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Sample records for bovine pancreatic trypsin

  1. A preliminary neutron crystallography on the trypsin-bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor complex

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    Kawamura, K; Yamada, T; Kurihara, K; Tamada, T; Kuroki, R; Tanaka, I; Takahashi, H; Niimura, N, E-mail: niimura@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp

    2010-11-01

    Trypsin is one of serine proteases. BPTI (Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor) is a protein inhibitor, which binds trypsin tightly and inhibits cleavage of peptide bonds. X-ray structure determination of trypsin-BPTI complex could make clear the overview of the active site. However, information of hydrogen atoms related to catalytic mechanism has not been satisfied. In this study, the trypsin-BPTI complex structure has been determined by neutron diffraction data at 2.0 A resolution. Deuterium atoms of catalytic triad, hydration structures in the binding pocket of trypsin and hydrogen bonds were observed. We would like to discuss details of hydrogen bonds in the interface between trypsin and BPTI and the adjacent water molecules including hydrogen atoms involved in the enzymatic reaction.

  2. {sup 13}C-NMR studies on disulfide bond isomerization in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)

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    Takeda, Mitsuhiro [Kumamoto University, Department of Structural BioImaging, Faculty of Life Sciences (Japan); Miyanoiri, Yohei [Nagoya University, Structural Biology Research Center, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Terauchi, Tsutomu [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Graduate School of Science and Engineering (Japan); Kainosho, Masatsune, E-mail: kainosho@tmu.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Structural Biology Research Center, Graduate School of Science (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    Conformational isomerization of disulfide bonds is associated with the dynamics and thus the functional aspects of proteins. However, our understanding of the isomerization is limited by experimental difficulties in probing it. We explored the disulfide conformational isomerization of the Cys14–Cys38 disulfide bond in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), by performing an NMR line-shape analysis of its Cys carbon peaks. In this approach, 1D {sup 13}C spectra were recorded at small temperature intervals for BPTI samples selectively labeled with site-specifically {sup 13}C-enriched Cys, and the recorded peaks were displayed in the order of the temperature after the spectral scales were normalized to a carbon peak. Over the profile of the line-shape, exchange broadening that altered with temperature was manifested for the carbon peaks of Cys14 and Cys38. The Cys14–Cys38 disulfide bond reportedly exists in equilibrium between a high-populated (M) and two low-populated states (m{sub c14} and m{sub c38}). Consistent with the three-site exchange model, biphasic exchange broadening arising from the two processes was observed for the peak of the Cys14 α-carbon. As the exchange broadening is maximized when the exchange rate equals the chemical shift difference in Hz between equilibrating sites, semi-quantitative information that was useful for establishing conditions for {sup 13}C relaxation dispersion experiments was obtained through the carbon line-shape profile. With respect to the m{sub c38} isomerization, the {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C signals at the β-position of the minor state were resolved from the major peaks and detected by exchange experiments at a low temperature.

  3. Solvent exchange of buried water and hydrogen exchange of peptide NH groups hydrogen bonded to buried waters in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor

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    Tuechsen, E.; Hayes, J.M.; Ramaprasad, S.; Copie, V.; Woodward, C.

    1987-08-11

    Solvent exchange of /sup 18/O-labeled buried water in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), trypsin, and trypsin-BPTI complex is measured by high-precision isotope ratio mass spectroscopy. Buried water is labeled by equilibrium of the protein in /sup 18/O-enriched water. Protein samples are then rapidly dialyzed against water of normal isotope composition by gel filtration and stored. The exchangeable /sup 18/O label eluting with the protein in 10-300 s is determined by an H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ equilibration technique. Exchange of buried waters with solvent water is complete before 10-15 s in BPTI, trypsin, and BPTI-trypsin, as well as in lysozyme and carboxypeptidase measured as controls. When in-exchange dialysis and storage are carried out at pH greater than or equal to 2.5, trypsin-BPTI and trypsin, but not free BPTI, have the equivalent of one /sup 18/O atom that exchanges slowly (after 300 s and before several days). This oxygen is probably covalently bound to a specific site in trypsin. When in-exchange dialysis and storage are carried out at pH 1.1, the equivalent of three to seven /sup 18/O atoms per molecule is associated with the trypsin-BPTI complex, apparently due to nonspecific covalent /sup 18/O labeling of carboxyl groups at low pH. In addition to /sup 18/O exchange of buried waters, the hydrogen isotope exchange of buried NH groups H bonded to buried waters was also measured. Their base-catalyzed exchange rate constants are on the order of NH groups that in the crystal are exposed to solvent and hydrogen-bonded main chain O, and their pH/sub min/ is similar to that for model compounds. The pH dependence of their exchange rate constants suggests that direct exchange with water may significantly contribute to their observed exchange rate.

  4. Structure and Dynamics of the Solvation of Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor in Explicit Water: A Comparative Study of the Effects of Solvent and Protein Polarizability

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    Kim, Byungchan; Young, Tom; Harder, Edward; Friesner, Richard A.; Berne, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    To isolate the effects of the inclusion of polarizability in the force field model on the structure and dynamics of the solvating water in differing electrostatic environments of proteins, we present the results of molecular dynamics simulations of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) in water with force fields that explicitly include polarization for both the protein and the water. We use three model potentials for water and two model potentials for the protein. Two of the water models and one of the protein models are polarizable. A total of six systems were simulated representing all combinations of these polarizable and nonpolarizable protein and water force fields. We find that all six systems behave in a similar manner in regions of the protein that are weakly electrostatic (either hydrophobic or weakly hydrophilic). However, in the vicinity of regions of the protein with relatively strong electrostatic fields (near positively or negatively charged residues), we observe that the water structure and dynamics are dependent on both the model of the protein and the model of the water. We find that a large part of the dynamical dependence can be described by small changes in the local environments of each region that limit the local density of non-hydrogen-bonded waters, precisely the water molecules that facilitate the dynamical relaxation of the water–water hydrogen bonds. We introduce a simple method for rescaling for this effect. When this is done, we are able to effectively isolate the influence of polarizability on the dynamics. We find that the solvating water’s relaxation is most affected when both the protein and the water models are polarizable. However, when only one model (or neither) is polarizable, the relaxation is similar regardless of the models used. PMID:16853101

  5. Maize (Zea mays)-derived bovine trypsin: characterization of the first large-scale, commercial protein product from transgenic plants.

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    Woodard, Susan L; Mayor, Jocelyne M; Bailey, Michele R; Barker, Donna K; Love, Robert T; Lane, Jeffrey R; Delaney, Donna E; McComas-Wagner, Janet M; Mallubhotla, Hanuman D; Hood, Elizabeth E; Dangott, Lawrence J; Tichy, Shane E; Howard, John A

    2003-10-01

    Bovine trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) is an enzyme that is widely used for commercial purposes to digest or process other proteins, including some therapeutic proteins. The biopharmaceutical industry is trying to eliminate animal-derived proteins from manufacturing processes due to the possible contamination of these products by human pathogens. Recombinant trypsin has been produced in a number of systems, including cell culture, bacteria and yeast. To date, these expression systems have not produced trypsin on a scale sufficient to fulfill the need of biopharmaceutical manufacturers where kilogram quantities are often required. The present paper describes commercial-level production of trypsin in transgenic maize (Zea mays) and its physical and functional characterization. This protease, the first enzyme to be produced on a large-scale using transgenic plant technology, is functionally equivalent to native bovine pancreatic trypsin. The availability of this reagent should allow for the replacement of animal-derived trypsin in the processing of pharmaceutical proteins.

  6. Gelatin-Enabled Microsensor for Pancreatic Trypsin Sensing

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    George Banis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Digestive health is critically dependent on the secretion of enzymes from the exocrine pancreas to the duodenum via the pancreatic duct. Specifically, pancreatic trypsin is a major protease responsible for breaking down proteins for absorption in the small intestine. Gelatin-based hydrogels, deposited in the form of thin films, have been studied as potential sensor substrates that hydrolyze in the presence of trypsin. In this work, we (1 investigate gelatin as a sensing material; (2 develop a fabrication strategy for coating sensor surfaces; and (3 implement a miniaturized impedance platform for measuring activity levels of pancreatic trypsin. Using impedance spectroscopy, we evaluate gelatin’s specificity and rate of degradation when exposed to a combination of pancreatic enzymes in neutral solution representative of the macromolecular heterogeneity present in the duodenal environment. Our findings suggest gelatin’s preferential degradation to trypsin compared to enzymes such as lipase and amylase. We further observe their interference with trypsin behavior in equivalent concentrations, reducing film digestion by as much as 83% and 77%, respectively. We achieve film patterns in thicknesses ranging from 300–700 nm, which we coat over interdigitated finger electrode sensors. Finally, we test our sensors over several concentrations to emulate the range of pancreatic secretions. Ultimately, our microsensor will serve as the foundation for developing in situ sensors toward diagnosing pancreatic pathologies.

  7. Targeting Trypsin-Inflammation Axis for Pancreatitis Therapy in a Humanized Pancreatitis Model

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    2016-10-01

    supraphysiological concentrations. CCK is a hormone that at physiological concentrations induces the release of digestive enzymes by pancreatic...death. We observed, that compared to WT cells, R122H cells display in basal conditions similar morphology and protein levels of digestive enzymes ...Award Number: W81XWH-15-1-0258 TITLE: Targeting Trypsin-Inflammation Axis for Pancreatitis Therapy in a Humanized Pancreatitis Model PRINCIPAL

  8. Protease-activated receptor-2 expression and the role of trypsin in cell proliferation in human pancreatic cancers.

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    Ohta, Tetsuo; Shimizu, Koichi; Yi, Shuangqin; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Amaya, Kohji; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Kayahara, Masato; Ninomiya, Itasu; Fushida, Sachio; Fujimura, Takashi; Nishimura, Gen-Ichi; Miwa, Koichi

    2003-07-01

    Protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by trypsin. The purpose of this study was to examine PAR-2 expression and the role of trypsin in cell proliferation in human pancreatic cancer cells. All four pancreatic cancer cell lines studied, from well to undifferentiated types, AsPC-1, BxPC-3, Panc-1, and MIAPaCa-2, had significant levels of PAR-2 mRNA detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and showed a band of about 55 kDa corresponding to the known molecular weight of PAR-2: AsPC-1, BxPC-3 and Panc-1 showed a strong band, and MIAPaCa-2 showed a weak one. Immunocytochemically, AsPC-1, BxPC-3, and Panc-1 showed intense immunostaining for PAR-2, predominantly in the plasma membrane, while in MIAPaCa-2, immunostaining was weak. Proliferative activity of AsPC-1 cells was increased by concentrations of trypsin as low as 10 nM, and activity peaked at a concentration of 100 nM, representing almost 60% of that induced by 10% fetal bovine serum. In contrast, trypsin had no significant effect on proliferation of MIAPaCa-2 cells. These findings suggest that trypsin plays a role in the growth of PAR-2-positive pancreatic cancer cells and serves as a potent mitogen in vitro, functioning as a growth factor.

  9. Framework for interpretation of trypsin-antitrypsin imbalance and genetic heterogeneity in pancreatitis.

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    Lin, Kun; Gao, Feng; Chen, Qingquan; Liu, Qicai; Chen, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Early intracellular premature trypsinogen activation was interpreted as the key initiator of pancreatitis. When the balance in the homeostasis of trypsin and antitrypsin system is disequilibrated, elevated aggressive enzymes directly attack the pancreatic tissue, which leads to pancreatic destruction and inflammation. However, trypsin alone is not enough to cause complications in pancreatitis, which may play a crucial role in modulating signaling events in the initial phase of the disease. NFκB activation is the major inflammatory pathway involved in the occurrence and development of pancreatitis and it can be induced by intrapancreatic activation of trypsinogen. Synthesis of trypsinogen occurs in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and ER stress is an important early acinar cell event. Components of ER stress response are known to be able to trigger cell death as well as NFκB signaling cascade. The strongest evidence supporting the trypsin-centered theory is that gene mutations, which lead to the generation of more trypsin, or reduce the activity of trypsin inhibitors or trypsin degradation, are associated with pancreatitis. Thus, trypsin-antitrypsin imbalance may be the first step leading to pancreatic autodigestion and inducing other pathways. Continued experimental studies are necessary to determine the specific relationships between trypsin-antitrypsin imbalance and genetic heterogeneity in pancreatitis. In this article, we review the latest advances that contributed to the understanding of the basic mechanisms behind the occurrence and development of pancreatitis with a focus on the interpretation of trypsin-antitrypsin imbalance and their relationships with other inflammation pathways. We additionally highlight genetic predispositions to pancreatitis and possible mechanisms associated with them.

  10. Trypsin Reduces Pancreatic Ductal Bicarbonate Secretion by Inhibiting CFTR Cl- channel and Luminal Anion Exchangers

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    Pallagi, Petra; Venglovecz, Viktória; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Borka, Katalin; Korompay, Anna; Ózsvári, Béla; Judák, Linda; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Geisz, Andrea; Schnúr, Andrea; Maléth, József; Takács, Tamás; Gray, Mike A.; Argent, Barry E.; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Wittmann, Tibor; Hegyi, Péter

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims The effects of trypsin on pancreatic ductal epithelial cells (PDEC) vary among species and depend on localization of proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2). Bicarbonate secretion is similar in human and guinea pig PDEC; we compared its localization in these cell types and isolated guinea pig ducts to study the effects of trypsin and a PAR-2 agonist on this process. Methods PAR-2 localization was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in guinea pig and human pancreatic tissue samples (from 15 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 15 without pancreatic disease). Functions of guinea pig PDEC were studied by microperfusion of isolated ducts, measurements of intracellular pH (pHi) and Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i, and patch clamp analysis. The effect of pH on trypsinogen autoactivation was assessed using recombinant human cationic trypsinogen. Results PAR-2 localized to the apical membrane of human and guinea pig PDEC. Trypsin increased [Ca2+]i and pHi, and inhibited secretion of bicarbonate by the luminal anion exchanger and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel. Autoactivation of human cationic trypsinogen accelerated when the pH was reduced from 8.5 to 6.0. PAR-2 expression was strongly down-regulated, at transcriptional and protein levels, in the ducts of patients with chronic pancreatitis, consistent with increased activity of intraductal trypsin. Importantly, in PAR-2 knockout mice, the effects of trypsin were PAR-2 dependent. Conclusions Trypsin reduces pancreatic ductal bicarbonate secretion via PAR-2–dependent inhibition of the apical anion exchanger and the CFTR Cl- channel. This could contribute to the development of chronic pancreatitis, decreasing luminal pH and promoting premature activation of trypsinogen in the pancreatic ducts. PMID:21893120

  11. A spectroscopic and thermal stability study on the interaction between putrescine and bovine trypsin.

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    Momeni, Lida; Shareghi, Behzad; Saboury, Ali A; Farhadian, Sadegh; Reisi, Fateme

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of putrescine with bovine trypsin was investigated using steady state thermal stability, intrinsic fluorescence, UV-vis spectroscopy, far and near- UV circular dichroism and kinetic techniques, as well as molecular docking. The Stern-Volmer quenching constants for the trypsin- putrescine complex were calculated revealing that putrescine interacted with trypsin via the static fluorescence quenching. The enthalpy and entropy change values and the molecular docking technique revealed that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces play a major role in the binding process. Upon putrescine conjugation, the V max value and the k cat /K m values of the enzyme was increased. The results of UV absorbance, circular dichroism and fluorescence techniques demonstrated that the micro environmental changes in trypsin were induced by the binding of putrescine, leading to changes in its secondary structure. The thermal stability of trypsin- putrescine complex was enhanced more significantly, as compared to that of the native trypsin. The increased thermal stability of trypsin- putrescine complex might be due to the lower surface hydrophobicity and the higher hydrogen bond formation after putrescine modification, as reflected in the increase of UV absorbance and the quenching of fluorescence spectra. It was concluded that the binding of putrescine changed trypsin structure and function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pre-diagnostic levels of anionic trypsinogen, cationic trypsinogen, and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor in relation to pancreatic cancer risk.

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    Johansen, Dorthe; Manjer, Jonas; Regner, Sara; Lindkvist, Björn

    2010-01-01

    Experimental studies have suggested that trypsinogen may enhance tumor progression and that the ratio between anionic trypsinogen and cationic trypsinogen (HAT/HCT) and between the sum of trypsinogens and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) ((HAT + HCT)/PSTI) are disturbed in patients with pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate if pre-diagnostic levels of these parameters are associated with subsequent pancreatic cancer risk. A total of 33,346 subjects participated in a health screening programme in Malmö, Sweden. Pancreatic cancer cases (n = 84) were matched to three controls each. HAT, HCT and PSTI were analyzed in pre-diagnostic serum samples. Odds ratios for pancreatic cancer were calculated using logistic regression and were then stratified for other risk factors. In the main analysis, a statistically significant association between the ratio between HAT/HCT and pancreatic cancer was observed for all, for the crude OR and for the ORs adjusted for sex, BMI or Helicobacter pylori. When stratified for sex, statistically significant associations were found for females in the crude OR and for the ORs adjusted for time to analysis, BMI, alcohol consumption or H. pylori. There was a positive association between the ratio of HAT/HCT to pancreatic cancer in the intermediate/high alcohol consumption group and subjects with a BMI alcohol consumption group. Our hypothesis predicted an increased risk for pancreatic cancer related to an imbalance between trypsin activity and trypsin inhibition capacity. The findings concerning the ratio of HAT/HCT are in line with this. The results related to analyses stratified for other risk factors should be considered as mainly explorative. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Human and bovine spinal disc mechanics subsequent to trypsin injection

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    Jeremy Alsup

    2017-10-01

    The Translational Potential of this Article: Preclinical testing of novel spinal devices is essential to the design validation and regulatory processes, but current testing techniques rely on cadaveric testing of primarily older spines with essentially random amounts of disc degeneration. The present work investigates the viability of using trypsin injections to create a more uniform preclinical model of disc degeneration from a mechanics perspective, for the purpose of testing spinal devices. Such a model would facilitate translation of new spinal technologies to clinical practice.

  14. [Soluble high molecular weight derivatives of trypsin pancreatic inhibitor. Isolation and properties of dextran-bound pancreatic inhibitor].

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    Larionova, N I; Kazanskaia, N F; Sakharov, I Iu

    1977-07-01

    A method of isolating preparations of pancreatic inhibitor of trypsin, bound with soluble polysaccharide carriers, is worked out. It is demonstrated that the reaction of a pancreatic inhibitor and cyanuric chloride-activated dextran proceeds for OH groups of tyrosine residues and for-epsilon-NH2 groups of lysine residues. A method is offered of the protection of amino groups with citraconic anhydride for the complete retaining of the inhibitory activity during attachment to dextran. Thermic denaturation of pancreatic inhibitor preparations at pH 4.7 and 97 degrees C is studied. It is found that the modification by 2-amino-4.6-dichloro-s-triazine stabilizes the protein molecule, while the interaction with the matrix of soluble dextran does not carry any contribution to thermostability of the pancreatic inhibitor.

  15. Interactive computer surface graphics approach to study of the active site of bovine trypsin

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    Feldmann, Richard J.; Bing, David H.; Furie, Barbara C.; Furie, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    A descriptive medium for the presentation of protein structure has been developed and used to evaluate the structure of the active site of bovine trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4). This technique, involving advanced computer graphics technology, permits the facile display of a representation of the molecular surface of proteins of known structure and employs color to code the structural or chemical features of this surface. Benzamidine derivatives were inserted into the benzamidine-binding site of trypsin and the binary inhibitor-trypsin complex was evaluated by using the computer-generated structure. On the basis of qualitative assessments of the contribution of electrostatic and hydrophobic forces to the binding energy associated with complex formation, we made predictions concerning the effects of interaction of benzamidine substituents and amino acid side chains upon the binding energy associated with inhibitor-protein binding. The computer display of the molecular surfaces of the binary complex of substituted benzamidines and trypsin permitted unique insight into the identity and chemical properties of the atoms that participate at the interface of the molecular surfaces of the inhibitor and the protein. The computer-generated molecular surface display can potentially be combined with quantitative definition of the physical forces involved in the interaction of molecular surfaces. This technology should facilitate the study of the structure-activity relationship of substrates, inhibitors, and drugs that bind to proteins of known three-dimensional structure. Images PMID:281690

  16. Crystal structure of an engineered subtilisin inhibitor complexed with bovine trypsin.

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    Takeuchi, Y; Nonaka, T; Nakamura, K T; Kojima, S; Miura, K; Mitsui, Y

    1992-05-15

    Proteinase specificity of a proteinaceous inhibitor of subtilisin (SSI; Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor) can be altered so as to strongly inhibit trypsin simply by replacing P1 methionine with lysine (with or without concomitant change of the P4 residue) through site-directed mutagenesis. Now the crystal structure of one such engineered SSI (P1 methionine converted to lysine and P4 methionine converted to glycine) complexed with bovine trypsin has been solved at 2.6 A resolution and refined to a crystallographic R factor of 0.173. Comparing this structure with the previously established structure of the native SSI complexed with subtilisin BPN', it was found that (i) P1 lysine of the mutant SSI is accommodated in the S1 pocket of trypsin as usual, and (ii) upon complex formation, considerable conformation change occurs to the reactive site loop of the mutant SSI. Thus, in this case, flexibility of the reactive site loop seems important for successfully changing the proteinase specificity through mere replacement of the P1 residue.

  17. Atomic-scale investigation of the interactions between tetrabromobisphenol A, tetrabromobisphenol S and bovine trypsin by spectroscopies and molecular dynamics simulations

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    Ding, Keke [Institute of Environmental Science, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhang, Huanxin [College of Marine Life Sciences, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003 (China); Wang, Haifei; Lv, Xuan; Pan, Liumeng; Zhang, Wenjing [Institute of Environmental Science, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Organic Pollution Process and Control, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhuang, Shulin, E-mail: shulin@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental Science, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Organic Pollution Process and Control, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • The interaction of TBBPA/TBBPS with bovine trypsin was deciphered for the first time. • The fluorescence of bovine trypsin was quenched in a concentration-dependent mode. • TBBPA and TBBPS bind at the ANS binding site with distinct binding modes. • TBBPS has a higher binding affinity toward bovine trypsin than TBBPA. • Our in vitro and in silico approach is helpful to assess risk of TBBPA-related BFRs. - Abstract: Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and its replacement alternative tetrabromobisphenol S (TBBPS) are used widely as brominated flame retardants (BFRs). However, the potential risk of their effects on bovine trypsin remains largely unknown. We investigated the effects of TBBPA and TBBPS to bovine trypsin by the fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. They statically quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of bovine trypsin in a concentration-dependent mode and caused slight red-shifted fluorescence. The short and long fluorescence lifetime decay components of bovine trypsin were both affected, partly due to the disturbed microenvironmental changes of Trp215. The β-sheet content of bovine trypsin was significantly reduced from 82.4% to 75.7% and 76.6% by TBBPA and TBBPS, respectively, possibly impairing the physiological function of bovine trypsin. TBBPA and TBBPS bind at the 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate (ANS) binding site with an association constant of 1.09 × 10{sup 4} M{sup −1} and 2.41 × 10{sup 4} M{sup −1} at 298 K, respectively. MD simulations revealed that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bond interactions are dominant for TBBPA, whereas electrostatic interactions are critical for TBBPS. Our in vitro and in silico studies are beneficial to the understanding of risk assessment and future design of environmental benign BFRs.

  18. Pancreatic mass, cellularity, and alpha-amylase and trypsin activity in feedlot steers fed diets differing in crude protein concentration.

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    Swanson, K C; Kelly, N; Salim, H; Wang, Y J; Holligan, S; Fan, M Z; McBride, B W

    2008-04-01

    Twenty-four yearling beef steers (initial BW = 510 +/- 4.9 kg) predominantly of Angus breeding were used in a randomized complete block design to determine the effect of dietary CP concentration on pancreatic cellularity, mass, and alpha-amylase and trypsin activities. Treatment diets were formulated to contain 8.8, 11.0, 13.2, and 15.4% CP. Soybean meal and Top Soy (ruminal bypass soybean meal) were used as supplemental protein sources to ensure that MP intake was increased with increasing dietary CP concentrations. Steers were penned in groups of 4 (1 steer per treatment) and individually fed at 2.5x the NE(m) requirement by using Calan gates for 28 d before tissue collection. Four steers (1 pen) were slaughtered per week. Pancreases were weighed, subsampled, frozen in liquid N(2), and stored at -80 degrees C until analyses for DNA, RNA, and protein concentrations, and alpha-amylase and trypsin activities. Pancreatic weight (g and g/kg of BW) did not differ among treatment groups. Pancreatic DNA concentration (mg/g) decreased linearly (P = 0.06) with increasing CP concentration. Pancreatic protein (g/pancreas) increased linearly (P = 0.08) with increasing dietary CP concentration. Pancreatic alpha-amylase activity (U/g, U/mg of DNA, U/g of protein, U/pancreas, and U/kg of BW) increased linearly (P pancreas, and U/kg of BW) increased linearly (P pancreas of cattle.

  19. Fish skin gelatin hydrolysates produced by visceral peptidase and bovine trypsin: Bioactivity and stability.

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    Ketnawa, Sunantha; Benjakul, Soottawat; Martínez-Alvarez, Oscar; Rawdkuen, Saroat

    2017-01-15

    The peptidase from the viscera of farmed giant catfish was used for producing gelatin hydrolysates (HG) and compared with those produced from commercial bovine trypsin (HB). The degree of hydrolysis (DH) observed suggests that proteolytic cleavage rapidly occurred within the first 120min of incubation, and there was higher DH in HG than in HB. HG demonstrated the highest ACE-inhibitory activity, DPPH, ABTS radical scavenging activity, and FRAP. HB showed the highest FRAP activity. The DPPH radical scavenging activity of HG was quite stable over the pH range of 1-11, but it increased slightly when the heating duration time reached 240min at 100°C. The ACE-inhibitory activity of HG showed the highest stability at a pH of 7, and it remained very stable at 100°C for over 15-240min. The visceral peptidase from farmed giant catfish could be an alternative protease for generating protein hydrolysates with desirable bioactivities. The resulting hydrolysates showed good stability, making them potential functional ingredients for food formulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bovine pancreatic polypeptide as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors

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    Pan, G.Z.; Lu, L.; Qian, J.; Xue, B.G.

    1987-03-01

    In dispersed acini from rat pancreas, it was found that bovine pancreatic polypeptide (BPP) and its C-fragment hexapeptide amide (PP-6), at concentrations of 0.1 and 30 ..mu..M, respectively, could significantly inhibit amylase secretion stimulated by carbachol, and this inhibition by BPP was dose dependent. /sup 45/Ca outflux induced by carbachol was also inhibited by BPP or PP-6, but they had no effect on cholecystokinin octapeptide- (CCK-8) or A23187-stimulated /sup 45/Ca outflux. BPP was also capable of displacing the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate to its receptors, and it possessed a higher affinity (K/sub i/35nM) than carbachol (K/sub i/ 1.8 ..mu..M) in binding with M-receptors. It is concluded from this study that BPP acts as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat pancreatic acini. In addition, BPP inhibited the potentiation of amylase secretion caused by the combination of carbachol plus secretin or vasoactive intestinal peptide. This may be a possible explanation of the inhibitory effect of BPP on secretin-induced pancreatic enzyme secretion shown in vivo, since pancreatic enzyme secretion stimulated by secretin under experimental conditions may be the result of potentiation of enzyme release produced by the peptide in combination with a cholinergic stimulant.

  1. FRET-based modified graphene quantum dots for direct trypsin quantification in urine

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    Poon, Chung-Yan; Li, Qinghua [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Zhang, Jiali; Li, Zhongping [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Research Center of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Dong, Chuan [Research Center of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Lee, Albert Wai-Ming; Chan, Wing-Hong [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Li, Hung-Wing, E-mail: hwli@hkbu.edu.hk [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong)

    2016-04-21

    A versatile nanoprobe was developed for trypsin quantification with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Here, fluorescence graphene quantum dot is utilized as a donor while a well-designed coumarin derivative, CMR2, as an acceptor. Moreover, bovine serum albumin (BSA), as a protein model, is not only served as a linker for the FRET pair, but also a fluorescence enhancer of the quantum dots and CMR2. In the presence of trypsin, the FRET system would be destroyed when the BSA is digested by trypsin. Thus, the emission peak of the donor is regenerated and the ratio of emission peak of donor/emission peak of acceptor increased. By the ratiometric measurement of these two emission peaks, trypsin content could be determined. The detection limit of trypsin was found to be 0.7 μg/mL, which is 0.008-fold of the average trypsin level in acute pancreatitis patient's urine suggesting a high potential for fast and low cost clinical screening. - Highlights: • A FRET-based biosensor was developed for direct quantification of trypsin. • Fast and sensitive screening of pancreatic disease was facilitated. • The direct quantification of trypsin in urine samples was demonstrated.

  2. B2 kinin receptor activation is the predominant mechanism by which trypsin mediates endothelium-dependent relaxation in bovine coronary arteries.

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    Drummond, Grant R; Selemidis, Stavros; Cocks, Thomas M

    2008-07-01

    The roles of kinin and protease-activated receptors (PAR) in endothelium-dependent relaxations to the serine protease, trypsin, were examined in rings of bovine left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). Trypsin (0.01-30 U/ml) caused biphasic, endothelium-dependent relaxations-a high potency (0.01-0.3 U/ml), low efficacy relaxation [maximum relaxation (R (max)), 9.0 +/- 5.1%] followed by a lower potency (1-30 U/ml) but high efficacy (R (max), 90.4 +/- 5.5%) relaxation, which was abolished by aprotinin. Captopril (10 microM) caused an approximately 10-fold leftward shift of the second phase response such that the first phase was masked. The second phase relaxation to trypsin was inhibited in a concentration-dependent, non-surmountable manner by the B2 antagonist, HOE-140. At 3 nM HOE-140, the second phase response to trypsin was abolished unmasking the first phase. Kallikrein (0.0003-0.3 U/ml) caused monophasic, endothelium-dependent relaxations (R (max), 33.7 +/- 14.6%), which were potentiated by captopril (R (max), 94.2 +/- 1.0%) and abolished by HOE-140. In the presence of captopril, the second phase relaxation to trypsin was only minimally inhibited by either N(G)-nitro-L: -arginine (100 microM) or 67 mM [K(+)](o) alone but markedly reduced when these two treatments were combined (R (max), 26.1 +/- 11.6% versus 98.6 +/- 2.9% in controls). The PAR1-activating peptide, SFLLRN (0.1-30 microM), but not the PAR2-activating peptide, SLIGRL, caused concentration-dependent relaxations (pEC(50), 5.9 +/- 0.0%; R (max), 43.3 +/- 8.3%). In conclusion, trypsin causes endothelium-dependent relaxations in the bovine LAD predominantly via release of endogenous BK, which in turn activates endothelial B2 receptors. Only a minor role for PAR1-like receptors was evident in this tissue.

  3. Hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics of single protons in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, C.K.; Hilton, B.C.

    1980-10-01

    The exchange kinetics of the slowest exchanging BPTI ..beta..-sheet protons are complex compared to model peptides; the activation energy, E/sub a/, and the pH dependence are temperature dependent. We have measured the exchange kinetics in the range pH 1 to 11, 33 to 71/sup 0/C, particularly the temperature dependence. The data are fit to a model in which exchange of each proton is determined by two discrete dynamical processes, one with E/sub a/ approx. 65 kcal/mol and less than first order dependence on catalyst ion, and one with E/sub a/ 20 to 30 kcal/mol and approaching first order in catalyst ion. The low activation energy process is the mechanism of interest in the native conformation of globular proteins and involves low energy, small amplitude fluctuations; the high activation energy process involves major unfolding. The model is simple, has a precedent in the hydrogen exchange literature, and explains quantitatively the complex feature of the exchange kinetics of single protons in BPTI.

  4. AN EFFICIENT SYSTEM FOR ACTIVE BOVINE PANCREATIC RIBONUCLEASE EXPRESSION IN ESCHERICHIA-COLI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OKOROKOV, AL; PANOV, KI; POELE, RHT; BREUKELMAN, HJ; FURIA, A; KARPEISKY, MY; BEINTEMA, JJ

    Bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase A) is a member of a homologous group of extensively studied proteins, It is a small, basic protein, containing 124 amino acid residues and four stabilizing disulfide bridges. Ribonuclease A catalyzes the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bonds in ribonucleic

  5. In vitro secretion of zymogens by bovine pancreatic acini and ultra-structural analysis of exocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivalingam Jayaveni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to establish a bovine pancreatic acinar cell culture model with longer viability and functionality. The cells could be maintained in a functional state for upto 20 days with normal morphology. Cells were positive for amylase as observed by immunofluorescence staining. Acinar cells are spherical and range about 2–3 µm in diameter. The porosome formed by exocytosis and heterogenous enzyme granules of size ranging 100–300 nm were seen on the surface of cells by electron microscopy. The activity of the enzymes was high on day 15 and the activity profile of the enzymes is in the order: protease>lipase>amylase and the enzymes were identified by SDS-PAGE. Long-term culture of bovine pancreatic acini could be useful in studying the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Since the bovine genome shares about 80% identity with the human genome, the cells derived from bovine pancreas can be engineered and used as a potential xenotransplant to treat conditions like pancreatitis as the tissue source is abundantly available.

  6. On the Structure of Bovine Pancreatic Ribonuclease B. Isolation of a Glycopeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, Jr., T. H.; Hirs, C. H.W.

    Ribonuclease B is a constituent of the zymogen granules of bovine pancreatic acinar cells and is secreted in the pancreatic juice of cattle. Its isolation from bovine pancreatic juice has been described. The enzyme is a glycoprotein that possesses an amino acid composition indistinguishable from that of ribonuclease A and contains carbohydrate to the extent of six residues of mannose and two residues of glucosamine per molecule. The experiments to be described in the present communication were designed to provide preliminary structural information about the protein, and, in particular, to furnish an understanding of the distribution of the carbohydrate in the molecule. The experiments have demonstrated that the carbohydrate content is accounted for by a single covalently-bonded oligosaccharide moiety attached at an aspartic acid or asparagine residue, and have provided further presumptive evidence that the structure of the protein is otherwise identical to that of ribonuclease A. (auth)

  7. Effective removal of alginate-poly-L-lysine microcapsules from pancreatic islets by use of trypsin-EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Martijn; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Keizer, Paula P M; Fekken, Susan; Schuurs, Theo A; van Schilfgaarde, Reinout

    2003-11-01

    Although the transplantation of alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate encapsulated islets of Langerhans usually is successful, graft survival is still limited. Molecular analysis by RT-PCR of the encapsulated islets may provide insight into the mechanisms that affect islets during graft failure. However, RT-PCR on encapsulated islets is not possible because the poly-L-lysine of the capsule interferes with both cDNA synthesis and PCR amplification. We applied a method that mechanically removes the microcapsules from the islets after a short trypsin-EDTA treatment (decapsulation), thereby enabling RT-PCR analysis. The results of this study show that the decapsulation procedure does not affect islet vitality and has only minor effects on islet function and morphology. The decapsulation does not affect GAPDH, beta-actin, Bcl-2, or Bax gene expression. This method is an improvement over the time-consuming manual dissection of microcapsules because it allows for the rapid and relatively harmless removal of capsules on a larger scale. Decapsulation offers the possibility of applying RT-PCR, as well as other methods, which cannot be performed on encapsulated islets. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. FRET-based modified graphene quantum dots for direct trypsin quantification in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Chung-Yan; Li, Qinghua; Zhang, Jiali; Li, Zhongping; Dong, Chuan; Lee, Albert Wai-Ming; Chan, Wing-Hong; Li, Hung-Wing

    2016-04-21

    A versatile nanoprobe was developed for trypsin quantification with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Here, fluorescence graphene quantum dot is utilized as a donor while a well-designed coumarin derivative, CMR2, as an acceptor. Moreover, bovine serum albumin (BSA), as a protein model, is not only served as a linker for the FRET pair, but also a fluorescence enhancer of the quantum dots and CMR2. In the presence of trypsin, the FRET system would be destroyed when the BSA is digested by trypsin. Thus, the emission peak of the donor is regenerated and the ratio of emission peak of donor/emission peak of acceptor increased. By the ratiometric measurement of these two emission peaks, trypsin content could be determined. The detection limit of trypsin was found to be 0.7 μg/mL, which is 0.008-fold of the average trypsin level in acute pancreatitis patient's urine suggesting a high potential for fast and low cost clinical screening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Bovine seminal ribonuclease triggers Beclin1-mediated autophagic cell death in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Claudia; Gotte, Giovanni; Donnarumma, Federica; Picone, Delia; Donadelli, Massimo

    2014-05-01

    Among the large number of variants belonging to the pancreatic-type secretory ribonuclease (RNase) superfamily, bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase A) is the proto-type and bovine seminal RNase (BS-RNase) represents the unique natively dimeric member. In the present manuscript, we evaluate the anti-tumoral property of these RNases in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines and in nontumorigenic cells as normal control. We demonstrate that BS-RNase stimulates a strong anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effect in cancer cells, while RNase A is largely ineffective. Notably, we reveal for the first time that BS-RNase triggers Beclin1-mediated autophagic cancer cell death, providing evidences that high proliferation rate of cancer cells may render them more susceptible to autophagy by BS-RNase treatment. Notably, to improve the autophagic response of cancer cells to BS-RNase we used two different strategies: the more basic (as compared to WT enzyme) G38K mutant of BS-RNase, known to interact more strongly than wt with the acidic membrane of cancer cells, or BS-RNase oligomerization (tetramerization or formation of larger oligomers). Both mutant BS-RNase and BS-RNase oligomers potentiated autophagic cell death as compared to WT native dimer of BS-RNase, while the various RNase A oligomers remained completely ineffective. Altogether, our results shed more light on the mechanisms lying at the basis of BS-RNase antiproliferative effect in cancer cells, and support its potential use to develop new anti-cancer strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Proton NMR assignments and regular backbone structure of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, A.D. (Stanford Univ. Medical School, CA (USA)); Purisima, E.O. (National Research Council of Canada, Montreal, Quebec (Canada) Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA)); Eastman, M.A.; Scheraga, H.A. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

    1989-07-11

    Proton NMR assignments have been made for 121 of the 124 residues of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A). During the first stage of assignment, COSY and relayed COSY data were used to identify 40 amino acid spin systems belonging to alanine, valine, threonine, isoleucine, and serine residues. Approximately 60 other NH-{alpha}CH-{beta}CH systems were also identified but not assigned to specific amino acid type. NOESY data then were used to connect sequentially neighboring spin systems; approximately 475 of the possible 700 resonances in RNase A were assigned in this way. The authors' assignments agree with those for 20 residues assigned previously. NOESY correlations were used to identify regular backbone structure elements in RNase A, which are very similar to those observed in X-ray crystallographic studies.

  11. Pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor causes autocrine-mediated migration and invasion in bladder cancer and phosphorylates the EGF receptor, Akt2 and Akt3, and ERK1 and ERK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchbank, Tania; Mahmood, Asif; Playford, Raymond J

    2013-08-01

    Pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) is expressed in most bladder carcinomas, where its pathophysiological relevance is unclear. Using recombinant normal sequence PSTI/tumor-associated trypsin inhibitor (TATI), a variant associated with familial pancreatitis (N34S), an active site-inactivated variant (R18/V19), and immunoneutralization and RNA interference-mediated knockdown techniques, we investigated the actions of PSTI/TATI on cell migration (wounding monolayers), collagen invasion (gel invasion assays), and proliferation (Alamar blue) on 253J, RT4, and HT1376 human bladder carcinoma cell lines. All three forms of PSTI/TATI stimulated migration twofold, and normal sequence PSTI/TATI showed synergistic promigratory effects when added with EGF. Addition of structurally unrelated soybean trypsin inhibitor had no promigratory activity. Similar results were seen using collagen invasion assays, although the active site mutated variant had no proinvasive activity, probably due to reduced Akt2 activation. PSTI/TATI did not stimulate proliferation despite acting, at least partially, through the EGF receptor, as effects of PSTI/TATI were truncated by the addition of an EGF receptor blocking antibody or the tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostin. Cell lines produced endogenous PSTI/TATI, and PSTI/TATI RNA interference knockdown or the addition of PSTI/TATI, EGF receptor, or tyrphostin blocking agents reduced migration and invasion below baseline. PSTI/TATI induced phosphorylation of the EGF receptor, ERK1 and ERK2, Akt2 and Akt3, JNK1, MKK3, and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1. This profile was more limited than that induced by EGF and did not include Akt1, probably explaining the lack of proproliferative activity. Our findings of autocrine stimulation and synergistic responses between EGF and PSTI/TATI at concentrations found in urine and tissue suggest that PSTI/TATI has pathophysiological relevance.

  12. Sequence-specific sup 1 H NMR assignments and solution structure of bovine pancreatic polypeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang Li; Dobson, C.M. (Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)); Sutcliffe, M.J. (Leicester Univ. (United Kingdom)); Schwartz, T.W. (Lab. for Molecular Endocrinology, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    1992-02-04

    Sequence-specific {sup 1}H NMR assignments for the 36 residue bovine pancreatic polypeptide (bPP) have been completed. The secondary and tertiary structure of bPP in solution has been determined from experimental NMR data. It is shown that bPP has a very well-defined C-terminal {alpha}-helix involving residues 15-32. Although regular secondary structure cannot be clearly defined in the N-terminal region, residues 15-32. Although regular secondary structure cannot be clearly defined in the N-terminal region, residues 4-8 maintain a rather ordered conformation in solution. This is attributed primarily to the hydrophobic interaction between this region and the C-terminal helix. The two segments of the structure are joined by a turn which is poorly defined. The four end residues both at the N-terminus and the C-terminus are highly disordered in solution. The overall fold of the bPP molecule is very closely similar to that found in the crystal structure of avian pancreatic polypeptide (aPP). The RMS deviation for backbone atoms of residues 4-8 and 15-32 between the bPP mean structure and the aPP crystal structure is 0.65 {angstrom}, although there is only 39% identity of the residues. Furthermore, the average conformations of some (mostly from the {alpha}-helix) side chains of bPP in solution are closely similar to those of aPP in the crystal structure. A large number of side chains of bPP, however, show significant conformational averaging in solution.

  13. The effect of corn trypsin inhibitor, anti-tissue factor pathway inhibitor antibodies and phospholipids on microvesicle-associated thrombin generation in patients with pancreatic cancer and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellum, Marit; Franco-Lie, Isabel; Øvstebø, Reidun; Hauge, Truls; Henriksson, Carola E

    2017-01-01

    Circulating microvesicles (MVs) are suggested to be important contributors to cancer-associated thrombosis due to the presence of surface-bound procoagulant molecules like tissue factor (TF) and phosphatidylserine (PS). Pancreatic cancer is considered to be one of the most prothrombotic malignancies. The aim of this study was to describe the impact of analytical variables on MV-associated thrombin generation in patients with pancreatic cancer and in healthy controls. MVs were isolated from citrated plasma and added to pooled normal plasma (PNP). Thrombin generation was measured by the calibrated automated thrombogram. The impact of corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI), anti-tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) antibodies and phospholipids was described. Antibodies against TF were used to assess TF-dependency, and MV-bound PS activity was measured with the Zymuphen MP-activity kit. MVs from the pancreatic cancer patients displayed higher thrombin generation and higher PS-activity than MVs from the healthy control group, while TF-dependency was observed in only 1 out of 13 patient samples. Adequate thrombin generation-curves were only achieved when CTI was omitted and anti-TFPI antibodies were added to PNP prepared in low contact-activating tubes. Addition of phospholipids reduced the significant differences between the two groups, and should be omitted. This modified thrombin generation assay could be useful for measurement of procoagulant circulating MVs, allowing the contribution from MVs affecting both the intrinsic and the extrinsic pathway to be measured.

  14. Purification and characterization of a trypsin inhibitor from seeds of Murraya koenigii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shee, Chandan; Sharma, Ashwani K

    2007-02-01

    A protein with trypsin inhibitory activity was purified to homogeneity from the seeds of Murraya koenigii (curry leaf tree) by ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography on HPLC. The molecular mass of the protein was determined to be 27 kDa by SDS-PAGE analysis under reducing conditions. The solubility studies at different pH conditions showed that it is completely soluble at and above pH 7.5 and slowly precipitates below this pH at a protein concentration of 1 mg/ml. The purified protein inhibited bovine pancreatic trypsin completely in a molar ratio of 1:1.1. Maximum inhibition was observed at pH 8.0. Kinetic studies showed that Murraya koenigii trypsin inhibitor is a competitive inhibitor with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 7 x 10(-9) M. The N-terminal sequence of the first 15 amino acids showed no similarity with any of the known trypsin inhibitors, however, a short sequence search showed significant homology to a Kunitz-type chymotrypsin inhibitor from Erythrina variegata.

  15. HYDROLYSIS OF CHEESEWHEY PROTEINSWITH TRYPSIN, CHYMOTRYPSINAND CARBOXYPEPTIDASEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. CUSTÓDIO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    This work presents a method for adding value to cheese whey residues by whey proteins hydrolysis, using trypsin, chymotrypsin and carboxypeptidase A as catalysts. Sweet cheese whey was dialyzed and filtered in kaolin. Lactose and protein contents were analyzed after each step. The activities of bovine pancreas trypsin and chymotrypsin were measured at different pHs and temperatures. The optimal pH for the hydrolysis of whey proteins was 9.0 for both enzymes. Optima temperatures were 60ºC for trypsin, and 50ºC for chymotrypsin. Trypsin exhibited typical Michaelis-Menten behavior, but chymotrypsin did not. Electrophoretic analysis showed that neither trypsin nor chymotrypsin alone hydrolyzed whey proteins in less than three hours. Hydrolysis rates of -lactalbumin by trypsin, and of bovine serum albumin by chymotrypsin were low. When these enzymes were combined, however, all protein fractions were attacked and rates of hydrolysis were enhanced by one order of magnitude. The addition of carboxypeptidase A to the others enzymes did not improve the process yield.

  16. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  17. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be present. How is pancreatitis diagnosed? How is pancreatitis treated? Treatment mainly consists of putting the pancreas to rest ( ... not as a definitive basis for diagnosis or treatment in any particular case. It is very ... pancreatitis is suspected, laboratory tests search for higher than ...

  18. Structural characterization of Spinacia oleracea trypsin inhibitor III (SOTI-III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotzbach, Bernhard; Schmelz, Stefan; Reinwarth, Michael; Christmann, Andreas; Heinz, Dirk W; Kolmar, Harald

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, several canonical serine protease inhibitor families have been classified and characterized. In contrast to most trypsin inhibitors, those from garden four o'clock (Mirabilis jalapa) and spinach (Spinacia oleracea) do not share sequence similarity and have been proposed to form the new Mirabilis serine protease inhibitor family. These 30-40-amino-acid inhibitors possess a defined disulfide-bridge topology and belong to the cystine-knot miniproteins (knottins). To date, no atomic structure of this inhibitor family has been solved. Here, the first structure of S. oleracea trypsin inhibitor III (SOTI-III), in complex with bovine pancreatic trypsin, is reported. The inhibitor was synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis on a multi-milligram scale and was assayed to test its inhibitory activity and binding properties. The structure confirmed the proposed cystine-bridge topology. The structural features of SOTI-III suggest that it belongs to a new canonical serine protease inhibitor family with promising properties for use in protein-engineering and medical applications.

  19. Atomic resolution structure of the double mutant (K53,56M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekar, K., E-mail: sekar@physics.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: sekar@serc.iisc.ernet.in [Bioinformatics Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Yogavel, M.; Gayathri, D.; Velmurugan, D. [Department of Crystallography and Biophysics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025 (India); Krishna, R. [Bioinformatics Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Poi, M.-J. [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the Ohio State Biochemistry Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Dauter, Z.; Dauter, M. [Synchrotron Radiation Research Section, National Cancer Institute, Brookhaven National Laboratory Building, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Tsai, M.-D. [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the Ohio State Biochemistry Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Academia Sinica,Taiwan (China); Bioinformatics Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2006-01-01

    The atomic resolution crystal structure of the double mutant (K53,56M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A{sub 2} is reported. The structure of the double mutant K53,56M has previously been refined at 1.9 Å resolution using room-temperature data. The present paper reports the crystal structure of the same mutant K53,56M refined against 1.1 Å data collected using synchrotron radiation. A total of 116 main-chain atoms from 29 residues and 44 side chains are modelled in alternate conformations. Most of the interfacial binding residues are found to be disordered and alternate conformations could be recognized. The second calcium ion-binding site residue Glu92 adopts two alternate conformations. The minor and major conformations of Glu92 correspond to the second calcium ion bound and unbound states.

  20. bovine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of various breeds under local conditions of management. (Hale, 1974b). AdditionaIly, this procedure has been used to assess the production of LH by the bovine anterior pituitary in vitro and to study the relationships between this production and the activity of the pineal- hypothalamic axis (Hayes, Knight & Symington, 1974;.

  1. Trypsin inhibition by ferrocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kukrić Zoran Z.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many transition metals and their complexes show inhibitory effect on someproteolytic enzymes, including trypsin. Their inhibitory activity is based on the direct binding to the active site of trypsin, mimicking formation of a five-coordinate transition state required for the reaction. The influence of ferrocene on trypsin activity using N-α-benzoyl-DL-arginine p-nitroanilide as a substrate was investigated. Ferrocene was selected as a potential inhibitor because it belongs to the family oforganometallic, so called "sandwich " compounds, and its cyclopentadienyl rings might have an appropriate geometry. It was found that ferrocene decreases trypsin activity and the K. for ferrocene was found to be 39.8.

  2. Potential Use of Atlantic Cod Trypsin in Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsdóttir, Ágústa; Hilmarsson, Hilmar; Stefansson, Bjarki

    2013-01-01

    Surface proteins of viruses and bacteria used for cell attachment and invasion are candidates for degradation by proteases. Trypsin from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) was previously demonstrated to have efficacy against influenza viruses in vitro and on skin. In this paper, cod trypsin is shown to be 3–12 times more effective in degrading large native proteins than its mesophilic analogue, bovine trypsin. This is in agreement with previous findings where cod trypsin was found to be the most active among twelve different proteases in cleaving various cytokines and pathological proteins. Furthermore, our results show that cod trypsin has high efficacy against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in vitro. The results on the antipathogenic properties of cod trypsin are important because rhinovirus, RSV, and influenza are the most predominant pathogenic viruses in upper respiratory tract infections. Results from a clinical study presented in this paper show that a specific formulation containing cod trypsin was preferred for wound healing over other methods used in the study. Apparently, the high digestive ability of the cold-adapted cod trypsin towards large native proteins plays a role in its efficacy against pathogens and its positive effects on wounds. PMID:23555095

  3. Potential Use of Atlantic Cod Trypsin in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágústa Gudmundsdóttir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface proteins of viruses and bacteria used for cell attachment and invasion are candidates for degradation by proteases. Trypsin from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua was previously demonstrated to have efficacy against influenza viruses in vitro and on skin. In this paper, cod trypsin is shown to be 3–12 times more effective in degrading large native proteins than its mesophilic analogue, bovine trypsin. This is in agreement with previous findings where cod trypsin was found to be the most active among twelve different proteases in cleaving various cytokines and pathological proteins. Furthermore, our results show that cod trypsin has high efficacy against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV in vitro. The results on the antipathogenic properties of cod trypsin are important because rhinovirus, RSV, and influenza are the most predominant pathogenic viruses in upper respiratory tract infections. Results from a clinical study presented in this paper show that a specific formulation containing cod trypsin was preferred for wound healing over other methods used in the study. Apparently, the high digestive ability of the cold-adapted cod trypsin towards large native proteins plays a role in its efficacy against pathogens and its positive effects on wounds.

  4. Porphyrin Induced Laser Deactivation of Trypsinogen-Trypsin Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perido, Joanna; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2015-03-01

    Pancreatitis is caused by the inflammation of the pancreas, where the digestive enzyme trypsin is activated from the precursor enzyme trypsinogen while still in the pancreas. The presence of trypsin in the pancreas causes auto-activation of trypsinogen, resulting in greater inflammation and auto-digestion of the pancreas. In severe cases, this cascade effect can lead to organ failure, diabetes, and pancreatic cancer. Our hypothesis is that if trypsinogen is prevented from auto-activating into trypsin, then this cascade can be stopped. We propose to do this by inducing conformational changes in trypsinogen when bound to a photoactive porphyrin dye. Porphyrins are comprised of four linked heterocyclic groups forming a flat ring, and bind well with proteins such as trypsinogen. In this study we used spectroscopic techniques to probe the binding of meso-tetrakis (4-sulfonatephenyl) porphyrin (TSPP) to trypsinogen in vitro, as a preliminary step to then prompt and characterize conformational changes of trypsinogen through irradiation. If conformational changes are detected the trypsinogen will be tested for trypsin inactivation. This investigation may provide promising initial results to the possible use of porphyrins as an inhibitor of the self-activation of trypsinogen into trypsin, and a potential inhibitor of pancreatitis. MARC*U-STAR.

  5. Pancreatic enzyme synthesis in pancreatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, E J; Clark, G; Dunbar, J; Wormsley, K G

    1985-08-01

    In a prospective evaluation of patients suspected of having chronic pancreatitis, synthesis of pancreatic enzymes was measured by means of the incorporation of selenium-75-labelled methionine into the proteins of duodenal aspirate during stimulation of pancreatic secretion with secretin (1 CU X kg-1 X h-1) plus cholecystokinin (CCK) (1 IDU X kg-1 X h-1). The rate of pancreatic enzyme synthesis was increased in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Measurement of pancreatic enzyme synthesis was more sensitive in the detection of chronic pancreatitis than either the bicarbonate or the trypsin secretory response to secretin plus CCK. A combination of the bicarbonate secretory response with measurement of the rate of enzyme synthesis provided a positive predictive power of 100% when both tests were abnormal and a negative predictive power of 100% when both tests were normal, so that the combined test can be recommended both for excluding and confirming the presence of chronic pancreatitis.

  6. Identification and characterization of a serine protease inhibitor with two trypsin inhibitor-like domains from the human hookworm Ancylostoma duodenale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xian; Deng, Li; Li, Hui; Zhang, Zhenlin; He, Qingfeng; Yang, Chen; Jiang, Hanguo; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Peng, Lifei

    2011-02-01

    Protease inhibitors play important roles in the parasitic nematodes' survival within their host, in the development and reproduction of the parasites. The present study described the isolation, identification, and characterization of a novel member of the Ascaris family of serine protease inhibitors, designated AduTIL-1, from the human hookworm Ancylostoma duodenale. AduTIL-1 is composed of a signal sequence and two trypsin inhibitor-like (TIL) domains, which showed the highest similarity with OdmCRP, a putative serine protease inhibitor with two TIL domains in Oesophagostomum dentatum. Each TIL domain of the AduTIL-1 was expressed in Escherichia coli, and their inhibitory activities against serine proteases from animals and human were characterized, respectively. Both of the two TIL domains inhibited human neutrophil elastase and pancreatic trypsin, but different in effectiveness. Although the first TIL domain of AduTIL-1 inhibited bovine pancreatic chymotrypsin (Ki=18.0 nM), both of the two domains showed no inhibitory activity against the human pancreatic chymotrypsin. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that AduTIL-1 was localized in esophagus, intestine, and cuticular surface of the adult worms. These results suggested that AduTIL-1 may be involved in the survival of A. duodenale in host by targeting related digestive enzymes and neutrophil elastase.

  7. Trypsin and chymotrypsin in stool

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be seen in a stool sample. This article discusses the test to measure trypsin and chymotrypsin in stool. ... drop of stool is placed on a thin layer of gelatin. If trypsin or chymotrypsin are present, ...

  8. Distinct localization of FMRFamide- and bovine pancreatic polypeptide-like material in the brain, retrocerebral complex and suboesophageal ganglion of the cockroach Periplaneta americana L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhaert, P; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; De Loof, A

    1985-01-01

    L. Double immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that the same perikarya and processes were stained by both the BPP and FMRFamide antisera. This was caused by cross-reaction of the BPP and FMRFamide antisera with common antigenic determinants as was shown by a number of solid-phase absorptions....... Application of a third FMRFamide antiserum, which was especially selected for its inability to react with bovine and avian pancreatic polypeptide, showed that more than half of the structures that were stained with the 'unspecific' BPP and FMRFamide antisera, contained material which was genuinely FMRFamide...

  9. Atomic resolution (0.97 Å) structure of the triple mutant (K53,56,121M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekar, K., E-mail: sekar@physics.iisc.ernet.in [Bioinformatics Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Rajakannan, V.; Gayathri, D.; Velmurugan, D. [Department of Crystallography and Biophysics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025 (India); Poi, M.-J. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and The Ohio State Biotechnology Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Academia Sinica,Taiwan (China); Dauter, M. [SAIC-Frederick Inc., Basic Research Program, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Building 725A-X9, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Dauter, Z. [Synchrotron Radiation Research Section, Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, NCI and Brookhaven National Laboratory, Building 725A-X9, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Tsai, M.-D. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and The Ohio State Biotechnology Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Academia Sinica,Taiwan (China); Bioinformatics Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2005-01-01

    The crystal structure of a triple mutant (K53,56,121M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A{sub 2} has been solved at atomic resolution (0.97 Å) and the refined model features the presence of a second calcium ion and a chloride ion. The enzyme phospholipase A{sub 2} catalyzes the hydrolysis of the sn-2 acyl chain of phospholipids, forming fatty acids and lysophospholipids. The crystal structure of a triple mutant (K53,56,121M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A{sub 2} in which the lysine residues at positions 53, 56 and 121 are replaced recombinantly by methionines has been determined at atomic resolution (0.97 Å). The crystal is monoclinic (space group P2), with unit-cell parameters a = 36.934, b = 23.863, c = 65.931 Å, β = 101.47°. The structure was solved by molecular replacement and has been refined to a final R factor of 10.6% (R{sub free} = 13.4%) using 63 926 unique reflections. The final protein model consists of 123 amino-acid residues, two calcium ions, one chloride ion, 243 water molecules and six 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol molecules. The surface-loop residues 60–70 are ordered and have clear electron density.

  10. Enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaushik, Neeraj; Pietraszewski, Marie; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    .5 g protein/kg ideal body weight/d. Plasma gut peptide responses were monitored in 15 subjects. RESULTS: In comparison with basal fasting trypsin secretion rates (mean = 134 [standard error = 22] U/h), duodenal feeding with the polymeric and elemental formulae stimulated trypsin secretion (mean = 408...... in enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation, with particular reference to trypsin, because the avoidance of trypsin stimulation may optimize enteral feeding in acute pancreatitis. METHODS: The pancreatic secretory responses to feeding were studied in 36 healthy volunteers by standard double...... [standard error = 51] U/h; P standard error = 34] U/h) and mid-distal jejunal (mean = 119 [standard error = 16] U/h) did not. Stimulation was associated with an increase in plasma cholecystokinin, whereas distal jejunal feeding resulted in an increase...

  11. Ab Initio Structure Determination of the Triple Mutant (K53,56,121M) of Bovine Pancreatic Phospholipase A(2) at Atomic and High Resolution Using ACORN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velmurugan,D.; Rajakannan, V.; Gayathri, D.; Banumathi, S.; Yamane, T.; Dauter, Z.; Dauter, M.; Sekar, K.

    2006-01-01

    Atomic resolution (0.97 Angstroms) data were collected for the triple mutant (K53,56,121M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A{sub 2} at 100 K and data extending to 1.0 Angstroms resolution were used for the present study. Accuracy of the data at high resolution allowed the structure to be solved using the program ACORN, with a random single-atom start in an ab initio manner. The phases obtained from ACORN are of good quality and revealed most of the amino acid residues. Single wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (SAD) data were also used to locate the position of the sulphurs and ACORN was run with these atomic positions as a source of phasing information. The effect of truncating the data to 1.4 and 1.45 Angstroms for input to ACORN is also examined. Larger fragments are required to trigger successful phase refinement at these lower resolutions.

  12. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Milan R.; Eppolito, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68–81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are also associated with hereditary pancreatitis. While chronic alcoholic pancreatitis may develop in the fourth or fifth decades, patients with hereditary pancreatitis may develop symptoms in the first or second decades of life. Hereditary pancreatitis is diagnosed either by detecting a causative gene mutation or by the presence of chronic pancreatitis in two first-degree or three second-degree relatives, in two or more generations, without precipitating factors and with a negative workup for known causes. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis may have recurrent acute pancreatitis and may develop pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Hereditary pancreatitis may involve premature trypsinogen activation or decreased control of trypsin. Recurrent inflammation can lead to acute pancreatitis and subsequently to chronic pancreatitis with parenchymal calcification. There is a markedly increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma compared with the general population. Patients are often referred for evaluation of pancreatitis, biliary or pancreatic ductal dilatation, jaundice, biliary obstruction, pancreatic duct stone or stricture, pancreatic pseudocysts, and for evaluation for malignancy. Medical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme supplementation, nutritional supplementation, diabetes management, and palliation of pain. Patients should avoid tobacco use and alcohol exposure. Hereditary pancreatitis is reviewed and recommendations for

  13. Liver regeneration in trypsin-fed partially hepatectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershbein, L L

    1993-01-01

    Young adult Sprague-Dawley rats were partially hepatectomized (two-thirds organ removal) and administered a basal diet supplemented with various animal- and plant-derived enzymes (trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin, pepsin, lipase, alpha-amylase, malt diastase, ficin and bromelain) over a post-operative period of up to 10 days. Porcine or bovine dialyzed and lyophilized crystalline trypsin products containing 2400-3200 NF u/mg in addition to enteric-coated tablets with trypsin to chymotrypsin in a ratio of 6:1, were tested at supplementary levels of up to 4980 u/g ration. With the weight of tissue regenerated or the liver increment as indicator, trypsin in excess of 1000-1200 u/g ration proved inhibitory. This effect did not extend to alpha-chymotrypsin (levels of up to 4000 u/g diet) and the remaining 6 enzyme products specified above, nor to the s.c. injection of trypsin daily at 12,860 u/rat for the 1st 7 days. The last route promoted little change in increment with soy bean trypsin inhibitor (8.0 mg/rat daily for days 1 to 9). When a portion of the group fed a trypsin supplement of 2000 u/g was injected with phenobarbital i.p. at 80 mg/kg daily on each of the last 3 days, the resulting liver increment rose to the control range. As with lysine and arginine, acids of pertinence in tryptic proteolysis, no significant change was elicited by feeding a diet supplemented with peptone from tryptic digestion of casein. The enzyme-containing diets fed to sham-operated rats over a similar interval, did not affect the wet- or dry-liver weight per 100 g body weight. Microsomal parameters as total protein, cytochrome P-450 and the enzymes, aminopyrine demethylase and benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase of livers from the partially hepatectomized or sham-operated rats fed trypsin and the other enzyme diets, presented no significant changes in the respective levels. The possible action of dietary trypsin in conjunction with inhibitors and growth factors controlling liver regeneration is

  14. A trypsin inhibitor from Sapindus saponaria L. seeds: purification, characterization, and activity towards pest insect digestive enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Maria Lígia R; Diz Filho, Eduardo B S; Freire, Mariadas Graças M; Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Sumikawa, Joana T; Toyama, Marcos H; Marangoni, Sérgio

    2011-01-01

    The present paper describes the purification, characterization and determination of the partial primary structure of the first trypsin inhibitor isolated from the family Sapindaceae. A highly stable, potent trypsin inhibitor (SSTI) was purified to homogeneity. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the protein consists of a two-polypeptide chain with molecular masses of approximately 15 and 3 kDa. The purified inhibitor inhibited bovine trypsin at a 1:1 M ratio. Kinetic analysis revealed that the protein is a competitive inhibitor with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 10⁻⁹ M for trypsin. The partial NH₂- terminal sequence of 36 amino acids in SSTI indicates homology with other members of the trypsin-inhibitor family from different sources. This inhibitor is highly stable in the presence of denaturing agents. SSTI showed significant inhibitory activity against trypsin-like proteases present in the larval midgut on Anagasta kuehniella, Corcyra cephalonica, Diatreae saccharalis and Anticarsia gemmatalis.

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Highly Stabilized Polymer–Trypsin Conjugates with Autolysis Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Sasai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein digestion by trypsin has been widely used in many industrial and research applications. However, extensive use of trypsin is limited because of the rapid decrease in enzymatic activity caused by autolysis at optimal pH and temperature. To improve the enzymatic performance of trypsin, we synthesized highly stabilized polymer–trypsin conjugates using vinylmethylether-maleic acid copolymer (VEMAC via multi-point attachment. The VEMAC modification significantly enhanced the thermal stability of trypsin, and the resulting conjugates showed a strong resistance to autolysis. VEMAC-modified trypsin (VEMAC-Tryp showed maximum activity at 55 °C and at 1.4-fold higher levels than that of unmodified trypsin. Bovine serum albumin was effectively digested by VEMAC-Tryp, indicating that the modified trypsin can be used for digestion of high molecular weight substrates. VEMAC modification is a simple and cost-effective strategy to obtain fully active modified enzymes, and may be used to develop bioreactors.

  16. New Insights into the Pathogenesis of Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Raghuwansh P.; Dawra, Rajinder K.; Saluja, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review In this article, we review important advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of pancreatitis. Recent Findings The relative contribution of intra-pancreatic trypsinogen activation and NFκB activation, the two major early independent cellular events in the etiology of pancreatitis, have been investigated using novel genetic models. Trypsinogen activation has traditionally held the spotlight for many decades as it is believed to be the central pathogenic event of pancreatitis However, recent experimental evidence points to the role of trypsin activation in early acinar cell damage but not in the inflammatory response of acute pancreatitis through NFκB activation. Further, chronic pancreatitis in the caerulein model develops independently of typsinogen activation. Sustained activation of the NFκB pathway, but not persistent intra-acinar expression of active trypsin, was shown to result in chronic pancreatitis. Calcineurin-NFAT signaling was shown to mediate downstream effects of pathologic rise in intracellular calcium. IL-6 was identified as a key cytokine mediating pancreatitis-associated lung injury. Summary Recent advances challenge the long-believed trypsin-centered understanding of pancreatitis. It is becoming increasingly clear that activation of intense inflammatory signaling mechanisms in acinar cells is crucial to the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, which may explain the strong systemic inflammatory response in pancreatitis. PMID:23892538

  17. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  18. Purification and characterization of a trypsin inhibitor from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Junchen; Liu, Yuan; An, Tianchen; Liu, Yujun; Wang, Manchuriga; Song, Yanting; Zheng, Feifei; Wu, Dan; Zhang, Yingxia; Deng, Shiming

    2015-05-01

    A proteinaceous inhibitor against trypsin was isolated from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. by successive ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange, and gel-filtration chromatography. The trypsin inhibitor, named as AHLTI (A. heterophyllus Lam. trypsin inhibitor), consisted of a single polypeptide chain with a molecular weight of 28.5 kDa, which was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel-filtration chromatography. The N-terminal sequence of AHLTI was DEPPSELDAS, which showed no similarity to other known trypsin inhibitor sequence. AHLTI completely inhibited bovine trypsin at a molar ratio of 1:2 (AHLTI:trypsin) analyzed by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, inhibition activity assay, and gel-filtration chromatography. Moreover, kinetic enzymatic studies were carried out to understand the inhibition mechanism of AHLTI against trypsin. Results showed that AHLTI was a competitive inhibitor with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Ki) of 3.7 × 10(-8) M. However, AHLTI showed weak inhibitory activity toward chymotrypsin and elastase. AHLTI was stable over a broad range of pH 4-8 and temperature 20-80°C. The reduction agent, dithiothreitol, had no obvious effect on AHLTI. The trypsin inhibition assays of AHLTI toward digestive enzymes from insect pest guts in vitro demonstrated that AHLTI was effective against enzymes from Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen). These results suggested that AHLTI might be a novel trypsin inhibitor from A. heterophyllus Lam. belonging to Kunitz family, and play an important role in protecting from insect pest. © The Author 2015. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  19. The structural basis of the difference in sensitivity for PNGase F in the de-N-glycosylation of the native bovine pancreatic ribonucleases B and BS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Véronique; Frank, Martin; Leeflang, Bas R; Boelens, Rolf; Kamerling, Johannis P

    2008-03-18

    In glycoanalysis protocols, N-glycans from glycoproteins are most frequently released with peptide- N (4)-( N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminyl)asparagine amidase F (PNGase F). As the enzyme is an amidase, it cleaves the NH-CO linkage between the Asn side chain and the Asn-bound GlcNAc residue. Usually, the enzyme has a low activity, or is not active at all, on native glycoproteins. A typical example is native bovine pancreatic ribonuclease B (RNase B) with oligomannose-type N-glycans at Asn-34. However, native RNase BS, generated by subtilisin digestion of native RNase B, which comprises amino acid residues 21-124 of RNase B, is sensitive to PNGase F digestion. The same holds for carboxymethylated RNase B (RNase B (cm)). In this study, NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling have been used to explain the differences in PNGase F activity for native RNase B, native RNase BS, and RNase B (cm). NMR analysis combined with literature data clearly indicated that the N-glycan at Asn-34 is more mobile in RNase BS than in RNase B. MD simulations showed that the region around Asn-34 in RNase B is not very flexible, whereby the alpha-helix of the amino acid residues 1-20 has a stabilizing effect. In RNase BS, the alpha-helix formed by amino acid residues 23-32 is significantly more flexible. Using these data, the possibilities for complex formation of both RNase B and RNase BS with PNGase F were studied, and a model for the RNase BS-PNGase F complex is proposed.

  20. Pancreatitis - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  1. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E-News Sign-Up Home Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis (HP) is a rare genetic condition characterized by ... of pancreatic attacks, which can progress to chronic pancreatitis . Symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Onset ...

  2. Pancreatic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NOW HONOR/MEMORIAL GENERAL DONATION MONTHLY PURPLESTRIDE Pancreatic enzymes Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer ... and see a registered dietitian. What are pancreatic enzymes? Pancreatic enzymes help break down fats, proteins and ...

  3. Pancreatitis and pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Mark D

    2005-11-01

    Many pancreatic disorders in children benefit from a multidisciplinary approach. This is especially true for acute and chronic pancreatitis which has numerous and diverse etiologies. The current management of pancreatitis is reviewed, focusing on recent advances. Children with pancreatitis must be fully investigated, not least to select out those who benefit from specific surgical interventions. The treatment of pancreas divisum, pseudocysts, and fibrosing pancreatitis deserve particular consideration. Management of pancreatic injuries involving the main pancreatic duct is both variable and controversial. Treatment should be individualized depending on the site of injury, timing of referral, presence of associated injuries, and institutional expertise.

  4. The effect of trypsin digestion on the structure and iron-donating properties of transferrins from several species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza, I; Brock, J H

    1980-04-25

    The effect of trypsin digestion on iron-saturated and iron-free (apo) human, rabbit, bovine, pig and horse tranferrins has been studied. Iron-binding fragments were produced only from iron-saturated pig and bovine transferrins although some cleavage of the polypeptide chain occurred in all cases. The apo-transferrins were generally degraded to a greater extent than the corresponding iron-saturated proteins. The ability of the different transferrins to donate iron to rabbit reticulocytes varied in the order rabbit approximately pig greater than human approximately horse greater than bovine. Trypsin digestion considerably reduced the ability of pig and bovine transferrins to donate iron to rabbit reticulocytes, slightly reduced the iron-donating ability of rabbit transferrin, and had almost no effect on that of human or horse transferrins.

  5. Duodenal juice total protein and pancreatic enzyme synthesis, turnover, and secretion in patients after acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, J M; O'Keefe, S J; Louw, J A; Adams, G; Marks, I N

    1993-09-01

    It is controversial whether acute pancreatitis has longterm effects on pancreatic function. Pancreatic enzyme synthesis, turnover, and secretion were measured in 10 patients in clinical remission who had had one or more (one to six) attacks of acute alcoholic pancreatitis. The studies were done between two and 29 months after the most recent attack. A control group included five patients with no evidence of pancreatic disease. A four hour primed/continuous intravenous infusion of [14C]L-leucine tracer was given with secretin (2 U/kg/h) and cholecystokinin (0.5 U/kg/h) and secreted duodenal juice aspirated. Amylase and trypsin were extracted from duodenal juice by affinity chromatography, permitting measurement of the rate of isotope incorporation into total protein, amylase, and trypsin. The results showed non-parallel changes in enzyme synthesis and turnover with decreases in total enzyme protein and amylase synthesis and turnover but preservation of trypsin synthesis and turnover. The low turnover rates may be ascribed to continuing pancreatic cell malfunction after recovery from acute alcoholic pancreatitis and suggest that the decreased amylase secretion rates are partly a consequence of impaired amylase synthesis and not simply because of loss of pancreatic tissue.

  6. Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Smyk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was first used to describe cases of pancreatitis with narrowing of the pancreatic duct, enlargement of the pancreas, hyper-γ-globulinaemia, and antinuclear antibody (ANA positivity serologically. The main differential diagnosis, is pancreatic cancer, which can be ruled out through radiological, serological, and histological investigations. The targets of ANA in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis do not appear to be similar to those found in other rheumatological diseases, as dsDNA, SS-A, and SS-B are not frequently recognized by AIP-related ANA. Other disease-specific autoantibodies, such as, antimitochondrial, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies or diabetes-specific autoantibodies are virtually absent. Further studies have focused on the identification of pancreas-specific autoantigens and reported significant reactivity to lactoferrin, carbonic anhydrase, pancreas secretory trypsin inhibitor, amylase-alpha, heat-shock protein, and plasminogen-binding protein. This paper discusses the findings of these investigations and their relevance to the diagnosis, management, and pathogenesis of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  7. Laura: Soybean variety lacking Kunitz trypsin inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srebrić Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Grain of conventional soybean varieties requires heat processing to break down trypsin inhibitor's activity before using as food or animal feed. At the same time, protein denaturation and other qualitative changes occur in soybean grain, especially if the temperature of heating is not controlled. Two types of trypsin inhibitor were found in soybean grain the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor and the Bowman-Birk inhibitor. Mature grain of soybean Laura is lacking Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. Grain yield of variety Laura is equal to high yielding varieties from the maturity group I, where it belongs. Lacking of Kunitz-trypsin inhibitor makes soybean grain suitable for direct feeding in adult non ruminant animals without previous thermal processing. Grain of variety Laura can be processed for a shorter period of time than conventional soybeans. This way we save energy, and preserve valuable nutritional composition of soybean grain, which is of interest in industrial processing.

  8. A sensitive and real-time assay of trypsin by using molecular imprinting-based capacitive biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertürk, Gizem; Hedström, Martin; Mattiasson, Bo

    2016-12-15

    Use of a highly sensitive, selective capacitive biosensor is reported for label-free, real-time, easy and rapid detection of trypsin by using the microcontact imprinting method. Real-time trypsin detection was performed with trypsin-imprinted (trypsin-MIP) capacitive electrodes using standard trypsin solutions in the concentration range of 1.0×10(-13)-1.0×10(-7)M with a detection limit of 3.0×10(-13)M. Selectivity and cross-reactivity of the system were tested by using competing proteins including chymotrypsin (chy), bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (lyz) and cytochrome c (cyt c) in singular and competitive manner and the selectivity of the system was determined with the selectivity coefficients of approximately 705.1, 6.5, 6.4 and 5.1 for chy, BSA, lyz and cyt c, respectively. The trypsin-MIP capacitive electrode was used for ~80 assays during 2 months and retained its binding property during all that time with a decrease of approximately 2.3% in the signal amplitude. In the last step, trypsin activity was measured by using Nα-Benzoyl-D, l-arginine 4-nitroanilide hydrochloride (BAPNA) as the substrate with spectrophotometer at 410nm. The trypsin activity was measured as 9mU/mL by spectrophotometer while the amount of captured enzyme calculated from the capacitive system was 7.9mU/mL which shows the correlation between two methods. From the comparison it is obvious that the new method is an attractive alternative for assaying trypsin and the developed capacitive system might be used successfully to monitor label-free, real-time enzymatic activity of different proteases in a sensitive, rapid, cost-effective manner for different applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetics of alcoholic and nonalcoholic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, David C

    2012-09-01

    To provide an expert review and expert perspective on important advances related to the genetics of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Provocative new studies highlight the interplay between genetic, developmental, and environmental factors. Key findings include the relationship between pancreas divisum and CFTR mutations, the role of trypsin in acute and recurrent acute pancreatitis, and the discovery of a pancreatitis modifier gene on the X chromosome that provides new clues to why the vast majority of patients with alcoholic pancreatitis are men. Pancreatic genetics is complex, linked to the multiplicative and modifying effects of multiple interacting genetic, structural, and environmental factors. Clinical interpretation will require disease modeling and simulation to understand the combined effect of risk factors that alone are neither sufficient nor necessary to cause disease, and to design treatment strategies that prevent the development of advanced chronic pancreatitis - which by definition is irreversible.

  10. Label-Free Fluorescent Detection of Trypsin Activity Based on DNA-Stabilized Silver Nanocluster-Peptide Conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Xia Zhuo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Trypsin is important during the regulation of pancreatic exocrine function. The detection of trypsin activity is currently limited because of the need for the substrate to be labeled with a fluorescent tag. A label-free fluorescent method has been developed to monitor trypsin activity. The designed peptide probe consists of six arginine molecules and a cysteine terminus and can be conjugated to DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs by Ag-S bonding to enhance fluorescence. The peptide probe can also be adsorbed to the surface of graphene oxide (GO, thus resulting in the fluorescence quenching of DNA-AgNCs-peptide conjugate because of Förster resonance energy transfer. Once trypsin had degraded the peptide probe into amino acid residues, the DNA-AgNCs were released from the surface of GO, and the enhanced fluorescence of DNA-AgNCs was restored. Trypsin can be determined with a linear range of 0.0–50.0 ng/mL with a concentration as low as 1 ng/mL. This label-free method is simple and sensitive and has been successfully used for the determination of trypsin in serum. The method can also be modified to detect other proteases.

  11. Alcohol and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Vay Liang W; Gukovskaya, Anna; Pandol, Stephen J

    2005-04-01

    Findings obtained from numerous prospective cohort and case-control studies on alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer risk have been inconsistent, with many confounding variables present in various investigations. However, heavy alcohol consumption has been known to be a major cause of chronic pancreatitis and a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus, both of which are linked to pancreatic cancer. It has been established that an extensive normal interaction exists between the exocrine and endocrine pancreas, as well as in inflammatory processes and carcinogenesis. Alcohol and its metabolites (acetaldehyde and fatty acid ethyl esters) can alter metabolic pathways involved in the inflammatory response and carcinogenesis, and they are mediated by one or more of the following mechanisms: (1) premature activation of zymogens; (2) induction of the inflammatory response through activation of nuclear transcription factors, including nuclear factor-kappa and activation protein 1; (3) increased production of reactive oxygen species, resulting in oxidative DNA damage and altered effect of dietary antioxidants; (4) activation of pancreatic stellate cells, which leads to fibrosis; (5) gene mutation in enzymes related to cytochrome P450, glutathione S-transferase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, cationic trypsinogen, and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor; (6) synergistic effects of ethanol and tobacco carcinogen on NNK [nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone] metabolism; and (7) dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis. These various metabolic effects of alcohol can lead to or interact with other risk factors (genetic, dietary, environmental, and lifestyle factors) that result in acute and chronic pancreatitis and diabetes mellitus and, ultimately, affect the multistep process of carcinogenesis toward the development of pancreatic cancer.

  12. Role of autophagy in development and progression of acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Shuli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is considered an autodigestive disorder in which inappropriate activation of trypsinogen to trypsin within pancreatic acinar cells leads to the development of pancreatitis. Autophagy is an evolutionarily preserved degradation process of cytoplasmic cellular constituents, and it is one of the early pathological processes in acute pancreatitis. Autophagic flux is impaired in acute pancreatitis, which mediates the key pathologic responses of this disease. Impaired autophagy, dysfunction of lysosomes, and dysregulation of autophagy suggest a disorder of the endolysosomal pathway in acute pancreatitis. The role of autophagy in acute pancreatitis is discussed from the aspects of autophagic process, autophagy and activation of trypsinogen, impaired autophagy and acute pancreatitis, and defective autophagy promoting inflammation.

  13. Clinical Studies of Human Pancreatic Enzyme Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Stephen J.D.

    1997-01-01

    Very little is known of the effects of diet and disease on panceratic enzyme syntheis in humans as conventional tests measure the secretory response to secreagogues, such as CCK, and secretion may be unrelated to synthesis because of the masking effect of a large intracellular pool of stored enzymes (zymogens). In order to obtain information on enzyme synthesis, as well as secretion, we have measured the incorporation characteristics of isotopically labelled amino acids (e.g., 14C or 13C leucine tracer) into amylase and trypsin protein, extracted by affinity chromatography from duodenal secretions during pancreatic stimulation with CCK-8 The results of our studies in healthy volunteers and patients have suggested that (a) it takes between 75 and 101 min for the participation of newly synthesized pancreatic enzymes in the digestive process, and that zymogen stores are replaced at a rate of between 12 percent and 47 percent per hour in normal healthy subjects, (b) the synthesis and production rates of trypsin and amylase are parallel in healthy subjects, but can diverge under stressful conditions such as hypersecretory states, post-acute pancreatitis and protein malnutrition, (c) hyperphagia stimulates the synthesis of enzymes whilst malnutrition diminishes the synthesis of trypsin to a greater extent than amylase, (d) intravenous glucose and amino acids exert negative feedback control on the synthesis and release of amylase and trypsin, and (e) the decreased secretion of pancreatic enzymes in Type 1 insulin-dependent diabetics is more a consequence of defective enzyme release from zymogen stores than defective synthesis. In conclusion, our results indicate that changes in pancreatic enzyme secretion noted in patients do not always reflect changes in enzyme synthesis, and that the production of individual enzymes may diverge under certain circumstances. Based on the methodology described, it should be possible to develop more sensitive clinical tests of pancreatic

  14. Framework for Interpretation of Trypsin–antitrypsin Imbalance and Genetic Heterogeneity in Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kun; Gao, Feng; Chen, Qingquan; Liu, Qicai; Chen, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Early intracellular premature trypsinogen activation was interpreted as the key initiator of pancreatitis. When the balance in the homeostasis of trypsin and antitrypsin system is disequilibrated, elevated aggressive enzymes directly attack the pancreatic tissue, which leads to pancreatic destruction and inflammation. However, trypsin alone is not enough to cause complications in pancreatitis, which may play a crucial role in modulating signaling events in the initial phase of the disease. NFκB activation is the major inflammatory pathway involved in the occurrence and development of pancreatitis and it can be induced by intrapancreatic activation of trypsinogen. Synthesis of trypsinogen occurs in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and ER stress is an important early acinar cell event. Components of ER stress response are known to be able to trigger cell death as well as NFκB signaling cascade. The strongest evidence supporting the trypsin-centered theory is that gene mutations, which lead to the generation of more trypsin, or reduce the activity of trypsin inhibitors or trypsin degradation, are associated with pancreatitis. Thus, trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance may be the first step leading to pancreatic autodigestion and inducing other pathways. Continued experimental studies are necessary to determine the specific relationships between trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance and genetic heterogeneity in pancreatitis. In this article, we review the latest advances that contributed to the understanding of the basic mechanisms behind the occurrence and development of pancreatitis with a focus on the interpretation of trypsin–antitrypsin imbalance and their relationships with other inflammation pathways. We additionally highlight genetic predispositions to pancreatitis and possible mechanisms associated with them. PMID:26228362

  15. Identification of a new soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor mutation and its effect on Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor content in soybean seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean seeds possess anti-nutritional compounds which inactivate digestive proteases, principally corresponding to two families: Kunitz Trypsin Inhibitors (KTi) and Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBI). High levels of raw soybeans/soybean meal in feed mixtures can cause poor weight gain and pancreatic abno...

  16. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  17. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  18. Investigating conformational stability of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2: a novel concept in evaluating the contribution of the 'native-framework' of disulphides to the global conformational stability of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R Rajesh; Chang, Jui-Yoa

    2004-02-01

    Bovine pancreatic PLA(2) (phospholipase A(2)) is a 14 kDa protein whose structure is highly cross-linked by seven disulphide bonds. We investigated the structural stability of this enzyme by the method of 'disulphide-scrambling' with denaturants such as urea, GdmCl (guanidine hydrochloride), GdmSCN (guanidine thiocyanate) and at high temperatures in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol (0.2 mM) as thiol initiator. Reverse-phase HPLC was used to follow denaturation. To denature 50% of the native protein, 1.25 M GdmSCN, approx. 3 M GdmCl and higher than 8 M urea were required. Only 20% of the protein was denatured after 2 h at 60 degrees C, whereas complete denaturation was seen after 2 h at 70 degrees C and within 30 min at 80 degrees C. A distinct enhancement of stability was observed when denaturation was conducted in the presence of 10 mM calcium chloride, which has not been reported previously. CD studies of GdmCl denaturation of bovine PLA(2) showed that 2.5 M GdmCl was required to denature 50% of the protein in the presence of 0.2 mM 2-mercaptoethanol (in agreement with the HPLC analysis), whereas 6.4 M GdmCl was necessary to denature 50% of the protein in the absence of a thiol initiator. Conformational stability (Delta G (water)) was estimated to be 8.7 kcal/mol (1 cal=4.184 J) by 'disulphide-intact' denaturation (where 'native' disulphide framework was unaffected) and 2.5 kcal/mol by 'disulphide-scrambling' denaturation (involved breaking of native disulphides and formation of 'non-native' ones). The difference, Delta(Delta G (water)), of 6.2 kcal/mol was the conformational stability contributed by the 'native-framework' of seven disulphides. Using bovine PLA(2) as an example, we have demonstrated a novel comparative technique, where the conformational stability study of a disulphide-containing protein, with a common denaturant, in both the presence and absence of catalytic amounts of a thiol initiator can be used as a convenient method to estimate selectively

  19. The on-bead digestion of protein corona on nanoparticles by trypsin immobilized on the magnetic nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhengyan; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2014-03-21

    Proteins interacting with nanoparticles would form the protein coronas on the surface of nanoparticles in biological systems, which would critically impact the biological identities of nanoparticles and/or result in the physiological and pathological consequences. The enzymatic digestion of protein corona was the primary step to achieve the identification of protein components of the protein corona for the bottom-up proteomic approaches. In this study, the investigation on the tryptic digestion of protein corona by the immobilized trypsin on a magnetic nanoparticle was carried out for the first time. As a comparison with the usual overnight long-time digestion and the severe self-digestion of free trypsin, the on-bead digestion of protein corona by the immobilized trypsin could be accomplished within 1h, along with the significantly reduced self-digestion of trypsin and the improved reproducibility on the identification of proteins by the mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach. It showed that the number of identified bovine serum (BS) proteins on the commercial Fe3O4 nanoparticles was increased by 13% for the immobilized trypsin with 1h digestion as compared to that of using free trypsin with even overnight digestion. In addition, the on-bead digestion of using the immobilized trypsin was further applied on the identification of human plasma protein corona on the commercial Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which leads the efficient digestion of the human plasma proteins and the identification of 149 human plasma proteins corresponding to putative critical pathways and biological processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    trypsin-dependent pathway in pancreatitis and to begin testing therapeutic and preventive approaches. Mutations in the digestive enzyme trypsinogen...expression of mutant trypsinogens at the protein level, we will perform chromatographic analysis of the total trypsinogen fraction isolated from mouse...pancreata (Subtask 4a). This subtask has been delayed until homozygous animals could be generated. Homozygous animals are now available and chromatographic

  1. Rheological behaviors of bovine blood forming artificial rouleaux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaibara, M

    1983-01-01

    A purpose of the present study is to make an artificial rouleau of bovine red blood cells which is not capable of rouleau formation under physiological condition. Rheological behaviors of bovine blood forming artificial rouleaux were examined. The modification of cell surface by enzyme trypsin induced rouleau formation, whereas the modification of cell surface by neuraminidase did not cause any aggregate formation. The drastic elevation of the fibrinogen content in bovine red blood cells suspension also brought about the formation of rouleau. The value of dynamic rigidity modulus G' of bovine red blood cells in saline solution containing high concentration of fibrinogen is somewhat smaller than that of trypsin treated bovine red blood cells in plasma. The value of G' of trypsin treated bovine red blood cells in plasma first increased to a maximum value and then decreased with the time. It is supposed that the removal of macro-molecules from the cell surface facilitates the mutual approach of cells and causes the formation of rouleau which seems to be the same as that of human and horse bloods.

  2. Extraction, purification and characterization of inhibitor of trypsin from Chenopodium quinoa seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Regiele Pesoti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractA novel trypsin inhibitor of protease (CqTI was purified from Chenopodium quinoa seeds. The optimal extracting solvent was 0.1M NaCl pH 6.8 (p < 0.05. The extraction time of 5h and 90 °C was optimum for the recovery of the trypsin inhibitor from C. quinoa seeds. The purification occurred in gel-filtration and reverse phase chromatography. CqTI presented active against commercial bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin and had a specific activity of 5,033.00 (TIU/mg, which was purified to 333.5-fold. The extent of purification was determined by SDS-PAGE. CqTI had an apparent molecular weight of approximately 12KDa and two bands in reduced conditions as determined by Tricine-SDS-PAGE. MALDI-TOF showed two peaks in 4,246.5 and 7,908.18m/z. CqTI presented high levels of essential amino acids. N-terminal amino acid sequence of this protein did not show similarity to any known protease inhibitor. Its activity was stable over a pH range (2-12, temperatures range (20-100 °C and reducing agents.

  3. Acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsell, Melissa A; Buscaglia, Jonathan M

    2010-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common disease most frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. Diagnosis is usually based on characteristic symptoms, often in conjunction with elevated serum pancreatic enzymes. Imaging is not always necessary, but may be performed for many reasons, such as to confirm a diagnosis of pancreatitis, rule out other causes of abdominal pain, elucidate the cause of pancreatitis, or to evaluate for complications such as necrosis or pseudocysts. Though the majority of patients will have mild, self-limiting disease, some will develop severe disease associated with organ failure. These patients are at risk to develop complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation such as pancreatic necrosis, fluid collections, pseudocysts, and pancreatic duct disruption. Validated scoring systems can help predict the severity of pancreatitis, and thus, guide monitoring and intervention.Treatment of acute pancreatitis involves supportive care with fluid replacement, pain control, and controlled initiation of regular food intake. Prophylactic antibiotics are not recommended in acute pancreatitis if there is no evidence of pancreatic infection. In patients who fail to improve, further evaluation is necessary to assess for complications that require intervention such as pseudocysts or pancreatic necrosis. Endoscopy, including ERCP and EUS, and/or cholecystectomy may be indicated in the appropriate clinical setting. Ultimately, the management of the patient with severe acute pancreatitis will require a multidisciplinary approach. (c) 2010 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  4. A novel poly(deep eutectic solvent)-based magnetic silica composite for solid-phase extraction of trypsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Kaijia [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Wang, Yuzhi, E-mail: wyzss@hnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Li, Yixue; Lin, Yunxuan; Zhang, Haibao [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082 (China); Zhou, Yigang [Department of Microbiology, College of Basic Medicine, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China)

    2016-11-23

    Novel poly(deep eutectic solvent) grafted silica-coated magnetic microspheres (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}-MPS@PDES) were prepared by polymerization of choline chloride-itaconic acid (ChCl-IA) and γ-MPS-modified magnetic silica composites, and were characterized by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Then the synthetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}-MPS@PDES microspheres were applied for the magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of trypsin for the first time. After extraction, the concentration of trypsin in the supernatant was determined by a UV–vis spectrophotometer. Single factor experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of the extraction process, including the concentration of trypsin, the ionic strength, the pH value, the extraction time and the temperature. Experimental results showed the extraction capacity could reach up to 287.5 mg/g under optimized conditions. In comparison with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}-MPS, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}-MPS@PDES displayed higher extraction capacity and selectivity for trypsin. According to the regeneration studies, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}-MPS@PDES microspheres can be recycled six times without significant loss of its extraction capacity, and retained a high extraction capacity of 233 mg/g after eight cycles. Besides, the activity studies also demonstrated that the activity of the extracted trypsin was well retained. Furthermore, the analysis of real sample revealed that the prepared magnetic microspheres can be used to purify trypsin in crude bovine pancreas extract. These results highlight the potential of the proposed Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}-MPS@PDES-MSPE method in separation of biomolecules. - Highlights: • A strategy for solid-phase extraction of trypsin based on poly(deep eutectic solvent) modified magnetic silica

  5. Complicated Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis

  6. Pancreatitis - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007679.htm Pancreatitis - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pancreatitis in children occurs when the pancreas becomes swollen ...

  7. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  8. Chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dennis; Forsmark, Chris E

    2017-09-01

    Summarize key clinical advances in chronic pancreatitis reported in 2016. Early diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains elusive. Recent studies suggest that endoscopic ultrasound may be less accurate than previously thought and new MRI techniques may be helpful. Genetic predisposition may independently affect the clinical course of chronic pancreatitis and the risk for pancreatic cancer. Cigarette smoking may have a greater negative impact on chronic pancreatitis than previously thought and moderate alcohol consumption may be protective. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary for the treatment of type 3 diabetes and nutritional deficiencies in chronic pancreatitis. Although endoscopic therapy remains a reasonable first-line option in treating chronic pancreatitis and its complications, early surgical intervention may be indicated for pain in select patients. Newer endoscopic ultrasound and MRI techniques are being evaluated to help with the early diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. Both genetic predisposition and cigarette smoking are increasingly recognized as having a major impact in the course of the disease and the risk for pancreatic cancer. Endoscopic therapy is well tolerated and effective for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis and its complications although an early surgical approach for pain may be associated with improved clinical outcomes.

  9. Microangiography of the pancreas in experimental hemorrhagic pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuutinen, P.; Lempinen, M.; Schroeder, T.; Kivisaari, L.; Standertskjoeld-Nordenstam, C.G.

    1986-08-01

    In experimental hemorrhagic pancreatitis induced with sodium-taurocholate-trypsin, contrast enhancement of the pancreas in computed tomography (CT) has been shown to be decreased in spite of normal pancreatic blood flow. The contrast enhancement in CT depends on blood flow to the organ, capillary permeability and the amount of extracellular fluid in the organ. For further evaluation of the role of microcirculatory changes in our model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis, microangiography was performed in five normal piglets and in ten piglets with acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis. In this experimental model histological studies showed focal necroses, hemorrhages and leucocyte accumulation. In the affected areas microangiography revealed unfilled capillaries and extravasation of contrast medium. Arteries and arterioles were well filled, as in the normal control animals. These severe disturbances in the capillary circulation of the pancreas may explain the decreased contrast enhancement of the pancreas in CT during acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis.

  10. Adsorption of trypsin on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsopoulos, Sotirios; Patzsch, Katja; Bosker, Wouter T. E.; Norde, Willem

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption of trypsin onto polystyrene and silica surfaces was investigated by reflectometry, spectroscopic methods, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The affinity of trypsin for the hydrophobic polystyrene surface was higher than that for the hydrophilic silica surface, but steady-state

  11. The trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of monomolecular films of lysylphosphatidylglycerol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gould, R.M.; Dawson, R.M.C.

    1972-01-01

    The hydrolysis by trypsin of the bacterial phospholipid, lysylphosphatidyl-glycerol has been studied at the air-water interface. High specific activity [14C]-lysylphosphatidylglycerol was prepared biosynthetically and the trypsin action followed by measuring the loss of surface radioactivity from a

  12. Trypsin Inhibitor Activity and Condensed Tannin Content in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    antinutrients trypsin inhibitor activity and condensed tannin content in nine landraces of bambara groundnut grown in three Southern African countries, ... nutrition is limited by antinutrients such as trypsin inhibitors and condensed tannins .... dry heat also need thorough investigations to determine if they are efficient in ...

  13. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  14. Obesity, pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbs, Andrew A

    2008-09-01

    The only universally accepted risk factors for the development of pancreatic cancer are a positive family history or a history of smoking. Although the contribution of pancreatitis to pancreatic carcinogenesis has been debated for decades in the epidemiology literature, the actual mechanism is still unclear. With the rising epidemic of obesity, scientists have begun to focus on the contribution of chronic inflammatory state of morbidly obese patients in an effort to better understand the contribution of inflammation to the comorbidities of obesity. Notably, population studies are beginning to show that one of the most serious potential comorbidities of obesity is an increased lifetime risk of developing cancer. In this article, the current literature that exists supporting this Chronic Inflammatory Hypothesis as it pertains to obesity and pancreatic carcinogenesis is reviewed. To date, studies have focused on interleukin-6, a cytokine known to play a role in obesity, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The anti-inflammatory adipocytokine, adiponectin, has also shown promise as a key player in this mechanism and has recently been found to be more specific than standard tumor markers in differentiating pancreatic cancer from chronic pancreatitis. If the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer is related to hormone levels associated with obesity, such as adipocytokines, and cytokines associated with chronic inflammation, this could potentially lead to the development of new pancreatic cancer tumor markers and ultimately new therapies and methods of prevention.

  15. Interaction of gallic acid with trypsin analyzed by spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Song

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between trypsin and gallic acid (GA were investigated by means of fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering (RLS spectroscopy, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, and enzymatic inhibition assay. It was found that GA can cause the fluorescence quenching of trypsin during the process of formation of GA-trypsin complex, resulting in inhibition of trypsin activity (IC50 = 3.9 × 10−6 mol/L. The fluorescence spectroscopic data showed that the quenching efficiency can reach about 80%. The binding constants were 1.9371 × 104 L/mol, 1.8192 × 104 L/mol, and 1.7465 × 104 L/mol at three temperatures, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters revealed that hydrogen bonds, van der Waals, hydrophobic, and electrostatic interactions were involved in the binding process of GA to trypsin. Molecular modeling studies illustrated a specific display of binding information and explained most of the experiment phenomena. The microenvironments of tryptophan and tyrosine residue in trypsin were changed by the GA. Results indicated that GA was a strong quencher and inhibitor of trypsin.

  16. A Kunitz trypsin inhibitor of Entada scandens seeds: another member with single disulfide bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingaraju, M H; Gowda, Lalitha R

    2008-05-01

    Sword bean (Entada scandens) is a tree climber that belongs to Mimosoideae, a subfamily of Leguminosae. A potent Kunitz type trypsin inhibitor (ESTI) was purified to homogeneity from Entada scandens seeds by sequential ammonium sulfate precipitation, affinity chromatography on trypsin-Sepharose and DEAE-Sephacel ion-exchange chromatography. ESTI is a single polypeptide chain of 19,766 Da. Both native PAGE as well as isoelectric focusing showed a single inhibitor species with a pI of 7.43. MALDI-TOF analysis also confirmed the monomeric nature. The amino-terminal sequence of ESTI reveals significant homology to the Kunitz-type protease inhibitors of legume plants. ESTI is unique in that it contains a single disulfide bridge, and unlike other inhibitors from Mimosoideae species is a single chain polypeptide. ESTI inhibited bovine trypsin with a stoichiometry of 1:1 and the apparent K(i) was 4.9 x 10(-9) M. In vitro assay showed that ESTI inhibited the midgut proteinase of the fifth instar larvae of Rice moth (Corcyra cephalonica) with an IC(50) of 26.4+/-0.01 nM. ESTI exhibits a mixed type competitive inhibition at lower concentration and pure competitive at higher inhibitor concentrations. Phylogenetic analyses depicted a clear divergence of single disulfide containing inhibitors from other tree legume Kunitz inhibitors. The homology of ESTI to Kunitz inhibitors together with the absence of Bowman-Birk type inhibitors in sword bean further supports the theory that there exists an evolutionary relationship between the families of inhibitors found in Leguminosae.

  17. [Autoimmune pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, G; Menzel, J; Krüger, P-C; Ribback, S; Lerch, M M; Mayerle, J

    2013-11-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a relatively rare form of chronic pancreatitis which is characterized by a lymphoplasmatic infiltrate with a storiform fibrosis and often goes along with painless jaundice and discrete discomfort of the upper abdomen. Clinically we distinguish between two subtypes, which differ in terms of their histology, clinical picture and prognosis. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis is the pancreatic manifestation of the IgG4-associated syndrome which also involves other organs. About one third of the patients can only be diagnosed after either histological prove or a successful steroid trail. Type 2 is IgG4-negative with the histological picture of an idiopathic duct centric pancreatitis and is to higher degree associated with inflammatory bowel disease. A definitive diagnosis can only be made using biopsy. Usually both forms show response to steroid treatment, but in type 1 up to 50 % of the patients might develop a relapse. The biggest challenge and most important differential diagnosis remains the discrimination of AIP from pancreatic cancer, because also AIP can cause mass of the pancreatic head, lymphadenopathy and ductal obstruction. This article summarizes recent advances on epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic strategy, therapy and differential diagnosis in this relatively unknown disease. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Chemically modified, immobilized trypsin reactor with improved digestion efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freije, J.R.; Mulder, P.P.; Werkman, W.; Rieux, L.; Niederlander, H.A G; Verpoorte, Sabeth; Bischoff, Rainer

    2005-01-01

    Tryptic digestion followed by identification using mass spectrometry is an important step in many proteomic studies. Here, we describe the preparation of immobilized, acetylated trypsin for enhanced digestion efficacy in integrated protein analysis platforms. Complete digestion of cytochrome c was

  19. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an episode of pancreatitis. How do you treat pancreatitis? The treatment of pancreatitis is supportive care. There is no ... and Diagnosis Risks and Treatment Complementary Therapies Chronic Pancreatitis ... and Diagnosis Pain Management/Treatment Pediatric Pancreatitis
 ...

  20. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Children/Pediatric Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child have? ... will develop diabetes in adolescence. Who gets chronic pancreatitis? Those at risk for chronic pancreatitis are children ...

  1. Identification and characterization of a Bowman-Birk inhibitor active towards trypsin but not chymotrypsin in Lupinus albus seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarafoni, Alessio; Consonni, Alessandro; Galbusera, Valerio; Negri, Armando; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Rasmussen, Patrizia; Magni, Chiara; Duranti, Marcello

    2008-06-01

    The paper describes the purification, structural characterization and inhibitory properties of a trypsin inhibitor from Lupinus albus L., a leguminous plant believed to be devoid of any protease inhibitor. The protein has been isolated by a newly set-up procedure and characterized by direct amino acid sequencing, MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy and circular dichroism. Inhibitory properties toward bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin, as well as its thermal and pH stabilities, have been also assessed. The inhibitor is 63 amino acid long (Mr 6858; pI 8.22) and it is capable to inhibit two trypsin molecules simultaneously, with a Kd of 4.2+/-0.4 nM, but not chymotrypsin. BLAST search against UniProtKB/TrEMBL database indicates that the inhibitor belongs to the Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) family. The interest in these serine-protease inhibitors arises from the ability to prevent or suppress carcinogen-induced transformation, as shown in various in vitro and in vivo model systems.

  2. Flavianate, an amino acid precipitant, is a competitive inhibitor of trypsin at pH 3.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Schneedorf

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Textile dyes bind to proteins leading to selective co-precipitation of a complex involving one protein molecule and more than one dye molecule of opposite charge in acid solutions, in a process of reversible denaturation that can be utilized for protein fractionation. In order to understand what occurs before the co-precipitation, a kinetic study using bovine ß-trypsin and sodium flavianate was carried out based on reaction progress curve techniques. The experiments were carried out using a-CBZ-L-Lys-p-nitrophenyl ester as substrate which was added to 50 mM sodium citrate buffer, pH 3.0, containing varying concentrations of ß-trypsin and dye. The reaction was recorded spectrophotometrically at 340 nm for 30 min, and the families of curves obtained were analyzed simultaneously by fitting integrated Michaelis-Menten equations. The dye used behaved as a competitive inhibitor of trypsin at pH 3.0, with Ki = 99 µM; kinetic parameters for the substrate hydrolysis were: Km = 32 µM, and kcat = 0.38/min. The competitive character of the inhibition suggests a specific binding of the first dye molecule to His-57, the only positively charged residue at the active site of the enzyme.

  3. Role of intrapancreatic SPINK1/Spink3 expression in the development of pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki eOhmuraya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies on hereditary pancreatitis have provided evidence in favor of central role for trypsin activity in the disease. Identification of genetic variants of trypsinogen linked the protease to the onset of pancreatitis, and biochemical characterization proposed an enzymatic gain of function as the initiating mechanism. Mutations of serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1gene (SPINK1 are shown to be associated with hereditary pancreatitis. We previously reported that Spink3 (a mouse homologue gene of human SPINK1 deficient mice showed excessive autophagy, followed by inappropriate trypsinogen activation in the exocrine pancreas. These data indicate that the role of SPINK1/Spink3 is not only trypsin inhibitor, but also negative regulator of autophagy. On the other hand, recent studies showed that high levels of SPINK1 protein detected in a serum or urine were associated with adverse outcome in various cancer types. It has been suggested that expression of SPINK1 and trypsin is balanced in normal tissue, but this balance could be disrupted during tumor progression. Based on the structural similarity between SPINK1 and epidermal growth factor (EGF, we showed that SPINK1 protein binds and activates EGF receptor, thus acting as a growth factor on tumor cell lines. In this review, we summarize the old and new roles of SPINK1/Spink3 in trypsin inhibition, autophagy, and cancer cell growth. These new functions of SPINK1/Spink3 may be related to the development of chronic pancreatitis.

  4. Pancreatic Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pancreatic cysts Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Doctors & departments Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  5. Chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruno, Marco J.

    2005-01-01

    In the past 20 years, endoscopic ultrasonography has been added to the already large armamentarium of diagnostic tests for chronic pancreatitis. This article discusses its potential and possible limitations

  6. Pancreatitis - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/presentations/100149.htm Pancreatitis - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  7. Fast trypsin digestion of proteins on a cross-linked [Os(dmebpy)(2)Cl](+/2+)-derivatized copolymer of acrylamide and vinylimidazole column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie

    2010-08-15

    Fast digestion of proteins was observed when they were loaded together with trypsin onto the cross-linked [Os(dmebpy)(2)Cl](+/2+)-derivatized copolymer of acrylamide and vinylimidazole column. The insoluble Os-complexed polymer particles were packed into an electrospray tip to monitor peptides eluted during loading, washing and elution periods with a mass spectrometer. The proteolytic cleavage of proteins was observed immediately when the mixture of trypsin and substrates in 0.2 mM ammonium bicarbonate 50:50 H(2)O/acetonitrile reached the column tip, and continued through the loading period. Some tryptic peptides were released from the column during the loading and following washing periods. The others still stayed on the column until the low pH elution buffer reached the column. If a protein was first loaded onto the column, no tryptic peptides of the protein were observed when trypsin was loaded later for the on-column digestion. Only the autolysis peptides of trypsin were observed. On-column digestion of 100 fmol myoglobin was successfully detected with a low sensitivity quadrupole mass spectrometer. A hybrid Os-polymer/C(18) column tip was constructed for the online trypsin digestion of proteins in the aqueous buffers and the following trapping and elution of peptides from the C(18) column. The digestion of reduced and alkylated bovine serum albumin and human transferrin in 2.5 mM ammonium bicarbonate and 0.2 M urea buffer was observed on the column, with more peptide coverage than conventional 4 h in-solution digestion at 37 degrees C. Control experiments without the Os-polymer in the column tip excluded the spontaneous in-solution digestion of proteins in the short time window of buffer delivery onto the column, indirectly confirming the contribution of Os-polymer on the fast trypsin digestion. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Comparison of the aggregation behavior of soy and bovine whey protein hydrolysates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, B.J.H.; Alting, A.C.; Gruppen, H.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Soy-derived proteins (soy protein isolate, glycinin, and ß-conglycinin) and bovine whey-derived proteins (whey protein isolate, ¿-lactalbumin, ß-lactoglobulin) were hydrolyzed using subtilisin Carlsberg, chymotrypsin, trypsin, bromelain, and papain. The (in)solubility of the hydrolysates

  9. Effects of realimentation after nutrient restriction during mid- to late gestation on pancreatic digestive enzymes, serum insulin and glucose levels, and insulin-containing cell cluster morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keomanivong, F E; Camacho, L E; Lemley, C O; Kuemper, E A; Yunusova, R D; Borowicz, P P; Kirsch, J D; Vonnahme, K A; Caton, J S; Swanson, K C

    2017-06-01

    This study examined effects of stage of gestation and nutrient restriction with subsequent realimentation on maternal and foetal bovine pancreatic function. Dietary treatments were assigned on day 30 of pregnancy and included: control (CON; 100% requirements; n = 18) and restricted (R; 60% requirements; n = 30). On day 85, cows were slaughtered (CON, n = 6; R, n = 6), remained on control (CC; n = 12) and restricted (RR; n = 12), or realimented to control (RC; n = 11). On day 140, cows were slaughtered (CC, n = 6; RR, n = 6; RC, n = 5), remained on control (CCC, n = 6; RCC, n = 5) or realimented to control (RRC, n = 6). On day 254, the remaining cows were slaughtered and serum samples were collected from the maternal jugular vein and umbilical cord to determine insulin and glucose concentrations. Pancreases from cows and foetuses were removed, weighed, and subsampled for enzyme and histological analysis. As gestation progressed, maternal pancreatic α-amylase activity decreased and serum insulin concentrations increased (p ≤ 0.03). Foetal pancreatic trypsin activity increased (p enzymes are influenced by nutrient restriction and there is a potential for programming of increased foetal digestive enzyme production resulting from previous maternal nutrient restriction. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Gclust Server: 59087 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Cluster Sequences - 98 possible Kunitz/Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhib 2 1.00e-40 0.0 0.0 8.0 0.0 0.0...Representative annotation possible Kunitz/Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhib Number of Sequences 2 Homologs

  11. Extraction purification and characterization of trypsin inhibitors from Andean seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Castillo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This work established the conditions of covalent immobilization of trypsin on a Sepharose matrix, which could be applied for the purification of trypsin inhibitors. The higher values of retention of enzymatic activity and immobilized enzymatic activity were obtained with a Sepharose 6B-CL matrix, at room temperature, a pH value of 10.5, an enzymatic load of 25 mg/mL, and a minimum immobilization time of 12 hours, in order to obtain a stable immobilization. The most active trypsin inhibitors were selected through the comparison of, extracts obtained from the seeds of amaranth (Amaranthus caudatus L., pea (Pisum sativum, lupine or “chocho” (Lupinus mutabilis, bean (Phaseolus vulgaris and “sangorache” (Amaranthus hybridus L.. The inhibitors were partially purified using centrifugal ultrafiltration, heat treatment, and TCA precipitation. The permeated and retained fractions of “sangorache” were selected as the most active trypsin inhibitors, and they were selectively purified using affinity chromatography in a Trypsin - Glyoxyl - Sepharose 6B-CL matrix. The kinetic characterization showed the presence of two inhibitors; the first one corresponded to a competitive inhibitor, while the second one behaved as a mixed inhibitor.

  12. Trypsin inhibitors from the garden four o'clock (Mirabilis jalapa) and spinach (Spinacia oleracea) seeds: isolation, characterization and chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Jolanta; Pszczoła, Katarzyna; Wilimowska-Pelc, Anna; Lorenc-Kubis, Irena; Zuziak, Ewa; Ługowski, Mateusz; Łegowska, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Anna; Sleszyńska, Małgorzata; Lesner, Adam; Walewska, Aleksandra; Zabłotna, Ewa; Rolka, Krzysztof; Wilusz, Tadeusz

    2007-06-01

    Five serine proteinase inhibitors (Mirabilis jalapa trypsin inhibitors, MJTI I and II and Spinacia oleracea trypsin inhibitors, SOTI I, II, and III) from the garden four-o'clock (M. jalapa) and spinach (S. oleracea) seeds were isolated. The purification procedures included affinity chromatography on immobilized methylchymotrypsin in the presence of 5M NaCl, ion exchange chromatography and/or preparative electrophoresis, and finally RP-HPLC on a C-18 column. The inhibitors, crosslinked by three disulfide bridges, are built of 35 to 37 amino-acid residues. Their primary structures differ from those of known trypsin inhibitors, but showed significant similarity to the antimicrobial peptides isolated from the seeds of M. jalapa (MJ-AMP1, MJ-AMP2), Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (AMP1), and Phytolacca americana (AMP-2 and PAFP-S) and from the hemolymph of Acrocinus longimanus (Alo-1, 2 and 3). The association equilibrium constants (K(a)) with bovine beta-trypsin for the inhibitors from M. jalapa (MJTI I and II) and S. oleracea (SOTI I-III) were found to be about 10(7)M(-1). Fully active MJTI I and SOTI I were obtained by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The disulfide bridge pattern in both inhibitors (Cys1-Cys4, Cys2-Cys5 and Cys3-Cys6) was established after their digestion with thermolysin and proteinase K followed by the MALDI-TOF analysis.

  13. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Elucidation of different cold-adapted Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) trypsin X isoenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Bjarki; Sandholt, Gunnar B; Gudmundsdottir, Ágústa

    2017-01-01

    Trypsins from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), consisting of several isoenzymes, are highly active cold-adapted serine proteases. These trypsins are isolated for biomedical use in an eco-friendly manner from underutilized seafood by-products. Our group has explored the biochemical properties of trypsins and their high potential in biomedicine. For broader utilization of cod trypsins, further characterization of biochemical properties of the individual cod trypsin isoenzymes is of importance. For that purpose, a benzamidine purified trypsin isolate from Atlantic cod was analyzed. Anion exchange chromatography revealed eight peaks containing proteins around 24kDa with tryptic activity. Based on mass spectrometric analysis, one isoenzyme gave the best match to cod trypsin I and six isoenzymes gave the best match to cod trypsin X. Amino terminal sequencing of two of these six trypsin isoenzymes showed identity to cod trypsin X. Three sequence variants of trypsin X were identified by cDNA analysis demonstrating that various forms of this enzyme exist. One trypsin X isoenzyme was selected for further characterization based on abundance and stability. Stepwise increase in catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of this trypsin X isoenzyme was obtained with substrates containing one to three amino acid residues. The study demonstrates that the catalytic efficiency of this trypsin X isoenzyme is comparable to that of cod trypsin I, the most abundant and highly active isoenzyme in the benzamidine cod trypsin isolate. Differences in pH stability and sensitivity to inhibitors of the trypsin X isoenzyme compared to cod trypsin I were detected that may be important for practical use. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Acute Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertilsson, Sara; Håkansson, Anders; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aimed to evaluate the potential relation between the incidence of (alcoholic and non-alcoholic) acute pancreatitis (AP) and alcohol consumption in the general population, and whether the occurrence of AP shows any seasonal variation, particularly in relation to periods with expected...... consumption in the general population do not appear to be related to changes in the incidence of AP and there are no significant seasonal differences in the occurrence of AP in Sweden. Short summary: The incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) is increasing, and alcohol is still recognized as one of the most...

  16. Endosonography of groove pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tio, T. L.; Luiken, G. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis. Distinction between pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is often difficult. Two cases of groove pancreatitis diagnosed by endosonography are described. A hypoechoic pattern between the duodenal wall and pancreas was clearly imaged in both

  17. Pancreatic cystadenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspestrand, F.; Oppedal, B.R.; Eide, T.J.

    1984-05-01

    Two cases of pancreatic cystadenoma are presented, demonstrating the typical angiographic and histologic pattern as given in previous literature. Although computed tomography and ultrasound examinations may be useful, angiography seems to play a decisive role in establishing the diagnosis, demonstrating the localization and extent of the tumor, and permitting the possible differentiation of benign and malignant lesions.

  18. Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Shounak; Takahashi, Naoki; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic fibroinflammatory disease of the pancreas that belongs to the spectrum of immunoglobulin G-subclass4-related diseases (IgG4-RD) and typically presents with obstructive jaundice. Idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) is a closely related but distinct disease that mimics AIP radiologically but manifests clinically most commonly as recurrent acute pancreatitis in young individuals with concurrent inflammatory bowel disease. IgG4 levels are often elevated in AIP and normal in IDCP. Histologically, lymphoplasmacytic acinar inflammation and storiform fibrosis are seen in both. In addition, the histologic hallmark of IDCP is the granulocyte epithelial lesion: intraluminal and intraepithelial neutrophils in medium-sized and small ducts with or without granulocytic acinar inflammation often associated with destruction of ductal architecture. Initial treatment of both AIP and IDCP is with oral corticosteroids for duration of 4 weeks followed by a gradual taper. Relapses are common in AIP and relatively uncommon in IDCP, a relatively rare disease for which the natural history is not well understood. For patients with relapsing AIP, treatment with immunomodulators and more recently rituximab has been recommended. Although rare instances of pancreaticobiliary malignancy has been reported in patients with AIP, overall the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer does not appear to be elevated.

  19. Pancreatitis aguda

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ALARCÓN O, CLAUDIA; ÁVILA B, MARÍA LORETO; TAJMUCH V, VIRGINIA

    2008-01-01

    .... La mayoría de los casos en niños son cuadros autolimitados y de buen pronóstico. La clasificación de Atlanta de 1992 define los conceptos de pancreatitis aguda leve, grave, necrosis, colecciones...

  20. Torque teno sus virus (TTSuV in cell cultures and trypsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Fumaco Teixeira

    Full Text Available Torque teno sus virus (TTSuV, a member of the family Anelloviridae, is a single-stranded, circular DNA virus, widely distributed in swine populations. Presently, two TTSuV genogroups are recognized: Torque teno sus virus 1 (TTSuV1 and Torque teno sus virus 2 (TTSuV2. TTSuV genomes have been found in commercial vaccines for swine, enzyme preparations and other drugs containing components of porcine origin. However, no studies have been made looking for TTSuV in cell cultures. In the present study, a search for TTSuV genomes was carried out in cell culture lineages, in sera used as supplement for cell culture media as well as in trypsin used for cell disaggregation. DNA obtained from twenty-five cell lineages (ten from cultures in routine multiplication and fifteen from frozen ampoules, nine samples of sera used in cell culture media and five batches of trypsin were examined for the presence of TTSuV DNA. Fifteen cell lineages, originated from thirteen different species contained amplifiable TTSuV genomes, including an ampoule with a cell lineage frozen in 1985. Three cell lineages of swine origin were co-infected with both TTSuV1 and TTSuV2. One batch of trypsin contained two distinct TTSuV1 plus one TTSuV2 genome, suggesting that this might have been the source of contamination, as supported by phylogenetic analyses of sequenced amplicons. Samples of fetal bovine and calf sera used in cell culture media did not contain amplifiable TTSuV DNA. This is the first report on the presence of TTSuV as contaminants in cell lineages. In addition, detection of the viral genome in an ampoule frozen in 1985 provides evidence that TTSuV contamination is not a recent event. These findings highlight the risks of TTSuV contamination in cell cultures, what may be source for contamination of biological products or compromise results of studies involving in vitro multiplied cells.

  1. Bovine explant model of degeneration of the intervertebral disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivan Sarit

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many new treatments for degeneration of the intervertebral disc are being developed which can be delivered through a needle. These require testing in model systems before being used in human patients. Unfortunately, because of differences in anatomy, there are no ideal animal models of disc degeneration. Bovine explant model systems have many advantages but it is not possible to inject any significant volume into an intact disc. Therefore we have attempted to mimic disc degeneration in an explant bovine model via enzymatic digestion. Methods Bovine coccygeal discs were incubated with different concentrations of the proteolytic enzymes, trypsin and papain, and maintained in culture for up to 3 weeks. A radio-opaque solution was injected to visualise cavities generated. Degenerative features were monitored histologically and biochemically (water and glycosaminoglycan content, via dimethylmethylene blue. Results and Conclusion The central region of both papain and trypsin treated discs was macro- and microscopically fragmented, with severe loss of metachromasia. The integrity of the surrounding tissue was mostly in tact with cells in the outer annulus appearing viable. Biochemical analysis demonstrated greatly reduced glycosaminoglycan content in these compared to untreated discs. We have shown that bovine coccygeal discs, treated with proteolytic enzymes can provide a useful in vitro model system for developing and testing potential new treatments of disc degeneration, such as injectable implants or biological therapies.

  2. Pancreatic tuberculosis masquerading as pancreatic serous cystadenoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung Goun; Kim, Jae Seon; Joo, Moon Kyung; Lee, Kwang Gyun; Kim, Key Hyeon; Oh, Cho Rong; Park, Jong-Jae; Bak, Young-Tae

    2009-01-01

    Solitary pancreatic involvement of tuberculosis is rare, especially in an immunocompetent individual, and it may be misdiagnosed as pancreatic cystic neoplasms. Pancreatic cystic neoplasms are being identified in increasing numbers, probably because of the frequent use of radiology and advances in endoscopic techniques. However, they are composed of a variety of neoplasms with a wide range of malignant potential, and it is often difficult to differentiate pancreatic tuberculosis mimicking cystic neoplasms from benign or malignant pancreatic cystic neoplasms. Non-surgical diagnosis of pancreatic tuberculosis is inconclusive and continues to be a challenge in many cases. If so, then laparotomy should be employed to establish the diagnosis. Therefore, pancreatic tuberculosis should be kept in mind during the differential diagnosis of solitary cystic masses in the pancreas. We report a patient who had solitary pancreatic tuberculosis masquerading as pancreatic serous cystadenoma. PMID:19248204

  3. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? Cancer of the pancreas is a genetic ... found in cigarette smoke. The genetics of hereditary pancreatic cancer is a focus of research at Johns Hopkins. ...

  4. Synthetic antiproteases in acute pancreatitis: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosz, M; Sledziński, Z; Babicki, A; Juszkiewicz, P; Basiński, A; Wajda, Z

    1992-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis was induced in 19 anesthetized dogs by retrograde injection of bile mixed with trypsin into the pancreatic duct. Two groups, of six animals each, were treated with intravenous infusion of synthetic antiproteases: gabexate mesilate and nafamostat mesilate in doses of 1 mg/kg per hr. One group of seven animals remained untreated. Two untreated dogs died during the experiment. All the treated dogs survived. Hemodynamic data were monitored hourly during a 6-hr observation period. In the untreated animals, cardiac output, mean arterial pressure, and left ventricular stroke volume decreased rapidly; an increase of pulmonary vascular resistance and systemic vascular resistance was observed. Synthetic antiproteases, given as a therapy, improved the hemodynamic parameters significantly and prevented the animals from developing shock. Gabexate mesilate and nafamostat mesilate seem to be of value in the treatment of experimentally produced acute pancreatitis in dogs.

  5. Cytogenetic study of Ascaris trypsin inhibitor in cultured human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-04-01

    Apr 1, 2009 ... helminth (Souza et al. 2002; Oshiro et al. 2004). Previ- ously we reported the results on chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid changes in human lymphocytes exposed to. Ascaris trypsin inhibitor in the absence of metabolic S9 acti- vation (Blaszkowska et al. 2004). In these experimental con- ditions ...

  6. Page 1 Trypsinated nylon surfaces 8} immobilize onto various ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Trypsinated nylon surfaces 8} immobilize onto various polymer surfaces using suitable catalysts. Our above investigations, are only preliminary in nature, basically, to explore possibilities in this area which appears to be interesting for certain enzymes suitable towards blood compatibility. References. Andrade J D, Lee M B, ...

  7. Orthosteric and Allosteric Regulation in Trypsin-Like Peptidases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann-Tofting, Tobias

    peptides and Camelid derived antibody fragments, so-called nanobodies. Allosteric regulation of activity in trypsin-like serine peptidases is in general poorly understood, as the propagation of the allosteric signal from the ligand binding site to the active site in some cases is subtle and based...

  8. Efficiency of inactivation of trypsin inhibitory activity in some selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. J. T. Ekanem

    2005-02-24

    Feb 24, 2005 ... toxicity is largely eliminated. For example, phytohaemagglutinins and trypsin inhibitors. (TIs) are heat labile and as such are readily destroyed by treatment of plant material with moist heat or autoclaving, dry heat being less effective. Levels of oxalates, tannin, nitrate/nitrite and various other antinutrients in.

  9. Magnetic nanoparticles coated with polyaniline to stabilize immobilized trypsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, J. C.; D. Mercês, A. A.; Cabrera, M.; Shigeyosi, W. T.; de Souza, S. D.; Olzon-Dionysio, M.; Fabris, J. D.; Cardoso, C. A.; Neri, D. F. M.; C. Silva, M. P.; Carvalho, L. B.

    2016-12-01

    It is reported the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles via the chemical co-precipitation of Fe 3+ ions and their preparation by coating them with polyaniline. The electronic micrograph analysis showed that the mean diameter for the nanoparticles is ˜15 nm. FTIR, powder X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to understand the chemical, crystallographic and 57Fe hyperfine structures for the two samples. The nanoparticles, which exhibited magnetic behavior with relatively high spontaneous magnetization at room temperature, were identified as being mainly formed by maghemite ( γFe2O3). The coated magnetic nanoparticles (sample labeled "mPANI") presented a real ability to bind biological molecules such as trypsin, forming the magnetic enzyme derivative (sample "mPANIG-Trypsin"). The amount of protein and specific activity of the immobilized trypsin were found to be 13±5 μg of protein/mg of mPANI (49.3 % of immobilized protein) and 24.1±0.7 U/mg of immobilized protein, respectively. After 48 days of storage at 4 ∘C, the activity of the immobilized trypsin was found to be 89 % of its initial activity. This simple, fast and low-cost procedure was revealed to be a promising way to prepare mPANI nanoparticles if technological applications addressed to covalently link biomolecules are envisaged. This route yields chemically stable derivatives, which can be easily recovered from the reaction mixture with a magnetic field and recyclable reused.

  10. activity of enzyme trypsin immobilized onto macroporous poly(epoxy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    macropores and the unique sponge-like morphology that can permit unhindered diffusion of solutes of practically any size. (Lozinsky et al. ... sodium acetate, sodium phosphate (Na3PO4), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were from Merck. (Darmstadt, Germany). Equipment. For trypsin activity ...

  11. 77 FR 29914 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products AGENCY... live bovines and products derived from bovines with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. This... products to revise the conditions for the importation of live bovines and products derived from bovines...

  12. PANCREATIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The pancreatic cancer is quite common malignant tumor of gastointestinal tract and its incidence is increasing in well developed part of the world. Despite of all advanced diagnostic methods the disease is in most cases recognised too late when the tumor is not resectable.Conclusions. Only in 20–30% of patients with pancreatic cancer surgical resection is possible, and even in this group 5year survival is very low. In the patients where the tumor is not resectable, sometimes only palliative procedures are indicated and sometimes only simptomatic therapy is possible. The average survival period in this group of patients is 12–20 months. Adjuvant chemo and radiotherapy has not shown much of benefit and the prognosis is still very bad.

  13. Supercritical fluid assisted production of micrometric powders of the labile trypsin and chitosan/trypsin composite microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-Bin; Guan, Yi-Xin; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2015-07-15

    Supercritical fluid assisted atomization introduced by a hydrodynamic cavitation mixer (SAA-HCM) was used to prepare micrometric particles of a labile protein, i.e., trypsin from aqueous solution without use of any organic solvents. The trypsin particles precipitated had various morphologies under different process conditions, with particle diameters ranging from 0.2 to 4 μm. FTIR, SDS-PAGE, CD and fluorescence spectra were performed to analyze the structural stability of the protein, and trypsin retained above 70% of the biological activity. Besides, chitosan was selected as the polymer carrier in an effort to prepare trypsin composite microparticles via SAA-HCM process. The influences of chitosan molecular weight, polymer/protein ratio and solution concentration on the particle morphology and size distribution were investigated in detail. Non-coalescing spherical composite microparticles with a narrow particle distribution (0.2-3 μm) could be obtained. The SAA-HCM prepared particles were amorphous as demonstrated by XRD and had a loading efficiency about 90%. The protein release profiles of the composite microparticles were evaluated using both the immersion condition and a Franz diffusion cell. Finally, the distribution of the protein within the particles was characterized through CLSM analysis of FITC-labeled trypsin-loaded chitosan microparticles. The SAA-HCM process is demonstrated to be a protein-friendly and promising technique for production of protein and polymer/protein composite particles formulations from aqueous solutions for drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Thermodynamic evaluation and modeling of proton and water exchange associated with benzamidine and berenil binding to ß-trypsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Pereira

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Serine-proteases are involved in vital processes in virtually all species. They are important targets for researchers studying the relationships between protein structure and activity, for the rational design of new pharmaceuticals. Trypsin was used as a model to assess a possible differential contribution of hydration water to the binding of two synthetic inhibitors. Thermodynamic parameters for the association of bovine ß-trypsin (homogeneous material, observed 23,294.4 ± 0.2 Da, theoretical 23,292.5 Da with the inhibitors benzamidine and berenil at pH 8.0, 25ºC and with 25 mM CaCl2, were determined using isothermal titration calorimetry and the osmotic stress method. The association constant for berenil was about 12 times higher compared to the one for benzamidine (binding constants are K = 596,599 ± 25,057 and 49,513 ± 2,732 M-1, respectively; the number of binding sites is the same for both ligands, N = 0.99 ± 0.05. Apparently the driving force responsible for this large difference of affinity is not due to hydrophobic interactions because the variation in heat capacity (DCp, a characteristic signature of these interactions, was similar in both systems tested (-464.7 ± 23.9 and -477.1 ± 86.8 J K-1 mol-1 for berenil and benzamidine, respectively. The results also indicated that the enzyme has a net gain of about 21 water molecules regardless of the inhibitor tested. It was shown that the difference in affinity could be due to a larger number of interactions between berenil and the enzyme based on computational modeling. The data support the view that pharmaceuticals derived from benzamidine that enable hydrogen bond formation outside the catalytic binding pocket of ß-trypsin may result in more effective inhibitors.

  15. Interaction of methotrexate with trypsin analyzed by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanqing; Zhang, Hongmei; Cao, Jian; Zhou, Qiuhua

    2013-11-01

    Trypsin is one of important digestive enzymes that have intimate correlation with human health and illness. In this work, the interaction of trypsin with methotrexate was investigated by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The results revealed that methotrexate could interact with trypsin with about one binding site. Methotrexate molecule could enter into the primary substrate-binding pocket, resulting in inhibition of trypsin activity. Furthermore, the thermodynamic analysis implied that electrostatic force, hydrogen bonding, van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions were the main interactions for stabilizing the trypsin-methotrexate system, which agreed well with the results from the molecular modeling study.

  16. Purification and characterisation of trypsin-like enzyme from the pyloric caeca of cod (Gadus morhua II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Beirão

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available A trypsin -like enzyme from the pyloric caeca of cod (Gadus morhua was purified by affinity chromatography on CHOM Sepharose 4B. Some characteristics were established by its catalytic activity on T.A.M.E., typical enzyme substrate, and serine protease inhibitors. The enzyme had an isoelectric point of 5.30 and 5.89 and was very similar in amino acid composition to bovine trypsin, but differed in having a higher relative amount of acidic amino acids and a lower amount of basic amino acids. The enzyme also hydrolysed fish protein substrates.A tripsina do ceco pilórico do bacalhau (Gadus morhua foi purificada por cromatografia de CHOM Sepharose 4B. Algumas características foram determinadas como atividade catalítica para T.A.M.E., substratos enzimáticos e inibidores de proteases. A enzima mostrou ponto isoelétrico de 5,30 e 5,89 e composição de aminoácidos similar à tripsina bovina, mas diferiu por ter um alto percentual de aminoácidos ácidos e baixo valor em aminoácidos básicos. A tripsina do bacalhau também hidrolisou substratos de proteínas de pescados.

  17. Microchip bioreactors based on trypsin-immobilized graphene oxide-poly(urea-formaldehyde) composite coating for efficient peptide mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Huizhi; Yao, Feina; Xu, Shuyuan; Chen, Gang

    2013-12-15

    Trypsin was covalently immobilized to graphene oxide (GO)-poly(urea-formaldehyde) (PUF) composite coated on the channel wall of poly(methyl methacrylate) microchips to fabricate microfluidic bioreactors for highly efficient proteolysis. A mixture solution containing urea-formaldehyde prepolymer and GO nanosheets was allowed to flow through the channels. The modification layer on the channel wall could further polycondense to form GO-PUF composite coating in the presence of ammonium chloride. The primary amino groups of trypsin could react with the carboxyl groups of the GO sheets in the coating with the aid of carboxyl activating agents to realize covalent immobilization. The feasibility and performance of the novel GO-based microchip bioreactors were demonstrated by the digestion of bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, ovalbumin, and myoglobin. The digestion time was significantly reduced to less than 5s. The obtained digests were identified by MALDI-TOF MS with satisfactory sequence coverages that were comparable to those obtained by using 12-h in-solution digestion. The present proteolysis strategy is simple and efficient, offering great promise for high-throughput protein identification. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Neural plasticity in pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic nerves undergo prominent alterations during the evolution and progression of human chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Intrapancreatic nerves increase in size (neural hypertrophy) and number (increased neural density). The proportion of autonomic and sensory fibres (neural remodelling) is switched, and are infiltrated by perineural inflammatory cells (pancreatic neuritis) or invaded by pancreatic cancer cells (neural invasion). These neuropathic alterations also correlate with neuropathic pain. Instead of being mere histopathological manifestations of disease progression, pancreatic neural plasticity synergizes with the enhanced excitability of sensory neurons, with Schwann cell recruitment toward cancer and with central nervous system alterations. These alterations maintain a bidirectional interaction between nerves and non-neural pancreatic cells, as demonstrated by tissue and neural damage inducing neuropathic pain, and activated neurons releasing mediators that modulate inflammation and cancer growth. Owing to the prognostic effects of pain and neural invasion in pancreatic cancer, dissecting the mechanism of pancreatic neuroplasticity holds major translational relevance. However, current in vivo models of pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis contain many discrepancies from human disease that overshadow their translational value. The present Review discusses novel possibilities for mechanistically uncovering the role of the nervous system in pancreatic disease progression.

  19. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  20. [Use of soybean trypsin inhibitor for modification of gold surface of the sensor chips in surface plasmon resonance spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilov, S V; Aleksandrova, N O; Kunda, Ie M; Verevka, S V; Shyrshov, Iu M

    2004-01-01

    Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) and glutaraldehyde are used to create an interlayer for proteins immobilization on the gold surface of the sensor chips of surface plasmon resonance spectrometer. Human serum albumin (HSA), goat Ig G and bovine eye lens alpha-crystallin are immobilized via the proposed interlayer. We studied the effects of the duration of storage of the sensor chips before use and pre-treatment by "piranha" solution on the STI adsorption by the gold surface. The influence of STI surface concentration, as well as the effect of the duration of storage of STI-modified sensor chips on the HSA immobilization are investigated. The binding of specific antibodies to the immobilized proteins and non-specific binding to the modified surfaces are studied. HSA immobilization on the bare gold surface is compared to that on the surfaces, modified by different methods.

  1. Trypsin-mediated enzymatic degradation of type II collagen in the human vitreous

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deemter, Mariëlle; Kuijer, Roel; Harm Pas, Hendri; Jacoba van der Worp, Roelofje; Hooymans, Johanna Martina Maria

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Aging of the vitreous body can result in sight-threatening pathology. One aspect of vitreous aging is liquefaction, which results from the vanishing of collagen fibrils. We investigated the possibility that trypsins are involved in vitreous type II collagen degradation. Methods Immunohistochemistry and western blotting were used for detecting and locating trypsin isoforms in the vitreous and retina of human donor eyes. The capability of the retina to produce these trypsins was analyzed with polymerase chain reaction. Whether the different trypsins degraded type II collagen was tested in vitro. The sizes of the in vitro induced type II collagen degradation products were compared to those present in the vitreous of human eyes of different ages. Results Trypsin-1 and trypsin-2 were detected in the vitreous. In the retina, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) coding for trypsin-2, -3, and -4 was present. Using immunohistochemistry, trypsin-2 was detected in microglial cells located in the vitreous and the retina. All trypsin isoforms degraded type II collagen and produced degradation products of similar sizes as those present in the vitreous. Conclusions Trypsin-1 and trypsin-2 appear to have a function in the degradation of vitreous type II collagen. They could therefore have a role in the development of vitreous liquefaction. PMID:23882137

  2. Effects of Trypsinization on Viability of Equine Chondrocytes in Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. C. Sutradhar, J. Park, G. Hong, S. H. Choi and G. Kim*

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Trypsin is an essential reagent for routine cell culture work. In the cultivation of mammalian cells, it has been extensively used for cell isolation from tissues or cell dislodging in subculturing. It may damage the cell membrane in contact of cells during long trypsinization. However, there is no specific report on time-dependent effect of trypsinization on cells. In the present study, we investigated the time dependent effects of trypsinization on equine chondrocytes. Cell viability after trypsinization with 0.25% trypsin-EDTA for 5 to 60 minutes was quantified by trypan blue exclusion assay, propidium iodide-Hoechst double staining, flow cytometry analysis and XTT assay. The results showed that trypsin-EDTA decreased the proliferation of equine chondrocytes depending on the exposure time of trypsinization. After 20 and 60 minutes of trypsinization, the cell membranes were strongly affected and the percentages of viable cells reduced to 91% and 85% respectively detected by trypan blue exclusion assay. Similar results were observed both in flow cytometric evaluation and propidium iodide-Hoechst double staining. The XTT assay result also showed decreased cell viability with the extended time of trypsinization. In order to minimize the time dependant cytotoxicity of trypsinization, as minimum as short time exposure is suggestive that maximizes live cell isolation from tissue as well as subculture of equine chondrocytes or other cells.

  3. Dorsal Pancreatic Agenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Oya Uygur-Bayramiçli; Can Dolapçioglu; Derya Öztas; Resat Dabak; Gamze Kiliçoglu

    2007-01-01

    Context Agenesis of the dorsal pancreas is a rare entity and might present with various symptoms. We report a case which presented with chronic pancreatitis. Case report The patient presented with epigastric pain and we found dorsal pancreatic agenesis causing chronic pancreatitis. Conclusions Dorsal pancreatic agenesis can be easily diagnosed with new techniques and its association with clinical syndromes can be better understood.

  4. exocrine pancreatic function

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary. Background:- Faecal pancreatic elastase-l is a laboratory based test used for the diagnosis or exclusion of exocrine pancreatic insufficiencies. Pancreatic elastase-l, is released into blood circulation during inflammation of the pancreas, but unlike most pancreatic enzymes it is stable during in- testinal passage ...

  5. Antiviral effects of bovine interferons on bovine respiratory tract viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, R W; Downing, M M; Cummins, J M

    1984-01-01

    The antiviral effects of bovine interferons on the replication of bovine respiratory tract viruses were studied. Bovine turbinate monolayer cultures were treated with bovine interferons and challenged with several bovine herpesvirus 1 strains, bovine viral diarrhea virus, parainfluenza type 3 virus, goat respiratory syncytial virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine adenovirus type 7, or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with bovine interferons reduced viral yield for each of the...

  6. Comparative study of the binding of trypsin to caffeine and theophylline by spectrofluorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruiyong, E-mail: wangry@zzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Kang, Xiaohui [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Wang, Ruiqiang [The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Wang, Rui; Dou, Huanjing; Wu, Jing; Song, Chuanjun [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Chang, Junbiao, E-mail: changjunbiao@zzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

    2013-06-15

    The interactions between trypsin and caffeine/theophylline were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV–visible absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy under mimic physiological conditions. The results revealed that the fluorescence quenching of trypsin by caffeine and theophylline was the result of the formed complex of caffeine–trypsin and theophylline–trypsin. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters at three different temperatures were obtained. The hydrophobic interaction was the predominant intermolecular forces to stabilize the complex. Results showed that caffeine was the stronger quencher and bound to trypsin with higher affinity than theophylline. -- Highlights: ► The fluorescence of trypsin can be quenched by caffeine or theophylline via hydrophobic contacts. ► Caffeine binds to trypsin with higher affinity than theophylline. ► The influence of molecular structure on the binding aspects is reported.

  7. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... History Committees of Interest Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws Careers Visitor Information Search Search Home Cancer Types Pancreatic Cancer Patient Pancreatic Cancer Patient Pancreatic ...

  8. Structure and Function of Trypsin-Loaded Fibrinolytic Liposomes

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Tanka-Salamon; Attila Bóta; András Wacha; Judith Mihály; Miklós Lovas; Krasimir Kolev

    2017-01-01

    Protease encapsulation and its targeted release in thrombi may contribute to the reduction of haemorrhagic complications of thrombolysis. We aimed to prepare sterically stabilized trypsin-loaded liposomes (SSLT) and characterize their structure and fibrinolytic efficiency. Hydrogenated soybean phosphatidylcholine-based SSLT were prepared and their structure was studied by transmission electron microscopy combined with freeze fracture (FF-TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), ...

  9. [Pancreatic cysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varola, F; Beccaria, A; Oliaro, A; Sasso, D; Villata, E; Cirillo, R

    1975-02-15

    True and pseudo-cysts of the pancreas are described and their aetiology, pathology, laboratory tests, radiological examination, differential diagnosis, symptomatology and surgical management are illustrated. A series of 22 cases of pancreatic cyst is presented. Surgical management consisted of 14 cystogastrostomies, 3 cystoduodenostomies, 2 resections of the tail of the pancreas, 1 internal drainage between the fistular segment of the gland and the gastric cavity, and 2 external drainages with a Pezzer tube. It is felt that internal drainage is the operation of choice. Of the surgical techniques available, a preference is expressed for cystogastrostomy and cystoduodenostomy.

  10. Immobilization of trypsin in the layer-by-layer coating of graphene oxide and chitosan on in-channel glass fiber for microfluidic proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Huimin; Chen, Qiwen; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2011-12-21

    In this report, trypsin was immobilized in the layer-by-layer (LBL) coating of graphene oxide (GO) and chitosan on a piece of glass fiber to fabricate microchip bioreactor for efficient proteolysis. LBL deposition driven by electrostatic forces easily took place on the surface of the glass fiber, providing mild environmental conditions so that the denaturation and autolysis of the immobilized trypsin was minimized. Prior to use, a piece of the prepared trypsin-immobilized glass fiber was inserted into the channel of a microchip to form a core-changeable bioreactor. The novel GO-based bioreactor can be regenerated by changing its fiber core. The feasibility and performance of the unique bioreactor were demonstrated by the tryptic digestion of bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, cytochrome c, and hemoglobin and the digestion time was significantly reduced to less than 10 s. The obtained digests were identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The digestion performance of the core-changeable GO-based microchip bioreactor was comparable to that of 12-h in-solution tryptic digestion. The novel microchip bioreactor is simple and efficient, offering great promise for high-throughput protein identification.

  11. Production of Secretory Leucocyte Protease Inhibitor (SLPI in Human Pancreatic β-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Nyström

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI is a potent inhibitor of granulocyte elastase and cathepsin G, and also an inhibitor of pancreatic enzymes like trypsin, chymotrypsin and pancreatic elastase. SLPI has also been shown to inhibit HIV-1 infections by blocking viral DNA synthesis. Since SLPI is an inhibitor of pancreatic proteases we wished to investigate whether SLPI was also actually produced in the pancreas. M-RNA from human pancreatic tissue showed evidence of SLPI production using the reverse transcriptase polymer chain reaction technique (RTPCR. Using immunohistochemical methods SLPI was demonstrated in the β-ce1ls of the islets of Langerhans. The function could be local protease/antiprotease regulation or antiviral/antibacterial defence in the close vicinity of the cell surface, or even inside the β-cell itself.

  12. Interaction between 8-methoxypsoralen and trypsin: Monitoring by spectroscopic, chemometrics and molecular docking approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingying; Zhang, Guowen; Zeng, Ni; Hu, Song

    2017-02-01

    8-Methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) is a naturally occurring furanocoumarin with various biological activities. However, there is little information on the binding mechanism of 8-MOP with trypsin. Here, the interaction between 8-MOP and trypsin in vitro was determined by multi-spectroscopic methods combined with the multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) chemometrics approach. An expanded UV-vis spectral data matrix was analysed by MCR-ALS, the concentration profiles and pure spectra for the three reaction species (trypsin, 8-MOP and 8-MOP-trypsin) were obtained to monitor the interaction between 8-MOP and trypsin. The fluorescence data suggested that a static type of quenching mechanism occurred in the binding of 8-MOP to trypsin. Hydrophobic interaction dominated the formation of the 8-MOP-trypsin complex on account of the positive enthalpy and entropy changes, and trypsin had one high affinity binding site for 8-MOP with a binding constant of 3.81 × 104 L mol- 1 at 298 K. Analysis of three dimensional fluorescence, UV-vis absorption and circular dichroism spectra indicated that the addition of 8-MOP induced the rearrangement of the polypeptides carbonyl hydrogen-bonding network and the conformational changes in trypsin. The molecular docking predicted that 8-MOP interacted with the catalytic residues His57, Asp102 and Ser195 in trypsin. The binding patterns and trypsin conformational changes may result in the inhibition of trypsin activity. This study has provided insights into the binding mechanism of 8-MOP with trypsin.

  13. [Obesity and pancreatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Gak; Han, Jimin

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is defined as BMI (calculated as weight in kg divided by height in m2) more than 30, and overweight is defined as BMI of 25-29.9. Obesity has been considered as a risk factor for pancreatic diseases, including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Severe acute pancreatitis is significantly more frequent in obese patients. Furthermore, obese patients develop systemic and local complications of acute pancreatitis more frequently. The underlying mechanisms are increased inflammation and necrosis from increased amount of intra- and peri-pancreatic fat. In addition, obesity is a poor prognostic factor in acute pancreatitis, and overweight before disease onset appears to be a risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Overweight and/or obesity are associated with greater risk of pancreatic cancer and younger age of onset. Physical activity appears to decrease the risk of pancreatic cancer, especially among those who are overweight. Long-standing diabetes increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. The pathogenic mechanism is that obesity and physical inactivity increase insulin resistance. In a state of hypersinulinemia, increased circulating level of insulin-like growth factor-1 induces cellular proliferation of pancreatic cancer. Obesity is associated with negative prognostic factor and increased mortality in pancreatic cancer. However, there are controversies regarding the effects of obesity on long-term post-operative results in the patient with pancreatic cancer.

  14. Angiotensin converting enzyme-independent, local angiotensin II-generation in human pancreatic ductal cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Tetsuo; Amaya, Kohji; Yi, Shuangqin; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Kayahara, Masato; Ninomiya, Itasu; Fushida, Sachio; Fujimura, Takashi; Nishimura, Gen-Ichi; Shimizu, Koichi; Miwa, Koichi

    2003-09-01

    Hypovascularity is an outstanding characteristic of pancreatic ductal cancer by diagnostic imaging: most pancreatic ductal cancers are hypovascular or avascular, and tumor vessels are seldom seen on angiography. However, we found that the vasculature was not always poor on angiography of surgically resected specimens of locally advanced pancreatic ductal cancers. To elucidate these controversial findings, we focused on angiotensin II, a vasoconstrictor which is directly produced from angiotensinogen at acidic pH by active trypsin. We examined whether a local angiotensin II-generating system exists in pancreatic ductal cancer tissue. We measured angiotensin II concentration and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity in tissues from normal pancreas, pancreatic ductal cancers, colon cancers, and hepatocellular carcinomas. After surgically resected specimens were homogenized, angiotensin II concentration and ACE activity in tissues were measured using the florisil method and the Kasahara method, respectively. Tissue angiotensin II levels in pancreatic ductal cancer (n=13) were significantly higher than those of normal pancreas (n=7), colon cancers (n=7), or hepatocellular carcinomas (n=7). However, there was no significant difference in the ACE activity in tissue between them. This study provides in vivo evidence of an ACE-independent, angiotensin II-generating system in pancreatic ductal cancer tissues and suggests that locally formed angiotensin II may act on the pre-existing pancreatic arteries around the tumor, leading to formation of hypovascular or avascular regions.

  15. Effect of oral administration of AZD8309, a CXCR2 antagonist, on the severity of experimental pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, Sudarshan R; Kärrman Mårdh, Carina; Günther, Annett; Mahajan, Ujjwal M; Sendler, Matthias; D'Haese, Jan; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Lerch, Markus M; Hansen, Mark Berner; Mayerle, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common gastrointestinal disorder burdened with a high mortality. Two pathophysiological events during experimental pancreatitis are thought to determine the clinical course: premature digestive protease activation and tissue infiltration by inflammatory cells. We have investigated the effect of AZD8309, a potent and orally bioavailable antagonist of the chemokine receptor CXCR2, which has been proposed to regulate the transmigration of neutrophils. Male C57BL6 mice (25-30 g) received gavage feeding of AZD8309 (50 mg/kg/BW) or mannitol (controls) twice daily starting 3 h prior to pancreatitis induction. Mild pancreatitis was induced by i.p. caerulein administration (50 μg/kg BW), severe pancreatitis by intraductal taurocholate (2%). Pancreas, lung, and serum was harvested up to 48 h after pancreatitis induction and used for histopathology, amylase, lipase, cathepsin B, trypsin, and elastase activity measurements, myeloperoxidase (MPO) content and cytokine concentrations. Oral administration of AZD8309 significantly reduced MPO in the pancreas and lungs (8 h & 24 h) and reduced intrapancreatic trypsin and elastase activity (8 h) in caerulein-pancreatitis. In taurocholate-pancreatitis AZD8309 reduced cathepsin B activity and MPO. Serum cytokine levels were reduced by AZD8309 as well as histopathological damage. The CXCR2 antagonist AZD8309 reduced the transmigration of neutrophils as well as intrapancreatic protease activation in experimental pancreatitis. This effect was sufficient to reduce the overall severity of the disease. CXCR2 may therefore be a viable therapeutic target and AZD8309 a suitable agent for the treatment of acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Pleural Fistula in Gallstone Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sala Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra-abdominal complications of pancreatitis such as pancreaticopleural fistulae are rare. A pancreaticopleural fistula occurs when inflammation of the pancreas and pancreatic ductal disruption lead to leakage of secretions through a fistulous tract into the thorax. The underlying aetiology in the majority of cases is alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis. The diagnosis is often delayed given that the majority of patients present with pulmonary symptoms and frequently have large, persistent pleural effusions. The diagnosis is confirmed through imaging and the detection of significantly elevated amylase levels in the pleural exudate. Treatment options include somatostatin analogues, thoracocentesis, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP with pancreatic duct stenting, and surgery. The authors present a case of pancreatic pseudocyst pleural fistula in a woman with gallstone pancreatitis presenting with recurrent pneumonias and bilateral pleural effusions.

  17. Magnetic nanoparticles coated with polyaniline to stabilize immobilized trypsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciel, J. C., E-mail: jackeline-maciel@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Roraima (Brazil); Mercês, A. A. D.; Cabrera, M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Laboratório de Imunopatologia Keizo Asami (Brazil); Shigeyosi, W. T. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Física (Brazil); Souza, S. D. de; Olzon-Dionysio, M.; Fabris, J. D. [Universidade Federal dos Vales de Jequitinhonha e Mucuri (Brazil); Cardoso, C. A. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Física (Brazil); Neri, D. F. M. [Universidade Federal do Vale do São Francisco (Brazil); Silva, M. P. C.; Carvalho, L. B. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Laboratório de Imunopatologia Keizo Asami (Brazil)

    2016-12-15

    It is reported the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles via the chemical co-precipitation of Fe {sup 3+} ions and their preparation by coating them with polyaniline. The electronic micrograph analysis showed that the mean diameter for the nanoparticles is ∼15 nm. FTIR, powder X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to understand the chemical, crystallographic and {sup 57}Fe hyperfine structures for the two samples. The nanoparticles, which exhibited magnetic behavior with relatively high spontaneous magnetization at room temperature, were identified as being mainly formed by maghemite (γFe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The coated magnetic nanoparticles (sample labeled “mPANI”) presented a real ability to bind biological molecules such as trypsin, forming the magnetic enzyme derivative (sample “mPANIG-Trypsin”). The amount of protein and specific activity of the immobilized trypsin were found to be 13±5 μg of protein/mg of mPANI (49.3 % of immobilized protein) and 24.1±0.7 U/mg of immobilized protein, respectively. After 48 days of storage at 4 {sup ∘}C, the activity of the immobilized trypsin was found to be 89 % of its initial activity. This simple, fast and low-cost procedure was revealed to be a promising way to prepare mPANI nanoparticles if technological applications addressed to covalently link biomolecules are envisaged. This route yields chemically stable derivatives, which can be easily recovered from the reaction mixture with a magnetic field and recyclable reused.

  18. Chitosan nanoencapsulated exogenous trypsin biomimics zymogen-like enzyme in fish gastrointestinal tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhi Kumari

    Full Text Available Exogenous proteolytic enzyme supplementation is required in certain disease conditions in humans and animals and due to compelling reasons on use of more plant protein ingredients and profitability in animal feed industry. However, limitations on their utility in diet are imposed by their pH specificity, thermolabile nature, inhibition due to a variety of factors and the possibility of intestinal damage. For enhancing the efficacy and safety of exogenous trypsin, an efficient chitosan (0.04% nanoencapsulation-based controlled delivery system was developed. An experiment was conducted for 45 days to evaluate nanoencapsulated trypsin (0.01% and 0.02% along with 0.02% bare trypsin and 0.4% chitosan nanoparticles against a control diet on productive efficiency (growth rate, feed conversion and protein efficiency ratio, organo-somatic indices, nutrient digestibility, tissue enzyme activities, hematic parameters and intestinal histology of the fish Labeo rohita. All the synthesized nanoparticles were of desired characteristics. Enhanced fish productive efficiency using nanoencapsulated trypsin over its bare form was noticed, which corresponded with enhanced (P<0.01 nutrient digestibility, activity of intestinal protease, liver and muscle tissue transaminases (alanine and aspartate and dehydrogenases (lactate and malate, serum blood urea nitrogen and serum protein profile. Intestinal tissues of fish fed with 0.02% bare trypsin showed broadened, marked foamy cells with lipid vacuoles. However, villi were healthier in appearance with improved morphological features in fish fed with nanoencapsulated trypsin than with bare trypsin, and the villi were longer in fish fed with 0.01% nanoencapsulated trypsin than with 0.02% nanoencapsulated trypsin. The result of this premier experiment shows that nanoencapsulated trypsin mimics zymogen-like proteolytic activity via controlled release, and hence the use of 0.01% nanoencapsulated trypsin (in chitosan

  19. [Effect of the Hydrogel Carrier Structure on the Activity of Immobilized Trypsin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valuev, L I; Valuev, I L; Vanchugova, L V; Valueva, T A

    2015-01-01

    The dependence of the activity of trypsin immobilized in polyacrylamide hydrogel on the hydrogel swelling ratio, the size distribution of its pores, and the means of enzyme binding has been studied. It has been shown that the most favorable conditions for immobilized trypsin are provided upon its binding to hydrogel via trypsin macromonomer copolymerization with acrylamide and a linking agent in the presence of a modifier that limits polymer chain growth.

  20. PREVALENCE OF BOVINE (1)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis is caused by a number of Mycobacterium species, of which Mycobacterium bovis, causing 'bovine tuberculosis' is ... KEY WORDS: Mycobacterium bovis, Zoonosis, Holeta, Ethiopia causing 'bovine tuberculosis ..... isolation of infected animals in which communal grazing and watering practiced.

  1. Effects of bisphenol S on the structures and activities of trypsin and pepsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei

    2014-11-19

    The effects of bisphenol S on the structures and activities of trypsin and pepsin were investigated by various methods like UV-visible absorbance, fluorescence, circular dichroism, and molecular docking. The secondary and tertiary structures of trypsin and pepsin were altered by bisphenol S binding, which resulted in the loosening of the skeletons of trypsin and pepsin. In addition, bisphenol S induced microenvironmental changes around tyrosine and tryptophan residues of trypsin and pepsin. The activity experimental results showed that the activity of pepsin decreases obviously with the increasing concentration of BPS, while the activity of trypsin does not change remarkably. The binding and thermodynamic parameters obtained by molecular docking and fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the bindings of bisphenol S to trypsin and pepsin were spontaneous processes and hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions played a vital role in stabilizing the bisphenol S-trypsin and bisphenol S-pepsin complexes. The binding constants (K(A)) of bisphenol S with trypsin were 7.42 × 10(4) (298 K) and 5.91 × 10(4) L/mol (310 K), and those of pepsin were 5.78 × 10(4) (298 K) and 4.44 × 10(4) L/mol (310 K). Moreover, there was one main kind of binding site for bisphenol S on trypsin or pepsin.

  2. Digestive enzyme activity and mRNA level of trypsin in embryonic redclaw crayfish, Cherax quadricarnatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wen; Zhao, Yunlong; Zhou, Zhongliang; An, Chuanguang; Ma, Qiang

    2008-02-01

    The digestive enzyme activity and mRNA level of trypsin during the embryonic development of Cherax quadricarinatus were analyzed using biochemical and Fluorogenic Quantitative PCR (FQ—PCR) methods. The results show that the activities of trypsin and chymotrypsin had two different change patterns. Trypsin specific activity increased rapidly in the early stages of development and still remained high in preparation for the hatch stage. However, chymotrypsin activity peaked in stage 4 of embryonic development and decreased significantly in the last stage. The mRNA level of trypsin was elevated in all stages and two peak values were observed in stages 2 and 5 respectively. The results indicate that trypsin is very important for the utilization of the yolk during embryonic development and for the assimilation of dietary protein for larvae. The gene of trypsin is probably regulated at transcriptional level. The mRNA levels of trypsin can reflect not only trypsin activity, but also the regulatory mechanism for expression of trypsin gene to a certain degree.

  3. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amundadottir, Laufey T

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1...

  4. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busireddy, Kiran K; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Kalubowila, Janaka; Baodong, Liu; Santagostino, Ilaria; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a significant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI. PMID:25133027

  5. Surgery for pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007649.htm Surgery for pancreatic cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... surgeries are used in the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer. Whipple procedure: This is the most common surgery ...

  6. Heritability of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in German Shepherd dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermarck, E; Saari, S A M; Wiberg, M E

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have revealed that exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) is an inherited disease in German Shepherd Dogs (GSDs). Pedigree analyses have suggested an autosomal recessive inheritance model. Test mating of 2 dogs with EPI. A sire and dam purebred GSD both with EPI and a litter of 6 puppies. Test mating and long-term follow-up of offspring. The pancreas was biopsied via laparotomy on 26 occasions. Serum trypsin-like immunoreactivity was measured. Study was approved by Animal Ethics Committee. During the 12-year study period only 2 of the 6 offsprings developed pancreatic acinar atrophy (PAA). In 1 puppy, end-stage PAA and in the other puppy partial PAA was diagnosed. PAA is not a congenital disease in GSDs. This study provided evidence that PAA is not inherited in a simple autosomal recessive fashion.

  7. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  8. Autoimmune pancreatitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandieh, Iman; Byrne, Michael-F

    2007-12-21

    Autoimmune pancreatitis has emerged over the last 40 years from a proposed concept to a well established and recognized entity. As an efficient mimicker of pancreatic carcinoma, its early and appropriate recognition are crucial. With mounting understanding of its pathogenesis and natural history, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. The characteristic laboratory features and imaging seen in autoimmune pancreatitis are reviewed along with some of the proposed diagnostic criteria and treatment algorithms.

  9. Autoimmune pancreatitis: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Zandieh, Iman; Michael F Byrne

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis has emerged over the last 40 years from a proposed concept to a well established and recognized entity. As an efficient mimicker of pancreatic carcinoma, its early and appropriate recognition are crucial. With mounting understanding of its pathogenesis and natural history, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. The characteristic laboratory features and imaging seen in autoimmune pancreatitis are reviewed along with some of the...

  10. Structure and Function of Trypsin-Loaded Fibrinolytic Liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tanka-Salamon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Protease encapsulation and its targeted release in thrombi may contribute to the reduction of haemorrhagic complications of thrombolysis. We aimed to prepare sterically stabilized trypsin-loaded liposomes (SSLT and characterize their structure and fibrinolytic efficiency. Hydrogenated soybean phosphatidylcholine-based SSLT were prepared and their structure was studied by transmission electron microscopy combined with freeze fracture (FF-TEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS. Fibrinolytic activity was examined at 45, 37, or 24°C on fibrin or plasma clots with turbidimetric and permeation-driven lysis assays. Trypsin was shown to be attached to the inner surface of vesicles (SAXS and FF-TEM close to the lipid hydrophilic/hydrophobic interface (FT-IR. The thermosensitivity of SSLT was evidenced by enhanced fibrinolysis at 45°C: time to reduce the maximal turbidity to 20% decreased by 8.6% compared to 37°C and fibrin degradation product concentration in the permeation lysis assay was 2-fold to 5-fold higher than that at 24°C. SSLT exerted its fibrinolytic action on fibrin clots under both static and dynamic conditions, whereas plasma clot dissolution was observed only in the permeation-driven assay. The improved fibrinolytic efficiency of SSLT under dynamic conditions suggests that they may serve as a novel therapeutic candidate for dissolution of intravascular thrombi, which are typically exposed to permeation forces.

  11. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  12. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4 Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1200 View Download Large: 2400x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4 Description: Stage IV pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  13. Biochemical characterization of bovine plasma thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Torsten

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TAFI is a plasma protein assumed to be an important link between coagulation and fibrinolysis. The three-dimensional crystal structures of authentic mature bovine TAFI (TAFIa in complex with tick carboxypeptidase inhibitor, authentic full lenght bovine plasma thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI, and recombinant human TAFI have recently been solved. In light of these recent advances, we have characterized authentic bovine TAFI biochemically and compared it to human TAFI. Results The four N-linked glycosylation sequons within the activation peptide were all occupied in bovine TAFI, similar to human TAFI, while the sequon located within the enzyme moiety of the bovine protein was non-glycosylated. The enzymatic stability and the kinetic constants of TAFIa differed somewhat between the two proteins, as did the isoelectric point of TAFI, but not TAFIa. Equivalent to human TAFI, bovine TAFI was a substrate for transglutaminases and could be proteolytically cleaved by trypsin or thrombin/solulin complex, although small differences in the fragmentation patterns were observed. Furthermore, bovine TAFI exhibited intrinsic activity and TAFIa attenuated tPA-mediated fibrinolysis similar to the human protein. Conclusion The findings presented here suggest that the properties of these two orthologous proteins are similar and that conclusions reached using the bovine TAFI may be extrapolated to the human protein.

  14. Chronic pancreatitis: relation to acute pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uomo, G; Rabitti, P G

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between chronic pancreatitis (CP) and other pancreatic diseases, such as acute pancreatitis (AP) and pancreatic cancer (PK), remains a fairly debated question. The progression from alcoholic AP to CP is controversial, and some long-term epidemiological studies suggest that alcoholic CP might be the result of recurrent alcoholic AP (necrosis-fibrosis sequence) and a subgroup of alcoholics may present recurrent AP without progression to CP. Other predisposing factors (genetic, nutritional, environmental) seems to be important in inducing different outcomes of pancreatic damage due to alcohol. However, recurrent episodes of AP are clearly involved in pathophysiology of CP in patients with hereditary pancreatitis. A relationship between CP and subsequent PK development has long been suspected, but we actually don't know whether this association is direct or is the result of confounding factors, such as alcohol intake or cigarette smoking. Many issues should be considered as indicators of a causal association, and several of them are not fulfilled. Nonetheless, epidemiological studies (case-control or cohort studies) showed that the risk of PK is increased in patients with CP; the risk is significantly higher in tropical calcifying CP and hereditary pancreatitis. Studies on growth factors, oncogenes, tumor-suppressor genes, and angiogenesis suggest that the sequence PC-KP is plausible from the biological standpoint.

  15. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schima, Wolfgang; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Koelblinger, Claus; Kulinna-Cosentini, Christiane [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Puespoek, Andreas [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Internal Medicine 4, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vienna (Austria); Goetzinger, Peter [Medical University of Vienna, Austria, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-03-15

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common malignant pancreatic tumor, affecting the head of the pancreas in 60-70% of cases. By the time of diagnosis, at least 80% of tumors are unresectable. Helical computed tomography (CT) is very effective in detecting and staging adenocarcinoma, with a sensitivity of up to 90% for detection and an accuracy of 80-90% for staging, but it has limitations in detecting small cancers. Moreover, it is not very accurate for determining nonresectability because small liver metastases, peritoneal carcinomatosis, and subtle signs of vascular infiltration may be missed. Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) has brought substantial improvements with its inherent ability to visualize vascular involvement in three dimensions. MDCT has been found to be at least equivalent to contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting adenocarcinoma. MRI can be used as a problem-solving tool in equivocal CT: MRI may help rule out pitfalls, such as inflammatory pseudotumor, focal lipomatosis, abscess, or cystic tumors. Mangafodipir-enhanced MRI reveals a very high tumor-pancreas contrast, which helps in diagnosing small cancers. Endosonography is, if available, also a very accurate tool for detecting small cancers, with a sensitivity of up to 98%. It is the technique of choice for image-guided biopsy if a histologic diagnosis is required for further therapy. (orig.)

  16. Autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannala, Rahul; Chari, Suresh T

    2008-09-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an increasingly recognized clinical condition. Our objective is to provide a concise review of the advances in the past year in our understanding of AIP. In a hospital survey from Japan, the prevalence of AIP was estimated at 0.82 per 100,000 individuals. The pathogenesis of AIP remains unclear but a recent report noted that T helper type 2 and T regulatory cells predominantly mediate the immune reaction in AIP. Genetic associations that may predispose to relapse of AIP were reported. Multiple case series further described the clinical profile of AIP and its extrapancreatic manifestations. A large series on immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-associated cholangitis noted that patients with IgG4-associated cholangitis presented with obstructive jaundice and had increased serum IgG4 levels and IgG4-positive cells in bile duct biopsy specimens. Tissue IgG4 staining is likely to be a useful adjunct to serological diagnosis. AIP is steroid-responsive but maintaining remission continues to remain challenging. Presently low-dose steroids or immunomodulators are being used but efficacy of these medications remains to be determined. There has been significant progress in understanding the clinical profile of AIP but knowledge of pathogenesis remains limited. Treatment practices vary widely and management of refractory disease continues to be challenging.

  17. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Vujasinovic

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor’s metabolism (Warburg effect and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes.

  18. Pancreatitis Induced by Cocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Pablo Chapela

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatitis is one of the commonest diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, characterized by epigastric pain of moderate to severe intensity, which radiates to the back, elevation of pancreatic lipase and amylase enzymes, and changes in pancreatic parenchyma in imaging methods. The most common etiologies vary, generally the most frequent being biliary lithiasis and alcohol, followed by hypertriglyceridemia. Among the less frequent causes is drug-induced pancreatitis. We report a case of acute pancreatitis caused by cocaine, rarely described in literature.

  19. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundadottir, Laufey T

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS).

  20. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Donghui

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

  1. [Pancreatitis: An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, A G; Grenacher, L; Juchems, M

    2016-04-01

    Acute and chronic pancreatitis are becoming increasingly more severe diseases in the western world with far-reaching consequences for the individual patient as well as the socioeconomic situation. This article gives an overview of the contribution of radiological imaging to the diagnostics and therapy of both forms of the disease. Acute pancreatitis can be subdivided into severe (20%) and mild manifestations. The diagnostics should be performed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessing necrosis or potential infections only in severe forms of pancreatitis. In chronic pancreatitis transabdominal ultrasound should initially be adequate for assessment of the pancreas. For the differential diagnosis between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis, MRI with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) followed by an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration is the method of choice. For the primary diagnosis for acute and chronic pancreatitis ultrasound examination is the modality of first choice followed by radiological CT and MRI with MRCP examinations.

  2. Purification and characterization of trypsin produced by gut bacteria from Anticarsia gemmatalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilon, Franciny Martins; Silva, Camila da Rocha; Visôtto, Liliane Evangelista; Barros, Rafael de Almeida; da Silva Júnior, Neilier Rodrigues; Campos, Wellington Garcia; de Almeida Oliveira, Maria Goreti

    2017-10-01

    Purification of active trypsin in the digestive process of insects is essential for the development of potent protease inhibitors (PIs) as an emerging pest control technology and research into insect adaptations to dietary PIs. An important aspect is the presence of proteolytic microorganisms, which contribute to host nutrition. Here, we purified trypsins produced by bacteria Bacillus cereus, Enterococcus mundtii, Enterococcus gallinarum, and Staphylococcus xylosus isolated from the midgut of Anticarsia gemmatalis. The trypsins had a molecular mass of approximately 25 kDa. The enzymes showed increased activity at 40°C, and they were active at pH values 7.5-10. Aprotinin, bis-benzamidine, and soybean Kunitz inhibitor (SKTI) significantly inhibited trypsin activity. The l-1-tosyl-amido-2-phenylethylchloromethyl ketone (TPCK), pepstatin A, E-64, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid, and calcium ions did not affect the enzyme activity at the concentrations tested. We infer the purified trypsins do not require calcium ions, by which they differ from the trypsins of other microorganisms and the soluble and insoluble trypsins characterized from A. gemmatalis. These data suggest the existence of different isoforms of trypsin in the velvetbean caterpillar midguts. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Carbohydrate as covalent crosslink in human inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, T E; Faarvang, K L; Ploug, M

    1988-01-01

    The primary structure of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor is partially elucidated, but controversy about the construction of the polypeptide backbone still exists. We present evidence suggesting that inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor represents a novel plasma protein structure with two separate polypept...... polypeptide chains covalently crosslinked only by carbohydrate (chondroitin sulphate)....

  4. Trypsin isozymes in the lobster Panulirus argus (Latreille, 1804): from molecules to physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Erick; Rodríguez-Viera, Leandro; Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Montero-Alejo, Vivian; Moyano, Francisco Javier; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Mancera, Juan Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Trypsin enzymes have been studied in a wide variety of animal taxa due to their central role in protein digestion as well as in other important physiological and biotechnological processes. Crustacean trypsins exhibit a high number of isoforms. However, while differences in properties of isoenzymes are known to play important roles in regulating different physiological processes, there is little information on this aspect for decapod trypsins. The aim of this review is to integrate recent findings at the molecular level on trypsin enzymes of the spiny lobster Panulirus argus, into higher levels of organization (biochemical, organism) and to interpret those findings in relation to the feeding ecology of these crustaceans. Trypsin in lobster is a polymorphic enzyme, showing isoforms that differ in their biochemical features and catalytic efficiencies. Molecular studies suggest that polymorphism in lobster trypsins may be non-neutral. Trypsin isoenzymes are differentially regulated by dietary proteins, and it seems that some isoenzymes have undergone adaptive evolution coupled with a divergence in expression rate to increase fitness. This review highlights important but poorly studied issues in crustaceans in general, such as the relation among trypsin polymorphism, phenotypic (digestive) flexibility, digestion efficiency, and feeding ecology.

  5. Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor with high stability from Spinacia oleracea L. seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhuang; Jiang, Jia-hong; Wang, Dong; Liu, Ke; Du, Lin-fang

    2009-01-01

    The trypsin inhibitor SOTI was isolated from Spinacia oleracea L. seeds through ammonium sulfate precipitation, Sepharose 4B-trypsin affinity chromatography, and Sephadex G-75 chromatography. This typical Kunitz inhibitor showed remarkable stability to heat, pH, and denaturant. It retained 80% of its activity against trypsin after boiling for 20 min, and more than 90% activity when treated with 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. The formation of stable SOTI-trypsin complex (K(i) = 2.3x10(-6) M) is consistent with significant inhibitory activity of SOTI against trypsin-like proteinases present in the larval midgut of Pieris rapae. Sequences of SOTI fragments showed homology with other inhibitors.

  6. Trypsinogen-trypsin transition: a molecular dynamics study of induced conformational change in the activation domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brünger, A T; Huber, R; Karplus, M

    1987-08-11

    The trypsinogen to trypsin transition has been investigated by a stochastic boundary molecular dynamics simulation that included a major portion of the trypsin molecule and the surrounding solvent. Attention focused on the "activation domain", which crystallographic studies have shown to be ordered in trypsin and disordered in its zymogen, trypsinogen. The chain segments that form the activation domain were found to exhibit large fluctuations during the simulation of trypsin. To model a difference between trypsin and trypsinogen, the N-terminal residues Ile-16 and Val-17 were removed in the former and replaced by water molecules. As a result of the perturbation, a structural drift of 1-2 A occurred that is limited to the activation domain. Glycine residues are found to act as hinges for the displaced chain segments.

  7. [Chymotrypsin and trypsin inhibitor isolated from potato tubers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revina, T A; Parfenov, I A; Gvozdeva, E L; Gerasimova, N G; Valueva, T A

    2011-01-01

    Potato Kunitz-type chymotrypsin inhibitor (PKCI-23) was isolated from potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L., Zhukov's Jubilee breed) and purified to a homogenous state. The protein was purified by gel-filtration chromatography and ion-exchange chromatography using Sephadex G-75 and CM-Sepharose CL-6B, respectively. PKCI-23 protein has been shown to inhibit both chymotrypsin and trypsin with equal efficacy, forming equimolar complexes with these enzymes. However, much weaker inhibitory effect of PKCI-23 has been observed for Carlsberg subtilisin. The N-terminal 20 amino acid sequence of PKCI-23 has been sequenced. PKCI-23 has been shown to suppress, with different efficacy, the growth and development of pathogenic microorganisms Fusarium culmorum (Wm. G. Sm.) Sacc. and Phytophtora infestans (Mont.) de Bary that infect potato.

  8. A novel thermosensitive in-situ gel of gabexate mesilate for treatment of traumatic pancreatitis: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Han-jing; Song, Qing; Lv, Fa-qin; Wang, Shan; Wang, Yi-ru; Luo, Yu-kun; Mei, Xing-guo; Tang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Gabexate mesilate (GM) is a trypsin inhibitor, and mainly used for treatment of various acute pancreatitis, including traumatic pancreatitis (TP), edematous pancreatitis, and acute necrotizing pancreatitis. However, due to the characteristics of pharmacokinetics, the clinical application of GM still needs frequently intravenous administration to keep the blood drug concentration, which is difficult to manage. Specially, when the blood supply of pancreas is directly damaged, intravenous administration is difficult to exert the optimum therapy effect. To address it, a novel thermosensitive in-situ gel of gabexate mesilate (GMTI) was developed, and the optimum formulation of GMTI containing 20.6% (w/w) P-407 and 5.79% (w/w) P188 with different concentrations of GM was used as a gelling solvent. The effective drug concentration on trypsin inhibition was examined after treatment with different concentrations of GMTI in vitro, and GM served as a positive control. The security of GMTI was evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, and its curative effect on grade II pancreas injury was also evaluated by testing amylase (AMS), C-reactive protein (CRP) and trypsinogen activation peptide (TAP), and pathological analysis of the pancreas. The trypsin activity was slightly inhibited at 1.0 and 5.0 mg/mL in GM group and GMTI group, respectively (Ptreatment as compared with TP group (Ptreatment as compared with TP group (Ptreatment, pancreas cells were gradually restored to tight distribution, with slightly stained nuclei. This preliminary study indicated that GMTI could effectively inhibit pancreatic enzymes, and alleviate the severity of trauma-induced pancreatitis, and had a potential drug developing and clinic application value.

  9. Lymphotoxin β receptor signaling promotes development of autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seleznik, Gitta M; Reding, Theresia; Romrig, Franziska; Saito, Yasuyuki; Mildner, Alexander; Segerer, Stephan; Sun, Li-Kang; Regenass, Stephan; Lech, Maciej; Anders, Hans-Joachim; McHugh, Donal; Kumagi, Teru; Hiasa, Yoichi; Lackner, Carolin; Haybaeck, Johannes; Angst, Eliane; Perren, Aurel; Balmer, Maria Luisa; Slack, Emma; MacPherson, Andrew; Manz, Markus G; Weber, Achim; Browning, Jeffrey L; Arkan, Melek Canan; Rülicke, Thomas; Aguzzi, Adriano; Prinz, Marco; Graf, Rolf; Heikenwalder, Mathias

    2012-11-01

    Little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), an increasingly recognized, immune-mediated form of chronic pancreatitis. Current treatment options are limited and disease relapse is frequent. We investigated factors that contribute to the development of AIP and new therapeutic strategies. We used quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemical, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent analyses to measure the expression of cytokines and chemokines in tissue and serum samples from patients with and without AIP. We created a mouse model of human AIP by overexpressing lymphotoxin (LT)α and β specifically in acinar cells (Ela1-LTab mice). Messenger RNA levels of LTα and β were increased in pancreatic tissues from patients with AIP, compared with controls, and expression of chemokines (CXCL13, CCL19, CCL21, CCL1, and B-cell-activating factor) was increased in pancreatic and serum samples from patients. Up-regulation of these factors was not affected by corticosteroid treatment. Acinar-specific overexpression of LTαβ (Ela1-LTαβ) in mice led to an autoimmune disorder with various features of AIP. Chronic inflammation developed only in the pancreas but was sufficient to cause systemic autoimmunity. Acinar-specific overexpression of LTαβ did not cause autoimmunity in mice without lymphocytes (Ela1-LTab/Rag1(-/-)); moreover, lack of proinflammatory monocytes (Ela1-LTab/Ccr2(-/-)) failed to prevent AIP but prevented early pancreatic tissue damage. Administration of corticosteroids reduced pancreatitis but did not affect production of autoantibodies, such as antipancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor in Ela1-LTab mice. In contrast, inhibition of LTβR signaling reduced chemokine expression, renal immune-complex deposition, and features of AIP in Ela1-LTab mice. Overexpression of LTαβ specifically in acinar cells of mice causes features of AIP. Reagents that neutralize LTβR ligands might be used to treat patients with AIP

  10. [Advances in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2008-10-01

    The present article reports the most recent evidence on the latest advances in the definition, diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis. The concept of acute pancreatitis and its complications is changing and the presence of persistent organ failure is essential to classify a patient as having severe disease. In this context, increased intestinal permeability is seen as an early phenomenon with important prognostic repercussions. Endoscopic ultrasonography is confirmed as the investigation of choice in patients with idiopathic acute pancreatitis or suspected acute biliary pancreatitis. Aggressive water and electrolyte replacement in the first few hours after onset is the key to a favorable clinical course. Conservative treatment and the use of endoscopic necrosectomy are replacing surgery as the treatment of choice of infected pancreatic necrosis. Lastly, the present article discusses the latest evidence on the prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) acute pancreatitis.

  11. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Donghui

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associat...

  12. Production of β-Lactoglobulin hydrolysates by monolith based immobilized trypsin reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yuhong; Černigoj, Urh; Zalokar, Viktor; Štrancar, Aleš; Kulozik, Ulrich

    2017-11-01

    Tryptic hydrolysis of β-Lactoglobulin (β-Lg) is attracting more and more attention due to the reduced allergenicity and the functionality of resulting hydrolysates. To produce hydrolysates in an economically viable way, immobilized trypsin reactors (IMTRs), based on polymethacrylate monolith with pore size 2.1 μm (N1) and 6 μm (N2), were developed and used in a flow-through system. IMTRs were characterized in terms of permeability and enzymatic activity during extensive usage. N1 showed twice the activity compared with N2, correlating well with its almost two times higher amount of immobilized trypsin. N2 showed high stability over 18 cycles, as well as over more than 30 weeks during storage. The efficiency of IMTRs on hydrolyzing β-Lg was compared with free trypsin, and the resulting hydrolysates were analyzed by MALDI-TOF/MS. The final hydrolysis degree by N1 reached 9.68% (86.58% cleavage sites) within 4 h, while only around 6% (53.67% cleavage sites) by 1.5 mg of free trypsin. Peptides analysis showed the different preference between immobilized trypsin and free trypsin. Under the experimental conditions used in this study, the potential cleavage site Lys135 -Phe136 was resistant against the immobilized trypsin in N1. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Immobilization of Trypsin in Lignocellulosic Waste Material to Produce Peptides with Bioactive Potential from Whey Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cristina Bassan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, trypsin (Enzyme Comission 3.4.21.4 was immobilized in a low cost, lignocellulosic support (corn cob powder—CCP with the goal of obtaining peptides with bioactive potential from cheese whey. The pretreated support was activated with glyoxyl groups, glutaraldehyde and IDA-glyoxyl. The immobilization yields of the derivatives were higher than 83%, and the retention of catalytic activity was higher than 74%. The trypsin-glyoxyl-CCP derivative was thermally stable at 65 °C, a value that was 1090-fold higher than that obtained with the free enzyme. The trypsin-IDA-glyoxyl-CCP and trypsin-glutaraldehyde-CCP derivatives had thermal stabilities that were 883- and five-fold higher, respectively, then those obtained with the free enzyme. In the batch experiments, trypsin-IDA-glyoxyl-CCP retained 91% of its activity and had a degree of hydrolysis of 12.49%, while the values for trypsin-glyoxyl-CCP were 87% and 15.46%, respectively. The stabilized derivative trypsin-glyoxyl-CCP was also tested in an upflow packed-bed reactor. The hydrodynamic characterization of this reactor was a plug flow pattern, and the kinetics of this system provided a relative activity of 3.04 ± 0.01 U·g−1 and an average degree of hydrolysis of 23%, which were suitable for the production of potentially bioactive peptides.

  14. Application of Frontal Affinity Chromatography to Study the Biomolecular Interactions with Trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, YuanYuan; Qian, Junqing; Guo, Hui; Jiang, ShengLan; Zhang, Zheng

    2015-07-01

    Trypsin is a serine protease that has been proposed as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders and malignancy diseases, thus the identification of biomolecular interactions of compounds to trypsin could be of great therapeutic importance. In this study, trypsin was immobilized on a monolithic silica capillary column via sol-gel. The binding properties of four small molecules (daidzin, genistin, matrine and oxymatrine) to trypsin were examined using the trypsin affinity columns by frontal analysis. The results indicate that the matrine (dissociation constant, Kd = 7.904 μM) has stronger interaction with trypsin than the oxymatrine (Kd = 8.204 μM), whereas daidzin and genistin were nearly have no affinity with trypsin. The results demonstrated that the frontal affinity chromatography can be used for the direct determination of protein-protease inhibitor binding interactions and have several significant advantages, including easy fabricating, reproducible, minimal technological requirements and potential to become a reliable alternative for quantitative studies of biomolecular interactions. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Maternally derived trypsin may have multiple functions in the early development of turbot (Scopthalmus maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Liang; Liu, Qinghua; Xu, Shihong; Xiao, Zhizhong; Ma, Daoyuan; Li, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Trypsin is an important serine protease that is considered to be involved in digestion of protein in teleost fish. Nevertheless, studies on trypsin/trypsinogen in fish embryos are very limited. In this study, the trypsinogen of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) (tTG) was identified and the expression patterns and activity of trypsinogen/trypsin were investigated. The results showed that the tTG mRNA was evenly distributed in the oocytes and was also expressed along the yolk periphery in early embryos. At later embryo stages and 1 days after hatching (dph), the tTG mRNA concentrated at the alimentary tract and head. Quantitative expression analysis showed that the tTG transcripts decreased after fertilization until the gastrula stage, then increased with the embryo and larvae development. This result was also confirmed by the specific activity analysis of trypsin and in-situ-hybridization (ISH). All of the results indicated that tTG in early embryo stages was maternally derived and expressed by itself after gastrula stages. Additionally, location of tTG mRNA in embryos and larvae was investigated; we considered that trypsin may have multiple functions during the embryo development process. Based on our results regarding trypsinogen in embryos and early development, we concluded that the trypsin/trypsinogen in turbot embryos was inherited from a maternal source and we suggested that trypsin in early development has multiple functions in the process of development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Protease-activated receptor 2 agonist increases cell proliferation and invasion of human pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    XIE, LIQUN; DUAN, ZEXING; LIU, CAIJU; ZHENG, YANMIN; ZHOU, JING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the expression of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) in the human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990, and to evaluate its effect on cell proliferation and invasion. The expression of PAR-2 protein and mRNA in SW1990 cells was determined by immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. MTT and cell invasion and migration assays, as well as semi-quantitative PCR and zymography analysis, were additionally performed. PAR-2 mRNA was significantly upregulated in the cells treated with trypsin or the PAR-2 activating peptide Ser-Leu-Ile-Gly-Lys-Val (SLIGKV) (P0.05). Trypsin and SLIGKV significantly promoted SW1990 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner (P<0.05). Compared with the control group, trypsin and SLIGKV significantly increased the mRNA expression (P<0.01) and gelatinolytic activity (P<0.01) of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2. In conclusion, PAR-2 is expressed in SW1990 cells. PAR-2 activation may promote the invasion and migration of human pancreatic cancer cells by increasing MMP-2 expression. PMID:25452809

  17. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, ...

  18. Trypsin-specific Inhibitors from the Macrolepiota procera, Armillaria mellea and Amanita phalloides wild mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukanc, Tjaša; Brzin, Jože; Kos, Janko; Sabotič, Jerica

    2017-01-01

    Wild growing mushrooms are a rich source of novel proteins with unique features. We have isolated and characterized trypsin inhibitors from two edible mushrooms, the honey fungus (Armillaria mellea) and the parasol mushroom (Macrolepiota procera), and from the poisonous death cap (Amanita phalloides). The trypsin inhibitors isolated: armespin, macrospin and amphaspin, have similar molecular masses, acidic isoelectric points and are not N-glycosylated. They are very strong trypsin inhibitors and weak chymotrypsin inhibitors. They are resistant to exposure to high temperatures and withstand extreme pH values. These exceptional characteristics are advantageous for their potential use in biotechnology, agriculture and medicine.

  19. 78 FR 73993 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, and 98 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Corrections In rule document 2013-28228 appearing on...

  20. 77 FR 20319 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 93 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Correction In proposed rule document...

  1. Reaction of ozone with protease inhibitors from bovine pancreas, egg white, and human serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leh, F.; Warr, T.A.; Mudd, J.B.

    1978-07-01

    Ozone inactivates the bovine pancreas trypsin-killikrein inhibitor. Tyrosine and methionine residues are oxidized. When methionine is completely oxidized and 0.5 of the four tyrosine residues is oxidized, 90% of the inhibitor capacity is retained. When both methionine and tyrosine residues are completely oxidized, 37% of the inhibitor capacity is retained. For 50% loss of anti-trypsin activity, 62 moles of O/sub 3//mole of protein were required. Inhibition of the chicken ovomucoid proteinase inhibitor by ozone is accompanied by oxidation of tyrosine, histidine, and methionine residues. For 50% loss of anti-trypsin activity, 32 moles of O/sub 3//mole of protein were required. Anti-trypsin activity of diluted human serum was only slightly inhibited by ozone. Purified ..cap alpha..-l-antiprotease from human serum was 50% inactivated by 88 moles of O/sub 3//mole of protein. The oxidation of free tyrosine by ozone proceeds by way of dihydroxyphenylalanine and dihydroxyphenylalanine quinone, finally yielding colored polymeric material.

  2. Effects of trypsin on cellular, chromosomal and DNA damage induced by X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprunt, Elizabeth A.

    When cells are trypsinized before irradiation, potentiation of cell killing is seen; this is known as the 'trypsin effect'. The trypsin effect is re-examined here in the light of experiments in which enzymatic modifications of DNA in permeabilized cells has become a powerful experimental tool (Bryant et al, 1978, Ahnstrom and Bryant,1982; Natarajan et al, 1980; Bryant, 1984, 1985; Natarajan and Obe, 1984) and where in some cases it is suspected that trypsinization as part of the technique could significantly alter cell membrane permeability and chromatin structure (Obe et al, 1985; Obe and Winkel, 1985; Bryant and Christie, 1989). The trypsin effect was investigated at various cellular levels, assaying for cell survival (to verify the potentiation), anaphase chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage and repair and lastly using a nucleoid assay to investigate the effect of trypsin on DNA-nuclear matrix interactions. Each of these are considered in separate chapters as individual studies, then all compared in the final discussion. A small potentiation effect of X-ray damage on cell killing was seen when using Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells but no potentiating effect was found in the murine Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cell line. Trypsinization was found to increase the number of X-ray induced chromosomal anaphase abnormalities in EAT cells. To investigate the possibility that the basis of the trypsin effect lies in its action at the DNA level, further experiments were performed to monitor DNA damage and repair using the DNA unwinding and neutral elution techniques. No difference was seen in the unwinding kinetics or in the DNA unwinding dose-effect curves for induction of DNA single strand breakage (ssb); when using neutral elution however. treatment of cells with trypsin or buffer alone increased the incidence of X-ray induced double strand breaks (dsb) at higher doses. Trypsinized EAT cells were found to repair ssb after 12 Gy less rapidly than those treated with

  3. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  4. Diagnosis of bovine neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Schares, G

    2006-08-31

    The protozoan parasite Neospora caninum is a major cause of abortion in cattle. The diagnosis of neosporosis-associated mortality and abortion in cattle is difficult. In the present paper we review histologic, serologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular methods for dignosis of bovine neosporosis. Although not a routine method of diagnosis, methods to isolate viable N. caninum from bovine tissues are also reviewed.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... loss of function can impair the production of digestive enzymes and disrupt normal digestion, leading to fatty stool (steatorrhea), weight loss, and ... its working or active form called trypsin. When digestion is complete and trypsin is no ... the enzyme is broken down. Some PRSS1 gene mutations that ...

  6. Mating-increases trypsin in female Drosophila hemolymph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilpel, Noam; Nezer, Ifat; Applebaum, Shalom W; Heifetz, Yael

    2008-03-01

    Male-derived accessory gland proteins (Acps) are transferred to the female reproductive tract during mating and affect female reproductive maturation and behavior. Some Acps subsequently enter the female hemolymph. We hypothesized that humoral proteases are the primary effectors of Acp bioactivity by processing (activating) and/or degrading them. To test this hypothesis we examined the fate of one Acp, Drosophila melanogaster Sex Peptide (Acp70A, DrmSP), which possesses several putative serine-protease cleavage sites, in hemolymph of unmated and mated females. In D. melanogaster, DrmSP induces post-mating non-receptivity and enhances oogenesis. To determine if serine proteases regulate the duration of DrmSP activity in mated females, we performed kinetic analysis of cleavage of a synthetic N-terminal truncated DrmSP(8-36) (T-SP) with hemolymph of unmated versus mated females. We found that T-SP is cleaved more rapidly and completely in mated female hemolymph. Using LC-MS/MS analyses, we identified its primary cleavage sites, indicating that trypsin was the major endopeptidase regulating T-SP in hemolymph. This was verified in vitro by utilizing specific chromogenic serine-protease substrates and inhibitors. We propose that post-mating cleavage of DrmSP in the female hemolymph regulates the duration of the rapidly induced post-mating responses in D. melanogaster and that this is a specific example of Acp bioactivity regulated by hemolymph serine proteases.

  7. Pancreatic function and enzyme synthesis rates in mild chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, I; Boyd, E J; Jacyna, M R; Penston, J G; Soutar, J S; Bouchier, I A

    1986-06-01

    Incorporation of intravenous 75Se-methionine into duodenal juice proteins during pancreatic stimulation was measured as an index of pancreatic enzyme synthesis rates in 12 patients with a normal pancreatogram and in 6 with mild chronic pancreatitis. Isotope incorporation was significantly greater in subjects with mild chronic pancreatitis than in those with a normal pancreatogram. Thus in most patients in whom pancreatography demonstrates the characteristic radiological features of 'mild chronic pancreatitis' pancreatic acinar function is abnormal. The coexistence of morphological and functional abnormality implies that such patients do have chronic pancreatitis.

  8. Treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunschot, S. van; Bakker, O.J.; Besselink, M.G.; Bollen, T.L.; Fockens, P.; Gooszen, H.G.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Dutch Pancreatitis Study, G.

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common and potentially lethal disease. It is associated with significant morbidity and consumes enormous health care resources. Over the last 2 decades, the treatment of acute pancreatitis has undergone fundamental changes based on new conceptual insights and evidence from

  9. Investigation of the interactions of lysozyme and trypsin with biphenol A using spectroscopic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Chen, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Hong-Mei

    2010-03-01

    The interaction between bisphenol A (BPA) and lysozyme (or trypsin) was investigated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra techniques under physiological pH 7.40. BPA effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of lysozyme and trypsin via static quenching. H-bonds and van der Waals interactions played a major role in stabilizing the BPA-proteinase complex. The distance r between donor and acceptor was obtained to be 1.65 and 2.26 nm for BPA-lysozyme and BPA-trypsin complexes, respectively. The effect of BPA on the conformation of lysozyme and trypsin was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra.

  10. The use of poly(ethylene terephthalate)-poly(aniline) composite for trypsin immobilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caramori, S.S. [Laboratorio de Quimica de Proteinas, Departamento de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Goias, Cx. Postal 131, 74001-970 Goiania-GO (Brazil)], E-mail: samanthabio@hotmail.com; Fernandes, K.F. [Laboratorio de Quimica de Proteinas, Departamento de Bioquimica e Biologia Molecular, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Goias, Cx. Postal 131, 74001-970 Goiania-GO (Brazil)], E-mail: katia@icb.ufg.br

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents trypsin immobilisation on strips of poly(ethylene terephthalate)-poly(aniline), activated with glutaraldehyde (PET-PANIG) composite. The photomicrography of the material showed changes corresponding to the chemical modifications produced in the steps of synthesis. The immobilisation process was very efficient under optimal conditions (18.6%). The immobilised and free enzyme presented the same pH and temperature optimum. PET-PANIG-trypsin was able to hydrolyse casein, albumin, gelatine, and skimmed milk. Km{sub app} value for PET-PANIG-trypsin was very close to Km of the free enzyme for casein. Immobilised trypsin showed higher stability than the free enzyme, with 100% activity after 14 days of storage at 4 deg. C and 100% operational stability after 4 cycles of use.

  11. Influence of Different Genotypes on Trypsin Inhibitor Levels and Activity in Soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor A. Nedovic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the relationship between the two major trypsin inhibitors (TI in soybean, i.e., the Kunitz (KTI and Bowman-Birk (BBI trypsin inhibitors, as well as between them and the corresponding trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA. Twelve investigated soybean genotypes showed significant differences in TI levels and TIA. A very strong positive correlation was found between the levels of KTI and total BBI (r = 0.94, P < 0.05. No relationship was found between KTI, BBI or total TI and TIA. Based on this data, it appears that the levels of major TI in soybean are related. Understanding the relationship between trypsin inhibitors and their activities could be useful for further improvement of the health impacts of soy proteins.

  12. Effect of parenteral and early intrajejunal nutrition on pancreatic digestive enzyme synthesis, storage and discharge in dog models of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Huan-Long; Su, Zhen-Dong; Hu, Lei-Guang; Ding, Zai-Xian; Lin, Qing-Tian

    2007-02-21

    To study the effect of early intrajejunal nutrition on enzyme-protein synthesis and secretion during acute pancreatitis. Fifteen dogs were randomly divided into parenteral nutrition (n = 7) and early intrajejunal nutrition groups (n = 8). An acute pancreatitis model was induced by injecting 5% sodium taurocholate and trypsin into the pancreas via the pancreatic duct. Intrajejunal nutrition was delivered with a catheter via a jejunostomy tube after the model was established for 24 h. On d 1 and 7 and at the beginning of nutritional support, radioactive tracing and electron microscopes were used to evaluate the enzyme-protein synthesis in acinar cells, the subcellular fractionation and the change in zymogen granules after 1.85 x 10(6) Bq L-(3)H phenylalanine was infused at 30, 60, 120, and 180 min. The 3H radioactivity in pancreatic acinar cells reached its peak level at 60 min, and the contents in the early intrajejunal nutrition group were higher than those in the parenteral nutrition group, which were then decreased. The mean number and area of zymogen granules did not show any significant statistical difference in both groups on d 1 or on d 7 (P > 0.05). Early intrajejunal nutrition might be effective in dogs with acute pancreatitis.

  13. Bioconjugation of trypsin onto gold nanoparticles: Effect of surface chemistry on bioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinterwirth, Helmut; Lindner, Wolfgang [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 38, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Laemmerhofer, Michael, E-mail: michael.laemmerhofer@uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 38, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Size and spacer affect bioactivity of nanoparticulate trypsin reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase of GNP's size increases activity of bound trypsin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase of spacer length increases amount and activity of immobilized enzyme by factor 6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decrease of digestion time up to less than 1 h when trypsin immobilized onto GNPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduced auto-digestion compared to trypsin in-solution. - Abstract: The systematic study of activity, long-time stability and auto-digestion of trypsin immobilized onto gold nanoparticles (GNPs) is described in this paper and compared to trypsin in-solution. Thereby, the influence of GNP's size and immobilization chemistry by various linkers differing in lipophilicity/hydrophilicity and spacer lengths was investigated with regard to the bioactivity of the conjugated enzyme. GNPs with different sizes were prepared by reduction and simultaneous stabilization with trisodium citrate and characterized by UV/vis spectra, dynamic light scattering (DLS), {zeta}-potential measurements and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). GNPs were derivatized by self-assembling of bifunctional thiol reagents on the nanoparticle (NP) surface via dative thiol-gold bond yielding a carboxylic acid functionalized surface. Trypsin was either attached directly via hydrophobic and ionic interactions onto the citrate stabilized GNPs or immobilized via EDC/NHS bioconjugation onto the carboxylic functionalized GNPs, respectively. The amount of bound trypsin was quantified by measuring the absorbance at 280 nm. The activity of bound enzyme and its Michaelis Menten kinetic parameter K{sub m} and v{sub max} were measured by the standard chromogenic substrate N{sub {alpha}}-Benzoyl-DL-arginine 4-nitroanilide hydrochloride (BApNA). Finally, digestion of a standard protein mixture with the trypsin-conjugated NPs followed by analysis with

  14. Primary pancreatic plasmacytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Yasunori; Nonaka, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Eiji; Funaki, Naomi; Kono, Yukihiro; Mizuta, Kazuhiko

    2004-06-01

    We report an extremely rare case of primary pancreatic plasmacytoma. A 56-year-old man had a 4-cm mass in the pancreatic tail and received distal pancreatectomy. This mass mainly consisted of plasma cells, but we failed to demonstrate their monoclonality in spite of the immunohistological staining. One and a half years later, this patient's right inguinal node swelled, and this node also showed a dense plasma cell infiltration. A very precise immunohistological staining was performed for this lymph node and the previous pancreatic mass, and both were diffusely positive for kappa light chain, IgG, and CD38. In the absence of myeloma elsewhere, we thus reached the correct diagnosis of primary pancreatic plasmacytoma, which later metastasized to lymph nodes. In the presence of the plasma cell proliferation in a pancreatic mass, plasmacytoma should be taken into consideration, and a more careful immunohistological staining is definitely necessary.

  15. Treatment Options by Stage (Pancreatic Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... History Committees of Interest Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws Careers Visitor Information Search Search Home Cancer Types Pancreatic Cancer Patient Pancreatic Cancer Patient Pancreatic ...

  16. Dissection of the binding of hydrogen peroxide to trypsin using spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Yu, Zehua; Hu, Xinxin; Liu, Rutao

    2015-02-01

    Studies on the effects of environmental pollutants to protein in vitro has become a global attention. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is used as an effective food preservative and bleacher in industrial production. The toxicity of H2O2 to trypsin was investigated by multiple spectroscopic techniques and the molecular docking method at the molecular level. The intrinsic fluorescence of trypsin was proved to be quenched in a static process based on the results of fluorescence lifetime experiment. Hydrogen bonds interaction and van der Waals forces were the main force to generate the trypsin-H2O2 complex on account of the negative ΔH0 and ΔS0. The binding of H2O2 changed the conformational structures and internal microenvironment of trypsin illustrated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) results. However, the binding site was far away from the active site of trypsin and the trypsin activity was only slightly affected by H2O2, which was further explained by molecular docking investigations.

  17. Bovine Herpesvirus 4 infections and bovine mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, Gerardus Johannus

    2002-01-01

    Mastitis is an often occurring disease in dairy cattle with an enormous economic impact for milk producers worldwide. Despite intensive research, which is historically based on the detection of bacterial udder pathogens, still around 20-35% of clinical cases of bovine mastitis have an unknown

  18. Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrique Domínguez-Muñoz, J

    2016-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the definition of the disease, the etiological diagnosis of idiopathic disease, the correlation between fibrosis degree and pancreatic secretion in the early stages of chronic pancreatitis, the treatment of the disease and of pain, the clinical relevance of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. A new mechanistic definition of chronic pancreatitis has been proposed. Genetic testing is mainly of help in patients with relapsing idiopathic pancreatitis. A significant correlation has been shown between the degree of pancreatic fibrosis as evaluated by elastography and pancreatic secretion of bicarbonate. New data supports the efficacy of antioxidants and simvastatin for the therapy of chronic pancreatitis. The pancreatoscopy-guided intraductal lithotripsy is an effective alternative to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with chronic calcifying pancreatitis. The presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significant risk of cardiovascular events. Fine needle biopsy and contrast enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography are of help for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and its differential diagnosis with pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Elimination of trypsin inhibitor activity and beany flavor in soy milk by consecutive blanching and ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shaohong; Chang, Sam K C; Liu, Zhisheng; Xu, Baojun

    2008-09-10

    Soy foods contain significant health-promoting components but also may contain beany flavor and trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA), which can cause pancreatic disease if present at a high level. Thermal processing can inactivate TIA and lipoxygenase. Ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) processing is relatively new for manufacturing soy milk. Simultaneous elimination of TIA and soy odor by UHT processing for enhancing soy milk quality has not been reported. The objective was to determine TIA in soy milk processed by traditional, steam injection, blanching, and UHT methods and to compare the products with commercial soy milk products. Soybean was soaked and blanched at 70-85 degrees C for 30 s-7.5 min. The blanched beans were made into base soy milk. The hexanal content of the base soy milk was determined by gas chromatography to determine the best conditions for further thermal processing by indirect and direct UHT methods at 135-150 degrees C for 10-50 s using the Microthermics processor. Soy milk was also made from soaked soybeans by traditional batch cooking and steaming methods. Eighteen commercial products were selected from the supermarket. Residual TIA in soy milk processed by the traditional and steam injection to 100 degrees C for 20 min was approximately 13%. Blanching could inactivate 25-50% of TIAs of the raw soy milk. The blanch conditions of 80 degrees C and 2 min were selected for UHT processing because these conditions produced blanched soy milk without hexanal, indicating a complete heat inactivation of lipoxygenases. The TIA decreased with increased temperature and time of UHT heating. The maximal trypsin inhibitor inactivation was achieved by UHT direct and indirect methods with residual activities of approximately 10%. Some commercial soy milk products contained high TIAs. The results are important to the food industry and consumers. Kinetic analysis showed that heat inactivation (denaturation) of TIA, under the continuous processing conditions of the

  20. Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Milena; Ilic, Irena

    2016-11-28

    Cancer of the pancreas remains one of the deadliest cancer types. Based on the GLOBOCAN 2012 estimates, pancreatic cancer causes more than 331000 deaths per year, ranking as the seventh leading cause of cancer death in both sexes together. Globally, about 338000 people had pancreatic cancer in 2012, making it the 11(th) most common cancer. The highest incidence and mortality rates of pancreatic cancer are found in developed countries. Trends for pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality varied considerably in the world. A known cause of pancreatic cancer is tobacco smoking. This risk factor is likely to explain some of the international variations and gender differences. The overall five-year survival rate is about 6% (ranges from 2% to 9%), but this vary very small between developed and developing countries. To date, the causes of pancreatic cancer are still insufficiently known, although certain risk factors have been identified, such as smoking, obesity, genetics, diabetes, diet, inactivity. There are no current screening recommendations for pancreatic cancer, so primary prevention is of utmost importance. A better understanding of the etiology and identifying the risk factors is essential for the primary prevention of this disease.

  1. PKD signaling and pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J

    2016-07-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder.

  2. Nonenzymatic glycosylation of bovine myelin basic protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitz, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    In the CNS myelin sheath the nonenzymatic glycosylation reaction (at the early stage of the Amadori product) occurs only with the myelin basic protein and not with the other myelin proteins. This was observed in isolated bovine myelin by in vitro incubation with (/sup 14/C)-galactose and (/sup 14/C)-glucose. The respective in-vitro incorporation rates for purified bovine myelin basic protein with D-galactose, D-glucose and D-mannose were 7.2, 2.4 and 2.4 mmoles/mole myelin basic protein per day at 37/sup 0/C. A more rapid, HPLC method was devised and characterized to specifically analyze for the Amadori product. The HPLC method was correlated to the (/sup 14/C)-sugar incorporation method for myelin basic protein under a set of standard reaction conditions using (/sup 14/C)-glucose and (/sup 14/C)-mannose with HPLC values at 1/6 and 1/5 of the (/sup 14/C)-sugar incorporation method. A novel myelin basic protein purification step has been developed that yields a relativity proteolytic free preparation that is easy to work with, being totally soluble at a neutral pH. Nine new spots appear for a trypsinized glycosylated MBP in the paper peptide map of which eight correspond to positions of the (/sup 3/H)-labeled Amadori product in affinity isolated peptides. These studies provide a general characterization of and a structural basis for investigations on nonenzymatically glycosylated MBP as well as identifying MBP as the only nonenzymatically glycosylated protein in the CNS myelin sheath which may accumulate during aging, diabetes, and demyelinating diseases in general.

  3. Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Claus; Detlefsen, Sönke; Palnæs Hansen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database aims to prospectively register the epidemiology, diagnostic workup, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer in Denmark at an institutional and national level. STUDY POPULATION: Since May 1, 2011, all patients......, and survival. The results are published annually. CONCLUSION: The Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database has registered data on 2,217 patients with microscopically verified ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. The data have been obtained nationwide over a period of 4 years and 2 months. The completeness...

  4. Pancreatitis in scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Bhatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a rickettsial infection prevalent in most parts of India. Acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation is a rare complication of this condition. This paper reports acute renal failure, pancreatitis and pseudocyst formation in a 48-year-old female with scrub typhus. Ultrasonography of the abdomen revealed a bulky pancreas with fluid seen along the body of the pancreas in the lesser sac. The infection was successfully treated with doxycycline and supportive treatment. Pancreatitis was managed conservatively. This case report highlights the importance of identifying and managing uncommon complications of a common tropical disease for optimum outcome.

  5. Endocrine pancreatic insufficiency in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelopoulos, Nicholas; Dervenis, Christos; Goula, Anastasia; Rombopoulos, Grigorios; Livadas, Sarantis; Kaltsas, Dimitrios; Kaltzidou, Victoria; Tolis, George

    2005-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is considered to be a rare cause of diabetes mellitus. However, in both the developed and developing world, there is an increasing number of patients suffering from pancreatitis probably due to lifestyle changes, which is partially associated with both social factors and the poor health status of immigrants. Owing to these circumstances, CP has evolved with one of the possible causes of diabetes in a selected group of patients and should be included in the differential diagnosis of diabetes. Several studies have shown that the long-term rate of diabetic complications in patients with CP and insulin-dependent diabetes is similar to that in patients with type 1 diabetes of equal duration. The hypothesis that early diagnosis of CP should result in better prognosis is not validated and may complicate the issue, since the risk of diabetes has been shown to increase significantly only once pancreatic calcification has developed. Accumulative evidence suggests that the risk of diabetes is not influenced by elective pancreatic surgical procedures other than distal pancreatectomy. The lack of contemporary data points to the urgent need for large prospective studies in order to accurately evaluate the special characteristics of disorders in glucose homeostasis in patients with CP.

  6. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term outcomes of total pancreatectomy and islet auto transplantation for hereditary/genetic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnakotla, Srinath; Radosevich, David M; Dunn, Ty B; Bellin, Melena D; Freeman, Martin L; Schwarzenberg, Sarah J; Balamurugan, A N; Wilhelm, Josh; Bland, Barbara; Vickers, Selwyn M; Beilman, Gregory J; Sutherland, David E R; Pruett, Timothy L

    2014-04-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a debilitating disease resulting from many causes. The subset with hereditary/genetic pancreatitis (HGP) not only has chronic pain, but also an increased risk for pancreatic cancer. Long-term outcomes of total pancreatectomy (TP) and islet autogeneic transplantation (IAT) for chronic pancreatitis due to HGP are not clear. We reviewed a prospectively maintained database of 484 TP-IATs from 1977 to 2012 at a single center. The outcomes (eg, pain relief, narcotic use, β-cell function, health-related quality of life measures) of patients who received TP-IAT for HGP (protease trypsin 1, n = 38; serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1, n = 9; cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, n = 14; and familial, n = 19) were evaluated and compared with those with non-hereditary/nongenetic causes. All 80 patients with HGP were narcotic dependent and failed endoscopic management or direct pancreatic surgery. Post TP-IAT, 90% of the patients were pancreatitis pain free with sustained pain relief; >65% had partial or full β-cell function. Compared with nonhereditary causes, HGP patients were younger (22 years old vs 38 years old; p ≤ 0.001), had pancreatitis pain of longer duration (11.6 ± 1.1 years vs 9.0 ± 0.4 years; p = 0.016), had a higher pancreas fibrosis score (7 ± 0.2 vs 4.8 ± 0.1; p ≤ 0.001), and trended toward lower islet yield (3,435 ± 361 islet cell equivalent vs 3,850 ± 128 islet cell equivalent; p = 0.28). Using multivariate logistic regression, patients with non-HGP causes (p = 0.019); lower severity of pancreas fibrosis (p Total pancreatectomy and IAT in patients with chronic pancreatitis due to HGP cause provide long-term pain relief (90%) and preservation of β-cell function. Patients with chronic painful pancreatitis due to HGP with a high lifetime risk of pancreatic cancer should be considered earlier for TP-IAT before pancreatic inflammation results in a higher degree of pancreatic fibrosis and islet cell function

  8. Preservation of the Structure of Enzymatically-Degraded Bovine Vitreous Using Synthetic Proteoglycan Mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianru; Filas, Benjamen A.; Roth, Robyn; Heuser, John; Ma, Nan; Sharma, Shaili; Panitch, Alyssa; Beebe, David C.; Shui, Ying-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Vitreous liquefaction and subsequent posterior vitreous detachment can lead to several sight-threatening diseases, including retinal detachment, macular hole and macular traction syndrome, nuclear cataracts, and possibly, open-angle glaucoma. In this study, we tested the ability of three novel synthetic chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan mimics to preserve the structure and physical properties of enzymatically-degraded bovine vitreous. Methods. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan mimics, designed to bind to type II collagen, hyaluronic acid, or both, were applied to trypsin- or collagenase-treated bovine vitreous in situ and in vitro. Rheology and liquefaction tests were performed to determine the physical properties of the vitreous, while Western blots were used to detect the presence and degradation of soluble collagen II (α1). Deep-etch electron microscopy (DEEM) identified the ultrastructure of mimic-treated and untreated enzyme-degraded bovine vitreous. Results. Proteoglycan mimics preserved the physical properties of trypsin-degraded bovine vitreous and protected against vitreous liquefaction. Although the collagen-binding mimic maintained the physical properties of collagenase-treated vitreous, liquefaction still occurred. Western blots indicated that the mimic provided only marginal protective ability against soluble collagen degradation. Deep-etch electron microscopy, however, showed increased density and isotropy of microstructural components in mimic-treated vitreous, supporting the initial result that vitreous structure was preserved. Conclusions. Proteoglycan mimics preserved bovine vitreous physical properties after enzymatic degradation. These compounds may be useful in delaying or preventing the pathological effects of age-related, or enzymatically-induced, degradation of the vitreous body. PMID:25342623

  9. Inhibition of proliferative responses of mouse spleen lymphocytes and rabbit Peyer's patch cells by bovine milk caseins and their digests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, H; Hata, I

    1995-05-01

    The modulating effect of bovine milk casein components and their digests on the proliferative responses of mouse spleen lymphocytes and rabbit Peyer's patch cells induced or not induced by mitogens has been studied with a colorimetric assay using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide. All the casein components and their digests tested had little mitogenic effect on the proliferative responses of mouse spleen lymphocytes and rabbit Peyer's patch cells. Intact kappa-casein significantly inhibited the proliferative responses of mouse spleen lymphocytes and Peyer's patch cells induced by mitogens such as lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium, concanavalin A, phytohaemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen. In contrast, intact alpha s1-casein and beta-casein had little effect. kappa-Casein had an inhibitory effect after digestion by pancreatin or trypsin, but not after pepsin or chymotrypsin digestion. Both pancreatin and trypsin digests of alpha s1-casein and beta-casein significantly inhibited the proliferative responses of mouse spleen lymphocytes and rabbit Peyer's patch cells induced by mitogens, whereas pepsin and chymotrypsin digests of both caseins were without effect. Moreover, the trypsin digest of each casein component had an inhibitory effect on mouse spleen lymphocyte proliferation in the absence of mitogen. Since trypsin is a major proteinase in pancreatin, the substrate specificity of trypsin seems to be important for the formation of the inhibitory peptides from casein components. These observations suggest that intact kappa-casein and some peptides formed from milk casein components by the action of trypsin may suppress the immune responsiveness of neonates.

  10. Obesity and Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Dominique S

    Pancreatic cancer has few known risk factors, providing little in the way of prevention, and is the most rapidly fatal cancer with 7 % survival rate at 5 years. Obesity has surfaced as an important risk factor for pancreatic cancer as epidemiological studies with strong methodological designs have removed important biases and solidified the obesity associations. Moreover, studies indicate that obesity early in adulthood is strongly associated with future risk of pancreatic cancer and that abdominal obesity is an independent risk factor. There is increasing evidence suggesting long-standing diabetes type 2 and insulin resistance are important etiological factors of this disease, providing a strong mechanistic link to obesity. The challenge remains to determine whether intended weight loss in midlife will reduce risk of pancreatic cancer and to elucidate the complex underlying pathways directly involved with risk.

  11. Perspectives in Pancreatic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Salim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describes some of the mechanisms which are thought to be important in the causation of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Both medical and surgical techniques for treating this pain are described.

  12. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (PNETs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Our signature PurpleStride run/walk events raise spirits, awareness and funds in communities nationwide. FIND YOUR ... two main pancreatic hormones. Insulin lowers blood sugar levels, while glucagon raises blood sugar levels. Together, these ...

  13. [Advances in the role of autophagy in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, He; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Weixing

    2017-10-01

    Autophagy is a self-protect cellular mechanism by which the unneeded cellular structure or impaired protein are targeted to degeneration. Acute pancreatitis (AP) is associated with autophagy tightly. This article is aimed to mainly elaborate the phenomenon that AP can be triggered by impaired autophagy and the mechanism of AP exacerbation by damaged autophagy. In AP, the reasons of impaired autophagy is dysfunction of cathepsins and lysosome associated membrane protein, which present as vacuoles accumulation in acinar cells and combination disorder of autophagolysosome, finally to activation of trypsin. By the relocation of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and promotion of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), impaired autophagy aggravates AP. Understanding the above mechanism has certain significance to the prevention and treatment of AP.

  14. New insights into alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Minoti; Pirola, Romano; Wilson, Jeremy

    2009-10-01

    Pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer represent two major diseases of the exocrine pancreas. Pancreatitis exhibits both acute and chronic manifestations. The commonest causes of acute pancreatitis are gallstones and alcohol abuse; the latter is also the predominant cause of chronic pancreatitis. Recent evidence indicates that endotoxinemia, which occurs in alcoholics due to increased gut permeability, may trigger overt necroinflammation of the pancreas in alcoholics and one that may also play a critical role in progression to chronic pancreatitis (acinar atrophy and fibrosis) via activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Chronic pancreatitis is a major risk factor for the development of pancreatic cancer, which is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in humans. Increasing attention has been paid in recent years to the role of the stroma in pancreatic cancer progression. It is now well established that PSCs play a key role in the production of cancer stroma and that they interact closely with cancer cells to create a tumor facilitatory environment that stimulates local tumor growth and distant metastasis. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, with particular reference to the central role played by PSCs in both diseases. An improved knowledge of PSC biology has the potential to provide an insight into pathways that may be therapeutically targeted to inhibit PSC activation, thereby inhibiting the development of fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis and interrupting stellate cell-cancer cell interactions so as to retard cancer progression.

  15. Primary Pancreatic Leiomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kocakoc, Ercan; Havan, Nuri; Bilgin, Mehmet; Atay, Musa

    2014-01-01

    Primary pancreatic leiomyosarcomas are rare malignant neoplasms with an aggressive course and a large size. A 56-year-old woman presented with an 8-year history of abdominal pain. Multislice computed tomography revealed a large heterogeneous mass with necrotic, calcified and macroscopic fatty areas. The tumor was excised. Histopathological evaluation revealed leiomyosarcoma of the pancreas. If a patient has a large size mass with a cystic-necrotic component, pancreatic leiomyosarcoma should b...

  16. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia With Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sacks, Frank Martin; Stanesa, Maxine; Hegele, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Recurrent pancreatitis is a potentially fatal complication of severe hypertriglyceridemia. Genetic defects and lifestyle risk factors may render this condition unresponsive to current treatments. OBSERVATIONS: We report this first case of long-term management of intractable near-fatal recurrent pancreatitis secondary to severe hypertriglyceridemia by a novel use of lomitapide, an inhibitor of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, recently approved for treatment of familia...

  17. Investigate the binding of catechins to trypsin using docking and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Fengchao; Yang, Kecheng; Li, Yunqi

    2015-01-01

    To explore the inhibitory mechanism of catechins for digestive enzymes, we investigated the binding mode of catechins to a typical digestive enzyme-trypsin and analyzed the structure-activity relationship of catechins, using an integration of molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and binding free energy calculation. We found that catechins with different structures bound to a conservative pocket S1 of trypsin, which is comprised of residues 189-195, 214-220 and 225-228. In the trypsin-catechin complexes, Asp189 by forming strong hydrogen bonding, and Gln192, Trp215 and Gly216 through hydrophobic interactions, all significantly contribute to the binding of catechins. The number and the position of hydroxyl and aromatic groups, the structure of stereoisomers, and the orientation of catechins in the binding pocket S1 of trypsin all affect the binding affinity. The binding affinity is in the order of Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) > Epicatechin gallate (ECG) > Epicatechin (EC) > Epigallocatechin (EGC), and 2R-3R EGCG shows the strongest binding affinity out of other stereoisomers. Meanwhile, the synergic conformational changes of residues and catechins were also analyzed. These findings will be helpful in understanding the knowledge of interactions between catechins and trypsin and referable for the design of novel polyphenol based functional food and nutriceutical formulas.

  18. Buckwheat trypsin inhibitor with helical hairpin structure belongs to a new family of plant defence peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oparin, Peter B; Mineev, Konstantin S; Dunaevsky, Yakov E; Arseniev, Alexander S; Belozersky, Mikhail A; Grishin, Eugene V; Egorov, Tsezi A; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2012-08-15

    A new peptide trypsin inhibitor named BWI-2c was obtained from buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) seeds by sequential affinity, ion exchange and reversed-phase chromatography. The peptide was sequenced and found to contain 41 amino acid residues, with four cysteine residues involved in two intramolecular disulfide bonds. Recombinant BWI-2c identical to the natural peptide was produced in Escherichia coli in a form of a cleavable fusion with thioredoxin. The 3D (three-dimensional) structure of the peptide in solution was determined by NMR spectroscopy, revealing two antiparallel α-helices stapled by disulfide bonds. Together with VhTI, a trypsin inhibitor from veronica (Veronica hederifolia), BWI-2c represents a new family of protease inhibitors with an unusual α-helical hairpin fold. The linker sequence between the helices represents the so-called trypsin inhibitory loop responsible for direct binding to the active site of the enzyme that cleaves BWI-2c at the functionally important residue Arg(19). The inhibition constant was determined for BWI-2c against trypsin (1.7×10(-1)0 M), and the peptide was tested on other enzymes, including those from various insect digestive systems, revealing high selectivity to trypsin-like proteases. Structural similarity shared by BWI-2c, VhTI and several other plant defence peptides leads to the acknowledgement of a new widespread family of plant peptides termed α-hairpinins.

  19. Crystallization, data collection and processing of the chymotrypsin–BTCI–trypsin ternary complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteves, Gisele Ferreira; Teles, Rozeni Chagas Lima; Cavalcante, Nayara Silva; Neves, David; Ventura, Manuel Mateus [Laboratório de Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, 70910-900 Brasília-DF (Brazil); Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalves, E-mail: joao@lnls.br [Center for Structural Molecular Biology (CeBiME), Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), CP 6192, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Freitas, Sonia Maria de, E-mail: joao@lnls.br [Laboratório de Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, 70910-900 Brasília-DF (Brazil)

    2007-12-01

    A ternary complex of the proteinase inhibitor (BTCI) with trypsin and chymotrypsin was crystallized and its crystal structure was solved by molecular replacement. A ternary complex of the black-eyed pea trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitor (BTCI) with trypsin and chymotrypsin was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with 0.1 M HEPES pH 7.5, 10%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 6000 and 5%(v/v) 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol as precipitant. BTCI is a small protein with 83 amino-acid residues isolated from Vigna unguiculata seeds and is able to inhibit trypsin and chymotrypsin simultaneously by forming a stable ternary complex. X-ray data were collected from a single crystal of the trypsin–BTCI–chymotrypsin ternary complex to 2.7 Å resolution under cryogenic conditions. The structure of the ternary complex was solved by molecular replacement using the crystal structures of the BTCI–trypsin binary complex (PDB code) and chymotrypsin (PDB code) as search models.

  20. TRYPSIN-INDUCED HEMAGGLUTINATION ASSAY FOR THE DETECTION OF INFECTIOUS BRONCHITIS VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Mahmood, M. Siddique, I. Hussain and A. Khan1

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A trypsin-induced hemagglutination (THA assay was standardized to detect infectious bronchitis virus (IBV in allantoic fluid (AF of embryonated eggs. The test was used in 20 samples, each collected from 5 different layer farms suspected for IBV. Allantoic fluid from inoculated embryos was harvested and treated with reagent grade trypsin at the percentages of 0.25, 0.50, 1.0 and 2.0 for 30 minutes to 3 hours at pH 7.2. The IBV in trypsinized AF was identified by clear and consistent agglutination of chicken red blood cells within 5 minutes of incubation at 37oC. The results indicated that AF treated with equal volume of 1.0% reagent grade trypsin elicited the hemagglutinating (HA activity in 3.0 hours whereas 2.0% reagent grade trypsin elicited the HA activity only after 30 minutes incubation at 37oC. Sensitivity of THA was 92% as compared with 76% for agar gel precipitation test. Gross pathological lesions (curling and dwarfing in chick embryo, intracereberal inoculation of un-weaned mice and pathogenicity test in one-day-old broiler chicks showed 79, 84 and 77% sensitivity, respectively.

  1. Trypsin inhibitor from tamarindus indica L. seeds reduces weight gain and food consumption and increases plasmatic cholecystokinin levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joycellane Alline do Nascimento Campos Ribeiro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Seeds are excellent sources of proteinase inhibitors, some of which may have satietogenic and slimming actions. We evaluated the effect of a trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus indica L. seeds on weight gain, food consumption and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. METHODS: A trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus was isolated using ammonium sulfate (30-60% following precipitation with acetone and was further isolated with Trypsin-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Analyses were conducted to assess the in vivo digestibility, food intake, body weight evolution and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. Histological analyses of organs and biochemical analyses of sera were performed. RESULTS: The trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus reduced food consumption, thereby reducing weight gain. The in vivo true digestibility was not significantly different between the control and Tamarindus trypsin inhibitor-treated groups. The trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus did not cause alterations in biochemical parameters or liver, stomach, intestine or pancreas histology. Rats treated with the trypsin inhibitor showed significantly elevated cholecystokinin levels compared with animals receiving casein or water. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that the isolated trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus reduces weight gain by reducing food consumption, an effect that may be mediated by increased cholecystokinin. Thus, the potential use of this trypsin inhibitor in obesity prevention and/or treatment should be evaluated.

  2. Amino acid sequence of the tryptic peptide containing the catalytic-site thiol group of bovine liver uridine diphosphate glucose dehydrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Franzen, B.; Carrubba, C; Feingold, D S; Ashcom, J; Franzen, J S

    1981-01-01

    The catalytic-site thiol groups of UDP-glucose dehydrogenase from bovine liver were carboxymethylated with iodo[2-14C]acetate or with iodoacetamidofluorescein. After the residual thiol groups were carboxymethylated with iodoacetate, the proteins were digested with trypsin. The 14C-labelled peptide from the carboxymethylated enzyme was purified to homogeneity by successive thick-layer chromatography on silica gel, paper electrophoresis and chromatography, and column chromatography on Bio-Gel P...

  3. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  4. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  5. Altered central pain processing after pancreatic surgery for chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwense, S.A.W.; Ali, U. Ahmed; Broek, R.P. Ten; Issa, Y.; Eijck, C.H. van; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Goor, H. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic abdominal pain is common in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and may involve altered central pain processing. This study evaluated the relationship between pain processing and pain outcome after pancreatic duct decompression and/or pancreatic resection in patients with CP. METHODS:

  6. Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic stones in patients with chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M. E.; Rauws, E. A.; Tytgat, G. N.; Huibregtse, K.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the long-term results of endoscopic pancreatic stone removal in patients with chronic pancreatitis. We retrospectively included 53 patients with chronic pancreatitis, in whom an attempt was made at endoscopic stone removal between 1984 and 1993. Patients

  7. Prospective risk of pancreatic cancer in familial pancreatic cancer kindreds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Alison P.; Brune, Kieran A.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Goggins, Michael; Tersmette, Anne C.; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Griffin, Constance; Cameron, John L.; Yeo, Charles J.; Kern, Scott; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2004-01-01

    Individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer have an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Quantification of this risk provides a rational basis for cancer risk counseling and for screening for early pancreatic cancer. In a prospective registry-based study, we estimated the risk

  8. Molecular mechanism of interaction between norfloxacin and trypsin studied by molecular spectroscopy and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Wang, Gongke; Lu, Xiumin; Lv, Juan; Xu, Meihua; Zhang, Weiwei

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of the binding of norfloxacin (NRF) to trypsin was investigated by fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy and molecular modeling at physiological conditions. The quenching mechanism and the binding mode were investigated in terms of the association constants and basic thermodynamic parameters. The results of spectroscopic measurements suggested that NRF have a strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of trypsin through static quenching procedure. Moreover, fluorescence experiments were also performed at different values of pH to elucidate the effect of pH on the binding. The NRF-trypsin complex was stabilized by hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bonding, via tryptophan residue as indicated from the thermodynamic parameters, which was consistent with the results of molecular docking and accessible surface area calculations.

  9. The effects of nitrogen on protein, oil and trypsin inhibitor content of soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perić Vesna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen fertilization have influence on protein, oil and trypsin inhibitor content of different soybean genotypes. Seed protein content was increased over control by 60 kg ha-1 nitrogen while trypsin inhibitor was reduced by all treatmens (30, 60,90 N kg ha-1 as compared to controls. Significant genetic variation in TI was found both within the genotype class with the Kunitz inhibitor present as well as within the class lacking this inhibitor. Genotypes containing the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor protein (KTI exhibit a higher TI than genotypes lacking this protein, however, in both groups of genotypes TI was similary affected by nitrogen application. Oil content was reduced following nitrogen fertilisation.

  10. Motion-Genetic Testing is Useful in the Diagnosis of Nonhereditary Pancreatic Conditions: Arguments for the Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Whitcomb

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of three major genes are associated with an increased risk of acute and chronic pancreatitis: the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 gene, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene, and the pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI or serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1 gene. Some autosomal dominant forms of hereditary pancreatitis are associated with mutations of the PRSS1 gene, which can be readily identified by genetic testing. Mutations of the CFTR gene can lead either to cystic fibrosis or to idiopathic chronic pancreatitis, and to a variety of cystic fibrosis-associated disorders, including congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens and sinusitis. These mutations, as with those of the SPINK1 (or PSTI gene, are prevalent in North America; thus, the presence of such a mutation in an asymptomatic person does not confer a high risk of developing pancreatitis. Combinations of mutations of the PRSS1 and SPINK1 genes lead to more severe disease, as indicated by an earlier onset of symptoms, which suggests that SPINK1 is a disease modifier. The major fear expressed by potential candidates for genetic testing is that the results could lead to insurance discrimination. Studies of the positive predictive value of genetic tests are hampered by recruitment bias and lack of knowledge of family history of pancreatitis. Genetic testing is most useful for persons for whom family members have already been found to exhibit a particular pancreatitis-associated mutation. In the future, increased knowledge of the myriad genetic causes of pancreatitis, as well as advances in the diagnosis and treatment of early chronic pancreatitis, should enhance the utility of genetic testing.

  11. Effective removal of alginate-poly-L-lysine microcapsules from pancreatic islets by use of trypsin-EDTA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, M; Leuvenink, HGD; Fekken, S; Schuurs, TA; van Schilfgaarde, R; KEIZER, J

    2003-01-01

    Although the transplantation of alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate encapsulated islets of Langerhans usually is successful, graft survival is still limited. Molecular analysis by RT-PCR of the encapsulated islets may provide insight into the mechanisms that affect islets during graft failure. However,

  12. Pancreatic trauma: A concise review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debi, Uma; Kaur, Ravinder; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Sinha, Anindita; Singh, Kartar

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the pancreas is rare and difficult to diagnose. In contrast, traumatic injuries to the liver, spleen and kidney are common and are usually identified with ease by imaging modalities. Pancreatic injuries are usually subtle to identify by different diagnostic imaging modalities, and these injuries are often overlooked in cases with extensive multiorgan trauma. The most evident findings of pancreatic injury are post-traumatic pancreatitis with blood, edema, and soft tissue infiltration of the anterior pararenal space. The alterations of post-traumatic pancreatitis may not be visualized within several hours following trauma as they are time dependent. Delayed diagnoses of traumatic pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of pancreatic injuries because early recognition of the disruption of the main pancreatic duct is important. We reviewed our experience with the use of various imaging modalities for diagnosis of blunt pancreatic trauma. PMID:24379625

  13. Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-01-01

    .... These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis...

  14. Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Kota

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis. Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson′s disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis.

  15. Surgery for pancreatic cancer -- discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000820.htm Surgery for pancreatic cancer - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... please enable JavaScript. You had surgery to treat pancreatic cancer . Now that you're going home, follow instructions ...

  16. Subclinical zinc deficiency impairs pancreatic digestive enzyme activity and digestive capacity of weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, Daniel; Windisch, Wilhelm M

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of short-term subclinical Zn deficiency on exocrine pancreatic activity and changes in digestive capacity. A total of forty-eight weaned piglets were fed ad libitum a basal diet (maize and soyabean meal) with adequate Zn supply (88 mg Zn/kg diet) during a 2-week acclimatisation phase. Animals were then assigned to eight dietary treatment groups (n 6) according to a complete randomised block design considering litter, live weight and sex. All pigs were fed restrictively (450 g diet/d) the basal diet but with varying ZnSO4.7H2O additions, resulting in 28·1, 33·6, 38·8, 42·7, 47·5, 58·2, 67·8 and 88·0 mg Zn/kg diet for a total experimental period of 8 d. Pancreatic Zn concentrations and pancreatic activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidase A and B, elastase and α-amylase exhibited a broken-line response to stepwise reduction in dietary Zn by declining beneath thresholds of 39·0, 58·0, 58·0, 41·2, 47·5, 57·7 and 58·0 mg Zn/kg diet, respectively. Furthermore, carboxypeptidase B and α-amylase activities were significantly lower in samples with reduced pancreatic Zn contents. Coefficients of faecal digestibility of DM, crude protein, total lipids and crude ash responded similarly to pancreatic enzyme activities by declining below dietary thresholds of 54·7, 45·0, 46·9 and 58·2 mg Zn/kg diet, respectively. In conclusion, (1) subclinical Zn deficiency impaired pancreatic exocrine enzymes, (2) this response was connected to pancreatic Zn metabolism and (3) the decline in catalytic activity impaired faecal digestibility already after 1 week of insufficient alimentary Zn supply and very early before clinical deficiency symptoms arise.

  17. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  18. Clinical advances in acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Jiaming

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common gastroenterological emergency. Because of the diverse prognosis in AP, it is crucial to identify severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) early and provide timely treatment. Thus, there are a number of clinical advances in this aspect. This paper reviews two advances in AP. Firstly, AP is classified into mild acute pancreatitis, moderately severe acute pancreatitis (MSAP), and SAP according to 2012 revision of the Atlanta Classification; SAP is distinguished from MS...

  19. Alcohol consumption on pancreatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Bañales, Jesus Maria; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Although the association between alcohol and pancreatic diseases has been recognized for a long time, the impact of alcohol consumption on pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer (PC) remains poorly defined. Nowadays there is not consensus about the epidemiology and the beverage type, dose and duration of alcohol consumption causing these diseases. The objective of this study was to review the epidemiology described in the literature for pancreatic diseases as a consequence of alcoholic behavior t...

  20. Production of engineered human pancreatic ribonucleases, solving expression and purification problems, and enhancing thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, A; Ribó, M; Benito, A; Bosch, M; Mombelli, E; Vilanova, M

    1999-10-01

    Human pancreatic ribonuclease, the homolog of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease, has a significant therapeutic potential. Its study has been hindered by the difficulty of obtaining the enzyme in a pure and homogeneous form, either from human source or using heterologous expression. Engineering of different variants of human pancreatic ribonuclease has allowed us to study and overcome some problems encountered during its heterologous production in an Escherichia coli system and its purification from inclusion bodies. The 5'-end region of the mRNA that encodes the enzyme is critical for obtaining high expression levels. The results also suggest the importance of the proline 50 residue in the recovery yields of human pancreatic ribonuclease. All the variants produced are pure and homogeneous. Their homogeneity has been demonstrated by cation-exchange and reversed-phase chromatography and by mass spectrometry analysis. Moreover, enhancement of human pancreatic ribonuclease thermal stability is observed when residues R4, K6, Q9, D16, and S17 are changed to the corresponding residues of bovine seminal ribonuclease. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  1. Enzootic bovine leucosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, L

    1978-09-02

    Enzootic bovine leucosis is associated with infection by bovine leucosis virus. The incubation period is measured in years and a minority of infected animals develop clinical signs. The disease is widespread in Europe and elsewhere and can cause significant economic loss. The epidemiology is incompletely understood and findings from one cattle production system may not be directly applicable to another. Major control programmes exist in Denmark and West Germany and control schemes are being developed elsewhere. Eradication of enzootic bovine leucosis has been established as a goal in the EEC and research is revealing the ways in which this goal may be attained. To be effective, control and epidemiological monitoring must be interactive. Recently introduced serological tests, of improved sensitivity, provide a valuable tool.

  2. Genetic basis of chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, JBMJ; Morsche, RT; van Goor, Harry; Drenth, JPH

    2002-01-01

    Background: Pancreatitis has a proven genetic basis in a minority of patients. Methods: Review of the literature on genetics of pancreatitis. Results: Ever since the discovery that in most patients with hereditary pancreatitis a mutation in the gene encoding for cationic trypsinogen (R122H) was

  3. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Eland (Ingo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are

  4. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  5. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  6. Autoantibodies in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Marner, B; Pedersen, N T

    1985-01-01

    In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane, and reti......In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane......, and reticulin, and the IgG- and IgA-type pancreas-specific antibodies against islet cells, acinus cells, and ductal cells (DA) were estimated blindly. In 23 of the patients chronic pancreatitis was verified, whereas chronic pancreatitis was rejected in 37 patients (control group). IgG and IgA were found...... in significantly higher concentrations in the patients with chronic pancreatitis than in the control group but within the normal range. ANA and DA occurred very frequently in both groups but with no statistical difference. Other autoantibodies only occurred sporadically. The findings of this study do not support...

  7. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-01-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis (HPA) was described as a clinical entity from Kashmir, India in 1985. HPA is caused by invasion and migration of nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides, in to the biliary tract and pancreatic duct. Patients present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholecystitis, hepatic abscesses and acute pancreatitis. Ascarides traverse the ducts repeatedly, get trapped and die, leading to formation of hepatolithiasis. HPA is ubiquitous in endemic regions and in Kashmir, one such region, HPA is the etiological factor for 36.7%, 23%, 14.5% and 12.5% of all biliary diseases, acute pancreatitis, liver abscesses and biliary lithiasis respectively. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool in visualizing worms in gut lumen and ductal system. The rational treatment for HPA is to give appropriate treatment for clinical syndromes along with effective anthelmintic therapy. Endotherapy in HPA is indicated if patients continue to have symptoms on medical therapy or when worms do not move out of ductal lumen by 3 wk or die within the ducts. The worms can be removed from the ductal system in most of the patients and such patients get regression of symptoms of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease. PMID:27672273

  8. Role of Pancreatic Stellate Cells in Chemoresistance in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua eMcCarroll

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is highly chemoresistant. A major contributing factor is the characteristic extensive stromal or fibrotic reaction, which comprises up to 90% of the tumour volume. Over the last decade there has been intensive research into the role of the pro-fibrogenic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs and their interaction with pancreatic cancer cells. As a result of the significant alterations in the tumour microenvironment following activation of pancreatic stellate cells, tumour progression and chemoresistance is enhanced. This review will discuss how PSCs contribute to chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer.

  9. Trypsin functionalization and zirconia coating of mesoporous silica nanotubes for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry analysis of phosphoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Fei; Xia, Yan

    2013-09-06

    Trypsin functionalized mesoporous silica nanotubes bioreactor (TEMSN) and zirconia layer coated mesoporous silica nanotubes (ZrO2-MSN) were developed to deal with the long in-solution digestion time of phosphoprotein and detection difficulty of phosphorylated peptides, respectively. Trypsin was immobilized on the mesoporous silica nanotubes via epoxy group and TEMSN were used as a bioreactor for digestion of α-casein within 3min. ZrO2-MSN were performed to enrich phosphopeptides selectively from in-solution digested peptide mixture of β-casein to demonstrate that ZrO2-MSN possessed remarkable selectivity for phosphorylated peptides even at 100/1 molar ratio of BSA/β-casein. The selective ability of ZrO2-MSN was also investigated in comparison to ZrO2 nanoparticles (ZrO2 NP). Moreover, phosphorylated peptides at the femtomole (2.5fmol) level can also be detected with high S/N (signal-to-noise) ratio. Phosphopeptides enriched from TEMSN-bioreactor digested peptide mixture of α-casein was also performed to evaluate the cooperative performance of TEMSN and ZrO2-MSN platform. The experimental results indicated that TEMSN-bioreactor digestion changed the distribution of relative abundance of phosphopeptides and improved the relative intensity of partial phosphopeptides. This analytical strategy has also been applied to the identification of phosphopeptides isolated from non-fat bovine milk and got a comparable results compared with other materials cited from the literature. By matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), TEMSN and ZrO2-MSN were combined together for the rapid and comprehensive analysis of phosphoprotein. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The adsorption of trypsin on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. In situ structural characterization of the enzyme in the adsorbed state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsopoulos, S.; Patzsch, K.; Bosker, W.T.E.; Norde, W.

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption of trypsin onto polystyrene and silica surfaces was investigated by reflectometry, spectroscopic methods, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The affinity of trypsin for the hydrophobic polystyrene surface was higher than that for the hydrophilic silica surface, but steady-state

  11. Molecular characterization of genes encoding trypsin-like enzymes from Aedes aegypti larvae and identification of digestive enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Tatiane S; Watanabe, Renata M O; Lemos, Francisco J A; Tanaka, Aparecida S

    2011-12-10

    Trypsin-like enzymes play an important role in the Aedes aegypti digestive process. The trypsin-like enzymes present in adults were characterized previously, but little is known about trypsins in larvae. In the present work, we identified one of the trypsin enzymes from Ae. aegypti larval midgut using a library of trypsin gene fragments, which was the sequence known as AAEL005607 from the Ae. aegypti genome. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that AAEL005607 was transcribed in all larval instars, but it was not present in adult midgut. In order to confirm transcription data, the trypsin-like enzymes from 4th instar larvae of Ae. aegypti midgut were purified and sequenced. Purified trypsin showed identity with the amino-terminal sequence of AAEL005607, AAEL005609 and AAEL005614. These three trypsins have high amino acids identity, and could all be used as a template for the design of inhibitors. In conclusion, for the first time, digestive enzymes of 4th larval instar of Ae. aegypti were purified and characterized. The knowledge of digestive enzymes present in Ae. aegypti larvae may be helpful in the development of a larvicide. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W. Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis admitted to 15 Dutch

  13. an extended pancreatic normal subjects and ~in pancreatItIs In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exocrine pancreatic response was evaluated in patients with varying degrees of pancreatic damage and in control subjects by means of an extended pancreatic function test (PFT). A second injection of secretin and pancreozymin was given after com- pletion of the standard test. The discriminatory value of the standard PFT ...

  14. Combined bicarbonate conductance-impairing variants in CFTR and SPINK1 variants are associated with chronic pancreatitis in patients without cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Alexander; Larusch, Jessica; Sun, Xiumei; Aloe, Amy; Lamb, Janette; Hawes, Robert; Cotton, Peter; Brand, Randall E; Anderson, Michelle A; Money, Mary E; Banks, Peter A; Lewis, Michele D; Baillie, John; Sherman, Stuart; Disario, James; Burton, Frank R; Gardner, Timothy B; Amann, Stephen T; Gelrud, Andres; George, Ryan; Rockacy, Matthew J; Kassabian, Sirvart; Martinson, Jeremy; Slivka, Adam; Yadav, Dhiraj; Oruc, Nevin; Barmada, M Michael; Frizzell, Raymond; Whitcomb, David C

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (ICP) is a complex inflammatory disorder associated with multiple genetic and environmental factors. In individuals without cystic fibrosis (CF), variants of CFTR that inhibit bicarbonate conductance but maintain chloride conductance might selectively impair secretion of pancreatic juice, leading to trypsin activation and pancreatitis. We investigated whether sequence variants in the gene encoding the pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor SPINK1 further increase the risk of pancreatitis in these patients. We screened patients and controls for variants in SPINK1 associated with risk of chronic pancreatitis and in all 27 exons of CFTR. The final study group included 53 patients with sporadic ICP, 27 probands with familial ICP, 150 unrelated controls, 375 additional controls for limited genotyping. CFTR wild-type and p.R75Q were cloned and expressed in HEK293 cells, and relative conductances of HCO(3)(-) and Cl(-) were measured. SPINK1 variants were identified in 36% of subjects and 3% of controls (odds ratio [OR], 18.1). One variant of CFTR not associated with CF, p.R75Q, was found in 16% of subjects and 5.3% of controls (OR, 3.4). Coinheritance of CFTR p.R75Q and SPINK1 variants occurred in 8.75% of patients and 0.38% of controls (OR, 25.1). Patch-clamp recordings of cells that expressed CFTR p.R75Q showed normal chloride currents but significantly reduced bicarbonate currents (P = .0001). The CFTR variant p.R75Q causes a selective defect in bicarbonate conductance and increases risk of pancreatitis. Coinheritance of p.R75Q or CF causing CFTR variants with SPINK1 variants significantly increases the risk of ICP. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An Update on Pediatric Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla-Udawatta, Monica; Madani, Shailender; Kamat, Deepak

    2017-05-01

    There has been a rise in the incidence and number of admissions of children with pancreatitis over the past 20 years. Current management practices for pancreatitis in children are adapted from standards of care for adults, and there are a lack of multicenter, prospective research studies on pancreatitis in children. There are inherent differences in the clinical presentation and natural course of pancreatitis between adults and children. This review focuses on the current understanding of the epidemiology, etiologies, evaluation, and management of children with pancreatitis. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(5):e207-e211.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Flow Cytometry Method Analysis of Apoptosis: No Significant Difference Between EDTA and EDTA-free Trypsin Treatment Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-yan; Nie, Xiao-cui; Ma, Hai-ying; Song, Guo-qing; Zhang, Xiao-tong; Jin, Yu-nan; Yu, Yan-qiu

    2015-04-01

    Flow cytometry method (FCM) is a generally accepted tool to analyze apoptosis. Although apoptosis assay kit was applied by many companies, the manufacturers were not consistent with whether using Trypsin with EDTA to collect the adherent cells. In another words, the influence of EDTA on apoptotic ratio is not clear. In this work, we compared the proportion of apoptotic cells with EDTA or EDTA-free Trypsin treatment by FCM. We concluded that Trypsin with or without EDTA has little influence on the proportion of apoptotic cells. In addition, we found that the ratio of necrosis and apoptosis was different in cells collected by scraping. WAVE2 protein was analyzed as a typical example for movement related protein. WAVE2 expression is elevated in the EDTA Trypsin treated group, compared with EDTA-free Trypsin treatment and scrapping group. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Cystic pancreatic lymphangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alihan Gurkan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Lymphangioma of the pancreas is a rare benign tumor of lymphatic origin. Retroperitoneal lymphangiomas account for 1% of all lymphangiomas. Herein, we report a case of cystic pancreatic lymphangioma diagnosed in 34 year-old female patient who was hospitalized for a slight pain in the epigastrium and vomiting. Radiological imaging revealed a large multiloculated cystic abdominal mass with enhancing septations involving the upper retroperitoneum. During the laparoscopic surgery, a well circumscribed polycystic tumor was completely excised preserving the pancreatic duct. The patient made a complete recovery and is disease-free 12 months postoperatively.

  18. Intervet Symposium: bovine neosporosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schetters, T.; Dubey, J.P.; Adrianarivo, A.; Frankena, K.; Romero, J.J.; Pérez, E.; Heuer, C.; Nicholson, C.; Russell, D.; Weston, J.

    2004-01-01

    This article summarises the most relevant data of presentations delivered at the 19th International Conference of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) held in New Orleans, LA, USA, from 10 to 14 August 2003) in a symposium session on bovine neosporosis. The

  19. Genotyping bovine coronaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine coronaviruses (BoCV) are enveloped, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses of the Coronaviridae family. Infection is associated with enteritis and pneumonia in calves and Winter Dysentery in adult cattle. Strains, isolated more than 50 years ago, are used in vaccines and as laboratory ...

  20. Genetic susceptibility to pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alison P

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. However, it has the poorest prognosis of any major tumor type, with a 5-yr survival rate of approximately 5%. Cigarette smoking, increased body mass index, heavy alcohol consumption, and a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus have all been demonstrated to increase risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer has also been associated with increased risk suggesting inherited genetic factors also play an important role, with approximately 5-10% of pancreatic cancer patients reporting family history of pancreatic cancer. While the genetic basis for the majority of the familial clustering of pancreatic cancer remains unclear, several important pancreatic cancer genes have been identified. These consist of high penetrance genes including BRCA2 or PALB2, to more common genetic variation associated with a modest increase risk of pancreatic cancer such as genetic variation at the ABO blood group locus. Recent advances in genotyping and genetic sequencing have accelerated the rate at which novel pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes have been identified with several genes identified within the past few years. This review addresses our current understanding of the familial aggregation of pancreatic cancer, established pancreatic cancer susceptablity genes and how this knowledge informs risk assessment and screening for high-risk families. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Genetic Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alison P.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. However, it has the poorest prognosis of any major tumor type, with a 5-yr survival rate of approximately 5%. Cigarette smoking, increased body mass index, heavy alcohol consumption, and a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus have all been demonstrated to increase risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer has also been associated with increased risk suggesting inherited genetic factors also play an important role, with approximately 5–10% of pancreatic cancer patients reporting family history of pancreatic cancer. While the genetic basis for the majority of the familial clustering of pancreatic cancer remains unclear, several important pancreatic cancer genes have been identified. These consist of high penetrance genes including BRCA2 or PALB2, to more common genetic variation associated with a modest increase risk of pancreatic cancer such as genetic variation at the ABO blood group locus. Recent advances in genotyping and genetic sequencing have accelerated the rate at which novel pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes have been identified with several genes identified within the past few years. This review addresses our current understanding of the familial aggregation of pancreatic cancer, established pancreatic cancer susceptablity genes and how this knowledge informs risk assessment and screening for high-risk families. PMID:22162228

  2. Gut microbiota and pancreatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signoretti, Marianna; Roggiolani, Roberta; Stornello, Caterina; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Capurso, Gabriele

    2017-12-01

    Changes in diet, lifestyle, and exposure to environmental risk factors account for the increased incidence of pancreatic disorders, including acute and chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer. The role of the microbiota in the development of pancreatic disorders is increasingly acknowledged. The translocation of gut bacteria and endotoxins following gut barrier failure is a key event contributing to the severity of acute pancreatitis, while small intestine bacterial overgrowth is common in patients with chronic pancreatitis and further worsens their symptoms and malnutrition. Specific molecular mimicry link the microbiota and Helicobacter pylori with autoimmune pancreatitis. Changes in the oral microbiota typical of periodontitis seem to be associated with an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer. The composition of the gut microbiota is also unbalanced in the presence of risk factors for pancreatic cancer, such as obesity, smoking and diabetes. Helicobacter pylori infection, atrophic body gastritis and related decreased gastric acid secretion also seem associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer, although this area needs further research. The link between dysbiosis, immune response and proinflammatory status is most likely the key for these associations. The present review article will discuss current available evidence on the role of gut microbiota in pancreatic disorders, highlighting potential areas for future research.

  3. Properties of purified gut trypsin from Helicoverpa zea, adapted to to proteinase inhibitors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volpicella, M.; Ceci, L.R.; America, T.; Gallarani, R.; Bode, W.; Jongsma, M.A.; Beekwilder, J.

    2003-01-01

    Pest insects such as Helicoverpa spp. frequently feed on plants expressing protease inhibitors. Apparently, their digestive system can adapt to the presence of protease inhibitors. To study this, a trypsin enzyme was purified from the gut of insects that were raised on an inhibitor-containing diet.

  4. The quaternary structure of chicken acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase; effect of collagenase and trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, P; Bon, S; Massoulié, J; Vigny, M

    1981-03-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7.; AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.8.; BuChE) from chicken muscle exist as sets of structurally homologous forms with very similar properties. The collagenase sensitivity and aggregation properties of the 'heavy' forms of both enzymes indicate that they possess a collagen-like tail, and their stepwise dissociation by trypsin confirms that they correspond to triple (A12) and double (A8) collagen-tailed tetramers. In addition to this dissociating effect, trypsin digests an important fraction of the catalytic units of AChE, in a progressive manner, removing as much as 30% of the enzyme's mass, without inactivation of the tetramers and of the tailed molecules. The trypsin-modified AChE forms closely resemble the corresponding mammalian AChE forms in their hydrodynamic properties. It is not known whether the trypsin-digestible peptides, which do not appear to be involved in the ionic or hydrophobic interactions of the enzymes, are a fragment of the catalytic subunit or whether they constitute distinct polypeptides.

  5. Proteolytic Activation of the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Coronavirus Spike Fusion Protein by Trypsin in Cell Culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wicht, Oliver|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/32291177X; Li, Wentao|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411296272; Willems, Lione; Meuleman, Tom J; Wubbolts, Richard W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/181688255; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/156614723; Rottier, Peter J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068451954; Bosch, Berend Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/273306049

    2014-01-01

    Isolation of porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus (PEDV) from clinical material in cell culture requires supplementation of trypsin. This may relate to the confinement of PEDV natural infection to the protease-rich small intestine of pigs. Our study focused on the role of protease activity on

  6. Inactivation of soybean trypsin inhibitors and lipoxygenases by high-pressure processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, van der C.; Matser, A.M.; Berg, van den R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Trypsin inhibitors (TIA), one of the antinutritional factors of soy milk, are usually inactivated by heat treatment. In the current study, high-pressure processing (HPP) was evaluated as an alternative for the inactivation of TIA in soy milk. Moreover, the effect of HPP on lipoxygenase (LOX) in

  7. Trypsin-mediated enzymatic degradation of type II collagen in the human vitreous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deemter, Marielle; Kuijer, Roel; Pas, Hendri Harm; van der Worp, Roelofje Jacoba; Hooymans, Johanna Martina Maria; Los, Leonoor Inge

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Aging of the vitreous body can result in sight-threatening pathology. One aspect of vitreous aging is liquefaction, which results from the vanishing of collagen fibrils. We investigated the possibility that trypsins are involved in vitreous type II collagen degradation. Methods:

  8. Trypsin inhibitors from Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum leaves involved in Pepper yellow mosaic virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, M M; Rodrigues, R; Ribeiro, S F F; Gonçalves, L S A; Bento, C S; Sudré, C P; Vasconcelos, I M; Gomes, V M

    2014-11-07

    Several plant organs contain proteinase inhibitors, which are produced during normal plant development or are induced upon pathogen attack to suppress the enzymatic activity of phytopathogenic microorganisms. In this study, we examined the presence of proteinase inhibitors, specifically trypsin inhibitors, in the leaf extract of Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum inoculated with PepYMV (Pepper yellow mosaic virus). Leaf extract from plants with the accession number UENF 1624, which is resistant to PepYMV, was collected at 7 different times (0, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, and 144 h). Seedlings inoculated with PepYMV and control seedlings were grown in a growth chamber. Protein extract from leaf samples was partially purified by reversed-phase chromatography using a C2/C18 column. Residual trypsin activity was assayed to detect inhibitors followed by Tricine-SDS-PAGE analysis to determine the N-terminal peptide sequence. Based on trypsin inhibitor assays, trypsin inhibitors are likely constitutively synthesized in C. baccatum var. pendulum leaf tissue. These inhibitors are likely a defense mechanism for the C. baccatum var. pendulum- PepYMV pathosystem.

  9. Effects of tannic acid on trypsin and leucine aminopeptidase activities in gypsy moth larval midgut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrdaković Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of allelochemical stress on genetic variations in the specific activities of gypsy moth digestive enzymes (trypsin and leucine aminopeptidase and relative midgut mass (indirect measure of food consumption, as well as variability in their plasticity, were investigated in fifth instar gypsy moths originating from two populations with different trophic adaptations (oak and locust-tree forests. Thirty-two full-sib families from the Quercus population and twenty-six full-sib families from the Robinia population were reared on an artificial diet with or without supplementation with tannic acid. Between population differences were observed as higher average specific activity of trypsin and relative midgut mass in larvae from the Robinia population. Significant broad-sense heritabilities were observed for the specific activity of trypsin in the control state, and for specific activity of leucine aminopeptidase in a stressful environment. Significantly lower heritability for relative midgut mass was recorded in larvae from the Robinia population reared under stressful conditions. Significant variability of trypsin plasticity in larvae from both populations and significant variability of leucine aminopeptidase plasticity in larvae from the Robinia population point to the potential for the evolution of enzyme adaptive plastic responses to the presence of stressor. Non-significant across-environment genetic correlations do not represent a constraint for the evolution of enzyme plasticity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173027

  10. Trypsin-like proteins of the fungi as possible markers of pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovenko, Aleksej G; Dunaevsky, Yakov E; Belozersky, Mikhail A; Oppert, Brenda; Lord, Jeffrey C; Elpidina, Elena N

    2010-01-01

    Sequences of peptidases with conserved motifs around the active site residues that are characteristic of trypsins (similar to trypsin peptidases, STP) were obtained from publicly-available fungal genomes and related databases. Among the 75 fungal genomes, 29 species of parasitic Ascomycota contained genes encoding STP and their homologs. Searches of non-redundant protein sequences, patented protein sequences, and expressed sequence tags resulted in another 18 STP sequences in 10 fungal species from Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota. A comparison of fungi species containing STP sequences revealed that almost all are pathogens of plants, animals or fungi. A comparison of the primary structure of homologous proteins, including the residues responsible for substrate binding and specificity of the enzyme, revealed three groups of homologous sequences, all presumably from S1 family: trypsin-like peptidases, chymotrypsin-like peptidases and serine peptidases with unknown substrate specificity. Homologs that are presumably functionally inactive were predicted in all groups. The results in general support the hypothesis that the expression of trypsin-like peptidases in fungi represents a marker of fungal phytopathogenicity. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using peptidase and homolog amino acid sequences, demonstrating that all have noticeable differences and almost immediately deviate from the common root. Therefore, we conclude that the changes that occurred in STP of pathogenic fungi in the course of evolution represent specific adaptations to proteins of their respective hosts, and mutations in peptidase genes are important components of life-style changes and taxonomic divergence.

  11. Ecological costs and benefits correlated with trypsin protease inhibitor production in Nicotiana attenuata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glawe, G.A.; Zavala, J.A.; Kessler, A.; Van Dam, N.M.; Baldwin, I.T.

    2003-01-01

    Genotypes of the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata from different geographic regions in North America vary considerably in the level of constitutive and inducible trypsin protease inhibitors (TrypPIs), a potent direct defense, as well as in the production of herbivore-induced volatiles that function

  12. A randomized controlled trial of trypsin to treat brown recluse spider bites in Guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaniss, Wyman W; Bush, Sean; O'Rourke, Dorcas P; Fletcher, Paul F; Brewer, Kori L; Lertpiriyapong, Kvin; Punja, Mohan; Miller, Susan N; Meggs, William J

    2014-09-01

    Brown recluse spider bites result in necrotic skin lesions for which there is no known antidote. Since venom toxins are proteins, a proteolytic enzyme like trypsin might be effective in reducing toxicity. The aim of this study was to conduct a randomized controlled trial of trypsin to treat brown recluse spider bites in guinea pigs. Subjects were 18 female guinea pigs. Anesthesia for injections was inhaled isoflurane. Analgesia was 0.05 mg/kg of buprenorphine twice a day as needed. Intervention was intradermal injection of 30 μg of brown recluse venom (Spider Pharm, Yarnell, AZ). Immediately after envenomation, subjects were randomized to two groups of nine: trypsin 10 μg in 1 mL normal saline and 1 mL of normal saline. The primary outcome was lesion area over a 10-day time period. Statistical analysis was performed with repeated measures ANOVA. Mean lesion area was smaller but not statistically different in the placebo group. Maximum lesion size occurred at day 4 in both groups, when lesion area was 76.1 ± 108.2 mm(2) in the placebo group and 149.7 ± 127.3 mm(2) in the treatment group. P value was 0.15 for placebo vs. treatment. This study did not establish a role for trypsin as a treatment for brown recluse spider bites in a guinea pig model.

  13. A NEW METHOD TO DETECT ACROSOME-REACTED SPERMATOZOA USING BIOTINYLATED SOYBEAN TRYPSIN-INHIBITOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ARTS, EGJM; KUIKEN, J; JAGER, S

    1994-01-01

    Objective: To develop a method to detect acrosome-reacted spermatozoa on human zonae pellucidae using only commercially available reagents and without need for sperm fixation. Design: Sperm head labeling with biotinylated soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI-biotin) was compared with results of a known

  14. Biochemical Characterization of An Arginine-Specific Alkaline Trypsin from Bacillus licheniformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Song Gong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we isolated a trypsin-producing strain DMN6 from the leather waste and identified it as Bacillus licheniformis through a two-step screening strategy. The trypsin activity was increased up to 140 from 20 U/mL through culture optimization. The enzyme was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity with a molecular mass of 44 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the specific activity of purified enzyme is 350 U/mg with Nα-Benzoyl-l-arginine ethylester as the substrate. The optimum temperature and pH for the trypsin are 65 °C and pH 9.0, respectively. Also, the enzyme can be significantly activated by Ba2+. This enzyme is relatively stable in alkaline environment and displays excellent activity at low temperatures. It could retain over 95% of enzyme activity after 180 min of incubation at 45 °C. The distinguished activity under low temperature and prominent stability enhance its catalytic potential. In the current work, the open reading frame was obtained with a length of 1371 nucleotides that encoded a protein of 456 amino acids. These data would warrant the B. licheniformis trypsin as a promising candidate for catalytic application in collagen preparation and leather bating through further protein engineering.

  15. Toxic effects of Ricinus communis non-protein trypsin inhibitor on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the study reported herein, we aimed to isolate a trypsin inhibitor from Ricinus communis leaves through chromatographic and spectrometric techniques and evaluate its toxic effects on the development of Spodoptera frugiperda larvae. Plant extracts were submitted to fractionation in adsorption column. The fraction 10 ...

  16. [Pancreatic serous cystadenoma associated with pancreatic heterotopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Hedfi; Dorra, Belghachem; Hela, Bouhafa; Cherif, Abdelhedi; Azza, Sridi; Karim, Sassi; Khadija, Bellil; Adnen, Chouchene

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic heterotopias (HP) are rare. They can occur at any age with a slight male predominance. These lesions are usually asymptomatic and they are often found incidentally during upper or lower GI endoscopy or during the anatomo-pathological examination of an organ which was resected for other reasons; they can be isolated or associated with a digestive pathology. We report, through observation, the association of HP with serous cystadenoma of the pancreas discovered during examinations to identify the etiology of isolated abdominal pain. The aim of this study is to analyse clinical and histological features of this rare pathology.

  17. Biochemical properties of pancreatic colipase from the common stingray Dasyatis pastinaca

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    Gargouri Youssef

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Pancreatic colipase is a required co-factor for pancreatic lipase, being necessary for its activity during hydrolysis of dietary triglycerides in the presence of bile salts. In the intestine, colipase is cleaved from a precursor molecule, procolipase, through the action of trypsin. This cleavage yields a peptide called enterostatin knoswn, being produced in equimolar proportions to colipase. Results In this study, colipase from the common stingray Dasyatis pastinaca (CoSPL was purified to homogeneity. The purified colipase is not glycosylated and has an apparent molecular mass of around 10 kDa. The NH2-terminal sequencing of purified CoSPL exhibits more than 55% identity with those of mammalian, bird or marine colipases. CoSPL was found to be less effective activator of bird and mammal pancreatic lipases than for the lipase from the same specie. The apparent dissociation constant (Kd of the colipase/lipase complex and the apparent Vmax of the colipase-activated lipase values were deduced from the linear curves of the Scatchard plots. We concluded that Stingray Pancreatic Lipase (SPL has higher ability to interact with colipase from the same species than with the mammal or bird ones. Conclusion The fact that colipase is a universal lipase cofactor might thus be explained by a conservation of the colipase-lipase interaction site. The results obtained in the study may improve our knowledge of marine lipase/colipase.

  18. Pancreatitis before pancreatic cancer: clinical features and influence on outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzeletovic, Ivana; Harrison, M Edwyn; Crowell, Michael D; Pannala, Rahul; Nguyen, Cuong C; Wu, Qing; Faigel, Douglas O

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatitis is considered a possible risk factor for and a presentation of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA). We aimed to evaluate a large PA patient registry to determine whether prior history of pancreatitis influenced survival. We retrospectively analyzed the Mayo Clinic Biospecimen Resource for Pancreas Research database from January 1992 to September 2011. Data collected included demographic characteristics, history of tobacco or alcohol use, diabetes mellitus (DM), cholelithiasis, pseudocyst, and details regarding PA. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of PA patients with pancreatitis were compared with PA patients without pancreatitis history. We analyzed 2573 patients with PA diagnosis. Among these patients, 195 (8%) were identified who had pancreatitis diagnosis ≥ 10 days before PA diagnosis. The cohort with pancreatitis history included more patients with DM (30% vs. 18%; Ppancreatitis history, these patients received diagnoses of PA at a younger age (63 vs. 65 y; P=0.005) and earlier stage (stages I and II; 52% vs. 37%; Ppancreatitis had more weight loss and DM, but had PA diagnosis at an earlier stage, were more likely to have pancreatic surgery, and therefore better survival than PA patients without pancreatitis, likely due to the earlier diagnosis. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether screening for PA in patients with pancreatitis history would provide survival benefit.

  19. [Pancreatic phlegmon: a potentially fatal form of acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroun Marun, C; Uscanga, L; Lara, F; Passareli, L; Quiroz-Ferrari, F; Robles-Díaz, G; Campuzano-Fernández, M

    1992-01-01

    To report the clinical characteristics of a group of patients with pancreatic phlegmon (PF) seen at the Instituto Nacional de la Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Mexico City. We reviewed all the cases of acute pancreatitis hospitalized from January 1981 to December 1989. The diagnosis of pancreatic phlegmon was established when the CT scan showed a solid mass in the pancreas and peripancreatic region with more than 20 Hounsfield units without liquid collections or a fibrous capsule. We analyzed clinical, biochemical, and radiological data. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 132 patients. In 14 a pancreatic phlegmon was observed (10.6%). Twelve were men; the mean age was 44.7 years. In six cases acute pancreatitis was secondary to alcohol abuse and in four to gallstones. Abdominal pain was present in all patients. Ten had leucocitosis and seven fever and/or jaundice. An abdominal mass was detected in three cases. The severity of pancreatitis was graded according to our institutional criteria as mild (0-2 signs) or severe (3-5 signs). In 10 patients AP was graded as mild: no mortality was observed in this group but three presented complications (two liquid collections and one an abscess). The four patients with severe pancreatitis presented complications and three died (one abscess, two multiorgan failure). Five patients were operated on. In three an abscess was drained. Pancreatic phlegmon is a potentially severe form of AP. All patients who died presented, in addition to PF, clinical criteria of severe pancreatitis.

  20. Trypsin from the digestive system of carp Cirrhinus mrigala: purification, characterization and its potential application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khangembam, Bronson Kumar; Chakrabarti, Rina

    2015-05-15

    Trypsin was purified 35.64-fold with 4.97% recovery from the viscera of carp Cirrhinus mrigala (mrigal) by ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange and affinity chromatography. The purified enzyme was active at a wide range of pH (7.0-9.2) and temperature (10-50°C). The purified enzyme exhibited high thermal stability up to 50°C for 1h. The enzyme activity was stabilized by Ca(+2) (2mM) up to 7h at 40°C. The Km and kcat values of purified enzyme were 0.0672 mM and 92.09/s/mM, respectively. Soybean trypsin inhibitor and phenylmethylsulphonylflouride completely inhibited the enzyme activity. The specific inhibitor of trypsin, N-α-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone inhibited 99.67% activity. Na(+), K(+) and Li(+) inhibited 20.99 ± 5.25%, 16.53 ± 4.80% and 18.99 ± 1.42% of enzyme activity, respectively. Divalent ions Mg(+2), Zn(+2), Co(+2), Hg(+2) and Cd(+2) inhibited 21.61 ± 2.22%, 31.62 ± 1.78%, 31.62 ± 1.96%, 85.68 ± 1.51% and 47.95 ± 2.13% enzyme activity, respectively. SDS-PAGE showed that the molecular mass of purified enzyme was 21.7 kDa. MALDI-TOF study showed a peptide sequence of AFCGGSLVNENKMHSAGHCYKSRIQV at the N-Terminal. This sequence recorded 76-84% identity with trypsin from Thunnus thynnus and other fish species. This confirmed that the purified protein was trypsin. The purified enzyme has potential applications in detergent and food industry because of its thermal stability and alkaline nature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Physicochemical characteristics of homogeneous bovine lung angiotensin I-converting enzyme. Comparison with human serum enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R B; Wilson, I B

    1982-08-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity (12 units/mg) from bovine lung tissue and from human serum using an affinity gel described previously (Harris et al., (1981) Anal. Biochem. 111, 227-234). The isoelectric point (4.5), molecular weight (145 000), S20,W (8.1), amino acid composition and carbohydrate content of the lung enzyme are all similar to the values obtained for the human serum enzyme. The NH2-terminus of the lung enzyme (Ala) is different from that of the serum enzyme (Tyr) but the COOH-terminal sequences are identical (-Leu-Ser-OH). Pure bovine lung enzyme was reduced and carboxyamidomethylated with iodo (14C1) acetamide to the extent predicted by the number of cysteine residues. Since no radioactivity was incorporated into denatured enzyme that was not reduced, all of the cysteine residues must be in the form of disulfide bonds. Reverse-phase HPLC was used to separate peptides obtained from the lung enzyme after degradation with either trypsin or cyanogen bromide. The number of peptides resolved (42 after trypsin, 31 after cyanogen bromide), were only 20% fewer than the number predicted from the amino acid analysis and therefore the possibility that the converting enzyme (a single polypeptide chain) might be a fused dimer is excluded.

  2. Physiochemical characteristics of homogeneous bovine lung angiotensin I-converting enzyme. Comparison with human serum enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, R.B.; Wilson, I.B. (Colorado Univ., Boulder (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1982-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity (12 units/mg) from bovine lung tissue from human serum using an affinity gel described previously. The isoelectric point (4.5), molecular weight (145 000) Ssub(20,w)(8.1), amino acid composition and carbohydrate content of the lung enzyme are all similar to the values obtained for the human serum enzyme. The NH/sub 2/-terminus of the lung enzyme (Ala) is different from that of the serum enzyme (Tyr) but the COOH-terminal sequences are identical (-Leu-Ser-OH). Pure bovine lung enzyme was reduced and carboxyamidomethylated with iodo (/sup 14/C/sub 1/) acetamide to the extent predicted by the number of cysteine residues. Since no radioactivity was incorporated into denatured enzyme that was not reduced, all of the cysteine residues must be in the form of disulfide bonds. Reverse-phase HPLC was used to separate peptides obtained from the lung enzyme after degradation with either trypsin or cyanogen bromide. The number of peptides resolved (42 after trypsin, 31 after cyanogen bromide), were only 20% fewer than the number predicted from the amino acid analysis and therefore the possibility that the converting enzyme ( a single polypeptide chain) might be a fused dimer is excluded.

  3. Pancreatitis del surco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Araújo-Fernández

    2014-03-01

    It is a rare disease, but we must keep it in mind when we make the differential diagnosis of patients with abdominal pain of unknown origin. It is very important to distinguish this pathology from a pancreatic head carcinoma, as both treatments and prognosis differ greatly, so we believe important communication of a new case.

  4. Nutrition in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard; Irtun, Oivind; Olesen, Søren Schou; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Holst, Mette

    2013-11-14

    The pancreas is a major player in nutrient digestion. In chronic pancreatitis both exocrine and endocrine insufficiency may develop leading to malnutrition over time. Maldigestion is often a late complication of chronic pancreatic and depends on the severity of the underlying disease. The severity of malnutrition is correlated with two major factors: (1) malabsorption and depletion of nutrients (e.g., alcoholism and pain) causes impaired nutritional status; and (2) increased metabolic activity due to the severity of the disease. Nutritional deficiencies negatively affect outcome if they are not treated. Nutritional assessment and the clinical severity of the disease are important for planning any nutritional intervention. Good nutritional practice includes screening to identify patients at risk, followed by a thoroughly nutritional assessment and nutrition plan for risk patients. Treatment should be multidisciplinary and the mainstay of treatment is abstinence from alcohol, pain treatment, dietary modifications and pancreatic enzyme supplementation. To achieve energy-end protein requirements, oral supplementation might be beneficial. Enteral nutrition may be used when patients do not have sufficient calorie intake as in pylero-duodenal-stenosis, inflammation or prior to surgery and can be necessary if weight loss continues. Parenteral nutrition is very seldom used in patients with chronic pancreatitis and should only be used in case of GI-tract obstruction or as a supplement to enteral nutrition.

  5. Familial pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hruban, R. H.; Petersen, G. M.; Goggins, M.; Tersmette, A. C.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Falatko, F.; Yeo, C. J.; Kern, S. E.

    1999-01-01

    For many years anecdotal case reports have suggested that pancreatic cancer aggregates in some families. Two recent advances have established that this is in fact the case. First, large registries, such as the National Familial Pancreas Tumor Registry (NFPTR) at Johns Hopkins, have identified a

  6. New advances in pancreatic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beger, Hans G; Rau, Bettina M

    2007-09-01

    New understanding of the dynamic of acute pancreatitis, the clinical impact of local pathology in chronic pancreatitis and cystic neoplastic lesions bearing high potential for malignant transformation has changed the management of pancreatic diseases. In acute pancreatitis, risk factors independently determining outcome in severe acute pancreatitis are early and persistent multiorgan failure, infected necrosis and extended sterile necrosis. The management of severe acute pancreatitis is based on early intensive-care treatment and late surgical debridement. In chronic pancreatitis, recent data from randomized controlled clinical trials have demonstrated duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection with an inflammatory mass of the head as superior to pylorus-preserving Whipple resection. Cystic neoplasms are local lesions of the pancreas with high malignant potential. Local organ-preserving resection techniques have been applied with low morbidity and mortality, replacing a Whipple-type resection. Resection of pancreatic cancer is ineffective to cure patients. After an R0-resection, a significant survival benefit has been achieved when adjuvant chemotherapy has additionally been applied. New knowledge about the nature of inflammatory diseases, cystic neoplastic lesions and malignant pancreatic tumours has changed the indication for surgical treatment and the application of organ-preserving surgical techniques.

  7. Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Protein Kinase D Suppress NF-kappaB Activation and Attenuate the Severity of Rat Cerulein Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingzhen Yuan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB activation is a key early signal regulating inflammatory and cell death responses in acute pancreatitis. Our previous in vitro studies with molecular approaches on AR42J cell showed that protein kinase D (PKD/PKD1 activation was required in NF-κB activation induced by cholecystokinin 8 (CCK or carbachol (CCh in pancreatic acinar cells. Recently developed small molecule PKD inhibitors, CID755673 and CRT0066101, provide potentially important pharmacological approaches to further investigate the effect of PKD in pancreatitis therapy. The aim of this study was to explore whether CID755673 and CRT0066101 block NF-κB activation with in vitro and in vivo models of experimental pancreatitis and whether the small molecule PKD inhibitors have therapeutic effects when given before or after the initiation of experimental pancreatitis. Freshly prepared pancreatic acini were incubated with CID755673 or CRT006101, followed by hyperstimulation with CCK or CCh. For in vivo experimental pancreatitis, rats were treated with intraperitoneal injection of CID755673 or CRT0066101 prior to or after administering cerulein or saline. PKD activation and NF-κB-DNA binding activity in nuclear extracts from pancreatic acini and tissue were measured. The effects of PKD inhibitors on pancreatitis responses were evaluated. Our results showed that both CID755673 or CRT0066101 selectively and specifically inhibited PKD without effects on related protein kinase Cs. Inhibition of PKD resulted in significantly attenuation of NF-κB activation in both in vitro and in vivo models of experimental pancreatitis. NF-κB inhibition by CID755673 was associated with decreased inflammatory responses and attenuated severity of the disease, which were indicated by less inflammatory cell infiltration, reduced pancreatic interleukin-6 (IL-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, decreased intrapancreatic trypsin activation, and alleviation in pancreatic

  8. Protective effects of soybean protein and egg white protein on the antibacterial activity of nisin in the presence of trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Dan; Zhang, Dong; Hao, Limin; Lin, Songyang; Kang, Qiaozhen; Liu, Xin; Lu, Laizheng; Lu, Jike

    2018-01-15

    The using of nisin to prevent foodborne pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes) from contamination has received broad attentions during meat processing. However, the application of nisin has been limited because its antibacterial activity may be inhibited by trypsin. In this study, the protective effects of soybean protein and egg white protein on antibacterial activity of nisin were evaluated. It could be concluded that exogenous trypsin decreased the antibacterial activity of nisin, soybean protein and egg white protein could keep the nisin activity from enzymolysis of trypsin. Trypsin inhibitors in soybean protein and egg white protein could protect the antibacterial activity of nisin. Nisin with soybean protein or egg white protein in cooked meat product presented better quality preservation effects than nisin alone in the presence of trypsin. The total viable counts (TVC) and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) of nisin-treated group were significantly higher than these in nisin-soybean protein-treated and nisin-egg white protein-treated groups with trypsin. This study showed the potential of using soybean protein and egg white protein to stabilize the antibacterial activity of nisin under high trypsin conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute Pancreatitis: Surgery, Pathophysiology and Probiotic Prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnen, L.P. van

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a challenging disease with a clinical course that is often difficult to predict. In severe acute pancreatitis, mortality increases significantly if intestinal bacteria translocate from the intestine and infect pancreatic necrosis. Surgical and prophylactic treatment strategies

  10. Bovine parainfluenza-3 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John A

    2010-11-01

    Bovine parainfluenza-3 virus (bPI(3)V) is a long-recognized, currently underappreciated, endemic infection in cattle populations. Clinical disease is most common in calves with poor passive transfer or decayed maternal antibodies. It is usually mild, consisting of fever, nasal discharge, and dry cough. Caused at least partly by local immunosuppressive effects, bPI(3)V infection is often complicated by coinfection with other respiratory viruses and bacteria, and is therefore an important component of enzootic pneumonia in calves and bovine respiratory disease complex in feedlot cattle. Active infection can be diagnosed by virus isolation from nasal swabs, or IF testing on smears made from nasal swabs. Timing of sampling is critical in obtaining definitive diagnostic test results. Parenteral and intranasal modified live vaccine combination vaccines are available. Priming early in calfhood with intranasal vaccine, followed by boosting with parenteral vaccine, may be the best immunoprophylactic approach. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Camel and bovine chymosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Langholm; Mølgaard, Anne; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro

    2013-01-01

    Bovine and camel chymosin are aspartic peptidases that are used industrially in cheese production. They cleave the Phe105-Met106 bond of the milk protein κ-casein, releasing its predominantly negatively charged C-terminus, which leads to the separation of the milk into curds and whey. Despite...... chymosin. Both enzymes possess local positively charged patches on their surface that can play a role in interactions with the overall negatively charged C-terminus of κ-casein. Camel chymosin contains two additional positive patches that favour interaction with the substrate. The improved electrostatic...... interactions arising from variation in the surface charges and the greater malleability both in domain movements and substrate binding contribute to the better milk-clotting activity of camel chymosin towards bovine milk....

  12. Mycotic bovine nasal granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conti Díaz Ismael Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of mycotic bovine nasal granuloma in a 10 year-old Jersey cow, produced by Drechslera halodes is presented. Histopathological sections showed abundant hyaline and pigmented extra and intracellular fungal structures together with a polymorphic cellular granuloma formed by neutrophils, lymphocytes, plasmocytes, histiocytes and giant cells of the Langhans type. It is the first case of mycotic bovine nasal granuloma recognized in Uruguay although this disease seems to be frequent according to the opinion of veterinarian specialists. Another similar clinical case also in a Jersey cow from the same dairy house with an intense cellular infiltrate rich in eosinophils without granulomatous image, together with extracellular hyaline and fuliginous fungal forms, is also referred for comparative purposes. Geotrichum sp. was isolated. The need of an early diagnosis and treatment of the disease is stressed.

  13. Pancreatic encephalopathy- a rare complication of severe acute biliary pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Denis Constantin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pancreatic encephalopathy is a rare complication of severe acute pancreatitis, with high mortality, being difficult to diagnose and treat, thus requiring continuous research regarding its management. Materials and Methods. Of 20 patients diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis on admission at Department of Emergency and Admission (DEA, from January 1st 2010 to March 31st 2014, 5 cases complicated by pancreatic encephalopathy were analyzed using a descriptive observational, retrospective, single-center study. Results. The study shows different types of diagnostic algorithm and therapeutical approaches, in correlation with morbidity and mortality rates. Conclusions. Our study highlighted the fact that speed is critical, early management being the key to outcome.

  14. Pancreatic islet autotransplantation with total pancreatectomy for chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Tamotsu; Adachi, Tomohiko; Ono, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Takayuki; Kitasato, Amane; Eguchi, Susumu

    2013-07-01

    Achieving pain relief and improving the quality of life are the main targets of treatment for patients with chronic pancreatitis. The use of total pancreatectomy to treat chronic pancreatitis is a radical and in some ways ideal strategy. However, total pancreatectomy is associated with severe diabetic control problems. Total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation can relieve severe pain and prevent the development of postsurgical diabetes. With islet autotransplantation, patients with chronic pancreatitis receive their own islet cells and therefore do not require immunosuppressive therapy. In the future, total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation may be considered a treatment option for chronic pancreatitis patients.

  15. Endoscopic Treatment of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis and Smoldering Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rohit; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) is a challenging condition that can lead to chronic pancreatitis and long-term morbidity. Etiology-based treatment can potentially have an impact on the natural history of RAP and its progression to chronic pancreatitis. In cases of divisum-associated RAP and idiopathic RAP, several studies have been performed to evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic therapy in alleviation of symptoms and frequency of AP events. This review discusses the literature available on these topic as well as touching on the role of endoscopic therapy in smoldering acute pancreatitis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Genetically Determined Chronic Pancreatitis but not Alcoholic Pancreatitis Is a Strong Risk Factor for Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midha, Shallu; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Kabra, Madhulika; Chattopadhyay, Tushar Kanti; Joshi, Yogendra Kumar; Garg, Pramod Kumar

    2016-11-01

    To study if chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Through a cohort and a case-control study design, CP and other important risk factors including smoking, diabetes, alcohol, obesity, and genetic mutations were studied for their association with pancreatic cancer. In the cohort study, 402 patients with CP were included. During 3967.74 person-years of exposure, 5 of the 402 patients (4 idiopathic CP, 1 hereditary CP) developed pancreatic cancer after 16.60 ± 3.51 years of CP. The standardized incidence ratio was 121. In the case-control study, 249 pancreatic cancer patients and 1000 healthy controls were included. Of the 249 patients with pancreatic cancer, 24 had underlying idiopathic CP, and none had alcoholic pancreatitis. SPINK1 gene mutation was present in 16 of 26 patients with idiopathic CP who had pancreatic cancer. Multivariable analysis showed CP (odds ratio [OR], 97.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 12.69-751.36), diabetes (>4 years duration) (OR, 3.05; 95% CI, 1.79-5.18), smoking (OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.38-2.69) as significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer. The population attributable risk was 9.41, 9.06, and 9.50 for diabetes, CP, and smoking, respectively. Genetically determined CP but not alcoholic CP is a strong risk factor for pancreatic cancer.

  17. Role of bacterial infections in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Michaud, Dominique S.

    2013-01-01

    Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including tobacco smoking, chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes, collectively account for less than half of all pancreatic cancer cases. Inflammation plays a key role in pancreatic carcinogenesis, but it is unclear what causes local inflammation, other than pancreatitis. Epidemiological data suggest that Helicobacter pylori may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, and more recently, data suggest that periodontal disease, and Porp...

  18. Dual core quantum dots for highly quantitative ratiometric detection of trypsin activity in cystic fibrosis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelló Serrano, Iván; Stoica, Georgiana; Matas Adams, Alba; Palomares, Emilio

    2014-10-01

    We present herein two colour encoded silica nanospheres (2nanoSi) for the fluorescence quantitative ratiometric determination of trypsin in humans. Current detection methods for cystic fibrosis diagnosis are slow, costly and suffer from false positives. The 2nanoSi proved to be a highly sensitive, fast (minutes), and single-step approach nanosensor for the screening and diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, allowing the quantification of trypsin concentrations in a wide range relevant for clinical applications (25-350 μg L-1). Furthermore, as trypsin is directly related to the development of cystic fibrosis (CF), different human genotypes, i.e. CF homozygotic, CF heterozygotic, and unaffected, respectively, can be determined using our 2nanoSi nanospheres. We anticipate the 2nanoSi system to be a starting point for non-invasive, easy-to-use and cost effective ratiometric fluorescent biomarkers for recessive genetic diseases like human cystic fibrosis. In a screening program in which the goal is to detect disease and also the carrier status, early diagnosis could be of great help.We present herein two colour encoded silica nanospheres (2nanoSi) for the fluorescence quantitative ratiometric determination of trypsin in humans. Current detection methods for cystic fibrosis diagnosis are slow, costly and suffer from false positives. The 2nanoSi proved to be a highly sensitive, fast (minutes), and single-step approach nanosensor for the screening and diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, allowing the quantification of trypsin concentrations in a wide range relevant for clinical applications (25-350 μg L-1). Furthermore, as trypsin is directly related to the development of cystic fibrosis (CF), different human genotypes, i.e. CF homozygotic, CF heterozygotic, and unaffected, respectively, can be determined using our 2nanoSi nanospheres. We anticipate the 2nanoSi system to be a starting point for non-invasive, easy-to-use and cost effective ratiometric fluorescent biomarkers for

  19. Animal Models of Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Otsuki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models for CP in rats can be classified into 2 groups: one is noninvasive or nonsurgical models and the other is invasive or surgical models. Pancreatic injury induced by repetitive injections of supramaximal stimulatory dose of caerulein (Cn or by intraductal infusion of sodium taurocholate (NaTc recovered within 14 days, whereas that caused by repetitive injection of arginine or by intraductal infusion of oleic acid was persistent. However, the destroyed acinar tissues were replaced by fatty tissues without fibrosis. Transient stasis of pancreatic fluid flow by 0.01% agarose and minimum injury of the pancreatic duct by 0.1% NaTc solution induced progressive pancreatic injury although one alone is insufficient to cause persistent pancreatic injury. However, the damaged tissue was replaced by fatty tissue without fibrosis. Continuous pancreatic ductal hypertension (PDH caused diffuse interlobular and intralobular fibrosis closely resembling human CP.

  20. VOLUME THERAPY IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Stošić

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental management is required soon after a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis has been made and includes monitoring of the conscious state, the respiratory and cardiovascular system, the urinary output, adequate fluid replacement and pain control, blood purification therapy and nutritional support. An adequate dose of fluid replacement is essential to stabilize cardiovascular dynamics and the dose should be adjusted while assessing circulatory dynamics constantly. Current clinical practice guidelines recommend aggressive fluid resuscitation despite limited prospective data. Fluid therapy remains the mainstay of early management of patients with acute pancreatitis and severe acute pancreatitis. High-level evidence is lacking to guide protocols for fluid resuscitation in patients presenting with acute pancreatitis. In those patients with severe acute pancreatitis, the available evidence indicates that controlled fluid resuscitation with crystalloids and colloids offers the best outcome. Hematocrit remains a useful marker to guide fluid resuscitation in acute pancreatitis. However, the timing and ideal “cut-off” level needs to be determined.

  1. [Robot-assisted pancreatic resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müssle, B; Distler, M; Weitz, J; Welsch, T

    2017-06-01

    Although robot-assisted pancreatic surgery has been considered critically in the past, it is nowadays an established standard technique in some centers, for distal pancreatectomy and pancreatic head resection. Compared with the laparoscopic approach, the use of robot-assisted surgery seems to be advantageous for acquiring the skills for pancreatic, bile duct and vascular anastomoses during pancreatic head resection and total pancreatectomy. On the other hand, the use of the robot is associated with increased costs and only highly effective and professional robotic programs in centers for pancreatic surgery will achieve top surgical and oncological quality, acceptable operation times and a reduction in duration of hospital stay. Moreover, new technologies, such as intraoperative fluorescence guidance and augmented reality will define additional indications for robot-assisted pancreatic surgery.

  2. Chronic pancreatitis: controversies in etiology, diagnosis and treatment Pancreatitis crónica: controversias respecto a la etiología, el diagnóstico y el tratamiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Draganov

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of idiopathic chronic pancreatitis remains poorly understood despite the high expectations for ascribing the pancreatic damage in affected patients to genetic defects. Mutations in the cationic trypsinogen gene, pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor, and the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator gene do not account for the chronic pancreatitis noted in most patients with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis. Small duct chronic pancreatitis can be best diagnosed with a hormone stimulation test. Endoscopic ultrasonography can detect abnormalities in both the parenchyma and ducts of the pancreas. The true value of endoscopic ultrasonography in diagnosing small duct chronic pancreatitis remains to be fully defined and is under active investigation. It is not clear whether endoscopic ultrasonography is more sensitive for early structural changes in patients with small duct disease or is over diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic enzyme supplementation with non-enteric formulation along with acid suppression (H2 blockers or proton pump inhibitors is an effective therapy for pain in patients with small duct chronic pancreatitis. The role of endoscopic ultrasonography-guided celiac plexus block should be limited to treating those patients with chronic pancreatitis whose pain has not responded to other modalities. Total pancreatectomy followed by autologous islet cell autotransplantation appears to be potential therapeutic approach but for now should be considered experimental.La patogenia de la pancreatitis crónica idiopática sigue siendo poco conocida, a pesar de las expectativas de atribuir el daño pancreático que sufren los pacientes con esta enfermedad a factores genéticos. Las mutaciones del gen del tripsinógeno catiónico, del gen del inhibidor de la tripsina secretoria del páncreas y del gen regulador de conductancia de la fibrosis quística no explican la pancreatitis crónica de la mayoría de los pacientes con

  3. Immunodetection of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript in bovine pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiuk, Izabela; Młynek, Krzysztof

    2015-07-01

    This study was aimed at identifying and determining the configuration of structures which contain the cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide (CART) in the bovine pancreas. The study material was collected from 20 animals. The distribution of CART in the bovine pancreas was investigated, by an immunohistochemical evaluation. CART peptide in the normal pancreas has been identified in intrapancreatic ganglia, nerve fibres and in endocrine cells of Langerhans islets and exocrine pancreas. CART immunoreactive nerve fibres innervate the exocrine and endocrine regions and the intrapancreatic ganglia, where they form a moderate number of networks, encircling the cell bodies. The few CART-immunoreactive endocrine cells, that appear in the bovine pancreas, are not limited to the islet cells, where they form a subpopulation of CART-containing cells, but are also individually distributed in the exocrine region. Furthermore, CART has been visualized in nerve fibres, innervating pancreatic outlet ducts and blood vessels. CART plays a physiological role in the integrated mechanisms that regulate both endocrine and exocrine pancreatic secretion. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that CART expression in nerve fibres and intrapancreatic ganglia is a common feature of the mammalian pancreas, whereas its expression in endocrine cells appears to be restricted to single cells of the bovine pancreas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Viral infections and bovine mastitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellenberg, G J; van der Poel, W H M; Van Oirschot, J T

    2002-08-02

    This review deals with the role of viruses in the aetiology of bovine mastitis. Bovine herpesvirus 1, bovine herpesvirus 4, foot-and-mouth disease virus, and parainfluenza 3 virus have been isolated from milk from cows with clinical mastitis. Intramammary inoculations of bovine herpesvirus 1 or parainfluenza 3 virus-induced clinical mastitis, while an intramammary inoculation of foot-and-mouth disease virus resulted in necrosis of the mammary gland. Subclinical mastitis has been induced after a simultaneous intramammary and intranasal inoculation of lactating cows with bovine herpesvirus 4. Bovine leukaemia virus has been detected in mammary tissue of cows with subclinical mastitis, but whether this virus was able to induce bovine mastitis has not been reported. Bovine herpesvirus 2, vaccinia, cowpox, pseudocowpox, vesicular stomatitis, foot-and-mouth disease viruses, and bovine papillomaviruses can play an indirect role in the aetiology of bovine mastitis. These viruses can induce teat lesions, for instance in the ductus papillaris, which result in a reduction of the natural defence mechanisms of the udder and indirectly in bovine mastitis due to bacterial pathogens. Bovine herpesvirus 1, bovine viral diarrhoea virus, bovine immunodeficiency virus, and bovine leukaemia virus infections may play an indirect role in bovine mastitis, due to their immunosuppressive properties. But, more research is warranted to underline their indirect role in bovine mastitis. We conclude that viral infections can play a direct or indirect role in the aetiology of bovine mastitis; therefore, their importance in the aetiology of bovine mastitis and their economical impact needs further attention.

  5. Genetic Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Alison P

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. However, it has the poorest prognosis of any major tumor type, with a 5-yr survival rate of approximately 5%. Cigarette smoking, increased body mass index, heavy alcohol consumption, and a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus have all been demonstrated to increase risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer has also been associated with increased risk suggesting inherited g...

  6. Diagnostic imaging in bovine orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, Johann; Geissbühler, Urs; Steiner, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    Although a radiographic unit is not standard equipment for bovine practitioners in hospital or field situations, ultrasound machines with 7.5-MHz linear transducers have been used in bovine reproduction for many years, and are eminently suitable for evaluation of orthopedic disorders. The goal of this article is to encourage veterinarians to use radiology and ultrasonography for the evaluation of bovine orthopedic disorders. These diagnostic imaging techniques improve the likelihood of a definitive diagnosis in every bovine patient but especially in highly valuable cattle, whose owners demand increasingly more diagnostic and surgical interventions that require high-level specialized techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Acute pancreatitis associated with hypercalcaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tun-Abraham, Mauro Enrique; Obregón-Guerrero, Gabriela; Romero-Espinoza, Larry; Valencia-Jiménez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcaemia due to primary hyperparathyroidism is a rare cause of acute pancreatitis, with a reported prevalence of 1.5 to 8%. There is no clear pathophysiological basis, but elevated parathyroid hormone and high serum calcium levels could be responsible for calcium deposit in the pancreatic ducts and activation of pancreatic enzymes, which may be the main risk factor for developing acute pancreatitis. The aim of this report is to describe four cases. Four cases are reported of severe pancreatitis associated with hypercalcaemia secondary to primary hyperparathyroidism; three of them with complications (two pseudocysts and one pancreatic necrosis). Cervical ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy using 99mTc-Sestambi, studies showed the parathyroid adenoma. Surgical resection was the definitive treatment in all four cases. None of the patients had recurrent acute pancreatitis events during follow-up. Acute pancreatitis secondary to hypercalcaemia of primary hyperparathyroidism is rare; however, when it occurs it is associated with severe pancreatitis. It is suspected in patients with elevated serum calcium and high parathyroid hormone levels. Imaging techniques such as cervical ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy using 99mTc-Sestambi, should be performed, to confirm clinical suspicion. Surgical resection is the definitive treatment with excellent results. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Stages of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  9. [Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, H

    1980-12-01

    Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency usually does not develop before reduction of enzyme output by more than 90%. Patients with pancreatic insufficiency have a ravenous appetite but fail to thrive from malnutrition. The caloric deprivation is primarily due to fat malabsorption, recognized by the passage of bulky foul smelling greasy stools. Several isolated enzyme deficiencies can be separated from diseases with generalised pancreatic insufficiency. Under replacement therapy with pancreatic enzyme supplements most patients improve and gain weight, although fat and bile acid malabsorption are not abolished.

  10. Food-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok K; Upparahalli Venkateshaiah, Sathisha; Goyal, Hemant; Mishra, Anil

    2017-12-01

    Food allergy, a commonly increasing problem worldwide, defined as an adverse immune response to food. A variety of immune-related effector cells such as mast cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, and T cells are involved in food-related allergic responses categorized as IgE mediated, non-IgE mediated, and mixed (IgE and non-IgE) depending upon underlying immunological mechanisms. The dietary antigens mainly target the gastrointestinal tract including pancreas that gets inflamed due to food allergy and leads acute pancreatitis. Reports indicate several food proteins induce pancreatitis; however, detailed underlying mechanism of food-induced pancreatitis is unexplored. The aim of the review is to understand and update the current scenario of food-induced pancreatitis. A comprehensive literature search of relevant research articles has been performed through PubMed, and articles were chosen based on their relevance to food allergen-mediated pancreatitis. Several cases in the literature indicate that acute pancreatitis has been provoked after the consumption of mustard, milk, egg, banana, fish, and kiwi fruits. Food-induced pancreatitis is an ignored and unexplored area of research. The review highlights the significance of food in the development of pancreatitis and draws the attention of physicians and scientists to consider food allergies as a possible cause for initiation of pancreatitis pathogenesis.

  11. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the prediction of the fibrosis degree of the gland, the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic hyperenzimemia, the medical and surgical treatment of abdominal pain and the knowledge of the natural history of the autoimmune pancreatitis. In patients with indetermined EUS findings of chronic pancreatitis, a new endoscopic ultrasound examination in the follow-up is of help to confirm or to exclude the disease. Smoking, number of relapses, results of pancreatic function tests and EUS findings allow predicting the degree of pancreatic fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Antioxidant therapy has shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Development of intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but its impact on symptoms is unknown and deserves further investigations. Finally, autoimmune pancreatitis relapses in about half of the patients with either type 1 or type 2 disease; relapses frequently occur within the first two years of follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of heavy metal salts on the activity of trypsin-like hydrolases from Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. L. Ryzhko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of salts of heavy metals on trypsin-like peptide hydrolase of drosophila larvae partly refined by methods of salting-out, gel chromatography and electrophoresis has been researched. It is established that cadmium chloride is characterized by the greatest inhibitory effect, while zinc chloride by the lowest one. Since metal chlorides were used in all cases, it is the differentiated effect of metal ions on manifestations of amidase activity of trypsin-like peptide hydrolase of drosophila larvae, which rather may be considered as proved than the effect of chlorine ions. This, as a whole, agrees with the effect of these ions on proteolytic digestion system at the level of live organisms.

  14. Efficacy of Trypsin in Treating Coral Snake Envenomation in the Porcine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker-Cote, Jennifer L; O'Rourke, Dorcas P; Brewer, Kori L; Lertpiriyapong, Kvin; Punja, Mohan; Bush, Sean P; Miller, Susan N; Meggs, William J

    2015-12-01

    Antivenom is the definitive treatment for venomous snakebites. Alternative treatments warrant investigation because antivenom is sometimes unavailable, expensive, and can have deleterious side effects. This study assesses the efficacy of trypsin to treat coral snake envenomation in an in vivo porcine model. A randomized, blinded study was conducted. Subjects were 13 pigs injected subcutaneously with 1 mL of eastern coral snake venom (10 mg/mL) in the right distal hind limb. After 1 min, subjects were randomized to have the envenomation site injected with either 1 mL of saline or 1 mL of trypsin (100 mg/mL) by a blinded investigator. Clinical endpoint was survival for 72 h or respiratory depression defined as respiratory rate coral snake venom and increased survival significantly. Further investigation is required before these results can be extended to human snakebites.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of Murraya koenigii trypsin inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shee, Chandan [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 (India); Singh, Tej P. [Department of Biophysics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 100 029 (India); Kumar, Pravindra, E-mail: kumarfbs@iitr.ernet.in; Sharma, Ashwani K., E-mail: kumarfbs@iitr.ernet.in [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 (India)

    2007-04-01

    A Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor purified from the seeds of Murraya koenigii has been crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as the precipitating agent. A Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor purified from the seeds of Murraya koenigii has been crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as the precipitating agent. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 75.8, c = 150.9 Å. The crystals contain two molecules in the asymmetric unit with a V{sub M} value of 2.5 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. Diffraction was observed to 2.65 Å resolution and a complete data set was collected to 2.9 Å resolution.

  16. Bauhinia variegata var. variegata trypsin inhibitor: From isolation to potential medicinal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Wong, Jack Ho [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR (China); Bah, Clara Shui Fern [Department of Food Science, Division of Sciences, University of Otago (New Zealand); Lin, Peng [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR (China); Tsao, Sai Wah [Department of Anatomy, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR (China); Ng, Tzi Bun, E-mail: b021770@mailserv.cuhk.edu.hk [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2010-06-11

    Here we report for the first time of a new Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor (termed BvvTI) from seeds of the Camel's foot tree, Bauhinia variegata var. variegata. BvvTI shares the same reactive site residues (Arg, Ser) and exhibits a homology of N-terminal amino acid sequence to other Bauhinia protease inhibitors. The trypsin inhibitory activity (K{sub i}, 0.1 x 10{sup -9} M) of BvvTI ranks the highest among them. Besides anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity, BvvTI could significantly inhibit the proliferation of nasopharyngeal cancer CNE-1 cells in a selective way. This may partially be contributed by its induction of cytokines and apoptotic bodies. These results unveil potential medicinal applications of BvvTI.

  17. [Procedure for obtaining and catalytic properties of trypsin immobilized in cryogels of polyvinyl alcohol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysogorskaia, E N; Rosliakova, T V; Beliaeva, A V; Bacheva, A V; Lozinskiĭ, V I; Filippova, I Iu

    2008-01-01

    Commercial preparations of trypsin, varying in activity, were immobilized in a cryogel of polyvinyl alcohol, activated by dialdehydes (terephthalic, succinic, or glutaric) or divinyl sulfone. All preparations of the immobilized enzyme exhibited hydrolytic activity and retained stability for 8 months. In an organic solvent environment, specimens of immobilized trypsin catalyzed the synthesis of N-carbobenzoxy-L-phenylalanyl-L-arginyl-L-leucine p-nitroanilide from N-carbobenzoxy-L-phenylalanyl-L-argininine methyl ester (or N-carbobenzoxy-L-phenylalanyl-L-arginine) and L-leucine p-nitroanilide, as well as the formation of N-carbobenzoxy-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-arginyl-L-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide from N-carbobenzoxy-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-arginine and L-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide. The presence of small amounts of water in organic solvents was prerequisite to the biocatalysts manifesting synthase activity in reactions of peptide bond formation.

  18. Why Ser and not Thr brokers catalysis in the trypsin fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Leslie A; Chen, Zhiwei; Gohara, David W; Vogt, Austin D; Pozzi, Nicola; Di Cera, Enrico

    2015-02-24

    Although Thr is equally represented as Ser in the human genome and as a nucleophile is as good as Ser, it is never found in the active site of the large family of trypsin-like proteases that utilize the Asp/His/Ser triad. The molecular basis of the preference of Ser over Thr in the trypsin fold was investigated with X-ray structures of the thrombin mutant S195T free and bound to an irreversible active site inhibitor. In the free form, the methyl group of T195 is oriented toward the incoming substrate in a conformation seemingly incompatible with productive binding. In the bound form, the side chain of T195 is reoriented for efficient substrate acylation without causing steric clash within the active site. Rapid kinetics prove that this change is due to selection of an active conformation from a preexisting ensemble of reactive and unreactive rotamers whose relative distribution determines the level of activity of the protease. Consistent with these observations, the S195T substitution is associated with a weak yet finite activity that allows identification of an unanticipated important role for S195 as the end point of allosteric transduction in the trypsin fold. The S195T mutation abrogates the Na(+)-dependent enhancement of catalytic activity in thrombin, activated protein C, and factor Xa and significantly weakens the physiologically important allosteric effects of thrombomodulin on thrombin and of cofactor Va on factor Xa. The evolutionary selection of Ser over Thr in trypsin-like proteases was therefore driven by the need for high catalytic activity and efficient allosteric regulation.

  19. Bioinsecticidal activity of a novel Kunitz trypsin inhibitor from Catanduva (Piptadenia moniliformis) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Ana C B; Massena, Fábio S; Migliolo, Ludovico; Macedo, Leonardo L P; Monteiro, Norberto K V; Oliveira, Adeliana S; Macedo, Francisco P; Uchoa, Adriana F; Grossi de Sá, Maria F; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Murad, Andre M; Franco, Octavio L; Santos, Elizeu A

    2013-09-01

    The present study aims to provide new in vitro and in vivo biochemical information about a novel Kunitz trypsin inhibitor purified from Piptadenia moniliformis seeds. The purification process was performed using TCA precipitation, Trypsin-Sepharose and reversed-phase C18 HPLC chromatography. The inhibitor, named PmTKI, showed an apparent molecular mass of around 19 kDa, visualized by SDS-PAGE, which was confirmed by mass spectrometry MALDI-ToF demonstrating a monoisotopic mass of 19.296 Da. The inhibitor was in vitro active against trypsin, chymotrypsin and papain. Moreover, kinetic enzymatic studies were performed aiming to understand the inhibition mode of PmTKI, which competitively inhibits the target enzyme, presenting Ki values of 1.5 × 10(-8) and 3.0 × 10(-1) M against trypsin and chymotrypsin, respectively. Also, the inhibitory activity was assayed at different pH ranges, temperatures and reduction environments (DTT). The inhibitor was stable in all conditions maintaining an 80% residual activity. N-terminal sequence was obtained by Edman degradation and the primary sequence presented identity with members of Kunitz-type inhibitors from the same subfamily. Finally after biochemical characterization the inhibitory effect was evaluated in vitro on insect digestive enzymes from different orders, PmTKI demonstrated remarkable activity against enzymes from Anthonomus grandis (90%), Plodia interpuncptella (60%), and Ceratitis capitata (70%). Furthermore, in vivo bioinsecticidal assays of C. capitata larvae were also performed and the concentration of PmTKI (w/w) in an artificial diet required to LD50 and ED50 larvae were 0.37 and 0.3% respectively. In summary, data reported here shown the biotechnological potential of PmTKI for insect pest control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. [Glitazones and pancreatic function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, J

    2005-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by two abnormalities, insulin resistance and insulin secretion defects. Their exact mechanisms and their interrelation are still a matter of debates. Development of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes requires insulin secretion abnormalities. As the principal function of pancreatic beta-cell is insulin secretion, mainly in response to a glucose stimulus, it is of utmost importance to study abnormal beta-pancreatic function during the development of type 2 diabetes. The animal model of choice for such studies is the ZDF (Zucker Diabetic Fatty) rat. Two hypothesis are commonly discussed to explain the progressive beta-cell failure during type 2 diabetes evolution: glucotoxicity, mainly related to chronic hyperglycaemia effect on secretory beta-cell function and to defective glucose utilization in skeletal muscles, and lipotoxicity, as a consequence of triglyceride accumulation in the islets of Langerhans. In fact, likely, these two phenomenons are linked together, this glucolipotoxicity leading to a cellular apoptosis, through mechanisms we describe. Thiazolidinediones (glitazones) are synthetic PPARgamma ligands. Their beneficial effect on glycaemic control in type 2 diabetic patients are well established. Several studies in ZDF rats, using rosiglitazone as a preventive diabetes treatment (early administration) or a curative one (starting administration when diabetes is well established), indicate, in this animal model, that rosiglitazone has a protective effect on pancreatic beta-cell and preserve its secretory function. These studies are described and discussed, as well as their practical implications.

  1. Reappraisal of xenobiotic-induced, oxidative stress-mediated cellular injury in chronic pancreatitis: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To reappraise the hypothesis of xenobiotic induced, cytochrome P450-mediated, micronutrient-deficient oxidative injury in chronic pancreatitis. METHODS: Individual searches of the Medline and Embase databases were conducted for each component of the theory of oxidative-stress mediated cellular injury for the period from 1st January 1990 to 31st December 2012 using appropriate medical subject headings. Boolean operators were used. The individual components were drawn from a recent update on theory of oxidative stress-mediated cellular injury in chronic pancreatitis. RESULTS: In relation to the association between exposure to volatile hydrocarbons and chronic pancreatitis the studies fail to adequately control for alcohol intake. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction occurs as a diffuse hepatic and extra-hepatic response to xenobiotic exposure rather than an acinar cell-specific process. GSH depletion is not consistently confirmed. There is good evidence of superoxide dismutase depletion in acute phases of injury but less to support a chronic intra-acinar depletion. Although the liver is the principal site of CYP induction there is no evidence to suggest that oxidative by-products are carried in bile and reflux into the pancreatic duct to cause injury. CONCLUSION: Pancreatic acinar cell injury due to short-lived oxygen free radicals (generated by injury mediated by prematurely activated intra-acinar trypsin) is an important mechanism of cell damage in chronic pancreatitis. However, in contemporary paradigms of chronic pancreatitis this should be seen as one of a series of cell-injury mechanisms rather than a sole mediator. PMID:24659895

  2. Immobilization of trypsin on miniature incandescent bulbs for infrared-assisted proteolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Huimin; Bao, Huimin; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang, E-mail: gangchen@fudan.edu.cn

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Trypsin was immobilized on miniature incandescent bulbs via chitosan coating. • The bulbs acted as enzymatic reactors and the generators of infrared radiation. • The bulb bioreactors were successfully employed in infrared-assisted proteolysis. • The proteolysis could accomplish within 5 min with high sequence coverages. - Abstract: A novel efficient proteolysis approach was developed based on trypsin-immobilized miniature incandescent bulbs and infrared (IR) radiation. Trypsin was covalently immobilized in the chitosan coating on the outer surface of miniature incandescent bulbs with the aid of glutaraldehyde. When an illuminated enzyme-immobilized bulb was immersed in protein solution, the emitted IR radiation could trigger and accelerate heterogeneous protein digestion. The feasibility and performance of the novel proteolysis approach were demonstrated by the digestion of hemoglobin (HEM), cytochrome c (Cyt-c), lysozyme (LYS), and ovalbumin (OVA) and the digestion time was significantly reduced to 5 min. The obtained digests were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS with the sequence coverages of 91%, 77%, 80%, and 52% for HEM, Cyt-c, LYS, and OVA (200 ng μL{sup −1} each), respectively. The suitability of the prepared bulb bioreactors to complex proteins was demonstrated by digesting human serum.

  3. Structural and Chemical Characterization of Silica Spheres before and after Modification by Silanization for Trypsin Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo F. Barbosa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, silica particles of a variety of sizes and shapes have been characterized and chemically modified for several applications, from chromatographic separation to dental supplies. The present study proposes the use of aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTS silanized silica particles to immobilize the proteolytic enzyme trypsin for the development of a bioreactor. The major advantage of the process is that it enables the polypeptides hydrolysis interruption simply by removing the silica particles from the reaction bottle. Silanized silica surfaces showed significant morphological changes at micro- and nanoscale level. Chemical characterization showed changes in elemental composition, chemical environment, and thermal degradation. Their application as supports for trypsin immobilization showed high immobilization efficiency at reduced immobilization times, combined with more acidic conditions. Indirect immobilization quantification by reversed-phase ultrafast high performance liquid chromatography proved to be a suitable approach due to its high linearity and sensitivity. Immobilized trypsin activities on nonmodified and silanized silica showed promising features (e.g., selective hydrolysis for applications in proteins/peptides primary structure elucidation for proteomics. Silanized silica system produced some preferential targeting peptides, probably due to the hydrophobicity of the nanoenvironment conditioned by silanization.

  4. Preparation and characterization of magnetic levan particles as matrix for trypsin immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciel, J.C. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Andrad, P.L. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50679-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Neri, D.F.M., E-mail: davidfmneri@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Vale do Sao Francisco, 56304-205 Petrolina, PE (Brazil); Carvalho, L.B. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50679-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Cardoso, C.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, PE (Brazil); Calazans, G.M.T. [Departamento de Antibioticos, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Albino Aguiar, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50679-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Silva, M.P.C. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50679-901 Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    Magnetic levan was synthesized by co-precipitating D-fructofuranosyl homopolysaccharide with a solution containing Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} in alkaline conditions at 100 Degree-Sign C. The magnetic levan particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), magnetization measurements, X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). Afterwards, magnetic levan particles were functionalized by NaIO{sub 4} oxidation and used as matrices for trypsin covalent immobilization. Magnetite and magnetic levan particles were both heterogeneous in shape and levan-magnetite presented bigger sizes compared to magnetite according to SEM images. Magnetic levan particles exhibited a magnetization 10 times lower as compared to magnetite ones, probably, due to the coating layer. XRD diffractogram showed that magnetite is the dominant phase in the magnetic levan. Infrared spectroscopy showed characteristics absorption bands of levan and magnetite (O-H, C-O-C and Fe-O bonds). The immobilized trypsin derivative was reused 10 times and lost 16% of its initial specific activity only. Therefore, these magnetic levan particles can be proposed as an alternative matrices for enzyme immobilization. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic levan particles presented larger size variation than magnetite particles due to the changes produced by coating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The utilization of magnetic levan particles showed to be efficacious for immobilization of enzymes as trypsin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic particles can be planned as other matrix for immobilization of biomolecule in various division processes in biotechnology.

  5. Influence of carbohydrates on the interaction of procyanidin B3 with trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Rui; Mateus, Nuno; De Freitas, Victor

    2011-11-09

    The biological properties of procyanidins, in particular their inhibition of digestive enzymes, have received much attention in the past few years. Dietary carbohydrates are an environmental factor that is known to affect the interaction of procyanidins with proteins. This work aimed at understanding the effect of ionic food carbohydrates (polygalacturonic acid, arabic gum, pectin, and xanthan gum) on the interaction between procyanidins and trypsin. Physical-chemical techniques such as saturation transfer difference-NMR (STD-NMR) spectroscopy, fluorescence quenching, and nephelometry were used to evaluate the interaction process. Using STD-NMR, it was possible to identify the binding of procyanidin B3 to trypsin. The tested carbohydrates prevented the association of procyanidin B3 and trypsin by a competition mechanism in which the ionic character of carbohydrates and their ability to encapsulate procyanidins seem crucial leading to a reduction in STD signal and light scattering and to a recovery of the proteins intrinsic fluorescence. On the basis of these results, it was possible to grade the carbohydrates in their aggregation inhibition ability: XG > PA > AG ≫ PC. These effects may be relevant since the coingestion of procyanidins and ionic carbohydrates are frequent and furthermore since these might negatively affect the antinutritional properties ascribed to procyanidins in the past.

  6. Inhibition of Amyloid-like Fibril Formation of Trypsin by Red Wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotorman, Marta; Kasi, Phanindra B; Halasz, Laszlo; Borics, Attila

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the potential role and applicability of dietary supplements in reducing the risk of development of amyloid diseases associated with the gastrointestinal tract, such as type II diabetes. Trypsin, a well-known serine protease was used as a model protein in our experiments. The effect of various red wines on the formation of amyloid-like fibrils of trypsin was studied in vitro, in aqueous ethanol, at pH 7.0. Turbidity measurements, aggregation kinetics experiments, Congo red binding assays and electronic circular dichroism spectroscopic measurements were used to follow the aggregation process in the presence or absence of various red wines. The results suggest that red wines effectively inhibit the formation of amyloid-like fibrils of trypsin and the inhibitory effect is dose-dependent. The extent of inhibition was found to be proportional to the total concentration of phenolic compounds. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Trypsin inhibition activity of heat-denatured ovomucoid: a kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Plancken, Iesel; Van Remoortere, Marijke; Van Loey, Ann; Hendrickx, Marc E

    2004-01-01

    A kinetic study was conducted on the effect of heating in the temperature range of 75-110 degrees C on the trypsin inhibition activity of ovomucoid. Heat treatment of isolated ovomucoid resulted in a time-dependent decrease in trypsin inhibition activity that could accurately be described by a first-order kinetic model. The magnitude and the temperature dependence of the rate constants was affected by the pH during heat treatment. The heat stability of ovomucoid was the lowest at pH 7.6. Heat treatments intended to decrease the trypsin inhibition activity should therefore be carried out as soon as possible after laying, because the ovomucoid was inactivated faster at the pH of fresh egg white (pH 7.6). The presence of the other egg white constituents decreased the heat stability of ovomucoid compared to that of the model system of ovomucoid in buffer, presumably by the formation of ovomucoid-lysozyme complexes in the former.

  8. Allergenicity, trypsin inhibitor activity and nutritive quality of enzymatically modified soy proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Barca, Ana María Calderón; Wall, Abraham; López-Díaz, José Alberto

    2005-05-01

    Two ultrafiltered soy flour protein fractions were evaluated; the first was obtained by hydrolysis (0.5-3 kDa, F(0.5-3)), and the second was an enzymatically methionine-enriched fraction (1-10 kDa, F(1-10)E). Amino acid profiles, protein quality, allergenicity (against soy-sensitive infant sera) and trypsin inhibitor activity were determined. Fraction F(1-10)E fulfilled amino acid requirements for infants, whereas the F(0.5-3) fraction was methionine deficient. Both fractions were similar in net protein utilization, and F(1-10)E digestibility was comparable with casein and higher (P?soy isolate. Allergenicity of SF was reduced to 21.5% with the hydrolysis in F(1-10)E and it was not detected in F(0.5-3.) Residual trypsin inhibitor activity with respect to soy flour was 8.1%, 3.3% and 1% for hydrolysate, F(1-10)E and F(0.5-3), respectively. Both fractions presented high nutritive quality and reduced or null allergenicity. The trypsin inhibitor activity decreased along processing and could be a useful indicator for production of hypoallergenic proteins.

  9. Differential diagnosis of focal pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gulik, T. M.; Moojen, T. M.; van Geenen, R.; Rauws, E. A.; Obertop, H.; Gouma, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    The differentiation of focal, chronic pancreatitis (CP) and pancreatic cancer (PAC) poses a diagnostic dilemma. Both conditions may present with the same symptoms and signs. The complexity of differential diagnosis is enhanced because PAC is frequently associated with secondary inflammatory changes

  10. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Taylor M; Villafane-Ferriol, Nicole; Shah, Kevin P; Shah, Rohan M; Tran Cao, Hop S; Massarweh, Nader N; Silberfein, Eric J; Choi, Eugene A; Hsu, Cary; McElhany, Amy L; Barakat, Omar; Fisher, William; Van Buren, George

    2017-03-07

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL). The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995-2016) addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1) patients with albumin 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2) patients with albumin pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of appropriate treatment to improve the patient's quality of life.

  11. Pancreatic Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm Communicating with Main Pancreatic Duct: An Unrecognized Presentation of Pancreatic Mucinous Neoplasm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weixun; Saam, Trustin; Zhou, Yihua; Trevino, Jose; Liu, Xiuli; Cao, Dengfeng; Lai, Jinping

    2017-12-01

    Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are two well recognized entities of precursor cystic lesions of pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma. The characteristic features of MCNs are the lined mucinous epithelium with underlying ovarian-type stroma, but without communication with the ducts, while that for IPMNs are the communication with the ducts but without the underlying ovarian-type stroma. Here we report a case of MCN communicating with the main pancreatic duct in a 68-year-old woman. The initial radiographic diagnosis was pancreatic IPMN with main pancreatic involvement and this was also confirmed during gross examination. Histologically, the pancreatic cystic neoplasm was lined with mucinous epithelium with underlying ovarian-type of stroma. Immunohistochemical stains confirmed that the stroma cells were positive for ER, PR, alpha-inhibin and focally positive for CD10. The final pathologic diagnosis was pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm communicating with the main pancreatic duct. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second pathology confirmed case of MCN communicating with the main pancreatic duct. A careful gross examination and bivalvation of the main duct communicating with the cystic neoplasm helps render the correct diagnosis. If more cases are reported in the future, the MCN communicating with duct could become a new entity of pancreatic mucinous neoplasm. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  12. Amino Acid Composition, Urease Activity and Trypsin Inhibitor Activity after Toasting of Soybean in Thick and Thin Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Tajana Krička; Vanja Jurišić; Neven Voća; Duška Ćurić; Tea Brlek Savić; Ana Matin

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine amino acid content, urease activity and trypsin inhibitor activity in soybean grain for polygastric animals’ feed aft er toasting with the aim to introduce thick layer in toasting technology. Hence, soybean was toasted both in thick and thin layer at 130 oC during 10 minutes. In order to properly monitor the technological process of soybean thermal processing, it was necessary to study crude protein content, urease activity, trypsin inhibitor activ...

  13. The Role of Adipocytokines in Pancreatic Remodeling in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Zhuravliova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analysed the data about the role of adipocytokines in pancreatic remodeling in chronic pancreatitis. Data, obtained by generalizing the current literature, enable to identify the role of some adipocytokines (apelin, tumor necrosis factor α in the development and progression of the pathophysiological processes in the pancreas, especially in regard to the mechanism of chronic pancreatitis. Adipocytokines being studied play a role in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism disorders, promote the induction of inflammation, tissue maladaptive hypertrophy, the onset of steatosis, fibrosis of the pancreas and have an impact on the various stages of the pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis. We should pay close attention to the diagnostic role of cytokines that can help to develop new algorithms for non-invasive diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis.

  14. The structural determinants that lead to the formation of particular oligomeric structures in the pancreatic-type ribonuclease family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, A; Laurents, D V; Ribó, M; Vilanova, M

    2008-08-01

    Pancreatic-type ribonucleases are a family of RNA degrading enzymes that share different degrees of sequence identity but a very similar 3D-structure. The prototype of this family is bovine pancreatic ribonuclease or ribonuclease A. This enzyme has been the object of landmark work on the folding, stability, protein chemistry, catalysis, enzyme-substrate interaction and molecular evolution. In the recent years, the interest in the study of pancreatic-type ribonucleases has increased due to the involvement of some members of this family in special biological functions. In addition, dimeric and also higher oligomeric structures can be attained by the members of this family. The oligomers described structurally to date are mainly formed by 3D-domain swapping, a process which consists of the exchange of identical domains (i.e. identical structural elements, usually the N- and C-termini) between the subunits and is considered to be a mechanism for amyloid-type aggregate formation. This review compares the dimeric and oligomeric structures of different members of the pancreatic-type ribonuclease family which are able to acquire these structures, namely, bovine seminal ribonuclease, ribonuclease A and its human counterpart, human pancreatic ribonuclease. A specific focus is placed on what is known about the structural determinants that lead to the acquisition of a particular oligomeric structure and on the proposed mechanism of 3D-swapping.

  15. Treatment options for acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.; Issa, Y.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Besselink, M.G.; Schepers, N.J.; Bruno, M.J.; Boermeester, M.A.; Gooszen, H.G.

    2014-01-01

    This Review covers the latest developments in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. The Atlanta Classification of acute pancreatitis has been revised, proposing several new terms and abandoning some of the old and confusing terminology. The 2012 Revised Atlanta Classification and the

  16. Treatment options for chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Issa, Y.; Bruno, M.J.; Bakker, O.J.; Besselink, M.G.; Schepers, N.J.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Gooszen, H.G.; Boermeester, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    This Review covers the latest developments in the treatment options for chronic pancreatitis. Pain is the most frequent and dominant symptom in patients with chronic pancreatitis, which ranges from severe disabling continuous pain to mild pain attacks and pain-free periods. Conventional treatment

  17. Dapsone-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Shivkumar H; Reddy, Jyothi A; Dave, Jatin K

    2003-10-01

    To report a case of acute pancreatitis associated with dapsone use. An 87-year-old white man was prescribed dapsone for dermatitis herpetiformis. Four weeks later, he developed acute abdominal pain requiring hospitalization. The patient had elevated serum amylase and lipase levels. Laboratory test results for other possible etiologies were negative. His symptoms resolved when dapsone was discontinued. Dapsone was reintroduced for exacerbation of dermatitis herpetiformis 4 months later. The patient again had severe abdominal pain with high amylase and lipase levels. Again, symptoms resolved following dapsone discontinuation. Only 1 other case of pancreatitis associated with dapsone was found in a MEDLINE search of the literature (1966-June 2003) using the key terms dapsone and pancreatitis. An objective causality assessment revealed dapsone to be a probable cause of acute pancreatitis, based on the Naranjo probability scale. Drugs should always be considered as causative factors for pancreatitis in patients without known risk factors. Dapsone is increasingly used as a second line of treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). The recognition of dapsone-induced pancreatitis is of particular importance in these patients. While dapsone is traditionally used for the treatment of leprosy and dermatitis herpetiformis, its use for PCP prophylaxis, malaria, brown recluse spider bites, and acne is not uncommon. Pancreatitis is an uncommon adverse effect of dapsone, and greater awareness of this association will prompt a high index of suspicion in an appropriate clinical setting. Further reporting of cases and clinical research of drug-induced pancreatitis is indicated.

  18. [Identifying the severe acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo Tizón, Anais; Targarona Modena, Javier; Málaga Rodríguez, Germán; Barreda Cevasco, Luis

    2011-01-01

    To compare patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis without any additional complications during their hospital stay (Group A) versus patients with Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis with additional complications during their hospital stay (Group B). Data obtained from a pre-existing base from hospitalized patients with diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in the specialized unit of "Unidad de Pancreatitis Aguda Grave del Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins" between 2000 and 2010. Data included patients with diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, of ages 18 and over. Data from 215 patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis was included. Patients from Group A represented 32% (68) and from Group B 68% (147). Group A had a average of 39 hospitalized days and Group B had an average of 56 days (p=0.01). From Group A 22% had more than 50% of necrosis while 43% of Group B had this extension of necrosis (p pancreatitis, based on the presence of necrosis, behave likewise. It is an extended necrosis, described as more than 50% of pancreatic necrosis, and not the presence itself which will determine additional complications during the course of disease and a greater mortality.

  19. Surgical Management of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Dilip; Natarajan, Sathima

    2015-10-01

    Advances over the past decade have indicated that a complex interplay between environmental factors, genetic predisposition, alcohol abuse, and smoking lead towards the development of chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a complex disorder that causes significant and chronic incapacity in patients and a substantial burden on the society. Major advances have been made in the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease and the role of genetic predisposition is increasingly coming to the fore. Advances in noninvasive diagnostic modalities now allow for better diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at an early stage of the disease. The impact of these advances on surgical treatment is beginning to emerge, for example, patients with certain genetic predispositions may be better treated with total pancreatectomy versus lesser procedures. Considerable controversy remains with respect to the surgical management of chronic pancreatitis. Modern understanding of the neurobiology of pain in chronic pancreatitis suggests that a window of opportunity exists for effective treatment of the intractable pain after which central sensitization can lead to an irreversible pain syndrome in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Effective surgical procedures exist for chronic pancreatitis; however, the timing of surgery is unclear. For optimal treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis, close collaboration between a multidisciplinary team including gastroenterologists, surgeons, and pain management physicians is needed.

  20. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma pathology : changing "landscape"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Hackeng, Wenzel M; Offerhaus, G Johan; Hruban, Ralph H; Wood, Laura D

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. At time of diagnosis the disease is usually advanced and only a minority of patients are eligible for surgical resection. The overall 5-year survival is 6%. However, survival of patients with early stage pancreatic cancer is significantly better. To

  1. Molecular characteristics of pancreatic carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorstra, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is a very aggressive disease with a high mortality rate. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries, despite the fact this cancer accounts for only about 3% of all malignant tumors. Most pancreatic cancers

  2. [Facial erythema and pancreatic glucagonoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erce, C; Morales, D J; Diego, L; Mazorra, F; García de Polavieja, M

    1997-02-01

    Glucagonoma is a rare pancreatic tumor, that gives a characteristic clinical syndrome. In this report we describe the case of a 27 year old woman whose only clinical manifestations were a facial erythema and a palpable abdominal mass. Surgical removal of the tumor resulted in elimination of the clinical symptoms. Immunohistochemical findings were consistent with pancreatic glucagonoma.

  3. Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Casari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is without any doubt the malignancy with the poorest prognosis and the lowest survival rate. This highly aggressive disease is rarely diagnosed at an early stage and difficult to treat due to its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need to clarify the causes responsible for pancreatic cancer and to identify preventive strategies to reduce its incidence in the population. Some circumstances, such as smoking habits, being overweight and diabetes, have been identified as potentially predisposing factors to pancreatic cancer, suggesting that diet might play a role. A diet low in fat and sugars, together with a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, weight reduction and not smoking, may contribute to prevent pancreatic cancer and many other cancer types. In addition, increasing evidence suggests that some food may have chemo preventive properties. Indeed, a high dietary intake of fresh fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and recent epidemiological studies have associated nut consumption with a protective effect against it. Therefore, diet could have an impact on the development of pancreatic cancer and further investigations are needed to assess the potential chemo preventive role of specific foods against this disease. This review summarizes the key evidence for the role of dietary habits and their effect on pancreatic cancer and focuses on possible mechanisms for the association between diet and risk of pancreatic cancer.

  4. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Feick

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available : In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated.

  5. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloff, Andreas; Singer, Manfred V; Feick, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated. PMID:20617020

  6. Clinical advances in acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QIAN Jiaming

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a common gastroenterological emergency. Because of the diverse prognosis in AP, it is crucial to identify severe acute pancreatitis (SAP early and provide timely treatment. Thus, there are a number of clinical advances in this aspect. This paper reviews two advances in AP. Firstly, AP is classified into mild acute pancreatitis, moderately severe acute pancreatitis (MSAP, and SAP according to 2012 revision of the Atlanta Classification; SAP is distinguished from MSAP by the presence of persistent organ failure, that is, organ failure >48 h. Secondly, bedside index for severity in acute pancreatitis, a new scoring system, has confirmed value in predicting the severity and prognosis of AP both in China and abroad. These advances show more insight into AP and may help to improve the prognosis in AP patients.

  7. General Information about Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... History Committees of Interest Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws Careers Visitor Information Search Search Home Cancer Types Pancreatic Cancer Patient Pancreatic Cancer Patient Pancreatic ...

  8. Alcohol consumption on pancreatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Bañales, Jesus Maria; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

    2013-02-07

    Although the association between alcohol and pancreatic diseases has been recognized for a long time, the impact of alcohol consumption on pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer (PC) remains poorly defined. Nowadays there is not consensus about the epidemiology and the beverage type, dose and duration of alcohol consumption causing these diseases. The objective of this study was to review the epidemiology described in the literature for pancreatic diseases as a consequence of alcoholic behavior trying to understand the association between dose, type and frequency of alcohol consumption and risk of pancreatitis and PC. The majority of the studies conclude that high alcohol intake was associated with a higher risk of pancreatitis (around 2.5%-3% between heavy drinkers and 1.3% between non drinkers). About 70% of pancreatitis are due to chronic heavy alcohol consumption. Although this incidence rate differs between countries, it is clear that the risk of developing pancreatitis increases with increasing doses of alcohol and the average of alcohol consumption vary since 80 to 150 g/d for 10-15 years. With regard to PC, the role of alcohol consumption remains less clear, and low to moderate alcohol consumption do not appear to be associated with PC risk, and only chronic heavy drinking increase the risk compared with lightly drinkers. In a population of 10%-15% of heavy drinkers, 2%-5% of all PC cases could be attributed to alcohol consumption. However, as only a minority (less than 10% for pancreatitis and 5% for PC) of heavily drinkers develops these pancreatic diseases, there are other predisposing factors besides alcohol involved. Genetic variability and environmental exposures such as smoking and diet modify the risk and should be considered for further investigations.

  9. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute

  10. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, U.A.; Issa, Y.; Hagenaars, J.C.; Bakker, O.J.; Goor, H. van; Nieuwenhuijs, V.B.; Bollen, T.L.; Ramshorst, B. van; Witteman, B.J.; Brink, M.A.; Schaapherder, A.F.; Dejong, C.H.; Spanier, B.W.; Heisterkamp, J.; Harst, E. van der; Eijck, C.H. van; Besselink, M.G.; Gooszen, H.G.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Boermeester, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute

  11. Acute Pancreatitis: Etiology, Pathology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Shirin; Golembioski, Adam; Wilson, Stephen L; Thompson, Errington C

    2017-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a fascinating disease. In the United States, the two most common etiologies of acute pancreatitis are gallstones and excessive alcohol consumption. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is made with a combination of history, physical examination, computed tomography scan, and laboratory evaluation. Differentiating patients who will have a benign course of their pancreatitis from patients who will have severe pancreatitis is challenging to the clinician. C-reactive protein, pro-calcitonin, and the Bedside Index for Severity of Acute Pancreatitis appeared to be the best tools for the early and accurate diagnosis of severe pancreatitis. Early laparoscopic cholecystectomy is indicated for patients with mild gallstone pancreatitis. For patients who are going to have a prolonged hospitalization, enteral nutrition is preferred. Total parenteral nutrition should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Prophylactic antibiotics are not indicated for patients with pancreatic necrosis. Surgical intervention for infected pancreatic necrosis should be delayed as long as possible to improve patient outcomes.

  12. Endoscopic management of pancreatic pseudocysts and necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ryan; Baron, Todd H

    2015-02-01

    Over the last several years, there have been refinements in the understanding and nomenclature regarding the natural history of acute pancreatitis. Patients with acute pancreatitis frequently develop acute pancreatic collections that, over time, may evolve into pancreatic pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Endoscopic management of these local complications of acute pancreatitis continues to evolve. Treatment strategies range from simple drainage of liquefied contents to repeated direct endoscopic necrosectomy of a complex necrotic collection. In patients with chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic pseudocysts may arise as a consequence of pancreatic ductal obstruction that then leads to pancreatic ductal disruption. In this review, we focus on the indications, techniques and outcomes for endoscopic therapy of pancreatic pseudocysts and walled-off necrosis.

  13. Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fristrup, Claus; Detlefsen, Sönke; Hansen, Carsten Palnæs; Ladekarl, Morten

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database aims to prospectively register the epidemiology, diagnostic workup, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer in Denmark at an institutional and national level. Since May 1, 2011, all patients with microscopically verified ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas have been registered in the database. As of June 30, 2014, the total number of patients registered was 2,217. All data are cross-referenced with the Danish Pathology Registry and the Danish Patient Registry to ensure the completeness of registrations. The main registered variables are patient demographics, performance status, diagnostic workup, histological and/or cytological diagnosis, and clinical tumor stage. The following data on treatment are registered: type of operation, date of first adjuvant, neoadjuvant, and first palliative chemo- or chemoradiation therapy, and dates for milestones in referrals, diagnostic workup, treatment decisions, and treatment. For patients undergoing resection, data on operative evaluation of tumor stage, histological diagnosis, and duration of hospital stay are registered. Death is monitored using data from the Danish Civil Registry. This registry monitors the survival status of the Danish population, and the registration is virtually complete. All data in the database are audited by all participating institutions, with respect to baseline characteristics, key indicators, and survival. The results are published annually. The Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database has registered data on 2,217 patients with microscopically verified ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. The data have been obtained nationwide over a period of 4 years and 2 months. The completeness of registration was 82%. The observed overall 3-year survival after diagnosis was 6%.

  14. Evidence of Altered Glycosylation of Serum Proteins Prior to Pancreatic Cancer Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shibu; Whitwell, Harry J; Cuenco, Joy; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Pereira, Stephen P; Gaspari, Marco; Timms, John F

    2017-12-09

    Biomarkers for the early detection of pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate changes in serum N-glycoproteins and their glycosylation status prior to clinical presentation of pancreatic cancer that may be potential biomarkers. Prediagnosis serum samples pooled according to five time-to-diagnosis groups and a non-cancer control pool were digested with trypsin, labelled with mass tags, and subjected to titanium dioxide capture, deglycosylation, and 2D-LC-MS/MS profiling. Unbound peptides were profiled in parallel. Across the sample groups, 703 proteins were quantified and 426 putative sites of N-glycosylation were identified with evidence of several novel sites. Altered proteins with biomarker potential were predominantly abundant inflammatory response, coagulation, and immune-related proteins. Whilst glycopeptide profiles largely paralleled those of their parent proteins, there was evidence of altered N-glycosylation site occupancy or sialic acid content prior to diagnosis for some proteins, most notably of immunoglobulin gamma chains. α-1-Antitrypsin was tested as a biomarker, but found not to complement carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in early detection of cancer. In conclusion, we provide preliminary evidence of altered glycosylation of several serum proteins prior to pancreatic cancer diagnosis, warranting further investigation of these proteins as early biomarkers. These changes may be largely driven by inflammatory processes that occur in response to tumour formation and progression.

  15. Effects of the Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant Mitoquinone in Murine Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although oxidative stress has been strongly implicated in the development of acute pancreatitis (AP, antioxidant therapy in patients has so far been discouraging. The aim of this study was to assess potential protective effects of a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, MitoQ, in experimental AP using in vitro and in vivo approaches. MitoQ blocked H2O2-induced intracellular ROS responses in murine pancreatic acinar cells, an action not shared by the control analogue dTPP. MitoQ did not reduce mitochondrial depolarisation induced by either cholecystokinin (CCK or bile acid TLCS, and at 10 µM caused depolarisation per se. Both MitoQ and dTPP increased basal and CCK-induced cell death in a plate-reader assay. In a TLCS-induced AP model MitoQ treatment was not protective. In AP induced by caerulein hyperstimulation (CER-AP, MitoQ exerted mixed effects. Thus, partial amelioration of histopathology scores was observed, actions shared by dTPP, but without reduction of the biochemical markers pancreatic trypsin or serum amylase. Interestingly, lung myeloperoxidase and interleukin-6 were concurrently increased by MitoQ in CER-AP. MitoQ caused biphasic effects on ROS production in isolated polymorphonuclear leukocytes, inhibiting an acute increase but elevating later levels. Our results suggest that MitoQ would be inappropriate for AP therapy, consistent with prior antioxidant evaluations in this disease.

  16. Variants in CPA1 are strongly associated with early-onset chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Heiko; Beer, Sebastian; Rosendahl, Jonas; Chen, Jian-Min; Chandak, Giriraj Ratan; Masamune, Atsushi; Bence, Melinda; Szmola, Richárd; Oracz, Grzegorz; Macek, Milan; Bhatia, Eesh; Steigenberger, Sandra; Lasher, Denise; Bühler, Florence; Delaporte, Catherine; Tebbing, Johanna; Ludwig, Maren; Pilsak, Claudia; Saum, Karolin; Bugert, Peter; Masson, Emmanuelle; Paliwal, Sumit; Bhaskar, Seema; Sobczynska-Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Bak, Daniel; Balascak, Ivan; Choudhuri, Gourdas; Reddy, D. Nageshwar; Rao, G. Venkat; Thomas, Varghese; Kume, Kiyoshi; Nakano, Eriko; Kakuta, Yoichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Durko, Lukasz; Szabó, András; Schnúr, Andrea; Hegyi, Péter; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Pfützer, Roland; Schneider, Alexander; Groneberg, David Alexander; Braun, Markus; Schmidt, Hartmut; Witt, Ulrike; Friess, Helmut; Algül, Hana; Landt, Olfert; Schuelke, Markus; Krüger, Renate; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Schmidt, Frank; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Blüher, Matthias; Müller, Thomas; Janecke, Andreas; Teich, Niels; Grützmann, Robert; Schulz, Hans-Ulrich; Mössner, Joachim; Keim, Volker; Löhr, Matthias; Férec, Claude; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disorder of the pancreas. We analyzed CPA1 encoding carboxypeptidase A1 in subjects with non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis and controls in a German discovery cohort and three replication cohorts. Functionally impaired variants were present in 29/944 (3.1%) German patients and in 5/3,938 (0.1%) controls (odds ratio [OR] = 24.9; P = 1.5 × 10-16). The association was strongest in subjects aged ≤10 years (9.7%; OR = 84.0; P = 4.1 × 10-24). In the replication cohorts, defective CPA1 variants were observed in 8/600 (1.3%) patients and in 9/2,432 (0.4%) controls from Europe (P = 0.01), in 5/230 (2.2%) patients and 0/264 controls from India (P = 0.02), and in 5/247 (2.0%) patients but 0/341 controls from Japan (P = 0.013). The mechanism of increased pancreatitis risk by CPA1 variants may involve misfolding-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress rather than elevated trypsin activity as seen with other genetic risk factors. PMID:23955596

  17. Metronidazole-induced pancreatitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Halloran, E

    2010-01-01

    A 25-year-old caucasian lady presented to the Accident & Emergency department complaining of acute onset severe epigastric pain radiating through to the back with associated nausea and vomiting. A diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was made. Symptoms commenced after the third dose of Metronidazole therapy prescribed for a recurrent periodontal abscess. The patient described a similar episode 10 months previously. On neither occasion were any other medications being taken, there was no history of alcohol abuse and no other gastro-intestinal aetiology could be identified on imaging. Symptoms resolved quickly upon discontinuation of the antibiotic agent. We conclude therefore that Metronidazole can reasonably be identified as the only potential causative agent.

  18. Pancreatic islet transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrêa-Giannella Maria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No formulation of exogenous insulin available to date has yet been able to mimic the physiological nictemeral rhythms of this hormone, and despite all engineering advancements, the theoretical proposal of developing a mechanical replacement for pancreatic β cell still has not been reached. Thus, the replacement of β cells through pancreas and pancreatic islet transplantation are the only concrete alternatives for re-establishing the endogenous insulin secretion in type 1 diabetic patients. Since only 1 to 1.5% of the pancreatic mass corresponds to endocrine tissue, pancreatic islets transplantation arises as a natural alternative. Data from the International Islet Transplant Registry (ITR from 1983 to December 2000 document a total of 493 transplants performed around the world, with progressively worse rates of post-transplant insulin independence. In 2000, the "Edmonton Protocol" introduced several modifications to the transplantation procedure, such as the use of a steroid-free immunosuppression regimen and transplantation of a mean islet mass of 11,000 islet equivalents per kilogram, which significantly improved 1-year outcomes. Although the results of a 5-year follow-up in 65 patients demonstrated improvement in glycemic instability in a significant portion of them, only 7.5% of the patients have reached insulin independence, indicating the need of further advances in the preservation of the function of transplanted islet. In addition to the scarcity of organs available for transplantation, islets transplantation still faces major challenges, specially those related to cell loss during the process of islet isolation and the losses related to the graft site, apoptosis, allorejection, autoimmunity, and immunosuppression. The main strategies to optimize islet transplantation aim at improving all these aspects. Conclusion Human islet transplantation should be regarded as an intervention that can decrease the frequency of

  19. Management of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsmark, Christopher E

    2013-06-01

    Advances in our understanding of chronic pancreatitis have improved our care of patients with this disease. Although our therapies are imperfect and many patients remain symptomatic, appropriate medical care improves the quality of life in these patients. Proper management requires an accurate diagnosis, recognition of the modifiable causes of disease, assessment of symptoms and complications, treatment of these symptoms and complications utilizing a multidisciplinary team, and ongoing monitoring for the effect of therapy and the occurrence of complications. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Screening for Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Canto, Marcia Irene

    2016-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly fatal disease that can only be cured by complete surgical resection. However, most patients with PC have unresectable disease at the time of diagnosis, highlighting the need to detect PC and its precursor lesions earlier in asymptomatic patients. Screening is not cost-effective for population-based screening of PC. Individuals with genetic risk factors for PC based on family history or known PC-associated genetic syndromes, however, can be a potential target for PC screening programs. This article provides an overview of the epidemiology and genetic background of familial PC and discusses diagnostic and management approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Viral infections and bovine mastitis: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, G.J.; Poel, van der W.H.M.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    2002-01-01

    This review deals with the role of viruses in the aetiology of bovine mastitis. Bovine herpesvirus 1, bovine herpesvirus 4, foot-and-mouth disease virus, and parainfluenza 3 virus have been isolated from milk from cows with clinical mastitis. Intramammary inoculations of bovine herpesvirus 1 or

  2. Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Jun; Robbins, Lori A.; Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T.; Jeon, Christie Y.; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and certain hormones play an important role in pro...

  3. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata, E-mail: mukhopadhyay.debabrata@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Guggenheim 1321C, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-02-24

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

  4. Impaired small-bowel barrier integrity in the presence of lumenal pancreatic digestive enzymes leads to circulatory shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Erik B; Alsaigh, Tom; Chang, Marisol; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2012-08-01

    In bowel ischemia, impaired mucosal integrity may allow intestinal pancreatic enzyme products to become systemic and precipitate irreversible shock and death. This can be attenuated by pancreatic enzyme inhibition in the small-bowel lumen. It is unresolved, however, whether ischemically mediated mucosal disruption is the key event allowing pancreatic enzyme products systemic access and whether intestinal digestive enzyme activity in concert with increased mucosal permeability leads to shock in the absence of ischemia. To test this possibility, the small intestinal lumen of nonischemic rats was perfused for 2 h with either digestive enzymes, a mucin disruption strategy (i.e., mucolytics) designed to increase mucosal permeability, or both, and animals were observed for shock. Digestive enzymes perfused included trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, amylase, and lipase. Control (n = 6) and experimental animals perfused with pancreatic enzymes only (n = 6) or single enzymes (n = 3 for each of the five enzyme groups) maintained stable hemodynamics. After mucin disruption using a combination of enteral N-acetylcysteine, atropine, and increased flow rates, rats (n = 6) developed mild hypotension (P shock and increase systemic protease activation in the absence of ischemia, implicating bowel mucin disruption as a key event in early ischemia. Digestive enzymes and their products, if allowed to penetrate the gut wall, may trigger multiorgan failure and death.

  5. Extended exenatide administration enhances lipid metabolism and exacerbates pancreatic injury in mice on a high fat, high carbohydrate diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney Rouse

    Full Text Available This study expanded upon a previous study in mice reporting a link between exenatide treatment and exocrine pancreatic injury by demonstrating temporal and dose responses and providing an initial mechanistic hypothesis. The design of the present study included varying lengths of exenatide exposure (3, 6 weeks to 12 weeks at multiple concentrations (3, 10, or 30 µg/kg with multiple endpoints (histopathology evaluations, immunoassay for cytokines, immunostaining of the pancreas, serum chemistries and measurement of trypsin, amylase, and, lipase, and gene expression profiles. Time- and dose-dependent exocrine pancreatic injury was observed in mice on a high fat diet treated with exenatide. The morphological changes identified in the pancreas involved acinar cell injury and death (autophagy, apoptosis, necrosis, and atrophy, cell adaptations (hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and cell survival (proliferation/regeneration accompanied by varying degrees of inflammatory response leading to secondary injury in pancreatic blood vessels, ducts, and adipose tissues. Gene expression profiles indicated increased signaling for cell survival and altered lipid metabolism in exenatide treated mice. Immunohistochemistry supported gene expression findings that exenatide caused and/or exacerbated pancreatic injury in a high fat diet environment potentially by further increasing high fat diet exacerbated lipid metabolism and resulting oxidative stress. Further investigation is required to confirm these findings and determine their relevance to human disease.

  6. Extended exenatide administration enhances lipid metabolism and exacerbates pancreatic injury in mice on a high fat, high carbohydrate diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Rodney; Zhang, Leshuai; Shea, Katherine; Zhou, Hongfei; Xu, Lin; Stewart, Sharron; Rosenzweig, Barry; Zhang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This study expanded upon a previous study in mice reporting a link between exenatide treatment and exocrine pancreatic injury by demonstrating temporal and dose responses and providing an initial mechanistic hypothesis. The design of the present study included varying lengths of exenatide exposure (3, 6 weeks to 12 weeks) at multiple concentrations (3, 10, or 30 µg/kg) with multiple endpoints (histopathology evaluations, immunoassay for cytokines, immunostaining of the pancreas, serum chemistries and measurement of trypsin, amylase, and, lipase, and gene expression profiles). Time- and dose-dependent exocrine pancreatic injury was observed in mice on a high fat diet treated with exenatide. The morphological changes identified in the pancreas involved acinar cell injury and death (autophagy, apoptosis, necrosis, and atrophy), cell adaptations (hypertrophy and hyperplasia), and cell survival (proliferation/regeneration) accompanied by varying degrees of inflammatory response leading to secondary injury in pancreatic blood vessels, ducts, and adipose tissues. Gene expression profiles indicated increased signaling for cell survival and altered lipid metabolism in exenatide treated mice. Immunohistochemistry supported gene expression findings that exenatide caused and/or exacerbated pancreatic injury in a high fat diet environment potentially by further increasing high fat diet exacerbated lipid metabolism and resulting oxidative stress. Further investigation is required to confirm these findings and determine their relevance to human disease.

  7. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  8. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yong Suk; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Chan Sub; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck [Kwandong Univ., Myongji Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Pancreatic panniculitis is an inflammation and necrosis of fat at distant foci in patients with pancreatic disorders, most frequently, pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. Clinically, pancreatic panniculitis is manifested by painless or painful subcutaneous nodules on the legs, buttocks, or trunk. The usual sites are the distal parts of the lower extremities. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been many reports for the radiologic findings of pancreatic panniculitis. In this article, we report a case of pancreatic panniculitis, including radiologic findings of CT and ultrasonography. The patient was presented with painful subcutaneous nodules on the trunk, and had underlying acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts.

  9. Pathogenesis of bovine neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Buxton, D; Wouda, W

    2006-05-01

    The protozoan parasite Neospora caninum is a major pathogen of cattle and dogs, being a significant cause of abortion in cattle in many countries. It is one of the most efficiently transmitted parasites, with up to 90% of cattle infected in some herds. The pathogenesis of abortion due to Neospora is complex and only partially understood. Losses occur after a primary infection during pregnancy but more commonly as the result of recrudescence of a persistent infection during pregnancy. Parasitaemia is followed by invasion of the placenta and fetus. It is suggested that abortion occurs when primary parasite-induced placental damage jeopardises fetal survival directly or causes release of maternal prostaglandins that in turn cause luteolysis and abortion. Fetal damage may also occur due to primary tissue damage caused by the multiplication of N. caninum in the fetus or due to insufficient oxygen/nutrition, secondary to placental damage. In addition, maternal immune expulsion of the fetus may occur associated with maternal placental inflammation and the release of maternal pro-inflammatory cytokines in the placenta. Thus N. caninum is a primary pathogen capable of causing abortion either through maternal placental inflammation, maternal and fetal placental necrosis, fetal damage, or a combination of all three. The question of how N. caninum kills the fetus exposes the complex and finely balanced biological processes that have evolved to permit bovine and other mammalian pregnancies to occur. Defining these immunological mechanisms will shed light on potential methods of control of bovine neosporosis and enrich our understanding of the continuity of mammalian and protozoal survival.

  10. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for organophosphates binding to trypsin and chymotrypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruark, Christopher D; Hack, C Eric; Robinson, Peter J; Gearhart, Jeffery M

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) nerve agents such as sarin, soman, tabun, and O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino) ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX) do not react solely with acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Evidence suggests that cholinergic-independent pathways over a wide range are also targeted, including serine proteases. These proteases comprise nearly one-third of all known proteases and play major roles in synaptic plasticity, learning, memory, neuroprotection, wound healing, cell signaling, inflammation, blood coagulation, and protein processing. Inhibition of these proteases by OP was found to exert a wide range of noncholinergic effects depending on the type of OP, the dose, and the duration of exposure. Consequently, in order to understand these differences, in silico biologically based dose-response and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methodologies need to be integrated. Here, QSAR were used to predict OP bimolecular rate constants for trypsin and α-chymotrypsin. A heuristic regression of over 500 topological/constitutional, geometric, thermodynamic, electrostatic, and quantum mechanical descriptors, using the software Ampac 8.0 and Codessa 2.51 (SemiChem, Inc., Shawnee, KS), was developed to obtain statistically verified equations for the models. General models, using all data subsets, resulted in R(2) values of .94 and .92 and leave-one-out Q(2) values of 0.9 and 0.87 for trypsin and α-chymotrypsin. To validate the general model, training sets were split into independent subsets for test set evaluation. A y-randomization procedure, used to estimate chance correlation, was performed 10,000 times, resulting in mean R(2) values of .24 and .3 for trypsin and α-chymotrypsin. The results show that these models are highly predictive and capable of delineating the complex mechanism of action between OP and serine proteases, and ultimately, by applying this approach to other OP enzyme reactions such as AChE, facilitate the development of biologically based

  11. Some biochemical properties of trypsin inhibitor type antinutrients derived from extracts of wheat grain, Beta variety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossor, G; Skupin, J

    1985-01-01

    Trypsin inhibitors were isolated and partially purified from wheat grain, Beta variety. The procedure for determination of the inhibitory activity was simplified. This pertains shortening of the reaction time as well as quantitative decrease of components in the incubation mixture. The inhibitory fraction was salted out at 30-65% ammonium sulfate saturation. The experimental material has not been initially defatted. For isolation of the inhibitors pH 4.4 was demonstrated to be optimal. The trypsin inhibitor was characterized by relatively low activity against trypsin (1.5% of soya inhibitory activity). Preparations showing inhibitory properties when stored at -18 degrees C retained their original activity for 40 days, whereas at 4 degrees C only for 10 days, respectively. Storage at 18 degrees C for 10 days resulted in 50% loss of the original activity. Among various factors stabilizing the inhibitory activity being studied, 2-mercaptoethanol at 0.01% final concentration was found to be most effective. Study on the effect of temperature on the antitrypsin activity revealed that the preparation retained its initial activity up to 80 degrees C. It has been demonstrated by wheat proteins fractionation that both albumin and globulin fractions were accompanied by the antitrypsin activity. Moreover gluten was also shown to exhibit some inhibitory activity. Variations in the inhibitory activity were evidenced during germination of wheat grain. After 2 days period of germination it tended to decrease, disappearing completely at the fifth day, respectively. The inhibitory activity appeared in coleoptile and root at fourth day of germination, being higher in coleoptile than in the roots.

  12. Pancreatic Metastasis from Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The pancreas is an unusual location for metastases from other primary cancers. Rarely, pancreatic metastases from kidney or colorectal cancers have been reported. However, a variety of other cancers may also spread to the pancreas. We report an exceptional case of pancreatic metastasis from prostate cancer. Differences in management between primary and secondary pancreatic tumors make recognition of metastases to the pancreas an objective of first importance. Knowledge of unusual locations for metastatic spread will reduce diagnostic delay and lead to a timely delivery of an appropriate treatment.

  13. Vitamin D and pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.

    2008-01-01

    Sun exposure has been associated with lower death rates for pancreatic cancer in ecological studies. Skin exposure to solar ultra-violet B radiation induces cutaneous production of precursors to 25-hydroxy (OH) vitamin D (D) and is considered the primary contributor to vitamin D status in most populations. Pancreatic islet and duct cells express 25-(OH) D3-1α-hydroxylase that generates the biologically active 1,25-dihydroxy(OH)2 D form. Thus, 25(OH)D concentrations could affect pancreatic fun...

  14. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, U.C.; Semb, S.; Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may...... be useful as prophylaxis against post endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP). The protease inhibitor gabexate mesilate (GM) is used routinely as treatment to AP in some countries, but randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis do not support this practice. Nitroglycerin (NGL...

  15. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  16. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahiyah Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes.

  17. Trypsin as enhancement in cyclical tracheal decellularization: Morphological and biophysical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldo-Gomez, D.M., E-mail: davidmauro2008@gmail.com [Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingeniería de Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Unidad de Posgrado Edificio “C” 1er Piso, Circuito de Posgrados, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D. F., México (Mexico); Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Circuito Exterior, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico); Leon-Mancilla, B. [Departamento de Cirugía, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Edificio “D” Planta Baja, Circuito Interior, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico); Del Prado-Audelo, M.L. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Circuito Exterior, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico); and others

    2016-02-01

    There are different types of tracheal disorders (e.g. cancer, stenosis and fractures). These can cause respiratory failure and lead to death of patients. Several attempts have been made for trachea replacement in order to restore the airway, including anastomosis and implants made from synthetic or natural materials. Tracheal allotransplantation has shown high rejection rates, and decellularization has emerged as a possible solution. Decellularization involves the removal of antigens from cells in the organ or tissue, leaving a matrix that can be used as 3D cell-scaffold. Although this process has been used for tracheal replacement, it usually takes at least two months and time is critical for patients with tracheal disorders. Therefore, there is necessary to develop a tracheal replacement process, which is not only effective, but also quick to prepare. The aim of this research was to develop a faster trachea decellularization protocol using Trypsin enzyme and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as decellularization agents. Three protocols of cyclic trachea decellularization (Protocols A, B, and C) were compared. Following Protocol A (previously described in the literature), 15 consecutive cycles were performed over 32 days. Protocol B (a variation of Protocol A) — EDTA being added — with 15 consecutive cycles performed over 60 days. Finally, Protocol C, with the addition of Trypsin as a decellularization agent, 5 consecutive cycles being performed over 10 days. For the three protocols, hematoxylin–eosin (H&E) staining and DNA residual content quantification were performed to establish the effectiveness of the decellularization process. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the changes in porosity and microarrays. To evaluate the structural matrices integrity, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and biomechanical test were used. None of the protocols showed significant alteration or degradation in the components of the extracellular matrix

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of Murraya koenigii trypsin inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shee, Chandan; Singh, Tej P.; Kumar, Pravindra; Sharma, Ashwani K.

    2007-01-01

    A Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor purified from the seeds of Murraya koenigii has been crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as the precipitating agent. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 75.8, c = 150.9 Å. The crystals contain two molecules in the asymmetric unit with a V M value of 2.5 Å3 Da−1. Diffraction was observed to 2.65 Å resolution and a complete data set was collected to 2.9 Å resolution. PMID:17401205

  19. Effects of gamma radiation on total phenolics, trypsin and tannin inhibitors in soybean grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Toledo, T.C.F [Department of Agroindustry, Food and Nutrition Escola Superior de Agricultura ' Luiz de Queiroz' , Universidade de Sao Paulo (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: tcftoled@esalq.usp.br; Canniatti-Brazaca, S.G. [Department of Agroindustry, Food and Nutrition, Escola Superior de Agricultura ' Luiz de Queiroz' , Universidade de Sao Paulo (ESALQ/USP), Av. Padua Dias, 11 Box 9, CEP 13418-900, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: sgcbraza@esalq.usp.br; Arthur, V. [Food Irradiation and Entomology Laboratory, Center for Nuclear Agriculture-CENA/USP, Av. Centenario 303, Caixa Postal 96, 13400-970, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br; Piedade, S.M.S. [Department of Mathematic Sciences, Escola Superior de Agricultura ' Luiz de Queiroz' , Universidade de Sao Paulo (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: soniamsp@esalq.usp.br

    2007-10-15

    The objective was determining possible radiation-induced alterations (with doses of 2, 4 and 8 kGy) in raw or cooked grains from five soybean cultivars through the analysis of some antinutrient. Total phenolic ranged from 2.46 to 10.83 mg/g, the trypsin inhibited from 18.19 to 71.64 UTI/g and tannins from 0.01 to 0.39 mg/g. All the antinutrient studied underwent reduction with increases in the doses and cooking process was effective too.

  20. Characterization of ß-trypsin at acid pH by differential scanning calorimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bittar E.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypsin is a serino-protease with a polypeptide chain of 223 amino acid residues and contains six disulfide bridges. It is a globular protein with a predominance of antiparallel ß-sheet and helix in its secondary structure and has two domains with similar structures. We assessed the stability of ß-trypsin in the acid pH range using microcalorimetric (differential scanning calorimetry techniques. Protein concentrations varied in the range of 0.05 to 2.30 mg/ml. Buffer solutions of 50.0 mM ß-alanine and 20.0 mM CaCl2 at different pH values (from 2.0 to 4.2 and concentrations of sorbitol (1.0 and 2.0 M, urea (0.5 M or guanidinium hydrochloride (0.5 and 1.0 M were used. The data suggest that we are studying the same conformational transition of the protein in all experimental situations using pH, sorbitol, urea and guanidinium hydrochloride as perturbing agents. The observed van't Hoff ratios (deltaHcal/deltaHvH of 1.0 to 0.5 in the pH range of 3.2 to 4.2 suggest protein aggregation. In contrast, deltaHcal/deltaHvH ratios equal to one in the pH range of 2.0 to 3.2 suggest that the protein unfolds as a monomer. At pH 3.00, ß-trypsin unfolded with Tm = 54ºC and deltaH = 101.8 kcal/mol, and the change in heat capacity between the native and unfolded forms of the protein (deltaCp was estimated to be 2.50 ± 0.07 kcal mol-1 K-1. The stability of ß-trypsin calculated at 298 K was deltaG D = 5.7 kcal/mol at pH 3.00 and deltaG D = 15.2 kcal/mol at pH 7.00, values in the range expected for a small globular protein.

  1. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Masquerading as Idiopathic Chronic Pancreatitis with Delayed Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Badami

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer carries poor prognosis. Establishing the diagnosis early could help in improving outcome. We are presenting a case of pancreatic cancer with delayed diagnosis. Our 60-year-old patient underwent multiple endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsies with no evidence of malignancy. He had normal molecular tumor biomarkers. The patient needed 8 months to receive the diagnosis and initiate the treatment. There are no specific guidelines regarding choice of tissue sampling modalities in such cases.

  2. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor M. Gilliland

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL. The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995–2016 addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC. We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1 patients with albumin < 2.5 mg/dL or weight loss > 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2 patients with albumin < 3 mg/dL or weight loss between 5% and 10% should have nutrition supplementation prior to surgery; (3 enteral nutrition (EN should be preferred as a nutritional intervention over total parenteral nutrition (TPN postoperatively; and, (4 a multidisciplinary approach should be used to allow for early detection of symptoms of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of

  3. Affinity labeling the bovine gallbladder cholecystokinin receptor using a battery of probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schjoldager, B.; Powers, S.P.; Miller, L.J. (Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1988-11-01

    Although the gallbladder was the first recognized target of the peptide hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) and is a physiologically important target, only one preliminary report of the biochemical characterization of this receptor exists. Recently, a series of molecular probes for the affinity labeling of different domains of the pancreatic CCK receptor have been developed. In this work the authors report the application of several of those probes toward the biochemical characterization of the bovine gallbladder muscularis receptor. These include long ({sup 125}I-Bolton-Hunter-CCK-33) and short ({sup 125}I-D-Tyr-Gly-((Nle{sup 28,31})CCK-(26-33))) probes chemically cross-linkable through their amino-terminal amino groups and monofunctional probes with their photolabile moieties at their amino terminus (2-diazo-3,3,3-trifluoropropionyl-{sup 125}I-D-Tyr-Gly-((Nle{sup 28,31})CCK-(26-33))) and carboxyl terminus ({sup 125}I-D-Tyr-Gly-((Nle{sup 28,31},pNO{sub 2}-Phe{sup 33})CCK-(26-33))), that span the receptor-binding region. Each of these bound specifically and saturably to a preparation enriched in plasma membranes from bovine gallbladder muscularis. These observations support the identification of the M{sub r} 70,000-85,000 protein as the bovine gallbladder CCK-binding subunit and, since this is a different size from the pancreatic CCK-binding subunit, provide biochemical evidence for molecular heterogeneity of peripheral CCK receptors.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  5. Application of an electrochemical immunosensor with a MWCNT/PDAA modified electrode for detection of serum trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Qiang; Liu, Qicai; Gao, Feng; Chen, Qingquan; Wang, Guina

    2014-06-10

    To establish an electrochemical immunosensor for the determination of serum trypsin levels using a multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-composite-modified electrode. A MWCNT composite coated on the surface of bare gold electrodes was used for fixation of an anti-trypsin antibody. The assembly process and the performance indicators, including sensitivity, linear range of detection, anti-jamming performance, and stability, of the electrochemical immunosensor were examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). With optimized experimental conditions, the difference of the current value measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) showed a linear relationship with the concentration of serum trypsin within 0.10-100 ng/mL. The detection limit for trypsin using this sensor was 0.002 ng/mL. The electrochemical immunosensor built using the MWCNT-composite-modified electrode is simple to operate and has a fast response time, along with a wide linear range, high sensitivity, and accuracy, making it suitable for serum trypsin detection.

  6. A trypsin inhibitor from rambutan seeds with antitumor, anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, and nitric oxide-inducing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-04-01

    Nephelium lappaceum L., commonly known as "rambutan," is a typical tropical tree and is well known for its juicy and sweet fruit which has an exotic flavor. Chemical studies on rambutan have led to the identification of various components such as monoterpene lactones and volatile compounds. Here, a 22.5-kDa trypsin inhibitor (N . lappaceum trypsin inhibitor (NLTI)) was isolated from fresh rambutan seeds using liquid chromatographical techniques. NLTI reduced the proteolytic activities of both trypsin and α-chymotrypsin. Dithiothreitol reduced the trypsin inhibitory activity of NLTI at a concentration of 1 mM, indicating that an intact disulfide bond is essential to the activity. NLTI inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC50 of 0.73 μM. In addition, NLTI manifested a time- and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on growth in many tumor cells. NLTI is one of the few trypsin inhibitors with nitric oxide-inducing activity and may find application in tumor therapy.

  7. The properties of covalently immobilized trypsin on soap-free P(MMA-EA-AA) latex particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kai; Kan, Chengyou; Yeung, Anthony; Liu, Deshan

    2005-04-19

    The covalent immobilization of trypsin onto poly[(methyl methacrylate)-co-(ethyl acrylate)-co-(acrylic acid)] latex particles, produced by a soap-free emulsion polymerization technique, was carried out using the carbodiimide method. The catalytic properties and kinetic parameters, as well as the stability of the immobilized enzyme were compared to those of the free enzyme. Results showed that the optimum temperature and pH for the immobilized trypsin in the hydrolysis of casein were 55 degrees C and 8.5, both of which were higher than that of the free form. It was found that K(m) (Michaelis constant) was 45.7 mg . ml(-1) and V(max) (maximal reaction rate) was 793.0 microg . min(-1) for immobilized trypsin, compared to a K(m) of 30.0 mg . ml(-1) and a V(max) of 5 467.5 microg . min(-1) for free trypsin. The immobilized trypsin exhibited much better thermal and chemical stabilities than its free counterpart and maintained over 63% of its initial activity after reusing ten times.

  8. Application of an Electrochemical Immunosensor with a MWCNT/PDAA Modified Electrode for Detection of Serum Trypsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Yi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish an electrochemical immunosensor for the determination of serum trypsin levels using a multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-composite-modified electrode. Method: A MWCNT composite coated on the surface of bare gold electrodes was used for fixation of an anti-trypsin antibody. The assembly process and the performance indicators, including sensitivity, linear range of detection, anti-jamming performance, and stability, of the electrochemical immunosensor were examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. Results: With optimized experimental conditions, the difference of the current value measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV showed a linear relationship with the concentration of serum trypsin within 0.10–100 ng/mL. The detection limit for trypsin using this sensor was 0.002 ng/mL. Conclusions: The electrochemical immunosensor built using the MWCNT-composite-modified electrode is simple to operate and has a fast response time, along with a wide linear range, high sensitivity, and accuracy, making it suitable for serum trypsin detection.

  9. Long-Term Outcomes of Pancreatic Function Following Pancreatic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Toshio; Takasu, Osamu; Sakamoto, Teruo; Mori, Shinjirou; Nakamura, Atsuo; Nabeta, Masakazu; Hirayu, Nobuhisa; Moroki, Mariko; Yamashita, Norio

    2017-05-08

    The objective of this study is to retrospectively assess long-term outcomes and late complications of pancreatic trauma. We studied 14 patients with pancreatic trauma who were treated at the Advanced Emergency Medical Service Center, Kurume University Hospital, between 1981 and 2012 and discharged alive. Relevant data were extracted from patient records and a retrospective patient questionnaire and blood test were completed to evaluate pancreatic function. The median patient age at the time of the survey was 49 years; the median post-injury period was 23 years and 5 months. The comorbidity rates for pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunctions were 35.7% and 33.3%, respectively. No new-onset diabetes mellitus (DM) was seen within 3 years of trauma, except in 1 patient who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. DM developed >15 years after trauma in 2 patients each in the pancreatectomy and non-pancreatectomy groups. Diarrhea exacerbated by fat intake was seen in 3 and 1 patient in the pancreatectomy and non-pancreatectomy groups, respectively. Both complications were more common in the pancreatectomy group, but without statistical significance. Although post-surgical pancreatic dysfunction may be absent at discharge, treatment for pancreatic trauma should take into account the possibility that pancreatectomy may accelerate DM onset.

  10. Shape-controlled synthesis of protein-conjugated CdS nanocrystals (NCs) and study on the binding of Cd2+/CdS to trypsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Dezhi; Wang, Li; Wang, Yabo; Du, Xian; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Qiuxia; He, Bingyu

    2017-07-01

    Protein-conjugated CdS nanocrystals (NCs) with different morphology have been synthesized under biomimetic condition using trypsin as capping agent in aqueous medium. The reaction parameters including concentration of trypsin, pH value, reaction time, and temperature have a major influence on the morphology and optical property of CdS NCs. XRD, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), TEM, HRTEM, and EDS characterizations were used to investigate the structure, composition, morphology, and size of as-prepared products. The binding reaction between Cd2+/CdS and trypsin was investigated systematically through various spectroscopic methods. UV-vis, FT-IR, photoluminescence (PL) spectra, and conductivity analysis of Cd2+-trypsin suggest that Cd2+ ions could coordinate with the functional groups of trypsin and induce the formation of unfolding and loosening structure in protein molecules, and the change of protein conformation was also verified by circular dichroism (CD) spectra. This interaction increased local supersaturation of Cd2+ ions around the groups of trypsin and reduced the nucleation activation energy of CdS nuclei, which favored heterogeneous nucleation in trypsin matrix and resulted in the formation of inorganic-organic hybrid materials. The functional integrity of the enzyme conjugated to CdS NCs was studied by monitoring the enzymatic activity of CdS-trypsin conjugates. The fluorescence of CdS NCs is dependent strongly on trypsin which passivates the surface of NCs.

  11. Endoscopic transpapillary stenting or conservative treatment for pancreatic fistulas in necrotizing pancreatitis: multicenter series and literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.; Baal, M.C. van; Santvoort, H.C. van; Besselink, M.G.; Poley, J.W.; Heisterkamp, J.; Bollen, T.L.; Gooszen, H.G.; Eijck, C.H. van

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endoscopic transpapillary stenting (ETS) of the pancreatic duct facilitates ductal outflow and may reduce time to pancreatic fistula closure. However, data on the feasibility of ETS in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis are scarce. BACKGROUND: Pancreatic fistulas often occur after

  12. Altered osmotic swelling behavior of proteoglycan-depleted bovine articular cartilage using high frequency ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q; Zheng, Y P; Leung, G; Mak, A F T [Department of Health Technology and Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Lam, W L; Guo, X [Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China); Lu, H B; Qin, L [Musculoskeletal Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: ypzheng@ieee.org

    2008-05-21

    Swelling behavior is an electrochemical mechanical property of articular cartilage. It plays an important role in weight bearing and joint lubrication. In this study, the altered transient and inhomogeneous swelling behavior of the degenerated articular cartilage was observed and quantified in situ using ultrasound. Three groups of bovine patellar articular cartilage samples (n = 10 x 3) were obtained and digested by trypsin for 10, 20 and 30 min respectively to mimic different levels of degeneration. The osmotic-free shrinkage and swelling behavior induced by changing the concentration of the bathing saline solution from 0.15 M to 2 M and then back to 0.15 M were characterized using high-frequency ultrasound (central frequency = 35 MHz) before and after digestion. It was found that the degenerated cartilage specimens showed a weaker shrinkage-swelling behavior compared with the normal cartilage samples. However, no significant differences in the peak shrinkage or swelling strains were observed between different groups. The absolute values of the peak shrinkage strain significantly (p < 0.05) decreased by 45.4%, 42.1% and 50.6% respectively after the trypsin digestion for 10, 20 and 30 min, but such significance was not demonstrated for the peak swelling strains. Due to the potential alterations in the collagen-PG matrix during trypsin digestion, the correlation between the swelling strain and the shrinkage strain of the degenerated samples changed slightly in comparison with the normal samples. The proposed ultrasound method has been successfully used to measure the transient and inhomogeneous swelling behavior of the degenerated articular cartilage and has the potential for the characterization of osteoarthritis.

  13. Treating acute pancreatitis: what's new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vikesh K; Moran, Robert A; Afghani, Elham; de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    The medical treatment of acute pancreatitis continues to focus on supportive care, including fluid therapy, nutrition, and antibiotics, all of which will be critically reviewed. Pharmacologic agents that were previously studied were found to be ineffective likely due to a combination of their targets and flaws in trial design. Potential future pharmacologic agents, particularly those that target intracellular calcium signaling, as well as considerations for trial design will be discussed. As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to increase, greater efforts will be needed to prevent hospitalization, readmission and excessive imaging in order to reduce overall healthcare costs. Primary prevention continues to focus on post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis and secondary prevention on cholecystectomy for biliary pancreatitis as well as alcohol and smoking abstinence.

  14. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  15. Radiologic appearance of pancreatic cystadenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Nagano, Hideki; Kimoto, Masatoshi and others

    1988-07-01

    We report the radiologic appearance of pancreatic cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma by various imaging methods. US demonstrated predominantly cystic mass containing internal septations. Highly echogenic solid components are often noted within cysts. CT revealed an encapsulated and lobulated cystic mass and most of the cysts contained thin and curvilinear septa within multilocular mass. Calcifications were often noted in the thick wall of the cysts. ERP showed extension of the pancreatic duct and no communication between cysts and pancreatic duct seemed to be characteristic findings. By angiography displacement of pancreatic vessels without encasement were common features and abnormal staining were noted in some cases. Seven cases experienced in our laboratory were analyzed clinically and one case of 90 year old female might be the oldest case ever reported.

  16. Dynamic CT of pancreatic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoki, T.

    1983-05-01

    Dynamic computed tomography was performed on 19 patients with clinically diagnosed pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. There were 10 patients with pancreatic cancer, three with inflammatory pancreatic masses, two with cystadenoma, one with insuloma, and three with peripancreatic tumors. Computed tomography was performed with a Varian-V-360-3 scanner; scanning was for 30 consecutive sec at 3 sec intervals after the bolus injection of 50 ml of contrast medium into the antecubital vein. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) may be more useful than conventional contrast CT because it facilitates: (1) correct evaluation of tumor vascularity allowing a differential diagnosis; (2) location of the boundary between tumor and a nontumor tissue; (3) detection of small tumors; and (4) visualization of pancreatic invasion by peripancreatic tumors. In addition, contrast enhancement and the degree of vascular proliferation can be quantitatively assessed by analyzing time-density curves.

  17. Emphysematous gastritis after acute pancreatitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Bloodworth, L. L.; Stevens, P E; Bury, R. F.; Arm, J P; Rainford, D J

    1987-01-01

    A case of emphysematous gastritis associated with extensive gastric infarction after acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure is described. This complication was diagnosed on a plain abdominal radiograph and confirmed endoscopically. Extensive gastric and hepatic infarction was seen at necropsy.

  18. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fischer, Iben Wendelboe Deleuran

    2014-01-01

    Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion....... Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases...... are often prescribed as pain treatment. Opioids have intrinsic effects on gastrointestinal motility and hence can modify the absorption of other drugs taken at the same time. Furthermore, the increased fluid absorption caused by opioids will decrease water available for drug dissolution and may hereby...

  19. Blood tests for acute pancreatitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Basnayake, Chamara; Ratnam, Dilip

    2015-01-01

    .... A threshold concentration 2-4 times the upper limit of normal is recommended for diagnosis. Serum lipase is now the preferred test due to its improved sensitivity, particularly in alcohol-induced pancreatitis...

  20. In Vitro Digestibility of Rapeseed and Bovine Whey Protein Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joehnke, Marcel Skejovic; Rehder, Alina; Sørensen, Susanne; Bjergegaard, Charlotte; Sørensen, Jens Christian; Markedal, Keld Ejdrup

    2018-01-24

    Partial replacement of animal protein sources with plant proteins is highly relevant for the food industry, but potential effects on protein digestibility need to be established. In this study, the in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD) of four protein sources and their mixtures (50:50 w/w ratio) was investigated using a transient pepsin hydrolysis (1 h) followed by pancreatin (1 h). The protein sources consisted of napin-rich rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) protein concentrates (RPCs; RP1, RP2) prepared in pilot scale and major bovine whey proteins (WPs; α-LA, alpha-lactalbumin; β-LG, beta-lactoglobulin). IVPD of individual protein sources was higher for WPs compared to RPCs. The RP2/β-LG mixture resulted in an unexpected high IVPD equivalent to β-LG protein alone. Protein mixtures containing RP1 showed a new IVPD response type due to the negative influence of a high trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA) level. Improved IVPD of RP1 alone and in protein mixtures was obtained by lowering the TIA level using dithiothreitol (DTT). These results showed that napin-rich protein products prepared by appropriate processing can be combined with specific WPs in mixtures to improve the IVPD.

  1. A Randomized, Clinical Trial to Evaluate Efficacy and Tolerability of Trypsin:Chymotrypsin as Compared to Serratiopeptidase and Trypsin:Bromelain:Rutoside in Wound Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandanwale, Ajay; Langade, Deepak; Sonawane, Dheeraj; Gavai, Piyush

    2017-01-01

    Systemic enzyme therapy can play an important role in maintaining normal inflammatory processes within the body and thereby helps support and speed up healing. In the course of the anti-inflammatory action, enzymes degrade damaged cells and necrotic material and, through the inactivation of mediators and toxic products, they restrict the edema and pain. The study conducted at Grant Medical College, Mumbai, India was a clinical trial comparing the efficacy and tolerability of three oral enzyme treatment groups-oral tablets containing trypsin:chymotrypsin (TC) (Chymoral Forte®), serratiopeptidase (S) 5 mg oral tablets, and oral enzyme tablets containing trypsin 48 mg, bromelain 90 mg, and rutoside 100 mg (TBR)-to evaluate their healing potential in surgical wounds after orthopedic surgery. A total of 75 patients were screened, randomized, and divided into three groups in 1:1:1 ratio receiving either of the three treatments. In the TC group, erythema was significantly reduced from 3.44 on day 3 to 1.16 on day 10 (p < 0.01). There was significantly better reduction in erythema scores in the TC group as compared to S and TBR groups (p < 0.05) at each follow-up visit. Similarly reduction in the local irritation, wound discharge, edema, induration, and tenderness score with TC treatment at the end of the study was significantly higher than that observed in the other two groups. In addition TC showed significant reduction in pain on the VAS scale (p < 0.01). Global assessment of response to therapy for efficacy and tolerability was reported to be good to excellent in 88% and 92% of the patients on TC as compared to 12% and 8% with S and 12% and 8% with TBR. TC provides a better resolution of symptoms of inflammation after orthopedic surgery as compared to S and TBR, thus facilitating better wound healing. Further studies are warranted to confirm the findings. Clinical Trial Registry of India (Reg. No. CTRI/2011/07/001920).

  2. Critical evaluation of pancreatic masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John DeWitt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of a patient with a pancreatic mass on a CT or MRI requires consideration of the gender and age of the patient, presenting symptoms, quality of the imaging study performed and relevant medical history. CT is generally preferred over MRI for suspected pancreatic cancer but MRI is best considered for evaluation of ductal anatomy and possible cystic neoplasms. EUS should be considered when further characterization of morphology or tissue sampling is required.

  3. Surgical Management of Chronic Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Parekh, Dilip; Natarajan, Sathima

    2015-01-01

    Advances over the past decade have indicated that a complex interplay between environmental factors, genetic predisposition, alcohol abuse, and smoking lead towards the development of chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a complex disorder that causes significant and chronic incapacity in patients and a substantial burden on the society. Major advances have been made in the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease and the role of genetic predisposition is increasingly coming to the ...

  4. Pancreatic dysfunction in severe obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, A; Greenhalgh, L; Newbury-Ecob, R; Crowne, E; Shield, J.

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To investigate pancreatic function in children attending an obesity clinic.
METHODS—Thirty six children (of which 34 were white) with severe obesity of prepubertal onset (body mass index more than +2 SDS) were reviewed clinically and dysmorphologically, with assessment of pancreatic function.
RESULTS—Eight had dysmorphic features and 13 had learning difficulties. Four of 17 prepubertal children had hyperinsulinaemia and seven had hyperproinsulinaemia. All 19 pubertal...

  5. Inheritance of pancreatic acinar atrophy in German Shepherd Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, E Michael; Steiner, Jörg M; Clark, Leigh Anne; Murphy, Keith E; Famula, Thomas R; Williams, David A; Stankovics, Mary E; Vose, Amy S

    2002-10-01

    To assess the heritability of pancreatic acinar atrophy (PAA) in German Shepherd Dogs (GSDs) in the United States. 135 GSDs belonging to 2 multigenerational pedigrees. Two multigenerational pedigrees of GSDs with family members with PAA were identified. The clinical history of each GSD enrolled in the study was recorded, and serum samples for canine trypsin-like immunoreactivity (cTLI) analysis were collected from 102 dogs. Dogs with a serum cTLI concentration Pedigree I consisted of 59 dogs and pedigree II of 76 dogs. Serum cTLI concentrations were measured in 48 dogs from pedigree I and 54 dogs from pedigree II. A total of 19 dogs (14.1%) were determined to have EPI, 9 in pedigree I (15.3%) and 10 in pedigree II (13.6%). Of the 19 dogs with EPI, 8 were male and 11 were female. Evaluation of data by complex segregation analysis is strongly suggestive of an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance for EPI in GSDs in the United States.

  6. Inonotus obliquus polysaccharide regulates gut microbiota of chronic pancreatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Teng, Chunying; Yu, Sumei; Wang, Xin; Liang, Jinsong; Bai, Xin; Dong, Liying; Song, Tao; Yu, Min; Qu, Juanjuan

    2017-12-01

    Polysaccharide is efficient in attenuation of metabolic ailments and modulation of gut microbiota as prebiotics. The therapeutic effect of Inonotus obliquus polysaccharide (IOP) on chronic pancreatitis (CP) in mice has been validated in our previous study. However, it is not clear whether IOP is conducive to maintaining the homeostasis between gut microbiota and host. The aim of this study is to testify the potential effects of IOP on gut microbiota composition and diversity in mice with CP. The changes in glutathione peroxidase (GSH-P X ), total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), lipase and trypsin levels were measured by commercial assay kits, meanwhile the gut microbiota composition and diversity were analyzed by high throughput sequencing. The IOP treatment increased GSH-P X and TAOC levels, and decreased TNF-α, TGF-β, lipase and trypsin levels in CP mice. It was also observed that gut microbiota in IOP treated groups were less diverse than others in terms of lower Shannon diversity index and Chao 1 estimator. IOP increased the proportion of Bacteroidetes and decreased that of Firmicutes at phylum level. Bacteroidetes was found positively correlated with GSH-P X and TAOC, and Firmicutes correlated with TNF-α, TGF-β, and lipase. In conclusion, administration of IOP could regulate gut microbiota composition and diversity to a healthy profile in mice with CP, and some bacterial phylum significantly correlated with characteristic parameters.

  7. Clinical pancreatic islet transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, A M James; Pokrywczynska, Marta; Ricordi, Camillo

    2017-05-01

    Clinical pancreatic islet transplantation can be considered one of the safest and least invasive transplant procedures. Remarkable progress has occurred in both the technical aspects of islet cell processing and the outcomes of clinical islet transplantation. With >1,500 patients treated since 2000, this therapeutic strategy has moved from a curiosity to a realistic treatment option for selected patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (that is, those with hypoglycaemia unawareness, severe hypoglycaemic episodes and glycaemic lability). This Review outlines the techniques required for human islet isolation, in vitro culture before the transplant and clinical islet transplantation, and discusses indications, optimization of recipient immunosuppression and management of adjunctive immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory strategies. The potential risks, long-term outcomes and advances in treatment after the transplant are also discussed to further move this treatment towards becoming a more widely available option for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and eventually a potential cure.

  8. Vegetative storage protein with trypsin inhibitor activity occurs in Sapindus mukorassi, a sapindaceae deciduous tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shi-Biao; Wang, Xu-Chu; Shi, Min-Jing; Chen, Yue-Yi; Hu, Zheng-Hai; Tian, Wei-Min

    2009-04-01

    A vegetative storage protein (VSP) with trypsin inhibitor activity in a deciduous tree, Sapindus mukorassi, was characterized by means of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western-blot, immuno-histochemical localization, light- and electro-microscopy, together with analysis of proteinase inhibitor activity of the purified VSP in vitro. There were two proteins with molecular masses of about 23 and 27 kDa in a relatively high content in the bark tissues of terminal branches of S. mukorassi in leafless periods. The proteins decreased markedly during young shoot development, indicating their role in seasonal nitrogen storage. Immuno-histochemical localization with the polyclonal antibodies raised against the 23 kDa protein demonstrated that the 23 kDa protein was the major component of protein inclusions in protein-storing cells. The protein inclusions were identified by protein-specific staining and should correspond to the electron-dense materials in different forms in the vacuoles of phloem parenchyma cells and phloem ray parenchyma cells under an electron microscope. So, the 23 kDa protein was a typical VSP in S. mukorassi. The 23 and 27 kDa proteins shared no immuno-relatedness, whereas the 23 kDa protein was immuno-related with the 22 kDa VSP in lychee and possessed trypsin inhibitor activity. The 23 kDa protein may confer dual functions: nitrogen storage and defense.

  9. CLONING AND EXPRESSING TRYPSIN MODULATING OOSTATIC FACTOR IN Chlorella desiccata TO CONTROL MOSQUITO LARVAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, Dov; Sterner, Andeas; Powell, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    The insect peptide hormone trypsin modulating oostatic factor (TMOF), a decapeptide that is synthesized by the mosquito ovary and controls the translation of the gut's trypsin mRNA was cloned and expressed in the marine alga Chlorella desiccata. To express Aedes aegypti TMOF gene (tmfA) in C. desiccata cells, two plasmids (pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA) were engineered with pKYLX71 DNA (5 Kb) carrying the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) promoter 35S(2) and the kanamycin resistant gene (neo), as well as, a 8 Kb nitrate reductase gene (nit) from Chlorella vulgaris. Transforming C. desiccata with pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA show that the engineered algal cells express TMOF (20 ± 4 μg ± SEM and 17 ± 3 μg ± SEM, respectively in 3 × 10(8) cells) and feeding the cells to mosquito larvae kill 75 and 60% of Ae. aegypti larvae in 4 days, respectively. Southern and Northern blots analyses show that tmfA integrated into the genome of C. desiccata by homologous recombination using the yeast 2 μ circle of replication and the nit in pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA, respectively, and the transformed algal cells express tmfA transcript. Using these algal cells it will be possible in the future to control mosquito larvae in the marsh. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Identification of flavonoids with trypsin inhibitory activity extracted from orange peel and green tea leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahwar, Durre; Raza, Muhammad A; Atta-Ur-Rahman

    2013-04-01

    Orange peel (Citrus sinensis) and green tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves, rich sources of food flavonoids, were analyzed for their trypsin inhibitory potential. Hesperetin, rutin and hesperidin from orange peel, and catechin from green tea leaves, were isolated and their chemical structures were analyzed. All four compounds were evaluated for their trypsin inhibitory potential. Among all the isolated compounds, rutin exhibited the highest protease inhibition activity (75.4 ± 0.9%) with IC50 = 16 ± 2 µmol L(-1), followed by catechin (65.3 ± 1.4%; IC50 = 83 ± 9 µmol L(-1)), hesperetin (62.1 ± 1.3%; IC50 = 104 ± 12 µmol L(-1)) and hesperidin (59.7 ± 1.1%; IC50 = 127 ± 14 µmol L(-1)). Lineweaver-Burk and Dixon plots and their secondary replots indicated that all four compounds possessed non-competitive inhibition. The Ki values of hesperetin, rutin, hesperidin and catechin were calculated as 90.2 ± 1.1, 17.5 ± 0.6, 84.2 ± 1.5 and 65.1 ± 1.5 µmol L(-1) respectively. The present results suggest that the four isolated flavonoids can be used as a supplement in food for the treatment of pathologies associated with the degradation of a specific protein. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Kinetic Dissection of the Pre-existing Conformational Equilibrium in the Trypsin Fold*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Austin D.; Chakraborty, Pradipta; Di Cera, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Structural biology has recently documented the conformational plasticity of the trypsin fold for both the protease and zymogen in terms of a pre-existing equilibrium between closed (E*) and open (E) forms of the active site region. How such plasticity is manifested in solution and affects ligand recognition by the protease and zymogen is poorly understood in quantitative terms. Here we dissect the E*-E equilibrium with stopped-flow kinetics in the presence of excess ligand or macromolecule. Using the clotting protease thrombin and its zymogen precursor prethrombin-2 as relevant models we resolve the relative distribution of the E* and E forms and the underlying kinetic rates for their interconversion. In the case of thrombin, the E* and E forms are distributed in a 1:4 ratio and interconvert on a time scale of 45 ms. In the case of prethrombin-2, the equilibrium is shifted strongly (10:1 ratio) in favor of the closed E* form and unfolds over a faster time scale of 4.5 ms. The distribution of E* and E forms observed for thrombin and prethrombin-2 indicates that zymogen activation is linked to a significant shift in the pre-existing equilibrium between closed and open conformations that facilitates ligand binding to the active site. These findings broaden our mechanistic understanding of how conformational transitions control ligand recognition by thrombin and its zymogen precursor prethrombin-2 and have direct relevance to other members of the trypsin fold. PMID:26216877

  12. Preparation and antimicrobial action of three tryptic digested functional molecules of bovine lactoferrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilisha Rastogi

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin is an 80 kDa bilobal, iron binding glycoprotein which is primarily antimicrobial in nature. The hydrolysis of lactoferrin by various proteases in the gut produces several functional fragments of lactoferrin which have varying molecular sizes and properties. Here, bovine lactoferrin has been hydrolyzed by trypsin, the major enzyme present in the gut, to produce three functional molecules of sizes approximately 21 kDa, 38 kDa and 45 kDa. The molecules have been purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography and identified using N-terminal sequencing, which reveals that while the 21 kDa molecule corresponds to the N2 domain (21LF, the 38 kDa represents the whole C-lobe (38LF and the 45 kDa is a portion of N1 domain of N-lobe attached to the C-lobe (45LF. The iron binding and release properties of 21LF, 38LF and 45LF have been studied and compared. The sequence and structure analysis of the portions of the excision sites of LF from various species have been done. The antibacterial properties of these three molecules against bacterial strains, Streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica and Listeria monocytogenes were investigated. The antifungal action of the molecules was also evaluated against Candida albicans. This is the first report on the antimicrobial actions of the trypsin cleaved functional molecules of lactoferrin from any species.

  13. Pancreatic cancer: advances in treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Somala; Van Buren, George; Fisher, William E

    2014-07-28

    Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer mortality and the incidence of this disease is expected to continue increasing. While patients with pancreatic cancer have traditionally faced a dismal prognosis, over the past several years various advances in diagnosis and treatment have begun to positively impact this disease. Identification of effective combinations of existing chemotherapeutic agents, such as the FOLFIRINOX and the gemcitabine + nab-paclitaxel regimen, has improved survival for selected patients although concerns regarding their toxicity profiles remain. A better understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis has identified several pre-malignant precursor lesions, such as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, and cystic neoplasms. Imaging technology has also evolved dramatically so as to allow early detection of these lesions and thereby facilitate earlier management. Surgery remains a cornerstone of treatment for patients with resectable pancreatic tumors, and advances in surgical technique have allowed patients to undergo resection with decreasing perioperative morbidity and mortality. Surgery has also become feasible in selected patients with borderline resectable tumors as a result of neoadjuvant therapy. Furthermore, pancreatectomy involving vascular reconstruction and pancreatectomy with minimally invasive techniques have demonstrated safety without significantly compromising oncologic outcomes. Lastly, a deeper understanding of molecular aberrations contributing to the development of pancreatic cancer shows promise for future development of more targeted and safe therapeutic agents.

  14. Metabolic syndrome and acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasevic, I; Milic, S; Orlic, L; Poropat, G; Jakopcic, I; Franjic, N; Klanac, A; Kristo, N; Stimac, D

    2016-07-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of metabolic syndrome on the course of acute pancreatitis determined by disease severity, the presence of local and systemic complications and survival rate. 609 patients admitted to our hospital in the period from January 1, 2008 up to June 31, 2015 with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were analyzed. The diagnosis and the severity of acute pancreatitis were made according to the revised Atlanta classification criteria from 2012. Of 609 patients with acute pancreatitis, 110 fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome had statistically significantly higher incidence of moderately severe (38.2% vs. 28.5%; p=0.05) and severe (22.7% vs. 12.8%; p=0.01) acute pancreatitis in comparison to those without metabolic syndrome, while patients without metabolic syndrome had higher incidence of mild acute pancreatitis in comparison to those patients with metabolic syndrome (58.7% vs. 39.1%; ppancreatitis. Comparing survival rates, patients suffering from metabolic syndrome had a higher death rate compared to patients without metabolic syndrome (16% vs. 4.5%; ppancreatitis, as well as higher mortality rate. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Simultaneous characterization of pancreatic stellate cells and other pancreatic components within three-dimensional tissue environment during chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenyan; Fu, Ling

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and other pancreatic components that play a critical role in exocrine pancreatic diseases are generally identified separately by conventional studies, which provide indirect links between these components. Here, nonlinear optical microscopy was evaluated for simultaneous characterization of these components within a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment, primarily based on multichannel detection of intrinsic optical emissions and cell morphology. Fresh rat pancreatic tissues harvested at 1 day, 7 days, and 28 days after induction of chronic pancreatitis were imaged, respectively. PSCs, inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and collagen fibers were identified simultaneously. The PSCs at day 1 of chronic pancreatitis showed significant enlargement compared with those in normal pancreas (ppancreatic components coincidently within 3-D pancreatic tissues. It is a prospect for intravital observation of dynamic events under natural physiological conditions, and might help uncover the key mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic diseases, leading to more effective treatments.

  16. Inflammation, Autophagy, and Obesity: Common Features in the Pathogenesis of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gukovsky, Ilya; Li, Ning; Todoric, Jelena; Gukovskaya, Anna; Karin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation and autophagy are cellular defense mechanisms. When these processes are deregulated (deficient or overactivated) they produce pathologic effects, such as oxidative stress, metabolic impairments, and cell death. Unresolved inflammation and disrupted regulation of autophagy are common features of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, obesity, a risk factor for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, promotes inflammation and inhibits or deregulates autophagy, creating an env...

  17. Cytotoxicity of bovine seminal ribonuclease: monomer versus dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J Eugene; Raines, Ronald T

    2005-12-06

    Bovine seminal ribonuclease (BS-RNase) is a homologue of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase A). Unlike RNase A, BS-RNase has notable toxicity for human tumor cells. Wild-type BS-RNase is a homodimer linked by two intermolecular disulfide bonds. This quaternary structure endows BS-RNase with resistance to inhibition by the cytosolic ribonuclease inhibitor protein (RI), which binds tightly to RNase A and monomeric BS-RNase. Here, we report on the creation and analysis of monomeric variants of BS-RNase that evade RI but retain full enzymatic activity. The cytotoxic activity of these monomeric variants exceeds that of the wild-type dimer by up to 30-fold, indicating that the dimeric structure of BS-RNase is not required for cytotoxicity. Dimers of these monomeric variants are more cytotoxic than wild-type BS-RNase, suggesting that the cytotoxicity of the wild-type enzyme is limited by RI inhibition following dissociation of the dimer in the reducing environment of the cytosol. Finally, the cytotoxic activity of these dimers is less than that of the constituent monomers, indicating that their quaternary structure is a liability. These data provide new insight into structure-function relationships of BS-RNase. Moreover, BS-RNase monomers described herein are more toxic to human tumor cells than is any known variant or homologue of RNase A including Onconase, an amphibian homologue in phase III clinical trials for the treatment of unresectable malignant mesothelioma.

  18. The control of hyperglycemia by a novel trypsin resistant oral insulin preparation in alloxan induced type I diabetic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sarbashri Bank; Arjun Ghosh; Suman Bhattacharya; Smarajit Maiti; Khan, Gausal A.; Sinha, Asru K.

    2016-01-01

    A trypsin resistant oral insulin preparation was made by incubating insulin for 2?h at 23??C with previously boiled cow milk at 100??C that was coagulated with 0.6?M acetic acid. The precipitate was resuspended in the same volume of milk. The immunoblot analysis of the suspended proteins treated with 200?ng of trypsin/ml for 3?h demonstrated that the 80.1% of the insulin in the suspension survived the proteolytic degradation compared to 0% of the hormone survived in the control. The feeding o...

  19. Autoimmune pancreatitis : Diagnostic and immunological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. van Heerde (Marianne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is the pancreatic manifestation of a systemic fibro- inflammatory disease, characterized by infiltration with lymphoplasmacytic cells and extensive fibrosis, which leads to morphological changes (swelling, mass forming) and organ dysfunction. Often, but

  20. [Computer tomographic diagnosis of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, W D; zur Nedden, D; Lepuschütz, H; Zalaudek, G; Bodner, E; Fotter, R; Lammer, J

    1981-06-01

    The article reports on 78 CT scans of surgically verified diseases of the pancreas, namely, 30 cases of chronic pancreatitis, 12 cases of haemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis, and 36 cases of carcinoma of the pancreas. 12 of these cases were operable, whereas 234 were inoperable. The operable carcinomas were so small that proper diagnosis was effected in 50% only, whereas the inoperable carcinomas eluded CT identification in 17% of the cases only. The most important signs of an operable carcinoma of the pancreas are a well-defined enlargement and inhomogeneity of the parenchyma with reduced contrast, especially on bolus injection, as well as dilatation of the bile duct system. The most essential criteria for inoperability are absence of boundaries, especially towards the dorsal side, with infiltration of the retroperitoneal fatty tissue, and lack of delineation of the large vessels. According to the present state of the art, CT does not supply definite criteria for differentiating between an operable carcinoma of the pancreas and chronic fibrotic pancreatitis. Overstepping of the marginal contours is a reliably distinctive feature between carcinoma and pancreatitis, but it also points to the inoperable nature of the disease. Haemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis is characterized by definite CT criteria, so that diagnosis is easy.

  1. Isolation and Partial Characterization of Human Amniotic Epithelial Cells: The Effect of Trypsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Meraj; Mosaffa, Nariman; Nikoo, Shohreh; Bozorgmehr, Mahmood; Ghods, Roya; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Rezania, Simin; Keshavarzi, Bahareh; Arefi, Soheila; Ramezani-Tehrani, Fahimeh; Mirzadegan, Ebrahim; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the extensive information available in the literature, cell surface marker signature of human Amniotic Epithelial Cells (hAECs) remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to characterize immunophenotypic features, proliferative capacity and immunogenicity of hAECs. We also tested whether expression of some cell surface markers is influenced by the type of trypsin used for tissue digestion. Methods Single cell suspensions of amniotic membranes from four human placentas were isolated by enzymatic digestion and expression of CD9, CD10, CD29, CD34, CD38, CD44, CD45, CD73, CD105, CD133, HLA-I, HLA-DR, HLA-G, SSEA-4, STRO-1 and OCT-4 was then evaluated by flow cytometry. The differential impact of four trypsin types on the yield and expression of CD105 and HLA-I was also determined. The proliferative capacity of cultured hAECs was assessed and compared in the presence and absence of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF). To test their immunogenicity, hAECs were injected into Balb/c mice and the reactivity of hyperimmunized sera was examined by immunofluorescence staining. Results Nearly all purified cells expressed mesenchymal markers, CD9, CD10, CD29, and CD73 and the embryonic marker, SSEA-4. A large proportion of the cells also expressed STRO-1 and OCT-4. The purified cells also expressed HLA-G and HLA-I. A very small proportion of hAECs expressed CD34, CD38, CD44, CD133 and HLA-DR. The type of trypsin used for enzymatic digestion affected both the percentage and expression of HLA-I and CD105. hAECs revealed substantial proliferative capacity only when cultured in the medium supplemented with EGF. These cells were shown to be capable of inducing high amounts of anti-donor antibodies. Conclusion Here we provided evidence that hAECs are immunogenic cells with high level of HLA-I expression. Furthermore, this work highlighted the impact of isolation procedure on the immunophenotype of hAEC. PMID:24523953

  2. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    SUZUKI, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The e...

  3. Papillocystic Variant of Acinar Cell Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasim Radhi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar cell pancreatic carcinoma is a rare solid malignant neoplasm. Recent review of the literature showed occasional cases with papillary or papillocystic growth patterns, ranging from 2 to 5 cm in diameter. We report a large 10 cm pancreatic tumor with papillocystic pathology features involving the pancreatic head. The growth pattern of these tumors could be mistaken for intraductal papillary mucinous tumors or other pancreatic cystic neoplasms.

  4. Bovine respiratory disease model based on dual infections with infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine corona virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the leading cause of economic loss in the U.S. cattle industry. BRDC likely results from simultaneous or sequential infections with multiple pathogens including both viruses and bacteria. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine corona virus (BoCV...

  5. [Persistence of chronic inflammatory responses, role in the development of chronic pancreatitis, obesity and pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khristich, T N

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the review--to analyze the basic data of the role of chronic low-intensity inflammatory response as general biological process in the development and progression of chronic pancreatitis, obesity, and pancreatic cancer. Highlighted evidence from epidemiological studies showing that chronic pancreatitis and obesity are independent risk factors for pancreatic cancer, regardless of diabetes. Studied role of adipokines as Cytokines regulating of immune inflammatory response. Draws attention to the staging of pancreatic cancer in obesity.

  6. Probing the binding mechanisms of α-tocopherol to trypsin and pepsin using isothermal titration calorimetry, spectroscopic, and molecular modeling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangrong; Ni, Tianjun

    2016-06-01

    α-Tocopherol is a required nutrient for a variety of biological functions. In this study, the binding of α-tocopherol to trypsin and pepsin was investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and molecular modeling methods. Thermodynamic investigations reveal that α-tocopherol binds to trypsin/pepsin is synergistically driven by enthalpy and entropy. The fluorescence experimental results indicate that α-tocopherol can quench the fluorescence of trypsin/pepsin through a static quenching mechanism. The binding ability of α-tocopherol with trypsin/pepsin is in the intermediate range, and one molecule of α-tocopherol combines with one molecule of trypsin/pepsin. As shown by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, α-tocopherol may induce conformational changes of trypsin/pepsin. Molecular modeling displays the specific binding site and gives information about binding forces and α-tocopherol-tryptophan (Trp)/tyrosine (Tyr) distances. In addition, the inhibition rate of α-tocopherol on trypsin and pepsin was studied. The study provides a basic data set for clarifying the binding mechanisms of α-tocopherol with trypsin and pepsin and is helpful for understanding its biological activity in vivo.

  7. Obesity, Intrapancreatic Fatty Infiltration, and Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Maitra, Anirban; Wang, Huamin

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and intrapancreatic fatty infiltration are associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions. The interplay among obesity, inflammation, and oncogenic Kras signaling promotes pancreatic tumorigenesis. Targeting the interaction between obesity-associated inflammation and Kras signaling may provide new strategies for prevention and therapy of pancreatic cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-12-07

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis.

  9. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  10. Pancreatic disturbances and typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, P; Gerard, M; van Laethem, Y; de Wit, S; Clumeck, N

    1991-01-01

    During an 8-year period, 14 adult patients were hospitalized with typhoid fever confirmed by positive blood cultures for Salmonella typhi. Among these patients, we have retrospectively (n = 7) and prospectively (n = 7) evaluated pancreatic disturbance by serum amylase and lipase measurements at the time of admission. In 7 (50%) biological signs of pancreatitis were noted: mean amylase level 81 IU (range 30-201 IU, normal value less than 40 IU), mean lipase level 949 IU (range 468-2,000 IU, normal value less than 300 IU). Clinical signs of pancreatitis were observed in 4 cases, one of whom had a concomitant salmonella biliary tract infection and gall stones demonstrated by laparotomy and the others a normal biliary ultrasonographic examination with a swelling of the pancreas. No alcohol or drug use or other infection were noted before admission. This study suggests that biological or clinical pancreatitis should be considered as a frequent complication of typhoid fever. S. typhi should therefore be added to the list of pathogens implicated in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic or non-lithiasic pancreatitis.

  11. Pancreatic carcinoma in fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes: An eastern India perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Pratim Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes (FCPD is a rare cause of diabetes (100-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We present 3 patients of FCPD with pancreatic cancer who had long duration of diabetes (19 years, 25 years, and 28 years, respectively, all of whom presented with anorexia, weight loss, and worsened glycemic control. Patient-1 in addition presented with deep venous thrombosis. All the 3 patients had evidence of metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Computerized tomography (CT abdomen revealed atrophic pancreas, dilated pancreatic ducts, and multiple calculi in the head, body, and tail of pancreas in all of them. Patient-1 had 38 mm × 38 mm × 32 mm mass in the tail of pancreas with multiple target lesions were seen in the right lobe of liver. Patient-2 had a mass in the tail of pancreas (46 × 34 × 31 mm encasing the celiac plexus and superior mesenteric artery infiltrating the splenic hilum and splenic flexure of colon. Patient-3 also had a mass in the tail of pancreas (33 × 31 × 22 mm, with multiple target lesions in the liver, suggestive of metastasis. All patients had elevated serum CA19-9 (828.8, 179.65, and 232 U/L, respectively; normal <40 U/L. Patients of FCPD with anorexia, weight loss, worsening of glycemic control should be evaluated to rule out pancreatic cancer. Studies are warranted to evaluate CA19-9 as a screening tool for diagnosing pancreatic cancer at an earlier stage in FCPD.

  12. Protein Hydrolysates from Non-bovine and Plant Sources Replaces Tryptone in Microbiological Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Yamini; Patel, Shifa; Pasupuleti, Vijai K.; Meganathan, R.

    Tryptone (pancreatic digest of casein) is a common ingredient in laboratory and fermentation media for growing wild-type and genetically modified microorganisms. Many of the commercially manufactured products such as human growth hormone, antibiotics, insulin, etc. are produced by recombinant strains grown on materials derived from bovine sources. With the emergence of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) and the consequent increase in Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, elimination of materials of bovine origin from fermentation media is of paramount importance. To achieve this objective, a number of protein hydrolysates derived from non-bovine animal and plant sources were evaluated. Tryptone in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth was replaced with an equal quantity of alternate protein hydrolysates. Four of the six hydrolysates (one animal and three from plants) were found to efficiently replace the tryptone present in LB-medium as measured by growth rate and growth yield of a recombinant Escherichia coli strain. In addition, we have determined plasmid stability, inducibility and activity of the plasmid encoded β-galactosidase in the recombinant strain grown in the presence of various protein hydrolysates.

  13. Cyclic RGD peptide conjugated trypsin etched gold quantum clusters: novel biolabeling agents for stem cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Bodhisatwa; Fernandez, Francis; John, Annie; Sharma, Chandra P

    2012-01-01

    Quantum clusters are sub-nano sized materials mostly synthesized from noble metals with luminescence property and high quantum yield. They are important to biomedical scientists because of their excellent optical properties. Here we represent a tool for cell imaging purpose using protein stabilized gold quantum clusters. Intestinal protease Trypsin was used to develop clusters. They were conjugated to cyclic RGD peptides by EDAC coupling. Cell imaging property was checked by transfecting the RGD-conjugated quantum clusters to bone marrow stem cells. For characterization of RGD-conjugated quantum clusters UV-Vis, Fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy was performed. DLS and Zeta potential measurement also have been done. To check the bio compatibility of the quantum clusters MTT assay, AFM and blood cell adhesion study were performed. The samples are found out to be good for cell imaging as well as bio compatible and hemo-compatible.

  14. High-gradient magnetic affinity separation of trypsin from porcine pancreatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubbuch, Jürgen; Thomas, Owen R. T.

    2002-01-01

    We introduce a robust and scale-flexible approach to macromolecule purification employing tailor-made magnetic adsorbents and high-gradient magnetic separation technology adapted from the mineral processing industries. Detailed procedures for the synthesis of large quantities of low-cost defined...... increased scale using a high-gradient magnetic separation system to capture loaded benzamidine-linked adsorbents following batch adsorption. With the aid of a simple recycle loop over 80% of the initially adsorbed trypsin was recovered in-line with an overall purification factor of approximate to3.5....... submicron-sized magnetic supports are presented. These support materials exhibit unique features, which facilitate their large-scale processing using high magnetic field gradients, namely sufficiently high magnetization, a relatively narrow particle size distribution and ideal superparamagnetism. Following...

  15. Trypsin, Tryptase, and Thrombin Polarize Macrophages towards a Pro-Fibrotic M2a Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J V White

    Full Text Available For both wound healing and the formation of a fibrotic lesion, circulating monocytes enter the tissue and differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes and pro-fibrotic M2a macrophages, which together with fibroblasts form scar tissue. Monocytes can also differentiate into classically activated M1 macrophages and alternatively activated M2 macrophages. The proteases thrombin, which is activated during blood clotting, and tryptase, which is released by activated mast cells, potentiate fibroblast proliferation and fibrocyte differentiation, but their effect on macrophages is unknown. Here we report that thrombin, tryptase, and the protease trypsin bias human macrophage differentiation towards a pro-fibrotic M2a phenotype expressing high levels of galectin-3 from unpolarized monocytes, or from M1 and M2 macrophages, and that these effects appear to operate through protease-activated receptors. These results suggest that proteases can initiate scar tissue formation by affecting fibroblasts, fibrocytes, and macrophages.

  16. [Value of nasojejunal nutrition in the treatment of children with acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming; Chen, Jie; Li, Fu-bang; Lou, Jin-gan; Peng, Ke-rong; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Fei-bo

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of placement of nasojejunal feeding tube and nasojejunal nutrition feeding in children with acute pancreatitis. Twenty-two patients (of whom 13 had severe acute pancreatitis and 9 acute mild pancreatitis) who needed nutritional intervention were selected. They were from Department of Gastroenterology and Surgery during the years 2009 - 2012, and they were at high nutritional risk after STONGkid nutrition risk screening. The average age of them was 5 - 15 years (9.1 years ± 2.8 years). Assisted by endoscopy, the nasojejunal feeding tube was placed in 22 of 24 patients (in 2 cases of recurrent pancreatitis the tubes were placed again after extubation). Besides the use of regular fasting, antacids, inhibitors of trypsin secretion, and anti-infective treatment, 23 cases of all children got nasojejunal nutrition treatment as well. The outcome measures included the success rate, complications of endoscope-assisted nasojejunal tube placement. The children's tolerance and nutrition indicators (weight, blood lymphocytes count, erythrocytes count, serum albumin, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen) were observed before and after enteral nutrition therapy. Malnutrition evaluation was done 24 times before treatment among 22 patients, incidence of malnutrition was 33% in 22 cases. Placement of nasojejunal tube placement was attempted for a total of 24 times and was successful on first placement in 22 cases, in two cases the placement was successful on the second placement, so the success rate of the first attempt for placement was 92%. No significant complications were observed in any of the cases. Twenty-three of 24 cases were given standardized enteral nutrition (one case was not given enteral nutrition therapy but underwent ERCP due to obstructive jaundice). Twenty-two of 23 cases could tolerate enteral nutrition well, only 1 case was unable to tolerate enteral nutrition due to the pancreas schizophrenia, paralytic ileus. The

  17. The starch-bound alpha-amylase/trypsin-inhibitors in Avena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazza, Laura; Gazzelloni, Gloria; Taddei, Federica; Latini, Arianna; Muccilli, Vera; Alfieri, Michela; Conti, Salvatore; Redaelli, Rita; Pogna, Norberto E

    2016-12-01

    Oat kernels exhibit an extra-soft texture, a trait recently demonstrated to be largely modulated by starch-bound tryptophan-rich 2S proteins, the vromindolines. In this study, fractionation by two-dimensional electrophoresis of starch-bound proteins in 25 oat (Avena sativa) cultivars and 11 diploid or tetraploid Avena species revealed novel 2S proteins called Avena α-amylase/trypsin-inhibitors (AATI) because of their sequence similarity with wheat α-amylase/trypsin inhibitors. Thirty-seven AATI polypeptides, about 14 kDa in size, were split into three families named AATI-1, AATI-2, and AATI-3 with different primary structures and isoelectric points. AATI-1 and AATI-2 proteins showed 55.5-60.0 % sequence similarity with wheat α-amylase inhibitors CM1, CM2, and CM16, which have been found to cause innate immunity responses in celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Diploid A-genome and tetraploid AC-genome oat species possess three and five genes encoding for the AATI proteins, respectively, whereas hexaploid A. sativa exhibits 12 genes dispersed over the A-, C-, and D-genomes. Some AATI proteins expressed in hexaploid oats were assigned to the A-genome based on similarity to their counterparts in diploid species, contributing to further clarify the genetic origin of hexaploid oats. Moreover, AATI may interact with starch-bound vromindolines in determining the extra-soft texture of oat kernels and, due to their balanced amino acid compositions, may contribute to the biological value of oat proteins in a positive manner.

  18. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens TpeL Toxin Gene Carriage, Production, Cytotoxic Contributions, and Trypsin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Large clostridial toxins (LCTs) are produced by at least four pathogenic clostridial species, and several LCTs are proven pivotal virulence factors for both human and veterinary diseases. TpeL is a recently identified LCT produced by Clostridium perfringens that has received relatively limited study. In response, the current study surveyed carriage of the tpeL gene among different C. perfringens strains, detecting this toxin gene in some type A, B, and C strains but not in any type D or E strains. This study also determined that all tested strains maximally produce, and extracellularly release, TpeL at the late-log or early-stationary growth stage during in vitro culture, which is different from the maximal late-stationary-phase production reported previously for other LCTs and for TpeL production by C. perfringens strain JIR12688. In addition, the present study found that TpeL levels in culture supernatants can be repressed by either glucose or sucrose. It was also shown that, at natural production levels, TpeL is a significant contributor to the cytotoxic activity of supernatants from cultures of tpeL-positive strain CN3685. Lastly, this study identified TpeL, which presumably is produced in the intestines during diseases caused by TpeL-positive type B and C strains, as a toxin whose cytotoxicity decreases after treatment with trypsin; this finding may have pathophysiologic relevance by suggesting that, like beta toxin, TpeL contributes to type B and C infections in hosts with decreased trypsin levels due to disease, diet, or age. PMID:25824828

  19. Prediction of trypsin/molecular fragment binding affinities by free energy decomposition and empirical scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Mark L.; Faver, John C.; Ucisik, Melek N.; Dashti, Danial S.; Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2012-05-01

    Two families of binding affinity estimation methodologies are described which were utilized in the SAMPL3 trypsin/fragment binding affinity challenge. The first is a free energy decomposition scheme based on a thermodynamic cycle, which included separate contributions from enthalpy and entropy of binding as well as a solvent contribution. Enthalpic contributions were estimated with PM6-DH2 semiempirical quantum mechanical interaction energies, which were modified with a statistical error correction procedure. Entropic contributions were estimated with the rigid-rotor harmonic approximation, and solvent contributions to the free energy were estimated with several different methods. The second general methodology is the empirical score LISA, which contains several physics-based terms trained with the large PDBBind database of protein/ligand complexes. Here we also introduce LISA+, an updated version of LISA which, prior to scoring, classifies systems into one of four classes based on a ligand's hydrophobicity and molecular weight. Each version of the two methodologies (a total of 11 methods) was trained against a compiled set of known trypsin binders available in the Protein Data Bank to yield scaling parameters for linear regression models. Both raw and scaled scores were submitted to SAMPL3. Variants of LISA showed relatively low absolute errors but also low correlation with experiment, while the free energy decomposition methods had modest success when scaling factors were included. Nonetheless, re-scaled LISA yielded the best predictions in the challenge in terms of RMS error, and six of these models placed in the top ten best predictions by RMS error. This work highlights some of the difficulties of predicting binding affinities of small molecular fragments to protein receptors as well as the benefit of using training data.

  20. Trypsin Isoinhibitors with Antiproliferative Activity toward Leukemia Cells from Phaseolus vulgaris cv “White Cloud Bean”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Sun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A purification protocol that comprised ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose, and gel filtration by FPLC on Superdex 75 was complied to isolate two trypsin inhibitors from Phaseolus vulgaris cv “White Cloud Bean”. Both trypsin inhibitors exhibited a molecular mass of 16 kDa and reduced the activity of trypsin with an IC50 value of about 0.6 M. Dithiothreitol attenuated the trypsin inhibitory activity, signifying that an intact disulfide bond is indispensable to the activity. [Methyl-3H] thymidine incorporation by leukemia L1210 cells was inhibited with an IC50 value of 28.8 M and 21.5 M, respectively. They were lacking in activity toward lymphoma MBL2 cells and inhibitory effect on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and fungal growth when tested up to 100 M.

  1. A comparative study of trypsin specificity based on QM/MM molecular dynamics simulation and QM/MM GBSA calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianzhong; Wang, Jinan; Zhang, Qinggang; Chen, Kaixian; Zhu, Weiliang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen bonding and polar interactions play a key role in identification of protein-inhibitor binding specificity. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (QM/MM MD) simulations combined with DFT and semi-empirical Hamiltonian (AM1d, RM1, PM3, and PM6) methods were performed to study the hydrogen bonding and polar interactions of two inhibitors BEN and BEN1 with trypsin. The results show that the accuracy of treating the hydrogen bonding and polar interactions using QM/MM MD simulation of PM6 can reach the one obtained by the DFT QM/MM MD simulation. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (QM/MM-GBSA) method was applied to calculate binding affinities of inhibitors to trypsin and the results suggest that the accuracy of binding affinity prediction can be significantly affected by the accurate treatment of the hydrogen bonding and polar interactions. In addition, the calculated results also reveal the binding specificity of trypsin: (1) the amidinium groups of two inhibitors generate favorable salt bridge interaction with Asp189 and form hydrogen bonding interactions with Ser190 and Gly214, (2) the phenyl of inhibitors can produce favorable van der Waals interactions with the residues His58, Cys191, Gln192, Trp211, Gly212, and Cys215. This systematic and comparative study can provide guidance for the choice of QM/MM MD methods and the designs of new potent inhibitors targeting trypsin.

  2. Protease-activated receptor-2 regulates trypsin expression in the brain and protects against seizures and epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Rink-Jan; O'Brien, Terence J; Cocks, Thomas M

    2008-04-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)), primarily involved in inflammation, is highly expressed in limbic regions of the brain such as the hippocampus. Although extracellular proteolysis is involved in normal and stress-related neuronal plasticity associated with learning, memory and inflammatory disease states, little is known about the role of PAR(2) and its physiological agonist, trypsin, in the brain. We show immunohistochemically that trypsin co-localises with tissue plasminogen activator within granular-like structures in PAR(2)-positive pyramidal neurons of the rat hippocampus. Central administration of the PAR(2) peptide agonist, SLIGRL, inhibited electrical amygdala kindling-induced epileptogenesis and abolished kindling-induced over-expression of trypsin in the hippocampus. SLIGRL similarly attenuated kindling when administered subcutaneously. Non-enzymatic activation of neuronal PAR(2) using SLIGRL may thus activate feedback mechanisms to inhibit the over-production of trypsin and possibly other proteases during brain insults and thereby attenuate pathogenesis. Prophylactic systemic administration of non-proteolytic PAR(2) agonists may therefore represent a novel approach to protect against epileptogenic brain insults.

  3. Kunitz trypsin inhibitor in addition to Bowman-Birk inhibitor influence stability of lunasin against pepsin-pancreatin hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean contains several biologically active components and one of this belongs to the bioactive peptide group. The objectives of this study were to produce different lunasin-enriched preparations (LEP) and determine the effect of Bowman-Birk inhibitor and Kunitz trypsin concentrations on the stabil...

  4. Cis-mediated down-regulation of a trypsin gene associated with Bt resistance in cotton bollworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenxi; Xiao, Yutao; Li, Xianchun; Oppert, Brenda; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Wu, Kongming

    2014-11-27

    Transgenic plants producing insecticidal proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are useful for pest control, but their efficacy is reduced when pests evolve resistance. Here we examined the mechanism of resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac in the laboratory-selected LF5 strain of the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. This strain had 110-fold resistance to Cry1Ac protoxin and 39-fold resistance to Cry1Ac activated toxin. Evaluation of five trypsin genes revealed 99% reduced transcription of one trypsin gene (HaTryR) was associated with resistance. Silencing of this gene with RNA interference in susceptible larvae increased their survival on diets containing Cry1Ac. Bioassays of progeny from crosses revealed that resistance to Cry1Ac was genetically linked with HaTryR. We identified mutations in the promoter region of HaTryR in the resistant strain. In transfected insect cell lines, transcription was lower when driven by the resistant promoter compared with the susceptible promoter, implicating cis-mediated down-regulation of HaTryR transcription as a mechanism of resistance. The results suggest that H. armigera can adapt to Bt toxin Cry1Ac by decreased expression of trypsin. Because trypsin activation of protoxin is a critical step in toxicity, transgenic plants with activated toxins rather than protoxins might increase the durability of Bt crops.

  5. Cloning and characterization of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like genes in the striped rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhao-Yu; Wan, Pin-Jun; Han, Zhao-Jun

    2012-04-01

    Serine proteinases including trypsins and chymotrypsins play various important roles in insects, including food digestion, immune defense, and zymogen activation. Studies on insect serine proteinases could reveal their feeding preference (polyphagous and monophagous) and facilitate identification of protease inhibitors, which can be engineered for pest management. In this paper, 11 transcripts encoding trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like proteins were cloned from the striped rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker). All the predicted proteins share high sequence similarity with known trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like proteins from either lepidopterans or dipterans, and most of the proteins have conserved motifs that are characteristics of serine proteinases. Among the 11 cloned genes, six were expressed predominantly and one exclusively in the midgut of the insect, three were expressed relatively evenly in examined tissues, and one was not expressed in either the gut or hemolymph based on RT-PCR results. The seven genes that were predominantly or exclusively expressed in the gut were also affected by feeding on different host plants. The genes that were expressed in the gut and were affected by host plants are likely to encode digestive proteinases. The identification of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like genes in this insect species is the first step towards further comparative studies and for identification of insect-specific proteinase inhibitors, which might be engineered to protect rice plants against the striped rice stem borer, which is one of the destructive pests of rice.

  6. Cold adaptation, ca2+ dependency and autolytic stability are related features in a highly active cold-adapted trypsin resistant to autoproteolysis engineered for biotechnological applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Olivera-Nappa

    Full Text Available Pig trypsin is routinely used as a biotechnological tool, due to its high specificity and ability to be stored as an inactive stable zymogen. However, it is not an optimum enzyme for conditions found in wound debriding for medical uses and trypsinization processes for protein analysis and animal cell culturing, where low Ca(2+ dependency, high activity in mild conditions and easy inactivation are crucial. We isolated and thermodynamically characterized a highly active cold-adapted trypsin for medical and laboratory use that is four times more active than pig trypsin at 10(° C and at least 50% more active than pig trypsin up to 50(° C. Contrary to pig trypsin, this enzyme has a broad optimum pH between 7 and 10 and is very insensitive to Ca(2+ concentration. The enzyme is only distantly related to previously described cryophilic trypsins. We built and studied molecular structure models of this trypsin and performed molecular dynamic calculations. Key residues and structures associated with calcium dependency and cryophilicity were identified. Experiments indicated that the protein is unstable and susceptible to autoproteolysis. Correlating experimental results and structural predictions, we designed mutations to improve the resistance to autoproteolysis and conserve activity for longer periods after activation. One single mutation provided around 25 times more proteolytic stability. Due to its cryophilic nature, this trypsin is easily inactivated by mild denaturation conditions, which is ideal for controlled proteolysis processes without requiring inhibitors or dilution. We clearly show that cold adaptation, Ca(2+ dependency and autolytic stability in trypsins are related phenomena that are linked to shared structural features and evolve in a concerted fashion. Hence, both structurally and evolutionarily they cannot be interpreted and studied separately as previously done.

  7. Comparison of Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog Expression in Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines and Human Pancreatic Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahideh Assadollahi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Genes are involved in the control of stem cell self-renewal as a new class of molecular markers of cancer. Objectives: In this study, the expression of Oct4, Nanog and Sox2 in cell lines MIA Paca-2, PA-TU-8902 and AsPC-1 and pancreatic cancer tissue were examined. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, cell lines, MIA Paca-2, PA-TU-8902 and AsPC-1, were cultured in DMEM (Dulbecco’s Modified Eagles Medium and RPMI-1640 (Roswell Park Memorial Institute containing FBS 10% (fetal bovine serum in a 37°C incubator containing Co2 5% and humidity 90%. Samples of tumor and non-cancer pancreatic tumor were purchased Iran tumor bank. Extraction of RNA and synthesis of cDNA was performed. Expression levels of Oct4, Nanog and Sox2 were determined using Real-time PCR. The protein expression levels of target genes in the cell lines were studied by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Results: The expression rate of Oct4, Nanog and Sox2 is more in the cancer cell lines than those in the control (normal tissue samples. The protein expression levels of target genes in the cell lines were confirmed by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Conclusions: The genes are involved in stem cell self-renewal as a new class of molecular markers of cancer that detected in the pancreatic cell lines. Maybe, these genes play important role in the uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells.

  8. Autoimmune pancreatitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, Masoumeh; Hosseini, Mousareza; Nekooei, Sirous; Ataei Azimi, Sajad; Farzanehfar, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a fibro-inflammatory form of chronic pancreatitis. It is diagnosed by the combination of imaging studies such as a CT scan and pancreatography, laboratory analyses that include IgG4 and/or autoantibodies, histopathological evaluations and positive response to corticosteroid therapy. We report the case of a 41-year-old female with a history of jaundice and increasing abdominal pain for two weeks prior to her clinic visit. Laboratory results were significant for an increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) confirmed areas of stenosis and dilatation in the pancreatic duct and in the intra- and extra-hepatic bile ducts similar to primary sclerosantcholangitis. Laboratory analyses showed increased levels of IgG4 with thepresence of antinuclear antibodies.

  9. Fluid resuscitation in acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Aakash; Manrai, Manish; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis remains a clinical challenge, despite an exponential increase in our knowledge of its complex pathophysiological changes. Early fluid therapy is the cornerstone of treatment and is universally recommended; however, there is a lack of consensus regarding the type, rate, amount and end points of fluid replacement. Further confusion is added with the newer studies reporting better results with controlled fluid therapy. This review focuses on the pathophysiology of fluid depletion in acute pancreatitis, as well as the rationale for fluid replacement, the type, optimal amount, rate of infusion and monitoring of such patients. The basic goal of fluid epletion should be to prevent or minimize the systemic response to inflammatory markers. For this review, various studies and reviews were critically evaluated, along with authors’ recommendations, for predicted severe or severe pancreatitis based on the available evidence. PMID:25561779

  10. Dynamic MRI of pancreatic neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Nobuyoshi; Takayasu, Ken-ichi; Muramatu, Yukio [National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital

    1995-12-01

    The usefulness of dynamic MRI study using contrast media is studied on pancreatic tumors. This method was useful in detecting small lesion of pancreatic tumor, however, T1-weighted SE method was more useful in detecting swelling lesions or diagnosing degree of tumors. Although endocrine tumors are depicted by contrast media, careful attention is needed since there are some hypovascular cases. T2-weighted image is commonly performed to detect the morphology of cystic content and the correlation between the pancreas and bile duct in cystic tumors, however, dynamic study was more useful in proving vascularity of serous cystadenoma and differentiating malignant or benign mucous cystic tumors by depicting intracystic torous components. In performing MR imaging on pancreatic diseases, it is necessary to select appropriate imaging procedure, and dynamic study should be included and used in a rational manner. (S.Y.).

  11. [Radiation therapy in pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chie, Eui Kyu

    2008-02-01

    Radiotherapy has been offered to patients with pancreatic cancer, either in the adjuvant or definitive setting. However, the role of radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer is increasingly doubted, especially after the introduction of gemcitabine to both domains. Although contradictory data exist, combined chemoradiotherapy improves both quantity and quality of life for patients with locally advanced tumors compared with radiotherapy alone or chemotherapy alone. Recently, induction chemotherapy strategy is being evaluated for better selection of patients for optimal benefit from consolidative chemoradiotherapy. Much controversy has been suggested concerning the role of adjuvant radiotherapy, but quality assurance for radiotherapy was not considered in the previously reported studies. Combined chemoradiotherapy in the adjuvant setting is still considered as a viable option. Current phase III randomized on-going studies will provide better answers on the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  12. Pancreatic Cancer: Pathogenesis and Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goral, Vedat

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a fatal malignancies which is predominantly seen in men and at advanced age (40-85 years) and has an aggressive course. Its frequency is gradually increasing over the past years. It accounts for 2% of all cancers and 5% of cancer-related deaths. Pancreatic cancer takes the first place among asymptomatic cancers. Ninety percent of cases are adenocarcinomas. Ten percent of the patients have a familial disposition. The disease is very difficult to detect as it has no early signs and spreads rapidly to surrounding organs is one of the most deadly types of cancer. Pancreatic cancer may result from hereditary germline or somatic acquired mutations in cancer-related genes and mutations also cause cancer progression and metastasis.

  13. [Pancreatic cancer and lifestyle factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeem, K; Sevčíková, J; Tomášková, H; Horáková, D; Procházka, V; Martínek, A; Shonová, O; Janout, V; Kollárová, H

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a serious cancer with unfavorable prognosis. Due to differences in the incidence of pancreatic cancer in different regions, it is clear that factors associated with lifestyle play an important role in the etiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of selected lifestyle factors in relation to pancreatic cancer. The study included a total of 529 subjects, including 309 cases and 220 control subjects. Cases of newly diagnosed patients with pancreatic cancer who lived in the region were selected in hospitals in three centers (University Hospital Olomouc, University Hospital Ostrava, Hospital Ceske Budejovice). The control group was obtained in cooperation with selected general practitioners for adults, and it is a population control group. Analyses compared persons who reported consuming alcohol with those who do not consume alcohol. Results showed a statistically significant inverse association, even after adjustment for the other studied factors (OR = 0.57, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.89). When assessing leisure time physical activity, results showed statistically significant inverse association and 35% decrease in the risk (crude OR = 0.65, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.93), and this inverse association was confirmed after adjustment for other studied factors although the result is on the border of statistical significance (adjusted OR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.44 to 1.04). Drinking coffee and tea has only a marginal impact on the occurrence of pancreatic cancer, although the medium and high consumption of black tea was found increased risk by 90 or 44%, respectively. Smoking is considered a causal risk factor for pancreatic cancer, but in this study, a positive association was not found. The study found no statistically significant association between overweight and obesity. Physical activity, dietary measures that will lead to weight loss and education to non-smoking can have a significant impact on the primary prevention of cancer.

  14. Target therapies in pancreatic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestris, Nicola; Gnoni, Antonio; Brunetti, Anna Elisabetta; Vincenti, Leonardo; Santini, Daniele; Tonini, Giuseppe; Merchionne, Francesca; Maiello, Evaristo; Lorusso, Vito; Nardulli, Patrizia; Azzariti, Amalia; Reni, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) occurs in the majority of cases with early locoregional spread and distant metastases at diagnosis, leading to dismal prognosis and limited treatment options. Traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy provides only modest benefit to patients with PDAC. Identification of different molecular pathways, overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cells, has provided the opportunity to develop targeted therapies (monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors) and peculiar new class of taxanes with a crucial therapeutic role in this cancer setting. A phase III trial has shown that erlotinib in combination with gemcitabine was clinically irrelevant and skin toxicity can be a positive prognostic factor. Moreover, the combination of cetuximab or erlotinib with radiotherapy in advanced pancreatic cancer has shown to be synergistic and a reversal of radio-resistance has been suggested by inhibition of VEGF/EGFR pathway. To overcome EGFR-inhibition therapy resistance several alternative pathways targets are under investigation (IGF- 1R, MMPs, Hedgehog proteins, m-TOR, MEK, COX-2) and provide the rationale for clinical use in phase II/III studies. Also nab-paclitaxel, a new taxanes class, uses high pancreatic albumin-binding protein SPARC levels to act in cancer cells with a less toxic and more effective dose with respect to classic taxanes. Understanding of molecular pathogenesis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma continues to expand. However, many promising data in preclinic and phase I/II trials did not yield promise in phase III trials, suggesting that identification of predictive biomarkers for these new agents is mandatory. The knowledge of biologic and molecular aspects of pancreatic cancer can be the basis for future therapeutic developments.

  15. Interventional radiological treatment in complications of pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memis, Ahmet E-mail: ahmemis@yahoo.com; Parildar, Mustafa

    2002-09-01

    Percutaneous interventional therapy plays an important role in treating complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis. With the development of cross-sectional imaging and advanced interventional techniques, percutaneous drainage has become the preferred treatment for pancreatic fluid collections such as acute collections, pseudocysts and abscesses. Abscess and pancreatic hemorrhage are the most life threatening complications of pancreatitis. Massive hemorrhage is rare but frequently lethal. As a rule, bleeding complications of pancreatitis require prompt diagnosis and an aggressive surgical approach. In unstable patients with a severely bleeding pseudoaneurysm, hemostasis can be obtained by occlusion with mechanical devices.

  16. ABDOMEN GROANS: A RARE CAUSE OF PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamoorthy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyperparathyroidism and hypercalcaemia are considered to be a rare cause of acute pancreatitis. The relationship between hyperparathyroidism and pancreatic inflammatory disease remains controversial. (1 But it has been shown that surgical correction of parathyroid disease and normalization of serum calcium levels may ameliorate the acute pancreatitis. (2 A case of acute pancreatitis and hyperparathyroidism due to parathyroid gland hyperplasia occurred in a 51- years-old woman is reported. After the excision of parathyroid gland the serum calcium levels and the function of the pancreas returned to normal. This suggests a cause and effect relationship between hyperparathyroidism and acute pancreatitis.

  17. Purification, characterization and cDNA cloning of a trypsin from the hepatopancreas of snakehead (Channa argus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Long-Zhen; Ruan, Mi-Mi; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Liu, Guang-Ming; Sun, Le-Chang; Su, Wen-Jin; Cao, Min-Jie

    2012-03-01

    A trypsin was purified from the hepatopancreas of snakehead (Channa argus) by ammonium sulfate fractionation and a series of column chromatographies including DEAE-Sepharose, Sephacryl S-200 HR and Hi-Trap Capto-Q. The molecular mass of the purified trypsin was about 22 kDa, as estimated by SDS-PAGE. The optimum pH and temperature of the purified trypsin were 9.0 and 40°C, respectively. The trypsin was stable in the pH range of 7.5-9.5 and below 45°C. The enzymatic activity was strongly inhibited by serine proteinase inhibitors, such as MBTI, Pefabloc SC, PMSF, LBTI and benzamidine. Peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) of the purified protein obtained 2 peptide fragments with 25 amino acid residues and were 100% identical to the trypsinogen from pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes). The activation energy (Ea) of this enzyme was 24.65 kJ·M(-1). Apparent K(m) was 1.02 μM and k(cat) was 148 S(-1) for fluorogenic substrate Boc-Phe-Ser-Arg-MCA. A trypsinogen gene encoding 247 amino acid residues was further cloned on the basis of the sequence obtained from PMF and the conserved site peptide of trypsinogen together with 5'-RACE and 3'-RACE. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a signal peptide of 15 residues and an activation peptide of 9 amino acid residues with a mature protein of 223 residues. The catalytic triad His-64, Asp-107, Ser-201 and 12 Cys residues which may form 6 disulfide bonds were conserved. Compared with the PMF data, only 2 amino acid residues difference were identified, suggesting the cloned trypsinogen is quite possibly the precursor of the purified trypsin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Changes in antigenicity of porcine serum albumin in gamma-irradiated sausage extract by treatment with pepsin and trypsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Koth-Bong-Woo-Ri; Song, Eu-Jin [Department of Food Science and Technology/Institute of Food Science, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, So-Young [Traditional Food Research Group, Korea Food Research Institute, Seongnam 463-746 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Gyu [Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju-Woon [National Federation of Fisheries Cooperatives, Fisheries Economic Institute, Seoul 138-827 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Myung-Woo [Department of Culinary Nutrition, Woosong University, Daejon 300-718 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Dong-Hyun, E-mail: dhahn@pknu.ac.kr [Department of Food Science and Technology/Institute of Food Science, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Pork is known as an allergenic food with porcine serum albumin (PSA, 66 kDa) representing the major allergen. This study was conducted to investigate the change in antigenicity of PSA in gamma-irradiated sausage extract treated with pepsin and trypsin. Sausage products (A and B) were irradiated at 1, 3, 10, and 20 kGy. After irradiation, sausage proteins were extracted and digested with pepsin (1:200, 30 min) and trypsin (1:300, 5, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min). The binding ability of PSA in extracts of the irradiated sausages (A and B) decreased by over 3 kGy relative to the binding ability of PSA in extracts of intact sausages and showed no notable differences when the dose of radiation ranged from 3 to 20 kGy. After treatment with pepsin and trypsin, the binding ability of PSA in extracts of the irradiated sausages was decreased more relative to that of intact sausages and showed no significant differences when the period of trypsin treatment is increased or when the dose of irradiation is increased. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) results indicated that there was no visible change in the intensity of the PSA band in extracts of the irradiated sausages. After pepsin and trypsin treatment, the intensity of PSA band faded with increasing doses of irradiation. In conclusion, antigenicity of PSA in pork sausages could be reduced by gamma irradiation. - Highlights: > Change in antigenicity of PSA in irradiated sausage extract (ISE) was examined. > Binding ability of PSA in ISE was decreased compared to intact extract. > Binding ability of PSA in ISE after enzyme treatments was also further decreased. > Intensity of PSA band in ISE after enzyme treatments became weak.

  19. Acute Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Nationwide Matched-cohort Study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegård, Jakob; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe

    2018-01-01

    . Pancreatic cancer risk was expressed as hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs, calculated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Cox models were stratified by age, sex, and year of pancreatitis diagnosis and adjusted for alcohol- and smoking-related conditions, and Charlson Comorbidity Index score. Results We...... included 41,669 patients diagnosed with incident acute pancreatitis and 208,340 comparison individuals. Patients with acute pancreatitis had an increased risk of pancreatic cancer compared with the age- and sex-matched general population throughout the follow-up period. The risk decreased over time......Background & Aims Acute pancreatitis may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. However, findings from studies on this association are conflicting. We investigated the association between acute pancreatitis and increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Methods We conducted a nationwide, population...

  20. Oxidative stress and NO generation in the rat pancreatitis induced by pancreatic duct ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwalow, Igor; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Atiakshin, Dmitri; Samoilova, Vera; Wolf, Eduard; Boecker, Werner; Tiemann, Katharina

    2017-04-01

    The interaction between nitric oxide (NO) and superoxides is critical in the development of an acute pancreatitis. Previously, we reported that the expression of superoxides and of the NO-generating enzyme (NO synthase, NOS) was up-regulated in the human pancreatitis, especially within the exocrine compartment indicating an exceptional susceptibility of the exocrine parenchyma to oxidative stress. The aim of the present study was to compare the regulation of NO signalling pathways in the human pancreatitis and in an animal model of an acute pancreatitis induced by pancreatic duct ligation (PDL) in rats. In the PDL-induced rat pancreatitis, we revealed a similar pattern of oxidative stress and NOS up-regulation in acinar and in ductal compartments, like in the human pancreatitis. This demonstrates that the PDL-induced rat pancreatitis is a proper model for further studies of acute pancreatitis development in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of pancreatic stellate cell activation regulated by microRNA on fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Yizhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive chronic inflammatory disease and finally progresses to irreversible pancreatic fibrosis. The diagnosis and treatment of chronic pancreatitis is difficult and there are still no effective measures for delaying or reversing fibrosis. This article introduces the research advances in the role of microRNA (miRNA in the fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis and points out that pancreatic stellate cell activation is the key step in pancreatic fibrosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNA regulates pancreatic stellate cell activation and participates in the fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis through altering gene expression and mediating signaling pathways and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and miRNA may become a new target for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

  2. Targeted Therapies for Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idoroenyi Amanam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the third leading cause of cancer related death and by 2030, it will be second only to lung cancer. We have seen tremendous advances in therapies for lung cancer as well as other solid tumors using a molecular targeted approach but our progress in treating pancreatic cancer has been incremental with median overall survival remaining less than one year. There is an urgent need for improved therapies with better efficacy and less toxicity. Small molecule inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies and immune modulatory therapies have been used. Here we review the progress that we have made with these targeted therapies.

  3. Pancreatic dysfunction in severe obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, A; Greenhalgh, L; Newbury-Ecob, R; Crowne, E; Shield, J

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To investigate pancreatic function in children attending an obesity clinic.
METHODS—Thirty six children (of which 34 were white) with severe obesity of prepubertal onset (body mass index more than +2 SDS) were reviewed clinically and dysmorphologically, with assessment of pancreatic function.
RESULTS—Eight had dysmorphic features and 13 had learning difficulties. Four of 17 prepubertal children had hyperinsulinaemia and seven had hyperproinsulinaemia. All 19 pubertal children had hyperinsulinaemia, 14 had hyperproinsulinaemia, and one had type II diabetes.
CONCLUSIONS—Metabolic abnormalities predictive of type II diabetes occur in severely obese white children.

 PMID:11207179

  4. Listeria Vaccines for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Immunol 20, 77 (Jan, 2013). 13. S. K. Biswas, C. E. Lewis, J Leukoc Biol 88, 877 (Nov, 2010). 14. L. J. Bayne et al., Cancer Cell 21, 822 (Jun 12, 2012...EMT and dissemination precede prancreatic tumor formation. Cell. 2012; 148:349. 14. Bayne , L.J., Beatty, G.L., Jhala, N., Clark, C.E., Rhim, A.D...immunity in pancreatic cancer. Cancer Cell. 2012; 21:822. 15. Vonderheide, RH, Bajor, DL, Bayne , LJ, and G.L. Beatty. CD40 immunotherapy for pancreatic

  5. Differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas vs. groove pancreatitis: Usefulness of the portal venous phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishigami, Kousei, E-mail: Ishigamikousei@aol.co [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan); Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Nishie, Akihiro; Kakihara, Daisuke [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan); Fujita, Nobuhiro [Anatomic Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Asayama, Yoshiki; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Irie, Hiroyuki [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan); Nakamura, Masafumi; Takahata, Shunichi [Surgery and Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ito, Tetsuhide [Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Purpose: To clarify if the portal venous phase is helpful for the differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis. Materials and methods: MDCT and MRI of groove pancreatic carcinomas (n = 7) and groove pancreatitis (n = 15) were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists independently. The signal intensity on T2-weighted images was subjectively assessed. The presence or absence of common bile duct (CBD) and main pancreatic duct (MPD) strictures, calcifications, and cystic lesions was evaluated. Additionally, the appearance of groove pancreatic carcinoma and that of groove pancreatitis in the portal venous phase on dynamic MDCT and MRI were compared. Results: There were no significant differences in the signal intensity on T2-weighted images and in the presence or absence of CBD and MPD strictures, calcifications, and cystic lesions between groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis. However, patchy focal enhancement in the portal venous phase was more commonly observed in groove pancreatitis than groove pancreatic carcinoma (Reviewers 1 and 2: 14/15 [93.3%] vs. 1/7 [14.3%], P < 0.0001). In addition, peripheral enhancement was only seen in groove pancreatic carcinomas (Reviewer 1: 4/7 [57.1%] vs. 0/15 [0%], P < 0.005, and Reviewer 2: 3/7 [42.9%] vs. 0/15 [0%], P < 0.05). Conclusion: The portal venous phase may be helpful for the differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis.

  6. Novel therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shing-Chun; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2014-08-21

    Pancreatic cancer has become the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the last two decades. Only 3%-15% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer had 5 year survival rate. Drug resistance, high metastasis, poor prognosis and tumour relapse contributed to the malignancies and difficulties in treating pancreatic cancer. The current standard chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer is gemcitabine, however its efficacy is far from satisfactory, one of the reasons is due to the complex tumour microenvironment which decreases effective drug delivery to target cancer cell. Studies of the molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer have revealed that activation of KRAS, overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2, inactivation of p16(INK4A) and loss of p53 activities occurred in pancreatic cancer. Co-administration of gemcitabine and targeting the molecular pathological events happened in pancreatic cancer has brought an enhanced therapeutic effectiveness of gemcitabine. Therefore, studies looking for novel targets in hindering pancreatic tumour growth are emerging rapidly. In order to give a better understanding of the current findings and to seek the direction in future pancreatic cancer research; in this review we will focus on targets suppressing tumour metastatsis and progression, KRAS activated downstream effectors, the relationship of Notch signaling and Nodal/Activin signaling with pancreatic cancer cells, the current findings of non-coding RNAs in inhibiting pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, brief discussion in transcription remodeling by epigenetic modifiers (e.g., HDAC, BMI1, EZH2) and the plausible therapeutic applications of cancer stem cell and hyaluronan in tumour environment.

  7. Imaging in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile D. Balaban

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by progressive and irreversible damage of the pancreatic parenchyma and ductal system, which leads to chronic pain, loss of endocrine and exocrine functions. Clinically, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency becomes apparent only after 90% of the parenchima has been lost. Despite the simple definition, diagnosing chronic pancreatitis remains a challenge, especially for early stage disease. Because pancreatic function tests can be normal until late stages and have significant limitations, there is an incresing interest in the role of imaging techniques for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. In this article we review the utility and accuracy of different imaging methods in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, focusing on the role of advanced imaging (magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound.

  8. Pancreatic sphincterotomy: technique, indications, and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscaglia, Jonathan M; Kalloo, Anthony N

    2007-08-14

    Pancreatic sphincterotomy serves as the cornerstone of endoscopic therapy of the pancreas. Historically, its indications have been less well-defined than those of endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy, yet it plays a definite and useful role in diseases such as chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic-type sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. In the appropriate setting, it may be used as a single therapeutic maneuver, or in conjunction with other endoscopic techniques such as pancreatic stone extraction or stent placement. The current standard of practice utilizes two different methods of performing pancreatic sphincterotomy: a pull-type sphincterotome technique without prior stent placement, and a needle-knife sphincterotome technique over an existing stent. The complications associated with pancreatic sphincterotomy are many, although acute pancreatitis appears to be the most common and the most serious of the early complications. As such, it continues to be reserved for those endoscopists who perform a relatively high-volume of therapeutic pancreaticobiliary endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography.

  9. MR imaging for blunt pancreatic injury

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    Yang Lin [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China); Zhang Xiaoming, E-mail: cjr.zhxm@vip.163.co [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China); Xu Xiaoxue; Tang Wei; Xiao Bo; Zeng Nanlin [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Objective: To study the MR imaging features of blunt pancreatic injury. Materials and methods: Nine patients with pancreatic injury related to blunt abdominal trauma confirmed by surgery performed MR imaging. Two abdominal radiologists conducted a review of the MR images to assess pancreatic parenchymal and pancreatic duct injury, and associated complications. Result: Diagnostic quality MR images were obtained in each of the nine patients. In the nine patients, pancreatic fracture, laceration and contusion were depicted on MR imaging in five, one and three patients, respectively. There were six patients with pancreatic duct disruption, eight patients with peripancreatic fluid collections, and four patients with peripancreatic pseudocyst or hematoma, respectively. All of the MR imaging findings was corresponded to surgical findings. Conclusion: MR imaging is an effective method to detect blunt pancreatic injury and may provide information to guide management decisions.

  10. A highly stable Yarrowia lipolytica lipase formulation for the treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turki, Saoussen; Mrabet, Ghada; Jabloun, Zeineb; Destain, Jacqueline; Thonart, Philippe; Kallel, Héla

    2010-12-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica lipase has been assumed to be a good candidate for the treatment of fat malabsorption in patients with pancreatic insufficiency. Nevertheless, no systematic studies on its stability under physiological conditions pertaining to the human GI (gastrointestinal) tract have been published. Stability of various Y. lipolytica lipase powder formulations at various physiological pH values as well as the effect of digestive proteases and bile salts on enzyme activity were investigated. Results were compared with those obtained from another competing fungal lipase sourced from Candida rugosa. Among the studied formulations, Y. lipolytica lipase stabilized with gum arabic and skimmed milk powder was the most promising powder formulation. Under acidic conditions (pH 3-5), this formulation showed higher stability than those observed with the other Y. lipolytica lipase formulations and C. rugosa lipase. In addition, in the presence of gum arabic and skimmed milk powder as additives, Y. lipolytica lipase exhibited markedly higher resistance to pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin actions. Resistance to proteolytic degradation by digestive proteases was also by far higher than that observed with C. rugosa lipase. Similar behaviour was, however, observed when these two fungal lipases were incubated with increased concentrations of bile salts. Residual lipase activity of both fungal lipases showed a slight decrease in NaTDC (sodium taurodeoxycholate) concentration above 4 mM. Consequently, Y. lipolytica lipase formulated with gum arabic and milk powder seemed to have great potential for use as a therapeutic tool for patients with pancreatic insufficiency.

  11. Elevation of serum pancreatic amylase and distortion of pancreatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes mellitus has been shown to cause severe impairment in exocrine pancreatic function and cyto-architecture. Ocimum grattissimum has been reported to lower blood glucose levels in experimental diabetic animals. This study, therefore, aims to investigate if treatment with O. grattissimum can alleviate ...

  12. Diprosopia em bovino Bovine diprosopus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.T. Rotta

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a malformation in one newborn female bovine, with two faces and two skull fused, showing one single head. Duplications of the nasal and oral structures, tetraofthalmy, two brains, one single cerebellum, and pons were observed. The right thyroid was hypertrophic and the other organs had normal morphology. Every change observed in this case was compatibles with diprosopus.

  13. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, B.E.C.; Somerville, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep has not been identified under natural conditions at the time of writing and remains a hypothetical issue. However, rumours about the possible finding of a BSE-like isolate in sheep have led to great unrest within the sheep industry, among the general

  14. Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-14

    A cattle dashboard has recently been developed to share surveillance information gathered from submissions to the Great Britain veterinary diagnostic network. Data relating to Scotland come from the SAC C VS. This article, by Tim Geraghty, relates to cases of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis in Scotland, as summarised on the APHA Cattle Dashboard. British Veterinary Association.

  15. Identification of lactoferrin in bovine tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M H; Brightman, A H; Fenwick, B W; Rider, M A

    1996-09-01

    To determine whether bovine tear film contains the iron-binding glycoprotein, lactoferrin. 40 Adult Hereford, Angus, and Simmental cattle. Protein analysis: pooled bovine tears were used for protein analysis (size exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography [HPLC] fractionation). HPLC was used for tear analysis. A diode array detector was used (215 and 280 microns) for chromatogram analysis and comparisons. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE): protein electrophoresis was performed, using 7.5% running gels with 4% stacking gels. Molecular weight of proteins in the unknown samples was determined as recommended by the manufacturer of the standards. Protein sequencing: amino acid sequencing, using automated Edman degradation of HPLC purified protein, was performed. The sequence obtained was compared with the known protein sequence of bovine lactoferrin. HPLC analysis of whole bovine tears resulted in a consistent chromatogram. Peak collection was performed to recover a protein from the bovine tear film with chromatogram characteristics nearly identical to purified bovine lactoferrin. Silver-stained SDS-PAGE of this peak revealed a band with molecular mass consistent with bovine lactoferrin (estimated mass of 78 kd). The first 13 amino acid residues of this protein were identical to the amino acid sequence of bovine lactoferrin. Analysis of whole bovine tears, using size exclusion HPLC, SDS-PAGE, and amino acid sequencing, provided evidence that bovine tears contain lactoferrin. Lactoferrin probably exerts a bacteriostatic effect in bovine tear film. Locally produced lactoferrin may bathe the ocular surface and sequester iron from potential pathogens.

  16. Pancreatic paragonimiasis mimics pancreatic cystic-solid tumor--A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Xu, Mingqing; Wu, Yang; Xiang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Paragonimiasis is frequently misdiagnosed owing to its various and complicated clinical manifestations. Although paragonimiasis has diverse manifestations, there is no report of paragonimiasis involving the pancreas. Herein we report the first case of pancreatic paragonimiasis, which was misdiagnosed as pancreatic cystic-solid tumor by CT scan. The pancreatic lesion was finally proved to be pancreatic paragonimiasis by pathological examination and serum antibody detection. The clinical manifestations and imaging features of this patient were analyzed. Pancreatic paragonimiasis should be an important differential diagnosis for pancreatic cyst-solid lesions. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Bovine leukemia virus: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliarena MA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Marcela Alicia Juliarena,1 Clarisa Natalia Barrios,1 Claudia María Lützelschwab,1 Eduardo Néstor Esteban,2 Silvina Elena Gutiérrez1 1Department of Animal Health and Preventive Medicine, Veterinary Research Center of Tandil (CIVETAN, CIC-CONICET, Faculty of Veterinary Science, National University of the Center of Buenos Aires Province, Tandil, Argentina; 2BIOALPINA Program (GENIAL/COTANA, Colonia Alpina, Argentina Abstract: Enzootic bovine leukosis, caused by bovine leukemia virus (BLV, is the most common neoplasm of dairy cattle. Although beef and dairy cattle are susceptible to BLV infection and BLV-associated lymphosarcoma, the disease is more commonly detected in dairy herds, mostly because of the management practices in dairy farms. The pathogenicity of BLV in its natural host, the bovine, depends mainly on the resistance/susceptibility genetics of the animal. The majority of infected cattle are asymptomatic, promoting the extremely high dissemination rate of BLV in many bovine populations. The important productive losses caused by the BLV, added to the health risk of maintaining populations with a high prevalence of infection with a retrovirus, generates the need to implement control measures. Different strategies to control the virus have been attempted. The most effective approach is to identify and cull the totality of infected cattle in the herd. However, this approach is not suitable for herds with high prevalence of infection. At present, no treatment or vaccine has proven effective for the control of BLV. Thus far, the genetic selection of resistant animals emerges as a natural strategy for the containment of the BLV dissemination. In natural conditions, most of the infected, resistant cattle can control the infection, and therefore do not pass the virus to other animals, gradually decreasing the prevalence of the herd. Keywords: bovine leukemia virus, control, genetic resistance, BoLA-DRB3

  18. In vitro pancreas duodenal homeobox-1 enhances the differentiation of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Chun-You; Yu, Feng; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wu, He-Shui; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Zhou, Feng

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To observe whether pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor-1 enhances the differentiation of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells in vitro. METHODS: Rat pancreatic tissue was submitted to digestion by collagenase, ductal epithelial cells were separated by density gradient centrifugation and then cultured in RPMI1640 medium with 10% fetal bovine serum. After 3-5 passages, the cells were incubated in a six-well plate for 24 h before transfection of recombination plasmid XlHbox8VP16. Lightcycler quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of PDX-1 and insulin mRNA in pancreatic epithelial cells. The expression of PDX-1 and insulin protein was analyzed by Western blotting. Insulin secretion was detected by radioimmunoassay. Insulin-producing cells were detected by dithizone-staining. RESULTS: XlHbox8 mRNA was expressed in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. PDX-1 and insulin mRNA as well as PDX-1 and insulin protein were significantly increased in the transfected group. The production and insulin secretion of insulin-producing cells differentiated from pancreatic ductal epithelial cells were higher than those of the untransfected cells in vitro with a significant difference (1.32 ± 0.43 vs 3.48 ± 0.81, P < 0.01 at 5.6 mmol/L; 4.86 ± 1.15 vs 10.25 ± 1.32, P < 0.01 at 16.7 mmol/L). CONCLUSION: PDX-1 can differentiate rat pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells in vitro. In vitro PDX-1 transfection is a valuable strategy for increasing the source of insulin-producing cells. PMID:17876894

  19. Quantitative Assessment of the Effects of Trypsin Digestion Methods on Affinity Purification-Mass Spectrometry-based Protein-Protein Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yueqing; Sun, Hong; Zhang, Jing; Brasier, Allan R; Zhao, Yingxin

    2017-08-04

    Affinity purification-mass spectrometry (AP-MS) has become the method of choice for discovering protein-protein interactions (PPIs) under native conditions. The success of AP-MS depends on the efficiency of trypsin digestion and the recovery of the tryptic peptides for MS analysis. Several different protocols have been used for trypsin digestion of protein complexes in AP-MS studies, but no systematic studies have been conducted on the impact of trypsin digestion conditions on the identification of PPIs. Here, we used NFκB/RelA and Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) as baits and test five distinct trypsin digestion methods (two using "on-beads," three using "elution-digestion" protocols). Although the performance of the trypsin digestion protocols change slightly depending on the different baits, antibodies and cell lines used, we found that elution-digestion methods consistently outperformed on-beads digestion methods. The high-abundance interactors can be identified universally by all five methods, but the identification of low-abundance RelA interactors is significantly affected by the choice of trypsin digestion method. We also found that different digestion protocols influence the selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-MS quantification of PPIs, suggesting that optimization of trypsin digestion conditions may be required for robust targeted analysis of PPIs.

  20. Development of a rapid high-efficiency scalable process for acetylated Sus scrofa cationic trypsin production from Escherichia coli inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingzhi; Wu, Feilin; Xu, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Trypsin is one of the most important enzymatic tools in proteomics and biopharmaceutical studies. Here, we describe the complete recombinant expression and purification from a trypsinogen expression vector construct. The Sus scrofa cationic trypsin gene with a propeptide sequence was optimized according to Escherichia coli codon-usage bias and chemically synthesized. The gene was inserted into pET-11c plasmid to yield an expression vector. Using high-density E. coli fed-batch fermentation, trypsinogen was expressed in inclusion bodies at 1.47 g/L. The inclusion body was refolded with a high yield of 36%. The purified trypsinogen was then activated to produce trypsin. To address stability problems, the trypsin thus produced was acetylated. The final product was generated upon gel filtration. The final yield of acetylated trypsin was 182 mg/L from a 5-L fermenter. Our acetylated trypsin product demonstrated higher BAEE activity (30,100 BAEE unit/mg) than a commercial product (9500 BAEE unit/mg, Promega). It also demonstrated resistance to autolysis. This is the first report of production of acetylated recombinant trypsin that is stable and suitable for scale-up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.