pancreatic juice was not altered all over the experimental period. Total activities of proteolytic enzymes, lipase and amylase led to decrease on day after irradiation and except for trypsin, the attenuated activity became significant from the third day after exposure. On the other hand, specific activities of the proteolytic enzymes and amylase did not show marked modifications after irradiation, whereas lipase specific activity was decreased. In conclusion, a whole body gamma irradiation resulted in a rapid and marked decrease of exocrine pancreatic secretion, in terms of volume as well as secreted enzymes. These modifications may, in part, contribute to the malabsorption of nutrients and these acute effects may be due to some modifications in the regulation of the exocrine pancreatic secretion

  12. Affinity purification of aprotinin from bovine lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yu; Liu, Lanhua; Chen, Beizhan; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun

    2015-05-01

    An affinity protocol for the purification of aprotinin from bovine lung was developed. To simulate the structure of sucrose octasulfate, a natural specific probe for aprotinin, the affinity ligand was composed of an acidic head and a hydrophobic stick, and was then linked with Sepharose. The sorbent was then subjected to adsorption analysis with pure aprotinin. The purification process consisted of one step of affinity chromatography and another step of ultrafiltration. Then purified aprotinin was subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, trypsin inhibitor activity, gel-filtration, and thin-layer chromatography analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax ) of the affinity sorbent was 25,476.0 ± 184.8 kallikrein inactivator unit/g wet gel; the dissociation constant of the complex "immobilized ligand-aprotinin" (Kd ) was 4.6 ± 0.1 kallikrein inactivator unit/mL. After the affinity separation of bovine lung aprotinin, reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and gel-filtration chromatography revealed that the protein was a single polypeptide, and the purities were ∼ 97 and 100%, respectively; the purified peptide was also confirmed with aprotinin standard by gel-filtration chromatography and thin-layer chromatography. After the whole purification process, protein, and bioactivity recoveries were 2.2 and 92.6%, respectively; and the specific activity was up to 15,907.1 ± 10.2 kallikrein inactivator unit/mg. PMID:25677462

  13. Pancreatitis. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute and chronic pancreatitis are becoming increasingly more severe diseases in the western world with far-reaching consequences for the individual patient as well as the socioeconomic situation. This article gives an overview of the contribution of radiological imaging to the diagnostics and therapy of both forms of the disease. Acute pancreatitis can be subdivided into severe (20 %) and mild manifestations. The diagnostics should be performed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessing necrosis or potential infections only in severe forms of pancreatitis. In chronic pancreatitis transabdominal ultrasound should initially be adequate for assessment of the pancreas. For the differential diagnosis between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis, MRI with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) followed by an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration is the method of choice. For the primary diagnosis for acute and chronic pancreatitis ultrasound examination is the modality of first choice followed by radiological CT and MRI with MRCP examinations. (orig.)

  14. Luminescence quenching effect for the interaction of prulifloxacin with trypsin-Britton-Robinson buffer solution system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yabei; Liu Benzhi; Yu Zhang [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Huaibei Coal Normal College, Huaibei 235000 (China); Zi Yanqin, E-mail: ziyanqin@163.co [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Huaibei Coal Normal College, Huaibei 235000 (China)

    2010-03-15

    Prulifloxacin is a kind of new oral taking antibiotic of fluoroquinolone. Conjugation reaction of prulifloxacin with trypsin in Britton-Robinson buffer solution of pH 7.96 was analyzed by UV-vis spectrophotometry and fluorescence spectrometry. The intrinsic fluorescence of trypsin was strongly quenched by prulifloxacin. This effect was rationalized in terms of a static quenching procedure. The binding parameters have been evaluated by fluorescence quenching methods. Negative values DELTAG{sup 0} for the formation of prulifloxacin-trypsin complex implied that both hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions might play a significant role in prulifloxacin binding to trypsin. The binding distance deduced from the efficiency of energy transfer was 0.84 nm for prulifloxacin-trypsin. Furthermore, association constants and binding mechanism were successfully derived from the fluorescence spectra. UV-vis detections supported a change in the secondary structure of proteins caused by the interaction of prulifloxacin with trypsin.

  15. Lectins as carriers: preparation and purification of a concanavalin A-trypsin conjugate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scheme for the preparation and purification of Con A-trypsin demonstrates the presence of Con A in the conjugate by affinity purification and by hemagglutination. The presence of Con A was demonstrated in two additional ways. The conjugate was prepared using trypsin labeled with iodine 125 and unlabeled Con A. The resulting conjugate containing 42,800 cpm/mg protein was used to demonstrate prolonged retention of the conjugated trypsin in mouse footpads. The presence of trypsin was also demonstrated in the conjugate by affinity chromatography and by the esterase activity characteristic of trypsin with tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester as substrate. Con A-trypsin was also assayed for proteolytic activity with a macromolecular substrate azocasein. A comparison of proteolytic activities with these two substrates indicated that 50-80% of the proteolytic activity observed with the small substrate is retained with macromolecular substrates

  16. Luminescence quenching effect for the interaction of prulifloxacin with trypsin-Britton-Robinson buffer solution system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prulifloxacin is a kind of new oral taking antibiotic of fluoroquinolone. Conjugation reaction of prulifloxacin with trypsin in Britton-Robinson buffer solution of pH 7.96 was analyzed by UV-vis spectrophotometry and fluorescence spectrometry. The intrinsic fluorescence of trypsin was strongly quenched by prulifloxacin. This effect was rationalized in terms of a static quenching procedure. The binding parameters have been evaluated by fluorescence quenching methods. Negative values ΔG0 for the formation of prulifloxacin-trypsin complex implied that both hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions might play a significant role in prulifloxacin binding to trypsin. The binding distance deduced from the efficiency of energy transfer was 0.84 nm for prulifloxacin-trypsin. Furthermore, association constants and binding mechanism were successfully derived from the fluorescence spectra. UV-vis detections supported a change in the secondary structure of proteins caused by the interaction of prulifloxacin with trypsin.

  17. Leukocytes are required for the trypsin-induced increase in lung vascular permeability.

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Szabo, R. R.; Johnson, A; Malik, A B

    1986-01-01

    The authors examined the role of leukocytes in mediating the increase in lung vascular permeability induced by trypsin infusion in the sheep lung lymph preparation. One group of sheep was challenged with an intravenous infusion of trypsin (4.5 mg/kg/hr). A second group was depleted of 80% of circulating granulocytes and of 48% of circulating lymphocytes by repeated injections of hydroxyurea several days prior to the trypsin infusion. Pulmonary lymph flow and transvascular protein clearance in...

  18. Trypsin-mediated enzymatic degradation of type II collagen in the human vitreous

    OpenAIRE

    van Deemter, Mariëlle; Kuijer, Roel; Harm Pas, Hendri; Jacoba van der Worp, Roelofje; Hooymans, Johanna Martina Maria; Los, Leonoor Inge

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Aging of the vitreous body can result in sight-threatening pathology. One aspect of vitreous aging is liquefaction, which results from the vanishing of collagen fibrils. We investigated the possibility that trypsins are involved in vitreous type II collagen degradation. Methods Immunohistochemistry and western blotting were used for detecting and locating trypsin isoforms in the vitreous and retina of human donor eyes. The capability of the retina to produce these trypsins was analyze...

  19. Binding of Tetracycline and Chlortetracycline to the Enzyme Trypsin: Spectroscopic and Molecular Modeling Investigations

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Zhenxing; Liu, Rutao; Yang, Hongxu; Shen, Hengmei; Wang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Tetracycline (TC) and chlortetracycline (CTC) are common members of the widely used veterinary drug tetracyclines, the residue of which in the environment can enter human body, being potentially harmful. In this study, we establish a new strategy to probe the binding modes of TC and CTC with trypsin based on spectroscopic and computational modeling methods. Both TC and CTC can interact with trypsin with one binding site to form trypsin-TC (CTC) complex, mainly through van der Waals' interacti...

  20. Different expressions of trypsin and chymotrypsin in relation to growth in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Rungruangsak-Torrissen, K.; Moss, R.; Andresen, L. H.; A. Berg; Waagbø, R

    2006-01-01

    The expressions of trypsin and chymotrypsin in the pyloric caeca of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) were studied in three experiments. Two internal (trypsin phenotypes, life stages) and three common external factors (starvation, feeding, temperatures) influencing growth rates were varied. Growth was stimulated by increased temperature and higher feeding rate, and it was depressed during starvation. The interaction between trypsin phenotype and start-feeding temperature affected specific acti...

  1. Developmental patterns for pancreatic opioids in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, A M; Voyles, N R; Wilkins, S D; Zalenski, C M; Timmers, K I; Recant, L

    1989-01-01

    Developmental patterns for rat pancreatic opioid peptides and islet hormones were studied from gestational day 20 through adulthood. Fetal tissue was obtained as well as pancreas at birth (day 0), and postnatal days 3, 7, 14, and 21, and 7 weeks. The hormones measured included insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin. The opioids measured were beta-endorphin, Met- and Leu-enkephalins, and the high molecular weight enkephalin precursors. Pancreata were pooled as necessary and extracted (acid alcohol, or hot acetic acid), and opioids were further purified on reversed-phase C-18 (Sep-pak) cartridges. In all instances measurements were made by radioimmunoassays. Precursor peptides were first digested (with trypsin and carboxypeptidase B) prior to immunoassay. All opioids and hormones except the precursors for enkephalins showed a well-defined surge in pancreatic concentration during the first postnatal week. In contrast, the precursors had the highest concentration in the fetus, and by the seventh day of life had decreased by greater than 50%. This progressive decrease may represent maturation of the enkephalin convertase and trypsin-like enzymes in the islets. The opioid and hormonal surges that we have described are similar to the surge in islet concentration of thyroid-releasing hormone (TRH) previously described in neonatal rat islets. It is suggested that these postnatal alterations in opioid and hormone concentration relate to a specific function in the development of the endocrine pancreas. PMID:2530576

  2. Trypsin inhibitory activity of artemisinin and its biotransformed product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summary: Artemisinin (1 ), a sesquiterpene lactone is an important constituent of anti-malarial drugs. In the present study, it was extracted from aerial parts of Artemisia roxburghiana Besser. Biotransformation of artemisinin ( 1 ) was carried out in the culture of Aspergillus niger GC-4 which yielded 5-hydroxy artemisinin (2 ) The structures of 1-2 were confirmed through spectral studies. Both compounds were screened against trypsin using colorimetric method. The biotransformed product 2 showed significant protease inhibitory activity with 53.5 +- 1.6% inhibition and IC/sub 50/ = 0.29 +- 0.02 mM as compared to artemisinin (20.4 +- 0.3% inhibition). (author)

  3. Digestive enzyme activity and mRNA level of trypsin in embryonic redclaw crayfish, Cherax quadricarnatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Wen; ZHAO Yunlong; ZHOU Zhongliang; AN Chuanguang; MA Qiang

    2008-01-01

    The digestive enzyme activity and mRNA level of trypsin during the embryonic development of Cherax quadricarinatus were analyzed using biochemical and Fluorogenic Quantitative PCR (FQ-PCR) methods.The results show that the activities of trypsin and chymotrypsin had two different change patterns.Trypsin specific activity increased rapidly in the early stages of development and still remained high in preparation for the hatch stage.However,chymotrypsin activity peaked in stage 4 of embryonic development and decreased significantly in the last stage.The mRNA level of trypsin was elevated in all stages and two peak values were observed in stages 2 and 5 respectively.The results indicate that trypsin is very important for the utilization of the yolk during embryonic development and for the assimilation of dietary protein for larvae.The gene of trypsin is probably regulated at transcriptional level.The mRNA levels of trypsin can reflect not only trypsin activity,but also the regulatory mechanism for expression of trypsin gene to a certain degree.

  4. Comparative study of the binding of Trypsin with bifendate and analogs by spectrofluorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Pu, Juanjuan; Wang, Yi; Liu, Chuang; Yu, Jie; Li, Tao; Wang, Ruiqiang

    2013-11-01

    The interactions between Trypsin and bifendate (DDB) or analogs (I, II and III) were investigated by fluorescence, UV-visible absorption, resonance light scattering, synchronous fluorescence and 3D spectroscopy under mimic physiological conditions. The results revealed that DDB and analogs caused the fluorescence quenching of Trypsin by the formation of DDB/I/II/III-Trypsin complex. The quenching and energy transfer mechanisms were discussed. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters at three different temperatures were obtained. The hydrophobic interaction was the predominant intermolecular forces to stabilize the complex. Results showed that DDB was the stronger quencher and bound to Trypsin with higher affinity than other three analogs.

  5. In vitro and in silico investigations of the binding interactions between chlorophenols and trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Binding interactions of five chlorophenols with trypsin were investigated. • The number of chlorine atoms of chlorophenols partly affected the binding ability of them to trypsin. • Noncovalent interactions stabilized the trypsin–chlorophenols complexes. • There was the one main binding site of trypsin for chlorophenols. - Abstract: Being the first-degree toxic pollutants, chlorophenols (CP) have potential carcinogenic and mutagenic activity and toxicity. Since there still lacks studies on molecular interactions of chlorophenols with trypsin, one major binding target of many exogenous environmental pollutants, the binding interactions between five chlorophenols, 2-CP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TCP and PCP and trypsin were characterized by the combination of multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling. The chlorophenols bind at the one main site of trypsin and the binding induces the changes of microenvironment and global conformations of trypsin. Different number of chloride atoms significantly affects the binding and the binding constants KA ranks as KA (2-CP) < KA (2,6-DCP) ≈ KA (2,4,6-TCP) < KA (2,3,4,6-TCP) < KA (PCP). These chlorophenols interacts with trypsin mainly through hydrophobic interactions and via hydrogen bonding interactions and aromatic–aromatic π–π stacking interaction. Our results offer insights into the binding mechanism of chlorophenols with trypsin and provide important information for possible toxicity risk of chlorophenols to human health

  6. Therapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most difficult diseases to cure. Japan pancreas society guidelines for management of pancreatic cancer indicate therapeutic algorithm according to the clinical stage. For locally limited pancreatic cancer (cStage I, II, III in Japanese classification system), surgical resection is recommended, however prognosis is still poor. Major randomized controlled trials of resected pancreatic cancer indicates that adjuvant chemotherapy is superior to observation and gemcitabine is superior to 5-fluorouracil (FU). For locally advanced resectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in Japanese classification system (JCS)), we perform neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Phase I study established a recommended dose of 800 mg gemcitabine and radiation dose of 36 Gy. For locally advanced nonresectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in JCS), chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy is recommended. Although pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy resistant tumor, systemic chemotherapy is recommended for metastatic pancreatic cancer (cStage IVb in JCS). Single-agent gemcitabine is the standard first line agent for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Meta-analysis of chemotherapy showed possibility of survival benefit of gemcitabine combination chemotherapy over gemcitabine alone. We hope gemcitabine combination chemotherapy or molecular targeted therapy will improve prognosis of pancreatic cancer in the future. (author)

  7. Phenotypic differentiation of neonatal rat cochlear spiral ganglion neurons following trypsin dissociation and culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dingjun Zha; Li Qiao; Lianjun Lu; Xue Gao; Tao Xue; Wenjuan Mi; Shunli Liu; Jianhua Qiu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Under laboratory conditions, cochlear spiral ganglion neurons are commonly isolated and cultured by mechanical dissociation. However, these neurons are extremely fragile and survive for only a short time.OBJECTIVE: To establish a trypsin dissociation and culture method for studying neonatal rat cochlear spiral ganglion neurons. DESIGN: A single sample study. SETTING: Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: This study was performed at the central laboratory for Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA from February to May 2006. A total of 40 neonatal Sprague Dawley rats of either gender, aged 2-5 days, were provided by the Laboratory Animal Center of the Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA. Trypsin and neuronal-specific nuclear protein (NeuN) monoclonal antibodies were purchased from Sigma Company, USA. Culture medium was synthesized using Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM)/F12 (Gibco Company, USA) supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (Sigma Company, USA), 100 000 U/L penicillin, and 1 mol/L NaOH. The following protocol was performed in accordance with ethical guidelines for the use and care of animals.METHODS: After anesthesia, rats were sacrificed by neck dislocation. A complete cochlear axis with spiral ganglion tissue was removed. The cochlear axis was rinsed three times in a culture dish with a diameter of 35 mm using Hank's balanced solution. After washings, the tissue was cut into pieces, digested with 0.25% trypsin for about 20 minutes, and incubated in a 37 ℃ water bath. The tissue was centrifuged, then mixed with serum-containing culture medium. Using a transfer pipette, the cell suspension was transferred to polylysine (0.1%)-treated culture dishes with a diameter of 35 mm. The culture dish was incubated at 37 ℃, with a 5% CO2-air environment. Once

  8. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  9. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  10. Pancreatic Panniculitis: A rare manifestation of Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronak Patel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication associated with pancreatic disease and perhaps even a presage to pancreatic pathology. Case report We present a case of pancreatic panniculitis in a 61 year old patient who was treated for sudden onset of abdominal pain associated with nausea and vomiting secondary to acute pancreatitis of unknown etiology. He subsequently developed skin lesions consistent with pancreatic panniculitis which gradually improved after resolution of his acute condition and treatment with topical steroid cream. Conclusion We discuss and review the literature along with highlighting for the readers the important clinical and histopathologic features of acute pancreatitis associated pancreatic panniculitis.

  11. Hereditary Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf Haddad; Kowdley, Gopal C; Timothy M. Pawlik; Cunningham, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary etiologies of pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancers are increasingly recognized. An estimated >10% of pancreatic and increasing number of hepatobiliary cancers are hereditary. The cumulative risk of hereditary pancreatic cancer ranges from measurable but negligible in cystic fibrosis to a sobering 70% in cases of hereditary pancreatitis. Candidates for pancreatic cancer surveillance are those with a risk pancreatic cancer estimated to be >10-fold that of the normal population. Scree...

  12. 77 FR 20319 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 93 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Correction In proposed rule...

  13. 78 FR 73993 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, and 98 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Corrections In rule document 2013-28228 appearing...

  14. Pancreatic Enzyme Supplementation in Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    R. V. Patankar; R. Chand; Johnson, C. D.

    1995-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of oral pancreatic enzyme supplements on pain, analgesic requirement and the incidence of complications in patients with acute pancreatitis. This double blind, prospectively randomised placebo controlled study included 23 patients. Pain was monitored using a visual analogue scale; the analgesic requirement was assessed with a numerical score. No significant differences were noted between the median (range) pain scores of patients who received placebo: 22 (17.1–...

  15. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Pitchumoni, Capecomorin S; Yegneswaran, Balaji

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a rare event in pregnancy, occurring in approximately 3 in 10 000 pregnancies. The spectrum of AP in pregnancy ranges from mild pancreatitis to serious pancreatitis associated with necrosis, abscesses, pseudocysts and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes. Pregnancy related hematological and biochemical alterations influence the interpretation of diagnostic tests and assessment of severity of AP. As in any other disease associated with pregnancy, AP is associated wit...

  16. Smoking and Pancreatic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the mechanisms through which it causes the diseases remain unknown. In the present manuscript we reviewed the latest knowledge gained on the effect of cigarette smoke and smoking compounds on cell signaling pathways mediating both diseases. We also reviewed the effect of smoking on the pancreatic cell microenvironment including inflammatory cells and stellate cells.

  17. Laparoscopy in pancreatic tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Shrikhande S; Barreto S; Shukla P.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, increasing number of manuscripts - original articles and case reports have attempted to provide evidence of the forays of minimal access surgery into pancreatic diseases. Many, based on the lack of Level I evidence, still believe that laparoscopy in pancreatic surgery is experimental. This article attempts to look into data exploring the existing use of minimally invasive surgery in pancreatic disease to answer a vital question - what does the evidence say on the current status of l...

  18. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Donghui

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associat...

  19. Pancreatic Exocrine Function Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Goff, John S.

    1982-01-01

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and par...

  20. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after pancreatic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goess, Ruediger; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Friess, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an often-underestimated complication following pancreatic surgery. After recent advances in managing acute postoperative complications the focus of current research is now shifting onto the long-term complications following pancreatectomy. Weight loss and steatorrhea as typical symptoms have high influence on the quality of life in the postoperative period. Malnutrition-related symptoms occur late and are often misinterpreted. Enzyme replacement therapy is more or less the only possible treatment option, even though not many controlled trials have been performed in this field. In this review we summarized the pathophysiology, diagnosis, risk factors and treatment options of exocrine insufficiency and focus mainly on patients with pancreaticoduodenectomy (classical Whipple), pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (ppWhipple) or distal pancreatectomy. Incidence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after surgery depends mainly on the initial diagnosis, the preoperative exocrine function and is associated with the extent of parenchyma resection. Diagnosing exocrine failure after surgery can be difficult and specific function tests are commonly not routinely performed. Starting and monitoring of enzyme replacement treatment is more based on clinical symptoms, than on objective markers. To improve the performance status of postsurgical patients it is important to consider pancreatic exocrine function as one aspect of quality of life. Further clinical trials should be initiated to gain more specific knowledge about the influence of the different pancreatic resections on pancreatic exocrine function to initialize proper treatment even before major clinical symptoms occur. PMID:27058237

  1. Acute pancreatitis; Pancreatite aigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehdi, M.; Deutsch, J.P.; Arrive, L.; Ayadi, K.; Ladeb, M.F.; Tubiana, J.M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Saint-Antoine, 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-12-31

    The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is based on clinical examination and basic laboratory tests. The main role of sonography in acute pancreatitis is to evaluate gallstones and small fluid collections. However, sonography is frequently difficult due to intestinal ileus related to pancreatitis. CT is indicated early in the clinical course of acute severe pancreatitis when the diagnosis is uncertain or when complications such as abscess, hemorrhage, or necrosis, are suspected. In addition, CT may be used to assess the prognosis and follow-up of patients. (authors). 20 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Unlocking the bovine genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    The draft genome sequence of cattle (Bos taurus) has now been analyzed by the Bovine Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium and the Bovine HapMap Consortium, which together represent an extensive collaboration involving more than 300 scientists from 25 different countries. ...

  3. Antifungal traits of a 14 kDa maize kernel trypsin inhibitor protein in transgenic cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic cotton plants expressing the maize kernel trypsin inhibitor (TI) protein were produced and evaluated for antifungal traits. This 14 kD trypsin inhibitor protein has been previously associated with resistance to aflatoxin-producing fungus Aspergillus flavus. Successful transformation of ...

  4. Cloning and transcription profiling of trypsin in Aedes taeniorhynchus (Diptera: Culicdae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cDNA of a trypsin gene from Aedes (Ochlerotatus) taeniorhynchus (Weidemann) was cloned and sequenced. THe full-length mRNA sequence (874 bp_ for trypsin from Ae.taeniorhynchus (AetTryp_ was obtained which encodes an open reading frame of 717 bp (i.e., 239 aa). To detect whether AetTryp is develo...

  5. Trypsin-like Proteins of the Fungi as Possible Markers of Phytopathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequences of peptidases with conserved motifs around the active site residues that are characteristic of trypsins (similar to trypsin peptidases, STP) were obtained from publicly available fungal genomes and related databases. Among the 74 fungal genomes, 30 species of parasitic Ascomycota contained...

  6. Effect of γ-radiation on trypsin immobilized at a modified polypropylene textile material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In studying the proteolytic activity and ESR spectra of γ-irradiated samples of trypsin immobilized at an inoculated copolymer of polypropylene with polyacrylic acid it was established that the carrier of a modified polypropylene increase the radioresistances of trypsin immobilized on it

  7. Porous layer open tubular columns with immobilized trypsin for protein digestion

    OpenAIRE

    Knob, R.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a monolithic porous layer open tubular (PLOT) column with immobilized trypsin for protein digestion. The PLOT column was prepared in a 10 (mikro)m ID fused silica capillary. Trypsin was immobilized on the monolithic surface and the developed enzyme reactor was used for protein digestion followed by on-line ESI/MS analysis.

  8. Camel and bovine chymosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langholm Jensen, Jesper; Mølgaard, Anne; Navarro Poulsen, Jens Christian;

    2013-01-01

    Bovine and camel chymosin are aspartic peptidases that are used industrially in cheese production. They cleave the Phe105-Met106 bond of the milk protein κ-casein, releasing its predominantly negatively charged C-terminus, which leads to the separation of the milk into curds and whey. Despite...... having 85% sequence identity, camel chymosin shows a 70% higher milk-clotting activity than bovine chymosin towards bovine milk. The activities, structures, thermal stabilities and glycosylation patterns of bovine and camel chymosin obtained by fermentation in Aspergillus niger have been examined...... interactions arising from variation in the surface charges and the greater malleability both in domain movements and substrate binding contribute to the better milk-clotting activity of camel chymosin towards bovine milk....

  9. Induction of Gene Expression Alterations by Culture Medium from Trypsinized Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ahmad Chaudhry

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study hypothesized that trypsin treatment itself could be a stress inducer before any other physical or chemical mediated stress is introduced. To further understand the role of trypsin treatment, we incubated adherent cells with conditioned growth medium isolated from trypsinized cells after several hours of trypsin action and examined global gene expression profile with microarray technology. Microarray data identified large-scale gene expression alterations in cells receiving conditioned medium from trypsin treated cells compared to control cells that did not receive such medium. Twenty eight genes were found to be upregulated with at least two-fold change in the expression level, while 70 genes were downregulated. Gene expression signature clearly identified stress response. Taken together this data cautions the contribution of background stress while assessing the effects of radiation, certain drugs or environmental mutagens. Further attention is required while determining the role of conditioned medium in elucidating radiobiological phenomenon such as bystander effect.

  10. Spectroscopic investigations on the interactions between isopropanol and trypsin at molecular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xinxin; Yu, Zehua; Liu, Rutao

    2013-05-01

    The toxicity of hydroxyl group of isopropanol to trypsin in aqueous solution was investigated by techniques including UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, enzyme activity assay and molecular docking technology. The results of UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and CD spectra indicate that isopropanol could change the secondary structure of trypsin by increasing the content of α-helix and decreasing the content of β-sheet. The tertiary structure of trypsin was also changed owing to the loss of environmental asymmetry of amino acid residues. Isopropanol bound into a hydrophobic cavity on the surface of trypsin by a hydrogen bond located between the hydrogen atom on the hydroxyl of isopropanol and the oxygen atoms on SER 214 and hydrophobic interaction, as the molecular docking results showed. In addition, isopropanol could affect the function of trypsin by increasing its catalytic activity.

  11. Influence of Tableting on the Conformation and Thermal Stability of Trypsin as a Model Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klukkert, Marten; Van De Weert, Marco; Fanø, Mathias; Rades, Thomas; Leopold, Claudia S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of compaction on the conformation of trypsin, its transition temperature (Tm ) of unfolding, and its folding reversibility after thermal denaturation. Plain trypsin was compacted at 40-382 MPa. Pressure-induced changes in the trypsin...... conformation and the extent of their reversibility were determined using solid- and liquid-state IR spectroscopy together with principal component analysis and an area overlap approach. Trypsin enzymatic activity was determined by a photometric assay. Liquid-state differential scanning calorimetry was...... reversible upon tablet reconstitution. Aqueous-state IR spectroscopy combined with partial least squares was shown to be a powerful tool to follow irreversible structural changes and evaluate sample bioactivity. Besides its conformation, the thermal stability of trypsin was altered as a result of the applied...

  12. Mechanism of cinnamic acid-induced trypsin inhibition: A multi-technique approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongmei; Zhou, Qiuhua; Cao, Jian; Wang, Yanqing

    2013-12-01

    In order to investigate the association of the protease trypsin with cinnamic acid, the interaction was characterized by using fluorescence, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, molecular modeling and an enzymatic inhibition assay. The binding process may be outlined as follows: cinnamic acid can interact with trypsin with one binding site to form cinnamic acid-trypsin complex, resulting in inhibition of trypsin activity; the spectroscopic data show that the interaction is a spontaneous process with the estimated enthalpy and entropy changes being -8.95 kJ mol-1 and 50.70 J mol-1 K-1, respectively. Noncovalent interactions make the main contribution to stabilize the trypsin-cinnamic acid complex; cinnamic acid can enter into the primary substrate-binding pocket and alter the environment around Trp and Tyr residues.

  13. Synthesis, purification and mass spectrometric characterisation of a fluorescent Au9@BSA nanocluster and its enzymatic digestion by trypsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Iglesias, Nerea; Bettmer, Jörg

    2013-12-01

    Nanoclusters of noble metals like Ag and Au have attracted great attention as they form a missing link between isolated metal atoms and nanoparticles. Their particular properties like luminescence in the visible range and nontoxicity make them attractive for bioimaging and biolabelling purposes, especially with use of proteins as stabilising agents. In this context, this study intends the synthesis of a specific Au nanocluster covered by bovine serum albumin (BSA). It is shown that size-exclusion chromatography is feasible for the purification and isolation of the nanocluster. A mass spectrometric characterisation, preferably by ESI-MS, indicates the presence of an Au9@BSA nanocluster. Enzymatic digestion of the nanocluster with trypsin results in a significant increase of the fluorescence intensity at 650 and 710 nm, whereas complementary MALDI-MS studies are presented for the identification of generated peptides and show a distinctive pattern in comparison to the pure protein. It can be concluded that Au9@BSA might be, in future, an interesting candidate for in vitro studies of protease activities.Nanoclusters of noble metals like Ag and Au have attracted great attention as they form a missing link between isolated metal atoms and nanoparticles. Their particular properties like luminescence in the visible range and nontoxicity make them attractive for bioimaging and biolabelling purposes, especially with use of proteins as stabilising agents. In this context, this study intends the synthesis of a specific Au nanocluster covered by bovine serum albumin (BSA). It is shown that size-exclusion chromatography is feasible for the purification and isolation of the nanocluster. A mass spectrometric characterisation, preferably by ESI-MS, indicates the presence of an Au9@BSA nanocluster. Enzymatic digestion of the nanocluster with trypsin results in a significant increase of the fluorescence intensity at 650 and 710 nm, whereas complementary MALDI-MS studies are presented

  14. Precursor of kunitz trypsin inhibitor in soybean seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (KSTI) appears to be synthesized in precursor form which is converted by proteolytic digestion to the mature form of KSTI. Two forms of anti-cross-reacting material are evident when Western blots of extracts of developing seeds are analyzed. The precursor form increases to maximum levels as seed lengths increase to 11 mm. As the seed matures to 13 mm and turns yellow, precursor levels decrease while mature KSTI levels increase. The conversion of precursor to mature form could be demonstrated in vitro in seed extracts. The conversion could also be demonstrated in excised seeds pulse-labeled with [14C]-leucine as loss of radioactivity from the precursor and appearance in the mature KSTI form

  15. Cytometric analysis of retinopathies in retinal trypsin digests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanian, Zahra; Staniszewski, Kevin; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader; Ranji, Mahsa

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this work was to design an automated image cytometry tool for determination of various retinal vascular parameters including extraction of features that are relevant to postnatal retinal vascular development, and the progression of diabetic retinopathy. To confirm the utility and accuracy of the software, retinal trypsin digest from TSP1-/- and diabetic Akita/+; TSP1-/- mice were analyzed. TSP1 is a critical inhibitor of development of retinopathies and lack of TSP1 exacerbates progression of early diabetic retinopathies. Loss of vascular cells of and gain more acellular capillaries as two major signs of diabetic retinopathies were used to classify a retina as normal or injured. This software allows quantification and high throughput assessment of retinopathy changes associated with diabetes.

  16. The Use of Mild Trypsinization Conditions in the Detachment of Endothelial Cells to Promote Subsequent Endothelialization on Synthetic Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Melissa A.; Wallace, Charles S.; Anamelechi, Charles C.; Clermont, Edward; Reichert, William M.; Truskey, George A.

    2007-01-01

    A necessary condition for endothelialization of small diameter grafts is rapid and firm adhesion of endothelial cells upon exposure to flow. To retain integrins on the cell surface, we assessed the effects of trypsin concentration, the duration of trypsin incubation, and trypsin neutralization methods on endothelial cell adhesion. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells which were detached using 0.025% trypsin for five minutes and seeded onto glass pretreated with fibronectin had close to 100%...

  17. Uncovering immobilized trypsin digestion features from large-scale proteome data generated by high-resolution mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Yan, Xiaojing; Mou, Si; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2014-01-01

    Immobilized trypsin produces very fast protein digestion, which is attractive for application to high throughput bottom-up proteomics. While there is a rich literature on the preparation of immobilized trypsin, there are very few studies that investigate its application to complex proteomic samples. In this work, we compared solution-phase trypsin with trypsin immobilized on magnetic microspheres for digestion of two complex proteomes, E. coli and the MCF7 cell line. The digests were separate...

  18. Plasmodium falciparum Is Able To Invade Erythrocytes through a Trypsin-Resistant Pathway Independent of Glycophorin B

    OpenAIRE

    Gaur, Deepak; Storry, Jill R.; Reid, Marion E.; Barnwell, John W.; Miller, Louis H.

    2003-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum invades erythrocytes through multiple ligand-receptor interactions, with redundancies in each pathway. One such alternate pathway is the trypsin-resistant pathway that enables P. falciparum to invade trypsin-treated erythrocytes. Previous studies have shown that this trypsin-resistant pathway is dependent on glycophorin B, as P. falciparum strains invade trypsin-digested glycophorin B-deficient erythrocytes at a highly reduced efficiency. ...

  19. Focal pancreatic enlargement: differentiation between pancreatic adenocarcinoma and focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To differentiate the pancreatic adenocarcinoma from focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP in cases of focal pancreatic enlargement. We analysed CT findings of 66 patients of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 45) or focal pancreatitis (n = 21) with respect to size, density, calcification, pancreatic or biliary duct dilatation, fat plane obliteration around the vessels, direction of retroperitoneal extension, lymphadenopathy, pseudocyst formation and atrophy of pancreas. ERCP available in 48 patients were analysed in respect to morphologic appearance of CBD and pancreatic duct, and distance between the two ducts. The patients in focal pancreatitis were younger with more common history of alcohol drinking. There was no statistical difference in calcifications of the mass (18% in the adenocarcinoma, 33% in the focal pancreatitis), but a tendency of denser, larger number of calcifications was noted in focal pancreatitis. The finding of fat plane obliteration around the vessels were more common in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and fascial thickenings were more prominent in focal pancreatitis, although not statistically significant. On ERCP, there were no differential points of CBD, pancreatic duct morphology, but distance between the two ducts at the lesion center was more wider in focal pancreatitis. Differentiating focal pancreatitis from pancreatic adenocarcinoma is difficult. However, we should consider the possibility of focal pancreatitis in cases of patients with young age, having alcoholic history in association with CT findings of large numbers of and dense calcifications, and ERCP findings of prominent separation of two duct at the lesion center

  20. Endoscopic pancreatic duct stent placement for inflammatory pancreatic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The role of endoscopic therapy in the management of pancreatic diseases is continuously evolving; at present most pathological conditions of the pancreas are successfully treated by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or endoscopic ultrasound (EUS),or both. Endoscopic placement of stents has played and still plays a major role in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis, pseudocysts, pancreas divisum, main pancreatic duct injuries, pancreatic fistulae, complications of acute pancreatitis, recurrent idiopathic pancreatitis,and in the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis. These stents are currently routinely placed to reduce intraductal hypertension, bypass obstructing stones, restore lumen patency in cases with dominant, symptomatic strictures,seal main pancreatic duct disruption, drain pseudocysts or fluid collections, treat symptomatic major or minor papilla sphincter stenosis, and prevent procedure-induced acute pancreatitis. The present review aims at updating and discussing techniques, indications, and results of endoscopic pancreatic duct stent placement in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases of the pancreas.

  1. Research on Isolation and Clone of Embryonic Stem Cell-Like in Bovine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Li-long; YANG Qi; XIAO Mei; FENG Xiu-Liang; YANG Chun-rong; LEI An-min; GAO Zhi-min; DOU Zhong-ying; QIU Huai

    2002-01-01

    Bovine embryonic stem cell would be invaluable for researching the aspect of animal cloning, production transgenic animal and discussion of gene function in vitro. With the object of establishing an effective culture system for isolation and clone of bovine pluripotent stem cell, we cultured bovine embryos and mouse embryos including morula blastula and hatached blastula and obtained animal ICM on Primary marine embryonic fibroblast (Primary murine embryonic fibroblast, PMEF) feeder layer with tissue medium(DMEM supplemented with 15ml/100ml NBS ,0.1μmol/L Na2SeO3, 0. 1mmol/L β-mercaptoethanol, 1 000ng/ml LIF,10 ng/ml IGF, 1mmol/L necessary amino acid and 1mmol/L L-glutamine), then, we obtained mouse ICM and bovine ICM. Moreover, we isolated and cloned the 6 passage bovine ES like cells(12 cell lines) and 9 passage marine ES like cells (52 cell lines) deriving from bovine ICM and murine ICM respectively on the feeder layer of PMEF by disaggregating ICM and ES cell clones of bovine and murine into smaller clumps through digesting with 0. 125g/100ml trypsin and 0.02g/100ml EDTA and scattering with a glass needle. The pluripotency of both murine and bovine ES like cells was identified with morphological character, histochemistry identification, karyotype analysis and differentiation of ES cells in vitro or in vivo. This result showed that bovine embryonic stem cell and murine embryonic stem cell had developmental pluripotency.

  2. Effect of parenteral and early intrajejunal nutrition on pancreatic digestive enzyme synthesis,storage and discharge in dog models of acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan-Long Qin; Zhen-Dong Su; Lei-Guang Hu; Zai-Xian Ding; Qing-Tian Lin

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To study the effect of early intrajejunal nutrition on enzyme-protein synthesis and secretion during acute pancreatitis.METHODS:Fifteen dogs were randomly divided into parenteral nutrition(n = 7)and early intrajejunal nutrition groups(n = 8).An acute pancreatitis model was induced by injecting 5% sodium taurocholate and trypsin into the pancreas via the pancreatic duct.Intrajejunal nutrition was delivered with a catheter via a jejunostomy tube after the model was established for 24 h.On d 1 and 7 and at the beginning of nutritional support,radioactive tracing and electron microscopes were used to evaluate the enzyme-protein synthesis in acinar cells,the subcellular fractionation and the change in zymogen granules after 1.85×106 Bq L-3H phenylalanine was infused at 30,60,120,and 180 min.RESULTS:The 3H radioactivity in pancreatic acinar cells reached its peak level at 60 min,and the contents in the early intrajejunal nutrition group were higher than those in the parenteral nutrition group,which were then decreased.The mean number and area of zymogen granules did not show any significant statistical difference in both groups on d 1 or on d 7(P > 0.05).CONCLUSION:Early intrajejunal nutrition might be effective in dogs with acute pancreatitis.

  3. Imatinib-induced pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varma Mahesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced pancreatitis is a rare but serious complication of many drugs, some of which have been well documented. Here we present a case of a middle-aged man with chronic myeloid leukemia who developed acute pancreatitis after being initiated on imatinib mesylate. The case history, the pharmacodynamics, uses, and adverse effects of imatinib mesylate are discussed in detail.

  4. Early Prediction of Severity in Acute Pancreatitis. Is This Possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandberg AA

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available One out of ten cases of acute pancreatitis develops into severe acute pancreatitis which is a life threatening disorder with a high mortality rate. The other nine cases are self limiting and need very little therapy. The specificity of good clinical judgement on admission, concerning the prognosis of the attack, is high (high specificity but misses a lot of severe cases (low sensitivity. The prediction of severity in acute pancreatitis was first suggested by John HC Ranson in 1974. Much effort has been put into finding a simple scoring system or a good biochemical marker for selecting the severe cases of acute pancreatitis immediately on admission. Today C-reactive protein is the method of choice although this marker is not valid until 48-72 hours after the onset of pain. Inflammatory mediators upstream from CRP like interleukin-6 and other cytokines are likely to react faster and preliminary results for some of these mediators look promising. Another successful approach has been to study markers for the activation of trypsinogen such as TAP and CAPAP. This is based on studies showing that active trypsin is the initial motor of the inflammatory process in acute pancreatitis. In the near future a combined clinical and laboratory approach for early severity prediction will be the most reliable. Clinical judgement predicts 1/3 of the severe cases on admission and early markers for either inflammation or trypsinogen activation should accurately identify 50-60% of the mild cases among the rest, thus missing only 2-4% of the remaining severe cases. One problem is that there is no simple and fast method to analyze any of these parameters.

  5. Increased immunofluorescent staining of rabies-infected, formalin-fixed brain tissue after pepsin and trypsin digestion.

    OpenAIRE

    Reid, F L; Hall, N H; Smith, J. S.; Baer, G M

    1983-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the sensitivity of the direct immunofluorescence test on Formalin-fixed, trypsin-digested, rabies-infected brain tissue. Our results suggest that the optimal unmasking of rabies antigenic sites is obtained by using a double enzyme digestion with pepsin and trypsin in lieu of only trypsin.

  6. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Max Petrov

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis.

  7. Pancreatic panniculitis: a cutaneous manifestation of acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Laureano, A; Mestre, T; Ricardo, L; Rodrigues, AM; Cardoso, J.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic diseases; these diseases include acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, pseudocyst, and other pancreatic diseases. This malady is manifested as tender erythematous nodules on the legs, buttock, or trunk. Histopathologically, it shows the pathognomonic findings of focal subcutaneous fat necrosis and ghost-like anucleated cells with a thi...

  8. Coexistence of Pancreatic Carcinoma and Pancreatic Tuberculosis: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Zhen-Jiang; Zhang, Hao; Xiang, Guang-Ming; Gong, Jun; Mai, Gang; Liu, Xu-Bao

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) is extremely rare and mimics pancreatic carcinoma both clinically and radiologically. This paper discusses the occurrence of 2 heterogeneous masses located in the head and tail of the pancreas in an adult male. In this patient, laparotomy was performed because of the high suspicion of pancreatic carcinoma. Intraoperative fine needle aspiration biopsy revealed the coexistence of pancreatic carcinoma with pancreatic TB, and a combined resection of the distal pancrea...

  9. Fatal Pancreatic Panniculitis Associated with Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Woo Sun; Kim, Mi Yeon; Kim, Sang Woo; Paik, Chang Nyol; Kim, Hyung Ok; Park, Young Min

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic diseases; these diseases include acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, pseudocyst, and other pancreatic diseases. This malady is manifested as tender erythematous nodules on the legs, buttock, or trunk. Histopathologically, it shows the pathognomonic findings of focal subcutaneous fat necrosis and ghost-like anucleated cells with a thi...

  10. Imaging of pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of peripancreatic tissues or remote organ systems. Mild AP accounts for 75-80% of the cases and it is characterized by interstitial oedema, absent or minimal organ dysfunction, lack of complications and, usually, uneventful recovery. Severe AP is characterized by pancreatic necrosis, protracted clinical course, high incidence of complications, and high mortality rate. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) is generally based on clinical and laboratory findings. The role of imaging is to confirm diagnosis, to assess disease severity - especially by detecting pancreatic necrosis-, to reveal complications of the disease and to guide interventions). Contrast- enhanced multidetector CT is the current 'gold standard' imaging modality in the evaluation of patients with AP. The spectrum of findings seen on CT ranges from a normal appearance to diffuse pancreatic enlargement with poorly defined pancreatic contour and heterogeneous attenuation. Stranding of the fat surrounding the pancreas and fluid collections in the anterior pararenal space, the peritoneal cavity or elsewhere, acquiring the form of the anatomic space where they are developed, may also be disclosed. Lack of pancreatic parenchyma enhancement is indicative of the presence of pancreatic necrosis. CT may reveal biliary tract calculi, calcifications in patients with AP combined with chronic pancreatitis- and air in an inflamed pancreas. Pancreatic abscess is usually seen on CT as a focal low attenuation area with a thick wall that may exhibit enhancement following i.v. contrast media administration. Haemorrhage, pseudoaneurysms, renal and splenic parenchyma complications can also be demonstrated by CT. Balthazar et.al have developed CT classification and severity scores based on the presence of fluid collections and pancreatic necrosis. These scores correlate with the incidence of morbidity and

  11. Bovine Herpesvirus 4 infections and bovine mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, Gerardus Johannus

    2002-01-01

    Mastitis is an often occurring disease in dairy cattle with an enormous economic impact for milk producers worldwide. Despite intensive research, which is historically based on the detection of bacterial udder pathogens, still around 20-35% of clinical cases of bovine mastitis have an unknown aetiol

  12. Treatment of acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Mofleh Ibrahim

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no specific treatment for acute pancreatitis. Majority of patients with acute pancreatitis respond to medical therapy. Supportive measures and close observations represent the cornerstone of the medical therapy. Failure to respond to medical treatment may indicate choledocholithiasis or infected necrosis. Endoscopic papillotomy with stone retrieval is beneficial in patients with severe biliary pancreatitis. Image-guided fine needle aspiration and bacteriological examination of aspirate is reliable in detecting infection and deliniating causative pathogen. Surgical debridement is the method of choice for treatment of infected necrosis. In contrast, in pancreatic abscess, surgery is preserved for those, who do not respond to percutaneous drainage combined with antibiotics. The benefit of antisecretory and antiproteolytic agents is debatable. A combination of antioxidants, calcium channel antagonists and antibiotics may play a major role in the treatment of acute pancreatitis in the future.

  13. Review of idiopathic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding of pancreatitis and advances in technology have uncovered the veils of idiopathic pancreatitis to a point where a thorough history and judicious use of diagnostic techniques elucidate the cause in over 80% of cases. This review examines the multitude of etiologies of what were once labeled idiopathic pancreatitis and provides the current evidence on each. This review begins with a background review of the current epidemiology of idiopathic pancreatitis prior to discussion of various etiologies. Etiologies of medications, infections, toxins,autoimmune disorders, vascular causes, and anatomic and functional causes are explored in detail. We conclude with management of true idiopathic pancreatitis and a summary of the various etiologic agents. Throughout this review, areas of controversies are highlighted.

  14. Hepatic damage during acute pancreatitis in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M.M. Coelho

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied the alterations in the metabolism of liver mitochondria in rats with acute pancreatitis. Male Wistar rats were allocated to a control group (group I and to five other groups corresponding to 2, 4, 12, 24 and 48 h after the induction of acute pancreatitis by the injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct. Sham-operated animals were submitted to the same surgical steps except for the induction of acute pancreatitis. Mitochondrial oxidation and phosphorylation were measured polarographically by determining oxygen consumption without ADP (basal respiration, state 4 and in the presence of ADP (activated respiration, state 3. Serum amylase, transaminases (ALT and AST and protein were also determined. Ascitic fluid, contents of amylase, trypsin and total protein were also determined and arterial blood pressure was measured in all groups. In ascitic fluid, trypsin and amylase increased reaching a maximum at 2 and 4 h, respectively. Serum amylase increased at 2 h reaching a maximum at 4 h. Serum transaminase levels increased at 12 and 24 h. After 2 h (and also 4 h there was an increase in state 4 respiration (45.65 ± 1.79 vs 28.96 ± 1.50 and a decrease in respiration control rate (3.53 ± 0.09 vs 4.45 ± 0.08 and in the ADP/O ratio (1.77 ± 0.02 vs 1.91 ± 0.01 compared to controls (P<0.05. These results indicate a disruption of mitochondrial function, which recovered after 12 h. In the 48-h groups there was mitochondrial damage similar to that occurring in ischemic lesion. Beat-to-beat analysis (30 min showed that arterial blood pressure remained normal up to 24 h (111 ± 3 mmHg while a significant decrease occurred in the 48-h group (91 ± 4 mmHg. These data suggest biphasic damage in mitochondrial function in acute pancreatitis: an initial uncoupled phase, possibly secondary to enzyme activity, followed by a temporary recovery and then a late and final dysfunction, associated with arterial hypotension, possibly related

  15. Pancreatic Involvement in Melioidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vui Heng Chong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Melioidosis is endemic to tropical regions and, despite the common occurrence of intra-abdominal abscesses, pancreatic involvement in melioidosis has not previously been reported. Objective We report our experience with pancreatic melioidosis. Patients All 65 patients treated for melioidosis who had computed tomography (CT scans were identified from prospective databases and were retrospectively reviewed. Main outcome measures A detailed review of cases with pancreas involvement was carried out. Results There were four cases (three males and one female; median age 29.5 years, range: 25-48 years with pancreatic melioidosis, giving a prevalence of 6.2%. All had predisposing conditions (two had poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and two had thalassemia for melioidosis. Fever (100%, anorexia (100%, weight loss (100%, rigor (75% and abdominal pain (75% were the most common symptoms at presentation and the median duration of symptoms before presentation was six weeks (range: 2-8 weeks. All pancreatic abscesses were detected on CT scan. Multiple foci involvement was common (3 to 6 sites: blood (4 patients, liver (3 patients, psoas muscle (2 patients, spleen (2 patients, infected ascites (2 patients and lung (1 patient. Pancreatic involvement ranged from multi-focal micro-abscesses to focal large abscesses and involved all parts of the pancreas (body 100%, head 75% and tail 50%. Associated pancreatic findings included splenic vein thrombosis, peripancreatic inflammation and peripancreatic fat streaking. All the pancreatic abscesses were resolved with antibiotics without requiring pancreatic abscess drainage (including one patient who died from disseminated melioidosis. Conclusion Pancreatic involvement typically occurs as part of multi-organ involvement and commonly manifests as multifoci micro-abscesses. Associated pancreatic abnormalities were also common. All responded to treatment without requiring drainage

  16. The influence of a 21 kDa Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor from nonhost madras thorn, Pithecellobium dulce, seeds on H. armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Prabhash K; Singh, Dushyant; Jamal, Farrukh

    2015-05-01

    A trypsin inhibitor purified from the seeds of the Manila tamarind, Pithecellobium dulce (PDTI), was studied for its effects on growth parameters and developmental stages of Helicoverpa armigera. PDTI exhibited inhibitory activity against bovine trypsin (∼86%; ∼1.33 ug/ml IC50). The inhibitory activity of PDTI was unaltered over a wide range of temperature, pH, and in the presence of dithiothreitol. Larval midgut proteases were unable to digest PDTI for up to 12 h of incubation. Dixon and Lineweaver-Burk double reciprocal plots analysis revealed a competitive inhibition mechanism and a Ki of ∼3.9 × 10(-8) M. Lethal dose (0.50% w/w) and dosage for weight reduction by 50% (0.25% w/w) were determined. PDTI showed a dose-dependent effect on mean larval weight and a series of nutritional disturbances. In artificial diet at 0.25% w/w PDTI, the efficiency of conversion of ingested food, of digested food, relative growth rate, and growth index declined, whereas approximate digestibility, relative consumption rate, metabolic cost, consumption index, and total developmental period were increased in larvae. This is the first report of antifeedant and antimetabolic activities of PDTI on midgut proteases of H. armigera. PMID:25580830

  17. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer; the clinical aspects and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.M. Sikkens (Edmée)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, the pancreas is unable to deliver a sufficient quantity of pancreatic enzymes to the small intestine to digest food. It may occur in several life threatening diseases, including chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Due to this lack or absence

  18. Ny klassifikation af pancreatitis acuta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benny Østerbye; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2011-01-01

    The course of acute pancreatitis is in the initial phase dominated by a systemic inflammatory response, later by local complications. A new classification defines three specific types of pancreatitis: 1) interstitial oedematous pancreatitis and 2) necrotizing pancreatitis with pancreatic...... parenchymal necrosis, or 3) peripancreatic necrosis alone. The classification also defines four types of collections: 1) Acute peripancreatic fluid collection, 2) pseudocyst, 3) acute post-necrotic collection, and 4) walled-off necrosis. This article summarizes the terminology of the revised Atlanta...

  19. Trypsin inactivation by latex fabricated gold nanoparticles: A new strategy towards insect control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Chandrashekhar D; Borase, Hemant P; Suryawanshi, Rahul K; Patil, Satish V

    2016-10-01

    Before applying nanotechnologies in biomedical and environmental areas it is advised to study interactions of nanoparticles and other nanomaterials with biomacromolecule present in living system. Moreover there is scarcity of reports on interactions between nanoparticles and biomaterials. In present report a rapid, ecofriendly method of fabricating stable gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using latex of Jatropha curcas is reported for the first time. AuNPs found to have characteristic absorption maxima centered at 540nm, multiple irregular shapes with size range from 20 to 50nm and have crystalline nature. Latex fabricated AuNPs were found to inhibit catalytic potential of trypsin (a vital enzyme responsible for digestion, insecticide resistance and in several disease conditions). The interactions between AuNPs and trypsin were analyzed by UV-vis spectrophotometry and microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry which suggests formation of trypsin-AuNPs complex responsible for lowering catalytic activity of trypsin. Transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and particle size distribution studies further confirm complex formation between trypsin and AuNPs. Diverse interactions of metal nanoparticles with proteins such as covalent interaction, electrostatic interactions and binding to SH group of amino acid may be the reasons behind inhibition of trypsin activity. In vivo studies on serum of several vectors and agriculturally important pests supported instrumental results on AuNPs induced trypsin inhibition. This work will bring a new research direction to explore eco-friendly nanoparticle in insect control via inhibition of enzyme catalytic potential. PMID:27542740

  20. Salmon trypsin stimulates the expression of interleukin-8 via protease-activated receptor-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we focus on salmon trypsin as an activator of inflammatory responses in airway cells in vitro. The rationale behind the investigation is that salmon industry workers are exposed to aerosols containing enzymes, which are generated during industrial processing of the fish. Knowing that serine proteases such as trypsin are highly active mediators with diverse biological activities, the stimulation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and interleukin (IL)-8 and the role of protease-activated receptors (PAR) in inflammatory signal mediation were investigated. Protease-activated receptors are considered important under pathological situations in the human airways, and a thorough understanding of PAR-induced cellular events and their consequences in airway inflammation is necessary. Human airway epithelial cells (A549) were exposed to trypsin isolated from fish (Salmo salar), and we observed that purified salmon trypsin could generate secretion of IL-8 in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PAR-2 activation by salmon trypsin is coupled to an induction of NF-κB-mediated transcription using a PAR-2 transfected HeLa cell model. Finally, we show that the release of IL-8 from A549 following stimulation with purified salmon trypsin is mediated through activation of PAR-2 using specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). The results presented suggest that salmon trypsin, via activation of PAR-2, might influence inflammation processes in the airways if inhaled in sufficient amounts

  1. X-ray studies on the bilayer structure of trypsin-treated rat brain myelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trypsin-treated rat brain myelin was subjected to biochemical and x-ray studies. Untreated myelin gave rise to a pattern of three rings with a fundamental repeat period of 155 A consisting of two bilayers per repeat period, whereas myelin treated with trypsin showed a fundamental repeat period of 75 A with one bilayer per repeat period. The integrated raw intensity of the h = 4 reflection with respect to the h = 2 reflection is 0.38 for untreated myelin. The corresponding value reduced to 0.23, 0.18, 0.17 for myelin treated with 5, 10, 40 units of trypsin per mg of myelin, respectively, for 30 min at 30 degC. The decrease in relative raw intensity of the higher-order reflection relative to the lower-order reflection is suggestive of a disordering of the phosphate groups upon trypsin treatment or an increased mosaicity of the membrane or a combination of both these effects. However, trypsin treatment does not lead to a complete breakdown of the membrane. The integrated intensity of the h = 1 reflection, though weak, is above the measurable threshold for untreated myelin, whereas the corresponding intensity is below the measurable threshold for trypsin-treated myelin, indicating a possible asymmetric to symmetric transition of the myelin bilayer structure about its centre after trypsin treatment. (author). 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  2. Immobilization of Trypsin in Lignocellulosic Waste Material to Produce Peptides with Bioactive Potential from Whey Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cristina Bassan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, trypsin (Enzyme Comission 3.4.21.4 was immobilized in a low cost, lignocellulosic support (corn cob powder—CCP with the goal of obtaining peptides with bioactive potential from cheese whey. The pretreated support was activated with glyoxyl groups, glutaraldehyde and IDA-glyoxyl. The immobilization yields of the derivatives were higher than 83%, and the retention of catalytic activity was higher than 74%. The trypsin-glyoxyl-CCP derivative was thermally stable at 65 °C, a value that was 1090-fold higher than that obtained with the free enzyme. The trypsin-IDA-glyoxyl-CCP and trypsin-glutaraldehyde-CCP derivatives had thermal stabilities that were 883- and five-fold higher, respectively, then those obtained with the free enzyme. In the batch experiments, trypsin-IDA-glyoxyl-CCP retained 91% of its activity and had a degree of hydrolysis of 12.49%, while the values for trypsin-glyoxyl-CCP were 87% and 15.46%, respectively. The stabilized derivative trypsin-glyoxyl-CCP was also tested in an upflow packed-bed reactor. The hydrodynamic characterization of this reactor was a plug flow pattern, and the kinetics of this system provided a relative activity of 3.04 ± 0.01 U·g−1 and an average degree of hydrolysis of 23%, which were suitable for the production of potentially bioactive peptides.

  3. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis develops immediately after the causative impulse, while chronic pancreatitis develops after the long-term action of the noxious agent. A typical representative of acute pancreatitis is biliary pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis develops in alcoholism and has a long latency. As alcoholic pancreatitis is manifested at first as a rule by a potent attack, it is classified in this stage as acute pancreatitis. The most frequent etiological factors in our civilization are thus cholelithiasis and alcoholism (both account for 20-50% in different studies). The assumed pathogenetic principles in acute biliary pancreatitis are the common canal of both efferent ducts above the obturated papilla, duodenopancreatic reflux and intrapancreatic hypertension. A detailed interpretation is however lacking. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is more complicated. Among others some part is played by changes in the calcium concentration and fusion of cellular membranes. Idiopathic pancreatitis occurs in up to 10%, part of the are due to undiagnosed alcoholism and cholelithiasis. Other etiologies are exceptional. Similarly as in cholelithiasis pancreatitis develops also during other pathological processes in the area of the papilla of Vater such as dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi, ampulloma and juxtapapillary diverticulum, it is however usually mild. The incidence of postoperative pancreatitis is declining. Its lethality is 30% and the diagnosis is difficult. In the pathogenesis changes of the ion concentration are involved, hypoxia and mechanical disorders of the integrity of the gland. Pancreatitis develops in association with other infections--frequently in mumps, rarely in hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and mycoses. Viral pancreatitis is usually mild. In parasitoses pancreatitis develops due to a block of the papilla Vateri. In hyperparathyroidism chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop, recent data are lacking. As to dyslipoproteinaemias

  4. In vitro and in silico investigations of the binding interactions between chlorophenols and trypsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan-Qing, E-mail: wyqing76@126.com [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Wetland Bioresources and Environmental Protection, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Institute of Applied Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Tan, Chun-Yun [Institute of Applied Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhuang, Shu-Lin [Institute of Environmental Science, College of Environmental and Resource Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhai, Peng-Zhan; Cui, Yun; Zhou, Qiu-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Mei [Institute of Applied Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Fei, Zhenghao [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Wetland Bioresources and Environmental Protection, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Institute of Applied Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Binding interactions of five chlorophenols with trypsin were investigated. • The number of chlorine atoms of chlorophenols partly affected the binding ability of them to trypsin. • Noncovalent interactions stabilized the trypsin–chlorophenols complexes. • There was the one main binding site of trypsin for chlorophenols. - Abstract: Being the first-degree toxic pollutants, chlorophenols (CP) have potential carcinogenic and mutagenic activity and toxicity. Since there still lacks studies on molecular interactions of chlorophenols with trypsin, one major binding target of many exogenous environmental pollutants, the binding interactions between five chlorophenols, 2-CP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TCP and PCP and trypsin were characterized by the combination of multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling. The chlorophenols bind at the one main site of trypsin and the binding induces the changes of microenvironment and global conformations of trypsin. Different number of chloride atoms significantly affects the binding and the binding constants K{sub A} ranks as K{sub A} (2-CP) < K{sub A} (2,6-DCP) ≈ K{sub A} (2,4,6-TCP) < K{sub A} (2,3,4,6-TCP) < K{sub A} (PCP). These chlorophenols interacts with trypsin mainly through hydrophobic interactions and via hydrogen bonding interactions and aromatic–aromatic π–π stacking interaction. Our results offer insights into the binding mechanism of chlorophenols with trypsin and provide important information for possible toxicity risk of chlorophenols to human health.

  5. Novel mutations of PRSS1 gene in patients with pancreatic cancer among Han population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Kai; LIU Qi-cai; LIN Jian-hua; LIN Xin-hua; ZHUANG Ze-hao; GAO Feng; OU Qi-shui

    2011-01-01

    Background A high mortality rate of pancreatic cancer becomes a bottleneck for further treatment with long-term efficacy. It is urgent to find a new mean to predict the early onset of pancreatic cancer accurately. The authors hypothesized that genetic variants of cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene could affect trypsin expression/function and result in abnormal activation of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2), then lead to pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to elaborate some novel mutations of PRSS1 gene in the patients with pancreatic cancer.Methods Totally 156 patients with pancreatic cancer and 220 unrelated individuals as controls were enrolled in this study. The mutations of PRSS1 gene were analyzed by direct sequencing. K-ras Mutation Detection Kit was used to find the general k-ras gene disorder in the pancreatic cancer tissue. Then the clinical data were collected and analyzed simultaneously.Results There were two patients who carried novel mutations which was IVS 3 +157 G>C of PRSS1 gene in peripheral blood specimens and pancreatic cancer tissue. What's more, it was surprising to find a novel complicated mutation of exon 3 in PRSS1 gene (c.409 A>G and c.416 C>T) in another young patient. The complicated mutation made No. 135 and No.137 amino acid transfer from Thr to Ala and Thr to Met respectively. No any mutation was found in the normal controls while no mutations of k-ras gene were detected in the three patients.Conclusion Mutations of PRSS1 gene may be an important factor of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Src kinases play a novel dual role in acute pancreatitis affecting severity but no role in stimulated enzyme secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Ramos-Álvarez, Irene; Jensen, R T

    2016-06-01

    In pancreatic acinar cells, the Src family of kinases (SFK) is involved in the activation of several signaling cascades that are implicated in mediating cellular processes (growth, cytoskeletal changes, apoptosis). However, the role of SFKs in various physiological responses such as enzyme secretion or in pathophysiological processes such as acute pancreatitis is either controversial, unknown, or incompletely understood. To address this, in this study, we investigated the role/mechanisms of SFKs in acute pancreatitis and enzyme release. Enzyme secretion was studied in rat dispersed pancreatic acini, in vitro acute-pancreatitis-like changes induced by supramaximal COOH-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin (CCK). SFK involvement assessed using the chemical SFK inhibitor (PP2) with its inactive control, 4-amino-7-phenylpyrazol[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP3), under experimental conditions, markedly inhibiting SFK activation. In CCK-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells, activation occurred of trypsinogen, various MAP kinases (p42/44, JNK), transcription factors (signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, nuclear factor-κB, activator protein-1), caspases (3, 8, and 9) inducing apoptosis, LDH release reflective of necrosis, and various chemokines secreted (monocyte chemotactic protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted). All were inhibited by PP2, not by PP3, except caspase activation leading to apoptosis, which was increased, and trypsin activation, which was unaffected, as was CCK-induced amylase release. These results demonstrate SFK activation is playing a dual role in acute pancreatitis, inhibiting apoptosis and promoting necrosis as well as chemokine/cytokine release inducing inflammation, leading to more severe disease, as well as not affecting secretion. Thus, our studies indicate that SFK is a key mediator of inflammation and pancreatic acinar cell death in acute pancreatitis, suggesting it

  7. Metabolism of 125I-labelled trypsin in man: evidence of recirculation.

    OpenAIRE

    Lake-Bakaar, G; Rubio, C E; McKavanagh, S; Potter, B. J.; Summerfield, J A

    1980-01-01

    125I-labelled human trypsin metabolism has been investigated in man. Three subjects received 125I-trypsin and 131I-albumin intravenously. Against a background secretin infusion (1 U/kg/h), trypsin decayed biexponentially from the serum with half-lives of 17.5, 21, and 24 minutes for the rapid disappearance phase and 520, 540, and 560 minutes for the slow phase. Between 13% and 38% of the 125I injected was recovered from duodenal juice aspirated continously over 300 minutes. In contrast, less ...

  8. Production of cod trypsin I in cold-adapted expression systems

    OpenAIRE

    Karen Ósk Pétursdóttir 1985

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research project was to produce recombinant cod trypsin I in two different cold-adapted protein expression systems, Escherichia coli and Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis. The results show that the P. haloplanktis system is better suited for expression of the recombinant trypsin I than the E. coli system. The specific activity of the recombinant cod trypsin I was 39.8 U/mg in the P. haloplanktis expression system compared to 17.9 U/mg in previous expression experiments. For compa...

  9. Influence of Different Genotypes on Trypsin Inhibitor Levels and Activity in Soybeans

    OpenAIRE

    Nedovic, Viktor A.; Stanojevic, Sladjana P.; Barac, Miroljub B.; Vucelic-Radovic, Biljana V.; Pesic, Mirjana B.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the relationship between the two major trypsin inhibitors (TI) in soybean, i.e., the Kunitz (KTI) and Bowman-Birk (BBI) trypsin inhibitors, as well as between them and the corresponding trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA). Twelve investigated soybean genotypes showed significant differences in TI levels and TIA. A very strong positive correlation was found between the levels of KTI and total BBI (r = 0.94, P < 0.05). No relationship was found between KTI, BBI or total TI and...

  10. Spectroscopic study on the interaction of Trypsin with Bicyclol and analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wu; Dou, Huanjing; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Lvjing; Wang, Ruiyong; Chang, Junbiao

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between Trypsin and Bicyclol or analogs (Bifendate, I, II and III) were investigated by spectrophotometric methods. It was found that Bicyclol or analogs had strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of Trypsin by a static quenching procedure. The binding constants were obtained at three temperatures. The thermodynamics parameters reveal that the hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions play an important role in the interaction. Results showed that the microenvironments of tryptophan residue of Trypsin were disturbed by the analogs. Results indicated that Bifendate was the strongest quencher among five compounds.

  11. Investigations on radical formation and inactivation of suspended trypsin after γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystalline trypsin was irradiated in oxygen-free suspension media of methanol, ethanol and n-heptane with 60Co-γ-rays at 77 K or 273 K. Measurements with ESR and activity determinations revealed no influence of ethanol and n-heptane on the formation of free radicals and inactivation of trypsin. Especially, the results are independent of the polarity of the suspension media and correspond to an irradiation of trypsin in vacuum. On the other hand, methanol leads to a decay of radiation-induced radicals and to an increased inactivation. The results are discussed in comparison to analogous experiments carried out with ultra-violet light. (orig.)

  12. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer; the clinical aspects and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Sikkens, Edmée

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, the pancreas is unable to deliver a sufficient quantity of pancreatic enzymes to the small intestine to digest food. It may occur in several life threatening diseases, including chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Due to this lack or absence of pancreatic enzymes, malabsorption of fat develops, which causes steatorrhea-related symptoms, weight loss, and malnutrition. To reduce morbidity and even mortality, patients should be treated wi...

  13. Can Pancreatic Cancer Be Found Early?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Signs and symptoms of pancreatic cancer Can pancreatic cancer be found early? Pancreatic cancer is hard to ... Testing: What You Need to Know . Testing for pancreatic cancer in people at high risk For people in ...

  14. Researchers Identify Early Sign of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of pancreatic cancer Researchers identify early sign of pancreatic cancer September 28, 2014 Tags: PancreaticCancer Brian Wolpin, MD ... discovered a sign of the early development of pancreatic cancer – an upsurge in certain amino acids that occurs ...

  15. Pancreatitis in scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Bhatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a rickettsial infection prevalent in most parts of India. Acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation is a rare complication of this condition. This paper reports acute renal failure, pancreatitis and pseudocyst formation in a 48-year-old female with scrub typhus. Ultrasonography of the abdomen revealed a bulky pancreas with fluid seen along the body of the pancreas in the lesser sac. The infection was successfully treated with doxycycline and supportive treatment. Pancreatitis was managed conservatively. This case report highlights the importance of identifying and managing uncommon complications of a common tropical disease for optimum outcome.

  16. Bovine Herpesvirus 4 infections and bovine mastitis

    OpenAIRE

    Wellenberg, Gerardus Johannus

    2002-01-01

    Mastitis is an often occurring disease in dairy cattle with an enormous economic impact for milk producers worldwide. Despite intensive research, which is historically based on the detection of bacterial udder pathogens, still around 20-35% of clinical cases of bovine mastitis have an unknown aetiology. Due to the high number of unknown causes of clinical mastitis, studies were undertaken to gain more insight into the role of viruses in this important disease. For the first time, we found tha...

  17. Antitumor action of bovine seminal ribonuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlike the bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase A), bovine seminal ribonuclease (BS RNase) displays various biological activities; including antitumor activity, immunosuppressivity, spermatogenicity and embryo-toxicity. To learn more about its antitumor effect we tested BS RNase on the growth of 16 cell lines derived from patients with various hematological malignancies. The cells of lymphoid origin were generally more susceptible to BS RNase, administered in the range of concentrations from 2 to 100 μg/ml, than the myeloid ones. RNase A used at the same concentrations did not exert any inhibitory effect. The inhibitory effect of BS RNase persisted in cultured cells three times wash in complete medium and cell re-cultivation in fresh medium free of BS RNase. Four cell lines were very little sensitive (KG-1 and U-937) or resistant (JOK and NAMALWA) to BS RNase regardless of their origin. The in vivo antitumor effect of BS RNase was tested on human prostate carcinoma transplanted to athymic nude mice. The daily dose of BS RNase (0.25 mg/20 g) was administered for three weeks except weekends (15 doses) by three different ways (intraperitoneally - i.p., subcutaneously - s.c. and intratumorally - i.t.). Whereas i.p. administration was ineffective, s.c. administration significantly reduced size of the tumors and i.t. administration abolished half of the tumors in treated mice. The average of treated mice decreased during the experiment by 10-15%. (author)

  18. Electronic structures of Ascaris trypsin inhibitor in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haoping

    2003-11-01

    The electronic structures of Ascaris trypsin inhibitor in solution are obtained by the first-principles, all-electron, ab initio calculation using the self-consistent cluster-embedding (SCCE) method. The inhibitor, made up of 62 amino acid residues with 912 atoms, has two three-dimensional solution structures: 1ata and 1atb. The calculated ground-state energy of structure 1atb is lower than that of structure 1ata by 6.12 eV. The active sites are determined and explained: only structure 1atb has a N terminal at residue ARG+31. This shows that the structure 1atb is the stable and active form of the inhibitor, which is in agreement with the experimental results. The calculation reveals that some parts of the inhibitor can be easily changed while the inhibitor’s biological activity may be kept. This kind of information may be helpful in fighting viruses such as AIDS, SARS, and flu, since these viruses have higher variability. The calculation offers an independent theoretical estimate of the precision of structure determination.

  19. Influence of Different Genotypes on Trypsin Inhibitor Levels and Activity in Soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor A. Nedovic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the relationship between the two major trypsin inhibitors (TI in soybean, i.e., the Kunitz (KTI and Bowman-Birk (BBI trypsin inhibitors, as well as between them and the corresponding trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA. Twelve investigated soybean genotypes showed significant differences in TI levels and TIA. A very strong positive correlation was found between the levels of KTI and total BBI (r = 0.94, P < 0.05. No relationship was found between KTI, BBI or total TI and TIA. Based on this data, it appears that the levels of major TI in soybean are related. Understanding the relationship between trypsin inhibitors and their activities could be useful for further improvement of the health impacts of soy proteins.

  20. High-gradient magnetic affinity separation of trypsin from porcine pancreatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubbuch, Jürgen; Thomas, Owen R. T.

    2002-01-01

    systematic optimization with respect to activation chemistry, spacer length and ligand density, conditions for preparation of effective high capacity (Q(max) = 120 mg g(-1)) strongly interacting (K-d <0.3 mum) trypsin-binding adsorbents based on immobilized benzamidine were established. In small......-scale studies approximate to95% of the endogenous trypsin present in a crude porcine pancreatin feedstock was recovered with a purification factor of approximate to4.1 at the expense of only a 4% loss in a-amylase activity. Efficient recovery of trypsin from the same feedstock was demonstrated at a vastly...... increased scale using a high-gradient magnetic separation system to capture loaded benzamidine-linked adsorbents following batch adsorption. With the aid of a simple recycle loop over 80% of the initially adsorbed trypsin was recovered in-line with an overall purification factor of approximate to3.5....

  1. Frequency of inhibitors of daphnid trypsin in the widely distributed cyanobacterial genus Planktothrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrlack, T.; Christoffersen, K.; Friberg-Jensen, U.

    2005-01-01

    Recent findings showed that inhibition of the digestive enzyme trypsin by cyanobacterial metabolites can result in the death of the microcrustacean Daphnia. Compounds that are active against daphnid trypsin can therefore be considered as potentially toxic to Daphnia. Here we reported on the...... frequency of such compounds in the widely distributed cyanobacterial genus Planktothrix. Of the 89 Planktothrix strains analysed, about 70% produced inhibitors of daphnid trypsin. The strains tested positive represented three common Planktothrix species and were isolated from diverse localities and...... geographical regions. Our findings suggest therefore that inhibitors of daphnid trypsin are common in Planktothrix and maybe other cyanobacterial genera. These compounds should therefore be considered in future studies on the chemical ecology of cyanobacteria....

  2. Determination of antigenicity by radioimmunoassay and of trypsin inhibitory activities in heat or enzyme denatured ovomucoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of heat treatment and enzymic digestion on the antigenic reactivity of ovomucoid were studied. This reactivity was mainly examined by a solid phase competitive radioimmunoassay. The trypsin inhibitory activity was also measured to elucidate its relationship to the antigenic reactivity. The antigenic reactivity and trypsin inhibitory activity diminished in parallel with increase of heating time. However, enzymic digestion caused a more rapid decrease in antigenic reactivity than in trypsin inhibitory activity. From these results, it is suggested that the structure of the antigenic determinants is destroyed in a similar manner to that of the trypsin inhibitory active site when ovomucoid is heated, while the former structure is destroyed more easily than the latter by enzymic digestion

  3. The use of poly(ethylene terephthalate)-poly(aniline) composite for trypsin immobilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents trypsin immobilisation on strips of poly(ethylene terephthalate)-poly(aniline), activated with glutaraldehyde (PET-PANIG) composite. The photomicrography of the material showed changes corresponding to the chemical modifications produced in the steps of synthesis. The immobilisation process was very efficient under optimal conditions (18.6%). The immobilised and free enzyme presented the same pH and temperature optimum. PET-PANIG-trypsin was able to hydrolyse casein, albumin, gelatine, and skimmed milk. Kmapp value for PET-PANIG-trypsin was very close to Km of the free enzyme for casein. Immobilised trypsin showed higher stability than the free enzyme, with 100% activity after 14 days of storage at 4 deg. C and 100% operational stability after 4 cycles of use

  4. The use of poly(ethylene terephthalate)-poly(aniline) composite for trypsin immobilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caramori, S.S. [Laboratorio de Quimica de Proteinas, Departamento de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Goias, Cx. Postal 131, 74001-970 Goiania-GO (Brazil)], E-mail: samanthabio@hotmail.com; Fernandes, K.F. [Laboratorio de Quimica de Proteinas, Departamento de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Goias, Cx. Postal 131, 74001-970 Goiania-GO (Brazil)], E-mail: katia@icb.ufg.br

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents trypsin immobilisation on strips of poly(ethylene terephthalate)-poly(aniline), activated with glutaraldehyde (PET-PANIG) composite. The photomicrography of the material showed changes corresponding to the chemical modifications produced in the steps of synthesis. The immobilisation process was very efficient under optimal conditions (18.6%). The immobilised and free enzyme presented the same pH and temperature optimum. PET-PANIG-trypsin was able to hydrolyse casein, albumin, gelatine, and skimmed milk. Km{sub app} value for PET-PANIG-trypsin was very close to Km of the free enzyme for casein. Immobilised trypsin showed higher stability than the free enzyme, with 100% activity after 14 days of storage at 4 deg. C and 100% operational stability after 4 cycles of use.

  5. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Capecomorin S Pitchumoni; Balaji Yegneswaran

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a rare event in pregnancy,occurring in approximately 3 in 10 000 pregnancies.The spectrum of AP in pregnancy ranges from mild pancreatitis to serious pancreatitis associated with necrosis, abscesses, pseudocysts and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes. Pregnancy related hematological and biochemical alterations influence the interpretation of diagnostic tests and assessment of severity of AP. As in any other disease associated with pregnancy, AP is associated with greater concerns as it deals with two lives rather than just one as in the nonpregnant population. The recent advances in clinical gastroenterology have improved the early diagnosis and effective management of biliary pancreatitis. Diagnostic studies such as endoscopic ultrasound,magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and therapeutic modalities that include endoscopic sphincterotomy, biliary stenting, common bile duct stone extraction and laparoscopic cholecystectomy are major milestones in gastroenterology. When properly managed AP in pregnancy does not carry a dismal prognosis as in the past.

  6. Familial Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Lanspa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer’s high mortality rate equates closely with its incidence, thereby showing the need for development of biomarkers of its increased risk and a better understanding of its genetics, so that high-risk patients can be better targeted for screening and early potential lifesaving diagnosis. Its phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity is extensive and requires careful scrutiny of its pattern of cancer associations, such as malignant melanoma associated with pancreatic cancer, in the familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome, due to the CDKN2A germline mutation. This review is designed to depict several of the hereditary pancreatic cancer syndromes with particular attention given to the clinical application of this knowledge into improved control of pancreatic cancer.

  7. Perspectives in Pancreatic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Salim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describes some of the mechanisms which are thought to be important in the causation of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Both medical and surgical techniques for treating this pain are described.

  8. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may include: Fasting glucose level Gastrin level Glucose tolerance test Secretin stimulation test for pancreas Blood glucagon ... PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Pancreatic Cancer Browse the ...

  9. What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... very important to distinguish between exocrine and endocrine cancers of the pancreas. They have distinct risk factors and causes, have ... are by far the most common type of pancreas cancer. If you are told you have pancreatic cancer, ...

  10. Pancreatic exocrine function testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and para-aminobenzoic acid bound to a dipeptide. Of all these tests the secretin stimulation test is the most accurate and reliable if done by experienced personnel. However, the indirect tests are simpler to do and appear to be comparable to the secretin test at detecting pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. These indirect tests are becoming clinically available and clinicians should familiarize themselves with the strengths and weaknesses of each

  11. Bioconjugation of trypsin onto gold nanoparticles: Effect of surface chemistry on bioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinterwirth, Helmut; Lindner, Wolfgang [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 38, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Laemmerhofer, Michael, E-mail: michael.laemmerhofer@uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 38, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Size and spacer affect bioactivity of nanoparticulate trypsin reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase of GNP's size increases activity of bound trypsin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase of spacer length increases amount and activity of immobilized enzyme by factor 6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decrease of digestion time up to less than 1 h when trypsin immobilized onto GNPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduced auto-digestion compared to trypsin in-solution. - Abstract: The systematic study of activity, long-time stability and auto-digestion of trypsin immobilized onto gold nanoparticles (GNPs) is described in this paper and compared to trypsin in-solution. Thereby, the influence of GNP's size and immobilization chemistry by various linkers differing in lipophilicity/hydrophilicity and spacer lengths was investigated with regard to the bioactivity of the conjugated enzyme. GNPs with different sizes were prepared by reduction and simultaneous stabilization with trisodium citrate and characterized by UV/vis spectra, dynamic light scattering (DLS), {zeta}-potential measurements and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). GNPs were derivatized by self-assembling of bifunctional thiol reagents on the nanoparticle (NP) surface via dative thiol-gold bond yielding a carboxylic acid functionalized surface. Trypsin was either attached directly via hydrophobic and ionic interactions onto the citrate stabilized GNPs or immobilized via EDC/NHS bioconjugation onto the carboxylic functionalized GNPs, respectively. The amount of bound trypsin was quantified by measuring the absorbance at 280 nm. The activity of bound enzyme and its Michaelis Menten kinetic parameter K{sub m} and v{sub max} were measured by the standard chromogenic substrate N{sub {alpha}}-Benzoyl-DL-arginine 4-nitroanilide hydrochloride (BApNA). Finally, digestion of a standard protein mixture with the trypsin-conjugated NPs followed by analysis with

  12. Bioconjugation of trypsin onto gold nanoparticles: Effect of surface chemistry on bioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Size and spacer affect bioactivity of nanoparticulate trypsin reactor. ► Increase of GNP's size increases activity of bound trypsin. ► Increase of spacer length increases amount and activity of immobilized enzyme by factor 6. ► Decrease of digestion time up to less than 1 h when trypsin immobilized onto GNPs. ► Reduced auto-digestion compared to trypsin in-solution. - Abstract: The systematic study of activity, long-time stability and auto-digestion of trypsin immobilized onto gold nanoparticles (GNPs) is described in this paper and compared to trypsin in-solution. Thereby, the influence of GNP's size and immobilization chemistry by various linkers differing in lipophilicity/hydrophilicity and spacer lengths was investigated with regard to the bioactivity of the conjugated enzyme. GNPs with different sizes were prepared by reduction and simultaneous stabilization with trisodium citrate and characterized by UV/vis spectra, dynamic light scattering (DLS), ζ-potential measurements and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). GNPs were derivatized by self-assembling of bifunctional thiol reagents on the nanoparticle (NP) surface via dative thiol-gold bond yielding a carboxylic acid functionalized surface. Trypsin was either attached directly via hydrophobic and ionic interactions onto the citrate stabilized GNPs or immobilized via EDC/NHS bioconjugation onto the carboxylic functionalized GNPs, respectively. The amount of bound trypsin was quantified by measuring the absorbance at 280 nm. The activity of bound enzyme and its Michaelis Menten kinetic parameter Km and vmax were measured by the standard chromogenic substrate Nα-Benzoyl-DL-arginine 4-nitroanilide hydrochloride (BApNA). Finally, digestion of a standard protein mixture with the trypsin-conjugated NPs followed by analysis with LC–ESI-MS and successful MASCOT search demonstrated the applicability of the new heterogenous nano-structured biocatalyst. It could be shown that the amount of

  13. Effect of Moringa oleifera flower extract on larval trypsin and acetylcholinesterase activities in Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique; Dias de Assis, Caio Rodrigo; de Souza Bezerra, Ranilson; Xavier, Haroudo Satiro; Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes

    2012-03-01

    Aedes aegypti control is crucial to reducing dengue fever. Aedes aegypti larvae have developed resistance to organophosporous insecticides and the use of natural larvicides may help manage larval resistance by increasing elements in insecticide rotation programs. Here, we report on larvicidal activity of Moringa oleifera flower extract against A. aegypti L(1), L(2), L(3), and L(4) as well as the effect of flower extract on gut trypsin and whole-larval acetylcholinesterase from L(4.) In addition, the heated flower extract was investigated for larvicidal activity against L(4) and effect on larval gut trypsin. Moringa oleifera flower extract contains a proteinaceous trypsin inhibitor (M. oleifera flower trypsin inhibitor, MoFTI), triterpene (β-amyrin), sterol (β-sitosterol) as well as flavonoids (kaempferol and quercetin). Larvicidal activity was detected against L(2), L(3), and L(4) (LC(50) of 1.72%, 1.67%, and 0.92%, respectively). Flower extract inhibited L(4) gut trypsin (MoFTI K(i) = 0.6 nM) and did not affect acetylcholinesterase activity. In vivo assay showed that gut trypsin activity from L(4) treated with M. oleifera flower extract decreased over time (0-1,440 min) and was strongly inhibited (98.6%) after 310 min incubation; acetylcholinesterase activity was not affected. Thermal treatment resulted in a loss of trypsin inhibitor and larvicidal activities, supporting the hypothesis that flower extract contains a proteinaceous trypsin inhibitor that may be responsible for the deleterious effects on larval mortality. PMID:22392801

  14. Trypsin-Catalyzed Peptide Synthesis in Acetonitrile with Low Water Content

    OpenAIRE

    YEŞİLOĞLU, Yeşim; SAĞIROĞLU, Ayten

    2002-01-01

    Trypsin was immobilized to alumina by adsorption from its aqueous solutions. The activity of trypsin was increased by immobilization for peptide synthesis. With these immobilized enzymes Bz-Arg-Leu-NH2 dipeptide synthesis was carried out. Iso amylalcohol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile were used as solvents giving the highest yield in the peptide formation reaction. The yield of the peptide was strongly dependent on water content in the reaction medium. The stability of alumina-...

  15. Specificity of Trypsin and Chymotrypsin: Loop Motion Controlled Dynamic Correlation as a Determinant

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Wenzhe; Tang, Chao; Lai, Luhua

    2005-01-01

    Trypsin and chymotrypsin are both serine proteases with high sequence and structural similarities, but with different substrate specificity. Previous experiments have demonstrated the critical role of the two loops outside the binding pocket in controlling the specificity of the two enzymes. To understand the mechanism of such a control of specificity by distant loops, we have used the Gaussian network model to study the dynamic properties of trypsin and chymotrypsin and the roles played by t...

  16. Inhibition of trypsin expression in Lutzomyia longipalpis using RNAi enhances the survival of Leishmania

    OpenAIRE

    Sant'Anna Mauricio RV; Diaz-Albiter Hector; Mubaraki Murad; Dillon Rod J; Bates Paul A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Leishmania parasites must overcome several barriers to achieve transmission by their sand fly vectors. One of the earliest threats is exposure to enzymes during blood meal digestion. Trypsin-like enzymes appear to be detrimental to parasite survival during the very early phase of development as amastigotes transform into promastigote stages. Here, we investigate whether parasites can affect trypsin secretion by the sand fly midgut epithelium and if inhibition of this proce...

  17. Imaging of acute pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkle, Elmar M.; Goerich, Johannes [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Ulm, Steinhoevel Strasse 9, 89075 Ulm (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is defined as an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of peripancreatic tissues or remote organ systems. This article reports the current classification, definition and terminology, epidemiology and etiology, pathogenesis and pathological findings, clinical and laboratory findings, and finally imaging findings of acute pancreatitis with emphasis on cross-sectional imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  18. Mucins and Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Van Seuningen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is characterized by an often dramatic outcome (five year survival < 5% related to a late diagnosis and a lack of efficient therapy. Therefore, clinicians desperately need new biomarkers and new therapeutic tools to develop new efficient therapies. Mucins belong to an ever increasing family of O-glycoproteins. Secreted mucins are the main component of mucus protecting the epithelia whereas membrane-bound mucins are thought to play important biological roles in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, in cell signaling and in modulating biological properties of cancer cells. In this review, we will focus on the altered expression pattern of mucins in pancreatic cancer, from the early neoplastic lesion Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia (PanIN to invasive pancreatic carcinomas, and the molecular mechanisms (including genetic and epigenetic regulation and signaling pathways known to control their expression. Moreover, we will discuss the recent advances about the biology of both secreted and membrane-bound mucins and their key roles in pancreatic carcinogenesis and resistance to therapy. Finally, we will discuss exciting opportunities that mucins offer as potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer.

  19. Studies on porcine pancreatic elastase activity, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved method of radioimmunoassay was devised to offer a successful formula for determining blood concentration of elastase. With porcine pancreatic elastase as the antigen, rabbits were immunized to obtain antiserum. Iodinated elastase labeled by the chloramine-T procedure using 131I (or 125I) had a specific activity of 200 - 300 mCi/mg. The double antibody method was used for BF separation. While the usual method of radioimmunoassay was not always successful in obtaining accurate serum concentration of elastase, the use of diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) was able to eliminate the disturbing influence of intra-serous inhibitors, α1-AT and α2-M, eventually producing satisfactory results. With the use of DFP, the elastase standard curve and the porcine serum dilution curve had a statistically significant correlation; precision and recovery were both satisfactory; cross-reactivity of the antiserum with trypsin and chymotrypsin was less than 0.001%. The minimal detectable concentration of elastase was 5 ng/ml, and the range of normal fasting porcine serum level was 70 - 100 ng/ml. (author)

  20. Efficacy of Trypsin in Treating Coral Snake Envenomation in the Porcine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker-Cote, Jennifer L; O'Rourke, Dorcas P; Brewer, Kori L; Lertpiriyapong, Kvin; Punja, Mohan; Bush, Sean P; Miller, Susan N; Meggs, William J

    2015-12-01

    Antivenom is the definitive treatment for venomous snakebites. Alternative treatments warrant investigation because antivenom is sometimes unavailable, expensive, and can have deleterious side effects. This study assesses the efficacy of trypsin to treat coral snake envenomation in an in vivo porcine model. A randomized, blinded study was conducted. Subjects were 13 pigs injected subcutaneously with 1 mL of eastern coral snake venom (10 mg/mL) in the right distal hind limb. After 1 min, subjects were randomized to have the envenomation site injected with either 1 mL of saline or 1 mL of trypsin (100 mg/mL) by a blinded investigator. Clinical endpoint was survival for 72 h or respiratory depression defined as respiratory rate depression occurred more frequently in control pigs than treated pigs (p = 0.009). Four of the six pigs that received trypsin survived to the end of the 3-day study. No control pigs survived. Two of the trypsin treatment pigs died with times to toxicity of 718 and 971 min. Survival to 12 and 24 h was significantly greater in the trypsin treatment group (p = 0.002, p = 0.009, respectively). Local injection of trypsin, a proteolytic enzyme, at the site of envenomation decreased the toxicity of eastern coral snake venom and increased survival significantly. Further investigation is required before these results can be extended to human snakebites. PMID:25952763

  1. Dissection of the binding of hydrogen peroxide to trypsin using spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Yu, Zehua; Hu, Xinxin; Liu, Rutao

    2015-02-01

    Studies on the effects of environmental pollutants to protein in vitro has become a global attention. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is used as an effective food preservative and bleacher in industrial production. The toxicity of H2O2 to trypsin was investigated by multiple spectroscopic techniques and the molecular docking method at the molecular level. The intrinsic fluorescence of trypsin was proved to be quenched in a static process based on the results of fluorescence lifetime experiment. Hydrogen bonds interaction and van der Waals forces were the main force to generate the trypsin-H2O2 complex on account of the negative ΔH0 and ΔS0. The binding of H2O2 changed the conformational structures and internal microenvironment of trypsin illustrated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) results. However, the binding site was far away from the active site of trypsin and the trypsin activity was only slightly affected by H2O2, which was further explained by molecular docking investigations.

  2. Aedes aegypti midgut early trypsin is post-transcriptionally regulated by blood feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega, F G; Pennington, J E; Barillas-Mury, C; Wang, X Y; Wells, M A

    1996-02-01

    Early trypsin is a female-specific protease present in the Aedes aegypti midgut during the first hours after ingestion of a blood meal. Early trypsin gene expression was studied by Northern blot analysis. The early trypsin mRNA, absent in larvae, pupae and newly emerged females, reaches detectable levels at 24 h post-emergence and attains a maximum level at an adult age of 4-7 days. After the first week there is a decrease in the steady-state level of the transcript, but it remains readily detectable for up to a month after emergence. Despite the high levels of early trypsin mRNA present in the midgut of the unfed female, translation of the early trypsin mRNA occurs only after a blood or a protein meal. Early trypsin mRNA levels rapidly decrease during the first 24 h after feeding, but the steady-state level of the transcript rises again at the end of the blood digestion cycle (60 h), as the mosquito prepares for a second blood meal. PMID:8630532

  3. A sensitive and label-free trypsin colorimetric sensor with cytochrome c as a substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lufeng; Du, Jianxiu

    2016-05-15

    The development of simple and sensitive methods for protease sensing plays important roles in clinical diagnostics and drug development. Here a simple, rapid, label-free, and sensitive trypsin colorimetric sensor was developed by employing cytochrome c (cyt c) as an enzyme substrate and 3,3´,5,5´-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) as a chromogenic reagent. It was found that cyt c hardly catalyzes H2O2-mediated TMB oxidation to produce a blue solution. But the hydrolysate of cyt c by trypsin displays an intense catalytic effect on the aforementioned reaction, resulting in the formation of a blue solution immediately. The detection process allows visually perceiving as low as 50ng/mL trypsin with the naked eyes. With the aid of a spectrophotometer, the absorbance at 652nm was proportional to the concentration of trypsin in the range from 5.0ng/mL to 2.0μg/mL with a detection limit of 4.5ng/mL. The sensor showed better precision with relative standard deviation of 2.5% and 1.7% for eleven repetitive measurements of 50.0ng/mL and 1.0μg/mL trypsin solution, respectively. The procedure has been successfully applied to the determination of trypsin in human urines and for inhibitor screening, demonstrating its potential application in clinic diagnosis and drug development. PMID:26724537

  4. Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview Go to Health Professional ... 8 ). Questions and Answers About Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) What is cartilage? Cartilage is a type of ...

  5. Pancreatic encephalopathy- a rare complication of severe acute biliary pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Vlad Denis Constantin; Alexandru Carȃp; Bogdan Socea; Simona Bobic

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pancreatic encephalopathy is a rare complication of severe acute pancreatitis, with high mortality, being difficult to diagnose and treat, thus requiring continuous research regarding its management. Materials and Methods. Of 20 patients diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis on admission at Department of Emergency and Admission (DEA), from January 1st 2010 to March 31st 2014, 5 cases complicated by pancreatic encephalopathy were analyzed using a descriptive observational...

  6. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P; Matzen, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  7. Endoscopic pancreatic duct stent placement for inflammatory pancreatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2007-01-01

    The role of endoscopic therapy in the management of pancreatic diseases is continuously evolving; at present most pathological conditions of the pancreas are successfully treated by endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) or endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), or both. Endoscopic placement of stents has played and still plays a major role in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis, pseudocysts, pancreas divisum, main pancreatic duct injuries, pancreatic fistulae, complications of acute ...

  8. Influence of treatment with pancreatic extracts on pancreatic enzyme secretion.

    OpenAIRE

    Mössner, J.; Wresky, H P; Kestel, W; Zeeh, J; Regner, U; Fischbach, W

    1989-01-01

    We have evaluated the effects of porcine pancreatic extracts on human pancreatic secretion. Ten male volunteers were intubated with a 4-lumen jejunal tube to collect gastric and duodenal secretions separately via the first and third tube, to infuse PEG 4000 distal the pylorus via the second tube and to apply porcine pancreatic extracts via the fourth tube distal the ligament of Treitz. Pancreatic extracts were given four times at 40 minute intervals; the first two as active enzymes and subseq...

  9. Effects of trypsin on X-ray-induced cell killing, chromosome abnormalities and kinetics of DNA repair in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When cells are trypsinized before irradiation a potentiation of X-ray damage may occur. This is known as the 'trypsin effect'. Potentiation of X-ray damage on cell killing was seen in V79 Chinese hamster cells but was marginal in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO K1) cells and not evident in murine Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells. Trypsinization did however increase the number of X-ray-induced chromosomal abnormalities in all 3 lines. To investigate the possibility that trypsin acts by digestion of proteins in chromatin, further experiments were performed to monitor DNA damage and repair. Induction of DNA breaks by X-rays was unaffected by trypsin but trypsinized EAT (suspension) cells repaired single-strand breaks (sbb) less rapidly than controls indicating an inhibitory effect or trypsin on ssb repair. However double-strand break (dsb) repair was unaffected by trypsin. It was also found that the EDTA solution in which the trypsin was dissolved also contributes to the inhibition of dsb repair. The results show that trypsinization can enhance X-ray-induced cell killing, chromosomal damage and DNA repair, the effect varying between cell lines. (author). 37 refs.; 7 figs

  10. Investigation of trypsin-CdSe quantum dot interactions via spectroscopic methods and effects on enzymatic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurvir; Tripathi, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the interactions between trypsin and water soluble cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots investigated by spectrophotometric methods. CdSe quantum dots have strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of trypsin by a static quenching mechanism. The quenching has been studied at three different temperatures where the results revealed that electrostatic interactions exist between CdSe quantum dots and trypsin and are responsible to stabilize the complex. The Scatchard plot from quenching revealed 1 binding site for quantum dots by trypsin, the same has been confirmed by making isothermal titrations of quantum dots against trypsin. The distance between donor and acceptor for trypsin-CdSe quantum dot complexes is calculated to be 2.8 nm by energy transfer mechanisms. The intrinsic fluorescence of CdSe quantum dots has also been enhanced by the trypsin, and is linear for concentration of trypsin ranging 1-80 μl. All the observations evidence the formation of trypsin-CdSe quantum dot conjugates, where trypsin retains the enzymatic activity which in turn is temperature and pH dependent.

  11. Absorption of vitamin B12 and effect of pancreatic juice on gastric vitamin B12 binder in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of pancreatic juice on vitamin B12 absorption was studied in dogs. It was found that dog gastric juice as well as pancreatic juice contain vitamin B12 binding proteins which differ in the elution pattern on DEAE-cellulose columns, the former being eluted at much lower sodium chloride concentrations. When radio-active vitamin B12 was fed or instilled in the proximal bowel and vitamin B12 recovered at different bowel levels, it was found that vitamin B12-protein complex behaved like gastric juice binder in the proximal bowel and like pancreatic binder in the distal. In vitro digestion of gastric binder with pancreatic juice altered vitamin B12-protein complex in such a way that elution pattern became similar to that of pancreatic juice. It was also shown that the change was not due to transfer of vitamin B12 from gastric binder to pancreatic binder. Trypsin digestion had similar effect on gastric binder, and Sephadex G-200 gelfiltration demonstrated reduction in the molecular size. In the doz, vitamin B12 first bound to gastric binder undergoes chemical changes in the bowel and becomes a readily absorbable form in the distal bowel. (auth.)

  12. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  13. Intrauterine inoculation of seronegative heifers with bovine viral diarrhea virus concurrent with transfer of in vivo-derived bovine embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, J A; Givens, M D; Marley, M S D; Galik, P K; Riddell, K P; Edmondson, M A; Rodning, S P

    2010-05-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been shown to be associated with single transferable in vivo-derived bovine embryos despite washing and trypsin treatment. Hence, the primary objective was to evaluate the potential of BVDV to be transmitted via the intrauterine route at the time of embryo transfer. In vivo-derived bovine embryos (n=10) were nonsurgically collected from a single Bos tarus donor cow negative for BVDV. After collection and washing, embryos were placed into transfer media containing BVDV (SD-1; Type 1a). Each of the 10 embryos was individually loaded into an 0.25-mL straw, which was then nonsurgically transferred into the uterus of 1 of the 10 seronegative recipients on Day 0. The total quantity of virus transferred into the uterus of each of the 10 Bos tarus recipients was 878 cell culture infective doses to the 50% end point (CCID(50))/mL. Additionally, control heifers received 1.5 x 10(6) CCID(50) BVDV/.5 mL without an embryo (positive) or heat-inactivated BVDV (negative). The positive control heifer and all 10 recipients of virus-exposed embryos exhibited viremia by Day 6 and seroconverted by Day 15 after transfer. The negative control heifer did not exhibit a viremia or seroconvert. At 30 d after embryo transfer, 6 of 10 heifers in the treatment group were pregnant; however, 30 d later, only one was still pregnant. This fetus was nonviable and was positive for BVDV. In conclusion, the quantity of BVDV associated with bovine embryos after in vitro exposure can result in viremia and seroconversion of seronegative recipients after transfer into the uterus during diestrus. PMID:20129656

  14. Loperamide-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Halla Vidarsdottir; Hanna Vidarsdottir; Pall Helgi Moller; Einar Stefan Bjornsson

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common disease leading to hospitalizations, most often caused by gallstones or alcohol. We present a case of a patient diagnosed with acute pancreatitis considered to be due to loperamide treatment for diarrhea.

  15. Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Kota

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis. Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson′s disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Cancer Institute: Pancreatic Cancer National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Educational Resources (9 links) Boston Children's Hospital Cleveland Clinic: Cancer of the Pancreas Cleveland Clinic: Pancreatitis Disease InfoSearch: ...

  17. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation) Afinitor (Everolimus) ...

  18. Subclinical zinc deficiency impairs pancreatic digestive enzyme activity and digestive capacity of weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, Daniel; Windisch, Wilhelm M

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of short-term subclinical Zn deficiency on exocrine pancreatic activity and changes in digestive capacity. A total of forty-eight weaned piglets were fed ad libitum a basal diet (maize and soyabean meal) with adequate Zn supply (88 mg Zn/kg diet) during a 2-week acclimatisation phase. Animals were then assigned to eight dietary treatment groups (n 6) according to a complete randomised block design considering litter, live weight and sex. All pigs were fed restrictively (450 g diet/d) the basal diet but with varying ZnSO4.7H2O additions, resulting in 28·1, 33·6, 38·8, 42·7, 47·5, 58·2, 67·8 and 88·0 mg Zn/kg diet for a total experimental period of 8 d. Pancreatic Zn concentrations and pancreatic activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidase A and B, elastase and α-amylase exhibited a broken-line response to stepwise reduction in dietary Zn by declining beneath thresholds of 39·0, 58·0, 58·0, 41·2, 47·5, 57·7 and 58·0 mg Zn/kg diet, respectively. Furthermore, carboxypeptidase B and α-amylase activities were significantly lower in samples with reduced pancreatic Zn contents. Coefficients of faecal digestibility of DM, crude protein, total lipids and crude ash responded similarly to pancreatic enzyme activities by declining below dietary thresholds of 54·7, 45·0, 46·9 and 58·2 mg Zn/kg diet, respectively. In conclusion, (1) subclinical Zn deficiency impaired pancreatic exocrine enzymes, (2) this response was connected to pancreatic Zn metabolism and (3) the decline in catalytic activity impaired faecal digestibility already after 1 week of insufficient alimentary Zn supply and very early before clinical deficiency symptoms arise. PMID:27230230

  19. The amino-acid sequence of kangaroo pancreatic ribonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaastra, W; Welling, G W; Beintema, J J

    1978-05-01

    Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) ribonuclease was isolated from pancreatic tissue by affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence was determined by automatic sequencing of overlapping large fragments and by analysis of shorter peptides obtained by digestion with a number of proteolytic enzymes. The polypeptide chain consists of 122 amino acid residues. Compared to other ribonucleases, the N-terminal residue and residue 114 are deleted. In other pancreatic ribonucleases position 114 is occupied by a cis proline residue in an external loop at the surface of the molecule. Other remarkable substitutions are the presence of a tyrosine residue at position 123 instead of a serine which forms a hydrogen bond with the pyrimidine ring of a nucleotide substrate, and a number of hydrophobichydrophilic interchanges in the sequence 51-55, which forms part of an alpha-helix in bovine ribonuclease and exhibits few substitutions in the placental mammals. Kangaroo ribonuclease contains no carbohydrate, although the enzyme possesses a recognition site for carbohydrate attachment in the sequence Asn-Val-Thr (62-64). The enzyme differs at about 35-40% of the positions from all other mammalian pancreatic ribonucleases sequenced to date, which is in agreement with the early divergence between the marsupials and the placental mammals. From fragmentary data a tentative sequence of red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) pancreatic ribonuclease has been derived. Eight differences with the kangaroo sequence were found. PMID:658039

  20. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Eland, I.A.

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are considered as potential risk factors for acute pancreatitis, but have received relatively little attention in the medical literature. In this thesis, several epidemiological studies were performed to ass...

  1. Folate Deficiency in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishna Rajesh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir, While there has been a spurt of interest in genetic alterations associated with pancreatitis in the past few years, interest in the role of environmental factors has largely focused on alcoholism and smoking with insufficient attention being paid to the contributions of nutritional deficiency, and the role of environmental toxins in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Braganza and Dormandy [1] argue convincingly about the role played by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (especially CYP1A enzyme induction by xenobiotics and the resultant oxidative stress, as also the now increasingly recognized reductive stress posed by the metabolites in initiating pancreatic injury. Their article underlines the important part played by the deficiency of methyl and thiol molecules in different stages of the progression of pancreatic damage. Furthermore, they attempt to establish a link between environmental and genetic factors and bring in a holistic view on the etiopathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis. We have recently demonstrated lower plasma methionine levels in two cohorts of chronic pancreatitis patients; one of tropical chronic pancreatitis and the other, of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis as compared to healthy controls [2] which suggests that deficiency of methyl groups may be a factor in various forms of pancreatitis. Similarly, we have shown lower red cell glutathione levels in chronic pancreatitis patients with tropical chronic pancreatitis and alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, indicating deficiency of thiol molecules. In addition, we have demonstrated significantly higher levels of plasma total homocysteine in chronic pancreatitis patients than in healthy controls. Moreover, our study has shown that there is a deficiency of red cell folate in the majority of chronic pancreatitis patients, more so in tropical chronic pancreatitis; and that folate deficiency appeared to be the key factor in hyperhomocysteinemia in chronic pancreatitis patients

  2. Uncommon pancreatic tumors and pseudotumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, Neeraj; Mannelli, Lorenzo; Ganeshan, Dhakshina Moorthy; Shanbhogue, Alampady K; Dighe, Manjiri K; Tiwari, Hina Arif; Maximin, Suresh; Monti, Serena; Ragucci, Monica; Prasad, Srinivasa R

    2015-01-01

    A heterogeneous group of uncommon neoplastic and non-neoplastic pancreatic pathologies exists that can mimic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. These "imitators" are unique and may demonstrate characteristic clinical and imaging features. Imaging characteristics of some of these diverse lesions are not well described in the literature, and erroneous diagnoses of these entities as pancreatic carcinoma may be responsible for unnecessary surgeries. Knowledge of these selected pancreatic pathologies is essential to facilitate optimal patient management. PMID:25063236

  3. Brain Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Marko Kornmann; Doris Henne-Bruns; Jan Scheele; Christian Rainer Wirtz; Thomas Kapapa; Johannes Lemke

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a fatal disease with a 5-year survival rate below 5%. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced tumor stage and existence of distant metastases. However, involvement of the central nervous system is rare in pancreatic cancer. We retrospectively analyzed all cases of brain metastases in pancreatic cancer reported to date focusing on patient characteristics, clinical appearance, therapy and survival. Including our own, 12 cases of brain metastases originating from pancreat...

  4. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer-2014

    OpenAIRE

    Andre Luiz De Souza; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2014-01-01

    Context Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States. Most of the patients are diagnosed in the metastatic staging. Consolidated risk factors include chronic pancreatitis, smoking and family history. Although controversial, diabetes mellitus has been increasingly associated with pancreatic cancer as a risk factor as opposed to just a manifestation of the disease. Biomarkers for early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer among diabetic patients and metformin...

  5. Concurrent Lymphoma and Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jiun Miin Lai; Mehrdad Nikfarjam; Peter Crowley

    2011-01-01

    Context Retroperitoneal lymph node enlargement in patients with pancreatic cancer is sometimes treated as incurable disease. Nonmetastatic causes of lymphadenopathy should however be considered. Case reports Two cases of significant retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy in the setting of pancreatic cancer, treated by pancreaticoduodenectomy and lymph node dissection are described. Both cases had a final diagnosis of concurrent pancreatic cancer and lymphoma with no evidence of pancreatic lymph node...

  6. Obstructive Jaundice in Chronic Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hollands, M. J.; Little, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Significant obstructive jaundice in chronic pancreatitis is generally considered to be rare. Eleven of 57 consecutive patients with proven chronic pancreatitis have developed significant obstructive jaundice of more than transient duration. Eight presented as jaundice complicating known pancreatitis and three as jaundice of unknown cause. Life table analysis showed a steady rise in the risk of developing jaundice up to the end of 10 years from the onset of chronic pancreatitis. Jaundice was f...

  7. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Eland

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are consid

  8. Acute pancreatitis and Cushing's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Clague, H W; B. Warren; Krasner, N.

    1984-01-01

    A case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in a 53-year-old man with an ectopic adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) producing bronchial carcinoma is described. The aetiology of acute pancreatitis in relation to steroid therapy and malignancy is discussed and it is suggested that excess endogenous steroid production may also cause acute pancreatitis.

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... the cancer cells in the liver are actually pancreatic cancer cells. The disease is metastatic pancreatic cancer, not liver cancer. The ...

  10. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... the cancer cells in the liver are actually pancreatic cancer cells. The disease is metastatic pancreatic cancer, not liver cancer. The ...

  11. Gadolinium induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco-Perrin, H; Glaser, B; Pienkowski, M; Peron, J M; Payen, J L

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden swelling and inflammation of the pancreas. The two most common causes are alcohol use and biliary stones. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis are rare (1.4-2%). In this present study, we present a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis induced by a specific magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) contrast agent called gadobenate dimeglumine. PMID:23395575

  12. Pancreatic ascariasis with periampullary carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Arulprakash, S; Sahu, Manoj Kumar; Dutta, Amit Kumar; Joseph, A; Chandy, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Ascarias lumbricoides infestation is endemic in tropical countries. Most infections are asymptomatic, but it can produce a wide spectrum of manifestations including hepatobiliary and pancreatic complications. There are reports of association of biliary ascariasis with bilary malignancies in the past, but same is not known for pancreatic ascariasis. We report a case of association of periampullary malignancy with pancreatic ascariasis.

  13. Prognostic Factors in Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2012-01-01

    Prognostic factors in pancreatic cancer have been a hot topic for the clinical pancreatology, and many studies have been involved in the field. The author reviewed the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011, and sumarized "highlight" of all the abstracts in prognostic factors in pancreatic cancer.

  14. Familial pancreatic cancer: genetic advances

    OpenAIRE

    Rustgi, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    This review by Rustgi elaborates on the known genetic syndromes that underlie familial pancreatic cancer. It aims to delineate the subtypes of syndromic hereditary pancreatic cancer in which germline genetic mutations have been identified and nonsyndromic familial pancreatic cancer in which genetic information is emerging.

  15. Hypocalcemia in acute pancreatitis revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypocalcemia is a frequent finding in acute pancreatitis. Severe hypocalcemia can present with neurological as well as cardiovascular manifestations. Correction of hypocalcemia by parenteral calcium infusion remains a controversial topic as intracellular calcium overload is the central mechanism of acinar cell injury in pancreatitis. The current article deals with the art and science of calcium correction in pancreatitis patients.

  16. Tests of pancreatic exocrine function - clinical significance in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Jutta; Aghdassi, Ali Alexander; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia V; Layer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The pancreas functions as the main factory for digestive enzymes and therefore enables food utilisation. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, partial or complete loss of digestive enzyme synthesis, occurs primarily in disorders directly affecting pancreatic tissue integrity. However, other disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, such as coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome or gastric resection can either mimic or cause pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. The overt clinical symptoms of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency are steatorrhoea and maldigestion, which frequently become apparent in advanced stages. Several direct and indirect function tests are available for assessment of pancreatic function but until today diagnosis of excretory insufficiency is difficult as in mild impairment clinically available function tests show limitations of diagnostic accuracy. This review focuses on diagnosis of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders. PMID:19505669

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an important cause of maldigestion and a major complication in chronic pancreatitis. Normal digestion requires adequate stimulation of pancreatic secretion, sufficient production of digestive enzymes by pancreatic acinar cells, a pancreatic duct system without significant outflow obstruction and adequate mixing of the pancreatic juice with ingested food. Failure in any of these steps may result in pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, which leads to steatorrh...

  18. The clinical assessment of intraductal ultrasonography in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare the clinical value of intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS) in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis with conventional imaging methods. Methods: IDUS was carried out in eighteen patients with pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis

  19. Bovine milk exosome proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exosomes are 40-100 nm membrane vesicles of endocytic origin and are found in blood, urine, amniotic fluid, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, as well as human and bovine milk. Exosomes are extracellular organelles important in intracellular communication/signaling, immune function, and biomarkers ...

  20. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also referred to as “mad cow disease” is a chronic, non-febrile, neuro-degenerative disease affecting the central nervous system. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of domestic animals, of which BSE is a member includes scrapie of sheep...

  1. BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an umbrella term for two species of viruses, BVDV1 and BVDV2, within the Pestivirus genus of the Flavivirus family. BVDV viruses are further subclassified as cytopathic and noncytopathic based on their activity in cultured epithelial cells. Noncytopathic BVDV p...

  2. Genotyping bovine coronaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine coronaviruses (BoCV) are enveloped, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses of the Coronaviridae family. Infection is associated with enteritis and pneumonia in calves and Winter Dysentery in adult cattle. Strains, isolated more than 50 years ago, are used in vaccines and as laboratory ...

  3. Trypsin-2 Degrades Human Type II Collagen and Is Expressed and Activated in Mesenchymally Transformed Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovitis Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Stenman, Mathias; Ainola, Mari; Valmu, Leena; Bjartell, Anders; Ma, Guofeng; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Sorsa, Timo; Luukkainen, Reijo; Konttinen, Yrjö T.

    2005-01-01

    It has traditionally been believed that only the human collagenases (matrix metalloproteinase-1, -8, and -13) are capable of initiating the degradation of collagens. Here, we show that human trypsin-2 is also capable of cleaving the triple helix of human cartilage collagen type II. We purified human trypsin-2 and tumor-associated trypsin inhibitor by affinity chromatography whereas collagen type II was purified from cartilage extracts using pepsin digestion and salt precipitation. Degradation...

  4. Trypsin inhibitor from tamarindus indica L. seeds reduces weight gain and food consumption and increases plasmatic cholecystokinin levels

    OpenAIRE

    Joycellane Alline do Nascimento Campos Ribeiro; Alexandre Coellho Serquiz; Priscila Fabíola dos Santos Silva; Patrícia Batista Barra Medeiros Barbosa; Tarcísio Bruno Montenegro Sampaio; Raimundo Fernandes de Araújo Junior; Adeliana Silva de Oliveira; Richele Janaina Araújo Machado; Bruna Leal Lima Maciel; Adriana Ferreira Uchôa; Elizeu Antunes dos Santos; Ana Heloneida de Araújo Morais

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Seeds are excellent sources of proteinase inhibitors, some of which may have satietogenic and slimming actions. We evaluated the effect of a trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus indica L. seeds on weight gain, food consumption and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. METHODS: A trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus was isolated using ammonium sulfate (30-60%) following precipitation with acetone and was further isolated with Trypsin-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Analyses were cond...

  5. Improvement of the Enzyme Performance of Trypsin via Adsorption in Mesoporous Silica SBA-15: Hydrolysis of BAPNA

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi Wang; Zhengqiang Li; Ming Lu; Zhuofu Wu; Shanshan Li

    2013-01-01

    The enzymatic performance of trypsin in hydrolysis of N-α-benzoyl-DL-arginine-4-nitroanilide (BAPNA) was improved by adsorption on Santa Barbara Amorphous (SBA)-15 mesoporous silica. The optimal immobilization conditions were screened and the properties of immobilized enzyme have also been studied. Under the optimal conditions, the immobilized trypsin displays maximum specific activity (49.8 μmol/min/g). The results also indicate that the immobilized trypsin exhibits better ...

  6. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference ...

  7. Trypsin inhibitor from tamarindus indica L. seeds reduces weight gain and food consumption and increases plasmatic cholecystokinin levels

    OpenAIRE

    do Nascimento Campos Ribeiro, Joycellane Alline; Serquiz, Alexandre Coellho; dos Santos Silva, Priscila Fabíola; Barbosa, Patrícia Batista Barra Medeiros; Sampaio, Tarcísio Bruno Montenegro; de Araújo, Raimundo Fernandes; Oliveira, Adeliana Silva de; Machado, Richele Janaina Araújo; Maciel, Bruna Leal Lima; Uchôa, Adriana Ferreira; dos Santos, Elizeu Antunes; de Araújo Morais, Ana Heloneida

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Seeds are excellent sources of proteinase inhibitors, some of which may have satietogenic and slimming actions. We evaluated the effect of a trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus indica L. seeds on weight gain, food consumption and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. METHODS: A trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus was isolated using ammonium sulfate (30–60%) following precipitation with acetone and was further isolated with Trypsin-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Analyses were cond...

  8. Unproductive cleavage and the inactivation of protease-activated receptor-1 by trypsin in vascular endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nakayama, Tetsuzo; Hirano, Katsuya; Shintani, Yoshinobu; Nishimura, Junji; Nakatsuka, Akio; Kuga, Hirotaka; Takahashi, Shosuke; Kanaide, Hideo

    2003-01-01

    Using fura-2 fluorometry of [Ca2+]i in response to thrombin, trypsin and protease-activated receptor activating peptides (PAR-APs), we determined whether trypsin cleaves protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) and activates it in the endothelial cells of the porcine aortic valves and human umbilical vein.Once stimulated with thrombin, the subsequent application of trypsin induced a [Ca2+]i elevation similar to that obtained without the preceding stimulation with thrombin in the valvular endothel...

  9. The involvement of a novel mechanism distinct from the thrombin receptor in the vasocontraction induced by trypsin

    OpenAIRE

    Komuro, Taro; Miwa, Soichi; Minowa, Tetsuya; Okamoto, Yasuo; Enoki, Taijiro; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Uemura, Yoshihiko; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Masaki, Tomoh

    1997-01-01

    The vasocontracting effect of a serine protease trypsin and its mechanisms were investigated by monitoring the isometric tension in endothelium-denuded rings of rabbit thoracic aortae and its effects on intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i) in dispersed rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells with a Ca2+ indicator fura-2. The actions of trypsin were compared with those of thrombin.Both thrombin and trypsin reversibly contracted aortic rings without endothelium in a concentration-depend...

  10. Improvement of the Enzyme Performance of Trypsin via Adsorption in Mesoporous Silica SBA-15: Hydrolysis of BAPNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic performance of trypsin in hydrolysis of N-α-benzoyl-DL-arginine-4-nitroanilide (BAPNA was improved by adsorption on Santa Barbara Amorphous (SBA-15 mesoporous silica. The optimal immobilization conditions were screened and the properties of immobilized enzyme have also been studied. Under the optimal conditions, the immobilized trypsin displays maximum specific activity (49.8 μmol/min/g. The results also indicate that the immobilized trypsin exhibits better storage stability.

  11. Controlled clinical study on pancreatic stenting in the relief of pain of advanced pancreatic cancer with dilated pancreatic duct

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高飞

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the efficacy of pancreatic stenting in the relief of abdominal pain of advanced pancreatic cancer with dilated pancreatic duct.Methods A tolal of 61 patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma companied with dilated pancreatic duct were divided into two groups.Twenty-eight cases(two cases were excluded because of stent loss)in stent group treated with

  12. Atorvastatin-induced pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajapati Samir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Drugs account for 1-2% of all cases of pancreatitis. A 58-year-old man was prescribed atorvastatin 10 mg for 6 months for hyperlipidemia. He developed acute abdominal pain and vomiting with epigastric tenderness. Serum lipase and CT scan of the patient suggested the presence of acute pancreatitis. The patient was hospitalized; atorvastatin was stopped and treated symptomatically. He recovered completely within 10 days of drug withdrawal. The causality of the adverse drug reaction according to Naranjo and WHO-UMC Scale was probable. The exact mechanism of pancreatitis due to atorvastatin is not known. It may be a class effect of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors as it had been reported with other statins too. The definite causal relationship is difficult to establish, as rechallenge with the suspected drug was not done due to ethical consideration.

  13. Drug-induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Claudia; Maertin, Sandrina; Scheiber, Jonas; Ritter, Christoph A; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia

    2012-04-01

    Drugs are thought to be a rare cause for acute pancreatitis; however 525 different drugs are listed in the World Health Organization (WHO) database suspected to cause acute pancreatitis as a side effect. Many of them are widely used to treat highly prevalent diseases. The true incidence is not entirely clear since only few systematic population based studies exist. The majority of the available data are derived from case reports or case control studies. Furthermore, the causality for many of these drugs remains elusive and for only 31 of these 525 dugs a definite causality was established. Definite proof for causality is defined by the WHO classification if symptoms reoccur upon rechallenge.In the actual algorithm the diagnosis is confirmed if no other cause of acute pancreatitis can be detected, and the patient is taking one of the suspected drugs. PMID:22314811

  14. Direct stimulation of immediate-early genes by intranuclear insulin in trypsin-treated H35 hepatoma cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Y J; Harada, S.; Loten, E G; Smith, R. M.; Jarett, L

    1992-01-01

    H35 hepatoma cells were treated with trypsin to abolish insulin binding and insulin-stimulated receptor kinase activity. Insulin was, however, internalized by fluid-phase endocytosis in trypsin-treated cells. Furthermore, nuclear accumulation of insulin was similar in control and trypsin-treated hepatoma cells. Northern blot analysis revealed insulin increased g33 and c-fos mRNA concentrations identically in control and trypsin-treated cells but had no effect on beta 2-microglobulin mRNA. Act...

  15. Trypsin Isoinhibitors with Antiproliferative Activity toward Leukemia Cells from Phaseolus vulgaris cv “White Cloud Bean”

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    A purification protocol that comprised ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose, and gel filtration by FPLC on Superdex 75 was complied to isolate two trypsin inhibitors from Phaseolus vulgaris cv “White Cloud Bean”. Both trypsin inhibitors exhibited a molecular mass of 16 kDa and reduced the activity of trypsin with an I C 5 0 value of about 0.6  M. Dithiothreitol attenuated the trypsin inhibito...

  16. Trypsin inhibitor from tamarindus indica L. seeds reduces weight gain and food consumption and increases plasmatic cholecystokinin levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joycellane Alline do Nascimento Campos Ribeiro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Seeds are excellent sources of proteinase inhibitors, some of which may have satietogenic and slimming actions. We evaluated the effect of a trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus indica L. seeds on weight gain, food consumption and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. METHODS: A trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus was isolated using ammonium sulfate (30-60% following precipitation with acetone and was further isolated with Trypsin-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Analyses were conducted to assess the in vivo digestibility, food intake, body weight evolution and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. Histological analyses of organs and biochemical analyses of sera were performed. RESULTS: The trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus reduced food consumption, thereby reducing weight gain. The in vivo true digestibility was not significantly different between the control and Tamarindus trypsin inhibitor-treated groups. The trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus did not cause alterations in biochemical parameters or liver, stomach, intestine or pancreas histology. Rats treated with the trypsin inhibitor showed significantly elevated cholecystokinin levels compared with animals receiving casein or water. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that the isolated trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus reduces weight gain by reducing food consumption, an effect that may be mediated by increased cholecystokinin. Thus, the potential use of this trypsin inhibitor in obesity prevention and/or treatment should be evaluated.

  17. Crystallization, data collection and processing of the chymotrypsin–BTCI–trypsin ternary complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ternary complex of the proteinase inhibitor (BTCI) with trypsin and chymotrypsin was crystallized and its crystal structure was solved by molecular replacement. A ternary complex of the black-eyed pea trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitor (BTCI) with trypsin and chymotrypsin was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with 0.1 M HEPES pH 7.5, 10%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 6000 and 5%(v/v) 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol as precipitant. BTCI is a small protein with 83 amino-acid residues isolated from Vigna unguiculata seeds and is able to inhibit trypsin and chymotrypsin simultaneously by forming a stable ternary complex. X-ray data were collected from a single crystal of the trypsin–BTCI–chymotrypsin ternary complex to 2.7 Å resolution under cryogenic conditions. The structure of the ternary complex was solved by molecular replacement using the crystal structures of the BTCI–trypsin binary complex (PDB code) and chymotrypsin (PDB code) as search models

  18. Crystallization, data collection and processing of the chymotrypsin–BTCI–trypsin ternary complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteves, Gisele Ferreira; Teles, Rozeni Chagas Lima; Cavalcante, Nayara Silva; Neves, David; Ventura, Manuel Mateus [Laboratório de Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, 70910-900 Brasília-DF (Brazil); Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalves, E-mail: joao@lnls.br [Center for Structural Molecular Biology (CeBiME), Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), CP 6192, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Freitas, Sonia Maria de, E-mail: joao@lnls.br [Laboratório de Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, 70910-900 Brasília-DF (Brazil)

    2007-12-01

    A ternary complex of the proteinase inhibitor (BTCI) with trypsin and chymotrypsin was crystallized and its crystal structure was solved by molecular replacement. A ternary complex of the black-eyed pea trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitor (BTCI) with trypsin and chymotrypsin was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with 0.1 M HEPES pH 7.5, 10%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 6000 and 5%(v/v) 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol as precipitant. BTCI is a small protein with 83 amino-acid residues isolated from Vigna unguiculata seeds and is able to inhibit trypsin and chymotrypsin simultaneously by forming a stable ternary complex. X-ray data were collected from a single crystal of the trypsin–BTCI–chymotrypsin ternary complex to 2.7 Å resolution under cryogenic conditions. The structure of the ternary complex was solved by molecular replacement using the crystal structures of the BTCI–trypsin binary complex (PDB code) and chymotrypsin (PDB code) as search models.

  19. TRYPSIN-INDUCED HEMAGGLUTINATION ASSAY FOR THE DETECTION OF INFECTIOUS BRONCHITIS VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Mahmood, M. Siddique, I. Hussain and A. Khan1

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A trypsin-induced hemagglutination (THA assay was standardized to detect infectious bronchitis virus (IBV in allantoic fluid (AF of embryonated eggs. The test was used in 20 samples, each collected from 5 different layer farms suspected for IBV. Allantoic fluid from inoculated embryos was harvested and treated with reagent grade trypsin at the percentages of 0.25, 0.50, 1.0 and 2.0 for 30 minutes to 3 hours at pH 7.2. The IBV in trypsinized AF was identified by clear and consistent agglutination of chicken red blood cells within 5 minutes of incubation at 37oC. The results indicated that AF treated with equal volume of 1.0% reagent grade trypsin elicited the hemagglutinating (HA activity in 3.0 hours whereas 2.0% reagent grade trypsin elicited the HA activity only after 30 minutes incubation at 37oC. Sensitivity of THA was 92% as compared with 76% for agar gel precipitation test. Gross pathological lesions (curling and dwarfing in chick embryo, intracereberal inoculation of un-weaned mice and pathogenicity test in one-day-old broiler chicks showed 79, 84 and 77% sensitivity, respectively.

  20. Primary Pancreatic Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Extranodal non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHLs represent up to 30-40% of all NHL cases. The gastrointestinal tract is the most commonly involved extranodal site; accounting for about half of such cases [1]. Stomach and the small intestine constitute the most common gastrointestinal sites. Secondary invasion of the pancreas from contiguous, retroperitoneal lymph node disease is the prevalent mode of involvement. Secondary involvement of the pancreas from the duodenum or adjacent peripancreatic lymphadenopathy is well-known. Primary pancreatic lymphoma (PPL is an extremely rare disease [2]. PPL can present as an isolated mass mimicking pancreatic carcinoma. However, unlike carcinomas, PPL are potentially treatable [3].

  1. Congenital pancreatic cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seddighy A

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cyst of the pancreas is an uncommon problem in the pediatric patient. The common symptoms at the time of diagnosis have been abdominal mass and pain or fullness, nausea and vomiting. Despite of various paraclinic methods for diagnosis, ultrasound is now recognized as the most effective and best noninvasive method for diagnosis of pancreatic cyts. Surgical intervention is the best mode of therapy. Upper abdominal cystic mass are seen in the fetus and newborn infants. In Amirkabir Hospital, during 12 years from 1981 to 1993, 8 pancreatic cysts have been operated on and only in this case it was congenital.

  2. Chemoradiotherapy in pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathy Sushmita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer patients present late in their course and surgical resection as a modality of treatment is of limited value. Majority develop loco-regional failure and distant metastasis, therefore, adjuvant therapy comprising of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are useful treatment options to achieve higher loco-regional control. Specialized irradiation techniques like intra-operative radiotherapy that help to increase the total tumor dose have been used, however, controvertible survival benefit was observed. Various studies have shown improved median and overall survival with chemoradiotherapy for advanced unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. The role of new agents such as topoisomerase I inhibitors also needs further clinical investigations.

  3. Unusual complications of pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computed tomography (CT) appearances of varying grades of severity of acute pancreatitis, and its complications, have been described. Body-wall ecchymosis in the periumbilical region (Cullen's sign) and loins (Grey Turner's sign), though rare, are frequently mentioned in the clinical literature. Massive, exclusively retroperitoneal, involvement is also exceedingly rare. Computed tomography depiction of these signs is sparsely documented. The CT documentation, with clinico-surgical correlation, of two cases of severe acute pancreatitis with these unusual complications, is presented. 9 refs., 3 figs

  4. Post-partum pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai P

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy and post-partum period, rarely encountered in surgical practice, can have a lethal effect on the mother and the foetus. We report here a case of a 35 year old tertigravida who presented with high grade fever, abdominal pain with distension, tachycardia and tachypnoea. Chest examination and X-rays were suggestive of pneumonia. The abdomen was tense and tender. Peristalsis was absent. Ultrasound revealed presence of fluid in the abdominal cavity which on paracentesis was found to contain Gram positive cocci. Fluid amylase levels were high. On exploratory laparotomy, haemorrhagic oedematous pancreatitis was noticed. The patient expired on the 2nd post operative day.

  5. MR imaging of pancreatic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Katsuyoshi E-mail: itokatsu@po.cc.yamaguchi-u.ac.jp; Koike, Shinji; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2001-05-01

    This article presents current MR imaging techniques for the pancreas, and review a spectrum of MR imaging features of various pancreatic diseases. These include: 1) congenital anomalies such as anomalous union of pancreatobiliary ducts, divisum, and annular pancreas, 2) inflammatory diseases, including acute or chronic pancreatitis with complications, groove pancreatitis, and autoimmune pancreatitis, tumor-forming pancreatitis, 3) pancreatic neoplasms, including adenocarcinoma, islet cell tumors, and cystic neoplasms (microcystic adenoma, mucinous cystic neoplasms, and intraductal mucin-producing pancreatic tumor). Particular attention is paid to technical advances in MR imaging of the pancreas such as fat-suppression, MR pancreatography (single- or multi-slice HASTE), and thin-section 3D multiphasic contrast-enhanced dynamic sequences. Imaging characteristics that may lead to a specific diagnosis or narrow the differential diagnosis are also discussed.

  6. Isoniazid-Induced Recurrent Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mattioni

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Drug induced pancreatitis are rare but potentially serious. Thus, drug withdrawal is warranted. Case report A 79-year-old woman who was treated with antituberculosis therapy for 5 weeks was admitted to our unit for pancreatitis. Usual etiologies of pancreatitis were eliminated. Because of vomiting, antituberculosis therapy was withdrawn and symptoms disappeared. Eight days later, the same treatment was reintroduced and the patient presented recurrent pancreatitis; thus, treatment was withheld again followed by disappearance of clinical and biological abnormalities. Two days later, a treatment without isoniazid was reintroduced and no recurrence of symptoms was observed. Conclusions We have experienced a case of isoniazid induced pancreatitis. This is a rare cause of pancreatitis but potentially fatal thus recognition of drug induced pancreatitis and definitive withdrawal of the drug is required.

  7. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer: Review Article

    OpenAIRE

    Moritz Pross; Wellner, Ulrich F.; Kim C Honselmann; Carlo Jung; Steffen Deichmann; Tobias Keck; Dirk Bausch

    2015-01-01

    We performed a literature review for neoadjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer. We divided the results into resectable disease and local advanced pancreatic cancer. Results Neoadjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer is safe. But currently no standard guidelines exist in neoadjuvant approaches on pancreatic cancer. For local advanced pancreatic cancer the available data tends to show a positive effect on survival rates for neoadjuvant approaches.

  8. Isolation of porcine pancreatic islets: low trypsin activity during the isolation procedure guarantees reproducible high islet yields

    OpenAIRE

    Heiser, Axel; Ulrichs, Karin; Müller-Buchholtz, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    During the past few years, interest in xenotransplantation of porcine islets of Langerhans for the future therapy of type I diabetes has Increased markedly. Therefore, we established a semiautomated digestion method for isolating islets from the porcine pancreas. However, although the isolation technique was standardized and collagenase of controlled quality was used, we were unable to attain high islet yields with a satisfactory degree of reproducibility. One hypothesis was that varying degr...

  9. Copper deficiency in rats increases pancreatic enkephalin-containing peptides and insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recant, L; Voyles, N R; Timmers, K I; Zalenski, C; Fields, M; Bhathena, S J

    1986-01-01

    Free enkephalins (enk) and higher molecular weight enkephalin-containing peptides (enk-c-p) are present in the endocrine pancreas of rats, presumably in B cells. To determine whether these opioid peptides show dynamic alterations as insulin content of pancreas changes, we utilized a copper deficient rat model, in which the exocrine pancreas atrophies and the endocrine pancreas is "intact" and insulin (IRI) content increases. Dietary copper deficiency (-C) was produced in weanling male rats for 4 and 7 weeks. The deficient and copper supplemented (+C) groups were further subdivided to receive all dietary carbohydrate as either 62% fructose (F) or 62% starch (S). -CF rats showed the most severe deficiency. After 7 weeks, total units of pancreatic IRI in -CF were 7.5 +CF 2.1, -CS 7.9 and in +CS 2.8 (p less than 0.001). Pancreatic content of Met5- and Leu5-enk was measured in extracts which were purified on C-18 Seppaks with and without prior treatment with trypsin and carboxypeptidase B. -C animals showed progressive, significant increases in pancreatic content of Leu-enk-c-p, with a decrease in free Leu- and Met-enk (p less than 0.02-0.01). The pancreatic findings are compatible with a co-localization of enkephalins and insulin in the endocrine pancreas and are suggestive of co-regulation. PMID:3550724

  10. Biochemical properties of pancreatic colipase from the common stingray Dasyatis pastinaca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargouri Youssef

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Pancreatic colipase is a required co-factor for pancreatic lipase, being necessary for its activity during hydrolysis of dietary triglycerides in the presence of bile salts. In the intestine, colipase is cleaved from a precursor molecule, procolipase, through the action of trypsin. This cleavage yields a peptide called enterostatin knoswn, being produced in equimolar proportions to colipase. Results In this study, colipase from the common stingray Dasyatis pastinaca (CoSPL was purified to homogeneity. The purified colipase is not glycosylated and has an apparent molecular mass of around 10 kDa. The NH2-terminal sequencing of purified CoSPL exhibits more than 55% identity with those of mammalian, bird or marine colipases. CoSPL was found to be less effective activator of bird and mammal pancreatic lipases than for the lipase from the same specie. The apparent dissociation constant (Kd of the colipase/lipase complex and the apparent Vmax of the colipase-activated lipase values were deduced from the linear curves of the Scatchard plots. We concluded that Stingray Pancreatic Lipase (SPL has higher ability to interact with colipase from the same species than with the mammal or bird ones. Conclusion The fact that colipase is a universal lipase cofactor might thus be explained by a conservation of the colipase-lipase interaction site. The results obtained in the study may improve our knowledge of marine lipase/colipase.

  11. The Pancreatic lipase Gene is Associated with Marbling in Japanese Black Beef Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Tanomura, Hideki; Yamamoto, Takuji; Muramatsu, Youji; Ohta, Takeshi; Kose, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Takahisa

    2011-01-01

    Marbling defined by the amount and distribution of intramuscular fat so-called Shimofuri is an economically important trait of beef cattle in Japan. The Pancreatic lipase (Pnlip) gene involved in energy income and fat regulation has been previously shown to be regarded as possible candidate for a rat Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) responsible for intramuscular fat content. It is located within the genomic region of a bovine QTL for marbling and thus was considered as a positional functional c...

  12. Mechanism of curcumin-induced trypsin inhibition: Computational and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Kang, Yi-Jun; Gu, Yun-Lan; Cao, Jian

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, the experimental and theoretical methods were used to analyze the binding interaction of food dye, curcumin with trypsin. The results of fluorescence spectroscopic measurements indicated that curcumin binding resulted in the obviously intrinsic fluorescence quenching with the increase concentration of curcumin. This binding interaction is a spontaneous process with the estimated enthalpy and entropy changes being -15.70 kJ mol-1 and 40.25 J mol-1 K-1, respectively. Hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic forces played an important role in the complex formation between curcumin and trypsin. Moreover, curcumin could enter into the primary substrate-binding pocket and makes the activity of trypsin decrease remarkably with the increasing concentration of curcumin.

  13. Detection of five tumor markers in lung cancer by trypsin digestion of sputum method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore the detection of five tumor markers by trypsin digestion of sputum in the diagnosis of lung cancer, the samples of sputum in patients with lung cancer and benign lung disease were digested by trypsin and used to measure five tumor markers. The results showed that the sputum were well digested by 6% trypsin at pH8 and no affect on the determination of tumor markers. The CEA, CA125, CA153, CA211 and NSE levels in lung cancer group were significantly higher than that of in benign group (P<0.05). The sputum CEA and CA125 levels were significantly higher than that of the serum levels (P<0.05). The detection of sputum CEA, CA125, CA153, CA211 and NSE levels have clinical value in the diagnosis of lung cancer. When combined with other diagnostic methods,it might be helpful for further diagnosis in non confirmed lung cancer patients. (authors)

  14. Increased [125I]trypsin-binding in serum from cystic fibrosis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capacities of normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) sera to bind to exogenous human [125I]trypsin were compared. Sera from eight older CF patients bound significantly more exogenous human [125I]trypsin than did sera from eight normal subjects (p less than 0.001). Disregarding the increased trypsin-binding (TB) of CF sera, serum immunoreactive trypsinogen (SIRT) levels were not detectable in these eight older CF patients. However, when SIRT levels were corrected for TB, four CF patients had normal SIRT concentrations and four had low but detectable SIRT levels. As compared to five normal newborns' sera, serum from a newborn with CF had normal TB and the SIRT levels were very high. In conclusion, increased TB in CF serum lowers results of SIRT assays. Therefore, unless SIRT levels are corrected for TB, results obtained from currently available SIRT kits may be invalid

  15. Trypsinization severely perturbs radioiodide transport via membrane Na/I symporter proteolysis: implications for reporter gene imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kyung-Ho [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jkhope.jung@sbri.co.kr; Paik, Jin-Young [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, You La; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Jaetae [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung-Han [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: khnm.lee@samsung.com

    2009-11-15

    Introduction: Cell preparation procedures injurious to Na/I symporters (NIS) could deter their usefulness for reporter gene assays and in vivo cell imaging. In this study, we investigated the effects of cell collection by trypsinization on radioiodide transport and in vivo cell imaging results. Methods: The influence of trypsinization procedures on {sup 125}I transport was evaluated using Huh-7/NIS hepatoma cells. The effects of graded concentrations of trypsin and EDTA were assessed on Huh-7/NIS and A431/NIS lung cancer cells. Trypsin-induced NIS proteolysis was investigated by immunoblots of plasma membrane prepared from adenovirus-infected mouse liver tissue. {sup 99m}Tc-O{sub 4}{sup -} scintigraphy was performed in Balb/C nude mice at 1 and 4 h following administration of Huh-7/NIS cells collected with and without trypsin. Results: {sup 125}I Transport ability of Huh-7/NIS cells was severely impaired within minutes of standard trypsinization and further deteriorated up to 24 h after termination of treatment. This perturbation was caused by trypsin, which dose- and time-dependently induced substantial reductions of {sup 125}I uptake in Huh-7/NIS and A431/NIS cells. Immunoblot analysis revealed significant dose- and time-dependent losses of membrane NIS protein by trypsin. NIS proteolysis was completely blocked by soybean trypsin inhibitor, and partial protection was offered by the substrates iodide and perchlorate. On {sup 99m}Tc-O{sub 4}{sup -} scintigraphy of mice, cells prepared by trypsinization were poorly visualized, whereas those collected with a nonenzymatic method showed significantly better uptake and contrast. Conclusion: Trypsinization leads to serious perturbations in iodide accumulating capacity through tryptic degradation of membrane NIS protein. Hence, NIS-based reporter assays and in vivo cell imaging studies may benefit from better-optimized cell cultivation and harvesting procedures.

  16. Trypsinization severely perturbs radioiodide transport via membrane Na/I symporter proteolysis: implications for reporter gene imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Cell preparation procedures injurious to Na/I symporters (NIS) could deter their usefulness for reporter gene assays and in vivo cell imaging. In this study, we investigated the effects of cell collection by trypsinization on radioiodide transport and in vivo cell imaging results. Methods: The influence of trypsinization procedures on 125I transport was evaluated using Huh-7/NIS hepatoma cells. The effects of graded concentrations of trypsin and EDTA were assessed on Huh-7/NIS and A431/NIS lung cancer cells. Trypsin-induced NIS proteolysis was investigated by immunoblots of plasma membrane prepared from adenovirus-infected mouse liver tissue. 99mTc-O4- scintigraphy was performed in Balb/C nude mice at 1 and 4 h following administration of Huh-7/NIS cells collected with and without trypsin. Results: 125I Transport ability of Huh-7/NIS cells was severely impaired within minutes of standard trypsinization and further deteriorated up to 24 h after termination of treatment. This perturbation was caused by trypsin, which dose- and time-dependently induced substantial reductions of 125I uptake in Huh-7/NIS and A431/NIS cells. Immunoblot analysis revealed significant dose- and time-dependent losses of membrane NIS protein by trypsin. NIS proteolysis was completely blocked by soybean trypsin inhibitor, and partial protection was offered by the substrates iodide and perchlorate. On 99mTc-O4- scintigraphy of mice, cells prepared by trypsinization were poorly visualized, whereas those collected with a nonenzymatic method showed significantly better uptake and contrast. Conclusion: Trypsinization leads to serious perturbations in iodide accumulating capacity through tryptic degradation of membrane NIS protein. Hence, NIS-based reporter assays and in vivo cell imaging studies may benefit from better-optimized cell cultivation and harvesting procedures.

  17. Cloning and Functional Analysis of the Bifunctional Agglutinin/Trypsin Inhibitor from Helianthus tuberosus L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuanjie Chang; Hongli Zhai; Songbiao Chen; Guisheng Song; Honglin Xu; Xiaoli Wei; Zhen Zhu

    2006-01-01

    In order to find new insect resistance genes, four homologous cDNAs, hta-a, hta-b, hta-c and hta-d with lengths of 775, 718, 784 and 752 bp, respectively (GenBank accession numbers AF477031-AF477034), were isolated from a tuber cDNA expression library of Helianthus tuberosus L. Sequence analysis revealed that all four cDNAs contain an open reading frame of 444 bp, coding a polypeptide of 147 amino acid residues, and that the sequences of the cDNAs are very similar to those of the mannose-binding agglutinin genes of the jacalin-related family. In hemagglutination reactions and hapten inhibition assays, affinity-purified HTA (Helianthus tuberosus agglutinin) from induced Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) expressing GST-HTA shows hemagglutination ability and a higher carbohydrate-binding ability for mannose than other tested sugars.Trypsin inhibitory activity was detected in the crude extracts of induced E. coli BL21(DE3)expressing HTA,and was further verified by trypsin inhibitory activity staining on native polyacrylamide gel. The mechanism of interaction between HTA and trypsin was studied by molecular modeling. We found that plenty of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions can be formed between the supposed binding sites of HTA-b and the active site of trypsin, and that a stable HTA/trypsin complex can be formed. The results above imply that HTA might be a bifunctional protein with carbohydrate-binding activity and trypsin inhibitory activity. Moreover,Northern blotting analysis demonstrated that hta is predominantly expressed in tubers of H. tuberosus, very weakly expressed in stems, but not expressed at all in other tissues. Southern blotting analysis indicated that hta is encoded by a multi-gene family. The insect resistance traits have been described in another paper.

  18. EFFECTIVENESS INACTIVATION OF TRYPSIN INHIBITOR FROM BRAZILIAN CULTIVARS OF BEANS (PHASEOLUS VULGARIS L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelli Cristina PAIVA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The trypsin inhibitor, an antinutritional factor, which is abundant in dycotiledoneous and monocotyledoneous, is usually inactivated by heating treatment. The infl uence of pressure-cooking (121°C and 141kPa for 30 min on, trypsin inhibitors concentration and inhibitors reactivation from ten Brazilian beans varieties of Phaseolus vulgaris L. namely: IAPAR-14, IAC-Carioca, Rudá, Corrente, IAC-Aruã, IAPAR-16, IAPAR-57, IACCarioca Pyatã, Carioca, Aporé, were investigated. The inhibitors reactivation was evaluated in comparison with the activity of raw and pressure-cooking. For raw the in vitro protein digestibility mean values ranged from 40% (in Carioca cultivar to 60% (in IAC-Aruã cultivar, showing an increase from 11% to 37% using the autoclaving at 121°C and 141kPa. Among ten cultivars studied the trypsin inhibitor activity varied from 36.18UTI.mg-1 for IAC-Aruã to 63.33UTI.mg-1 for IAPAR-16. Trypsin inhibitor activity was totally inactivated by pressure-cooking. The study of the trypsin inhibitors reactivation using double-digestive pepsin-pancreatin enzymes in vitro showed a recovering activity from 34% up to 100%. Native inhibitor is resistant to double- digestive pepsin-pancreatin proteolysis, whereas autoclaving to 121o C.30 min-1 results in a non-native conformation that is susceptible to proteolysis, improving the digestibility and inactivate differentially the activity of trypsin inhibitors. The results of the thermal treatment of the beans show inactivation of the inhibitors, which may be due to formation of high molecular weight aggregates with other substances of the grain. The pepsin-pancreatin digestion of the inactivated inhibitor restores the activity, probably due to its retention by the digested fragments.

  19. Pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Andreas K; Herrmann, Ken; Eckel, Florian; Beer, Ambros J

    2011-01-01

    Morphology-based imaging modalities have replaced classical conventional nuclear medicine modalities for detection of liver or pancreatic lesions. With positron emission tomography and the glucose analog F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), a sensitive and specific modality for the detection of hepatic metastases and extrahepatic tumor deposits from hepatocellular or pancreatic cancer is available. F-18 FDG PET can increase the accuracy of staging primary tumors of the liver or the pancreas, and can be used for response monitoring. Radiopharmaceuticals such as Ga-68 DOTATOC and F-18 DOPA allow the specific detection of neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors and their metastatic deposits. Hybrid scanners such as PET-CT integrate morphologic and metabolic information, and allow to increase the sensitivity and specificity of noninvasive imaging in many tumor entities. The development of specific radiopharmaceuticals and technical innovations such as SPECT-CT has increased the reliability of conventional scintigraphic imaging. This chapter focuses on the use of PET-CT in hepatobiliary and pancreatic cancers. PMID:21331938

  20. Radioimmunoassay of pancreatic glucagon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents some of the problems and concepts related to the development of a radioimmunoassay of pancreatic glucagon. A specific derivatization of glucagon for raising specific anti-glucagon antisera is introduced, and special procedures for diminishing the non-specific effect are outlined. (G.T.H.)

  1. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fewer than 10 grams of fat. About 20 potato chips contain 10 grams of fat, so it takes discipline to make sure to stay within this range. Patients who have lost the ability to digest food will be prescribed pills containing pancreatic enzymes to help with digestion. They may also be ...

  2. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung, liver, and peritoneal cavity. An inset shows cancer cells spreading from the pancreas, through the blood and lymph system, to another ... abdomen that contains the intestines, stomach, and liver). Cancer may also have spread to ... pancreas or to lymph nodes. Stage IV pancreatic cancer. ...

  3. Hyperamylasaemia: pathognomonic to pancreatitis?

    OpenAIRE

    Burden, Sam; Poon, Anna Sau Kuk; Masood, Kausar; Didi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman, presented with a history of vomiting, abdominal mass and a significantly raised amylase, but no clinical evidence of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasound and CT scans showed an ovarian tumour, and no evidence of pancreatitis—as is often associated with a raised amylase. The patient underwent bilateral ovariectomy and hysterectomy and made a good recovery.

  4. Focal autoimmune pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Maren, N Vander; Everarts, Ph; Nicaise, G.

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old man was referred for evaluation of mild epigastric discomfort with tiredness. He had no particular medical history and admitted drinking two glasses of wine a day. Biology showed a small increase in CRP and pancreatic enzymes (lipases and amylases).

  5. Autoantibodies in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Marner, B; Pedersen, N T;

    1985-01-01

    In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane, and...

  6. Pancreatic Cancer: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabar, Cinthya S; Winter, Jordan M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States, yet advances in treatment options have been minimal over the past decade. In this review, we summarize the evaluation and treatments for this disease. We highlight molecular advances that hopefully will soon translate into improved outcomes. PMID:27546841

  7. Study on chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer using MRS and pancreatic juice samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wang; Chao Ma; Zhuan Liao; Bing Tian; Jian-Ping Lu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the markers of pancreatic diseases and provide basic data and experimental methods for the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. METHODS: There were 15 patients in the present study, among whom 10 had pancreatic cancer and 5, chronic pancreatitis. In all patients, pancreatic cancer or chronic pancreatitis was located on the head of the p-a-ncreas. Pathology data of all pa tients was confirmed by biopsy and surgery. Among the 10 patients with pancreatic cancer, 3 people had a medical history of longterm alcohol consumption. Of 5 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 4 men suffered from alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic juice samples were obtained from patients by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Magnetic resonance spectroscopyn was performed on an 11.7-T scanner (Bruker DRX-500) using Call-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequences. The parameters were as follows: spectral width, 15 KHz; time domain, 64 K; number of scans, 512; and acquisition time, 2.128 s. RESULTS: The main component of pancreatic juice included leucine, iso-leucine, valine, lactate, alanine, acetate, aspartate, lysine, glycine, threonine, tyrosine, histidine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine. On performing 1D 1H and 2D total correlation spectroscopy, we found a triplet peak at the chemical shift of 1.19 ppm, which only appeared in the spectra of pancreatic juice obtained from patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. This triplet peak was considered the resonance of the methyl of ethoxy group, which may be associated with the metabolism of alcohol in the pancreas. CONCLUSION: The triplet peak, at the chemical shift of 1.19 ppm is likely to be the characteristic metabolite of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis.

  8. Le complexe respiratoire bovin

    OpenAIRE

    Lekeux, Pierre

    1996-01-01

    Les maladies respiratoires des bovins sont, partout dans le monde, la cause principale de mortalité chez les jeunes bovins. Plusieurs facteurs favorisent l'apparition de ce syndrome : des facteurs propres à l'animal, comme l'âge, l'état général et le statut immunitaire; d'autres relatifs à l'environnement, comme les stress engendrés par les changements de régime alimentaire, de température et d'humidité; d'autres encore, liés à la présence d'agents infectieux, comme des bactéries, des virus e...

  9. CT-Guided Pancreatic Percutaneous Fine-Needle Biopsy in Differential Diagnosis between Pancreatic Cancer and Chronic Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Carlucci; Alessandro Zerbi; Danilo Parolini; Sandro Sironi; Angelo Vanzulli; Carlo Staudacher; Agostino Faravelli; Paola Garancini; Alessandro del Maschio; Valerio di Carlo

    1989-01-01

    Differential diagnosis between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis is still difficult to establish. In 63 patients with suspected pancreatic neoplasm we performed: serum CA 19-9 assessment, abdominal ultrasound, CT scan and CT-guided pancreatic percutaneous fine-needle biopsy. The conclusive diagnosis was pancreatic cancer in 40 patients and chronic pancreatitis in 23 patients. With regard to the differential diagnosis, sensitivity and specificity were respectively 80% and ...

  10. X-Ray Studies On The Bilayer Structure Of Trypsin-Treated Rat-Brain Myelin

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Viswamitra, MA; Mohan, PM; Sastry, PS

    1995-01-01

    Trypsin-treated rat brain myelin was subjected to biochemical and X-ray studies. Untreated myelin gave rise to a pattern of three rings with a fundamental repeat period of 155 Angstrom consisting of two bilayers per repeat period, whereas myelin treated with trypsin showed a fundamental repeat period of 75 Angstrom with one bilayer per repeat period. The integrated raw intensity of the h=4 reflection with respect to the h=2 reflection is 0.38 for untreated myelin. The corresponding value redu...

  11. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Luiz De Souza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States. Most of the patients are diagnosed in the metastatic staging. Consolidated risk factors include chronic pancreatitis, smoking and family history. Although controversial, diabetes mellitus has been increasingly associated with pancreatic cancer as a risk factor as opposed to just a manifestation of the disease. Biomarkers for early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer among diabetic patients and metformin as a biologic therapy for pancreatic cancer are herein discussed. Methods Review of the literature and evaluation of two Abstracts (#180 and #253 from the 2014 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium focusing on pancreatic adenocarcinoma and diabetes diagnosis and therapeutics. Results Abstract #180 discusses the role of metabolic biomarkers in the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer among diabetic patients, especially recently diagnosed. Abstract #253 debates metformin as a candidate radiosensitizer for pancreatic cancer, although it fails to reject its null hypothesis. Conclusion Search for methods that can identify pancreatic cancer patients among new-onset diabetic patients could result in early diagnosis of this lethal disease. Metformin is a target therapy that increases median overall survival but is not a radiation sensitizer in patients with pancreatic cancer who present with diabetes.

  12. Genetics of bovine vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Leach, Richard Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Infectious disease is an important issue for animal breeders, farmers and governments. Solutions to control infectious disease are needed and research focused on the genetic loci determining variation in immune-related traits has the potential to deliver solutions. The primary aim of this thesis is to discover regions of the bovine genome which influence the immune response post immunisation. To accomplish this two types of immunising agents, a Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMD...

  13. Vitrification of Bovine Oocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Anchamparuthy, Vahida Muhammed Ismail

    2007-01-01

    Cryopreservation of oocytes is a challenge. Studies were conducted to vitrify mouse zygotes and cumulus-intact bovine oocytes from follicles of different diameters, small (â ¤ 4 mm) and medium (4 to 10 mm), using nylon mesh. The specific goals were to assess changes in apoptotic gene expression (Fas-FasL, Bax, Bcl-2, and survivin) in conjunction with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and caspase assays. Mouse zygotes were exposed to increasing concentrations...

  14. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months

  15. Acute Pancreatitis: Surgery, Pathophysiology and Probiotic Prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnen, L.P. van

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a challenging disease with a clinical course that is often difficult to predict. In severe acute pancreatitis, mortality increases significantly if intestinal bacteria translocate from the intestine and infect pancreatic necrosis. Surgical and prophylactic treatment strategies

  16. Groove Pancreatitis: A Rare form of Chronic Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bharivi Jani; Fadi Rzouq; Shreyas Saligram; Atta Nawabi; Marian Nicola; Katie Dennis; Carly Ernst; Ali Abbaszadeh; John Bonino; Mojtaba Olyaee

    2015-01-01

    Context: Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis affecting the "groove" of the pancreas among the pancreatic head, duodenum, and common bile duct. The exact cause is unknown, although there are associations with long-term alcohol abuse, smoking, peptic ulcer disease, heterotopic pancreas, gastric resection, biliary disease, and anatomical or functional obstruction of the minor papilla. The diagnosis can be challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance chol...

  17. Role of pancreatic stellate cells in chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    McCarroll, Joshua A.; Naim, Stephanie; Sharbeen, George; Russia, Nelson; Lee, Julia; Kavallaris, Maria; Goldstein, David; Phillips, Phoebe A.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly chemoresistant. A major contributing factor is the characteristic extensive stromal or fibrotic reaction, which comprises up to 90% of the tumor volume. Over the last decade there has been intensive research into the role of the pro-fibrogenic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and their interaction with pancreatic cancer cells. As a result of the significant alterations in the tumor microenvironment following activation of PSCs, tumor progression, and chemoresistanc...

  18. Identification and transcription profiling of Trypsin in Aedes taeniorhynchus (Diptera: Culicidae): Developmental regulation, blood feeding, and Permethrin exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cDNA of a trypsin gene from Aedes (Ochlerotatus) taeniorhynchus (Weidemann) was cloned and sequenced. The full-length mRNA sequence (874 bp) for trypsin from Ae. taeniorhynchus (AetTryp) was obtained which encodes an open reading frame of 717 bp (i.e., 239 aa). To detect whether AetTryp is devel...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging for acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is characterized by acute chemical injury of the pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissue. The increased frequency of death in acute pancreatitis is directly correlated with the degree and progress of pancreatic necrosis. Moreover, the occurrence of some local complications in acute pancreatitis, such as pancreatic hemorrhage, peripancreatic abscess or large pseudocyst, and pseudoaneurysm, could influence the choice of treatment for these patients. Magnetic resonance...

  20. Contemporary Management of Acute Biliary Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Orhan Ozkan

    2014-01-01

    Acute biliary pancreatitis is one of the major causes of acute pancreatitis.Gallstones, biliary sludge and microlithiasis, especially in pancreatitis without detectable reason, can be the cause of acute pancreatitis. Acute biliary pancreatitis has many controversions in the literature, and its classification and guidelines are being updated very frequently. Atlanta classifications which determine the definitions and guidelines about acute pancreatitis were renewed and published in 2013. It ha...

  1. Chronic pancreatitis: controversies in etiology, diagnosis and treatment Pancreatitis crónica: controversias respecto a la etiología, el diagnóstico y el tratamiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Draganov

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of idiopathic chronic pancreatitis remains poorly understood despite the high expectations for ascribing the pancreatic damage in affected patients to genetic defects. Mutations in the cationic trypsinogen gene, pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor, and the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator gene do not account for the chronic pancreatitis noted in most patients with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis. Small duct chronic pancreatitis can be best diagnosed with a hormone stimulation test. Endoscopic ultrasonography can detect abnormalities in both the parenchyma and ducts of the pancreas. The true value of endoscopic ultrasonography in diagnosing small duct chronic pancreatitis remains to be fully defined and is under active investigation. It is not clear whether endoscopic ultrasonography is more sensitive for early structural changes in patients with small duct disease or is over diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic enzyme supplementation with non-enteric formulation along with acid suppression (H2 blockers or proton pump inhibitors is an effective therapy for pain in patients with small duct chronic pancreatitis. The role of endoscopic ultrasonography-guided celiac plexus block should be limited to treating those patients with chronic pancreatitis whose pain has not responded to other modalities. Total pancreatectomy followed by autologous islet cell autotransplantation appears to be potential therapeutic approach but for now should be considered experimental.La patogenia de la pancreatitis crónica idiopática sigue siendo poco conocida, a pesar de las expectativas de atribuir el daño pancreático que sufren los pacientes con esta enfermedad a factores genéticos. Las mutaciones del gen del tripsinógeno catiónico, del gen del inhibidor de la tripsina secretoria del páncreas y del gen regulador de conductancia de la fibrosis quística no explican la pancreatitis crónica de la mayoría de los pacientes con

  2. Groove pancreatitis and pancreatic heterotopia in the minor duodenal papilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Denis; Vibert, Eric; Yzet, Thierry; Geslin, Guillaume; Bartoli, Eric; Manaouil, David; Delcenserie, Richard; Brevet, Marie; Dupas, Jean-Louis; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2005-05-01

    Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of segmental chronic pancreatitis that involves the anatomic space between the head of the pancreas, the duodenum, and the common bile duct. We report 2 cases of groove pancreatitis with pancreatic heterotopia in the minor papilla. Patients were a 44-year-old woman and a 47-year-old man. Both had a past history of alcohol consumption and presented with abdominal pain, vomiting, and weight loss caused by duodenal stenosis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed thickening of the duodenal wall and enlargement of the pancreatic head in both patients. In 1 patient, ultrasound endoscopy showed a dilated duct in the head of the pancreas. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed to rule out pancreatic adenocarcinoma and because of the severity of the symptoms. In both cases, gross and microscopic examinations showed fibrous scar of the groove area. The Santorini duct was dilated and contained protein plugs in both patients, with abscesses in 1 of them. In both cases, there were microscopic foci of heterotopic pancreas with mild fibrosis in the wall of the minor papilla. Groove pancreatitis is often diagnosed in middle-aged alcoholic men presenting with clinical symptoms caused by duodenal stenosis. The pathogenesis of this rare entity could be because of disturbance of the pancreatic secretion through the minor papilla. Pancreatitis in heterotopic pancreas located in the minor papilla and chronic consumption of alcohol seem to be important pathogenic factors. PMID:15841034

  3. Pancreatic encephalopathy- a rare complication of severe acute biliary pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Denis Constantin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pancreatic encephalopathy is a rare complication of severe acute pancreatitis, with high mortality, being difficult to diagnose and treat, thus requiring continuous research regarding its management. Materials and Methods. Of 20 patients diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis on admission at Department of Emergency and Admission (DEA, from January 1st 2010 to March 31st 2014, 5 cases complicated by pancreatic encephalopathy were analyzed using a descriptive observational, retrospective, single-center study. Results. The study shows different types of diagnostic algorithm and therapeutical approaches, in correlation with morbidity and mortality rates. Conclusions. Our study highlighted the fact that speed is critical, early management being the key to outcome.

  4. Follicular pancreatitis: a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis-an additional mimic of pancreatic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajib K; Xie, Bill H; Patton, Kurt T; Lisovsky, Mikhail; Burks, Eric; Behrman, Stephen W; Klimstra, David; Deshpande, Vikram

    2016-02-01

    Follicular pancreatitis is a recently described variant of chronic pancreatitis characterized clinically by the formation of a discrete pancreatic mass and histologically by the presence of florid lymphoid aggregates with reactive germinal centers. Our aim was to study the clinical and histologic features of follicular pancreatitis, as well as to critically examine potential overlap with autoimmune pancreatitis. Immunohistochemistry for Bcl-2, CD21, κ and λ light chains as well as IgG4 and IgG were performed. We found a total of 6 patients (male-female ratio, 2:1; mean age, 57 years) who fulfilled the diagnosis of follicular pancreatitis in our institutions. Four had an incidental diagnosis, while two presented with abdominal pain, fatigue, and elevated liver enzymes. On imaging, 3 patients had a discrete solid mass, whereas 2 cases showed a dilated main pancreatic duct, mimicking an intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasm on imaging. One patient had a lesion in the intra-pancreatic portion of the common bile duct. On histopathology, all cases showed numerous lymphoid follicles with Bcl-2-negative germinal centers either in a periductal or in a more diffuse (periductal and intra-parenchymal) fashion, but without attendant storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis, or granulocytic epithelial lesions. IgG4-to-IgG ratio was <40% in 5 cases. A comparison cohort revealed germinal centers in 25% of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis and 2% of type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis cases, but none were periductal in location. In conclusion, follicular pancreatitis, an under-recognized mimic of pancreatic neoplasms is characterized by intrapancreatic lymphoid follicles with reactive germinal centers. PMID:26563969

  5. Computed tomography of pancreatic trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Crass, R.A.

    1983-05-01

    In a review of over 300 CT scans of abdominal trauma, we encountered 13 patients with surgically proved pancreatic injuries. CT correctly diagnosed pancreatic fractures, contusions, or posttraumatic pseudocysts in 11 of these patients. There were two false positive and two false negative diagnoses. The CT diagnosis of pancreatic trauma may be difficult in selected patients who are scanned soon after injury. Acutely, the actual plane of a pancreatic fracture may be difficult to identify with CT, and the peripancreatic soft-tissue changes of traumatic pancreatitis are often subtle. Eight of 11 correctly diagnosed pancreatic injuries showed thickening of the left anterior renal fascia on CT scans. This sign should prompt a critical evaluation of the pancreas of the traumatized patient.

  6. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of 99/sup m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of 99/sup m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained in 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis

  7. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained on 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis

  8. Carbofuran-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizos E

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Carbamate insecticides are widely used in commercial agriculture and home gardening. A serious side effect of organophosphate and carbamate intoxication is the development of acute pancreatitis. CASE REPORT: A 36-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our hospital with cholinergic crisis and pancreatitis soon after the ingestion of a carbamate insecticide (carbofuran. An abdominal CT scan disclosed pancreatic necrosis with intrapancreatic fluid collection, consistent with the development of a pancreatic pseudocyst in a subsequent CT scan. No predisposing factor for pancreatitis was evident. Pseudocholinesterase levels returned to normal 7 days later and the patient was discharged in good physical condition one month after admission. DISCUSSION: Although acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after organophosphate intoxication, it is quite rare after carbamate ingestion and has not been previously reported after carbofuran intoxication.

  9. Rapid Evolution from the First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis to Chronic Pancreatitis in Human Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Elie Aoun; Adam Slivka; Papachristou, Dionysios J.; David C. Whitcomb; Ferga C. Gleeson; Georgios I Papachristou

    2007-01-01

    Context Growing evidence suggests that recurrent acute pancreatitis leads to chronic pancreatitis, but this sequence is seldom reported in human subjects. The sentinel acute pancreatitis event hypothesis suggests that an initial episode of acute pancreatitis is the first step in a complicated series of events ultimately leading to chronic pancreatitis. Objective To identify patients who evolved from recurrent acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis. Setting The Severity of Acute Pancreatit...

  10. Acute pancreatitis following paracetamol overdose

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Roland

    2009-01-01

    A 17-year-old woman presented with acute abdominal pain and vomiting 3 h after she attempted to commit suicide by ingesting 30×500 mg paracetamol tablets. The woman was found to have a raised amylase level, and a CT scan confirmed the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. According to the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale, it is likely that the pancreatitis was induced by the paracetamol ingestion. A literature search reported 36 cases of pancreatitis following excessive doses of par...

  11. Approaches Towards Endogenous Pancreatic Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Meenal; Kanitkar, Meghana; Bhonde, Ramesh R.

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of pancreatic regeneration in mammals has been well documented. It has been shown that pancreatic tissue is able to regenerate in several species of mammal after surgical insult. This tissue is also known to have the potential to maintain or increase its β-cell mass in response to metabolic demands during pregnancy and obesity. Since deficiency in β-cell mass is the hallmark of most forms of diabetes, it is worthwhile understanding pancreatic regeneration in the context of this...

  12. Acute pancreatitis complicating severe dengue

    OpenAIRE

    Vishakha Jain; O P Gupta; Tarun Rao; Siddharth Rao

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is an arthropod borne viral infection endemic in tropical and subtropical continent. Severe dengue is life threatening. Various atypical presentations of dengue have been documented. But we present a rare and fatal complication of severe dengue in form of acute pancreatitis. A 27-year-old male had presented with severe dengue in decompensated shock and with pain in abdomen due to pancreatitis. The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in dengue is not clearly understood, but various mecha...

  13. Helicobacter pylori and pancreatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Bulajic, Milutin; Panic, Nikola; Löhr, Johannes Matthias

    2014-01-01

    A possible role for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in pancreatic diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection with antral predomination leading to an increase in pancreatic bicarbonate output and inducing ductal epithelial cell proliferation could contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer via complex interactions with the ABO genotype, dietary and smoking habits and N-nitrosamine exposure of the host. Although the individual study data available so far is inconsiste...

  14. Lung Injury in Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Raffaele Pezzilli; Lara Bellacosa; Cristina Felicani

    2009-01-01

    Most knowledge has been accumulated on the mechanisms involved in the development of distant organ injuries during the course of severe acute pancreatitis. Among the various distant organ dysfunctions, both the development of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome represent serious complications. In the following paragraphs the pathophysiological mechanisms capable of determining lung injury during the course of acute pancreatitis will be reviewed. Pancreatic Enzymes and...

  15. Nutrition Support in Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Orestis Ioannidis; Athina Lavrentieva; Dimitrios Botsios

    2008-01-01

    The management of acute pancreatitis differs according to its severity. Approximately 75% of patients with acute pancreatitis have mild disease with a mortality rate below 1%. Mortality increases up to 20% if the disease progresses to its severe necrotizing form and, in the most severe cases, mortality can increase to 30-40%. Severe acute pancreatitis is usually accompanied by systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) which results in hypermetabolism with prominent protein catabolism. Ac...

  16. Genetic Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Alison P

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. However, it has the poorest prognosis of any major tumor type, with a 5-yr survival rate of approximately 5%. Cigarette smoking, increased body mass index, heavy alcohol consumption, and a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus have all been demonstrated to increase risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer has also been associated with increased risk suggesting inherited g...

  17. Pancreatic scintiphotography in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic scintiphotography was performed in 108 cases of patients with diabetes mellitus. Scintiphotos were taken at 30 min. after intravenous injection of approximately 200μCi of 75Se-selenomethionine using a Toshiba gamma camera. The relationship between the degree of pancreatic uptake of 75Se-selenomethionine and the types and duration of diabetes, vascular complications and the average range of fasting blood sugar levels were studied. In some cases, pancreatic scintiphotos were taken at 10, 30 and 50 min. after injection of 75Se-selenomethionine, and the degrees of the pancreatic uptake were compared on each time course. Only two out of 24 cases of insulin-dependent diabetics showed normal pancreatic scintiphotos. On the other hand, two out of 47 cases of mild diabetics treated with diet alone showed no uptake in pancreatic scintiphotos. There was a tendency toward abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos in chronic diabetics. Especially, of the 15 cases who had diabetes for more than eleven years, only one case showed a normal pancreatic scintiphoto. Abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos were found more frequently in the group of poorly controlled diabetics than in the group of well controlled diabetics. In cases showing normal pancreatic scintiphotos, diabetic retinopathy was less frequently found. Out of 36 cases which had sequential pancreatic scintiphotos, hypertension and/or arteriosclerosis were found more frequently in the 20 cases which showed a delay in reaching a plateau of the activity. However, the uptake in sequential pancreatic scintiphotos showed no definite correlation between diabetic retinopathy and other diabetic conditions. (auth.)

  18. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. PMID:26520203

  19. Helicobacter pylori and pancreatic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milutin; Bulajic; Nikola; Panic; Johannes; Matthias; L?hr

    2014-01-01

    A possible role for Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infec-tion in pancreatic diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection with antral predomination leading to an increase in pancreatic bicarbonate output and induc-ing ductal epithelial cell proliferation could contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer via complex interactions with the ABO genotype, dietary and smok-ing habits and N-nitrosamine exposure of the host. Although the individual study data available so far is inconsistent, several meta-analyses have reported an increased risk for pancreatic cancer among H. pylori seropositive individuals. It has been suggested that H. pylori causes autoimmune pancreatitis due to molecu-lar mimicry between H. pylori a-carbonic anhydrase(a-CA) and human CA type Ⅱ, and between H. pylori plasminogen-binding protein and human ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 2, enzymes that are highly expressed in the pancreatic ductal andacinar cells, respectively. Future studies involving large numbers of cases are needed in order to examine the role of H. pylori in autoimmune pancreatitis more fully. Considering the worldwide pancreatic cancer burden, as well as the association between autoimmune pan-creatitis and other autoimmune conditions, a complete elucidation of the role played by H. pylori in the gen-esis of such conditions could have a substantial impact on healthcare.

  20. [Development of new soybean germplasm with null lipoxygenase and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fen-Xia; Ding, An-Lin; Sun, Jun-Ming; Li, Gui-Ying

    2005-04-01

    Soybean is one of the most important sources of plant protein for human. Soybean protein is a kind of high-quality protein composed of balanced amino acids, which contains all kinds of amino acids, especially 8 amino acids necessary for human. But it also contains some components that are not good for human and affect food quality, such as lipoxygenase (Lox) and trypsin inhibitor (Ti). Those are important anti-nutritious factors. Nutritional value and processing quality of soybean can be improved by means of development of new variety with null Lox and Ti. In this paper, new soybean germplasms that pyramided multiple genes of high quality, null lipoxygenase and trypsin inhibitor genes (Ix1, Ix2, Ix3 and ti) were developed by means of cross and biochemical marker-assisted selection of progenies for null lipoxygenase and trypsin inhibitor genes using known Lox and Ti markers (protein markers). Female parents were soybean varieties Ludou 4, Zhongpin 661, Yudou 8,91D15, wei8640 popularized in Huanghuaihai Plain. Male parents were varieties introduced from US, trypsin-inhibitor (Ti)-deficient varieties P. I. L83-4387 and near isogenic lines of varieties Century for lipoxygenase (Lox)-deficient genes, Century-2 (Ix2), Century-2.3 (Ix2Ix3) and Century-1.3 (Ix1 Ix3). These new germplasms will promote soybean breeding for improved quality production,and utilization. PMID:16011034