WorldWideScience

Sample records for bovine leukemia virus

  1. Economics of bovine leukemia virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelzer, K D

    1997-03-01

    A herd infected with bovine leukemia virus suffers a direct economic loss due to clinical lymphosarcoma. A major indirect cost associated with infection is restriction of the sale of animals and germplasma to foreign markets. Reports on the economic effects of infection on production have been variable and are reviewed in this article. In order to develop cost-effective bovine leukemia virus control programs, costs associated with the disease, the cost of prevention, and expected economic returns from a program need to be considered. PMID:9071750

  2. Dynamics of perinatal bovine leukemia virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Alvarez, Irene; Merlini, Ramiro; Rondelli, Flavia; Trono, Karina

    2014-01-01

    Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is highly endemic in many countries, including Argentina. As prevention of the spread from infected animals is of primary importance in breaking the cycle of BLV transmission, it is important to know the pathophysiology of BLV infection in young animals, as they are the main source of animal movement. In this work, we determined the proviral load and antibody titers of infected newborn calves from birth to first parturition (36 months). Results All calve...

  3. Investigation of the Bovine Leukemia Virus Proviral DNA in Human Leukemias and Lung cancers in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, JeHoon; Kim, Yonggoo; Kang, Chang Suk; Cho, Dae Hyun; Shin, Dong Hwan; Yum, Young Na; Oh, Jae Ho; Kim, Sheen Hee; Hwang, Myung Sil; Lim, Chul Joo; Yang, Ki Hwa; Han, Kyungja

    2005-01-01

    The bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leucosis. This study investigated the presence of the BLV in leukemia (179 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 292 acute myeloid leukemia and 46 chronic myelogenous leukemia cases) and 162 lung cancer patients (139 adenocarcinoma, 23 squamous cell carcinoma) to determine if the BLV is a causative organism of leukemia and lung cancer in Koreans. A BLV infection was confirmed in human cells by PCR using a BLV-8 primer combinati...

  4. Vaccination against δ-retroviruses: the bovine leukemia virus paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Rodríguez, Sabrina M; de Brogniez, Alix; Gillet, Nicolas; Golime, Ramarao; Burny, Arsène; Jaworski, Juan-Pablo; Alvarez, Irene; Vagnoni, Lucas; Trono, Karina; Willems, Luc

    2014-06-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) are closely related d-retroviruses that induce hematological diseases. HTLV-1 infects about 15 million people worldwide, mainly in subtropical areas. HTLV-1 induces a wide spectrum of diseases (e.g., HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis) and leukemia/lymphoma (adult T-cell leukemia). Bovine leukemia virus is a major pathogen of cattle, causing important economic losses due to a reduction in production, export limitations and lymphoma-associated death. In the absence of satisfactory treatment for these diseases and besides the prevention of transmission, the best option to reduce the prevalence of d-retroviruses is vaccination. Here, we provide an overview of the different vaccination strategies in the BLV model and outline key parameters required for vaccine efficacy. PMID:24956179

  5. Vaccination against δ-Retroviruses: The Bovine Leukemia Virus Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerónimo Gutiérrez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bovine leukemia virus (BLV and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 are closely related d-retroviruses that induce hematological diseases. HTLV-1 infects about 15 million people worldwide, mainly in subtropical areas. HTLV-1 induces a wide spectrum of diseases (e.g., HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis and leukemia/lymphoma (adult T-cell leukemia. Bovine leukemia virus is a major pathogen of cattle, causing important economic losses due to a reduction in production, export limitations and lymphoma-associated death. In the absence of satisfactory treatment for these diseases and besides the prevention of transmission, the best option to reduce the prevalence of d-retroviruses is vaccination. Here, we provide an overview of the different vaccination strategies in the BLV model and outline key parameters required for vaccine efficacy.

  6. Investigation of the bovine leukemia virus proviral DNA in human leukemias and lung cancers in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jehoon; Kim, Yonggoo; Kang, Chang Suk; Cho, Dae Hyun; Shin, Dong Hwan; Yum, Young Na; Oh, Jae Ho; Kim, Sheen Hee; Hwang, Myung Sil; Lim, Chul Joo; Yang, Ki Hwa; Han, Kyungja

    2005-08-01

    The bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leucosis. This study investigated the presence of the BLV in leukemia (179 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 292 acute myeloid leukemia and 46 chronic myelogenous leukemia cases) and 162 lung cancer patients (139 adenocarcinoma, 23 squamous cell carcinoma) to determine if the BLV is a causative organism of leukemia and lung cancer in Koreans. A BLV infection was confirmed in human cells by PCR using a BLV-8 primer combination. All 517 cases of human leukemia and 162 lung cancer were negative for a PCR of the BLV proviral DNA. In conclusion, although meat has been imported from BLV endemic areas, the BLV infection does not appear to be the cause of human leukemia or lung cancer in Koreans. These results can be used as a control for further studies on the BLV in Koreans. PMID:16100451

  7. Seroprevalence of antibodies against bovine leukemia virus, bovine viral diarrhea virus, Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, and Neospora caninum in dairy cattle in Saskatchewan

    OpenAIRE

    Vanleeuwen, John A.; Forsythe, LeeAnn; Tiwari, Ashwani; Chartier, Renee

    2005-01-01

    Blood was drawn from 1530 dairy cows in 51 herds. For antibodies against bovine leukemia virus, Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, and Neospora caninum, 37.4%, 2.7%, and 5.6% of cows were test positive, respectively, while 29.2% of herds had unvaccinated animals with ≥ 1:64 for bovine viral diarrhea virus.

  8. Vaccination against δ−Retroviruses: The Bovine Leukemia Virus Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Rodríguez, Sabrina M.; de Brogniez, Alix; Gillet, Nicolas; Golime, Ramarao; Burny, Arsène; Jaworski, Juan-Pablo; Alvarez, Irene; Vagnoni, Lucas; Trono, Karina; Willems, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) are closely related δ-retroviruses that induce hematological diseases. HTLV-1 infects about 15 million people worldwide, mainly in subtropical areas. HTLV-1 induces a wide spectrum of diseases (e.g., HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis) and leukemia/lymphoma (adult T-cell leukemia). Bovine leukemia virus is a major pathogen of cattle, causing important economic losses due to a reduction in production, export limitations and lymphoma-associated death. In the absence of satisfactory treatment for these diseases and besides the prevention of transmission, the best option to reduce the prevalence of δ-retroviruses is vaccination. Here, we provide an overview of the different vaccination strategies in the BLV model and outline key parameters required for vaccine efficacy. PMID:24956179

  9. Fraction of bovine leukemia virus-infected dairy cattle developing enzootic bovine leukosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Sota; Hayama, Yoko; Yamamoto, Takehisa

    2016-02-01

    Enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL) is a transmissible disease caused by the bovine leukemia virus that is prevalent in cattle herds in many countries. Only a small fraction of infected animals develops clinical symptoms, such as malignant lymphosarcoma, after a long incubation period. In the present study, we aimed to determine the fraction of EBL-infected dairy cattle that develop lymphosarcoma and the length of the incubation period before clinical symptoms emerge. These parameters were determined by a mathematical modeling approach based on the maximum-likelihood estimation method, using the results of a nationwide serological survey of prevalence in cattle and passive surveillance records. The best-fit distribution to estimate the disease incubation period was determined to be the Weibull distribution, with a median and average incubation period of 7.0 years. The fraction of infected animals developing clinical disease was estimated to be 1.4% with a 95% confidence interval of 1.2-1.6%. The parameters estimated here contribute to an examination of efficient control strategies making quantitative evaluation available. PMID:26754928

  10. Delayed-onset enzootic bovine leukosis possibly caused by superinfection with bovine leukemia virus mutated in the pol gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tadaaki; Inoue, Emi; Mori, Hiroshi; Osawa, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Katsunori

    2015-08-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL), to which animals are most susceptible at 4-8 years of age. In this study, we examined tumor cells associated with EBL in an 18-year-old cow to reveal that the cells carried at least two different copies of the virus, one of which was predicted to encode a reverse transcriptase (RT) lacking ribonuclease H activity and no integrase. Such a deficient enzyme may exhibit a dominant negative effect on the wild-type RT and cause insufficient viral replication, resulting in delayed tumor development in this cow. PMID:26025155

  11. Increased bovine Tim-3 and its ligand expressions during bovine leukemia virus infection

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    Okagawa Tomohiro

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The immunoinhibitory receptor T cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain-3 (Tim-3 and its ligand, galectin-9 (Gal-9, are involved in the immune evasion mechanisms for several pathogens causing chronic infections. However, there is no report concerning the role of Tim-3 in diseases of domestic animals. In this study, cDNA encoding for bovine Tim-3 and Gal-9 were cloned and sequenced, and their expression and role in immune reactivation were analyzed in bovine leukemia virus (BLV-infected cattle. Predicted amino acid sequences of Tim-3 and Gal-9 shared high homologies with human and mouse homologues. Functional domains, including tyrosine kinase phosphorylation motif in the intracellular domain of Tim-3 were highly conserved among cattle and other species. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that bovine Tim-3 mRNA is mainly expressed in T cells such as CD4+ and CD8+ cells, while Gal-9 mRNA is mainly expressed in monocyte and T cells. Tim-3 mRNA expression in CD4+ and CD8+ cells was upregulated during disease progression of BLV infection. Interestingly, expression levels for Tim-3 and Gal-9 correlated positively with viral load in infected cattle. Furthermore, Tim-3 expression level closely correlated with up-regulation of IL-10 in infected cattle. The expression of IFN-γ and IL-2 mRNA was upregulated when PBMC from BLV-infected cattle were cultured with Cos-7 cells expressing Tim-3 to inhibit the Tim-3/Gal-9 pathway. Moreover, combined blockade of the Tim-3/Gal-9 and PD-1/PD-L1 pathways significantly promoted IFN-γ mRNA expression compared with blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway alone. These results suggest that Tim-3 is involved in the suppression of T cell function during BLV infection.

  12. Seroprevalences of antibodies against bovine leukemia virus, bovine viral diarrhea virus, Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, and Neospora caninum in beef and dairy cattle in Manitoba

    OpenAIRE

    Vanleeuwen, John A.; Tiwari, Ashwani; Plaizier, Jan C; Whiting, Terry L.

    2006-01-01

    Of 1204 dairy cows and 1425 beef cows sampled, 60.8% and 10.3% were seropositive for Bovine leukemia virus, 4.5% and 1.7% were seropositive for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, and 8.3% and 9.1% were seropositive for Neospora caninum, respectively, while 28.1% of dairy herds had unvaccinated animals with titres ≥ 1:64 for Bovine viral diarrhea virus.

  13. Cell Infectivity in Relation to Bovine Leukemia Virus gp51 and p24 in Bovine Milk Exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Shigemura, Hiroaki; ISHIGURO, Naotaka; Inoshima, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are small membranous microvesicles (40–100 nm in diameter) and are extracellularly released from a wide variety of cells. Exosomes contain microRNA, mRNA, and cellular proteins, which are delivered into recipient cells via these exosomes, and play a role in intercellular communication. In bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection of cattle, although it is thought to be a minor route of infection, BLV can be transmitted to calves via milk. Here, we investigated the association between exo...

  14. Cell Infectivity in Relation to Bovine Leukemia Virus gp51 and p24 in Bovine Milk Exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsuya Yamada; Hiroaki Shigemura; Naotaka Ishiguro; Yasuo Inoshima

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are small membranous microvesicles (40-100 nm in diameter) and are extracellularly released from a wide variety of cells. Exosomes contain microRNA, mRNA, and cellular proteins, which are delivered into recipient cells via these exosomes, and play a role in intercellular communication. In bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection of cattle, although it is thought to be a minor route of infection, BLV can be transmitted to calves via milk. Here, we investigated the association between exo...

  15. Chromatin disruption in the promoter of Bovine Leukemia Virus during transcriptional activation

    OpenAIRE

    Colin, Laurence; Dekoninck, Ann; Reichert, Michal; Calao, Miriam; Merimi, Makram; Van den Broeke, Anne; Vierendeel, Valérie; Cleuter, Yvette; Burny, Arsène; Rohr, Olivier; Van Lint, Carine

    2011-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus expression relies on its chromatin organization after integration into the host cell genome. Proviral latency, which results from transcriptional repression in vivo, represents a viral strategy to escape the host immune system and likely allows for tumor progression. Here, we discriminated two types of latency: an easily reactivable latent state of the YR2 provirus and a ‘locked’ latent state of the L267 provirus. The defective YR2 provirus was characterized by the prese...

  16. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the gp51 gene from Korean bovine leukemia virus isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eunjung; Kim, Eun-Ju; Joung, Ha-Kyung; Kim, Bo-hye; SONG, Jae-Young; Cho, In-Soo; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Shin, Yeun-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Background Bovine Leukemia virus (BLV) infection of cattle has been reported in Korea for more than three decades. However, to date, there have been few studies regarding Korean BLV since 1980s. Thus, the purpose of this study is to perform a diagnosis and molecular characterization of BLV strains circulating in Korea and to estimate genetic diversity of different genotypes of BLV. Method To investigate the distribution of BLV variants in the world and assess the evolutionary history of Korea...

  17. Epidemiology, infection dynamics and effective control of Bovine Leukemia virus within dairy herds of Argentina: a quantitative approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monti, G.E.

    2005-01-01

    Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV) is a retrovirus that causes lymphomas (leucosis) and other disorders in cattle and it has a large economical impact on the livestock sector of many countries around the world. BovineShort communication: Relationship between the level of bovine leukemia virus antibody and provirus in blood and milk of cows from a naturally infected herd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Juan P; Porta, Natalia G; Gutierrez, Geronimo; Politzki, Romina P; Álvarez, Irene; Galarza, Roxana; Abdala, Alejandro; Calvinho, Luis; Trono, Karina G

    2016-07-01

    We explored the relationship between the level of bovine leukemia virus antibodies and provirus load during natural infection. For that purpose, a set of 50 blood and milk paired samples were analyzed for the presence of bovine leukemia virus provirus and antibodies. Additionally, provirus load and antibody titers were measured and the relationship between these variables was investigated. Bovine leukemia provirus was detected in 59% of milk samples and a negative correlation was observed between the level of milk provirus load and milk antibody titers. By the consumption of raw milk, calves might be exposed to bovine leukemia virus favoring the perinatal transmission of this disease. PMID:27132093

  18. Preventive and therapeutic strategies for bovine leukemia virus: lessons for HTLV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Sabrina M; Florins, Arnaud; Gillet, Nicolas; de Brogniez, Alix; Sánchez-Alcaraz, María Teresa; Boxus, Mathieu; Boulanger, Fanny; Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Trono, Karina; Alvarez, Irene; Vagnoni, Lucas; Willems, Luc

    2011-07-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is a retrovirus closely related to the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). BLV is a major animal health problem worldwide causing important economic losses. A series of attempts were developed to reduce prevalence, chiefly by eradication of infected cattle, segregation of BLV-free animals and vaccination. Although having been instrumental in regions such as the EU, these strategies were unsuccessful elsewhere mainly due to economic costs, management restrictions and lack of an efficient vaccine. This review, which summarizes the different attempts previously developed to decrease seroprevalence of BLV, may be informative for management of HTLV-1 infection. We also propose a new approach based on competitive infection with virus deletants aiming at reducing proviral loads. PMID:21994777

  19. Preventive and Therapeutic Strategies for Bovine Leukemia Virus: Lessons for HTLV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Vagnoni

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Bovine leukemia virus (BLV is a retrovirus closely related to the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1. BLV is a major animal health problem worldwide causing important economic losses. A series of attempts were developed to reduce prevalence, chiefly by eradication of infected cattle, segregation of BLV-free animals and vaccination. Although having been instrumental in regions such as the EU, these strategies were unsuccessful elsewhere mainly due to economic costs, management restrictions and lack of an efficient vaccine. This review, which summarizes the different attempts previously developed to decrease seroprevalence of BLV, may be informative for management of HTLV-1 infection. We also propose a new approach based on competitive infection with virus deletants aiming at reducing proviral loads.

  1. Preventive and Therapeutic Strategies for Bovine Leukemia Virus: Lessons for HTLV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Sabrina M.; Florins, Arnaud; Gillet, Nicolas; de Brogniez, Alix; Sánchez-Alcaraz, María Teresa; Boxus, Mathieu; Boulanger, Fanny; Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Trono, Karina; Alvarez, Irene; Vagnoni, Lucas; Willems, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is a retrovirus closely related to the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). BLV is a major animal health problem worldwide causing important economic losses. A series of attempts were developed to reduce prevalence, chiefly by eradication of infected cattle, segregation of BLV-free animals and vaccination. Although having been instrumental in regions such as the EU, these strategies were unsuccessful elsewhere mainly due to economic costs, management restrictions and lack of an efficient vaccine. This review, which summarizes the different attempts previously developed to decrease seroprevalence of BLV, may be informative for management of HTLV-1 infection. We also propose a new approach based on competitive infection with virus deletants aiming at reducing proviral loads. PMID:21994777

  2. Using a Herd Profile to Determine Age-Specific Prevalence of Bovine Leukemia Virus in Michigan Dairy Herds

    OpenAIRE

    Catherine Febvay; Chelsea L. Render; Byrem, Todd M.; Bartlett, Paul C.; Erskine, Ronald J.; Jessica T. Houseman

    2012-01-01

    Enzootic bovine leukosis is a contagious disease of cattle caused by the retrovirus, bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and is the most common cause of malignant neoplasm in cattle. In order to facilitate surveillance of this disease in dairy herds, we developed a method to combine ELISA of milk collected during routine production testing with a prescribed sampling of cows that is independent of the proportion of cows within each lactation. In 113 Michigan dairy herds, milk samples from ten cows in ...

  3. Risk factors associated with within-herd transmission of bovine leukemia virus on dairy farms in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Konishi Misako; Kameyama Ken-ichiro; Hayama Yoko; Yamamoto Takehisa; Tsutsui Toshiyuki; Kobayashi Sota; Murakami Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Although several attempts have been made to control enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) at the local level, a nationwide control program has not been implemented in Japan, except for passive surveillance. Effective control of EBL requires that the transmission routes of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection should be identified and intercepted based on scientific evidence. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the risk factors associated with within-herd transmission of BL...

  4. Genome-wide association study for host response to bovine leukemia virus in Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brym, P; Bojarojć-Nosowicz, B; Oleński, K; Hering, D M; Ruść, A; Kaczmarczyk, E; Kamiński, S

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms of leukemogenesis induced by bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and the processes underlying the phenomenon of differential host response to BLV infection still remain poorly understood. The aim of the study was to screen the entire cattle genome to identify markers and candidate genes that might be involved in host response to bovine leukemia virus infection. A genome-wide association study was performed using Holstein cows naturally infected by BLV. A data set included 43 cows (BLV positive) and 30 cows (BLV negative) genotyped for 54,609 SNP markers (Illumina Bovine SNP50 BeadChip). The BLV status of cows was determined by serum ELISA, nested-PCR and hematological counts. Linear Regression Analysis with a False Discovery Rate and kinship matrix (computed on the autosomal SNPs) was calculated to find out which SNP markers significantly differentiate BLV-positive and BLV-negative cows. Nine markers reached genome-wide significance. The most significant SNPs were located on chromosomes 23 (rs41583098), 3 (rs109405425, rs110785500) and 8 (rs43564499) in close vicinity of a patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 1 (PNPLA1); adaptor-related protein complex 4, beta 1 subunit (AP4B1); tripartite motif-containing 45 (TRIM45) and cell division cycle associated 2 (CDCA2) genes, respectively. Furthermore, a list of 41 candidate genes was composed based on their proximity to significant markers (within a distance of ca. 1 Mb) and functional involvement in processes potentially underlying BLV-induced pathogenesis. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that host response to BLV infection involves nine sub-regions of the cattle genome (represented by 9 SNP markers), containing many genes which, based on the literature, could be involved to enzootic bovine leukemia progression. New group of promising candidate genes associated with the host response to BLV infection were identified and could therefore be a target for future studies. The functions of candidate genes

  5. Characterization of novel Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV) antisense transcripts by deep sequencing reveals constitutive expression in tumors and transcriptional interaction with viral microRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Durkin, Keith; Rosewick, Nicolas; Artesi, Maria; Hahaut, Vincent; Griebel, Philip; Arsic, Natasa; Burny, Arsène; Georges, Michel; Van den Broeke, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV) is a deltaretrovirus closely related to the Human T cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1). Cattle are the natural host of BLV where it integrates into B-cells, producing a lifelong infection. Most infected animals remain asymptomatic but following a protracted latency period about 5 % develop an aggressive leukemia/lymphoma, mirroring the disease trajectory of HTLV-1. The mechanisms by which these viruses provoke cellular transformation remain opaque. In both v...

  6. Milk and fat yields decline in bovine leukemia virus-infected Holstein cattle with persistent lymphocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da, Y; Shanks, R D; Stewart, J A; Lewin, H A

    1993-07-15

    Effects of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection on milk and fat yields were studied by using data collected from Holstein cows over a 6-year period. Milk and fat yields in BLV-infected cows with persistent lymphocytosis (PL) declined significantly relative to their BLV-infected non-PL herdmates. Declines were most pronounced in cows older than 6 years. The estimated loss to the dairy industry due to PL is more than $42 million annually. A major histocompatibility complex class I (BoLA-A) allele that has been previously associated with resistance to PL was associated with longevity and realization of milk production potentials, indicating that genetic resistance to PL will have an economic benefit in herds where BLV is endemic. PMID:8341665

  7. Detection of monoclonal integration of bovine leukemia virus proviral DNA as a malignant marker in two enzootic bovine leukosis cases with difficult clinical diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    MIURA, Saori; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; MATSUMOTO, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro; INOKUMA, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal integration of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) proviral DNA into bovine genomes was detected in peripheral blood from two clinical cases of enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) without enlargement of superficial lymph nodes. A BLV-specific probe hybridized with 1 to 3 EcoRI and HindIII fragments in these 2 atypical EBL cattle by Southern blotting and hybridization, as well as in 3 typical EBL cattle. The probe also hybridized to a large number of EcoRI and HindIII fragments in 5 cattle with ...

  8. L233P mutation of the Tax protein strongly correlated with leukemogenicity of bovine leukemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Emi; Matsumura, Keiko; Soma, Norihiko; Hirasawa, Shintaro; Wakimoto, Mayuko; Arakaki, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Osawa, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Katsunori

    2013-12-27

    The bovine leukemia virus (BLV) Tax protein is believed to play a crucial role in leukemogenesis by the virus. BLV usually causes asymptomatic infections in cattle, but only one-third develop persistent lymphocytosis that rarely progress after a long incubation period to lymphoid tumors, namely enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL). In the present study, we demonstrated that the BLV tax genes could be divided into two alleles and developed multiplex PCR detecting an L233P mutation of the Tax protein. Then, in order to define the relationship between the Tax protein and leukemogenicity, we examined 360 tumor samples randomly collected from dairy or breeding cattle in Japan, of which Tax proteins were categorized, for age at the time of diagnosis of EBL. The ages of 288 animals (80.0%) associated with L233-Tax and those of 70 animals (19.4%) with P233-Tax individually followed log-normal distributions. Only the two earliest cases (0.6%) with L233-Tax disobeyed the log-normal distribution. These findings suggest that the animals affected by EBL were infected with the virus at a particular point in life, probably less than a few months after birth. Median age of those with P233-Tax was 22 months older than that with L233-Tax and geometric means exhibited a significant difference (P<0.01). It is also quite unlikely that viruses carrying the particular Tax protein infect older cattle. Here, we conclude that BLV could be divided into two categories on the basis of amino acid at position 233 of the Tax protein, which strongly correlated with leukemogenicity. PMID:24139177

  9. Bovine leukemia virus nucleocapsid protein is an efficient nucleic acid chaperone

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    Qualley, Dominic F., E-mail: dqualley@berry.edu; Sokolove, Victoria L.; Ross, James L.

    2015-03-13

    Nucleocapsid proteins (NCs) direct the rearrangement of nucleic acids to form the most thermodynamically stable structure, and facilitate many steps throughout the life cycle of retroviruses. NCs bind strongly to nucleic acids (NAs) and promote NA aggregation by virtue of their cationic nature; they also destabilize the NA duplex via highly structured zinc-binding motifs. Thus, they are considered to be NA chaperones. While most retroviral NCs are structurally similar, differences are observed both within and between retroviral genera. In this work, we compare the NA binding and chaperone activity of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) NC to that of two other retroviral NCs: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC, which is structurally similar to BLV NC but from a different retrovirus genus, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC, which possesses several key structural differences from BLV NC but is from the same genus. Our data show that BLV and HIV-1 NCs bind to NAs with stronger affinity in relation to HTLV-1 NC, and that they also accelerate the annealing of complementary stem-loop structures to a greater extent. Analysis of kinetic parameters derived from the annealing data suggests that while all three NCs stimulate annealing by a two-step mechanism as previously reported, the relative contributions of each step to the overall annealing equilibrium are conserved between BLV and HIV-1 NCs but are different for HTLV-1 NC. It is concluded that while BLV and HTLV-1 belong to the same genus of retroviruses, processes that rely on NC may not be directly comparable. - Highlights: • BLV NC binds strongly to DNA and RNA. • BLV NC promotes mini-TAR annealing as well as HIV-1 NC. • Annealing kinetics suggest a low degree of similarity between BLV NC and HTLV-1 NC.

  10. Bovine leukemia virus nucleocapsid protein is an efficient nucleic acid chaperone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleocapsid proteins (NCs) direct the rearrangement of nucleic acids to form the most thermodynamically stable structure, and facilitate many steps throughout the life cycle of retroviruses. NCs bind strongly to nucleic acids (NAs) and promote NA aggregation by virtue of their cationic nature; they also destabilize the NA duplex via highly structured zinc-binding motifs. Thus, they are considered to be NA chaperones. While most retroviral NCs are structurally similar, differences are observed both within and between retroviral genera. In this work, we compare the NA binding and chaperone activity of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) NC to that of two other retroviral NCs: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC, which is structurally similar to BLV NC but from a different retrovirus genus, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC, which possesses several key structural differences from BLV NC but is from the same genus. Our data show that BLV and HIV-1 NCs bind to NAs with stronger affinity in relation to HTLV-1 NC, and that they also accelerate the annealing of complementary stem-loop structures to a greater extent. Analysis of kinetic parameters derived from the annealing data suggests that while all three NCs stimulate annealing by a two-step mechanism as previously reported, the relative contributions of each step to the overall annealing equilibrium are conserved between BLV and HIV-1 NCs but are different for HTLV-1 NC. It is concluded that while BLV and HTLV-1 belong to the same genus of retroviruses, processes that rely on NC may not be directly comparable. - Highlights: • BLV NC binds strongly to DNA and RNA. • BLV NC promotes mini-TAR annealing as well as HIV-1 NC. • Annealing kinetics suggest a low degree of similarity between BLV NC and HTLV-1 NC

  11. Serological and molecular detection of bovine leukemia virus in cattle in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudhair, Yahia Ismail; Hasso, Saleem Amin; Yaseen, Nahi Y; Al-Shammari, Ahmed Majeed

    2016-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is highly endemic in many countries, including Iraq, and it impacts the beef and dairy industries. The current study sought to determine the percentage of BLV infection and persistent lymphocytosis (PL) in cattle in central Iraq. Hematological, serological, and molecular observations in cross breeds and local breeds of Iraqi cattle naturally infected with BLV were conducted in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 400 cattle (340 cross breed and 60 local breed) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). On the basis of the absolute number of lymphocytes, five of the 31 positive PCR cases had PL. Among these leukemic cattle, one case exhibited overt neutrophilia. Serum samples were used to detect BLV antibodies, which were observed in 28 (7%) samples. PCR detected BLV provirus in 31 samples (7.75%). All 28 of the seropositive samples and the 3 seronegative samples were positive using PCR. Associations were observed between bovine leukosis and cattle breed, age and sex. Age-specific analysis showed that the BLV percentage increased with age in both breeds. Female cattle (29 animals; 7.34%) exhibited significantly higher infectivity than male cattle (two animals; 4.34%). In conclusion, comprehensive screening for all affected animals is needed in Iraq; programs that segregate cattle can be an effective and important method to control and/or eliminate the BLV. PMID:27273225

  12. Seroprevalence of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection in dairy cattle in Isfahan Province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morovati, Hassan; Shirvani, Edris; Noaman, Vahid; Lotfi, Mohsen; Kamalzadeh, Morteza; Hatami, Alireza; Bahreyari, Masoume; Shahramyar, Zahra; Morovati, Mohammad H; Azimi, Mahmoud; Sakhaei, Davoud

    2012-08-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), the causative agent of enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) is an exogenous C-type oncovirus in the Retroviridae family. It causes significant economic losses associated with the costs of control and eradication programs due to carcass condemnation at slaughter and restrictions of export of cattle and semen to importing countries. The main objective of this research was to determine the seroprevalence of BLV infection in cattle herds in central region of Iran (Isfahan province) using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect serum antibodies against BLV. Samples of blood serum were collected from 403 female dairy cattle (Holstein-Friesian) from 21 livestock farms and 303 animals (81.9%) were BLV seropositive. A significant association was found between age as a potential risk factor and BVL seroprevalence with animals ≥ 4 years (86.6%) having a significantly (χ(2) = 35.6, p 0.1). It is concluded that BLV infection is a very common problem in the study area. Hence, control measures should be instituted to combat the disease and further studies are required to investigate the impact of this disease on dairy production in the country. PMID:22210288

  13. Interaction between Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection and age on telomerase misregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmatzadeh, Farhid; Keyvanfar, Hadi; Hasan, Noor Haliza; Niap, Faustina; Bani Hassan, Ebrahim; Hematzade, Azar; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; McWhorter, Andrea; Ignjatovic, Jagoda

    2015-06-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL). BLV can interact with telomerase and inhibits telomere shortening, contributing in leukemogenesis and tumour induction. The role of telomerase in BLV-induced lymphosarcoma and aging has been extensively studied. To date, the interaction of both BLV and aging on telomerase mis-regulation have, however, not been investigated. In the present study, telomerase activity in BLV positive and negative cows was compared over a wide range of ages (11-85 months). Lymphocyte counts were also measured in both BLV positive and negative groups. Telomerase activity was detected in all BLV infected animals with persistent lymphocytosis (PL), especially in older individuals. This study revealed that the cells undergo the natural telomerase shortening even in the presence of an existing viral infection. We also show that viral infection, especially during the PL phase of the disease, increases telomerase activity. A statistically significant interaction between age and viral infection was observed for telomere shortening during BLV infection. Older animals with BLV infection, especially those with persistent lymphocytosis or visible tumors, exhibited a sharp increase in telomerase activity. This study demonstrates that there is a significant interaction between BLV infection and telomerase up-regulation and lymphocytosis. PMID:25665900

  14. Application of a sepharose bead immunofluorescence assay and a solid-phase radioimmunoassay to the bovine leukemia virus system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several fluorescence assays with bovine leukemia virus (BLV) conjugated to activated Sepharose 4B were used for the detection of BLV and anti-BLV antibodies. These tests were compared with a solid-phase radioimmunoassay and found to be in the same sensitivity range. Sepharose bead immunofluorescence assay and solid-phase radioimmunoassay can be applied to the diagnosis of BLV infection in cattle. (author)

  15. Novel CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell epitopes in bovine leukemia virus with cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lanlan; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Isogai, Emiko; Kohara, Junko; Aida, Yoko

    2015-12-16

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis and is closely related to human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) plays a key role in suppressing the progression of disease caused by BLV. T and B cell epitopes in BLV have been studied, but CD8(+) CTL epitopes remain poorly understood. We used a library of 115 synthetic peptides covering the entirety of the Env proteins (gp51 and gp30), the Gag proteins (p15, p24, and p12), and the Tax protein of BLV to identify 11 novel CD8(+) T cell epitopes (gp51N5, gp51N11, gp51N12, gp30N5, gp30N6, gp30N8, gp30N16, tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20) in four calves experimentally infected with BLV. The number of CD8(+) T cell epitopes that could be identified in each calf correlated with the BLV proviral load. Interestingly, among the 11 epitopes identified, only gp51N11 was capable of inducing CD8(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxicity in all four calves, but it is not a suitable vaccine target because it shows a high degree of polymorphism according to the Wu-Kabat variability index. By contrast, no CTL epitopes were identified from the Gag structural protein. In addition, several epitopes were obtained from gp30 and Tax, indicating that cellular immunity against BLV is strongly targeted to these proteins. CD8(+) CTL epitopes from gp30 and Tax were less polymorphic than epitopes from. Indeed, peptides tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20 include a leucine-rich activation domain that encompasses a transcriptional activation domain, and the gp30N16 peptide contains a proline-rich region that interacts with a protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP1 to regulate B cell activation. Moreover, at least one CD8(+) CTL epitope derived from gp30 was identified in each of the four calves. These results indicate that BLV gp30 may be the best candidate for the development of a BLV vaccine. PMID:26552001

  16. Fusogenic segments of bovine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus are interchangeable and mediate fusion by means of oblique insertion in the lipid bilayer of their target cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Vonèche, V; Portetelle, D; Kettmann, R; Willems, L; Limbach, K.; E. Paoletti; Ruysschaert, J M; Burny, A; Brasseur, R.

    1992-01-01

    Modified bovine leukemia virus (BLV) glycoproteins were expressed by using vaccinia virus recombinants, and their fusogenic capacities were examined by a syncytia-formation assay. This analysis indicates that (i) both BLV envelope glycoproteins gp51 and gp30 are necessary for cell fusion; (ii) insertion of the N-terminal segment of gp30 (fusion peptide) into the lipid bilayer in an oblique orientation, as predicted by computer conformational analysis, results in fusogenic capacities higher th...

  17. Iron and Ferritin Levels in the Serum and Milk of Bovine Leukemia Virus-Infected Dairy Cows

    OpenAIRE

    Schnell, Star A.; Ohtsuka, Hiromichi; Kakinuma, Seiichi; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Orino, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Iron metabolism was examined in 15 bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected dairy cows (2.6–7.8 years old). BLV infection was detected by measuring serum antibody titer against BLV virus antigen (gp51). The anti-BLV antibody titers of the BLV-infected cows were significantly higher in serum than in milk; a single serum-positive animal lacked detectable anti-BLV antibodies in its milk. Iron and ferritin concentrations also were significantly higher in serum than in milk. Although most of the BLV-i...

  18. Detection and molecular characterization of bovine leukemia virus in Philippine cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Meripet; Ohno, Ayumu; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Kim, Jiyun; Kikuya, Mari; Matsumoto, Yuki; Mingala, Claro Niegos; Onuma, Misao; Aida, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the etiological agent of enzootic bovine leukosis, which is the most common neoplastic disease of cattle. BLV infects cattle worldwide, imposing a severe economic impact on the dairy cattle industry. However, there are no comprehensive studies on the distribution of BLV in the Philippines, and the genetic characteristics of Philippine BLV strains are unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to detect BLV infections in the Philippines and determined their genetic variability. Blood samples were obtained from 1116 cattle from different farms on five Philippine islands, and BLV provirus was detected by BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2 and nested PCR targeting BLV long terminal repeats. Out of 1116 samples, 108 (9.7 %) and 54 (4.8 %) were positive for BLV provirus, as determined by BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2 and nested PCR, respectively. Of the five islands, Luzon Island showed the highest prevalence of BLV infection (23.1 %). Partial env gp51 genes from 43 samples, which were positive for BLV provirus by both methods, were sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. Phylogenetic analysis based on a 423-bp fragment of the env gene revealed that Philippine BLV strains clustered into either genotype 1 or genotype 6. Substitutions were mainly found in antigenic determinants, such as the CD4(+) T-cell epitope, the CD8(+) T-cell epitope, the second neutralizing domain, B and E epitopes, and these substitutions varied according to genotype. This study provides comprehensive information regarding BLV infection levels in the Philippines and documents the presence of two BLV genotypes, genotypes 1 and 6, in this population. PMID:25399399

  19. Detection of bovine leukemia virus in cattle by the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtaugh, M P; Lin, G F; Haggard, D L; Weber, A F; Meiske, J C

    1991-06-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is widely distributed in U.S. cattle herds. It infects B lymphocytes and causes neoplastic disease in 5-10% of infected animals. Direct economic losses are incurred as a result of death, reduced milk production and condemnation at slaughter. Thus the identification of cattle infected with BLV is of significant concern to the U.S. cattle industry. For this reason, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was used to examine seropositive and seronegative cattle for the presence of BLV DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Using an amplification protocol able to detect 1 viral genome in 100,000 cells, BLV was not detected in 7 seronegative cattle in an infected herd. BLV sequences were detected in 13 of 18 seropositive animals with various levels of infection as determined by in vitro lymphocyte culture and electron microscopy. An active infection was demonstrated in one animal, based on the presence of viral RNA. These findings indicate that PCR is a sensitive method for the detection of BLV in cattle and provides new information regarding the dynamics of the infection. PMID:1658030

  20. Determinants of the Bovine Leukemia Virus Envelope Glycoproteins Involved in Infectivity, Replication and Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brogniez, Alix; Mast, Jan; Willems, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of viral envelope proteins with host cell membranes has been extensively investigated in a number of systems. However, the biological relevance of these interactions in vivo has been hampered by the absence of adequate animal models. Reverse genetics using the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) genome highlighted important functional domains of the envelope protein involved in the viral life cycle. For example, immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAM) of the envelope transmembrane protein (TM) are essential determinants of infection. Although cell fusion directed by the aminoterminal end of TM is postulated to be essential, some proviruses expressing fusion-deficient envelope proteins unexpectedly replicate at wild-type levels. Surprisingly also, a conserved N-linked glycosylation site of the extracellular envelope protein (SU) inhibits cell-to-cell transmission suggesting that infectious potential has been limited during evolution. In this review, we summarize the knowledge pertaining to the BLV envelope protein in the context of viral infection, replication and pathogenesis. PMID:27023592

  1. Determinants of the Bovine Leukemia Virus Envelope Glycoproteins Involved in Infectivity, Replication and Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alix de Brogniez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of viral envelope proteins with host cell membranes has been extensively investigated in a number of systems. However, the biological relevance of these interactions in vivo has been hampered by the absence of adequate animal models. Reverse genetics using the bovine leukemia virus (BLV genome highlighted important functional domains of the envelope protein involved in the viral life cycle. For example, immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAM of the envelope transmembrane protein (TM are essential determinants of infection. Although cell fusion directed by the aminoterminal end of TM is postulated to be essential, some proviruses expressing fusion-deficient envelope proteins unexpectedly replicate at wild-type levels. Surprisingly also, a conserved N-linked glycosylation site of the extracellular envelope protein (SU inhibits cell-to-cell transmission suggesting that infectious potential has been limited during evolution. In this review, we summarize the knowledge pertaining to the BLV envelope protein in the context of viral infection, replication and pathogenesis.

  2. Evaluating enzootic bovine leukemia virus infection by means of molecular probe compared with the results of serological tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present studies were aimed at determining the relation between the finding obtained by means of serological tests and the specific molecular probe. Serological tests were performed according to the methods recommended by the Polish Ministry of Agriculture; ELISA was run with ''Bioveta'' and ''Rhone Merieux'' kits and the AGID test was performed with EBL antigen made in our laboratory. The molecular probe was prepared from the previously cloned provirus DNA of EBL virus. The EBL provirus was detected in 28 samples taken from 44 randomly selected cows in three herds on which a leukemia eradication programme was in process. Three sera out of 28 positive reacting animals were negative in AGID test and only one serum in ELISA. The results indicate that the use of a specific molecular probe has some advantages in the diagnosis of latent virus infections. Besides, it can be applied in the studies on the pathogenesis of enzootic bovine leukemia. (author). 13 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  3. Detection of monoclonal integration of bovine leukemia virus proviral DNA as a malignant marker in two enzootic bovine leukosis cases with difficult clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Saori; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2015-07-01

    Monoclonal integration of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) proviral DNA into bovine genomes was detected in peripheral blood from two clinical cases of enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) without enlargement of superficial lymph nodes. A BLV-specific probe hybridized with 1 to 3 EcoRI and HindIII fragments in these 2 atypical EBL cattle by Southern blotting and hybridization, as well as in 3 typical EBL cattle. The probe also hybridized to a large number of EcoRI and HindIII fragments in 5 cattle with persistent leukosis. These results suggest that the detection of monoclonal integration of BLV provirus into the host genome may serve as a marker of monoclonal proliferation and malignancy in difficult to diagnose EBL cattle. PMID:25766769

  4. Using a Herd Profile to Determine Age-Specific Prevalence of Bovine Leukemia Virus in Michigan Dairy Herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald J. Erskine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzootic bovine leukosis is a contagious disease of cattle caused by the retrovirus, bovine leukemia virus (BLV and is the most common cause of malignant neoplasm in cattle. In order to facilitate surveillance of this disease in dairy herds, we developed a method to combine ELISA of milk collected during routine production testing with a prescribed sampling of cows that is independent of the proportion of cows within each lactation. In 113 Michigan dairy herds, milk samples from ten cows in each of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and ≥4th lactations were analyzed for anti-Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV antibodies by milk ELISA. For each herd, a BLV herd profile (BHP was calculated as the simple average of the percent of BLV-positive cows within each of the four lactation groups. The mean BHP for all herds was 32.8%, with means of 18.5, 28.8, 39.2, and 44.8% of 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and ≥4th lactation animals infected, respectively. In eight herds, we determined the correlation between the BHP, and true herd prevalence by testing the entire lactating herd (r=0.988,  P<0.0001. The BHP allows discrimination of lactation-specific BLV prevalence within a dairy herd, to help identify risk factors and management plans that may be important in transmission of BLV.

  5. Using a Herd Profile to Determine Age-Specific Prevalence of Bovine Leukemia Virus in Michigan Dairy Herds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erskine, Ronald J.; Bartlett, Paul C.; Byrem, Todd M.; Render, Chelsea L.; Febvay, Catherine; Houseman, Jessica T.

    2012-01-01

    Enzootic bovine leukosis is a contagious disease of cattle caused by the retrovirus, bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and is the most common cause of malignant neoplasm in cattle. In order to facilitate surveillance of this disease in dairy herds, we developed a method to combine ELISA of milk collected during routine production testing with a prescribed sampling of cows that is independent of the proportion of cows within each lactation. In 113 Michigan dairy herds, milk samples from ten cows in each of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and ≥4th lactations were analyzed for anti-Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV) antibodies by milk ELISA. For each herd, a BLV herd profile (BHP) was calculated as the simple average of the percent of BLV-positive cows within each of the four lactation groups. The mean BHP for all herds was 32.8%, with means of 18.5, 28.8, 39.2, and 44.8% of 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and ≥4th lactation animals infected, respectively. In eight herds, we determined the correlation between the BHP, and true herd prevalence by testing the entire lactating herd (r = 0.988, P < 0.0001). The BHP allows discrimination of lactation-specific BLV prevalence within a dairy herd, to help identify risk factors and management plans that may be important in transmission of BLV. PMID:22577607

  6. Carryover of bovine leukemia virus antibodies in samples from shared milk meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouei, O A; Sanchez, J; Keefe, G P

    2015-08-01

    Screening for infectious diseases of cattle using milk from the dairy herd improvement (DHI) sampling process is very convenient. However, when samples from shared milk meters are used, carryover of antibodies or other diagnostic targets can complicate the interpretation of the diagnostic test results for diseases, including bovine leukosis. The objectives of this study were (1) to assess the potential for carryover of antibodies against bovine leukemia virus (BLV) in milk samples obtained from shared meters, and (2) to determine if adjustment of the diagnostic test cut-off value would improve the test characteristics for meter-collected milk ELISA results. Eight dairy farms were randomly selected from herds with a wide range of BLV prevalence levels in Prince Edward Island, Canada. Within each chosen farm, 2 to 4milk meters were randomly selected. During the routine procedures of DHI sampling, 2 simultaneous milk samples, 1 hand-collected at the beginning of milking (after udder preparation) and the other from the corresponding milk meter, were taken from all lactating cows (n=236) that were milked at the selected meters (n=26). The sequence of cows using each meter was recorded. All samples were tested for BLV antibodies using a commercial indirect ELISA. Antibody carryover potential was assessed in meter-collected samples which were preceded by other cows using the same meters. Applying the hand-collected sample results as our reference standard, a new cut-off was defined for meter-collected samples to optimize the test characteristics. At the standard cut-off value of the diagnostic test, 110 (46.6%) of the hand-collected and 136 (57.6%) of the meter-collected samples were positive. For low-titer cows (e.g., true negatives), the likelihood of antibody carryover significantly increased as the titer of preceding cows increased, whereas this change was not substantial for high-titer cows. The odds of obtaining false diagnoses in meter-positive samples became

  7. Herd-level risk factors for infection with bovine leukemia virus in Canadian dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouei, Omid; VanLeeuwen, John; Sanchez, Javier; Kelton, David; Tiwari, Ashwani; Keefe, Greg

    2015-05-01

    Enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) is an economically important infection of dairy cattle worldwide, which is caused by bovine leukemia virus (BLV). The prevalence of infection in Canadian dairy herds is high and continues to increase; however, there has not been a national program to control BLV. This cross-sectional study was conducted to identify potentially important risk factors for BLV infection on Canadian dairy herds, which is a prerequisite to developing an effective control program. During 1998-2003, based on a stratified two-stage random sampling process, 315 dairy farms from seven provinces of Canada were selected. Within each farm, 9-45 cows were bled and tested with a commercial serum ELISA kit for BLV antibodies. A comprehensive questionnaire, targeting potentially important herd-level management indicators, was successfully administered in 272 herds. A zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB) regression model was fit to the resulting data to assess the potential associations between BLV seropositivity and a variety of herd-level factors. Seventy-eight percent of the herds were identified as BLV-positive (had one or more test positive animals). In the negative-binomial part of the final ZINB model, herds with clinical cases of leukosis during the 12 months prior to sampling, as well as herds which purchased animals with unknown BLV infection status in the last five years, had a significantly larger proportion of BLV positive animals. Based on a significant interaction between two of the risk factors, changing gloves between cows during pregnancy examination was not statistically associated with lower proportion of infected cows compared with not changing gloves, in the western Canadian provinces. In the logistic part of the model, herds from eastern Canadian provinces and those not purchasing cows in the last five years had increased odds of being free from BLV. The high prevalence of infection across Canada should be addressed through the development and

  8. Direct polymerase chain reaction from blood and tissue samples for rapid diagnosis of bovine leukemia virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimori, Asami; Konnai, Satoru; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Nakahara, Ayako; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection induces bovine leukemia in cattle and causes significant financial harm to farmers and farm management. There is no effective therapy or vaccine; thus, the diagnosis and elimination of BLV-infected cattle are the most effective method to eradicate the infection. Clinical veterinarians need a simpler and more rapid method of diagnosing infection, because both nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR are labor intensive, time-consuming, and require specialized molecular biology techniques and expensive equipment. In this study, we describe a novel PCR method for amplifying the BLV provirus from whole blood, thus eliminating the need for DNA extraction. Although the sensitivity of PCR directly from whole blood (PCR-DB) samples as measured in bovine blood containing BLV-infected cell lines was lower than that of nested PCR, the PCR-DB technique showed high specificity and reproducibility. Among 225 clinical samples, 49 samples were positive by nested PCR, and 37 samples were positive by PCR-DB. There were no false positive samples; thus, PCR-DB sensitivity and specificity were 75.51% and 100%, respectively. However, the provirus loads of the samples detected by nested PCR and not PCR-DB were quite low. Moreover, PCR-DB also stably amplified the BLV provirus from tumor tissue samples. PCR-DB method exhibited good reproducibility and excellent specificity and is suitable for screening of thousands of cattle, thus serving as a viable alternative to nested PCR and real-time PCR. PMID:26911373

  9. Direct polymerase chain reaction from blood and tissue samples for rapid diagnosis of bovine leukemia virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    NISHIMORI, Asami; KONNAI, Satoru; IKEBUCHI, Ryoyo; OKAGAWA, Tomohiro; NAKAHARA, Ayako; MURATA, Shiro; OHASHI, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection induces bovine leukemia in cattle and causes significant financial harm to farmers and farm management. There is no effective therapy or vaccine; thus, the diagnosis and elimination of BLV-infected cattle are the most effective method to eradicate the infection. Clinical veterinarians need a simpler and more rapid method of diagnosing infection, because both nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR are labor intensive, time-consuming, and require specialized molecular biology techniques and expensive equipment. In this study, we describe a novel PCR method for amplifying the BLV provirus from whole blood, thus eliminating the need for DNA extraction. Although the sensitivity of PCR directly from whole blood (PCR-DB) samples as measured in bovine blood containing BLV-infected cell lines was lower than that of nested PCR, the PCR-DB technique showed high specificity and reproducibility. Among 225 clinical samples, 49 samples were positive by nested PCR, and 37 samples were positive by PCR-DB. There were no false positive samples; thus, PCR-DB sensitivity and specificity were 75.51% and 100%, respectively. However, the provirus loads of the samples detected by nested PCR and not PCR-DB were quite low. Moreover, PCR-DB also stably amplified the BLV provirus from tumor tissue samples. PCR-DB method exhibited good reproducibility and excellent specificity and is suitable for screening of thousands of cattle, thus serving as a viable alternative to nested PCR and real-time PCR. PMID:26911373

  10. Bovine Leukemia Virus Small Noncoding RNAs Are Functional Elements That Regulate Replication and Contribute to Oncogenesis In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaidia, Malik; de Brogniez, Alix; Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Renotte, Nathalie; Reichert, Michal; Trono, Karina; Willems, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses are not expected to encode miRNAs because of the potential problem of self-cleavage of their genomic RNAs. This assumption has recently been challenged by experiments showing that bovine leukemia virus (BLV) encodes miRNAs from intragenomic Pol III promoters. The BLV miRNAs are abundantly expressed in B-cell tumors in the absence of significant levels of genomic and subgenomic viral RNAs. Using deep RNA sequencing and functional reporter assays, we show that miRNAs mediate the expression of genes involved in cell signaling, cancer and immunity. We further demonstrate that BLV miRNAs are essential to induce B-cell tumors in an experimental model and to promote efficient viral replication in the natural host. PMID:27123579

  11. Production, Characterization, and Use of Monoclonal Antibodies Against gp51 Protein to Diagnose Bovine Leukemia Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiano, Ludmilla D C; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Agottani, Jorge V B; Brodzinski, Josiane; Penha, Tania R; Ozaki, Silvia C

    2013-02-01

    Enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) is a retroviral infection that causes persistent lymphocytosis and lymphosarcoma in cattle. The economic importance of infection by bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is due to several factors, including losses in exportation, treatment of secondary infection, and reduction in dairy production. To facilitate the development of a national test that is sensitive, simple, and applicable on a large scale, this work aimed to produce and characterize monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against gp51 protein from BLV for use in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test. Two hundred seventy-four hybridomas were generated, from which 37 were mAbs secretory clones screened by indirect ELISA. The specificity of the mAbs generated against gp51 was verified by Western blot analysis, and the isotypes were characterized for isotyping in IgG1 and IgM. To evaluate the test, 250 sera were tested by agar gel immunodiffusion and mAb-ELISA. The values obtained for the mAb-ELISA test were 95% sensitivity and 90% specificity. PMID:23515423

  12. Risk factors associated with within-herd transmission of bovine leukemia virus on dairy farms in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konishi Misako

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although several attempts have been made to control enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL at the local level, a nationwide control program has not been implemented in Japan, except for passive surveillance. Effective control of EBL requires that the transmission routes of bovine leukemia virus (BLV infection should be identified and intercepted based on scientific evidence. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the risk factors associated with within-herd transmission of BLV on infected dairy farms in Japan. Blood samples taken from 30 randomly selected adult cows at each of 139 dairy farms were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Information on herd management was collected using a structured questionnaire. Results Infected farms were defined as those with more than one ELISA-positive animal and accounted for 110 (79.1% of the 139 farms in the study. Completed questionnaires obtained from 90 of these 110 farms were used for statistical analysis. Seroprevalence, which was defined as the proportions of animals that tested positive out of all animals tested on the farm, was 17.1%, 48.1%, and 68.5% for the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles, respectively. A mixed logistic regression analysis implicated a loose housing system, dehorning, and a large number of horseflies in summer as risk factors (coefficient = 0.71, 1.11, and 0.82; p = 0.03, Conclusion Control of EBL in infected dairy farms in Japan will be improved by focusing particularly on these risk and protective factors.

  13. Risk factors associated with increased bovine leukemia virus proviral load in infected cattle in Japan from 2012 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Ayumu; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Matsumoto, Yuki; Aida, Yoko

    2015-12-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leukosis, a malignant B cell lymphoma. BLV has spread worldwide and causes serious problems. After infection, the BLV genome is integrated into the host DNA and can be amplified during periods of latency. We previously designed degenerate primers using the Coordination of Common Motifs (CoCoMo) algorithm to establish a new quantitative real-time PCR method (BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2) of measuring the proviral load of both known and novel BLV variants. Here, we aimed to examine the correlation between proviral load and risk factors for BLV infection, such as breeding systems, parousity, and colostrum feeding. Blood and serum samples were collected from 83 BLV-positive farms in 22 prefectures of Japan, and the BLV proviral load and anti-BLV antibody levels were measured. BLV was detected in 73.3% (1039/1,417) of cattle by BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2 and the provirus was detected in 93 of 1039 antibody-negative samples. The results showed that the proviral load increased with progression of lymphocytosis. Next, the risk factors associated with increasing BLV infection rate were examined along with any association with proviral load. The proviral load was higher in cattle with lymphocytosis than in healthy cattle, and higher in multiparous cows than in nulliparous cows. Finally, proviral loads were higher in contact breeding systems than in non-contact breeding systems. Taken together, these findings may help to formulate a plan for eliminating BLV from contaminated farms. This is the first nationwide study to estimate BLV proviral load in Japanese cattle. PMID:26321160

  14. Effects of subclinical bovine leukemia virus infection on some production parameters in a dairy farm in southern Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, M; Bulut, O; Yapkic, O; Gulay, M S; Pehlivanoglu, F; Ata, A; Yavru, S

    2007-09-01

    Some production parameters of seropositive cows (age, first calving age, 305 day mature equivalent last milk yield production, lifetime mature equivalent milk yield production, lifetime total milk production, lifetime total milking period, lifetime monthly milk production, lifetime daily milk production, lifetime total days of milking, number of inseminations per pregnancy (for last pregnancy), number of calves and calving interval (for last pregnancy)) were analysed in the current study. The study population was clinically healthy Holstein cows from a commercial dairy herd in southern Turkey. Of 109 animals, 65 cows were seropositive by ELISA and the prevalence of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection was 59.6%. The prevalence of seropositive cows in 2nd (62.8%), 3rd (64.7%), 4th (61.5%), and 5th (66.6 %) lactations was slightly higher than that of cows in 1st (52.6%) lactations. No statistical differences were observed between BLV seronegative and seropositive cows for production and reproduction parameters analysed in this study (P > 0.05). PMID:18237034

  15. Effects of subclinical bovine leukemia virus infection on some production parameters in a dairy farm in southern Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kale

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Some production parameters of seropositive cows (age, first calving age, 305 day mature equivalent last milk yield production, lifetime mature equivalent milk yield production, lifetime total milk production, lifetime total milking period, lifetime monthly milk production, lifetime daily milk production, lifetime total days of milking, number of inseminations per pregnancy (for last pregnancy, number of calves and calving interval (for last pregnancy were analysed in the current study. The study population was clinically healthy Holstein cows from a commercial dairy herd in southern Turkey. Of 109 animals, 65 cows were seropositive by ELISA and the prevalence of bovine leukemia virus (BLV infection was 59.6 %. The prevalence of seropositive cows in 2nd (62.8 %, 3rd (64.7 %, 4th (61.5 %, and 5th (66.6 % lactations was slightly higher than that of cows in 1st (52.6 % lactations. No statistical differences were observed between BLV seronegative and seropositive cows for production and reproduction parameters analysed in this study (P > 0.05.

  16. Detection of Bovine Leukemia Virus in Brains of Cattle with a Neurological Syndrome: Pathological and Molecular Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelino, Rubens Henrique Ramos; Pituco, Edviges Maristela; Villalobos, Eliana Monteforte Cassaro; Harakava, Ricardo; Gregori, Fábio

    2013-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) was investigated in the central nervous system (CNS) of cattle with neurological syndrome. A total of 269 CNS samples were submitted to nested-PCR (BLV env gene gp51), and the viral genotypes were identified. The nested-PCR was positive in 4.8% (13/269) CNS samples, with 2.7% (2/74) presenting at histological examination lesions of nonpurulent meningoencephalitis (NPME), whereas 5.6% (11/195) not presenting NPME (P > 0.05). No samples presented lymphosarcoma. The PCR products (437 bp) were sequenced and submitted to phylogenetic analysis by neighbor-joining and maximum composite likelihood methods, and genotypes 1, 5, and 6 were detected, corroborating other South American studies. The genotype 6 barely described in Brazil and Argentina was more frequently detected in this study. The identity matrices showed maximum similarity (100%) among some samples of this study and one from Argentina (FJ808582), recovered from GenBank. There was no association among the genotypes and NPME lesions. PMID:23710448

  17. Estimation of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) proviral load harbored by lymphocyte subpopulations in BLV-infected cattle at the subclinical stage of enzootic bovine leucosis using BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR

    OpenAIRE

    Panei, Carlos Javier; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Omori, Takashi; NUNOYA, Tetsuo; Davis, William C.; Ishizaki, Hiroshi; Matoba, Kazuhiro; Aida, Yoko

    2013-01-01

    Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL), which is the most common neoplastic disease of cattle. BLV infection may remain clinically silent at the aleukemic (AL) stage, cause persistent lymphocytosis (PL), or, more rarely, B cell lymphoma. BLV has been identified in B cells, CD2+ T cells, CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, γ/δ T cells, monocytes, and granulocytes in infected cattle that do not have tumors, although the most consistently i...

  18. BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR: a useful tool for evaluating bovine leukemia virus infection status

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    Jimba Mayuko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis, which is the most common neoplastic disease of cattle. BLV infects cattle worldwide, imposing a severe economic impact on the dairy cattle industry. Recently, we developed a new quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR method using Coordination of Common Motifs (CoCoMo primers to measure the proviral load of known and novel BLV variants in BLV-infected animals. Indeed, the assay was highly effective in detecting BLV in cattle from a range of international locations. This assay enabled us to demonstrate that proviral load correlates not only with BLV infection capacity as assessed by syncytium formation, but also with BLV disease progression. In this study, we compared the sensitivity of our BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR method for detecting BLV proviruses with the sensitivities of two real-time PCR systems, and also determined the differences of proviral load with serotests. Results BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR was found to be highly sensitive when compared with the real-time PCR-based TaqMan MGB assay developed by Lew et al. and the commercial TaKaRa cycleave PCR system. The BLV copy number determined by BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR was only partially correlated with the positive rate for anti-BLV antibody as determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, passive hemagglutination reaction, or agar gel immunodiffusion. This result indicates that, although serotests are widely used for the diagnosis of BLV infection, it is difficult to detect BLV infection with confidence by using serological tests alone. Two cattle were experimentally infected with BLV. The kinetics of the provirus did not precisely correlate with the change in anti-BLV antibody production. Moreover, both reactions were different in cattle that carried different bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3 genotypes. Conclusions Our results suggest that the quantitative measurement of proviral load by BLV

  19. Increase of cells expressing PD-L1 in bovine leukemia virus infection and enhancement of anti-viral immune responses in vitro via PD-L1 blockade

    OpenAIRE

    Ikebuchi Ryoyo; Konnai Satoru; Shirai Tatsuya; Sunden Yuji; Murata Shiro; Onuma Misao; Ohashi Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The inhibitory receptor programmed death-1 (PD-1) and its ligand, programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) are involved in immune evasion mechanisms for several pathogens causing chronic infections. Blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway restores anti-virus immune responses, with concomitant reduction in viral load. In a previous report, we showed that, in bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection, the expression of bovine PD-1 is closely associated with disease progression. However, the functions ...

  20. Predicting within-herd prevalence of infection with bovine leukemia virus using bulk-tank milk antibody levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouei, Omid; Stryhn, Henrik; VanLeeuwen, John; Kelton, David; Hanna, Paul; Keefe, Greg

    2015-11-01

    Enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) is an economically important infection of dairy cattle caused by bovine leukemia virus (BLV). Estimating the prevalence of BLV within dairy herds is a fundamental step towards pursuing efficient control programs. The objectives of this study were: (1) to determine the prevalence of BLV infection at the herd level using a bulk-tank milk (BTM) antibody ELISA in the Maritime region of Canada (3 provinces); and (2) to develop appropriate statistical models for predicting within-herd prevalence of BLV infection using BTM antibody ELISA titers. During 2013, three monthly BTM samples were collected from all dairy farms in the Maritime region of Canada (n=623) and tested for BLV milk antibodies using a commercial indirect ELISA. Based on the mean of the 3 BTM titers, 15 strata of herds (5 per province) were defined. From each stratum, 6 herds were randomly selected for a total of 90 farms. Within every selected herd, an additional BTM sample was taken (round 4), approximately 2 months after the third round. On the same day of BTM sampling, all cows that contributed milk to the fourth BTM sample were individually tested for BLV milk antibodies (n=6111) to estimate the true within-herd prevalence for the 90 herds. The association between true within-herd prevalence of BLV and means of various combinations of the BTM titers was assessed using linear regression models, adjusting for the stratified random sampling design. Herd level prevalence of BLV in the region was 90.8%. In the individual testing, 30.4% of cows were positive. True within-herd prevalences ranged from 0 to 94%. All linear regression models were able to predict the true within-herd prevalence of BLV reasonably well (R(2)>0.69). Predictions from the models were particularly accurate for low-to-medium spectrums of the BTM titers. In general, as a greater number of the four repeated BTM titers were incorporated in the models, narrower confidence intervals around the prediction lines

  1. Antiviral effects of bovine interferons on bovine respiratory tract viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, R W; Downing, M M; Cummins, J M

    1984-01-01

    The antiviral effects of bovine interferons on the replication of bovine respiratory tract viruses were studied. Bovine turbinate monolayer cultures were treated with bovine interferons and challenged with several bovine herpesvirus 1 strains, bovine viral diarrhea virus, parainfluenza type 3 virus, goat respiratory syncytial virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine adenovirus type 7, or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with bovine interferons reduced viral yield for each of the...

  2. BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an umbrella term for two species of viruses, BVDV1 and BVDV2, within the Pestivirus genus of the Flavivirus family. BVDV viruses are further subclassified as cytopathic and noncytopathic based on their activity in cultured epithelial cells. Noncytopathic BVDV p...

  3. Bovine Leukemia ProVirus: Evidence of Presence of Part of Gag Gene in Seminal Plasma of Naturally Infected Bulls

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    Razi Jafari

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available It is of critical importance to understand the modalities of BLV presence in semen, especially with regard to artificial insemination (AI. Presence of bovine leukemia provirus was demonstrated in fresh and frozen semen samples by researchers. In this study paired blood and semen samples from 45 bulls were assessed for the presence of part of gag gene and antibodies to BLV in blood, semen and cell-free fraction of the semen (seminal plasma. Proviral DNA was detected in 5 out of 45 seminal plasma samples. PCR products were sequenced and submitted to gene bank. This data strongly suggested that seminal plasma of seropositive bulls can be positive in PCR.

  4. Molecular epidemiological and serological studies of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection in Thailand cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, EunJung; Kim, Eun-Ju; Ratthanophart, Jadsada; Vitoonpong, Ratchaneekorn; Kim, Bo-Hye; Cho, In-Soo; Song, Jae-Young; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Shin, Yeun-Kyung

    2016-07-01

    BLV is the etiological agent of enzootic bovine leucosis. BLV has negative effects on animal health and causes economic losses worldwide. However, epidemiological studies on BLV are relatively unknown in many parts of Asian countries. Thus, this study sought to explore BLV infections in cattle in Thailand to determine the extent of the geographic distribution of BLV and to measure its prevalence rates. For this study, 744 cattle from 11 farms in 9 provinces of Thailand were screened in 2013 and 2014 by ELISA and nested PCR. Of those cattle, 41 BLVs were genetically characterized using 188 BLV gp51 env gene sequences available in GenBank. The BLV prevalence in Thailand was high, ranging from 5.3% to 87.8%, as determined by PCR and 11.0% to 100% as determined by ELISA, according to geographical region. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Thailand BLVs belonged to genotypes 1 and 6 and a new genotype 10, which are sporadically observed across Thailand with a prevalence of 31.7%, 19.5%, and 48.8%, respectively. A significant number of amino acid substitutions were also found in the gp51 sequences, of which unique changes in genotype 10 have not been reported previously. Briefly, the majority of substitutions were confined to CD4+/CD8+ T-cell epitopes, neutralizing domains, and E-D-A epitopes. Those observations indicate that BLV infections in Thailand cattle are prevalent and that the geographic distribution of BLV is dynamic, with a high level of genetic diversity. This distribution implies a long-term BLV infection in cattle populations and the movement of infected cattle. In sum, this study suggests that intensive surveillance and effective prevention strategies are required to determine the prevalence of BLV in Thailand and control continuous infections with BLVs. PMID:27090024

  5. BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR: Quantitation of bovine leukemia virus proviral load using the CoCoMo algorithm

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    Matoba Kazuhiro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV is closely related to human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV and is the etiological agent of enzootic bovine leukosis, a disease characterized by a highly extended course that often involves persistent lymphocytosis and culminates in B-cell lymphomas. BLV provirus remains integrated in cellular genomes, even in the absence of detectable BLV antibodies. Therefore, to understand the mechanism of BLV-induced leukemogenesis and carry out the selection of BLV-infected animals, a detailed evaluation of changes in proviral load throughout the course of disease in BLV-infected cattle is required. The aim of this study was to develop a new quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR method using Coordination of Common Motifs (CoCoMo primers to measure the proviral load of known and novel BLV variants in clinical animals. Results Degenerate primers were designed from 52 individual BLV long terminal repeat (LTR sequences identified from 356 BLV sequences in GenBank using the CoCoMo algorithm, which has been developed specifically for the detection of multiple virus species. Among 72 primer sets from 49 candidate primers, the most specific primer set was selected for detection of BLV LTR by melting curve analysis after real-time PCR amplification. An internal BLV TaqMan probe was used to enhance the specificity and sensitivity of the assay, and a parallel amplification of a single-copy host gene (the bovine leukocyte antigen DRA gene was used to normalize genomic DNA. The assay is highly specific, sensitive, quantitative and reproducible, and was able to detect BLV in a number of samples that were negative using the previously developed nested PCR assay. The assay was also highly effective in detecting BLV in cattle from a range of international locations. Finally, this assay enabled us to demonstrate that proviral load correlates not only with BLV infection capacity as assessed by syncytium formation, but

  6. An interferon regulatory factor binding site in the U5 region of the bovine leukemia virus long terminal repeat stimulates Tax-independent gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiermer, V; Van Lint, C; Briclet, D; Vanhulle, C; Kettmann, R; Verdin, E; Burny, A; Droogmans, L

    1998-07-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) replication is controlled by both cis- and trans-acting elements. The virus-encoded transactivator, Tax, is necessary for efficient transcription from the BLV promoter, although it is not present during the early stages of infection. Therefore, sequences that control Tax-independent transcription must play an important role in the initiation of viral gene expression. This study demonstrates that the R-U5 sequence of BLV stimulates Tax-independent reporter gene expression directed by the BLV promoter. R-U5 was also stimulatory when inserted immediately downstream from the transcription initiation site of a heterologous promoter. Progressive deletion analysis of this region revealed that a 46-bp element corresponding to the 5' half of U5 is principally responsible for the stimulation. This element exhibited enhancer activity when inserted upstream or downstream from the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter. This enhancer contains a binding site for the interferon regulatory factors IRF-1 and IRF-2. A 3-bp mutation that destroys the IRF recognition site caused a twofold decrease in Tax-independent BLV long terminal repeat-driven gene expression. These observations suggest that the IRF binding site in the U5 region of BLV plays a role in the initiation of virus replication. PMID:9621009

  7. Identification of bovine leukemia virus tax function associated with host cell transcription, signaling, stress response and immune response pathway by microarray-based gene expression analysis

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    Arainga Mariluz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis and is closely related to human T-cell leukemia virus type I. The Tax protein of BLV is a transcriptional activator of viral replication and a key contributor to oncogenic potential. We previously identified interesting mutant forms of Tax with elevated (TaxD247G or reduced (TaxS240P transactivation effects on BLV replication and propagation. However, the effects of these mutations on functions other than transcriptional activation are unknown. In this study, to identify genes that play a role in the cascade of signal events regulated by wild-type and mutant Tax proteins, we used a large-scale host cell gene-profiling approach. Results Using a microarray containing approximately 18,400 human mRNA transcripts, we found several alterations after the expression of Tax proteins in genes involved in many cellular functions such as transcription, signal transduction, cell growth, apoptosis, stress response, and immune response, indicating that Tax protein has multiple biological effects on various cellular environments. We also found that TaxD247G strongly regulated more genes involved in transcription, signal transduction, and cell growth functions, contrary to TaxS240P, which regulated fewer genes. In addition, the expression of genes related to stress response significantly increased in the presence of TaxS240P as compared to wild-type Tax and TaxD247G. By contrast, the largest group of downregulated genes was related to immune response, and the majority of these genes belonged to the interferon family. However, no significant difference in the expression level of downregulated genes was observed among the Tax proteins. Finally, the expression of important cellular factors obtained from the human microarray results were validated at the RNA and protein levels by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting

  8. Complete suppression of viral gene expression is associated with the onset and progression of lymphoid malignancy: observations in Bovine Leukemia Virus-infected sheep

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    Burny Arsène

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During malignant progression, tumor cells need to acquire novel characteristics that lead to uncontrolled growth and reduced immunogenicity. In the Bovine Leukemia Virus-induced ovine leukemia model, silencing of viral gene expression has been proposed as a mechanism leading to immune evasion. However, whether proviral expression in tumors is completely suppressed in vivo was not conclusively demonstrated. Therefore, we studied viral expression in two selected experimentally-infected sheep, the virus or the disease of which had features that made it possible to distinguish tumor cells from their nontransformed counterparts. Results In the first animal, we observed the emergence of a genetically modified provirus simultaneously with leukemia onset. We found a Tax-mutated (TaxK303 replication-deficient provirus in the malignant B-cell clone while functional provirus (TaxE303 had been consistently monitored over the 17-month aleukemic period. In the second case, both non-transformed and transformed BLV-infected cells were present at the same time, but at distinct sites. While there was potentially-active provirus in the non-leukemic blood B-cell population, as demonstrated by ex-vivo culture and injection into naïve sheep, virus expression was completely suppressed in the malignant B-cells isolated from the lymphoid tumors despite the absence of genetic alterations in the proviral genome. These observations suggest that silencing of viral genes, including the oncoprotein Tax, is associated with tumor onset. Conclusion Our findings suggest that silencing is critical for tumor progression and identify two distinct mechanisms-genetic and epigenetic-involved in the complete suppression of virus and Tax expression. We demonstrate that, in contrast to systems that require sustained oncogene expression, the major viral transforming protein Tax can be turned-off without reversing the transformed phenotype. We propose that suppression

  9. Bovine Virus Diarrhea (BVD)

    OpenAIRE

    Hoar, Bruce R.

    2004-01-01

    Bovine virus diarrhea (BVD) is a complicated disease to discuss as it can result in a wide variety of disease problems from very mild to very severe. BVD can be one of the most devastating diseases cattle encounter and one of the hardest to get rid of when it attacks a herd. The viruses that cause BVD have been grouped into two genotypes, Type I and Type II. The disease syndrome caused by the two genotypes is basically the same, however disease caused by Type II infection is often more severe...

  10. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis and Bovine Leukemia Virus Seroprevalence and Associated Risk Factors in Commercial Dairy and Beef Cattle in Northern and Northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wu-Wen; Lv, Wen-Fa; Cong, Wei; Meng, Qing-Feng; Wang, Chun-Feng; Shan, Xiao-Feng; Qian, Ai-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) and bovine leukemia virus (BLV) are important pathogens, commonly responsible for economical loss to cattle farms all over the world, yet their epidemiology in commercial dairy and beef cattle in China is still unknown. Thus, from September 2013 to December 2014, a large-scale seroprevalence study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence and identify herd-level risk factors associated with MAP and BLV infection. The source sample was 3674 cattle from 113 herds in northern and northeastern China. Antibodies against MAP and BLV were detected using ELISA tests. At animal-level, the seroprevalence of antibodies against MAP and BLV was 11.79% (433/3674) and 18.29% (672/3674), respectively. At herd-level, the seroprevalence of antibodies against MAP and BLV was 20.35% and 21.24% (24/113), respectively. Herd size was identified to be associated with MAP infection while herd size and presence of cattle introduced from other farms were significantly associated with BLV infection. Further research is needed to confirm these findings and improve the knowledge of the epidemiology of these two pathogens in these regions and elsewhere in China. PMID:26504798

  11. Polymorphism and expression of the tumor necrosis factor receptor II gene in cows infected with the bovine leukemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachura, A; Brym, P; Bojarojć-Nosowicz, B; Kaczmarczyk, E

    2016-01-01

    A single T>C nucleotide polymorphism (rs42686850) of bovine tumor necrosis factor receptor type II gene (TNF-RII) is located within a sequence with allele-specific affinity to bind E2F transcription factors, considered pivotal in the regulation of cell cycle and cell proliferation. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of this SNP and BLV infection on the TNF-RII gene expression at the mRNA and protein levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We noted that analyzed TNF-RII gene polymorphism influenced the expression of the TNF-RII gene at the mRNA level but only in BLV-positive cows. Concurrently, no statistically significant association was found between gene polymorphism and TNF-RII expression at the protein level. However, we found a significant effect of BLV infection status on the amount of TNF-RII mRNA and the percentage of PBMC expressing TNF-RII. These results show an unclear effect of considered T>C polymorphism on TNF-RII gene expression in bovine leukocytes and they suggest the involvement of BLV in modifying the TNF-RII expression in BLV-infected cows potentially implying the EBL (Enzootic Bovine Leukosis) associated pathogenesis. PMID:27096796

  12. Increase of cells expressing PD-L1 in bovine leukemia virus infection and enhancement of anti-viral immune responses in vitro via PD-L1 blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikebuchi Ryoyo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The inhibitory receptor programmed death-1 (PD-1 and its ligand, programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1 are involved in immune evasion mechanisms for several pathogens causing chronic infections. Blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway restores anti-virus immune responses, with concomitant reduction in viral load. In a previous report, we showed that, in bovine leukemia virus (BLV infection, the expression of bovine PD-1 is closely associated with disease progression. However, the functions of bovine PD-L1 are still unknown. To investigate the role of PD-L1 in BLV infection, we identified the bovine PD-L1 gene, and examined PD-L1 expression in BLV-infected cattle in comparison with uninfected cattle. The deduced amino acid sequence of bovine PD-L1 shows high homology to the human and mouse PD-L1. The proportion of PD-L1 positive cells, especially among B cells, was upregulated in cattle with the late stage of the disease compared to cattle at the aleukemic infection stage or uninfected cattle. The proportion of PD-L1 positive cells correlated positively with prediction markers for the progression of the disease such as leukocyte number, virus load and virus titer whilst on the contrary, it inversely correlated with the degree of interferon-gamma expression. Blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in vitro by PD-L1-specific antibody upregulated the production of interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma, and correspondingly, downregulated the BLV provirus load and the proportion of BLV-gp51 expressing cells. These data suggest that PD-L1 induces immunoinhibition in disease progressed cattle during chronic BLV infection. Therefore, PD-L1 would be a potential target for developing immunotherapies against BLV infection.

  13. BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2: improvements to the BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR assay for bovine leukemia virus by reducing primer degeneracy and constructing an optimal standard curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Kitamura-Muramatsu, Yuri; Yuan, Yuan; Polat, Meripet; Saito, Susumu; Aida, Yoko

    2015-05-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the etiological agent of enzootic bovine leukosis, which is the most common neoplastic disease of cattle. Because BLV infection can remain clinically silent, the proviral load is an important index for estimating disease progression. CoCoMo-qPCR, an assay developed to estimate BLV proviral load, allows the highly sensitive detection of BLV originating in different countries. Here, we developed a modified version of the CoCoMo-qPCR assay, the "BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2" assay, which uses optimized degenerate primers. We also constructed a new plasmid standard. Finally, we used both assays to examine DNA samples from BLV-infected cattle and compared the results. PMID:25731158

  14. Enzootic bovine leukosis and Bovine leukemia virus/ Leucose enzoótica bovina e vírus da leucemia bovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amauri Alcindo Alfieri

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available All over de World the Enzootic Bovine Leukosis is a important viral infection in cattle herds. This revision points out topics relative to the etiological agent, clinical signals, diagnosis methods, control and prophylaxis of the infection.A Leucose Enzoótica Bovina é uma infecção viral amplamente disseminada em rebanhos bovinos de todo o mundo. Esta revisão tem por objetivo apresentar tópicos relacionados ao agente etiológico, à doença clínica e aos métodos de diagnóstico, controle e profilaxia da infecção.

  15. Enzootic bovine leukosis and Bovine leukemia virus/
    Leucose enzoótica bovina e vírus da leucemia bovina

    OpenAIRE

    Amauri Alcindo Alfieri; Alice Fernandes Alfieri; Luis Álvaro Leuzzi Junior

    2001-01-01

    All over de World the Enzootic Bovine Leukosis is a important viral infection in cattle herds. This revision points out topics relative to the etiological agent, clinical signals, diagnosis methods, control and prophylaxis of the infection.A Leucose Enzoótica Bovina é uma infecção viral amplamente disseminada em rebanhos bovinos de todo o mundo. Esta revisão tem por objetivo apresentar tópicos relacionados ao agente etiológico, à doença clínica e aos métodos de diagnóstico, controle e profila...

  16. Detección del virus de la leucosis bovina en ganado criollo colombiano mediante PCR-anidado Bovine leukemia virus detection in Creole Colombian breeds using nested-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwin Yovanny Hernández-Herrera

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó la presencia del virus de la leucosis bovina (VLB en 360 muestras de ADN de ocho razas bovinas criollas: Blanco Orejinegro (BON, Casanareño (CAS, Costeño con Cuernos (CCC, Chino Santandereano (ChS, Caqueteño (CQT, Hartón del Valle (HV, Romosinuano (RS y San Martinero (SM, dos Razas Sintéticas Colombianas: Lucerna (LUC y Velásquez (VEL y dos razas foráneas: Brahmán (B y Holstein (H. Para la detección del pro-virus se amplificó una región del gen env viral, mediante PCR anidada. La presencia del VLB fue mayor en la raza HV seguido por ChS (83.3% y 60% respectivamente, VEL y LUC tuvieron el mismo porcentaje (50%, en CAS, CCC y CQT la presencia del virus fue de 26.7%, 23.3% y 16.7% respectivamente; no se encontró el virus en BON, SM y RS. En las razas foráneas la presencia fue de 83.3% para H y 6.7% para B. Se encontró dependencia altamente significativa entre la presencia del VLB y la raza, el sexo y región de origen de la muestra. El promedio de presencia en las razas criollas fue menor que en las foráneas, menor en los machos que en las hembras y en la región norte que en el suroccidente y el centro del país.Using 360 DNA samples from eight Creole bovine breeds Blanco Orejinegro (BON, Casanareño (CAS, Costeño con Cuernos (CCC, Chino Santandereano (ChS, Caqueteño (CQT, Hartón del Valle (HV, Romosinuano (RS and San Martinero (SM, two synthetic Colombian breeds: Lucerna (LUC and Velásquez (VEL and two introduced breeds Brahmán (B and Holstein (H; the presence of Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV was evaluated through the amplification of a viral gene region env (provirus detection - nested-PCR. The percentage of presence and independence test were calculated (X². Presence of BLV was higher in HV breed, followed by ChS (83.3% and 60% respectively; VEL and LUC breeds showed the same percentage (50%. In CAS, CCC and CQT the presence of virus was 26.7%, 23.3% y 16.7% respectively. On the other hand, no virus presence was

  17. Bovine respiratory disease model based on dual infections with infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine corona virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the leading cause of economic loss in the U.S. cattle industry. BRDC likely results from simultaneous or sequential infections with multiple pathogens including both viruses and bacteria. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine corona virus (BoCV...

  18. Production of cattle immunotolerant to bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    OpenAIRE

    McClurkin, A W.; Littledike, E T; Cutlip, R C; Frank, G H; Coria, M F; Bolin, S R

    1984-01-01

    Inoculation of bovine virus diarrhea virus into 58 to 125 day old fetuses of bovine virus diarrhea virus seropositive pregnant cows, or inoculation of bovine virus diarrhea virus into seronegative cows 42 to 114 days pregnant, may produce clinically normal calves which are persistently infected with the specific isolate of bovine virus diarrhea virus yet seronegative to the homologous and heterologous isolates. Reinoculation of these persistently infected cattle with their homologous isolate ...

  19. Bovine Rhinitis Viruses Are Common in U.S. Cattle with Bovine Respiratory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hause, Ben M.; Collin, Emily A.; Anderson, Joe; Hesse, Richard A.; Anderson, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Bovine rhinitis viruses (BRV) are established etiological agents of bovine respiratory disease complex however little research into their epidemiology and ecology has been published for several decades. In the U.S., only bovine rhinitis A virus 1 (BRAV1) has been identified while bovine rhinitis A virus 2 (BRAV2) and bovine rhinitis B virus (BRBV) were previously only identified in England and Japan, respectively. Metagenomic sequencing of a nasal swab from a bovine respiratory disease (BRD) ...

  20. Selective host range restriction of goat cells for recombinant murine leukemia virus and feline leukemia virus type A.

    OpenAIRE

    Fischinger, P J; Thiel, H J; Blevins, C S; Dunlop, N M

    1981-01-01

    We isolated a strain of normal goat fibroblasts which was uniquely selective in that it allowed the replication of xenotropic murine leukemia virus but not polytropic recombinant murine leukemia virus. In addition, feline leukemia virus type A replication was severely diminished in these goat cells, whereas feline leukemia virus type B and feline endogenous RD114-CCC viruses replicated efficiently. No other known cells exhibit this pattern of virus growth restriction. These goat cells allow t...

  1. Dinâmica das proteínas séricas de fêmeas bovinas da raça holandesa naturalmente infectadas pelo vírus da leucose dos bovinos Serum protein dynamics in Holstein cows naturally infected with bovine leukemia virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Harry Birgel Junior

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a dinâmica das proteínas séricas de fêmeas bovinas da raça holandesa, criadas no Estado de São Paulo e naturalmente infectadas pelo vírus da leucose dos bovinos, foram colhidas 60 amostras de soro sangüíneo. Os animais foram divididos em 3 grupos experimentais: Grupo 1 - composto de 20 fêmeas não reagentes ao antígeno gp-51 do vírus da leucose dos bovinos; Grupo 2 - composto de 20 fêmeas reagentes ao antígeno gp-5l do vírus da leucose dos bovinos sem linfocitose; Grupo 3 - composto de 20 fêmeas reagentes ao antígeno gp-5l do vírus da leucose dos bovinos com linfocitose. A avaliação do proteinograma sérico foi realizada pela determinação dos teores séricos de proteína total pelo método do biureto e a separação das frações albumina, alfaglobulina, betaglobulina e gamaglobulina através de eletroforese. A determinação quantitativa dos níveis séricos de imunoglobulinas IgM e IgG foi realizada através de imunodifusão radial simples. Os valores séricos do proteinograma e da concentração sérica das imunoglobulinas IgG e IgM dos animais não reagentes ao vírus da leucose dos bovinos foram semelhantes àqueles observados nos animais reagentes ao vírus da leucose dos Bovinos sem linfocitose e no grupo de animais reagentes ao vírus da leucose dos bovinos com linfocitose.In an attempt to determine the serum protein dynamics in cattle naturally infected with bovine leukemia virus, samples of blood sera from 60 cows of Holstein breed, raised in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, were collected.The animals were divided in three Groups: Group 1- was composed of 20 bovine leukemia virus antibody negative cows; Group 2 - was composed of 20 cows reacting to the antigen (gp-51 of the bovine leukemia virus without lymphocytosis and Group 3 - was composed of 20 cows reacting to the antigen (gp-51 of the bovine leukemia virus with lymphocytosis. Serum total protein was determined by the biuret

  2. 9 CFR 113.215 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.215 Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bovine Virus Diarrhea... paragraph. (i) Eight bovine virus diarrhea susceptible calves (five vaccinates and three controls) shall...

  3. Chimeras of receptors for gibbon ape leukemia virus/feline leukemia virus B and amphotropic murine leukemia virus reveal different modes of receptor recognition by retrovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lene; Johann, Stephen V; van Zeijl, Marja;

    1995-01-01

    Glvr1 encodes the human receptor for gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) and feline leukemia virus subgroup B (FeLV-B), while the related gene Glvr2 encodes the human receptor for amphotropic murine leukemia viruses (A-MLVs). The two proteins are 62% identical in their amino acid sequences and are...

  4. 9 CFR 113.311 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine. 113.311... Virus Vaccines § 113.311 Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine. Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine shall be prepared... virus diarrhea susceptible calves shall be used as test animals (20 vaccinates and five controls)....

  5. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: biotypes and disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Deregt, D; Loewen, K G

    1995-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus continues to produce significant economic losses for the cattle industry and challenges investigators with the complexity of diseases it produces and the mechanisms by which it causes disease. This paper updates and attempts to clarify information regarding the roles of noncytopathic and cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea viruses in persistent infections and mucosal disease. It also covers, in brief, what is known of the new diseases: thrombocytopenia and hemorrhagic...

  6. Association of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus with Multiple Viral Infections in Bovine Respiratory Disease Outbreaks

    OpenAIRE

    Richer, Lisette; Marois, Paul; Lamontagne, Lucie

    1988-01-01

    We investigated eleven outbreaks of naturally occurring bovine respiratory diseases in calves and adult animals in the St-Hyacinthe area of Quebec. Specific antibodies to bovine herpesvirus-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza type 3 virus, reovirus type 3, and serotypes 1 to 7 of bovine adenovirus were found in paired sera from diseased animals. Several bovine viruses with respiratory tropism were involved concomitantly in herds during an outbreak of bov...

  7. Polimorfismo del promotor del gen TNF-α (p-TNF-α bovino y su asociación con la resistencia del huesped a la diseminación del virus de la leucosis - Polymorphism of the TNF-α (p-TNF-α bovine gene promoter region and its association with host resistance to bovine leukemia virus infectio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LENDEZ, Pamela Anahí

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl virus de la leucemia bovina (BLV es el agente causal de la leucosis bovina enzoótica, enfermedad neoplásica que provoca enormes pérdidas económicas en la producción ganadera y en la exportación.Luego de la infección por BLV, la expresión del mensajero del TNF-α se ve aumentada en aquellos animales capaces de eliminar el virus en la fase aguda de la infección. Esto sugiere que esta citoquina tendría un rol importante en la eliminación del virus. Se ha demostrado que la homocigosis G/G en la posición -824 de la región promotora del TNF-α estaría asociada con el desarrollo de linfosarcoma. Por otro lado, el alelo *902 del gen BoLA DRB3.2 del complejo mayor de histocompatibilidad de clase II está asociado con la resistencia a la diseminación viral y a la baja carga proviral. El objetivo de este trabajo fue estudiar la relación entre el olimorfismo en la región promotora del TNF-α y la presencia del alelo de resistencia BoLA DRB3.2*902 en animales infectados con BLV.Se seleccionaron 60 animales portadores o no del alelo *902, y se dentificó por la técnica de PCR-RFLP la presencia de la mutación en la región descripta. Los datos preliminares obtenidos sugieren que los genotipos A/A y A/G estarían asociado a la presencia del alelo de resistencia *902. No se encontró ningún animal homocigota G/G en ese grupo de animales, lo que sugiere una asociación negativa entre este polimorfismo y la presencia del alelo de resistencia frente al BLV. Se requiere estudiar un mayor número de animales.SummaryBovine leukemia virus (BLV is the causative agent of enzootic bovineleukosis, a neoplasic disease that causes important economic losses in cattle production and trading. After BLV infection, TNF-α mRNA expression is increased in those a nimals hich are capable of eliminating the virus in the acute phase of infection.This finding suggests that this cytokine could have an important role in virus elimination. It has been

  8. Bovine lymphocytic leukemia: studies of etiology, pathogenesis, and mode of transmission. Progress report No. 19, June 1978-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, D.K.

    1979-07-01

    Bovine leukemia is believed to be caused by an oncogenic RNA virus designated bovine leukemia virus (BLV). The presence of BLV particles in lymphocyte cultures from leukemic cattle and cattle with a persistent lymphocytosis has been consistentily demonstrated. Concentrated, cell free, BLV preparations were used to inoculate 12 late stage bovine fetuses (in utero) and two newborn calves. Current studies involve extensive monitoring of these inoculated animals to detect precancerous changes and obtain a detailed description of the events preceding the development of lymphosarcoma. Ongoing monitoring studies will provide a complete record of all changes in the various leukemia associated parameters. We will then be able to detail when, in what sequence, and to what extent each parameter changes in the course of lymphosarcoma development. Fourteen animals were successfully inoculated during the study. Eleven remain alive, and comprise the current monitoring program. All eleven of these animals are definitely infected with BLV, and in nine the infection has substantially progressed with respect to the parameters being monitored. In addition to transmission and monitoring studies, various lymphocyte subpopulations were examined to determine which cell type(s) are involved in the pathogenesis of bovine lymphosarcoma. These studies have conclusively established that B-lymphocytes are the target cells for BLV infection and that they carry the morphologic nuclear abnormality associated with this disease.

  9. Characterization of bovine viral diarrhea virus proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Purchio, A F; Larson, R.; Collett, M S

    1984-01-01

    Virus-specific proteins were examined in cultured cells infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus. By using antisera obtained from virus-infected animals, three major virus-specific polypeptides with molecular weights of 115,000 (115K), 80K, and 55K were observed. Minor proteins of 45,000 and 38,000 daltons were also noted. Tryptic peptide mapping indicated that the 115K and the 80K polypeptides were structurally related. The 55K protein was glycosylated and appeared not to be related to the ...

  10. Radioimmunoassay of bovine leukosis virus antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A RIA method was developed for identifying the presence of serum antibodies to the bovine leukosis virus. The chosen procedure uses the ability of the virus antigen to bind to the solid phase of a polystyrene carrier. The method was compared with the ELISA method and with the pseudoneutralization and immunodiffusion tests. A high level of agreement was achieved between the RIA and the ELISA methods (95%). By its accuracy the RIA method proves superior to the immunodiffusion test. (author)

  11. Molecular biology of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are arguably the most important viral pathogen of ruminants worldwide and can cause severe economic loss. Clinical symptoms of the disease caused by BVDV range from subclinical to severe acute hemorrhagic syndrome, with the severity of disease being strain depend...

  12. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV): A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in calves during the first year of life. The study of the virus has been difficult because of its lability and very poor growth in cell culture. However, during the last decade, the introduction of new...... complex and unpredictable which makes the diagnosis and subsequent therapy very difficult. BRSV is closely related to human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) which is an important cause of respiratory disease in young children. In contrast to BRSV, the recent knowledge of HRSV is regularly extensively...

  13. Seroprevalence of Bovine Herpes Virus-1, Bovine Herpes Virus-4 and Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus in Dairy Cattle in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira M. Elhassan*, M.A Fadol and A.M. El-Hussein

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A survey was conducted to determine prevalence of antibodies against Bovine herpes virus-1 (BoHv-1, Bovine herpes virus-4 (BoHv-4 and Bovine viral diarrhea (BVD in dairy cattle in farms with reproductive problems in two areas in Sudan. Sera samples were collected from Khartoum state and central Sudan during 2005-2008 and analyzed using direct ELISA. The prevalence of antibodies was discussed with respect to age, season, sex, breed and locality BoHv-1 and BVD antibodies were highly prevalent in Khartoum state (51.7 and 50.4%, respectively while in central Sudan BoHv-1 (32.7% antibodies were the most prevalent followed by, BVD (25.7% and BoHv-4 (19.3%. The highest prevalence of antibodies against the three viruses in both areas was found during the rainy season (July to October. The prevalence of antibodies to viruses studied was significantly associated with female sex except for BoHv-1. Prevalence of antibodies to BoHv-4 was significantly associated with breed while those of BoHv-1 and BVD were not. The present results indicated that older cattle were more likely to be seropositive in case of BoHv-4 but to BoHv-1 or BVD viruses. Furthermore, it was found that BoHv-1 and BVD antibodies were highly prevalent in aborted dams. While, infertility problems were highly associated with BoHv-1 antibodies. BVD antibodies showed the highest prevalence in case of death after birth. The results of this study provide better understanding of viral epidemics of reproductive disorders and represent the first report of BoHv-4 antibodies in cattle in Sudan.

  14. Bovine viral diarrhea virus modulations of monocyte derived macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a single stranded, positive sense RNA virus and is the causative agent of bovine viral diarrhea (BVD). Disease can range from persistently infected (PI) animals displaying no clinical symptoms of disease to an acute, severe disease. Presently, limited studies ha...

  15. Synergistic effects of bovine respiratory syncytial virus and non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus infection on selected bovine alveolar macrophage functions.

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, L.; Lehmkuhl, H D; Kaeberle, M L

    1999-01-01

    The effect of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (ncpBVDV) infection on selected bovine alveolar macrophage (AM) functions was investigated. Alveolar macrophages were harvested from 2- to 6-month-old calves seronegative for BRSV and BVDV and inoculated with approximately 1 median cell culture infective dose of virus per AM. Control, BRSV infected, ncpBVDV-infected and BRSV-ncpBVDV coinfected AM cultures were evaluated for Fc receptor expre...

  16. 9 CFR 113.216 - Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Virus. 113.216 Section 113.216 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.216 Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Infectious...

  17. Formation of infectious hybrid virions with gibbon ape leukemia virus and human T-cell leukemia virus retroviral envelope glycoproteins and the gag and pol proteins of Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    OpenAIRE

    C. Wilson; Reitz, M S; Okayama, H; Eiden, M V

    1989-01-01

    The gibbon ape leukemia virus, SEATO strain, and human T-cell leukemia virus type I envelope glycoproteins can be functionally assembled with a Moloney murine leukemia virus core into infectious particles. The envelope-host cell receptor interaction is the major determinant of the host cell specificity for these hybrid virions.

  18. Molecular and biological aspects of the bovine immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corredor, Andrea G; St-Louis, Marie-Claude; Archambault, Denis

    2010-01-01

    The bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) was isolated in 1969 from a cow, R-29, with a wasting syndrome suggesting bovine leucosis. The virus, first designated bovine visna-like virus, remained unstudied until HIV was discovered in 1983. Then, it was demonstrated in 1987 that the bovine R-29 isolate was a lentivirus with striking similarity to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Moreover, BIV has the most complex genomic structure among all identified lentiviruses shown by several regulatory/accessory genes encoding proteins, some of which are involved in the regulation of virus gene expression. This manuscript aims to review biological and molecular aspects of BIV, with emphasis on regulatory/accessory viral genes/proteins which are involved in virus expression. PMID:20210777

  19. Cell-free translation of bovine viral diarrhea virus RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Purchio, A F; Larson, R.; Torborg, L L; Collett, M S

    1984-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus RNA was translated in a reticulocyte cell-free protein synthesizing system. The purified, 8.2-kilobase, virus-specific RNA species was unable to serve an an efficient message unless it was denatured immediately before translation. In this case, several polypeptides, ranging in molecular weight from 50,000 to 150,000 and most of which were immunoprecipitated by bovine viral diarrhea virus-specific antiserum, were synthesized in vitro. When polyribosomes were used to...

  20. Investigation of Bovine Viral Diarrheae Virus, Bovine Herpesvirus 1, and Bovine Leukosis Virus infections in a dairy cattle herd with abortion problem

    OpenAIRE

    Avcı, Oğuzhan; Yavru, Sibel; Kale, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    A survey was conducted to determine of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, Bovine Herpesvirus 1 and Bovine Leukosis Virus infections in a dairy cattle herd with abortion problem in Çankırı. A total of 172 serum and 172 leukocytes samples were collected from unvaccinated Holstein cows for mentioned infections in 2010. All sampled animals were over 3 years. While the serum samples were analysed by commercially available indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), leukocyte samples...

  1. Comparison of levels and duration of detection of antibodies to bovine viral diarrhea virus 1, bovine viral diarrhea virus 2, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus 1, and bovine parainfluenza virus 3 in calves fed maternal colostrum or a colostrum-replacement product

    OpenAIRE

    Chamorro, Manuel F; Walz, Paul H.; Haines, Deborah M.; Passler, Thomas; Earleywine, Thomas; Palomares, Roberto A.; Riddell, Kay P; Galik, Patricia; Zhang, Yijing; Givens, M. Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Colostrum-replacement products are an alternative to provide passive immunity to neonatal calves; however, their ability to provide adequate levels of antibodies recognizing respiratory viruses has not been described. The objective of this study was to compare the serum levels of IgG at 2 d of age and the duration of detection of antibodies to bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 (BVDV-2), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1)...

  2. ESCRT Requirements for Murine Leukemia Virus Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartusch, Christina; Prange, Reinhild

    2016-01-01

    The Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) is a gammaretrovirus that hijack host components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) for budding. To determine the minimal requirements for ESCRT factors in MLV viral and viral-like particles (VLP) release, an siRNA knockdown screen of ESCRT(-associated) proteins was performed in MLV-producing human cells. We found that MLV VLPs and virions primarily engage the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and marginally the ESCRT-associated adaptors Nedd4-1 and Alix to enter the ESCRT pathway. Conversely, the inactivation of ESCRT-II had no impact on VLP and virion egress. By analyzing the effects of individual ESCRT-III knockdowns, VLP and virion release was profoundly inhibited in CHMP2A- and CHMP4B-knockdown cells. In contrast, neither the CHMP2B and CHMP4A isoforms nor CHMP3, CHMP5, and CHMP6 were found to be essential. In case of CHMP1, we unexpectedly observed that the CHMP1A isoform was specifically required for virus budding, but dispensable for VLP release. Hence, MLV utilizes only a subset of ESCRT factors, and viral and viral-like particles differ in ESCRT-III factor requirements. PMID:27096867

  3. The Contribution of Infections with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Viruses to Bovine Respiratory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The contribution of bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) to the development of bovine respiratory disease is the sum of a number of different factors. These factors include the contribution of acute uncomplicated BVDV infections, the high incidence of respiratory disease in animals persistently inf...

  4. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: involvement in bovine respiratory disease and diagnostic challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reviews the contribution of bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) to the development of Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD). Veterinarians and producers generally consider BRD as one of the most significant diseases affecting production in the cattle industry. BRD can affect the performance (...

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus 2 from Commercial Fetal Bovine Serum

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hua; Li, Yan; Gao, Mingchun; Wen, Kai; Jia, Ying; Liu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Wenlong; Ma, Bo; Wang, Junwei

    2012-01-01

    We isolated a bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) from commercial fetal bovine serum and designated it HLJ-10. The complete genome is 12,284 nucleotides (nt); the open reading frame is 11,694 nt, coding 3,898 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that this strain belongs to BVDV group 2.

  6. Comparative serological response in calves to eight commercial vaccines against infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, parainfluenza-3, bovine respiratory syncytial, and bovine viral diarrhea viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Van Donkersgoed, Joyce; van den Hurk, Jan V.; McCartney, Duane; Harland, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    A field trial was conducted to compare the serological responses in calves to eight commercial vaccines against infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV), parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), and/or bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Calves given IBRV, P13V, BRSV, and BVDV vaccines had significantly higher antibodies to these viruses than unvaccinated controls; however, serological responses to killed BVDV vaccines were low. Calves with preexisting an...

  7. Characterization of natural antibodies in mice to endogenous leukemia virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of radiation to induce thymic lymphomas in susceptible mice is presumably related to its ability either to induce or activate expression of the endogenous leukemia virus or its ability to immunosuppress the host sufficiently to allow escape of the virus from host regulation, or both. Techniques to quantitatively measure changes in virus expression induced by radiation now exist. In tissue culture it has been demonstrated that radiation can induce at low but significant frequencies spontaneous expression of the virus. This suggests that a similar induction by radiation can be achieved in vivo. The relative role of the immunosuppressive effects of radiation must also be examined. The spontaneous expression of endogenous leukemia viruses induces a chronic humoral response to the virus, which may contribute to the regulation of the pathologic expression of the virus. Techniques and findings on this autogenous immune response as it relates to the immunosuppressive effects of radiation in the induction of thymic lymphomas in mice are reviewed

  8. In vitro protective effect of bacteria-derived bovine alpha interferon I1 against selected bovine viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Gillespie, J H; Robson, D. S.; Scott, F. W.; Schiff, E I

    1985-01-01

    We used bacteria-derived bovine alpha-interferon I1 (Bo IFN-alpha I1) to study its antiviral effect in a bovine turbinate cell line on bovine diarrhea virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, parainfluenza 3 virus, and pseudorabies virus. We based our study upon replicate tests for each strain by using a block titration system with various concentrations of Bo IFN-alpha I1 against various concentrations of virus. The data were compiled in two-axis tables (replicate X concentration) and...

  9. Endogenous murine leukemia virus-encoded proteins in radiation leukemias of BALB/c mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore the role of endogenous retroviruses in radiation-induced leukemogenesis in the mouse, we have examined virus-encoded proteins in nine BALB/c leukemias by pulsechase labeling procedures and serological typing with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. The major gag precursor protein, Pr65/sup gag/, was observed in all cases, but only three leukemias expressed detectable amounts of the glycosylated gag species, gP95/sup gag/, or its precursor, Pr75/sup gag/. No evidence was found for synthesis of gag-host fusion proteins. None of the leukemias released infectious xenotropic or dualtropic virus, but all nine expressed at least one env protein with xenotropic properties. In two instances a monoclonal antibody, 35/56, which is specific for the NuLV G/sub IX/ antigen, displayed a distinctive reactivity with this class of env protein, although this antibody is unreactive with replicating xenotropic viruses. An ecotropic/xenotropic recombinant env protein with the same 35/56 phenotype was observed in a leukemia induced by a strongly leukemogenic virus isolated from a BALB/c radiation leukemia

  10. Three viruses of the bovine respiratory disease complex apply different strategies to initiate infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchhoff, Jana; Uhlenbruck, Sabine; Goris, Katherina; Keil, Günther M.; Herrler, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the major cause of serious respiratory tract infections in calves. The disease is multifactorial, with either stress or reduced immunity allowing several pathogens to emerge. We investigated the susceptibility of bovine airway epithelial cells (BAEC) to infection by the three major viruses associated with the BRDC: bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) and bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3). For this pu...

  11. Bovine rhinitis viruses are common in U.S. cattle with bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Ben M; Collin, Emily A; Anderson, Joe; Hesse, Richard A; Anderson, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Bovine rhinitis viruses (BRV) are established etiological agents of bovine respiratory disease complex however little research into their epidemiology and ecology has been published for several decades. In the U.S., only bovine rhinitis A virus 1 (BRAV1) has been identified while bovine rhinitis A virus 2 (BRAV2) and bovine rhinitis B virus (BRBV) were previously only identified in England and Japan, respectively. Metagenomic sequencing of a nasal swab from a bovine respiratory disease (BRD) diagnostic submission from Kansas identified contigs with approximately 90% nucleotide similarity to BRAV2 and BRBV. A combination of de novo and templated assemblies using reference genomes yielded near complete BRAV2 and BRBV genomes. The near complete genome of bovine rhinitis A virus 1 (BRAV1) was also determined from a historical isolate to enable further molecular epidemiological studies. A 5'-nuclease reverse transcription PCR assay targeting the 3D polymerase gene was designed and used to screen 204 archived BRD clinical specimens. Thirteen (6.4%) were positive. Metagenomic sequencing of six positive samples identified mixed BRAV1/BRAV2, BRAV1/BRBV and BRAV2/BRBV infections for five samples. One sample showed infection only with BRAV1. Seroprevalence studies using a cell culture adapted BRBV found immunofluorescence assay-reactive antibodies were common in the herds analyzed. Altogether, these results demonstrate that BRV infections are common in cattle with respiratory disease and that BRAV1, BRAV2 and BRBV co-circulate in U.S. cattle and have high similarity to viruses isolated more than 30 years ago from diverse locations. PMID:25789939

  12. Bovine rhinitis viruses are common in U.S. cattle with bovine respiratory disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben M Hause

    Full Text Available Bovine rhinitis viruses (BRV are established etiological agents of bovine respiratory disease complex however little research into their epidemiology and ecology has been published for several decades. In the U.S., only bovine rhinitis A virus 1 (BRAV1 has been identified while bovine rhinitis A virus 2 (BRAV2 and bovine rhinitis B virus (BRBV were previously only identified in England and Japan, respectively. Metagenomic sequencing of a nasal swab from a bovine respiratory disease (BRD diagnostic submission from Kansas identified contigs with approximately 90% nucleotide similarity to BRAV2 and BRBV. A combination of de novo and templated assemblies using reference genomes yielded near complete BRAV2 and BRBV genomes. The near complete genome of bovine rhinitis A virus 1 (BRAV1 was also determined from a historical isolate to enable further molecular epidemiological studies. A 5'-nuclease reverse transcription PCR assay targeting the 3D polymerase gene was designed and used to screen 204 archived BRD clinical specimens. Thirteen (6.4% were positive. Metagenomic sequencing of six positive samples identified mixed BRAV1/BRAV2, BRAV1/BRBV and BRAV2/BRBV infections for five samples. One sample showed infection only with BRAV1. Seroprevalence studies using a cell culture adapted BRBV found immunofluorescence assay-reactive antibodies were common in the herds analyzed. Altogether, these results demonstrate that BRV infections are common in cattle with respiratory disease and that BRAV1, BRAV2 and BRBV co-circulate in U.S. cattle and have high similarity to viruses isolated more than 30 years ago from diverse locations.

  13. Survey on vertical infection of bovine viral diarrhea virus from fetal bovine sera in the field

    OpenAIRE

    NAGAYAMA, Kumiko; OGUMA, Keisuke; SENTSUI, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) isolation and antibody survey were performed using 2,758 fetal bovine sera (FBS) collected from slaughterhouses in New Zealand, Australia and the Dominican Republic, and then sent to Japan to manufacture commercial serum for cell culture use. FBS in the Dominican Republic were pooled for each several individuals, and those collected in other countries were separated according to each individual and subjected to the tests. BVDV was isolated from 25 (0.91%) FB...

  14. Bovine HEXIM1 inhibits bovine immunodeficiency virus replication through regulating BTat-mediated transactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Hong-yan; Ma, Yong-gang; Gai, Yuan-ming; Liang, Zhi-bin; Ma, Jing; Su, Yang; Zhang, Qi-cheng; Chen, Qi-Min; Tan, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) transactivator (BTat) recruits the bovine cyclin T1 (B-cyclin T1) to the LTR to facilitate the transcription of BIV. Here, we demonstrate that bovine hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA)-induced protein 1 (BHEXIM1) inhibits BTat-mediated BIV LTR transcription. The results of in vivo and in vitro assays show direct binding of BHEXIM1 to the B-cyclin T1. These results suggest that the repression arises from BHEXIM1-BTat competition for B-cyclin T1, which all...

  15. Discovery of drugs that possess activity against feline leukemia virus

    OpenAIRE

    Greggs, Willie M.; Clouser, Christine L.; Patterson, Steven E.; Louis M Mansky

    2012-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a gammaretrovirus that is a significant cause of neoplastic-related disorders affecting cats worldwide. Treatment options for FeLV are limited, associated with serious side effects, and can be cost-prohibitive. The development of drugs used to treat a related retrovirus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has been rapid, leading to the approval of five drug classes. Although structural differences affect the susceptibility of gammaretroviruses to anti...

  16. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus-Associated Disease in Feedlot Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDv) is associated with bovine respiratory disease complex and other diseases of feedlot cattle. Although occasionally a primary pathogen, BVDv's impact on cattle health is through the immunosuppressive effects of the virus and its synergism with other pathogens. The simple presence or absence of BVDv does not result in consistent health outcomes because BVDv is only one of many risk factors that contribute to disease syndromes. Current interventions have limitations and the optimum strategy for their uses to limit the health, production, and economic costs associated with BVDv have to be carefully considered for optimum cost-effectiveness. PMID:26210765

  17. Appearance of murine leukemia virus in NIH Swiss mice with radiation-induced leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the NIH Swiss mouse strain, a low leukemic strain, thymic lymphomas were efficiently induced by fractionated X-irradiation. However, neither XC-plaqueforming virus nor mink S+L- cell focus-inducing virus were found in either leukemic or normal mice. A search for murine leukemia virus-related components was carried out in NIH Swiss mice with radiation-induced leukemias by measurement of viral specific RDDP activity and radioimmunoassay for p30. RDDP activities in thymomas from leukemic mice were sign ificantly higher than thymuses from normal mice. RDDP-containing particles obtaind from those thymomas showed a buoyant density of 1.16(g/m1). Radioimmunoassay studies showed that thymomas and enlarged spleens of leukemic mice contained much higher amounts of p30 than those of normal mice, but there was no difference in the p30 level of bone marrow, u terus or liver between normal and leukemic mice. The possible role in leukemogeneis of these murine leukemia virus-like particles appearing in mice with radiation-induced leukemia is discussed. (author)

  18. Vaccination against bovine herpes mammillitis virus infections in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smee, D F; Leonhardt, J A

    1994-01-01

    Bovine herpes mammillitis virus or bovine herpesvirus type 2 (BHV-2) causes ulcerative lesions on the teats and udders of infected cows. Since no commercial vaccine is available for this disease, we investigated certain experimental BHV-2 vaccines against this virus in infected guinea pigs. Vaginally infected guinea pigs get severe, self-limiting vaginal infections characterized by erythema and swelling and the production of measurable vaginal virus titers. Two vaccine approaches were investigated: vaccination with wild-type (WT) virus by the subcutaneous route, and vaccination either subcutaneously or intravaginally with a thymidine kinase (TK) deficient (TK-) virus. The TK- strain was prepared by passage of BHV-2 in the presence of the potent TK-dependent antiviral agent 1-(2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-methyluracil (FMAU). The antiviral activity of FMAU against the virus in plaque reduction assays changed from 0.05 to 2 microM at the same time that the TK activity of the mutant virus decrease to 7% of WT virus TK activity. Subcutaneous vaccination of guinea pigs with WT and TK- viruses did not induce vaginal infection. Primary vaginal infection (vaccination) with the TK- virus led to greatly reduced lesion severity compared to vaginal infection with the WT virus. However, the amount of vaginal virus titers recovered during these primary infections was similar for both TK- and WT viruses, indicating that both viruses had equal infecting potential. Thirty days after vaccination the animals were re-infected intravaginally with WT virus. The vaccinated animals showed dramatically reduced lesion severity and low recoverable virus titers compared to age-matched nonvaccinated animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7928285

  19. Isolation of paralysis-inducing murine leukemia viruses from Friend virus passaged in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Kai, K; Furuta, T

    1984-01-01

    Four clones of murine leukemia viruses (PVC-111, PVC-211, PVC-321, and PVC-441) were isolated from a paralyzed Fischer rat which had been infected with rat-passaged Friend leukemia virus. PVC-211 and PVC-321 viruses induced hind leg paralysis in rats and killed them within 1 month, and PVC-441 did so within 2 months after infection, whereas PVC-111 did not within 4 months. PVC-321 and PVC-441 but not PVC-111 virus grew well in brain and spinal cord media. The viral antigens were found often i...

  20. Epidemiology, Molecular Epidemiology and Evolution of Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Gilberto Vaughan; Yuko Nakamura-Lopez; Rosa Elena Sarmiento-Silva

    2012-01-01

    The bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is an enveloped, negative sense, single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the pneumovirus genus within the family Paramyxoviridae. BRSV has been recognized as a major cause of respiratory disease in young calves since the early 1970s. The analysis of BRSV infection was originally hampered by its characteristic lability and poor growth in vitro. However, the advent of numerous immunological and molecular methods has facilitated the study of BRSV enor...

  1. Characterization of an Experimental Vaccine for Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hägglund, Sara; Hu, Kefei; Blodörn, Krister; Makabi-Panzu, Boby; Gaillard, Anne-Laure; Ellencrona, Karin; Chevret, Didier; Hellman, Lars; Bengtsson, Karin Lövgren; Riffault, Sabine; Taylor, Geraldine; Valarcher, Jean François; Eléouët, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) are major causes of respiratory disease in calves and children, respectively, and are priorities for vaccine development. We previously demonstrated that an experimental vaccine, BRSV-immunostimulating complex (ISCOM), is effective in calves with maternal antibodies. The present study focuses on the antigenic characterization of this vaccine for the design of new-generation subunit vaccines. The results of ...

  2. Human and bovine respiratory syncytial virus vaccine research and development

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Gilles; Deplanche, Martine; Schelcher, François

    2008-01-01

    Human (HRSV) and bovine (BRSV) respiratory syncytial viruses (RSV) are two closely related viruses, which are the most important causative agents of respiratory tract infections of young children and calves, respectively. BRSV vaccines have been available for nearly 2 decades. They probably have reduced the prevalence of RSV infection but their efficacy needs improvement. In contrast, despite decades of research, there is no currently licensed vaccine for the prevention of HRSV disease. Devel...

  3. Prevalence of antibodies to infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, parainfluenza 3, bovine respiratory syncytial, and bovine viral diarrhea viruses in cattle in Saskatchewan and Alberta

    OpenAIRE

    Durham, Peter J.K.; Hassard, Lori E.

    1990-01-01

    A total of 1745 healthy cattle from 295 farms in Saskatchewan and Alberta was tested by ELISA for antibodies to four viruses. Antibodies to infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus were found in 37.8% of sera (59.5% of properties), to parainfluenza 3 (PI3) virus in 93.9% of sera (99.7% of properties), to bovine respiratory syncytial (BRS) virus in 78.5% of sera (86.6% of properties), and to bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) virus in 40.6% of sera (66.7% of properties)

  4. Construction and characterization of chimeric BHIV (BIV/HIV-1) viruses carrying the bovine immunodeficiency virus gag gene

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yi-Xin; Liu, Chang; Liu, Xin-Lei; Qiao, Wen-Tao; Chen, Qi-Min; Zeng, Yi; Geng, Yun-Qi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the possibility of the replacement of the gag gene between human immunodeficiency virus and bovine immunodeficiency virus, to achieve chimeric virions, and thereby gain a new kind of AIDS vaccine based on BHIV chimeric viruses.

  5. Experimental infection of reindeer with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Morton

    1990-08-01

    Full Text Available Two 8-month reindeer (Rangifer tarandus and a 1-month-old Hereford-Holstein calf (Bos taurus were inoculated intranasally with the Singer (cytopathogenic strain of bovine viral diarrhea (BVD virus. Clinical signs in reindeer included loose stools containing blood and mucus, and transient laminitis or coronitis. Signs in the calf were limited to bloody mucus in the stool and lesions in the nasal mucosa. Antibody titers to BVD virus in the reindeer were intermittent, and titers in the calf persisted from days 14 to 63 post-inoculation (PI. Viremia was detected on PI day 4 in one reindeer, days 3-7 in the other, and days 2-7 in the calf. Bovine viral diarrhea virus was isolated from the lung of the calf at necropsy (PI day 63.

  6. Bovine lymphocytic leukemia: studies of etiology, pathogenesis and mode of transmission. Progress report, November 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, D.K.

    1980-06-01

    The primary project objectives are to elucidate the cause(s) and early pathogenesis of the adult form of lymphosarcoma in cattle. This goal is to be accomplished through experimental transmission of the disease. For these studies large quantities of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) were propagated in short-term, mitogen stimulated, lymphocyte cultures. Cultures containing abundant BLV particles were pooled (33 liters total) and further processed by continuous flow, density gradient, ultracentrifugation. This higly concentrated, cell free, BLV preparation was then used as inoculum for 12 late stage bovine fetuses (inoculated in utero) and two newborn calves. Extensive monitoring studies have been carrid out on these inoculated animals to detect precancerous changes and to obtain a detailed description of the events preceding the development of lymphosarcoma. These extensive records on lymphosarcoma associated blood parameters have established that all of the inoculated animals became persistently BLV infected. However, after more than five years of incubation, no cases of lymphosarcoma developed. Consequently, during the past seven months, five of these well characterized animals have been subjected to frequent BLV re-exposure in order to study BLV-host interactions in previously infected adults and to potentially accelerate tumor formation in these animals.

  7. Evaluation of western blotting for the diagnosis of enzootic bovine leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez E.T.; Oliva G.A.; Norimine J.; Cid de la Paz V.; Echeverría M.G.

    1999-01-01

    A western blotting (WB) procedure has been developed for detecting antibodies to bovine leukosis virus (BLV) in cattle sera. Two hundred and thirty three serum samples from naturally infected cattle with BLV virus and serial bleedings from experimentally BLV infected cows were used. An agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGID) was used for comparing with the results obtained by WB. The AGID positive sera showed a different degree of reactivity by WB test against the two most important viral antige...

  8. Feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus in Canada: Recommendations for testing and management

    OpenAIRE

    Little, Susan; Bienzle, Dorothee; Carioto, Lisa; Chisholm, Hugh; O’Brien, Elizabeth; Scherk, Margie

    2011-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are common and important infectious disease agents of cats in Canada. Seroprevalence data for FeLV and FIV in various populations of Canadian cats are reviewed and recommendations for testing and management of infections by these viruses in cats in Canada are presented. Retrovirus testing in Canada is infrequent in comparison with the United States, and efforts should be focused on reducing physical and other barriers to tes...

  9. Estimating transfer of bovine virus-diarrhoea virus in Danish cattle by use of register data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alban, L.; Stryhn, H.; Kjeldsen, A.M.; Ersbøll, A. K.; Skjøth, F.; Christensen, J.; Bitsch, V.; Chriél, Mariann; Strøger, U.

    2001-01-01

    To study how routinely recorded data (also called "register data") might be used in disease monitoring on a regional or national level, a database for bovine virus-diarrhoea virus (BVDV) was made from existing databases, covering the period January 1995-November 1999. This paper includes a general...

  10. Integration of murine leukemia virus DNA depends on mitosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Roe, T.; Reynolds, T. C.; Yu, G.; Brown, P O

    1993-01-01

    In synchronized rat or mouse cells infected with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV), integration of viral DNA and production of viral proteins occur only after the cells traverse mitosis. Integration is blocked when cells are prevented from progressing through mitosis. Viral nucleoprotein complexes isolated from arrested cells contain full-length viral DNA and can integrate this viral DNA in vitro, showing that the block to integration in arrested cells is not due to a lack of mature integra...

  11. Delayed type hypersensitivity responses to radiation leukemia virus variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DTH responses were evaluated in different strains of mice shown to be resistant or sensitive to leukemogenesis by the radiation leukemia virus variants A-RadLV and D-RadLV. A significant response was observed only in the H-2 complex-linked resistant haplotypes to RadLV leukemogenesis. The DTH response could be transferred by immune cells of mice resistant to the appropriate RadLV variant. Thus, an inverse relationship between the leukemogenic activity of the virus and its immunization ability expressed by DTH response was demonstrated in different mouse strains

  12. Specific fluorescein-labeled antibodies to bovine viral diarrhea virus prepared from sera of rabbits immunized with purified virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, R. A.; Rhodes, M B

    1980-01-01

    Specific fluorescein-labeled antibody conjugates to three strains of bovine virus diarrhea virus were prepared from hyperimmune rabbit sera. Viruses used to hyperimmunize the rabbits were purified by four different procedures. Conjugates were comparable in quality and specificity to conjugates prepared from serum of a calf hyperimmunized to bovine virus diarrhea virus in our laboratory. The latter conjugate was tested by Biologics Laboratories, National Veterinary Services, U.S.D.A., Ames, Iowa.

  13. Clinical aspects of feline immunodeficiency and feline leukemia virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Katrin

    2011-10-15

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are retroviruses with a global impact on the health of domestic cats. The two viruses differ in their potential to cause disease. FIV can cause an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome that increases the risk of developing opportunistic infections, neurological diseases, and tumors. In most naturally infected cats, however, FIV itself does not cause severe clinical signs, and FIV-infected cats may live many years without any health problems. FeLV is more pathogenic, and was long considered to be responsible for more clinical syndromes than any other agent in cats. FeLV can cause tumors (mainly lymphoma), bone marrow suppression syndromes (mainly anemia) and lead to secondary infectious diseases caused by suppressive effects of the virus on bone marrow and the immune system. Today, FeLV is less important as a deadly infectious agent as in the last 20 years prevalence has been decreasing in most countries. PMID:21807418

  14. Molecular characterization of RadLV (radiation leukemia virus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a course of a fractionated whole-body x-irradiation, a high percentage of C57BL/Ka mice develop thymic lymphomas. Radiation leukemia virus (RadLV) can be consistently isolated from these tumors. RadLV can induce identical lymphomas in unirradiated C57BL/Ka mice, and its role as the etiologic agent of these malignancies has been clearly documented. In order to characterize the viral genome at the molecular level, the unintegrated DNA intermediates of several RadLV isolates were prepared. Several different protocols were developed to optimize the yield and quality of restriction endonucleases, and cloned into a bacteriophage vector using recombinant DNA technology. RadLV is a general term used to describe a number of lymphomagenic viruses isolated from (1) primary radiation-induced lymphomas, (2) virus-induced lymphomas, and (3) established cell lines. The RadLV viruses replicate preferentially in the thymus and cause thymic lymphomas. Non-thymotropic, non-oncogenic, fibrotropic viruses can also be isolated from C57BL/Ka mice. Thus, a spectrum of biological activities can be seen among the C57BL/Ka mouse retroviruses. This dissertation reports the molecular cloning of three of the RadLV viruses. They are: (1) RadLV/VL3 and (2) RadLV/RL10, both lymphomagenic viruses, and (3) RadLV/RL15, a non-oncogenic isolate. The generation of restriction maps from both the cloned DNAs and the unintegrated viral DNA intermediates is described. These maps are compared with those of other C57BL/Ka murine retroviruses, and with published maps of other murine leukemia viruses

  15. Production of a highly immunogenic subunit ISCOM vaccine against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Søren; Roensholt, L.; Jensen, M.Holm;

    1999-01-01

    Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) is a major pathogen of cattle in most countries. The main reservoir of virus in herds are BVDV persistently infected animals, which arise as a result of infection of the bovine fetus early in gestation. The spread of virus to the unborn fetus may be prevented by...

  16. Induction of mouse leukemia by combined ionizing radiation and virus inoculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reported on leukemogenetic effect of γ-rays and T-638 virus in adult Kumming mice. During the period of one year, the incidence of leukemia in the mice of all experimental groups was remarkably higher than that of the control. The induction rate of leukemia was increased in the group which received combined treatment of fractionated total-body irradiation and virus injection, compared with the group which received virus alone. The latent period of induced leukemia in the group of combined treatment was shorter than the corresponding groups with 680 R irradiation and with virus inoculation alone. The results showed that both ionizing radiation and T-638 virus may induce leukemia in mice. Enhancing effect of virus on irradiation was proved by shortening of the latent period of leukemia

  17. Adjuvant enhancement of humoral immune response to chemically inactivated bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, K S; Johnson, D. W.; Muscoplat, C C

    1985-01-01

    Potentiation of the antibody response to inactivated bovine viral diarrhea virus by immunological adjuvants was studied in guinea pigs and cattle. The inactivated bovine viral diarrhea virus alone was demonstrated to be a weak immunogen. Addition of either 2 mg per mL diethylaminoethyl-dextran or 5% alhydrogel to inactivated bovine viral diarrhea virus did not or only slightly stimulated the antibody response; the combined adjuvants induced a significantly higher titer. A higher concentration...

  18. The relationship between the occurrence of undifferentiated bovine respiratory disease and titer changes to bovine coronavirus and bovine viral diarrhea virus in 3 Ontario feedlots.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, A; Martin, S W; Nagy, E.; Menzies, P; Harland, R

    2001-01-01

    Serological evidence of previous viral exposure (titer at arrival) and current viral exposure (titer increase) during a 28-day study period, was used to determine if bovine coronavirus (BCV) or bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) was associated with the occurrence of undifferentiated bovine respiratory disease (UBRD) in feedlot calves. Neutralizing antibody titers to BCV and BVDV were determined for 852 animals from 3 Ontario feedlots. Calves at 2 of the 3 feedlots (n = 753) received a modifie...

  19. Single Amino Acid Insertion in Loop 4 Confers Amphotropic Murine Leukemia Virus Receptor Function upon Murine Pit1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundorf, Mikkel D.; Pedersen, Finn Skou; O'Hara, Bryan; Pedersen, Lene

    1998-01-01

    Pit1 is the human receptor for gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) and feline leukemia virus subgroup B (FeLV-B), while the related human protein Pit2 is a receptor for amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV). The A-MuLV-related isolate 10A1 can utilize both Pit1 and Pit2 as receptors. A stretch of...

  20. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) gene polymorphism and expression of membrane-bound TNFα protein on CD11b+ and IgM+ cells in cows naturally infected with bovine leukemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojarojć-Nosowicz, B; Kaczmarczyk, E; Stachura, A; Kubińska, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether SNP at position -824 (promoter region) of the TNFα gene significantly differentiates the size of IgM+, CD5+ and CD11b+ cell subpopulations and affects the expression of membrane-bound TNFα protein (mTNFα) on these cells and their susceptibility to BLV infections. In this study, significant differences were determined for the first time between TNFα genotypes and the percentage of cells with the CD11b+TNFα+p24+ immunophenotype. Furthermore, greater expansion of lymphocytes with the IgM+TNFα+p24+ immunophenotype was reported in cows with the G/G genotype than in A/A homozygotes. Cells with the above immunophenotype were more frequently observed in cows with persistent leukocytosis than in aleukemic cattle. Our results suggest that polymorphism of the TNFα-824 A>G gene and mTNFα protein expression play an important role in the pathogenesis of enzootic bovine leukosis. PMID:26618585

  1. Occurrence of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus and Feline Leukemia Virus Infection in Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiana Alves; Daniela D.S. Rajao; Helen L.D. Puerto; Braz, Gissandra F; Romulo C. Leite; Carlos Mazur; Martins, Almir S; Jenner K.P.D. Reis

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The objective of the present work was to evaluate the occurrence of the Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) and the Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) infection in asymptomatic domestic cats in the metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) for FIV detection and SNAP Combo Plus for FeLV and FIV detection. Approach: Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein of 78 healthy cats, mixed breeds and ages and both sexes. Specif...

  2. The receptors for gibbon ape leukemia virus and amphotropic murine leukemia virus are not downregulated in productively infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiden Maribeth V

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last several decades it has been noted, using a variety of different methods, that cells infected by a specific gammaretrovirus are resistant to infection by other retroviruses that employ the same receptor; a phenomenon termed receptor interference. Receptor masking is thought to provide an earlier means of blocking superinfection, whereas receptor down regulation is generally considered to occur in chronically infected cells. Results We used replication-competent GFP-expressing viruses containing either an amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MLV or the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV envelope. We also constructed similar viruses containing fluorescence-labeled Gag proteins for the detection of viral particles. Using this repertoire of reagents together with a wide range of antibodies, we were able to determine the presence and availability of viral receptors, and detect viral envelope proteins and particles presence on the cell surface of chronically infected cells. Conclusions A-MLV or GALV receptors remain on the surface of chronically infected cells and are detectable by respective antibodies, indicating that these receptors are not downregulated in these infected cells as previously proposed. We were also able to detect viral envelope proteins on the infected cell surface and infected cells are unable to bind soluble A-MLV or GALV envelopes indicating that receptor binding sites are masked by endogenously expressed A-MLV or GALV viral envelope. However, receptor masking does not completely prevent A-MLV or GALV superinfection.

  3. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and concurrent Bartonella spp., feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Dirofilaria immitis infections in Egyptian cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxoplasma gondii and Bartonella spp. are zoonotic pathogens of cats. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLv) are related to Human Immunodeficiency Virus, and Human Leukemia Virus, respectively, and these viruses are immunosuppressive. In the present study, the prevalen...

  4. Bioinformatic and molecular analysis of evolutionary relation between bovine rhinitis A viruses and foot-and-mouth disease virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine rhinitis viruses (BRV) cause mild respiratory disease of cattle. In this study, a near full length genome sequence of a virus named RS3X (formerly classified as bovine rhinovirus type 1) isolated from infected cattle from the United Kingdom in the 1960s, was obtained and analyzed. Phylogeneti...

  5. Bioinformatic and molecular analysis of evolutionary relation between bovine rhinitis A viruses and Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine rhinitis viruses (BRV) cause mild respiratory disease of cattle. In this study, a near full length genome sequence of a virus named RS3X, formerly classified as bovine rhinovirus type 1, isolated from infected cattle from the United Kingdom in the 1960s, was obtained and analyzed. Phylogeneti...

  6. Seroepidemiological study of parainfluenza 3 virus in bovines with reproductive failure, from monteria-colombia

    OpenAIRE

    César Betancur Hurtado; Alberto Orrego Uribe; Marco González Tous

    2010-01-01

    The virus of the bovine Para influenza 3 is known to be a part of the bovine respiratory complex, along with another infectious agent as the bovine sincitialrespiratory virus, which has not as yet been diagnosed at the geographical area of this study. This work was carried out at Monteria, Colombia, in bovines from 28 farms, with the aim of finding the serological prevalence of the PI-3 virus. Blood samples were collected from 137 females, with a history of reproductive failure, and from 26 b...

  7. Sporadic Bovine Leukosis: A Description of Eight Calves Received at Animal Diseases Research Institute from 1974-1980

    OpenAIRE

    Bundza, A.; Greig, A. S.; Chander, S; Dukes, T W

    1980-01-01

    Eight calves with sporadic bovine leukosis are described. The common features were generalized lymphadenopathy, visceral involvement and raised total leukocyte and lymphocyte counts. Agar gel immunodiffusion tests for bovine leukemia virus antibodies were negative in eight animals and in all animals from three herds of origin. Lymphocytic nuclear pockets were found in the tissues of one calf but attempts to isolate bovine leukemia virus from two animals were unsuccessful.

  8. Detection of bluetongue virus by using bovine endothelial cells and embryonated chicken eggs.

    OpenAIRE

    Wechsler, S J; Luedke, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    Two systems, inoculation of bovine endothelial cells and of embryonated chicken eggs, were compared for detection of bluetongue virus (BTV) in blood specimens from experimentally inoculated sheep. For all BTV serotypes tested, embryonated chicken eggs detected longer periods of viremia than did bovine endothelial cells, primarily by detecting BTV in samples containing lower virus concentrations.

  9. Control of bovine leukosis virus in a dairy herd by a change in dehorning.

    OpenAIRE

    DiGiacomo, R F; Hopkins, S G; Darlington, R L; Evermann, J F

    1987-01-01

    Following the demonstration that bovine leukosis virus was transmitted in calves by gouge dehorning, electrical dehorning at a younger age was implemented in a commercial Holstein herd. Subsequently, annual testing of the herd revealed a decline in the prevalence of bovine leukosis virus antibodies as older cattle dehorned by the former method were replaced by younger cattle dehorned by the latter method.

  10. Genotyping of feline leukemia virus in Mexican housecats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Hugo; Autran, Marcela; García, M Martha; Carmona, M Ángel; Rodríguez, Cecilia; Martínez, H Alejandro

    2016-04-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a retrovirus with variable rates of infection globally. DNA was obtained from cats' peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and proviral DNA of pol and env genes was detected using PCR. Seventy-six percent of cats scored positive for FeLV using env-PCR; and 54 %, by pol-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of both regions identified sequences that correspond to a group that includes endogenous retroviruses. They form an independent branch and, therefore, a new group of endogenous viruses. Cat gender, age, outdoor access, and cohabitation with other cats were found to be significant risk factors associated with the disease. This strongly suggests that these FeLV genotypes are widely distributed in the studied feline population in Mexico. PMID:26747244

  11. Cerebral Candidal Abscess and Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus Infection in an Aborted Bovine Fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilander, A C; Niles, G A; Frank, C B

    2016-01-01

    Candida species are opportunistic fungi associated with immunosuppression and are the most commonly isolated fungal pathogens from the human central nervous system. Invasive candidiasis is reported uncommonly in animals and there have only been two reports of candidal infection of the brain. This report presents a case of a cerebral candidal abscess in an aborted late-term calf co-infected with bovine viral diarrhoea virus. Candida etchellsii, a species not previously identified as pathogenic, was identified as the causative agent by polymerase chain reaction. PMID:26895887

  12. Experimental fetal infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus. II. Morphological reactions and distribution of viral antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohmann, H B

    1982-01-01

    The effect of an infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus on fetal bovine tissues as well as the tissue-localization of viral antigen are described. Four bovine fetuses, 120-165 days of gestation, were inoculated in utero with a second passage virus strain. Lymphoid tissues were studied by light and electron microscopy. The infection induced precocious development of the secondary lymphoid organs. Characteristic changes were seen in postcapillary venules, cells of the mononuclear phagocyte ...

  13. Antibody Tracing, Seroepidemiology and Risk Factors of Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Bovine Adenovirus-3 in Dairy Holstein Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa FARZINPOUR

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibody tracing, risk factors and seroepidemiology of bovine respiratory syncytial virus and bovine adenovirus-3 were investigated in 22 Industrial and Semi-Industrial dairy Holstein farms. Serum samples (n=736 from various ages of unvaccinated cows were collected from May to September 2012. Risk factors including age, past history of respiratory diseases, amount of milk production, husbandry type and herd size were considered. Data were analyzed by Chi-square and logistic regression. Results indicated that the infection with some of individual viruses was related to past history of respiratory disease and herd size. No specific pattern was seen on the effect of level of milk production on seropositivity of animals. The seroprevalence for BRSV and BAV-3 were 89.1% and 88%, respectively. The present study indicates that infections of bovine respiratory viruses frequently occur in cattle of Fars province and the main viral cause of primary occurrence of respiratory diseases may be due to aforementioned viruses.

  14. Target cells involved in radiation and radiation leukemia virus leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative studies concerned with the induction and early proliferation phases of preleukemic cells in relation to host environments using radiation or radiation leukemia virus as the leukemogenic agents, indicated different developmental pathways. The lack of thymus in mice exposed to fractionated irradiation did not prevent preleukemic cell induction but did interfere with the incidence of RadLV induced preleukemic cells. Thymus removal within several days following RadLV inoculation prevented the establishment of preleukemic cells in the bone marrow. The radiation induced preleukemic cells in the bone marrow. The radiation induced preleukemic cells were not lysed by anti-Thy-1.2 serum treatment and guinea pig complement whereas the RadLV induced ones were lysed to different degrees. Elimination of Thy-1.2 bearing cells from the virus induced preleukemic population reduced the development of overt T leukemias of donor origin. The thymus seemed of essential importance for establishing the proliferation of RadLV induced preleukemic cells but not for those induced by fractionated irradiation

  15. Identification and analysis of putative promoter motifs in bovine herpes virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurjogi, Mahantesh Mallikrjun; Sanakal, Rajeshwari Danappa; Kaliwal, Basappa Basaveneppa

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and analyse the putative promoter motifs in the bovine herpes virus which causes several diseases in cattle worldwide including bovine mastitis with large economic impact on dairy industry. Bovine mastitis caused due to virus is often neglected as bacterial infections are held mainly responsible for the disease. Therefore, in this in silico investigation with all the existing experimental data a total of 147 promoter were identified along with their sequences from three genome viz bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV), bovine herpes virus 4 and bovine herpes virus 5, out of which 39 promoters were from bovine herpes virus 4 (BHV 4), 95 from BHV1 and 13 from BHV5 and it was observed that BHV1 and BHV5 have a close evolutionary history. However, they belong to the same subfamily and size of the genome and GC% of BHV1 and BHV5 was almost equal and very high compare to that of BHV4. This analysis may help in designing the live attenuated vaccine against BHV causing bovine mastitis that reduces the incidence of bovine mastitis. Identification of promoters may also help in designing of expression vectors which help in better understanding of the regulation of gene expression. In the era of large genomics and proteomics prediction of promoters in the whole genome is crucial for the advancement of drug discovery and gene therapy. PMID:23275714

  16. Epidemiology, Molecular Epidemiology and Evolution of Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Vaughan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV is an enveloped, negative sense, single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the pneumovirus genus within the family Paramyxoviridae. BRSV has been recognized as a major cause of respiratory disease in young calves since the early 1970s. The analysis of BRSV infection was originally hampered by its characteristic lability and poor growth in vitro. However, the advent of numerous immunological and molecular methods has facilitated the study of BRSV enormously. The knowledge gained from these studies has also provided the opportunity to develop safe, stable, attenuated virus vaccine candidates. Nonetheless, many aspects of the epidemiology, molecular epidemiology and evolution of the virus are still not fully understood. The natural course of infection is rather complex and further complicates diagnosis, treatment and the implementation of preventive measures aimed to control the disease. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms by which BRSV is able to establish infection is needed to prevent viral and disease spread. This review discusses important information regarding the epidemiology and molecular epidemiology of BRSV worldwide, and it highlights the importance of viral evolution in virus transmission.

  17. Inactivation of bovine immunodeficiency virus by photodynamic therapy with HMME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huijuan Yin; Yingxin Li; Zhaohui Zou; Wentao Qiao; Xue Yao; Yang Su; Hongyan Guo

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with hematoporphrin monomethyl ether (HMME) on bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) can provide the basis theory for photoinactivation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). To assess the protection of HMME-PDT on the cell line Cf2Th infected with BIVR29 by 3-(4,5)-dimethylthiahiazol-2-yl-3,5-di-phenytetrazolium bromide (MTT) with power density of 5 and 25 mW/cm2 and energy density from 0.6 to 3 J/cm. To observe the inhibition of membrane fusion using a new reporter cell line BIVE by fluorescence microscope. HMME-PDT has significant protectant effects on Cf2Th-BIVR29 with both power densities, especially in the group of high power density. Fluorescent microscope shows that there is no significant difference between the group of PDT and control, which means PDT could not inhibit the BIV-mediated membrane fusion.

  18. Symmetrical base preferences surrounding HIV-1, avian sarcoma/leukosis virus, and murine leukemia virus integration sites

    OpenAIRE

    Holman, Alexander G; Coffin, John M.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate retroviral integration targeting on a nucleotide scale, we examined the base frequencies directly surrounding cloned in vivo HIV-1, murine leukemia virus, and avian sarcoma/leukosis virus integrations. Base preferences of up to 2-fold the expected frequencies were found for three viruses, representing P values down to

  19. DETECTION OF ANTIBODIES AGAINST BOVINE HERPES VIRUS 1, BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUS AND BOVINE RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS IN EARLY AND ULTRA-EARLY WEANED BEEF CALVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Daniel Gonzalez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in weaned calves. In Argentina, two weaning practices have been implemented. In the early weaning, the calf is removed from the cow at 60-70 days of age while in ultra-early weaning the calf is weaned at 30-45 days of age. The purposes of both systems is to improve cow body condition, calf performance, conception rates and forage availability for the cow. In this study we evaluated the antibody response against BVDV and BoHV1 in early and ultra-early weaned calves that had received a conventional vaccination schedule (first dose at weaning and a booster 21 days post-weaning. Passively acquired immunity may provide protection against disease caused by these viruses. The presence of antibodies against BRSV, a virus that was not present in the vaccines used, was also evaluated as an indirect indicator of viral circulation in the herd. At the time of vaccination, calves presented a wide range of maternally-derived antibody titers. Vaccination against BoHV-1 did not evoke seroconvertion and antibody titers continued to decay throughout the experience. After vaccination, seroconversion to BVDV could be detected in calves with low antibody titers, while higher antibody titers exerted an inhibitory effect of the active humoral response.

  20. Cell surface antigens of radiation leukemia virus-induced BALB/c leukemias defined by syngeneic cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cell surface antigens of mouse leukemias were defined by BALB/c cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) generated against syngeneic radiation leukemia virus (RadLV)-induced leukemia, BALBRV1 or BALBRVD. Hyperimmunization of BALB/c mice with irradiated leukemias followed by in vitro sensitization of primed spleen cells resulted in the generation of CTL with high killing activity. The specificity of CTL was examined by direct cytotoxicity assays and competitive inhibition assays. A shared cell surface antigen, designated as BALBRV1 antigen, was detected by BALB/c anti-BALBRV1 CTL. BALBRV1 antigen was expressed not only on RadLV-induced BALB/c leukemias except for BALBRVD, but also on spontaneous or X-ray-induced BALB/c leukemias, chemically-induced leukemias with the H-2d haplotype and some chemically-induced BALB/c sarcomas. In contrast, a unique cell surface antigen, designated as BALBRVD antigen, was detected by BALB/c anti-BALBRVD CTL. BALBRVD antigen was expressed only on BALBRVD, but not on thirty-nine normal lymphoid or tumor cells. These two antigens could be distinguished from those previously defined on Friend, Moloney, Rauscher or Gross murine leukemia virus (MuLV) leukemias, or MuLV-related antigens. Both cytotoxic responses were blocked by antisera against H-2Kd, but not H-2Dd. The relationship of BALBRV1 antigen and BALBRVD antigen to endogenous MuLV is discussed with regard to the antigenic distribution on tumor cell lines. (author)

  1. Expression of a 50 kDa putative receptor for bovine viral diarrhea virus in bovine fetal tissues.

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, L; Zhang, S.; W. Xue; Kapil, S; Minocha, H C

    1998-01-01

    The expression of a 50 kDa bovine viral diarrhea virus putative receptor in different bovine fetal tissues from 3-month old fetuses was studied. The receptor expression was examined by immunocytochemical staining and by immunoblotting using antiidiotypic probe (anti-D89). Intense specific staining in enterocytes of the small and large intestines, cortical tubular epithelial cells of kidneys, respiratory epithelial cells of the trachea and esophageal mucosal epithelial cells was observed, demo...

  2. Susceptibility of human primary neuronal cells to Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-related (XMRV virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girisetty Mohan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-related (XMRV virus is a recently identified mouse gammaretrovirus that has the ability to infect certain human cells. In this study, we investigated the susceptibility of primary neuronal cell types to infection with XMRV. Findings We observed that the human primary progenitors, progenitor-derived neurons, and progenitor-derived astrocytes supported XMRV multiplication. Interestingly, both progenitors and progenitor-derived neurons were more susceptible compared with progenitor-derived astrocytes. In addition, XMRV-infected Jurkat cells were able to transmit infection to neuronal cells. Conclusions These data suggest that neuronal cells are susceptible for XMRV infection.

  3. A review of feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence in cats in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Susan

    2011-10-15

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are common and important infectious diseases of cats in Canada. Prevalence data are necessary to define prophylactic, management, and therapeutic measures for stray, feral and owned cats. Recently, comprehensive data on the seroprevalence of retrovirus infections of cats in Canada have become available and are reviewed. Further investigation into geographic variations in retrovirus seroprevalence within Canada is warranted, and may provide information to improve recommendations for testing and prevention. As well, more information is needed on FIV subtypes in Canada to improve diagnostics and vaccines, as well as to provide information on disease outcomes. PMID:21757241

  4. Seroprevalence of feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus infection among cats in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Little, Susan; Sears, William; Lachtara, Jessica; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection among cats in Canada and to identify risk factors for seropositivity. Signalment, lifestyle factors, and test results for FeLV antigen and FIV antibody were analyzed for 11 144 cats from the 10 Canadian provinces. Seroprevalence for FIV antibody was 4.3% and seroprevalence for FeLV antigen was 3.4%. Fifty-eight cats (0.5%) were seropositive for both...

  5. Complete genome sequences of both biotypes of a virus pair of bovine viral diarrhea virus subgenotype 1k

    OpenAIRE

    Marques Antunes de Oliveira, Adriano; Stalder, Hanspeter; Peterhans, Ernst; Sauter, Kay Sara; Schweizer, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    We determined the complete genome sequences of both biotypes of a virus pair of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) subgenotype 1k. The viruses were isolated from a persistently infected calf suffering from mucosal disease. Compared to the noncytopathic biotype, the cytopathic biotype contains an insertion of 84 nucleotides and 22 nucleotide changes.

  6. Effectivity of PCR and AGID methods to detect of enzootic bovine leukosis in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Saepulloh M; Sendow I

    2015-01-01

    Enzootic Bovine Leucosis (EBL) is one of viral diseases in cattle caused by bovine leukemia virus (BLV), from Retroviridae. The virus can be detected using severals methods such as Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), while antibody can be detected using Agar Gel Immunodifussion (AGID). The aim of this experiment was to study the effectivity of PCR and AGID methods to detect enzootic bovine leukosis virus in Indonesia. Samples of peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) were collected from cattles those ...

  7. Macropinocytosis is the Entry Mechanism of Amphotropic Murine Leukemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Izabela; Vilhardt, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    infection. Understanding how pathogens and toxins exploit or divert endocytosis pathways has advanced our understanding of membrane trafficking pathways, which benefits development of new therapeutical schemes and methods of drug delivery. We show here that Murine Leukemia Virus (A-MLV) pseudotyped with the......, or NIH-3T3 cells knocked-down for caveolin expression, was unaffected. Conversely, A-MLV infection of NIH-3T3 and HeLa cells was sensitive to amiloride analogues and actin-depolymerizing drugs that interfere with macropinocytosis. Further manipulation of the actin cytoskeleton through conditional...... amphotropic (expands the host range to many mammalian cells) envelope protein gains entry into host cells by macropinocytosis. Macropinosomes form as large, fluid-filled vacuoles (up to 10 μm) following collapse of cell surface protrusions and membrane scission. We use drugs or introduction of mutant proteins...

  8. Experimental fetal infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus. I. Virological and serological studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohmann, H B; Jensen, M. H.; Sørensen, K J; Dalsgaard, K

    1982-01-01

    The serological and virological results of an experimental infection of bovine fetuses with bovine viral diarrhea virus are presented. Four fetuses, 120-165 days gestational age, were inoculated in utero with a second passage virus strain. Two fetuses received a sham-inoculum. A humoral immune response in the virus-inoculated fetuses, was demonstrated three weeks later. In three fetuses only IgM and IgG1 were detectable. The serum from the fourth fetus also contained IgG2 and IgA. Bovine vira...

  9. Epidemiology of prolonged testicular infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, M Daniel; Riddell, Kay P; Edmondson, Misty A; Walz, Paul H; Gard, Julie A; Zhang, Yijing; Galik, Patricia K; Brodersen, Bruce W; Carson, Robert L; Stringfellow, David A

    2009-10-20

    Previously, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) had been found in prolonged testicular infections following acute infection of immunocompetent bulls. The primary purpose of this research was to evaluate the production and maintenance of prolonged testicular infections after exposure to BVDV of seronegative bulls in varying circumstances. The secondary objective was to initiate assessment of the potential for transmission of BVDV via semen of bulls exhibiting a prolonged testicular infection. In total, 10 research trials were conducted. The first trial examined the duration of detectable virus in semen after intranasal inoculation of peri-pubertal bulls. The second to fifth trials examined the potential for prolonged testicular infections resulting from natural exposure of seronegative bulls to persistently infected heifers. In the last five trials, the potential for viral transmission from bulls exhibiting prolonged testicular infections to a small number of exposed animals (n=28) was evaluated. Results of this research demonstrated that prolonged testicular infections could result in detection of viral RNA in semen for 2.75 years with infectious virus grown from testicular tissue 12.5 months after viral exposure. A type 1b strain of BVDV caused prolonged testicular infection after natural exposure of seronegative bulls to a persistently infected heifer. However, transmission of BVDV to susceptible animals was not detected in the final five trials of this research. In conclusion, BVDV can persist in testicular tissue after acute infection for several years, but the potential for viral transmission from these prolonged testicular infections appears to be low. PMID:19473788

  10. BTA2 and BTA26 are linked with bovine respiratory disease and associated with persistent infection of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is a pathogen associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). BRD causes 28% of all cattle deaths and an annual U.S. loss over $692 million. The objective of this study was to refine the linkage of BRD and association of bovine viral diarrhea-persistent infection (BVD-P...

  11. Construction of recombinant DNA clone for bovine viral diarrhea virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular cloning was carried out on the Danish strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) to construct strategy for the diagnostic tools and effective vaccine of BVD afterwards. A recombinant DNA clone (No. 29) was established successfully from cDNA for viral RNA tailed with adenine homopolymer at 3 -end. 32P-labeled DNA probes of 300~1, 800bp fragments, originating from the clone 29, directed specific DNA-RNA hybridization results with BVDV RNA. Recombinant DNA of the clone 29 was about 5,200bp representing 41.6% of the full length of Danish strain's RNA, and restriction sites were recognized for EooR I, Sst I, Hind III and Pst I restriction enzymes in the DNA fragment

  12. Bovine aortic endothelial cells are susceptible to Hantaan virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hantavirus serotype Hantaan (HTN) is one of the causative agents of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS, lethality up to 10%). The natural host of HTN is Apodemus agrarius. Recent studies have shown that domestic animals like cattle are sporadically seropositive for hantaviruses. In the present study, the susceptibility of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) expressing αVβ3-integrin to a HTN infection was investigated. Viral nucleocapsid protein and genomic RNA segments were detected in infected BAEC by indirect immunofluorescence assay, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. The results of this study strongly support our previous observation on Puumala virus (PUU) that has been propagated efficiently in BAEC. These findings open a new window to contemplate the ecology of hantavirus infection and transmission route from animal to man

  13. Human APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human APOBEC3G protein exhibits broad antiretroviral activity against a variety of retroviruses. It is packaged into viral particles and executes its antiviral function in the target cell. The packaging of APOBEC3G into different viral particles requires a mechanism that confers this promiscuity. Here, APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus (MLV) was studied using retroviral vectors. APOBEC3G uptake did not require either its cytidine deaminase activity or the presence of a retroviral vector genome. Results from immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies of APOBEC3G with a MLV Gag-CFP (cyan fluorescent protein) fusion protein imply an interaction between both proteins. RNase A treatment did not inhibit the co-precipitation of Gag-CFP and APOBEC3G, suggesting that the interaction is RNA independent. Like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag, the MLV Gag precursor protein appears to interact with APOBEC3G, indicating that Gag contains conserved structures which are used to encapsidate APOBEC3G into different retroviral particles

  14. Murine leukemia virus (MLV replication monitored with fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bittner Alexandra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer gene therapy will benefit from vectors that are able to replicate in tumor tissue and cause a bystander effect. Replication-competent murine leukemia virus (MLV has been described to have potential as cancer therapeutics, however, MLV infection does not cause a cytopathic effect in the infected cell and viral replication can only be studied by immunostaining or measurement of reverse transcriptase activity. Results We inserted the coding sequences for green fluorescent protein (GFP into the proline-rich region (PRR of the ecotropic envelope protein (Env and were able to fluorescently label MLV. This allowed us to directly monitor viral replication and attachment to target cells by flow cytometry. We used this method to study viral replication of recombinant MLVs and split viral genomes, which were generated by replacement of the MLV env gene with the red fluorescent protein (RFP and separately cloning GFP-Env into a retroviral vector. Co-transfection of both plasmids into target cells resulted in the generation of semi-replicative vectors, and the two color labeling allowed to determine the distribution of the individual genomes in the target cells and was indicative for the occurrence of recombination events. Conclusions Fluorescently labeled MLVs are excellent tools for the study of factors that influence viral replication and can be used to optimize MLV-based replication-competent viruses or vectors for gene therapy.

  15. Feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus in Canada: recommendations for testing and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Susan; Bienzle, Dorothee; Carioto, Lisa; Chisholm, Hugh; O'Brien, Elizabeth; Scherk, Margie

    2011-08-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are common and important infectious disease agents of cats in Canada. Seroprevalence data for FeLV and FIV in various populations of Canadian cats are reviewed and recommendations for testing and management of infections by these viruses in cats in Canada are presented. Retrovirus testing in Canada is infrequent in comparison with the United States, and efforts should be focused on reducing physical and other barriers to testing, and on education of veterinarians, veterinary team members, and cat owners regarding the importance of testing. New test methodologies for FeLV and FIV are emerging, and should be independently evaluated in order to provide practitioners with information on test reliability. Finally, more information is needed on FIV subtypes in Canada to improve diagnostics and vaccines, and to provide information on disease outcomes. PMID:22294790

  16. Limited efficacy of Fever Tag® temperature sensing ear tags in calves with naturally occurring bovine respiratory disease or induced bovine viral diarrhea virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    McCorkell, Robert; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine; Windeyer, Claire; Schaefer, Al

    2014-01-01

    Temperature sensing ear tags were tested in 1) auction-derived calves with 50% incidence of bovine respiratory disease, and 2) specific pathogen-free calves infected with bovine virus diarrhea virus. There were no false positives, but tag placement, probe displacement, and a high threshold for activation all contributed to failure to reliably detect sick calves.

  17. Determining bovine viral diarrhea virus genotypes and biotypes circulating in cattle populations in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) is the disease in cattle that results from infection with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV). BVDV is found in cattle populations throughout the world. While the term BVD encompasses a wide range of clinical manifestations, including severe respiratory disease, gastroe...

  18. Evaluation of the Human Host Range of Bovine and Porcine Viruses that may Contaminate Bovine Serum and Porcine Trypsin Used in the Manufacture of Biological Products

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus-Sekura, Carol; Richardson, James C.; Rebecca K. Harston; Sane, Nandini; Sheets, Rebecca L.

    2011-01-01

    Current U.S. requirements for testing cell substrates used in production of human biological products for contamination with bovine and porcine viruses are U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) 9CFR tests for bovine serum or porcine trypsin. 9CFR requires testing of bovine serum for seven specific viruses in six families (immunofluorescence) and at least 2 additional families non-specifically (cytopathicity and hemadsorption). 9CFR testing of porcine trypsin is for porcine parvovirus. Recent ...

  19. Bioinformatics and Molecular Analysis of the Evolutionary Relationship between Bovine Rhinitis A Viruses and Foot-And-Mouth Disease Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Rai, Devendra K.; Paul Lawrence; Steve J. Pauszek; Piccone, Maria E.; Knowles, Nick J.; Elizabeth Rieder

    2016-01-01

    Bovine rhinitis viruses (BRVs) cause mild respiratory disease of cattle. In this study, a near full-length genome sequence of a virus named RS3X (formerly classified as bovine rhinovirus type 1), isolated from infected cattle from the UK in the 1960s, was obtained and analyzed. Compared to other closely related Aphthoviruses, major differences were detected in the leader protease (Lpro), P1, 2B, and 3A proteins. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that RS3X was a member of the species bovine rhini...

  20. Prevalence, transmission and impact of bovine leukosis in Michigan dairies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine leukosis, caused by infection with the retrovirus bovine leukemia virus (BLV), has been characterized as a contagious, but practically benign disease of the immune system. National Animal Health Monitoring Surveys in 1996 and 2007 indicate complacency has resulted in high prevalence of infect...

  1. Common proviral integration region on mouse chromosome 7 in lymphomas and myelogenous leukemias induced by Friend murine leukemia virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Silver, J.; Kozak, C

    1986-01-01

    Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV) induces a variety of hematopoietic neoplasms 2 to 12 months after inoculation into newborn mice. These neoplasms are clonal or oligoclonal and contain a small number of F-MuLV insertions in high-molecular-weight DNA. To investigate whether different tumors have proviral insertions in the same region, a provirus-cellular DNA junction fragment from an F-MuLV-induced myelogenous leukemia was cloned in lambda gtWES, and a portion of the flanking cellular DNA ...

  2. Occurrence and phylogenetic analysis of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in outbreaks of respiratory disease in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Klem, Thea; Rimstad, Espen; Stokstad, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is one of the major pathogens involved in the bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex. The seroprevalence to BRSV in Norwegian cattle herds is high, but its role in epidemics of respiratory disease is unclear. The aims of the study were to investigate the etiological role of BRSV and other respiratory viruses in epidemics of BRD and to perform phylogenetic analysis of Norwegian BRSV strains. Results BRSV infection was detected either serol...

  3. In vivo evidence for quasispecies distributions in the bovine respiratory syncytial virus genome

    OpenAIRE

    Deplanche, Martine; Lemaire, Mylène; Mirandette, Carole; Bonnet, Marion; Schelcher, François; Meyer, Gilles

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the genetic evolution of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) isolate W2-00131, from its isolation in bovine turbinate (BT) cells to its inoculation in calves. Results showed that the BRSV genomic region encoding the highly variable glycoprotein G remains genetically stable after virus isolation and over 10 serial infections in BT cells, as well as following experimental inoculation in calves. This remarkable genetic stability led us to examine the mutant spectrum of several ...

  4. Factors affecting the infectivity of lymphocytes from cattle with bovine leukosis virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Buxton, B A; Schultz, R D

    1984-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from 13 bovine leukosis virus infected cattle and inoculated subcutaneously into 29 recipient adult steers to determine (a) the number of mononuclear cells (equivalent amount of blood) necessary to cause infection and (b) factors influencing infectivity of mononuclear cells from bovine leukosis virus-infected animals. A total of 55 inoculations were made. Inoculation of 1 X 10(4), 2 X 10(4) and 5 X 10(4) mononuclear cells caused seroconversion ...

  5. Molecular cloning of osteoma-inducing replication-competent murine leukemia viruses from the RFB osteoma virus stock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lene; Behnisch, Werner; Schmidt, Jörg;

    1992-01-01

    We report the molecular cloning of two replication-competent osteoma-inducing murine leukemia viruses from the RFB osteoma virus stock (M. P. Finkel, C. A. Reilly, Jr., B. O. Biskis, and I. L. Greco, p. 353-366, in C. H. G. Price and F. G. M. Ross, ed., Bone--Certain Aspects of Neoplasia, 1973......). Like the original RFB osteoma virus stock, viruses derived from the molecular RFB clones induced multiple osteomas in mice of the CBA/Ca strain. The cloned RFB viruses were indistinguishable by restriction enzyme analysis and by nucleotide sequence analysis of their long-terminal-repeat regions and...

  6. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus (XMRV) and the Safety of the Blood Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew D; Cohn, Claudia S

    2016-10-01

    In 2006, a new virus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), was discovered in a cohort of U.S. men with prostate cancer. Soon after this initial finding, XMRV was also detected in samples from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). The blood community, which is highly sensitive to the threat of emerging infectious diseases since the HIV/AIDS crisis, recommended indefinite deferral of all blood donors with a history of CFS. As XMRV research progressed, conflicting results emerged regarding the importance of this virus in the pathophysiology of prostate cancer and/or CFS. Molecular biologists traced the development of XMRV to a recombination event in a laboratory mouse that likely occurred circa 1993. The virus was propagated via cell lines derived from a tumor present in this mouse and spread through contamination of laboratory samples. Well-controlled experiments showed that detection of XMRV was due to contaminated samples and was not a marker of or a causal factor in prostate cancer or CFS. This paper traces the development of XMRV in the prostate and CFS scientific communities and explores the effect it had on the blood community. PMID:27358491

  7. Transient virus expression during murine leukemia induction by x-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most x-irradiation-induced thymomas in C57BL/6 mice are virus-free when assayed by immunofluorescence for the gs antigen (gsa) of murine leukemia virus (MuLV). Virus was induced transiently in bone marrow cells and later appeared in thymus cells. Six to 7 weeks post irradiation, thymocytes and bone marrow cells were MuLV gsa-negative and remained negative for the lifetime of most animals, whether or not they contracted overt leukemia. During the period when MuLV gsa-positive bone marrow cells were found, XC-positive syncytia-producing bone marrow cells were also found. Virus information was expressed, therefore, for a limited duration, long before any signs of leukemia in the animal were evident. MuLV gsa-positive thymocytes taken from mice 4 weeks after x-irradiation were cocultivated with a series of indicator cells. B-tropic virus, in addition to a xenotropic virus, was isolated from these cells. Ecotropic virus was not found in normal mouse thymocytes, in irradiated thymocytes a few days after termination of the X-irradiation sequence, or in most primary thymomas. All thymocytes produced only xenotropic virus in the cocultivation assays. Expression of the ecotropic virus was, therefore, transient, as assayed by immunofluorescence, XC syncytia formation, and virus isolation from MuLV gsa-positive thymus cells

  8. Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliusson, Gunnar; Hough, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Leukemias are a group of life threatening malignant disorders of the blood and bone marrow. In the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population, the acute leukemias are most prevalent, with chronic myeloid leukemia being infrequently seen. Factors associated with more aggressive disease biology tend to increase in frequency with increasing age, whilst tolerability of treatment strategies decreases. There are also challenges regarding the effective delivery of therapy specific to the AYA group, consequences on the unique psychosocial needs of this age group, including compliance. This chapter reviews the current status of epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment strategies and outcomes of AYA leukemia, with a focus on acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27595359

  9. Genomically intact endogenous feline leukemia viruses of recent origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Alfred L; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2004-04-01

    We isolated and sequenced two complete endogenous feline leukemia viruses (enFeLVs), designated enFeLV-AGTT and enFeLV-GGAG. In enFeLV-AGTT, the open reading frames are reminiscent of a functioning FeLV genome, and the 5' and 3' long terminal repeat sequences are identical. Neither endogenous provirus is genetically fixed in cats but polymorphic, with 8.9 and 15.2% prevalence for enFeLV-AGTT and enFeLV-GGAG, respectively, among a survey of domestic cats. Neither provirus was found in the genomes of related species of the Felis genus, previously shown to harbor enFeLVs. The absence of mutational divergence, polymorphic incidence in cats, and absence in related species suggest that these enFeLVs may have entered the germ line more recently than previously believed, perhaps coincident with domestication, and reopens the question of whether some enFeLVs might be replication competent. PMID:15047851

  10. Occurrence of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus and Feline Leukemia Virus Infection in Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Alves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The objective of the present work was to evaluate the occurrence of the Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV and the Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV infection in asymptomatic domestic cats in the metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR for FIV detection and SNAP Combo Plus for FeLV and FIV detection. Approach: Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein of 78 healthy cats, mixed breeds and ages and both sexes. Specific primers were designed for PCR to amplify a 244 bp fragment of FIV gag gene. Results: Five animals (6.41% were positive by PCR and three animals (3.85% were positive by SNAP Combo Plus for FIV and 14 animals were positive for FeLV (17.95%. Conclusion: These results suggest that there is a significant occurrence of asymptomatic infected animals which may serve as potential transmitters of FIV and FeLV.

  11. Detection of Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus in Prostate Biopsy Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the association of Xenotropic murine leukemia virus related virus (XMRV) infection with prostate cancer and compare it with benign prostate hyperplasia. Study Design: Case control study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Histopathology and Molecular Pathology, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, from January 2009 to December 2012. Methodology: XMRV was screened in 50 prostate cancer and 50 benign prostatic hyperplasia biopsies using conventional end-point PCR. Other studied variables were family history of prostate cancer, patients age and Gleason score. Results: XMRV was detected in 4 (8%) of the 50 prostate cancer biopsy specimens compared to none in biopsies with benign prostatic hyperplasia. However, there was no significant statistical association of XMRV infection with the other variables. Conclusion: A low frequency of XMRV infection was found in this case-control study. Men, who harbor XMRV infection, may be at increased risk of prostate cancer but this needs to be investigated further at a larger scale. (author)

  12. Managing the future: the Special Virus Leukemia Program and the acceleration of biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Robin Wolfe

    2014-12-01

    After the end of the Second World War, cancer virus research experienced a remarkable revival, culminating in the creation in 1964 of the United States National Cancer Institute's Special Virus Leukemia Program (SVLP), an ambitious program of directed biomedical research to accelerate the development of a leukemia vaccine. Studies of cancer viruses soon became the second most highly funded area of research at the Institute, and by far the most generously funded area of biological research. Remarkably, this vast infrastructure for cancer vaccine production came into being before a human leukemia virus was shown to exist. The origins of the SVLP were rooted in as much as shifts in American society as laboratory science. The revival of cancer virus studies was a function of the success advocates and administrators achieved in associating cancer viruses with campaigns against childhood diseases such as polio and leukemia. To address the urgency borne of this new association, the SVLP's architects sought to lessen the power of peer review in favor of centralized Cold War management methods, fashioning viruses as "administrative objects" in order to accelerate the tempo of biomedical research and discovery. PMID:25459347

  13. Identification and Characterization of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus from Indonesian Cattle (IDENTIFIKASI DAN KARAKTERISASI VIRUS BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA DARI SAPI INDONESIA)

    OpenAIRE

    Muharam Saepulloh; Indrawati Sendow

    2015-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important viral disease, which a ubiquitous pathogen ofcattle with worldwide economic importance and due to its misdiagnose with other viruses. The goal of thecurrent study was to identify and characterize of BVDV by reverse transcriptase polymerase chainreaction (RT-PCR) and followed by sequence genome analyses. Blood, feces, and semen samples werecollected from 588 selected cattle from animals suffering from diarrhea and respiratory manifestation. RT...

  14. Regeneration and characterization of a recombinant bovine viral diarrhea virus and determination of its efficacy to cross the bovine placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhen-Chuan; Wang, Hai-Hong

    2009-02-01

    The capacity of different bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strains to cause transplacental infection is variable. BVDV strain SD-1 was isolated from a persistently infected heifer. Its genome represents the only reported nucleotide sequence of a noncytopathic viral isolate determined without cell culture passage in the laboratory. Thus, SD-1 might possess biological advantages over other NCP BVDV strains to be used as a model virus for investigation of viral transplacental transmission. To evaluate if a molecularly generated BVDV SD-1 is capable of crossing the bovine placenta efficiently, a full-length cDNA clone of SD-1 was constructed using RT-PCR amplification and standard molecular techniques. In vitro transcripts synthesized from the cDNA template directed the generation of infectious virus in MDBK cells with a transfection efficiency as high as 4.7 x 10(5) FFU/mug RNA. The recovered virus termed ASD1 harbored five silent point mutations engineered as genetic markers and was similar to wild type (wt) SD-1 in viral growth kinetics. As evaluated in the pregnant heifers, ASD1 was capable of crossing the bovine placenta efficiently, suggesting that NCP BVDV SD-1 is a suitable viral backbone for investigation of the role of viral genetic element(s) in viral transplacental transmission by allowing for evaluation of newly created viral mutants. PMID:19067148

  15. Quantification of B cells and T lymphocyte subsets in bovine leukemia virus infected dairy cowsQuantificação da população de linfócitos B e das subpopulações de linfócitos T em bovinos infectados pelo vírus da leucose enzoótica bovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claúdia Regina Stricagnolo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente trabalho foi avaliar a frequência e número absoluto de linfócitos B e das subpopulações de linfócitos T em bovinos infectados pelo vírus da leucemia bovina (BLV com distintos perfis leucocitários conhecidos como não leucêmicos (AL e com linfocitose persistente (LP. Deste modo, 15 animais foram selecionados e divididos uniformemente em três grupos (negativo, AL e LP. A infecção pelo vírus da BLV foi detectada por imunodifusão em ágar gel e por ensaio imunoenzimático. A quantificação das populações de linfócitos B e T foi determinada por citometria de fluxo utilizando anticorpos monoclonais. Os resultados do presente estudo apontaram para aumento da população de linfócitos B, e também das células CD5+ e CD11b+, que geralmente são alvo da infecção pelo vírus da BLV, nos animais com LP. Consequentemente pode-se observar redução da porcentagem de linfócitos T, T CD4+ no sangue periférico, e de linfócitos T, T CD4+ e T CD8+ nas células mononucleares do sangue periférico isoladas por gradiente de centrifugação. No entanto, nenhuma alteração no número absoluto de linfócitos T, T CD4+ e T CD8+ no sangue periférico foi encontrada nos animais manifestando LP. Entretanto, encontrou-se correlação alta e significativa entre o número absoluto de linfócitos T e T CD8+ e o número absoluto de linfócitos B no sangue periférico nos animais manifestando LP, não encontrando a mesma correlação com os linfócitos T CD4+. Além disso, não foram observadas correlações significativas entre o número absoluto de linfócitos T, T CD4+ e T CD8+ e o número absoluto de linfócitos B no sangue periférico nos animais AL e negativos.The aim of the present trial was to determine the frequencies and absolute number of B and T lymphocytes subpopulations in bovine leukemia virus (BLV-infected dairy cows with distinct lymphocyte profile known as non-leukemic (AL and persistent lymphocytosis (PL. Thus

  16. Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  17. Bovine virus diarrhea virus in free-living deer from Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S S; Roensholt, L; Bitsch, V

    2000-07-01

    Free-living deer are suggested as a possible source of infection of cattle with bovine virus diarrhea (BVD) virus. To examine this hypothesis blood samples from 476 free-living deer were collected during two different periods and tested for BVD virus and antibody in Denmark. In 1995-96, 207 animals were tested. These included 149 roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), 29 fallow deer (Dama dama), 20 red deer (Cervus elaphus) and one sika deer (Cervus sika). For the remaining eight animals no species information was available. In 1998-99, 269 animals were tested including 212 roe deer and 57 red deer. The animals were selected from areas with a relatively high prevalence of cattle herds with a BVD persistent infection status in 1997 and 1998. All 207 samples from 1995-96 were found antibody-negative except two samples from red deer. Only 158 of the 207 samples were tested for virus and were all found negative. Of the 269 samples from 1998-99 all but one were antibody negative. The positive sample was from a red deer. All samples were virus-negative. It appears that BVD infection does not occur in roe deer in Denmark. The presence of antibody in a few red deer from various districts in Jutland probably results from cattle to deer transmission, rather than spread among deer. Hence, the possibility of free-living deer as a source of infection for cattle in Denmark seems to be remote. PMID:10941751

  18. Virus-host interactions in persistently FMDV-infected cells derived from bovine pharynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) produces a disease in cattle characterized by vesicular lesions and a persistent infection with asymptomatic low-level production of virus. Here we describe the establishment of a persistently infected primary cell culture derived from bovine pharynx tissue (PBPT)...

  19. Case Report: Emergence of bovine viral diarrhea virus persistently infected calves in a closed herd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) continues to have significant economic impact on the cattle industry worldwide. The virus is primarily maintained in the cattle population due to persistently infected animals. Herd surveillance along with good vaccination programs and biosecurity practices are the...

  20. [Typing of cattle leukemia virus circulating in the Ukraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limanskiĭ, A P; Geue, L; Limanskaia, O Iu; Beier, D

    2004-01-01

    Bovine leucosis virus (BLV), circulating in the Ukrainian territory, was characterized through the definition of its subspecies affiliation. The pro-viral BLV DNA was isolated from peripheral-blood lymphocytes of naturally-HIV-infected black-variegate animals taken from leucosis-affected farms in the Kharkov Region. The env-gene fragment of pro-viral DNA was amplified, sequenced and analyzed after the amplicon had been treated by three restriction enzymes, i.e. BamH I, Bcl I and Pvu II. According to the analysis of restriction-fragments' length polymorphism, the Ukrainian BLV isolate can be classified as belonging to the Australian subspecies, i.e. to one of the 3 known subspecies. Multiple alignment and phylogenetic analysis of the env-gene fragment of BLV isolates from the EMBL database showed that evolutionally the Ukrainian isolate is distantly located from the isolates' clusters of the Belgian, Japanese and Australian subspecie and has the biggest quantity (4) of non-coinciding nucleotides for the analyzed highly conservative locus of the BLV env-gene with a length of 444 pair of nucleotides. PMID:15017853

  1. Evaluation of western blotting for the diagnosis of enzootic bovine leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez E.T.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A western blotting (WB procedure has been developed for detecting antibodies to bovine leukosis virus (BLV in cattle sera. Two hundred and thirty three serum samples from naturally infected cattle with BLV virus and serial bleedings from experimentally BLV infected cows were used. An agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGID was used for comparing with the results obtained by WB. The AGID positive sera showed a different degree of reactivity by WB test against the two most important viral antigens (gp51 and p24, or against one of them. Other proteins (gp30, p15, p12 and p10 were not detected with any AGID positive sera, being observed occasionally three bands corresponding to the p24 protein. Using sera obtained by BLV experimental inoculation, the antibodies directed to p24 appeared early (between the 2nd and 4th week post inoculation and thereafter antibodies to gp51were detected in some animals. The analysis of field serum samples by AGID as compared to WB showed an agreement of 90.9%. Only 1.7% of sera were negative by AGID and positive by WB and 7.2% that were not conclusive by AGID and were defined by WB (4.2% as positive and 3.0% as negative.

  2. Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 infection drives spontaneous proliferation of natural killer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, Philip J; Hirschkorn, Dale F.; DeVita, Deborah A.; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Murphy, Eedward L

    2010-01-01

    Most human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infected subjects remain asymptomatic throughout their lives, with a few individuals developing HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) or adult T cell leukemia. Lymphocytes from about half of HTLV-1 infected subjects spontaneously proliferate in vitro, and how this phenomenon relates to symptomatic disease outcome and viral burden is poorly understood. Spontaneous proliferation was measured in lymphocyte subsets, an...

  3. Recovery of cytopathogenic and noncytopathogenic bovine viral diarrhea viruses from cDNA constructs.

    OpenAIRE

    Meyers, G; Tautz, N.; Becher, P; Thiel, H J; Kümmerer, B M

    1997-01-01

    After cDNA cloning of the genome of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) isolate CP7, a full-length cDNA clone was constructed. RNA transcribed in vitro from this construct was shown to direct the generation of infectious BVDV upon transfection into bovine cells. To confirm the de novo generation of infectious BVDV from cloned cDNA a genetically tagged virus was constructed. In comparison with parental BVDV, the recombinant virus was slightly retarded in growth. The NS2 coding region of the CP7...

  4. Subcellular Localization Analysis of Bovine Foamy Virus Borf1 Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan TAN; Kai WU; Rui CHANG; Qi-min CHEN; Yun-qi GENG; Wen-tao QIAO

    2008-01-01

    The Borf1 protein is encoded by an immediate-early gene of the bovine foamy virus (BFV) and plays a key role in the viral life cycle. Borf1 is a DNA binding protein which can transactivate both the long terminal repeat (LTR) and the internal promoter (IP) of BFV by specifically binding to the transactivation responsive element (TRE). To analyze the subcellular localization of Borf1 during the BFV life cycle, this gene was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector and expressed in a soluble form. After the purification and immunization, we raised the mouse anti-Borf1 serum with a high titer based on ELISA results. Western blot analysis showed that the antiserum could specifically recognize the Borf1 protein that was expressed in 293T cells. With this specific serum, we revealed the nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of Borf1 in HeLa cells that was transfected with Borf1. Moreover, the immuno-fluorescence assay also showed that the localization of Borf1 during the infection and transfection of BFV was identical.

  5. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and concurrent bartonella spp., feline immunodeficiency virus, and feline leukemia infections in cats from Grenada, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxoplasma gondii and Bartonella spp. are zoonotic pathogens of cats. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLv) are related to Human Iimmunodeficiency Virus, and Human Leukemia Virus, respectively, and these viruses are immunosuppressive. In the present study, the prevale...

  6. Associations between exposure to viruses and bovine respiratory disease in Australian feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, K E; Barnes, T S; Morton, J M; Gravel, J L; Commins, M A; Horwood, P F; Ambrose, R C; Clements, A C A; Mahony, T J

    2016-05-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most important cause of clinical disease and death in feedlot cattle. Respiratory viral infections are key components in predisposing cattle to the development of this disease. To quantify the contribution of four viruses commonly associated with BRD, a case-control study was conducted nested within the National Bovine Respiratory Disease Initiative project population in Australian feedlot cattle. Effects of exposure to Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 (BVDV-1), Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and Bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3), and to combinations of these viruses, were investigated. Based on weighted seroprevalences at induction (when animals were enrolled and initial samples collected), the percentages of the project population estimated to be seropositive were 24% for BoHV-1, 69% for BVDV-1, 89% for BRSV and 91% for BPIV-3. For each of the four viruses, seropositivity at induction was associated with reduced risk of BRD (OR: 0.6-0.9), and seroincrease from induction to second blood sampling (35-60 days after induction) was associated with increased risk of BRD (OR: 1.3-1.5). Compared to animals that were seropositive for all four viruses at induction, animals were at progressively increased risk with increasing number of viruses for which they were seronegative; those seronegative for all four viruses were at greatest risk (OR: 2.4). Animals that seroincreased for one or more viruses from induction to second blood sampling were at increased risk (OR: 1.4-2.1) of BRD compared to animals that did not seroincrease for any viruses. Collectively these results confirm that prior exposure to these viruses is protective while exposure at or after feedlot entry increases the risk of development of BRD in feedlots. However, the modest increases in risk associated with seroincrease for each virus separately, and the progressive increases in risk with multiple viral exposures highlights

  7. A genome-wide association study for the incidence of persistent bovine viral diarrhea virus infection in cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is diverse group of viruses causing disease in ruminants. It is controlled with vaccination, biosecurity, and removal of persistently infected animals. The objective was to determine whether genomic regions harbored single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associated ...

  8. Persistence of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Is Determined by a Cellular Cofactor of a Viral Autoprotease

    OpenAIRE

    Lackner, T.; Müller, A.; König, M; Thiel, H.-J.; Tautz, N.

    2005-01-01

    Polyprotein processing control is a crucial step in the life cycle of positive-strand RNA viruses. Recently, a vital autoprotease generating an essential viral replication factor was identified in such a virus, namely, the pestivirus bovine viral diarrhea virus. Surprisingly, the activity of this protease, which resides in nonstructural protein 2 (NS2), diminishes early after infection, resulting in the limitation of viral RNA replication. Here, we describe that a cellular chaperone termed Ji...

  9. Relationship between endogenous ecotropic murine leukemia virus and radiation leukemogenesis in various strains of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between the incidence of radiation-induced leukemia and replication of infectious ecotropic leukemia virus was investigated using RF, BALB/c, NIH Swiss and DD/Tb mice. Mice of all strains tested have been shown to be highly susceptible to the induction of thymic lymphoma of fractionated whole-body x-irradiation. The replication of endogenous ecotropic MuLV in RF and BALB/c mice was enhanced by x-irradiation. On the contrary, any infectious ecotropic virus could not be detected in NIH Swiss and DD/Tb mice. (auth.)

  10. Characterization of mouse cellular deoxyribonucleic acid homologous to Abelson murine leukemia virus-specific sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Dale, B.; Ozanne, B.

    1981-01-01

    The genome of Abelson murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) consists of sequences derived from both BALB/c mouse deoxyribonucleic acid and the genome of Moloney murine leukemia virus. Using deoxyribonucleic acid linear intermediates as a source of retroviral deoxyribonucleic acid, we isolated a recombinant plasmid which contained 1.9 kilobases of the 3.5-kilobase mouse-derived sequences found in A-MuLV (A-MuLV-specific sequences). We used this clone, designated pSA-17, as a probe restriction enzyme ...

  11. Structural and biochemical characterization of the inhibitor complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Matúz, Krisztina; Tözsér, Jozsef; Namwong, Sirilak; Goldfarb, Nathan E.; Dunn, Ben M.; Wlodawer, Alexander (Debrecen); (NCI); (Florida); (Suan Sunandha)

    2012-10-23

    Interactions between the protease (PR) encoded by the xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus and a number of potential inhibitors have been investigated by biochemical and structural techniques. It was observed that several inhibitors used clinically against HIV PR exhibit nanomolar or even subnanomolar values of K{sub i}, depending on the exact experimental conditions. Both TL-3, a universal inhibitor of retroviral PRs, and some inhibitors originally shown to inhibit plasmepsins were also quite potent, whereas inhibition by pepstatin A was considerably weaker. Crystal structures of the complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus PR with TL-3, amprenavir and pepstatin A were solved at high resolution and compared with the structures of complexes of these inhibitors with other retropepsins. Whereas TL-3 and amprenavir bound in a predictable manner, spanning the substrate-binding site of the enzyme, two molecules of pepstatin A bound simultaneously in an unprecedented manner, leaving the catalytic water molecule in place.

  12. Effects of Preinfection With Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus on Immune Cells From the Lungs of Calves Inoculated With Bovine Herpesvirus 1.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risalde, M A; Molina, V; Sánchez-Cordón, P J; Romero-Palomo, F; Pedrera, M; Gómez-Villamandos, J C

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the interstitial aggregates of immune cells observed in pulmonary parenchyma of calves preinfected with bovine viral diarrhea virus and challenged later with bovine herpesvirus 1. In addition, the intent of this research was to clarify the role of bovine viral diarrhea virus in local cell-mediated immunity and potentially in predisposing animals to bovine respiratory disease complex. Twelve Friesian calves, aged 8 to 9 months, were inoculated with noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus genotype 1. Ten were subsequently challenged with bovine herpesvirus 1 and euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 7, or 14 days postinoculation. The other 2 calves were euthanized prior to the second inoculation. Another cohort of 10 calves was inoculated only with bovine herpesvirus 1 and then were euthanized at the same time points. Two calves were not inoculated with any agent and were used as negative controls. Pulmonary lesions were evaluated in all animals, while quantitative and biosynthetic changes in immune cells were concurrently examined immunohistochemically to compare coinfected calves and calves challenged only with bovine herpesvirus 1. Calves preinfected with bovine viral diarrhea virus demonstrated moderate respiratory clinical signs and histopathologic evidence of interstitial pneumonia with aggregates of mononuclear cells, which predominated at 4 days postinoculation. Furthermore, this group of animals was noted to have a suppression of interleukin-10 and associated alterations in the Th1-driven cytokine response in the lungs, as well as inhibition of the response of CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes against bovine herpesvirus 1. These findings suggest that bovine viral diarrhea virus preinfection could affect the regulation of the immune response as modulated by regulatory T cells, as well as impair local cell-mediated immunity to secondary respiratory pathogens. PMID:25322747

  13. Investigation of some hematological and blood biochemical parameters in cattle spontaneously infected with bovine leukosis virus

    OpenAIRE

    Sandev Nikolay; Zapryanova Dimitrinka; Stoycheva Ivanka; Rusenova Nikolina; Mircheva Teodora

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to follow out the alterations in some haematological and blood biochemical parameters in cattle spontaneously infected with enzootic bovine leukosis virus with regard to the invivodifferentiation of bovine leukosis stages. The experiment included 76 cows at various ages and body weight. Serological leukosis tests were done by agar-gel immunodiffusion test with a commercial kit of Synbiotiсs (France), containing standardised gp 51 antigen and positive serum app...

  14. No evidence of murine leukemia virus-related viruses in live attenuated human vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M Switzer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association of xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-related virus (XMRV in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome reported in previous studies remains controversial as these results have been questioned by recent data. Nonetheless, concerns have been raised regarding contamination of human vaccines as a possible source of introduction of XMRV and MLV into human populations. To address this possibility, we tested eight live attenuated human vaccines using generic PCR for XMRV and MLV sequences. Viral metagenomics using deep sequencing was also done to identify the possibility of other adventitious agents. RESULTS: All eight live attenuated vaccines, including Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV (SA-14-14-2, varicella (Varivax, measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR-II, measles (Attenuvax, rubella (Meruvax-II, rotavirus (Rotateq and Rotarix, and yellow fever virus were negative for XMRV and highly related MLV sequences. However, residual hamster DNA, but not RNA, containing novel endogenous gammaretrovirus sequences was detected in the JEV vaccine using PCR. Metagenomics analysis did not detect any adventitious viral sequences of public health concern. Intracisternal A particle sequences closest to those present in Syrian hamsters and not mice were also detected in the JEV SA-14-14-2 vaccine. Combined, these results are consistent with the production of the JEV vaccine in Syrian hamster cells. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of XMRV and MLV in eight live attenuated human vaccines further supporting the safety of these vaccines. Our findings suggest that vaccines are an unlikely source of XMRV and MLV exposure in humans and are consistent with the mounting evidence on the absence of these viruses in humans.

  15. Histophathologic and Immunohistochemical Findings in Two White-tail Deer Fawns Persistently Infected with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important pathogen of domestic cattle. Serological, experimental and individual case studies have explored the presence and pathogenesis of the virus in wild ungulates; however there remain large gaps in knowledge regarding BVDV infection in non-bovine speci...

  16. Dynamic stochastic simulation as a tool for studying bovine virus diarrhoea virus infections at the herd level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, J.T.; Enevoldsen, Carsten

    Infectious diseases, such as bovine virus diarrhoea (BVD) virus infections in cattle, are often studied by Markov chain models. However, it is difficult to simulate dynamic interactions between production of a reproductive herd and the disease by this type of model. As an alternative, a dynamic...... stochastic model simulating the herd production was suggested. A dynamic stochastic model simulating the effect of BVD virus infection in a dairy cattle herd was used to exemplify how this type of model could be applied in research. The simulation example demonstrated that the effect of a BVD virus infection...

  17. Molecular detection and characterization of bovine viral diarrhea virus in Mongolian cattle and yaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochirkhuu, Nyamsuren; Konnai, Satoru; Odbileg, Raadan; Odzaya, Battogtokh; Gansukh, Shura; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is classified into two species, namely, Bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 and Bovine viral diarrhea virus 2, and affects cattle worldwide, resulting in significant economic loss. The prevalence of BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 infections and its genotypes in Mongolian animals has not been studied. In this study, we surveyed BVDV infection in dairy cattle and yaks from Bornuur and Bulgan counties by RT-PCR, and the average infection rate in the sampling sites was 15.8 % and 20.0 %, respectively. In addition, molecular features of the 5'-UTR region of the BVDV genome in Mongolian cattle and yaks were identified as belonging to the subtypes BVDV-1a and BVDV-2a, respectively. Determining the prevalence, geographical distribution, and molecular diversity of BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 in various host species in Mongolia is important for further studies and process control programs. PMID:27206573

  18. Identification and genome characterization of genotype B and genotype C bovine parainfluenza type 3 viruses isolated in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F.; Valayudhan, Binu T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bovine parainfluenza 3 viruses (BPI3V) are respiratory pathogens of cattle that cause disease singly but are often associated with bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) in conjunction with other viral and bacterial agents. Bovine vaccines currently contain BPI3V to provide protection against the virus, but there is no current information regarding the BPI3V strains that are circulating in the U.S. Results A project was initiated to sequence archival BPI3V isolates to study vira...

  19. Implementation of immunohistochemistry on frozen ear notch tissue samples in diagnosis of bovine viral diarrhea virus in persistently infected cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Bedeković Tomislav; Lemo Nina; Lojkić Ivana; Beck Ana; Lojkić Mirko; Madić Josip

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea is a contagious disease of domestic and wild ruminants and one of the most economically important diseases in cattle. Bovine viral diarrhea virus belongs to the genus Pestivirus, within the family Flaviviridae. The identification and elimination of the persistently infected animals from herds is the initial step in the control and eradication programs. It is therefore necessary to have reliable methods for diagnosis of bovine viral diarrhea virus. One...

  20. Bovine viral diarrhea virus in postweaned calves in a feedlot after vaccination and from fatal respiratory cases: isolation and differentiation of MLV BVDV and field strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viral infections are important etiologies in BRD cases. Calves at stocker/feedlot entry usually receive modified live viral (MLV) vaccines containing bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1), parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V), bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV), and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). In...

  1. Molecular analysis and pathogenesis of the feline aplastic anemia retrovirus, feline leukemia virus C-Sarma.

    OpenAIRE

    N. Riedel; Hoover, E. A.; Gasper, P W; Nicolson, M O; Mullins, J I

    1986-01-01

    We describe the molecular cloning of an anemogenic feline leukemia virus (FeLV), FeLV-C-Sarma, from the productively infected human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line RD(FeLV-C-S). Molecularly cloned FeLV-C-S proviral DNA yielded infectious virus (mcFeLV-C-S) after transfection of mammalian cells, and virus interference studies using transfection-derived virus demonstrated that our clone encodes FeLV belonging to the C subgroup. mcFeLV-C-S did not induce viremia in eight 8-week-old outbred specific-p...

  2. The detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in formalin fixed bovine lung with commercially available monoclonal antibodies and avidin biotin complex immunohistochemistry.

    OpenAIRE

    Haines, D M; Clark, E.G.; Chelack, B J

    1989-01-01

    Eight commercially available monoclonal antibodies directed against respiratory syncytial virus antigens were tested for ability to detect bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) antigen in formalin fixed, paraffin embedded bovine lung using avidin-biotin complex immunohistochemical staining. Monoclonal antibodies from clone 18B2 purchased from Biosoft, Paris, France and those from clone 8G12 purchased from the Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska sta...

  3. Intrauterine inoculation of seronegative heifers with bovine viral diarrhea virus concurrent with transfer of in vivo-derived bovine embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, J A; Givens, M D; Marley, M S D; Galik, P K; Riddell, K P; Edmondson, M A; Rodning, S P

    2010-05-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been shown to be associated with single transferable in vivo-derived bovine embryos despite washing and trypsin treatment. Hence, the primary objective was to evaluate the potential of BVDV to be transmitted via the intrauterine route at the time of embryo transfer. In vivo-derived bovine embryos (n=10) were nonsurgically collected from a single Bos tarus donor cow negative for BVDV. After collection and washing, embryos were placed into transfer media containing BVDV (SD-1; Type 1a). Each of the 10 embryos was individually loaded into an 0.25-mL straw, which was then nonsurgically transferred into the uterus of 1 of the 10 seronegative recipients on Day 0. The total quantity of virus transferred into the uterus of each of the 10 Bos tarus recipients was 878 cell culture infective doses to the 50% end point (CCID(50))/mL. Additionally, control heifers received 1.5 x 10(6) CCID(50) BVDV/.5 mL without an embryo (positive) or heat-inactivated BVDV (negative). The positive control heifer and all 10 recipients of virus-exposed embryos exhibited viremia by Day 6 and seroconverted by Day 15 after transfer. The negative control heifer did not exhibit a viremia or seroconvert. At 30 d after embryo transfer, 6 of 10 heifers in the treatment group were pregnant; however, 30 d later, only one was still pregnant. This fetus was nonviable and was positive for BVDV. In conclusion, the quantity of BVDV associated with bovine embryos after in vitro exposure can result in viremia and seroconversion of seronegative recipients after transfer into the uterus during diestrus. PMID:20129656

  4. An unusual presentation of enzootic bovine leukosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Sparling, A M

    2000-01-01

    A 6-year-old, Holstein x Simmental cow diagnosed with pyelonephritis had increasing difficulty rising and became recumbent, despite treatment with antibiotics. A serological test for the bovine leukemia virus was positive; at necropsy, the left kidney and ureter and the myocardium showed lesions of lymphosarcoma, confirmed by histology.

  5. NMR study of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease in a complex with amprenavir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Protease (PR) of XMR virus (XMRV) was successfully synthesized with cell-free system. ► Interface of XMRV PR with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), was identified with NMR. ► Structural heterogeneity is induced for two PR protomers in the APV:PR = 1:2 complex. ► Structural heterogeneity is transmitted even to distant regions from the interface. ► Long-range transmission of structural change may be utilized for drug discovery. -- Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a virus created through recombination of two murine leukemia proviruses under artificial conditions during the passage of human prostate cancer cells in athymic nude mice. The homodimeric protease (PR) of XMRV plays a critical role in the production of functional viral proteins and is a prerequisite for viral replication. We synthesized XMRV PR using the wheat germ cell-free expression system and carried out structural analysis of XMRV PR in a complex with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), by means of NMR. Five different combinatorially 15N-labeled samples were prepared and backbone resonance assignments were made by applying Otting’s method, with which the amino acid types of the [1H, 15N] HSQC resonances were automatically identified using the five samples (Wu et al., 2006) . A titration experiment involving APV revealed that one APV molecule binds to one XMRV PR dimer. For many residues, two distinct resonances were observed, which is thought to be due to the structural heterogeneity between the two protomers in the APV:XMRV PR = 1:2 complex. PR residues at the interface with APV have been identified on the basis of chemical shift perturbation and identification of the intermolecular NOEs by means of filtered NOE experiments. Interestingly, chemical shift heterogeneity between the two protomers of XMRV PR has been observed not only at the interface with APV but also in regions apart from the interface. This indicates that the structural heterogeneity

  6. Comparison of type I and type II bovine viral diarrhea virus infection in swine.

    OpenAIRE

    Walz, P H; Baker, J. C.; Mullaney, T P; Kaneene, J B; Maes, R K

    1999-01-01

    Some isolates of type II bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are capable of causing severe clinical disease in cattle. Bovine viral diarrhea virus infection has been reported in pigs, but the ability of these more virulent isolates of type II BVDV to induce severe clinical disease in pigs is unknown. It was our objective to compare clinical, virologic, and pathologic findings between type I and type II BVDV infection in pigs. Noninfected control and BVDV-infected 2-month-old pigs were used. A ...

  7. Protein stabilization explains the gag requirement for transformation of lymphoid cells by Abelson murine leukemia virus

    OpenAIRE

    Prywes, R; Hoag, J; Rosenberg, N; Baltimore, D

    1985-01-01

    The single protein encoded by Abelson murine leukemia virus is a fusion of sequence from the retroviral gag genes with the v-abl sequence. Deletion of most of the gag region from the transforming protein results in a virus capable of transforming fibroblasts but no longer capable of transforming lymphoid cells. Smaller deletions in gag reveal that p15 gag sequences are responsible for this effect, whereas deletion of p12 sequences had no effect on lymphoid transformation. In transformed fibro...

  8. Frequency and significance of feline leukemia virus infection in necropsied cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinacher, M; Theilen, G

    1987-06-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection was diagnosed immunohistologically on paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from 1,095 necropsied cats. Significant association of FeLV infection was demonstrated by chi 2 and Fisher's tests with various conditions and diseases (ie, anemia, tumors of the leukemia/lymphoma complex, feline infectious peritonitis, bacterial infections, emaciation, FeLV-associated enteritis, lymphatic hyperplasia, and hemorrhage). Unexpected findings associated with FeLV infection were icterus, several types of hepatitis, and liver degeneration. A negative association with FeLV infection was found for most parasitic and viral infections, including feline panleukopenia. Neither positive nor negative associations were established for FeLV infection and most forms of nephritis, including severe glomerulonephritis. Feline leukemia virus-infected cats were significantly (Kruskal-Wallis test) older than were FeLV-negative cats with the same nonneoplastic FeLV-associated diseases. PMID:3037951

  9. Animals Models of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Leukemogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2016-03-31

    Infection with human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in a minority of infected individuals after long periods of viral persistence. The various stages of HTLV-I infection and leukemia development are studied by using several different animal models: (1) the rabbit (and mouse) model of persistent HTLV-I infection, (2) transgenic mice to model tumorigenesis by HTLV-I specific protein expression, (3) ATL cell transfers into immune-deficient mice, and (4) infection of humanized mice with HTLV-I. After infection, virus replicates without clinical disease in rabbits and to a lesser extent in mice. Transgenic expression of both the transactivator protein (Tax) and the HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) protein have provided insight into factors important in leukemia/lymphoma development. To investigate factors relating to tumor spread and tissue invasion, a number of immune-deficient mice based on the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or non-obese diabetic/SCID background have been used. Inoculation of adult T cell leukemia cell (lines) leads to lymphoma with osteolytic bone lesions and to a lesser degree to leukemia development. These mice have been used extensively for the testing of anticancer drugs and virotherapy. A recent development is the use of so-called humanized mice, which, upon transfer of CD34(+)human umbilical cord stem cells, generate human lymphocytes. Infection with HTLV-I leads to leukemia/lymphoma development, thus providing an opportunity to investigate disease development with the aid of molecularly cloned viruses. However, further improvements of this mouse model, particularly in respect to the development of adaptive immune responses, are necessary. PMID:27034390

  10. Antibody responses against xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus envelope in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Makarova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was recently discovered to be the first human gammaretrovirus that is associated with chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer (PC. Although a mechanism for XMRV carcinogenesis is yet to be established, this virus belongs to the family of gammaretroviruses well known for their ability to induce cancer in the infected hosts. Since its original identification XMRV has been detected in several independent investigations; however, at this time significant controversy remains regarding reports of XMRV detection/prevalence in other cohorts and cell type/tissue distribution. The potential risk of human infection, coupled with the lack of knowledge about the basic biology of XMRV, warrants further research, including investigation of adaptive immune responses. To study immunogenicity in vivo, we vaccinated mice with a combination of recombinant vectors expressing codon-optimized sequences of XMRV gag and env genes and virus-like particles (VLP that had the size and morphology of live infectious XMRV. RESULTS: Immunization elicited Env-specific binding and neutralizing antibodies (NAb against XMRV in mice. The peak titers for ELISA-binding antibodies and NAb were 1:1024 and 1:464, respectively; however, high ELISA-binding and NAb titers were not sustained and persisted for less than three weeks after immunizations. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccine-induced XMRV Env antibody titers were transiently high, but their duration was short. The relatively rapid diminution in antibody levels may in part explain the differing prevalences reported for XMRV in various prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome cohorts. The low level of immunogenicity observed in the present study may be characteristic of a natural XMRV infection in humans.

  11. Transgene stability for three replication-competent murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, Mogens R.; Carrasco, Maria L; Hansen, Bettina Dencker;

    2004-01-01

    cassette consisting of an internal ribosome entry site followed by the enhanced green fluorescent protein coding sequence inserted in different configurations into murine leukemia virus genomes. In two of the constructs, the insert was located in the upstream part of the U3 region while in the third...

  12. Hepatitis B virus reactivation in a chronic myeloid leukemia patient treated with imatinib mesylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ya-dan; CUI Guo-hui; LI Mian; GOWREA Bhuveshwarnath; XIA Jia; HU Yu

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate is a molecular targeted agent for treating chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumor.Although imatinib mesylate is not regarded as an immunosuppressive agent,few studies have also shown that it may impair immune response.In this report,we present a case of transient hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation during imatinib mesylate treatment for CML.

  13. Origin of envelope proteins of a leukemia virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The roles of avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV) and host myeloblast cells in controlling the protein composition of virus envelope and host cell membrane are being studied by examining an ATPase enzyme in the virus and cells. New culture techniques for virus producing myeloblasts have been developed. (U.S.)

  14. Characterization of a chimeric foot-and-mouth disease virus bearing bovine rhinitis B virus leader proteinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our recent study has shown that bovine rhinovirus type 2 (BRV2), a new member of the Aphthovirus genus, shares many motifs and sequence similarities with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Despite low sequence conservation (36percent amino acid identity) and N- and C-terminus folding differences,...

  15. Mutations that abrogate transactivational activity of the feline leukemia virus long terminal repeat do not affect virus replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U3 region of the LTR of oncogenic Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) and feline leukemia viruses (FeLV) have been previously reported to activate expression of specific cellular genes in trans, such as MHC class I, collagenase IV, and MCP-1, in an integration-independent manner. It has been suggested that transactivation of these specific cellular genes by leukemia virus U3-LTR may contribute to the multistage process of leukemogenesis. The U3-LTR region, necessary for gene transactivational activity, also contains multiple transcription factor-binding sites that are essential for normal virus replication. To dissect the promoter activity and the gene transactivational activity of the U3-LTR, we conducted mutational analysis of the U3-LTR region of FeLV-A molecular clone 61E. We identified minimal nucleotide substitution mutants on the U3 LTR that did not disturb transcription factor-binding sites but abrogated its ability to transactivate the collagenase gene promoter. To determine if these mutations actually have altered any uncharacterized important transcription factor-binding site, we introduced these U3-LTR mutations into the full-length infectious molecular clone 61E. We demonstrate that the mutant virus was replication competent but could not transactivate cellular gene expression. These results thus suggest that the gene transactivational activity is a distinct property of the LTR and possibly not related to its promoter activity. The cellular gene transactivational activity-deficient mutant FeLV generated in this study may also serve as a valuable reagent for testing the biological significance of LTR-mediated cellular gene activation in the tumorigenesis caused by leukemia viruses

  16. Human and bovine viruses in the Milwaukee River watershed: Hydrologically relevant representation and relations with environmental variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the occurrence, hydrologic variability, and seasonal variability of human and bovine viruses in surface water, three stream locations were monitored in the Milwaukee River watershed in Wisconsin, USA, from February 2007 through June 2008. Monitoring sites included an urban subwatershed, a rural subwatershed, and the Milwaukee River at the mouth. To collect samples that characterize variability throughout changing hydrologic periods, a process control system was developed for unattended, large-volume (56–2800 L) filtration over extended durations. This system provided flow-weighted mean concentrations during runoff and extended (24-h) low-flow periods. Human viruses and bovine viruses were detected by real-time qPCR in 49% and 41% of samples (n = 63), respectively. All human viruses analyzed were detected at least once including adenovirus (40% of samples), GI norovirus (10%), enterovirus (8%), rotavirus (6%), GII norovirus (1.6%) and hepatitis A virus (1.6%). Three of seven bovine viruses analyzed were detected including bovine polyomavirus (32%), bovine rotavirus (19%), and bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1 (5%). Human viruses were present in 63% of runoff samples resulting from precipitation and snowmelt, and 20% of low-flow samples. Maximum human virus concentrations exceeded 300 genomic copies/L. Bovine viruses were present in 46% of runoff samples resulting from precipitation and snowmelt and 14% of low-flow samples. The maximum bovine virus concentration was 11 genomic copies/L. Statistical modeling indicated that stream flow, precipitation, and season explained the variability of human viruses in the watershed, and hydrologic condition (runoff event or low-flow) and season explained the variability of the sum of human and bovine viruses; however, no model was identified that could explain the variability of bovine viruses alone. Understanding the factors that affect virus fate and transport in rivers will aid watershed management for minimizing

  17. Human and bovine viruses in the Milwaukee River watershed: Hydrologically relevant representation and relations with environmental variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corsi, S.R., E-mail: srcorsi@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, Wisconsin Water Science Center, Middleton, WI 53562 (United States); Borchardt, M.A.; Spencer, S.K. [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, 2615 Yellowstone Dr., Marshfield, WI 54449 (United States); Hughes, P.E.; Baldwin, A.K. [U.S. Geological Survey, Wisconsin Water Science Center, Middleton, WI 53562 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    To examine the occurrence, hydrologic variability, and seasonal variability of human and bovine viruses in surface water, three stream locations were monitored in the Milwaukee River watershed in Wisconsin, USA, from February 2007 through June 2008. Monitoring sites included an urban subwatershed, a rural subwatershed, and the Milwaukee River at the mouth. To collect samples that characterize variability throughout changing hydrologic periods, a process control system was developed for unattended, large-volume (56–2800 L) filtration over extended durations. This system provided flow-weighted mean concentrations during runoff and extended (24-h) low-flow periods. Human viruses and bovine viruses were detected by real-time qPCR in 49% and 41% of samples (n = 63), respectively. All human viruses analyzed were detected at least once including adenovirus (40% of samples), GI norovirus (10%), enterovirus (8%), rotavirus (6%), GII norovirus (1.6%) and hepatitis A virus (1.6%). Three of seven bovine viruses analyzed were detected including bovine polyomavirus (32%), bovine rotavirus (19%), and bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1 (5%). Human viruses were present in 63% of runoff samples resulting from precipitation and snowmelt, and 20% of low-flow samples. Maximum human virus concentrations exceeded 300 genomic copies/L. Bovine viruses were present in 46% of runoff samples resulting from precipitation and snowmelt and 14% of low-flow samples. The maximum bovine virus concentration was 11 genomic copies/L. Statistical modeling indicated that stream flow, precipitation, and season explained the variability of human viruses in the watershed, and hydrologic condition (runoff event or low-flow) and season explained the variability of the sum of human and bovine viruses; however, no model was identified that could explain the variability of bovine viruses alone. Understanding the factors that affect virus fate and transport in rivers will aid watershed management for minimizing

  18. Human monoclonal antibody directed against an envelope glycoprotein of human T-cell leukemia virus type I.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsushita, S; Robert-Guroff, M; Trepel, J. (Jane); Cossman, J; Mitsuya, H; Broder, S

    1986-01-01

    We report the production and characterization of a human monoclonal antibody reactive against the major envelope glycoprotein of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I), a virus linked to the etiology of adult T-cell leukemia. We exposed lymph-node cells derived from a patient with adult T-cell leukemia to the Epstein-Barr virus in vitro and obtained a B-cell clone (designated 0.5 alpha) by a limiting dilution technique. The secreted product of 0.5 alpha is a monoclonal antibody (also des...

  19. Synergistic In Vitro Interactions between Alpha Interferon and Ribavirin against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus and Yellow Fever Virus as Surrogate Models of Hepatitis C Virus Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Buckwold, Victor E.; Wei, Jiayi; Wenzel-Mathers, Michelle; Russell, Julie

    2003-01-01

    Monotherapy of hepatitis C virus infection with either alpha interferon or ribavirin alone is rather ineffective, while the use of the two antivirals together is much more efficacious. In vitro drug-drug combination analysis utilizing related members of the family Flaviviridae, bovine viral diarrhea virus and yellow fever virus, revealed significant direct synergistic interactions between these drugs' antiviral activities that might explain this clinical observation.

  20. Production of Monoclonal Antibody Against Recombinant Polypeptide From the Erns Coding Region of the Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Seyfi Abad Shapouri, Masood Reza; Ekhtelat, Maryam; Ghorbanpoor Najaf Abadi, Masood; Mahmoodi Koohi, Pezhman; Lotfi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) is an economically important cattle disease with a worldwide distribution. Detection and elimination of animals persistently infected (PI) with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is essential for the control of BVD and eradication of BVDV. There are usually no pathognomonic clinical signs of BVDV infection. Diagnostic investigations therefore rely on laboratory-based detection of the virus, or virus-induced antigens or antibodies. Objectives: Erns as an...

  1. A Metagenomics and Case-Control Study To Identify Viruses Associated with Bovine Respiratory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Kondov, Nikola O.; Deng, Xutao; Van Eenennaam, Alison; Neibergs, Holly L.; Delwart, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is a common health problem for both dairy and beef cattle, resulting in significant economic loses. In order to identify viruses associated with BRD, we used a metagenomics approach to enrich and sequence viral nucleic acids in the nasal swabs of 50 young dairy cattle with symptoms of BRD. Following deep sequencing, de novo assembly, and translated protein sequence similarity searches, numerous known and previously uncharacterized viruses were identified. Bovi...

  2. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus in Zoos: A Perspective from the Veterinary Team

    OpenAIRE

    Kottwitz, Jack J.; Ortiz, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    The many different species in close proximity make zoological collections a unique environment for disease transmission. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) is of special concern with zoos due to the numerous exotic ruminant species that this virus can infect. BVDV occurs as both a non-cytopathic and a cytopathic strain both of which are capable of infecting exotic ruminants. The cytopathic strain causes mucosal disease (MD) and death. Infection with the non-cytopathic strain may produce persi...

  3. The effects of exposure of susceptible alpacas to alpacas persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    OpenAIRE

    Byers, Stacey R.; Evermann, James F.; Bradway, Daniel S; Grimm, Amanda L.; Ridpath, Julia F.; Parish, Steven M.; Tibary, Ahmed; Barrington, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Reports of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections in alpacas have been increasing in recent years but much is still unknown about the mechanisms of disease in this species. This report characterizes the transmission of BVDV from persistently infected (PI) alpacas to BVDV naïve alpacas, documents shedding patterns, and characterizes the disease effects in both PI and transiently infected alpacas. Two PI alpacas shed BVDV Type 1b virus in most body fluids, and commonly available diagnost...

  4. Immunofluorescence of bovine virus diarrhea viral antigen in white blood cells from experimentally infected immunocompetent calves.

    OpenAIRE

    Bezek, D M; Baker, J. C.; Kaneene, J B

    1988-01-01

    A study to evaluate the detection of bovine virus diarrhea viral antigen using immunofluorescence testing of white blood cells was conducted. Five colostrum-deprived calves were inoculated intravenously with a cytopathic strain of the virus. Lymphocyte and buffy coat smears were prepared daily for direct immunofluorescent staining for detection of antigen. Lymphocytes were separated from heparinized blood using a Ficoll density procedure. Buffy coat smears were prepared from centrifuged blood...

  5. Seroepidemiological study of parainfluenza 3 virus in bovines with reproductive failure, from monteria-colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Betancur Hurtado

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The virus of the bovine Para influenza 3 is known to be a part of the bovine respiratory complex, along with another infectious agent as the bovine sincitialrespiratory virus, which has not as yet been diagnosed at the geographical area of this study. This work was carried out at Monteria, Colombia, in bovines from 28 farms, with the aim of finding the serological prevalence of the PI-3 virus. Blood samples were collected from 137 females, with a history of reproductive failure, and from 26 bulls from the same farms. The serological test used was the ELISA test. A descriptive analysis was carried out, recording data from positives and from negatives sera. A Chi-square test was used to test for association between the variables: sex, age, reproductive condition and type of production system, with serological reactivity to the PI-3virus. Concerning the results of the study, the point prevalence for the PI-3 virus found was 13, 5%, and under statistical bases, statistical significance was found between age groups and association was not found for the others variables taken in account for the study. According to the results, it was concluded that the PI-3 virus is present in bovines of Monteria, and that a part of the reproductive failure in females of the region, mostly the return to estrus and abortions, is due to the effect of that pathological entity. Finally, the authors recommend more extensive studies on PI-3 Infection, at the different cattle raising areas of Colombia, a country of 24 million heads.

  6. Bioinformatics and Molecular Analysis of the Evolutionary Relationship between Bovine Rhinitis A Viruses and Foot-And-Mouth Disease Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Devendra K.; Lawrence, Paul; Pauszek, Steve J.; Piccone, Maria E.; Knowles, Nick J.; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Bovine rhinitis viruses (BRVs) cause mild respiratory disease of cattle. In this study, a near full-length genome sequence of a virus named RS3X (formerly classified as bovine rhinovirus type 1), isolated from infected cattle from the UK in the 1960s, was obtained and analyzed. Compared to other closely related Aphthoviruses, major differences were detected in the leader protease (Lpro), P1, 2B, and 3A proteins. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that RS3X was a member of the species bovine rhinitis A virus (BRAV). Using different codon-based and branch-site selection models for Aphthoviruses, including BRAV RS3X and foot-and-mouth disease virus, we observed no clear evidence for genomic regions undergoing positive selection. However, within each of the BRV species, multiple sites under positive selection were detected. The results also suggest that the probability (determined by Recombination Detection Program) for recombination events between BRVs and other Aphthoviruses, including foot-and-mouth disease virus was not significant. In contrast, within BRVs, the probability of recombination increases. The data reported here provide genetic information to assist in the identification of diagnostic signatures and research tools for BRAV. PMID:27081310

  7. Simultaneous concentration of bovine viruses and agricultural zoonotic bacteria from water using sodocalcic glass wool filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infiltration and runoff from manured agricultural fields can result in livestock pathogens reaching groundwater and surface waters. Here, we measured the effectiveness of glass wool filters to simultaneously concentrate enteric viruses and bacteria of bovine origin from water. The recovery efficienc...

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of a Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Strain Isolated in Southern China

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Zhixun; Fan, Qing; Xie, Zhiqin; Liu, Jiabo; Pang, Yaoshan; Deng, Xianwen; Xie, Liji; Luo, Sisi; Khan, M. I.

    2014-01-01

    We report here the full-length RNA genomic sequence of the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain GX4, isolated from a cow in southern China. Studies indicate that BVDV GX4 belongs to the BVDV-1b subtype. This report will help in understanding the epidemiology and molecular characteristics of BVDV in southern China cattle.

  9. Synthetic analogues of bovine bactenecin dodecapeptide reduce herpes simplex virus type 2 infectivity in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard; Shestakov, Andrey; Hancock, Robert E. W; Nordström, Inger; Eriksson, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    We have evaluated the potential of four synthetic peptides (denoted HH-2, 1002, 1006, 1018) with a distant relationship to the host defense peptide bovine bactenecin dodecapeptide for their ability to prevent genital infections with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) in mice. All four peptides...

  10. Fatal trichuris spp. infection in a Holstein heifer persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideman, Greg N

    2004-06-01

    Whipworms (Trichuris spp.) were identified in the colon of a recently purchased, 10-month-old dairy heifer that died suddenly. A skin test was positive for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Signs of BVDV occurred in other heifers in the group, but fecal flotations were negative for whipworm eggs. PMID:15283522

  11. Resolving bovine viral diarrhea virus subtypes from persistently infected US beef calves with complete genome sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is classified into 2 genotypes, BVDV-1 and BVDV-2, each of which contains distinct subtypes with genetic and antigenic differences. Currently, three major subtypes circulate in the United States: BVDV-1a, 1b, and 2a. In addition, a single case of BVDV-2b infection ...

  12. Genetic diversity and frequency of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) detected in cattle in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapid detection and culling of persistently infected animals and efficacious vaccination are key factors to control bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections in cattle. The aim of this study was to investigate frequency of detection of persistently infected cattle and examine the diversity of bo...

  13. Evaluation of natural transmission of bovine leukaemia virus within dairy herds of Argentina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monti, G.E.; Frankena, K.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe patterns of seroconversion to bovine leukaemia virus and to estimate the main parameters needed for future model building. A longitudinal study was carried out between February 1999 and November 2001 in seven commercial dairy farms in Argentina using 1535 la

  14. Detection, characterization, and control of bovine viral diarrhea virus infection in a large commercial dairy herd

    OpenAIRE

    Schefers, Jeremy M.; Collins, James E.; Sagar M. Goyal; Ames, Trevor R.

    2009-01-01

    Detection, genetic characterization, and control of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) disease in a large commercial dairy herd is reported. Precolostral BVDV serum antibody was detected in 5.3% (12/226) of newborn calves before the test and removal of persistently infected (PI) animals and in 0.4% (2/450) of newborn calves after the removal of PI heifers.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of a Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Subgenotype 1e Strain Isolated in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Stalder, Hanspeter; Schweizer, Matthias; Bachofen, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    We sequenced the complete genome of the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain Carlito. It belongs to the subgenotype 1e that is described in Europe only and represents the second most prevalent subgenotype in Switzerland. This is the first report of a full-length sequence of BVDV-1e.

  16. Periparturient infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1 causes hemorrhagic proctocolitis in a cow

    OpenAIRE

    Laureyns, Jozef; Pardon, Bart; Letellier, Carine; Deprez, Piet

    2011-01-01

    After 3 cows of a dairy herd had died from severe hemorrhagic diarrhea, a 4th sick cow was transported to the clinic. Blood analyses revealed the complete absence of white blood cells, the presence of a type 1b strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and seroconversion to BVDV.

  17. Detection and Characterization of Genetic Recombination in Cytopathic Type 2 Bovine Viral Diarrhea Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Ridpath, Julia F.; Neill, John D.

    2000-01-01

    In cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus genotype 1 (BVDV1) isolates, insertions are reported at position A (amino acid [aa] 1535) and position B (aa 1589). Insertions at position B predominate. In this survey it was found that in BVDV2, insertions at position A predominate. Possible reasons for this difference in relative frequency are discussed.

  18. Long-term clincopathological characteristics of alpacas naturally infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus type Ib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Substantial bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV)-related production losses in North American alpaca herds have been associated with BVDV type Ib infection. Objectives: To classify and differentiate the long-term clinicopathological characteristics of BVDV type Ib infection of alpaca crias,...

  19. Fatal Trichuris spp. infection in a Holstein heifer persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    OpenAIRE

    Wideman, Greg N.

    2004-01-01

    Whipworms (Trichuris spp.) were identified in the colon of a recently purchased, 10-month-old dairy heifer that died suddenly. A skin test was positive for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Signs of BVDV occurred in other heifers in the group, but fecal flotations were negative for whipworm eggs.

  20. The effects of exposure of susceptible alpacas to alpacas persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reports of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections in alpacas have been increasing over the past several years but much is still unknown about the mechanisms of disease in this species. This report describes research performed to characterize the transmission of BVDV from persistently infected...

  1. Studies on genetic diversity of bovine viral diarrhea viruses in Danish cattle herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagy, Abdou; Fahnøe, Ulrik; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun;

    2014-01-01

    Scandinavian countries have successfully pursued bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) eradication without the use of vaccines. In Denmark, control and eradication of BVDV were achieved during the last two decades, but occasionally new BVDV infections are detected in some Danish cattle herds. The aim...

  2. Quantitative assessment of the risk of introduction of bovine viral diarrhea virus in Danish dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foddai, Alessandro; Boklund, Anette; Stockmarr, Anders;

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative risk assessment was carried out to estimate the likelihood of introduc-ing bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in Danish dairy herds per year and per trimester,respectively. The present study gives important information on the impact of risk mitiga-tion measures and sources of...

  3. Knowledge Gaps Impacting the Development of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Control Programs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper identifies knowledge gaps that impact on the design of programs to control and or eradicate bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) in the United States. Currently there are several voluntary regional BVDV control programs in place. These control programs are aimed at the removal of animals ...

  4. Virus survival in slurry: Analysis of the stability of foot-and-mouth disease, classical swine fever, bovine viral diarrhoea and swine influenza viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtner, Anette; Belsham, Graham

    2012-01-01

    outbreak of disease before it has been recognized. The survival of foot-and-mouth disease virus, classical swine fever virus, bovine viral diarrhoea virus and swine influenza virus, which belong to three different RNA virus families plus porcine parvovirus (a DNA virus) was examined under controlled...... conditions. For each RNA virus, the virus survival in farm slurry under anaerobic conditions was short (generally ≤1h) when heated (to 55°C) but each of these viruses could retain infectivity at cool temperatures (5°C) for many weeks. The porcine parvovirus survived considerably longer than each of the RNA...

  5. Leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Masetti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood and adolescence cancer, characterized by clonal proliferation of variably differentiated myeloid or lymphoid precursors. Recent insights into the molecular pathogenesis of leukemia have shown that epigenetic modifications, such as deacetylation of histones and DNA methylation, play crucial roles in leukemogenesis, by transcriptional silencing of critical genes. Histone deacetylases (HDACs are potential targets in the treatment of leukaemia, and, as a consequence, inhibitors of HDACs (HDIs are being studied for therapeutic purposes. HDIs promote or enhance several different anticancer mechanisms, such as apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and cellular differentiation and, therefore, are in evidence as promising treatment for children and adolescents with acute leukemia, in monotherapy or in association with other anticancer drugs. Here we review the main preclinical and clinical studies regarding the use of HDIs in treating childhood and adolescence leukemia.

  6. Development of a duplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of bovine herpesvirus 1 and bovine viral diarrhea virus in bovine follicular fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mylissa S D; Givens, M Daniel; Galik, Patricia K; Riddell, Kay P; Stringfellow, David A

    2008-07-15

    The objective of this study was to develop a duplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for simultaneous detection of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type I and type II. Follicular fluid was collected from a BoHV-1 acutely infected heifer, a BVDV I persistently infected heifer, and from 10 ovaries recovered from an abattoir. Both the BoHV-1 and BVDV contaminated follicular fluid were diluted 1:5 to 1:10(7) using the pooled, abattoir-origin follicular fluid. Each dilution sample was analyzed using the duplex qPCR, virus isolation, reverse transcription-nested PCR (RT-nPCR), and BoHV-1 qPCR. The duplex qPCR was able to simultaneously detect BoHV-1 and BVDV I in the fluid diluted to 1:100 and 1:1000, respectively. These results corresponded with the reverse transcription-nested PCR and BoHV-1 qPCR. Therefore, the duplex qPCR might be used for quality assurance testing to identify these two viruses in cells, fluids and tissues collected from donor animals and used in reproductive technologies. PMID:18452983

  7. The effect of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strains on bovine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (Mo-DC) phenotype and capacity to produce BVDV

    OpenAIRE

    Rajput, Mrigendra KS; Darweesh, Mahmoud F; Park, Kaci; Braun, Lyle J; Mwangi, Waithaka; Young, Alan J; Chase, Christopher CL

    2014-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DC) are important antigen presentation cells that monitor, process, and present antigen to T cells. Viruses that infect DC can have a devastating impact on the immune system. In this study, the ability of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) to replicate and produce infectious virus in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (Mo-DC) and monocytes was studied. The study also examined the effect of BVDV infection on Mo-DC expression of cell surface markers, including MHCI, MH...

  8. Identification and Characterization of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus from Indonesian Cattle (IDENTIFIKASI DAN KARAKTERISASI VIRUS BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA DARI SAPI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharam Saepulloh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV is an important viral disease, which a ubiquitous pathogen ofcattle with worldwide economic importance and due to its misdiagnose with other viruses. The goal of thecurrent study was to identify and characterize of BVDV by reverse transcriptase polymerase chainreaction (RT-PCR and followed by sequence genome analyses. Blood, feces, and semen samples werecollected from 588 selected cattle from animals suffering from diarrhea and respiratory manifestation. RTPCRresults showed that the 69 (11.74% samples were positive to BVDV. Further molecularcharacterization was conducted only with 17 PCR positive samples. The results indicated the 17 IndonesianBVD virus isolates were belonging to the genotype-1 of BVDV (BVDV-1 based on sequence analysis anda phylogenetic relationship between Indonesian BVDV isolates and BVDV in the world. This finding is thefirst report of BVD-1 circulated in Indonesian cattle.

  9. Control of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus in Ruminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document is a consensus statement, produced at the request of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine that reflects the opinion of an expert panel regarding the prevalence and host range, clinical manifestations, and the potential for ultimate eradication of bovine viral diarrhea v...

  10. Seroepidemiological Survey of Infection by Feline Leukemia Virus and Immunodeficiency Virus in Madrid and Correlation with Some Clinical Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Arjona, Alvaro; Escolar, Elena; Soto, Iria; Barquero, Nuria; Martin, Daniel; Gomez-Lucia, Esperanza

    2000-01-01

    A study of 180 healthy cats found that 15.6% were feline leukemia virus (FeLV) positive, 8.3% were feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) positive, and 1.1% were FIV and FeLV positive, which corresponded to 30.4, 13.8, and 2.6, of 115 cats with FIV- and FeLV-related symptoms, respectively. Differences were seen in the sexes and ages of the populations studied. Anemia, leukopenia, and lymphopenia were the most frequent hematological abnormalities in infected cats.

  11. Comparison of flow cytometry and virus isolation in cell culture for identification of cattle persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Qvist, P.; Houe, H.; Aasted, B.; Meyling, A

    1991-01-01

    Detection of bovine viral diarrhea virus in 143 blood samples by virus isolation in cell culture and flow cytometry was performed. The material included 37 samples later shown to originate from persistently infected cattle. Thirty-three samples were positive by virus isolation, and all 37 samples were positive by the flow cytometric assay.

  12. HoBi-like virus challenge of pregnant cows that had previously given birth to calves persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) to establish persistent infection (PI) following fetal infection is central to keeping these viruses circulating. Similarly, an emerging species of pestivirus, HoBi-like viruses, is also able to establish PIs. Dams that are not PI, but carrying PI ...

  13. Bovine Lactoferrin Inhibits Toscana Virus Infection by Binding to Heparan Sulphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostina Pietrantoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Toscana virus is an emerging sandfly-borne bunyavirus in Mediterranean Europe responsible for neurological diseases in humans. It accounts for about 80% of paediatric meningitis cases during the summer. Despite the important impact of Toscana virus infection-associated disease on human health, currently approved vaccines or effective antiviral treatments are not available. In this research, we have analyzed the effect of bovine lactoferrin, a bi-globular iron-binding glycoprotein with potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities, on Toscana virus infection in vitro. Our results showed that lactoferrin was capable of inhibiting Toscana virus replication in a dose-dependent manner. Results obtained when lactoferrin was added to the cells during different phases of viral infection showed that lactoferrin was able to prevent viral replication when added during the viral adsorption step or during the entire cycle of virus infection, demonstrating that its action takes place in an early phase of viral infection. In particular, our results demonstrated that the anti-Toscana virus action of lactoferrin took place on virus attachment to the cell membrane, mainly through a competition for common glycosaminoglycan receptors. These findings provide further insights on the antiviral activity of bovine lactoferrin.

  14. Bovine lactoferrin inhibits Toscana virus infection by binding to heparan sulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrantoni, Agostina; Fortuna, Claudia; Remoli, Maria Elena; Ciufolini, Maria Grazia; Superti, Fabiana

    2015-02-01

    Toscana virus is an emerging sandfly-borne bunyavirus in Mediterranean Europe responsible for neurological diseases in humans. It accounts for about 80% of paediatric meningitis cases during the summer. Despite the important impact of Toscana virus infection-associated disease on human health, currently approved vaccines or effective antiviral treatments are not available. In this research, we have analyzed the effect of bovine lactoferrin, a bi-globular iron-binding glycoprotein with potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities, on Toscana virus infection in vitro. Our results showed that lactoferrin was capable of inhibiting Toscana virus replication in a dose-dependent manner. Results obtained when lactoferrin was added to the cells during different phases of viral infection showed that lactoferrin was able to prevent viral replication when added during the viral adsorption step or during the entire cycle of virus infection, demonstrating that its action takes place in an early phase of viral infection. In particular, our results demonstrated that the anti-Toscana virus action of lactoferrin took place on virus attachment to the cell membrane, mainly through a competition for common glycosaminoglycan receptors. These findings provide further insights on the antiviral activity of bovine lactoferrin. PMID:25643293

  15. BoLA antigens are associated with increased frequency of persistent lymphocytosis in bovine leukaemia virus infected cattle and with increased incidence of antibodies to bovine leukaemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stear, M J; Dimmock, C K; Newman, M J; Nicholas, F W

    1988-01-01

    The association between bovine major histocompatibility system (BoLA) type and persistent lymphocytosis in cattle with antibodies to bovine leukaemia virus was examined by comparing antigen frequencies in cattle with persistent lymphocytosis to controls matched for age, sex, breed and presence of antibodies to BLV. The cattle came from nine dairy herds in south-east Queensland, Australia; six herds were Australian Illawarra Shorthorn (AIS), two herds were Jersey and one herd was Friesian. Antigen W6 and Eu28R were more common in cattle with persistent lymphocytosis than in controls. Antigen W8 was less common in AIS cattle with persistent lymphocytosis. A study of 24 offspring from one sire, heterozygous for W10 and Eu28R, showed that offspring inheriting Eu28R from the sire were significantly more likely to have antibodies to BLV than offspring inheriting the opposing W10 haplotype. PMID:2843067

  16. Diagnosis of natural exposure to bovine viral diarrhea in a vaccinated herd by measuring extended antibody titers against bovine viral diarrhea virus

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Jeremy

    2003-01-01

    Two abortions occurred in a 150-head commercial cow-calf herd. Bovine viral diarrhea was suspected and confirmed by measuring extended titers against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in a sample of 15 breeding females. Fifteen were sero-positive and 11 had significantly high titers (1:972–1:8748), likely due to natural exposure to cattle persistently infected with BVDV.

  17. Noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 impairs virus control in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Giyong; Lee, Jin-Sol; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Shin, Seung-Uk; Yoon, Ji Young; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2016-02-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an economically important pathogen that causes development of mild to severe clinical signs in wild and domesticated ruminants. We previously showed that mice could be infected by BVDV. In the present study, we infected mice intraperitoneally with non-cytopathic (ncp) BVDV1 or ncp BVDV2, harvested the blood and organs of the infected mice at days 4, 7, 10 and 14 postinfection (pi), and performed immunohistochemical analyses to confirm BVDV infection. Viral antigens were detected in the spleens of all infected mice from days 4 through 14 and were also found in the mesenteric lymph nodes, gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), heart, kidney, intestine, and bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) of some infected mice. In ncp BVDV2-infected mice, flow cytometric analysis revealed markedly fewer CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes and lower expression of costimulatory molecules CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II (I-A/I-E) than those in ncp BVDV1-infected mice. Production of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 was higher in the plasma of ncp BVDV2-infected mice than that in that of ncp BVDV1-infected mice. Our results demonstrate that ncp BVDV1 and ncp BVDV2 interact differently with the host innate immune response in vivo. These findings highlight an important distinction between ncp BVDV1 and ncp BVDV2 and suggest that ncp BVDV2 impairs the host's ability to control the infection and enhances virus dissemination. PMID:26586332

  18. Mutated primer binding sites interacting with different tRNAs allow efficient murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Lovmand, J;

    1993-01-01

    Two Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors with primer binding sites matching tRNA(Gln-1) and tRNA(Lys-3) were constructed. The transduction efficiency of these mutated vectors was found to be comparable to that of a vector carrying the wild-type primer binding site matching t......RNA(Pro). Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis of transduced proviruses confirmed the transfer of vectors with mutated primer binding sites and further showed that tRNA(Gln-2) may act efficiently in conjunction with the tRNA(Gln-1) primer binding site. We conclude that murine leukemia virus...... can replicate by using various tRNA molecules as primers and propose primer binding site-tRNA primer interactions to be of major importance for tRNA primer selection. However, efficient primer selection does not require perfect Watson-Crick base pairing at all 18 positions of the primer binding site....

  19. Diverse outcomes of bovine viral diarrhea virus infections in a herd naturally infected during pregnancy - a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    A beef producer purchased Angus crossbred cattle that were pregnant with nursing calves. The purchased cattle, their nursing calves, and subsequent born calves were not initially tested for BVDV. Bovine viral diarrhea virus subtype 2a (BVDV2a) was isolated from an aborted bovine fetus, 6.5 months,...

  20. Immunotherapy of murine leukemia. Efficacy of passive serum therapy of Friend leukemia virus-induced disease in immunocompromised mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the passive therapy of Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-induced disease with chimpanzee anti-F-MuLV serum is accompanied by the development of host antiviral humoral and cellular immunity, the latter measurable in adoptive transfer protocols and by the ability of serum-protected mice to resist virus rechallenge. The present study was designed to further examine the contribution of various compartments of the host immune system to serum therapy itself, as well as to the acquired antiviral immunity that develops in serum-protected mice, through the use of naturally immunocompromised animals [e.g., nude athymic mice and natural killer (NK)-deficient beige mutant mice] or mice treated with immunoabrogating agents such as sublethal irradiation, cyclophosphamide [Cytoxan (Cy)], cortisone, and 89Sr. The studies in nude mice indicate that while mature T-cells are not needed for effective serum therapy, they do appear to be necessary for the long-term resistance of serum-protected mice to virus rechallenge and for the generation of the cell population(s) responsible for adoptive transfer of antiviral immunity. Furthermore, this acquired resistance is not due to virus neutralization by serum antibodies since antibody-negative, Cy-treated, serum-protected mice still reject the secondary virus infection. Lastly, while the immunocompromise systems examined did effect various host antiviral immune responses, none of them, including the NK-deficient beige mutation, significantly diminished the efficacy of the passive serum therapy of F-MuLV-induced disease

  1. Role of immunity in age-related resistance to paralysis after murine leukemia virus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, P M; Robbins, D S; Morse, H C

    1984-01-01

    Resistance to the paralytic effects of a wild mouse (Cas-Br-M) murine leukemia virus infection develops with age and is complete by 10 days of age in susceptible NFS mice. The possibility that cell-mediated immunity plays a significant role in this resistance was suggested by the observation that treatment of 10-day-old mice with antithymocyte serum rendered them susceptible to paralysis. By comparison, mice rendered incapable of generating a humoral immune response by treatment from birth to...

  2. Functional dissection of the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope protein gp70.

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Y.; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1997-01-01

    The envelope protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MLV) is a complex glycoprotein that mediates receptor binding and entry via fusion with cell membranes. By using a series of substitution mutations and truncations in the Mo-MLV external envelope surface protein gp70, we have identified regions important for these processes. Firstly, truncations of gp70 revealed that the minimal continuous receptor-binding region is amino acids 9 to 230, in broad agreement with other studies. Secondly,...

  3. The relationship between antibody status to bovine corona virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus and disease incidence, reproduction and herd characteristics in dairy herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tråvén Madeleine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV and bovine corona virus (BCV affects cattle worldwide. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of these infections on general health and reproduction parameters measurable on herd level and to explore the association between antibody status and some herd characteristics. Methods We collected a pooled milk sample from five primiparous cows from 79 Swedish dairy herds in September 2006. The samples were analysed for immunoglobulin G antibodies to BCV and BRSV with indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Herd level data from 1 September 2005 to 30 August 2006 were accessed retrospectively. The location of the herds was mapped using a geographical information system. Results Ten herds were antibody negative to both viruses and were compared with 69 herds positive to BCV or BRSV or both. Positive herds had a higher (P = 0.001 bulk tank milk somatic cell count (BMSCC compared with negative herds. The medians for all other analyzed health and reproductive parameters were consistently in favour of the herds negative to both viruses although the differences were not statistically significant. A higher proportion (P = 0.01 of herds used professional technicians for artificial insemination, rather than farm personnel, amongst the 33 herds negative to BCV compared with the 46 positive herds. Conclusions Our result shows that herds that were antibody positive to BCV and/or BRSV had a higher BMSCC compared with herds negative to BCV and BRSV. There was also tendency that negative herds had a better general herd health compared with positive. A higher proportion amongst the BCV negative herds used external technicians for AI instead of farm personnel, indicating that it is possible to avoid infection although having regular visits. Negative herds were located in close proximity to positive herds, indicating that local spread and airborne transmission between herds might not be of great

  4. A stochastic model for simulation of the economic consequences of bovine virus diarrhoea virus infection in a dairy herd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, J.T.; Enevoldsen, Carsten; Houe, H.

    1995-01-01

    A dynamic, stochastic model simulating the technical and economic consequences of bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infections for a dairy cattle herd for use on a personal computer was developed. The production and state changes of the herd were simulated by state changes of the individual cows...... applied modelling principle. The validation problem in relation to the model was discussed. A comparison between real and simulated data using data from a published case report was shown to illustrate how user acceptance can be obtained. © 1995....

  5. Typing of cytopathic and noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus reference and Canadian field strains using a neutralizing monoclonal antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Magar, R; Minocha, H C; Montpetit, C; Carman, P S; Lecomte, J.

    1988-01-01

    Cytopathic and noncytopathic reference strains as well as Canadian field isolates of bovine viral diarrhea virus were analyzed by neutralization and immunofluorescence tests using a bovine viral diarrhea virus-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody. Results on reference strains indicated three major antigenic groups: I) NADL-like, II) New York 1-like and III) Oregon C24V-like. Field isolates could be segregated into groups I and II and none could be typed into the group III. It appears tha...

  6. Iminosugars in Combination with Interferon and Ribavirin Permanently Eradicate Noncytopathic Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus from Persistently Infected Cells▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Woodhouse, Stephen D; SMITH, Caroline; Michelet, Maud; Branza-Nichita, Norica; Hussey, Mark; Dwek, Raymond A.; Zitzmann, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated interferon (IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) as dual therapy and as part of triple-combination therapies with the iminosugars N-butyl-deoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ), N-nonyl-deoxynojirimycin, and N-7-oxanonyl-6-deoxymethyl-galactonojirimycin. The ability of these compounds to clear bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a surrogate model for hepatitis C virus (HCV), from a persistently infected Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells cell line was determined by monitoring the secretion of viral RNA and ...

  7. Quantitation, in vitro propagation, and characterization of preleukemic cells induced by radiation leukemia virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intrathymic (i.t.) inoculation of radiation leukemia virus into C57BL/6 mice induces a population of preleukemic (PL) cells that can progress into mature thymic lymphomas upon transfer into syngeneic recipients. A minimum of 10(3) PL thymic cells are required to induce lymphomas in the recipient. Most of the individual lymphomas developed in mice which were inoculated with cells of a single PL thymus, derived from different T-cell precursors. PL thymic cells could be grown in vitro on a feeder layer consisting of splenic stromal cells. Growth medium was supplemented with supernatant harvested from an established radiation leukemia virus-induced lymphoma cell line (SR4). The in vitro-grown PL cells were characterized as Thy-1+, CD4+, CD8- T-cells, most of which expressed radiation leukemia virus antigens. Cultured PL cells were found to be nontumorigenic, based on their inability to form s.c. tumors. However, these cells could develop into thymic lymphomas if inoculated i.t. into syngeneic recipients. A culture of PL cells, maintained for 2 mo, showed clonal T-cell receptor arrangement. Lymphomas which developed in several recipient mice upon injection with these PL cells were found to possess the same T-cell receptor arrangement. These results indicate that PL cells can be adapted for in vitro growth while maintaining their preleukemic character

  8. Pathogenicity Induced by Feline Leukemia Virus, Rickard Strain, Subgroup A Plasmid DNA (pFRA)

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Hang; Bechtel, Marta K.; Shi, Yan; Phipps, Andrew; Mathes, Lawrence E.; Hayes, Kathleen A.; Roy-Burman, Pradip

    1998-01-01

    A new provirus clone of feline leukemia virus (FeLV), which we named FeLV-A (Rickard) or FRA, was characterized with respect to viral interference group, host range, complete genome sequence, and in vivo pathogenicity in specific-pathogen-free newborn cats. The in vitro studies indicated the virus to be an ecotropic subgroup A FeLV with 98% nucleotide sequence homology to another FeLV-A clone (F6A/61E), which had also been fully sequenced previously. Since subgroup B polytropic FeLVs (FeLV-B)...

  9. Single-Tube Single-Enzyme Reverse Transcriptase PCR Assay for Detection of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus in Pooled Bovine Serum

    OpenAIRE

    Weinstock, Daniel; Bhudevi, Bodreddigari; Castro, Anthony E.

    2001-01-01

    A reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) was developed for use as a diagnostic screening test for the detection of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in pooled bovine serum samples. Individual serum samples from 60 dairy cattle herds located in Pennsylvania were evaluated by the microplate virus isolation method, and pooled sera were analyzed by RT-PCR. RT-PCR was sensitive and specific and detected a single viremic serum sample in up to 100 pooled serum samples. RT-PCR analysis of pooled sera pr...

  10. Characterization of bovine A20 gene: Expression mediated by NF-κB pathway in MDBK cells infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericksen, Fernanda; Villalba, Melina; Olavarría, Víctor H

    2016-05-01

    Cytokine production for immunological process is tightly regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. The NF-κB signaling pathway maintains immune homeostasis in the cell through the participation of molecules such as A20 (TNFAIP3), which is a key regulatory factor in the immune response, hematopoietic differentiation, and immunomodulation. Although A20 has been identified in mammals, and despite recent efforts to identify A20 members in other higher vertebrates, relatively little is known about the composition of this regulator in other classes of vertebrates, particularly for bovines. In this study, the genetic context of bovine A20 was explored and compared against homologous genes in the human, mouse, chicken, dog, and zebrafish chromosomes. Through in silico analysis, several regions of interest were found conserved between even phylogenetically distant species. Additionally, a protein-deduced sequence of bovine A20 evidenced many conserved domains in humans and mice. Furthermore, all potential amino acid residues implicated in the active site of A20 were conserved. Finally, bovine A20 mRNA expression as mediated by the bovine viral diarrhea virus and poly (I:C) was evaluated. These analyses evidenced a strong fold increase in A20 expression following virus exposure, a phenomenon blocked by a pharmacological NF-κB inhibitor (BAY 117085). Interestingly, A20 mRNA had a half-life of only 32min, likely due to adenylate- and uridylate-rich elements in the 3'-untranslated region. Collectively, these data identify bovine A20 as a regulator of immune marker expression. Finally, this is the first report to find the bovine viral diarrhea virus modulating bovine A20 activation through the NF-κB pathway. PMID:26809100

  11. Replication and clearance of respiratory syncytial virus - Apoptosis is an important pathway of virus clearance after experimental infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, B.; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Larsen, Lars Erik; Røntved, C.M.; Uttenthal, Åse; Rønsholt, L.; Alexandersen, Søren

    2002-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus is an important cause of severe respiratory disease in young children, the elderly, and in immunocompromised adults. Similarly, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is causing severe, sometimes fatal, respiratory disease in calves. Both viruses are pneumovirus...... replication and clearance in a natural target animal. Replication of BRSV was demonstrated in the luminal part of the respiratory epithelial cells and replication in the upper respiratory tract preceded the replication in the lower respiratory tract. Virus excreted to the lumen of the respiratory tract was...... and the infections with human respiratory syncytial. virus and BRSV have similar clinical, pathological, and epidemiological characteristics. In this study we used experimental BRSV infection in calves as a model of respiratory syncytial virus infection to demonstrate important aspects of viral...

  12. Experimental infection of eastern cottontail rabbits Sylvilagus floridanus) with infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, H W; Reed, D E

    1979-09-01

    Experimental infection of eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) with infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus caused acute keratoconjunctivitis and a fatal systemic infection. The clinical syndrome was characterized initially by blepharospasm and ocular discharge. The rabbits were markedly depressed on post-exposure day (PED) 5 and were dead or moribund on PED 6. The virus was readily recovered from liver and adrenal gland tissue on PED 6 and from conjunctival swabs on PED 1 to 6. Histopathologic studies revealed a few necrotic foci in the liver and multiple focal to diffuse necrosis of the adrenal glands. Viral isolation and immunofluorescence tests were used to demonstrate a direct association between infectious bovine rhinotracheitis viral antigens and the lesions. PMID:230773

  13. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) pneumonia in beef calf herds despite vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tegtmeier, C.; Pedersen, E.

    2001-01-01

    The present report describes the clinical, pathological, serological and virological findings in calves from 2 larger Danish beef herds experiencing outbreaks of pneumonia. The calves had been vaccinated with an inactivated bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) vaccine 2 months prior to the o...... beef herds failed to protect the calves against severe or even fatal BRSV mediated respiratory disease 2 months later.......The present report describes the clinical, pathological, serological and virological findings in calves from 2 larger Danish beef herds experiencing outbreaks of pneumonia. The calves had been vaccinated with an inactivated bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) vaccine 2 months prior to the...... outbreak. The clinical signs comprised nasal discharge, pyrexia, cough and increased respiratory rates. A total of 28 calves died in the 2 herds. The laboratory investigations revealed that BRSV was involved and probably initiated both outbreaks. Furthermore, the serological results suggested that the...

  14. PREVALENCE OF BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHOEA VIRUS IN WEST BENGAL, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshmi Ghosh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Viral Diarrhea (BVD is one of the most economically important diseases in cattle. The present study was undertaken to diagnose the persistently infected (PI animals by AntigenELISA and Reverse Transcriptase PCR using serum samples from organized farms as well as rural areas of West Bengal. The results showed that out of 964 serum samples tested 07 (0.73% was positive for BVDV by Antigen-ELISA. For further confirmation, RNA was extracted from the positive samples and RT-PCR was performed with 5' UTR specific primers which showed 294 bp amplicons. This finding showed circulation of BVDV in cattle in West Bengal, India.

  15. Seroprevalence and risk factors associated with bovine herpesvirus 1 and bovine viral diarrhea virus in North-Eastern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Correa, J.C.; Zapata-Campos, C.C.; Jasso-Obregón, J.O.; Martinez-Burnes, J.; López-Zavala, R.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are well known etiological agents of cattle that produce important economic losses due to reproductive failures and calf mortality, as well as enteric and respiratory disease. Tamaulipas is located northeast of Mexico, an important cattle production and the principal exporter of calf and heifer to the United States. The objectives of this study were to estimate the seroprevalence of BoHV-1 and of BVDV, and to determine the effects of risk factors on these infections. Blood samples of cattle from 57 farms from rural districts of Tamaulipas were collected. The samples were tested for antibodies against BoHV-1 and BVDV using commercial ELISA kits. Data on potential risk factors were obtained using a questionnaire administered to the farmer at the time the blood samples were taken. The seroprevalences for BoHV-1 and BVDV were 64.4% and 47.8%, respectively. In the logistic regression analysis, the significant risk factors were rural district, herd size and cattle introduced to the farm. This study confirms the high seroprevalence of BoHV-1 and BVDV in unvaccinated cattle in Tamaulipas, Mexico. The results of this study could be used for the development of BoHV-1 and BVDV prevention and control program in North-Eastern, Mexico.

  16. Bovine epizootic encephalomyelitis caused by Akabane virus in southern Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Shogo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Akabane virus is a member of the genus Orthobunyavirus in the family Bunyaviridae. It is transmitted by hematophagous arthropod vectors such as Culicoides biting midges and is widely distributed in temperate to tropical regions of the world. The virus is well known as a teratogenic pathogen which causes abortions, stillbirths, premature births and congenital abnormalities with arthrogryposis-hydranencephaly syndrome in cattle, sheep and goats. On the other hand, it is reported that the virus rarely induces encephalomyelitis in cattle by postnatal infection. A first large-scale epidemic of Akabane viral encephalomyelitis in cattle occurred in the southern part of Japan from summer to autumn in 2006. The aim of this study is to define the epidemiological, pathological and virological properties of the disease. Results Nonsuppurative encephalomyelitis was observed in cattle that showed neurological symptoms such as astasia, ataxia, opisthotonus and hypersensitivity in beef and dairy farms by histopathological analysis. Akabane viral antigen and genome were consistently detected from the central nervous system of these animals, and the virus was isolated not only from them but also from the blood samples of clinically healthy calves in the epidemic area. The isolates were classified into genogroup I a containing the Iriki strain, which caused encephalitis of calves almost twenty years ago in Japan. Most of the affected cattle possessed the neutralizing antibody against Akabane virus. Seroconversion of the cohabitated and sentinel cattle in the epidemic area was also confirmed during an outbreak of the disease. Conclusion The ecological and epidemiological data we have obtained so far demonstrated that the Akabane virus is not endemic in Japan. No evidence of Akabane virus circulation was observed in 2005 through nation-wide serological surveillance, suggesting that a new strain belonging to genogroup I a invaded southern Japan

  17. Isolation and identification of a bovine viral diarrhea virus from sika deer in china

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Nan; Sun Changjiang; Wang Quankai; Du Rui; Wang Shijie; Gao Yugang; Zhang Pengju; Zhang Lianxue

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections continue to cause significantly losses in the deer population. Better isolation and identification of BVDV from sika deer may contribute significantly to the development of prophylactic therapeutic, and diagnostic reagents as well as help in prevention and control of BVDV. However, isolation and identification of BVDV from sika deer is seldom reported in literature. In this study, we collected some samples according to clinical...

  18. Isolation and Genetic Analysis of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus from Infected Cattle in Indiana

    OpenAIRE

    H. Leon Thacker; Maria Negron; Duane A. Murphy; Raizman, Eran A.; Schnur, Megan E.; Roman M. Pogranichniy

    2011-01-01

    Species and biotype distribution was determined in 44 bovine viral diarrhea virus- (BVDV-) positive samples submitted to the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (ADDL) in Indiana during 2006–2008. BVDV RNA was detected in the 5′-untranslated region and Npro region using reverse transcriptase PCR followed by sequencing analysis of the PCR product. Additionally, cases were classified into one of six categories according to history and/or lesions: acute symptomatic, hemorrhagic, respiratory dis...

  19. Cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV): emerging pestiviruses doomed to extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Peterhans, Ernst; Bachofen, Claudia; Stalder, Hanspeter; Schweizer, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a Flaviviridae pestivirus, is arguably one of the most widespread cattle pathogens worldwide. Each of its two genotypes has two biotypes, non-cytopathic (ncp) and cytopathic (cp). Only the ncp biotype of BVDV may establish persistent infection in the fetus when infecting a dam early in gestation, a time point which predates maturity of the adaptive immune system. Such fetuses may develop and be born healthy but remain infected for life. Due to this early in...

  20. Complete Genome Sequencing of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus 1, Subgenotypes 1n and 1o.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Asuka; Tateishi, Kentaro; Shinohara, Minami; Naoi, Yuki; Shiokawa, Mai; Aoki, Hiroshi; Ohmori, Keitaro; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Shirai, Junsuke; Nagai, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    To gain further insight into the genomic features of bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1) subgenotypes, we sequenced the complete genome of BVDV-1n Shitara/02/06 and BVDV-1o IS26NCP/01. The complete genome of Shitara/02/06 and IS26NCP/01 shared 77.7 to 79.3% and 78.0 to 85.7% sequence identities with other BVDV-1 subgenotype strains, respectively. PMID:26893426

  1. Coinfection with bovine viral diarrhea virus and Mycoplasma bovis in feedlot cattle with chronic pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Shahriar, Farshid M.; Clark, Edward G.; Janzen, Eugene; West, Keith; Wobeser, Gary

    2002-01-01

    Chronic, antibiotic-resistant pneumonia, sometimes with concurrent polyarthritis, occurs in feedlot cattle in western Canada. The prevalence of Mycoplasma bovis, bovine viral diarrhea virus, and Haemophilus somnus was determined by using immunohistochemical staining of lung and heart tissue from 2 groups of animals with this history. Mycoplasma bovis antigen was present in 44/48 cases submitted between 1995 and 1998 (retrospective group) and 15/16 of cases from 1999 (prospective group), and w...

  2. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Entry Is Dependent on Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lecot, Steve; Belouzard, Sandrine; Dubuisson, Jean; Rouillé, Yves

    2005-01-01

    Cellular mechanisms of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) entry in MDBK cells were investigated. Chloroquine, bafilomycin A1, or ammonium chloride inhibited BVDV infection, indicating that an acidic endosomal pH is required for BVDV entry. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein partially inhibited BVDV infection at a postentry step, whereas BVDV entry was strongly inhibited by chlorpromazine or by the overexpression of a dominant-negative form of EPS15, a protein essential for the formation ...

  3. Typing of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Viruses Directly from Blood of Persistently Infected Cattle by Multiplex PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, S. A.; Burton, K. M.; Prins, S. E.; Deregt, D

    1999-01-01

    A nested multiplex PCR was developed for genotyping of bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDVs). The assay could detect as little as 3 50% tissue culture infective doses of BVDV per ml and typed 42 out of 42 cell culture isolates. BVDV was also successfully typed, with or without RNA extraction, from all 27 whole-blood samples examined from 22 carriers or probable carriers and 5 experimentally infected cattle.

  4. Clinical and Haematological Findings in Bovine Immunodeficiency Virus (BIV) Infected Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Yilmaz, Zeki; YEŞİLBAĞ, Kadir

    2008-01-01

    The clinical and haematological findings in dairy cattle with naturally infected bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) infection were evaluated. Thirty-seven (12.3%) out of 300 cattle that had previously been found positive for BIV infection were monitored. Thirty-seven BIV-free cattle selected from BIV-positive herds were used as a control group. Routine clinical and haematological parameters were recorded 6 times, at 1-month intervals. Mastitis (n = 18), metritis (n = 9), respiratory system...

  5. Transmission of bovine leukaemia virus within dairy herds by simulation modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Monti, G.E.; Frankena, K.; Jong, de, T.

    2007-01-01

    In Argentina, bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) infection is common in dairy herds. The country currently has a National Voluntary Control Programme but relatively few farms have enrolled. However, there is increased interest from authorities and farmers to implement regional compulsory programmes but there is scarce quantitative information of the transmission of BLV in cattle herds. This information is a prerequisite to develop effective BLV control strategies. Mathematical modelling offers ways...

  6. Evaluation of viral inactivation of pseudorabies virus, encephalomyocarditis virus, bovine viral diarrhea virus and porcine parvovirus in pancreatin of porcine origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, C; Gobbi, E; Biosa, T; Andra', M; Cavallazzi, U; Masoero, L

    2014-11-01

    Pancreatin is a substance containing enzymes, principally amylase, lipase, and protease. It is obtained from bovine or porcine pancreas and used in the treatment of pancreatic endocrine insufficiency in humans. Regulations and safety concerns mandate viral clearance (virus removal or inactivation) in biopharmaceuticals such as pancreatin. A virus validation study was performed to evaluate virus clearance achieved in the final step of drying under vacuum by testing a panel of four animal viruses: Pseudorabies virus (PRV), Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and Porcine parvovirus (PPV). Because of the product's virucidal effect and high cytotoxicity, the starting material was diluted to a ratio of 0.67 g of dried pancreatin resuspended in 13.5 mL of cell culture medium followed by a 50-fold dilution in cell culture medium before spiking. After heating at 60±1°C for 5 h, the samples were diluted about 5-fold in cell culture medium and titered by the plaque assay method. The virus reduction factor ranged from 5.59 (for PPV) to 7.07 (for EMCV) and no viral plaque was observed, indicating that the process step was effective in the reduction and removal of virus contamination. Though no virus contamination events in pancreatin have been reported to date, evaluation of the production process for its ability to inactivate and/or remove virus contamination, particularly from zoonotic viral agents such as hepatitis E virus and Norovirus considered emerging pathogens, is necessary to ensure the viral safety of animal-derived biopharmaceuticals. PMID:25110118

  7. Serological survey of Toxoplasma gondii, Dirofilaria immitis, Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) infections in pet cats in Bangkok and vicinities, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    The seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii, Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infections was examined using serum or plasma samples from 746 pet cats collected between May and July 2009 from clinics and hospitals located in and around ...

  8. Genetic diversity of bovine viral diarrhoea viruses (BVDV) in Denmark during a 10-year eradication period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uttenthal, Åse; Stadejek, T.; Nylin, B.

    2005-01-01

    A 243 base-pair fragment of the 5'- untranslated region (5'-UTR) of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) was RT-PCR amplified from tissue samples (after one passage) or from plasma collected from Danish cattle in 1962 (1), 1993 (7), or in 2002-03 (28) when BVD was almost extinct as a result of a 6...... subtype, the samples collected in 2002-2003 belonged to Id (22 samples), 1b (5 samples) and le (I sample) subtypes. In five herds, materials from two animals were obtained for PCR analysis. In four of five herds the sequences of the two viruses were identical, but in one herd the obtained sequences...

  9. Susceptibility of human lymphoid tissue cultured ex vivo to xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Curriu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was generated after a recombination event between two endogenous murine leukemia viruses during the production of a prostate cancer cell line. Although the associations of the XMRV infection with human diseases appear unlikely, the XMRV is a retrovirus of undefined pathogenic potential, able to replicate in human cells in vitro. Since recent studies using animal models for infection have yielded conflicting results, we set out an ex vivo model for XMRV infection of human tonsillar tissue to determine whether XMRV produced by 22Rv1 cells is able to replicate in human lymphoid organs. Tonsil blocks were infected and infection kinetics and its pathogenic effects were monitored RESULTS: XMRV, though restricted by APOBEC, enters and integrates into the tissue cells. The infection did not result in changes of T or B-cells, immune activation, nor inflammatory chemokines. Infectious viruses could be recovered from supernatants of infected tonsils by reinfecting DERSE XMRV indicator cell line, although these supernatants could not establish a new infection in fresh tonsil culture, indicating that in our model, the viral replication is controlled by innate antiviral restriction factors. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the replication-competent retrovirus XMRV, present in a high number of laboratories, is able to infect human lymphoid tissue and produce infectious viruses, even though they were unable to establish a new infection in fresh tonsillar tissue. Hereby, laboratories working with cell lines producing XMRV should have knowledge and understanding of the potential biological biohazardous risks of this virus.

  10. Prevalence of bovine viral diarrhoea virus in cattle farms in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabára, Ágnes; Lang, Zsolt; Földi, József; Hornyák, Ákos; Abonyi, Tamás; Ózsvári, László

    2016-06-01

    A study was performed to survey the virological prevalence of bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) virus (BVDV) in cattle herds in Hungary between 2008 and 2012. A total of 40,413 samples for BVDV detection and 24,547 samples for antibody testing were collected from 3,247 herds (570,524 animals), thus representing approximately 75% of the cattle population in Hungary. Retrospective Bayesian analysis demonstrated that (1) the herd-level true virus prevalence was 12.4%, (2) the mean individual (within-herd) true virus prevalence was 7.2% in the herds having at least one virus-positive animal and 0.89% for all investigated herds with a mean apparent prevalence of 1.15% for the same population. This is the first study about BVDV prevalence in Hungary. PMID:27342097

  11. Hemotopoetic radiation damage in mice with the leukemia virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of congenital carriage of tumorgenic viruses on the radioresistance of mice exposed to ionizing radiation is studied. Mice were irradiated by γ-rays of 137Cs source at 0.5-8.0 Gy doses and 1.5 Gy/min dose rate. It is shown that mice-carriers of virus (T-leukosis) are more radiosensitive according to survival rate and hemopoiesis state. It is supposed that the decrease in leukosal mice ability to repair postradiation damages is the basis of these regularities

  12. Androgen-independent proliferation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells infected by xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakoki, Katsura [Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Department of AIDS Research, Institute of Tropical Medicine, G-COE, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Department of Urology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kamiyama, Haruka [Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Department of AIDS Research, Institute of Tropical Medicine, G-COE, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Izumida, Mai; Yashima, Yuka; Hayashi, Hideki [Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Yamamoto, Naoki [Department of AIDS Research, Institute of Tropical Medicine, G-COE, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Department of Microbiology, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Matsuyama, Toshifumi [Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Igawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Hideki [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kubo, Yoshinao, E-mail: yoshinao@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Department of AIDS Research, Institute of Tropical Medicine, G-COE, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • XMRV infection induces androgen-independent growth in LNCaP cells. • XMRV infection reduces expression of androgen receptor. • XMRV promotes appearance of androgen blocker-resistant prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a novel gammaretrovirus that was originally isolated from human prostate cancer. It is now believed that XMRV is not the etiologic agent of prostate cancer. An analysis of murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection in various human cell lines revealed that prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected by XMRV, and this suggested that XMRV infection may confer some sort of growth advantage to prostate cancer cell lines. To examine this hypothesis, androgen-dependent LNCaP cells were infected with XMRV and tested for changes in certain cell growth properties. We found that XMRV-infected LNCaP cells can proliferate in the absence of the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, androgen receptor expression is significantly reduced in XMRV-infected LNCaP cells. Such alterations were not observed in uninfected and amphotropic MLV-infected LNCaP cells. This finding explains why prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected with XMRV.

  13. Androgen-independent proliferation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells infected by xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • XMRV infection induces androgen-independent growth in LNCaP cells. • XMRV infection reduces expression of androgen receptor. • XMRV promotes appearance of androgen blocker-resistant prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a novel gammaretrovirus that was originally isolated from human prostate cancer. It is now believed that XMRV is not the etiologic agent of prostate cancer. An analysis of murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection in various human cell lines revealed that prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected by XMRV, and this suggested that XMRV infection may confer some sort of growth advantage to prostate cancer cell lines. To examine this hypothesis, androgen-dependent LNCaP cells were infected with XMRV and tested for changes in certain cell growth properties. We found that XMRV-infected LNCaP cells can proliferate in the absence of the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, androgen receptor expression is significantly reduced in XMRV-infected LNCaP cells. Such alterations were not observed in uninfected and amphotropic MLV-infected LNCaP cells. This finding explains why prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected with XMRV

  14. Molecular diversity of bovine viral diarrhea virus in uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, L; Puentes, R; Reolón, E; Acuña, P; Riet, F; Rivero, R; Cristina, J; Colina, R

    2016-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) affects bovine production and reproduction causing significant economic losses all over the world. Two viral species has been recognized: BVDV-1 and BVDV-2, both distributed worldwide. Recently, novel specie of BVDV named HoBi-like pestivirus was discovered. The presence of BVDV was confirmed in 1996 in Uruguay, however, does not exist until today a schedule of compulsory vaccination along the country. Serological studies with samples from all Uruguayan herds were performed during 2000 and 2001 demonstrating that all of them were seropositive to BVDV with a mean prevalence of 69%. In addition, there have been no new studies done since those previously described and it is important to mention that the genetic diversity of BVD has never been described in Uruguay. Nowadays, there is strongly suspect that BVDV is one of the most important causes of reproductive failures in our herds. The aim of this study was to describe for the first time in Uruguay the genetic diversity of BVDV with samples collected from different regions along the country. Serological status of 390 non-vaccinated animals against BVDV with reproductive problems from farms of Rivera, Tacuarembó and Florida departments of Uruguay were studied. All herds were seropositive to BVDV and high proportion of animals were positive (298/390), while 4.1% (16/390) of the animals were positive to Antigen Capture ELISA test and Real Time PCR. Phylogenetic analysis performed with concatenated sequences from the 5'UTR and Npro genomic regions revealed that BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 are infecting our herds, being BVDV-1 the most frequently found. The major subtype was BVDV-1a, followed by BVDV-1i and BVDV-2b. This is the first study that describes the genetic diversity of BVDV in Uruguay and it will contribute to the elaboration of sanitization programs. PMID:26597189

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus-1 Strain Egy/Ismailia/2014, Subtype 1b

    OpenAIRE

    Soltan, Mohamed A.; Wilkes, Rebecca P.; Elsheery, Mohamed N.; Elhaig, Mahmoud M.; Riley, Matthew C.; Melissa A. Kennedy

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of bovine viral diarrhea virus-1b (BVDV-1b), strain Egy/Ismailia/2014. The virus genome is composed of 12,217 nucleotides organized as one open reading frame encoding 3,898 amino acids. This report will assist efforts in diagnostics, studying molecular epidemiology, and control of BVDV in Egypt.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Noncytopathic Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus 1 Contaminating a High-Passage RK-13 Cell Line

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Bora; Li, Ganwu; Zheng, Ying; Zhang, Jianqiang; Shuck, Kathleen M.; Timoney, Peter J.; Balasuriya, Udeni B. R.

    2015-01-01

    A high-passage rabbit kidney RK-13 cell line (HP-RK-13[KY], originally derived from the ATCC CCL-37 cell line) used in certain laboratories worldwide is contaminated with noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (ncpBVDV). On complete genome sequence analysis, the virus strain was found to belong to BVDV group 1b.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus-1 Strain Egy/Ismailia/2014, Subtype 1b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltan, Mohamed A; Wilkes, Rebecca P; Elsheery, Mohamed N; Elhaig, Mahmoud M; Riley, Matthew C; Kennedy, Melissa A

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of bovine viral diarrhea virus-1b (BVDV-1b), strain Egy/Ismailia/2014. The virus genome is composed of 12,217 nucleotides organized as one open reading frame encoding 3,898 amino acids. This report will assist efforts in diagnostics, studying molecular epidemiology, and control of BVDV in Egypt. PMID:26701085

  18. Genetic detection and characterization of emerging HoBi-like viruses in archival foetal bovine serum batches

    Science.gov (United States)

    The propagation of viruses, for use in research and the production of vaccines, is dependent on growth of the virus in cell culture. The media used to grow cells is commonly supplemented with serum collected from the fetuses of pregnant cattle that have gone to slaughter. This fetal bovine serum (...

  19. Suitability of vaccinia virus and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV for determining activities of three commonly-used alcohol-based hand rubs against enveloped viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinmann Jochen

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A procedure for including activity against enveloped viruses in the post-contamination treatment of hands has been recommended, but so far no European standard is available to implement it. In 2004, the German Robert Koch-Institute (RKI and the German Association for the Control of Virus Disease (DVV suggested that vaccinia virus and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV should be used as test viruses in a quantitative suspension test to determine the activity of a disinfectant against all enveloped viruses. Methods We have studied the activities of three commonly-used alcohol-based hand rubs (hand rub A, based on 45% propan-2-ol, 30% propan-1-ol and 0.2% mecetronium etilsulfate; hand rub B, based on 80% ethanol; hand rub C, based on 95% ethanol against vaccinia virus and BVDV, and in addition against four other clinically relevant enveloped viruses: herpes simplex virus (HSV types 1 and 2, and human and avian influenza A virus. The hand rubs were challenged with different organic loads at exposure time of 15, 30 and 60 s. According to the guidelines of both BGA/RKI and DVV, and EN 14476:2005, the reduction of infectivity of each test virus was measured on appropriate cell lines using a quantitative suspension test. Results All three alcohol-based hand rubs reduced the infectivity of vaccinia virus and BVDV by ≥ 4 log10-steps within 15 s, irrespective of the type of organic load. Similar reductions of infectivity were seen against the other four enveloped viruses within 15 s in the presence of different types of organic load. Conclusion Commonly used alcohol-based hand rubs with a total alcohol concentration ≥ 75% can be assumed to be active against clinically relevant enveloped viruses if they effectively reduce the infectivities of vaccinia virus and BVDV in a quantitative suspension test.

  20. Mechanisms in endogenous leukemia virus induction by radiation and chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model of endogenous virus induction in AKR-strain mouse cells, based on two distinct types of alterations in cellular or proviral DNA, is presented. The first type are nonrepairable alterations such as those caused by the incorporation of halogenated pyrimidines; the second type are repairable lesions such as those caused by irradiation or certain chemicals other than pyrimidines. The production of nonrepairable lesions leads to the formation of a stable, proviral state which is dependent upon cell division for complete virus expression. A stable provirus intermediate state is not demonstrable in mouse cells induced by treatments which cause repairable lesions since replication of damaged or altered DNA must occur before the lesions are removed by repair synthesis. Experimental support for this model is based upon the following observations: (a) enhancement of induction is observed if lesions are introduced during cellular DNA synthesis; (b) quinacrine, which is an inhibitor of repair synthesis, increases the observed level of radiation induction; and (c) incorporation of 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine during repair of DNA appears to 'stabilize' lesions which would otherwise be removed by repair synthesis, and increases the level of virus induction

  1. Crystal structures of inhibitor complexes of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1) protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Tadashi; Li, Mi; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander (NCI); (Kyoto)

    2010-09-28

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus associated with several serious diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia and tropical spastic paraparesis/myelopathy. For a number of years, the protease (PR) encoded by HTLV-1 has been a target for designing antiviral drugs, but that effort was hampered by limited available structural information. We report a high-resolution crystal structure of HTLV-1 PR complexed with a statine-containing inhibitor, a significant improvement over the previously available moderate-resolution structure. We also report crystal structures of the complexes of HTLV-1 PR with five different inhibitors that are more compact and more potent. A detailed study of structure-activity relationships was performed to interpret in detail the influence of the polar and hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitors and the protease.

  2. Crystal Structures of Inhibitir Complexes of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus (HTLV-1) Protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Tadashi; Li, Mi; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander (NCI); (Kyoto)

    2010-09-17

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus associated with several serious diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia and tropical spastic paraparesis/myelopathy. For a number of years, the protease (PR) encoded by HTLV-1 has been a target for designing antiviral drugs, but that effort was hampered by limited available structural information. We report a high-resolution crystal structure of HTLV-1 PR complexed with a statine-containing inhibitor, a significant improvement over the previously available moderate-resolution structure. We also report crystal structures of the complexes of HTLV-1 PR with five different inhibitors that are more compact and more potent. A detailed study of structure-activity relationships was performed to interpret in detail the influence of the polar and hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitors and the protease.

  3. Infectious complications of human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B J

    1996-07-01

    Infection with human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) has been etiologically associated with two diseases: adult T cell leukemia and HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Increasing evidence suggests that HTLV-I infection may be associated with immunosuppression and, as a consequence, affect the risk and expression of several other infectious diseases, of which the best studied are strongyloidiasis, tuberculosis, and leprosy. In strongyloidiasis, coinfection with HTLV-I appears to result in a higher rate of chronic carriage, an increased parasite load, and a risk of more severe infection. In tuberculosis, a decrease in delayed-type hypersensitivity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been established, but whether this decrease is clinically significant has yet to be determined. In leprosy, an increased risk of disease is suggested, but the published studies are all too poorly controlled to draw definite conclusions. PMID:8816143

  4. Comparison of the prevalence and incidence of infection with bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV) in Denmark and Michigan and association with possible risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houe, H.; Baker, J.C.; Maes, R.K.;

    1995-01-01

    Based on 2 previous surveys on the occurrence of infection with bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV) in Danish and Michigan dairy herds, the prevalence and incidence of the infection were compared. The presence of certain possible risk factors for the occurrence of infection in the 2 areas were su...

  5. A transgenic mouse model of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1–associated diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo eOhsugi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL and several inflammatory diseases. Tax, the protein encoded by HTLV-1, may be responsible for the development of the diseases caused by this virus. To investigate the pathogenic role of Tax, several transgenic mouse strains expressing Tax have been developed in recent years. These mice develop various tumors including large granular lymphocytic leukemia, as well as inflammatory diseases such as arthritis. These results suggest that Tax expression alone is sufficient to cause both malignant neoplastic diseases and inflammatory diseases. However, until recently, there were no tax transgenic mice that develop T-cell leukemia and lymphoma resembling ATLL. The first successful induction of leukemia in T cells was pre–T-cell leukemia generated in transgenic mice in which a mouse lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase p56lck (lck proximal promoter was used to express the tax gene in immature T cells. Subsequently, transgenic mice were established in which the lck-distal promoter was used to express Tax in mature T cells; these mice developed mature T-cell leukemia and lymphoma that more closely resembled ATLL than did earlier mouse models.

  6. Friend and Moloney murine leukemia viruses specifically recombine with different endogenous retroviral sequences to generate mink cell focus-forming viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, L H; Cloyd, M W

    1985-01-01

    A group of mink cell focus-forming (MCF) viruses was derived by inoculation of NFS/N mice with Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV 1387) and was compared to a similarly derived group of MCF viruses from mice inoculated with Friend MuLV (Fr-MuLV 57). Antigenic analyses using monoclonal antibodies specific for MCF virus and xenotropic MuLV envelope proteins and genomic structural analyses by RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotide finger-printing indicated that the Moloney and Friend MCF viruses ...

  7. Altered plasma concentrations of sex hormones in cats infected by feline immunodeficiency virus or feline leukemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejerizo, G; Doménech, A; Illera, J-C; Silván, G; Gómez-Lucía, E

    2012-02-01

    Gender differences may affect human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in humans and may be related to fluctuations in sex hormone concentration. The different percentage of male and female cats observed to be infected by feline leukemia virus (FeLV) or feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) has been traditionally explained through the transmission mechanisms of both viruses. However, sexual hormones may also play a role in this different distribution. To study this possibility, 17β-estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) concentrations were analyzed using a competitive enzyme immunoassay in the plasma of 258 cats naturally infected by FIV (FIV(+)), FeLV (FeLV(+)), or FeLV and FIV (F(-)F(+)) or negative for both viruses, including both sick and clinically healthy animals. Results indicated that the concentrations of 17β-estradiol and testosterone were significantly higher in animals infected with FIV or FeLV (P FIV(+) females had higher DHEA concentrations than the corresponding males (P FIV and FeLV infections are associated with an important deregulation of steroids, possibly from early in the infection process, which might have decisive consequences for disease progression. PMID:22177694

  8. Evidence of feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Toxoplasma gondii in feral cats on Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, R.M.; Goltz, Dan M.; Hess, S.C.; Banko, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    We determined prevalence to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies, feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen, and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in feral cats (Felis catus) on Mauna Kea Hawaii from April 2002 to May 2004. Six of 68 (8.8%) and 11 of 68 (16.2%) cats were antibody positive to FIV and antigen positive for FeLV, respectively; 25 of 67 (37.3%) cats were seropositive to T. gondii. Antibodies to FeLV and T. gondii occurred in all age and sex classes, but FIV occurred only in adult males. Evidence of current or previous infections with two of these infectious agents was detected in eight of 64 cats (12.5%). Despite exposure to these infectious agents, feral cats remain abundant throughout the Hawaiian Islands. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2007.

  9. Persistent Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Infection in Domestic and Wild Small Ruminants and Camelids Including the Mountain Goat (Oreamnos americanus)

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Danielle D.; Duprau, Jennifer L.; Wolff, Peregrine L.; Evermann, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a pestivirus best known for causing a variety of disease syndromes in cattle, including gastrointestinal disease, reproductive insufficiency, immunosuppression, mucosal disease, and hemorrhagic syndrome. The virus can be spread by transiently infected individuals and by persistently infected animals that may be asymptomatic while shedding large amounts of virus throughout their lifetime. BVDV has been reported in over 40 domestic and free-ranging species,...

  10. Human and bovine viruses and bacteria at three Great Lakes beaches: Environmental variable associations and health risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Steven R.; Borchardt, Mark A.; Carvin, Rebecca B.; Burch, Tucker R; Spencer, Susan K.; Lutz, Michelle A.; McDermott, Colleen M.; Busse, Kimberly M.; Kleinheinz, Gregory; Feng, Xiaoping; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Waterborne pathogens were measured at three beaches in Lake Michigan, environmental factors for predicting pathogen concentrations were identified, and the risk of swimmer infection and illness was estimated. Waterborne pathogens were detected in 96% of samples collected at three Lake Michigan beaches in summer, 2010. Samples were quantified for 22 pathogens in four microbial categories (human viruses, bovine viruses, protozoa, and pathogenic bacteria). All beaches had detections of human and bovine viruses and pathogenic bacteria indicating influence of multiple contamination sources at these beaches. Occurrence ranged from 40 to 87% for human viruses, 65–87% for pathogenic bacteria, and 13–35% for bovine viruses. Enterovirus, adenovirus A, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, bovine polyomavirus, and bovine rotavirus A were present most frequently. Variables selected in multiple regression models used to explore environmental factors that influence pathogens included wave direction, cloud cover, currents, and water temperature. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment was done for C. jejuni, Salmonella spp., and enteroviruses to estimate risk of infection and illness. Median infection risks for one-time swimming events were approximately 3 × 10–5, 7 × 10–9, and 3 × 10–7 for C. jejuni, Salmonella spp., and enteroviruses, respectively. Results highlight the importance of investigating multiple pathogens within multiple categories to avoid underestimating the prevalence and risk of waterborne pathogens.

  11. Crystal structure of human T cell leukemia virus protease, a novel target for anticancer drug design

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Mi; Laco, Gary S.; Jaskolski, Mariusz; Rozycki, Jan; Alexandratos, Jerry; Wlodawer, Alexander; Gustchina, Alla

    2005-01-01

    The successful development of a number of HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitors for the treatment of AIDS has validated the utilization of retroviral PRs as drug targets and necessitated their detailed structural study. Here we report the structure of a complex of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) PR with a substrate-based inhibitor bound in subsites P5 through P5′. Although HTLV-1 PR exhibits an overall fold similar to other retroviral PRs, significant structural differences are present i...

  12. Long Terminal Repeat Regions from Exogenous but Not Endogenous Feline Leukemia Viruses Transactivate Cellular Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Sajal K.; Roy-Burman, Pradip; Faller, Douglas V.

    2000-01-01

    We have previously reported that the long terminal repeat (LTR) region of feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) can enhance expression of certain cellular genes such as the collagenase IV gene and MCP-1 in trans (S. K. Ghosh and D. V. Faller, J. Virol. 73:4931–4940, 1999). Genomic DNA of all healthy feline species also contains LTR-like sequences that are related to exogenous FeLV LTRs. In this study, we evaluated the cellular gene transactivational potential of these endogenous FeLV LTR sequences....

  13. Type C virus particles produced in human T-cell lines derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a leukemic T-lymphoid malignancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oda,Takuzo

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Electron microscopy of four human T-cell lines revealed the production of type C virus particles in two T-cell lines: one derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the other from a leukemic T-lymphoid malignancy. Virus particles isolated from these cells had reverse transcriptase activity and the major internal structural protein of 30,000 daltons (p30. The indirect immunofluorescence test of these virus-producing cells with sera of patients with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL was negative. The data indicate that these retroviruses are different from adult T-cell leukemia virus (ATLV.

  14. Proteins of bovine viral diarrhea virus: characterization, biotype-specific differences, and immunological properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virus-specific polypeptides in bovine viral diarrhea-mucosal disease (BVD) virus-infected bovine cells were studied by radiolabeling. A total of 12 polypeptides with apparent Mr of 165, 135, 118, 80, 75, 62, 56-58, 48, 37, 32, 25 and 19 kilodaltons (k) were identified in infected cells. Five glycoproteins were detected in infected cells. Two abundant species had apparent Mr of 48 k and 56-58 k while the minor species had masses of 118, 75 and 65 k. When cells were radiolabeled with L-[35S]-methionine in the presence of tunicamycin the 56-58 k migrated with apparent masses of 54 k and 48-50 K in PAGE. Endoglycosidase F digestion of virus-induced polypeptides caused a 4-6 K reduction in the apparent molecular mass of the 56-58 k yielding a 52 k digested product. Tunicamycin caused a drastic reduction in the yield of infectious virus indicating that the carbohydrate moieties serve a vital role in the infection cycle of BVD virus. The noncytopathic biotype BVD (NCB-BVD) virus isolates can be consistently differentiated from cytopathic biotype BVD (CB-BVD) isolates on the basis of unique polypeptide profiles they induce in the infected cell: the most abundant polypeptide in CB-BVD infected cells is the 80 kD polypeptide while NCB-BVD lack this polypeptide and induce a predominant 118 k polypeptide. A panel of 25 murine monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against the two major glycoproteins of BVD virus was produced. Based on their viral polypeptide specificity and on their ability to neutralize viral infectivity the Mabs in the panel were divided into 3 classes: Class 1 Mabs reacted with the 56-58 k glycoprotein and neutralized the virus, Class 2 Mabs recognized the 56-58 k glycoprotein but were not neutralizing and Class 3 Mabs reacted with the 48 k glycoprotein and did not neutralize the virus. These results identify the 56-58 k as one of the envelope glycoproteins of BVD virus

  15. Proteins of bovine viral diarrhea virus: characterization, biotype-specific differences, and immunological properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donis, R.O.

    1987-01-01

    Virus-specific polypeptides in bovine viral diarrhea-mucosal disease (BVD) virus-infected bovine cells were studied by radiolabeling. A total of 12 polypeptides with apparent Mr of 165, 135, 118, 80, 75, 62, 56-58, 48, 37, 32, 25 and 19 kilodaltons (k) were identified in infected cells. Five glycoproteins were detected in infected cells. Two abundant species had apparent Mr of 48 k and 56-58 k while the minor species had masses of 118, 75 and 65 k. When cells were radiolabeled with L-(/sup 35/S)-methionine in the presence of tunicamycin the 56-58 k migrated with apparent masses of 54 k and 48-50 K in PAGE. Endoglycosidase F digestion of virus-induced polypeptides caused a 4-6 K reduction in the apparent molecular mass of the 56-58 k yielding a 52 k digested product. Tunicamycin caused a drastic reduction in the yield of infectious virus indicating that the carbohydrate moieties serve a vital role in the infection cycle of BVD virus. The noncytopathic biotype BVD (NCB-BVD) virus isolates can be consistently differentiated from cytopathic biotype BVD (CB-BVD) isolates on the basis of unique polypeptide profiles they induce in the infected cell: the most abundant polypeptide in CB-BVD infected cells is the 80 kD polypeptide while NCB-BVD lack this polypeptide and induce a predominant 118 k polypeptide. A panel of 25 murine monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against the two major glycoproteins of BVD virus was produced. Based on their viral polypeptide specificity and on their ability to neutralize viral infectivity the Mabs in the panel were divided into 3 classes: Class 1 Mabs reacted with the 56-58 k glycoprotein and neutralized the virus, Class 2 Mabs recognized the 56-58 k glycoprotein but were not neutralizing and Class 3 Mabs reacted with the 48 k glycoprotein and did not neutralize the virus. These results identify the 56-58 k as one of the envelope glycoproteins of BVD virus.

  16. Construction and characterization of chimeric BHIV (BIV/HIV-1) viruses carrying the bovine immunodeficiency virus gag gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Xin Zhu; Chang Liu; Xin-Lei Liu; Wen-Tao Qiao; Qi-Min Chen; Yi Zeng; Yun-Qi Geng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the possibility of the replacement of the gag gene between human immunodeficiency virus and bovine immunodeficiency virus, to achieve chimeric virions,and thereby gain a new kind of AIDS vaccine based on BHIV chimeric viruses.METHODS: A series of chimeric BHIV proviral DNAs differing in the replacement regions in gag gene were constructed, and then were transfected into 293T cells. The expression of chimeric viral genes was detected at the RNA and protein level. The supematant of 293T cell was ultra centrifuged to detect the probable chimeric virion. Once the chimeric virion was detected, its biological activities were also assayed by infecting HIV-sensitive MT4 cells.RESULTS: Four chimeric BHIV proviral DNAs were constructed. Genes in chimeric viruses expressed correctly in transfected 293T cells. All four constructs assembled chimeric virions with different degrees of efficiency. These virions had complete structures common to retroviruses and packaged genomic RNAs, but the cleavages of the precursor Gag proteins were abnormal to some extent. Three of these virions tested could attach and enter into MT4 cells, and one of them could complete the course of reverse transcription. Yet none of them could replicate in MT4 cells.CONCLUSION: The replacement of partial gag gene of HIV with BIV gaggene is feasible. Genes in chimeric BHIVs are accurately expressed, and virions are assembled. These chimeric BHIVs (proviral DNA together with virus particles) have the potential to become a new kind of HIV/AIDS vaccine.

  17. Effects of exposure to Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 on risk of bovine respiratory disease in Australian feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, K E; Ambrose, R C K; Morton, J M; Horwood, P F; Gravel, J L; Waldron, S; Commins, M A; Fowler, E V; Clements, A C A; Barnes, T S; Mahony, T J

    2016-04-01

    Viruses play a key role in the complex aetiology of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 (BVDV-1) is widespread in Australia and has been shown to contribute to BRD occurrence. As part of a prospective longitudinal study on BRD, effects of exposure to BVDV-1 on risk of BRD in Australian feedlot cattle were investigated. A total of 35,160 animals were enrolled at induction (when animals were identified and characteristics recorded), held in feedlot pens with other cattle (cohorts) and monitored for occurrence of BRD over the first 50days following induction. Biological samples collected from all animals were tested to determine which animals were persistently infected (PI) with BVDV-1. Data obtained from the Australian National Livestock Identification System database were used to determine which groups of animals that were together at the farm of origin and at 28days prior to induction (and were enrolled in the study) contained a PI animal and hence to identify animals that had probably been exposed to a PI animal prior to induction. Multi-level Bayesian logistic regression models were fitted to estimate the effects of exposure to BVDV-1 on the risk of occurrence of BRD. Although only a total of 85 study animals (0.24%) were identified as being PI with BVDV-1, BVDV-1 was detected on quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 59% of cohorts. The PI animals were at moderately increased risk of BRD (OR 1.9; 95% credible interval 1.0-3.2). Exposure to BVDV-1 in the cohort was also associated with a moderately increased risk of BRD (OR 1.7; 95% credible interval 1.1-2.5) regardless of whether or not a PI animal was identified within the cohort. Additional analyses indicated that a single quantitative real-time PCR test is useful for distinguishing PI animals from transiently infected animals. The results of the study suggest that removal of PI animals and/or vaccination, both before feedlot entry, would reduce the impact of BVDV-1 on BRD risk

  18. Prevalence study of Bovine viral diarrhea virus by evaluation of antigen capture ELISA and RT-PCR assay in Bovine, Ovine, Caprine, Buffalo and Camel aborted fetuses in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Safarpoor Dehkordi, Farhad

    2011-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is a pestivirus in the family Flaviviridae that cause abortions and stillbirths in livestock and its traditional diagnosis is based on cell culture and virus neutralization test. In this study, for more sensitive, specific detection and determined the prevalence of virus in aborted Bovine, Ovine, Caprine, Buffalo and Camel fetuses the antigen capture ELISA and RT-PCR were recommended. From the total of 2173 aborted fetuses, 347 (15.96%) and 402 (18.49%) were positi...

  19. Antigenic characterization of Brazilian bovine viral diarrhea virus isolates by monoclonal antibodies and cross-neutralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botton S.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Nineteen Brazilian isolates of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV were characterized antigenically with a panel of 19 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs (Corapi WV, Donis RO and Dubovi EJ (1990 American Journal of Veterinary Research, 55: 1388-1394. Eight isolates were further characterized by cross-neutralization using sheep monospecific antisera. Analysis of mAb binding to viral antigens by indirect immunofluorescence revealed distinct patterns of reactivity among the native viruses. Local isolates differed from the prototype Singer strain in recognition by up to 14 mAbs. Only two mAbs - one to the non-structural protein NS23/p125 and another to the envelope glycoprotein E0/gp48 - recognized 100% of the isolates. No isolate was recognized by more than 14 mAbs and twelve viruses reacted with 10 or less mAbs. mAbs to the major envelope glycoprotein E2/gp53 revealed a particularly high degree of antigenic variability in this glycoprotein. Nine isolates (47.3% reacted with three or less of 10 E2/gp53 mAbs, and one isolate was not recognized by any of these mAbs. Virus-specific antisera to eight isolates plus three standard BVDV strains raised in lambs had virus-neutralizing titers ranging from 400 to 3200 against the homologous virus. Nonetheless, many antisera showed significantly reduced neutralizing activity when tested against heterologous viruses. Up to 128-fold differences in cross-neutralization titers were observed for some pairs of viruses. When the coefficient of antigenic similarity (R was calculated, 49 of 66 comparisons (74.24% between viruses resulted in R values that antigenically distinguish strains. Moreover, one isolate had R values suggesting that it belongs to a distinct serologic group. The marked antigenic diversity observed among Brazilian BVDV isolates should be considered when planning diagnostic and immunization strategies.

  20. Influence of herd structure and type of virus introduction on the spread of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) on the spread of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) within a dairy herd

    OpenAIRE

    Ezanno, Pauline; Fourichon, Christine; Seegers, Henri

    2008-01-01

    A herd is a population structured into groups not all equally in contact, which may influence within-herd spread of pathogens. Herd structure varies among cattle herds. However, published models of the spread of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) assume no herd structure or a unique structure chosen as a representative. Our objective was to identify - for different index cases introduced into an initially BVDV - free dairy herd - risky (favourable) herd structures, which increased (decreased...

  1. Molecular cloning of complementary DNA from a pneumopathic strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus and its diagnostic application.

    OpenAIRE

    Brock, K V; Brian, D A; Rouse, B T; Potgieter, L N

    1988-01-01

    A pneumopathic strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus was grown in cell culture and purified. Genomic ribonucleic acid was extracted, polyadenylated at the 3' end, and copied into complementary DNA after oligo-dT priming. Complementary DNA was male double stranded and cloned into the pUC9 plasmid. Approximately 200 complementary DNA clones varying in length from 0.5 to 2.5 kilobases were obtained. Hybridization assays indicated that the sequences isolated were specific for bovine viral diarrhe...

  2. A Multiepitope Fusion Antigen Elicits Neutralizing Antibodies against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Homologous Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Emad A. Hashish; Zhang, Chengxian; Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E.; Chase, Christopher C.; Richard E Isaacson; Zhou, Guoqiang; Zhang, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most important bovine diseases. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are the major causes of diarrhea in calves and cattle. ETEC expressing K99 (F5) fimbriae and heat-stable type Ia (STa) toxin are the leading bacteria causing calf diarrhea, and BVDV causes diarrhea and other clinical illnesses in cattle of all ages. It is reported that maternal immunization with K99 fimbrial antigens provides passive protection to calves agains...

  3. A rapid and sensitive diagnosis of bovine leukaemia virus infection using the nested shuttle polymerase chain reaction

    OpenAIRE

    González Ester T.; Norimine Junzo; Valera Alejandro R.; Travería Gabriel; Oliva Graciela A.; Etcheverrigaray María E.

    1999-01-01

    Bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL). In Argentina, where a program to eradicate EBL has been introduced, sensitive and reliable diagnosis has attained high priority. Although the importance of the agar gel immunodiffusion test remains unchanged for routine work, an additional diagnostic technique is necessary to confirm cases of sera with equivocal results or of calves carrying maternal antibodies. Utilizing a nested shuttle polymerase chain r...

  4. Detection and analysis of bovine foamy virus infection by an indicator cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe MA; Wen-tao QIAO; Cheng-hao XUAN; Jin-hui XIE; Qi-min CHEN; Yun-qi GENG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To determine the infectivity and replication strategy of bovine foamy virus (BFV) in different cultured cells using the BFV indicator cell line (BICL) system. Methods: BFV infection was induced by the co-culture method or the transient transfection of the infectious BFV plasmid [Pcmv (cytomegalovirus) - BFV] clone. The infectivity of BFV was monitored by the percentage of green fluorescent protein-positive cells in the BICL. The effect of reverse transcriptase inhibitor zidovudine (AZT) on BFV replication was also evaluated in the BICL. Results-The titer of BFV in fetal bovine lung cells was 4-5-folds more than that in either 293T or HeLa (Cells from Henrietta lacks) cells using the co-culture method, and in the meantime was significantly higher than that produced by the infectious clone Pcmv-BFV in the same cells. AZT had only a minor effect on viral titers when added to cells prior to the virus infection. In contrast, viral titers reduced sharply to the level of the negative control when the virus was produced from cells in the presence of AZT. Conclusions: BICL can be used for the titration of the BFV viral infection in non-cytopathic condition. In addition, we provide important evi-dence to show that reverse transcription is essential for BFV replication at a late step of viral infection.

  5. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: molecular cloning of genomic RNA and its diagnostic application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, K.V.

    1987-01-01

    Molecular cloning of a field isolate of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain 72 RNA was done in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of cloned cDNA sequences in hybridization assays with various BVDV strains were determined. cDNA was synthesized from polyadenylated BVDV RNA templates with oligo-dT primers, reverse transcriptase, and DNA polymerase I. The newly synthesized double-stranded BVDV cDNA was C-tailed with terminal deoxytransferase and annealed into G-tailed, Pst-1-cut pUC9 plasmid. Escherichia coli was transformed with the recombinant plasmids and a library of approximately 200 BVDV specific cDNA clones varying in length from 0.5 to 2.6 kilobases were isolated. The sensitivity and specificity of hybridization between the labelled cDNA and BVDV target sequences were determined. Cloned BVDV sequences were isolated from pUC9 plasmid DNA and labelled with /sup 32/P by nick translation. The detection limit by dot blot hybridization assay was 20 pg of purified genomic BVDV RNA. cDNA hybridization probes were specific for all strains of BVDV tested, regardless of whether they were noncytopathic and cytopathic, but did not hybridize with heterologous bovine viruses tested. Probes did not hybridize with uninfected cell culture or cellular RNA. Hybridization probes were at least as sensitive as infectivity assays in detecting homologous virus.

  6. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: molecular cloning of genomic RNA and its diagnostic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular cloning of a field isolate of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain 72 RNA was done in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of cloned cDNA sequences in hybridization assays with various BVDV strains were determined. cDNA was synthesized from polyadenylated BVDV RNA templates with oligo-dT primers, reverse transcriptase, and DNA polymerase I. The newly synthesized double-stranded BVDV cDNA was C-tailed with terminal deoxytransferase and annealed into G-tailed, Pst-1-cut pUC9 plasmid. Escherichia coli was transformed with the recombinant plasmids and a library of approximately 200 BVDV specific cDNA clones varying in length from 0.5 to 2.6 kilobases were isolated. The sensitivity and specificity of hybridization between the labelled cDNA and BVDV target sequences were determined. Cloned BVDV sequences were isolated from pUC9 plasmid DNA and labelled with 32P by nick translation. The detection limit by dot blot hybridization assay was 20 pg of purified genomic BVDV RNA. cDNA hybridization probes were specific for all strains of BVDV tested, regardless of whether they were noncytopathic and cytopathic, but did not hybridize with heterologous bovine viruses tested. Probes did not hybridize with uninfected cell culture or cellular RNA. Hybridization probes were at least as sensitive as infectivity assays in detecting homologous virus

  7. Comparison of nucleic acid hybridization and nucleic acid amplification using conserved sequences from the 5' noncoding region for detection of bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Ridpath, J F; Bolin, S R; Katz, J

    1993-01-01

    Primers and probes derived from conserved sequences located in the 5' noncoding region of pestiviruses were evaluated for detection of bovine viral diarrhea virus. With these reagents, hybridization and polymerase chain reaction tests detected 62 of 90 and 90 of 90 bovine viral diarrhea virus isolates, respectively. A quick lysis method for preparing RNA for use in polymerase chain reaction amplification also was evaluated.

  8. Inhibition of Moloney murine leukemia virus-induced leukemia in transgenic mice expressing antisense RNA complementary to the retroviral packaging sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Han, L.; Yun, J S; Wagner, T E

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant plasmids pLP psi as and pCP psi as were constructed by positioning the Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) proviral packaging (psi) sequences in reverse orientation under the transcriptional regulation of lymphotropic promoter/regulatory elements from the M-MuLV long terminal repeat or the cytomegalovirus immediate-early region. Linear fragments containing the antisense psi and the appropriate transcriptional regulatory sequences from these plasmids were introduced into the mou...

  9. Cytokine regulation by virus infection: bovine viral diarrhea virus, a flavivirus, downregulates production of tumor necrosis factor alpha in macrophages in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Adler, H; Jungi, T. W.; Pfister, H; Strasser, M; Sileghem, M; Peterhans, E

    1996-01-01

    Bovine bone marrow-derived macrophages were infected in vitro with noncytopathic or cytopathic strains of bovine viral diarrhea virus. Infection with both biotypes resulted in a decreased production of tumor necrosis factor alpha upon stimulation with heat-inactivated Salmonella dublin or lipopolysaccharide. Other macrophage functions were not downregulated, indicating that the observed effect was not due to a loss in macrophage viability. The downregulated production of tumor necrosis factor...

  10. [Detection of the level of antibodies against bovine leucosis virus in the cow milk by immune sensor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrohova, L V; Starodub, M F; Nahaeva, L I

    2005-01-01

    An immune sensor based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was developed for express diagnostics of bovine leucosis. Sensor used for detection of the level of antibodies against bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) in the milk serum. It was shown that immune sensor analysis is more sensitive, rapid and simple in comparison with the traditional AGID test. It was stated that the developed immune sensor may be used for performance of screening of bovine leucosis at the farms and the minimal dilution of the milk serum should be 1:20. PMID:16335252

  11. Removal of xenotropic murine leukemia virus by nanocellulose based filter paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asper, M; Hanrieder, T; Quellmalz, A; Mihranyan, A

    2015-11-01

    The removal of xenotrpic murine leukemia virus (xMuLV) by size-exclusion filter paper composed of 100% naturally derived cellulose was validated. The filter paper was produced using cellulose nanofibers derived from Cladophora sp. algae. The filter paper was characterized using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, helium pycnometry, and model tracer (100 nm latex beads and 50 nm gold nanoparticles) retention tests. Following the filtration of xMuLV spiked solutions, LRV ≥5.25 log10 TCID50 was observed, as limited by the virus titre in the feed solution and sensitivity of the tissue infectivity test. The results of the validation study suggest that the nanocellulose filter paper is useful for removal of endogenous rodent retroviruses and retrovirus-like particles during the production of recombinant proteins. PMID:26328471

  12. Sensitivity and specificity of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of bovine viral diarrhea virus antibody in cattle.

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, H J; Masri, S A; Deregt, D; Yeo, S G; Thomas, E J

    1991-01-01

    A reliable bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) viral antigen was prepared from BVD virus grown on Madin Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells by solubilizing the virus with detergent MEGA-10 (decanoyl-N-methylglucamide) followed by removal of hydrophobic proteins with Triton X-100 treatment. By these treatments, problems of high background associated with BVD viral antigen in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were eliminated. With this new antigen, an ELISA was adapted to detect bovine serum a...

  13. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus ISCOMs - protection in the presence of maternal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägglund, Sara; Hu, Ke-Fei; Larsen, Lars Erik;

    2004-01-01

    The protection induced by immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) was evaluated and compared to that of a commercial inactivated vaccine (CV) in calves with BRSV-specific maternal antibodies. Following experimental challenge, controls (n = 4) and...... animals immunized with CV (n = 5) developed moderate to severe respiratory disease, whereas calves immunized with ISCOMS (17 = 5) remained clinically healthy. BRSV was re-isolated from the nasopharynx of all controls and from all calves immunized with CV, but from none of the calves immunized with ISCOMs...

  14. Quantitative Trait Loci Associated with the Immune Response to a Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Leach, R J; O'Neill, R. G.; Fitzpatrick, J.L; Williams, J.L.; Glass, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Infectious disease is an important problem for animal breeders, farmers and governments worldwide. One approach to reducing disease is to breed for resistance. This linkage study used a Charolais-Holstein F2 cattle cross population (n = 501) which was genotyped for 165 microsatellite markers (covering all autosomes) to search for associations with phenotypes for Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV) specific total-IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 concentrations at several time-points pre- and post-BRSV...

  15. Quantitative Trait Loci Associated with the Immune Response to a Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Leach, Richard J; O'Neill, Ronan G; Fitzpatrick, Julie L.; Williams, John L; Glass, Elizabeth J

    2012-01-01

    Infectious disease is an important problem for animal breeders, farmers and governments worldwide. One approach to reducing disease is to breed for resistance. This linkage study used a Charolais-Holstein F2 cattle cross population (n = 501) which was genotyped for 165 microsatellite markers (covering all autosomes) to search for associations with phenotypes for Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV) specific total-IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 concentrations at several time-points pre- and post-BRSV...

  16. Virulent Properties of Russian Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Strains in Experimentally Infected Calves

    OpenAIRE

    Glotov, Alexander G.; Tatyana I. Glotova; Koteneva, Svetlana V.; Semenova, Olga V.; Alexander A. Sergeev; Titova, Ksenya A.; Morozova, Anastasia A.; Sergeev, Artemiy A.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experimental study of three noncytopathic and two cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strains isolated from cattle in the Siberian region and belonging to the type 1 (subtypes 1a, 1b, and 1d) have been presented. All investigated strains caused the development of infectious process in the seronegative 4–6-month-old calves after aerosol challenge with the dose of 6 log10 TCID50. The greatest virulence had noncytopathic strain and cytopathic strain related to the subtyp...

  17. Short communication. Genotyping and phylogenetic analysis of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV isolates in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izedin Goga

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Three serum samples positive in Antigen ELISA BVDV have been tested to characterise genetic diversity of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV in Kosovo. Samples were obtained in 2011 from heifers and were amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, sequenced and analysed by computer-assisted phylogenetic analysis. Amplified products and nucleotide sequence showed that all 3 isolates belonged to BVDV 1 genotype and 1b sub genotype. These results enrich the extant knowledge of BVDV and represent the first documented data about Kosovo BVDV isolates.

  18. Immune response to bovine viral diarrhea virus--looking at newly defined targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Christopher C L; Thakur, Neelu; Darweesh, Mahmoud F; Morarie-Kane, Susan E; Rajput, Mrigendra K

    2015-06-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has long been associated with a wide variety of clinical syndromes and immune dysregulation, many which result in secondary bacterial infections. Current understanding of immune cell interactions that result in activation and tolerance are explored in light of BVDV infection including: depletion of lymphocytes, effects on neutrophils, natural killer cells, and the role of receptors and cytokines. In addition, we review some new information on the effect of BVDV on immune development in the fetal liver, the role of resident macrophages, and greater implications for persistent infection. PMID:26050567

  19. Use of DNA from milk tank for diagnosis and typing of bovine leukaemia virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim of achieving a better understanding of the epidemiology of Bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) infection, we investigated the suitability of milk tank samples for effecting molecular epidemiology studies of BLV in a southern area of Chile. As part of a serological survey for BLV antibodies carried out in 280 herds, we selected 33 strong positive samples, from which DNA was isolated to perform a BLV-specific nested PCR. Using RFLP analysis, all 33 PCR products could be assigned to the known Australian or the Belgium subgroups. A phylogenetic tree resulting from the comparison of these sequences demonstrates the relations and differences among and within the subgroups. (author)

  20. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) pneumonia in beef calf herds despite vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tegtmeier, C.; Pedersen, E.

    2001-01-01

    to the outbreak. The clinical signs comprised nasal discharge, pyrexia, cough and increased respiratory rates. A total of 28 calves died in the 2 herds. The laboratory investigations revealed that BRSV was involved and probably initiated both outbreaks. Furthermore, the serological results suggested......The present report describes the clinical, pathological, serological and virological findings in calves from 2 larger Danish beef herds experiencing outbreaks of pneumonia. The calves had been vaccinated with an inactivated bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) vaccine 2 months prior...... beef herds failed to protect the calves against severe or even fatal BRSV mediated respiratory disease 2 months later....

  1. Seroprevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) in shelter cats on the island of Newfoundland, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Munro, Hannah J.; Berghuis, Lesley; Lang, Andrew S.; Rogers, Laura; Whitney, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are retroviruses found within domestic and wild cat populations. These viruses cause severe illnesses that eventually lead to death. Housing cats communally for long periods of time makes shelters at high risk for virus transmission among cats. We tested 548 cats from 5 different sites across the island of Newfoundland for FIV and FeLV. The overall seroprevalence was 2.2% and 6.2% for FIV and FeLV, respectively. Two sites ha...

  2. Human T-cell leukemia virus types I and II exhibit different DNase I protection patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human T-cell leukemia virus types I (HTLV-I) and II (HTLV-II) are human retroviruses which normally infect T-lymphoid cells. HTLV-I infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, and HTLV-II is associated with an indolent form of hairy-cell leukemia. To identify potential transcriptional regulatory elements of these two related human retroviruses, the authors performed DNase I footprinting of both the HTLV-I and HTLV-II long terminal repeats (LTRs) by using extracts prepared from uninfected T cells, HTLV-I and HTLV-II transformed T cells, and HeLa cells. Five regions of the HTLV-I LTR and three regions of the HTLV-II LTR showed protection by DNase I footprinting. All three of the 21-base-pair repeats previously shown to be important in HTLV transcriptional regulation were protected in the HTLV-I LTR, whereas only one of these repeats was protected in the HTLV-II LTR. Several regions exhibited altered protection in extracts prepared from lymphoid cells as compared with HeLa cells, but there were minimal differences in the protection patterns between HTLV-infected and uninfected lymphoid extracts. A number of HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTR fragments which contained regions showing protection in DNase I footprinting were able to function as inducible enhancer elements in transient CAT gene expression assays in the presence of the HTLV-II tat protein. The alterations in the pattern of the cellular proteins which bind to the HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTRs may in part be responsible for differences in the transcriptional regulation of these two related viruses

  3. Reproductive performance of apparently healthy cattle persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClurkin, A W; Coria, M F; Cutlip, R C

    1979-05-15

    A Holstein-Friesian bull and three Holstein-Friesian cows were seronegative for bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) virus but were persistently infected with the virus. Virus was isolated from buffy coat cells and nasal and lacrimal secretions during their lifetime, and they remained free of clinical signs of BVD. The three cows were pregnant when purchased, and they gave birth to full-term calves. One calf lived only a few hours, one calf became ill and died within a few days, and one calf became ill and was euthanatized within a few weeks. One cow was then bred and became pregnant but aborted a 7-month fetus. A second cow was bred approximately 5 months after parturition but did not conceive. The third cow was necropsied 6 weeks after calving, because of loss of weight. Although the bull's semen contained BVD virus when seropositive cows were bred, normal calves were born. When seronegative heifers were bred, they became seropositive to BVD virus within two weeks, with higher titers in six weeks. On heifer conceived after one service but aborted a 6-month fetus. Three others continued to have estrous cycles until their titers rose to 1:128, then they conceived and gave birth to normal calves. Another heifer conceived on the first service, had a titer of 1:128 two weeks after breeding, and gave birth to a normal calf. PMID:220208

  4. Reversal by Dithiothreitol Treatment of the Block in Murine Leukemia Virus Maturation Induced by Disulfide Cross-Linking

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Stephen; Oshima, Masamichi; Mirro, Jane; Nagashima, Kunio; Rein, Alan

    2002-01-01

    We previously reported that if murine leukemia virus particles are produced in the presence of the mild oxidizing agent disulfide-substituted benzamide-2, they fail to undergo the normal process of virus maturation. We now show that treatment of these immature particles with a reducing agent (dithiothreitol) induces their maturation in vitro, as evidenced by proteolytic cleavage of Gag, Gag-Pol, and Env proteins and by their morphology. The identification of partial cleavage products in these...

  5. Mutations of the Kissing-Loop Dimerization Sequence Influence the Site Specificity of Murine Leukemia Virus Recombination In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm; Lund, Anders H.; Duch, Mogens; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2000-01-01

    The genetic information of retroviruses is retained within a dimeric RNA genome held together by intermolecular RNA-RNA interactions near the 5′ ends. Coencapsidation of retrovirus-derived RNA molecules allows frequent template switching of the virus-encoded reverse transcriptase during DNA synthesis in newly infected cells. We have previously shown that template shifts within the 5′ leader of murine leukemia viruses occur preferentially within the kissing stem-loop motif, a cis element cruci...

  6. Hypomyelination associated with bovine viral diarrhea virus type 2 infection in a longhorn calf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, B F; Ridpath, J F; Calise, D V; Payne, H R; Janke, J J; Baxter, D G; Edwards, J F

    2010-07-01

    A newborn Longhorn heifer calf presented with generalized tremors, muscle fasciculations, ataxia, and nystagmus. At necropsy, no gross central nervous system lesions were observed. Histologically, the brain and spinal cord had mild to moderate diffuse microgliosis and astrocytosis, minimal nonsuppurative encephalitis, and decreased myelin staining. Ultrastructural examination revealed thinning and absence of myelin sheaths. Various cell types were immunohistochemically positive for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Noncytopathogenic BVDV was isolated from the brain and identified as BVDV type 2 by phylogenetic analysis. BVDV-induced hypomyelination is rare and analogous to lesions in neonates infected with border disease and classical swine fever viruses. This is the first documented case of hypomyelination in a calf specifically attributed to BVDV type 2 and the first description of the ultrastructural appearance of BVDV-induced hypomyelination. PMID:20448278

  7. Parameters of disease progression in long-term experimental feline retrovirus (feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus) infections: hematology, clinical chemistry, and lymphocyte subsets.

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann-Lehmann, R.; Holznagel, E; Ossent, P.; Lutz, H.

    1997-01-01

    After several years of latency, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) cause fatal disease in the cat. The aim of this study was to determine laboratory parameters characteristic of disease progression which would allow a better description of the asymptomatic phase and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the two infections. Therefore, experimentally infected cats (FIV and/or FeLV positive) and control animals were observed over a period of 6.5 years un...

  8. Comparison of the geographical distribution of feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus infections in the United States of America (2000–2011)

    OpenAIRE

    Chhetri Bimal K; Berke Olaf; Pearl David L; Bienzle Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Although feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) have similar risk factors and control measures, infection rates have been speculated to vary in geographic distribution over North America. Since both infections are endemic in North America, it was assumed as a working hypothesis that their geographic distributions were similar. Hence, the purpose of this exploratory analysis was to investigate the comparative geographical distribution of both v...

  9. Feline leukemia virus infection as a potentiating cofactor for the primary and secondary stages of experimentally induced feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, N C; Torten, M.; Rideout, B; Sparger, E; Tonachini, T; Luciw, P A; Ackley, C; Levy, N.; Yamamoto, J.

    1990-01-01

    Preexistent feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection greatly potentiated the severity of the transient primary and chronic secondary stages of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection. Of 10 FeLV-FIV carrier cats, 5 died of experimentally induced FIV infection, compared with 2 deaths in 10 cats infected only with FeLV and 1 death in 7 cats infected only with FIV. FIV-infected cats with preexistent FeLV infections developed severe depression, anorexia, fever, diarrhea, dehydration, weight l...

  10. Comparison of risk factors for seropositivity to feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus among cats: a case-case study

    OpenAIRE

    Chhetri, Bimal K.; Berke, Olaf; Pearl, David L.; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Background Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are reported to have similar risk factors and similar recommendations apply to manage infected cats. However, some contrasting evidence exists in the literature with regard to commonly reported risk factors. In this study, we investigated whether the known risk factors for FIV and FeLV infections have a stronger effect for either infection. This retrospective study included samples from 696 cats seropositive for F...

  11. Murine leukemia virus-based Tat-inducible long terminal repeat replacement vectors: a new system for anti-human immunodeficiency virus gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, P M; Kim, N; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-11-01

    We have constructed new murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based vectors (TIN vectors) which, following integration, contain human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 U3 and R sequences in place of the MLV U3 and R regions. This provides, for the first time, single transcriptional unit retroviral vectors under the control of Tat. TIN vectors have several advantages for anti-HIV gene therapy applications. PMID:8892960

  12. Murine leukemia virus-based Tat-inducible long terminal repeat replacement vectors: a new system for anti-human immunodeficiency virus gene therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Cannon, P M; Kim, N.; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-01-01

    We have constructed new murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based vectors (TIN vectors) which, following integration, contain human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 U3 and R sequences in place of the MLV U3 and R regions. This provides, for the first time, single transcriptional unit retroviral vectors under the control of Tat. TIN vectors have several advantages for anti-HIV gene therapy applications.

  13. Immunity and suppression in radiation- and radiation leukemia virus (RADLV)-induced leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult C57BL/6 (B6) mice exposed to fractionated irradiation or inoculated with a highly leukemogenic RadLV (A-RadLV) develop high incidence of lymphatic leukemias after a latency of 3-5 months. Inoculation of a low leukemogenic RadLV variant (D-RadLV) does not result in lymphoma development unless the animals receive a single, sublethal dose of irradiation. Whereas virus-induced primary lymphomas produce virus, express gp70 and are all immunogenic, those induced by X-rays are devoid of virus expression and are not immunogenic. A-RadLV inoculation into B6 mice is associated with early induction of virus specific, cyclophosphamide sensitive suppressor T cells which are capable of abrogating a potential antitumor immune responsiveness. D-RadLV, on the other hand, induces reactive T lymphocytes that arrest leukemogenesis unless their function is impaired by irradiation. In (B6 x BALB/c)F1 mice both A-RadLV and D-RadLV leukemogenesis depend on sublethal irradiation of the host, and both induce reactive T cells. These results suggest that (a) RadLV and X-ray induced leukemogeneses involve different etiologies. (b) Different leukemogenic treatments evoke different host responses early in latency which can either sustain or interfere with lymphoma progression. (author)

  14. A rapid bioassay to monitor murine leukemia virus infection in mice using cellular gp71 binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid and sensitive bioassay based on the availability of cell surface receptors for the binding of purified envelope glycoprotein, gp71, of Rauscher murine leukemia virus (R-MuLV) was developed to serially monitor viral-induced leukemogenesis in individual BALB/cAnN mice. The specificity of the bioassay was demonstrated by the competition of [125I]gp71 cellular binding with murine ecotropic viruses, purified unlabelled R-MuLV envelope glycoprotein and by antiserum to R-MuLV gp71. In contrast, there was no effect on the [125I]gp71 binding level with the addition of murine xenotropic viruses, R-MuLV p30, or several other proteins. The [125I]gp71 binding level of circulating leukocytes was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in mice after R-MuLV infection. The reduction of cellular gp71 binding developed in two stages and the latter stage was highly dependent (P < 0.05) on circulating infections virus titer. Using this technique, the gp71 cellular binding levels of 48-60 individual mice can be assayed in a 4 h period. The advantages of this bioassay compared to standard immunological and tissue culture techniques used in studying retrovirus expression and viral-cell interactions are discussed. (Auth.)

  15. Recovery of Virulent and RNase-Negative Attenuated Type 2 Bovine Viral Diarrhea Viruses from Infectious cDNA Clones

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Christiane; von Freyburg, Martina; Elbers, Knut; Meyers, Gregor

    2002-01-01

    Cloned cDNA derived from the genome of the virulent type 2 bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain NY'93/C was sequenced and served for establishment of the infectious cDNA clone pKANE40A. Virus recovered from pKANE40A exhibited growth characteristics similar to those of wild-type BVDV NY'93/C and proved to be clinically indistinguishable from the wild-type virus in animal experiments. A virus mutant in which the RNase residing in the viral glycoprotein Erns was inactivated, revealed an att...

  16. Detection of Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis and Bovine Viral Diarrhea Viruses in the Nasal Epithelial Cells by the Direct Immunofluorescence Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Silim, A.; Elazhary, M. A. S. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Nasal epithelial cells were collected by cotton swabs for the diagnosis in experimental and field cases of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis and field cases of bovine viral diarrhea in calves. A portion of the cells was washed twice in phosphate buffered saline and a 25 µL drop was placed on microscope slides. The cells were dried, fixed and stained according to the direct fluorescent antibody technique. Another portion of the same specimen was inoculated onto primary bovine skin cell culture...

  17. Molecular detection of bovine immunodeficiency virus in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) from the Amazon region, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albernaz, Tatiane Teles; Leite, Rômulo Cerqueira; Reis, Jenner Karlison Pimenta; de Sousa Rodrigues, Ana Paula; da Cunha Kassar, Telissa; Resende, Claudia Fideles; de Oliveira, Cairo Henrique Sousa; Silva, Rafaela das Mercês; Salvarani, Felipe Masiero; Barbosa, José Diomedes

    2015-12-01

    Bovine immunodeficiency is a chronic progressive disease caused by a lentivirus that affects cattle and buffaloes. Although the infection has been described in cattle in some countries, including in Brazil, there are only two reports of infection in buffaloes: one in Pakistan and one in Cambodia. The aim of the present study was to survey the occurrence of bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) in water buffaloes from the Amazon region, Pará state, Brazil. BIV proviral DNA was surveyed in 607 whole blood samples of water buffaloes from 10 farms located in the state of Pará using semi-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (PCR-SN) to amplify the pol region of the viral genome. Of the 607 samples tested, 27 (4.4 %) were positive for BIV proviral DNA. The amplified fragments were confirmed by sequence analysis after cloning and nucleotide sequencing. The sequence obtained had 99 % similarity to the reference strain (R-29). The present study provides important epidemiological data because BIV was detected for the first time in water buffaloes in Brazil. Further, the results suggest the possibility of the virus being a risk factor for herd health because it may be a potential causal agent of chronic disease and, also may be associated to other infectious diseases. PMID:26174574

  18. Susceptibility of in vitro produced hatched bovine blastocysts to infection with bluetongue virus serotype 8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandaele Leen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8, which caused an epidemic in ruminants in central Western Europe in 2006 and 2007, seems to differ from other bluetongue serotypes in that it can spread transplacentally and has been associated with an increased incidence of abortion and other reproductive problems. For these reasons, and also because BTV-8 is threatening to spread to other parts of the world, there is a need for more information on the consequences of infection during pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether hatched (i.e. zona pellucida-free in vitro produced bovine blastocysts at 8-9 days post insemination are susceptible to BTV-8 and whether such infection induces cell death as indicated by apoptosis. Exposure of hatched in vitro produced bovine blastocysts for 1 h to a medium containing 103.8 or 104.9 TCID50 of the virus resulted in active viral replication in between 25 and 100% of the cells at 72 h post exposure. The infected blastocysts also showed growth arrest as evidenced by lower total cell numbers and a significant level of cellular apoptosis. We conclude from this in vitro study that some of the reproductive problems that are reported when cattle herds are infected with BTV-8 may be attributed to direct infection of blastocysts and other early-stage embryos in utero.

  19. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in infants with acute leukemia: a retrospective survey of the Japanese Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Michiki; Miyamura, Takako; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Taga, Takashi; Tawa, Akio; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kajihara, Ryosuke; Adachi, Souichi; Ishii, Eiichi; Tomizawa, Daisuke

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can cause life-threatening complications of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in young children with malignancies, but reports remain limited. We performed a retrospective nationwide survey to clarify the current status of RSV disease among infants with hematological malignancies. Clinical course, treatment, and outcome of patients with hematological malignancies who suffered from RSV infections at the age of Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group (JPLSG). Twelve patients with acute leukemia were identified as having experienced RSV disease. The primary diseases were acute myeloid leukemia (n = 8) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 4). RSV infection occurred pre- or during induction therapy (n = 8) and during consolidation therapy (n = 4). Eight patients developed LRTI, four of whom had severe pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome; these four patients died despite receiving intensive care. In our survey, the prognosis of RSV disease in pediatric hematological malignancies was poor, and progression of LRTI in particular was associated with high mortality. In the absence of RSV-specific therapy, effective prevention and treatment strategies for severe RSV disease must be investigated. PMID:26520649

  20. Weaning management of newly received beef calves with or without continuous exposure to a persistently infected bovine viral diarrhea virus pen mate: Effects on health, performance, bovine viral diarrhea virus titers,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to animals persistently infected (PI) with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) results in immunomodulation that may have health and growth consequences; however, effects may differ in low-risk, preconditioned (PC) vs. high-risk, auction market (AM) cattle. Our objective was to compare health...

  1. Bovine viral diarrhea virus type 2-induced meningoencephalitis in a heifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blas-Machado, U; Saliki, J T; Duffy, J C; Caseltine, S L

    2004-03-01

    The brain from a 15-month-old, black female Angus, with a 48-hour history of central nervous system disease, was submitted to the Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory. Microscopic findings consisted of acute, multifocal meningoencephalitis, with neuronal degeneration and necrosis and gliosis. Viral isolation yielded noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Virus genotyping classified the virus as BVDV type 2. Immunohistochemical labeling for BVDV antigens with BVD MAb 3.12F1 clone was prominent in the cytoplasm of neurons, glial cells, ependymal epithelium, perivascular macrophages and spindle cells, smooth muscle cells, and intravascular monocytes of the cerebrum and brain stem. Laboratory results support that tissue alterations occurred as a result of BVDV type 2 infection. In the absence of other clinical signs related to BVDV infection and using the microscopic and laboratory evidence presented, we propose that the BVDV type 2 isolated from this case may represent a neurovirulent strain of the virus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of brain lesions and neuronal viral antigen localization in BVDV genotype 2 viral infection, acquired either congenitally or postnatally. PMID:15017036

  2. Differences in virulence between two noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea viruses in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolin, S R; Ridpath, J F

    1992-11-01

    A noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), BVDV-890, isolated from a yearling heifer that died with extensive internal hemorrhages, was compared for virulence in calves with noncytopathic BVDV-TGAN, isolated from an apparently healthy persistently infected calf. After challenge exposure with BVDV-890, nonimmune calves (n = 7) developed fever > 40 C, diarrhea, leukopenia, lymphopenia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia. Most calves (n = 6) died or were euthanatized by 19 days after challenge exposure. Challenge exposure with BVDV-890 did not induce disease in 2 calves that had congenital persistent infection with BVDV or in 3 calves that had neutralizing antibody titer > 4 against BVDV-890. After challenge exposure with BVDV-TGAN, nonimmune calves (n = 7) developed fever > 40 C and, rarely, diarrhea or lymphopenia. All of those calves survived challenge exposure. The average maximal titer of BVDV-890 isolated from serum was 1,000 times that of BVDV-TGAN. In calves infected with BVDV-890, the average maximal percentages of lymphocytes and platelets associated with virus were greater than those found in calves infected with BVDV-TGAN. Additional findings of epidemiologic significance were prolonged shedding of virus and delayed production of viral-neutralizing antibody in 1 calf challenge-exposed with BVDV-890. Also, after production of neutralizing antibody, mutant virus that was refractory to neutralization was isolated from calves challenge-exposed with BVDV-TGAN. PMID:1334641

  3. Bovine viral diarrhea virus structural protein E2 as a complement regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostachuk, Agustín

    2016-07-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a member of the genus Pestivirus, family Flaviviridae, and is one of the most widely distributed viruses in cattle worldwide. Approximately 60 % of cattle in endemic areas without control measures are infected with BVDV during their lifetime. This wide prevalence of BVDV in cattle populations results in significant economic losses. BVDV is capable of establishing persistent infections in its host due to its ability to infect fetuses, causing immune tolerance. However, this cannot explain how the virus evades the innate immune system. The objective of the present work was to test the potential activity of E2 as a complement regulatory protein. E2 glycoprotein, produced both in soluble and transmembrane forms in stable CHO-K1 cell lines, was able to reduce complement-mediated cell lysis up to 40 % and complement-mediated DNA fragmentation by 50 %, in comparison with cell lines not expressing the glycoprotein. This work provides the first evidence of E2 as a complement regulatory protein and, thus, the finding of a mechanism of immune evasion by BVDV. Furthermore, it is postulated that E2 acts as a self-associated molecular pattern (SAMP), enabling the virus to avoid being targeted by the immune system and to be recognized as self. PMID:27038454

  4. Generation of the Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus E0 Protein in Transgenic Astragalus and Its Immunogenicity in Sika Deer

    OpenAIRE

    Yugang Gao; Xueliang Zhao; Pu Zang; Qun Liu; Gongqing Wei; Lianxue Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a single-stranded RNA virus, can cause fatal diarrhea syndrome, respiratory problems, and reproductive disorders in herds. Over the past few years, it has become clear that the BVDV infection rates are increasing and it is likely that an effective vaccine for BVDV will be needed. In this study, transgenic Astragalus was used as an alternative productive platform for the expression of glycoprotein E0. The immunogenicity of glycoprotein E0 expressed in tr...

  5. Antiviral Activity of Marine Actinobacteria against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, a Surrogate Model of the Hepatitis C Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cristina Santiago Bastos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Hepatitis C virus (Flaviviridae family, Hepacivirus genus represents a major public health problem worldwide and it is responsible for chronic infections in humans, which can develop to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. As this virus does not replicate efficiently in cell culture and in animals, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV is used as a surrogate model for screening assays of antiviral activity, and mechanism of action assays. From marine invertebrates and their microorganisms isolated, we prepared extracts and fractions, and we isolated substances for assessment of their possible antiviral activity. Of the 71 tested, seven were considered promising presenting protection percentage of more than 80%. The best inhibition results were obtained from the extracts produced by the Gordonia bacteria samples with 99.9% inhibition and by Micrococcus with 99% inhibition. Furthermore, most of the extracts selected by the protection percentage showed selectivity index values considered promising, especially the extracts of the bacteria Williansia (SI=27 and Brachybacterium (SI=39. On the action mechanism, most of the promising extracts showed activity in the inhibition of intracellular replication steps, although it has been observed action of different extracts in several stages of viral replicative cycle. Thus, various extracts stood out and may lead to the development of drugs that ensure an alternative therapy for the treatment of hepatitis C.

  6. Co-existence of genetically and antigenically diverse bovine viral diarrhoea viruses in an endemic situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachofen, Claudia; Stalder, Hanspeter; Braun, Ueli; Hilbe, Monika; Ehrensperger, Felix; Peterhans, Ernst

    2008-09-18

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an important cattle pathogen that causes acute or persistent infections. These are associated with immunotolerance to the viral strain persisting in animals that became infected early in their intrauterine development. To this date, the epidemiology of BVD in Switzerland runs virtually undisturbed by control measures such as restrictions on animal traffic or vaccination. Here, we analysed the viral genetics of 169 Swiss isolates and carried out crossed serum neutralisation tests to assess the antigenic spectrum of BVDV strains present in the cattle population. Besides confirming the presence of BVDV type 1 subgroups b, e, h and k, a single "orphan" BVDV-1 virus was detected that does not belong to any known BVDV-1 subgroup. No BVDV type 2 viruses were detected, suggesting that they are rare or not present in the cattle population. Antigenic comparison revealed significant differences between the different subgroups, with anti-1k immune serum having up to tenfold lower neutralising activity against 1b, 1e and 1h subgroup viruses, which however may still suffice to protect 1k-immune animals against superinfection by viruses of those other subgroups. Serum from routinely vaccinated animals revealed generally low titres but good cross-neutralisation. A geographic information system revealed that the viruses of the different subgroups are distributed in an apparently randomised fashion in the cattle population. This geographic distribution pattern may reflect peculiarities of the management practice in the Swiss cattle industry that, especially through annual transhumance of up to 25% of the entire population in the alpine region, tend to optimise the spread of BVDV. PMID:18424020

  7. Antiviral Activity of Bacillus sp. Isolated from the Marine Sponge Petromica citrina against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, a Surrogate Model of the Hepatitis C Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Clarice Weis Arns; Cláudia Beatriz Afonso de Menezes; Bárbara Pereira da Silva; Eduardo Furtado Flores; Fabiana Fantinatti-Garboggini; Marina Aiello Padilla; Juliana Cristina Santiago Bastos; Luciana Konecny Kohn

    2013-01-01

    The Hepatitis C virus causes chronic infections in humans, which can develop to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The Bovine viral diarrhea virus is used as a surrogate model for antiviral assays for the HCV. From marine invertebrates and microorganisms isolated from them, extracts were prepared for assessment of their possible antiviral activity. Of the 128 tested, 2 were considered active and 1 was considered promising. The best result was obtained from the extracts produced fro...

  8. Mutagenesis analysis of the murine leukemia virus matrix protein: identification of regions important for membrane localization and intracellular transport.

    OpenAIRE

    Soneoka, Y; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1997-01-01

    We have created two sets of substitution mutations in the Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) matrix protein in order to identify domains involved in association with the plasma membrane and in incorporation of the viral envelope glycoproteins into virus particles. The first set of mutations was targeted at putative membrane-associating regions similar to those of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 matrix protein, which include a polybasic region at the N terminus of the Mo-MuLV matr...

  9. Enhanced antiviral activity against foot-and-mouth disease virus by the combination of bovine type 1 and 2 interferons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the most contagious pathogen of cloven-hoofed animals including swine and bovines. In emergency control of outbreaks, it is fundamental to develop rapid protection to prevent spread of the infection. It has been shown that inoculation of 10^10 pfu of human aden...

  10. Activation of cell signaling pathways is dependant on the biotype of bovine viral diarrhea virus type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a pestivirus of the Flaviviridae family, is an economically important cattle pathogen with a world wide distribution. Besides the segregation into two distinct species (BVDV1 / BVDV2) two different biotypes, a cytopathic (cp) and a noncytopathic (ncp) biotype, are...

  11. Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen detection across whole cattle hides using two antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is a costly disease of cattle that can be controlled by vaccination, biosecurity, and removal of persistently infected cattle. Development and proficiency testing of assays to identify persistently infected cattle substantial quantities of known positive and negative samp...

  12. Enhanced Antiviral Activity Against Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus by the Combination of Bovine Type 1 and 2 Interferons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the most contagious pathogen of cloven-hoofed animals including swine and bovines. The emergency control of outbreaks is dependent on rapid protection and prevention of spread of the infection. Human adenovirus type 5 expressing porcine interferon alpha (Ad5-pI...

  13. Novel Atlantic bottlenose dolphin parainfluenza virus TtPIV-1 clusters with bovine PIV-3 genotype B strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parainfluenza virus 3 (PIV-3) is a common viral infection not only in humans, but many other species. Serological evidence suggests that nearly 100% of children in the United States have been infected with PIV-3 by five years of age. Similarly, in cattle PIV-3 is commonly associated with bovine re...

  14. Induction of interferon-gamma and downstream pathways during establishment of fetal persistent infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of transplacental infection depends on the ability of the virus to cross the placenta and replicate within the fetus while counteracting maternal and fetal immune responses.Unfortunately, little is known about this complex process. Non-cytopathic (ncp) strains of bovine viral diarrhea vi...

  15. Innate immune responses of calves during transient infection with a noncytopathic strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller-Doblies, D.; Arquint, A.; Schaller, P.;

    2004-01-01

    In this study, six immunocompetent calves were experimentally infected with a noncytopathic strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and the effects of the viral infection on parameters of the innate immune response of the host were analyzed. Clinical and virological data were compared with...

  16. Sites of replication of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in naturally infected calves as determined by in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, B.; Uttenthal, Åse; Tegtmeier, C.; Alexandersen, Søren

    1996-01-01

    Replication of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) was studied in three naturally infected calves by in situ hybridization using strand-specific RNA probes. One of the calves was a 5-month-old Friesian, the other two calves were a 3-month-old and a 2-week-old Jersey. Two Jersey calves, 3 mo...

  17. Distinct Morphology of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1-Like Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, José O; Cao, Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Mansky, Louis M

    2016-01-01

    The Gag polyprotein is the main retroviral structural protein and is essential for the assembly and release of virus particles. In this study, we have analyzed the morphology and Gag stoichiometry of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-like particles and authentic, mature HTLV-1 particles by using cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). HTLV-1-like particles mimicked the morphology of immature authentic HTLV-1 virions. Importantly, we have observed for the first time that the morphology of these virus-like particles (VLPs) has the unique local feature of a flat Gag lattice that does not follow the curvature of the viral membrane, resulting in an enlarged distance between the Gag lattice and the viral membrane. Other morphological features that have been previously observed with other retroviruses include: (1) a Gag lattice with multiple discontinuities; (2) membrane regions associated with the Gag lattice that exhibited a string of bead-like densities at the inner leaflet; and (3) an arrangement of the Gag lattice resembling a railroad track. Measurement of the average size and mass of VLPs and authentic HTLV-1 particles suggested a consistent range of size and Gag copy numbers in these two groups of particles. The unique local flat Gag lattice morphological feature observed suggests that HTLV-1 Gag could be arranged in a lattice structure that is distinct from that of other retroviruses characterized to date. PMID:27187442

  18. Intracellular assembly and budding of the Murine Leukemia Virus in infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briant Laurence

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV assembly has been long thought to occur exclusively at the plasma membrane. Current models of retroviral particle assembly describe the recruitment of the host vacuolar protein sorting machinery to the cell surface to induce the budding of new particles. Previous fluorescence microscopy study reported the vesicular traffic of the MLV components (Gag, Env and RNA. Here, electron microscopy (EM associated with immunolabeling approaches were used to go deeply into the assembly of the "prototypic" MLV in chronically infected NIH3T3 cells. Results Beside the virus budding events seen at the cell surface of infected cells, we observed that intracellular budding events could also occur inside the intracellular vacuoles in which many VLPs accumulated. EM in situ hybridization and immunolabeling analyses confirmed that these latter were MLV particles. Similar intracellular particles were detected in cells expressing MLV Gag alone. Compartments containing the MLV particles were identified as late endosomes using Lamp1 endosomal/lysosomal marker and BSA-gold pulse-chase experiments. In addition, infectious activity was detected in lysates of infected cells. Conclusion Altogether, our results showed that assembly of MLV could occur in part in intracellular compartments of infected murine cells and participate in the production of infectious viruses. These observations suggested that MLV budding could present similarities with the particular intracellular budding of HIV in infected macrophages.

  19. Endophilins interact with Moloney murine leukemia virus Gag and modulate virion production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Camilli Pietro

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The retroviral Gag protein is the central player in the process of virion assembly at the plasma membrane, and is sufficient to induce the formation and release of virus-like particles. Recent evidence suggests that Gag may co-opt the host cell's endocytic machinery to facilitate retroviral assembly and release. Results A search for novel partners interacting with the Gag protein of the Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV via the yeast two-hybrid protein-protein interaction assay resulted in the identification of endophilin 2, a component of the machinery involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We demonstrate that endophilin interacts with the matrix or MA domain of the Gag protein of Mo-MuLV, but not of human immunodeficiency virus, HIV. Both exogenously expressed and endogenous endophilin are incorporated into Mo-MuLV viral particles. Titration experiments suggest that the binding sites for inclusion of endophilin into viral particles are limited and saturable. Knock-down of endophilin with small interfering RNA (siRNA had no effect on virion production, but overexpression of endophilin and, to a lesser extent, of several fragments of the protein, result in inhibition of Mo-MuLV virion production, but not of HIV virion production. Conclusions This study shows that endophilins interact with Mo-MuLV Gag and affect virion production. The findings imply that endophilin is another component of the large complex that is hijacked by retroviruses to promote virion production.

  20. Mechanism of infectivity of a murine leukemia virus in adult mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infection of adult BALB/c mice with murine leukemia virus (MuLV) induces typical thymic lymphomas. Expression of virus was measured by using a radioimmunoassay for murine P-30, a virion core protein. Nineteen days after injection of MuLV-S into adult mice, there were 0.3μg P-30/ml of serum. X-irradiation permitted the early expression of high levels of viremia, when given before or after MuLV-S administration, and it also hastened the development of lymphomas. Seventeen to 21 days after injection of MuLV-S into x-irradiated (600 rads) adult mice, there were 2.7 μg of P-30/ml of serum. The virus produced by infected adult mice was infectious and oncogenic when given to newborn mice. Several lines of evidence are presented that suggest the mechanism by which x-irradiation permits early expession of virion proteins and lymphomas is not immunosuppression

  1. The BET family of proteins targets Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus integration near transcription start sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rijck, Jan; de Kogel, Christine; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Vets, Sofie; Ashkar, Sara El; Malani, Nirav; Bushman, Frederic D; Landuyt, Bart; Husson, Steven J.; Busschots, Katrien; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2014-01-01

    Summary A hallmark of retroviral replication is integration of the viral genome in the host cell DNA. This characteristic makes retrovirus-based vectors attractive delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, adverse events in gene therapeutic trials, caused by activation of proto-oncogenes due to Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV)-derived vector integration, hamper their application. Here we show that bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins (BRD2, BRD3 and BRD4) and MLV integrase specifically interact and co-localize within the nucleus of the cell. Inhibition of the BET proteins chromatin interaction via specific bromodomain inhibitors blocks MLV virus replication at the integration step. MLV integration site distribution parallels the chromatin binding profile of BET proteins, and expression of an artificial fusion protein of the BET integrase binding domain with the chromatin interaction domain of the lentiviral targeting factor LEDGF/p75, retargets MLV integration away from TSS and into the body of actively transcribed genes, conform to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) integration pattern. Together these data validate BET proteins as MLV integration targeting factors. PMID:24183673

  2. Detection and characterization of viruses as field and vaccine strains in feedlot cattle with bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, R W; d'Offay, J M; Landis, C; Miles, D G; Smith, R A; Saliki, J T; Ridpath, J F; Confer, A W; Neill, J D; Eberle, R; Clement, T J; Chase, C C L; Burge, L J; Payton, M E

    2016-06-24

    This study investigated viruses in bovine respiratory disease (BRD) cases in feedlots, including bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine coronaviruses (BoCV) and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V). Nasal swabs were collected from 114 cattle on initial BRD treatment. Processing included modified live virus (MLV) vaccination. Seven BRD necropsy cases were included for 121 total cases. Mean number of days on feed before first sample was 14.9 days. Swabs and tissue homogenates were tested by gel based PCR (G-PCR), quantitative-PCR (qPCR) and quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) and viral culture. There were 87/114 (76.3%) swabs positive for at least one virus by at least one test. All necropsy cases were positive for at least one virus. Of 121 cases, positives included 18/121 (14.9%) BoHV-1; 19/121 (15.7%) BVDV; 76/121 (62.8%) BoCV; 11/121 (9.1%) BRSV; and 10/121 (8.3%) PI3V. For nasal swabs, G-PCR (5 viruses) detected 44/114 (38.6%); q-PCR and qRT-PCR (4 viruses) detected 81/114 (71.6%); and virus isolation detected 40/114 (35.1%). Most were positive for only one or two tests, but not all three tests. Necropsy cases had positives: 5/7 G-PCR, 5/7 q-PCR and qRT-PCR, and all were positive by cell culture. In some cases, G-PCR and both real time PCR were negative for BoHV-1, BVDV, and PI3V in samples positive by culture. PCR did not differentiate field from vaccines strains of BoHV-1, BVDV, and PI3V. However based on sequencing and analysis, field and vaccine strains of culture positive BoHV-1, BoCV, BVDV, and PI3V, 11/18 (61.1%) of BoHV-1 isolates, 6/17 (35.3%) BVDV isolates, and 1/10 (10.0%) PI3V identified as vaccine. BRSV was only identified by PCR testing. Interpretation of laboratory tests is appropriate as molecular based tests and virus isolation cannot separate field from vaccine strains. Additional testing using sequencing appears appropriate for identifying vaccine

  3. The increased susceptibility of hematopoietic stem cells to Friend leukemia virus in the repopulating period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study considers two fundamental problems of leukemia and stem cells: (1) whether the target cells for malignant transformation of Friend leukemia virus (FV) are the pluripotential stem cells; (2) whether the susceptibility of the target cell is changeable depending on the proliferating state of the cell. In the experiments, inbred 8- to 12-week-old C3H/He and BC3Fl hybrid mice were used. As target cells for FV, two candidate cell populations should be considered. These are the pluripotential stem cells expressed as CFUs and the committed stem cells expressed as erythropoietin-responsive cells (ERC). According to our preliminary experiments on the recovery patterns of CFUs or ERC, after a single 150 rads X-irradiation (X) or administration of 215 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide (CY), it was clear that the repopulation of CFUs was quite different from that of ERC. The target cells for FV-induced transformation are the stem cells expressed as CFUs and the susceptibility of these increases under conditions of active repopulation after X-irradiation and cyclophosphamide administration. After the irradiation especially, this effect is dose-dependent for doses over 25 rads at 2 weeks after irradiation. (Auth.)

  4. Diseases associated with spontaneous feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinacher, M

    1989-05-01

    More than 2000 cats sent for necropsy in order to provide a diagnosis were investigated immunohistologically using paraffin sections for the presence of a persistent infection with feline leukemia virus (FeLV). The spectrum of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases associated significantly with FeLV infection was determined statistically. Three-quarters of the cats with persistent FeLV infections died of non-neoplastic diseases and about 23% died of tumors, nearly exclusively those of the leukemia/lymphoma disease complex. A strong association with liver degeneration, icterus and a FeLV-associated enteritis was found in addition to the known association with non-neoplastic diseases and conditions such as anemia, bacterial secondary infections and respiratory tract inflammations due to the immunosuppressive effect of FeLV, hemorrhages and feline infectious peritonitis. Surprisingly, diseases and conditions like feline infectious panleukopenia, enteritis (of other types than FeLV-associated enteritis and feline infectious panleukopenia), glomerulonephritis, uremia and hemorrhagic cystitis were not associated with persistent FeLV infection. Another unexpected finding was that most pathogenic infectious agents demonstrated in the cats were not FeLV-associated either. Thus, immunosuppression due to FeLV infection seems to make the animals susceptible to certain pathogenic infectious agents, but not to the majority. PMID:2549696

  5. Elevation of blood levels of zinc protoporphyrin by radiomimetic drugs and friend leukemia virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sublethal doses of whole-body irradiation induced the elevation of zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP). Experiments were conducted to determine if recovery from radiomimetic drugs also resulted in elevation of ZPP. Daily injections with hydroxyurea and other cytotoxic drugs for 10 days caused ZPP elevation and a dose of radiation too low to cause ZPP elevation by itself caused ZPP elevation when hydroxyurea was administered prior to irradiation. Friend leukemia virus also brought about an elevation of ZPP. However, not all factors that increased erythropoiesis brought about ZPP elevation. The elevated erythropoiesis in response to hypoxia and the enhanced erythropoiesis that followed administration of folic acid to folic acid-deficient mice was not accompanied by ZPP elevation. (orig.)

  6. Fungal phosphate transporter serves as a receptor backbone for gibbon ape leukemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lene; van Zeijl, Marja; Johann, Stephen V;

    1997-01-01

    Pit1, the receptor for gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV), is proposed to be an integral membrane protein with five extracellular loops. Chimeras made between Pit1 homologs differing in permissivity for infection and between Pit1 and the related protein Pit2 have shown that the fourth extracellular...... loop plays a critical role in infection. However, further elucidation of the roles of the extracellular loops in infection is hampered by the high level of sequence similarity among these proteins. The sodium-dependent phosphate transporter, Pho-4, from the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa is...... in a functional GALV receptor. Therefore, the presence of a Pit1 loop 4-specific sequence is sufficient to confer receptor function for the mammalian retrovirus GALV on the fungal phosphate transporter Pho-4...

  7. Identification of a novel human tRNA(Ser(CGA)) functional in murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Schmitz, A; Pedersen, F S;

    2000-01-01

    We have identified a human tRNA(Ser) isoacceptor matching the UCG codon. The tRNA was discovered via its ability to act in reverse transcription of a murine leukemia virus vector containing a complementary tRNA primer binding site (Lund et al., Nucleic Acids Res., 28 (2000) 791-799). The tRNA......(Ser(CGA)) was detected in cell lines of human, monkey and mouse origin. The UCG codon is the most rarely used codon in human genes. The cloned human tRNA(Ser(CGA)) gene encodes an 85 nucleotide, intron-less tRNA, contains a consensus split intragenic promoter and is located at region p21.3-22.2 on chromosome 6....... The integrity and functionality of the cloned tRNA(Ser(CGA)) gene was verified by in vitro transcription analysis in HeLa nuclear extracts....

  8. Surface proteins of radiation-induced and radiation leukemia virus-induced thymic lymphosarcomas in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thymic lymphosarcomas (TLS) were induced in C57BL mice by X-rays or by Radiation Leukemia Virus (RadLV) and their surface glycoproteins (gps) compared after cell-surface radio-iodination and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). All lymphocytic antigens tested (T200, 170/100, Thy-1) and proteins with apparent molecular weight (Mr) around 120,000 and 100,000 were present on all tumours, as well as retrovirus - encoded proteins but considerable variation in the Mr of several serologically-related proteins was observed. Therefore, the TLS in C57BL mice form a heterogeneous group, suggesting that T cells can be transformed at different stages of maturation. The possibility that transformation allows or even triggers differentiation is also entertained. (author)

  9. In vitro generation of cytotoxic lymphocytes against radiation-and radiation leukemia virus-induced tumors. III. Suppression of anti-tumor immunity in vitro by lymphocytes of mice undergoing radiation leukemia virus-induced leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult C57BL/6 mice exposed to fractionated irradiation or inoculated with the radiation leukemia virus (RadLV), develop high incidence (80 to 100%) of lymphatic leukemias within 3 to 6 months. RadLV-induced lymphomas can elicit cytotoxic responses in vitro in lymphocytes of preimmunized syngeneic mice. As soon as 5 d after RadLV inoculation, and during the entire leukemogenic process, suppressor T cells are detectable in the spleen that are capable of specifically abrogating generation of syngeneic anti-tumor cytotoxic cells in vitro. Mice exposed to fractionated x irradiation do not develop suppressor cells. These findings suggest that although RadLV has been isolated from radiation-induced leukemias, x-ray- and RadLV-induced leukemogenesis do not seem to involve a common viral etilogy, and that induction of suppressor cells during RadLV leukemogenesis may be essential for tumor progression

  10. Fidelity of target site duplication and sequence preference during integration of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanggu Kim

    Full Text Available Xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-related virus (XMRV is a new human retrovirus associated with prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome. The causal relationship of XMRV infection to human disease and the mechanism of pathogenicity have not been established. During retrovirus replication, integration of the cDNA copy of the viral RNA genome into the host cell chromosome is an essential step and involves coordinated joining of the two ends of the linear viral DNA into staggered sites on target DNA. Correct integration produces proviruses that are flanked by a short direct repeat, which varies from 4 to 6 bp among the retroviruses but is invariant for each particular retrovirus. Uncoordinated joining of the two viral DNA ends into target DNA can cause insertions, deletions, or other genomic alterations at the integration site. To determine the fidelity of XMRV integration, cells infected with XMRV were clonally expanded and DNA sequences at the viral-host DNA junctions were determined and analyzed. We found that a majority of the provirus ends were correctly processed and flanked by a 4-bp direct repeat of host DNA. A weak consensus sequence was also detected at the XMRV integration sites. We conclude that integration of XMRV DNA involves a coordinated joining of two viral DNA ends that are spaced 4 bp apart on the target DNA and proceeds with high fidelity.

  11. Seroprevalence of feline leukemia virus, feline immunodeficiency virus and heartworm infection among owned cats in tropical Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Pacheco, Antonio; Aguilar-Caballero, Armando J; Colin-Flores, Rafael F; Acosta-Viana, Karla Y; Guzman-Marin, Eugenia; Jimenez-Coello, Matilde

    2014-06-01

    Several infectious agents may be distributed within a healthy population of cats where diverse risk factors predispose them to come into contact with pathogens. Blood samples from 227 owned cats in Merida, Mexico, were collected with the objective of determining the seroprevalence and associated risk factors of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and Dirofilaria immitis antigen, and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibody. Serological detection of FeLV and D immitis antigens, and FIV antibodies was performed using the commercial kit SNAP Feline Triple Test. The prevalence was found to be 7.5% for FeLV, 2.5% for FIV and 0% for D immitis. Adult cats were at a higher risk of coming into contact with FeLV (P FIV. The prevalence of retroviral infections found in this study was low, but within the limits reported in the different geographical areas of the world. Cases of filariosis in the domestic cats of Merida, Mexico, may be absent or very low; however, the low sample size may have influenced these results. PMID:24196568

  12. Crystal structures of the reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia-virus related virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dongwen; Chung, Suhman; Miller, Maria; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.; Wlodawer, Alexander (NCI)

    2012-06-19

    The ribonuclease H (RNase H) domain of retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) plays a critical role in the life cycle by degrading the RNA strands of DNA/RNA hybrids. In addition, RNase H activity is required to precisely remove the RNA primers from nascent (-) and (+) strand DNA. We report here three crystal structures of the RNase H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) RT, namely (i) the previously identified construct from which helix C was deleted, (ii) the intact domain, and (iii) the intact domain complexed with an active site {alpha}-hydroxytropolone inhibitor. Enzymatic assays showed that the intact RNase H domain retained catalytic activity, whereas the variant lacking helix C was only marginally active, corroborating the importance of this helix for enzymatic activity. Modeling of the enzyme-substrate complex elucidated the essential role of helix C in binding a DNA/RNA hybrid and its likely mode of recognition. The crystal structure of the RNase H domain complexed with {beta}-thujaplicinol clearly showed that coordination by two divalent cations mediates recognition of the inhibitor.

  13. PCR and serology find no association between xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satterfield Brent C

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV is a retrovirus implicated in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. Press releases have suggested that it could contribute to autism spectrum disorder (ASD. In this study we used two PCR assays and one antibody assay to screen 25 blood samples from autistic children born to mothers with CFS and from 20 mixed controls including family members of the children assayed, people with fibromyalgia and people with chronic Lyme disease. Using a real-time PCR assay, we screened an additional 48 South Carolina autism disorder samples, 96 Italian ASD samples, 61 South Carolina ASD samples and 184 healthy controls. Despite having the ability to detect low copy number XMRV DNA in a large background of cellular DNA, none of the PCR assays found any evidence of XMRV infection in blood cells from patients or controls. Further, no anti-XMRV antibodies were detected, ruling out possible low level or abortive infections in blood or in other reservoirs. These results imply that XMRV is not associated with autism.

  14. Genetic and antigenic characterization of bovine viral diarrhea viruses isolated from cattle in Hokkaido, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yuri; Tamura, Tomokazu; Torii, Shiho; Wakamori, Shiho; Nagai, Makoto; Mitsuhashi, Kazuya; Mine, Junki; Fujimoto, Yuri; Nagashima, Naofumi; Yoshino, Fumi; Sugita, Yukihiko; Nomura, Takushi; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, we genetically analyzed bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDVs) isolated from 2000 to 2006 in Japan and reported that subgenotype 1b viruses were predominant. In the present study, 766 BVDVs isolated from 2006 to 2014 in Hokkaido, Japan, were genetically analyzed to understand recent epidemics. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the 5'-untranslated region of viral genome revealed that 766 isolates were classified as genotype 1 (BVDV-1; 544 isolates) and genotype 2 (BVDV-2; 222). BVDV-1 isolates were further divided into BVDV-1a (93), 1b (371) and 1c (80) subgenotypes, and all BVDV-2 isolates were grouped into BVDV-2a subgenotype (222). Further comparative analysis was performed with BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a viruses isolated from 2001 to 2014. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the viral glycoprotein E2 gene, a major target of neutralizing antibodies, revealed that BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were further classified into several clusters. Cross-neutralization tests showed that BVDV-1b isolates were antigenically different from BVDV-1a isolates, and almost BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were antigenically similar among each subgenotype and each E2 cluster. Taken together, BVDV-1b viruses are still predominant, and BVDV-2a viruses have increased recently in Hokkaido, Japan. Field isolates of BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a show genetic diversity on the E2 gene with antigenic conservation among each subgenotype during the last 14 years. PMID:26400674

  15. Genome sequence of foot-and-mouth disease virus outside the 3A region is also responsible for virus replication in bovine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xueqing; Li, Pinghua; Sun, Pu; Lu, Zengjun; Bao, Huifang; Bai, Xingwen; Fu, Yuanfang; Cao, Yimei; Li, Dong; Chen, Yingli; Qiao, Zilin; Liu, Zaixin

    2016-07-15

    The deletion of residues 93-102 in non-structure protein 3A of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is associated with the inability of FMDV to grow in bovine cells and attenuated virulence in cattle.Whereas, a previously reported FMDV strain O/HKN/21/70 harboring 93-102 deletion in 3A protein grew equally well in bovine and swine cells. This suggests that changes inFMDV genome sequence, in addition to 93-102 deletion in 3A, may also affectthe viral growth phenotype in bovine cellsduring infection and replication.However, it is nuclear that changes in which region (inside or outside of 3A region) influences FMDV growth phenotype in bovine cells.In this study, to determine the region in FMDV genomeaffecting viral growth phenotype in bovine cells, we constructed chimeric FMDVs, rvGZSB-HKN3A and rvHN-HKN3A, by introducing the 3A coding region of O/HKN/21/70 into the context of O/SEA/Mya-98 strain O/GZSB/2011 and O Cathay topotype strain O/HN/CHA/93, respectively, since O/GZSB/2011 containing full-length 3A protein replicated well in bovine and swine cells, and O/HN/CHA/93 harboring 93-102 deletion in 3A protein grew poorly in bovine cells.The chimeric virusesrvGZSB-HKN3A and rvHN-HKN3A displayed growth properties and plaque phenotypes similar to those of the parental virus rvGZSB and rv-HN in BHK-21 and primary fetal porcine kidney (FPK) cells. However, rvHN-HKN3A and rv-HN replicated poorly in primary fetal bovine kidney (FBK) cells with no visible plaques, and rvGZSB-HKN3A exhibited lower growth rate and smaller plaque size phenotypes than those of the parental virus in FBK cells, but similar growth properties and plaque phenotypes to those of the recombinant viruses harboring 93-102 deletion in 3A. These results demonstrate that the difference present in FMDV genome sequence outside the 3A coding region also have influence on FMDV replication ability in bovine cells. PMID:27094491

  16. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) in White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passler, Thomas; Ditchkoff, Stephen S; Walz, Paul H

    2016-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is the prototypic member of the genus Pestivirus in the family Flaviviridae. Infections with BVDV cause substantial economic losses to the cattle industries, prompting various organized control programs in several countries. In North America, these control programs are focused on the identification and removal of persistently infected (PI) cattle, enhancement of BVDV-specific immunity through vaccination, and the implementation of biosecure farming practices. To be successful, control measures must be based on complete knowledge of the epidemiology of BVDV, including the recognition of other potential sources of the virus. BVDV does not possess strict host-specificity, and infections of over 50 species in the mammalian order Artiodactyla have been reported. Over 50 years ago, serologic surveys first suggested the susceptibility of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), the most abundant free-ranging ruminant in North America, to BVDV. However, susceptibility of white-tailed deer to BVDV infection does not alone imply a role in the epidemiology of the virus. To be a potential wildlife reservoir, white-tailed deer must: (1) be susceptible to BVDV, (2) shed BVDV, (3) maintain BVDV in the population, and (4) have sufficient contact with cattle that allow spillback infections. Based on the current literature, this review discusses the potential of white-tailed deer to be a reservoir for BVDV. PMID:27379074

  17. Detection of an untyped strain of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in a dairy herd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Bortolin Affonso

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV causes important lower respiratory tract illness in calves. According to F and G proteins genetic sequences, three BRSV subgroups have been reported and characterized in several countries, showing differences in its distribution. In Brazil, the virus is widely disseminated throughout the herds and the few characterized isolates revealed the solely occurrence of the subgroup B. This study describes the detection and characterization of an untyped BRSV strain from a twenty-days-old calf from a herd without clinical respiratory disease. Nasal swabs were analyzed by RT-nested PCR for the F and G proteins genes. One sample has amplified the F protein gene. Sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic reconstruction were accomplished, revealing that the strain could not be grouped with any other BRSV subgroups reported. This result may suggest that the BRSV is in constantly evolution, even in Brazil, where the vaccination is not a common practice. More detailed studies about BRSV characterization are necessary to know the virus subgroups distribution among the Brazilian herds to recommend appropriated immunoprophylaxis.

  18. Vertical transmission of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) in mousedeer (Tragulus javanicus) and spread to domestic cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uttenthal, Åse; Høyer, M.J.; Grøndahl, C.;

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the transmission of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) 1f from a persistently infected (PI) lesser Malayan mousedeer to two bovine calves. Different contact routes to two calves were analysed: 1) aerosol contact between two adjacent pens without physical contact; 2......) indirect contact by use of common utensils; 3) direct nose-to-nose contact for 30 seconds. One of the calves was infected either by aerosol or indirect contact. The virus sequence in 247 nucleotides in the 5'-UTR was 100% identical in mousedeer and calf. To elucidate the distribution of BVDV within the...... mousedeer BVD virus in the E2 region (420 nucleotides) through 4 generations showed only 7 mutations, which were maintained from mother to offspring....

  19. High prevalence of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Tozon Nataša; Svete Nemec A.; Zemljič M.; Zakošek M.; Barlič-Maganja Darja

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalences of FIV and FeLV infections in domestic cats by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of the 42 cats examined by the ELISA test, 14 (33.3 %) were seropositive for FIV antibody, 10 (23.8 %) for FeLV antigen, 1 (2.4 %) was positive for both viruses and 17 were negative for infection with either virus. In the PCR assay, 17 cats (40.5 %) were positive for FeLV, 11 (26.2%) for FIV, 9 (21.4%) for ...

  20. Expression of IMP1 enhances production of murine leukemia virus vector by facilitating viral genomic RNA packaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Mai

    Full Text Available Murine leukemia virus (MLV-based retroviral vector is widely used for gene transfer. Efficient packaging of the genomic RNA is critical for production of high-titer virus. Here, we report that expression of the insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 1 (IMP1 enhanced the production of infectious MLV vector. Overexpression of IMP1 increased the stability of viral genomic RNA in virus producer cells and packaging of the RNA into progeny virus in a dose-dependent manner. Downregulation of IMP1 in virus producer cells resulted in reduced production of the retroviral vector. These results indicate that IMP1 plays a role in regulating the packaging of MLV genomic RNA and can be used for improving production of retroviral vectors.

  1. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix

  2. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, James S., E-mail: james.lawson@unsw.edu.au; Heng, Benjamin [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2010-04-30

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix.

  3. Cross Talk between Expression of the Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Tax Transactivator and the Oncogenic bHLH Transcription Factor TAL1▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Terme, Jean-Michel; Wencker, Melanie; Favre-Bonvin, Arnaud; Bex, Françoise; Gazzolo, Louis; Duc Dodon, Madeleine; Jalinot, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax transactivator is known to induce or repress various cellular genes, several of them encoding transcription factors. As Tax is known to deregulate various basic bHLH factors, we looked more specifically at its effect on TAL1 (T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia 1), also known as SCL (stem cell leukemia). Indeed, TAL1 is deregulated in a high percentage of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, and its oncogenic properties are well-establ...

  4. Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV Pneumonia in Beef Calf Herds Despite Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen E

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes the clinical, pathological, serological and virological findings in calves from 2 larger Danish beef herds experiencing outbreaks of pneumonia. The calves had been vaccinated with an inactivated bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV vaccine 2 months prior to the outbreak. The clinical signs comprised nasal discharge, pyrexia, cough and increased respiratory rates. A total of 28 calves died in the 2 herds. The laboratory investigations revealed that BRSV was involved and probably initiated both outbreaks. Furthermore, the serological results suggested that the vaccine induced only sparse levels of antibodies probably due to the presence of maternally derived antibodies at the time of vaccination. Necropsy findings in 5 calves revealed changes typical for infectious pneumonia with involvment of BRSV. In conclusion, vaccination of calves against BRSV in 2 Danish beef herds failed to protect the calves against severe or even fatal BRSV mediated respiratory disease 2 months later.

  5. Immune Responses in Mice Injected with gD Plasmid DNA of Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ji-chang; TONG Guang-zhi; QIU Hua-ji

    2004-01-01

    The gene encoding gD of isolate Luojing of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV)was amplified,sequenced, and cloned into plasmid pcDNA 3.1, resulting in a recombinant pcDNA-gD. Groups of BALB/c mice were injected with 100 μ g of plasmid only or together with liposome. After immunization, serum samples were collected from mice every 2 weeks for a 10-week period and tested for protein-specific antibody with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA). It was showed that the plasmid encoding IBRV glycopretein D developed gene-specific antibody. This report indicates the potential of DNA injection as a method of vaccination.

  6. Isolation and Genetic Analysis of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus from Infected Cattle in Indiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman M. Pogranichniy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Species and biotype distribution was determined in 44 bovine viral diarrhea virus- (BVDV- positive samples submitted to the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (ADDL in Indiana during 2006–2008. BVDV RNA was detected in the 5′-untranslated region and Npro region using reverse transcriptase PCR followed by sequencing analysis of the PCR product. Additionally, cases were classified into one of six categories according to history and/or lesions: acute symptomatic, hemorrhagic, respiratory distress, reproductive, persistent infection (PI, and mucosal disease (MD. Of 44 BVDV-positive samples, 33 were noncytopathic (ncp, 10 were cytopathic (cp, and one presented both ncp and cp biotypes. Sequencing analysis demonstrated that all samples belonged to BVDV-1a, BVDV-1b, or BVDV-2. The most common isolate was ncp BVDV-1b, (44% followed by ncp BVDV-2a (24%. Among the six categories, respiratory clinical signs were the most common (36% followed by PI (25% and MD (16%.

  7. Latex immunoagglutination assay for bovine viral diarrhea virus utilizing forward light scattering in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Brian C.; Song, Jae-Young; Han, Jin-Hee; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2008-02-01

    We have investigated the utilization of particle agglutination assays using forward light scattering measurements in a microfluidic device towards detecting viral particles. The model viral target was bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Highly carboxylated polystyrene microspheres (510 nm) were coated with anti-BVDV monoclonal antibodies. This solution was in turn used to detect live modified BVDV. This assay was first performed in a two well slide for proof of concept and then in a simple y-channel microfluidic device with optical fibers arranged in a close proximity setup. Particle immunoagglutination was detected through static light scattering measurements taken at 45° to incident light. In the microfluidic device, modified live BVDV was detected with a detection limit of 0.5 TCID 50 mL -1.

  8. Actinobacteria from Termite Mounds Show Antiviral Activity against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, a Surrogate Model for Hepatitis C Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Aiello Padilla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracts from termite-associated bacteria were evaluated for in vitro antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV. Two bacterial strains were identified as active, with percentages of inhibition (IP equal to 98%. Both strains were subjected to functional analysis via the addition of virus and extract at different time points in cell culture; the results showed that they were effective as posttreatments. Moreover, we performed MTT colorimetric assays to identify the CC50, IC50, and SI values of these strains, and strain CDPA27 was considered the most promising. In parallel, the isolates were identified as Streptomyces through 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Specifically, CDPA27 was identified as S. chartreusis. The CDPA27 extract was fractionated on a C18-E SPE cartridge, and the fractions were reevaluated. A 100% methanol fraction was identified to contain the compound(s responsible for antiviral activity, which had an SI of 262.41. GC-MS analysis showed that this activity was likely associated with the compound(s that had a peak retention time of 5 min. Taken together, the results of the present study provide new information for antiviral research using natural sources, demonstrate the antiviral potential of Streptomyces chartreusis compounds isolated from termite mounds against BVDV, and lay the foundation for further studies on the treatment of HCV infection.

  9. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection in dairy cattle herds in northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilnont, Theerakul; Aiumlamai, Suneerat; Kanistanont, Kwankate; Inchaisri, Chaidate; Kampa, Jaruwan

    2016-08-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus causes a wide range of clinical manifestation with subsequent economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Our study of a population of dairy cattle in Thailand based on 933 bulk tank milk samples from nine public milk collection centers aimed to monitor infective status and to evaluate the effect of the infection in cows as well as to examine the reproductive performance of heifers to provide effective recommendations for disease control in Thailand. The results showed a moderate antibody-positive prevalence in the herd (62.5 %), with the proportion of class-3 herd, actively infected stage, being 17.3 %. Fourteen persistently infected (PI) animals were identified among 1196 young animals from the class-3 herds. Most of the identified PI animals, 11/14, were born in one sub-area where bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) investigation has not been performed to date. With respect to reproductive performance, class-3 herds also showed higher median values of reproductive indices than those of class-0 herds. Cows and heifers in class-3 herds had higher odds ratio of calving interval (CI) and age at first service (AFS) above the median, respectively, compared to class-0 herds (OR = 1.29; P = 0.02 and OR = 1.63; P = 0.02). Our study showed that PI animals were still in the area that was previously studied. Furthermore, a newly studied area had a high prevalence of BVDV infection and the infection affected the reproductive performance of cows and heifers. Although 37.5 % of the population was free of BVDV, the lack of official disease prevention and less awareness of herd biosecurity may have resulted in continuing viral spread and silent economic losses have potentially occurred due to BVDV. We found that BVDV is still circulating in the region and, hence, a national control program is required. PMID:27154218

  10. Investigation of some hematological and blood biochemical parameters in cattle spontaneously infected with bovine leukosis virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandev Nikolay

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to follow out the alterations in some haematological and blood biochemical parameters in cattle spontaneously infected with enzootic bovine leukosis virus with regard to the invivodifferentiation of bovine leukosis stages. The experiment included 76 cows at various ages and body weight. Serological leukosis tests were done by agar-gel immunodiffusion test with a commercial kit of Synbiotiсs (France, containing standardised gp 51 antigen and positive serum approved by the EU. On the basis of haematological results, the cows were divided into three groups: first group – EBL-seropositive with normal haemogramme; second group – EBL seropositive with altered haemogramme and third group – controls. In cows from the first and the second group, a statistically significantly increased blood cell counts was established compared to healthy controls. The total WBC were increased in the second group (leukocytosis up to 33.21×109/l vs reference range of 5-10×109/l as well as lymphocyte percentages (lymphocytosis – 81.89% (reference 40–63%. A reduction in the proportion of neutrophils to 12.78% (relative neutropenia vs the reference range of 22-49% and monocytes (monocytopenia to 1.78% (reference range 2–6% was observed. A statistically significant reduction in Ca concentrations (4.41 mg/dl and higher inorganic phosphate levels (5.28 mg/dl were established in cows from the second group. Also, ASAT activity was considerably lower – 47.03 U/l, while alkaline phosphatase increased slightly within the reference range up to 167.68 U/l and 165.81 U/l in groups one and two, respectively. The present haematological and whole blood/serum biochemical results in cows spontaneously infected with EBL virus could be used as prognostic markers of the course of the disease, to distinguish the stages of infection with regard to alive diagnostics.

  11. Phylogenetic study on the 5'-untranslated region of bovine viral diarrhoea virus isolates from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Esmaelizad

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhoea virus is a pathogen of bovids associated with reproduction system, causing in infected animals a range of ailments, from abortion to congenital defects. In this article, the nucleotide structure of the 5'-untranslated region (5-UTR from 7 Iranian bovine diarrhoea virus (BVDV isolates was characterized and subjected to comparative analysis against a panel of BVDV isolates from different sources. To this end, a 288 bp-long stretch of the internal ribosome entry site was amplified by RT-PCR. The PCR products subsequently cloned into PTZ57T vector and sequenced using T7 promoter primers. This resulted in detection of 3 new point mutations G→A and G→T in 2 isolates. When these findings were phylogenetically assessed, all the examined Iranian isolates were deemed to belong to the type1 of BVDV. Besides, 2 subtypes were identified among these isolates. In group A, a high level of similarity (99.2% between Iranian isolates with a cytopathic Australian strain of BVDV-1c was detected; while in group B, the 4 Iranian isolates proved to be very similar to NADL-like BVDV-1a strains. We believe that the surprisingly high level of similarity between group A Iranian isolates and their corresponding Australian strain is likely to be an indication of a shared common ancestor. If correct, the most likely explanation of this observation is the introduction of such strains from Australia to Iran, possibly through exportation of infected live animals or animal productions (e.g. semen and meat at some points in the past. Nevertheless, this hypothesis remains to be proved as further epidemiological work at genomic level is required to understand population of BVDV in Iran.

  12. Quantitation of specific antibodies bound to feline leukemia virus in the plasma of pet cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, H W; Singhal, M C; Yoshida, L H; Jones, F R

    1985-08-01

    A method is described for determining levels of circulating immune complexes (CIC) composed of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigens and corresponding antibodies in plasma of persistently-infected pet cats. The procedure is based on the ability of high-titered heterologous anti-FeLV serum to chase cat anti-FeLV IgG from dissociated CIC by successfully competing for binding of free antigen. The eluted cat antibody is then collected and quantitated. In a study of cats in the process of clearing persistent FeLV infections, measured levels of FeLV-specific CIC correlated well with fluctuating levels of free FeLV antigen and antibody. The Raji cell assay for CIC in those cats was of comparatively little value in following the clearance of the virus, presumably because that assay does not distinguish between CIC containing viral and those containing non-viral antigens. The method described can be adapted to studies of specific immune complexes associated with a variety of syndromes, provided that the antigen eliciting the immune response is known. PMID:2995795

  13. The BET Family of Proteins Targets Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Integration near Transcription Start Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan De Rijck

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of retroviral replication is integration of the viral genome into host cell DNA. This characteristic makes retrovirus-based vectors attractive delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, adverse events in gene therapeutic trials, caused by activation of proto-oncogenes due to murine leukemia virus (MLV-derived vector integration, hamper their application. Here, we show that bromodomain and extraterminal (BET proteins (BRD2, BRD3, and BRD4 and MLV integrase specifically interact and colocalize within the nucleus of the cell. Inhibition of the BET proteins’ chromatin interaction via specific bromodomain inhibitors blocks MLV virus replication at the integration step. MLV integration site distribution parallels the chromatin binding profile of BET proteins, and expression of an artificial fusion protein of the BET integrase binding domain with the chromatin interaction domain of the lentiviral targeting factor LEDGF/p75 retargets MLV integration away from transcription start sites and into the body of actively transcribed genes, conforming to the HIV integration pattern. Together, these data validate BET proteins as MLV integration targeting factors.

  14. Differential multimerization of Moloney murine leukemia virus integrase purified under nondenaturing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retroviral integrases (IN) catalyze the integration of the reverse-transcribed viral DNA into the host genome, an essential process leading to virus replication. For Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) IN, the limited solubility of the recombinant protein has restricted the development of biophysical and structural analyses. Herein, recombinant M-MuLV IN proteins, either full length or two nonoverlapping domain constructs, were purified under non-denaturing conditions from solubilized bacterial extracts by Ni2+-NTA resins. Additionally, WT IN was further purified by heparin chromatography. All of the purified proteins were shown to be active and stable. WT M-MuLV IN chromatographed with a peak corresponding with a dimer by gel filtration chromatography. In contrast, the single point mutant C209A IN migrated predominantly as a tetramer. For both proteins, fractions in equilibrium between dimers and tetramers were competent to assemble concerted two-end integrations and yielded a unique strand-transfer profile in the presence of a 28-mer U5 oligonucleotide substrate, indicative of a distinct conformation within the synaptic complex. This specific target-site selection was not observed with a shorter 20-mer U5 substrate. These studies provide the foundation for biophysical and structural analysis on M-MuLV IN and the mechanism of retroviral integration

  15. Replication and pathogenicity of primer binding site mutants of SL3-3 murine leukemia viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Schmidt, J; Luz, A;

    1999-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is primed by a cellular tRNA molecule annealed to an 18-bp primer binding site sequence. The sequence of the primer binding site coincides with that of a negatively acting cis element that mediates transcriptional silencing of murine leukemia virus (MLV) in...... undifferentiated embryonic cells. In this study we test whether SL3-3 MLV can replicate stably using tRNA primers other than the cognate tRNAPro and analyze the effect of altering the primer binding site sequence to match the 3' end of tRNA1Gln, tRNA3Lys, or tRNA1,2Arg in a mouse pathogenicity model. Contrary to...... findings from cell culture studies of primer binding site-modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and avian retroviruses, our findings were that SL3-3 MLV may stably and efficiently replicate with tRNA primers other than tRNAPro. Although lymphoma induction of the SL3-3 Lys3 mutant was significantly...

  16. Murine leukemia virus in organs of senescence-prone and -resistant mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carp, R I; Meeker, H C; Chung, R; Kozak, C A; Hosokawa, M; Fujisawa, H

    2002-03-31

    A series of inbred strains of mice have been developed that are either prone (SAMP) or resistant (SAMR) to accelerated senescence. All of these strains originated from an inadvertent cross or crosses between the AKR/J mouse strain and an unknown strain(s). The characteristics of the nine senescence-prone lines differ, with all strains showing generalized aspects of accelerated aging but with each line having a specific aging-related change that is emphasized, e.g. learning and memory deficits, osteoporosis and senile amyloidosis. The senescence-resistant strains have normal patterns of aging and do not show the specific aging-related changes seen in SAMP strains. The fact that AKR mice have high levels of endogenous, ecotropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV) prompted an examination of the expression levels of MuLV in SAM strains. Analysis of brain, spleen and thymus samples revealed that seven of nine SAMP strains had high levels of MuLV and contained the Emv11 provirus (previously termed Akv1) that encodes the predominant MuLV found in AKR mice. In contrast, none of the SAMR strains had Emv11 or significant amounts of virus. The current findings represent an initial step in determining the role of MuLV in the accelerated senescence seen in SAMP strains. PMID:11850021

  17. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to Brazilian isolates of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C. Kreutz

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Three Brazilian isolates of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV, antigenically distinct from the standard North American isolates, were selected to immunize BALB/c mice in order to obtain hybridoma cells secreting anti-BVDV monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. Two hybridoma clones secreting mAbs, reacting specifically with BVDV-infected cells (mAbs 3.1C4 and 6.F11, were selected after five fusions and screening of 1001 hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine-resistant clones. These mAbs reacted in an indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA assay with all 39 South and North American BVDV field isolates and reference strains available in our laboratory, yet failed to recognize other pestiviruses, namely the hog cholera virus. The mAbs reacted at dilutions up to 1:25,600 (ascitic fluid and 1:100 (hybridoma culture supernatant in IFA and immunoperoxidase (IPX staining of BVDV-infected cells but only mAb 3.1C4 neutralized virus infectivity. Furthermore, both mAbs failed to recognize BVDV proteins by IPX in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues and following SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analysis of virus-infected cells, suggesting they are probably directed to conformational-type epitopes. The protein specificity of these mAbs was then determined by IFA staining of CV-1 cells transiently expressing each of the BVDV proteins: mAb 3.1C4 reacted with the structural protein E2/gp53 and mAb 6.F11 reacted with the structural protein E1/gp25. Both mAbs were shown to be of the IgG2a isotype. To our knowledge, these are the first mAbs produced against South American BVDV isolates and will certainly be useful for research and diagnostic purposes.

  18. Biochemical analysis of bovine viral diarrhea virus polypeptides and studies of strain variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracellular viral-specific polypeptides from the National Animal Disease Laboratory (NADL) strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus were studied by biosynthesis labelling, radioimmunoprecipitation (RIP), hypertonic initiation block (HIB) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Eighteen virus-specific proteins were identified; thirteen were glycosylated (gp170, p135, p130, gp118, gp82, p80, gp74, gp63, gp60, p59, gp53, gp50, gp45, gp42, p37, gp32, gp25 and p22). When glycosylation was inhibited by tunicamycin, five 35S-methionine labelled proteins displayed increased electrophoretic mobility (gp170 to p165, gp74 to p66, gp53 to p45, gp50 to p42 and gp25 to p20) and four could not be identified. Similar shifts in mobility were observed following in vitro deglycosylation with endoglycosidases H and F indicating that the nine glycoproteins contained N-linked simple or high mannose containing moieties. Biosynthetic labelling in the presence of the ionophore, monensin, or in vitro deglycosylation with the endoglycosidase, O-glycanase, had no effect, which is consistent with the absence of O-linked carbohydrates in BVDV-specific proteins. N-linked glycosylation of BVDV proteins is critical for infectivity, because the virus from cells treated with tunicamycin was devoid of infectivity, whereas the virus from monensin-treated cells was fully infective. Partitioning of p130, p59, gp53-50, and p37 into solutions of Triton X-114 tentatively identified these molecules as partially hydrophobic transmembrane proteins. Biosynthesis in the presence of 3H-myristate and 3H-palmitate did not result in specifically labelled viral proteins indicating predominantly noncovalent nature of putative interactions of these proteins with membranes. Partial proteolytic peptide mapping revealed similarities among gp170, p130 and p80 and between gp53 and gp50

  19. Biochemical analysis of bovine viral diarrhea virus polypeptides and studies of strain variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisch, K.P.

    1989-01-01

    Intracellular viral-specific polypeptides from the National Animal Disease Laboratory (NADL) strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus were studied by biosynthesis labelling, radioimmunoprecipitation (RIP), hypertonic initiation block (HIB) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Eighteen virus-specific proteins were identified; thirteen were glycosylated (gp170, p135, p130, gp118, gp82, p80, gp74, gp63, gp60, p59, gp53, gp50, gp45, gp42, p37, gp32, gp25 and p22). When glycosylation was inhibited by tunicamycin, five {sup 35}S-methionine labelled proteins displayed increased electrophoretic mobility (gp170 to p165, gp74 to p66, gp53 to p45, gp50 to p42 and gp25 to p20) and four could not be identified. Similar shifts in mobility were observed following in vitro deglycosylation with endoglycosidases H and F indicating that the nine glycoproteins contained N-linked simple or high mannose containing moieties. Biosynthetic labelling in the presence of the ionophore, monensin, or in vitro deglycosylation with the endoglycosidase, O-glycanase, had no effect, which is consistent with the absence of O-linked carbohydrates in BVDV-specific proteins. N-linked glycosylation of BVDV proteins is critical for infectivity, because the virus from cells treated with tunicamycin was devoid of infectivity, whereas the virus from monensin-treated cells was fully infective. Partitioning of p130, p59, gp53-50, and p37 into solutions of Triton X-114 tentatively identified these molecules as partially hydrophobic transmembrane proteins. Biosynthesis in the presence of {sup 3}H-myristate and {sup 3}H-palmitate did not result in specifically labelled viral proteins indicating predominantly noncovalent nature of putative interactions of these proteins with membranes. Partial proteolytic peptide mapping revealed similarities among gp170, p130 and p80 and between gp53 and gp50.

  20. Isolation and identification of a bovine viral diarrhea virus from sika deer in china

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Nan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV infections continue to cause significantly losses in the deer population. Better isolation and identification of BVDV from sika deer may contribute significantly to the development of prophylactic therapeutic, and diagnostic reagents as well as help in prevention and control of BVDV. However, isolation and identification of BVDV from sika deer is seldom reported in literature. In this study, we collected some samples according to clinical sign of BVDV to isolation and identification of BVDV from sika deer. Results we isolated a suspected BVDV strain from livers of an aborted fetus from sika deer in Changchun (China using MDBK cell lines, named as CCSYD strain, and identified it by cytopathic effect (CPE, indirect immunoperoxidase test (IPX and electron microscopy(EM. The results indicated that this virus was BVDV by a series of identification. The structural proteins E0 gene was cloned and sequenced. The obtained E0 gene sequence has been submitted to GenBank with the accession number: FJ555203. Alignment with other 9 strains of BVDV, 7 strains of classical swine fever virus (CSFV and 3 strains of border disease virus(BDV in the world, showed that the homology were 98.6%-84.8%, 76.0%-74.7%, 76.6%-77.0% for nucleotide sequence, respectively. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that new isolation and identification CCSYD strain belonged to BVDV1b. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that BVDV was isolated and identified in sika deer. This current research contributes development new BVDV vaccine to prevent and control of BVD in sika deer.

  1. Quantitative trait loci associated with the immune response to a bovine respiratory syncytial virus vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Leach

    Full Text Available Infectious disease is an important problem for animal breeders, farmers and governments worldwide. One approach to reducing disease is to breed for resistance. This linkage study used a Charolais-Holstein F2 cattle cross population (n = 501 which was genotyped for 165 microsatellite markers (covering all autosomes to search for associations with phenotypes for Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV specific total-IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 concentrations at several time-points pre- and post-BRSV vaccination. Regions of the bovine genome which influenced the immune response induced by BRSV vaccination were identified, as well as regions associated with the clearance of maternally derived BRSV specific antibodies. Significant positive correlations were detected within traits across time, with negative correlations between the pre- and post-vaccination time points. The whole genome scan identified 27 Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL on 13 autosomes. Many QTL were associated with the Thymus Helper 1 linked IgG2 response, especially at week 2 following vaccination. However the most significant QTL, which reached 5% genome-wide significance, was on BTA 17 for IgG1, also 2 weeks following vaccination. All animals had declining maternally derived BRSV specific antibodies prior to vaccination and the levels of BRSV specific antibody prior to vaccination were found to be under polygenic control with several QTL detected.Heifers from the same population (n = 195 were subsequently immunised with a 40-mer Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus peptide (FMDV in a previous publication. Several of these QTL associated with the FMDV traits had overlapping peak positions with QTL in the current study, including the QTL on BTA23 which included the bovine Major Histocompatibility Complex (BoLA, and QTL on BTA9 and BTA24, suggesting that the genes underlying these QTL may control responses to multiple antigens. These results lay the groundwork for future investigations to identify the

  2. Mutations of the kissing-loop dimerization sequence influence the site specificity of murine leukemia virus recombination in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Pedersen, F S

    2000-01-01

    -cycle transfer of Akv murine leukemia virus-based vectors harboring defective primer binding site sequences, we now report that modifications of the kissing-loop structure, ranging from a deletion of the entire sequence to introduction of a single point mutation in the loop motif, significantly disturb site...... synthesis in newly infected cells. We have previously shown that template shifts within the 5' leader of murine leukemia viruses occur preferentially within the kissing stem-loop motif, a cis element crucial for in vitro RNA dimer formation. By use of a forced recombination approach based on single...... specificity of recombination within the highly structured 5' leader region. In addition, we find that an intact kissing-loop sequence favors optimal RNA encapsidation and vector transduction. Our data are consistent with the kissing-loop dimerization model and suggest that a direct intermolecular RNA...

  3. The acute phase response of haptoglobin and serum amyloid A (SAA) in cattle undergoing experimental infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Godson, D.L.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Larsen, Lars Erik; Viuff, B.; Rønsholt, Leif

    The ability of a pure virus infection to induce an acute phase protein response is of interest as viral infections are normally considered to be less efficient in inducing an acute phase protein response than bacterial infections. This was studied in a bovine model for infection with bovine respi...

  4. Isolation and adaptation of bovine herpes virus Type 1 in embryonated chicken eggs and in Madin–Darby bovine kidney cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devprabha Samrath

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Objective of the present study was to isolate bovine herpes virus Type 1 (BHV-1 from semen of infected bull and to adapt it onto embryonated eggs and Madin–Darby bovine kidney (MDBK cell line. Further, the virus was identified by agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID test. Materials and Methods: Semen samples were collected from five BHV-1 positive bulls previously confirmed for the presence of antibodies against BHV-1 using avidin-biotin enzyme linked immunosorbent assay test. The virus from semen samples was adapted in chorioallantoic membrane (CAM of 11-day-old embryonated chickens eggs and in MDBK cell line. The presence of BHV-1 in infected CAM and cell culture fluid was confirmed by AGID test. Results: Virus infected CAM showed edema, congestion and thickening at first passage level. Small foci ranged from 1 to 2 mm in diameter, scattered all over the membrane were observed at first passage. More severe changes were observed in CAM after serial passaging. The large pock lesions, round in shape with opaque raised edge and depressed gray central area of necrosis ranged from 3 to 5 mm in diameter were developed at fourth passage. Blind passages in MDBK cell culture were made. The MDBK cell line at second passage level showed characteristic cytopathic effect viz. rounding of cells with shrinkage, followed by aggregation or clumping of cells which progressed rapidly and appeared as “bunch of grapes” at 72 h post inoculation. Few cells become elongated when compared with uninfected controls. A homogenate of CAM with distinct pock lesions and infected cell culture fluid developed precipitation line within 48 h against specific anti-BHV-1 immune serum by AGID test. Conclusion: BHV-1 was easily adapted in CAM of chicken embryos and in MDBK cell line. Virus infected CAM and cell culture fluid showed precipitin band by AGID test.

  5. Isolation and adaptation of bovine herpes virus Type 1 in embryonated chicken eggs and in Madin–Darby bovine kidney cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samrath, Devprabha; Shakya, Sanjay; Rawat, Nidhi; Gilhare, Varsha Rani; Singh, Fateh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Objective of the present study was to isolate bovine herpes virus Type 1 (BHV-1) from semen of infected bull and to adapt it onto embryonated eggs and Madin–Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cell line. Further, the virus was identified by agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test. Materials and Methods: Semen samples were collected from five BHV-1 positive bulls previously confirmed for the presence of antibodies against BHV-1 using avidin-biotin enzyme linked immunosorbent assay test. The virus from semen samples was adapted in chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of 11-day-old embryonated chickens eggs and in MDBK cell line. The presence of BHV-1 in infected CAM and cell culture fluid was confirmed by AGID test. Results: Virus infected CAM showed edema, congestion and thickening at first passage level. Small foci ranged from 1 to 2 mm in diameter, scattered all over the membrane were observed at first passage. More severe changes were observed in CAM after serial passaging. The large pock lesions, round in shape with opaque raised edge and depressed gray central area of necrosis ranged from 3 to 5 mm in diameter were developed at fourth passage. Blind passages in MDBK cell culture were made. The MDBK cell line at second passage level showed characteristic cytopathic effect viz. rounding of cells with shrinkage, followed by aggregation or clumping of cells which progressed rapidly and appeared as “bunch of grapes” at 72 h post inoculation. Few cells become elongated when compared with uninfected controls. A homogenate of CAM with distinct pock lesions and infected cell culture fluid developed precipitation line within 48 h against specific anti-BHV-1 immune serum by AGID test. Conclusion: BHV-1 was easily adapted in CAM of chicken embryos and in MDBK cell line. Virus infected CAM and cell culture fluid showed precipitin band by AGID test. PMID:27051213

  6. High prevalence of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozon Nataša

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalences of FIV and FeLV infections in domestic cats by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Of the 42 cats examined by the ELISA test, 14 (33.3 % were seropositive for FIV antibody, 10 (23.8 % for FeLV antigen, 1 (2.4 % was positive for both viruses and 17 were negative for infection with either virus. In the PCR assay, 17 cats (40.5 % were positive for FeLV, 11 (26.2% for FIV, 9 (21.4% for both viruses and 5 cats (11.9% were negative for the presence of viral DNA. The average age of FIV positive cats was 6 and of FeLV 7 years. Infections were more common in outdoor cats (65% FIV, 61.1% FeLV positive and in male cats (71.4% FIV, 80% FeLV. The results of both tests used in this study have shown high prevalence of both infections among cats in Slovenia. The ELISA method was found useful as a screening test for fast detection of FIV and FeLV infections, but additional testing with PCR was shown to be more effective in the characterization and progression of both infections.

  7. Receptor-Triggered but Alkylation-Arrested Env of Murine Leukemia Virus Reveals the Transmembrane Subunit in a Prehairpin Conformation

    OpenAIRE

    Wallin, Michael; Ekström, Maria; Garoff, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    A central feature of the prevailing model for retrovirus fusion is conversion of the transmembrane (TM) subunit from a prehairpin to a hairpin-like structure. The fusion inhibition of many retroviruses, except murine leukemia virus (MLV), with peptides corresponding to interacting regions in the hairpin supports the model. MLV fusion is controlled by isomerization of the intersubunit disulfide in Env. We show here that TM peptides bind to MLV Env that has been arrested at an intermediate stag...

  8. Effects of Limiting Homology at the Site of Intermolecular Recombinogenic Template Switching during Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer, Julie K.; Telesnitsky, Alice

    2001-01-01

    A Moloney murine leukemia virus-based single-replication-cycle assay was developed to study the effects of limiting the extent of template and primer strand complementarity on recombinogenic template switching. This system mimicked forced copy choice recombination in which nascent DNA transfers from the end of a donor template to an acceptor position on the other copackaged RNA. When acceptor target regions with different extents of complementarity to the transferring DNA were tested, efficie...

  9. Protection against retroviral diseases after vaccination is conferred by interference to superinfection with attenuated murine leukemia viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Corbin, A.; Sitbon, M.

    1993-01-01

    Cell cultures expressing a retroviral envelope are relatively resistant to superinfection by retroviruses which bear envelopes using the same receptor. We tested whether this phenomenon, known as interference to superinfection, might confer protection against retroviral diseases. Newborn mice first inoculated with the attenuated strain B3 of Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV) were protected against severe early hemolytic anemia and nonacute anemiant erythroleukemia induced by the virulent ...

  10. [Sarcoidosis and leukemia/T-cell lymphoma associated with HTLV-1 virus infection in adults (apropos of a case)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panelatti, G; Plumelle, Y; Arfi, S; Pascaline, N; Caplanne, D; Jean-Baptiste, G

    1992-01-01

    The HTLV-1 virus causes a disturbance of the immune system, the evaluation of which is often difficult. We report a case of sarcoidosis in a 49 year old woman of Martinique as evidenced by bilateral hilar adenopathy, hypercalcaemia, uveitis and granulomatous lesions on histological examination. Serological was positive for HTLV-1 antibodies. Three years later she developed an adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. The relationships between the HTLV-1 retroviral infection and different pathologies observed are discussed. PMID:1287773

  11. Sodium-Dependent myo-Inositol Transporter 1 Is a Cellular Receptor for Mus cervicolor M813 Murine Leukemia Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hein, Sibyll; Prassolov, Vladimir; Zhang, Yuanming; Ivanov, Dmitry; Löhler, Jürgen; Susan R Ross; Stocking, Carol

    2003-01-01

    Retrovirus infection is initiated by binding of the surface (SU) portion of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) to specific receptors on cells. This binding triggers conformational changes in the transmembrane portion of Env, leading to membrane fusion and cell entry, and is thus a major determinant of retrovirus tissue and species tropism. The M813 murine leukemia virus (MuLV) is a highly fusogenic gammaretrovirus, isolated from Mus cervicolor, whose host range is limited to mouse cells. T...

  12. APOBEC3G targets human T-cell leukemia virus type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imada Kazunori

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme-catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G is a host cellular protein with a broad antiviral activity. It inhibits infectivitiy of a wide variety of retroviruses by deaminating deoxycytidine (dC into deoxyuridine (dU in newly synthesized minus strand DNA, resulting in G-to-A hypermutation of the viral plus strand DNA. To clarify the mechanism of its function, we have examined the antiviral activity of APOBEC3G on human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1, the first identified human retrovirus. Results In this study, we have demonstrated that overexpressed as well as endogenous APOBEC3G were incorporated into HTLV-1 virions and that APOBEC3G inhibited the infection of HTLV-1. Interestingly, several inactive mutants of APOBEC3G also inhibited HTLV-1 and no G-to-A hypermutation was induced by APOBEC3G in HTLV-1 genome. Furthermore, we introduced the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 vif gene into HTLV-1 producing cell line, MT-2, to antagonize APOBEC3G by reducing its intracellular expression and virion incorporation, which resulted in upregulation of the infectivity of produced viruses. Conclusion APOBEC3G is incorporated into HTLV-1 virions and inhibits the infection of HTLV-1 without exerting its cytidine deaminase activity. These results suggest that APOBEC3G might act on HTLV-1 through different mechanisms from that on HIV-1 and contribute to the unique features of HTLV-1 infection and transmission.

  13. Clinical response and immunomodulation following experimental challenge of calves with type 2 noncytopathogenic bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, D; Béliveau, C; Couture, Y; Carman, S

    2000-01-01

    Eight calves between 16 and 18 weeks of age that were seronegative to bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine leucosis virus and bovine immunodeficiency-like virus were infected (day 0) intranasally with the type 2 noncytopathogenic Canadian 24515 field isolate of BVDV in order to evaluate the effect of BVDV infection on certain clinical, hematological and immunological parameters. All virus-exposed animals developed fever and showed a significant (P < 0.05, 0.01 or 0.001) drop in the number of circulating leucocytes (neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes) by day 3 or 5 post-exposure (PE), which continued to the end of the experiment at day 12 PE. BVDV was consistently isolated from the peripheral blood buffy coat cells from day 5 PE, and also from selected tissues (spleen, thymus, mesenteric and submaxillary lymph nodes, small intestine, lungs and thyroid gland) that were collected at the time of euthanasia of the animals at day 12 PE. Diminished significant (P < 0.05) percentages of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) expressing at their surface either B7 and MHC II molecules were observed in virus-exposed calves at days 7, 10 and/or 12 PE, when compared to virus-nonexposed control calves (n = 5). However, no changes in the percentages of PBMCs expressing either B4 or MHC I molecules were observed throughout the experiment. Finally, a significant (P < 0.05 or 0.01) enhanced phagocytic capability of the PBMCs, as analyzed by flow cytometry, was observed in virus-exposed animals at days 3, 5, 7, 10 and 12 PE, when compared to control calves. These results demonstrated the virulence of the 24515 isolate of BVDV in 4 to 4.5 month-old calves, and suggest that type 2 BVDV infection in calves is associated with dysregulation of certain immunological functions. PMID:10779200

  14. Effects of supplemental chromium on antibody responses of newly weaned feedlot calves to immunization with infectious bovine rhinotracheitis and parainfluenza 3 virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, J. L.; Mallard, B A; Mowat, D N

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of supplemental dietary chromium (Cr) on antibody responses of feedlot calves. Fifty-five newly weaned calves were divided into two groups, 28 that received supplemental Cr and 27 that did not, and were immunized with a commercial vaccine against bovine infectious rhinotracheitis virus (IBR) and bovine parainfluenza virus type 3(PI-3). Sera harvested from blood sampled preimmunization, and at days 14 and 28 postimmunization (PI), were as...

  15. Le virus de la leucémie bovine et l’homéostasie du compartiment lymphocytaire périphérique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Willems

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine leukaemia virus and peripheral blood lymphocytes homeostasis. Bovine leukaemia virus (BLV is the etiological agent of a lymphoproliferative disease in cattle. This retrovirus can also be transmitted experimentally to the ovine species, in which pathology is more rapid and more frequent. In this model, infection leads to an increased cell turnover. This accelerated lymphocyte dynamics might be related to viral expression which induces cellular proliferation and host cell destruction by the immune system.

  16. [Adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia associated with HTLV-I virus in Martinique: apropos of 2 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessain, A; Plumelle, Y; Sanhadji, K; Barin, F; Gazzolo, L; Constant-Desportes, M; Pascaline, N; Diebold, J; De-Thé, G

    1986-01-01

    Two HTLV-I associated adult T cell leukemia cases were observed in patient from Martinique (French West Indies). These case are similar to the clinical entity, described by Takatsuki in 1977 in Japan and by Catovsky in Caribbean patients, characterized by a lymphadenopathy, skin lesions and visceral involvement, hypercalcemia, an aggressive course, and poor prognosis. The malignant cells with T4 phenotype and often suppressive function, were pleomorphic, mature, with prominent nuclear irregularities. Systematic research of HTLV-I virus or antibodies in patients with this clinical picture, to measure the influence of this virus in T cell lymphoproliferative diseases in France and in French West Indies is required. PMID:3016639

  17. Phosphorylation regulates human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Rex function

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    Ward Michael

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a pathogenic complex deltaretrovirus, which is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. In addition to the structural and enzymatic viral gene products, HTLV-1 encodes the positive regulatory proteins Tax and Rex along with viral accessory proteins. Tax and Rex proteins orchestrate the timely expression of viral genes important in viral replication and cellular transformation. Rex is a nucleolar-localizing shuttling protein that acts post-transcriptionally by binding and facilitating the export of the unspliced and incompletely spliced viral mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. HTLV-1 Rex (Rex-1 is a phosphoprotein and general protein kinase inhibition correlates with reduced function. Therefore, it has been proposed that Rex-1 function may be regulated through site-specific phosphorylation. Results We conducted a phosphoryl mapping of Rex-1 over-expressed in transfected 293 T cells using a combination of affinity purification and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We achieved 100% physical coverage of the Rex-1 polypeptide and identified five novel phosphorylation sites at Thr-22, Ser-36, Thr-37, Ser-97, and Ser-106. We also confirmed evidence of two previously identified residues, Ser-70 and Thr-174, but found no evidence of phosphorylation at Ser-177. The functional significance of these phosphorylation events was evaluated using a Rex reporter assay and site-directed mutational analysis. Our results indicate that phosphorylation at Ser-97 and Thr-174 is critical for Rex-1 function. Conclusion We have mapped completely the site-specific phosphorylation of Rex-1 identifying a total of seven residues; Thr-22, Ser-36, Thr-37, Ser-70, Ser-97, Ser-106, and Thr-174. Overall, this work is the first to completely map the phosphorylation sites in Rex-1 and provides important insight into

  18. Silencing of human T-cell leukemia virus type I gene transcription by epigenetic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueller Nancy

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I causes adult T-cell leukemia (ATL after a long latent period. Among accessory genes encoded by HTLV-I, the tax gene is thought to play a central role in oncogenesis. However, Tax expression is disrupted by several mechanims including genetic changes of the tax gene, deletion/hypermethylation of 5'-LTR. To clarify the role of epigenetic changes, we analyzed DNA methylation and histone modification in the whole HTLV-I provirus genome. Results The gag, pol and env genes of HTLV-I provirus were more methylated than pX region, whereas methylation of 5'-LTR was variable and 3'-LTR was not methylated at all. In ATL cell lines, complete DNA methylation of 5'-LTR was associated with transcriptional silencing of viral genes. HTLV-I provirus was more methylated in primary ATL cells than in carrier state, indicating the association with disease progression. In seroconvertors, DNA methylation was already observed in internal sequences of provirus just after seroconversion. Taken together, it is speculated that DNA methylation first occurs in the gag, pol and env regions and then extends in the 5' and 3' directions in vivo, and when 5'-LTR becomes methylated, viral transcription is silenced. Analysis of histone modification in the HTLV-I provirus showed that the methylated provirus was associated with hypoacetylation. However, the tax gene transcript could not be detected in fresh ATL cells regardless of hyperacetylated histone H3 in 5'-LTR. The transcription rapidly recovered after in vitro culture in such ATL cells. Conclusion These results showed that epigenetic changes of provirus facilitated ATL cells to evade host immune system by suppressing viral gene transcription. In addition, this study shows the presence of another reversible mechanism that suppresses the tax gene transcription without DNA methylation and hypoacetylated histone.

  19. Lethal cutaneous disease in transgenic mice conditionally expressing type I human T cell leukemia virus Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hakju; Ogle, Louise; Benitez, Bobby; Bohuslav, Jan; Montano, Mauricio; Felsher, Dean W; Greene, Warner C

    2005-10-21

    Type I human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I) is etiologically linked with adult T cell leukemia, an aggressive and usually fatal expansion of activated CD4+ T lymphocytes that frequently traffic to skin. T cell transformation induced by HTLV-I involves the action of the 40-kDa viral Tax transactivator protein. Tax both stimulates the HTLV-I long terminal repeat and deregulates the expression of select cellular genes by altering the activity of specific host transcription factors, including cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor, NF-kappaB/Rel, and serum response factor. To study initiating events involved in HTLV-I Tax-induced T cell transformation, we generated "Tet-off" transgenic mice conditionally expressing in a lymphocyte-restricted manner (EmuSR alpha promoter-enhancer) either wild-type Tax or mutant forms of Tax that selectively compromise the NF-kappaB (M22) or CREB/activating transcription factor (M47) activation pathways. Wild-type Tax and M47 Tax-expressing mice, but not M22-Tax expressing mice, developed progressive alopecia, hyperkeratosis, and skin lesions containing profuse activated CD4 T cell infiltrates with evidence of deregulated inflammatory cytokine production. In addition, these animals displayed systemic lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. These findings suggest that Tax-mediated activation of NF-kappaB plays a key role in the development of this aggressive skin disease that shares several features in common with the skin disease occurring during the preleukemic stage in HTLV-I-infected patients. Of note, this skin disease completely resolved when Tax transgene expression was suppressed by administration of doxycycline, emphasizing the key role played by this viral oncoprotein in the observed pathology. PMID:16105841

  20. Changes in ovarian follicles following acute infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grooms, D L; Brock, K V; Pate, J L; Day, M L

    1998-02-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been associated with several reproductive problems in cattle, including poor fertility, early embryonic deaths, abortion and congenital anomalies. Little is known about the cause of poor fertility in cows acutely infected with BVDV. The purpose of this study was to identify changes in ovarian function following acute infection with noncytopathic BVDV. The ovaries of 5 BVDV sero-negative and virus-negative pubertal heifers were monitored daily for 4 consecutive estrous cycles. The position and diameter of all follicles (> 5 mm) and luteal structures were recorded. Daily plasma samples were collected to measure peripheral progesterone and estradiol levels. Each heifer was infected intranasally with noncytopathic BVDV following ovulation of the second estrous cycle. The maximum diameter and growth rate of dominant anovulatory and ovulatory follicles were significantly reduced following acute BVDV infection. Similarly, the number of subordinate follicles associated with both the anovulatory and ovulatory follicle was reduced following infection. There were no significant differences in other follicle or luteal dynamic parameters or in peripheral progesterone or estradiol levels. Ovarian follicular growth was different during the first 2 estrous cycles following acute infection with BVDV when compared with the 2 estrous cycles preceding infection. These differences may be important in explaining reduced fertility in herds with acute BVDV infection. PMID:10732038

  1. First report of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus antigen from pneumonic cattle in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intisar Kamil Saeed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To explore the expected role of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV in pneumonia in cattle, cattle lungs (n=242 showing signs of pneumonia were collected from slaughter houses of three different localities located at Northern, Central and Western Sudan during 2010–2013. The collected samples were tested for the presence of BVDV antigen using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA, and Fluorescent Antibody Test (FAT. Twenty six (10.7% out of 242 samples were found to be positive for BVDV. Positive results were seen in all the three studied areas, with the highest prevalence (16.7%; n=4/24 at Gezira State in Central Sudan. BVDV genome could be detected in all ELISA positive samples. The results indicated the existence of BVDV infection in cattle in different areas in Sudan, and its possible association with respiratory infections in cattle. Analysis using BLAST indicated that the sequence was identical to the previously reported BVDV-1 (GenBank accession AF220247.1.; nucleotide A was found in our study at position 9 of our sequence, whereas T was present instead in the reference virus. This is the first report of detecting BVDV antigen, genome, and its sequence analysis collected from cattle lungs in Sudan.

  2. Identification of bovine viral diarrhea virus infection in Saanen goats in the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yu-Jung; Chae, Jeong-Byoung; Chae, Joon-Seok; Yu, Do-Hyeon; Park, Jinho; Park, Bae-Keun; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol; Yoo, Jae-Gyu; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2016-06-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is one of the most important viral pathogens of livestock and causes substantial economic losses to the livestock industry worldwide. BVDV is not necessarily species specific and is known to infect domesticated and wild ruminants. In the present study, BVDV infection was identified in two Saanen goats from one farm, and two different viral subtypes were found, BVDV-1a and BVDV-2a. Each isolate was closely related to cattle isolates identified in the Republic of Korea. The two sequences obtained in this study were not consistent with border disease virus (BDV). The incidence of BVDV in this farm apparently occurred in the absence of contact with cattle and may be associated with grazing. This study demonstrates that BVDV infection may be possible to transmit among goats without exposure to cattle. Therefore, this result indicates that Saanen goats may act as natural reservoirs for BVDV. This is the first report of BVDV-1a infection in a Saanen goat. PMID:26992733

  3. Effects of bovine viral diarrhoea virus on the fertility of cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavru, Sibel; Kale, Mehmet; Gulay, Mehmet Sukru; Yapici, Orhan; Bulut, Oya; Ata, Ayhan

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the possible relationship between bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) virus infection and the appearance of cervical mucous discharge (CMD) and the reproductive performance of cows in oestrus. For this purpose, CMD from 97 Holstein cows in oestrus was evaluated visually before artificial insemination (AI). Cows in oestrus were inseminated with frozen semen free from BVD virus (BVDV). Blood samples were tested by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) for antigen (Ag) and antibodies (Ab) of BVDV. The presence of the BVDV genome in cervical mucus samples was tested by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The presence of BVDV Ab, Ag or genome was not associated with abnormal cervical mucous discharge (A-CMD). However, the presence of BVDV Ag (but not of the BVDV Ab) in blood samples was associated with a lower first service conception rate (FSCR; 27.8 vs. 70.9%; P < 0.01), indicating that BVDV viraemia at the time of AI has a negative effect on the fertility of cows. PMID:23661395

  4. In vitro neutralization against HoBi-like viruses by antiobodies in serum of cattle immunized with inactivated or modified live vaccines of bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    HoBi-like viruses are an emerging species of pestiviruses with genetic and antigenic similarities to bovine viral diarrhea viruses 1 and 2 (BVDV1 and BVDV2). These viruses have been detected associated with respiratory and/or reproductive disease in cattle in Italy and Brazil. Vaccines for HoBi-like...

  5. Seroprevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) in shelter cats on the island of Newfoundland, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Hannah J; Berghuis, Lesley; Lang, Andrew S; Rogers, Laura; Whitney, Hugh

    2014-04-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are retroviruses found within domestic and wild cat populations. These viruses cause severe illnesses that eventually lead to death. Housing cats communally for long periods of time makes shelters at high risk for virus transmission among cats. We tested 548 cats from 5 different sites across the island of Newfoundland for FIV and FeLV. The overall seroprevalence was 2.2% and 6.2% for FIV and FeLV, respectively. Two sites had significantly higher seroprevalence of FeLV infection than the other 3 sites. Analysis of sequences from the FeLV env gene (envelope gene) from 6 positive cats showed that 4 fell within the FeLV subtype-A, while 2 sequences were most closely related to FeLV subtype-B and endogenous feline leukemia virus (en FeLV). Varying seroprevalence and the variation in sequences at different sites demonstrate that some shelters are at greater risk of FeLV infections and recombination can occur at sites of high seroprevalence. PMID:24688176

  6. Interactions of bovine viral diarrhoea virus glycoprotein E(rns) with cell surface glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, M; Flick-Smith, H; McCauley, J W

    2000-02-01

    Recombinant E(rns) glycoprotein of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) has been tagged with a marker epitope or linked to an immunoglobulin Fc tail and expressed in insect and mammalian cell lines. The product was shown to be functional, both having ribonuclease activity and binding to a variety of cells that were permissive and non-permissive for replication of BVDV. Addition of soluble E(rns) to the medium blocked replication of BVDV in permissive cells. Binding of epitope-tagged E(rns) to permissive calf testes (CTe) cells was abolished and virus infection was reduced when cells were treated with heparinases I or III. E(rns) failed to bind to mutant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells that lacked glycosaminoglycans (pgsA-745 cells) or heparan sulphate (pgsD-677 cells) but bound to normal CHO cells. E(rns) also bound to heparin immobilized on agarose and could be eluted by heparin and by a high concentration of salt. Flow cytometric analysis of E(rns) binding to CTe cell cultures showed that glycosaminoglycans such as heparin, fucoidan and dermatan sulphate all inhibit binding but dextran sulphate, keratan sulphate, chondroitin sulphate and mannan fail to inhibit binding. The low molecular mass polysulphonated inhibitor suramin also inhibited binding to CTe cells but poly-L-lysine did not. Furthermore, suramin, the suramin analogue CPD14, fucoidan and pentosan polysulphate inhibited the infectivity of virus. It is proposed that binding of E(rns) to cells is through an interaction with glycosaminoglycans and that BVDV may bind to cells initially through this interaction. PMID:10644844

  7. Molecular analysis of bovine viral diarrhoea virus isolates from South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kabongo

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of bovine viral diarrhoea virus in South Africa has been confirmed by several serological surveys. However, little is known about its biological properties. Twenty five isolates obtained by isolation in tissue culture and detected by means of the antigen capture ELISA from clinically sick cattle and from foetal calf serum in South Africa were characterized on the basis of analysis of the 5' non-translated (NTR region of the genome. A reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was used to amplify specific sequences from the 5'NTR of the genome. The oligonucleotide primers corresponding to positions 105-125 and 399-378, respectively, in the sequence of BVDV strain NADL were used to generate the PCR products. Both strands were sequenced directly with these primers and fluorescence-labelled dideoxynucleotides in an automated nucleic acid sequencer. Reference strains of pestiviruses [(BVDV type I, BVDV type II, border disease virus (BDV and hog cholera virus (HCV] and isolates from a previous investigation on BVDV in southern Africa were included for comparative purposes. All the BVDV strains obtained during this study belong to subgroups of BVDV genotype I. No association could be demonstrated between the geographic origin of the isolates. A number of isolates formed another branch separate from the existing branches Ia, Ib and Ic. These findings suggest that extensive genetic diversity can be found within BVDV type I isolates from southern Africa. Isolates that group with the classical BVDV type I strains, particularly of American origin, coexist with variants that appear to represent a local genetic pool and or variants evolving from the classical strains.

  8. Morphology and Molecular Composition of Purified Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Envelope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Nathalie; Brügger, Britta; Bonnafous, Pierre; Drobecq, Hervé; Gerl, Mathias J; Krey, Thomas; Roman-Sosa, Gleyder; Rümenapf, Till; Lambert, Olivier; Dubuisson, Jean; Rouillé, Yves

    2016-03-01

    The family Flaviviridae includes viruses that have different virion structures and morphogenesis mechanisms. Most cellular and molecular studies have been so far performed with viruses of the Hepacivirus and Flavivirus genera. Here, we studied bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a member of the Pestivirus genus. We set up a method to purify BVDV virions and analyzed their morphology by electron microscopy and their protein and lipid composition by mass spectrometry. Cryo-electron microscopy showed near spherical viral particles displaying an electron-dense capsid surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer with no visible spikes. Most particles had a diameter of 50 nm and about 2% were larger with a diameter of up to 65 nm, suggesting some size flexibility during BVDV morphogenesis. Morphological and biochemical data suggested a low envelope glycoprotein content of BVDV particles, E1 and E2 being apparently less abundant than Erns. Lipid content of BVDV particles displayed a ~2.3 to 3.5-fold enrichment in cholesterol, sphingomyelin and hexosyl-ceramide, concomitant with a 1.5 to 5-fold reduction of all glycerophospholipid classes, as compared to lipid content of MDBK cells. Although BVDV buds in the endoplasmic reticulum, its lipid content differs from a typical endoplasmic reticulum membrane composition. This suggests that BVDV morphogenesis includes a mechanism of lipid sorting. Functional analyses confirmed the importance of cholesterol and sphingomyelin for BVDV entry. Surprisingly, despite a high cholesterol and sphingolipid content of BVDV envelope, E2 was not found in detergent-resistant membranes. Our results indicate that there are differences between the structure and molecular composition of viral particles of Flaviviruses, Pestiviruses and Hepaciviruses within the Flaviviridae family. PMID:26939061

  9. Morphology and Molecular Composition of Purified Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Envelope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Callens

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The family Flaviviridae includes viruses that have different virion structures and morphogenesis mechanisms. Most cellular and molecular studies have been so far performed with viruses of the Hepacivirus and Flavivirus genera. Here, we studied bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV, a member of the Pestivirus genus. We set up a method to purify BVDV virions and analyzed their morphology by electron microscopy and their protein and lipid composition by mass spectrometry. Cryo-electron microscopy showed near spherical viral particles displaying an electron-dense capsid surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer with no visible spikes. Most particles had a diameter of 50 nm and about 2% were larger with a diameter of up to 65 nm, suggesting some size flexibility during BVDV morphogenesis. Morphological and biochemical data suggested a low envelope glycoprotein content of BVDV particles, E1 and E2 being apparently less abundant than Erns. Lipid content of BVDV particles displayed a ~2.3 to 3.5-fold enrichment in cholesterol, sphingomyelin and hexosyl-ceramide, concomitant with a 1.5 to 5-fold reduction of all glycerophospholipid classes, as compared to lipid content of MDBK cells. Although BVDV buds in the endoplasmic reticulum, its lipid content differs from a typical endoplasmic reticulum membrane composition. This suggests that BVDV morphogenesis includes a mechanism of lipid sorting. Functional analyses confirmed the importance of cholesterol and sphingomyelin for BVDV entry. Surprisingly, despite a high cholesterol and sphingolipid content of BVDV envelope, E2 was not found in detergent-resistant membranes. Our results indicate that there are differences between the structure and molecular composition of viral particles of Flaviviruses, Pestiviruses and Hepaciviruses within the Flaviviridae family.

  10. Type C virus particles produced in human T-cell lines derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a leukemic T-lymphoid malignancy.

    OpenAIRE

    Oda, Takuzo; Watanabe,Sekiko; Nakamura,Takashi

    1983-01-01

    Electron microscopy of four human T-cell lines revealed the production of type C virus particles in two T-cell lines: one derived from acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the other from a leukemic T-lymphoid malignancy. Virus particles isolated from these cells had reverse transcriptase activity and the major internal structural protein of 30,000 daltons (p30). The indirect immunofluorescence test of these virus-producing cells with sera of patients with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) was negative....

  11. Feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus infections in a cat with lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, G H; McKim, K D; Cooley, P L; Dice, P F; Russell, R G; Grant, C K

    1989-01-15

    Lymphoma was diagnosed in a 7-year-old domestic cat found to be infected with FeLV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). The cat was affected by chronic disorders suggestive of immunosuppression, including gingivitis, periodontitis, keratitis, and abscesses. Despite treatment, peripheral keratitis of the left eye progressed, resulting in uveitis, chronic glaucoma, and eventual corneal rupture. Microscopic retinal and optic disk pathologic processes also were suspected. Abnormal jaw movements that were believed to be indicative of neurologic disease were observed. Approximately 17 months later, the cat developed generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and bilateral renomegaly. Lymphoblastic lymphoma and glomerulonephritis were diagnosed histologically. Manganese- and magnesium-dependent reverse transcriptase activity were detected in supernatants from lymph node and spleen mononuclear cell cultures, suggesting T-lymphocyte infection with FeLV and FIV. PMID:2537274

  12. Antiviral Efficacy of a Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Fusion Inhibitor in a Bovine Model of RSV Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Robert; Shao, Matt; Mackman, Richard L.; Perron, Michel; Cihlar, Tomas; Lewis, Sandy A.; Eisenberg, Eugene J.; Carey, Anne; Strickley, Robert G.; Chien, Jason W.; Anderson, Mark L.; McEligot, Heather A.; Behrens, Nicole E.; Gershwin, Laurel J.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants. Effective treatment for RSV infection is a significant unmet medical need. While new RSV therapeutics are now in development, there are very few animal models that mimic the pathogenesis of human RSV, making it difficult to evaluate new disease interventions. Experimental infection of Holstein calves with bovine RSV (bRSV) causes a severe respiratory infection that is similar to human RSV infecti...

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus 2 Japanese Reference and Vaccine Strain KZ-91CP

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Asuka; Kameyama, Ken-ichiro; Nagai, Makoto; Tateishi, Kentaro; Ohmori, Keitaro; Todaka, Reiko; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Yamakawa, Makoto; SHIRAI, Junsuke

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report the complete genome sequence of the bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 Japanese reference strain KZ-91CP. The complete genome comprises 12,654 nucleotides and one open reading frame with 4,020 amino acids. A 369-nucleotide-long insertion encoding the chaperone protein DnaJ is found in the nonstructural 2 (NS2) coding region.

  14. Detection of bovine viral diarrhea virus genome in leukocytes from persistently infected cattle by RNA-cDNA hybridization.

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, J.; Aiken, J; Schultz, R D

    1990-01-01

    A bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) cDNA library was constructed. One cloned complementary DNA sequence was used as a probe to detect BVDV RNA by hybridization in infected cell cultures and in mononuclear leukocytes from persistently infected cattle by dot blot and in situ hybridization. The cDNA probe hybridized with all cytopathic and noncytopathic BVDV isolates tested. The hybridization results were consistent with results obtained using conventional subculturing and immunofluorescent sta...

  15. Modelling the spread of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in a beef cattle herd and its impact on herd productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Damman, Alix; Viet, Anne France; Arnoux, Sandie; Guerrier-Chatellet, Marie-Claude; Petit, Etienne; Ezanno, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a common pathogen of cattle herds that causes economic losses due to reproductive disorders in breeding cattle and increased morbidity and mortality amongst infected calves. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of BVDV spread on the productivity of a beef cow-calf herd using a stochastic model in discrete time that accounted for (1) the difference in transmission rates when animals are housed indoors versus grazing on pasture, (2) the external risk of...

  16. Alpha/Beta and Gamma Interferons Are Induced by Infection with Noncytopathic Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Charleston, B; Brackenbury, L.S; Carr, B. V.; Fray, M D; Hope, Jayne; Howard, CJ; Morrison, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    In contrast to the results of previous in vitro studies, experimental infection of calves with noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (ncpBVDV) was found to induce strong alpha/beta and gamma interferon responses in gnotobiotic animals. These responses were associated with depressed levels of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) in serum. The results of this study indicate that the immunosuppression caused by ncpBVDV is not associated with low interferon responses or elevated levels ...

  17. Detection of the bovine viral diarrhoea / mucosal disease (BVD/MD) virus in tissues from aborted ruminant foetuses using immunohistochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. Njiro; C.M. Nkosi

    2009-01-01

    Various tissues from aborted ruminant foetuses were collected, fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin wax. Sections were made and exposed to a primary monoclonal antibody against the bovine viral diarrhoea / mucosal disease (BVD/MD) virus, and subsequently to a goat anti-mouse secondary antibody conjugated to horse radish peroxidase (HRP). Diaminobenzidine (DAB) was the substrate and it released a brown pigment in the tissues on reacting with the HRP in an immunohistochemistry (IHC) proce...

  18. Short communication. Prevalence of antibodies against Parainfluenza virus type 3, Respiratory syncitial virus and bovine Herpesvirus type 1 in sheep from Northern Prefectures of Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Giangaspero

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ovine sera collected in the Prefectures of Hokkaido, Aomori and Iwate in the Northern Japan were examined for the presence of antibodies against Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, bovine Herpesvirus type 1 (infectious bovine rhinotracheitis: IBR and Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3 using serum neutralisation (SN and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA tests. Twenty-three animals (11.73% out of the 196 tested were sero-positive to PIV3. Sixteen animals (8.69% out of the 184 tested reacted to RSV. No animals were positive to IBR antigen. Sero-conversions to PIV3 were detected in Hokkaido and Iwate (14.92% and 8.82%, respectively. Antibodies against RSV were detected in Hokkaido (9.23% and Aomori (14.28%. Although no diagnostic measures were in place, the infections did not appear to be related to any reduction in sheep productivity.

  19. Impairment of alternative splice sites defining a novel gammaretroviral exon within gag modifies the oncogenic properties of Akv murine leukemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Annette Balle; Lund, Anders H; Kunder, Sandra;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations of an alternative splice donor site located within the gag region has previously been shown to broaden the pathogenic potential of the T-lymphomagenic gammaretrovirus Moloney murine leukemia virus, while the equivalent mutations in the erythroleukemia inducing Friend murine...... leukemia virus seem to have no influence on the disease-inducing potential of this virus. In the present study we investigate the splice pattern as well as the possible effects of mutating the alternative splice sites on the oncogenic properties of the B-lymphomagenic Akv murine leukemia virus. RESULTS: By...... examination of the tumors showed that the introduced synonymous gag mutations have a significant influence on the phenotype of the induced tumors, changing the distribution of the different types as well as generating tumors of additional specificities such as de novo diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and...

  20. In vitro inhibition of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus by the essential oil of Ocimum basilicum (basil) and monoterpenes

    OpenAIRE

    Kubiça, Thaís F.; Sydney H. ALVES; Rudi Weiblen; Luciane T. Lovato

    2014-01-01

    The bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is suggested as a model for antiviral studies of the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The antiviral activity of the essential oil of Ocimum basilicum and the monoterpenes camphor, thymol and 1,8-cineole against BVDV was investigated. The cytotoxicities of the compounds were measured by the MTT (3-(4.5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2.5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) test, and the antiviral activities were tested by the plaque reduction assay. The oil or compounds were add...

  1. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 protects against acute myeloid leukemia by suppressing the myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lingbo; Cai, Weili; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xueying; Dong, Wenqian; Tang, Dongqi; Zhang, Yun; Ji, Chunyan; Zhang, Mingxiang

    2015-01-01

    An abnormal expression of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) has been described in many tumors. PARP-1 promotes tumorigenesis and cancer progression by acting on different molecular pathways. PARP-1 inhibitors can be used with radiotherapy or chemotherapy to enhance the susceptibility of tumor cells to the treatment. However, the specific mechanism of PARP-1 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains unknown. Our study showed that expression of PARP-1 was upregulated in AML patients. PARP-1 ...

  2. Comprehensive mapping of receptor-functioning domains in feline leukemia virus subgroup C receptor FLVCR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jennifer K; Fung, Claire; Tailor, Chetankumar S

    2006-02-01

    Infection of cells by the highly anemogenic feline leukemia virus subgroup C (FeLV-C) is mediated by the heme exporter FLVCR1, a cell surface protein containing 12 potential transmembrane segments with six presumptive extracellular loops (ECLs). To identify FLVCR1 residues critical for mediating FeLV-C infection, we first independently isolated a human cDNA encoding the FLVCR2 protein that shares 52% identity to human FLVCR1, and we show that FLVCR2 does not function as a receptor for FeLV-C. Then, by generating specific hybrids between FLVCR1 and FLVCR2 and testing susceptibility of mouse cells expressing these hybrids to beta-galactosidase encoding FeLV-C, we identify FLVCR1 ECLs 1 and 6 as critical for mediating FeLV-C infection. Mouse cells expressing a hybrid protein containing FLVCR2 backbone with the ECL6 sequence from FLVCR1 were highly susceptible to FeLV-C infection. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that a single mutation of Asn463 in FLVCR2 ECL6 to an acidic Asp residue (a residue present in the corresponding position 487 in FLVCR1 ECL6) is sufficient to render FLVCR2 functional as an FeLV-C receptor. However, an Asp487Asn mutation in FLVCR1 ECL6 or substitution of the entire FLVCR1 ECL6 sequence for FLVCR2 ECL6 sequence does not disrupt receptor function. Subsequent substitutions show that residues within FLVCR1 ECL1 also contribute to mediating FeLV-C infection. Furthermore, our results suggest that FLVCR1 regions that mediate FeLV-C surface unit binding are distinct from ECL1 and ECL6. Our results are consistent with previous conclusions that infection of cells by gammaretroviruses involves interaction of virus with multiple receptor regions. PMID:16439531

  3. Evolutionary dynamics of endogenous feline leukemia virus proliferation among species of the domestic cat lineage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endogenous feline leukemia viruses (enFeLVs) occur in the germ lines of the domestic cat and related wild species (genus Felis). We sequenced the long terminal repeats and part of the env region of enFeLVs in domestic cats and five wild species. A total of 305 enFeLV sequences were generated across 17 individuals, demonstrating considerable diversity within two major clades. Distinct proliferations of enFeLVs occurred before and after the black-footed cat diverged from the other species. Diversity of enFeLVs was limited for the sand cat and jungle cat suggesting that proliferation of enFeLVs occurred within these species after they diverged. Relationships among enFeLVs were congruent with host species relationships except for the jungle cat, which carried only enFeLVs from a lineage that recently invaded the germline (enFeLV-AGTT). Comparison of wildcat and domestic cat enFeLVs indicated that a distinctive germ line invasion of enFeLVs has not occurred since the cat was domesticated.

  4. Solution Properties of Murine Leukemia Virus Gag Protein: Differences from HIV-1 Gag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Zuo, Xiaobing; Clark, Patrick K.; Campbell, Stephen J.; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan (SAIC); (NCI)

    2012-05-09

    Immature retrovirus particles are assembled from the multidomain Gag protein. In these particles, the Gag proteins are arranged radially as elongated rods. We have previously characterized the properties of HIV-1 Gag in solution. In the absence of nucleic acid, HIV-1 Gag displays moderately weak interprotein interactions, existing in monomer-dimer equilibrium. Neutron scattering and hydrodynamic studies suggest that the protein is compact, and biochemical studies indicate that the two ends can approach close in three-dimensional space, implying the need for a significant conformational change during assembly. We now describe the properties of the Gag protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV), a gammaretrovirus. We found that this protein is very different from HIV-1 Gag: it has much weaker protein-protein interaction and is predominantly monomeric in solution. This has allowed us to study the protein by small-angle X-ray scattering and to build a low-resolution molecular envelope for the protein. We found that MLV Gag is extended in solution, with an axial ratio of {approx}7, comparable to its dimensions in immature particles. Mutational analysis suggests that runs of prolines in its matrix and p12 domains and the highly charged stretch at the C terminus of its capsid domain all contribute to this extended conformation. These differences between MLV Gag and HIV-1 Gag and their implications for retroviral assembly are discussed.

  5. Survey of feline leukemia virus and feline coronaviruses in captive neotropical wild felids from Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimaraes, Ana M S; Brandão, Paulo E; de Moraes, Wanderlei; Cubas, Zalmir S; Santos, Leonilda C; Villarreal, Laura Y B; Robes, Rogério R; Coelho, Fabiana M; Resende, Mauricio; Santos, Renata C F; Oliveira, Rosangela C; Yamaguti, Mauricio; Marques, Lucas M; Neto, Renata L; Buzinhani, Melissa; Marques, Regina; Messick, Joanne B; Biondo, Alexander W; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2009-06-01

    A total of 57 captive neotropical felids (one Leopardus geoffroyi, 14 Leopardus pardalis, 17 Leopardus wiedii, 22 Leopardus tigrinus, and three Puma yagouaroundi) from the Itaipu Binacional Wildlife Research Center (Refúgio Bela Vista, Southern Brazil) were anesthetized for blood collection. Feces samples were available for 44 animals, including one L. geoffroyi, eight L. pardalis, 14 L. wiedii, 20 L. tigrinus, and one P. yagouaroundi. Total DNA and RNA were extracted from blood and feces, respectively, using commercial kits. Blood DNA samples were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) proviral DNA, whereas reverse transcriptase-PCR was run on fecal samples for detection of coronavirus RNA. None of the samples were positive for coronaviruses. A male L. pardalis and a female L. tigrinus were positive for FeLV proviral DNA, and identities of PCR products were confirmed by sequencing. This is the first evidence of FeLV proviral DNA in these species in Southern Brazil. PMID:19569487

  6. Murine Leukemia Virus Uses TREX Components for Efficient Nuclear Export of Unspliced Viral Transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshie Sakuma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Previously we reported that nuclear export of both unspliced and spliced murine leukemia virus (MLV transcripts depends on the nuclear export factor (NXF1 pathway. Although the mRNA export complex TREX, which contains Aly/REF, UAP56, and the THO complex, is involved in the NXF1-mediated nuclear export of cellular mRNAs, its contribution to the export of MLV mRNA transcripts remains poorly understood. Here, we studied the involvement of TREX components in the export of MLV transcripts. Depletion of UAP56, but not Aly/REF, reduced the level of both unspliced and spliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, depletion of THO components, including THOC5 and THOC7, affected only unspliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the RNA immunoprecipitation assay showed that only the unspliced viral transcript interacted with THOC5. These results imply that MLV requires UAP56, THOC5 and THOC7, in addition to NXF1, for nuclear export of viral transcripts. Given that naturally intronless mRNAs, but not bulk mRNAs, require THOC5 for nuclear export, it is plausible that THOC5 plays a key role in the export of unspliced MLV transcripts.

  7. Functional dissection of the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope protein gp70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Y; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1997-03-01

    The envelope protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MLV) is a complex glycoprotein that mediates receptor binding and entry via fusion with cell membranes. By using a series of substitution mutations and truncations in the Mo-MLV external envelope surface protein gp70, we have identified regions important for these processes. Firstly, truncations of gp70 revealed that the minimal continuous receptor-binding region is amino acids 9 to 230, in broad agreement with other studies. Secondly, within this region there are two key basic amino acids, Arg-83 and Arg-95, that are essential for receptor binding and may interact with a negatively charged residue(s) or with the pi electrons of the aromatic ring on a hydrophobic residue(s) in the basic amino acid transporter protein that is the Mo-MLV ecotropic receptor. Finally, we showed that outside the minimal receptor-binding region at amino acids 2 to 8, there is a region that is essential for postbinding fusion events. PMID:9032341

  8. Structural basis of suppression of host translation termination by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xuhua; Zhu, Yiping; Baker, Stacey L.; Bowler, Matthew W.; Chen, Benjamin Jieming; Chen, Chen; Hogg, J. Robert; Goff, Stephen P.; Song, Haiwei

    2016-06-01

    Retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is expressed in the form of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein by suppression of translational termination in which the maximal efficiency of stop codon read-through depends on the interaction between MoMLV RT and peptidyl release factor 1 (eRF1). Here, we report the crystal structure of MoMLV RT in complex with eRF1. The MoMLV RT interacts with the C-terminal domain of eRF1 via its RNase H domain to sterically occlude the binding of peptidyl release factor 3 (eRF3) to eRF1. Promotion of read-through by MoMLV RNase H prevents nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) of mRNAs. Comparison of our structure with that of HIV RT explains why HIV RT cannot interact with eRF1. Our results provide a mechanistic view of how MoMLV manipulates the host translation termination machinery for the synthesis of its own proteins.

  9. Association of feline leukemia virus with lymphosarcoma and other disorders in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, S M; Hardy, W D; Essex, M

    1975-03-01

    Two hundred fifty Boston cats with disorders such as lymphosarcoma, myeloproliferative disease, anemia, glomerulonephritis, pregnancy abnormalities, feline infectious peritonitis, toxoplasmosis, and various bacterial infections were examined for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) by immunofluorescence. Antibody titers against feline oncornavirus-associated cell membrane antigen (FOCMA) were tested in 133 of these cats. The tests for FeLV and FOCMA antibody were also conducted among healthy cats not known to have been exposed to FeLV, as well as among healthy cats from households where FeLV was known to be present. Most of the cats with lymphosarcoma and the other aforementioned disorders were infected with FeLV and low FOCMA antibody titers. Healthy cats known to have been exposed to FeLV were often viremic, but those that remained healthy were able to develop high FOCMA antibody titers. Healthy cats without known prior exposure to FeLV were unlikely to be viremic but often had detectable FOCMA antibody titers, indicating that some exposure occurs under natural conditions in the Boston area. The association of FeLV with infections other than lymphosarcoma was assumed to be caused by the immunosuppresive effect of FeLV, thus allowing development of disease. PMID:163223

  10. Mutagenesis analysis of the murine leukemia virus matrix protein: identification of regions important for membrane localization and intracellular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soneoka, Y; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1997-07-01

    We have created two sets of substitution mutations in the Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) matrix protein in order to identify domains involved in association with the plasma membrane and in incorporation of the viral envelope glycoproteins into virus particles. The first set of mutations was targeted at putative membrane-associating regions similar to those of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 matrix protein, which include a polybasic region at the N terminus of the Mo-MuLV matrix protein and two regions predicted to form beta strands. The second set of mutations was created within hydrophobic residues to test for the production of virus particles lacking envelope proteins, with the speculation of an involvement of the membrane-spanning region of the envelope protein in incorporation into virus particles. We have found that mutation of the N-terminal polybasic region redirected virus assembly to the cytoplasm, and we show that tryptophan residues may also play a significant role in the intracellular transport of the matrix protein. In total, 21 mutants of the Mo-MuLV matrix protein were produced, but we did not observe any mutant virus particles lacking the envelope glycoproteins, suggesting that a direct interaction between the Mo-MuLV matrix protein and envelope proteins either may not exist or may occur through multiple redundant interactions. PMID:9188629

  11. VIRUS VACCINE RESEARCH AT THE NATIONAL ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER: LESSONS FROM SWINE INFLUENZA VIRUS AND BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The continuing emergence of novel subtypes and genetic variants of swine influenza viruses (SIV) causing swine flu challenges our ability to effectively manage this high morbidity disease among swine. New strategic approaches for vaccine development must be considered to keep up with the ever-evolv...

  12. Homology modelling and analysis of structure predictions of the bovine rhinitis B virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine Rhinitis B Viruses (BRBV) are picornaviruses responsible for mild respiratory infection of cattle and probably the least characterized member of the Aphthoviruses. BRBV is the closest relative known to Foot and Mouth Disease virus (FMDV) with around a 43 percent identical polyprotein sequenc...

  13. Identification of amino acid changes in the envelope glycoproteins of bovine viral diarrhea viruses isolated from alpaca that may be involved in host adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are most commonly associated with infections of cattle. However, BVDV is often isolated from closely related ruminants with a number of BVDV-1b viruses being isolated from alpacas that were both acutely and persistently infected (PI). The complete nucleotide se...

  14. A Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial of Ibuprofen for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in a Bovine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Paul; Behrens, Nicole; Carvallo Chaigneau, Francisco R.; McEligot, Heather; Agrawal, Karan; Newman, John W.; Anderson, Mark; Gershwin, Laurel J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and hospital admission in infants. An analogous disease occurs in cattle and costs US agriculture a billion dollars a year. RSV causes much of its morbidity indirectly via adverse effects of the host response to the virus. RSV is accompanied by elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) which is followed by neutrophil led inflammation in the lung. Ibuprofen is a prototypical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that decreases PGE2 levels by inhibiting cyclooxygenase. Hypotheses We hypothesized that treatment of RSV with ibuprofen would decrease PGE2 levels, modulate the immune response, decrease clinical illness, and decrease the histopathological lung changes in a bovine model of RSV. We further hypothesized that viral replication would be unaffected. Methods We performed a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen in 16 outbred Holstein calves that we infected with RSV. We measured clinical scores, cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and endocannabinoid products in plasma and mediastinal lymph nodes and interleukin (Il)-4, Il-13, Il-17 and interferon-γ in mediastinal lymph nodes. RSV shedding was measured daily and nasal Il-6, Il-8 and Il-17 every other day. The calves were necropsied on Day 10 post inoculation and histology performed. Results One calf in the ibuprofen group required euthanasia on Day 8 of infection for respiratory distress. Clinical scores (p<0.01) and weight gain (p = 0.08) seemed better in the ibuprofen group. Ibuprofen decreased cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and cytochrome P450 products, and increased monoacylglycerols in lung lymph nodes. Ibuprofen modulated the immune response as measured by narrowed range of observed Il-13, Il-17 and IFN-γ gene expression in mediastinal lymph nodes. Lung histology was not different between groups, and viral shedding was increased in calves randomized to ibuprofen. Conclusions Ibuprofen decreased PGE2, modulated the immune

  15. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus in Zoos: A Perspective from the Veterinary Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack J Kottwitz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The many different species in close proximity make zoological collections a unique environment for disease transmission. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV is of special concern with zoos due to the numerous exotic ruminant species that this virus can infect. BVDV occurs as both a non-cytopathic and a cytopathic strain both of which are capable of infecting exotic ruminants. The cytopathic strain causes mucosal disease and death. Infection with the non-cytopathic strain may produce persistently infected (PI animals. PI individuals may show vague clinical signs, including abortion. Management of BVDV in zoos should focus on identification of PI individuals and prevention of infection of other animals of the collection. Variability makes serological testing as the sole method of screening for BVDV infection undesirable in exotic ruminants. Combination testing provides a definitive answer, especially in sensitive wildlife. Use of a combination of antigen-capture ELISA (ACE with haired skin, Real Time-PCR (RT-PCR on whole blood, and antibody detection via serum neutralization has the greatest potential to identify PI animals. An animal that is positive on both ACE and RT-PCR, but is negative on serology should be considered highly suspicious of being a PI, and should be isolated and undergo repeat testing 4 to 6 weeks later to confirm positive status. This testing methodology also allows screening of pregnant and newborn animals. Isolation or culling may need to be considered in animals determined to be positive via combination testing. These decisions should only be made after careful consideration and evaluation, especially with endangered species.

  16. Effect of bovine viral diarrhea virus infection on fertility of dairy heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Zanzi, Claudia A; Thurmond, Mark C; Hietala, Sharon K

    2004-04-15

    A prospective field study in heifers from birth to first breeding was undertaken on two commercial dairies to assess the effect of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) congenital and post-natal infection (PNI) on fertility. A high BVDV Type 2 antibody titer (1:4096) at 10 months of age was associated with 32 more days to conceive, compared with a low titer (1:128). Conversely, infection with BVDV by 5-6 months of age and high BVDV Type 2 titers 1 month before conception or breeding was associated with improved fertility. Heifers with evidence of congenital BVDV infection had lower fertility than non-infected heifers (15-42 days longer time-to-first AI), which depended on BVDV Type 2 titers at 10 months of age. Neospora caninum infection was associated with additional services per conception (SPC) and Leptospira interrogans infection was associated with a delay in the time-to-first breeding. It appears that under field conditions, the effect of subclinical BVDV infection on subsequent heifer fertility may be due to a complex of interrelationships among multiple BVDV infections that depend on the type and timing of infection relative to reproductive development and events. PMID:15036997

  17. Herd-level determinants of bovine leukaemia virus prevalence in dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erskine, Ronald J; Bartlett, Paul C; Byrem, Todd M; Render, Chelsea L; Febvay, Catherine; Houseman, Jessica T

    2012-11-01

    The prevalence of bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) was determined in 113 Michigan dairy herds by ELISA testing for anti-BLV antibodies in milk. Additionally, an interview regarding management practices with cooperating herd managers identified farm-level variables thought to be associated with prevalence of BLV. Twenty-three risk factors (P ≤ 0·1) were identified on one-way ANOVA or simple linear regression. Multivariate analysis identified several management practices whose predictive value for increased prevalence of BLV may relate to transmission among herd mates, e.g. reuse of hypodermic needles, lack of fly control, gouge dehorning and increased use of injections in dry cows. Additionally, exclusive breeding of heifers with artificial insemination was associated with decreased BLV prevalence, as compared with at least some use of natural service by a bull. Although intervention studies are needed before causal relationships can be concluded, and unaccounted variables related to transmission exist among dairy herds, these findings suggest management practices that may help dairy producers reduce the transmission of BLV within their herds. PMID:22963749

  18. A New Indicator Cell Line Established to Monitor Bovine Foamy Virus Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-yan Guo; Zhi-bin Liang; Yue Li; Juan Tan; Qi-min Chen; Wen-tao Qiao

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the accuracy for quantitating the bovine foamy virus(BFV)in vitro,we developed a baby hamster kidney cell(BHK)-21-derived indicator cell line containing a plasmid that encodes the firefly luciferase driven by the BFV long terminal repeat promoter(LTR,from -7 to 1012). The BFV titer could be determined by detecting the luciferase expression since the viral trans-activator BTas protein activates the promoter activity of the LTR. One clone,designated BFVL,was selected from ten neomycin-resistant clones.BFVL showed a specific and inducible dose-and time-dependent luciferase activity in response to BFV infection.Although the changes in luciferase activity of BFVL peaked at 84 h post infection,it was possible to differentiate infected and uninfected cells at 48 h post infection. A linear relationship was established between the multiplicity of infection(MOI)of BFV and the activated ratio of luciferase expression in BFVL. Moreover,the sensitivity of the BFVL-based assay for detecting infectious BFV was 10,000 times higher than the conventional CPE-based assay at 48 h post infection. These findings suggest that the BFVL-based assay is rapid,easy,sensitive,quantitative and specific for detection of BFV infection.

  19. Identification and structural analysis of the thymidine kinase gene of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an attempt to understand the gene expression of the infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV), the viral thymidine kinase ge (tk), a well regulated viral gene, has been cloned in Escherichia coli HB101 by integrating partially Sau 3A-digested DNA fragments into a cosmid vector, pJB8. Recombinant cosmids were further analyzed by restriction digestions and by Southern blot hybridization. Results showed that this plasmid library comprised all of the IBRV genome with the exception of both termini. The individual recombinant cosmid clones were then transformed to E. coli tdk- mutant strains, Ky895 or C600 tdk- for the selection of the IBRV tk gene. The physical location of the viral DNA inserts of one of the clones, pIBR5, was determined and sequences complementing the tk activity were isolated by subcloning. The E. coli mutant strain mutant strain C600 tdk- harboring pIBRTK partially restores the tk activity by exhibiting a three and half fold increase in the level of the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into bacterial DNA over that of the C600 tdk- mutant. The plasmid, pIBRTK was also used as a probe to examine the expression of IBRV-tk gene in infected MDBK cells. A species of mRNA from infected cells with molecular weight of 2.2 kb was obtained when the total RNA or polyA-enriched RNA were electrophoresized in agarose gels and hybridized with 32P-pIBRTK DNA

  20. Virulent Properties of Russian Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Strains in Experimentally Infected Calves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koteneva, Svetlana V.; Semenova, Olga V.; Sergeev, Alexander A.; Titova, Ksenya A.; Morozova, Anastasia A.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experimental study of three noncytopathic and two cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strains isolated from cattle in the Siberian region and belonging to the type 1 (subtypes 1a, 1b, and 1d) have been presented. All investigated strains caused the development of infectious process in the seronegative 4–6-month-old calves after aerosol challenge with the dose of 6 log10 TCID50. The greatest virulence had noncytopathic strain and cytopathic strain related to the subtypes 1d and 1b, respectively. All strains in infected calves caused some signs of moderate acute respiratory disease and diarrhea: depression 3–5 days postinfection (p.i.), refusal to food, severe hyperthermia to 41.9°С, serous exudate discharges from the nasal cavity and eyes, transient diarrhea with blood, leukopenia (up to 2700 cells/mm3), and macroscopic changes in the respiratory organs and intestine. The infected animals recovered from 12 to 15 days p.i. and in 90% cases formed humoral immune response 25 days p.i. (antibody titers to BVDV: 1 : 4–1 : 16). Our results confirmed the presence of virulent BVDV1 strains and showed the need for researches on the molecular epidemiology of the disease, development of more effective diagnostic systems, and optimization of control programs with use of vaccines. PMID:27190687