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Sample records for bovine pancreatic trypsin

  1. A preliminary neutron crystallography on the trypsin-bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor complex

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    Kawamura, K; Yamada, T; Kurihara, K; Tamada, T; Kuroki, R; Tanaka, I; Takahashi, H; Niimura, N, E-mail: niimura@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp

    2010-11-01

    Trypsin is one of serine proteases. BPTI (Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor) is a protein inhibitor, which binds trypsin tightly and inhibits cleavage of peptide bonds. X-ray structure determination of trypsin-BPTI complex could make clear the overview of the active site. However, information of hydrogen atoms related to catalytic mechanism has not been satisfied. In this study, the trypsin-BPTI complex structure has been determined by neutron diffraction data at 2.0 A resolution. Deuterium atoms of catalytic triad, hydration structures in the binding pocket of trypsin and hydrogen bonds were observed. We would like to discuss details of hydrogen bonds in the interface between trypsin and BPTI and the adjacent water molecules including hydrogen atoms involved in the enzymatic reaction.

  2. Structural Basis for Accelerated Cleavage of Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor (BPTI) by Human Mesotrypsin

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    Salameh,M.; Soares, A.; Hockla, A.; Radisky, E.

    2008-01-01

    Human mesotrypsin is an isoform of trypsin that displays unusual resistance to polypeptide trypsin inhibitors and has been observed to cleave several such inhibitors as substrates. Whereas substitution of arginine for the highly conserved glycine 193 in the trypsin active site has been implicated as a critical factor in the inhibitor resistance of mesotrypsin, how this substitution leads to accelerated inhibitor cleavage is not clear. Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) forms an extremely stable and cleavage-resistant complex with trypsin, and thus provides a rigorous challenge of mesotrypsin catalytic activity toward polypeptide inhibitors. Here, we report kinetic constants for mesotrypsin and the highly homologous (but inhibitor sensitive) human cationic trypsin, describing inhibition by, and cleavage of BPTI, as well as crystal structures of the mesotrypsin-BPTI and human cationic trypsin-BPTI complexes. We find that mesotrypsin cleaves BPTI with a rate constant accelerated 350-fold over that of human cationic trypsin and 150,000-fold over that of bovine trypsin. From the crystal structures, we see that small conformational adjustments limited to several side chains enable mesotrypsin-BPTI complex formation, surmounting the predicted steric clash introduced by Arg-193. Our results show that the mesotrypsin-BPTI interface favors catalysis through (a) electrostatic repulsion between the closely spaced mesotrypsin Arg-193 and BPTI Arg-17, and (b) elimination of two hydrogen bonds between the enzyme and the amine leaving group portion of BPTI. Our model predicts that these deleterious interactions accelerate leaving group dissociation and deacylation.

  3. Protein internal flexibility and global stability: effect of urea on hydrogen exchange rates of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

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    Kim, K S; Woodward, C

    1993-09-21

    The hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics of buried NH protons in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) was measured in 8 M urea at 30 degrees C and pH 3.5. The data were analyzed by the two-process model in which slower exchanging protons utilize an unfolding mechanism and more rapidly exchanging protons exchange from the folded state. Urea accelerates the set of protons exchanging by the unfolding mechanism, all of which have approximately the same exchange rate constants in urea. For protons in this set, the ratio of exchange rate constants in the presence and absence of urea is used to estimate delta delta G(0-->8M urea) = 6.6 kcal/mol. For the set of protons exchanging from the folded state, 8 M urea either has no effect or slows exchange. Slowing of exchange by urea implies binding of urea to sites at or near the exchanging proton. Some buried protons exchanging from the folded state have diminished rates in 8 M urea, meaning that urea is accessible to these buried sites. Several unassigned side-chain NH's of arginine or lysine are highly protected from exchange by urea, suggesting that they are the location of urea binding sites on the surface of the molecule.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of a beta-hairpin peptide that represents a 'core module' of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI).

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    Carulla, N; Woodward, C; Barany, G

    2000-07-11

    A new strategy for the design and construction of peptide fragments that can achieve defined, nativelike secondary structure is presented. The strategy is based upon the hypothesis that 'core elements' of a protein, synthesized in a single polypeptide molecule, will favor nativelike structure, and that by incorporating a cross-link, nativelike core structure will dominate the ensemble as the more extended conformations are excluded. 'Core elements' are the elements of packed secondary structure that contain the slowest exchanging backbone amide protons in the native protein. The 'core elements' in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) are the two long strands of antiparallel beta-sheet (residues 18-24 and 29-35) and the small beta-bridge (residues 43-44). To test the design strategy, we synthesized an 'oxidized core module', which contains the antiparallel strands connected by a modified reverse turn (A27 replaced by D), a natural disulfide cross-link at the open end of the hairpin, and N- and C-termini blocking groups. A peptide with identical sequence but lacking the disulfide cross-link at the open end was used as the 'reduced core module' control. The conformational behavior of both peptides was examined using (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shift dispersion, chemical shift deviation from random coil values, sequential and long-range NOEs, and H/D amide exchange rates were compared for the two peptides. We conclude that the ensemble of oxidized and reduced core module conformations samples both nativelike 4:4 and non-native 3:5 beta-hairpin structure, and that the oxidized module samples nativelike structure for a greater fraction of the time than the reduced module.

  5. Crystal structure of an extensively simplified variant of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor in which over one-third of the residues are alanines.

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    Islam, Mohammad Monirul; Sohya, Shihori; Noguchi, Keiichi; Yohda, Masafumi; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2008-10-07

    We report the high-resolution crystal structures of an extensively simplified variant of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor containing 20 alanines (BPTI-20st) and a reference single-disulfide-bonded variant (BPTI-[5,55]st) at, respectively, 1.39 and 1.09 A resolutions. The sequence was simplified based on the results of an alanine scanning experiment, as reported previously. The effects of the multiple alanine substitutions on the overall backbone structure were surprisingly small (C(alpha) atom RMSD of 0.53 A) being limited to small local structural perturbations. Both BPTI variants retained a wild-type level of trypsin inhibitory activity. The side-chain configurations of residues buried in the hydrophobic cores (alanine replacements nor the removal of the disulfide bonds affected their precise placements. However, the side chains of three partially buried residues (Q31, R20, and to some extent Y21) and several unburied residues rearranged into alternative dense-packing structures, suggesting some plasticity in their shape complementarity. These results indicate that a protein sequence simplified over its entire length can retain its densely packed, native side-chain structure, and suggest that both the design and fold recognition of natively folded proteins may be easier than previously thought.

  6. From Acute to Chronic Pancreatitis: The Role of Mutations in the Pancreatic Secretory Trypsin Inhibitor Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Hirota M; Kuwata K; Ohmuraya M; Ogawa M

    2003-01-01

    Pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) is a potent natural inhibitor of trypsin. We proposed the hypothesis that, if the function of the PSTI is impaired by its genetic mutation, trypsin may easily promote autodigestion causing pancreatitis and we performed a mutational analysis of the PSTI gene in patients with pancreatitis. Two exonic mutations (N34S and R67C) were thought to be associated with a predisposition to pancreatitis. The N34S mutation was co-segregated with two intronic mu...

  7. Trypsin/creatinine clearance ratio and serum immunoreactive trypsin in digestive and pancreatic diseases.

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    Del Favero, G; Fabris, C; Bonvicini, P; Piccoli, A; Baccaglini, U; Pedrazzoli, S; Burlina, A; Naccarato, R

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of trypsin/creatinine clearance ratio (Ctr/Ccr) and serum immunoreactive trypsin (IRT) was evaluated in a total of 168 subjects with pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis and non-pancreatic digestive diseases. Amylase/creatinine clearance ratio (Cam/Ccr) and serum amylase levels were also evaluated in order to establish their possible relationship with Ctr/Ccr and IRT values. Elevated Ctr/Ccr and IRT values were observed in several patients with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis. Abnormal IRT and Ctr/Ccr values were found in 28.2 and 4% of non-pancreatic digestive diseases, respectively. IRT and amylase serum levels showed consensual modifications, while Ctr/Ccr showed a behavior different from that of Cam/Ccr. Liver damage seems to play a role in increasing serum IRT levels of patients without pancreatic involvement, while the increased Ctr/Ccr seems to depend on other factors, for instance renal tubular dysfunction.

  8. Maize (Zea mays)-derived bovine trypsin: characterization of the first large-scale, commercial protein product from transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Susan L; Mayor, Jocelyne M; Bailey, Michele R; Barker, Donna K; Love, Robert T; Lane, Jeffrey R; Delaney, Donna E; McComas-Wagner, Janet M; Mallubhotla, Hanuman D; Hood, Elizabeth E; Dangott, Lawrence J; Tichy, Shane E; Howard, John A

    2003-10-01

    Bovine trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) is an enzyme that is widely used for commercial purposes to digest or process other proteins, including some therapeutic proteins. The biopharmaceutical industry is trying to eliminate animal-derived proteins from manufacturing processes due to the possible contamination of these products by human pathogens. Recombinant trypsin has been produced in a number of systems, including cell culture, bacteria and yeast. To date, these expression systems have not produced trypsin on a scale sufficient to fulfill the need of biopharmaceutical manufacturers where kilogram quantities are often required. The present paper describes commercial-level production of trypsin in transgenic maize (Zea mays) and its physical and functional characterization. This protease, the first enzyme to be produced on a large-scale using transgenic plant technology, is functionally equivalent to native bovine pancreatic trypsin. The availability of this reagent should allow for the replacement of animal-derived trypsin in the processing of pharmaceutical proteins.

  9. Inactivation of pectin methylesterase by immobilized trypsins from cunner fish and bovine pancreas.

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    Li, Dan; Matos, Madyu; Simpson, Benjamin K

    2013-01-01

    Immobilized cunner fish trypsin was used to inactivate pectin methylesterase (PME). The effects of different reaction conditions (e.g., incubation time, PME concentration, and temperature) on PME inactivation and kinetics of inactivation were investigated. Temperature, incubation time, and PME concentration significantly affected the extent of PME inactivation. Generally, higher temperature, longer incubation time, and low PME concentration caused more PME inactivation. The immobilized fish trypsin had higher capacity to inactivate PME than immobilized bovine trypsin. The inactivation efficiency of the immobilized fish trypsin was about 20% higher than that of its bovine counterpart. However, PME inactivated by both trypsins regained partial activity during storage at 4°C, with immobilized fish trypsin-treated PME regaining more of its original activity than the immobilized bovine trypsin-treated PME. Heat-denatured PME was hydrolyzed more extensively by immobilized fish trypsin than by its bovine counterpart. The rate constants increased, whereas the D-values decreased with temperature for both immobilized fish and bovine trypsins. The inactivation rate constants of immobilized fish trypsin at all the temperatures investigated (i.e., 15-35°C) were higher than those of immobilized bovine trypsin. Furthermore, the activation energy (Ea ) of PME inactivation by immobilized fish trypsin was lower than that of immobilized bovine trypsin.

  10. From Acute to Chronic Pancreatitis: The Role of Mutations in the Pancreatic Secretory Trypsin Inhibitor Gene

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    Hirota M

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI is a potent natural inhibitor of trypsin. We proposed the hypothesis that, if the function of the PSTI is impaired by its genetic mutation, trypsin may easily promote autodigestion causing pancreatitis and we performed a mutational analysis of the PSTI gene in patients with pancreatitis. Two exonic mutations (N34S and R67C were thought to be associated with a predisposition to pancreatitis. The N34S mutation was co-segregated with two intronic mutations, IVS1-37T>C and IVS3-69insTTTT. Although we analyzed the function of the recombinant N34S protein, we could not demonstrate the loss of function of this protein. Intronic mutations, rather than N34S itself (IVS1-37T>C + N34S + IVS3-69insTTTT complex, may be associated with the decreased function of the PSTI. Alternatively, increased digestion of N34S in vivo may be applicable. As for R67C, the conformational alteration of the protein by forming intra-molecular or inter-molecular disulfide bonds with 67Cys was strongly suggested. These results, along with the brand-new findings in PSTI knockout mice, suggest that the genetic mutation of the PSTI is one of the important mechanisms for predisposition to pancreatitis by lowering the trypsin inhibitory function.

  11. Digestion of atopic allergens with trypsin α-chymotrypsin and pancreatic kallikrein, and influence of the allergens upon the proteolytic and esterolytic activity of these enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrens, L.

    1968-01-01

    The action of bovine trypsin, α-chymotrypsin and pancreatic kallikrein upon a number of atopic allergens has been studied by pH-stat measurements during short-term incubation. Most atopic allergens proved chemically resistant towards these enzymes. Graphs of enzyme susceptibility vs. the ratio of ex

  12. Framework for interpretation of trypsin-antitrypsin imbalance and genetic heterogeneity in pancreatitis

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    Kun Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Early intracellular premature trypsinogen activation was interpreted as the key initiator of pancreatitis. When the balance in the homeostasis of trypsin and antitrypsin system is disequilibrated, elevated aggressive enzymes directly attack the pancreatic tissue, which leads to pancreatic destruction and inflammation. However, trypsin alone is not enough to cause complications in pancreatitis, which may play a crucial role in modulating signaling events in the initial phase of the disease. NFκB activation is the major inflammatory pathway involved in the occurrence and development of pancreatitis and it can be induced by intrapancreatic activation of trypsinogen. Synthesis of trypsinogen occurs in endoplasmic reticulum (ER, and ER stress is an important early acinar cell event. Components of ER stress response are known to be able to trigger cell death as well as NFκB signaling cascade. The strongest evidence supporting the trypsin-centered theory is that gene mutations, which lead to the generation of more trypsin, or reduce the activity of trypsin inhibitors or trypsin degradation, are associated with pancreatitis. Thus, trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance may be the first step leading to pancreatic autodigestion and inducing other pathways. Continued experimental studies are necessary to determine the specific relationships between trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance and genetic heterogeneity in pancreatitis. In this article, we review the latest advances that contributed to the understanding of the basic mechanisms behind the occurrence and development of pancreatitis with a focus on the interpretation of trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance and their relationships with other inflammation pathways. We additionally highlight genetic predispositions to pancreatitis and possible mechanisms associated with them.

  13. Trypsin-Based Laboratory Methods and Carboxypeptidase Activation Peptide in Acute Pancreatitis

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    Kylanpaa-Back ML

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a common disease varying widely in severity. At present, there is no "gold standard" for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Currently, the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is based on measurements of serum amylase and/or lipase activity, which are considered unsatisfactory due to their low level of accuracy. Early identification of acute pancreatitis and especially detection of patients with a severe form of the disease is of utmost importance. Premature intrapancreatic activation of trypsinogen is a crucial early event in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis. The conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin is mediated by the release of its activation peptide (TAP. The active trypsin is then able to activate other pancreatic zymogens (i.e. procarboxypeptidase leading to tissue damage and eventually to autodigestion of the pancreas. To improve the laboratory diagnostics of AP, new methods have been developed to measure this primary pancreatic proteolytic insult. Here we review the current knowledge and clinical implications of trypsin based laboratory methods and carboxypeptidase activation peptide (CAPAP in the diagnosis and severity assessment of acute pancreatitis.

  14. Conjugation of D-glucosamine to bovine trypsin increases thermal stability and alters functional properties.

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    Gizurarson, Jóhann Grétar Kröyer; Filippusson, Hörður

    2015-01-01

    D-Glucosamine was conjugated to bovine trypsin by carbodiimide chemistry, involving a water-soluble carbodiimide and a succinimide ester, with the latter being to increase the yield of the conjugation. Mass spectrometric data suggested that several glycoforms were formed, with around 12 D-glucosamine moieties coupled to each trypsin molecule on average. The moieties were probably coupled to eight carboxyl groups (of glutamyl and aspartyl residues) and to four tyrosyl residues on the surface of the enzyme. The glycated trypsin possessed increased thermal stability. When compared with its unmodified counterpart, T50% was increased by 7 °C, thermal inactivation of the first step was increased 34%, and long-term stability assay revealed 71-times higher residual activity at 25 °C (without stabilizing Ca(2+) ions in aqueous buffer) after 67 days. Furthermore, resistance against autolysis was increased almost two-fold. Altered functional properties of the glycated trypsin were also observed. The glycated trypsin was found to become increasingly basophilic, and was found to be slightly structurally altered. This was indicated by 1.2 times higher catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) than unmodified trypsin against the substrate N-α-benzoyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide. Circular dichroism spectropolarimetry suggested a minor change in spatial arrangement of α-helix/helices, resulting in an increased affinity of the glycated trypsin for this small synthetic substrate.

  15. Measurement of serum pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) for the evaluation as a marker for pancreatic diseases

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    Sasaki, Y.; Tsujino, D.; Noguchi, M.; Someya, K.

    1985-05-01

    Clinical usefulness of measuring PSTI in sera was studied using a new RIA kit produced by Shionogi Pharmaceutical Co. The assessment of the kit performance was satisfactory with good precision (1.6-6.9% in C.V.), reproducibility (5.0-6.0%), sensitivity (>2.Ong/ml), recovery test (98-109%, m101) and linear dilution test results. Serum PSTI levels in 71 normal controls were 12.0 + 5.0 ng/ml(m+S.D.) with higher values in subjects over 60 y.o. (14.2 +- 4.2 in 60-69 y.o. and 18.9 +- 6.5 over 70 y.o.). Serum PSTI levels were measured in 183 patients with various benign diseases (BD) and 251 cancer patients (CA). Among BD relatively high positive (>30ng/ml) ratios were observed in acute pancreatitis(40%, N=15), chronic pancreatitis(23.1%,13), pneumonia(23.5%,23) in contrast to low levels in acute hepatitis (6.7%,15), chronic hepatitis (8.0%, 25), liver cirrhosis (10.3%,29) and others (11.1%,25) including 2 chronic renal failure (220 and 465 ng/ml). In a patient with acute pancreatitis followed from the onset of the attack PSTI levels revealed 2 peaks on the 1st and 4th day. Serum PSTI correlated with clinical courses better than serum amylase which declined faster than PSTI. Among CA relatively high positive ratios were seen in CA of pancreas(46.7%,30), biliary tract (52.6%,19) and primary hepatoma (58.8%,34) in contrast to low levels in CA of esophagus (18.2%,11), stomach (16.7%, 78), colon (21.6%, 37), lung (8.0%, 25) and breast (0%.17). Measurement of PSTI should provide a clinical indicator for pancreatic diseases complementing existing markers such as amylase, lipase, elastase 1 and trypsin.

  16. Evaluation of the Human Host Range of Bovine and Porcine Viruses that may Contaminate Bovine Serum and Porcine Trypsin Used in the Manufacture of Biological Products

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    Marcus-Sekura, Carol; Richardson, James C.; Harston, Rebecca K.; Sane, Nandini; Sheets, Rebecca L.

    2011-01-01

    Current U.S. requirements for testing cell substrates used in production of human biological products for contamination with bovine and porcine viruses are U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) 9CFR tests for bovine serum or porcine trypsin. 9CFR requires testing of bovine serum for seven specific viruses in six families (immunofluorescence) and at least 2 additional families non-specifically (cytopathicity and hemadsorption). 9CFR testing of porcine trypsin is for porcine parvovirus. Recent contaminations suggest these tests may not be sufficient. Assay sensitivity was not the issue for these contaminations that were caused by viruses/virus families not represented in the 9CFR screen. A detailed literature search was undertaken to determine which viruses that infect cattle or swine or bovine or porcine cells in culture also have human host range [ability to infect humans or human cells in culture] and to predict their detection by the currently used 9CFR procedures. There are more viruses of potential risk to biological products manufactured using bovine or porcine raw materials than are likely to be detected by 9CFR testing procedures; even within families, not all members would necessarily be detected. Testing gaps and alternative methodologies should be evaluated to continue to ensure safe, high quality human biologicals. PMID:22000165

  17. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950347 Pancreatic endorcine response to parenteralnutrition in experimental acute pancreatitis.SUN Xi-aoguang(孙晓光),et al.Dept Nucl Med,ZhongshanHosp,Shanghai Med Univ,Shanghai.Shanghai Med J1995;18(2),74-70.In order to study the pancreatic endocrine responseto parenteral nutrition (PN) in acute pancreatitis,thedisease was induced in dogs by injecting 4% tauro-cholate sodium 0.5ml/kg plus trypsin 0.5mg/kg into the pancreatic duct.Intravenous infusion of PN wasinitiated one hour after the establishment of the dis-

  18. Changes in gene expression of pancreatitis-associated protein and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitors in experimental pancreatitis produced by pancreatic duct occlusion in rats: comparison with gene expression of cholecystokinin and secretin.

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    Funakoshi, A; Miyasaka, K; Jimi, A; Nakamura, E; Teraoka, H

    1995-08-01

    Pancreatic duct occlusion is known to produce a sustained increase in the plasma cholecystokinin (CCK) concentration and to affect the tissue content of CCK in the rat. The tissue content of CCK is correlated with regenerative changes in the pancreas after pancreatic duct occlusion. In the present study, we examined the changes in mRNA levels of pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitors (PSTIs), pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP), and amylase in the pancreas in comparison with changes in CCK and secretin mRNA levels in the intestine and the histological changes produced by pancreatic duct ligation. Rats with an internal bile fistula and with obstruction of pancreatic flow were prepared and were sacrificed 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, and 28 days later. Then mRNA levels of CCK, secretin, PSTIs, PAP, and amylase were determined by slot-blot analysis. The CCK mRNA level gradually increased to a peak on day 10, was slightly lower on day 14, and returned to the control level on day 28. The level of secretin mRNA did not change. The mRNA levels of PSTIs increased significantly on day 3 after occlusion. PAP mRNA was detectable on days 1 and 3, being maximal on day 1. The mRNA level of amylase was markedly decreased on days 1 and 3, then remained lower than the control level. Histological examination showed acute inflammatory changes in the pancreas on days 1 and 3 and regenerative changes from day 7. These results suggest that a change in gene expression of PAP reflects acute inflammatory changes in the pancreas most sensitively.

  19. Beneficial effects of trypsin inhibitors derived from a spider venom peptide in L-arginine-induced severe acute pancreatitis in mice.

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    Weiwen Ning

    Full Text Available HWTI is a 55-residue protein isolated from the venom of the spider Ornithoctonus huwena. It is a potent trypsin inhibitor and a moderate voltage-gated potassium channel blocker. Here, we designed and expressed two HWTI mutants, HWTI-mut1 and HWTI-mut2, in which the potassium channel inhibitory activity was reduced while the trypsin inhibitory activity of the wild type form (approximately 5 EPU/mg was retained. Animal studies showed that these mutants were less toxic than HWTI. The effects of HWTI and HWTI-mut1 were examined in a mouse model of acute pancreatitis induced by intraperitoneal injection of a large dose of L-arginine (4 mg/kg, twice. Serum amylase and serum lipase activities were assessed, and pathological sections of the pancreas were examined. Treatment with HWTI and HWTI-mut1 significantly reduced serum amylase and lipase levels in a dose dependent manner. Compared with the control group, at 4 mg/kg, HWTI significantly reduced serum amylase level by 47% and serum lipase level by 73%, while HWTI-mut1 significantly reduced serum amylase level by 59% and serum lipase level by 72%. Moreover, HWTI and HWTI-mut1 effectively protected the pancreas from acinar cell damage and inflammatory cell infiltration. The trypsin inhibitory potency and lower neurotoxicity of HWTI-mut1 suggest that it could potentially be developed as a drug for the treatment of acute pancreatitis with few side effects.

  20. FRET-based modified graphene quantum dots for direct trypsin quantification in urine

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    Poon, Chung-Yan; Li, Qinghua [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Zhang, Jiali; Li, Zhongping [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Research Center of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Dong, Chuan [Research Center of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Lee, Albert Wai-Ming; Chan, Wing-Hong [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Li, Hung-Wing, E-mail: hwli@hkbu.edu.hk [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong)

    2016-04-21

    A versatile nanoprobe was developed for trypsin quantification with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Here, fluorescence graphene quantum dot is utilized as a donor while a well-designed coumarin derivative, CMR2, as an acceptor. Moreover, bovine serum albumin (BSA), as a protein model, is not only served as a linker for the FRET pair, but also a fluorescence enhancer of the quantum dots and CMR2. In the presence of trypsin, the FRET system would be destroyed when the BSA is digested by trypsin. Thus, the emission peak of the donor is regenerated and the ratio of emission peak of donor/emission peak of acceptor increased. By the ratiometric measurement of these two emission peaks, trypsin content could be determined. The detection limit of trypsin was found to be 0.7 μg/mL, which is 0.008-fold of the average trypsin level in acute pancreatitis patient's urine suggesting a high potential for fast and low cost clinical screening. - Highlights: • A FRET-based biosensor was developed for direct quantification of trypsin. • Fast and sensitive screening of pancreatic disease was facilitated. • The direct quantification of trypsin in urine samples was demonstrated.

  1. Structure of Bovine Pancreatic Phospholipase A2 at 1.7Å Resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Kalk, Kor H.; Hol, Wim G.J.; Drenth, Jan

    1981-01-01

    The crystal structure of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2 has been refined to 1.7 Å resolution. The starting model for this refinement was the previously published structure at a resolution of 2.4 Å. This model was adjusted to the multiple isomorphous replacement map with Diamond’s real space refi

  2. In vitro secretion of zymogens by bovine pancreatic acini and ultra-structural analysis of exocytosis

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    Sivalingam Jayaveni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to establish a bovine pancreatic acinar cell culture model with longer viability and functionality. The cells could be maintained in a functional state for upto 20 days with normal morphology. Cells were positive for amylase as observed by immunofluorescence staining. Acinar cells are spherical and range about 2–3 µm in diameter. The porosome formed by exocytosis and heterogenous enzyme granules of size ranging 100–300 nm were seen on the surface of cells by electron microscopy. The activity of the enzymes was high on day 15 and the activity profile of the enzymes is in the order: protease>lipase>amylase and the enzymes were identified by SDS-PAGE. Long-term culture of bovine pancreatic acini could be useful in studying the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Since the bovine genome shares about 80% identity with the human genome, the cells derived from bovine pancreas can be engineered and used as a potential xenotransplant to treat conditions like pancreatitis as the tissue source is abundantly available.

  3. X-ray structure of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A(2) at atomic resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steiner, RA; Rozeboom, HJ; Kalk, KH; Murshudov, GN; Wilson, KS; Dijkstra, BW

    2001-01-01

    Using synchrotron radiation and a CCD camera, X-ray data have been collected from wild-type bovine pancreatic phospholipase A(2) at 100 K to 0.97 Angstrom resolution allowing full anisotropic refinement. The final model has a conventional R factor of 9.44% for all reflections, with a mean standard u

  4. Enzymatic hydrolysis of structurally diverse phthalic acid esters by porcine and bovine pancreatic cholesterol esterases.

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    Saito, Takao; Hong, Peng; Tanabe, Rima; Nagai, Kazuo; Kato, Katsuya

    2010-12-01

    A weak hydrolyzing activity against bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was discovered in a commercial crude lipase (EC 3.1.1.3) preparation from porcine pancreas. DEHP was hydrolyzed to mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) not by a pancreatic lipase but by a cholesterol esterase (CEase, EC 3.1.1.13), a trace contaminant in the crude lipase preparation. Enzymatic hydrolysis of phthalic acid esters (PAEs), suspected to be endocrine-disrupting chemicals, was investigated using CEases from two species of mammals and a microorganism. Eight structurally diverse PAEs, namely diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-n-propyl phthalate (DPrP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), di-n-pentyl phthalate (DPeP), di-n-hexyl phthalate (DHP), DEHP, n-butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), and dicyclohexyl phthalate (DCHP), were hydrolyzed to their corresponding monoesters by both porcine and bovine pancreatic CEases, while a microbial CEase from Pseudomonas sp. had no hydrolyzing activity against these PAEs. The hydrolysis experiments with bovine pancreatic CEase (50 U) indicated complete hydrolysis of every PAE (5 μmole) except for BBP and DCHP within 15 min; BBP and DCHP were hydrolyzed within 30 min and 6h, respectively. The rates of PAE hydrolysis could be affected by the bulkiness of alkyl side chains in the PAEs. This study provides important evidence that mammalian pancreatic CEases, such as those from porcine and bovine sources, are potential enzymes for nonspecific degradation of structurally diverse PAEs.

  5. The modifier effects of chymotrypsin and trypsin enzymes on fluorescence lifetime distribution of "N-(1-pyrenyl)maleimide-bovine serum albumin" complex

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    Özyiğit, İbrahim Ethem; Karakuş, Emine; Pekcan, Önder

    2016-02-01

    Chymotrypsin and trypsin are the well known proteolytic enzymes, both of which are synthesized in the pancreas as their precursors - the inactive forms; chymotrypsinogen and trypsinogen - and then are released into the duodenum to cut proteins into smaller peptides. In this paper, the effects of activities of chymotrypsin and trypsin enzymes on fluorescence lifetime distributions of the substrat bovine serum albumin (BSA) modified with N-(1-pyrenyl)maleimide (PM) were examined. In the labeling study of BSA with PM, it is aimed to attach PM to the single free thiol (Cys34) and to all the free amine groups in accessible positions in order to produce excimers of pyrene planes of the possible highest amount to form the lifetime distributions in the widest range, that may show specifically distinguishing changes resulting from the activities of the proteases. The time resolved spectrofluorometer was used to monitor fluorescence decays, which were analyzed by using the exponential series method (ESM) to obtain the changes of lifetime distributions. After the exposure of the synthesized substrat PM-BSA to the enzymes, the fluorescence lifetime distributions exhibited different structures which were attributed to the different activities of the proteases.

  6. Trypsin potentiates human fibrocyte differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J V White

    Full Text Available Trypsin-containing topical treatments can be used to speed wound healing, although the mechanism of action is unknown. To help form granulation tissue and heal wounds, monocytes leave the circulation, enter the wound tissue, and differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes. We find that 20 to 200 ng/ml trypsin (concentrations similar to those used in wound dressings potentiates the differentiation of human monocytes to fibrocytes in cell culture. Adding trypsin inhibitors increases the amount of trypsin needed to potentiate fibrocyte differentiation, suggesting that the potentiating effect is dependent on trypsin proteolytic activity. Proteases with other site specificities such as pepsin, endoprotease GluC, and chymotrypsin do not potentiate fibrocyte differentiation. This potentiation requires the presence of albumin in the culture medium, and tryptic fragments of human or bovine albumin also potentiate fibrocyte differentiation. These results suggest that topical trypsin speeds wound healing by generating tryptic fragments of albumin, which in turn potentiate fibrocyte differentiation.

  7. Trypsin potentiates human fibrocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael J V; Glenn, Melissa; Gomer, Richard H

    2013-01-01

    Trypsin-containing topical treatments can be used to speed wound healing, although the mechanism of action is unknown. To help form granulation tissue and heal wounds, monocytes leave the circulation, enter the wound tissue, and differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes. We find that 20 to 200 ng/ml trypsin (concentrations similar to those used in wound dressings) potentiates the differentiation of human monocytes to fibrocytes in cell culture. Adding trypsin inhibitors increases the amount of trypsin needed to potentiate fibrocyte differentiation, suggesting that the potentiating effect is dependent on trypsin proteolytic activity. Proteases with other site specificities such as pepsin, endoprotease GluC, and chymotrypsin do not potentiate fibrocyte differentiation. This potentiation requires the presence of albumin in the culture medium, and tryptic fragments of human or bovine albumin also potentiate fibrocyte differentiation. These results suggest that topical trypsin speeds wound healing by generating tryptic fragments of albumin, which in turn potentiate fibrocyte differentiation.

  8. Genes and Proteins Differentially Expressed during In Vitro Malignant Transformation of Bovine Pancreatic Duct Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jesnowski

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic carcinoma has an extremely bad prognosis due to lack of early diagnostic markers and lack of effective therapeutic strategies. Recently, we have established an in vitro model recapitulating the first steps in the carcinogenesis of the pancreas. SV40 large T antigen-immortalized bovine pancreatic duct cells formed intrapancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors on k-rasmut transfection after orthotopic injection in the nude mouse pancreas. Here we identified genes and proteins differentially expressed in the course of malignant transformation using reciprocal suppression subtractive hybridization and 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, respectively. We identified 34 differentially expressed genes, expressed sequence tags, and 15 unique proteins. Differential expression was verified for some of the genes or proteins in samples from pancreatic carcinoma. Among these genes and proteins, the majority had already been described either to be influenced by a mutated ras or to be differentially expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, thus proving the feasibility of our model. Other genes and proteins (e.g., BBC1, GLTSCR2, and rhoGDlα, up to now, have not been implicated in pancreatic tumor development. Thus, we were able to establish an in vitro model of pancreatic carcinogenesis, which enabled us to identify genes and proteins differentially expressed during the early steps of malignant transformation.

  9. 21 CFR 862.1725 - Trypsin test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... activity of trypsin (a pancreatic enzyme important in digestion for the breakdown of proteins) in blood and... treatment of pancreatic disease. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt...

  10. 1H-NMR and photochemically-induced dynamic nuclear polarization studies on bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egmond, M.R.; Slotboom, A.J.; Haas, G.H. de; Dijkstra, Klaas; Kaptein, R.

    1980-01-01

    Proton-NMR resonances of trytophan 3 and tyrosine 69 in bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2, its pro-enzyme and in Ala1-transaminated protein were assigned using photochemically-induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) as such or in combination with spin-echo measurements. In addition assig

  11. Distinct localization of FMRFamide- and bovine pancreatic polypeptide-like material in the brain, retrocerebral complex and suboesophageal ganglion of the cockroach Periplaneta americana L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhaert, P; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; De Loof, A

    1985-01-01

    One bovine pancreatic polypeptide (BPP) antiserum and two FMRFamide antisera were applied in the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) immunohistochemical technique on a complete series of sections of brains, suboesophageal ganglia (SOG), corpora cardiaca (CC) and corpora allata of Periplaneta american...

  12. 1H-NMR and photochemically-induced dynamic nuclear polarization studies on bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egmond, M R; Slotboom, A J; De Haas, G H; Dijkstra, K; Kaptein, R

    1980-06-26

    Proton-NMR resonances of trytophan 3 and tyrosine 69 in bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2, its pro-enzyme and in Ala1-transaminated protein were assigned using photochemically-induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) as such or in combination with spin-echo measurements. In addition assignments were made by suppression of cross-relaxation effects using short (0.1 s) high-power laser pulses.

  13. HYDROLYSIS OF CHEESEWHEY PROTEINSWITH TRYPSIN, CHYMOTRYPSINAND CARBOXYPEPTIDASEA

    OpenAIRE

    M. F. CUSTÓDIO; A. J. GOULART; D. P. MARQUES; R. C. GIORDANO; Giordano,R.L.C.; R. MONTI

    2009-01-01

    This work presents a method for adding value to cheese whey residues by whey proteins hydrolysis, using trypsin, chymotrypsin and carboxypeptidase A as catalysts. Sweet cheese whey was dialyzed and filtered in kaolin. Lactose and protein contents were analyzed after each step. The activities of bovine pancreas trypsin and chymotrypsin were measured at different pHs and temperatures. The optimal pH for the hydrolysis of whey proteins was 9.0 for both enzymes. Optima te...

  14. Clinical usefulness of trypsin radioimmunoassay kit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanamori, Isao; Nakano, Satoshi; Hurukawa, Masakazu; Okumura, Yasuki; Higuchi, Chizuko; Yanase, Mikiko; Onogi, Michiteru

    1988-08-01

    From the clinical use of RIA-gnost trypsin kit, the following results were obtained. 1. Standard curve showed a steep and good curve was shown. 2. Incubation: The condition for the first incubation was set at the room temperature for 10-24 hours and that for the second incubation at the room temperature for 3-5 hours. With these settings, satisfactory results were obtained. 3. Reproducibility and recovery: The C.V. of the reproducibility and the recovery were considered superior, and the values were below 10 % and +-3 %, respectively. 4. Correlation between trypsin and serum elestase-1: An excellent positive correlation (coefficient of correlation r = 0.889) was shown. 5. Serum trypsin concentration of normal and pancreatic diseases: The normal range was from 100 to 500 ng/ml. Acute pancreatitis rose obviously. Diabetes mellitus and chronic pancreatitis was below 500 ng/ml and the pancreatic cancer showed a tendency to scatter in the range of 50-1 250 ng/ml. The above results indicated that serum trypsin can be easily measured with high precision by using this method. Thus the method is considered useful for the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases.

  15. A colostrum trypsin inhibitor gene expressed in the Cape fur seal mammary gland during lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharo, Elizabeth A; Cane, Kylie N; McCoey, Julia; Buckle, Ashley M; Oosthuizen, W H; Guinet, Christophe; Arnould, John P Y

    2016-03-01

    The colostrum trypsin inhibitor (CTI) gene and transcript were cloned from the Cape fur seal mammary gland and CTI identified by in silico analysis of the Pacific walrus and polar bear genomes (Order Carnivora), and in marine and terrestrial mammals of the Orders Cetartiodactyla (yak, whales, camel) and Perissodactyla (white rhinoceros). Unexpectedly, Weddell seal CTI was predicted to be a pseudogene. Cape fur seal CTI was expressed in the mammary gland of a pregnant multiparous seal, but not in a seal in its first pregnancy. While bovine CTI is expressed for 24-48 h postpartum (pp) and secreted in colostrum only, Cape fur seal CTI was detected for at least 2-3 months pp while the mother was suckling its young on-shore. Furthermore, CTI was expressed in the mammary gland of only one of the lactating seals that was foraging at-sea. The expression of β-casein (CSN2) and β-lactoglobulin II (LGB2), but not CTI in the second lactating seal foraging at-sea suggested that CTI may be intermittently expressed during lactation. Cape fur seal and walrus CTI encode putative small, secreted, N-glycosylated proteins with a single Kunitz/bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) domain indicative of serine protease inhibition. Mature Cape fur seal CTI shares 92% sequence identity with Pacific walrus CTI, but only 35% identity with BPTI. Structural homology modelling of Cape fur seal CTI and Pacific walrus trypsin based on the model of the second Kunitz domain of human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and porcine trypsin (Protein Data Bank: 1TFX) confirmed that CTI inhibits trypsin in a canonical fashion. Therefore, pinniped CTI may be critical for preventing the proteolytic degradation of immunoglobulins that are passively transferred from mother to young via colostrum and milk.

  16. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  17. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970359 CT diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma andchronic pancreatitis. LUAN Baoqing(栾宝庆), et al,Dept Radiol, Beijing Friendship Hosp, Capital Med U-niv, Beijing, 100050. Chin J Radiol 1997; 31(2): 114-118. Objective: To improve the diagnostic accuracy ofpancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. Materi-

  18. Hereditary pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard M Charnley

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant condition,which results in recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis,progressing to chronic pancreatitis often at a young age.The majority of patients with hereditary pancreatitis expressone of two mutations (R122H or N29I) in the cationictrypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene). It has been hypothesisedthat one of these mutations, the R122H mutation causespancreatitis by altering a trypsin recognition site sopreventing deactivation of trypsin within the pancreas andprolonging its action, resulting in autodigestion. Families withthese two mutations have been identified in many countriesand there are also other rarer mutations, which have alsobeen linked to hereditary pancreatitis.Patients with hereditary pancreatitis present in the sameway as those with sporadic pancreatitis but at an earlierage. It is common for patients to remain undiagnosed formany years, particularly ifthey present with non-specificsymptoms. Hereditary pancreatitis should always beconsidered in patients who present with recurrent pancreatitiswith a family history of pancreatic disease. If patients withthe 2 common mutations are compared, those with theR122H mutation are more likely to present at a younger ageand are more likely to require surgical intervention than thosewith N29I. Hereditary pancreatitis carries a 40 % lifetimerisk of pancreatic cancer with those patients aged between50 to 70 being most at risk in whom screening tests maybecome important.

  19. HYDROLYSIS OF CHEESEWHEY PROTEINSWITH TRYPSIN, CHYMOTRYPSINAND CARBOXYPEPTIDASEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. CUSTÓDIO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    This work presents a method for adding value to cheese whey residues by whey proteins hydrolysis, using trypsin, chymotrypsin and carboxypeptidase A as catalysts. Sweet cheese whey was dialyzed and filtered in kaolin. Lactose and protein contents were analyzed after each step. The activities of bovine pancreas trypsin and chymotrypsin were measured at different pHs and temperatures. The optimal pH for the hydrolysis of whey proteins was 9.0 for both enzymes. Optima temperatures were 60ºC for trypsin, and 50ºC for chymotrypsin. Trypsin exhibited typical Michaelis-Menten behavior, but chymotrypsin did not. Electrophoretic analysis showed that neither trypsin nor chymotrypsin alone hydrolyzed whey proteins in less than three hours. Hydrolysis rates of -lactalbumin by trypsin, and of bovine serum albumin by chymotrypsin were low. When these enzymes were combined, however, all protein fractions were attacked and rates of hydrolysis were enhanced by one order of magnitude. The addition of carboxypeptidase A to the others enzymes did not improve the process yield.

  20. Differential interfacial and substrate binding modes of mammalian pancreatic phospholipases A2: a comparison among human, bovine, and porcine enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snitko, Y; Han, S K; Lee, B I; Cho, W

    1999-06-15

    To identify the residues essential for interfacial binding and substrate binding of human pancreatic phospholipase A2 (hpPLA2), several ionic residues in the putative interfacial binding surface (R6E, K7E, K10E, and K116E) and substrate binding site (D53K and K56E) were mutated. Interfacial affinity of these mutants was measured using anionic polymerized liposomes, and their enzymatic activity was measured using various substrates including phospholipid monomers, zwitterionic and anionic micelles, and anionic polymerized mixed liposomes. Similar mutations (R6E, K10E, K56E, and K116E) were made to porcine pancreatic phospholipase A2 (ppPLA2), and the properties of mutants were measured by the same methods. Results indicate that hpPLA2 and ppPLA2 have similar interfacial binding mechanisms in which cationic residues in the amino terminus and Lys-116 in the carboxy terminus are involved in binding to anionic lipid surfaces. Small but definite differences between the two enzymes were observed in overall interfacial affinity and activity and the effects of the mutations on interfacial enzyme activity. The interfacial binding of hpPLA2 and ppPLA2 is distinct from that of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2 in that Lys-56 is involved in the interfacial binding of the latter enzyme. The unique phospholipid headgroup specificity of hpPLA2 derives from the presence of Asp-53 in the substrate binding site. This residue appears to participate in stabilizing electrostatic interactions with the cationic ethanolamine headgroup, hence the phosphatidylethanolamine preference of hpPLA2. Taken together, these studies reveal the similarities and the differences in the mechanisms by which mammalian pancreatic phospholipases A2 interact with lipid aggregates and perform interfacial catalysis.

  1. [Occupational Allergies to Trypsin and Chymotrypsin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kampen, V; Brüning, T; Merget, R

    2016-07-01

    Trypsin and chymotrypsin are proteolytic pancreatic enzymes that are secreted as the inactive precursors trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen, respectively. They have several pharmacological as well as laboratory applications, especially in protein chemistry. Exposure to enzyme dusts has long been known to cause immediate occupational hypersensitivities of the airways. Also trypsin and chymotrypsin are potential inhalable sensitizers, and clear cases of specific airway sensitization caused by trypsin- and chymotrypsin-containing products have been reported by several studies. Positive skin prick and challenge tests as well as specific IgE antibodies have been described. These results and the clinical symptoms usually matched well, suggesting an immunological mechanism of action. Immediate urticarial reactions of the skin due to contact with these enzymes are possible, but there is no clear evidence of allergic cell-mediated delayed eczematous skin reactions.

  2. Analysis and Optimization of Nutritional Set-up for Murine Pancreatic Acinar Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurup S

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Pancreatic acinar cell cultivation poses a serious problem due to limitations in the in vitro survival time despite variations of dissociation protocols, culture media and nutrient supplements. OBJECTIVE: To establish a long term culture of murine pancreatic acinar cells which retain their viability, monolayer formation and responsiveness to secretagogues. In order to investigate the mechanism of the short-life of acinar cells studied in vitro, we studied their survival under the influence of different supplements on nutrient media. INTERVENTIONS: Dissociated pancreatic acini were prepared from BALB/c mice pancreata by collagenase digestion supplemented with bovine serum albumin fraction V and soybean trypsin inhibitor. A nutrient set-up was designed for their long term survival in vitro. RESULTS: It was observed that mouse pancreatic acinar cells dissociated in presence of bovine serum albumin fraction V and soybean trypsin inhibitor result in 95% viability. Further cultivation of these acinar cells in Waymouth's MB 752/1 medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum (v/v, soybean trypsin inhibitor, bovine serum albumin, dexamethasone, and epidermal growth factor results in their survival for more than 6 days in culture with 85% viability, retention of the secretagogue responsiveness and formation of a monolayer without any extracellular matrix coating. CONCLUSIONS: Our study clearly demonstrates that the addition of soybean trypsin inhibitor to culture medium reduces zymogen granule fragility and acinar cell death, thus increasing their viability for sufficiently long periods. The present study offers an excellent, in vitro model for the investigation of exocrine dysfunction in response to acinar cell injury.

  3. Acute pancreatitis: Etiology and common pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Jun Wang; Chun-Fang Gao; Dong Wei; Cun Wang; Si-Qin Ding

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The etiology and pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have been intensively investigated for centuries worldwide. Many causes of acute pancreatitis have been discovered, but the pathogenetic theories are controversial. The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is gallstone impacting the distal common bile-pancreatic duct. The majority of investigators accept that the main factors for acute billiary pancreatitis are pancreatic hyperstimulation and bile-pancreatic duct obstruction which increase pancreatic duct pressure and active trypsin reflux. Acute pancreatitis occurs when intracellular protective mechanisms to prevent trypsinogen activation or reduce trypsin activity are overwhelmed. However, little is known about the other acute pancreatitis. We hypothesize that acute biliary pancreatitis and other causes of acute pancreatitis possess a common pathogenesis. Pancreatic hyperstimulation and pancreatic duct obstruction increase pancreatic duct pressure, active trypsin reflux, and subsequent unregulated activation of trypsin within pancreatic acinar cells. Enzyme activation within the pancreas leads to auto-digestion of the gland and local inflammation. Once the hypothesis is confirmed, traditional therapeutic strategies against acute pancreatitis may be improved. Decompression of pancreatic duct pressure should be advocated in the treatment of acute pancreatitits which may greatly improve its outcome.

  4. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008318 Proteomics of hyperlipidemia-associated pancreatitis using differential gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry: experiment with rats. ZHANG Wei(张伟), et al. Dept Gastroenterol, Shanghai 1st Hosp, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ, Shanghai 200080. Natl Med J China 2008;88(16):1132-1131.Objective To analyze the injury mechanismof hyperlipidemia-associated acute pancreatitis utilizing pro-teomics.Methods Ten SD rats were fed with high fat feed to establish hyperlipidemic models,and 10 SD rats were fed with normal feed to be used as control group.

  5. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009216 Relation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate with calcium metabolism in rats with severe acute pancreatitis.SHI Chengxian(石承先),et al.Dept Live Bili Pancre Surg,Guizhou Prov Hosp,Guiyang 550002.World Chin J Digestol,2009;17(6):598-601.

  6. Induction of pancreatic duct cells of neonatal rats into insulin-producing cells with fetal bovine serum: A natural protocol and its use for patch clamp experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    San-Hua Leng; Fu-Er Lu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To induce the pancreatic duct cells into endocrine cells with a new natural protocol for electrophysiological study.METHODS: The pancreatic duct cells of neonatal rats were isolated, cultured and induced into endocrine oells with 15% fetal bovine serum for a period of 20 d. During this period, insulin secretion, MTT value, and morphological change of neonatal and adult pancreatic islet cells were comparatively investigated. Pancreatic β-cells were identified by morphological and electrophysiological characteristics, while ATP sensitive potassium channels(KATP), voltage-dependent potassium channels (KV), and voltage-dependent calcium channels (KCA) in β-cells were identified by patch clamp technique.RESULTS: After incubation with fetal bovine serum, the neonatal duct cells budded out, changed from duct-like cells into islet clusters. In the first 4 d, MTT value and insulin secretion increased slowly (MTT value from 0.024±0.003 to0.028±0.003, insulin secretion from 2.6±0.6to 3.1±0.8 mIU/L). Then MTT value and insulin secretion increased quickly from d 5 to d 10 (MTT value from 0.028±0.003 to 0.052±0.008, insulin secretion from 3.1±0.8to 18.3±2.6 mIU/L), then reached high plateau (MTT value >0.052±0.008, insulin secretion >18.3±2.6 mIU/L).In contrast, for the isolated adult pancreatic islet cells,both insulin release and MTT value were stable in the first 4 d (MTT value from 0.029±0.01 to 0.031±0.011,insulin secretion from 13.9±3.1 to 14.3±3.3 mIU/L), but afterwards they reduced gradually (MTT value <0.031±0.011, insulin secretion <8.2±1.5 mIU/L), and the pancrearic islet cells became dispersed, broken or atrophied correspondingly. The differentiated neonatal cells were identified as pancreatic islet cells by dithizone staining method, and pancreatic β-cells were further identified by both morphological features and electrophysiological characteristics, i.e. the existence of recording currents from KATP KV, and KCA.CONCLUSION: Islet

  7. Potential Use of Atlantic Cod Trypsin in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágústa Gudmundsdóttir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface proteins of viruses and bacteria used for cell attachment and invasion are candidates for degradation by proteases. Trypsin from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua was previously demonstrated to have efficacy against influenza viruses in vitro and on skin. In this paper, cod trypsin is shown to be 3–12 times more effective in degrading large native proteins than its mesophilic analogue, bovine trypsin. This is in agreement with previous findings where cod trypsin was found to be the most active among twelve different proteases in cleaving various cytokines and pathological proteins. Furthermore, our results show that cod trypsin has high efficacy against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV in vitro. The results on the antipathogenic properties of cod trypsin are important because rhinovirus, RSV, and influenza are the most predominant pathogenic viruses in upper respiratory tract infections. Results from a clinical study presented in this paper show that a specific formulation containing cod trypsin was preferred for wound healing over other methods used in the study. Apparently, the high digestive ability of the cold-adapted cod trypsin towards large native proteins plays a role in its efficacy against pathogens and its positive effects on wounds.

  8. Porphyrin Induced Laser Deactivation of Trypsinogen-Trypsin Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perido, Joanna; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2015-03-01

    Pancreatitis is caused by the inflammation of the pancreas, where the digestive enzyme trypsin is activated from the precursor enzyme trypsinogen while still in the pancreas. The presence of trypsin in the pancreas causes auto-activation of trypsinogen, resulting in greater inflammation and auto-digestion of the pancreas. In severe cases, this cascade effect can lead to organ failure, diabetes, and pancreatic cancer. Our hypothesis is that if trypsinogen is prevented from auto-activating into trypsin, then this cascade can be stopped. We propose to do this by inducing conformational changes in trypsinogen when bound to a photoactive porphyrin dye. Porphyrins are comprised of four linked heterocyclic groups forming a flat ring, and bind well with proteins such as trypsinogen. In this study we used spectroscopic techniques to probe the binding of meso-tetrakis (4-sulfonatephenyl) porphyrin (TSPP) to trypsinogen in vitro, as a preliminary step to then prompt and characterize conformational changes of trypsinogen through irradiation. If conformational changes are detected the trypsinogen will be tested for trypsin inactivation. This investigation may provide promising initial results to the possible use of porphyrins as an inhibitor of the self-activation of trypsinogen into trypsin, and a potential inhibitor of pancreatitis. MARC*U-STAR.

  9. [Defense mechanism to prevent ectopic activation of pancreatic digestive enzymes under physiological conditions and its breakdown in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, Midori; Otsuko, Makoto

    2004-11-01

    Independent of the etiology, acute pancreatitis is associated with significant morbidity and the potential for mortality. In most patients, acute pancreatitis follows an uncomplicated or mild course. Recent studies in hereditary pancreatitis have clearly revealed that trypsin is the key enzyme at the onset of pancreatitis. However, there are several defense mechanisms to prevent ectopic activation of trypsin under physiological conditions. If the defense mechanisms failed or activation of trypsin occurred over defense ability, trypsin would activate other digestive enzymes and self-digestion of the pancreas would occur.

  10. A trypsin inhibitor from snail medic seeds active against pest proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceciliani, F; Tava, A; Iori, R; Mortarino, M; Odoardi, M; Ronchi, S

    1997-02-01

    A protein trypsin inhibitor from seeds of snail medic (Medicago scutellata), MsTI, has been purified by ion-exchange chromatography, gel-filtration chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. The protein inhibits the catalytic activity of bovine beta-trypsin, with an apparent Kd of 1.8 x 10(-9), but exhibits no activity towards bovine alpha-chymotrypsin. Moreover, MsTI inhibits the trypsin-like proteinase activity present in larvae of the crop pests Adoxophyes orana, Hyphantria cunea, Lobesia botrana and Ostrinia nubilalis. The complete amino acid sequence of MsTI consists of 62 residues corresponding to a M(r) of 6925. Sequence comparison shows that MsTI exhibits significant similarity to other proteins belonging to the Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitor family, and the closest identity (81%) with the wound-induced trypsin inhibitor from Medicago sativa leaves.

  11. Pancreatic and pancreatic-like microbial proteases accelerate gut maturation in neonatal rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Prykhodko

    Full Text Available Postnatal gut maturation in neonatal mammals, either at natural weaning or after precocious inducement, is coinciding with enhanced enzymes production by exocrine pancreas. Since the involvement of enzymes in gut functional maturation was overlooked, the present study aimed to investigate the role of enzymes in gut functional maturation using neonatal rats.Suckling rats (Rattus norvegicus were instagastrically gavaged with porcine pancreatic enzymes (Creon, microbial-derived amylase, protease, lipase and mixture thereof, while controls received α-lactalbumin or water once per day during 14-16 d of age. At 17 d of age the animals were euthanized and visceral organs were dissected, weighed and analyzed for structural and functional properties. For some of the rats, gavage with the macromolecular markers such as bovine serum albumin and bovine IgG was performed 3 hours prior to blood collection to assess the intestinal permeability.Gavage with the pancreatic or pancreatic-like enzymes resulted in stimulated gut growth, increased gastric acid secretion and switched intestinal disaccharidases, with decreased lactase and increased maltase and sucrase activities. The fetal-type vacuolated enterocytes were replaced by the adult-type in the distal intestine, and macromolecular transfer to the blood was declined. Enzyme exposure also promoted pancreas growth with increased amylase and trypsin production. These effects were confined to the proteases in a dose-dependent manner.Feeding exogenous enzymes, containing proteases, induced precocious gut maturation in suckling rats. This suggests that luminal exposure to proteases by oral loading or, possibly, via enhanced pancreatic secretion involves in the gut maturation of young mammals.

  12. Toxicity to cotton boll weevil Anthonomus grandis of a trypsin inhibitor from chickpea seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de P G Gomes, Angélica; Dias, Simoni C; Bloch, Carlos; Melo, Francislete R; Furtado, José R; Monnerat, Rose G; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria F; Franco, Octávio L

    2005-02-01

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is an important agricultural commodity, which is attacked by several pests such as the cotton boll weevil Anthonomus grandis. Adult A. grandis feed on fruits and leaf petioles, reducing drastically the crop production. The predominance of boll weevil digestive serine proteinases has motivated inhibitor screenings in order to discover new ones with the capability to reduce the digestion process. The present study describes a novel proteinase inhibitor from chickpea seeds (Cicer arietinum L.) and its effects against A. grandis. This inhibitor, named CaTI, was purified by using affinity Red-Sepharose Cl-6B chromatography, followed by reversed-phase HPLC (Vydac C18-TP). SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF analyses, showed a unique monomeric protein with a mass of 12,877 Da. Purified CaTI showed significant inhibitory activity against larval cotton boll weevil serine proteinases (78%) and against bovine pancreatic trypsin (73%), when analyzed by fluorimetric assays. Although the molecular mass of CaTI corresponded to alpha-amylase/trypsin bifunctional inhibitors masses, no inhibitory activity against insect and mammalian alpha-amylases was observed. In order to observe CaTI in vivo effects, an inhibitor rich fraction was added to an artificial diet at different concentrations. At 1.5% (w/w), CaTI caused severe development delay, several deformities and a mortality rate of approximately 45%. These results suggested that CaTI could be useful in the production of transgenic cotton plants with enhanced resistance toward cotton boll weevil.

  13. [Hereditary aspects of pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Daniel; Sobczyńska-Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Bal, Jerzy

    2003-01-01

    Pancreatitis presents clinically as acute and chronic form. A common characteristic of these two forms is enzymatic autodigestion of pancreas in the course of the disease. It results from premature activation of pancreatic digestive enzymes and disturbance of subtle balance between proteolytic enzymes and their inhibitors. The way to understand the character of mechanisms leading to development of pancreatitis has been simplified by discovery of genetic factors, which are able to initiate pathological changes at tissue level. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene (first of all R122H and N29I mutations), which encodes for cationic trypsin, cause trypsin to be protected from autodegradation. These mutations also cause precursor of trypsin - trypsinogen, to be activated easier. On the other hand mutations in the SPINK1 gene have been identified. SPINK1 gene encodes for the most important protease inhibitor of the pancreatic fluid. The most frequent mutation, namely N34S, decrease SPINK1 protein in its activity. The link between the genotype and phenotype is not clear in every case. It is probable that pancreatitis will be recognized as poligenic with many genes engaged in the disease development. Pancreatic cancer is a frequent consequence of pancreatitis. It is a very invasive cancer with high mortality. In the course of pancreatic inflammation intensive cell proliferation takes place for regeneration of pancreas damage. It is the chance for amplification of pathological changes in DNA, which have arisen as a ROS's (Reactive Oxygen Species) and RNOS's (Reactive Nitrogen Oxide Species) action effect. ROS and RNOS are generated in the course of pancreas inflammation.

  14. Framework for Interpretation of Trypsin–antitrypsin Imbalance and Genetic Heterogeneity in Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Early intracellular premature trypsinogen activation was interpreted as the key initiator of pancreatitis. When the balance in the homeostasis of trypsin and antitrypsin system is disequilibrated, elevated aggressive enzymes directly attack the pancreatic tissue, which leads to pancreatic destruction and inflammation. However, trypsin alone is not enough to cause complications in pancreatitis, which may play a crucial role in modulating signaling events in the initial phase of the disease. NF...

  15. Expression of a cold-adapted fish trypsin in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macouzet, Martin; Simpson, Benjamin K; Lee, Byong H

    2005-06-01

    Trypsin is a highly valuable protease that has many industrial and biomedical applications. The growing demand for non-animal sources of the enzyme and for trypsins with special properties has driven the interest to clone and express this protease in microorganisms. Reports about expression of recombinant trypsins show wide differences in the degree of success and are contained mainly in patent applications, which disregard the difficulties associated with the developments. Although the yeast Pichia pastoris appears to be the microbial host with the greatest potential for the production of trypsin, it has shown problems when expressing cold-adapted fish trypsins (CAFTs). CAFTs are considered of immense value for their comparative advantage over other trypsins in a number of food-processing and biotechnological applications. Thus, to investigate potential obstacles related to the production of CAFTs in P. pastoris, the cunner fish trypsin (CFT) was cloned in different Pichia expression vectors. The vectors were constructed targeting both internal and secreted expression and keeping the CFT native signal peptide. Western-blotting analysis confirmed the expression with evident differences for each construct, observing a major effect of the leader peptide sequence on the expression patterns. Immobilized nickel affinity chromatography yielded a partially purified recombinant CFT, which exhibited trypsin-specific activity after activation with bovine enterokinase.

  16. Enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaushik, Neeraj; Pietraszewski, Marie; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: All forms of commonly practiced enteral feeding techniques stimulate pancreatic secretion, and only intravenous feeding avoids it. In this study, we explored the possibility of more distal enteral infusions of tube feeds to see whether activation of the ileal brake mechanism can result...... in enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation, with particular reference to trypsin, because the avoidance of trypsin stimulation may optimize enteral feeding in acute pancreatitis. METHODS: The pancreatic secretory responses to feeding were studied in 36 healthy volunteers by standard double......-lumen duodenal perfusion/aspiration techniques over 6 hours. Subjects were assigned to no feeding (n = 7), duodenal feeding with a polymeric diet (n = 7) or low-fat elemental diet (n = 6), mid-distal jejunal feeding (n = 11), or intravenous feeding (n = 5). All diets provided 40 kcal/kg ideal body weight/d and 1...

  17. Radioimmunoassay in the evaluation of pancreatic function in chronic pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubovskij, G.A.; Vasil' chenko, S.A. (Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Rentgenologii i Radiologii, Moscow (USSR))

    1983-12-01

    Insular apparatus function in primary chronic and reactive pancreatitis associated with hepatobiliary pathology was studied in 178 patients by radioimmunoassay. Typical changes of insulin and C-peptide concentration in the presence of an intravenous glucose tolerance test are shown that make it possible to differentiate in combination with the trypsin concentration in the serum primary and reactive pancreatitis as well as exacerbation and remission stages of the disease.

  18. Real-time electro-mechano-acoustic imaging for monitoring interactions between trypsin and different inhibitors in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong-Ping; Wang, Qing; Butt, Yoki Kwok Chu

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the real-time interactions between trypsin and various inhibitors in articular cartilage in vitro using a novel electro-mechano-acoustic imaging method. Monitored in real-time, articular cartilage specimens from bovine patellae were first treated with trypsin to reach half proteoglycan depletion (Phase I), then the trypsin solution was replaced with (i) physiological saline buffer (PS), (ii) fetal bovine serum (FBS), (iii) protease inhibitor cocktail (PI) and (iv) 10% formalin (F), respectively, to observe their effects on residual digestion (Phase II). Ultrasound radio frequency signals from the articular cartilage were used to form a M-mode image, where the interface between trypsin digested and intact cartilage tissues could be observed with an additional echo generated. The inhibition time, the digestion depth and digestion fraction were measured for each specimen. The results showed that the dilution of trypsin using saline solution was not sufficient to stop the enzyme action instantly. Although groups FBS and PI had a similar inhibition time of approximately 1.5 h, their digestion depth was obviously different (0.25±0.03 and 0.06±0.06 mm, respectively). In contrast, formalin only took <30 min to stop the trypsin digestion with almost no further digestion. The results demonstrated that the current system was capable of monitoring the trypsin digestion and inhibition process in real time. Also, different chemicals affected the residual trypsin digestion to different degrees.

  19. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas.

  20. Acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its blood vessels. This problem is called acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis affects men more often than women. Certain ... pancreatitis; Pancreas - inflammation Images Digestive system Endocrine glands Pancreatitis, acute - CT scan Pancreatitis - series References Forsmark CE. Pancreatitis. ...

  1. Isolation, structure modeling and function characterization of a trypsin inhibitor from Cassia obtusifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zubi; Zhu, Qiankun; Li, Juanjuan; Zhang, Gan; Jiamahate, Aerguli; Zhou, Jiayu; Liao, Hai

    2015-04-01

    A trypsin inhibitor gene (CoTI1) from Cassia obtusifolia was isolated and the deduced amino acid sequence was attributed to the Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor. The recombined CoTI1, expressed in E. coli, exhibited strong inhibitory effect on bovine trypsin and trypsin-like proteases from Helicoverpa armigera, Spodoptera exigua, and Spodoptera litura. CoTI1 thus presents insecticidal properties that may be useful for the genetic engineering of plants. Leu84, Arg86 and Thr88 were predicted as three key residues by molecular modeling in which Arg86, inserted into the substrate pocket of trypsin, interacted directly with residue Asp189 of trypsin causing the specific inhibition against trypsin. The predicted results were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis with L84A, R86A and T88A, respectively. The substantial changing expression level of CoTI1 under salt, drought and abscisic acid treatment suggested that CoTI1 might play important role in the resistance against abiotic stress.

  2. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of the conformational folding process of SS-reduced bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A using a selenoxide reagent with high oxidizing ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Kenta; Kumakura, Fumio; Iwaoka, Michio

    2012-01-01

    Redox-coupled folding pathways of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) with four intramolecular disulfide (SS) bonds comprise three phases: (I) SS formation to generate partially oxidized intermediate ensembles with no rigid folded structure; (II) SS rearrangement from the three SS intermediate ensemble (3S) to the des intermediates having three native SS linkages; (III) final oxidation of the last native SS linkage to generate native RNase A. We previously demonstrated that DHS(ox), a water-soluble selenoxide reagent for rapid and quantitative SS formation, allows clear separation of the three folding phases. In this study, the main conformational folding phase (phase II) has been extensively analyzed at pH 8.0 under a wide range of temperatures (5-45 °C), and thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for the four des intermediates were determined. The free-energy differences (ΔG) as a function of temperature suggested that the each SS linkage has different thermodynamic and kinetic roles in stability of the native structure. On the other hand, comparison of the rate constants and the activation energies for 3S → des with those reported for the conformational folding of SS-intact RNase A suggested that unfolded des species (desU) having three native SS linkages but not yet being folded are involved in very small amounts (SS-intact RNase A. It was revealed that DHS(ox) is useful for kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of the conformational folding process on the oxidative folding pathways of SS-reduced proteins.

  3. Chronic pancreatitis: controversies in etiology, diagnosis and treatment Pancreatitis crónica: controversias respecto a la etiología, el diagnóstico y el tratamiento

    OpenAIRE

    Draganov, P.; Toskes, P P

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of idiopathic chronic pancreatitis remains poorly understood despite the high expectations for ascribing the pancreatic damage in affected patients to genetic defects. Mutations in the cationic trypsinogen gene, pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor, and the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator gene do not account for the chronic pancreatitis noted in most patients with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis. Small duct chronic pancreatitis can be best diagnosed with a hormone sti...

  4. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... alcohol abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute ... chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be a factor in some cases. ...

  5. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alcohol is a known risk factor for both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Therefore it is recommended that all HP patients ... Pancreatitis Patient Info Animated Pancreas Patient Pancreatic Cancer Chronic Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis Research Research Grant Application Research History Grant ...

  6. Pancreatitis - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  7. Establishing a human pancreatic stem cell line and transplanting induced pancreatic islets to reverse experimental diabetes in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Mei; DOU ZhongYing; AN LiLong; YANG XueYi; GE Xin; QIAO Hai; ZHAO Ting; MA XiaoFei; FAN JingZhua; ZHU MengYang

    2008-01-01

    The major obstacle in using pancreatic islet transplantation to cure type Ⅰ and some type Ⅱ diabetes is the shortage of the donors. One of ways to overcome such obstacle is to isolate and clone pancreatic stem cells as "seed cells" and induce their differentiation into functional islets as an abundant trans-plantation source. In this study, a monoclonal human pancreatic stem cell (mhPSC) line was obtained from abortive fetal pancreatic tissues. Pancreatic tissues were taken from abortive fetus by sterile procedures, and digested into single cells and cell clusters with 0.1% type Ⅳ collagenase. Cultured in modified glucose-low DMEM with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), these single cells and cell clusters adhered to culture dishes, and then primary epidermal-like pancreatic stem ceils started to clone. After digesting with 0.25% trypsin and 0.04% EDTA, fibroblasts and other cells were gradually eliminated and epithelioid pancreatic stem cells were gradually purified during generations. Using clone-ring selection, the mhPSCs were obtained. After addition of 10 ng/mL epidermal growth factor (EGF) in cell culture medium, the mhPSCs quickly grew and formed a gravelstone-like monolayer. Continuously proliferated, a mhPSC line, which was derived from a male abortive fetus of 4 months old, has been passed through 50 generations. More than 1×109 mhPSCs were cryo-preserved in liquid nitrogen. Karyotype analysis showed that the chromosome set of the mhPSC line was normal diploid. Immunocytochemistry results demonstrated that the mhPSC line was positive for the pdxl, glucagon, nestin and CK19, and negative for the insulin, CD34, CD44 and CD45 protein expression. RT-PCR revealed further that the mhPSCs expressed transcription factors of the pdx1, glucagon, nestin and CK19. Also, in vitro induced with β-mercaptoethanol, the mhPSCs differentiated into nerve cells that expressed the NF protein. Induced with nicotinamide, the mhPSCs differentiated into functional islet

  8. Establishing a human pancreatic stem cell line and transplanting induced pancreatic islets to reverse experimental diabetes in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The major obstacle in using pancreatic islet transplantation to cure type I and some type II diabetes is the shortage of the donors. One of ways to overcome such obstacle is to isolate and clone pancreatic stem cells as "seed cells" and induce their differentiation into functional islets as an abundant trans-plantation source. In this study, a monoclonal human pancreatic stem cell (mhPSC) line was obtained from abortive fetal pancreatic tissues. Pancreatic tissues were taken from abortive fetus by sterile procedures, and digested into single cells and cell clusters with 0.1% type IV collagenase. Cultured in modified glucose-low DMEM with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), these single cells and cell clusters adhered to culture dishes, and then primary epidermal-like pancreatic stem cells started to clone. After digesting with 0.25% trypsin and 0.04% EDTA, fibroblasts and other cells were gradually eliminated and epithelioid pancreatic stem cells were gradually purified during generations. Using clone-ring selection, the mhPSCs were obtained. After addition of 10 ng/mL epidermal growth factor (EGF) in cell culture medium, the mhPSCs quickly grew and formed a gravelstone-like monolayer. Continuously proliferated, a mhPSC line, which was derived from a male abortive fetus of 4 months old, has been passed through 50 generations. More than 1×109 mhPSCs were cryo-preserved in liquid nitrogen. Karyotype analysis showed that the chromosome set of the mhPSC line was normal diploid. Immunocytochemistry results demonstrated that the mhPSC line was positive for the pdx1, glucagon, nestin and CK19, and negative for the insulin, CD34, CD44 and CD45 protein expression. RT-PCR revealed further that the mhPSCs expressed transcription factors of the pdx1, glucagon, nestin and CK19. Also, in vitro induced with β-mercaptoethanol, the mhPSCs differentiated into nerve cells that expressed the NF protein. Induced with nicotinamide, the mhPSCs differentiated into functional islet

  9. [Chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabuchi, T; Katada, N; Nishimura, D; Hoshino, H; Shimizu, F; Suzuki, R; Sano, H; Kato, K

    1998-11-01

    MRCP has been recognized as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic method. In the present study we evaluated the usefulness of MRCP in diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis. Two-dimensional fast asymmetric spin-echo (FASE) MRCP was performed in 40 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 13 with acute pancreatitis. In 29 patients (72.5%) with chronic pancreatitis and 9 (66.7%) with acute pancreatitis, main pancreatic duct (MPD) was visualized entirely. MRCP could demonstrate the characteristic findings of chronic pancreatitis such as dilatation and irregularity of MPD in most cases. In acute pancreatitis, MRCP indicated that MPD was normal in diameter, but irregular in configuration compared with that of the control group. MRCP may facilitate the diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis.

  10. Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Smyk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was first used to describe cases of pancreatitis with narrowing of the pancreatic duct, enlargement of the pancreas, hyper-γ-globulinaemia, and antinuclear antibody (ANA positivity serologically. The main differential diagnosis, is pancreatic cancer, which can be ruled out through radiological, serological, and histological investigations. The targets of ANA in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis do not appear to be similar to those found in other rheumatological diseases, as dsDNA, SS-A, and SS-B are not frequently recognized by AIP-related ANA. Other disease-specific autoantibodies, such as, antimitochondrial, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies or diabetes-specific autoantibodies are virtually absent. Further studies have focused on the identification of pancreas-specific autoantigens and reported significant reactivity to lactoferrin, carbonic anhydrase, pancreas secretory trypsin inhibitor, amylase-alpha, heat-shock protein, and plasminogen-binding protein. This paper discusses the findings of these investigations and their relevance to the diagnosis, management, and pathogenesis of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  11. Antiproteases in the Treatment of Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoji Kitagawa

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis relates to the inappropriate activation of trypsinogen to trypsin and a lack of the prompt elimination of the active trypsin inside the pancreas. Therefore, trypsin is believed to be the key enzyme in the initiation and exacerbation of acute pancreatitis by activating pancreatic zymogens. The activation of digestive enzymes causes pancreatic injury and results in an inflammatory response. The acute inflammatory response in the pancreas induces the systemic production of cytokines causing substantial tissue damage, and may progress beyond the pancreas to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, multi-organ failure (MOF or death [1]. In several studies, protease inhibitors have not been shown to be of significant value in the treatment of acute pancreatitis and are not available in the United States [2]. Several guidelines [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12] on the treatment of acute pancreatitis do not recommend them and the debate about the use of protease inhibitors is mentioned.

  12. The on-bead digestion of protein corona on nanoparticles by trypsin immobilized on the magnetic nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhengyan; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2014-03-21

    Proteins interacting with nanoparticles would form the protein coronas on the surface of nanoparticles in biological systems, which would critically impact the biological identities of nanoparticles and/or result in the physiological and pathological consequences. The enzymatic digestion of protein corona was the primary step to achieve the identification of protein components of the protein corona for the bottom-up proteomic approaches. In this study, the investigation on the tryptic digestion of protein corona by the immobilized trypsin on a magnetic nanoparticle was carried out for the first time. As a comparison with the usual overnight long-time digestion and the severe self-digestion of free trypsin, the on-bead digestion of protein corona by the immobilized trypsin could be accomplished within 1h, along with the significantly reduced self-digestion of trypsin and the improved reproducibility on the identification of proteins by the mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach. It showed that the number of identified bovine serum (BS) proteins on the commercial Fe3O4 nanoparticles was increased by 13% for the immobilized trypsin with 1h digestion as compared to that of using free trypsin with even overnight digestion. In addition, the on-bead digestion of using the immobilized trypsin was further applied on the identification of human plasma protein corona on the commercial Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which leads the efficient digestion of the human plasma proteins and the identification of 149 human plasma proteins corresponding to putative critical pathways and biological processes.

  13. Stress kinase inhibition modulates acute experimental pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. Fleischer; R. Dabew; B. Goke; ACC Wagner

    2001-01-01

    AIM To examine the role of p38 during acute experimental cerulein pancreatitis.METHODS Rats were treated with cerulein with or without a specific JNK inhibitor (CEP1347)andy or a specific p38 inhbitor (SB203380) and pancreatic stress kinase activity wasdetermined. Parameters to assess pancreatitis included trypsin, amylase, lipase, pancreatic weight and histology.RESULTS JNK inhibition with CEP1347ameliorated pancreatitis, reducing pancreatic edema. In contrast, p38 inhibition with SB203580aggravated pancreatitis with higher trypsinlevels and, with induction of acinar necrosis not normally found after cerulein hyperstimulation.Simultaneous treatment with both CEP1347 and SB203580 mutually abolished the effects of either compound on cerulein pancreatitis.CONCLUSION Stress kinases modulatepancreatitis differentially. JNK seems to promote pancreatitis development, possibly by supporting inflammatory reactions such as edema formation while its inhibition ameliorates pancreatitis. In contrast, p38 may help reduce organ destruction while inhibition of p38 during induction of cerulein pancreatitis leads to the occurrence of acinar necrosis.

  14. Label-Free Fluorescent Detection of Trypsin Activity Based on DNA-Stabilized Silver Nanocluster-Peptide Conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Xia Zhuo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Trypsin is important during the regulation of pancreatic exocrine function. The detection of trypsin activity is currently limited because of the need for the substrate to be labeled with a fluorescent tag. A label-free fluorescent method has been developed to monitor trypsin activity. The designed peptide probe consists of six arginine molecules and a cysteine terminus and can be conjugated to DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs by Ag-S bonding to enhance fluorescence. The peptide probe can also be adsorbed to the surface of graphene oxide (GO, thus resulting in the fluorescence quenching of DNA-AgNCs-peptide conjugate because of Förster resonance energy transfer. Once trypsin had degraded the peptide probe into amino acid residues, the DNA-AgNCs were released from the surface of GO, and the enhanced fluorescence of DNA-AgNCs was restored. Trypsin can be determined with a linear range of 0.0–50.0 ng/mL with a concentration as low as 1 ng/mL. This label-free method is simple and sensitive and has been successfully used for the determination of trypsin in serum. The method can also be modified to detect other proteases.

  15. Cathepsin B Activity Initiates Apoptosis via Digestive Protease Activation in Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Experimental Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendler, Matthias; Maertin, Sandrina; John, Daniel; Persike, Maria; Weiss, F Ulrich; Krüger, Burkhard; Wartmann, Thomas; Wagh, Preshit; Halangk, Walter; Schaschke, Norbert; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2016-07-08

    Pancreatitis is associated with premature activation of digestive proteases in the pancreas. The lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin B (CTSB) is a known activator of trypsinogen, and its deletion reduces disease severity in experimental pancreatitis. Here we studied the activation mechanism and subcellular compartment in which CTSB regulates protease activation and cellular injury. Cholecystokinin (CCK) increased the activity of CTSB, cathepsin L, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and caspase 3 in vivo and in vitro and induced redistribution of CTSB to a secretory vesicle-enriched fraction. Neither CTSB protein nor activity redistributed to the cytosol, where the CTSB inhibitors cystatin-B/C were abundantly present. Deletion of CTSB reduced and deletion of cathepsin L increased intracellular trypsin activation. CTSB deletion also abolished CCK-induced caspase 3 activation, apoptosis-inducing factor, as well as X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein degradation, but these depended on trypsinogen activation via CTSB. Raising the vesicular pH, but not trypsin inhibition, reduced CTSB activity. Trypsin inhibition did not affect apoptosis in hepatocytes. Deletion of CTSB affected apoptotic but not necrotic acinar cell death. In summary, CTSB in pancreatitis undergoes activation in a secretory, vesicular, and acidic compartment where it activates trypsinogen. Its deletion or inhibition regulates acinar cell apoptosis but not necrosis in two models of pancreatitis. Caspase 3-mediated apoptosis depends on intravesicular trypsinogen activation induced by CTSB, not CTSB activity directly, and this mechanism is pancreas-specific.

  16. Purification and characterisation of trypsin-like enzyme from the pyloric caeca of cod (Gadus morhua) II

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Henrique Beirão; Ian Mckintoch Mackie; Evanilda Teixeira; César Damian

    2001-01-01

    A trypsin -like enzyme from the pyloric caeca of cod (Gadus morhua) was purified by affinity chromatography on CHOM Sepharose 4B. Some characteristics were established by its catalytic activity on T.A.M.E., typical enzyme substrate, and serine protease inhibitors. The enzyme had an isoelectric point of 5.30 and 5.89 and was very similar in amino acid composition to bovine trypsin, but differed in having a higher relative amount of acidic amino acids and a lower amount of basic amino acids. Th...

  17. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  18. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  19. Structure basis 1/2SLPI and porcine pancreas trypsin interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, Kei; Kamimura, Takashi; Takimoto-Kamimura, Midori, E-mail: m.kamimura@teijin.co.jp [Teijin Institute for Bio-Medical Research, 4-3-2 Asahigaoka, Hino-shi, Tokyo 191-8512 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    1/2SLPI is a C-terminal domain of SLPI (secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor) which inhibits various serine proteases broadly. The present study is the first X-ray structural report on how 1/2SLPI with P1 Leu strongly inhibits trypsin and how it can inhibit multiple serine proteases. SLPI (secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor) is a 107-residue protease inhibitor which inhibits various serine proteases, including elastase, cathepsin G, chymotrypsin and trypsin. SLPI is obtained as a multiple inhibitor in lung defense and in chronic airway infection. X-ray crystal structures have so far reported that they are full-length SLPIs with bovine α-chymotrypsin and 1/2SLPI (recombinant C-terminal domain of SLPI; Arg58–Ala107) with HNE (human neutrophil elastase). To understand the role of this multiple inhibitory mechanism, the crystal structure of 1/2SLPI with porcine pancreas trypsin was solved and the binding modes of two other complexes compared. The Leu residue surprisingly interacts with the S1 site of trypsin, as with chymotrypsin and elastase. The inhibitory mechanism of 1/2SLPI using the wide primary binding site contacts (from P2′ to P5) with various serine proteases is discussed. These inhibitory mechanisms have been acquired in the evolution of the protection system for acute inflammatory diseases.

  20. Identification of a new soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor mutation and its effect on Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor content in soybean seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean seeds possess anti-nutritional compounds which inactivate digestive proteases, principally corresponding to two families: Kunitz Trypsin Inhibitors (KTi) and Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBI). High levels of raw soybeans/soybean meal in feed mixtures can cause poor weight gain and pancreatic abno...

  1. Complete disassociation of adult pancreas into viable single cells through cold trypsin-EDTA digestion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan LI; Shi-yun PENG; Zhen-wu ZHANG; Rui-cheng FENG; Lu LI; Jie LIANG; Sheng TAI

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro isolation and analysis of pancreatic stem/progenitor cells are necessary for understanding their properties and function; however,the preparation of high-quality single-cell suspensions from adult pancreas is prerequisite.In this study,we applied a cold trypsin-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) digestion method to disassociate adult mouse pancreata into single cells.The yield of single cells and the viability of the harvested cells were much higher than those obtained via the two commonly used warm digestion methods.Flow cytometric analysis showed that the ratio of ductal or BCRP1-positive cells in cell suspensions prepared through cold digestion was consistent with that found in vivo.Cell culture tests showed that pancreatic epithelial cells prepared by cold digestion maintained proliferative capacity comparable to those derived from warm collagenase digestion.These results indicate that cold trypsin-EDTA digestion can effectively disassociate an adult mouse pancreas into viable single cells with minimal cell loss,and can be used for the isolation and analysis of pancreatic stem/progenitor cells.

  2. Role of genetic disorders in acute recurrent pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Volker Keim

    2008-01-01

    There was remarkable progress in the understanding of the role genetic risk factors in chronic pancreatitis.These factors seem to be much more important than thought in the past.The rare autosomal-dominant mutations N29I and R122H of PRSS1(cationic trypsinogen) as well as the variant N34S of SPINK1(pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor) are associated to a disease onset in childhood or youth.Compared to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis the progression is slow so that for a long time only signs of acute-recurrent pancreatitis are found.Only at later time points(more than 10-15 years) there is evidence for chronic pancreatitis in the majority of patients.Acute recurrent pancreatitis may therefore be regarded as a transition state until definite signs of chronic pancreatitis are detectable.

  3. Facile trypsin immobilization in polymeric membranes for rapid, efficient protein digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Wang, Wei-Han; Tan, Yu-Jing; Bruening, Merlin L

    2010-12-15

    Sequential adsorption of poly(styrene sulfonate) and trypsin in nylon membranes provides a simple, inexpensive method to create stable, microporous reactors for fast protein digestion. The high local trypsin concentration and short radial diffusion distances in membrane pores facilitate proteolysis in residence times of a few seconds, and the minimal pressure drop across the thin membranes allows their use in syringe filters. Membrane digestion and subsequent MS analysis of bovine serum albumin provide 84% sequence coverage, which is higher than the 71% coverage obtained with in-solution digestion for 16 h or the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), whereas in-solution digestion under similar conditions yields no peptide signals in mass spectra even after removal of SDS. These membrane reactors, which can be easily prepared in any laboratory, have a shelf life of several months and continuously digest protein for at least 33 h without significant loss of activity.

  4. Acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions : Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  5. Acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions: Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  6. Effects of realimentation after nutrient restriction during mid- to late gestation on pancreatic digestive enzymes, serum insulin and glucose levels, and insulin-containing cell cluster morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keomanivong, F E; Camacho, L E; Lemley, C O; Kuemper, E A; Yunusova, R D; Borowicz, P P; Kirsch, J D; Vonnahme, K A; Caton, J S; Swanson, K C

    2016-04-14

    This study examined effects of stage of gestation and nutrient restriction with subsequent realimentation on maternal and foetal bovine pancreatic function. Dietary treatments were assigned on day 30 of pregnancy and included: control (CON; 100% requirements; n = 18) and restricted (R; 60% requirements; n = 30). On day 85, cows were slaughtered (CON, n = 6; R, n = 6), remained on control (CC; n = 12) and restricted (RR; n = 12), or realimented to control (RC; n = 11). On day 140, cows were slaughtered (CC, n = 6; RR, n = 6; RC, n = 5), remained on control (CCC, n = 6; RCC, n = 5) or realimented to control (RRC, n = 6). On day 254, the remaining cows were slaughtered and serum samples were collected from the maternal jugular vein and umbilical cord to determine insulin and glucose concentrations. Pancreases from cows and foetuses were removed, weighed, and subsampled for enzyme and histological analysis. As gestation progressed, maternal pancreatic α-amylase activity decreased and serum insulin concentrations increased (p ≤ 0.03). Foetal pancreatic trypsin activity increased (p enzymes are influenced by nutrient restriction and there is a potential for programming of increased foetal digestive enzyme production resulting from previous maternal nutrient restriction.

  7. [Effect of trypsin on the rat keratinocyte separation and subculture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, An-Li; Zhou, Yan; Hua, Ping; Tan, Wen-Song

    2002-01-01

    The effect of trypsin on the separation an subculture of the keratinocytes was investigated in this work. It was found that when 0.25% trypsin was employed for 5 minutes to separate keratinocytes, the number of active keratinocytes and the cells capable of forming colony were higher than those of other experimental conditions. The maximum attached ratio of primary keratinocytes was obtained when skin tissues were treated at 0.05% concentration of trypsin. With the increase of the trypsin concentrations, the attached ratio, attachment rate constant, and colony forming efficiency were all increased. Thus, 0.25% concentration of trypsin was recommended for separating and subculturing the keratinocytes.

  8. Complicated Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis

  9. Pancreatic abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000270.htm Pancreatic abscess To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A pancreatic abscess is an area filled with pus within the ...

  10. Immunohistochemical study on the ontogenetic development of the regional distribution of peptide YY, pancreatic polypeptide, and glucagon-like peptide 1 endocrine cells in bovine gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyarokhil, Asadullah Hamid; Ishihara, Miyuki; Sasaki, Motoki; Kitamura, Nobuo

    2012-04-10

    The regional distribution and relative frequency of peptide YY (PYY)-, pancreatic polypeptide (PP)-, and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)-immunoreactive (IR) cells were determined immunohistochemically in the gastrointestinal tract at seven ontogenetic stages in pre- and postnatal cattle. Different frequencies of PYY-, PP-, and GLP-1-IR cells were found in the intestines at all stages; they were not found in the esophagus and stomach. The frequencies varied depending on the intestinal segment and the developmental stage. The frequencies of PYY- and PP-IR cells were lower in the small intestine and increased from ileum to rectum, whereas GLP-1-IR cells were more numerous in duodenum and jejunum, decreased in ileum and cecum, and increased again in colon and rectum. The frequencies also varied according to pre- and postnatal stages. All three cell types were most numerous in fetus, and decreased in calf and adult groups, indicating that the frequencies of these three types of endocrine cells decrease with postnatal development. The results suggest that these changes vary depending on feeding habits and adaptation of growth, secretion, and motility of intestine at different ontogenetic stages of cattle.

  11. Childhood pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uretsky, G; Goldschmiedt, M; James, K

    1999-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare finding in childhood but probably more common than is generally realized. This condition should be considered in the evaluation of children with vomiting and abdominal pain, because it can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Clinical suspicion is required to make the diagnosis, especially when the serum amylase concentration is normal. Recurrent pancreatitis may be familial as a result of inherited biochemical or anatomic abnormalities. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis are at high risk for pancreatic cancer.

  12. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Froeling, Fieke EM

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas owing to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects 3–9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  13. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Kadaba, Raghu

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas due to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects between 3 and 9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  14. Bio-potency of a 21 kDa Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus indica seeds on the developmental physiology of H. armigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Prabhash K; Jamal, Farrukh

    2014-11-01

    A trypsin inhibitor purified from the seeds of Tamarindus indica by Sephadex G-75, DEAE-Sepharose and Trypsin-Sepharose CL-4B columns was studied for its antifeedant, larvicidal, pupicidal and growth inhibitory activities against Helicoverpa armigera larvae. Tamarindus trypsin inhibitor (TTI) exhibited inhibitory activity towards total gut proteolytic enzymes of H. armigera (~87%) and bovine trypsin (~84%). Lethal doses which caused mortality and weight reduction by 50% were 1% w/w and 0.50% w/w, respectively. IC50 of TTI against Helicoverpa midgut proteases and bovine trypsin were ~2.10 µg/ml and 1.68 µg/ml respectively. In larval feeding studies the 21 kDa Kunitz-type protein was found to retard growth and development, prolonged the larval-pupal development durations along with adversely affecting the fertility and fecundity of H. armigera. In artificial diet at 0.5% w/w TTI, the efficiency of conversion of ingested food as well as of digested food, relative growth rate, growth index declined whereas approximate digestibility, metabolic cost, relative consumption rate, consumption index and total developmental period enhanced for H. armigera larvae. These results suggest that TTI has toxic and adverse effect on the developmental physiology of H. armigera and could be useful in controlling the pest H. armigera.

  15. Momordica charantia trypsin inhibitor Ⅱ inhibits growth and development of Helicoverpa armigera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manasi Alok Telang; Prashant Pyati; Mohini Sainani; Vidya Shrikant Gupta; Ashok Prabhakar Giri

    2009-01-01

    Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.) seeds contain several squash-type serine proteinase inhibitors (PIs),which inhibit the digestive proteinases of the polyphagous insect pest Helicoverpa armigera.In the present work isolation of a DNA sequence encoding the mature peptide of a trypsin inhibitor McTI-Ⅱ,its cloning and expression as a recombinant protein using Pichia pastoris have been reported.Recombinant McTI-Ⅱinhibited bovine trypsin at 1:1 molar ratio,as expected,but did not inhibit chymotrypsin or elastase.McTI-Ⅱalso strongly inhibited trypsin-like proteinases (81% inhibition) as well as the total proteolytic activity of digestive proteinases (70% inhibition) from the midgut of H.armigera larvae.The insect larvae fed with McTI-Ⅱ-incorporated artificial diet suffered over 70% reduction in the average larval weight after 12 days of feeding.Moreover,ingestion of McTI-Ⅱresulted in 23% mortality in the larval population.The strong antimetabolic activity of McTI-Ⅱtoward H.armigera indicates its probable use in developing insect tolerance in susceptible plants.

  16. RBI, a one-domain alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor with completely independent binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskos, K; Huber-Wunderlich, M; Glockshuber, R

    1996-11-11

    The bifunctional inhibitor from Ragi (Eleusine coracana Gaertneri) (RBI) is the only member of the alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor family that inhibits both trypsin and alpha-amylase. Here, we show that both enzymes simultaneously and independently bind to RBI. The recently solved three-dimensional NMR structure of RBI has revealed that the inhibitor possesses a hitherto unknown fold for serine proteinase and alpha-amylase inhibitors. Despite its different fold, RBI obeys the standard mechanism observed for most protein inhibitors of serine proteinases and is a strong, competitive inhibitor of bovine trypsin (Ki = 1.2 +/- 0.2 nM). RBI is also a competitive inhibitor of porcine alpha-amylase (Ki = 11 +/- 2 nM) when a disaccharide is used as a substrate of alpha-amylase. However, the inhibition mode becomes complex when larger (> or = 7 saccharide units) alpha-amylase substrates are used. A second saccharide binding site on porcine alpha-amylase may enable larger oligosaccharides to displace RBI from its binding site in an intramolecular reaction.

  17. Primary Culture of Porcine Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a method for the primary culture of porcine pancreatic acinar cells. INTERVENTIONS: Dispersed pancreatic acinar cells available utilizing RPMI-1640 medium containing collagenase III. After purification, the isolated acinar cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium with the addition of 2.5% fetal bovine serum. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The morphological characteristics of acinar cells were described. (3)H-thymidine incorporation of acinar cells and the activity of amylase or l...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1914 - Trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... 110, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies... obtained from purified extracts of porcine or bovine pancreas. It is a white to tan amorphous powder....

  19. Alteration of the exDNA profile in blood serum of LLC-bearing mice under the decrease of tumour invasion potential by bovine pancreatic DNase I treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Evgenyi V.; Kurilshikov, Alexander M.; Patutina, Olga A.; Zenkova, Marina A.

    2017-01-01

    Taking into account recently obtained data indicating the participation of circulating extracellular DNA (exDNA) in tumorigenesis, enzymes with deoxyribonucleic activity have again been considered as potential antitumour and antimetastatic drugs. Previously, using murine Lewis lung carcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma A1 tumour models, we have shown the antimetastatic activity of bovine DNase I, which correlates with an increase of DNase activity and a decrease of exDNA concentration in the blood serum of tumour-bearing mice. In this work, using next-generation sequencing on the ABS SOLiD™ 5.500 platform, we performed a search for molecular targets of DNase I by comparing the exDNA profiles of healthy animals, untreated animals with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and those with LLC treated with DNase I. We found that upon DNase I treatment of LLC-bearing mice, together with inhibition of metastasis, a number of strong alterations in the patterns of exDNA were observed. The major differences in exDNA profiles between groups were: i) the level of GC-poor sequences increased during tumour development was reduced to that of healthy mice; ii) levels of sequences corresponding to tumour-associated genes Hmga2, Myc and Jun were reduced in the DNase I-treated group in comparison with non-treated mice; iii) 224 types of tandem repeat over-presented in untreated LLC-bearing mice were significantly reduced after DNase I treatment. The most important result obtained in the work is that DNase I decreased the level of B-subfamily repeats having homology to human ALU repeats, known as markers of carcinogenesis, to the level of healthy animals. Thus, the obtained data lead us to suppose that circulating exDNA plays a role in tumour dissemination, and alteration of multiple molecular targets in the bloodstream by DNase I reduces the invasive potential of tumours. PMID:28222152

  20. A novel poly(deep eutectic solvent)-based magnetic silica composite for solid-phase extraction of trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kaijia; Wang, Yuzhi; Li, Yixue; Lin, Yunxuan; Zhang, Haibao; Zhou, Yigang

    2016-11-23

    Novel poly(deep eutectic solvent) grafted silica-coated magnetic microspheres (Fe3O4@SiO2-MPS@PDES) were prepared by polymerization of choline chloride-itaconic acid (ChCl-IA) and γ-MPS-modified magnetic silica composites, and were characterized by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Then the synthetic Fe3O4@SiO2-MPS@PDES microspheres were applied for the magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of trypsin for the first time. After extraction, the concentration of trypsin in the supernatant was determined by a UV-vis spectrophotometer. Single factor experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of the extraction process, including the concentration of trypsin, the ionic strength, the pH value, the extraction time and the temperature. Experimental results showed the extraction capacity could reach up to 287.5 mg/g under optimized conditions. In comparison with Fe3O4@SiO2-MPS, Fe3O4@SiO2-MPS@PDES displayed higher extraction capacity and selectivity for trypsin. According to the regeneration studies, Fe3O4@SiO2-MPS@PDES microspheres can be recycled six times without significant loss of its extraction capacity, and retained a high extraction capacity of 233 mg/g after eight cycles. Besides, the activity studies also demonstrated that the activity of the extracted trypsin was well retained. Furthermore, the analysis of real sample revealed that the prepared magnetic microspheres can be used to purify trypsin in crude bovine pancreas extract. These results highlight the potential of the proposed Fe3O4@SiO2-MPS@PDES-MSPE method in separation of biomolecules.

  1. Calcium signaling of pancreatic acinar cells in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhou, Rui; Zhang, Jian; Li, Zong-Fang

    2014-11-21

    Pancreatitis is an increasingly common and sometimes severe disease that lacks a specific therapy. The pathogenesis of pancreatitis is still not well understood. Calcium (Ca(2+)) is a versatile carrier of signals regulating many aspects of cellular activity and plays a central role in controlling digestive enzyme secretion in pancreatic acinar cells. Ca(2+) overload is a key early event and is crucial in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In pancreatic acinar cells, pathological Ca(2+) signaling (stimulated by bile, alcohol metabolites and other causes) is a key contributor to the initiation of cell injury due to prolonged and global Ca(2+) elevation that results in trypsin activation, vacuolization and necrosis, all of which are crucial in the development of pancreatitis. Increased release of Ca(2+) from stores in the intracellular endoplasmic reticulum and/or increased Ca(2+) entry through the plasma membrane are causes of such cell damage. Failed mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production reduces re-uptake and extrusion of Ca(2+) by the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-activated ATPase and plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase pumps, which contribute to Ca(2+) overload. Current findings have provided further insight into the roles and mechanisms of abnormal pancreatic acinar Ca(2+) signals in pancreatitis. The lack of available specific treatments is therefore an objective of ongoing research. Research is currently underway to establish the mechanisms and interactions of Ca(2+) signals in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.

  2. [Bifunctional inhibitor of alpha-amylase/trypsin from wheat grain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islamov, R A; Furusov, O V

    2007-01-01

    A trypsin inhibitor, isolated from whole-wheat grain (Triticum aestivum L.) by the method of bio-specific chromatography on trypsin-Sepharose, was potent in inhibiting human salivary alpha-amylase. The bi-functional alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor was characterized by a narrow specificity for other alpha-amylases and proteinases. The high thermostability of the inhibitor was lost in the presence of SH group-reducing agents. The inhibitor-trypsin complex retained its activity against alpha-amylase. The inhibitor-alpha-amylase complex was active against trypsin. Studies of the enzyme kinetics demonstrated that the inhibition of alpha-amylase and trypsin was noncompetitive. Our results suggest the existence of two independent active sites responsible for the interaction with the enzymes.

  3. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information > Children/Pediatric > Chronic Pancreatitis in Children test Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child ... pancreatitis will develop diabetes in adolescence. Who gets chronic pancreatitis? Those at risk for chronic pancreatitis are ...

  4. Pancreatic Juice Culture in Acute Pancreatitis and Other Pancreatic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Kikuyama

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively evaluated the results of pancreatic juice cultures of patients with acute pancreatitis and other pancreatic disorders. Methods Twenty patients who underwent pancreatic juice culture were studied. Nine had acute pancreatitis due to alcohol (n=5, idiopathic causes (n=2, drugs (n=1, or gallstones (n=1, and remaining 11 had other pancreatic disorders such as an intraductal papillary mucin-producing neoplasm (n=3 and main pancreatic duct dilatation with a stricture due to a tumorous lesion suspected of pancreatic cancer (n=7 or chronic pancreatitis (n=1 without symptoms. Nasopancreatic drainage tubes were placed for pancreatic duct drainage in acute pancreatitis and for pancreatic juice cytology in other disorders. Pancreatic juice was obtained through the drainage tube and cultured. Results Pancreatic juice cultures were positive in all patients with acute pancreatitis for Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus species, and others. Six among 11 patients (54.5% with other disorders showed positive results for Escherichia coli, Streptococcus salivarius, and others. The rate of positive pancreatic juice cultures was significantly higher in acute pancreatitis (p=0.038. Seven of the 9 patients with acute pancreatitis were classified as having severe acute pancreatitis, and all survived treatment. Conclusions Pancreatic juice culture was highly positive in acute pancreatitis. Further study is needed to confirm the relationship between orally indigenous bacteria identified in the pancreatic juice and acute pancreatitis.

  5. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  6. Development of an enzymatic reactor applying spontaneously adsorbed trypsin on the surface of a PDMS microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecskemeti, Adam; Bako, Jozsef; Csarnovics, Istvan; Csosz, Eva; Gaspar, Attila

    2017-03-15

    Herein, a microfluidic device (MD) containing immobilized trypsin for rapid and efficient proteolysis was described. Trypsin was immobilized via non-specific protein adsorption onto the hydrophobic poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) channel wall of the MD. Peptide mapping of bovine serum albumin (BSA) samples was carried out to estimate the stability of trypsin adsorbed on PDMS surface. Peptide maps of BSA samples were obtained by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), the RSD% for migration times were under 1%. Several proteins (hemoglobin, myoglobin, lysozyme, and BSA) in a wide molecular size range (15-70 kDa) were digested efficiently with ∼50 s contact time. The number of separated peaks correlated well with the expected number of peptides formed in the complete tryptic digestion of the proteins. Peptide mass fingerprinting of BSA and human serum was carried out. Trypsin retained its activity for 2 h; within this period, the MD can be used for multiple digestions. The main properties of this device are simple channel pattern, simple immobilization procedure, regenerability, and disposability; all these features make this MD one of the simplest yet applicable enzymatic microreactors. Graphical abstract Development of microfluidic device including a serpentine channel as an enzyme reactor for protein digestion.

  7. Pathophysiology of pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George W Browne; CS Pitchurnoni

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in its severe form is complicated by multiple organ system dysfunction, most importantly by pulmonary complications which include hypoxia,acute respiratory distress syndrome, atelectasis, and pleural effusion. The pathogenesis of some of the above complications is attributed to the production of noxious cytokines. Clinically significant is the early onset of pleural effusion, which heralds a poor outcome of acute pancreatitis. The role of circulating trypsin, phospholipase A2, platelet activating factor, release of free fatty acids,chemoattractants such as tumor necrsosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-8, fMet-leu-phe (a bacterial wall product), nitric oxide, substance P, and macrophage inhibitor factor is currently studied. The hope is that future management of acute pancreatitis with a better understanding of the pathogenesis of lung injury will be directed against the production of noxious cytokines.

  8. Relationship between Carbachol Hyperstimulation-Induced Pancreatic Acinar Cellular Injury and Trypsinogen or NF-κB Activation in Rats in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between M3 cholinergic receptor agonist (carbachol) hyperstimulationinduced pancreatic acinar cellular injury and trypsinogen activation or NF-κB activation in rats was studied in vitro. Rat pancreatic acinar cells were isolated, cultured and treated with carbachol, the active protease inhibitor (pefabloc), and NF-κB inhibitor (PDTC) in vitro. Intracellular trypsin activity was measured by using a fluorogenic substrate. The cellular injury was evaluated by measuring the leakage of LDH from pancreatic acinar cells. The results showed that as compared with control group, 10-3 mol/L carbachol induced a significant increase of the intracellular trypsin activity and the leakage of LDH from pancreatic acinar cells. Pretreatment with 2 mmol/L pefabloc could significantly decrease the activity of trypsin and the leakage of LDH from pancreatic acinar cells (P <0.01) following the treatment with a high concentration of carbachol (10-3 mol/L) in vitro. The addition of 10-2 mol/L PDTC didn't result in a significant decrease in the activity of trypsin and the leakage of LDH from pancreatic acinar cells treated with a high concentration of carbachol (10-3 mol/L) in vitro (P>0.05). It was concluded that intracellular trypsinogen activation is likely involved in pancreatic acinar cellular injury induced by carbachol hyperstimulation in vitro. NF-κB activation may not be involved in pancreatic acinar cellular injury induced by carbachol hyperstimulation in vitro.

  9. The trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of monomolecular films of lysylphosphatidylglycerol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gould, R.M.; Dawson, R.M.C.

    1972-01-01

    The hydrolysis by trypsin of the bacterial phospholipid, lysylphosphatidyl-glycerol has been studied at the air-water interface. High specific activity [14C]-lysylphosphatidylglycerol was prepared biosynthetically and the trypsin action followed by measuring the loss of surface radioactivity from a

  10. Action of Antiproteases on the Inflammatory Response in Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chia Chen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of acute pancreatitis ranges from mild edematous disease to a severe necrotizing process which is usually accompanied by local or systemic complications and even mortality. Early deaths (within the first week due to severe acute pancreatitis are generally caused by massive inflammatory responses which result in multiple organ failure. Although the exact mechanisms which trigger the inflammatory and necrotizing processes are not completely understood, it is generally accepted that autodigestion and activated leukocytes play important roles in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Proinflammatory cytokines are associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ failure syndrome in acute pancreatitis. A compensatory anti-inflammatory response occurs in parallel with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Trypsin secreted by the pancreatic acinar cells activates proteaseactivated receptor-2 which can result in the production of cytokines. Protease inhibitors such as aprotinin, gabexate mesilate, nafamostat mesilate, ulinastatin, etc. can inhibit the various enzymes and inflammatory response in experimental and clinical studies. Thus, protease inhibitors have been considered as a potential treatment to inhibit the pancreatic inflammation in acute pancreatitis. The beneficial effects of antiproteases on experimental severe acute pancreatitis may be, in part, due to the modulation of inflammatory cytokine responses. The effect of protease inhibitors on the inflammatory response in human acute pancreatitis deserves further study.

  11. [Autoimmune pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, G; Menzel, J; Krüger, P-C; Ribback, S; Lerch, M M; Mayerle, J

    2013-11-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a relatively rare form of chronic pancreatitis which is characterized by a lymphoplasmatic infiltrate with a storiform fibrosis and often goes along with painless jaundice and discrete discomfort of the upper abdomen. Clinically we distinguish between two subtypes, which differ in terms of their histology, clinical picture and prognosis. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis is the pancreatic manifestation of the IgG4-associated syndrome which also involves other organs. About one third of the patients can only be diagnosed after either histological prove or a successful steroid trail. Type 2 is IgG4-negative with the histological picture of an idiopathic duct centric pancreatitis and is to higher degree associated with inflammatory bowel disease. A definitive diagnosis can only be made using biopsy. Usually both forms show response to steroid treatment, but in type 1 up to 50 % of the patients might develop a relapse. The biggest challenge and most important differential diagnosis remains the discrimination of AIP from pancreatic cancer, because also AIP can cause mass of the pancreatic head, lymphadenopathy and ductal obstruction. This article summarizes recent advances on epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic strategy, therapy and differential diagnosis in this relatively unknown disease.

  12. Interaction of gallic acid with trypsin analyzed by spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Song

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between trypsin and gallic acid (GA were investigated by means of fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering (RLS spectroscopy, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, and enzymatic inhibition assay. It was found that GA can cause the fluorescence quenching of trypsin during the process of formation of GA-trypsin complex, resulting in inhibition of trypsin activity (IC50 = 3.9 × 10−6 mol/L. The fluorescence spectroscopic data showed that the quenching efficiency can reach about 80%. The binding constants were 1.9371 × 104 L/mol, 1.8192 × 104 L/mol, and 1.7465 × 104 L/mol at three temperatures, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters revealed that hydrogen bonds, van der Waals, hydrophobic, and electrostatic interactions were involved in the binding process of GA to trypsin. Molecular modeling studies illustrated a specific display of binding information and explained most of the experiment phenomena. The microenvironments of tryptophan and tyrosine residue in trypsin were changed by the GA. Results indicated that GA was a strong quencher and inhibitor of trypsin.

  13. Purification and physicochemical characterization of a trypsin inhibitor from Cassia absus Linn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Girijesh K; Gupta, Amit K; Gupta, Akshita; Mishra, Manisha; Singh, Pradhyumna K; Saxena, Anil K; Sharma, Ashwani K

    2014-01-01

    A thermotolerant protein with trypsin inhibitory activity designated as CaTI was purified to homogeneity from seeds of Cassia absus. Gel filtration chromatography and SDS-PAGE analysis showed the apparent molecular mass of ~20 kDa. Partial internal sequences indicate that CaTI belongs to Kunitz-inhibitor family. CaTI inhibits the bovine trypsin in 1:1 molar ratio and exhibited a competitive-type inhibitory activity with Ki = 5.6 x 10(-9) M. The inhibitory activity was retained over a broad pH range (2-12). Thermal stability study showed that it is stable up to 80 °C and inhibition activity reduced at and above 90 °C which might be due to the presence of predominantly β-sheets revealed by the CD study. The proteolysis studies of CaTI exhibited strong resistance to proteolysis by different proteases tested. The studies show that CaTI can be used as potential candidates for the development of the transgenic plant against the microbes and insect pests.

  14. A Suspicious Pancreatic Mass in Chronic Pancreatitis: Pancreatic Actinomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. de Clerck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a chronic infection of the pancreas caused by the suppurative Gram-positive bacterium Actinomyces. It has mostly been described in patients following repeated main pancreatic duct stenting in the context of chronic pancreatitis or following pancreatic surgery. This type of pancreatitis is often erroneously interpreted as pancreatic malignancy due to the specific invasive characteristics of Actinomyces. Case. A 64-year-old male with a history of chronic pancreatitis and repeated main pancreatic duct stenting presented with weight loss, fever, night sweats, and abdominal pain. CT imaging revealed a mass in the pancreatic tail, invading the surrounding tissue and resulting in splenic vein thrombosis. Resectable pancreatic cancer was suspected, and pancreatic tail resection was performed. Postoperative findings revealed pancreatic actinomycosis instead of neoplasia. Conclusion. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a rare type of infectious pancreatitis that should be included in the differential diagnosis when a pancreatic mass is discovered in a patient with chronic pancreatitis and prior main pancreatic duct stenting. Our case emphasizes the importance of pursuing a histomorphological confirmation.

  15. Peritoneal absorption of pancreatic enzymes in bile-induced acute pancreatitis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Y; Hayakawa, T; Kondo, T; Shibata, T; Kishimoto, W

    1990-01-01

    To clarify the contribution of peritoneal absorption of enzyme-rich exudate to the persistent elevation of serum amylase in bile-induced pancreatitis in dogs, serum amylase, lipase and immunoreactive trypsin (IRT) levels were measured during 24 h after induction of pancreatitis with and without peritoneal lavage. The basal level of serum amylase activity (m +/- s.e. = 1291 +/- 111 U/L) reached a plateau at 30 min (2688 +/- 185) after induction of pancreatitis and continued to rise until 24 h (7201 +/- 424). This persistent amylase elevation could be reduced significantly by peritoneal lavage. Serum IRT rose to a peak (378 +/- 103 ng/mL) at 30 min from the basal (20 +/- 5), then decreased until 3 h (211 +/- 34) and maintained a consistent level thereafter. Serum lipase elevation took an intermediate course between the levels of serum amylase and IRT. Intraperitoneal injection of 5 mL pancreatic juice could reproduce similar elevations to those of the respective enzymes, except lipase, seen in pancreatitis. These results suggest that transperitoneal absorption of pancreatic enzymes contributes to the elevation in serum enzymes levels and that rates of peritoneal absorption and serum disappearance differ from enzyme to enzyme.

  16. Pancreatitis - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... perform lab tests to check the release of pancreatic enzymes. These include tests to check the: Blood amylase level Blood lipase level Urine amylase level Other blood tests ... the pancreas include: Ultrasound of the abdomen (most common) CT ...

  17. Pancreatic Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be cancerous when found. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a growth in the main pancreatic duct or one of its side branches. IPMN may be precancerous or cancerous. It occurs most ...

  18. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisonneuve, Patrick; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the USA in both sexes. Early diagnosis is difficult and the overall mortality rate is high. Individuals at high risk for pancreatic cancer include smokers, and persons with all forms of chronic alcoholic, metabolic, tropical or hereditary pancreatitis. The duration of exposure to inflammation seems to be the major factor involved in the transition from benign to malignant condition. Smoking, which appears to further accelerate the carcinogenic transformation, remains the strongest risk factor amenable to preventive intervention.

  19. Role of intrapancreatic SPINK1/Spink3 expression in the development of pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki eOhmuraya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies on hereditary pancreatitis have provided evidence in favor of central role for trypsin activity in the disease. Identification of genetic variants of trypsinogen linked the protease to the onset of pancreatitis, and biochemical characterization proposed an enzymatic gain of function as the initiating mechanism. Mutations of serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1gene (SPINK1 are shown to be associated with hereditary pancreatitis. We previously reported that Spink3 (a mouse homologue gene of human SPINK1 deficient mice showed excessive autophagy, followed by inappropriate trypsinogen activation in the exocrine pancreas. These data indicate that the role of SPINK1/Spink3 is not only trypsin inhibitor, but also negative regulator of autophagy. On the other hand, recent studies showed that high levels of SPINK1 protein detected in a serum or urine were associated with adverse outcome in various cancer types. It has been suggested that expression of SPINK1 and trypsin is balanced in normal tissue, but this balance could be disrupted during tumor progression. Based on the structural similarity between SPINK1 and epidermal growth factor (EGF, we showed that SPINK1 protein binds and activates EGF receptor, thus acting as a growth factor on tumor cell lines. In this review, we summarize the old and new roles of SPINK1/Spink3 in trypsin inhibition, autophagy, and cancer cell growth. These new functions of SPINK1/Spink3 may be related to the development of chronic pancreatitis.

  20. Studies on prekallikrein of bovine plasma. II. Activation of prekallikrein with proteinases and properties of kallikrein activated by bovine Hageman factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H; Nagasawa, S; Suzuki, T

    1980-01-01

    Activation of bovine plasma prekallikrein was investigated with several proteinases. Highly purified bovine plasma prekallikrein was rapidly activated to kallikrein [EC 3.4.21.8] by bovine activated Hageman factor, trypsin [EC 3.4.21.4] and Pronase P (proteinases from Streptomyces griseus) and more gradually by papain [EC 3.4.22.2] and ficin [EC 3.4.22.3]. Activation of prekallikrein was also observed with bovine plasmin [EC 3.4.21.7], but not with bovine clotting factors Xa (Stuart factor) [EC 3.4.21.6] and IXa (Christmas factor) or thrombin [EC 3.4.21.5]. Urokinase [EC 3.4.99.26], Reptilase, collagenase [EC 3.4.24.3], elastase [EC 3.4.21.11], alpha-chymotrypsin [EC 3.4.21.1], Nagarse [EC 3.4.21.14], and stem bromelain [EC 3.4.22 4] did not convert prekallikrein to kallikrein. Plasma kallikrein activated to Hageman factor released kinin rapidly from bovine high molecular weight (HMW) kininogen. However, from bovine low molecular weight (LMW) kininogen, liberation of kinin was extremely slow. The kallikrein activity was inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI), Trasylol, diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), and N-alpha-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethylketone (TLCK), but not by egg-white trypsin inhibitor (EWTI), lima bean trypsin inhibitor (LBTI), heparin or hexadimethrine bromide (Polybrene). The kallikrein formed an enzyme-inhibitor complex with SBTI and Trasylol, but not with LBTI. Prekallikrein did not react with SBTI. Prekallikrein consists of a single polypeptide chain of molecular weight about 90,000, as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Activation of prekallikrein by Hageman factor was found to involve cleavage of the single peptide bond on the disulfide-bridged polypeptide chain, and no change of molecular weight was observed during the activation. The peptide bond cleaved in prekallikrein by the activation was an Arg-X peptide bond on a disulfide-bridged polypeptide chain.

  1. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  2. Flavianate, an amino acid precipitant, is a competitive inhibitor of trypsin at pH 3.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Schneedorf

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Textile dyes bind to proteins leading to selective co-precipitation of a complex involving one protein molecule and more than one dye molecule of opposite charge in acid solutions, in a process of reversible denaturation that can be utilized for protein fractionation. In order to understand what occurs before the co-precipitation, a kinetic study using bovine ß-trypsin and sodium flavianate was carried out based on reaction progress curve techniques. The experiments were carried out using a-CBZ-L-Lys-p-nitrophenyl ester as substrate which was added to 50 mM sodium citrate buffer, pH 3.0, containing varying concentrations of ß-trypsin and dye. The reaction was recorded spectrophotometrically at 340 nm for 30 min, and the families of curves obtained were analyzed simultaneously by fitting integrated Michaelis-Menten equations. The dye used behaved as a competitive inhibitor of trypsin at pH 3.0, with Ki = 99 µM; kinetic parameters for the substrate hydrolysis were: Km = 32 µM, and kcat = 0.38/min. The competitive character of the inhibition suggests a specific binding of the first dye molecule to His-57, the only positively charged residue at the active site of the enzyme.

  3. Comparison of the aggregation behavior of soy and bovine whey protein hydrolysates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, B.J.H.; Alting, A.C.; Gruppen, H.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Soy-derived proteins (soy protein isolate, glycinin, and ß-conglycinin) and bovine whey-derived proteins (whey protein isolate, ¿-lactalbumin, ß-lactoglobulin) were hydrolyzed using subtilisin Carlsberg, chymotrypsin, trypsin, bromelain, and papain. The (in)solubility of the hydrolysates ob

  4. The effects of trypsin on rat brain astrocyte activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Fereidoni

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are cells within the central nervous system which are activated in a wide spectrum of infections, and autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases. In pathologic states, they produce inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and nitric oxide (NO, and sometimes they induce apoptosis. Their protease-activated receptors (PARs can be activated by proteases, e.g. thrombin and trypsin, which are important in brain inflammation. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of different concentrations of trypsin (1 to 100U/ml on cultured astrocytes.In the present study, two-day rat infants' brains were isolated and homogenized after meninges removal, then cultivated in DMEM + 10% FBS medium. 10 days later, astrocytes were harvested and recultivated for more purification (up to 95%, using Immunocytochemistry method, in order to be employed for tests. They were affected by different concentrations of trypsin (1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 U/ml. To reveal the inflammation progress, NO concentrations (the Griess test were assessed after 24 and 48 hours.The results showed that trypsin concentration up to 20 U/ml caused a significant increase in NO, in a dose-dependent manner, on cultured astrocytes (P < 0.001. Trypsin 20 U/ml increased NO production fivefold the control group (P < 0.001. At higher concentrations than 20 U/ml, NO production diminished (P < 0.001. At 100 U/ml, NO production was less than the control group (P < 0.001.Inflammatory effects of trypsin 5-20 U/ml are probably due to the stimulation of astrocytes' PAR-2 receptors and the increasing of the activation of NF-κB, PKC, MAPKs. Stimulation of astrocytes' PAR-2 receptors causes an increase in iNOS activation which in turn leads to NO production. However, higher trypsin concentration possibly made astrocyte apoptosis; therefore, NO production diminished. These assumptions need to be further investigated.

  5. Phenotypic changes in mouse pancreatic stellate cell Ca2+ signaling events following activation in culture and in a disease model of pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Jong Hak; Zhang, Yu; Ji, Baoan; Logsdon, Craig D; Yule, David I

    2011-02-01

    The specific characteristics of intracellular Ca 2+ signaling and the downstream consequences of these events were investigated in mouse pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) in culture and in situ using multiphoton microscopy in pancreatic lobules. PSC undergo a phenotypic transformation from a quiescent state to a myofibroblast-like phenotype in culture. This is believed to parallel the induction of an activated state observed in pancreatic disease such as chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. By day 7 in culture, the complement of cell surface receptors coupled to intracellular Ca 2+ signaling was shown to be markedly altered. Specifically, protease-activated receptors (PAR) 1 and 2, responsive to thrombin and trypsin, respectively, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors were expressed only in activated PSC (aPSC). PAR-1, ATP, and PDGF receptor activation resulted in prominent nuclear Ca 2+ signals. Nuclear Ca 2+ signals and aPSC proliferation were abolished by expression of parvalbumin targeted to the nucleus. In pancreatic lobules, PSC responded to agonists consistent with the presence of only quiescent PSC. aPSC were observed following induction of experimental pancreatitis. In contrast, in a mouse model of pancreatic disease harboring elevated K-Ras activity in acinar cells, aPSC were present under control conditions and their number greatly increased following induction of pancreatitis. These data are consistent with nuclear Ca 2+ signaling generated by agents such as trypsin and thrombin, likely present in the pancreas in disease states, resulting in proliferation of "primed" aPSC to contribute to the severity of pancreatic disease.

  6. Lupeol Protects Against Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Jun; Bae, Gi-Sang; Choi, Sun Bok; Jo, Il-Joo; Kim, Dong-Goo; Shin, Joon-Yeon; Lee, Sung-Kon; Kim, Myoung-Jin; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2015-10-01

    Lupeol is a triterpenoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables and is known to exhibit a wide range of biological activities, including antiinflammatory and anti-cancer effects. However, the effects of lupeol on acute pancreatitis specifically have not been well characterized. Here, we investigated the effects of lupeol on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Acute pancreatitis was induced via an intraperitoneal injection of cerulein (50 µg/kg). In the lupeol treatment group, lupeol was administered intraperitoneally (10, 25, or 50 mg/kg) 1 h before the first cerulein injection. Blood samples were taken to determine serum cytokine and amylase levels. The pancreas was rapidly removed for morphological examination and used in the myeloperoxidase assay, trypsin activity assay, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In addition, we isolated pancreatic acinar cells using a collagenase method to examine the acinar cell viability. Lupeol administration significantly attenuated the severity of pancreatitis, as was shown by reduced pancreatic edema, and neutrophil infiltration. In addition, lupeol inhibited elevation of digestive enzymes and cytokine levels, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1, and interleukin (IL)-6. Furthermore, lupeol inhibited the cerulein-induced acinar cell death. In conclusion, these results suggest that lupeol exhibits protective effects on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

  7. Molecular Design of Trypsin Towards High Substrate Selectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    来鲁华; 王彦力; 徐筱杰; 唐有祺; 倪逸声; 张龙翔

    1994-01-01

    Molecular design of trypsin mutants towards higher substrate specificity for arginine or ly-sine type substrates was studied. The difference in side chain pKa of arginine and lysine was utilized in redesigning trypsin. If the enzyme could react effectively at a pH higher than lysine’s pKa but lower than that of arginine, it would react more selectively with arginine-type substrates, since in that pH range, the side chain of arginie remain protonated, while that of lysine is deprotonated. For trypsin. the change of histidine (57)’s pKa reflects the shift in reaction optimum pH. Electrostatic calculations showed that when surface positive residues were mutated into neutral or negative ones, the pKa of histidine(57) would be raised and those surface charges within a cone of 70 degree around histidine(57) have strong influence on its pKa. Several sites were suggested in rat trypsin which might serve as potential mutation locations to make trypsin active at a higher pH, thus more selective towards arginine t

  8. Trypsin inhibitors from the garden four o'clock (Mirabilis jalapa) and spinach (Spinacia oleracea) seeds: isolation, characterization and chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Jolanta; Pszczoła, Katarzyna; Wilimowska-Pelc, Anna; Lorenc-Kubis, Irena; Zuziak, Ewa; Ługowski, Mateusz; Łegowska, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Anna; Sleszyńska, Małgorzata; Lesner, Adam; Walewska, Aleksandra; Zabłotna, Ewa; Rolka, Krzysztof; Wilusz, Tadeusz

    2007-06-01

    Five serine proteinase inhibitors (Mirabilis jalapa trypsin inhibitors, MJTI I and II and Spinacia oleracea trypsin inhibitors, SOTI I, II, and III) from the garden four-o'clock (M. jalapa) and spinach (S. oleracea) seeds were isolated. The purification procedures included affinity chromatography on immobilized methylchymotrypsin in the presence of 5M NaCl, ion exchange chromatography and/or preparative electrophoresis, and finally RP-HPLC on a C-18 column. The inhibitors, crosslinked by three disulfide bridges, are built of 35 to 37 amino-acid residues. Their primary structures differ from those of known trypsin inhibitors, but showed significant similarity to the antimicrobial peptides isolated from the seeds of M. jalapa (MJ-AMP1, MJ-AMP2), Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (AMP1), and Phytolacca americana (AMP-2 and PAFP-S) and from the hemolymph of Acrocinus longimanus (Alo-1, 2 and 3). The association equilibrium constants (K(a)) with bovine beta-trypsin for the inhibitors from M. jalapa (MJTI I and II) and S. oleracea (SOTI I-III) were found to be about 10(7)M(-1). Fully active MJTI I and SOTI I were obtained by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The disulfide bridge pattern in both inhibitors (Cys1-Cys4, Cys2-Cys5 and Cys3-Cys6) was established after their digestion with thermolysin and proteinase K followed by the MALDI-TOF analysis.

  9. Pancreatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself Pancreatic cancer Cystic fibrosis, a genetic disorder in which thick, sticky mucus can also block tubes in your pancreas The pancreas also plays a role in diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the beta cells of ...

  10. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samir Habashi; Peter V Draganov

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are complications of acute or chronic pancreatitis. Initial diagnosis is accomplished most often by cross-sectional imaging. Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration has become the preferred test to help distinguish pseudocyst from other cystic lesions of the pancreas. Most pseudocysts resolve spontaneously with supportive care. The size of the pseudocyst and the length of time the cyst has been present are poor predictors for the potential of pseudocyst resolution or complications, but in general, larger cysts are more likely to be symptomatic or cause complications. The main two indications for some type of invasive drainage procedure are persistent patient symptoms or the presence of complications (infection, gastric outlet or biliary obstruction, bleeding). Three different strategies for pancreatic pseudocysts drainage are available: endoscopic (transpapillary or transmural) drainage, percutaneous catheter drainage, or open surgery. To date, no prospective controlled studies have compared directly these approaches. As a result, the management varies based on local expertise, but in general, endoscopic drainage is becoming the preferred approach because it is less invasive than surgery, avoids the need for external drain, and has a high long-term success rate. A tailored therapeutic approach taking into consideration patient preferences and involving multidisciplinary team of therapeutic endoscopist, interventional radiologist and pancreatic surgeon should be considered in all cases.

  11. Ny klassifikation af pancreatitis acuta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benny Østerbye; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2011-01-01

    The course of acute pancreatitis is in the initial phase dominated by a systemic inflammatory response, later by local complications. A new classification defines three specific types of pancreatitis: 1) interstitial oedematous pancreatitis and 2) necrotizing pancreatitis with pancreatic...

  12. Elucidation of different cold-adapted Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) trypsin X isoenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Bjarki; Sandholt, Gunnar B; Gudmundsdottir, Ágústa

    2017-01-01

    Trypsins from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), consisting of several isoenzymes, are highly active cold-adapted serine proteases. These trypsins are isolated for biomedical use in an eco-friendly manner from underutilized seafood by-products. Our group has explored the biochemical properties of trypsins and their high potential in biomedicine. For broader utilization of cod trypsins, further characterization of biochemical properties of the individual cod trypsin isoenzymes is of importance. For that purpose, a benzamidine purified trypsin isolate from Atlantic cod was analyzed. Anion exchange chromatography revealed eight peaks containing proteins around 24kDa with tryptic activity. Based on mass spectrometric analysis, one isoenzyme gave the best match to cod trypsin I and six isoenzymes gave the best match to cod trypsin X. Amino terminal sequencing of two of these six trypsin isoenzymes showed identity to cod trypsin X. Three sequence variants of trypsin X were identified by cDNA analysis demonstrating that various forms of this enzyme exist. One trypsin X isoenzyme was selected for further characterization based on abundance and stability. Stepwise increase in catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of this trypsin X isoenzyme was obtained with substrates containing one to three amino acid residues. The study demonstrates that the catalytic efficiency of this trypsin X isoenzyme is comparable to that of cod trypsin I, the most abundant and highly active isoenzyme in the benzamidine cod trypsin isolate. Differences in pH stability and sensitivity to inhibitors of the trypsin X isoenzyme compared to cod trypsin I were detected that may be important for practical use.

  13. Surgery for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the Tumor Pancreatic Cancer Treating Pancreatic Cancer Surgery for Pancreatic Cancer Two general types of surgery ... how far the cancer has spread. Potentially curative surgery Studies have shown that removing only part of ...

  14. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... maintaining good health. Can chronic pancreatitis give my child cancer? If your child has chronic pancreatitis, he or she will be at an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer compared to the general population. The degree of ...

  15. Acute Pancreatitis Secondary to Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grinó P

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Pancreatic neoplasms are an uncommon aetiology of acute pancreatitis. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours are a rare subgroup of pancreatic neoplasms. CASE REPORT: We report on three patients having acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, one of them with severe pancreatitis, and review the published cases up to now. Only 22 patients with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours have been reported (including the present cases. Most of these cases were of non-functioning neoplasms and the course of the pancreatitis tended to be mild. In the most recent reports and in the present cases, the initial diagnostic method was CT scan. Less than half had metastases when the tumour was diagnosed and mortality from these neoplasms reached approximately 50%. CONCLUSIONS: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours can cause acute pancreatitis even in patients under 50 years of age. On many occasions, the tumours are non-functioning; therefore, acute pancreatitis may be the first clinical symptom. Consequently, faced with acute pancreatitis of unknown origin, a non-functioning neuroendocrine tumour should be ruled out.

  16. In the absence of nutrients, pancreatic-biliary secretions in the jejunum do not exert feedback control of human pancreatic or gastric function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawisz, B R; Miller, L J; DiMagno, E P; Go, V L

    1980-01-01

    Feedback inhibition of basal pancreatic enzyme secretion by luminal pancreatic enzymes appears to be an important regulator of pancreatic secretion in some laboratory animals. To determine whether pancreatic enzymes in the jejunum influence pancreatic or gastric functions in healthy man, we intubated six subjects with a gastric sump tube and a four-lumen duodenal tube which provided (1) a duodenal perfusion site, (2) a duodenal aspiration site, (3) an inflatable balloon immediately distal to the aspiration site, and (4) a jejunal perfusion site immediately beyond the balloon. In this way, the gastroduodenal segment could be functionally separated from the remainder of the intestine. The jejunum was exposed to normal saline, active pancreatic-biliary secretions, or pancreatic-biliary secretions in which the enzymes had been inactivated by heat. Ten minutes after initiation of each jejunal perfusion, normal saline was instilled into the stomach. No differences in trypsin secretion, gastric acid secretion, or gastric emptying occurred with the different jejunal perfusates. We therefore conclude that normal man, in the absence of intraluminal nutrients, does not exhibit a jejunal pancreatic enzyme-dependent feedback control mechanism for pancreatic enzyme or gastric secretion. However, our study does not exclude the possibility of a duodenal feedback regulatory mechanism.

  17. Diagnosis of pancreatic disease in feline platynosomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Liza S; Shell, Linda; Ketzis, Jennifer; Rajeev, Sreekumari; Illanes, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Platynosomum species are cat-specific parasitic trematodes that parasitize the biliary ducts and gall bladder. Due to the common connection to the major duodenal papilla of the pancreas and common bile ducts in addition to the periductal proximity of the pancreas, it is possible that platynosomosis could cause pancreatitis. The objective of this study was to determine whether platynosomosis, a commonly diagnosed parasitic disease in cats on St Kitts, has any association with pancreatic disease. Methods To investigate this possibility, the pancreas of free-roaming cats with naturally acquired platynosomosis were evaluated via ultrasound, serum concentrations of feline pancreatic lipase (fPL), cobalamin, folate and feline trypsin-like immunoreactivity (fTLI) and histopathology. Twenty free-roaming, young adult, feral cats, positive for feline immunodeficiency virus, and diagnosed with Platynosomum species infection via fecal analysis were recruited. The liver, biliary system and pancreas were evaluated via ultrasonography during a short duration anesthesia. Serum concentrations of fPL, fTLI, folate and cobalamin were measured. Sections of the right limb, left limb and body of the pancreas were evaluated histopathologically using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain. Results None of the cats had sufficient criteria to fulfill the ultrasonographic diagnosis of pancreatitis. One cat had an elevated fPL concentration in the range consistent with pancreatitis. Four cats had cobalamin deficiencies and 11 had abnormal folate concentration. The fTLI concentration was equivocal for the diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in one cat. With a single exception, histopathology changes, when present (n = 12), were mild, non-specific and predominantly characterized by lymphocytic infiltrates and fibrosis. The exception was a cat that presented a chronic interstitial and eosinophilic pancreatitis of slightly increased severity, likely the result of platynosomosis

  18. ERCP in acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jijo V Cherian; Joye Varghese Selvaraj; Rajesh Natrayan; Jayanthi Venkataraman

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the management of acute pancreatitis has evolved over years since its introduction in 1968. Its importance in diagnosing the etiology of pancreatitis has steadily declined with the advent of less invasive diagnostic tools. The therapeutic implications of ERCP in acute pancreatitis are many fold and are directed towards management of known etiological factors or its related complications. This article highlights the current status of ERCP in acute pancreatitis. DATA SOURCES:An English literature search using PubMed database was conducted on ERCP in acute pancreatitis, the etiologies and complications of pancreatitis amenable to endotherapy and other related subjects, which were reviewed. RESULTS: ERCP serves as a primary therapeutic modality for management of biliary pancreatitis in speciifc situations, pancreatitis due to microlithiasis, speciifc types of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, pancreas divisum, ascariasis and malignancy. In recurrent acute pancreatitis and smoldering pancreatitis it has a deifnite therapeutic utility. Complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic-duct disruptions or leaks, benign pancreatic-lfuid collections and pancreatic necrosis can be beneifcially dealt with. Intraductal ultrasound and pancreatoscopy during ERCP are useful in detecting pancreatic malignancy. CONCLUSIONS:The role of ERCP in acute pancreatitis is predominantly therapeutic and occasionally diagnostic. Its role in the management continues to evolve and advanced invasive procedures should be undertaken only in centers dedicated to pancreatic care.

  19. Genetics of acute and chronic pancreatitis: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi Kanth, Vv; Nageshwar Reddy, D

    2014-11-15

    Progress made in identifying the genetic susceptibility underlying acute and chronic pancreatitis has benefitted the clinicians in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease in a better way. The identification of mutations in cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene; functional gain mutations) and serine protease inhibitor kazal type 1 (SPINK1 gene; functional loss mutations) and other potential susceptibility factors in genes that play an important role in the pancreatic secretory functions or response to inflammation during pancreatic injury has changed the current concepts and understanding of a complex multifactorial disease like pancreatitis. An individual's susceptibility to the disease is governed by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Candidate gene and genetic linkage studies have identified polymorphisms in cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1), SPINK1, cystic fibrosis trans-membrane conductance regulator (CFTR), Chymotrypsinogen C (CTRC), Cathepsin B (CTSB) and calcium sensing receptor (CASR). Individuals with polymorphisms in the mentioned genes and other as yet identified genes are at an enhanced risk for the disease. Recently, polymorphisms in genes other than those involved in "intra-pancreatic trypsin regulatory mechanism" namely Claudin-2 (CLDN2) and Carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1) gene have also been identified for their association with pancreatitis. With ever growing number of studies trying to identify the genetic susceptibility in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms, this review is an attempt to compile the available information on the topic.

  20. Genetics of acute and chronic pancreatitis: An update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VV; Ravi; Kanth; D; Nageshwar; Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Progress made in identifying the genetic susceptibility underlying acute and chronic pancreatitis has benefitted the clinicians in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease in a better way. The identification of mutations in cationic trypsinogen gene(PRSS1 gene; functional gain mutations) and serine protease inhibitor kazal type 1(SPINK1 gene; functional loss mutations) and other potential susceptibility factors in genes that play an important role in the pancreatic secretory functions or response to inflammation during pancreatic injury has changed the current concepts and understanding of a complex multifactorial disease like pancreatitis. An indi-vidual’s susceptibility to the disease is governed by ge-netic factors in combination with environmental factors. Candidate gene and genetic linkage studies have iden-tified polymorphisms in cationic trypsinogen(PRSS1), SPINK1, cystic fibrosis trans-membrane conductance regulator(CFTR), Chymotrypsinogen C(CTRC), Ca-thepsin B(CTSB) and calcium sensing receptor(CASR). Individuals with polymorphisms in the mentioned genes and other as yet identified genes are at an enhanced risk for the disease. Recently, polymorphisms in genes other than those involved in "intra-pancreatic trypsin regulatory mechanism" namely Claudin-2(CLDN2) andCarboxypeptidase A1(CPA1) gene have also been iden-tified for their association with pancreatitis. With ever growing number of studies trying to identify the genetic susceptibility in the form of single nucleotide polymor-phisms, this review is an attempt to compile the avail-able information on the topic.

  1. Magnetic nanoparticles coated with polyaniline to stabilize immobilized trypsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, J. C.; D. Mercês, A. A.; Cabrera, M.; Shigeyosi, W. T.; de Souza, S. D.; Olzon-Dionysio, M.; Fabris, J. D.; Cardoso, C. A.; Neri, D. F. M.; C. Silva, M. P.; Carvalho, L. B.

    2016-12-01

    It is reported the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles via the chemical co-precipitation of Fe 3+ ions and their preparation by coating them with polyaniline. The electronic micrograph analysis showed that the mean diameter for the nanoparticles is ˜15 nm. FTIR, powder X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to understand the chemical, crystallographic and 57Fe hyperfine structures for the two samples. The nanoparticles, which exhibited magnetic behavior with relatively high spontaneous magnetization at room temperature, were identified as being mainly formed by maghemite ( γFe2O3). The coated magnetic nanoparticles (sample labeled "mPANI") presented a real ability to bind biological molecules such as trypsin, forming the magnetic enzyme derivative (sample "mPANIG-Trypsin"). The amount of protein and specific activity of the immobilized trypsin were found to be 13±5 μg of protein/mg of mPANI (49.3 % of immobilized protein) and 24.1±0.7 U/mg of immobilized protein, respectively. After 48 days of storage at 4 ∘C, the activity of the immobilized trypsin was found to be 89 % of its initial activity. This simple, fast and low-cost procedure was revealed to be a promising way to prepare mPANI nanoparticles if technological applications addressed to covalently link biomolecules are envisaged. This route yields chemically stable derivatives, which can be easily recovered from the reaction mixture with a magnetic field and recyclable reused.

  2. Prevalence of S and Z alpha 1-antitrypsin mutations in patients with pancreatic diseases in Serbian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key points in research of pancreatic disease pathology is further elucidation of the role of proteases and antiproteases, since their imbalance can lead to pancreatic injury. Alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT is one of the most important serum inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes, including pancreatic enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase. It is speculated that mutations in the AAT gene may influence the onset and the development of pancreatic disease. The presence of the most common AAT mutations Z and S was analyzed in 160 patients with pancreatic diseases (50 patients with pancreatic cancer, 50 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 60 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 129 healthy individuals by PCR-mediated site-directed mutagenesis (PSM method. One patient with pancreatic cancer was found to be a carrier of Z mutation, as well as one patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus. One patient with chronic pancreatitis was found to be a carrier of S mutation. The common AAT mutations were statistically significantly over-represented in patients with pancreatic diseases (3 of 160 patients, allelic frequency 0.9% than in the control group (1 of 129 individuals, allelic frequency 0.4%. The results of this study, requiring confirmation, suggest that common AAT mutations Z and S may be associated with a modest increase in susceptibility to the development of pancreatic disease.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (3 links) Encyclopedia: Acute Pancreatitis Encyclopedia: Chronic Pancreatitis Health Topic: Pancreatitis Genetic and Rare Diseases Information ...

  4. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Park, Young Hee; Kim, Soo Mi; Ko, Young Tae; Lim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Soon Yong [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-04-15

    A retrospective analysis of ultrasonograms of 24 patients with acute pancreatitis and 8 patients with chronic pancreatitis was performed. Nine cases were proven by surgery and 23 cases were diagnosed clinically. Generalized pancreatic enlargement with normal or decreased echogenecity was principal findings in acute pancreatitis, while pancreas was normal in size and echogenecity was normal or slightly altered in chronic pancreatitis. Ultrasonography is considered a simple and accurate method in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and thus it could be an initial test in patients with suspected acute pancreatitis.

  5. Diabetes and pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Hsu; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Risk factors for pancreatic cancer are smoking, family history, chronic pancreatitis, and diabetes. There is controversy with regards to the causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer because many patients with pancreatic cancer have new onset diabetes. Abstracts presented at the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting highlighted and supported the positive association ...

  6. Complications of pancreatic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many diseases, including pancreatitis benign tumors and cancer, may require pancreas surgery. Pancreatic resection can lead to a prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer and even a potential chance for cure. However, the pancreatic surgery can result in complications, and high postoperative morbidity rates are still presence. This article reviews the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011, which involves the more common complications, their prevention and treatment.

  7. Thermodynamic evaluation and modeling of proton and water exchange associated with benzamidine and berenil binding to ß-trypsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Pereira

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Serine-proteases are involved in vital processes in virtually all species. They are important targets for researchers studying the relationships between protein structure and activity, for the rational design of new pharmaceuticals. Trypsin was used as a model to assess a possible differential contribution of hydration water to the binding of two synthetic inhibitors. Thermodynamic parameters for the association of bovine ß-trypsin (homogeneous material, observed 23,294.4 ± 0.2 Da, theoretical 23,292.5 Da with the inhibitors benzamidine and berenil at pH 8.0, 25ºC and with 25 mM CaCl2, were determined using isothermal titration calorimetry and the osmotic stress method. The association constant for berenil was about 12 times higher compared to the one for benzamidine (binding constants are K = 596,599 ± 25,057 and 49,513 ± 2,732 M-1, respectively; the number of binding sites is the same for both ligands, N = 0.99 ± 0.05. Apparently the driving force responsible for this large difference of affinity is not due to hydrophobic interactions because the variation in heat capacity (DCp, a characteristic signature of these interactions, was similar in both systems tested (-464.7 ± 23.9 and -477.1 ± 86.8 J K-1 mol-1 for berenil and benzamidine, respectively. The results also indicated that the enzyme has a net gain of about 21 water molecules regardless of the inhibitor tested. It was shown that the difference in affinity could be due to a larger number of interactions between berenil and the enzyme based on computational modeling. The data support the view that pharmaceuticals derived from benzamidine that enable hydrogen bond formation outside the catalytic binding pocket of ß-trypsin may result in more effective inhibitors.

  8. Immobilization of trypsin onto multifunctional meso-/macroporous core-shell microspheres: A new platform for rapid enzymatic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Gong [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Changchun 130022 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Ping [Key Laboratory of Marine Bioresources and Ecology, College of Life Science, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Wang, Zhi-Gang; Sui, Xiao-Jing [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Changchun 130022 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Ji-Lin, E-mail: zjl@ciac.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Changchun 130022 (China); Ni, Jia-Zuan [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Changchun 130022 (China); Key Laboratory of Marine Bioresources and Ecology, College of Life Science, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2014-02-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A novel microwave-assisted tryptic digestion system. •Characterization with SEM, TEM, EDX, XRD, and FT-IR. •The meso-/macroporous shell structure withthe high affinity and loading capacity of trypsin. •Decrease of digestion time up to less than 1 min. •MALDI-MS and nanoLC-MS analysis with database identification. -- Abstract: A simple, fast, efficient, and reusable microwave-assisted tryptic digestion system which was constructed by immobilization of trypsin onto porous core-shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@fTiO{sub 2} microspheres has been developed. The nanostructure with magnetic core and titania shell has multiple pore sizes (2.4 and 15.0 nm), high pore volume (0.25 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}), and large surface area (50.45 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}). For the proteins, the system can realize fast and efficient microwave-assisted tryptic digestion. Various standard proteins (e.g., cytochrome c (cyt-c), myoglobin (MYO), β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), and bovine serum albumin (BSA)) used can be digested in 45 s under microwave radiation, and they can be confidently identified by mass spectrometry (MS) analysis; even the concentration of substrate is as low as 5 ng μL{sup −1}. Furthermore, the system for the 45 s microwave-assisted tryptic digestion is still effective after the trypsin-immobilized microspheres have been reused for 5 times. Importantly, 1715 unique proteins from 10 μg mouse brain proteins can be identified with high confidence after treatment of 45 s microwave-assisted tryptic digestion.

  9. Pancreatic transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A pancreas transplant is a surgical procedure to place a healthy pancreas from a donor into a patient whose pancreas no longer functions properly. Exocrine pancreas transplantation remains the standard treatment of choice for patients with diabetes mellitus complicated by end-stage renal disease. The use of pancreas transplantation for type 2 diabetes mellitus is an emerging concept. A pancreas transplant is often done in conjunction with a kidney transplant. Even if pancreas transplantation provides the best glycemic control option for diabetes mellitus, it is associated with significant morbidities related to infectious disease. The present article provides with a review of pancreatic transplantation.

  10. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ulrich Weiss

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Hereditary pancreatitis often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of hereditary pancreatitis patients to develop pancreatic cancer.

  11. Preparing bioactive surface of polystyrene with hydrophobin for trypsin immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Baolong; Li, Bingzhang; Wang, Huifang; Guo, Ruijie; Liang, HaiXia; Qiao, Mingqiang; Li, Wenfeng

    2016-05-01

    A simple and reliable enzyme immobilization technique which can retain their catalytic activity for a long time is interest in many technologies. Here, the trypsin was immobilized by physisorption on polystyrene (PS) surface coated with a class I hydrophobin recombinant HGFI (rHGFI). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water-contact-angle measurements demonstrated that the hydrophobicity of the PS could be well improved by rHGFI modification, and the self-assembled rHGFI showed an admirable stability on the hydrophobic PS surface against hot SDS rinsing. The enzyme activity assay illustrated that the capacity of rHGFI could enable it to well intermediate trypsin on PS surface and allow its immobilization lasting in an active form. The results obtained in this work show a way that surface modification with rHGFI should be an easy and feasible strategy for applications of enzyme-based catalytic surfaces in biosensing.

  12. 77 FR 29914 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products AGENCY... live bovines and products derived from bovines with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. This... with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Comments on the proposed rule were required to......

  13. Comparative study of the binding of trypsin to caffeine and theophylline by spectrofluorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruiyong, E-mail: wangry@zzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Kang, Xiaohui [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Wang, Ruiqiang [The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Wang, Rui; Dou, Huanjing; Wu, Jing; Song, Chuanjun [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Chang, Junbiao, E-mail: changjunbiao@zzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

    2013-06-15

    The interactions between trypsin and caffeine/theophylline were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV–visible absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy under mimic physiological conditions. The results revealed that the fluorescence quenching of trypsin by caffeine and theophylline was the result of the formed complex of caffeine–trypsin and theophylline–trypsin. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters at three different temperatures were obtained. The hydrophobic interaction was the predominant intermolecular forces to stabilize the complex. Results showed that caffeine was the stronger quencher and bound to trypsin with higher affinity than theophylline. -- Highlights: ► The fluorescence of trypsin can be quenched by caffeine or theophylline via hydrophobic contacts. ► Caffeine binds to trypsin with higher affinity than theophylline. ► The influence of molecular structure on the binding aspects is reported.

  14. Trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitors from Vigna mungo seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Allen H K; Wong, Jack H; Ng, T B

    2009-01-01

    Three trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitors were isolated from seeds of the black gram (Vigna mungo) with a procedure that entailed cation exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose, anion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose, ion exchange chromatography by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on Mono Q and Mono S, and gel filtration by FPLC on Superdex 75. Two of the trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitors were adsorbed on the first four types of chromatographic media. All three inhibitors have a molecular mass of 16 kDa as judged by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The trypsin inhibitory activity of the inhibitors was attenuated in the presence of the reducing agent dithiothreitol. The remaining inhibitor was unadsorbed on SP-Sepharose but adsorbed on Q-Sepharose, Mono Q and Mono S. The protease inhibitors did not exert any inhibitory effect on hepatoma (Hep G2) and breast cancer (MCF 7) cells or antifungal action toward Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium oxysporum and Mycosphaerella arachidicola. Two of the inhibitors slightly inhibited the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, with an IC50 in the millimolar range.

  15. Stability and kinetics of a bifunctional amylase/trypsin inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagiri, S; Singh, T P

    1993-11-10

    The stability of the bifunctional amylase/trypsin inhibitor from ragi (Indian finger millet, Eleusine coracana) has been studied by methods of circular dichroism, UV absorption and intrinsic fluorescence. The inhibitor is stable in 8 M urea and 6 M guanidine-HCl. In 150 mM NaCl, thermal denaturation does not occur up to 90 degrees C. However, it is irreversibly denatured in 5 mM NaCl if heated over 73 degrees C. The acidic denaturation is reversible in both high and low salt conditions, but it shows different behavior below pH 1.65 under similar salt conditions. The helical content is about 2-4% in the pH range of 7-9 at which the inhibitor is active maximally. The NaCl concentration does not have a significant effect on the secondary structure elements. The beta-strand form does not show much variation under various conditions. Arg34-Leu35 is the reactive peptide bond in the trypsin-binding site. Trp and Tyr are involved in the binding with amylase. The bifunctional inhibitor represents the sum of individual inhibitors of trypsin and amylase.

  16. [Trial of the combined use of trental and solcoseryl in treating patients with chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakhrushev, Ia M; Trusov, V V; Solov'eva, N E

    1988-01-01

    The effect of combined use of pentoxifylline and solcoseryl was studied in 35 patients with chronic pancreatitis. General clinical findings were studied in parallel with the time course of pancreatic exocrine (trypsin) and endocrine (insulin, C-peptide) function. The blood level of gastrin and changes in intestinal function using 131I-lipids were also studied. The incorporation of both drugs in multimodality therapy made a positive therapeutic effect, resulting in a decrease in the pain syndrome and dyspeptic symptoms. At the same time some favorable shifts in pancreatic and GI tract function were noted. Possible mechanisms of a positive therapeutic effect were discussed. A conclusion was made that the incorporation of pentoxifylline and solcoseryl in multimodality therapy of chronic pancreatitis was clinically justified and determined pathogenetically.

  17. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist.

  18. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Pleural Fistula in Gallstone Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sala Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra-abdominal complications of pancreatitis such as pancreaticopleural fistulae are rare. A pancreaticopleural fistula occurs when inflammation of the pancreas and pancreatic ductal disruption lead to leakage of secretions through a fistulous tract into the thorax. The underlying aetiology in the majority of cases is alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis. The diagnosis is often delayed given that the majority of patients present with pulmonary symptoms and frequently have large, persistent pleural effusions. The diagnosis is confirmed through imaging and the detection of significantly elevated amylase levels in the pleural exudate. Treatment options include somatostatin analogues, thoracocentesis, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP with pancreatic duct stenting, and surgery. The authors present a case of pancreatic pseudocyst pleural fistula in a woman with gallstone pancreatitis presenting with recurrent pneumonias and bilateral pleural effusions.

  19. Comparison of the effects between animal-derived trypsin and recombinant trypsin on human skin cells proliferation, gene and protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manira, Maarof; Khairul Anuar, Khairoji; Seet, Wan Tai; Ahmad Irfan, Abd Wahab; Ng, Min Hwei; Chua, Kien Hui; Mohd Heikal, Mohd Yunus; Aminuddin, Bin Saim; Ruszymah, Bt Hj Idrus

    2014-03-01

    Animal-derivative free reagents are preferred in skin cell culture for clinical applications. The aim of this study was to compare the performance and effects between animal-derived trypsin and recombinant trypsin for skin cells culture and expansion. Full thickness human skin was digested in 0.6 % collagenase for 6 h to liberate the fibroblasts, followed by treatment with either animal-derived trypsin; Trypsin EDTA (TE) or recombinant trypsin; TrypLE Select (TS) to liberate the keratinocytes. Both keratinocytes and fibroblasts were then culture-expanded until passage 2. Trypsinization for both cell types during culture-expansion was performed using either TE or TS. Total cells yield was determined using a haemocytometer. Expression of collagen type I, collagen type III (Col-III), cytokeratin 10, and cytokeratin 14 genes were quantified via RT-PCR and further confirmed with immunocytochemical staining. The results of our study showed that the total cell yield for both keratinocytes and fibroblasts treated with TE or TS were comparable. RT-PCR showed that expression of skin-specific genes except Col-III was higher in the TS treated group compared to that in the TE group. Expression of proteins specific to the two cell types were confirmed by immunocytochemical staining in both TE and TS groups. In conclusion, the performance of the recombinant trypsin is comparable with the well-established animal-derived trypsin for human skin cell culture expansion in terms of cell yield and expression of specific cellular markers.

  20. Comparative evaluation of bioactivity of crystalline trypsin for drying by Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Makoto; Fukui, Yuya; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the enzymatic stability of colloidal trypsin powder during heating in a solid-state by using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra with chemoinformatics and generalized two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy. Colloidal crystalline trypsin powders were heated using differential scanning calorimetry. The enzymatic activity of trypsin was assayed by the kinetic degradation method. Spectra of 10 calibration sample sets were recorded three times with a FT-IR spectrometer. The maximum intensity at 1634cm(-1) of FT-IR spectra and enzymatic activity of trypsin decreased as the temperature increased. The FT-IR spectra of trypsin samples were analyzed by a principal component regression analysis (PCR). A plot of the calibration data obtained was made between the actual and predicted trypsin activity based on a two-component model with gamma(2)=0.962. On the other hand, a 2D method was applied to FT-IR spectra of heat-treated trypsin. The result was consistent with that of the chemoinformetrical method. The results for deactivation of colloidal trypsin powder by heat-treatment indicated that nano-structure of crystalline trypsin changed by heating reflecting that the beta-sheet was mainly transformed, since the peak at 1634cm(-1) decreased with dehydration. The FT-IR chemoinformetrical method allows for a solid-state quantitative analysis of the bioactivity of the bulk powder of trypsin during drying.

  1. Interaction between 8-methoxypsoralen and trypsin: Monitoring by spectroscopic, chemometrics and molecular docking approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingying; Zhang, Guowen; Zeng, Ni; Hu, Song

    2017-02-01

    8-Methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) is a naturally occurring furanocoumarin with various biological activities. However, there is little information on the binding mechanism of 8-MOP with trypsin. Here, the interaction between 8-MOP and trypsin in vitro was determined by multi-spectroscopic methods combined with the multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) chemometrics approach. An expanded UV-vis spectral data matrix was analysed by MCR-ALS, the concentration profiles and pure spectra for the three reaction species (trypsin, 8-MOP and 8-MOP-trypsin) were obtained to monitor the interaction between 8-MOP and trypsin. The fluorescence data suggested that a static type of quenching mechanism occurred in the binding of 8-MOP to trypsin. Hydrophobic interaction dominated the formation of the 8-MOP-trypsin complex on account of the positive enthalpy and entropy changes, and trypsin had one high affinity binding site for 8-MOP with a binding constant of 3.81 × 104 L mol- 1 at 298 K. Analysis of three dimensional fluorescence, UV-vis absorption and circular dichroism spectra indicated that the addition of 8-MOP induced the rearrangement of the polypeptides carbonyl hydrogen-bonding network and the conformational changes in trypsin. The molecular docking predicted that 8-MOP interacted with the catalytic residues His57, Asp102 and Ser195 in trypsin. The binding patterns and trypsin conformational changes may result in the inhibition of trypsin activity. This study has provided insights into the binding mechanism of 8-MOP with trypsin.

  2. Pancreatitis - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common bile duct and block the flow of pancreatic enzymes out of the pancreas into the intestine. Pancreatitis ... three to five days, to prevent secretion of enzymes by the pancreas. He will also receive pain medication to control ...

  3. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiran; K; Busireddy; Mamdoh; AlObaidy; Miguel; Ramalho; Janaka; Kalubowila; Liu; Baodong; Ilaria; Santagostino; Richard; C; Semelka

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a significant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrastenhanced computed tomography(MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI.

  4. Experimental Models of Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun, Jong Jin; Lee, Hong Sik

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by interstitial edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and acinar cell necrosis, depending on its severity. Regardless of the extent of tissue injury, acute pancreatitis is a completely reversible process with evident normal tissue architecture after recovery. Its pathogenic mechanism has been known to be closely related to intracellular digestive enzyme activation. In contrast to acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis is character...

  5. Autoimmune pancreatitis: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis has emerged over the last 40 years from a proposed concept to a well established and recognized entity. As an efficient mimicker of pancreatic carcinoma, its early and appropriate recognition are crucial. With mounting understanding of its pathogenesis and natural history, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. The characteristic laboratory features and imaging seen in autoimmune pancreatitis are reviewed along with some of the proposed diagnostic criteria and treatment algorithms.

  6. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  7. Relationship between Carbachol Hyperstimulation-induced Pancreatic Intracelluar Trypsinogen and NF-кB Activation in Rats in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunfang JIANG; Hai ZHENG; Sunan LIU; Kaifeng FANG

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between intracelluar trypsinogen activation and NF-r,B activation in rat pancreatic acinar cells induced by M3 cholinergic receptor agonist (carbachoi) hyperstimulation was studied. Rat pancreatic acinar cells were isolated, cultured and treated with carbachol, the active pro- tease inhibitor (pefabloc) and NF-кB inhibitor (PDTC) in vitro. Intracelluar trypsin activity was measured by using a fluorogenie substrate. The activity of NF-кB was monitored by using electro- phoretic mobility shift assay. The results showed that after pretreatment with 2 mmol/L pefabloc, the activities of trypsin and NF-кB in pancreatic acinar cells treated with high concertrations of carbachol (10-3 mol/L) in vitro was significantly decreased as compared with control group (P<0.01). The addi- tion of 10-2mol/L PDTC resulted in a significant decrease of NF-кB activities in pancreatic acinar cells after treated with high concertrations of carbachol (10-3 mol/L) in vitro, but the intracelluar trypsinogen activity was not obviously inhibited (P>0.05). It was concluded that intracelluar trypsi- nogen activation is likely involved in the regulation of high concertrations of carbachol-induced NF-кB activation in pancreatic acinar cells in vitro. NF-кB activation is likely not necessary for high concertrations of carbachol-induced trypsinogen activation in pancreatic acinar cells in vitro.

  8. Application of an acid proteinase from Monascus purpureus to reduce antigenicity of bovine milk whey protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshman, P L Nilantha; Tachibana, Shinjiro; Toyama, Hirohide; Taira, Toki; Suganuma, Toshihiko; Suntornsuk, Worapot; Yasuda, Masaaki

    2011-09-01

    An acid proteinase from Monascus purpureus No. 3403, MpuAP, was previously purified and some characterized in our laboratory (Agric Biol Chem 48:1637-1639, 1984). However, further information about this enzyme is lacking. In this study, we investigated MpuAP's comprehensive substrate specificity, storage stability, and prospects for reducing antigenicity of whey proteins for application in the food industry. MpuAP hydrolyzed primarily five peptide bonds, Gln(4)-His(5), His(10)-Leu(11), Ala(14)-Leu(15), Gly(23)-Phe(24) and Phe(24)-Phe(25) in the oxidized insulin B-chain. The lyophilized form of the enzyme was well preserved at 30-40°C for 7 days without stabilizers. To investigate the possibility of reducing the antigenicity of the milk whey protein, enzymatic hydrolysates of the whey protein were evaluated by inhibition ELISA. Out of the three main components of whey protein, casein and α-lactalbumin were efficiently degraded by MpuAP. The sequential reaction of MpuAP and trypsin against the whey protein successfully degraded casein, α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin with the highest degree of hydrolysis. As a result, the hydrolysates obtained by using the MpuAP-trypsin combination showed the lowest antigenicity compared with the single application of pepsin, trypsin or pepsin-trypsin combination. Therefore, the overall result suggested that the storage-stable MpuAP and trypsin combination will be a productive approach for making hypoallergic bovine milk whey protein hydrolysates.

  9. An anomalous behavior of trypsin immobilized in alginate network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganachaud, Chrystelle; Bernin, Diana; Isaksson, Dan; Holmberg, Krister

    2013-05-01

    Alginate is a biopolymer used in drug formulations and for surgical purposes. In the presence of divalent cations, it forms solid gels, and such gels are of interest for immobilization of cells and enzymes. In this work, we entrapped trypsin in an alginate gel together with a known substrate, N α-benzoyl-L-arginine-4-nitroanilide hydrochloride (L-BAPNA), and in the presence or absence of D-BAPNA, which is known to be a competitive inhibitor. Interactions between alginate and the substrate as well as the enzyme were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, rheology, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biocatalysis was monitored by spectrophotometry at temperatures ranging from 10 to 42 °C. It was found that at 37 and 42 °C a strong acceleration of the reaction was obtained, whereas at 10 °C and at room temperature, the presence of D-BAPNA leads to a retardation of the reaction rate. The same effect was found when the reaction was performed in a non-cross-linked alginate solution. In alginate-free buffer solution, as well as in a solution of carboxymethylcellulose, a biopolymer that resembles alginate, the normal behavior was obtained; however, with D-BAPNA acting as an inhibitor at all temperatures. A more detailed investigation of the reaction kinetics showed that at higher temperature and in the presence of alginate, the curve of initial reaction rate versus L-BAPNA concentration had a sigmoidal shape, indicating an allosteric behavior. We believe that the anomalous behavior of trypsin in the presence of alginate is due to conformational changes caused by interactions between the positively charged trypsin and the strongly negatively charged alginate.

  10. Recurrent pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic ascariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K H; Shelat, V G; Low, H C; Ho, K Y; Diddapur, R K

    2009-06-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides infestations are endemic in tropical countries. Ascaris lumbricoides can occasionally cause biliary obstruction and result in obstructive jaundice or pancreatitis. We present a 34-year-old Bangladeshi woman with biliary ascariasis, resulting in recurrent pancreatitis. Her diagnosis was made with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed during an acute attack of pain.

  11. Chitosan nanoencapsulated exogenous trypsin biomimics zymogen-like enzyme in fish gastrointestinal tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhi Kumari

    Full Text Available Exogenous proteolytic enzyme supplementation is required in certain disease conditions in humans and animals and due to compelling reasons on use of more plant protein ingredients and profitability in animal feed industry. However, limitations on their utility in diet are imposed by their pH specificity, thermolabile nature, inhibition due to a variety of factors and the possibility of intestinal damage. For enhancing the efficacy and safety of exogenous trypsin, an efficient chitosan (0.04% nanoencapsulation-based controlled delivery system was developed. An experiment was conducted for 45 days to evaluate nanoencapsulated trypsin (0.01% and 0.02% along with 0.02% bare trypsin and 0.4% chitosan nanoparticles against a control diet on productive efficiency (growth rate, feed conversion and protein efficiency ratio, organo-somatic indices, nutrient digestibility, tissue enzyme activities, hematic parameters and intestinal histology of the fish Labeo rohita. All the synthesized nanoparticles were of desired characteristics. Enhanced fish productive efficiency using nanoencapsulated trypsin over its bare form was noticed, which corresponded with enhanced (P<0.01 nutrient digestibility, activity of intestinal protease, liver and muscle tissue transaminases (alanine and aspartate and dehydrogenases (lactate and malate, serum blood urea nitrogen and serum protein profile. Intestinal tissues of fish fed with 0.02% bare trypsin showed broadened, marked foamy cells with lipid vacuoles. However, villi were healthier in appearance with improved morphological features in fish fed with nanoencapsulated trypsin than with bare trypsin, and the villi were longer in fish fed with 0.01% nanoencapsulated trypsin than with 0.02% nanoencapsulated trypsin. The result of this premier experiment shows that nanoencapsulated trypsin mimics zymogen-like proteolytic activity via controlled release, and hence the use of 0.01% nanoencapsulated trypsin (in chitosan

  12. Pancreatic pseudo-cyst.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Raúl Sánchez Aguilar

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The pancreatic pseudocyst is the most common cystic lesion of the pancreas. It constitutes an amilasa rich liquid collection, located inside or adjacent to the pancreas; surrounded by a wall without ephithelium, as result of a sharp or chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic trauma, or obstruction of pancreatic conduit. 50 % solves spontaneously in 6 weeks, but some of they require surgical treatment. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Pancreatic pseudocysts, approved by consent in the 3th National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Camagüey, Cuba; February 23 – 26, 2004.

  13. Biochemical characterization of bovine plasma thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Torsten

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TAFI is a plasma protein assumed to be an important link between coagulation and fibrinolysis. The three-dimensional crystal structures of authentic mature bovine TAFI (TAFIa in complex with tick carboxypeptidase inhibitor, authentic full lenght bovine plasma thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI, and recombinant human TAFI have recently been solved. In light of these recent advances, we have characterized authentic bovine TAFI biochemically and compared it to human TAFI. Results The four N-linked glycosylation sequons within the activation peptide were all occupied in bovine TAFI, similar to human TAFI, while the sequon located within the enzyme moiety of the bovine protein was non-glycosylated. The enzymatic stability and the kinetic constants of TAFIa differed somewhat between the two proteins, as did the isoelectric point of TAFI, but not TAFIa. Equivalent to human TAFI, bovine TAFI was a substrate for transglutaminases and could be proteolytically cleaved by trypsin or thrombin/solulin complex, although small differences in the fragmentation patterns were observed. Furthermore, bovine TAFI exhibited intrinsic activity and TAFIa attenuated tPA-mediated fibrinolysis similar to the human protein. Conclusion The findings presented here suggest that the properties of these two orthologous proteins are similar and that conclusions reached using the bovine TAFI may be extrapolated to the human protein.

  14. Effects of bisphenol S on the structures and activities of trypsin and pepsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei

    2014-11-19

    The effects of bisphenol S on the structures and activities of trypsin and pepsin were investigated by various methods like UV-visible absorbance, fluorescence, circular dichroism, and molecular docking. The secondary and tertiary structures of trypsin and pepsin were altered by bisphenol S binding, which resulted in the loosening of the skeletons of trypsin and pepsin. In addition, bisphenol S induced microenvironmental changes around tyrosine and tryptophan residues of trypsin and pepsin. The activity experimental results showed that the activity of pepsin decreases obviously with the increasing concentration of BPS, while the activity of trypsin does not change remarkably. The binding and thermodynamic parameters obtained by molecular docking and fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the bindings of bisphenol S to trypsin and pepsin were spontaneous processes and hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions played a vital role in stabilizing the bisphenol S-trypsin and bisphenol S-pepsin complexes. The binding constants (K(A)) of bisphenol S with trypsin were 7.42 × 10(4) (298 K) and 5.91 × 10(4) L/mol (310 K), and those of pepsin were 5.78 × 10(4) (298 K) and 4.44 × 10(4) L/mol (310 K). Moreover, there was one main kind of binding site for bisphenol S on trypsin or pepsin.

  15. Probing the binding of trypsin to glutathione-stabilized gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gongke; Liu, Xingbing; Yan, Changling; Bai, Guangyue; Lu, Yan

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the interaction of trypsin with glutathione-stabilized Au nanoparticles (NPs) using fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy. We find that trypsin binds strongly to the Au NPs with a static quenching mechanism, and that the interaction is characteristic of positive cooperative binding. Furthermore, we determine the binding constants and the thermodynamic parameters, which suggest that the main binding forces between the glutathione-stabilized Au NPs and trypsin are electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding. Analysis of UV-vis absorption spectra suggests that aggregation of the Au NPs occurs in the trypsin/Au NPs system, which significantly alters the conformation of the protein.

  16. Influence of an intravenous infusion of amino acids and glucose on the pancreatic exocrine in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Bo-guang 范博广; (A。)ke Andrén-Sandberg

    2004-01-01

    Background A number of reports based on both animal experiments and clinical investigations have pointed out that total parenteral nutrition (TPN) suppresses the function of the exocrine pancreas. Even though pancreatic hypotrophy and dysfunction resulting from TPN may be explained by several mechanisms, the clinically most important cause is that nutrients in circulation affect pancreatic secretion. The effect of nutrients on the exocrine pancreas is still controversial. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to clarify the influence of intravenous amino acids and hypertonic glucose in TPN solution on the exocrine pancreas. Methods Three mixed TPN solutions, consisting of 30% or 50% glucose or of 14% amino acids, were employed. Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups, six rats in each group, including a control group and one group receiving each of the three TPN solutions. All animals were killed after 10 days of TPN. Body weight, pancreatic content, and enzyme levels in the pancreas were measured. Results Compared with the control group, pancreatic wet weight was lower in all TPN groups. Glucose significantly decreased the content and concentration of pancreatic protein, but amino acids did not alter the concentration of protein. The level of amylase was lower in all parenterally fed groups, with a greater decrease in the groups treated with amino acids and 30% glucose than with 50% glucose. Trypsin levels in all groups receiving TPN were markedly higher than in the control group. Conclusion TPN results in atrophy of the pancreas, but trypsin levels increase with TPN treatment. Glucose elevates the amylase level in the pancreas, while amino acids suppress pancreatic amylase. Amino acids used as a source of protein maintain normal pancreatic protein levels.

  17. Inherited pancreatic cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sheila; Das, Siddhartha; Brand, Randall; Whitcomb, David C

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most challenging of all cancers. Genetic risk factors are believed to play a major role, but other than genes coding for blood group, genetic risks for sporadic cases remain elusive. However, several germline mutations have been identified that lead to hereditary pancreatic cancer, familial pancreatic cancer, and increased risk for pancreatic cancer as part of a familial cancer syndrome. The most important genes with variants increasing risk for pancreatic cancer include BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM, CDKN2A, APC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, PRSS1, and STK11. Recognition of members of high-risk families is important for understanding pancreatic cancer biology, for recommending risk reduction strategies and, in some cases, initiating cancer surveillance programs. Because the best methods for surveillance have not been established, the recommendation to refer at-risk patients to centers with ongoing research programs in pancreatic cancer surveillance is supported.

  18. Pancreatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, M

    1992-12-01

    The pathophysiology of pancreatic autodigestion is poorly understood. Pancreatitis affects all age groups, and the diagnosis is sometimes missed when serum amylase and lipase activities are not measured in the child with abdominal pain. Acute pancreatitis in children has become a more commonly seen condition and the causes have varied. Laboratory and radiological studies play an important role in determining the diagnosis and prognosis. Family history is important in the diagnosis of idiopathic hereditary pancreatitis. Most acute episodes resolve with supportive care, but the mortality in acute pancreatitis is currently about 15% (Hadorn et al., 1980). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or an endoscopic retrograde pancreatogram may be necessary to investigate relapses of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis can be a life-threatening condition requiring lifetime medical management.

  19. The effect of exogenous apelin on the secretion of pancreatic juice in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapica, M; Jankowska, A; Antushevich, H; Pietrzak, P; Bierla, J B; Dembinski, A; Zabielski, R

    2012-02-01

    Apelin is known to stimulate cholecystokinin (CCK) and inhibit insulin release, however the mechanisms on pancreatic secretion remain unclear. The present study aimed to determine the expression of apelin and apelin receptor in the pancreas by immunofluorescence studies and the effect of exogenous apelin on the secretion of pancreatic juice in anesthetized rats. Pancreatic-biliary juice (P-BJ) was collected from Wistar rats treated with apelin (10, 20 and 50 nmol/kg b.w., boluses given every 30 min intravenously or intraduodenaly). The same apelin doses were administered to rats subjected to intraduodenal tarazapide, capsaicin or vagotomy. Pancreatic blood flow was measured by a laser doppler flowmeter. Direct effects of apelin were tested on dispersed acinar cells. Apelin receptor was expressed on acinar cells, pancreatic duct and islets cells, whereas apelin in pancreatic acini, but not in the islets. Intravenous apelin decreased P-BJ volume, protein and trypsin outputs in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, intraduodenal apelin stimulated P-BJ secretion. Pharmacological block of mucosal CCK(1) receptor by tarazepide, vagotomy and capsaicin pretreatment abolished the effects of intravenous and intraduodenal apelin on P-BJ volume, protein and tryspin outputs. Apelin decreased the pancreatic blood flow. Apelin at 10(-6) M increased the release of amylase from non-stimulated and CCK-8-stimulated acinar cells. In conclusion, apelin can affect the exocrine pancreas through a complex mechanism involving local blood flow regulation and is driven by vagal nerves.

  20. Phenotypic differentiation of neonatal rat cochlear spiral ganglion neurons following trypsin dissociation and culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dingjun Zha; Li Qiao; Lianjun Lu; Xue Gao; Tao Xue; Wenjuan Mi; Shunli Liu; Jianhua Qiu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Under laboratory conditions, cochlear spiral ganglion neurons are commonly isolated and cultured by mechanical dissociation. However, these neurons are extremely fragile and survive for only a short time.OBJECTIVE: To establish a trypsin dissociation and culture method for studying neonatal rat cochlear spiral ganglion neurons. DESIGN: A single sample study. SETTING: Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: This study was performed at the central laboratory for Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA from February to May 2006. A total of 40 neonatal Sprague Dawley rats of either gender, aged 2-5 days, were provided by the Laboratory Animal Center of the Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA. Trypsin and neuronal-specific nuclear protein (NeuN) monoclonal antibodies were purchased from Sigma Company, USA. Culture medium was synthesized using Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM)/F12 (Gibco Company, USA) supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (Sigma Company, USA), 100 000 U/L penicillin, and 1 mol/L NaOH. The following protocol was performed in accordance with ethical guidelines for the use and care of animals.METHODS: After anesthesia, rats were sacrificed by neck dislocation. A complete cochlear axis with spiral ganglion tissue was removed. The cochlear axis was rinsed three times in a culture dish with a diameter of 35 mm using Hank's balanced solution. After washings, the tissue was cut into pieces, digested with 0.25% trypsin for about 20 minutes, and incubated in a 37 ℃ water bath. The tissue was centrifuged, then mixed with serum-containing culture medium. Using a transfer pipette, the cell suspension was transferred to polylysine (0.1%)-treated culture dishes with a diameter of 35 mm. The culture dish was incubated at 37 ℃, with a 5% CO2-air environment. Once

  1. Clinical results of the complex prevention of the acute postoperative pancreatitis at the surgical gastroenterology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotenko К.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to study the results of the complex prevention of the acute postoperative pancreatitis in the surgical gastroenterology. Material and methods. 2968 patients with various disorders of the digestive system were operated. Empirical preventing of the acute postoperative pancreatitis was used in the control group. Complex prevention of the acute postoperative pancreatitis in the main group of patients included the use of Dalargin, intravenous infusion of Octreotide, duodenal trypsin enzyme inhibition; intraduodenal reversal of pancreatic secret; intraductal injection of Lidocaine and external transnasal drainage of the pancreatic and biliary ducts. Results. The frequency of acute postoperative pancreatitis was 12.2% in the main group. The frequency of acute postoperative pancreatitis was 36.9% in the control group. Increased frequency of a mild form of the acute postoperative pancreatitis observed in the main group compared with the control. At the same time reducing the frequency of the moderate severity and severity forms of the acute postoperative pancreatitis observed in the main group compared with the control. Reduction of the morbidity (13.6% vs. 25.1%, hospital mortality (1.6% vs. 3.5%, the duration of the postoperative hospital bed-day (12.1±0.4 vs. 16.7±0.6 were identified in the main group patients compared with the control group. Conclusion. The use of the given scheme for the complex prevention of the acute postoperative pancreatitis allowed significantly reduce the frequency and severity of illness, morbidity, reduce the duration of postoperative hospital bed-day and hospital mortality, as well as the frequency of both mild and severity, and fatal postoperative complications in all investigated groups of patients.

  2. Pancreatic Stellate Cells and Chronic Alcoholic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a disease often characterized by recurrent episodes of abdominal pain accompanied by progressive pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency [1] and it sometimes requires multiple hospitalizations. Obstructive jaundice, duodenal stenosis, left-sided portal hypertension, pseudocyst and mass formation, and pancreatic carcinoma may occur as complications of chronic pancreatitis. The disease is frequently the result of chronic alcohol abuse, even if other factors such as genetic alterations, autoimmune disorders, and obstructive disease of the biliary tract and the pancreas may cause the disease [2]. Medical therapy is the treatment of choice for most patients and it is based on substitutive therapy for either exocrine or endocrine insufficiency and on analgesics for pain control. In the presence of intractable pain, surgical management is the main option [3] even if, in recent years, other therapeutic options such as endoscopic therapy [4], thoracoscopic splanchnicectomy [5], and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy have been applied in clinical practice [6]. From a pathological point of view, chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irregular sclerosis with destruction and loss of the exocrine parenchyma, and complete replacement of acinar, ductal and endocrine tissue by fibrotic tissue. It has recently been reported that acute alcoholic pancreatitis develops in a pancreas already affected by chronic pancreatitis [7]. In 1982, Watari et al. [8] reported the presence of vitamin A-containing cells in the vitamin A-fed rat pancreas. These were later described and characterized as stellate cells in the rat and the human pancreas [9, 10]. Pancreatic stellate cells are morphologically similar to hepatic stellate cells. They bear long cytoplasmic processes and are situated close to the pancreatic acini. In the quiescent state, these cells contain lipid droplets, store vitamin A and express markers such as desmin, glial

  3. Pancreatic Panniculitis: A rare manifestation of Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronak Patel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication associated with pancreatic disease and perhaps even a presage to pancreatic pathology. Case report We present a case of pancreatic panniculitis in a 61 year old patient who was treated for sudden onset of abdominal pain associated with nausea and vomiting secondary to acute pancreatitis of unknown etiology. He subsequently developed skin lesions consistent with pancreatic panniculitis which gradually improved after resolution of his acute condition and treatment with topical steroid cream. Conclusion We discuss and review the literature along with highlighting for the readers the important clinical and histopathologic features of acute pancreatitis associated pancreatic panniculitis.

  4. The complete amino acid sequence of a trypsin inhibitor from Bauhinia variegata var. candida seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ciero, L; Oliva, M L; Torquato, R; Köhler, P; Weder, J K; Camillo Novello, J; Sampaio, C A; Oliveira, B; Marangoni, S

    1998-11-01

    Trypsin inhibitors of two varieties of Bauhinia variegata seeds have been isolated and characterized. Bauhinia variegata candida trypsin inhibitor (BvcTI) and B. variegata lilac trypsin inhibitor (BvlTI) are proteins with Mr of about 20,000 without free sulfhydryl groups. Amino acid analysis shows a high content of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and glycine, and a low content of histidine, tyrosine, methionine, and lysine in both inhibitors. Isoelectric focusing for both varieties detected three isoforms (pI 4.85, 5.00, and 5.15), which were resolved by HPLC procedure. The trypsin inhibitors show Ki values of 6.9 and 1.2 nM for BvcTI and BvlTI, respectively. The N-terminal sequences of the three trypsin inhibitor isoforms from both varieties of Bauhinia variegata and the complete amino acid sequence of B. variegata var. candida L. trypsin inhibitor isoform 3 (BvcTI-3) are presented. The sequences have been determined by automated Edman degradation of the reduced and carboxymethylated proteins of the peptides resulting from Staphylococcus aureus protease and trypsin digestion. BvcTI-3 is composed of 167 residues and has a calculated molecular mass of 18,529. Homology studies with other trypsin inhibitors show that BvcTI-3 belongs to the Kunitz family. The putative active site encompasses Arg (63)-Ile (64).

  5. Trypsin isozymes in the lobster Panulirus argus (Latreille, 1804): from molecules to physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Erick; Rodríguez-Viera, Leandro; Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Montero-Alejo, Vivian; Moyano, Francisco Javier; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Mancera, Juan Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Trypsin enzymes have been studied in a wide variety of animal taxa due to their central role in protein digestion as well as in other important physiological and biotechnological processes. Crustacean trypsins exhibit a high number of isoforms. However, while differences in properties of isoenzymes are known to play important roles in regulating different physiological processes, there is little information on this aspect for decapod trypsins. The aim of this review is to integrate recent findings at the molecular level on trypsin enzymes of the spiny lobster Panulirus argus, into higher levels of organization (biochemical, organism) and to interpret those findings in relation to the feeding ecology of these crustaceans. Trypsin in lobster is a polymorphic enzyme, showing isoforms that differ in their biochemical features and catalytic efficiencies. Molecular studies suggest that polymorphism in lobster trypsins may be non-neutral. Trypsin isoenzymes are differentially regulated by dietary proteins, and it seems that some isoenzymes have undergone adaptive evolution coupled with a divergence in expression rate to increase fitness. This review highlights important but poorly studied issues in crustaceans in general, such as the relation among trypsin polymorphism, phenotypic (digestive) flexibility, digestion efficiency, and feeding ecology.

  6. Label-free, turn-on fluorescent sensor for trypsin activity assay and inhibitor screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lufeng; Qin, Haiyan; Cui, Wanwan; Zhou, Yang; Du, Jianxiu

    2016-12-01

    The development of new detection methods for proteases activity assay is important in clinical diagnostics and drug development. In this work, a simple, label-free, and turn-on fluorescent sensor was fabricated for trypsin, a protease produced in the pancreas. Cytochrome c, a natural substance of trypsin, could be selectively cleaved by trypsin into heme-peptide fragment. The produced heme-peptide fragment exhibited an intensive catalytic role on the H2O2-mediated the oxidation of thiamine to form strong fluorescent thiochrome. The fluorescence intensity was closely dependent on the amount of trypsin presented. The procedure allowed the measurement of trypsin over the range of 0.5-20.0μg/mL with a detection limit of 0.125μg/mL. The sensor showed better precision with a relative standard deviation of 1.6% for the measurement of 1.0μg/mL trypsin solution (n=11). This sensing system was applied to screen the inhibitor of trypsin, the IC50 values were calculated to be 12.71ng/mL for the trypsin inhibitor from soybean and 2.0μg/mL for benzamidine hydrochloride, respectively, demonstrating its potential application in drug development and related diseases treatment.

  7. Isolation and characterization of a novel trypsin inhibitor from fresh lily bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2008-04-01

    A 17-kDa trypsin inhibitor was isolated from fresh lily bulbs with an isolation procedure that involved ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose, and gel filtration by FPLC on Superdex 75. Its N-terminal sequence displayed similarity to a short segment of the sequences of the Populus tremula trypsin inhibitor, a putative trypsin inhibitor from Arabidopsis thaliana and sporamin B from sweet potato. The trypsin inhibitor was adsorbed on DEAE-cellulose, unadsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel, and adsorbed on SP-Sepharose. It dose-dependently inhibited trypsin with an IC (50) value of 1.3 microM. There was a stimulatory effect on macrophage production of nitric oxide. Unlike field bean trypsin inhibitor it did not inhibit [methyl-(3)H]thymidine incorporation by leukemia L1210 cells and MBL2 cells when tested up to 100 microM. In contrast to broad bean trypsin inhibitor, there was no inhibitory effect on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase when lily bulb trypsin inhibitor was tested up to 100 microM. The present report is one of the very few on bulbs in contrast to the voluminous literature on seeds.

  8. High-gradient magnetic affinity separation of trypsin from porcine pancreatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubbuch, Jürgen; Thomas, Owen R. T.

    2002-01-01

    -scale studies approximate to95% of the endogenous trypsin present in a crude porcine pancreatin feedstock was recovered with a purification factor of approximate to4.1 at the expense of only a 4% loss in a-amylase activity. Efficient recovery of trypsin from the same feedstock was demonstrated at a vastly...

  9. Walled-off pancreatic necrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; Stamatakos; Charikleia; Stefanaki; Konstantinos; Kontzoglou; Spyros; Stergiopoulos; Georgios; Giannopoulos; Michael; Safioleas

    2010-01-01

    Walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN), formerly known as pancreatic abscess is a late complication of acute pancreatitis. It can be lethal, even though it is rare. This critical review provides an overview of the continually expanding knowledge about WOPN, by review of current data from references identified in Medline and PubMed, to September 2009, using key words, such as WOPN, infected pseudocyst, severe pancreatitis, pancreatic abscess, acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP), pancreas, inflammation and al...

  10. Allostery in trypsin-like proteases suggests new therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohara, David W; Di Cera, Enrico

    2011-11-01

    Trypsin-like proteases (TLPs) are a large family of enzymes responsible for digestion, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, development, fertilization, apoptosis and immunity. A current paradigm posits that the irreversible transition from an inactive zymogen to the active protease form enables productive interaction with substrate and catalysis. Analysis of the entire structural database reveals two distinct conformations of the active site: one fully accessible to substrate (E) and the other occluded by the collapse of a specific segment (E*). The allosteric E*-E equilibrium provides a reversible mechanism for activity and regulation in addition to the irreversible zymogen to protease conversion and points to new therapeutic strategies aimed at inhibiting or activating the enzyme. In this review, we discuss relevant examples, with emphasis on the rational engineering of anticoagulant thrombin mutants.

  11. Evaluation of the toxicity of ionic liquids on trypsin: A mechanism study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yunchang; Dong, Xing; Yan, Lingling; Li, Dandan; Hua, Shaofeng; Hu, Chaobing; Pan, Chengcheng

    2016-04-01

    The toxicity of ionic liquids (ILs) was evaluated by using trypsin as biomarker. Experimental results indicated that the trypsin activity was inhibited by ILs and the degree of inhibition highly depended on the chemical structures of ILs. Primary analysis illustrated that hydrophobicity of ILs was one of the driven forces ruling the ILs-trypsin interaction. Thermodynamic parameters, Gibbs free energy change (ΔG), enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) were obtained by analyzing the fluorescence behavior of trypsin in the presence of ILs. Both negative ΔH and ΔS suggested hydrogen bonding was the major driven force underlying the IL-trypsin interaction. To assess the toxicity of ILs, it should be considered the combination of the hydrogen bonding ability and hydrophobicity of ILs. A regression based model was established to correlate the relationship of the inhibitory ability, hydrophobicity and hydrogen bonding ability of ILs.

  12. Spectroscopic investigations on the interactions between isopropanol and trypsin at molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xinxin; Yu, Zehua; Liu, Rutao

    2013-05-01

    The toxicity of hydroxyl group of isopropanol to trypsin in aqueous solution was investigated by techniques including UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, enzyme activity assay and molecular docking technology. The results of UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and CD spectra indicate that isopropanol could change the secondary structure of trypsin by increasing the content of α-helix and decreasing the content of β-sheet. The tertiary structure of trypsin was also changed owing to the loss of environmental asymmetry of amino acid residues. Isopropanol bound into a hydrophobic cavity on the surface of trypsin by a hydrogen bond located between the hydrogen atom on the hydroxyl of isopropanol and the oxygen atoms on SER 214 and hydrophobic interaction, as the molecular docking results showed. In addition, isopropanol could affect the function of trypsin by increasing its catalytic activity.

  13. Pancreatic Pseudocyst: Therapeutic Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Khanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic pseudocyst develops in both acute and chronic pancreatitis. It is an entity likely to either remain asymptomatic or develop devastating complications. Despite being diagnosed easily, treatment exercise is still at crossroads whether in the form of internal or external drainage or endoscopic, laparoscopic, or open intervention with a good radiological guidance. The therapeutic dilemma whether to treat a patient with a pancreatic pseudocyst, as well as when and with what technique, is a difficult one. This paper is intended to get information about diagnostic and therapeutic exercises most appropriate for acute and chronic pancreatic pseudocyst.

  14. Hypermutation In Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphris, Jeremy L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Nones, Katia; Bailey, Peter J; Johns, Amber L; McKay, Skye; Chang, David K; Miller, David K; Pajic, Marina; Kassahn, Karin S; Quinn, Michael C J; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Christ, Angelika N; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Stone, Andrew; Wilson, Peter J; Anderson, Matthew; Fink, J Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Mead, Ronald S; Xu, Qinying; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Nagrial, Adnan M; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Chou, Angela; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Jamieson, Nigel B; McKay, Colin J; Carter, C Ross; Dickson, Euan J; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Grützmann, Robert; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Rusev, Borislav; Corbo, Vincenzo; Salvia, Roberto; Cataldo, Ivana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Hofmann, Oliver; Eshleman, James R; Pilarsky, Christian; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Gill, Anthony J; Pearson, John V; Grimmond, Sean M; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechanisms of somatic inactivation of MLH1 and MSH2. Defining mutation load in individual pancreatic cancers and the optimal assay for patient selection may inform clinical trial design for immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

  15. Polyethylene glycol-grafted bovine pericardium: a novel hybrid tissue resistant to calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudev, S C; Chandy, T

    1999-02-01

    Calcification is a frequent cause of the clinical failure of bioprosthetic heart valves fabricated from glutaraldehyde pretreated bovine pericardium (GATBP). An investigation was made of the grafting of different molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG 600, 1500, 4000 and 6000) via glutaraldehyde (GA) linkages to bovine pericardium (BP) and of their stability and calcification. The process of the calcification profile was studied by in vitro experiments via incubating pericardial samples in a metastable solution of calcium phosphate. Calcification of bovine pericardium grafted with PEG 6000 was significantly decreased compared to low molecular weight PEG grafts or Sodium dodecyl sulphate- (SDS) and GA-treated tissues. The mechanical properties of these modified tissues after enzyme (Trypsin) digestion and calcification were investigated. The biocompatibility aspects of grafted tissues were also established by monitoring the platelet adhesion, octane contact angle and water of hydration. PEG 6000-grafted tissues retained the maximum strength in trypsin buffer and calcium phosphate solutions. Scanning electron micrographs revealed that the PEG-grafted bovine pericardium had substantially inhibited the platelet-surface attachment and their spreading. It is conceivable that high molecular weight polyethylene glycol-grafted pericardium (a hybrid tissue) may be a suitable calcium-resistant material for developing prosthetic valves due to their stability and biocompatibility.

  16. Primary Culture of Porcine Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao X

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To develop a method for the primary culture of porcine pancreatic acinar cells. INTERVENTIONS: Dispersed pancreatic acinar cells available utilizing RPMI-1640 medium containing collagenase III. After purification, the isolated acinar cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium with the addition of 2.5% fetal bovine serum. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The morphological characteristics of acinar cells were described. (3H-thymidine incorporation of acinar cells and the activity of amylase or lipase were determined during the culture process. RESULTS: There were no remarkable morphological changes in the pancreatic acinar cells during the 20 days culture. The acini showed a tendency to gather but did not attach to the walls of the culture disks. A good (3H-thymidine incorporation of acinar cells in the primary culture was maintained. The secretion of amylase or lipase from the acini decreased with the length of time of the culture. DISCUSSION: The primary culture of acinar cells from a porcine pancreas which was carried out in this study maintained the normal morphology of the acinar cells and their ability to grow but not their secretion of amylase or lipase. The method would benefit by the further experiments on acini of porcine pancreas.

  17. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  18. 77 FR 20319 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 93 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Correction In proposed rule...

  19. 78 FR 73993 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, and 98 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Corrections In rule document 2013-28228 appearing...

  20. Endoscopic pancreatic duct stent placement for inflammatory pancreatic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The role of endoscopic therapy in the management of pancreatic diseases is continuously evolving; at present most pathological conditions of the pancreas are successfully treated by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or endoscopic ultrasound (EUS),or both. Endoscopic placement of stents has played and still plays a major role in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis, pseudocysts, pancreas divisum, main pancreatic duct injuries, pancreatic fistulae, complications of acute pancreatitis, recurrent idiopathic pancreatitis,and in the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis. These stents are currently routinely placed to reduce intraductal hypertension, bypass obstructing stones, restore lumen patency in cases with dominant, symptomatic strictures,seal main pancreatic duct disruption, drain pseudocysts or fluid collections, treat symptomatic major or minor papilla sphincter stenosis, and prevent procedure-induced acute pancreatitis. The present review aims at updating and discussing techniques, indications, and results of endoscopic pancreatic duct stent placement in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases of the pancreas.

  1. Trypsin-induced proteome alteration during cell subculture in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Cheng-Wen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is essential to subculture the cells once cultured cells reach confluence. For this, trypsin is frequently applied to dissociate adhesive cells from the substratum. However, due to the proteolytic activity of trypsin, cell surface proteins are often cleaved, which leads to dysregulation of the cell functions. Methods In this study, a triplicate 2D-DIGE strategy has been performed to monitor trypsin-induced proteome alterations. The differentially expressed spots were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and validated by immunoblotting. Results 36 proteins are found to be differentially expressed in cells treated with trypsin, and proteins that are known to regulate cell metabolism, growth regulation, mitochondrial electron transportation and cell adhesion are down-regulated and proteins that regulate cell apoptosis are up-regulated after trypsin treatment. Further study shows that bcl-2 is down-regulated, p53 and p21 are both up-regulated after trypsinization. Conclusions In summary, this is the first report that uses the proteomic approach to thoroughly study trypsin-induced cell physiological changes and provides researchers in carrying out their experimental design.

  2. Trypsin promotes C6 glioma cell proliferation in serum- and growth factor-free medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, H; Kurosaka, R; Ema, M; Ogawa, Y

    1996-07-01

    C6 glioma cells could be successively subcultured and maintained in serum- and growth factor-free medium (SF/GFF medium). C6 cell proliferation in SF/GFF medium was positively correlated with the initial cell density at plating. This correlation disappeared when the medium had been renewed early after cell adhesion (3 h after plating), suggesting that C6 cell growth depends on some diffusible factor in the medium before renewal, and that this factor is not secreted from C6 cells in the assay culture but is transferred from the cell suspension. The supernatant of trypsinized C6 cell suspension (SCS), trypsin-EDTA solution for routine cell harvesting use, and modified trypsin of protein sequencing grade all promoted C6 cell proliferation at, appropriate dilutions or concentrations under SF/GFF conditions. The growth promoting effects of SCS and trypsin-EDTA solution were completely inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor. These results demonstrate that the serine protease trypsin has a proliferative effect on C6 cells continuously subcultured in SF/GFF medium. In addition, it is suggested that trypsin used for cell dispersion is transferred from cell suspension into the culture, where it promotes C6 cell growth after passage in our SF/GFF subculture system.

  3. Trypsin inactivation by latex fabricated gold nanoparticles: A new strategy towards insect control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Chandrashekhar D; Borase, Hemant P; Suryawanshi, Rahul K; Patil, Satish V

    2016-10-01

    Before applying nanotechnologies in biomedical and environmental areas it is advised to study interactions of nanoparticles and other nanomaterials with biomacromolecule present in living system. Moreover there is scarcity of reports on interactions between nanoparticles and biomaterials. In present report a rapid, ecofriendly method of fabricating stable gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using latex of Jatropha curcas is reported for the first time. AuNPs found to have characteristic absorption maxima centered at 540nm, multiple irregular shapes with size range from 20 to 50nm and have crystalline nature. Latex fabricated AuNPs were found to inhibit catalytic potential of trypsin (a vital enzyme responsible for digestion, insecticide resistance and in several disease conditions). The interactions between AuNPs and trypsin were analyzed by UV-vis spectrophotometry and microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry which suggests formation of trypsin-AuNPs complex responsible for lowering catalytic activity of trypsin. Transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and particle size distribution studies further confirm complex formation between trypsin and AuNPs. Diverse interactions of metal nanoparticles with proteins such as covalent interaction, electrostatic interactions and binding to SH group of amino acid may be the reasons behind inhibition of trypsin activity. In vivo studies on serum of several vectors and agriculturally important pests supported instrumental results on AuNPs induced trypsin inhibition. This work will bring a new research direction to explore eco-friendly nanoparticle in insect control via inhibition of enzyme catalytic potential.

  4. Immobilization of Trypsin in Lignocellulosic Waste Material to Produce Peptides with Bioactive Potential from Whey Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cristina Bassan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, trypsin (Enzyme Comission 3.4.21.4 was immobilized in a low cost, lignocellulosic support (corn cob powder—CCP with the goal of obtaining peptides with bioactive potential from cheese whey. The pretreated support was activated with glyoxyl groups, glutaraldehyde and IDA-glyoxyl. The immobilization yields of the derivatives were higher than 83%, and the retention of catalytic activity was higher than 74%. The trypsin-glyoxyl-CCP derivative was thermally stable at 65 °C, a value that was 1090-fold higher than that obtained with the free enzyme. The trypsin-IDA-glyoxyl-CCP and trypsin-glutaraldehyde-CCP derivatives had thermal stabilities that were 883- and five-fold higher, respectively, then those obtained with the free enzyme. In the batch experiments, trypsin-IDA-glyoxyl-CCP retained 91% of its activity and had a degree of hydrolysis of 12.49%, while the values for trypsin-glyoxyl-CCP were 87% and 15.46%, respectively. The stabilized derivative trypsin-glyoxyl-CCP was also tested in an upflow packed-bed reactor. The hydrodynamic characterization of this reactor was a plug flow pattern, and the kinetics of this system provided a relative activity of 3.04 ± 0.01 U·g−1 and an average degree of hydrolysis of 23%, which were suitable for the production of potentially bioactive peptides.

  5. Application of Frontal Affinity Chromatography to Study the Biomolecular Interactions with Trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, YuanYuan; Qian, Junqing; Guo, Hui; Jiang, ShengLan; Zhang, Zheng

    2015-07-01

    Trypsin is a serine protease that has been proposed as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders and malignancy diseases, thus the identification of biomolecular interactions of compounds to trypsin could be of great therapeutic importance. In this study, trypsin was immobilized on a monolithic silica capillary column via sol-gel. The binding properties of four small molecules (daidzin, genistin, matrine and oxymatrine) to trypsin were examined using the trypsin affinity columns by frontal analysis. The results indicate that the matrine (dissociation constant, Kd = 7.904 μM) has stronger interaction with trypsin than the oxymatrine (Kd = 8.204 μM), whereas daidzin and genistin were nearly have no affinity with trypsin. The results demonstrated that the frontal affinity chromatography can be used for the direct determination of protein-protease inhibitor binding interactions and have several significant advantages, including easy fabricating, reproducible, minimal technological requirements and potential to become a reliable alternative for quantitative studies of biomolecular interactions.

  6. Treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunschot, S. van; Bakker, O.J.; Besselink, M.G.; Bollen, T.L.; Fockens, P.; Gooszen, H.G.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Dutch Pancreatitis Study, G.

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common and potentially lethal disease. It is associated with significant morbidity and consumes enormous health care resources. Over the last 2 decades, the treatment of acute pancreatitis has undergone fundamental changes based on new conceptual insights and evidence from cl

  7. Acute Recurrent Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen A Lehman

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available History, physical examination, simple laboratory and radiological tests, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP are able to establish the cause of recurrent acute pancreatitis in 70% to 90% of patients. Dysfunction of the biliary and/or pancreatic sphincter, as identified by sphincter of Oddi manometry, accounts for the majority of the remaining cases. The diagnosis may be missed if the pancreatic sphincter is not evaluated. Pancreas divisum is a prevalent congenital abnormality that is usually innocuous but can lead to recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis or abdominal pain. In select cases, endoscopic sphincterotomy of the minor papilla can provide relief of symptoms and prevent further attacks. A small proportion of patients with idiopathic pancreatitis have tiny stones in the common bile duct (microlithiasis. Crystals can be visualized during microscopic analysis of bile that is aspirated at the time of ERCP. Neoplasia is a rare cause of pancreatitis, and the diagnosis can usually be established by computerized tomography or ERCP. A wide variety of medications can also cause recurrent pancreatitis. ERCP, sphincter of Oddi manometry, and microscopy of aspirated bile should be undertaken in patients with recurrent pancreatitis in whom the diagnosis is not obvious.

  8. In vitro and in silico investigations of the binding interactions between chlorophenols and trypsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan-Qing, E-mail: wyqing76@126.com [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Wetland Bioresources and Environmental Protection, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Institute of Applied Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Tan, Chun-Yun [Institute of Applied Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhuang, Shu-Lin [Institute of Environmental Science, College of Environmental and Resource Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhai, Peng-Zhan; Cui, Yun; Zhou, Qiu-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Mei [Institute of Applied Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Fei, Zhenghao [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Wetland Bioresources and Environmental Protection, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Institute of Applied Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Binding interactions of five chlorophenols with trypsin were investigated. • The number of chlorine atoms of chlorophenols partly affected the binding ability of them to trypsin. • Noncovalent interactions stabilized the trypsin–chlorophenols complexes. • There was the one main binding site of trypsin for chlorophenols. - Abstract: Being the first-degree toxic pollutants, chlorophenols (CP) have potential carcinogenic and mutagenic activity and toxicity. Since there still lacks studies on molecular interactions of chlorophenols with trypsin, one major binding target of many exogenous environmental pollutants, the binding interactions between five chlorophenols, 2-CP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TCP and PCP and trypsin were characterized by the combination of multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling. The chlorophenols bind at the one main site of trypsin and the binding induces the changes of microenvironment and global conformations of trypsin. Different number of chloride atoms significantly affects the binding and the binding constants K{sub A} ranks as K{sub A} (2-CP) < K{sub A} (2,6-DCP) ≈ K{sub A} (2,4,6-TCP) < K{sub A} (2,3,4,6-TCP) < K{sub A} (PCP). These chlorophenols interacts with trypsin mainly through hydrophobic interactions and via hydrogen bonding interactions and aromatic–aromatic π–π stacking interaction. Our results offer insights into the binding mechanism of chlorophenols with trypsin and provide important information for possible toxicity risk of chlorophenols to human health.

  9. Orlistat-induced acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced pancreatitis is a rare but important cause of pancreatic injury. Orlistat is a pancreatic lipase inhibitor licensed for the treatment of obesity. We present a case of orlistat- induced mild acute pancreatitis that developed 8 days after starting treatment.

  10. Pancreatic and pulmonary mast cells activation during experimental acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Inmaculada; Lopez-Font; Sabrina; Gea-Sorlí; Enrique; de-Madaria; Luis; M; Gutiérrez; Miguel; Pérez-Mateo; Daniel; Closa

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To study the activation of pancreatic and pulmonary mast cells and the effect of mast cell inhibition on the activation of peritoneal and alveolar macrophages during acute pancreatitis.METHODS:Pancreatitis was induced by intraductal infusion of 5% sodium taurodeoxycholate in rats.The mast cell inhibitor cromolyn was administered intraperitoneally(i.p.) 30 min before pancreatitis induction.The pancreatic and pulmonary tissue damage was evaluated histologically and mast cells and their state of activation...

  11. Unlocking the bovine genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worley Kim C

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The draft genome sequence of cattle (Bos taurus has now been analyzed by the Bovine Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium and the Bovine HapMap Consortium, which together represent an extensive collaboration involving more than 300 scientists from 25 different countries.

  12. Treatment of acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Mofleh Ibrahim

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no specific treatment for acute pancreatitis. Majority of patients with acute pancreatitis respond to medical therapy. Supportive measures and close observations represent the cornerstone of the medical therapy. Failure to respond to medical treatment may indicate choledocholithiasis or infected necrosis. Endoscopic papillotomy with stone retrieval is beneficial in patients with severe biliary pancreatitis. Image-guided fine needle aspiration and bacteriological examination of aspirate is reliable in detecting infection and deliniating causative pathogen. Surgical debridement is the method of choice for treatment of infected necrosis. In contrast, in pancreatic abscess, surgery is preserved for those, who do not respond to percutaneous drainage combined with antibiotics. The benefit of antisecretory and antiproteolytic agents is debatable. A combination of antioxidants, calcium channel antagonists and antibiotics may play a major role in the treatment of acute pancreatitis in the future.

  13. Review of idiopathic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding of pancreatitis and advances in technology have uncovered the veils of idiopathic pancreatitis to a point where a thorough history and judicious use of diagnostic techniques elucidate the cause in over 80% of cases. This review examines the multitude of etiologies of what were once labeled idiopathic pancreatitis and provides the current evidence on each. This review begins with a background review of the current epidemiology of idiopathic pancreatitis prior to discussion of various etiologies. Etiologies of medications, infections, toxins,autoimmune disorders, vascular causes, and anatomic and functional causes are explored in detail. We conclude with management of true idiopathic pancreatitis and a summary of the various etiologic agents. Throughout this review, areas of controversies are highlighted.

  14. Effect of parenteral and early intrajejunal nutrition on pancreatic digestive enzyme synthesis,storage and discharge in dog models of acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan-Long Qin; Zhen-Dong Su; Lei-Guang Hu; Zai-Xian Ding; Qing-Tian Lin

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To study the effect of early intrajejunal nutrition on enzyme-protein synthesis and secretion during acute pancreatitis.METHODS:Fifteen dogs were randomly divided into parenteral nutrition(n = 7)and early intrajejunal nutrition groups(n = 8).An acute pancreatitis model was induced by injecting 5% sodium taurocholate and trypsin into the pancreas via the pancreatic duct.Intrajejunal nutrition was delivered with a catheter via a jejunostomy tube after the model was established for 24 h.On d 1 and 7 and at the beginning of nutritional support,radioactive tracing and electron microscopes were used to evaluate the enzyme-protein synthesis in acinar cells,the subcellular fractionation and the change in zymogen granules after 1.85×106 Bq L-3H phenylalanine was infused at 30,60,120,and 180 min.RESULTS:The 3H radioactivity in pancreatic acinar cells reached its peak level at 60 min,and the contents in the early intrajejunal nutrition group were higher than those in the parenteral nutrition group,which were then decreased.The mean number and area of zymogen granules did not show any significant statistical difference in both groups on d 1 or on d 7(P > 0.05).CONCLUSION:Early intrajejunal nutrition might be effective in dogs with acute pancreatitis.

  15. ITIH4 (inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4) is a new acute-phase protein isolated from cattle during experimental infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pineiro, M.; Andres, M.; Iturralde, M.;

    2004-01-01

    We have isolated from calf serum a protein with an apparent M, of 120,000. The protein was detected by using antibodies against major acute-phase protein in pigs with acute inflammation. The amino acid sequence of an internal fragment revealed that this protein is the bovine counterpart of ITIH4......, the heavy chain 4 of the inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor family. The response of this protein in the sera was determined for animals during experimental bacterial and viral infections. In the bacterial model, animals were inoculated with a mixture of Actinomyces pyogenes, Fusobacterium necrophorum....... Because of the significant induction of the protein in the animals in the mastitis and BRSV infection models, we can conclude that ITIH4 is a new positive acute-phase protein in cattle....

  16. The influence of a 21 kDa Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor from nonhost madras thorn, Pithecellobium dulce, seeds on H. armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Prabhash K; Singh, Dushyant; Jamal, Farrukh

    2015-05-01

    A trypsin inhibitor purified from the seeds of the Manila tamarind, Pithecellobium dulce (PDTI), was studied for its effects on growth parameters and developmental stages of Helicoverpa armigera. PDTI exhibited inhibitory activity against bovine trypsin (∼86%; ∼1.33 ug/ml IC50). The inhibitory activity of PDTI was unaltered over a wide range of temperature, pH, and in the presence of dithiothreitol. Larval midgut proteases were unable to digest PDTI for up to 12 h of incubation. Dixon and Lineweaver-Burk double reciprocal plots analysis revealed a competitive inhibition mechanism and a Ki of ∼3.9 × 10(-8) M. Lethal dose (0.50% w/w) and dosage for weight reduction by 50% (0.25% w/w) were determined. PDTI showed a dose-dependent effect on mean larval weight and a series of nutritional disturbances. In artificial diet at 0.25% w/w PDTI, the efficiency of conversion of ingested food, of digested food, relative growth rate, and growth index declined, whereas approximate digestibility, relative consumption rate, metabolic cost, consumption index, and total developmental period were increased in larvae. This is the first report of antifeedant and antimetabolic activities of PDTI on midgut proteases of H. armigera.

  17. Silica-supported Macroporous Chitosan Bead for Affinity Purification of Trypsin Inhibitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Na XI; Jian Min WU; Ming Ming LUAN

    2005-01-01

    Macroporous cross-linking chitosan layer coated on silica gel (CTS-SiO2) was prepared by phase inversion and polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecular imprinting methods. Formation of macroporous surface was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET analysis.The prepared bead was activated by reacting with 1,2-ethylene diglycidyl ether for introducing epoxy groups, and trypsin could be efficiently immobilized on the bead as a biospecific ligand.The bead bearing trypsin was employed to purify trypsin inhibitor (TIs) from egg white as affinity adsorbent.

  18. Camel and bovine chymosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langholm Jensen, Jesper; Mølgaard, Anne; Navarro Poulsen, Jens Christian;

    2013-01-01

    Bovine and camel chymosin are aspartic peptidases that are used industrially in cheese production. They cleave the Phe105-Met106 bond of the milk protein κ-casein, releasing its predominantly negatively charged C-terminus, which leads to the separation of the milk into curds and whey. Despite...... having 85% sequence identity, camel chymosin shows a 70% higher milk-clotting activity than bovine chymosin towards bovine milk. The activities, structures, thermal stabilities and glycosylation patterns of bovine and camel chymosin obtained by fermentation in Aspergillus niger have been examined...... interactions arising from variation in the surface charges and the greater malleability both in domain movements and substrate binding contribute to the better milk-clotting activity of camel chymosin towards bovine milk....

  19. Pancreatic Involvement in Melioidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vui Heng Chong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Melioidosis is endemic to tropical regions and, despite the common occurrence of intra-abdominal abscesses, pancreatic involvement in melioidosis has not previously been reported. Objective We report our experience with pancreatic melioidosis. Patients All 65 patients treated for melioidosis who had computed tomography (CT scans were identified from prospective databases and were retrospectively reviewed. Main outcome measures A detailed review of cases with pancreas involvement was carried out. Results There were four cases (three males and one female; median age 29.5 years, range: 25-48 years with pancreatic melioidosis, giving a prevalence of 6.2%. All had predisposing conditions (two had poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and two had thalassemia for melioidosis. Fever (100%, anorexia (100%, weight loss (100%, rigor (75% and abdominal pain (75% were the most common symptoms at presentation and the median duration of symptoms before presentation was six weeks (range: 2-8 weeks. All pancreatic abscesses were detected on CT scan. Multiple foci involvement was common (3 to 6 sites: blood (4 patients, liver (3 patients, psoas muscle (2 patients, spleen (2 patients, infected ascites (2 patients and lung (1 patient. Pancreatic involvement ranged from multi-focal micro-abscesses to focal large abscesses and involved all parts of the pancreas (body 100%, head 75% and tail 50%. Associated pancreatic findings included splenic vein thrombosis, peripancreatic inflammation and peripancreatic fat streaking. All the pancreatic abscesses were resolved with antibiotics without requiring pancreatic abscess drainage (including one patient who died from disseminated melioidosis. Conclusion Pancreatic involvement typically occurs as part of multi-organ involvement and commonly manifests as multifoci micro-abscesses. Associated pancreatic abnormalities were also common. All responded to treatment without requiring drainage

  20. Quantitation of residual trypsin in cell-based therapeutics using immobilized α-1-antitrypsin or SBTI in an ELISA format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braatz, James A; Elias, Christopher; Finny, Joseph G; Tran, Huan; McCaman, Michael

    2015-02-01

    An Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) has been developed for the quantitation of porcine trypsin as a process residual in cell therapy products based on its capture by either of two immobilized anti-trypsins, α-1-antitrypsin (α1AT) or soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) followed by detection with a polyclonal goat anti-porcine trypsin-IgG conjugated with peroxidase. It was demonstrated that an extended range of antigen quantitation could be achieved that covered nearly three orders of magnitude of trypsin concentration. The utility of the assay was demonstrated by its application to samples generated in a cell-based therapeutic manufacturing setting.

  1. Hepatic damage during acute pancreatitis in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M.M. Coelho

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied the alterations in the metabolism of liver mitochondria in rats with acute pancreatitis. Male Wistar rats were allocated to a control group (group I and to five other groups corresponding to 2, 4, 12, 24 and 48 h after the induction of acute pancreatitis by the injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct. Sham-operated animals were submitted to the same surgical steps except for the induction of acute pancreatitis. Mitochondrial oxidation and phosphorylation were measured polarographically by determining oxygen consumption without ADP (basal respiration, state 4 and in the presence of ADP (activated respiration, state 3. Serum amylase, transaminases (ALT and AST and protein were also determined. Ascitic fluid, contents of amylase, trypsin and total protein were also determined and arterial blood pressure was measured in all groups. In ascitic fluid, trypsin and amylase increased reaching a maximum at 2 and 4 h, respectively. Serum amylase increased at 2 h reaching a maximum at 4 h. Serum transaminase levels increased at 12 and 24 h. After 2 h (and also 4 h there was an increase in state 4 respiration (45.65 ± 1.79 vs 28.96 ± 1.50 and a decrease in respiration control rate (3.53 ± 0.09 vs 4.45 ± 0.08 and in the ADP/O ratio (1.77 ± 0.02 vs 1.91 ± 0.01 compared to controls (P<0.05. These results indicate a disruption of mitochondrial function, which recovered after 12 h. In the 48-h groups there was mitochondrial damage similar to that occurring in ischemic lesion. Beat-to-beat analysis (30 min showed that arterial blood pressure remained normal up to 24 h (111 ± 3 mmHg while a significant decrease occurred in the 48-h group (91 ± 4 mmHg. These data suggest biphasic damage in mitochondrial function in acute pancreatitis: an initial uncoupled phase, possibly secondary to enzyme activity, followed by a temporary recovery and then a late and final dysfunction, associated with arterial hypotension, possibly related

  2. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer; the clinical aspects and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.M. Sikkens (Edmée)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, the pancreas is unable to deliver a sufficient quantity of pancreatic enzymes to the small intestine to digest food. It may occur in several life threatening diseases, including chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Due to this lack or absence

  3. Regulation of pancreatic exocrine secretion in goats: differential effects of short- and long-term duodenal phenylalanine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z P; Xu, M; Yao, J H; Liu, K; Li, F; Liu, Y; Wang, F; Sun, F F; Liu, N N

    2013-06-01

    Four yearling goats (31.2 ± 2.5 kg), surgically fitted with common bile duct reentrant and duodenal catheter, were used in two 4 × 4 Latin square design experiments to investigate the effects of duodenal infusion of phenylalanine for different times on pancreatic exocrine secretion (PES). In experiment 1 (the long-term experiment), goats were duodenally infused with 0, 2, 4 or 8 g/day phenylalanine for 14 day. Pancreatic juice and jugular blood samples were collected over 1-h intervals for 6 h daily from day 11 to day 14 to encompass a 24-h day. In experiment 2 (the short-term experiment), goats were infused with phenylalanine for 10 h continuously at the same infusion rate as experiment 1 after feed deprivation for 24 h repeated every 10 day. Pancreatic juice and blood samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 h of infusion. The volume and pH of pancreatic juice were measured, and a 5% subsample was composited and frozen until analysis of enzyme activities. Plasma was frozen until analysis of insulin and cholecystokinin (CCK). In experiment 1, pancreatic juice, α-amylase secretion and plasma CCK concentration responded quadratically (p phenylalanine. Trypsin secretion had a quadratic response (p phenylalanine and decreasing thereafter. Phenylalanine linearly decreased pancreatic protein and lipase secretion (p phenylalanine infusion did not influence (p > 0.05) pancreatic juice, protein, α-amylase, lipase, trypsin secretion and plasma CCK concentration. These results indicate PES of ruminants is stimulated by phenylalanine and is potentially mediated by CCK in the long-term duodenal infusion treatment, but is not influenced by phenylalanine in the short-term duodenal infusion treatment.

  4. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis develops immediately after the causative impulse, while chronic pancreatitis develops after the long-term action of the noxious agent. A typical representative of acute pancreatitis is biliary pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis develops in alcoholism and has a long latency. As alcoholic pancreatitis is manifested at first as a rule by a potent attack, it is classified in this stage as acute pancreatitis. The most frequent etiological factors in our civilization are thus cholelithiasis and alcoholism (both account for 20-50% in different studies). The assumed pathogenetic principles in acute biliary pancreatitis are the common canal of both efferent ducts above the obturated papilla, duodenopancreatic reflux and intrapancreatic hypertension. A detailed interpretation is however lacking. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is more complicated. Among others some part is played by changes in the calcium concentration and fusion of cellular membranes. Idiopathic pancreatitis occurs in up to 10%, part of the are due to undiagnosed alcoholism and cholelithiasis. Other etiologies are exceptional. Similarly as in cholelithiasis pancreatitis develops also during other pathological processes in the area of the papilla of Vater such as dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi, ampulloma and juxtapapillary diverticulum, it is however usually mild. The incidence of postoperative pancreatitis is declining. Its lethality is 30% and the diagnosis is difficult. In the pathogenesis changes of the ion concentration are involved, hypoxia and mechanical disorders of the integrity of the gland. Pancreatitis develops in association with other infections--frequently in mumps, rarely in hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and mycoses. Viral pancreatitis is usually mild. In parasitoses pancreatitis develops due to a block of the papilla Vateri. In hyperparathyroidism chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop, recent data are lacking. As to dyslipoproteinaemias

  5. Pancreatic groove cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yuan-Hao; Chen, Shih-Chin; Shyr, Bor-Uei; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Wang, Shin-E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic groove cancer is very rare and can be indistinguishable from groove pancreatitis. This study is to clarify the characteristics, clinical features, managements, and survival outcomes of this rare tumor. Brief descriptions were made for each case of pancreatic groove cancer encountered at our institute. Individualized data of pancreatic groove cancer cases described in the literature were extracted and added to our database to expand the study sample size for a more complete analysis. A total of 33 patients with pancreatic groove cancer were included for analysis, including 4 cases from our institute. The median tumor size was 2.7 cm. The most common symptom was nausea or vomiting (89%), followed by jaundice (67%). Duodenal stenosis was noted by endoscopy in 96% of patients. The histopathological examination revealed well differentiated tumor in 43%. Perineural invasion was noted in 90%, and lymphovascular invasion and lymph node involvement in 83%. Overall 1-year survival rate was 93.3%, and 3- or 5-year survival rate was 62.2%, with a median survival of 11.0 months. Survival outcome for the well-differentiated tumors was better than those of the moderate/poorly differentiated ones. Early involvement of duodenum causing vomiting is often the initial presentation, but obstructive jaundice does not always happen until the disease progresses. Tumor differentiation is a prognostic factor for survival outcome. The possibility of pancreatic groove cancer should be carefully excluded before making the diagnosis of groove pancreatitis for any questionable case. PMID:28079795

  6. Updates on Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojas Vyas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains a therapeutic challenge. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2014 about 46,420 people will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and about 39,590 people will die of pancreatic cancer in the United States [1]. The incidence of pancreatic carcinoma has markedly increased over the past several decades and it now ranks as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Despite the high mortality rate associated with pancreatic cancer, its etiology is poorly understood. Although progress in the development of new cytotoxic and biological drugs for the treatment of pancreatic cancer continues, the outcome remains grim. Many organizations and associations have taken an effort to improve knowledge, understanding and outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer. Pancreas Club, since its founding in 1966, is aimed to promote the interchange of ideas between physicians and scientists focused on pancreas throughout the world in an informal “club” atmosphere. We attended the 48th Annual Meeting of Pancreas Club in Chicago and reviewed many interesting posters and oral presentations. Here we discuss a few selected abstracts.

  7. Effects of infrared treatment on urease, trypsin inhibitor and lipoxygenase activities of soybean samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Seda; Basman, Arzu

    2015-02-15

    In this study, infrared (IR) treatment at different powers (814W, 1003W, 1208W, 1342W) and times (10min, 15min) were applied to unsoaked and soaked (30min, 45min) soybeans (cvs. Adasoy, Nazlican). Effects of IR treatment on urease, trypsin inhibitor, lipoxygenase-1 and lipoxygenase-3 activities were investigated. Infrared treatment caused a substantial reduction in urease and trypsin inhibitor activities and considerable decrease was observed as the IR power increased. Urease inactivation in unsoaked samples was achieved at even lower power (1208W). In contrast to urease activity, IR treatment had a more pronounced effect on trypsin inhibitor and lipoxygenase activities of soaked soybeans as compared to unsoaked counterparts. Maximum trypsin inhibitor reduction in IR-treated samples was 95% for cv. Adasoy and 97% for cv. Nazlican. IR power of 1003W was sufficient for complete inactivation of lipoxygenase-1 and lipoxygenase-3, regardless of the moisture contents of the samples.

  8. The use of poly(ethylene terephthalate)-poly(aniline) composite for trypsin immobilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caramori, S.S. [Laboratorio de Quimica de Proteinas, Departamento de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Goias, Cx. Postal 131, 74001-970 Goiania-GO (Brazil)], E-mail: samanthabio@hotmail.com; Fernandes, K.F. [Laboratorio de Quimica de Proteinas, Departamento de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Goias, Cx. Postal 131, 74001-970 Goiania-GO (Brazil)], E-mail: katia@icb.ufg.br

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents trypsin immobilisation on strips of poly(ethylene terephthalate)-poly(aniline), activated with glutaraldehyde (PET-PANIG) composite. The photomicrography of the material showed changes corresponding to the chemical modifications produced in the steps of synthesis. The immobilisation process was very efficient under optimal conditions (18.6%). The immobilised and free enzyme presented the same pH and temperature optimum. PET-PANIG-trypsin was able to hydrolyse casein, albumin, gelatine, and skimmed milk. Km{sub app} value for PET-PANIG-trypsin was very close to Km of the free enzyme for casein. Immobilised trypsin showed higher stability than the free enzyme, with 100% activity after 14 days of storage at 4 deg. C and 100% operational stability after 4 cycles of use.

  9. Influence of Different Genotypes on Trypsin Inhibitor Levels and Activity in Soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor A. Nedovic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the relationship between the two major trypsin inhibitors (TI in soybean, i.e., the Kunitz (KTI and Bowman-Birk (BBI trypsin inhibitors, as well as between them and the corresponding trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA. Twelve investigated soybean genotypes showed significant differences in TI levels and TIA. A very strong positive correlation was found between the levels of KTI and total BBI (r = 0.94, P < 0.05. No relationship was found between KTI, BBI or total TI and TIA. Based on this data, it appears that the levels of major TI in soybean are related. Understanding the relationship between trypsin inhibitors and their activities could be useful for further improvement of the health impacts of soy proteins.

  10. Familial pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, A P; Hruban, R H; Brune, K A; Petersen, G M; Goggins, M

    2001-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States and will be responsible for an estimated 28,900 deaths in 2001. Relatively little is known of its etiology, and the only well-established risk factor is cigarette smoking. Studies over the past 3 decades have shown that 4%-16% of patients with pancreatic cancer have a family history of the disease. A small fraction of this aggregation can be accounted for in inherited cancer syndromes, including familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, hereditary breast-ovarian cancer, hereditary pancreatitis, and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. These syndromes arise as a result of germline mutations in the BRCA2, pl6 (familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma), mismatch repair (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer), and STK11 (Peutz-Jeghers syndrome) genes. In addition, hereditary plays a role in predisposing certain patients with apparently sporadic pancreatic cancer. Many patients with pancreatic cancers caused by a germline mutation in a cancer-causing gene do not have a pedigree that is suggestive of a familial cancer syndrome. A recent prospective analysis of the pedigrees in the National Familial Pancreatic Tumor Registry found that individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer in multiple first-degree relatives have a high risk of pancreatic cancer themselves. The identification of such high-risk individuals will help clinicians target screening programs and develop preventive interventions with the hope of reducing the mortality of pancreatic cancer in these families.

  11. Research on Isolation and Clone of Embryonic Stem Cell-Like in Bovine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Li-long; YANG Qi; XIAO Mei; FENG Xiu-Liang; YANG Chun-rong; LEI An-min; GAO Zhi-min; DOU Zhong-ying; QIU Huai

    2002-01-01

    Bovine embryonic stem cell would be invaluable for researching the aspect of animal cloning, production transgenic animal and discussion of gene function in vitro. With the object of establishing an effective culture system for isolation and clone of bovine pluripotent stem cell, we cultured bovine embryos and mouse embryos including morula blastula and hatached blastula and obtained animal ICM on Primary marine embryonic fibroblast (Primary murine embryonic fibroblast, PMEF) feeder layer with tissue medium(DMEM supplemented with 15ml/100ml NBS ,0.1μmol/L Na2SeO3, 0. 1mmol/L β-mercaptoethanol, 1 000ng/ml LIF,10 ng/ml IGF, 1mmol/L necessary amino acid and 1mmol/L L-glutamine), then, we obtained mouse ICM and bovine ICM. Moreover, we isolated and cloned the 6 passage bovine ES like cells(12 cell lines) and 9 passage marine ES like cells (52 cell lines) deriving from bovine ICM and murine ICM respectively on the feeder layer of PMEF by disaggregating ICM and ES cell clones of bovine and murine into smaller clumps through digesting with 0. 125g/100ml trypsin and 0.02g/100ml EDTA and scattering with a glass needle. The pluripotency of both murine and bovine ES like cells was identified with morphological character, histochemistry identification, karyotype analysis and differentiation of ES cells in vitro or in vivo. This result showed that bovine embryonic stem cell and murine embryonic stem cell had developmental pluripotency.

  12. Bovine Herpesvirus 4 infections and bovine mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, Gerardus Johannus

    2002-01-01

    Mastitis is an often occurring disease in dairy cattle with an enormous economic impact for milk producers worldwide. Despite intensive research, which is historically based on the detection of bacterial udder pathogens, still around 20-35% of clinical cases of bovine mastitis have an unknown aetiol

  13. Novel mutations of PRSS1 gene in patients with pancreatic cancer among Han population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Kai; LIU Qi-cai; LIN Jian-hua; LIN Xin-hua; ZHUANG Ze-hao; GAO Feng; OU Qi-shui

    2011-01-01

    Background A high mortality rate of pancreatic cancer becomes a bottleneck for further treatment with long-term efficacy. It is urgent to find a new mean to predict the early onset of pancreatic cancer accurately. The authors hypothesized that genetic variants of cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene could affect trypsin expression/function and result in abnormal activation of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2), then lead to pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to elaborate some novel mutations of PRSS1 gene in the patients with pancreatic cancer.Methods Totally 156 patients with pancreatic cancer and 220 unrelated individuals as controls were enrolled in this study. The mutations of PRSS1 gene were analyzed by direct sequencing. K-ras Mutation Detection Kit was used to find the general k-ras gene disorder in the pancreatic cancer tissue. Then the clinical data were collected and analyzed simultaneously.Results There were two patients who carried novel mutations which was IVS 3 +157 G>C of PRSS1 gene in peripheral blood specimens and pancreatic cancer tissue. What's more, it was surprising to find a novel complicated mutation of exon 3 in PRSS1 gene (c.409 A>G and c.416 C>T) in another young patient. The complicated mutation made No. 135 and No.137 amino acid transfer from Thr to Ala and Thr to Met respectively. No any mutation was found in the normal controls while no mutations of k-ras gene were detected in the three patients.Conclusion Mutations of PRSS1 gene may be an important factor of pancreatic cancer.

  14. Pancreatic cellular injury after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: frequency, time course and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nys, Monique; Venneman, Ingrid; Deby-Dupont, Ginette; Preiser, Jean-Charles; Vanbelle, Sophie; Albert, Adelin; Camus, Gérard; Damas, Pierre; Larbuisson, Robert; Lamy, Maurice

    2007-05-01

    Although often clinically silent, pancreatic cellular injury (PCI) is relatively frequent after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass; and its etiology and time course are largely unknown. We defined PCI as the simultaneous presence of abnormal values of pancreatic isoamylase and immunoreactive trypsin (IRT). The frequency and time evolution of PCI were assessed in this condition using assays for specific exocrine pancreatic enzymes. Correlations with inflammatory markers were searched for preoperative risk factors. One hundred ninety-three patients submitted to cardiac surgery were enrolled prospectively. Blood IRT, amylase, pancreatic isoamylase, lipase, and markers of inflammation (alpha1-protease inhibitor, alpha2-macroglobulin, myeloperoxidase) were measured preoperatively and postoperatively until day 8. The postoperative increase in plasma levels of pancreatic enzymes and urinary IRT was biphasic in all patients: early after surgery and later (from day 4 to 8 after surgery). One hundred thirty-three patients (69%) experienced PCI, with mean IRT, isoamylase, and alpha1-protease inhibitor values higher for each sample than that in patients without PCI. By multiple regression analysis, we found preoperative values of plasma IRT >or=40 ng/mL, amylase >or=42 IU/mL, and pancreatic isoamylase >or=20 IU/L associated with a higher incidence of postsurgery PCI (P < 0.005). In the PCI patients, a significant correlation was found between the 4 pancreatic enzymes and urinary IRT, total calcium, myeloperoxidase, alpha1-protease inhibitor, and alpha2-macroglobulin. These data support a high prevalence of postoperative PCI after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, typically biphasic and clinically silent, especially when pancreatic enzymes were elevated preoperatively.

  15. Bioconjugation of trypsin onto gold nanoparticles: Effect of surface chemistry on bioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinterwirth, Helmut; Lindner, Wolfgang [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 38, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Laemmerhofer, Michael, E-mail: michael.laemmerhofer@uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 38, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Size and spacer affect bioactivity of nanoparticulate trypsin reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase of GNP's size increases activity of bound trypsin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase of spacer length increases amount and activity of immobilized enzyme by factor 6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decrease of digestion time up to less than 1 h when trypsin immobilized onto GNPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduced auto-digestion compared to trypsin in-solution. - Abstract: The systematic study of activity, long-time stability and auto-digestion of trypsin immobilized onto gold nanoparticles (GNPs) is described in this paper and compared to trypsin in-solution. Thereby, the influence of GNP's size and immobilization chemistry by various linkers differing in lipophilicity/hydrophilicity and spacer lengths was investigated with regard to the bioactivity of the conjugated enzyme. GNPs with different sizes were prepared by reduction and simultaneous stabilization with trisodium citrate and characterized by UV/vis spectra, dynamic light scattering (DLS), {zeta}-potential measurements and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). GNPs were derivatized by self-assembling of bifunctional thiol reagents on the nanoparticle (NP) surface via dative thiol-gold bond yielding a carboxylic acid functionalized surface. Trypsin was either attached directly via hydrophobic and ionic interactions onto the citrate stabilized GNPs or immobilized via EDC/NHS bioconjugation onto the carboxylic functionalized GNPs, respectively. The amount of bound trypsin was quantified by measuring the absorbance at 280 nm. The activity of bound enzyme and its Michaelis Menten kinetic parameter K{sub m} and v{sub max} were measured by the standard chromogenic substrate N{sub {alpha}}-Benzoyl-DL-arginine 4-nitroanilide hydrochloride (BApNA). Finally, digestion of a standard protein mixture with the trypsin-conjugated NPs followed by analysis with

  16. Pancreatitis in scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Bhatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a rickettsial infection prevalent in most parts of India. Acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation is a rare complication of this condition. This paper reports acute renal failure, pancreatitis and pseudocyst formation in a 48-year-old female with scrub typhus. Ultrasonography of the abdomen revealed a bulky pancreas with fluid seen along the body of the pancreas in the lesser sac. The infection was successfully treated with doxycycline and supportive treatment. Pancreatitis was managed conservatively. This case report highlights the importance of identifying and managing uncommon complications of a common tropical disease for optimum outcome.

  17. Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Claus; Detlefsen, Sönke; Palnæs Hansen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database aims to prospectively register the epidemiology, diagnostic workup, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer in Denmark at an institutional and national level. STUDY POPULATION: Since May 1, 2011, all patients......, and survival. The results are published annually. CONCLUSION: The Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database has registered data on 2,217 patients with microscopically verified ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. The data have been obtained nationwide over a period of 4 years and 2 months. The completeness...

  18. Comparison of the aggregation behavior of soy and bovine whey protein hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Bas J H; Alting, Arno C; Gruppen, Harry

    2007-01-01

    Soy-derived proteins (soy protein isolate, glycinin, and beta-conglycinin) and bovine whey-derived proteins (whey protein isolate, alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin) were hydrolyzed using subtilisin Carlsberg, chymotrypsin, trypsin, bromelain, and papain. The (in)solubility of the hydrolysates obtained was studied as a function of pH. At neutral pH, all soy-derived protein hydrolysates, particularly those from glycinin, obtained by hydrolysis with subtilisin Carlsberg, chymotrypsin, bromelain, and papain showed a stronger aggregation compared to the non-hydrolyzed ones. This increase in aggregation was not observed upon hydrolysis by trypsin. None of the whey-derived protein hydrolysates exhibited an increase in aggregation at neutral pH. The high abundance of theoretical cleavage sites in the hydrophobic regions of glycinin probably explains the stronger exposure of hydrophobic groups than for the other proteins, which is suggested to be the driving force in the aggregate formation.

  19. Delayed internal pancreatic fistula with pancreatic pleural effusion postsplenectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of pancreatic pleural effusion,secondary to an internal pancreatic fistula,is a rare clinical syndrome and diagnosis is often missed.The key to the diagnosis is a dramatically elevated pleural fluid amylase.This pancreatic pleural effusion is also called a pancreatic pleural fistula.It is characterized by profuse pleural fluid and has a tendency to recur.Here we report a case of delayed internal pancreatic fistula with pancreatic pleural effusion emerging after splenectomy.From the treatment ...

  20. Management of necrotizing pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Slavin1; Paula Ghaneh; Robert Sutton1; Mark Hartley; Peter Rowlands; Conall Garvey; Mark Hughes; John Neoptolemos

    2001-01-01

    Infection complicating pancreatic necrosis leads to persisting sepsis, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and accounts for about half the deaths that occur following acute pancreatitis. Severe cases due to gallstones require urgent endoscopic sphincterotomy. Patients with pancreatic necrosis should be followed with serial contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) and if infection is suspected fine needle aspiration of the necrotic area for bacteriology (FNAB) should be undertaken. Treatment of sterile necrosis should initially be non-operative. In the presence of infection necrosectomy is indicated. Although traditionally this has been by open surgery, minimally invasive procedures are a promising new alternative. There are many unresolved issues in the management of pancreatic necrosis. These include, the use of antibiotic prophylaxis, the precise indications for and frequency of repeat CE-CT and FNAB,and the role of enteral feeding.

  1. Acute pancreatitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokić Radoica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute pancreatitis in children is mostly due to abdominal trauma, diseases or congenital anomalies of the biliary-pancreatic tree. Both exogenous and endogenous functions of the gland could be disturbed by various levels of damage. Clinical Finding and Diagnostics. Acute abdominal pain, gastrointestinal signs and general deterioration are the main clinical findings. The examination can be completed by blood and urine tests of amylase, electrolytes level, and the C-reactive protein. In addition to these tests, ultrasound, computed tomography and endoscopy are required as well. Therapeutic Methods. The therapy of choice is non-operative treatment using medicaments to control the pain, decrease the pancreatic activity and prevent further complications. If the conservative treatment fails, the surgical approach is necessary: drainage, resections, by-pass procedures, etc. Conclusion. Acute pancreatitis is a very serious disease in childhood. Clinical experience and rational approach are very important in the diagnostic and therapeutic methods.

  2. Perspectives in Pancreatic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Salim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describes some of the mechanisms which are thought to be important in the causation of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Both medical and surgical techniques for treating this pain are described.

  3. What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also called 5-HT ) or its precursor, 5-HTP. The treatment and outlook for pancreatic NETs depend ... known as precancers ). Because people are getting imaging tests such as CT scans more often than in ...

  4. [Acute hypertrygliceridemic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senosiain Lalastra, Carla; Tavío Hernández, Eduardo; Moreira Vicente, Victor; Maroto Castellanos, Maite; García Sánchez, Maria Concepción; Aicart Ramos, Marta; Téllez Vivajos, Luis; Cuño Roldán, José Luis

    2013-04-01

    Acute hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis is the third cause of acute pancreatitis in the Western population. There is usually an underlying alteration in lipid metabolism and a secondary factor. Clinical presentation is similar to that of pancreatitis of other etiologies, but the course of acute hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis seems to be worse and more recurrent. Some laboratory data can be artefacts, leading to diagnostic errors. This is the case of amylase, which can show false low levels. Treatment is based on intense fluidotherapy and analgesia. When there is no response to conservative management, other methods to lower triglyceride levels should be used. Several options are available, such as plasmapheresis, insulin, and heparin. The present article provides a review of the current literature on this entity.

  5. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risks of other cancers (or other health problems). Examples of genetic syndromes that can cause exocrine pancreatic cancer include: Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome , caused by mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes Familial atypical ...

  6. Autoimmune pancreatitis and cholangitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niraj; Jani; James; Buxbaum

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis(AIP) is part of a systemic fibrosclerotic process characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with immunoglobulin G subtype-4(Ig G4) positive cells. It characteristically presents with biliary obstruction due to mass-like swelling of the pancreas. Frequently AIP is accompanied by extra-pancreaticmanifestations including retroperitoneal fibrosis, thyroid disease, and salivary gland involvement. Auto-antibodies, hypergammaglobulemia, and prompt resolution of pancreatic and extrapancreatic findings with steroids signify its autoimmune nature. Refractory cases are responsive to immunomodulators and rituximab. Involvement of the biliary tree, termed IgG 4 associated cholangiopathy, mimics primary sclerosing cholangitis and is challenging to manage. High IgG 4 levels and swelling of the pancreas with a diminutive pancreatic duct are suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. Given similarities in presentation but radical differences in management and outcome, differentiation from pancreatic malignancy is of paramount importance. There is controversy regarding the optimal diagnostic criterion and steroid trials to make the diagnosis. Additionally, the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas and requirement for histologic sampling, makes tissue acquisition challenging. Recently, a second type of autoimmune pancreatitis has been recognized with similar clinical presentation and steroid response though different histology, serologic, and extrapancreatic findings.

  7. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  8. Hereditary pancreatitis and secondary screening for early pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitone, L J; Greenhalf, W; Howes, N R; Neoptolemos, J P

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant disease with incomplete penetrance (80%), accounting for approximately 1% of all cases of pancreatitis. It is characterized by the onset of recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis in childhood and frequent progression to chronic pancreatitis. Whitcomb et al. identified the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1) on chromosome 7q35 as the site of the mutation that causes hereditary pancreatitis. The European registry of hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer (EUROPAC) aims to identify and make provisions for those affected by hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer. The most common mutations in hereditary pancreatitis are R122H, N29I and A16V but many families have been described with clinically defined hereditary pancreatitis where there is no PRSS1 mutation. It is known that the cumulative lifetime risk (to age 70 years) of pancreatic cancer is 40% in individuals with hereditary pancreatitis. This subset of individuals form an ideal group for the development of a screening programme aimed at detecting pancreatic cancer at an early stage in an attempt to improve the presently poor long-term survival. Current screening strategies involve multimodality imaging (computed tomography, endoluminal ultrasound) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for pancreatic juice collection followed by molecular analysis of the DNA extracted from the juice. The potential benefit of screening (curative resection) must be balanced against the associated morbidity and mortality of surgery. Philosophically, the individual's best interest must be sought in light of the latest advances in medicine and science following discussions with a multidisciplinary team in specialist pancreatic centres.

  9. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  10. Pancreatic ductal system obstruction and acute recurrent pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Delhaye; C Matos; M Arvanitakis; J Devière

    2008-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis is a clinical entity largely associated with pancreatic ductal obstruction.This latter includes congenital variants,of which pancreas divisum is the most frequent but also controversial,chronic pancreatitis,tumors of the pancreaticobiliary junction and sphincter of Oddi dysfunction.This review summarizes current knowledge about diagnostic work-up and therapy of these conditions.

  11. Pancreatic disorders and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisterfeld, R; Ehehalt, F; Saeger, H D; Solimena, M

    2008-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease among patients with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis, disorders of the exocrine pancreas. Different clinical features of diabetes are associated with these two conditions: hyperinsulinemia and peripheral insulin resistance are the prevailing diabetic traits in pancreatic cancer, whereas reduced islet cell mass and impaired insulin secretion are typically observed in chronic pancreatitis. Whether or not a causal relationship exists between diabetes and pancreatic carcinoma is an intriguing but unanswered question. Diabetes often precedes pancreatic cancer and is thus regarded as a potential risk factor for malignancy. Conversely, pancreatic cancer may secrete diabetogenic factors. Given these findings, there is increasing interest in whether close monitoring of the glycemic profile may aid early detection of pancreatic tumor lesions.

  12. Loperamide-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halla Vidarsdottir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a common disease leading to hospitalizations, most often caused by gallstones or alcohol. We present a case of a patient diagnosed with acute pancreatitis considered to be due to loperamide treatment for diarrhea.

  13. Endoscopic treatment of chronic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of chronic pancreatitis has been exclusively surgical for a long time. Recently, endoscopic therapy has become widely used as a primary therapeutic option.Initially performed for drainage of pancreatic cysts and pseudocysts, endoscopic treatments were adapted to biliary and pancreatic ducts stenosis. Pancreatic sphincterotomy which allows access to pancreatic ducts was firstly reported. Secondly, endoscopic methods of stenting, dilatation, and stones extraction of the bile ducts were applied to pancreatic ducts. Nevertheless,new improvements were necessary: failures of pancreatic stone extraction justified the development of extra-corporeal shock wave lithotripsy; dilatation of pancreatic stenosis was improved by forage with a new device; moreover endosonography allowed guidance for celiac block, gastro-cystostomy, duodeno-cystostomy and pancreatico-gastrostomy. Although endoscopic treatments are more and more frequently accepted,indications are still debated.

  14. [The epidemiology of pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2010-10-31

    Pancreatic cancer is a relatively uncommon tumor, but even with early diagnosis, mortality rates are high, explaining why this form of cancer has now become a common cause of cancer mortality. There are no screening tests for early detection of pancreatic cancer. It is more common in men than women and is predominantly a disease of elderly people. There is wide variation in the incidence of pancreatic cancer around the world, suggesting that environmental factors are important in the pathogenesis. Smoking is the major known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, while dietary factors seem to be less important. Other possible risk factors include chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Numerous inherited germ line mutations are associated with pancreatic cancer. Of these, hereditary pancreatitis confers the greatest risk, while BRCA2 mutations are the commonest inherited disorder. Polymorphisms in genes that control detoxification of environmental carcinogens and metabolic pathways may alter the risk of pancreatic cancer.

  15. SEQUENCES RELATED TO THE OX PANCREATIC RIBONUCLEASE CODING REGION IN THE GENOMIC DNA OF MAMMALIAN-SPECIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BREUKELMAN, HJ; BEINTEMA, JJ; CONFALONE, E; COSTANZO, C; SASSO, MP; CARSANA, A; PALMIERI, M; FURIA, A

    1993-01-01

    Mammalian pancreatic ribonucleases form a family of homologous proteins that has been extensively investigated. The primary structures of these enzymes were used to derive phylogenetic trees. These analyses indicate that the presence of three strictly homologous enzymes in the bovine species (the pa

  16. CT of pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Toshio (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-09-01

    One hundred and two cases of acute and chronic pancreatitis were studied by computed tomography. Fluid collection was detected by CT in 45 cases, and the common extrapancreatic sites of involvement included the lesser sac (13 cases), anterior pararenal space (9 cases), transverse mesocolon (7 cases) and posterior pararenal space (5 cases). Ten cases of spontaneous resolution of pancreatic pseudocysts were encountered. Cystojejunostomy was done on 6 patients. A 4-to-6-weeks time interval has been currently accepted as necessary for pseudocyst wall maturation. However, the surgery was not possible in two patients in this series since the cyst wall was too thin. It is considered that the time over 3 months is required for surgical anastomosis of the cyst to the gastrointestinal tract. Pancreatic abscess has become the most common cause of death from pancreatitis. In this series pancreatic abscess occurred in 8 patients. Gas collection in the pancreas was observed in only one patient. In the other patients, pseudocysts had become infected and converted to abscesses. The CT number of 4 infected pseudocysts was less than 15 HU. Thus, it was not possible to distinguish infected from noninfected pseudocysts by CT. The author studied 9 patients with focal inflammatory mass of the pancreas with histologically proved severe fibrosis. All masses were small. Angiography showed occlusion or marked stenosis of the splenic vein in 3 cases. The postcontract CT (after intravenous bolus injection) in 7 cases of focal inflammatory mass demonstrated almost equal enhanced effect of the mass as compared with the adjacent normal pancreatic parenchyma. This finding is considered to be useful in distinguishing inflammatory mass from pancreatic carcinoma. (author).

  17. Motion-Genetic Testing is Useful in the Diagnosis of Nonhereditary Pancreatic Conditions: Arguments for the Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Whitcomb

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of three major genes are associated with an increased risk of acute and chronic pancreatitis: the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 gene, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene, and the pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI or serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1 gene. Some autosomal dominant forms of hereditary pancreatitis are associated with mutations of the PRSS1 gene, which can be readily identified by genetic testing. Mutations of the CFTR gene can lead either to cystic fibrosis or to idiopathic chronic pancreatitis, and to a variety of cystic fibrosis-associated disorders, including congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens and sinusitis. These mutations, as with those of the SPINK1 (or PSTI gene, are prevalent in North America; thus, the presence of such a mutation in an asymptomatic person does not confer a high risk of developing pancreatitis. Combinations of mutations of the PRSS1 and SPINK1 genes lead to more severe disease, as indicated by an earlier onset of symptoms, which suggests that SPINK1 is a disease modifier. The major fear expressed by potential candidates for genetic testing is that the results could lead to insurance discrimination. Studies of the positive predictive value of genetic tests are hampered by recruitment bias and lack of knowledge of family history of pancreatitis. Genetic testing is most useful for persons for whom family members have already been found to exhibit a particular pancreatitis-associated mutation. In the future, increased knowledge of the myriad genetic causes of pancreatitis, as well as advances in the diagnosis and treatment of early chronic pancreatitis, should enhance the utility of genetic testing.

  18. ERK activation is required for CCK-mediated pancreatic adaptive growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtz, Bryan J; Lodewyk, Kevin B; Sebolt-Leopold, Judith S; Ernst, Stephen A; Williams, John A

    2014-10-01

    High levels of cholecystokinin (CCK) can stimulate pancreatic adaptive growth in which mature acinar cells divide, leading to enhanced pancreatic mass with parallel increases in protein, DNA, RNA, and digestive enzyme content. Prolonged release of CCK can be induced by feeding trypsin inhibitor (TI) to disrupt normal feedback control. This leads to exocrine growth in a CCK-dependent manner. The extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) pathway regulates many proliferative processes in various tissues and disease models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of ERK signaling in pancreatic adaptive growth using the MEK inhibitors PD-0325901 and trametinib (GSK-1120212). It was determined that PD-0325901 given two times daily by gavage or mixed into powdered chow was an effective and specific inhibitor of ERK signaling in vivo. TI-containing chow led to a robust increase in pancreatic mass, protein, DNA, and RNA content. This pancreatic adaptive growth was blocked in mice fed chow containing the MEK inhibitors. PD-0325901 blocked TI-induced ERK-regulated early response genes, cell-cycle proteins, and mitogenesis by acinar cells. It was determined that ERK signaling is necessary for the initiation of pancreatic adaptive growth but not necessary to maintain it. PD-0325901 blocked adaptive growth when given before cell-cycle initiation but not after mitogenesis had been established. Furthermore, GSK-1120212, a chemically distinct inhibitor of the ERK pathway that is now approved for clinical use, inhibited growth similar to PD-0325901. These data demonstrate that the ERK pathway is required for CCK-stimulated pancreatic adaptive growth.

  19. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Eland (Ingo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are consid

  20. Genetic basis of chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, JBMJ; Morsche, RT; van Goor, Harry; Drenth, JPH

    2002-01-01

    Background: Pancreatitis has a proven genetic basis in a minority of patients. Methods: Review of the literature on genetics of pancreatitis. Results: Ever since the discovery that in most patients with hereditary pancreatitis a mutation in the gene encoding for cationic trypsinogen (R122H) was foun

  1. Crystallization, data collection and processing of the chymotrypsin–BTCI–trypsin ternary complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteves, Gisele Ferreira; Teles, Rozeni Chagas Lima; Cavalcante, Nayara Silva; Neves, David; Ventura, Manuel Mateus [Laboratório de Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, 70910-900 Brasília-DF (Brazil); Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalves, E-mail: joao@lnls.br [Center for Structural Molecular Biology (CeBiME), Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), CP 6192, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Freitas, Sonia Maria de, E-mail: joao@lnls.br [Laboratório de Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, 70910-900 Brasília-DF (Brazil)

    2007-12-01

    A ternary complex of the proteinase inhibitor (BTCI) with trypsin and chymotrypsin was crystallized and its crystal structure was solved by molecular replacement. A ternary complex of the black-eyed pea trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitor (BTCI) with trypsin and chymotrypsin was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with 0.1 M HEPES pH 7.5, 10%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 6000 and 5%(v/v) 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol as precipitant. BTCI is a small protein with 83 amino-acid residues isolated from Vigna unguiculata seeds and is able to inhibit trypsin and chymotrypsin simultaneously by forming a stable ternary complex. X-ray data were collected from a single crystal of the trypsin–BTCI–chymotrypsin ternary complex to 2.7 Å resolution under cryogenic conditions. The structure of the ternary complex was solved by molecular replacement using the crystal structures of the BTCI–trypsin binary complex (PDB code) and chymotrypsin (PDB code) as search models.

  2. Insensitive trypsins are differentially transcribed during Spodoptera frugiperda adaptation against plant protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Caio Fernando Ramalho; de Paula Souza, Thaís; Parra, José Roberto Postali; Marangoni, Sergio; Silva-Filho, Marcio de Castro; Macedo, Maria Ligia Rodrigues

    2013-05-01

    0The fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) is an important pest insect due to high degree of polyphagia. In order to better understand its adaptation mechanism against plant protease inhibitors, bioassays were carried supplementing diet with the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor from Entada acaciifolia seeds (EATI). In vitro assays showed an increase of proteolytic activity in EATI-fed larvae midgut. Moreover, the trypsin enzymes showed insensitivity to inhibition with EATI. In order to understand what genes were overexpressed after chronic exposition to EATI, quantitative RT-PCR analyses were performed and revealed an increase in transcription of two trypsin genes, suggesting its participation in insensitivity of midgut trypsins. Another important result was the expression of one chymotrypsin gene, which is not expressed in control fed-larvae but induced in EATI-fed larvae. New regions of higher molecular weight showing proteolytic activity were visualized in inhibitor-fed larvae by zymography gel electrophoresis, proposing that the new enzymes expressed in response of inhibitor dietary would be formatting oligomers. This is a characteristic also observed in other pest insects that adapt to feed in plant protease inhibitors diet. Additional assays revealed that trypsins from EATI-fed larvae also became insensitive against Kunitz and Bowman-Birk inhibitors from soybean. This result suggests a possible involvement of the same S. frugiperda genes in adaptation against Kunitz and Bowman-Birk inhibitors in their host plants.

  3. Isolation of a trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor and its functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaoyun; Shao, Biao; Lu, Wei; Hong, Jing; Rao, Pingfan

    2014-01-01

    A novel trypsin inhibitor with thermal and pH stability, designated Merrtine, was isolated from Glycine max L. merr. The procedure involved ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography on CM-Sephadex C-50, and affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel. The 20 N-terminal amino acid sequences were determined to be DEYSKPCCDLCMCTRRCPPQ, demonstrating high homology with the sequence of Bowman-Birk type trypsin inhibitors. The molecular mass and isoelectric point of the inhibitor were estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and isoelectric focusing to be 20.0 kD and 5.8, respectively. Trypsin could be completely inhibited by Merrtine when the molar ratio was 8.1. The inhibitory activity of Merrtine was unaffected after exposure to temperatures up to 85 °C, as well as within the pH range 2-12. Besides inhibiting trypsin-chymotrypsin, the inhibitor demonstrated additional antifungal activity against the species of Alternaria alternate, Fusarium oxysporum, Pythium aphanidermatum, Physalospora piricola, Botrytis cinerea, and Fusarium solani. We herein report not only the trypsin inhibitor's extraction and isolation for the first time, but also its physiochemical and antifungal properties.

  4. Sexing Bovine Embryos Using PCR Amplification of Bovine SRY Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾溢滔; 张美兰; 陈美珏; 周霞娣; 黄英; 任兆瑞; 黄淑帧; 胡明信; 吴学清; 高建明; 张斌; 徐慧如

    1994-01-01

    This study analyses the bovine SRY DNA sequence by direct sequencing procedure, followed by the designation of the PCR primers specific for bovine SRY. Using PCR amplification of bovine SRY gene, the embryo sex was determined. The results of the embryo sex identification were confirmed after the embryo transfer and pregnancies.

  5. Trypsin inhibitor from tamarindus indica L. seeds reduces weight gain and food consumption and increases plasmatic cholecystokinin levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joycellane Alline do Nascimento Campos Ribeiro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Seeds are excellent sources of proteinase inhibitors, some of which may have satietogenic and slimming actions. We evaluated the effect of a trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus indica L. seeds on weight gain, food consumption and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. METHODS: A trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus was isolated using ammonium sulfate (30-60% following precipitation with acetone and was further isolated with Trypsin-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Analyses were conducted to assess the in vivo digestibility, food intake, body weight evolution and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. Histological analyses of organs and biochemical analyses of sera were performed. RESULTS: The trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus reduced food consumption, thereby reducing weight gain. The in vivo true digestibility was not significantly different between the control and Tamarindus trypsin inhibitor-treated groups. The trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus did not cause alterations in biochemical parameters or liver, stomach, intestine or pancreas histology. Rats treated with the trypsin inhibitor showed significantly elevated cholecystokinin levels compared with animals receiving casein or water. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that the isolated trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus reduces weight gain by reducing food consumption, an effect that may be mediated by increased cholecystokinin. Thus, the potential use of this trypsin inhibitor in obesity prevention and/or treatment should be evaluated.

  6. Chronic pancreatitis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Penny

    2012-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis used to be considered uncommon in dogs, but recent pathological and clinical studies have confirmed that it is in fact a common and clinically significant disease. Clinical signs can vary from low-grade recurrent gastrointestinal signs to acute exacerbations that are indistinguishable from classical acute pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a significant cause of chronic pain in dogs, which must not be underestimated. It also results in progressive impairment of endocrine and exocrine function and the eventual development of diabetes mellitus or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency or both in some affected dogs at end stage. The etiology is unknown in most cases. Chronic pancreatitis shows an increased prevalence in certain breeds, and recent work in English Cocker Spaniels suggests it is part of a polysystemic immune-mediated disease in this breed. The histological and clinical appearance is different in different breeds, suggesting that etiologies may also be different. Diagnosis is challenging because the sensitivities of the available noninvasive tests are relatively low. However, with an increased index of suspicion, clinicians will recognize more cases that will allow them to institute supportive treatment to improve the quality of life of the patient.

  7. Autoantibodies in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Marner, B; Pedersen, N T

    1985-01-01

    In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane, and reti......In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane......, and reticulin, and the IgG- and IgA-type pancreas-specific antibodies against islet cells, acinus cells, and ductal cells (DA) were estimated blindly. In 23 of the patients chronic pancreatitis was verified, whereas chronic pancreatitis was rejected in 37 patients (control group). IgG and IgA were found...... in significantly higher concentrations in the patients with chronic pancreatitis than in the control group but within the normal range. ANA and DA occurred very frequently in both groups but with no statistical difference. Other autoantibodies only occurred sporadically. The findings of this study do not support...

  8. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-01-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis (HPA) was described as a clinical entity from Kashmir, India in 1985. HPA is caused by invasion and migration of nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides, in to the biliary tract and pancreatic duct. Patients present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholecystitis, hepatic abscesses and acute pancreatitis. Ascarides traverse the ducts repeatedly, get trapped and die, leading to formation of hepatolithiasis. HPA is ubiquitous in endemic regions and in Kashmir, one such region, HPA is the etiological factor for 36.7%, 23%, 14.5% and 12.5% of all biliary diseases, acute pancreatitis, liver abscesses and biliary lithiasis respectively. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool in visualizing worms in gut lumen and ductal system. The rational treatment for HPA is to give appropriate treatment for clinical syndromes along with effective anthelmintic therapy. Endotherapy in HPA is indicated if patients continue to have symptoms on medical therapy or when worms do not move out of ductal lumen by 3 wk or die within the ducts. The worms can be removed from the ductal system in most of the patients and such patients get regression of symptoms of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease. PMID:27672273

  9. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-09-07

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis (HPA) was described as a clinical entity from Kashmir, India in 1985. HPA is caused by invasion and migration of nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides, in to the biliary tract and pancreatic duct. Patients present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholecystitis, hepatic abscesses and acute pancreatitis. Ascarides traverse the ducts repeatedly, get trapped and die, leading to formation of hepatolithiasis. HPA is ubiquitous in endemic regions and in Kashmir, one such region, HPA is the etiological factor for 36.7%, 23%, 14.5% and 12.5% of all biliary diseases, acute pancreatitis, liver abscesses and biliary lithiasis respectively. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool in visualizing worms in gut lumen and ductal system. The rational treatment for HPA is to give appropriate treatment for clinical syndromes along with effective anthelmintic therapy. Endotherapy in HPA is indicated if patients continue to have symptoms on medical therapy or when worms do not move out of ductal lumen by 3 wk or die within the ducts. The worms can be removed from the ductal system in most of the patients and such patients get regression of symptoms of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease.

  10. Insulin-like growth factor-I receptor in proliferation and motility of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minoru; Tomizawa; Fuminobu; Shinozaki; Takao; Sugiyama; Shigenori; Yamamoto; Makoto; Sueishi; Takanobu; Yoshida

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To develop a molecular therapy for pancreatic cancer, the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) signaling pathway was analyzed.METHODS: Pancreatic cancer cell lines (MIA-Paca2, NOR-P1, PANC-1, PK-45H, PK-1, PK-59 and KP-4) were cultured in media with 10 mL/L fetal bovine serum. Western blotting analysis was performed to clarify the expression of IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR). Picropodophyllin (PPP), a specific inhibitor of IGF-IR, LY294002, a specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol3 kinase (PI3K), and PD980...

  11. Acute effects of whole body gamma irradiation on exocrine pancreatic secretion in the pig; Effets aigus d'une irradiation corps entier sur la secretion pancreatique exocrine chez le porc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, P.; Scanff, P.; Joubert, C.; Vergnet, M.; Grison, S.; Griffiths, N. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DPRH/SRBE, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2004-06-01

    Reports on radiation damage to the pancreas deal essentially with long-term morphological changes with few data on pancreatic exocrine function. The aim of this work was to study the acute effects of whole body irradiation on volume and enzyme activities in the pancreatic juice. A whole body gamma irradiation (6 Gy) was investigated in pigs with continuous sampling of pancreatic juice before and after exposure via an indwelling catheter in the pancreatic duct. For each sample collected, total protein concentration and enzyme activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, lipase and amylase were determined. Pancreatic juice volume was monitored during all periods of collection. The volume of pancreatic juice secreted daily decreased one day after irradiation and remained lower than the control values over the experimental period. Total proteins secreted in the pancreatic juice and total activities of pancreatic enzymes were reduced similarly. On the other hand, only specific activities of elastase and lipase were affected by irradiation. Whole body gamma irradiation resulted in a rapid and marked decrease of exocrine pancreatic secretion, in terms of volume as well as secreted enzymes. This may contribute in part to the intestinal manifestations of the acute and/or late radiation syndrome. (author)

  12. Pancreatic metastasis from mycosis fungoides mimicking primary pancreatic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriolo, Paola; Fausti, Valentina; Cinotti, Elisa; Bonadio, Silvia; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Bianchi, Giovanna; Orcioni, Giulio Fraternali; Fiocca, Roberto; Rongioletti, Franco; Pistoia, Vito; Borgonovo, Giacomo

    2016-03-28

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that can undergo local progression with possible systemic dissemination. We report a case of a patient affected by MF with a pancreatic mass that was a diagnostic challenge between primitive tumor and pancreatic metastasis from MF. Clinical setting findings and imaging studies raised the suspicion of a pancreatic primary neoplasm. A diagnostic clue was provided by the combined histomorphologic/immunohistochemical study of pancreatic and cutaneous biopsies, which revealed a pancreatic localization of MF. Considering the rarity of metastatic localization of MF to the pancreas, we next investigated whether chemokine-chemokine receptor interactions could be involved in the phenomenon to provide new insight into the possible mechanisms underlying metastatic localization of MF to the pancreas. Histological analyses of archival pancreatic tissue demonstrated that glucagon-secreting cells of the pancreatic islets expressed the CCL27 chemokine, which may have attracted in our case metastatic MF cells expressing the complementary receptor CCR10.

  13. Primary Pancreatic Head Tuberculosis: Great Masquerader of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Dhaval; Patel, Jatin; Rathi, Chetan; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    Isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) is considered an extremely rare condition, even in the developing countries. Most reported cases of pancreatic TB are diagnosed after exploratory laparotomy or autopsy. Pancreatic TB is a potential mimic of invasive pancreatic malignancy and the presence of vascular invasion does not distinguish one condition from the other. Every effort should be made for the earliest diagnosis of this condition as TB is a treatable condition and it avoids unnecessary management of pancreatic carcinoma. Here we report a rare case of primary pancreatic head TB in a 58-year-old male who presented with hypodense lesion in head of pancreas with double duct sign and portal vein invasion mimicking non-resectable pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27785295

  14. The clinical assessment of intraductal ultrasonography in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare the clinical value of intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS) in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis with conventional imaging methods. Methods: IDUS was carried out in eighteen patients with pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis

  15. Discovery of benzothiazole guanidines as novel inhibitors of thrombin and trypsin IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karle, Michael; Knecht, Wolfgang; Xue, Yafeng

    2012-07-15

    In a project to find novel neutral P1 fragments for the synthesis of thrombin inhibitors with improved pharmacokinetic properties, fragments containing a benzothiazole guanidine scaffold were identified as weak thrombin inhibitors. WaterLOGSY (Water-Ligand Observed via Gradient SpectroscopY) NMR was used to detect fragments binding to thrombin and these fragments were followed up by Biacore A100 affinity measurements and enzyme assays. A crystal structure of the most potent compound with thrombin was obtained and revealed an unexpected binding mode as well as the key interactions of the fragment with the protein. Based on these results, the structure-based design and synthesis of a small series of optimized novel substituted benzothiazole guanidines with comparatively low pK(a) values was accomplished. Testing of these compounds against human trypsin I and human trypsin IV revealed unexpected inhibitory activity and selectivity of some of the compounds, making them attractive starting points for selective trypsin inhibitors.

  16. Mechanism of curcumin-induced trypsin inhibition: Computational and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Kang, Yi-Jun; Gu, Yun-Lan; Cao, Jian

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, the experimental and theoretical methods were used to analyze the binding interaction of food dye, curcumin with trypsin. The results of fluorescence spectroscopic measurements indicated that curcumin binding resulted in the obviously intrinsic fluorescence quenching with the increase concentration of curcumin. This binding interaction is a spontaneous process with the estimated enthalpy and entropy changes being -15.70 kJ mol-1 and 40.25 J mol-1 K-1, respectively. Hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic forces played an important role in the complex formation between curcumin and trypsin. Moreover, curcumin could enter into the primary substrate-binding pocket and makes the activity of trypsin decrease remarkably with the increasing concentration of curcumin.

  17. Enzootic bovine leukosis and Bovine leukemia virus

    OpenAIRE

    Amauri Alcindo Alfieri; Alice Fernandes Alfieri; Luis Álvaro Leuzzi Junior

    2004-01-01

    All over de World the Enzootic Bovine Leukosis is a important viral infection in cattle herds. This revision points out topics relative to the etiological agent, clinical signals, diagnosis methods, control and prophylaxis of the infection.A Leucose Enzoótica Bovina é uma infecção viral amplamente disseminada em rebanhos bovinos de todo o mundo. Esta revisão tem por objetivo apresentar tópicos relacionados ao agente etiológico, à doença clínica e aos métodos de diagnóstico, controle e profila...

  18. Controlled clinical study on pancreatic stenting in the relief of pain of advanced pancreatic cancer with dilated pancreatic duct

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高飞

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the efficacy of pancreatic stenting in the relief of abdominal pain of advanced pancreatic cancer with dilated pancreatic duct.Methods A tolal of 61 patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma companied with dilated pancreatic duct were divided into two groups.Twenty-eight cases(two cases were excluded because of stent loss)in stent group treated with

  19. Cloning and Functional Analysis of the Bifunctional Agglutinin/Trypsin Inhibitor from Helianthus tuberosus L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuanjie Chang; Hongli Zhai; Songbiao Chen; Guisheng Song; Honglin Xu; Xiaoli Wei; Zhen Zhu

    2006-01-01

    In order to find new insect resistance genes, four homologous cDNAs, hta-a, hta-b, hta-c and hta-d with lengths of 775, 718, 784 and 752 bp, respectively (GenBank accession numbers AF477031-AF477034), were isolated from a tuber cDNA expression library of Helianthus tuberosus L. Sequence analysis revealed that all four cDNAs contain an open reading frame of 444 bp, coding a polypeptide of 147 amino acid residues, and that the sequences of the cDNAs are very similar to those of the mannose-binding agglutinin genes of the jacalin-related family. In hemagglutination reactions and hapten inhibition assays, affinity-purified HTA (Helianthus tuberosus agglutinin) from induced Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) expressing GST-HTA shows hemagglutination ability and a higher carbohydrate-binding ability for mannose than other tested sugars.Trypsin inhibitory activity was detected in the crude extracts of induced E. coli BL21(DE3)expressing HTA,and was further verified by trypsin inhibitory activity staining on native polyacrylamide gel. The mechanism of interaction between HTA and trypsin was studied by molecular modeling. We found that plenty of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions can be formed between the supposed binding sites of HTA-b and the active site of trypsin, and that a stable HTA/trypsin complex can be formed. The results above imply that HTA might be a bifunctional protein with carbohydrate-binding activity and trypsin inhibitory activity. Moreover,Northern blotting analysis demonstrated that hta is predominantly expressed in tubers of H. tuberosus, very weakly expressed in stems, but not expressed at all in other tissues. Southern blotting analysis indicated that hta is encoded by a multi-gene family. The insect resistance traits have been described in another paper.

  20. Chemoradiotherapy in pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathy Sushmita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer patients present late in their course and surgical resection as a modality of treatment is of limited value. Majority develop loco-regional failure and distant metastasis, therefore, adjuvant therapy comprising of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are useful treatment options to achieve higher loco-regional control. Specialized irradiation techniques like intra-operative radiotherapy that help to increase the total tumor dose have been used, however, controvertible survival benefit was observed. Various studies have shown improved median and overall survival with chemoradiotherapy for advanced unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. The role of new agents such as topoisomerase I inhibitors also needs further clinical investigations.

  1. Post-partum pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai P

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy and post-partum period, rarely encountered in surgical practice, can have a lethal effect on the mother and the foetus. We report here a case of a 35 year old tertigravida who presented with high grade fever, abdominal pain with distension, tachycardia and tachypnoea. Chest examination and X-rays were suggestive of pneumonia. The abdomen was tense and tender. Peristalsis was absent. Ultrasound revealed presence of fluid in the abdominal cavity which on paracentesis was found to contain Gram positive cocci. Fluid amylase levels were high. On exploratory laparotomy, haemorrhagic oedematous pancreatitis was noticed. The patient expired on the 2nd post operative day.

  2. Primary Pancreatic Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Extranodal non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHLs represent up to 30-40% of all NHL cases. The gastrointestinal tract is the most commonly involved extranodal site; accounting for about half of such cases [1]. Stomach and the small intestine constitute the most common gastrointestinal sites. Secondary invasion of the pancreas from contiguous, retroperitoneal lymph node disease is the prevalent mode of involvement. Secondary involvement of the pancreas from the duodenum or adjacent peripancreatic lymphadenopathy is well-known. Primary pancreatic lymphoma (PPL is an extremely rare disease [2]. PPL can present as an isolated mass mimicking pancreatic carcinoma. However, unlike carcinomas, PPL are potentially treatable [3].

  3. Comparative studies of canine colipase and lipases from bovine, porcine, canine, human and rat pancreases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P C

    1978-01-01

    1. Colipase was purified from canine pancreatic juice and found to have certain specificity in its reaction with various pancreatic lipases. 2. This colipase will stimulate the lipolytic activities of lipases isolated from canine, bovine and porcine pancreas but not lipases from a fungus, or from human and rat pancreases. 3. Characterization of these lipases showed (a) the molecular dimension of rat lipase is very different from the other lipases; (b) the pIs of canine, porcine and bovine lipases are almost identical but different from the pIs of rat, human and Candida (a fungus) lipases; and (c) the antiserum prepared against canine lipase will also react with lipases from human, hog and cow pancreases but not with rat and Candida lipases. 4. These physical differences can explain partly the difference in reaction between the various lipases and the canine colipase.

  4. MR imaging of pancreatic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Katsuyoshi E-mail: itokatsu@po.cc.yamaguchi-u.ac.jp; Koike, Shinji; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2001-05-01

    This article presents current MR imaging techniques for the pancreas, and review a spectrum of MR imaging features of various pancreatic diseases. These include: 1) congenital anomalies such as anomalous union of pancreatobiliary ducts, divisum, and annular pancreas, 2) inflammatory diseases, including acute or chronic pancreatitis with complications, groove pancreatitis, and autoimmune pancreatitis, tumor-forming pancreatitis, 3) pancreatic neoplasms, including adenocarcinoma, islet cell tumors, and cystic neoplasms (microcystic adenoma, mucinous cystic neoplasms, and intraductal mucin-producing pancreatic tumor). Particular attention is paid to technical advances in MR imaging of the pancreas such as fat-suppression, MR pancreatography (single- or multi-slice HASTE), and thin-section 3D multiphasic contrast-enhanced dynamic sequences. Imaging characteristics that may lead to a specific diagnosis or narrow the differential diagnosis are also discussed.

  5. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Filippo Antonini; Raffaele Pezzilli; Lucia Angelelli; Giampiero Macarri

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been rec-orded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) compared to the general population.Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced,in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic,suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD.Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD.

  6. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Filippo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Angelelli, Lucia; Macarri, Giampiero

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been recorded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to the general population. Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced, in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic, suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD. Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD. PMID:27574565

  7. Compositional changes in trypsin inhibitors, phytic acid, saponins and isoflavones related to soybean processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R L; Wolf, W J

    1995-03-01

    Soybeans are high in protein but also contain a number of minor constituents traditionally considered to be antinutritional factors. These include trypsin inhibitors, phytic acid, saponins and isoflavones. These compounds are now thought to have beneficial biological effects in the diet, such as lowering blood cholesterol or preventing cancer. Soybean processing changes the content of these minor constituents in various ways. This review discusses the changes in content of trypsin inhibitors, phytic acid, saponins and isoflavones as soybeans are processed into the conventional protein ingredients, flours, concentrates and isolates, as well as some of the traditional Oriental soybean foods.

  8. Studies of pancreatic carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Yu-bin; PANG Lin-lin; YU Lei; YANG Hai-fan; LIU Guang-da; LI Hai-jiao

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is the most common pancreatic neoplasm characterized by latentmorbidit, poor prognosis, high mortality rate and limited choice of treatment. Quite a lot studies focused on its pathogenesis, and showed molecular genetic alterations, which derived of genetic and environmental factors and played an important role in tumorigenesis. Recently, more and more findings laid particular emphasis on the changes of gene molecule and some were confirmed in vitro and in vivo. In this paper, we made a review and summarized the arked molecular changes and signalings of the four pathways to understand their functions in Pancreatic carcinoma. The most important changes concentrate on K-RAS, p16 INK4α, P53 and SMAD4 gene, secondly, the changes of pl4ARF, TGF-β, LKB1 /STK11, BRCA2 and growth factor Hedgehog and Notch path way and Telomere also play a important role in pancreatic carcinoma. The vast majority (83%) of pancreatic carcinomas had a distinctive genetic fingerprint, comprising activation of the K-ras oncogene and inactivation of the p 16 gene, generally also accompanied by alterations in the p53 gene (in 76 % of the tumors). The activation of K-ras appears nearly to be a prerequisite for the development of pancreatic carcinoma. Also, the binary alteration of K-ras and p16 is an extremely uncommon combination among other human tumor types. This particular genetic imprint of pancreatic carcinomas could have diagnostic utility in the evaluation of patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma of unknown primary origin. The evaluation of genetic alterations as they naturally occur in humantumors allows the formulation of hypotheses concerning the biological processes that involve human tumongenesis. A central tenet of tumori genesis, that positive selection is exerted upon those tumor cells that alterrate-limiting regulatory pathways, implies that mutation of one gene abrogates the need for inactivation of another gene in the same tumor suppressive pathway. It

  9. Pancreatitis associated with clomipramine administration in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kook, P H; Kranjc, A; Dennler, M; Glaus, T M

    2009-02-01

    A three-year-old, male, entire, Yorkshire terrier was presented with peracute onset of abdominal pain and vomitus. Clinicopathological abnormalities included severely increased serum lipase activity, immeasurably high serum trypsin-like immunoreactivity and mild hypocalcaemia. Canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI) was intended to be measured, however, the sample got lost. Ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic pancreas with small amounts of peripancreatic fluid and hyperechogenic mesentery. Acute pancreatitis (AP) was diagnosed and the dog recovered with appropriate therapy within 48 hours. Clomipramine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) for alleviating signs of separation anxiety had been given for seven weeks. Two similar, albeit less severe, episodes associated with previous courses of clomipramine had occurred eight months earlier that responded to discontinuing clomipramine and supportive care. As SSRIs are associated with AP in human beings and no other trigger could be identified, we conclude that clomipramine should be considered as a potential cause when investigating causes for AP in susceptible breeds or other dogs presenting with compatible clinical signs.

  10. Bovine milk glycome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, N; DePeters, E J; Freeman, S; German, J B; Grimm, R; Lebrilla, C B

    2008-10-01

    Bovine milk oligosaccharides have several potentially important biological activities including the prevention of pathogen binding to the intestinal epithelial and as nutrients for beneficial bacteria. It has been suggested that milk oligosaccharides are an important source of complex carbohydrates as supplements for the food and the pharmaceutical industries. However, only a small number of structures of bovine milk oligosaccharides (bMO) are known. There have been no systematic studies on bMO. High-performance mass spectrometry and separation methods are used to evaluate bMO, and nearly 40 oligosaccharides are present in bovine milk. Bovine milk oligosaccharides are composed of shorter oligomeric chains than are those in human milk. They are significantly more anionic with nearly 70%, measured abundances, being sialylated. Additionally, bMO are built not only on the lactose core (as are nearly all human milk oligosaccharides), but also on lactose amines. Sialic acid residues include both N-acetyl and N-glycolylneuraminic acid, although the former is significantly more abundant.

  11. Bovine milk exosome proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exosomes are 40-100 nm membrane vesicles of endocytic origin and are found in blood, urine, amniotic fluid, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, as well as human and bovine milk. Exosomes are extracellular organelles important in intracellular communication/signaling, immune function, and biomarkers ...

  12. Intervet Symposium: bovine neosporosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schetters, T.; Dubey, J.P.; Adrianarivo, A.; Frankena, K.; Romero, J.J.; Pérez, E.; Heuer, C.; Nicholson, C.; Russell, D.; Weston, J.

    2004-01-01

    This article summarises the most relevant data of presentations delivered at the 19th International Conference of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) held in New Orleans, LA, USA, from 10 to 14 August 2003) in a symposium session on bovine neosporosis. The sy

  13. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is caused by a novel contagion, known to as a prion. Prions are proteins capable of converting a normal cellular protein into a prion, thereby propagating an infection. BSE is the first known prion zoonotic. As such it has attracted broad scientific and, to a r...

  14. Biochemical properties of pancreatic colipase from the common stingray Dasyatis pastinaca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargouri Youssef

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Pancreatic colipase is a required co-factor for pancreatic lipase, being necessary for its activity during hydrolysis of dietary triglycerides in the presence of bile salts. In the intestine, colipase is cleaved from a precursor molecule, procolipase, through the action of trypsin. This cleavage yields a peptide called enterostatin knoswn, being produced in equimolar proportions to colipase. Results In this study, colipase from the common stingray Dasyatis pastinaca (CoSPL was purified to homogeneity. The purified colipase is not glycosylated and has an apparent molecular mass of around 10 kDa. The NH2-terminal sequencing of purified CoSPL exhibits more than 55% identity with those of mammalian, bird or marine colipases. CoSPL was found to be less effective activator of bird and mammal pancreatic lipases than for the lipase from the same specie. The apparent dissociation constant (Kd of the colipase/lipase complex and the apparent Vmax of the colipase-activated lipase values were deduced from the linear curves of the Scatchard plots. We concluded that Stingray Pancreatic Lipase (SPL has higher ability to interact with colipase from the same species than with the mammal or bird ones. Conclusion The fact that colipase is a universal lipase cofactor might thus be explained by a conservation of the colipase-lipase interaction site. The results obtained in the study may improve our knowledge of marine lipase/colipase.

  15. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.

    2016-03-01

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors’ dynamics that may be of utility in drug design.

  16. Pancreatitis del surco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Araújo-Fernández

    2014-03-01

    It is a rare disease, but we must keep it in mind when we make the differential diagnosis of patients with abdominal pain of unknown origin. It is very important to distinguish this pathology from a pancreatic head carcinoma, as both treatments and prognosis differ greatly, so we believe important communication of a new case.

  17. Pancreatic Cancer: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabar, Cinthya S; Winter, Jordan M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States, yet advances in treatment options have been minimal over the past decade. In this review, we summarize the evaluation and treatments for this disease. We highlight molecular advances that hopefully will soon translate into improved outcomes.

  18. Hepato-pancreatic ascariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Uptal; Mukherjee, M; Das, S; Kumar, Rupesh

    2010-10-01

    Intestinal infestation of humans by Ascaris lumbricoides is endemic in India. The usual habitat of the adult worm is the jejunum. Hepatopancreatic ascariasis (HPA) is designated to a rare group of diseases caused by lodgement of adult worms in the bile or pancreatic ducts. This short report illustrates four rare cases of patients with HPA.

  19. Study on chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer using MRS and pancreatic juice samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wang; Chao Ma; Zhuan Liao; Bing Tian; Jian-Ping Lu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the markers of pancreatic diseases and provide basic data and experimental methods for the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. METHODS: There were 15 patients in the present study, among whom 10 had pancreatic cancer and 5, chronic pancreatitis. In all patients, pancreatic cancer or chronic pancreatitis was located on the head of the p-a-ncreas. Pathology data of all pa tients was confirmed by biopsy and surgery. Among the 10 patients with pancreatic cancer, 3 people had a medical history of longterm alcohol consumption. Of 5 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 4 men suffered from alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic juice samples were obtained from patients by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Magnetic resonance spectroscopyn was performed on an 11.7-T scanner (Bruker DRX-500) using Call-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequences. The parameters were as follows: spectral width, 15 KHz; time domain, 64 K; number of scans, 512; and acquisition time, 2.128 s. RESULTS: The main component of pancreatic juice included leucine, iso-leucine, valine, lactate, alanine, acetate, aspartate, lysine, glycine, threonine, tyrosine, histidine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine. On performing 1D 1H and 2D total correlation spectroscopy, we found a triplet peak at the chemical shift of 1.19 ppm, which only appeared in the spectra of pancreatic juice obtained from patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. This triplet peak was considered the resonance of the methyl of ethoxy group, which may be associated with the metabolism of alcohol in the pancreas. CONCLUSION: The triplet peak, at the chemical shift of 1.19 ppm is likely to be the characteristic metabolite of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis.

  20. Flow Cytometry Method Analysis of Apoptosis: No Significant Difference Between EDTA and EDTA-free Trypsin Treatment Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-yan; Nie, Xiao-cui; Ma, Hai-ying; Song, Guo-qing; Zhang, Xiao-tong; Jin, Yu-nan; Yu, Yan-qiu

    2015-04-01

    Flow cytometry method (FCM) is a generally accepted tool to analyze apoptosis. Although apoptosis assay kit was applied by many companies, the manufacturers were not consistent with whether using Trypsin with EDTA to collect the adherent cells. In another words, the influence of EDTA on apoptotic ratio is not clear. In this work, we compared the proportion of apoptotic cells with EDTA or EDTA-free Trypsin treatment by FCM. We concluded that Trypsin with or without EDTA has little influence on the proportion of apoptotic cells. In addition, we found that the ratio of necrosis and apoptosis was different in cells collected by scraping. WAVE2 protein was analyzed as a typical example for movement related protein. WAVE2 expression is elevated in the EDTA Trypsin treated group, compared with EDTA-free Trypsin treatment and scrapping group.

  1. Secretin is not necessary for exocrine pancreatic development and growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sans, Maria Dolors; Sabbatini, Maria Eugenia; Ernst, Stephen A; D'Alecy, Louis G; Nishijima, Ichiko; Williams, John A

    2011-11-01

    Adaptive exocrine pancreatic growth is mediated primarily by dietary protein and the gastrointestinal hormone cholecystokinin (CCK). Feeding trypsin inhibitors such as camostat (FOY-305) is known to induce CCK release and stimulate pancreatic growth. However, camostat has also been reported to stimulate secretin release and, because secretin often potentiates the action of CCK, it could participate in the growth response. Our aim was to test the role of secretin in pancreatic development and adaptive growth through the use of C57BL/6 mice with genetic deletion of secretin or secretin receptor. The lack of secretin in the intestine or the secretin receptor in the pancreas was confirmed by RT-PCR. Other related components, such as vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) receptors (VPAC(1) and VPAC(2)), were not affected. Secretin increased cAMP levels in acini from wild-type (WT) mice but had no effect on acini from secretin receptor-deleted mice, whereas VIP and forskolin still induced a normal response. Secretin in vivo failed to induce fluid secretion in receptor-deficient mice. The pancreas of secretin or secretin receptor-deficient mice was of normal size and histology, indicating that secretin is not necessary for normal pancreatic differentiation or maintenance. When WT mice were fed 0.1% camostat in powdered chow, the pancreas doubled in size in 1 wk, accompanied by parallel increases in protein and DNA. Camostat-fed littermate secretin and secretin receptor-deficient mice had similar pancreatic mass to WT mice. These results indicate that secretin is not required for normal pancreatic development or adaptive growth mediated by CCK.

  2. Patient Derived Cancer Cell Lines in Identifying Molecular Changes in Patients With Previously Untreated Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Gemcitabine Hydrochloride-Based Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-18

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  3. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, M.C. (Univ. of Miami, FL); Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-08-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months.

  4. Acute Pancreatitis: Surgery, Pathophysiology and Probiotic Prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnen, L.P. van

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a challenging disease with a clinical course that is often difficult to predict. In severe acute pancreatitis, mortality increases significantly if intestinal bacteria translocate from the intestine and infect pancreatic necrosis. Surgical and prophylactic treatment strategies

  5. Trypsin-enabled construction of anti-fouling and self-cleaning polyethersulfone membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qing; Su, Yanlei; Ning, Xue; Chen, Wenjuan; Peng, Jinming; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2011-01-01

    Constructing anti-fouling and self-cleaning membrane surfaces based on covalent attachment of trypsin on poly(methacrylic acid)-graft-polyethersulfone (PMAA-g-PES) membrane was reported. The carboxylic acid groups enriched on asymmetric PMAA-g-PES membrane surface were activated with 1-ethyl-(3-3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) and employed as chemical anchors for the conjugation with amino groups of trypsin. Activity assays showed that such chemically immobilized trypsin was much more active and stable than that of the physically adsorbed counterpart. Trypsin covalently attached on membrane surface could substantially resist protein fouling in dynamic flow process. The considerable enhancement of protein solution permeation flux was observed as a consequence of rapid enzymatic degradation of protein deposited onto membrane surface. The permeation flux of the membrane could be recovered upon simple hydraulic flush after protein filtration, suggesting superior self-cleaning property. After multi-cycle BSA filtration over 15-day period, the active self-cleaning membrane maintained more than 95.0% of its initial flux.

  6. Trypsin-mediated enzymatic degradation of type II collagen in the human vitreous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deemter, Marielle; Kuijer, Roel; Pas, Hendri Harm; van der Worp, Roelofje Jacoba; Hooymans, Johanna Martina Maria; Los, Leonoor Inge

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Aging of the vitreous body can result in sight-threatening pathology. One aspect of vitreous aging is liquefaction, which results from the vanishing of collagen fibrils. We investigated the possibility that trypsins are involved in vitreous type II collagen degradation. Methods: Immunohisto

  7. Whole blood assay for trypsin activity using polyanionic focusing gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkowitz, Roy B; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W; Heller, Michael J

    2010-07-01

    The measurement of trypsin activity directly in blood is important for the development of novel diagnostics and for biomedical research. Presently, most degradative enzyme assays require sample preparation, making them time consuming, costly, and less accurate. We recently demonstrated a simple and rapid electrophoretic assay for the measurement of trypsin activity directly in whole blood. This assay utilizes a charge-changing fluorescent peptide substrate that produces a positively charged fluorescent product fragment upon cleavage by the target enzyme. This fragment is then rapidly separated from whole blood by electrophoresis and quantified with a fluorescent detector. In this study, we demonstrate that polyanionic poly-L-glutamic acid-doped polyacrylamide gels can focus the fluorescent cleavage product and markedly improve the LODs of the assay. A LOD of 2 pg in 6 microL (0.3 ng/mL) in whole human blood was achieved after a 1-h reaction of enzyme and substrate followed by 10 min of electrophoresis. This is 50- to 200-fold better than the estimated reference levels for trypsin (15-60 ng/mL) in blood. This straightforward technique now allows for the rapid measurement of clinically relevant levels of trypsin activity in microliter volumes of whole blood, providing a useful tool for the development of novel point-of-care diagnostics.

  8. A NEW METHOD TO DETECT ACROSOME-REACTED SPERMATOZOA USING BIOTINYLATED SOYBEAN TRYPSIN-INHIBITOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ARTS, EGJM; KUIKEN, J; JAGER, S

    1994-01-01

    Objective: To develop a method to detect acrosome-reacted spermatozoa on human zonae pellucidae using only commercially available reagents and without need for sperm fixation. Design: Sperm head labeling with biotinylated soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI-biotin) was compared with results of a known m

  9. Influence of Tableting on the Conformation and Thermal Stability of Trypsin as a Model Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klukkert, Marten; Van De Weert, Marco; Fanø, Mathias;

    2015-01-01

    reversible upon tablet reconstitution. Aqueous-state IR spectroscopy combined with partial least squares was shown to be a powerful tool to follow irreversible structural changes and evaluate sample bioactivity. Besides its conformation, the thermal stability of trypsin was altered as a result of the applied...

  10. 21 CFR 524.2620 - Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.2620 Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor oil. (a)(1) Specifications..., and 788.0 milligrams of castor oil. (2) Sponsor. See No. 051079 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (b)(1... balsam, and 800 milligrams of castor oil. (2) Sponsor. See No. 017135 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter....

  11. Damage and repair of the peripheral myelin sheath and node of Ranvier after treatment with trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, R C; Bunge, R P

    1975-01-01

    Cultures of whole fetal rat sensory ganglia which had matured and myelinated in culture were treated for 1-3 h with a pulse of 0.2% trypsin. The tissue was observed during the period of treatment and during subsequent weeks using both light and electron microscopy. Within minutes after trypsin addition the matrix of the culture was altered and the nerve fascicles loosened. Progressive changes included the retraction of Schwann cell processes from the nodal region the detachment of the myelin-related paranodal Schwann cell loops from the axon, and lengthening of the nodal region as the axon was bared. The retraction of myelin from nodal stabilized several hours after trypsin withdrawal. Breakdown of the altered myelin segments was rare. There were no discernable changes in neurons or their processes after this exposure to trypsin. The partial repair which occured over a period of several weeks included the reattachment of paranodal Schwann cell loops to the axolemma and the insertion of new myelin segments where a substantial length of axolemma had been bared. The significance of these observations to the characterization of the Schwann cell-axolemmal junctions on myelinated nerve fibers is discussed. The dramatic degree of myelin change that can occur without concomitant myelin breakdown is particularly noted, as is the observation that these altered myelin segments are, in part, repaired.

  12. Understanding enzymic binding affinity : thermodynamics of binding of benzamidinium chloride inhibitors to trypsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talhout, Reinskje

    2003-01-01

    Understanding enzymic binding affinity is of fundamental scientific importance as well as a prerequisite for structure-based drug design. In this study, the interactions of the serine proteinase trypsin with several artificial, benzamidinium-based inhibitors have been studied in aqueous solutions. I

  13. Proteolytic Activation of the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Coronavirus Spike Fusion Protein by Trypsin in Cell Culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wicht, Oliver; Li, Wentao; Willems, Lione; Meuleman, Tom J; Wubbolts, Richard W; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Rottier, Peter J M; Bosch, Berend Jan

    2014-01-01

    Isolation of porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus (PEDV) from clinical material in cell culture requires supplementation of trypsin. This may relate to the confinement of PEDV natural infection to the protease-rich small intestine of pigs. Our study focused on the role of protease activity on infec

  14. Effects of tannic acid on trypsin and leucine aminopeptidase activities in gypsy moth larval midgut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrdaković Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of allelochemical stress on genetic variations in the specific activities of gypsy moth digestive enzymes (trypsin and leucine aminopeptidase and relative midgut mass (indirect measure of food consumption, as well as variability in their plasticity, were investigated in fifth instar gypsy moths originating from two populations with different trophic adaptations (oak and locust-tree forests. Thirty-two full-sib families from the Quercus population and twenty-six full-sib families from the Robinia population were reared on an artificial diet with or without supplementation with tannic acid. Between population differences were observed as higher average specific activity of trypsin and relative midgut mass in larvae from the Robinia population. Significant broad-sense heritabilities were observed for the specific activity of trypsin in the control state, and for specific activity of leucine aminopeptidase in a stressful environment. Significantly lower heritability for relative midgut mass was recorded in larvae from the Robinia population reared under stressful conditions. Significant variability of trypsin plasticity in larvae from both populations and significant variability of leucine aminopeptidase plasticity in larvae from the Robinia population point to the potential for the evolution of enzyme adaptive plastic responses to the presence of stressor. Non-significant across-environment genetic correlations do not represent a constraint for the evolution of enzyme plasticity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173027

  15. Biochemical Characterization of An Arginine-Specific Alkaline Trypsin from Bacillus licheniformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Song Gong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we isolated a trypsin-producing strain DMN6 from the leather waste and identified it as Bacillus licheniformis through a two-step screening strategy. The trypsin activity was increased up to 140 from 20 U/mL through culture optimization. The enzyme was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity with a molecular mass of 44 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the specific activity of purified enzyme is 350 U/mg with Nα-Benzoyl-l-arginine ethylester as the substrate. The optimum temperature and pH for the trypsin are 65 °C and pH 9.0, respectively. Also, the enzyme can be significantly activated by Ba2+. This enzyme is relatively stable in alkaline environment and displays excellent activity at low temperatures. It could retain over 95% of enzyme activity after 180 min of incubation at 45 °C. The distinguished activity under low temperature and prominent stability enhance its catalytic potential. In the current work, the open reading frame was obtained with a length of 1371 nucleotides that encoded a protein of 456 amino acids. These data would warrant the B. licheniformis trypsin as a promising candidate for catalytic application in collagen preparation and leather bating through further protein engineering.

  16. Atomic force microscopic examination of chromosomes treated with trypsin or ethidium bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yangzhe; Cai, Jiye; Cheng, Longqiu; Yun, Keyu; Wang, Chenxi; Chen, Yong

    2006-04-01

    Trypsin treatment is frequently used during chromosome preparation for removal of cellular contaminants, and ethidium bromide (EB) staining of bands is often used to facilitate high-resolution observations by optical microscopy. However, conventional optical microscopy is unable to visualize potential aberrations of chromosome structures caused by these physicochemical treatments. In this article, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the tapping mode to obtain and analyze high-resolution images of chromosome surface structure damage associated with trypsinization and EB treatment. According to our results, the trypsin-based digestion effects became more severe as incubations increased across a range from 10 to 40 s; a digestion time of 10 to 20 s appeared to be most suitable for observation by AFM. In terms of chromosomal damage induced by EB treatment, addition of EB into the media of cultured human blood cells induced chromosomal breakage in a dose-dependent fashion, and the results indicate centromeric region damnifyed severer than arms. Together, these results indicate that EB staining and the standard chromosomal preparative techniques of trypsinization can induce chromosomal damage that may affect the observed results.

  17. Possible Involvement of Pancreatic Fatty Infiltration in Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mika Hori; Michihiro Mutoh; Toshio Imai; Hitoshi Nakagama; Mami Takahashi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to diagnose in its early stage and is one of the most lethal human cancers. Thus, it is important to clarify its major risk factors, predictive factors and etiology. Here, we focus on fatty infiltration of the pancreas and suggest that it could be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Fatty infiltration of the pancreas is observed as ectopic adipocytes infiltrating the pancreatic tissue and is positively correlated with obesity and the prevalence of diabetes mell...

  18. Improved purification process of β- and α-trypsin isoforms by ion-exchange chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Martins Costa Santos

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to improve the separation and yield of pure β- and α-trypsin isoforms by ion-exchange chromatography and to characterize some physical-chemical properties of these isoforms. Purification of trypsin isoforms was performed by ion-exchange chromatography in 0.1 mol/L tris-HC buffer, pH 7.10 at 4ºC. The sample loading, salt concentration, flow rate and pH of mobile phase were varied to determine their effects on the resolution of the separation. The resolution was optimized mainly between β- and α-trypsin. Pure isoforms were obtained by chromatographying 100 mg of commercial trypsin during seven days, yielding 51 mg of high purity β-trypsin and 13 mg of α-trypsin partially pure, with small amounts of contaminating of ψ-trypsin. Thus, time and resolution of purification were optimized yielding large amounts of pure active enzymes that are useful for several research areas and biotechnology.O propósito deste trabalho foi melhorar a separação e o rendimento das isoformas puras β- e α-tripsina por meio de cromatografia de troca iônica e caracterizar algumas propriedades físico-químicas dessas isoformas. A purificação de isoformas de tripsina foi realizada em SE Sephadex, com tampão tris-HCl, pH 7,10 a 4ºC. A quantidade de amostra, a concentração salina, o fluxo e o pH da fase móvel foram variados para determinar o efeito sobre a resolução da separação. A resolução foi otimizada principalmente entre β- e α-tripsina, utilizando o pH 7,10 a 4ºC. Isoformas puras foram obtidas a partir de 100 mg de tripsina comercial bovina depois de sete dias de cromatografia, fornecendo 51,0 mg de β-tripsina totalmente pura e 13,0 mg de α-tripsina parcialmente pura, com quantidades pequenas de contaminação por ψ-Tripsina. Assim, tempo e resolução da purificação foram otimizados redendo grandes quantidades de enzimas puras e ativas que são úteis em várias áreas de pesquisa e ciências biotecnológicas.

  19. Enzyme separation techniques for the study of growth of cells from layers of bovine dental pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W A; Everett, M M; Freedman, J T; Feagans, W C; Cramer, J F

    1976-08-01

    Effects of the enzymes trypsin, papain, bromelains and ficin on bovine dental pulp tissue were studied. Minced or whole pulps were subjected to each enzyme at 17 degrees, 20 degrees and 37 degrees C for set time intervals, after which aliquots of supernatant fluid were removed for cell counts and viability tests. Pooled samples were subsequently cultured as monolayers in Eagle's MEM plus 10% calf serum. The dissociation characteristics were quite distinct for each enzyme, although quite similar between minced and whole pulp. A parallel histological study was made of the residual pulp tissue. Ficin was found to be the most suitable enzyme for future studies on the growth of isolated pulp cells from various layers of the bovine pulp, due to its even rate of cell removal, and the good initial viability and subsequent growth of the separated cells in monolayer culture. Further studies on ficin may show that it is more suitable for enzymatic separation of tissues generally than the more commonly used trypsin, a major advantage being its use in media containing Ca2+ and Mg2+.

  20. Exocrine pancreatic secretion is stimulated in piglets fed fish oil compared with those fed coconut oil or lard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedemann, M S; Pedersen, A R; Engberg, R M

    2001-12-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the effect of feeding diets containing fat sources with different fatty acid composition (fish oil, coconut oil or lard, 10 g/100 g diet) on exocrine pancreatic secretion in piglets after weaning. A total of 16 barrows were weaned at 4 wk of age; 3 d later, they were surgically fitted with a catheter in the pancreatic duct for continuous collection of pancreatic juice. Collections of pancreatic juice were made every other day starting 4 d postsurgically. Piglets fed the fish oil diet secreted a significantly greater volume of pancreatic juice than piglets fed the coconut oil or lard diets. The output [U/(h. kg(0.75))] of lipase was higher in piglets fed fish oil than in piglets fed lard or coconut oil. The output of colipase was greater in piglets fed fish oil and coconut oil than in those fed lard. The dietary treatments did not affect the output of carboxylester hydrolase. The output of trypsin was significantly lower in piglets fed lard than in piglets fed fish oil or coconut oil diets and the output of carboxypeptidase B was greater in those fed the fish oil diet. Protein, chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidase A, elastase and amylase outputs did not differ among the dietary treatment groups. The apparent digestibilities of nutrients and energy were measured in feces and did not differ among groups. Thus, the greater output of lipase in fish oil-fed piglets did not result in a greater digestibility of fat in this diet.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of pancreatic stone formation in chronic pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru B.H. Ko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis (CP is a progressive inflammatory disease in which the pancreatic secretory parenchyma is destroyed and replaced by fibrosis. The presence of intraductal pancreatic stone(s is important for the diagnosis of CP; however, the precise molecular mechanisms of pancreatic stone formation in CP were left largely unknown. CFTR is a chloride channel expressed in the apical plasma membrane of pancreatic duct cells and plays a central role in HCO3- secretion. In previous studies, we have found that CFTR is largely mislocalized to the cytoplasm of pancreatic duct cells in all forms of CP and corticosteroids normalizes the localization of CFTR to the proper apical membrane at least in autoimmune pancreatitis. From these observations, we could conclude that the mislocalization of CFTR is a cause of protein plug formation in CP, subsequently resulting in pancreatic stone formation.Considering our observation that the mislocalization of CFTR also occurs in alcoholic or idiopathic CP, it is very likely that these pathological conditions can also be treated by corticosteroids, thereby preventing pancreatic stone formation in these patients. Further studies are definitely required to clarify these fundamental issues.

  2. Carbofuran-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

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    Rizos E

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Carbamate insecticides are widely used in commercial agriculture and home gardening. A serious side effect of organophosphate and carbamate intoxication is the development of acute pancreatitis. CASE REPORT: A 36-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our hospital with cholinergic crisis and pancreatitis soon after the ingestion of a carbamate insecticide (carbofuran. An abdominal CT scan disclosed pancreatic necrosis with intrapancreatic fluid collection, consistent with the development of a pancreatic pseudocyst in a subsequent CT scan. No predisposing factor for pancreatitis was evident. Pseudocholinesterase levels returned to normal 7 days later and the patient was discharged in good physical condition one month after admission. DISCUSSION: Although acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after organophosphate intoxication, it is quite rare after carbamate ingestion and has not been previously reported after carbofuran intoxication.

  3. Chronic pancreatitis: controversies in etiology, diagnosis and treatment Pancreatitis crónica: controversias respecto a la etiología, el diagnóstico y el tratamiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Draganov

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of idiopathic chronic pancreatitis remains poorly understood despite the high expectations for ascribing the pancreatic damage in affected patients to genetic defects. Mutations in the cationic trypsinogen gene, pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor, and the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator gene do not account for the chronic pancreatitis noted in most patients with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis. Small duct chronic pancreatitis can be best diagnosed with a hormone stimulation test. Endoscopic ultrasonography can detect abnormalities in both the parenchyma and ducts of the pancreas. The true value of endoscopic ultrasonography in diagnosing small duct chronic pancreatitis remains to be fully defined and is under active investigation. It is not clear whether endoscopic ultrasonography is more sensitive for early structural changes in patients with small duct disease or is over diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic enzyme supplementation with non-enteric formulation along with acid suppression (H2 blockers or proton pump inhibitors is an effective therapy for pain in patients with small duct chronic pancreatitis. The role of endoscopic ultrasonography-guided celiac plexus block should be limited to treating those patients with chronic pancreatitis whose pain has not responded to other modalities. Total pancreatectomy followed by autologous islet cell autotransplantation appears to be potential therapeutic approach but for now should be considered experimental.La patogenia de la pancreatitis crónica idiopática sigue siendo poco conocida, a pesar de las expectativas de atribuir el daño pancreático que sufren los pacientes con esta enfermedad a factores genéticos. Las mutaciones del gen del tripsinógeno catiónico, del gen del inhibidor de la tripsina secretoria del páncreas y del gen regulador de conductancia de la fibrosis quística no explican la pancreatitis crónica de la mayoría de los pacientes con

  4. Immunodetection of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript in bovine pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiuk, Izabela; Młynek, Krzysztof

    2015-07-01

    This study was aimed at identifying and determining the configuration of structures which contain the cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide (CART) in the bovine pancreas. The study material was collected from 20 animals. The distribution of CART in the bovine pancreas was investigated, by an immunohistochemical evaluation. CART peptide in the normal pancreas has been identified in intrapancreatic ganglia, nerve fibres and in endocrine cells of Langerhans islets and exocrine pancreas. CART immunoreactive nerve fibres innervate the exocrine and endocrine regions and the intrapancreatic ganglia, where they form a moderate number of networks, encircling the cell bodies. The few CART-immunoreactive endocrine cells, that appear in the bovine pancreas, are not limited to the islet cells, where they form a subpopulation of CART-containing cells, but are also individually distributed in the exocrine region. Furthermore, CART has been visualized in nerve fibres, innervating pancreatic outlet ducts and blood vessels. CART plays a physiological role in the integrated mechanisms that regulate both endocrine and exocrine pancreatic secretion. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that CART expression in nerve fibres and intrapancreatic ganglia is a common feature of the mammalian pancreas, whereas its expression in endocrine cells appears to be restricted to single cells of the bovine pancreas.

  5. CT findings of pancreatic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mi Sook; Park, In Sook; Jeon, Doo Sung; Kim, Hong Soo; Rhee, Hak Song [Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Won, Jong Jin [College of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iri (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-02-15

    CT was found to be a reliable, often specific, and noninvasive method for detecting pancreatic diseases. In a study of pancreatic lesions, 37 cases having satisfactory operative and histological proofs were analyzed by CT at PMC from Jan. 1986 to Oct. 1987. The results were as following: 1. Male:female is 26:11. 2. The incidence of pancreatic disease were as follows: 1) Pancreatic cancer:21 cases (56%) a.Head:12 cases b.Body:4 cases c.Tail:1 case d.Body and tail:1 case e.Uncinate process:2 cases f.Entire pancreas: 1 case 2) Acute pancreatitis: 6 cases (16%) 3) Chronic pancreatitis:5 cases (14%) 3. The characteristic CT findings: 1) 100% of pancreatic head cancer showed focal mass or alteration of pancreatic head contour and biliary tree dilatation, and 33% (7/12) fat line obliteration. 2) All of other pancreatic cancer except head appeared as focal mass or contour alteration and fat line obliteration. 3) Total 6 cases of acute pancreatitis showed that 5 cases diffuse enlargement of pancreas, 3 fluid collection (2 cases:left anterior pararenal and posterior pararenal space and lesser sac, 1 case:only pancreas body) and 1 case abscess formation. 4) Total 5 cases of chronic pancreatitis revealed diffuse enlargement 2 cases and atrophy 1 case, pancreatic ductal dilatation 3 cases, calcification 2 cases, and biliary tree dilatation with CBD tapering appearance 1 case. 5) All cases of pseudocysts were well marginated cystic lesions that located at head in 3 cases and tail 3 cases, and 4 cases were well defined pure cystic masses but 1 case was well capsulated cyst with multiple internal septation.

  6. Rapid Evolution from the First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis to Chronic Pancreatitis in Human Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Elie Aoun; Adam Slivka; Papachristou, Dionysios J.; Whitcomb, David C.; Gleeson, Ferga C; Papachristou, Georgios I

    2007-01-01

    Context Growing evidence suggests that recurrent acute pancreatitis leads to chronic pancreatitis, but this sequence is seldom reported in human subjects. The sentinel acute pancreatitis event hypothesis suggests that an initial episode of acute pancreatitis is the first step in a complicated series of events ultimately leading to chronic pancreatitis. Objective To identify patients who evolved from recurrent acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis. Setting The Severity of Acute Pancreatit...

  7. Mycotic bovine nasal granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti Díaz, Ismael Alejandro; Vargas, Roberto; Apolo, Ada; Moraña, José Antonio; Pedrana, Graciela; Cardozo, Elena; Almeida, Edgardo

    2003-01-01

    A case of mycotic bovine nasal granuloma in a 10 year-old Jersey cow, produced by Drechslera halodes is presented. Histopathological sections showed abundant hyaline and pigmented extra and intracellular fungal structures together with a polymorphic cellular granuloma formed by neutrophils, lymphocytes, plasmocytes, histiocytes and giant cells of the Langhans type. It is the first case of mycotic bovine nasal granuloma recognized in Uruguay although this disease seems to be frequent according to the opinion of veterinarian specialists. Another similar clinical case also in a Jersey cow from the same dairy house with an intense cellular infiltrate rich in eosinophils without granulomatous image, together with extracellular hyaline and fuliginous fungal forms, is also referred for comparative purposes. Geotrichum sp. was isolated. The need of an early diagnosis and treatment of the disease is stressed.

  8. Acute Pancreatitis Associated with Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrios Papaioannides

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Context :Acute pancreatitis can be caused by a variety of infectious agents but it is regarded as an extremely rare complication of brucellosis. Case report: We briefly describe a 56-yearold man who presented with acute pancreatitis, fever, myalgia, and other clinical symptoms. Brucella melitensis was cultured from his blood. All clinical manifestations gradually resolved with the institution of intramuscular streptomycin and oral doxycycline therapy. Conclusion :Acute pancreatitis may rarely be a complication of infection with B. melitensis. In areas where brucellosis is endemic, it should be kept in mind that acute pancreatitis may result from infection with brucella organisms..

  9. Early management of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Nicolien J; Besselink, Marc G H; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Bakker, Olaf J; Bruno, Marco J

    2013-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastro-intestinal indication for acute hospitalization and its incidence continues to rise. In severe pancreatitis, morbidity and mortality remains high and is mainly driven by organ failure and infectious complications. Early management strategies should aim to prevent or treat organ failure and to reduce infectious complications. This review addresses the management of acute pancreatitis in the first hours to days after onset of symptoms, including fluid therapy, nutrition and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. This review also discusses the recently revised Atlanta classification which provides new uniform terminology, thereby facilitating communication regarding severity and complications of pancreatitis.

  10. Helicobacter pylori and pancreatic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milutin; Bulajic; Nikola; Panic; Johannes; Matthias; L?hr

    2014-01-01

    A possible role for Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infec-tion in pancreatic diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection with antral predomination leading to an increase in pancreatic bicarbonate output and induc-ing ductal epithelial cell proliferation could contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer via complex interactions with the ABO genotype, dietary and smok-ing habits and N-nitrosamine exposure of the host. Although the individual study data available so far is inconsistent, several meta-analyses have reported an increased risk for pancreatic cancer among H. pylori seropositive individuals. It has been suggested that H. pylori causes autoimmune pancreatitis due to molecu-lar mimicry between H. pylori a-carbonic anhydrase(a-CA) and human CA type Ⅱ, and between H. pylori plasminogen-binding protein and human ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 2, enzymes that are highly expressed in the pancreatic ductal andacinar cells, respectively. Future studies involving large numbers of cases are needed in order to examine the role of H. pylori in autoimmune pancreatitis more fully. Considering the worldwide pancreatic cancer burden, as well as the association between autoimmune pan-creatitis and other autoimmune conditions, a complete elucidation of the role played by H. pylori in the gen-esis of such conditions could have a substantial impact on healthcare.

  11. An overview of hereditary pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebours, Vinciane; Lévy, Philippe; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatitis. The prevalence was evaluated to 0.3/100000 in Western Countries. Genetic disorders are due to mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). Since 1996, more than 30 mutations were found. The three more common mutations are R122H, N29I and A16V. First symptoms begin since childhood, mainly before 10 years old. Main symptoms are pancreatic pain and acute pancreatitis (>70%). CP morphological changes as pancreatic calcifications are diagnosed at a median age of 22-25 years. Exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency occurred in 34% and 26% at a median age of 29 and 38 years. No clinical differences exist according to the mutation type. No excess of mortality in hereditary pancreatitis population compared to general population was found, despite a real risk of cancer. The cumulative risks of pancreatic cancer at 50, 60 and, 75 years are 10%, 18.7% and, 53.5%, respectively. The relative risk of cancer increases in smokers and is evaluated to 8.55. Hereditary pancreatitis diagnosis permits to propose an adapted management in expert centres.

  12. Selenium in bovine spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, S M; Kuzan, F B; Senger, P L

    1981-05-01

    This study investigated the association of selenium with ejaculated bovine spermatozoa. Over 75% of the radioactive spermatozoa. Over 75% of the radioactive selenium-75 was released after 30 min of incubation in 2 X 10(-3) dithiothreitol. Of the selenium-75 released by dithiothreitol, 85% was associated with spermatozoal protein. Protein containing selenium-75 was found predominantly in a single band after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Molecular weight was approximately 21,500 daltons.

  13. Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (pinkeye)

    OpenAIRE

    Angelos, JA

    2015-01-01

    Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. As is the case for controlling other infectious livestock diseases, the most successful efforts to control infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) will include consideration of the host, the environment, herd management, and ongoing surveillance even after the immediate crisis has passed. Research over many years has led to the discovery of a variety of antibiotic treatments and antibiotic regimens that can be effective against IBK. The...

  14. A trypsin-like proteinase in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): purification, characterization, and host plant inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mina; Zibaee, Arash; Sendi, Jalal Jalali

    2014-01-01

    A trypsin-like proteinase was purified and characterized in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae. A purification process that used Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-cellulose fast flow chromatographies revealed a proteinase with specific activity of 66.7 μmol/min/mg protein, recovery of 27.04 and purification fold of 23.35. Molecular weight of the purified protein was found to be 35.8 kDa. Optimal pH and temperature were obtained 9 and 20°C for the purified trypsin proteinase, respectively. The purified enzyme was significantly inhibited by PMSF, TLCK, and SBTI as specific inhibitors of trypsins in which TLCK showed the highest inhibitory effect. Trypsin proteinase inhibitors were extracted from four varieties of pomegranate including Brait, Torsh-Sabz, May-Khosh, and Shirin by ion exchange chromatography. It was found that fractions 17-20 of Brait; fractions 18 and 21-26 of Torsh-Sabz; fractions 1-7, 11-17, and 19-21 of May-Khosh and fraction 8 for Shirin showed presence of trypsin inhibitor in these host. Comparison of their inhibitory effects on the purified trypsin proteinase of E. ceratoniae demonstrated that fractions from May-khosh variety had the highest effect on the enzyme among other extracted fractions. Characterization of serine proteinases of insects mainly trypsins is one of the promising methods to decrease population and damages via extracting their inhibitors and providing resistant varieties.

  15. Diagnostic imaging in bovine orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, Johann; Geissbühler, Urs; Steiner, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    Although a radiographic unit is not standard equipment for bovine practitioners in hospital or field situations, ultrasound machines with 7.5-MHz linear transducers have been used in bovine reproduction for many years, and are eminently suitable for evaluation of orthopedic disorders. The goal of this article is to encourage veterinarians to use radiology and ultrasonography for the evaluation of bovine orthopedic disorders. These diagnostic imaging techniques improve the likelihood of a definitive diagnosis in every bovine patient but especially in highly valuable cattle, whose owners demand increasingly more diagnostic and surgical interventions that require high-level specialized techniques.

  16. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery.

  17. Physical-chemical characterization and stability study of alpha-trypsin at ph 3.0 by differential scanning calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, A.M.C.; Santana, M.A.; Gomide, F.T.F.; Oliveira, J.S.; Vilas Boas, F.A.S.; Santoro, M.M.; Teixera, K.N. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas (ICB). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia; Miranda, A.A.C.; Biondi, I. [Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana (UEFS), BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas; Vasconcelos, A.B.; Bemquerer, M.P. [EMBRAPA Recursos Geneticos e Biotecnologia, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Parque Estacao Biologica (PqEB)

    2008-07-01

    Full text: {alpha}-Trypsin is a serine-protease with a polypeptide chain of 223 amino acid residues and six disulfide bridges. It is a globular protein with predominance of antiparallel {beta}-sheet secondary structure and it has two domains with similar structures. In the present work, a stability study of {alpha}-trypsin in the acid pH range was performed and physical-chemical denaturation parameters were measured by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The {alpha}-trypsin has a shelf-life (t{sub 95%}) of about ten months at pH 3.0 and 4 deg C and its hydrolysis into the {psi}-trypsin isoform is negligible during six months as monitored by mass spectrometry (Micromass Q-ToF). The observed {delta}H{sub cal}/{delta}H{sub vH} ratio is close to unity for {alpha}-trypsin denaturation, which suggests the occurrence of a two-state transition, devoid of molten-globule intermediates. At pH 3.0, {alpha}-trypsin unfolded with T{sub m} 325.9 K and {delta}H= 99.10 kcal mol{sup -1}, and the change in heat capacity between the native and unfolded forms of the protein was estimated to be 1.96 {+-} 0.18 kcal mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}. The stability of {alpha}-trypsin calculated at 298 K and at pH 3.0 was {delta}G{sub U} = 6.10 kcal mol{sup -1}. These values are in the range expected for a small globular protein. These results show that the thermodynamic parameters for unfolding of {beta}-trypsin do not change substantially after its conversion to {alpha}-trypsin.

  18. A novel optical nanoprobe for trypsin detection and inhibitor screening based on Mn-doped ZnSe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Xue; Tang Guangchao [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Qianwei Road 10, Changchun 130012 (China); Li Yang [Department of Pathophysiology, Prostate Diseases Prevention and Treatment Research Centre, Norman Bethune Medical School, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Su Xingguang, E-mail: suxg@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Qianwei Road 10, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2012-09-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new fluorescence turn-on nanoprobe for detection of trypsin was reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method was based on the fluorescence quenching and recovery of Mn:ZnSe d-dots. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Good sensitivity and selectivity were obtained for the determination of trypsin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trypsin in human biological fluids was detected with satisfactory results. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel optical nanoprobe (Mn:ZnSe d-dots-Arg{sub 6}) for trypsin detection and its inhibitor screening has been constructed successfully based on the fluorescence quenching and recovery of Mn:ZnSe d-dots. Mn:ZnSe d-dots would aggregate in the presence of positively charged Arg{sub 6} (six arginine residues) due to electrostatic interactions that result in the fluorescence quenching. Arg{sub 6} can be hydrolyzed into small fragments in the presence of trypsin, and accordingly, the aggregation of Mn:ZnSe d-dots can be prohibited, which lead to the fluorescence recovery. Experimental results show that the recovery in fluorescence intensity is linearly proportional to the concentration of trypsin within the range of 0.1-12.0 {mu}g mL{sup -1} with a detection limit of 40 ng mL{sup -1} under the optimized experimental conditions. We also prove the feasibility of fluorescence recovery of Mn:ZnSe d-dots for trypsin detection through the resonance light scattering (RLS) technique. Additionally, the optical nanoprobe can be employed for screening the inhibitors of trypsin. The optical nanoprobe was successfully applied for the determination of trypsin in human serum and urine samples with good accuracy and satisfactory recovery.

  19. Pancreatic and peri-pancreatic lesions mimic pancreatic islet cell tumor in multidetector computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Hua-dan; LIU Wei; XIAO Yu; SUN Hao; WANG Xuan; LEI Jing; JIN Zheng-yu

    2011-01-01

    Objective This pictorial review aimed to summarize the most possible differential diagnosis of pancreatic islet cell tumor (PICT).Data sources Data used in this review were mainly from Medline and Pubmed in English. And all clinical images in this review were from Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China.Study selection Cases of pancreatic cystadenoma, solid pseudo-papillary tumor of the pancreas, pancreatic metastasis, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, para-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, Castleman disease, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, splenic artery aneurysm and accessory spleen were selected in this pictorial review for differential diagnosis of PICT.Results Careful analysis of imaging features and correlation with the clinical manifestations may allow a more specific diagnosis. It is also important that the radiologist is familiar with the anatomic variants and disease entities which mimic pancreatic islet cell tumor in order to avoid an improper treatment protocol.Conclusions Many congenital anatomic variants or other pancreatic and peri-pancreatic diseases may mimic MDCT appearance of pancreatic islet cell tumor. Radiological, clinical and pathological characteristics should be considered for the final diagnosis.

  20. Dual core quantum dots for highly quantitative ratiometric detection of trypsin activity in cystic fibrosis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelló Serrano, Iván; Stoica, Georgiana; Matas Adams, Alba; Palomares, Emilio

    2014-10-01

    We present herein two colour encoded silica nanospheres (2nanoSi) for the fluorescence quantitative ratiometric determination of trypsin in humans. Current detection methods for cystic fibrosis diagnosis are slow, costly and suffer from false positives. The 2nanoSi proved to be a highly sensitive, fast (minutes), and single-step approach nanosensor for the screening and diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, allowing the quantification of trypsin concentrations in a wide range relevant for clinical applications (25-350 μg L-1). Furthermore, as trypsin is directly related to the development of cystic fibrosis (CF), different human genotypes, i.e. CF homozygotic, CF heterozygotic, and unaffected, respectively, can be determined using our 2nanoSi nanospheres. We anticipate the 2nanoSi system to be a starting point for non-invasive, easy-to-use and cost effective ratiometric fluorescent biomarkers for recessive genetic diseases like human cystic fibrosis. In a screening program in which the goal is to detect disease and also the carrier status, early diagnosis could be of great help.We present herein two colour encoded silica nanospheres (2nanoSi) for the fluorescence quantitative ratiometric determination of trypsin in humans. Current detection methods for cystic fibrosis diagnosis are slow, costly and suffer from false positives. The 2nanoSi proved to be a highly sensitive, fast (minutes), and single-step approach nanosensor for the screening and diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, allowing the quantification of trypsin concentrations in a wide range relevant for clinical applications (25-350 μg L-1). Furthermore, as trypsin is directly related to the development of cystic fibrosis (CF), different human genotypes, i.e. CF homozygotic, CF heterozygotic, and unaffected, respectively, can be determined using our 2nanoSi nanospheres. We anticipate the 2nanoSi system to be a starting point for non-invasive, easy-to-use and cost effective ratiometric fluorescent biomarkers for

  1. Influence of black gram (Vigna mungo) trypsin inhibitory fraction on the hepatic protein catabolism in male albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalakannan, V; Sathyamoorthy, A V; Motlag, D B

    1984-01-01

    The effect of black gram and black gram trypsin inhibitor on the protein catabolism of male albino mice has been investigated. Group 1 was given autoclaved black gram (control), Group II raw black gram and Group III the autoclaved black gram incorporated with 1% black gram trypsin inhibitor. Blood as well as urinary urea and creatine were found to be elevated in Groups II and III. Increased levels of arginase, ornithine transcarbamylase and transaminases were noted in Groups II and III. The results suggested an enhanced catabolism of proteins evoked by the native black gram trypsin inhibitor.

  2. Groove pancreatitis: A rare form of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharivi Jani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis affecting the "groove" of the pancreas among the pancreatic head, duodenum, and common bile duct. The exact cause is unknown, although there are associations with long-term alcohol abuse, smoking, peptic ulcer disease, heterotopic pancreas, gastric resection, biliary disease, and anatomical or functional obstruction of the minor papilla. The diagnosis can be challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are the preferred imaging modalities. The treatment of choice is conservative although surgical intervention can sometimes be required. Case Report: A 57-year-old male with a history of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B presented with 4 days of epigastric pain. Abdominal exam revealed absent bowel sounds and epigastric tenderness. He had a creatinine of 1.72 mg/dL, potassium of 2.9 mmol/L, and a normal lipase level of 86 U/L. Liver enzymes and total bilirubin were normal. Computed tomography abdomen showed high-grade obstruction of the second portion of the duodenum without any obvious mass. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a mass at the duodenal bulb causing luminal narrowing, with biopsies negative for malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the region of the pancreatic head and descending duodenum. EUS revealed a 3 cm mass in the region of pancreatic head with irregular borders and no vascular invasion. Fine needle aspiration (FNA was nondiagnostic. The patient then underwent a Whipple′s procedure. Pathology of these specimens was negative for malignancy but was consistent with para-duodenal or groove pancreatitis. Conclusion: The low incidence of groove pancreatitis is partly due to lack of familiarity with the disease. Groove pancreatitis should be considered in the differential for patients presenting with pancreatic head lesions and no cholestatic jaundice, especially when a duodenal obstruction

  3. Possible Involvement of Pancreatic Fatty Infiltration in Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Hori

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is difficult to diagnose in its early stage and is one of the most lethal human cancers. Thus, it is important to clarify its major risk factors, predictive factors and etiology. Here, we focus on fatty infiltration of the pancreas and suggest that it could be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Fatty infiltration of the pancreas is observed as ectopic adipocytes infiltrating the pancreatic tissue and is positively correlated with obesity and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, which are risk factors for pancreatic cancer. However, whether fatty infiltration is a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer has not been established. Recent clinical studies show there is a positive correlation between fatty infiltration of the pancreas and pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas. Animal experimental studies also show an association between fatty infiltration of the pancreas and pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas development. Syrian golden hamsters, which are sensitive to chemical carcinogens in the pancreas, develop fatty infiltration of the pancreas with age. The combination of a high-fat diet and a chemical carcinogen that induces a K-ras mutation increases the severity of fatty infiltration of the pancreas. Thus, fatty infiltration of the pancreas is suggested to promote pancreatic carcinogenesis via a K-ras activating mutation. It is assumed that increased expression of adipokines and of inflammatory and proliferation-associated factors elicited by fatty infiltration of the pancreas may contribute to pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas development. Accumulating evidence suggests that in addition to suppression of Ras activation, methods to modulate fatty infiltration in the pancreas can be considered as a strategy for preventing pancreatic cancer.

  4. Acute pancreatitis in patients with pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaojun; Tian, Bole

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a rare manifestation of pancreatic cancer (PC). The relationship between AP and PC remains less distinct. From January 2009 to November 2015, 47consecutive patients with PC who presented with AP were reviewed for this study. Clinical features, clinicopathologic variables, postoperative complications, and follow-up evaluations of patients were documented in detail from our database. In order to identify cutoff threshold time for surgery, receiver operating curve (ROC) was built according to patients with or without postoperative complications. Cumulative rate of survival was calculated by using the Kaplan–Meier method. The study was conducted in accordance with the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki and the guidelines of West China Hospital. This study included 35 men (74.5%) and 12 women (25.5%) (mean age: 52 years), with a median follow-up of 40 months. AP was clinically mild in 45 (95.7%) and severe in 2 (4.3%). The diagnosis of PC was delayed by 2 to 660 days (median 101 days). Thirty-nine (83.0%) cases underwent surgery. Eight (17.0%) cases performed biopsies only. Of 39 patients, radical surgery was performed in 32 (82.1%) cases and palliative in 7 (19.9%) cases. Two (8.0%) patients were needed for vascular resection and reconstruction. Postoperative complications occurred in 12 (30.8%) patients. About 24.5 days was the best cutoff point, with an area under curve (AUC) of 0.727 (P = 0.025, 95% confidence interval: 0.555–0.8999). The survival rate of patients at 1 year was 23.4%. The median survival in patients with vascular resection and reconstruction was 18 months, compared with 10 months in patients without vascular resection (P = 0.042). For the primary stage (T), Tix was identified in 3 patients, the survival of whom were 5, 28, 50 months, respectively. And 2 of them were still alive at the follow-up period. The severity of AP was mainly mild. Surgical intervention after 24.5 days may benefit for

  5. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloff, Andreas; Singer, Manfred V; Feick, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated. PMID:20617020

  6. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Feick

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available : In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated.

  7. Pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debra Ouyang; Deepti Dhall; Run Yu

    2011-01-01

    Pathologic hyperplasia of various pancreatic endocrine cells is rare but has been long known. β cell hyperplasia contributes to persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy, which is commonly caused by mutations in the islet ATP-sensitive potassium channel, and to noninsulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia in adults,which may or may not be associated with bariatric surgery.α cell hyperplasia may cause glucagonoma syndrome or induce pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. An inactivating mutation of the glucagon receptor causes α cell hyperplasia and asymptomatic hyperglucagonemia.Pancreatic polypeptide cell hyperplasia has been described without a clearly-characterized clinical syndrome and hyperplasia of other endocrine cells inside the pancreas has not been reported to our knowledge.Based on morphological evidence, the main pathogenetic mechanism for pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia is increased endocrine cell neogenesis from exocrine ductal epithelium. Pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia should be considered in the diagnosis and management of hypoglycemia, elevated islet hormone levels,and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Further studies of pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia will likely yield insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  8. Canagliflozin-Associated Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rajanshu

    2016-01-01

    Canagliflozin is a new drug in class of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors used for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We describe a patient who developed moderately severe acute pancreatitis as an untoward consequence after being initiated on this drug. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of canagliflozin-associated acute pancreatitis in clinical literature.

  9. Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casari, Ilaria; Falasca, Marco

    2015-11-23

    Pancreatic cancer is without any doubt the malignancy with the poorest prognosis and the lowest survival rate. This highly aggressive disease is rarely diagnosed at an early stage and difficult to treat due to its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need to clarify the causes responsible for pancreatic cancer and to identify preventive strategies to reduce its incidence in the population. Some circumstances, such as smoking habits, being overweight and diabetes, have been identified as potentially predisposing factors to pancreatic cancer, suggesting that diet might play a role. A diet low in fat and sugars, together with a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, weight reduction and not smoking, may contribute to prevent pancreatic cancer and many other cancer types. In addition, increasing evidence suggests that some food may have chemo preventive properties. Indeed, a high dietary intake of fresh fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and recent epidemiological studies have associated nut consumption with a protective effect against it. Therefore, diet could have an impact on the development of pancreatic cancer and further investigations are needed to assess the potential chemo preventive role of specific foods against this disease. This review summarizes the key evidence for the role of dietary habits and their effect on pancreatic cancer and focuses on possible mechanisms for the association between diet and risk of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Casari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is without any doubt the malignancy with the poorest prognosis and the lowest survival rate. This highly aggressive disease is rarely diagnosed at an early stage and difficult to treat due to its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need to clarify the causes responsible for pancreatic cancer and to identify preventive strategies to reduce its incidence in the population. Some circumstances, such as smoking habits, being overweight and diabetes, have been identified as potentially predisposing factors to pancreatic cancer, suggesting that diet might play a role. A diet low in fat and sugars, together with a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, weight reduction and not smoking, may contribute to prevent pancreatic cancer and many other cancer types. In addition, increasing evidence suggests that some food may have chemo preventive properties. Indeed, a high dietary intake of fresh fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and recent epidemiological studies have associated nut consumption with a protective effect against it. Therefore, diet could have an impact on the development of pancreatic cancer and further investigations are needed to assess the potential chemo preventive role of specific foods against this disease. This review summarizes the key evidence for the role of dietary habits and their effect on pancreatic cancer and focuses on possible mechanisms for the association between diet and risk of pancreatic cancer.

  11. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma pathology : changing "landscape"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Hackeng, Wenzel M; Offerhaus, G Johan; Hruban, Ralph H; Wood, Laura D

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. At time of diagnosis the disease is usually advanced and only a minority of patients are eligible for surgical resection. The overall 5-year survival is 6%. However, survival of patients with early stage pancreatic cancer is significantly better. To improv

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of Murraya koenigii trypsin inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shee, Chandan [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 (India); Singh, Tej P. [Department of Biophysics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 100 029 (India); Kumar, Pravindra, E-mail: kumarfbs@iitr.ernet.in; Sharma, Ashwani K., E-mail: kumarfbs@iitr.ernet.in [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 (India)

    2007-04-01

    A Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor purified from the seeds of Murraya koenigii has been crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as the precipitating agent. A Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor purified from the seeds of Murraya koenigii has been crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as the precipitating agent. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 75.8, c = 150.9 Å. The crystals contain two molecules in the asymmetric unit with a V{sub M} value of 2.5 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. Diffraction was observed to 2.65 Å resolution and a complete data set was collected to 2.9 Å resolution.

  13. Bauhinia variegata var. variegata trypsin inhibitor: from isolation to potential medicinal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Wong, Jack Ho; Bah, Clara Shui Fern; Lin, Peng; Tsao, Sai Wah; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2010-06-11

    Here we report for the first time of a new Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor (termed BvvTI) from seeds of the Camel's foot tree, Bauhinia variegata var. variegata. BvvTI shares the same reactive site residues (Arg, Ser) and exhibits a homology of N-terminal amino acid sequence to other Bauhinia protease inhibitors. The trypsin inhibitory activity (K(i), 0.1 x 10(-9)M) of BvvTI ranks the highest among them. Besides anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity, BvvTI could significantly inhibit the proliferation of nasopharyngeal cancer CNE-1 cells in a selective way. This may partially be contributed by its induction of cytokines and apoptotic bodies. These results unveil potential medicinal applications of BvvTI.

  14. Bauhinia variegata var. variegata trypsin inhibitor: From isolation to potential medicinal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Wong, Jack Ho [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR (China); Bah, Clara Shui Fern [Department of Food Science, Division of Sciences, University of Otago (New Zealand); Lin, Peng [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR (China); Tsao, Sai Wah [Department of Anatomy, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR (China); Ng, Tzi Bun, E-mail: b021770@mailserv.cuhk.edu.hk [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2010-06-11

    Here we report for the first time of a new Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor (termed BvvTI) from seeds of the Camel's foot tree, Bauhinia variegata var. variegata. BvvTI shares the same reactive site residues (Arg, Ser) and exhibits a homology of N-terminal amino acid sequence to other Bauhinia protease inhibitors. The trypsin inhibitory activity (K{sub i}, 0.1 x 10{sup -9} M) of BvvTI ranks the highest among them. Besides anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity, BvvTI could significantly inhibit the proliferation of nasopharyngeal cancer CNE-1 cells in a selective way. This may partially be contributed by its induction of cytokines and apoptotic bodies. These results unveil potential medicinal applications of BvvTI.

  15. Kinetics of trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis determined by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximova, Ksenia; Trylska, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was applied to determine enzymatic activity and inhibition. We measured the Michaelis-Menten kinetics for trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of two substrates, casein (an insoluble macromolecule substrate) and Nα-benzoyl-dl-arginine β-naphthylamide (a small substrate), and estimated the thermodynamic parameters in the temperature range from 20 to 37°C. The inhibitory activities of reversible (small molecule benzamidine) and irreversible (small molecule phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and macromolecule α1-antitrypsin) inhibitors of trypsin were also determined. We showed the usefulness of ITC for fast and direct measurement of inhibition constants and half-maximal inhibitory concentrations and for predictions of the mechanism of inhibition. ITC kinetic assays could be an easy and straightforward way to estimate Michaelis-Menten constants and the effectiveness of inhibitors as well as to predict the inhibition mechanism. ITC efficiency was found to be similar to that of classical spectrophotometric enzymatic assays.

  16. Psc-AFP, an antifungal protein with trypsin inhibitor activity from Psoralea corylifolia seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingyong; Li, Jun; Wang, Xiaowen; Fang, Weiguo; Bidochka, Michael J; She, Rong; Xiao, Yuehua; Pei, Yan

    2006-07-01

    An antifungal protein designated as Psc-AFP, with an apparent molecular mass of 18kDa, was isolated from a traditional Chinese herb, malaytea scurfpea (Psoralea corylifolia L.). The isolation procedure entailed extraction, cation exchange chromatography on CM FF, gel filtration chromatography on Superdex 75 and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography on SOURCE 5RPC column. Automated Edman degradation determined the partial N-terminal sequence of Psc-AFP to be NH2-EWEPVQNGGSSYYMVPRIWA, which displayed homology with plant trypsin inhibitors. The protease inhibitor activity of Psc-AFP was then confirmed by the inhibition on trypsin. Psc-AFP at 10 microM inhibited the mycelial growth of Alternari brassicae, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia cerealis, suggesting that Psc-AFP has a role in the defense against pathogens.

  17. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fischer, Iben Wendelboe Deleuran

    2014-01-01

    Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion....... Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases...... food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids...

  18. Chromosome G—banding in plants by inducing with trypsin and urea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENRUIYANG; WENQINSONG; 等

    1994-01-01

    Clear G-bands were revealed by applying the TUG method on chromosomes of 5 species of higher plants(Lilium davidii,Viciafaba,Hordeum vulgare,Ginkgo biloba and Triticum monococcum).Some details of the TUG method which consisted of treating chromosomes with both trypsin and urea were also studied.The mechanisms that might account for the presence of G-bands in plants were discussed.

  19. New insights into rotavirus entry machinery: stabilization of rotavirus spike conformation is independent of trypsin cleavage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier M Rodríguez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The infectivity of rotavirus, the main causative agent of childhood diarrhea, is dependent on activation of the extracellular viral particles by trypsin-like proteases in the host intestinal lumen. This step entails proteolytic cleavage of the VP4 spike protein into its mature products, VP8* and VP5*. Previous cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM analysis of trypsin-activated particles showed well-resolved spikes, although no density was identified for the spikes in uncleaved particles; these data suggested that trypsin activation triggers important conformational changes that give rise to the rigid, entry-competent spike. The nature of these structural changes is not well understood, due to lack of data relative to the uncleaved spike structure. Here we used cryo-EM and cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET to characterize the structure of the uncleaved virion in two model rotavirus strains. Cryo-EM three-dimensional reconstruction of uncleaved virions showed spikes with a structure compatible with the atomic model of the cleaved spike, and indistinguishable from that of digested particles. Cryo-ET and subvolume average, combined with classification methods, resolved the presence of non-icosahedral structures, providing a model for the complete structure of the uncleaved spike. Despite the similar rigid structure observed for uncleaved and cleaved particles, trypsin activation is necessary for successful infection. These observations suggest that the spike precursor protein must be proteolytically processed, not to achieve a rigid conformation, but to allow the conformational changes that drive virus entry.

  20. Development of activity-based probes for trypsin-family serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhengying; Jeffery, Douglas A; Chehade, Kareem; Beltman, Jerlyn; Clark, James M; Grothaus, Paul; Bogyo, Matthew; Baruch, Amos

    2006-06-01

    A series of diphenylphosphonate-based probes were developed for the trypsin-like serine proteases. These probes selectively target serine proteases rather than general serine hydrolases that are targets for fluorophosphonate-based probes. This increased selectivity allows detection of low abundance serine proteases in complex proteomes using simple SDS-PAGE methods. We present here the application of multiple probes in enzyme activity profiling of intact mast cells, a type of inflammatory cell implicated in allergy and autoimmune diseases.

  1. [Prolonged acute pancreatitis after bone marrow transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Singly, B; Simon, M; Bennani, J; Wittnebel, S; Zagadanski, A-M; Pacault, V; Gornet, J-M; Allez, M; Lémann, M

    2008-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after allogenic marrow transplantation. Several causes can predispose to pancreatitis, including Graft-Versus-Host Disease (GVHD), a condition which is probably underestimated. In the literature, few description of pancreatic GVHD can be found. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis can be difficult if pancreatic involvement occurs without other typical manifestations of GVHD. We report the case of a woman, 54 years old, suffering from prolonged, painful pancreatitis two months after allogenic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leucemia. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis was performed after five weeks on duodenal biopsies despite the absence of diarrheoa. The patient dramatically improved within few days on corticosteroids.

  2. Mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marta Herreros-Villanueva; Elizabeth Hijona; Angel Cosme; Luis Bujanda

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal of human malignancies ranking 4th among cancer-related death in the western world and in the United States,and potent therapeutic options are lacking.Although during the last few years there have been important advances in the understanding of the molecular events responsible for the development of pancreatic cancer,currently specific mechanisms of treatment resistance remain poorly understood and new effective systemic drugs need to be developed and probed.In vivo models to study pancreatic cancer and approach this issue remain limited and present different molecular features that must be considered in the studies depending on the purpose to fit special research themes.In the last few years,several genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic exocrine neoplasia have been developed.These models mimic the disease as they reproduce genetic alterations implicated in the progression of pancreatic cancer.Genetic alterations such as activating mutations in KRas,or TGFb and/or inactivation of tumoral suppressors such as p53,INK4A/ARF BRCA2 and Smad4 are the most common drivers to pancreatic carcinogenesis and have been used to create transgenic mice.These mouse models have a spectrum of pathologic changes,from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to lesions that progress histologically culminating in fully invasive and metastatic disease and represent the most useful preclinical model system.These models can characterize the cellular and molecular pathology of pancreatic neoplasia and cancer and constitute the best tool to investigate new therapeutic approaches,chemopreventive and/or anticancer treatments.Here,we review and update the current mouse models that reproduce different stages of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and will have clinical relevance in future pancreatic cancer developments.

  3. Bovine coronavirus hemagglutinin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, B; Potts, B J; Brian, D A

    1985-02-01

    Treatment of purified bovine coronavirus (Mebus strain) with pronase destroyed the integrity of virion surface glycoproteins gp140, gp120, gp100, reduced the amount of gp26 and destroyed the hemagglutinating activity of the virus. Bromelain, on the other hand, destroyed the integrity of gp120, gp100 and gp26 but failed to remove gp140 and failed to destroy viral hemagglutinating activity. These experiments suggest that gp140 is the virion hemagglutinin. Immunoblotting studies using monospecific antiserum demonstrate that gp140 is a disulfide-linked dimeric structure reducible to monomers of 65 kDa.

  4. Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (pinkeye).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelos, John A

    2015-03-01

    As is the case for controlling other infectious livestock diseases, the most successful efforts to control infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) will include consideration of the host, the environment, herd management, and ongoing surveillance even after the immediate crisis has passed. Research over many years has led to the discovery of a variety of antibiotic treatments and antibiotic regimens that can be effective against IBK. The discoveries of Mor bovoculi and reports of IBK associated with Mycoplasma spp without concurrent Mor bovis or Mor bovoculi have raised new questions into the roles that other organisms may play in IBK pathogenesis.

  5. The clinical significance of pancreatic steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Mark M; van Geenen, Erwin J M

    2011-03-01

    More research is now focused on pancreatic steatosis. Multiple definitions, clinical associations and synonyms for pancreatic steatosis are described in the literature and can be confusing. The integration and comparison of several studies concerning this topic is therefore challenging. In the past, pancreatic steatosis was considered an innocuous condition, a bystander of many underlying diseases (such as congenital syndromes, hemochromatosis and viral infection). However, evidence that pancreatic steatosis (strongly associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome) has a role in type 2 diabetes mellitus, pancreatic exocrine dysfunction, acute pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and the formation of pancreatic fistula after pancreatic surgery is emerging. This Review focuses on the different etiological factors and the clinical consequences of pancreatic steatosis.

  6. Influence of carbohydrates on the interaction of procyanidin B3 with trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Rui; Mateus, Nuno; De Freitas, Victor

    2011-11-09

    The biological properties of procyanidins, in particular their inhibition of digestive enzymes, have received much attention in the past few years. Dietary carbohydrates are an environmental factor that is known to affect the interaction of procyanidins with proteins. This work aimed at understanding the effect of ionic food carbohydrates (polygalacturonic acid, arabic gum, pectin, and xanthan gum) on the interaction between procyanidins and trypsin. Physical-chemical techniques such as saturation transfer difference-NMR (STD-NMR) spectroscopy, fluorescence quenching, and nephelometry were used to evaluate the interaction process. Using STD-NMR, it was possible to identify the binding of procyanidin B3 to trypsin. The tested carbohydrates prevented the association of procyanidin B3 and trypsin by a competition mechanism in which the ionic character of carbohydrates and their ability to encapsulate procyanidins seem crucial leading to a reduction in STD signal and light scattering and to a recovery of the proteins intrinsic fluorescence. On the basis of these results, it was possible to grade the carbohydrates in their aggregation inhibition ability: XG > PA > AG ≫ PC. These effects may be relevant since the coingestion of procyanidins and ionic carbohydrates are frequent and furthermore since these might negatively affect the antinutritional properties ascribed to procyanidins in the past.

  7. Cloning, expression and characterization of Bauhinia variegata trypsin inhibitor BvTI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Adriana F; Torquato, Ricardo J S; Tanaka, Aparecida S; Sampaio, Claudio A M

    2005-11-01

    A Bauhinia variegata trypsin inhibitor (BvTI) cDNA fragment was cloned into the pCANTAB5E phagemid. The clone pAS 1.1.3 presented a cDNA fragment of 733 bp, including the coding region for a mature BvTI protein comprising 175 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence for BvTI confirmed it as a member of the Kunitz-type plant serine proteinase inhibitor family. The BvTI cDNA fragment encoding the mature form was cloned into the expression vector, pET-14b, and ex-pressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS in an active form. In addition, a BvTI mutant form, r(mut)BvTI, with a Pro residue as the fifth amino acid in place of Leu, was produced. The recombinant proteins, rBvTI and r(mut)BvTI, were purified on a trypsin-Sepharose column, yielding 29 and 1.44 mg/l of active protein, respectively, and showed protein bands of approximately 21.5 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Trypsin inhibition activity was comparable for rBvTI (Ki=4 nM) and r(mut)BvTI (Ki=6 nM). Our data suggest that the Leu to Pro substitution at the fifth amino-terminal residue was not crucial for proteinase inhibition.

  8. The trypsin inhibitor panulirin regulates the prophenoloxidase-activating system in the spiny lobster Panulirus argus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Montero-Alejo, Vivian; Corzo, Gerardo; Besada, Vladimir; Vega-Hurtado, Yamile; González-González, Yamile; Perera, Erick; Porto-Verdecia, Marlene

    2013-11-01

    The melanization reaction promoted by the prophenoloxidase-activating system is an essential defense response in invertebrates subjected to regulatory mechanisms that are still not fully understood. We report here the finding and characterization of a novel trypsin inhibitor, named panulirin, isolated from the hemocytes of the spiny lobster Panulirus argus with regulatory functions on the melanization cascade. Panulirin is a cationic peptide (pI 9.5) composed of 48 amino acid residues (5.3 kDa), with six cysteine residues forming disulfide bridges. Its primary sequence was determined by combining Edman degradation/N-terminal sequencing and electrospray ionization-MS/MS spectrometry. The low amino acid sequence similarity with known proteins indicates that it represents a new family of peptidase inhibitors. Panulirin is a competitive and reversible tight-binding inhibitor of trypsin (Ki = 8.6 nm) with a notable specificity because it does not inhibit serine peptidases such as subtilisin, elastase, chymotrypsin, thrombin, and plasmin. The removal of panulirin from the lobster hemocyte lysate leads to an increase in phenoloxidase response to LPS. Likewise, the addition of increasing concentrations of panulirin to a lobster hemocyte lysate, previously depleted of trypsin-inhibitory activity, decreased the phenoloxidase response to LPS in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results indicate that panulirin is implicated in the regulation of the melanization cascade in P. argus by inhibiting peptidase(s) in the pathway toward the activation of the prophenoloxidase enzyme.

  9. Preparation and characterization of magnetic levan particles as matrix for trypsin immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciel, J.C. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Andrad, P.L. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50679-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Neri, D.F.M., E-mail: davidfmneri@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Vale do Sao Francisco, 56304-205 Petrolina, PE (Brazil); Carvalho, L.B. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50679-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Cardoso, C.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, PE (Brazil); Calazans, G.M.T. [Departamento de Antibioticos, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Albino Aguiar, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50679-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Silva, M.P.C. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50679-901 Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    Magnetic levan was synthesized by co-precipitating D-fructofuranosyl homopolysaccharide with a solution containing Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} in alkaline conditions at 100 Degree-Sign C. The magnetic levan particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), magnetization measurements, X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). Afterwards, magnetic levan particles were functionalized by NaIO{sub 4} oxidation and used as matrices for trypsin covalent immobilization. Magnetite and magnetic levan particles were both heterogeneous in shape and levan-magnetite presented bigger sizes compared to magnetite according to SEM images. Magnetic levan particles exhibited a magnetization 10 times lower as compared to magnetite ones, probably, due to the coating layer. XRD diffractogram showed that magnetite is the dominant phase in the magnetic levan. Infrared spectroscopy showed characteristics absorption bands of levan and magnetite (O-H, C-O-C and Fe-O bonds). The immobilized trypsin derivative was reused 10 times and lost 16% of its initial specific activity only. Therefore, these magnetic levan particles can be proposed as an alternative matrices for enzyme immobilization. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic levan particles presented larger size variation than magnetite particles due to the changes produced by coating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The utilization of magnetic levan particles showed to be efficacious for immobilization of enzymes as trypsin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic particles can be planned as other matrix for immobilization of biomolecule in various division processes in biotechnology.

  10. Proteolytic and Trypsin Inhibitor Activity in Germinating Jojoba Seeds (Simmondsia chinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samac, D; Storey, R

    1981-12-01

    Changes in proteolytic activity (aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase, endopeptidase) were followed during germination (imbibition through seedling development) in extracts from cotyledons of jojoba seeds (Simmondsia chinensis). After imbibition, the cotyledons contained high levels of sulfhydryl aminopeptidase activity (APA) but low levels of serine carboxypeptidase activity (CPA). CPA increased with germination through the apparent loss of a CPA inhibitor substance in the seed. Curves showing changes in endopeptidase activity (EPA) assayed at pH 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 during germination were distinctly different. EPA at pH 4, 5, 6, and 7 showed characteristics of sulfhydryl enzymes while activity at pH 8 was probably due to a serine type enzyme. EPA at pH 6 was inhibited early in germination by one or more substances in the seed. Activities at pH 5 and later at pH 6 were the highest of all EPA throughout germination and increases in these activities were associated with a rapid loss of protein from the cotyledons of the developing seedling.Jojoba cotyledonary extracts were found to inhibit the enzymic activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, and pepsin but not the protease from Aspergillus saotoi. The heat-labile trypsin inhibitor substance(s) was found in commercially processed jojoba seed meal and the albumin fraction of seed proteins. Trypsin inhibitor activity decreased with germination.

  11. Immobilization of trypsin on miniature incandescent bulbs for infrared-assisted proteolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Huimin; Bao, Huimin; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang, E-mail: gangchen@fudan.edu.cn

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Trypsin was immobilized on miniature incandescent bulbs via chitosan coating. • The bulbs acted as enzymatic reactors and the generators of infrared radiation. • The bulb bioreactors were successfully employed in infrared-assisted proteolysis. • The proteolysis could accomplish within 5 min with high sequence coverages. - Abstract: A novel efficient proteolysis approach was developed based on trypsin-immobilized miniature incandescent bulbs and infrared (IR) radiation. Trypsin was covalently immobilized in the chitosan coating on the outer surface of miniature incandescent bulbs with the aid of glutaraldehyde. When an illuminated enzyme-immobilized bulb was immersed in protein solution, the emitted IR radiation could trigger and accelerate heterogeneous protein digestion. The feasibility and performance of the novel proteolysis approach were demonstrated by the digestion of hemoglobin (HEM), cytochrome c (Cyt-c), lysozyme (LYS), and ovalbumin (OVA) and the digestion time was significantly reduced to 5 min. The obtained digests were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS with the sequence coverages of 91%, 77%, 80%, and 52% for HEM, Cyt-c, LYS, and OVA (200 ng μL{sup −1} each), respectively. The suitability of the prepared bulb bioreactors to complex proteins was demonstrated by digesting human serum.

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Bovine Nucleolus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amrutlal K.Patel; Doug Olson; Suresh K. Tikoo

    2010-01-01

    Nucleolus is the most prominent subnuclear structure, which performs a wide variety of functions in the eu-karyotic cellular processes. In order to understand the structural and functional role of the nucleoli in bovine cells,we analyzed the proteomie composition of the bovine nueleoli. The nucleoli were isolated from Madin Darby bo-vine kidney cells and subjected to proteomie analysis by LC-MS/MS after fractionation by SDS-PAGE and strongcation exchange chromatography. Analysis of the data using the Mascot database search and the GPM databasesearch identified 311 proteins in the bovine nucleoli, which contained 22 proteins previously not identified in theproteomic analysis of human nucleoli. Analysis of the identified proteins using the GoMiner software suggestedthat the bovine nueleoli contained proteins involved in ribosomal biogenesis, cell cycle control, transcriptional,translational and post-translational regulation, transport, and structural organization.

  13. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute pancre

  14. Pancreatic microcirculatory impairment in experimental acute pancreatitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-Guang Zhou; You-Dai Chen; Wei Sun; Zhong Chen

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study the feature of pancreatic microcirculatoryimpairment, especially the initial changes, in caerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis (AP).METHODS: The pancreatic microcirculation of caerulein-induced AP model was studied by intravital fluorescencemicroscopy with FITC-labeled erythrocytes (FITC-RBC),scanning electron microscopy of vascular corrosion casts,and light microscopy of Chinese ink-injected/cleared tissues.RESULTS: Animals in caerulein-treated group showedhyperamylemia (× 2), pancreatic oedema, infiltration ofinflammatory cells in pancreas. Constrictions of intralobulararteriolar sphincters, presence of vacuoles in all layers ofsphincter, and gross irregularity in capillary network of aciniwere found in the AP specimens. The decrease of pancreaticcapillary blood flow (0.34±0.10 nl @ min-1 vs0.910.06 nl @rain-1 of control, P<0.001), reduction of functional capillarydensity(277± 13 cm-1 vs349±8 cm-1 of control, P<0.001),and irregular intermittent perfusion were observed incaerulein-induced groups.CONCLUSION: Impairment and constriction of pancreaticintralobular arteriolar sphincter are the initial microcirculatorylesions in the early phase of acute pancreatitis, and play akey role in the pancreatic ischaemia and pancreaticmicrovascular failure in acute pancreatitis.

  15. CT and MRI Findings of Autoimmune Polymorph Bifocal Pancreatitis Mimicking Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Rotzinger MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare type of chronic pancreatitis. It is supposed to be a pancreatic manifestation of an immune-complex modulated systemic disorder. In contrast, pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the most frequent malignant neoplasm of the pancreas. Within the rare type of focal autoimmune pancreatitis, only few presentations with multifocal pancreatic lesions have been described. Herein we report a case of a 58-year-old patient with autoimmune pancreatitis presenting with bifocal manifestations of the pancreatic head and tail, mimicking pancreatic adenocarcinoma clinically, on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Typical imaging findings of autoimmune pancreatitis are compared with typical findings in pancreatic carcinoma. The diagnostic dilemma of differentiating between both entities is discussed. A review of the present literature regarding multifocal presence of autoimmune pancreatitis is performed.

  16. Mechanical Prevention of Post-ERCP Pancreatitis by Pancreatic Stents: Results, Techniques, and Indications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarnasky PR

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired pancreatic drainage may be most important in the pathophysiology of post-ERCP pancreatitis. When there is a mechanical problem, there is often a mechanical solution. Pancreatic stenting reduces the incidence and severity of post-ERCP pancreatitis in high-risk patients. Young patients with suspected sphincter of Oddi dysfunction or prior pancreatitis and those undergoing procedures with either a difficult cannulation, precut and/or pancreatic sphincterotomy should be strongly considered for pancreatic stenting. Stents should be removed within about one week or have the proximal flaps removed to allow early spontaneous distal migration. Pancreatic stent placement following biliary intervention can occasionally be difficult. In cases where the primary goal is pancreatic therapy, one should consider establishing pancreatic access before addressing the bile duct. A pancreatic stent can then serve as a guide for sphincterotomy, but most importantly, protect against post-ERCP pancreatitis.

  17. Alcoholic pancreatitis:Lessons from the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dahn; L; Clemens; Katrina; J; Mahan

    2010-01-01

    The association between alcohol consumption and pancreatitis has been recognized for over 100 years. Despite the fact that this association is well recognized, the mechanisms by which alcohol abuse leads to pancreatic tissue damage are not entirely clear. Alcohol abuse is the major factor associated with pancreatitis in the Western world. Interestingly, although most cases of chronic pancreatitis and many cases of acute pancreatitis are associated with alcohol abuse, only a small percentage of individuals w...

  18. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Mariani, Alberto; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreatitis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis. There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation, hereditary a...

  19. Screening and purification of a novel trypsin inhibitor from Prosopis juliflora seeds with activity toward pest digestive enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, S; Franco, O L; Tagliari, P D; Bloch, C; Mohan, M; Thayumanavan, B

    2005-08-01

    Several pests are capable of decreasing crop production causing severe economical and social losses. Aiming to find novel molecules that could impede the digestion process of different pests, a screening of alpha-amylase and trypsin-like proteinase inhibitors was carried out in Prosopis juliflora, showing the presence of both in dry seeds. Furthermore, a novel trypsin inhibitor, with molecular mass of 13,292 Da, was purified showing remarkable in vitro activity against T. castaneum and C. maculatus.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell detachment with trace trypsin is superior to EDTA for in vitro chemotaxis and adhesion assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, David; Duceppe, Nicholas; Hoemann, Caroline D

    2017-03-11

    Trypsin is frequently used to dissociate mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for in vitro adhesion and chemotaxis assays. However, its potential impact on surface receptor degradation is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of trypsin-EDTA exposure versus PBS-EDTA on MSC surface receptor integrity and function. Primary human MSCs were detached with PBS-EDTA alone, or Cell Dissociation Buffer followed by 30 s exposure to 0.05% w/v trypsin-EDTA (trace trypsin method, TT), or 0.25% w/v trypsin exposure for 2 or 5 min. Cells were characterized for surface integrity of β1 integrin (CD29) and PDGF Receptor (PDGF-R), and assessed in vitro for adhesion to atelocollagen-coated surfaces and migration to PDGF-BB. PBS-EDTA detachment fully preserved receptor integrity but routinely detached only half of the adherent cells and led to cell aggregates that failed to adhere evenly across the Transwell migration insert. Both CD29 and PDGF-R were significantly degraded by 0.25% trypsin detachment for 2 or 5 min compared to the TT method or PBS-EDTA (p < 0.05). Cells migrated optimally to PDGF-BB when detached with the TT method (3.1-fold vs α-MEM, p = 0.01). Cells attached optimally to atelocollagen when detached using the TT method or PBS-EDTA (6- to 10-fold vs 0.25% trypsin, p < 0.01). CDB followed by trace trypsin-EDTA exposure is recommended over PBS-EDTA to produce a single-cell MSC suspension that preserves receptor integrity and more reproducible receptor-mediated responses.

  1. Natural plant enzyme inhibitors. Characterization of an unusual alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor from ragi (Eleusine coracana Geartn.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaraj, B; Pattabiraman, T N

    1981-01-01

    An inhibitor I-1, capable of acting on both alpha-amylase and trypsin, was purified to homogeneity from ragi (finger-millet) grains. The factor was found to be stable to heat treatment at 100 degrees C for 1 h in the presence of NaCl and also was stable over the wide pH range 1-10. Pepsin and Pronase treatment of inhibitor I-1 resulted in gradual loss of both the inhibitory activities. Formation of trypsin-inhibitor I-1 complex, amylase-inhibitor I-1 complex and trypsin-inhibitor I-1-amylase trimer complex was demonstrated by chromatography on a Bio-Gel P-200 column. This indicated that the inhibitor is 'double-headed' in nature. The inhibitor was retained on a trypsin-Sepharose 4B column at pH 7.0. Elution at acidic pH resulted in almost complete recovery of amylase-inhibitory and trypsin-inhibitory activities. alpha-Amylase was retained on a trypsin-Sepharose column to which inhibitor I-1 was bound, but not on trypsin-Sepharose alone. Modification of amino groups of the inhibitor with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid resulted in complete loss of amylase-inhibitory activity but only 40% loss in antitryptic activity. Modification of arginine residues by cyclohexane-1,2-dione led to 85% loss of antitryptic activity after 5 h, but no effect on amylase-inhibitory activity. The results show that a single bifunctional protein factor is responsible for both amylase-inhibitory and trypsin-inhibitory activities with two different reactive sites.

  2. Metronidazole-induced pancreatitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Halloran, E

    2010-01-01

    A 25-year-old caucasian lady presented to the Accident & Emergency department complaining of acute onset severe epigastric pain radiating through to the back with associated nausea and vomiting. A diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was made. Symptoms commenced after the third dose of Metronidazole therapy prescribed for a recurrent periodontal abscess. The patient described a similar episode 10 months previously. On neither occasion were any other medications being taken, there was no history of alcohol abuse and no other gastro-intestinal aetiology could be identified on imaging. Symptoms resolved quickly upon discontinuation of the antibiotic agent. We conclude therefore that Metronidazole can reasonably be identified as the only potential causative agent.

  3. 14.2.Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930325 A clinical study on a lipid—based sys-tem of parenteral nutrition in acute pancreati-tis.ZHU Jiangfan (朱江帆),et al.Dept Hepato-bill Surg,lst Teach Hosp,3rd Milit Med Coll.Chin J Digest 1992;12(4):195—197.A controlled prospective study on a lipid-based system of parenteral nutrition has beencarried out in patients with acute pancreatitis.The results show that the patients’ positive ni-trogen balance can be obtained and the visceralproteins can be maintained within normal range

  4. Screening for Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Keita; Takaori, Kyoichi; Traverso, L William

    2015-10-01

    Neither extended surgery nor extended indication for surgery has improved survival in patients with pancreatic cancer. According to autopsy studies, presumably 90% are metastatic. The only cure is complete removal of the tumor at an early stage before it becomes a systemic disease or becomes invasive. Early detection and screening of individuals at risk is currently under way. This article reviews the evidence and methods for screening, either familial or sporadic. Indication for early-stage surgery and precursors are discussed. Surgeons should be familiar with screening because it may provide patients with a chance for cure by surgical resection.

  5. Pancreatic islet transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrêa-Giannella Maria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No formulation of exogenous insulin available to date has yet been able to mimic the physiological nictemeral rhythms of this hormone, and despite all engineering advancements, the theoretical proposal of developing a mechanical replacement for pancreatic β cell still has not been reached. Thus, the replacement of β cells through pancreas and pancreatic islet transplantation are the only concrete alternatives for re-establishing the endogenous insulin secretion in type 1 diabetic patients. Since only 1 to 1.5% of the pancreatic mass corresponds to endocrine tissue, pancreatic islets transplantation arises as a natural alternative. Data from the International Islet Transplant Registry (ITR from 1983 to December 2000 document a total of 493 transplants performed around the world, with progressively worse rates of post-transplant insulin independence. In 2000, the "Edmonton Protocol" introduced several modifications to the transplantation procedure, such as the use of a steroid-free immunosuppression regimen and transplantation of a mean islet mass of 11,000 islet equivalents per kilogram, which significantly improved 1-year outcomes. Although the results of a 5-year follow-up in 65 patients demonstrated improvement in glycemic instability in a significant portion of them, only 7.5% of the patients have reached insulin independence, indicating the need of further advances in the preservation of the function of transplanted islet. In addition to the scarcity of organs available for transplantation, islets transplantation still faces major challenges, specially those related to cell loss during the process of islet isolation and the losses related to the graft site, apoptosis, allorejection, autoimmunity, and immunosuppression. The main strategies to optimize islet transplantation aim at improving all these aspects. Conclusion Human islet transplantation should be regarded as an intervention that can decrease the frequency of

  6. Pancreatic function testing:Here to stay for the 21st century

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John G Lieb II; Peter V Draganov

    2008-01-01

    The diagnosis of Chronic Pancreatitis (CP) is based on the detection of abnormal structure or function of the diseased pancreas.The pancreatic function tests more accurately determine the presence of CP than tests of structure,especially for early stage disease.The function tests can be divided into two categories:noninvasive and invasive.The invasive "tube" tests can reliably detect mild,early CP,but are only available at a few referral centers and tend to be poorly tolerated by patients.The non-invasive tests are easy to obtain,but tend to perform poorly in patients with early,mild disease.Therefore,no one test is useful in all clinical situations,and a detailed understanding of the rational,pathophysiologic basis,strengths,and limitations of various tests is needed.This review highlights the role of various pancreatic function tests in the diagnosis of CP including fecal fat analysis,fecal elastase,fecal chymotrypsin,serum trypsin,the secretin stimulation test,the cholecystokinin (CCK) stimulation test,the combined secretin-CCK stimulation test,the intraductal and endoscopic secretin stimulation tests,and the functional magnetic resonance imaging of the pancreas after secretin stimulation.

  7. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis Nandy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, insulin-like growth factor (IGF, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, epidermal growth factor (EGF, and transforming growth factor (TGF in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

  8. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata, E-mail: mukhopadhyay.debabrata@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Guggenheim 1321C, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-02-24

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

  9. Study on the interaction of β-carotene and astaxanthin with trypsin and pepsin by spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangrong; Li, Peihong

    2016-05-01

    β-Carotene and astaxanthin are two carotenoids with powerful antioxidant properties, but the binding mechanisms of β-carotene/astaxanthin to proteases remain unclear. In this study, the interaction of these two carotenoids with trypsin and pepsin was investigated using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The experimental results indicated that the quenching mechanisms of trypsin/pepsin by the two carotenoids are static processes. The binding constants of trypsin and pepsin with these two carotenoids are in the following order: astaxanthin-trypsin > astaxanthin-pepsin > β-carotene-trypsin > β-carotene-pepsin, respectively. Thermodynamic investigations revealed that the interaction between the two carotenoids and trypsin/pepsin is synergistically driven by enthalpy and entropy, and hydrophobic forces and electrostatic attraction have a significant role in the reactions. In addition, as shown by synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and CD, the two carotenoids may induce conformational and microenvironmental changes in trypsin/pepsin. The study provides an accurate and full basic data for clarifying the binding mechanisms of the two carotenoids with trypsin/pepsin and is helpful in understanding their effect on protein function and their biological activity in vivo.

  10. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Pérez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  11. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF-VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  12. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miroslav Zavoral; Petra Minarikova; Filip Zavada; Cyril Salek; Marek Minarik

    2011-01-01

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  13. Viral infections and bovine mastitis: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, G.J.; Poel, van der W.H.M.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    2002-01-01

    This review deals with the role of viruses in the aetiology of bovine mastitis. Bovine herpesvirus 1, bovine herpesvirus 4, foot-and-mouth disease virus, and parainfluenza 3 virus have been isolated from milk from cows with clinical mastitis. Intramammary inoculations of bovine herpesvirus 1 or para

  14. Genetic ontogeny of pancreatic enzymes in Labrus bergylta larvae and the effect of feed type on enzyme activities and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Truls Wergeland; Folkvord, Arild; Grøtan, Espen; Sæle, Øystein

    2013-03-01

    A newly cultivated wrasse species, Labrus bergylta, have shown great potential for use in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) farms in the battle against sea lice (Lepeoptheirus salmonis) infections. Hatchery reared L. bergylta were studied from 2 to 55 DPH to examine the molecular basis of digestive ontogeny related to the pancreas. An isolated feeding trial was performed on 27-34 DPH larvae to compare the effect of diet on enzyme activity and the possible exogenous contribution by live feed. The following genes coding for key pancreatic enzymes were analyzed by qPCR: trypsin, Cyp7 A1, BAL, sPLA(2) 1B, amylase and pancreatic chitinase. Enzyme activity was measured on trypsin, neutral lipase, sPLA(2), amylase and chitinase in fed and unfed larvae. We did not observe any effects of the formulated diet v.s. rotifers on enzyme activities of neutral lipase, chitinase and sPLA(2). However, a probable feed-dependency was observed at a transcriptional level, where rotifers seem to stimulate upregulation. The regulation of BAL was the only exception, where an upregulation was observed after weaning both in the ontogeny series and the experimental part. Our data on pancreatic chitinase and amylase mRNA levels suggest the importance of carbohydrates in the diet of early larval and juvenile L. bergylta.

  15. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yong Suk; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Chan Sub; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck [Kwandong Univ., Myongji Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Pancreatic panniculitis is an inflammation and necrosis of fat at distant foci in patients with pancreatic disorders, most frequently, pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. Clinically, pancreatic panniculitis is manifested by painless or painful subcutaneous nodules on the legs, buttocks, or trunk. The usual sites are the distal parts of the lower extremities. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been many reports for the radiologic findings of pancreatic panniculitis. In this article, we report a case of pancreatic panniculitis, including radiologic findings of CT and ultrasonography. The patient was presented with painful subcutaneous nodules on the trunk, and had underlying acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts.

  16. Impaired small-bowel barrier integrity in the presence of lumenal pancreatic digestive enzymes leads to circulatory shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Erik B; Alsaigh, Tom; Chang, Marisol; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2012-08-01

    In bowel ischemia, impaired mucosal integrity may allow intestinal pancreatic enzyme products to become systemic and precipitate irreversible shock and death. This can be attenuated by pancreatic enzyme inhibition in the small-bowel lumen. It is unresolved, however, whether ischemically mediated mucosal disruption is the key event allowing pancreatic enzyme products systemic access and whether intestinal digestive enzyme activity in concert with increased mucosal permeability leads to shock in the absence of ischemia. To test this possibility, the small intestinal lumen of nonischemic rats was perfused for 2 h with either digestive enzymes, a mucin disruption strategy (i.e., mucolytics) designed to increase mucosal permeability, or both, and animals were observed for shock. Digestive enzymes perfused included trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, amylase, and lipase. Control (n = 6) and experimental animals perfused with pancreatic enzymes only (n = 6) or single enzymes (n = 3 for each of the five enzyme groups) maintained stable hemodynamics. After mucin disruption using a combination of enteral N-acetylcysteine, atropine, and increased flow rates, rats (n = 6) developed mild hypotension (P shock and increase systemic protease activation in the absence of ischemia, implicating bowel mucin disruption as a key event in early ischemia. Digestive enzymes and their products, if allowed to penetrate the gut wall, may trigger multiorgan failure and death.

  17. Extended exenatide administration enhances lipid metabolism and exacerbates pancreatic injury in mice on a high fat, high carbohydrate diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney Rouse

    Full Text Available This study expanded upon a previous study in mice reporting a link between exenatide treatment and exocrine pancreatic injury by demonstrating temporal and dose responses and providing an initial mechanistic hypothesis. The design of the present study included varying lengths of exenatide exposure (3, 6 weeks to 12 weeks at multiple concentrations (3, 10, or 30 µg/kg with multiple endpoints (histopathology evaluations, immunoassay for cytokines, immunostaining of the pancreas, serum chemistries and measurement of trypsin, amylase, and, lipase, and gene expression profiles. Time- and dose-dependent exocrine pancreatic injury was observed in mice on a high fat diet treated with exenatide. The morphological changes identified in the pancreas involved acinar cell injury and death (autophagy, apoptosis, necrosis, and atrophy, cell adaptations (hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and cell survival (proliferation/regeneration accompanied by varying degrees of inflammatory response leading to secondary injury in pancreatic blood vessels, ducts, and adipose tissues. Gene expression profiles indicated increased signaling for cell survival and altered lipid metabolism in exenatide treated mice. Immunohistochemistry supported gene expression findings that exenatide caused and/or exacerbated pancreatic injury in a high fat diet environment potentially by further increasing high fat diet exacerbated lipid metabolism and resulting oxidative stress. Further investigation is required to confirm these findings and determine their relevance to human disease.

  18. 重症急性胰腺炎治疗研究进展%Research Progress in the Treatment of Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄振鹏; 梁仲惠

    2012-01-01

    急性胰腺炎( acute pancreatitis,AP)是消化系统常见急症,可分为轻症急性胰腺炎(mild acute pancreatits,MAP)和重症急性胰腺炎(sever acute pancreatitis,SAP).SAP起病急,病情危重,常并发感染、腹膜炎、休克等多种并发症,病死率高,常在20%~40%,预后较差.近年来,随着科技发展,SAP治疗有了很大进步,多数患者能避免死亡并获得痊愈.因此,采取及时、有效的治疗对于SAP有着极其重要的意义.文章将近年来抑制胰腺外分泌和胰酶活性药物应用、抗生素预防性使用、内镜技术等发展作一综述.%Acute pancreatitis ( acute pancreatitis, AP ) is one of the most common diseases . It can be divided into mild acute pancreatitis ( mild acute pancreatits, MAP ) and severe acute pancreatitis ( sever acute pancreatitis, SAP ) . SAP is onset rapidly, and it is severly illness. SAP often complicated by infection, peritonitis, shock and other complications. Its mortality rate is very high, in 20%~40%, besides, the prognosis is poor. In recent years, with the development of science and technology, SAP treatment has very great progress, the majority of patients can avoid the death and recover. Therefore, to take timely, effective treatment for SAP has extremely important significance. This article will review in inhibition of pancreatic exocrine secretion and trypsin activity of drug application, antibiotic prophylaxis, using endoscopic techniques and development.

  19. Pancreatic Metastasis from Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The pancreas is an unusual location for metastases from other primary cancers. Rarely, pancreatic metastases from kidney or colorectal cancers have been reported. However, a variety of other cancers may also spread to the pancreas. We report an exceptional case of pancreatic metastasis from prostate cancer. Differences in management between primary and secondary pancreatic tumors make recognition of metastases to the pancreas an objective of first importance. Knowledge of unusual locations for metastatic spread will reduce diagnostic delay and lead to a timely delivery of an appropriate treatment.

  20. Pancreatic infection with Candida parapsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, R; Serrano-Heranz, R

    1999-01-01

    Candida species other than C. albicans have been implicated as pathogens in intravascular (bloodstream, intravascular devices, endocarditis) and extravascular (arthritis, osteomielitis, endophtalmitis) infections. C. parapsilosis, however, is rarely implicated in intra-abdominal infections (peritonitis during peritoneal dialysis, complicating surgery or solid-organ transplantation). We describe a case of a 48-y-old male with acute pancreatitis who had a pancreatic abscess produced by primary C. parapsilosis infection. Although he received adequate treatment with antifungal medication and surgical drainage, the outcome was fatal. Because the clinical findings are indistinguishable from bacterial abscesses, Candida species should be considered in cases of complicated pancreatitis, in order to establish a prompt adequate treatment.

  1. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahiyah Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes.

  2. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich-Christian; Semb, Synne; Nojgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may...... be useful as prophylaxis against post endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP). The protease inhibitor gabexate mesilate (GM) is used routinely as treatment to AP in some countries, but randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis do not support this practice. Nitroglycerin (NGL...

  3. [Eosinophilic pancreatitis and autoimmune pancreatitis: comparison, differential diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Turrin

    2017-03-01

    Here we discuss the importance of hypereosinophilia in EP and IgG increase in type 1 AIP (included in IgG-related systemic diseases. Differential diagnosis with pancreatic neoplasms and therapy schedules are discussed as well.

  4. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure and pain in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N

    1992-01-01

    A casual relation between pancreatic pressure and pain has been searched for decades but lack of appropriate methods for pressure measurements has hindered progress. During the 1980's the needle method has been used for direct intraoperative pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measurements and later...... for percutaneous sonographically-guided pressure measurements. Clinical and experimental evaluation of the method showed comparable results at intraoperative and percutaneous measurements and little week-to-week variation. Furthermore, comparable pressures in duct and adjacent pancreatic tissue were found, i.......e. the needle pressure mirrors the intraductal pressure. Comparisons of pain registrations, morphological and functional parameters with pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measurements have revealed a relation between pressure and pain which probably is causal. In patients with pain the high pressures previously...

  5. Computerized tomography in acute and chronic pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalmar, J.A.; Matthews, C.C.; Bishop, L.A.

    1984-11-01

    Modern imaging techniques have revolutionized the diagnostic evaluation of pancreatitis, primarily demonstrating its complications. Computerized tomography (CT) is a more sensitive method than ultrasonography and pancreatic ductography. A chart review revealed 214 patients at our hospital with a discharge diagnosis of pancreatitis. Sixty patients had CT for evaluation of possible complications. Only five scans were normal. Of 37 cases of acute pancreatitis, 92% demonstrated localized or diffuse enlargement, and 65% showed loss of pancreatic outline. Other frequent findings included thickening of perirenal fascia (49%), ileus (43%), edema of mesentery (35%), and inflammatory exudate (32%). Abscess and pseudocyst were each detected in 8% of cases. In chronic pancreatitis 65% of patients showed localized or diffuse pancreatic enlargement. Atrophy of the gland (30%), calcification (30%), pseudocyst (26%), and dilated pancreatic ducts (17%) were also seen. CT is effective in evaluating pancreatitis and its complications. 14 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  6. The role of diagnostic radiology in pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmas, Nevra E-mail: elmas@med.ege.edu.tr

    2001-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a frequent inflammatory and necrotic process of pancreas and peripancreatic field. To detect the presence of infected or sterile necrotic components and hemorrhage of the pancreatic paranchyma is important for therapeutic approach. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irreversible exocrine dysfunction, progressive loss of pancreatic tissue and morphological changes of the pancreatic canal. Imaging modalities play a primary role in the management of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. CT and MR imaging confirm the diagnosis and detect the severity of disease. In chronic pancreatitis, MRCP after Secretin administration, Spiral CT and endoscopic US seems to replace diagnostic ERCP. However differentiation of pseudotumor of chronic pancreatitis from the pancreatic carcinoma is difficult with either imaging modalities.

  7. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alberto Mariani; Pier Alberto Testoni

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreaUtis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis.There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association.Cystic fibrosis transmembrane con ductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation,hereditary and obstructive pancreatitis seem an acute disease that progress to chronic pancreatitis,likely as a consequence of the activation and proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells that produce and activate collagen and therefore fibrosis.From the diagnostic point of view,in patients with acute recurrent pancreatitis Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) seems the more reliable technique for an accurate evaluation and follow-up of some ductal and parenchymal abnormalities suspected for early chronic pancreatitis.

  8. Diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis and acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis in 5 severe acute pancreatitis by plain computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Keishoku; Kim, Jong-hyo; Nakasaku, Osamu

    1987-12-01

    The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is still mainly based on the clinical signs and symptoms of patients. In a prospective study of 64 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomography (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical types of acute pancreatitis. We were able to correctly diagnose 3 acute necrotizing pancreatitis with autopsy and 2 acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis by plain CT about 48 hours after onset. At present, CT about 48 hours after onset seems to be the most accurate method for the early detection of necrotizing, hemorrhagic and edematous forms of acute pancreatitis.

  9. Recent advances in autoimmune pancreatitis: concept, diagnosis, and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Kazuichi; Uchida, Kazushige; Fukui, Toshiro

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances support the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) as a unique systemic disease, because it shows occasional extrapancreatic lesions such as sclerosing cholangitis, sclerosing sialoadenitis, and retroperitoneal fibrosis, pathological features similar to those of fibrosis, and abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells, and it is steroid responsive. Based on these findings, several diagnostic criteria have been proposed. Although AIP is accepted worldwide as a unique clinical entity, its pathogenetic mechanism remains unclear. To clarify its pathogenesis, its genetic background, humoral immunity, candidate target antigens including self-antigens and molecular mimicry by microbes, and cellular immunity including regulatory T cells, the complement system, and experimental models are reviewed. On the basis of this review, we hypothesize that the pathogenesis of AIP involves a biphasic mechanism consisting of "induction" and "progression." In the early stage, the initial response to self-antigens [lactoferrin, carbonic anhydrase (CA)-II, CA-IV, pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor, and alpha-fodrin] and molecular mimicry (Helicobacter pylori) are induced by decreased naïve regulatory T cells (Tregs), and T-helper (Th) 1 cells release proinflammatory cytokines [interferon-gamma, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-2, and tumor necrosis factor alpha]. In the chronic stage, progression is supported by increased memory Tregs and Th2 immune responses. The classical complement system pathway may be activated by the IgG1 immune complex. As Tregs seem to play an important role in progression as well as in induction of the disease, further studies are necessary to clarify the pathogenesis of AIP.

  10. Bovine herpesvirus 1 infection and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), classified as an alphaherpesvirus, is a major pathogen of cattle. Primary infection is accompanied by various clinical manifestations such as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, abortion, infectious pustular vulvovaginitis, and systemic infection in neonates. When animals survive, a life-long latent infection is established in nervous sensory ganglia. Several reactivation stimuli can lead to viral re-excretion, which is responsible for the...

  11. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma associated with pancreatic ductal intraepithelial neoplasia:repor t of a case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajkumar Krishnasamy; Shaleen Agarwal; Shivendra Singh; Sunil Puri; Puja Sakhuja; Anil K Agarwal

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The presence of pancreatic ductal intraepithelial neoplasia in patients with chronic pancreatitis is a risk factor for development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHOD: A case of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma associated with pancreatic ductal intraepithelial neoplasia was diagnosed in the setting of chronic pancreatitis. RESULTS:Distal pancreatectomy combined with splenec-tomy was performed with a diagnosis of pancreatic body carcinoma. Histopathological examination suggested adenocarcinoma associated with pancreatic ductal intraepithelial neoplasia. The tumor was detected in the remaining head of the pancreas, for which a total pancreatectomy was done. CONCLUSIONS: When a patient with pancreatic ductal intraepithelial neoplasia associated with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas in the setting of chronic pancreatitis is at an increased risk of recurrence in the remaining pancreatic parenchyma, total pancreatectomy may be feasible.

  12. Autoimmune pancreatitis associated with a large pancreatic pseudocyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thilo Welsch; J(o)rg Kleeff; Irene Esposito; Markus W Büchler; Helmut Friess

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions comprise various entities with different histopathological characteristics and their differential diagnosis is often a challenge for clinicians.Autoimmune pancreatitis (ATP) is usually not considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic lesions, but often mimics the morphological aspects of pancreatic neoplasm. We report the case of a 64-year-old male patient with a cystic pancreatic head lesion (diameter 5 cm) and stenosis of the distal bile duct requiring repeated stentlng. Because of the clinical presentation together with moderate elevation of serum CA19-9 and massive elevation of cyst fluid CA19-9 (122.695 U/L; normal range: <37.0 U/L), the patient underwent explorative laparotomy and pylorus preserving partial pancreaticoduodenectomy.Histology revealed surprisingly ATP with an inflammatory pseudocyst. Tn conclusion, cyst fluid analysis of tumor markers and cyst fluid cytology lack high accuracy to clearly differentiate cystic pancreatic lesions. Although ATP is rarely associated with pseudocysts, the disease has to be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions. Early examination of serum IgG,IgG4 and auto-antibodies might save these patients from unnecessary endoscopical and surgical procedures.

  13. Intervet symposium: bovine neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetters, T; Dubey, J P; Adrianarivo, A; Frankena, K; Romero, J J; Pérez, E; Heuer, C; Nicholson, C; Russell, D; Weston, J

    2004-10-28

    This article summarises the most relevant data of presentations delivered at the 19th International Conference of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP)held in New Orleans, LA, USA, from 10 to 14 August 2003) in a symposium session on bovine neosporosis. The symposium was organised by Juan Muñoz-Bielsa,Wicher Holland, Enzo Foccoliand Theo Schetters (chairman). The focus was on the present state of knowledge of the biology, epidemiology(presented by J.P. Dubey) and immunology of Neospora infection (presented by A. Adrianarivo),with special emphasis on the prospects of vaccination of cattle against Neospora-induced abortion (presentations of K. Frankena (Costa Rican trial) and C. Heuer (New Zealand trial)).

  14. Effect of alternative crosslinking techniques on the enzymatic degradation of bovine pericardia and their calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudev, S C; Chandy, T

    1997-06-01

    The in vitro calcification and enzymatic degradation of bovine pericardia (BP) after a series of surface treatments were studied as a function of exposure time. The degradation of these treated surfaces was monitored by scanning electron micrography and tensile strength measurements. Polyethylene glycol-(PEG) grafted BP and glutaraldehyde-(GA) treated BPs retained maximum stability in collagenase digestion compared with SDS-treated BP. The ability of alpha chymotrypsin, bromelain, esterase, trypsin, and collagenase to modulate the degradation of SDS-, GA-, PEG-, Carbodiimide-, and glycidylether-treated BPs also was investigated. Incubation of various enzymes to these crosslinked pericardia variably reduced the tensile strength of these tissues. It is conceivable that chemical treatments of pericardial tissues might have altered their physical and chemical configuration and the subsequent degradation properties. In vitro calcification studies showed a substantial reduction in the calcification profile of PEG-grafted bovine pericardia compared to other treated tissues. Furthermore, the biocompatibility aspects of pericardial tissues were established by platelet adhesion and octane contact angle. In conclusion, it seems that the surface modification of bovine pericardia via GA-PEG grafting may provide new ways of controlling biodegradation and calcification.

  15. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  16. Evaluating steatosis in pancreatic transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Aneesha Ratan; Papalois, Vassilios

    2011-06-01

    Pancreatic transplant remains the only treatment that cures insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. It is recognized by transplant surgeons that donor pancreases with excessive fat infiltration have a poorer clinical outcome, resulting in significant recipient morbidity and mortality. However, no objective measure of pancreatic fat infiltration exists, and no study has been done that correlates the level of fat infiltration with clinical outcome. There have been significant radiologic advances that allow assessment of fat content of organs, and these could be used to accurately quantify the extent of pancreatic fat infiltration. We reviewed the literature regarding pancreatic steatosis, and examined ways in which the level of steatosis could be objectively measured before transplant, thereby improving clinical outcome.

  17. Nutrition Support in Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orestis Ioannidis

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The management of acute pancreatitis differs according to its severity. Approximately 75% of patients with acute pancreatitis have mild disease with a mortality rate below 1%. Mortality increases up to 20% if the disease progresses to its severe necrotizing form and, in the most severe cases, mortality can increase to 30-40%. Severe acute pancreatitis is usually accompanied by systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS which results in hypermetabolism with prominent protein catabolism. Acute malnutrition, commonly observed in patients with acute pancreatitis, is associated with immunological disturbances, septic complications and delayed healing of surgical wounds, and may lead to multiorgan dysfunction or failure syndrome (MODS or MOFS and increased morbidity and mortality [1].

  18. Genetic alterations in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif; Lena Karapanagiotou; Kostas Syrigos

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is devastating for patients and their relatives as the incidence rate is approximately the same as mortality rate. Only a small percentage, which ranges from 0.4% to 4% of patients who have been given this diagnosis, will be alive at five years. At the time of diagnosis, 80% of pancreatic cancer patients have unresectable or metastatic disease.Moreover, the therapeutic alternatives offered by chemotherapy or radiotherapy are few, if not zero. For all these reasons, there is an imperative need of analyzing and understanding the primitive lesions that lead to invasive pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Molecular pathology of these lesions is the key of our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of this cancer and will probably help us in earlier diagnosis and better therapeutic results. This review focuses on medical research on pancreatic cancer models and the underlying genetic alterations.

  19. Presenilin 1 promotes trypsin-induced neuroprotection via the PAR2/ERK signaling pathway. Effects of presenilin 1 FAD mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakopoulou, Angeliki M; Georgakopoulos, Anastasios; Robakis, Nikolaos K

    2016-06-01

    Mutants of presenilin 1 (PS1) increase neuronal cell death causing autosomal-dominant familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). Recent literature shows that treatment of neuronal cultures with low concentrations of trypsin, a member of the serine family of proteases, protects neurons from toxic insults by binding to the proteinase-activated receptor 2 and stimulating survival kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2). Other studies show that PS1 is necessary for the neuroprotective activity of specific neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, against excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. Here, we show that treatment of mouse cortical neuronal cultures with trypsin activates ERK1/2 and protects neurons against glutamate excitoxicity. The trypsin-dependent ERK activation and neuroprotection requires both alleles of PS1 because neither PS1 knockout nor PS1 hemizygous neuronal cultures can use exogenous trypsin to activate ERK1/2 or increase neuronal survival. The protective effect of PS1 does not depend on its γ-secretase activity because inhibitors of γ-secretase have no effect on trypsin-mediated neuroprotection. Importantly, cortical neuronal cultures either heterozygous or homozygous for PS1 FAD mutants are unable to use trypsin to activate ERK1/2 and rescue neurons from excitotoxicity, indicating that FAD mutants inhibit trypsin-dependent neuroprotection in an autosomal-dominant manner. Furthermore, our data support the theory that PS FAD mutants increase neurodegeneration by inhibiting the ability of neurons to use cellular factors as protective agents against toxic insults.

  20. Chronic Pancreatitis and Neoplasia: Correlation or Coincidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Zografos

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Any link between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could reflect the malignant potential of a chronic inflammatory process. Four patients with ductal adenocarcinomas had a long history of pancreatic pain (median duration 5 years and showed clearcut evidence of chronic pancreatitis “downstream” of the tumour. Four were alcoholics and two heavy smokers. These four cases arose within a surgical series of approximately 250 patients with chronic pancreatitis, giving an incidence of 1.6 per cent. The incidence and anatomical distribution of carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could possibly be consistent with a casual relationship.

  1. Surgical management of chronic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stavros Gourgiotis; Stylianos Germanos; Marco Pericoli Ridolifni

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Treatment of chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a challenging condition for surgeons. During the last decades, increasing knowledge about pathophysiology of CP, improved results of major pancreatic resections, and integration of sophisticated diagnostic methods in clinical practice have resulted in signiifcant changes in surgery for CP. DATA SOURCES:To detail the indications for CP surgery, the surgical procedures, and outcome, a Pubmed database search was performed. The abstracts of searched articles about surgical management of CP were reviewed. The articles could be identiifed and further scrutinized. Further references were extracted by cross-referencing. RESULTS: Main indications of CP for surgery are intractable pain, suspicion of malignancy, and involvement of adjacent organs. The goal of surgical treatment is to improve the quality of life of patients. The surgical approach to CP should be individualized according to pancreatic anatomy, pain characteristics, baseline exocrine and endocrine function, and medical co-morbidity. The approach usually involves pancreatic duct drainage and resection including longitudinal pancreatojejunostomy, pancreatoduodenectomy (Whipple's procedure), pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy, distal pancreatectomy, total pancreatectomy, duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (Beger's procedure), and local resection of the pancreatic head with longitudinal pancreatojejunostomy (Frey's procedure). Non-pancreatic and endoscopic management of pain has also been advocated. CONCLUSIONS:Surgical procedures provide long-term pain relief, a good postoperative quality of life with preservation of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function, and are associated with low early and late mortality and morbidity. In addition to available results from randomized controlled trials, new studies are needed to determine which procedure is the most effective for the management of patients with CP.

  2. Overview of Exocrine Pancreatic Pathobiology

    OpenAIRE

    Pandiri, Arun R.

    2013-01-01

    Exocrine pancreas is a source of several enzymes that are essential for the digestive process. The exocrine pancreatic secretion is tightly regulated by the neuroendocrine system. The endocrine pancreas is tightly integrated anatomically and physiologically with the exocrine pancreas and modulates its function. Compound-induced pancreatitis is not a common event in toxicology or drug development but it becomes a significant liability when encountered. Understanding the species-specific differ...

  3. Acute Pancreatitis and Ileus Postcolonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hin Hin Ko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Postpolypectomy bleeding and perforation are the most common complications of colonoscopy. A case of acute pancreatitis and ileus after colonoscopy is described. A 60-year-old woman underwent a gastroscopy and colonoscopy for investigation of iron deficiency anemia. Gastroscopy was normal; however, the colonoscope could not be advanced beyond the splenic flexure due to a tight angulation. Two polypectomies were performed in the descending colon. After the procedure, the patient developed a distended, tender abdomen. Bloodwork was remarkable for an elevated amylase level. An abdominal x-ray and computed tomography scan showed pancreatitis (particularly of the tail, a dilated cecum and a few air-fluid levels. The patient improved within 24 h of a repeat colonoscopy and decompression tube placement. The patient had no risk factors for pancreatitis. The causal mechanism of pancreatitis was uncertain but likely involved trauma to the tail of the pancreas during the procedure. Our patient developed ileus, likely secondary to pancreatitis. The present case is the first report of clinical pancreatitis and ileus associated with colonoscopy.

  4. Genetic abnormalities in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamboni Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The incidence and mortality of pancreatic adenocarcinoma are nearly coincident having a five-year survival of less than 5%. Enormous advances have been made in our knowledge of the molecular alterations commonly present in ductal cancer and other pancreatic malignancies. One significant outcome of these studies is the recognition that common ductal cancers have a distinct molecular fingerprint compared to other nonductal or endocrine tumors. Ductal carcinomas typically show alteration of K-ras, p53, p16INK4, DPC4 and FHIT, while other pancreatic tumor types show different aberrations. Among those tumors arising from the exocrine pancreas, only ampullary cancers have a molecular fingerprint that may involve some of the same genes most frequently altered in common ductal cancers. Significant molecular heterogeneity also exists among pancreatic endocrine tumors. Nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine tumors have frequent mutations in MEN-1 and may be further subdivided into two clinically relevant subgroups based on the amount of chromosomal alterations. The present review will provide a brief overview of the genetic alterations that have been identified in the various subgroups of pancreatic tumors. These results have important implications for the development of genetic screening tests, early diagnosis, and prognostic genetic markers.

  5. Pancreatic cancer chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Thomas B; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal gastrointestinal tumour. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of therapy in the majority of the patients whereas resection is the only chance of cure but only possible in 15-20% of all patients. The integration of radiotherapy into multimodal treatment concepts is heavily investigated. It is now commonly accepted that induction chemotherapy should precede radiotherapy. When fractionated conventionally it should be given as chemoradiotherapy. Recently, stereotactic body radiotherapy emerged as an alternative, but will have to be carefully investigated in clinical trials. This review aims to give an overview of radiotherapeutic strategies with a focus on the latest developments in the field in the context of chemotherapy and surgery.

  6. Trypsin as enhancement in cyclical tracheal decellularization: Morphological and biophysical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldo-Gomez, D.M., E-mail: davidmauro2008@gmail.com [Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingeniería de Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Unidad de Posgrado Edificio “C” 1er Piso, Circuito de Posgrados, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D. F., México (Mexico); Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Circuito Exterior, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico); Leon-Mancilla, B. [Departamento de Cirugía, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Edificio “D” Planta Baja, Circuito Interior, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico); Del Prado-Audelo, M.L. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Circuito Exterior, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico); and others

    2016-02-01

    There are different types of tracheal disorders (e.g. cancer, stenosis and fractures). These can cause respiratory failure and lead to death of patients. Several attempts have been made for trachea replacement in order to restore the airway, including anastomosis and implants made from synthetic or natural materials. Tracheal allotransplantation has shown high rejection rates, and decellularization has emerged as a possible solution. Decellularization involves the removal of antigens from cells in the organ or tissue, leaving a matrix that can be used as 3D cell-scaffold. Although this process has been used for tracheal replacement, it usually takes at least two months and time is critical for patients with tracheal disorders. Therefore, there is necessary to develop a tracheal replacement process, which is not only effective, but also quick to prepare. The aim of this research was to develop a faster trachea decellularization protocol using Trypsin enzyme and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as decellularization agents. Three protocols of cyclic trachea decellularization (Protocols A, B, and C) were compared. Following Protocol A (previously described in the literature), 15 consecutive cycles were performed over 32 days. Protocol B (a variation of Protocol A) — EDTA being added — with 15 consecutive cycles performed over 60 days. Finally, Protocol C, with the addition of Trypsin as a decellularization agent, 5 consecutive cycles being performed over 10 days. For the three protocols, hematoxylin–eosin (H&E) staining and DNA residual content quantification were performed to establish the effectiveness of the decellularization process. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the changes in porosity and microarrays. To evaluate the structural matrices integrity, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and biomechanical test were used. None of the protocols showed significant alteration or degradation in the components of the extracellular matrix

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of Murraya koenigii trypsin inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shee, Chandan; Singh, Tej P.; Kumar, Pravindra; Sharma, Ashwani K.

    2007-01-01

    A Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor purified from the seeds of Murraya koenigii has been crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as the precipitating agent. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 75.8, c = 150.9 Å. The crystals contain two molecules in the asymmetric unit with a V M value of 2.5 Å3 Da−1. Diffraction was observed to 2.65 Å resolution and a complete data set was collected to 2.9 Å resolution. PMID:17401205

  8. Effects of gamma radiation on total phenolics, trypsin and tannin inhibitors in soybean grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Toledo, T. C. F.; Canniatti-Brazaca, S. G.; Arthur, V.; Piedade, S. M. S.

    2007-10-01

    The objective was determining possible radiation-induced alterations (with doses of 2, 4 and 8 kGy) in raw or cooked grains from five soybean cultivars through the analysis of some antinutrient. Total phenolic ranged from 2.46 to 10.83 mg/g, the trypsin inhibited from 18.19 to 71.64 UTI/g and tannins from 0.01 to 0.39 mg/g. All the antinutrient studied underwent reduction with increases in the doses and cooking process was effective too.

  9. Effects of gamma radiation on total phenolics, trypsin and tannin inhibitors in soybean grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Toledo, T.C.F [Department of Agroindustry, Food and Nutrition Escola Superior de Agricultura ' Luiz de Queiroz' , Universidade de Sao Paulo (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: tcftoled@esalq.usp.br; Canniatti-Brazaca, S.G. [Department of Agroindustry, Food and Nutrition, Escola Superior de Agricultura ' Luiz de Queiroz' , Universidade de Sao Paulo (ESALQ/USP), Av. Padua Dias, 11 Box 9, CEP 13418-900, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: sgcbraza@esalq.usp.br; Arthur, V. [Food Irradiation and Entomology Laboratory, Center for Nuclear Agriculture-CENA/USP, Av. Centenario 303, Caixa Postal 96, 13400-970, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br; Piedade, S.M.S. [Department of Mathematic Sciences, Escola Superior de Agricultura ' Luiz de Queiroz' , Universidade de Sao Paulo (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: soniamsp@esalq.usp.br

    2007-10-15

    The objective was determining possible radiation-induced alterations (with doses of 2, 4 and 8 kGy) in raw or cooked grains from five soybean cultivars through the analysis of some antinutrient. Total phenolic ranged from 2.46 to 10.83 mg/g, the trypsin inhibited from 18.19 to 71.64 UTI/g and tannins from 0.01 to 0.39 mg/g. All the antinutrient studied underwent reduction with increases in the doses and cooking process was effective too.

  10. A Novel, Poly(Ethyl Ethylene Ether) Inhibitor to Trypsin from Marine Cyanobacteria, Lyngbya confervoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Ambika; Prasanth, Shankar; Murugesh, Easwaran; Haridas, Karickal R; Sabu, Abdulhameed; Haridas, Madhathilkovilakathu

    2016-03-01

    A novel, poly(ethyl ethylene ether) inhibitor to trypsin was purified from marine cyanobacteria, Lyngbya confervoides from the coastal areas of Thalassery, North Kerala. The kinetics and the thermodynamic parameters of its interactions with the enzyme were also studied. It was demonstrated that the substrate binding, catalytic triad of the enzyme could be blocked by the inhibitor, as expressed by molecular simulation studies. The study also showed that the cyanobacterial group could prove to be a potential source of novel enzyme inhibitors for various applications.

  11. In vitro cultivation of human fetal pancreatic ductal stem cells and their differentiation into insulin-producing cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Xiang Yao; Mao-Lin Qin; Jian-Jun Liu; Xing-Shu Chen; De-Shan Zhou

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To isolate, culture and identify the human fetal pancreatic ductal stem cells in vitro, and to observe the potency of these multipotential cells differentiation into insulin-producing cells.METHODS: The human fetal pancreas was digested by 1 g/L collagease type Ⅳ and then 2.5 g/L trypsin was used to isolate the pancreatic ducta stem cells, followed by culture in serum-free, glucose-free DMEM media with some additional chemical substrates in vitro (according to the different Stage). The cells were induced by glucose-free (control),5 mmol/L, 17.8 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L glucose, respectively.The cell types of differentiated cells were identified using immunocytochemical staining.RESULTS: The shape of human fetal pancreatic ductal stem cells culturedin vitro was firstly fusiform in the first 2 wk,and became monolayer and cobblestone pattern after another 3 to 4 wk. After induced and differentiated by the glucose of different concentrations for another 1 to 2 wk,the cells formed the pancreatic islet-like structures. The identification and potency of these cells were then identified by using the pancreatic ductal stem cell marker, cytokeratin-19 (CK-19), pancreatic β cell marker, insulin and pancreatic α cell marker, glucagons with immunocytochemical staining.At the end of the second week, 95.2% of the cells were positive for CK-19 immunoreactivity. Up to 22.7% of the cells induced by glucose were positive for insulin immunoreactivity, and less than 3.8% of the cells were positive for glucagon immunoreactivity in pancreatic isletlike structures. The positive ratio of immunoreactive staining was dependent on the concentration of glucose, and it was observed that the 17.8 mmol/L glucose stimulated effectively to produce insulin- and glucagons-producing cells.CONCLUSION: The human fetal pancreatic ductal stem cells are capable of proliferation in vitro. These cells have multidifferentiation potential and can be induced by glucose and differentiated into insulin

  12. Pancreatic Stellate Cells and Pancreatic Carcinoma: An Unholy Alliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes-Matthias Löhr

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the stromal compartment in the development, proliferation, invasion, metastasis and resistance of epithelial cancers has increasingly been recognized in recent decades [1, 2]. This stromal reaction is found in many carcinomas, e.g. in breast, prostate, colon, ovarian and pancreatic cancer. It is made up of stromal cells, endothelial cells, immune cells and extracellular matrix proteins. Moreover, the ECM proteins in the stroma act as a reservoir for growth factors released either by tumor or stromal cells, thus enabling autocrine and paracrine stimulation of the cells within the tumor mass. In this respect, groundbreaking work in solid tumors was done by Mina Bissell with breast carcinoma as her model system [3]. Recently, Vonlaufen et al. have contributed a review on the relationship between activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells which is worth reading [4]. Vonlaufen et al., with their own study [5] and those of some other groups (see their review, convincingly demonstrate a reciprocal influence of both nonepithelial and epithelial constituents of pancreatic carcinoma which works to their mutual benefit. Thus, the coinjection of PSC and pancreatic tumor cells enhances tumor growth and metastasis. In In vitro and animal models, PSCs increase tumor cell proliferation and decrease basal and induced apoptosis of pancreatic tumor cells. On the other hand, pancreatic tumor cells activate PSCs, recruit them to their vicinity and stimulate their proliferation. This review clearly exemplifies the specialized milieu in which both cell types grow to their mutual benefit, thus forming one of the deadliest tumors we know.

  13. A rational design for improving the trypsin resistance of aflatoxin-detoxifizyme (ADTZ) based on molecular structure evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuxin; Wu, Xiyang; Xie, Chunfang; Hu, Yadong; Liu, Daling; Ma, Yi; Yao, Dongsheng

    2016-05-01

    The resistance of feed enzymes against proteases is crucial in livestock farming. In this study, the trypsin resistance of aflatoxin-detoxifizyme (ADTZ) is improved. ADTZ possesses 72 lys/arg residue sites, 45 of which are scattered on the outermost layers of the molecule (RSA≧25%). These 45 lys/arg sites could be target sites for trypsin hydrolysis. By considering shape-matching (including physical and secondary bond interactions) and the "induced fit-effect", we hypothesized that some of these lys/arg sites are vulnerable to trypsin. A protein-protein docking simulation method was used to avoid the massive computational requirements and to address the intricacy of selecting candidate sites, as candidate site selection is affected by space displacement. Optimal mutants (K244Q/K213C/K270T and R356E/K357T/R623C) were predicted by computational design with protein folding energy analysis and molecular dynamics simulations. A trypsin digestion assay was performed, and the mutants displayed much higher stability against trypsin hydrolysis compared to the native enzyme. Moreover, temperature- and pH-activity profiles revealed that the designed mutations did not affect the catalytic activity of the enzyme.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor with antiproliferative activity from Gymnocladus chinensis (Yunnan bean) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, M J; Zhang, G Q; Wang, H X; Ng, T B

    2011-04-01

    A 20-kDa Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor was isolated from Gymnocladus chinensis (Yunnan bean) seeds. The isolation procedure involved ion exchange chromatography on diethylaminoethyl cellulose (DEAE-cellulose), affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on sulfopropyl sepharose (SP-sepharose), and gel filtration by FPLC on Superdex 75. The trypsin inhibitor was adsorbed on DEAE-cellulose, unadsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel, and adsorbed on SP-Sepharose. It dose-dependently inhibited trypsin with an IC(50) value of 0.4 μM. Dithiothreitol reduced its trypsin inhibitory activity, suggesting that an intact disulfide bond is indispensable to the activity. It suppressed [methyl-(3)H] thymidine incorporation by leukemia L1210 cells and lymphoma MBL2 cells with an IC(50) value of 4.7 and 9.4 μM, respectively. There was no effect on human immunodeficiency virus(4)-1 reverse transcriptase activity and fungal growth when the trypsin inhibitor was tested up to 100 μM.

  15. Loss of Periostin Results in Impaired Regeneration and Pancreatic Atrophy after Cerulein-Induced Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Simone; Regel, Ivonne; Steiger, Katja; Wagner, Nadine; Thorwirth, Manja; Schlitter, Anna M; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg; Erkan, Mert

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix molecule periostin (POSTN, encoded by POSTN), which is secreted by activated pancreatic stellate cells, has important functions in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the role of POSTN in acute pancreatitis and subsequent regeneration processes has not been addressed so far. We analyzed the function of POSTN in pancreatic exocrine regeneration after the induction of a severe acute pancreatitis. Postn-deficient mice and wild-type control animals received repetitive cerulein injections, and a detailed histologic analysis of pancreatic tissues was performed. Although there was no difference in pancreatitis severity in the acute inflammatory phase, the recovery of the exocrine pancreas was massively impaired in Postn-deficient mice. Loss of Postn expression was accompanied by strong pancreatic atrophy and acinar-to-adipocyte differentiation, which was also reflected in gene expression patterns. Our data suggest that POSTN is a crucial factor for proper exocrine lineage-specific regeneration after severe acute pancreatitis.

  16. Acute and chronic pancreatitis: surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzakovic, Alexander; Superina, Riccardo

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis is becoming increasingly prevalent in children, posing new challenges to pediatric health care providers. Although some general adult treatment paradigms are applicable in the pediatric population, diagnostic workup and surgical management of acute and chronic pancreatitis have to be tailored to anatomic and pathophysiological entities peculiar to children. Nonbiliary causes of acute pancreatitis in children are generally managed nonoperatively with hydration, close biochemical and clinical observation, and early initiation of enteral feeds. Surgical intervention including cholecystectomy or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is often required in acute biliary pancreatitis, whereas infected pancreatic necrosis remains a rare absolute indication for pancreatic debridement and drainage via open, laparoscopic, or interventional radiologic procedure. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by painful irreversible changes of the parenchyma and ducts, which may result in or be caused by inadequate ductal drainage. A variety of surgical procedures providing drainage, denervation, resection, or a combination thereof are well established to relieve pain and preserve pancreatic function.

  17. Reduction of immunoreactivity of bovine beta-lactoglobulin upon combined physical and proteolytic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonomi, F.; Fiocchi, A.; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2003-01-01

    Bovine beta-lactoglobulin was hydrolyzed with trypsin or chymotrypsin before, during and after treatment at 600 MPa and pH 6.8 for 10 min at 30, 37 and 44degreesC. The extent of beta-lactoglobulin hydrolysis under pressure was noticeably higher than at atmospheric pressure, particularly when...... chymotrypsin was used. Addition of proteases at ambient pressure to previously pressure-treated beta-lactoglobulin gave only a modest increase in proteolysis with respect to the untreated protein. Products of enzyme hydrolysis under pressure were separated by reverse-phase HPLC, and were found to be different...... from those obtained at atmospheric pressure when chymotrypsin was used. The residual immunochemical reactivity of the products of combined pressure-enzyme treatment was assessed on the unresolved hydrolysates by ELISA tests using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, and on individual hydrolytic...

  18. Preparation and Antimicrobial Action of Three Tryptic Digested Functional Molecules of Bovine Lactoferrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Nilisha; Nagpal, Nitish; Alam, Hammad; Pandey, Sadanand; Gautam, Lovely; Sinha, Mau; Shin, Kouichirou; Manzoor, Nikhat; Virdi, Jugsharan S.; Kaur, Punit; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin is an 80 kDa bilobal, iron binding glycoprotein which is primarily antimicrobial in nature. The hydrolysis of lactoferrin by various proteases in the gut produces several functional fragments of lactoferrin which have varying molecular sizes and properties. Here, bovine lactoferrin has been hydrolyzed by trypsin, the major enzyme present in the gut, to produce three functional molecules of sizes approximately 21 kDa, 38 kDa and 45 kDa. The molecules have been purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography and identified using N-terminal sequencing, which reveals that while the 21 kDa molecule corresponds to the N2 domain (21LF), the 38 kDa represents the whole C-lobe (38LF) and the 45 kDa is a portion of N1 domain of N-lobe attached to the C-lobe (45LF). The iron binding and release properties of 21LF, 38LF and 45LF have been studied and compared. The sequence and structure analysis of the portions of the excision sites of LF from various species have been done. The antibacterial properties of these three molecules against bacterial strains, Streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica and Listeria monocytogenes were investigated. The antifungal action of the molecules was also evaluated against Candida albicans. This is the first report on the antimicrobial actions of the trypsin cleaved functional molecules of lactoferrin from any species. PMID:24595088

  19. Preparation and antimicrobial action of three tryptic digested functional molecules of bovine lactoferrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilisha Rastogi

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin is an 80 kDa bilobal, iron binding glycoprotein which is primarily antimicrobial in nature. The hydrolysis of lactoferrin by various proteases in the gut produces several functional fragments of lactoferrin which have varying molecular sizes and properties. Here, bovine lactoferrin has been hydrolyzed by trypsin, the major enzyme present in the gut, to produce three functional molecules of sizes approximately 21 kDa, 38 kDa and 45 kDa. The molecules have been purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography and identified using N-terminal sequencing, which reveals that while the 21 kDa molecule corresponds to the N2 domain (21LF, the 38 kDa represents the whole C-lobe (38LF and the 45 kDa is a portion of N1 domain of N-lobe attached to the C-lobe (45LF. The iron binding and release properties of 21LF, 38LF and 45LF have been studied and compared. The sequence and structure analysis of the portions of the excision sites of LF from various species have been done. The antibacterial properties of these three molecules against bacterial strains, Streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica and Listeria monocytogenes were investigated. The antifungal action of the molecules was also evaluated against Candida albicans. This is the first report on the antimicrobial actions of the trypsin cleaved functional molecules of lactoferrin from any species.

  20. CLINICAL STUDY ON ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaib Rehaman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Early diagnosis and severity evaluation on patients with acute pancreatitis are very important due to its potential morbidity and mortality. Given the wide spectrum of disease seen, the care of patients with pancreatitis must be highly individualized. Sev eral clinical, laboratory and radiologic factors and many scoring systems have been proposed for outcome prediction. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To study the symptomatology, clinical presentation and management in pancreatitis . To study the severity of acute panc reatitis according to Glasgow Scale . METHODS: Present study includes consecutive 38 patients hospitalized in CSI Holdsworth Memorial Hospital over the period of 2 years. All patients were thoroughly investigated and were stratified according to the Glasgow criteria. Data was collected on complications, investigations and interventions undertaken, outcome, duration of stay in hospital and ICU. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Descriptive, Chi square tests, Crosstabs (Contingency coefficient analysis . RESULTS : Mean age of presentation in our study was 43.1 years. There was a male predominance accounting for 68.4% compared to 31.6% females. Alcohol was the main etiological factor in about 50% of the patients. Sensitivity to S. amylase was about 100%. Accuracy of USG abdomen in diagnosing pancreatitis was about 88.5%. Ascitis was the commonest complication seen in 13.2%. Mean duration of hospital stay was 6.2 days. The patient were stratified according to Glasgow scoring system into mild (0 - 3 and severe (>3 panc reatitis. In our study 32 people were graded with mild pancreatitis, all improved and in 6 people who were graded with severe pancreatitis, 83.3 % improved and 2.6% expired because of complications. Test statistics showed Contingency coefficient 0.355 and P 0.019 (NS. CONCLUSION : Glasgow scoring system remains a valid predicting system for the outcome in patients with acute pancreatitis. It is simple easy to apply with

  1. Resectable pancreatic small cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M. Winter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary pancreatic small cell carcinoma (SCC is rare, with just over 30 cases reported in the literature. Only 7 of these patients underwent surgical resection with a median survival of 6 months. Prognosis of SCC is therefore considered to be poor, and the role of adjuvant therapy is uncertain. Here we report two institutions’ experience with resectable pancreatic SCC. Six patients with pancreatic SCC treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (4 patients and the Mayo Clinic (2 patients were identified from prospectively collected pancreatic cancer databases and re-reviewed by pathology. All six patients underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Clinicopathologic data were analyzed, and the literature on pancreatic SCC was reviewed. Median age at diagnosis was 50 years (range 27-60. All six tumors arose in the head of the pancreas. Median tumor size was 3 cm, and all cases had positive lymph nodes except for one patient who only had five nodes sampled. There were no perioperative deaths and three patients had at least one postoperative complication. All six patients received adjuvant therapy, five of whom were given combined modality treatment with radiation, cisplatin, and etoposide. Median survival was 20 months with a range of 9-173 months. The patient who lived for 9 months received chemotherapy only, while the patient who lived for 173 months was given chemoradiation with cisplatin and etoposide and represents the longest reported survival time from pancreatic SCC to date. Pancreatic SCC is an extremely rare form of cancer with a poor prognosis. Patients in this surgical series showed favorable survival rates when compared to prior reports of both resected and unresectable SCC. Cisplatin and etoposide appears to be the preferred chemotherapy regimen, although its efficacy remains uncertain, as does the role of combined modality treatment with radiation.

  2. CLONING AND EXPRESSING TRYPSIN MODULATING OOSTATIC FACTOR IN Chlorella desiccata TO CONTROL MOSQUITO LARVAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, Dov; Sterner, Andeas; Powell, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    The insect peptide hormone trypsin modulating oostatic factor (TMOF), a decapeptide that is synthesized by the mosquito ovary and controls the translation of the gut's trypsin mRNA was cloned and expressed in the marine alga Chlorella desiccata. To express Aedes aegypti TMOF gene (tmfA) in C. desiccata cells, two plasmids (pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA) were engineered with pKYLX71 DNA (5 Kb) carrying the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) promoter 35S(2) and the kanamycin resistant gene (neo), as well as, a 8 Kb nitrate reductase gene (nit) from Chlorella vulgaris. Transforming C. desiccata with pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA show that the engineered algal cells express TMOF (20 ± 4 μg ± SEM and 17 ± 3 μg ± SEM, respectively in 3 × 10(8) cells) and feeding the cells to mosquito larvae kill 75 and 60% of Ae. aegypti larvae in 4 days, respectively. Southern and Northern blots analyses show that tmfA integrated into the genome of C. desiccata by homologous recombination using the yeast 2 μ circle of replication and the nit in pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA, respectively, and the transformed algal cells express tmfA transcript. Using these algal cells it will be possible in the future to control mosquito larvae in the marsh.

  3. Highly selective recovery of phosphopeptides using trypsin-assisted digestion of precipitated lanthanide-phosphoprotein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güzel, Yüksel; Rainer, Matthias; Mirza, Munazza R; Messner, Christoph B; Bonn, Günther K

    2013-05-21

    The basic idea of this study was to recover phosphopeptides after trypsin-assisted digestion of precipitated phosphoproteins using trivalent lanthanide ions. In the first step, phosphoproteins were extracted from the protein solution by precipitation with La(3+) and Ce(3+) ions, forming stable pellets. Additionally, the precipitated lanthanide-phosphoprotein complexes were suspended and directly digested on-pellet using trypsin. Non-phosphorylated peptides were released into the supernatants by enzymatic cleavage and phosphopeptides remained bound on the precipitated pellet. Further washing steps improved the removal of non-phosphorylated peptides. For the recovery of phosphopeptides the precipitated pellets were dissolved in 3.7% hydrochloric acid. The performance of this method was evaluated by several experiments using MALDI-TOF MS measurements and delivered the highest selectivity for phosphopeptides. This can be explained by the overwhelming preference of lanthanides for binding to oxygen-containing anions such as phosphates. The developed enrichment method was evaluated with several types of biological samples, including fresh milk and egg white. The uniqueness and the main advantages of the presented approach are the enrichment on the protein-level and the recovery of phosphopeptides on the peptide-level. This allows much easier handling, as the number of molecules on the peptide level is unavoidably higher, by complicating every enrichment strategy.

  4. Vegetative Storage Protein with Trypsin Inhibitor Activity Occurs in Sapindus mukorassi,a Sapindaceae Deciduous Tree

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Biao Liu; Xu-Chu Wang; Min-Jing Shi; Yue-Yi Chen; Zheng-Hai Hu; Wei-Min Tian

    2009-01-01

    A vegetative storage protein (VSP) with trypsin inhibitor activity in a deciduous tree,Sapindus mukorassi,was characterized by means of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis,Western-blot,immuno-histochemical localization,light- and electro-microscopy,together with analysis of proteinase inhibitor activity of the purified VSP in vitro.There were two proteins with molecular masses of about 23 and 27 kDa in a relatively high content in the bark tissues of terminal branches of S.mukorassi in leafless periods.The proteins decreased markedly during young shoot development,indicating their role in seasonal nitrogen storage.Immuno-histochemical localization with the polyclonal antibodies raised against the 23 kDa protein demonstrated that the 23 kDa protein was the major component of protein inclusions in protein-storing cells.The protein inclusions were identified by protein-specific staining and should correspond to the electron-dense materials in different forms in the vacuoles of phloem parenchyma cells and phloem ray parenchyma cells under an electron microscope.So,the 23 kDa protein was a typical VSP in S.mukorassi.The 23 and 27 kDa proteins shared no immuno-relatedness,whereas the 23 kDa protein was immuno-related with the 22 kDa VSP in lychee and possessed trypsin inhibitor activity.The 23 kDa protein may confer dual functions:nitrogen storage and defense.

  5. Comparative effects of ohmic, induction cooker, and electric stove heating on soymilk trypsin inhibitor inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Zhao, Luping; Zhang, Caimeng; Kong, Xiangzhen; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Yeming

    2015-03-01

    During thermal treatment of soymilk, a rapid incorporation of Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI) into protein aggregates by covalent (disulfide bond, SS) and/or noncovalent interactions with other proteins is responsible for its fast inactivation of trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA). In contrast, the slow cleavage of a single Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) peptide bond is responsible for its slow inactivation of TIA and chymotrypsin inhibitor activity (CIA). In this study, the effects of Ohmic heating (220 V, 50 Hz) on soymilk TIA and CIA inactivation were examined and compared to induction cooker and electric stove heating with similar thermal histories. It was found that: (1) TIA and CIA inactivation was slower from 0 to 3 min, and faster after 3 min as compared to induction cooker and electric stove. (2) The thiol (SH) loss rate was slower from 0 to 3 min, and similar to induction cooker and electric stove after 3 min. (3) Ohmic heating slightly increased protein aggregate formation. (4) In addition to the cleavage of one BBI peptide bond, an additional reaction might occur to enhance BBI inactivation. (5) Ohmic heating was more energy-efficient for TIA and CIA inactivation. (6) TIA and CIA inactivation was accelerated with increasing electric voltage (110, 165, and 220 V) of Ohmic heating. It is likely that the enhanced inactivation of TIA by Ohmic heating is due to its combined electrochemical and thermal effects.

  6. Expression of Aedes trypsin-modulating oostatic factor on the virion of TMV: A potential larvicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, Dov; Rabindran, Shailaja; Dawson, William O; Powell, Charles A; Iannotti, Donna A; Morris, Timothy J; Shabanowitz, Jeffry; Hunt, Donald F; DeBondt, Hendrik L; DeLoof, Arnold

    2006-12-12

    We report the engineering of the surface of the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) virion with a mosquito decapeptide hormone, trypsin-modulating oostatic factor (TMOF). The TMV coat protein (CP) was fused to TMOF at the C terminus by using a read-through, leaky stop codon that facilitated expression of CP and chimeric CP-TMOF (20:1 ratio) that were coassembled into virus particles in infected Nicotiana tabacum. Plants that were infected with the hybrid TMV RNA accumulated TMOF to levels of 1.3% of total soluble protein. Infected tobacco leaf discs that were fed to Heliothis virescens fourth-instar larvae stunted their growth and inhibited trypsin and chymotrypsin activity in their midgut. Purified CP-TMOF virions fed to mosquito larvae stopped larval growth and caused death. Because TMV has a wide host range, expressing TMV-TMOF in plants can be used as a general method to protect them against agricultural insect pests and to control vector mosquitoes.

  7. Structure of catalytic domain of Matriptase in complex with Sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Mingdong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matriptase is a type II transmembrane serine protease that is found on the surfaces of epithelial cells and certain cancer cells. Matriptase has been implicated in the degradation of certain extracellular matrix components as well as the activation of various cellular proteins and proteases, including hepatocyte growth factor and urokinase. Sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1, a cyclic peptide inhibitor originally isolated from sunflower seeds, exhibits potent inhibitory activity toward matriptase. Results We have engineered and produced recombinant proteins of the matriptase protease domain, and have determined the crystal structures of the protease:SFTI-1 complex at 2.0 Å as well as the protease:benzamidine complex at 1.2 Å. These structures elaborate the structural basis of substrate selectivity of matriptase, and show that the matriptase S1 substrate specificity pocket is larger enough to allow movement of benzamidine inside the S1 pocket. Our study also reveals that SFTI-1 binds to matriptase in a way similar to its binding to trypsin despite the significantly different isoelectric points of the two proteins (5.6 vs. 8.2. Conclusions This work helps to define the structural basis of substrate specificity of matriptase and the interactions between the inhibitor and protease. The complex structure also provides a structural template for designing new SFTI-1 derivatives with better potency and selectivity against matriptase and other proteases.

  8. Cytogenetic study of Ascaris trypsin inhibitor in cultured human lymphocytes with metabolic activation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joanna Blaszkowska; Wanda Bratkowska; Dobroslawa Lopaczynska; Tomasz Ferenc

    2009-04-01

    The trypsin inhibitor (ATI) isolated from gastrointestinal nematode Ascaris suum was tested in vitro for induction of chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). Genotoxicity assessment of purified ATI was carried out on metaphase plates received from peripheral blood lymphocyte macroculture (48 h test of structural chromosome aberrations and 72 h test of SCE) with exogenous metabolic activation. ATI was tested in dose of 25, 50 and 100 μg per ml of culture. Kinetics of cell divisions were determined by the replication index (RI). The mitotic index (MI) was expressed as a number of metaphases per 1000 nuclei analysed. Analysis of chromosome aberrations showed that higher doses of ATI (50 and 100 /ml) significantly increased the frequency of chromosome aberrations (mainly of chromatid gaps and breaks) compared to the negative control. All concentrations of ATI caused a statistically significant reduction in the MI and RI. In comparison with the negative control, a significant increase in the SCE frequency was observed in all applied doses of ATI. Thus, in the presence of S9 activation, the Ascaris trypsin inhibitor showed potential clastogenic activity and inhibition of the dynamics of lymphocyte divisions.

  9. Extraction, purification, and characterization of a trypsin inhibitor from cowpea seeds (Vigna unguiculata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Li, Xiaona; Xia, Xunfeng; Li, Hao; Liu, Jing; Li, Qing X; Li, Ji; Xu, Ting

    2014-01-01

    Protease inhibitors against trypsin were extracted from cowpea seeds, purified, and characterized. After the seed powder was defatted with hexane, the cowpea trypsin inhibitor (CpTI) was extracted with 0.15 M NaCl for 30 min. The crude extracts were then heated at 90°C for 10 min, followed by precipitation with 40-65% saturation ammonium sulfate, by which the protein purity increased approximately 15-fold. The CpTI had approximate 88-fold and 186-fold purification after anion-exchange chromatography (Super-Q) and gel filtration (Sephadex G-200), respectively. A broad band of the purified CpTI on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) indicates a degree of heterogeneity and partial denaturation of CpTI, having a molecular mass of ∼8000 kD. Multiple peaks between 7451 and 8898 by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy also suggest heterogeneity. The purified CpTI was stable at 90°C for 60 min, pH 5-10, and 0-3.0% of NaCl. The purification method described here can be used to obtain highly purified CpTI for its studies such as risk assessment of CpTI genetically modified foods.

  10. Transversal Descriptive Study of Xenobiotic Exposures in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara Yvonne Jeppe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available There have been a substantial number of reports in the literature linking pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer to certain xenobiotics and occupations. It has been hypothesized that exposure to volatile hydrocarbons and particularly petrochemicals increases susceptibility to pancreatitis. We performed a study aimed to enumerate occupational and environmental xenobiotics described in the literature as potential risk factors for pancreatitis and to document exposures to these in chronic pancreatitis patients presenting with chronic pain for surgery.

  11. Endoscopic ultrasonography findings in autoimmune pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elisabetta Buscarini; Claudio De Angelis; Stefania De Lisi; Paolo Giorgio Arcidiacono; Maria Chiara Petrone; Arnaldo Fuini; Rita Conigliaro; Guido Manfredi; Raffaele Manta; Dario Reggio

    2011-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool for pancreatic masses and chronic pancreatitis. In recent years there has been a growing interest in the worldwide medical community in autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), a form of chronic pancreatitis caused by an autoimmune process. This paper reviews the current available literature about the endoscopic ultrasonographic findings of AIP and the role of this imaging technique in the management of this protean disease.

  12. Pathophysiology of alcoholic pancreatitis: An overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parimal Chowdhury; Priya Gupta

    2006-01-01

    Use of alcohol is a worldwide habit regardless of socioeconomic background. Heavy alcohol consumption is a potential risk factor for induction of pancreatitis. The current review cites the updated literature on the alcohol metabolism, its effects on gastrointestinal and pancreatic function and in causing pancreatic injury, genetic predisposition of alcohol induced pancreatitis. Reports describing prospective mechanisms of action of alcohol activating the signal transduction pathways, induction of oxidative stress parameters through the development of animal models are being presented.

  13. Papillocystic Variant of Acinar Cell Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasim Radhi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar cell pancreatic carcinoma is a rare solid malignant neoplasm. Recent review of the literature showed occasional cases with papillary or papillocystic growth patterns, ranging from 2 to 5 cm in diameter. We report a large 10 cm pancreatic tumor with papillocystic pathology features involving the pancreatic head. The growth pattern of these tumors could be mistaken for intraductal papillary mucinous tumors or other pancreatic cystic neoplasms.

  14. Pancreatic cancer: yesterday, today and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Daniel; Tingstedt, Bobby; Andersson, Bodil; Holmquist, Fredrik; Sturesson, Christian; Williamsson, Caroline; Sasor, Agata; Borg, David; Bauden, Monika; Andersson, Roland

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of our most lethal malignancies. Despite substantial improvements in the survival rates for other major cancer forms, pancreatic cancer survival rates have remained relatively unchanged since the 1960s. Pancreatic cancer is usually detected at an advanced stage and most treatment regimens are ineffective, contributing to the poor overall prognosis. Herein, we review the current understanding of pancreatic cancer, focusing on central aspects of disease management from radiology, surgery and pathology to oncology.

  15. Evaluation of Mannosidase and Trypsin Enzymes Effects on Biofilm Production of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Burn Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banar, Maryam; Emaneini, Mohammad; Satarzadeh, Mhboubeh; Abdellahi, Nafiseh; Beigverdi, Reza; van Leeuwen, Willem B.; Jabalameli, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm is an important virulence factor in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and has a substantial role in antibiotic resistance and chronic burn wound infections. New therapeutic agents against P. aeruginosa, degrading biofilms in burn wounds and improving the efficacy of current antimicrobial agents, are required. In this study, the effects of α-mannosidase, β-mannosidase and trypsin enzymes on the degradation of P. aeruginosa biofilms and on the reduction of ceftazidime minimum biofilm eliminating concentrations (MBEC) were evaluated. All tested enzymes, destroyed the biofilms and reduced the ceftazidime MBECs. However, only trypsin had no cytotoxic effect on A-431 human epidermoid carcinoma cell lines. In conclusion, since trypsin had better features than mannosidase enzymes, it can be a promising agent in combatting P. aeruginosa burn wound infections. PMID:27736961

  16. Immobilization of trypsin on graphene oxide for microwave-assisted on-plate proteolysis combined with MALDI-MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guobin; Chen, Xiaoyi; Hu, Jianhua; Yang, Pengyuan; Yang, Dong; Wei, Liming

    2012-06-21

    With an ultra-high surface area and abundant functional groups, graphene oxide (GO) provides an ideal substrate for the immobilization of trypsin. We demonstrated that trypsin could be immobilized on GO sheets assisted by polymers as molecular spacers to maintain the activity of the enzyme. And with the trypsin-linked GO as the enzyme immobilization probe, a novel microwave-assisted on-plate digestion method has been developed with subsequent analysis by MALDI-MS. The feasibility and performance of the digestion approach were demonstrated by the proteolysis of standard proteins. The results show that this novel approach substantially accelerated proteolysis and reduced the time required for traditional procedures involving on-plate enzymatic digestion and sample preparation prior to MALDI-MS analysis. The novel digestion approach is simple and efficient, offering great promise for high throughput protein identification.

  17. Isolating subpopulations of human epidermal basal cells based on polyclonal serum against trypsin-resistant CSPG4 epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Anders Patrik Alexander; Christensen, Rikke; Prætorius, Jeppe

    2016-01-01

    unable to study these keratinocytes isolated directly from skin samples by flow cytometry. By choosing epitopes of CSPG4 relatively close to the cell membrane we were able to generate a polyclonal antibody that successfully detects CSPG4 on keratinocytes after trypsinization. Although CSPG4-positive......Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) is highly expressed by human epidermal keratinocytes located at the tip of the dermal papilla where keratinocytes show characteristics of stem cells. However, since available antibodies to CSPG4 are directed against trypsin-sensitive epitopes we have been...... that CSPG4-positive basal cell keratinocytes are distinct from CSPG4-negative basal cell keratinocytes. Our study demonstrates that it is possible to generate antibodies against trypsin-resistant epitopes of CSPG4. Our study also documents a marked change in behaviour upon cell culturing and challenges...

  18. Blunt pancreatic trauma: A persistent diagnostic conundrum?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atin Kumar; Ananya Panda; Shivanand Gamanagatti

    2016-01-01

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury but has high morbidity and mortality. In modern era of trauma care, pancreatic trauma remains a persistent challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Early detection of pancreatic trauma is essential to prevent subsequent complications. However early pancreatic injury is often subtle on computed tomography(CT) and can be missed unless specifically looked for. Signs of pancreatic injury on CT include laceration, transection, bulky pancreas, heterogeneous enhancement, peripancreatic fluid and signs of pancreatitis. Pan-creatic ductal injury is a vital decision-making parameter as ductal injury is an indication for laparotomy. While lacerations involving more than half of pancreatic parenchyma are suggestive of ductal injury on CT, ductal injuries can be directly assessed on magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) or encoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Pancreatic trauma also shows temporal evolution with increase in extent of injury with time. Hence early CT scans may underestimate the extent of injures and sequential imaging with CT or MRI is important in pancreatic trauma. Sequential imaging is also needed for successful nonoperative management of pancreatic injury. Accurate early detection on initial CT and adopting a multimodality and sequential imaging strategy can improve outcome in pancreatic trauma.

  19. Pharmacological management of pain in chronic pancreatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esch, A.A.J.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Goor, H. van; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2006-01-01

    Pain is the major presenting symptom of chronic pancreatitis. Patients with chronic pancreatitis experience substantial impairments in health-related quality of life. Pain may be considered as the most important factor affecting the quality of life. The pathogenesis of pancreatic pain is poorly unde

  20. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Gompertz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  1. Pharmacological Ascorbate Radiosensitizes Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Cieslak, John A; Welsh, Jessemae L; Sibenaller, Zita A; Allen, Bryan G; Wagner, Brett A; Kalen, Amanda L; Doskey, Claire M; Strother, Robert K; Button, Anna M; Mott, Sarah L; Smith, Brian; Tsai, Susan; Mezhir, James; Goswami, Prabhat C; Spitz, Douglas R; Buettner, Garry R; Cullen, Joseph J

    2015-08-15

    The toxicity of pharmacologic ascorbate is mediated by the generation of H2O2 via the oxidation of ascorbate. Because pancreatic cancer cells are sensitive to H2O2 generated by ascorbate, they would also be expected to become sensitized to agents that increase oxidative damage such as ionizing radiation. The current study demonstrates that pharmacologic ascorbate enhances the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation as seen by decreased cell viability and clonogenic survival in all pancreatic cancer cell lines examined, but not in nontumorigenic pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Ascorbate radiosensitization was associated with an increase in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, which was reversed by catalase. In mice with established heterotopic and orthotopic pancreatic tumor xenografts, pharmacologic ascorbate combined with ionizing radiation decreased tumor growth and increased survival, without damaging the gastrointestinal tract or increasing systemic changes in parameters indicative of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of pharmacologic ascorbate as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  2. The Pancreatic Islet Regulome Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mularoni, Loris; Ramos-Rodríguez, Mireia; Pasquali, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    The pancreatic islet is a highly specialized tissue embedded in the exocrine pancreas whose primary function is that of controlling glucose homeostasis. Thus, understanding the transcriptional control of islet-cell may help to puzzle out the pathogenesis of glucose metabolism disorders. Integrative computational analyses of transcriptomic and epigenomic data allows predicting genomic coordinates of putative regulatory elements across the genome and, decipher tissue-specific functions of the non-coding genome. We herein present the Islet Regulome Browser, a tool that allows fast access and exploration of pancreatic islet epigenomic and transcriptomic data produced by different labs worldwide. The Islet Regulome Browser is now accessible on the internet or may be installed locally. It allows uploading custom tracks as well as providing interactive access to a wealth of information including Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) variants, different classes of regulatory elements, together with enhancer clusters, stretch-enhancers and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic progenitors and adult human pancreatic islets. Integration and visualization of such data may allow a deeper understanding of the regulatory networks driving tissue-specific transcription and guide the identification of regulatory variants. We believe that such tool will facilitate the access to pancreatic islet public genomic datasets providing a major boost to functional genomics studies in glucose metabolism related traits including diabetes. PMID:28261261

  3. Pancreatic carcinoma in fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes: An eastern India perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Pratim Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes (FCPD is a rare cause of diabetes (100-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We present 3 patients of FCPD with pancreatic cancer who had long duration of diabetes (19 years, 25 years, and 28 years, respectively, all of whom presented with anorexia, weight loss, and worsened glycemic control. Patient-1 in addition presented with deep venous thrombosis. All the 3 patients had evidence of metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Computerized tomography (CT abdomen revealed atrophic pancreas, dilated pancreatic ducts, and multiple calculi in the head, body, and tail of pancreas in all of them. Patient-1 had 38 mm × 38 mm × 32 mm mass in the tail of pancreas with multiple target lesions were seen in the right lobe of liver. Patient-2 had a mass in the tail of pancreas (46 × 34 × 31 mm encasing the celiac plexus and superior mesenteric artery infiltrating the splenic hilum and splenic flexure of colon. Patient-3 also had a mass in the tail of pancreas (33 × 31 × 22 mm, with multiple target lesions in the liver, suggestive of metastasis. All patients had elevated serum CA19-9 (828.8, 179.65, and 232 U/L, respectively; normal <40 U/L. Patients of FCPD with anorexia, weight loss, worsening of glycemic control should be evaluated to rule out pancreatic cancer. Studies are warranted to evaluate CA19-9 as a screening tool for diagnosing pancreatic cancer at an earlier stage in FCPD.

  4. Bovine respiratory disease model based on dual infections with infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine corona virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the leading cause of economic loss in the U.S. cattle industry. BRDC likely results from simultaneous or sequential infections with multiple pathogens including both viruses and bacteria. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine corona virus (BoCV...

  5. [Development of enzyme biosensor based on trypsin and conductometric thin-film electrodes for protein and artificial substrates determination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biloivan, O A; Dziadevich, S V; Soldatkin, O P; Starodub, M F; Iel'ska, G V

    1997-01-01

    Two analytical systems based on the soluble and immobilized trypsin and conductometric thin-film electrodes were developed to measure concentration of artificial substrate and protein in solution. It was shown that these systems allow one to determine concentrations of Ha-benzoyl-L-arginin-ethyl-ester in the range of 0.1-1.0 mM and concentrations of HSA: 0.1-2.0 mg/ml with soluble and 0.1-0.8 mg/ml with immobilized trypsin.

  6. Protein Hydrolysates from Non-bovine and Plant Sources Replaces Tryptone in Microbiological Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Yamini; Patel, Shifa; Pasupuleti, Vijai K.; Meganathan, R.

    Tryptone (pancreatic digest of casein) is a common ingredient in laboratory and fermentation media for growing wild-type and genetically modified microorganisms. Many of the commercially manufactured products such as human growth hormone, antibiotics, insulin, etc. are produced by recombinant strains grown on materials derived from bovine sources. With the emergence of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) and the consequent increase in Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, elimination of materials of bovine origin from fermentation media is of paramount importance. To achieve this objective, a number of protein hydrolysates derived from non-bovine animal and plant sources were evaluated. Tryptone in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth was replaced with an equal quantity of alternate protein hydrolysates. Four of the six hydrolysates (one animal and three from plants) were found to efficiently replace the tryptone present in LB-medium as measured by growth rate and growth yield of a recombinant Escherichia coli strain. In addition, we have determined plasmid stability, inducibility and activity of the plasmid encoded β-galactosidase in the recombinant strain grown in the presence of various protein hydrolysates.

  7. Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolthers, B O; Frandsen, T L; Abrahamsson, J;

    2016-01-01

    Asparaginase (ASP)-associated pancreatitis (AAP) occurs during acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. Among 1285 children (1.0-17.9 years) diagnosed during July 2008-December 2014 and treated according to the Nordic/Baltic ALL2008 protocol, 86 (cumulative incidence=6.8%) developed AAP. Seventy...... therapy, and 7% had recurrent abdominal pain. Germline DNA on 62 cases and 638 controls was genotyped on Omni2.5exome-8-v1.2 BeadChip arrays. Overall, the ULK2 variant rs281366 showed the strongest association with AAP (P=5.8 × 10(-7); odds ratio (OR)=6.7). Cases with the rs281366 variant were younger (4.......3 vs 8 years; P=0.015) and had lower risk of AAP-related complications (15% vs 43%; P=0.13) compared with cases without this variant. Among 45 cases and 517 controls associations with AAP were found for RGS6 variant rs17179470 (P=9.8 × 10(-9); OR=7.3). Rs281366 is located...

  8. Comparison of Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog Expression in Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines and Human Pancreatic Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahideh Assadollahi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Genes are involved in the control of stem cell self-renewal as a new class of molecular markers of cancer. Objectives: In this study, the expression of Oct4, Nanog and Sox2 in cell lines MIA Paca-2, PA-TU-8902 and AsPC-1 and pancreatic cancer tissue were examined. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, cell lines, MIA Paca-2, PA-TU-8902 and AsPC-1, were cultured in DMEM (Dulbecco’s Modified Eagles Medium and RPMI-1640 (Roswell Park Memorial Institute containing FBS 10% (fetal bovine serum in a 37°C incubator containing Co2 5% and humidity 90%. Samples of tumor and non-cancer pancreatic tumor were purchased Iran tumor bank. Extraction of RNA and synthesis of cDNA was performed. Expression levels of Oct4, Nanog and Sox2 were determined using Real-time PCR. The protein expression levels of target genes in the cell lines were studied by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Results: The expression rate of Oct4, Nanog and Sox2 is more in the cancer cell lines than those in the control (normal tissue samples. The protein expression levels of target genes in the cell lines were confirmed by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Conclusions: The genes are involved in stem cell self-renewal as a new class of molecular markers of cancer that detected in the pancreatic cell lines. Maybe, these genes play important role in the uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells.

  9. Recurrent acute pancreatitis and its relative factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Hong-Chao Shan; Yan Gu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the causes and the relative factors of recurrent acute pancreatitis.METHODS: From 1997 to 2000, acute pancreatitis relapsed in 77 of 245 acute pancreatitis patients. By reviewing the clinical treatment results and the follow-up data, we analyzed the recurrent factors of acute pancreatitis using univariate analysis and multivariate analysis.RESULTS: Of the 245 acute pancreatitis patients, 77 were patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis. Of them, 56 patients relapsed two times, 19 relapsed three times, each patient relapsed three and four times. Forty-seven patients relapsed in hospital and the other 30 patients relapsed after discharge. Eighteen patients relapsed in 1 year, eight relapsed in 1-3 years, and four relapsed after 3 years. There were 48 cases of biliary pancreatitis, 3 of alcohol pancreatitis, 5 of hyperlipidemia pancreatitis, 21 of idiopathic pancreatitis. Univariate analysis showed that the patients with local complications of pancreas, obstructive jaundice and hepatic function injury were easy to recur during the treatment period of acute pancreatitis (P = 0.022<0.05, P = 0.012<0.05 and P = 0.002<0.05, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that there was no single factor related to recurrence. Of the 47 patients who had recurrence in hospital, 16 had recurrence in a fast period, 31 after refeeding. CONCLUSION: Acute pancreatitis is easy to recur even during treatment. The factors such as changes of pancreas structure and uncontrolled systemic inflammatory reaction are responsible for the recurrence of acute pancreatitis. Early refeeding increases the recurrence of acute pancreatitis. Defining the etiology is essential for reducing the recurrence of acute pancreatitis.

  10. Ascariasis of the pancreatic duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimovskij, Michail; Dulskas, Audrius; Kraulyte, Zita; Mikalauskas, Saulius

    2015-09-15

    Ascariasis is a common helminthic disease worldwide, although Lithuania and other European countries are not considered endemic areas. The presence of the Ascaris worm in the biliary tree causes choledocholithiasis-like symptoms. We report a case of pancreatic duct ascariasis causing such symptoms. A 73-year-old Lithuanian woman underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) suspecting choledocholithiasis. Contrast injection into the common bile duct demonstrated a slightly dilated biliary tree without any filling defects, and the tail of an Ascaris worm protruding from the opening of the papilla Vater. The worm was captured by a snare but escaped deep into the duct. After a small wirsungotomy the worm was retrieved from the pancreatic duct. The patient received a 150 mg dose of levamisole orally repeated 7 days later and was discharged after complete resolution of symptoms. This first reported sporadic case of pancreatic duct ascariasis in Lithuania was successfully treated with ERCP and Levamisole.

  11. Pancreatic Cancer Imaging: Which Method?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santo E

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the 10th most common malignancy and the 4th largest cancer killer in adults. Surgery offers the only chance of curing these patients. Complete surgical resection is associated with a 5-year survival rate of between 20 and 30%. The challenge is how to best select those patients for curative surgery. Early studies demonstrated excellent sensitivity of EUS in detecting pancreatic tumors in comparison to CT. Similarly, EUS showed an 85-94% accuracy rate for T staging and 70-80% accuracy rate for N staging. Later studies report on substantially less TN staging accuracy for EUS. Possible explanations and the problem of vascular involvement assessment by EUS will be provided. Considering the role of EUS in M staging and a comparison between EUS, MRI, and positron emission tomography, scanning will be presented. A diagnostic algorithm for the evaluation of patients with a suspected pancreatic mass will be offered, stressing the pivotal role of EUS.

  12. Interventional radiological treatment in complications of pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memis, Ahmet E-mail: ahmemis@yahoo.com; Parildar, Mustafa

    2002-09-01

    Percutaneous interventional therapy plays an important role in treating complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis. With the development of cross-sectional imaging and advanced interventional techniques, percutaneous drainage has become the preferred treatment for pancreatic fluid collections such as acute collections, pseudocysts and abscesses. Abscess and pancreatic hemorrhage are the most life threatening complications of pancreatitis. Massive hemorrhage is rare but frequently lethal. As a rule, bleeding complications of pancreatitis require prompt diagnosis and an aggressive surgical approach. In unstable patients with a severely bleeding pseudoaneurysm, hemostasis can be obtained by occlusion with mechanical devices.

  13. Differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas vs. groove pancreatitis: Usefulness of the portal venous phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishigami, Kousei, E-mail: Ishigamikousei@aol.co [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan); Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Nishie, Akihiro; Kakihara, Daisuke [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan); Fujita, Nobuhiro [Anatomic Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Asayama, Yoshiki; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Irie, Hiroyuki [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan); Nakamura, Masafumi; Takahata, Shunichi [Surgery and Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ito, Tetsuhide [Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Purpose: To clarify if the portal venous phase is helpful for the differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis. Materials and methods: MDCT and MRI of groove pancreatic carcinomas (n = 7) and groove pancreatitis (n = 15) were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists independently. The signal intensity on T2-weighted images was subjectively assessed. The presence or absence of common bile duct (CBD) and main pancreatic duct (MPD) strictures, calcifications, and cystic lesions was evaluated. Additionally, the appearance of groove pancreatic carcinoma and that of groove pancreatitis in the portal venous phase on dynamic MDCT and MRI were compared. Results: There were no significant differences in the signal intensity on T2-weighted images and in the presence or absence of CBD and MPD strictures, calcifications, and cystic lesions between groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis. However, patchy focal enhancement in the portal venous phase was more commonly observed in groove pancreatitis than groove pancreatic carcinoma (Reviewers 1 and 2: 14/15 [93.3%] vs. 1/7 [14.3%], P < 0.0001). In addition, peripheral enhancement was only seen in groove pancreatic carcinomas (Reviewer 1: 4/7 [57.1%] vs. 0/15 [0%], P < 0.005, and Reviewer 2: 3/7 [42.9%] vs. 0/15 [0%], P < 0.05). Conclusion: The portal venous phase may be helpful for the differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis.

  14. A Case of Non-Swelling Autoimmune Pancreatitis with Multiple Pancreatic Pseudocysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotsugu Maruyama

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-swelling autoimmune pancreatitis with multiple pancreatic pseudocysts is very rare. Case report A Seventy-five-year-old man was referred to our hospital for further examination of multiple pancreatic cysts with nodules detected by computed tomography. Endoscopic ultrasound examination showed a pancreatic cyst with a nodule (6.3 mm in diameter in the pancreatic head and another pancreatic cyst with a nodule (8.7 mm in diameter in the pancreatic tail, and these cysts were connected to the main pancreatic duct. The patient was clinically diagnosed with branch duct type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. The recent international consensus guidelines indicate that a mural nodule indicates high risk for malignancy and recommend surgical resection of branch duct type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with mural nodule. Therefore, pancreatoduodenectomy and pancreatic body tail resection were performed in our hospital. Histopathological findings showed IgG4-positive plasma cells and obstructive phlebitis. Autoimmune pancreatitis associated with multiple pancreatic pseudocysts was the final diagnosis. Conclusions We encountered a rare case of autoimmune pancreatitis with pseudocyst but not swollen pancreas nor an increase in serum IgG4 level. The correct diagnosis was very difficult before surgical treatment. In clinical cases with various pancreatic cystic lesions, it is necessary to consider autoimmune pancreatitis in the differential diagnosis.

  15. Pancreatic carcinoma coexisting with chronic pancreatitis versus tumor-forming pancreatitis: Diagnostic utility of the time-signal intensity curve from dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshitsugu Tajima; Tamotsu Kuroki; Ryuji Tsutsumi; Ichiro Isomoto; Masataka Uetani; Takashi Kanematsu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the ability of the time-signal intensity curve (TIC) of the pancreas obtained from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for differentiation of focal pancreatic masses, especially pancreatic carcinoma coexisting with chronic pancreatitis and tumor-forming pancreatitis.METHODS: Forty-eight consecutive patients who underwent surgery for a focal pancreatic mass, including pancreatic ductal carcinoma (n = 33), tumor-forming pancreatitis (n = 8), and islet cell tumor (n = 7), were reviewed. Five pancreatic carcinomas coexisted with longstanding chronic pancreatitis. The pancreatic TICs were obtained from the pancreatic mass and the pancreatic parenchyma both proximal and distal to the mass lesion in each patient, prior to surgery, and were classified into 4 types according to the time to a peak: 25 s and 1, 2, and 3 min after the bolus injection of contrast material, namely, type-Ⅰ,Ⅱ,Ⅲ,and IV, respectively, and were then compared to the corresponding histological pancreatic conditions.RESULTS: Pancreatic carcinomas demonstrated type-m (n = 13) or IV (n = 20) TIC. Tumor-forming pancreatitis showed type-Ⅱ(n = 5) or Ⅲ(n = 3) TIC. All islet cell tumors revealed type-1. The type-IV TIC was only recognized in pancreatic carcinoma, and the TIC of carcinoma always depicted the slowest rise to a peak among the 3 pancreatic TICs measured in each patient, even in patients with chronic pancreatitis.CONCLUSION: Pancreatic TIC from dynamic MRI provides reliable information for distinguishing pancreatic carcinoma from other pancreatic masses, and may enable us to avoid unnecessary pancreatic surgery and delays in making a correct diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma, especially, in patients with longstanding chronic pancreatitis.

  16. Listeria Vaccines for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Immunol 20, 77 (Jan, 2013). 13. S. K. Biswas, C. E. Lewis, J Leukoc Biol 88, 877 (Nov, 2010). 14. L. J. Bayne et al., Cancer Cell 21, 822 (Jun 12, 2012...EMT and dissemination precede prancreatic tumor formation. Cell. 2012; 148:349. 14. Bayne , L.J., Beatty, G.L., Jhala, N., Clark, C.E., Rhim, A.D...immunity in pancreatic cancer. Cancer Cell. 2012; 21:822. 15. Vonderheide, RH, Bajor, DL, Bayne , LJ, and G.L. Beatty. CD40 immunotherapy for pancreatic

  17. Autoimmune pancreatitis - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallya, Varuna; Rathi, K R; Sahai, Kavita; Jakhmola, C K

    2015-02-01

    Autoiommune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease that has distinct histological, immunological, serological and radiological findings. It is characterised histologically by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, storiform fibrosis, obliterative phelibitis and presence of IgG4 positive plasma cells and lymphocytes. Elevated serum levels of IgG4 are also noted. It is usually misdiagnosed preoperatively as pancreatic cancer. It may involve extrapancreatic sites also and responds well to steroid therapy. Here, we share our experience of AIP in a 52-year-old male.

  18. Biliary acute pancreatitis: a review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Osvaldo M. Tiscomia; Susana Hamamura; Enriqueta S. de Lehmann; Graciela Otero; Hipólito Waisman; Patricia Tiscornia-Wasserman; Simmy Bank

    2000-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION It is axiomatic that the most effective and soundly based plan of treatment of any disorder is one aimed at the mechanism or mechanisms responsible for its development[1]. This basic notion, coupled with recent reports[2- 11] in which, surprisingly there is a total lack of reference to the probable involvement of autonomic-arc-reflexes in the physiopathogenesis of biliary acute pancreatitis have prompted this presentation. Undoubtedly, this disease entity has numerous causes, an obscure physiopathology, few effective remedies, and, often, an unpredictable outcome. At the turn of the century, Opie[12,13] brought to light the association between gallstone migration and acute pancreatitis.

  19. Molecular mechanisms of alcohol associated pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dahn; L; Clemens; Mark; A; Wells; Katrina; J; Schneider; Shailender; Singh

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is commonly associated with the development of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Despite this close association, the fact that only a small percentage of human beings who abuse alcohol develop pancreatitis indicates that alcohol abuse alone is not sufficient to initiate clinical pancreatitis. This contention is further supported by the fact that administration of ethanol to experimental animals does not cause pancreatitis. Because of these findings, it is widely believed that ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to injury and additional factors trigger the development of overt pancreatitis. How ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to pancreatitis is not entirely known. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ethanol and its metabolites have a number of deleterious effects on acinar cells. Important acinar cells properties that are affected by ethanol include: calcium signaling, secretion of zymogens, autophagy, cellular regeneration, the unfolded protein response, and mitochondrial membrane integrity. In addition to the actions of ethanol on acinar cells, it is apparent that ethanol also affects pancreatic stellatecells. Pancreatic stellate cells have a critical role in normal tissue repair and the pathologic fibrotic response. Given that ethanol and its metabolites affect so many pancreatic functions, and that all of these effects occur simultaneously, it is likely that none of these effects is "THE" effect. Instead, it is most likely that the cumulative effect of ethanol on the pancreas predisposes the organ to pancreatitis. The focus of this article is to highlight some of the important mechanisms by which ethanol alters pancreatic functions and may predispose the pancreas to disease.

  20. Cloning eleven midgut trypsin cDNAs and evaluating the interaction of proteinase inhibitors with Cry1Ac against the tobacco budworm Heliothis virescens (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgut trypsins are associated with Bt protoxin activation and toxin degradation. Proteinase inhibitors have potential insecticidal toxicity against a wide range of insect species. Proactive action to examine trypsin gene profiles and proteinase inhibitors for interaction with Bt toxin is necessary ...

  1. Pancreatic sphincterotomy: Technique, indications, and complications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jonathan M Buscaglia; Anthony N Kalloo

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic sphincterotomy serves as the cornerstone of endoscopic therapy of the pancreas. Historically,its indications have been less well-defined than those of endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy, yet it plays a definite and useful role in diseases such as chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic-type sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. In the appropriate setting, it may be used as a single therapeutic maneuver, or in conjunction with other endoscopic techniques such as pancreatic stone extraction or stent placement. The current standard of practice utilizes two different methods of performing pancreatic sphincterotomy: a pull-type sphincterotome technique without prior stent placement, and a needleknife sphincterotome technique over an existing stent. The complications associated with pancreatic sphincterotomy are many, although acute pancreatitis appears to be the most common and the most serious of the early complications. As such, it continues to be reserved for those endoscopists who perform a relatively high-volume of therapeutic pancreaticobiliary endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography.

  2. MR imaging for blunt pancreatic injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Lin [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China); Zhang Xiaoming, E-mail: cjr.zhxm@vip.163.co [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China); Xu Xiaoxue; Tang Wei; Xiao Bo; Zeng Nanlin [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Objective: To study the MR imaging features of blunt pancreatic injury. Materials and methods: Nine patients with pancreatic injury related to blunt abdominal trauma confirmed by surgery performed MR imaging. Two abdominal radiologists conducted a review of the MR images to assess pancreatic parenchymal and pancreatic duct injury, and associated complications. Result: Diagnostic quality MR images were obtained in each of the nine patients. In the nine patients, pancreatic fracture, laceration and contusion were depicted on MR imaging in five, one and three patients, respectively. There were six patients with pancreatic duct disruption, eight patients with peripancreatic fluid collections, and four patients with peripancreatic pseudocyst or hematoma, respectively. All of the MR imaging findings was corresponded to surgical findings. Conclusion: MR imaging is an effective method to detect blunt pancreatic injury and may provide information to guide management decisions.

  3. Imaging in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile D. Balaban

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by progressive and irreversible damage of the pancreatic parenchyma and ductal system, which leads to chronic pain, loss of endocrine and exocrine functions. Clinically, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency becomes apparent only after 90% of the parenchima has been lost. Despite the simple definition, diagnosing chronic pancreatitis remains a challenge, especially for early stage disease. Because pancreatic function tests can be normal until late stages and have significant limitations, there is an incresing interest in the role of imaging techniques for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. In this article we review the utility and accuracy of different imaging methods in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, focusing on the role of advanced imaging (magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound.

  4. Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raja, Raheel Altaf; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Frandsen, Thomas Leth

    2012-01-01

    l-asparaginase has been an element in the treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma since the late 1960s and remains an essential component of their combination chemotherapy. Among the major toxicities associated with l-asparaginase therapy are pancreatitis......, allergic reactions, thrombotic events, hepatotoxicity and hyperlipidaemia. Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common reasons for stopping treatment with l-asparaginase. Short-term complications of asparaginase-associated pancreatitis include development of pseudocysts and pancreatic necrosis. Long......-term complications include chronic pancreatitis and diabetes. The pathophysiology of asparaginase-associated pancreatitis remains to be uncovered. Individual clinical and genetic risk factors have been identified, but they are only weak predictors of pancreatitis. This review explores the definition, possible risk...

  5. Biliary emergencies: pancreatitis, cholangitis, and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Robert M S; Byrne, Michael F

    2003-04-01

    The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is gallstones, although many other etiological factors have been identified. The management of the initial episode depends on the severity of the attack and the etiology. In most patients, acute pancreatitis has a benign, self-limited course. However, in the minority who develop infected pancreatic necrosis the mortality can reach 25%. The early assessment of severity and aggressive management of these patients is critical. The roles of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, surgical intervention, enteral feeding and use of antibiotics in acute pancreatitis are discussed in this article. Finally, the origin of recurrent acute pancreatitis is discussed, with particular reference to conditions such as pancreas divisum and sphincter of Oddi dysfunction whose role in the development of acute pancreatitis is controversial, and to hereditary or familial pancreatitis.

  6. MicroRNA Expression Analyses in Preoperative Pancreatic Juice Samples of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Sadakari

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Context Cytological assessment of pancreatic juice is commonly used to diagnose pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma; however, the sensitivity of cytological assessment has been reported to be low. MicroRNAs are small RNAs regulating various cellular processes and have recently been identified as possible markers of malignant diseases including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Objective The purposes of this study were to prove the existence of microRNAs in pancreatic juice and to determine whether specific microRNAs in pancreatic juice could be used for detecting pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Methods Relative expression levels of microRNA-21 and microRNA-155 in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues of resected specimens (no. 13 and pancreatic juice samples collected using preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (no. 21 were quantified and their expression levels were then compared to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. Results Relative expression levels of microRNA-21 in tissue and pancreatic juice samples were significantly higher in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma than those in chronic pancreatitis (P=0.009 and P=0.021, respectively. The same results were obtained in the expression levels of microRNA-155 in tissue and pancreatic juice between pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and chronic pancreatitis (P=0.014 and P=0.021, respectively. Expression levels of microRNA-21 and microRNA-155 did not correlate with the preoperative cytological results of pancreatic juice. Conclusion MicroRNA-21 and microRNA-155 in pancreatic juice have the potential of becoming biomarkers for diagnosing pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

  7. Material Properties of Inorganic Bovine Cancellous Bovine: Nukbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña, Cristina; Palma, Benito; Munguía, Nadia

    2006-09-01

    In this work, inorganic cancellous bovine bone implants prepared in the Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales — UNAM were characterized. Elementary chemical analysis was made, toxic elements concentration were measured and the content of organic matter also. These implants fulfill all the requirements of the ASTM standards, and therefore it is possible their use in medical applications.

  8. Pathogenesis of pancreatic encephalopathy in severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Ping Zhang; Hua Tian

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Pancreatic encephalopathy (PE) is a serious complication of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). In recent years, more and more PE cases have been reported worldwide, and the onset PE in the early stage was regarded as a poor prognosis sign of SAP, but the pathogenesis of PE in SAP still has not been clariifed in the past decade. The purpose of this review is to elucidate the possible pathogenesis of PE in SAP. DATA SOURCES:The English-language literature concern-ing PE in this review came from the Database of MEDLINE (period of 1991-2005), and the keywords of severe acute pancreatitis and pancreatic encephalopathy were used in the searching. RESULTS:Many factors were involved in the pathogenesis of PE in SAP. Pancreatin activation, excessive release of cytokines and oxygen free radicals, microcirculation abnormalities of hemodynamic disturbance, ET-1/NO ratio, hypoxemia, bacterial infection, water and electrolyte imbalance, and vitamin B1 deifciency participated in the development of PE in SAP. CONCLUSIONS:The pathogenesis of PE in SAP has not yet been fully understood. The development of PE in SAP may be a multi-factor process. To ifnd out the possible inducing factor is essential to the clinical management of PE in SAP.

  9. Chronic Pancreatitis, Type 3c Diabetes, and Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Whitcomb

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available About half of all patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP develop diabetes mellitus (DM due to the loss of islet cell mass, not just beta cells as in Type 1 DM (T1DM, or due to insulin resistance, as in Type 2 DM (T2DM. Patients with DM from loss of islets due to pancreatic disease or resection are diagnosed with pancreatogenic or Type 3c DM (T3cDM. Patients with T3cDM also lose counter-regulatory hormones, such as glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide, and experience maldigestion associated with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Patients with T3cDM are therefore more susceptible to hypoglycemia and a mismatch (asynchrony between food ingestion and nutrient absorption. At the same time, the use of incretin therapy is likely useless, since maldigestion leads to the release of higher levels of hind gut hormones, including GLP1. Thus, T3cDM caused by CP or destruction of the islets involves a special class of potential risks and comorbidity that may be overlooked if the CP has not been diagnosed.

  10. Beneficial effect of the bioflavonoid quercetin on cholecystokinin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in isolated rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Heike; Jonas, Ludwig; Wakileh, Michael; Krüger, Burkhard

    2014-03-01

    The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP) is still poorly understood. Thus, a reliable pharmacological therapy is currently lacking. In recent years, an impairment of the energy metabolism of pancreatic acinar cells, caused by Ca(2+)-mediated depolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane and a decreased ATP supply, has been implicated as an important pathological event. In this study, we investigated whether quercetin exerts protection against mitochondrial dysfunction. Following treatment with or without quercetin, rat pancreatic acinar cells were stimulated with supramaximal cholecystokinin-8 (CCK). CCK caused a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP concentration, whereas the mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity was significantly increased. Quercetin treatment before CCK application exerted no protection on MMP but increased ATP to a normal level, leading to a continuous decrease in the dehydrogenase activity. The protective effect of quercetin on mitochondrial function was accompanied by a reduction in CCK-induced changes to the cell membrane. Concerning the molecular mechanism underlying the protective effect of quercetin, an increased AMP/ATP ratio suggests that the AMP-activated protein kinase system may be activated. In addition, quercetin strongly inhibited CCK-induced trypsin activity. The results indicate that the use of quercetin may be a therapeutic strategy for reducing the severity of AP.

  11. Piperine ameliorates the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis by inhibiting the activation of mitogen activated protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Gi-Sang; Kim, Min-Sun; Jeong, Jinsu; Lee, Hye-Youn; Park, Kyoung-Chel; Koo, Bon Soon; Kim, Byung-Jin; Kim, Tae-Hyeon; Lee, Seung Ho; Hwang, Sung-Yeon; Shin, Yong Kook; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2011-07-01

    Piperine is a phenolic component of black pepper (Piper nigrum) and long pepper (Piper longum), fruits used in traditional Asian medicine. Our previous study showed that piperine inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses. In this study, we investigated whether piperine reduces the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). Administration of piperine reduced histologic damage and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the pancreas and ameliorated many of the examined laboratory parameters, including the pancreatic weight (PW) to body weight (BW) ratio, as well as serum levels of amylase and lipase and trypsin activity. Furthermore, piperine pretreatment reduced the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 during cerulein-induced AP. In accordance with in vivo results, piperine reduced cell death, amylase and lipase activity, and cytokine production in isolated cerulein-treated pancreatic acinar cells. In addition, piperine inhibited the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). These findings suggest that the anti-inflammatory effect of piperine in cerulein-induced AP is mediated by inhibiting the activation of MAPKs. Thus, piperine may have a protective effect against AP.

  12. Benign Pancreatic Duct Strictures: Medical and Endoscopic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JE Geenen

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic duct strictures usually reflect underlying pancreatic disease and are likely caused by one or more of the following: acute or chronic pancreatitis, benign or malignant pancreatic neoplasm, pseudocyst and trauma. The characteristics of pancreatic strictures are identified, and medical and endoscopic therapy options are reviewed.

  13. Pharm GKB: Acute necrotizing pancreatitis [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available A165108252 External Vocabularies MeSH: Pancreatitis, Acute Necrotizing (D019283) SnoMedCT: Acute necrotizing... pancreatitis (7881005) UMLS: C0267941 (C0267941) MedDRA: Necrotising pancreatitis (10056219) NDFRT: Pancreatitis, Acute... Necrotizing [Disease/Finding] (N0000003910) Common Searches Search Medline Plus Search CTD Pharm GKB: Acute necrotizing pancreatitis ...

  14. Trypsin, Tryptase, and Thrombin Polarize Macrophages towards a Pro-Fibrotic M2a Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J V White

    Full Text Available For both wound healing and the formation of a fibrotic lesion, circulating monocytes enter the tissue and differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes and pro-fibrotic M2a macrophages, which together with fibroblasts form scar tissue. Monocytes can also differentiate into classically activated M1 macrophages and alternatively activated M2 macrophages. The proteases thrombin, which is activated during blood clotting, and tryptase, which is released by activated mast cells, potentiate fibroblast proliferation and fibrocyte differentiation, but their effect on macrophages is unknown. Here we report that thrombin, tryptase, and the protease trypsin bias human macrophage differentiation towards a pro-fibrotic M2a phenotype expressing high levels of galectin-3 from unpolarized monocytes, or from M1 and M2 macrophages, and that these effects appear to operate through protease-activated receptors. These results suggest that proteases can initiate scar tissue formation by affecting fibroblasts, fibrocytes, and macrophages.

  15. [Proteolytic enzymes and trypsin inhibitors of higher plants under stress conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domash, V I; Sharpio, T P; Zabreĭko, S A; Sosnovskaia, T F

    2008-01-01

    The response of the components of a protease-inhibitor system of legume and cereal crops to stress factors was studied. It was found that salinization, heavy metal ions, and phytopathogenic flora inhibit the activity of neutral, acidic, and alkaline proteases at early stages of seed germination, the degree of the inhibition of the endoprotease activity being dependent on the index of tolerance of legume and cereal crops. It was shown that, in response to unfavorable conditions, accumulation of trypsin inhibitors occurs, which is accompanied by the appearance of new protein components, as indicated by electrophoresis. The results confirm the presumption that serine protease inhibitors are involved in the response of plants to stress factors.

  16. Covalent immobilization of mixed proteases, trypsin and chymotrypsin, onto modified polyvinyl chloride microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-Fang; Ding, Hao-Chen; Zhou, Tao

    2013-11-01

    A commercially available trypsin-chymotrypsin mixture was covalently immobilized onto modified polyvinyl chloride (PVC) microspheres, which were activated by the subsequent treatment of PVC microspheres with ethylenediamine and glutaraldehyde. The immobilized mixed protease was characterized by FT-IR and SEM analyses. Immobilization conditions were optimized by Box-Behnken design and the response surface method. The activity of the immobilized mixed protease prepared under optimal conditions (pH 6.6, 23 °C, 2 h) reached 1341 U/g. Compared with the free form, the immobilized enzyme possesses a slightly higher optimal pH value and a wider pH-activity profile, superior thermal stability, and a higher Km value. Reusability of the immobilized mixed protease indicated that >70% of the original activity was retained after having been recycled six times.

  17. In vitro pancreas duodenal homeobox-1 enhances the differentiation of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To observe whether pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor-1 enhances the differentiation of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells in vitro.METHODS: Rat pancreatic tissue was submitted to digestion by collegenase, ductal epithelial cells were separated by density gradient centrifugation and then cultured in RPMI1640 medium with 10% fetal bovine serum. After 3-5 passages, the cells were incubated in a six-well plate for 24 h before transfection of recombination plasmid XIHbox8VP16. Lightcycler quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of PDX-1 and insulin mRNA in pancreatic epithelial cells. The expression of PDX-1 and insulin protein was analyzed by Western blotting. Insulin secretion was detected by radioimmunoassay. Insulinproducing cells were detected by dithizone-staining.RESULTS: XIHbox8 mRNA was expressed in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. PDX-1 and insulin mRNA as well as PDX-1 and insulin protein were significantly increased in the transfected group. The production and insulin secretion of insulin-producing cells differentiated from pancreatic ductal epithelial cells were higher than those of the untransfected cells in vitro with a significant difference (1.32 ± 0.43 vs 3.48 ± 0.81, P < 0.01 at 5.6 mmol/L; 4.86 ± 1.15 vs 10.25 ± 1.32, P < 0.01 at 16.7 mmol/L).CONCLUSION: PDX-1 can differentiate rat pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells in vitro.In vitro PDX-1 transfection is a valuable strategy for increasing the source of insulin-producing cells.

  18. Cis-mediated down-regulation of a trypsin gene associated with Bt resistance in cotton bollworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenxi; Xiao, Yutao; Li, Xianchun; Oppert, Brenda; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Wu, Kongming

    2014-11-27

    Transgenic plants producing insecticidal proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are useful for pest control, but their efficacy is reduced when pests evolve resistance. Here we examined the mechanism of resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac in the laboratory-selected LF5 strain of the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. This strain had 110-fold resistance to Cry1Ac protoxin and 39-fold resistance to Cry1Ac activated toxin. Evaluation of five trypsin genes revealed 99% reduced transcription of one trypsin gene (HaTryR) was associated with resistance. Silencing of this gene with RNA interference in susceptible larvae increased their survival on diets containing Cry1Ac. Bioassays of progeny from crosses revealed that resistance to Cry1Ac was genetically linked with HaTryR. We identified mutations in the promoter region of HaTryR in the resistant strain. In transfected insect cell lines, transcription was lower when driven by the resistant promoter compared with the susceptible promoter, implicating cis-mediated down-regulation of HaTryR transcription as a mechanism of resistance. The results suggest that H. armigera can adapt to Bt toxin Cry1Ac by decreased expression of trypsin. Because trypsin activation of protoxin is a critical step in toxicity, transgenic plants with activated toxins rather than protoxins might increase the durability of Bt crops.

  19. Effect of sorbitol and glycerol on the stability of trypsin and difference between their stabilization effects in the various solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazhang, Mohammad; Mehrnejad, Faramarz; Pazhang, Yaghub; Falahati, Hanieh; Chaparzadeh, Nader

    2016-01-01

    The effect of glycerol and sorbitol on the stability of porcine pancreas trypsin was investigated in this work. Molecular dynamics simulation and thermostability results showed that trypsin has two flexible regions, and polyols (sorbitol and glycerol) stabilize the enzyme by decreasing the flexibility of these regions. Radial distribution function results exhibited that sorbitol and glycerol were excluded from the first water layer of the enzyme, therefore decrease the flexibility of the regions by preferential exclusion. Also, results showed that the stabilization effect of sorbitol is more than glycerol. This observation could be because of the larger decrease in the fluctuations of trypsin in the presence of sorbitol. We also examined the role of solvent's hydrophobicity in enzyme stabilization by sorbitol and glycerol. To do so, the thermostability of trypsin was evaluated in the presence of solvents with different hydrophobicity (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol and n-propanol) in addition to the polyols. Our results depicted that glycerol is a better stabilizer than sorbitol in the presence of hydrophobic solvents (n-propanol), whereas sorbitol is a better stabilizer than glycerol in the presence of hydrophilic solvents (methanol).

  20. Digestive duet: Midgut digestive proteinases of Manduca sexta ingesting Nicotiana attenuata with manipulated trypsin proteinase inhibitor expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zavala, J.A.; Giri, A.P.; Jongsma, M.A.; Baldwin, I.T.

    2008-01-01

    The defensive effect of endogenous trypsin proteinase inhibitors (NaTPIs) on the herbivore Manduca sexta was demonstrated by genetically altering NaTPI production in M. sexta's host plant, Nicotiana attenuata. To understand how this defense works, we studied the effects of NaTPI on M. sexta gut prot