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Sample records for boundary stiffness regulates

  1. On the elastic stiffness of grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elastic softening of grain boundaries is evaluated from the starting point of grain boundary energy. Several examples are given to illustrate the relationship between boundary energy and the extent of softening. In general, a high grain boundary energy is associated with a large excess atomic volume in the boundary region. The consequent reduction in grain boundary stiffness can represent a significant fraction of that observed in bulk crystals. (orig.)

  2. Impact Analysis of Geometric Characteristics and Boundary Conditions on the Stiffness of Sheet Metal Parts

    OpenAIRE

    Huaying WU; Lu, Bingheng; Guo, Cheng; Wang, Yongxin

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the traditional stiffness characterization of sheet metal, examined the impact sensitivity of general cover panel geometry to the sheet metal stiffness, and determines the main factors affecting it. The sheet metal stiffness was characterized using both material and geometry properties. Extensive study was conducted on the effects of boundary constraints to the sheet metal stiffness, along with analysis of same range center stiffness variations due to different size bou...

  3. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation through MAPK Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ha Hwang

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC differentiation is regulated by the extracellular matrix (ECM through activation of intracellular signaling mediators. The stiffness of the ECM was shown to be an important regulatory factor for MSC differentiation, and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ was identified as an effector protein for MSC differentiation. However, the detailed underlying mechanism regarding the role of ECM stiffness and TAZ in MSC differentiation is not yet fully understood. In this report, we showed that ECM stiffness regulates MSC fate through ERK or JNK activation. Specifically, a stiff hydrogel matrix stimulates osteogenic differentiation concomitant with increased nuclear localization of TAZ, but inhibits adipogenic differentiation. ERK and JNK activity was significantly increased in cells cultured on a stiff hydrogel. TAZ activation was induced by ERK or JNK activation on a stiff hydrogel because exposure to an ERK or JNK inhibitor significantly decreased the nuclear localization of TAZ, indicating that ECM stiffness-induced ERK or JNK activation is important for TAZ-driven osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that ECM stiffness regulates MSC differentiation through ERK or JNK activation.

  4. Mechanism of regulation of stem cell differentiation by matrix stiffness

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, Hongwei; Li, Lisha; Sun, Meiyu; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Li; Rong, Yue; Li, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell behaviors are regulated by multiple microenvironmental cues. As an external signal, mechanical stiffness of the extracellular matrix is capable of governing stem cell fate determination, but how this biophysical cue is translated into intracellular signaling remains elusive. Here, we elucidate mechanisms by which stem cells respond to microenvironmental stiffness through the dynamics of the cytoskeletal network, leading to changes in gene expression via biophysical transduction sign...

  5. Matrix stiffness regulates endothelial cell proliferation through septin 9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ting Yeh

    Full Text Available Endothelial proliferation, which is an important process in vascular homeostasis, can be regulated by the extracellular microenvironment. In this study we demonstrated that proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs was enhanced on hydrogels with high stiffness (HSG, 21.5 kPa in comparison to those with low stiffness (LSG, 1.72 kPa. ECs on HSG showed markedly prominent stress fibers and a higher RhoA activity than ECs on LSG. Blockade of RhoA attenuated stress fiber formation and proliferation of ECs on HSG, but had little effect on ECs on LSG; enhancement of RhoA had opposite effects. The phosphorylations of Src and Vav2, which are positive RhoA upstream effectors, were higher in ECs on HSG. The inhibition of Src/Vav2 attenuated the HSG-mediated RhoA activation and EC proliferation but exhibited nominal effects on ECs on LSG. Septin 9 (SEPT9, the negative upstream effector for RhoA, was significantly higher in ECs on LSG. The inhibition of SEPT9 increased RhoA activation, Src/Vav2 phosphorylations, and EC proliferation on LSG, but showed minor effects on ECs on HSG. We further demonstrated that the inactivation of integrin α(vβ(3 caused an increase of SEPT9 expression in ECs on HSG to attenuate Src/Vav2 phosphorylations and inhibit RhoA-dependent EC proliferation. These results demonstrate that the SEPT9/Src/Vav2/RhoA pathway constitutes an important molecular mechanism for the mechanical regulation of EC proliferation.

  6. Stiffness in 1D Matrix Product States with periodic boundary conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Rossini, Davide; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Fazio, Rosario

    2011-01-01

    We discuss in details a modified variational matrix-product-state algorithm for periodic boundary conditions, based on a recent work by P. Pippan, S.R. White and H.G. Everts, Phys. Rev. B 81, 081103(R) (2010), which enables one to study large systems on a ring (composed of N ~ 10^2 sites). In particular, we introduce a couple of improvements that allow to enhance the algorithm in terms of stability and reliability. We employ such method to compute the stiffness of one-dimensional strongly cor...

  7. The Application of the Unified Homogeneous Periodical Boundary Conditions to the Prediction of Effective Elastic Stiffness in a Widespread Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dong; Yang, Hong; Luo, Dong-Mei

    2011-06-01

    Periodical boundary conditions (PBC) are important for the prediction of effective elastic stiffness of composites by applying the macro-microscopic asymptotic expansion homogenization method (HM). In this paper, two kinds of homogeneous periodical boundary conditions are proposed to satisfy the improved expression for the homogenized effective stiffness with the homogeneous characteristic function, and one is the relaxed periodical boundary condition, and the other is a precise polynomial derived from the first one. A typical example of the off-axis short-fiber reinforced composites is analyzed by the described procedure. The results show that the periodical boundary condition is not unique, and the relaxed periodic boundary condition is the simplest and most convenient method to guarantee periodical displacement and anti-periodical traction boundary conditions simultaneously in a widespread field with a unified form.

  8. On Stiffness Regulators with Dissipative Injection for Robot Manipulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Chávez-Olivares

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The stiffness controller proposed by Salisbury is an interaction control strategy designed to achieve a desired form of static behavior as regards the interaction of a robot manipulator with the environment. The main idea behind this approach is the simulation of a multidimensional linear spring - or linear elastic material - using the difference between the actual position of the end-effector and a constant position (relaxed point, multiplied by a constant stiffness matrix. In this paper, this idea is generalized with the objective of proposing a controller structure that includes a family of stiffness models based on the idea of linear elastic materials. The new controller structure also includes a damping term in order to have control over energy dissipation, as well as a term added for the purpose of compensating the gravity forces of the links. The stability analysis of the proposed controller was performed in the Lyapunov sense. The new stiffness controller is presented as a case study and compared to other cases, such as the Salisbury controller (Cartesian PD and the tanh-tanh controller. Experimental results using a three degrees-of-freedom direct-drive robot for the evaluation of controllers in a constrained motion task are presented.

  9. On the Influence of Force Distribution and Boundary Condition on Helical Gear Stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Leergaard Pedersen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The gear stiffness has a direct influence on the dynamic response of transmission systems that include a gear box, the stiffness also controls the load distribution among the teeth in mesh. The stiffness of a gear tooth varies non-linearly as the contact line with the meshing gear tooth moves along the surface of the tooth and the resulting meshing stiffness also includes discontinuities. The stiffness estimation for helical gears can only be done using full 3D analysis contrary to spur gears where 2D often suffice. Besides the usual gear geometry defined by standards two factors are found to have a large influence on the stiffness. These two factors are the rim thickness included in the stiffness calculation and the contact zone size. In the contact zone the distribution of the load is also shown to be important. Simple possible simplifications in relation to the contact load distribution are presented. The gear stiffness is found using the elastic energy of the loaded tooth. In the finite element calculation the true gear tooth root profile is applied.

  10. Chain stiffness regulates entropy-templated perfect mixing at single-nanoparticle level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zihan; Lu, Ce; Dong, Bojun; Xu, Guoxi; Ji, Chengcheng; Zhao, Kongyin; Yan, Li-Tang

    2015-12-01

    The mixing on a single-particle level of chemically incompatible nanoparticles is an outstanding challenge for many applications. Burgeoning research activity suggests that entropic templating is a potential strategy to address this issue. Herein, using systematic computer simulations of model nanoparticle systems, we show that the entropy-templated interfacial organization of nanoparticles significantly depends on the stiffness of tethered chains. Unexpectedly, the optimal chain stiffness can be identified wherein a system exhibits the most perfect mixing for a certain compression ratio. Our simulations demonstrate that entropic templating regulated by chain stiffness precisely reflects various entropic repulsion states that arise from typical conformation regimes of semiflexible chains. The physical mechanism of the chain stiffness effect is revealed by analyzing the entropic repulsion states of tethered chains and quantitatively estimating the resulting entropy penalties, which provides direct evidence that supports the key role of entropic transition in the entropic templating strategy, as suggested in experiments. Moreover, the model nanoparticle systems are found to evolve into binary nanoparticle superlattices by remixing at extremely high stiffness. The findings facilitate the wide application of the entropic templating strategy in creating interfacially reactive nanomaterials with ordered structures on the single-nanoparticle level as well as mechanomutable responses.The mixing on a single-particle level of chemically incompatible nanoparticles is an outstanding challenge for many applications. Burgeoning research activity suggests that entropic templating is a potential strategy to address this issue. Herein, using systematic computer simulations of model nanoparticle systems, we show that the entropy-templated interfacial organization of nanoparticles significantly depends on the stiffness of tethered chains. Unexpectedly, the optimal chain stiffness can

  11. On the Influence of Force Distribution and Boundary Condition on Helical Gear Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2015-01-01

    the surface of the tooth and the resulting meshing stiness also includes discontinuities.The stiffness estimation for helical gears can only be done using full 3D analysis contrary to spur gears where 2D often suce. Besides the usual gear geometry dened by standards two factors are found to have a...... large influence on the stiffness. These two factors are the rim thickness included in the stiffness calculation and the contact zone size. In the contact zone the distribution of the load is also shown to be important. Simple possible simplications in relation to the contact load distribution are...... presented. The gear stiffness is found using the elastic energy of the loaded tooth. In the nite element calculation the true gear tooth root profile is applied....

  12. Use of self-selected postures to regulate multi-joint stiffness during unconstrained tasks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy D Trumbower

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human motor system is highly redundant, having more kinematic degrees of freedom than necessary to complete a given task. Understanding how kinematic redundancies are utilized in different tasks remains a fundamental question in motor control. One possibility is that they can be used to tune the mechanical properties of a limb to the specific requirements of a task. For example, many tasks such as tool usage compromise arm stability along specific directions. These tasks only can be completed if the nervous system adapts the mechanical properties of the arm such that the arm, coupled to the tool, remains stable. The purpose of this study was to determine if posture selection is a critical component of endpoint stiffness regulation during unconstrained tasks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three-dimensional (3D estimates of endpoint stiffness were used to quantify limb mechanics. Most previous studies examining endpoint stiffness adaptation were completed in 2D using constrained postures to maintain a non-redundant mapping between joint angles and hand location. Our hypothesis was that during unconstrained conditions, subjects would select arm postures that matched endpoint stiffness to the functional requirements of the task. The hypothesis was tested during endpoint tracking tasks in which subjects interacted with unstable haptic environments, simulated using a 3D robotic manipulator. We found that arm posture had a significant effect on endpoint tracking accuracy and that subjects selected postures that improved tracking performance. For environments in which arm posture had a large effect on tracking accuracy, the self-selected postures oriented the direction of maximal endpoint stiffness towards the direction of the unstable haptic environment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate how changes in arm posture can have a dramatic effect on task performance and suggest that postural selection is a fundamental

  13. Cell motility regulation on a stepped micro pillar array device (SMPAD) with a discrete stiffness gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sujin; Hong, Juhee; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-02-28

    Our tissues consist of individual cells that respond to the elasticity of their environment, which varies between and within tissues. To better understand mechanically driven cell migration, it is necessary to manipulate the stiffness gradient across a substrate. Here, we have demonstrated a new variant of the microfabricated polymeric pillar array platform that can decouple the stiffness gradient from the ECM protein area. This goal is achieved via a "stepped" micro pillar array device (SMPAD) in which the contact area with the cell was kept constant while the diameter of the pillar bodies was altered to attain the proper mechanical stiffness. Using double-step SU-8 mold fabrication, the diameter of the top of every pillar was kept uniform, whereas that of the bottom was changed, to achieve the desired substrate rigidity. Fibronectin was immobilized on the pillar tops, providing a focal adhesion site for cells. C2C12, HeLa and NIH3T3 cells were cultured on the SMPAD, and the motion of the cells was observed by time-lapse microscopy. Using this simple platform, which produces a purely physical stimulus, we observed that various types of cell behavior are affected by the mechanical stimulus of the environment. We also demonstrated directed cell migration guided by a discrete rigidity gradient by varying stiffness. Interestingly, cell velocity was highest at the highest stiffness. Our approach enables the regulation of the mechanical properties of the polymeric pillar array device and eliminates the effects of the size of the contact area. This technique is a unique tool for studying cellular motion and behavior relative to various stiffness gradients in the environment. PMID:26787193

  14. Regulation of astrocyte activity via control over stiffness of cellulose acetate electrospun nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seul Ki; Jung, Sang Myung; Ju, Jung Hyeon; Kwon, Yeo Seon; Yoon, Gwang Heum; Shin, Hwa Sung

    2015-10-01

    Astrocytes are involved in neuron protection following central nervous system (CNS) injury; accordingly, engineered astrocytes have been investigated for their usefulness in cell therapy for CNS injury. Nanofibers have attracted a great deal of attention in neural tissue engineering, but their mechanical properties greatly influence physiology. Cellulose acetate (CA) has been studied for use in scaffolds owing to its biocompatibility, biodegradability, and good thermal stability. In this study, stiffness of CA nanofibers controlled by heat treatment was shown to regulate astrocyte activity. Adhesion and viability increased in culture as substrate became stiffer but showed saturation at greater than 2 MPa of tensile strength. Astrocytes became more active in terms of increasing intermediate filament glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The results of this study demonstrate the effects of stiffness alone on cellular behaviors in a three-dimensional culture and highlight the efficacy of heat-treated CA for astrocyte culture in that the simple treatment enables control of astrocyte activity. PMID:26091629

  15. Estimating Gear Teeth Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2013-01-01

    The estimation of gear stiffness is important for determining the load distribution between the gear teeth when two sets of teeth are in contact. Two factors have a major influence on the stiffness; firstly the boundary condition through the gear rim size included in the stiffness calculation and...

  16. Substrate Stiffness Regulates the Development of Left-Right Asymmetry in Cell Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuanye; Huang, Yaozhun; Lam, Miu Ling; Xu, Ting; Zhu, Ninghao; Guo, Zhaobin; Cui, Xin; Lam, Raymond H W; Chen, Ting-Hsuan

    2016-07-20

    Left-right (LR) asymmetry of tissue/organ structure is a morphological feature essential for many tissue functions. The ability to incorporate the LR formation in constructing tissue/organ replacement is important for recapturing the inherent tissue structure and functions. However, how LR asymmetry is formed remains largely underdetermined, which creates significant hurdles to reproduce and regulate the formation of LR asymmetry in an engineering context. Here, we report substrate rigidity functioning as an effective switch that turns on the development of LR asymmetry. Using micropatterned cell-adherent stripes on rigid substrates, we found that cells collectively oriented at a LR-biased angle relative to the stripe boundary. This LR asymmetry was initiated by a LR-biased migration of cells at stripe boundary, which later generated a velocity gradient propagating from stripe boundary to the center. After a series of cell translocations and rotations, ultimately, an LR-biased cell orientation within the micropatterned stripe was formed. Importantly, this initiation and propagation of LR asymmetry was observed only on rigid but not on soft substrates, suggesting that the LR asymmetry was regulated by rigid substrate probably through the organization of actin cytoskeleton. Together, we demonstrated substrate rigidity as a determinant factor that mediates the self-organizing LR asymmetry being unfolded from single cells to multicellular organization. More broadly, we anticipate that our findings would pave the way for rebuilding artificial tissue constructs with inherent LR asymmetry in the future. PMID:27359036

  17. Substrate stiffness and oxygen as regulators of stem cell differentiation during skeletal tissue regeneration: a mechanobiological model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Paul Burke

    Full Text Available Extrinsic mechanical signals have been implicated as key regulators of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC differentiation. It has been possible to test different hypotheses for mechano-regulated MSC differentiation by attempting to simulate regenerative events such as bone fracture repair, where repeatable spatial and temporal patterns of tissue differentiation occur. More recently, in vitro studies have identified other environmental cues such as substrate stiffness and oxygen tension as key regulators of MSC differentiation; however it remains unclear if and how such cues determine stem cell fate in vivo. As part of this study, a computational model was developed to test the hypothesis that substrate stiffness and oxygen tension regulate stem cell differentiation during fracture healing. Rather than assuming mechanical signals act directly on stem cells to determine their differentiation pathway, it is postulated that they act indirectly to regulate angiogenesis and hence partially determine the local oxygen environment within a regenerating tissue. Chondrogenesis of MSCs was hypothesized to occur in low oxygen regions, while in well vascularised regions of the regenerating tissue a soft local substrate was hypothesised to facilitate adipogenesis while a stiff substrate facilitated osteogenesis. Predictions from the model were compared to both experimental data and to predictions of a well established computational mechanobiological model where tissue differentiation is assumed to be regulated directly by the local mechanical environment. The model predicted all the major events of fracture repair, including cartilaginous bridging, endosteal and periosteal bony bridging and bone remodelling. It therefore provides support for the hypothesis that substrate stiffness and oxygen play a key role in regulating MSC fate during regenerative events such as fracture healing.

  18. Triceps surae short latency stretch reflexes contribute to ankle stiffness regulation during human running.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil J Cronin

    Full Text Available During human running, short latency stretch reflexes (SLRs are elicited in the triceps surae muscles, but the function of these responses is still a matter of controversy. As the SLR is primarily mediated by Ia afferent nerve fibres, various methods have been used to examine SLR function by selectively blocking the Ia pathway in seated, standing and walking paradigms, but stretch reflex function has not been examined in detail during running. The purpose of this study was to examine triceps surae SLR function at different running speeds using Achilles tendon vibration to modify SLR size. Ten healthy participants ran on an instrumented treadmill at speeds between 7 and 15 km/h under 2 Achilles tendon vibration conditions: no vibration and 90 Hz vibration. Surface EMG from the triceps surae and tibialis anterior muscles, and 3D lower limb kinematics and ground reaction forces were simultaneously collected. In response to vibration, the SLR was depressed in the triceps surae muscles at all speeds. This coincided with short-lasting yielding at the ankle joint at speeds between 7 and 12 km/h, suggesting that the SLR contributes to muscle stiffness regulation by minimising ankle yielding during the early contact phase of running. Furthermore, at the fastest speed of 15 km/h, the SLR was still depressed by vibration in all muscles but yielding was no longer evident. This finding suggests that the SLR has greater functional importance at slow to intermediate running speeds than at faster speeds.

  19. Modeling and simulating the neuromuscular mechanisms regulating ankle and knee joint stiffness during human locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Massimo; Maculan, Marco; Pizzolato, Claudio; Reggiani, Monica; Farina, Dario

    2015-10-01

    This work presents an electrophysiologically and dynamically consistent musculoskeletal model to predict stiffness in the human ankle and knee joints as derived from the joints constituent biological tissues (i.e., the spanning musculotendon units). The modeling method we propose uses electromyography (EMG) recordings from 13 muscle groups to drive forward dynamic simulations of the human leg in five healthy subjects during overground walking and running. The EMG-driven musculoskeletal model estimates musculotendon and resulting joint stiffness that is consistent with experimental EMG data as well as with the experimental joint moments. This provides a framework that allows for the first time observing 1) the elastic interplay between the knee and ankle joints, 2) the individual muscle contribution to joint stiffness, and 3) the underlying co-contraction strategies. It provides a theoretical description of how stiffness modulates as a function of muscle activation, fiber contraction, and interacting tendon dynamics. Furthermore, it describes how this differs from currently available stiffness definitions, including quasi-stiffness and short-range stiffness. This work offers a theoretical and computational basis for describing and investigating the neuromuscular mechanisms underlying human locomotion. PMID:26245321

  20. Experimental and computational assessment of F-actin influence in regulating cellular stiffness and relaxation behaviour of fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallqvist, Björn; Fielden, Matthew L; Pettersson, Torbjörn; Nordgren, Niklas; Kroon, Martin; Gad, Annica K B

    2016-06-01

    In biomechanics, a complete understanding of the structures and mechanisms that regulate cellular stiffness at a molecular level remain elusive. In this paper, we have elucidated the role of filamentous actin (F-actin) in regulating elastic and viscous properties of the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Specifically, we performed colloidal-probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) on BjhTERT fibroblast cells incubated with Latrunculin B (LatB), which results in depolymerisation of F-actin, or DMSO control. We found that the treatment with LatB not only reduced cellular stiffness, but also greatly increased the relaxation rate for the cytoplasm in the peripheral region and in the vicinity of the nucleus. We thus conclude that F-actin is a major determinant in not only providing elastic stiffness to the cell, but also in regulating its viscous behaviour. To further investigate the interdependence of different cytoskeletal networks and cell shape, we provided a computational model in a finite element framework. The computational model is based on a split strain energy function of separate cellular constituents, here assumed to be cytoskeletal components, for which a composite strain energy function was defined. We found a significant influence of cell geometry on the predicted mechanical response. Importantly, the relaxation behaviour of the cell can be characterised by a material model with two time constants that have previously been found to predict mechanical behaviour of actin and intermediate filament networks. By merely tuning two effective stiffness parameters, the model predicts experimental results in cells with a partly depolymerised actin cytoskeleton as well as in untreated control. This indicates that actin and intermediate filament networks are instrumental in providing elastic stiffness in response to applied forces, as well as governing the relaxation behaviour over shorter and longer time-scales, respectively. PMID:26766328

  1. Estimating Gear Teeth Stiffness

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2013-01-01

    The estimation of gear stiffness is important for determining the load distribution between the gear teeth when two sets of teeth are in contact. Two factors have a major influence on the stiffness; firstly the boundary condition through the gear rim size included in the stiffness calculation and secondly the size of the contact. In the FE calculation the true gear tooth root profile is applied. The meshing stiffness’s of gears are highly non-linear, it is however found that the stiffness of ...

  2. Uncertainty quantification of inflow boundary condition and proximal arterial stiffness coupled effect on pulse wave propagation in a vascular network

    CERN Document Server

    Brault, A; Lucor, D

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY This work aims at quantifying the effect of inherent uncertainties from cardiac output on the sensitivity of a human compliant arterial network response based on stochastic simulations of a reduced-order pulse wave propagation model. A simple pulsatile output form is utilized to reproduce the most relevant cardiac features with a minimum number of parameters associated with left ventricle dynamics. Another source of critical uncertainty is the spatial heterogeneity of the aortic compliance which plays a key role in the propagation and damping of pulse waves generated at each cardiac cycle. A continuous representation of the aortic stiffness in the form of a generic random field of prescribed spatial correlation is then considered. Resorting to a stochastic sparse pseudospectral method, we investigate the spatial sensitivity of the pulse pressure and waves reflection magnitude with respect to the different model uncertainties. Results indicate that uncertainties related to the shape and magnitude of th...

  3. On gear tooth stiffness evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard; Jørgensen, Martin Felix

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of gear stiffness is important for determining the load distribution between the gear teeth when two sets of teeth are in contact. Two factors have a major influence on the stiffness; firstly the boundary condition through the gear rim size included in the stiffness calculation and...... secondly the size of the contact. In the FE calculation the true gear tooth root profile is applied. The meshing stiffnesses of gears are highly non-linear, it is however found that the stiffness of an individual tooth can be expressed in a linear form assuming that the contact width is constant. © 2014...

  4. Aortic and carotid arterial stiffness and epigenetic regulator gene expression changes precede blood pressure rise in stroke-prone Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L Herrera

    Full Text Available Multiple clinical studies show that arterial stiffness, measured as pulse wave velocity (PWV, precedes hypertension and is an independent predictor of hypertension end organ diseases including stroke, cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. Risk factor studies for arterial stiffness implicate age, hypertension and sodium. However, causal mechanisms linking risk factor to arterial stiffness remain to be elucidated. Here, we studied the causal relationship of arterial stiffness and hypertension in the Na-induced, stroke-prone Dahl salt-sensitive (S hypertensive rat model, and analyzed putative molecular mechanisms. Stroke-prone and non-stroke-prone male and female rats were studied at 3- and 6-weeks of age for arterial stiffness (PWV, strain, blood pressure, vessel wall histology, and gene expression changes. Studies showed that increased left carotid and aortic arterial stiffness preceded hypertension, pulse pressure widening, and structural wall changes at the 6-week time-point. Instead, differential gene induction was detected implicating molecular-functional changes in extracellular matrix (ECM structural constituents, modifiers, cell adhesion, and matricellular proteins, as well as in endothelial function, apoptosis balance, and epigenetic regulators. Immunostaining testing histone modifiers Ep300, HDAC3, and PRMT5 levels confirmed carotid artery-upregulation in all three layers: endothelial, smooth muscle and adventitial cells. Our study recapitulates observations in humans that given salt-sensitivity, increased Na-intake induced arterial stiffness before hypertension, increased pulse pressure, and structural vessel wall changes. Differential gene expression changes associated with arterial stiffness suggest a molecular mechanism linking sodium to full-vessel wall response affecting gene-networks involved in vascular ECM structure-function, apoptosis balance, and epigenetic regulation.

  5. Non-viral gene delivery regulated by stiffness of cell adhesion substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Hyun Joon; Liu, Jodi; Riddle, Kathryn; Matsumoto, Takuya; Leach, Kent; Mooney, David J.

    2005-06-01

    Non-viral gene vectors are commonly used for gene therapy owing to safety concerns with viral vectors. However, non-viral vectors are plagued by low levels of gene transfection and cellular expression. Current efforts to improve the efficiency of non-viral gene delivery are focused on manipulations of the delivery vector, whereas the influence of the cellular environment in DNA uptake is often ignored. The mechanical properties (for example, rigidity) of the substrate to which a cell adheres have been found to mediate many aspects of cell function including proliferation, migration and differentiation, and this suggests that the mechanics of the adhesion substrate may regulate a cell's ability to uptake exogeneous signalling molecules. In this report, we present a critical role for the rigidity of the cell adhesion substrate on the level of gene transfer and expression. The mechanism relates to material control over cell proliferation, and was investigated using a fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. This study provides a new material-based control point for non-viral gene therapy.

  6. Finger Stiffness

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterhoff, Thijs C.H.; Nota, Sjoerd P. F. T.; Ring, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Finger stiffness varies substantially in patients with hand and upper extremity illness and can be notably more than expected for a given pathophysiology. In prior studies, pain intensity and magnitude of disability consistently correlate with coping strategies such as catastrophic thinking and kinesiophobia, which can be characterized as overprotectiveness. In this retrospective study we address the primary research question whether patients with finger stiffness are more often ov...

  7. Finger Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhoff, Thijs C H; Nota, Sjoerd P F T; Ring, David

    2015-06-01

    Background Finger stiffness varies substantially in patients with hand and upper extremity illness and can be notably more than expected for a given pathophysiology. In prior studies, pain intensity and magnitude of disability consistently correlate with coping strategies such as catastrophic thinking and kinesiophobia, which can be characterized as overprotectiveness. In this retrospective study we address the primary research question whether patients with finger stiffness are more often overprotective when the primary pathology is outside the hand (e.g. distal radius fracture) than when it is located within the hand. Methods In an orthopaedic hand surgery department 160 patients diagnosed with more finger stiffness than expected for a given pathophysiology or time point of recovery between December 2006 and September 2012 were analyzed to compare the proportion of patients characterized as overprotective for differences by site of pathology: (1) inside the hand, (2) outside the hand, and (3) psychiatric etiology (e.g. clenched fist). Results Among 160 subjects with more finger stiffness than expected, 132 (82 %) were characterized as overprotective including 88 of 108 (81 %) with pathology in the hand, 39 of 44 (89 %) with pathology outside the hand, and 5 of 8 (63 %) with psychiatric etiology. These differences were not significant. Conclusions Overprotectiveness is common in patients with more finger stiffness than expected regardless the site and type of primary pathology. It seems worthwhile to recognize and treat maladaptive coping strategies early during recovery to limit impairment, symptoms, and disability. PMID:26078497

  8. A Negative Regulatory Mechanism Involving 14-3-3ζ Limits Signaling Downstream of ROCK to Regulate Tissue Stiffness in Epidermal Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kular, Jasreen; Scheer, Kaitlin G; Pyne, Natasha T;

    2015-01-01

    ROCK signaling causes epidermal hyper-proliferation by increasing ECM production, elevating dermal stiffness, and enhancing Fak-mediated mechano-transduction signaling. Elevated dermal stiffness in turn causes ROCK activation, establishing mechano-reciprocity, a positive feedback loop that can pr...

  9. Dynamic stiffness of suction caissons - vertical vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Liingaard, M.; Andersen, Lars

    2006-12-15

    The dynamic response of offshore wind turbines are affected by the properties of the foundation and the subsoil. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the dynamic soil-structure interaction of suction caissons for offshore wind turbines. The investigation is limited to a determination of the vertical dynamic stiffness of suction caissons. The soil surrounding the foundation is homogenous with linear viscoelastic properties. The dynamic stiffness of the suction caisson is expressed by dimensionless frequency-dependent dynamic stiffness coefficients corresponding to the vertical degree of freedom. The dynamic stiffness coefficients for the foundations are evaluated by means of a dynamic three-dimensional coupled Boundary Element/Finite Element model. Comparisons are made with known analytical and numerical solutions in order to evaluate the static and dynamic behaviour of the Boundary Element/Finite Element model. The vertical frequency dependent stiffness has been determined for different combinations of the skirt length, Poisson's ratio and the ratio between soil stiffness and skirt stiffness. Finally the dynamic behaviour at high frequencies is investigated. (au)

  10. Instantons near a tachyonic top in an anti de Sitter and the no-boundary regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; Ro, Daeho; Yeom, Dong-han

    2015-08-01

    We investigate instantons near a tachyonic top in an anti de Sitter (AdS) background. If the mass scale around the hill-top is above the Breitenlohner-Freedman (BF) bound, then the top is classically stable. When the BF bound is satisfied, it is already known that there can exist instantons with a non-zero probability, though fine-tunings of the potential are required. On the other hand, we may consider a possibility to obtain instantons with a non-zero probability for a more natural shape of potentials. We found that the no-boundary regulator is useful to assign a non-zero probability for general instantons near the tachyonic top with a consistent framework. To use the no-boundary regulator, we need to introduce the complexification of fields. One interesting feature is that, for these AdS instantons, the classicality may not be satisfied after the Wick rotation and hence after the nucleation. This magnifies a novel difference between dS and AdS; a semi-classical boundary observer in AdS may notice the dispersion of quantum fields as a kind of uncertainty, while every semi-classical observer in dS is classicalized individually and hence there is no semi-classical observer who can see the quantum dispersion of the scalar field.

  11. Chromatin boundary elements organize genomic architecture and developmental gene regulation in Drosophila Hox clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhibo; Li, Mo; Roy, Sharmila; Liu, Kevin J; Romine, Matthew L; Lane, Derrick C; Patel, Sapna K; Cai, Haini N

    2016-08-26

    The three-dimensional (3D) organization of the eukaryotic genome is critical for its proper function. Evidence suggests that extensive chromatin loops form the building blocks of the genomic architecture, separating genes and gene clusters into distinct functional domains. These loops are anchored in part by a special type of DNA elements called chromatin boundary elements (CBEs). CBEs were originally found to insulate neighboring genes by blocking influences of transcriptional enhancers or the spread of silent chromatin. However, recent results show that chromatin loops can also play a positive role in gene regulation by looping out intervening DNA and "delivering" remote enhancers to gene promoters. In addition, studies from human and model organisms indicate that the configuration of chromatin loops, many of which are tethered by CBEs, is dynamically regulated during cell differentiation. In particular, a recent work by Li et al has shown that the SF1 boundary, located in the Drosophila Hox cluster, regulates local genes by tethering different subsets of chromatin loops: One subset enclose a neighboring gene ftz, limiting its access by the surrounding Scr enhancers and restrict the spread of repressive histones during early embryogenesis; and the other loops subdivide the Scr regulatory region into independent domains of enhancer accessibility. The enhancer-blocking activity of these CBE elements varies greatly in strength and tissue distribution. Further, tandem pairing of SF1 and SF2 facilitate the bypass of distal enhancers in transgenic flies, providing a mechanism for endogenous enhancers to circumvent genomic interruptions resulting from chromosomal rearrangement. This study demonstrates how a network of chromatin boundaries, centrally organized by SF1, can remodel the 3D genome to facilitate gene regulation during development. PMID:27621770

  12. Chromatin boundary elements organize genomic architecture and developmental gene regulation in Drosophila Hox clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhibo; Li, Mo; Roy, Sharmila; Liu, Kevin J; Romine, Matthew L; Lane, Derrick C; Patel, Sapna K; Cai, Haini N

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) organization of the eukaryotic genome is critical for its proper function. Evidence suggests that extensive chromatin loops form the building blocks of the genomic architecture, separating genes and gene clusters into distinct functional domains. These loops are anchored in part by a special type of DNA elements called chromatin boundary elements (CBEs). CBEs were originally found to insulate neighboring genes by blocking influences of transcriptional enhancers or the spread of silent chromatin. However, recent results show that chromatin loops can also play a positive role in gene regulation by looping out intervening DNA and “delivering” remote enhancers to gene promoters. In addition, studies from human and model organisms indicate that the configuration of chromatin loops, many of which are tethered by CBEs, is dynamically regulated during cell differentiation. In particular, a recent work by Li et al has shown that the SF1 boundary, located in the Drosophila Hox cluster, regulates local genes by tethering different subsets of chromatin loops: One subset enclose a neighboring gene ftz, limiting its access by the surrounding Scr enhancers and restrict the spread of repressive histones during early embryogenesis; and the other loops subdivide the Scr regulatory region into independent domains of enhancer accessibility. The enhancer-blocking activity of these CBE elements varies greatly in strength and tissue distribution. Further, tandem pairing of SF1 and SF2 facilitate the bypass of distal enhancers in transgenic flies, providing a mechanism for endogenous enhancers to circumvent genomic interruptions resulting from chromosomal rearrangement. This study demonstrates how a network of chromatin boundaries, centrally organized by SF1, can remodel the 3D genome to facilitate gene regulation during development.

  13. Stiff skin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, S; Lei, X; Toyohara, J P; Zhan, P; Wang, J; Tan, S

    2006-07-01

    Stiff skin syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by pronounced skin induration, mild hypertrichosis and limited joint mobility, predominantly on the buttocks and thighs. Many heterogeneous cases have been reported under the name of stiff skin syndrome. We present a case of stiff skin syndrome from China, the diagnosis based on the patient's typical clinical and histopathological features. PMID:16836505

  14. Dynamic behavior of stay cables with passive negative stiffness dampers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiang; Zhu, Songye; Li, Jin-Yang; Spencer, Billie F., Jr.

    2016-07-01

    This paper systematically investigates the dynamic behavior of stay cables with passive negative stiffness dampers (NSD) installed close to the cable end. A passive NSD is modeled as a combination of a negative stiffness spring and a viscous damper. Through both analytical and numerical approaches, parametric analysis of negative stiffness and viscous damping are conducted to systematically evaluate the vibration control performance of passive NSD on stay cables. Since negative stiffness is an unstable element, the boundary of passive negative stiffness for stay cables to maintain stability is also derived. Results reveal that the asymptotic approach is only applicable to passive dampers with positive or moderate negative stiffness, and loses its accuracy when a passive NSD possesses significant negative stiffness. It has been found that the performance of passive NSD can be much better than those of conventional viscous dampers. The superior control performance of passive NSD in cable vibration mitigation is validated through numerical simulations of a full-scale stay cable.

  15. Hierarchies of plant stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulé, Veronique; Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Pasini, Damiano; Western, Tamara L

    2016-09-01

    Plants must meet mechanical as well as physiological and reproductive requirements for survival. Management of internal and external stresses is achieved through their unique hierarchical architecture. Stiffness is determined by a combination of morphological (geometrical) and compositional variables that vary across multiple length scales ranging from the whole plant to organ, tissue, cell and cell wall levels. These parameters include, among others, organ diameter, tissue organization, cell size, density and turgor pressure, and the thickness and composition of cell walls. These structural parameters and their consequences on plant stiffness are reviewed in the context of work on stems of the genetic reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), and the suitability of Arabidopsis as a model system for consistent investigation of factors controlling plant stiffness is put forward. Moving beyond Arabidopsis, the presence of morphological parameters causing stiffness gradients across length-scales leads to beneficial emergent properties such as increased load-bearing capacity and reversible actuation. Tailoring of plant stiffness for old and new purposes in agriculture and forestry can be achieved through bioengineering based on the knowledge of the morphological and compositional parameters of plant stiffness in combination with gene identification through the use of genetics. PMID:27457986

  16. Stiff Quantum Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinert, H

    2007-01-01

    At ultralow temperatures, polymers exhibit quantum behavior, which is calculated here for the second and fourth moments of the end-to-end distribution in the large-stiffness regime. The result should be measurable for polymers in wide optical traps.

  17. Stiffness modification of tensegrity structures

    OpenAIRE

    Dalilsafaei, Seif

    2011-01-01

    Although the concept of tensegrity structures was invented in the beginning of the twentieth century, the applications of these structures are limited, partially due to their low stiffness. The stiffness of tensegrities comes from topology, configuration, pre-stress and initial axial element stiffnesses.  The first part of the present work is concerned with finding the magnitude of pre-stress. Its role in stiffness of tensegrity structures is to postpone the slackening of cables. A high pre-s...

  18. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  19. Stiff person syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, Shahrzad; Noyce, Alastair J; Leslie, R David; Giovannoni, Gavin

    2011-10-01

    Stiff person syndrome (SPS) is a rare disorder, characterised by fluctuating rigidity and stiffness of the axial and proximal lower limb muscles, with superimposed painful spasms and continuous motor unit activity on electromyography. Although rare in general neurology practice, once observed it is unforgettable. The general neurologist may see only one or two cases during his or her career and as such it remains underdiagnosed. Left untreated, SPS symptoms can progress to cause significant disability. Patients have a poor quality of life and an excess rate of comorbidity and mortality. The severity of symptoms and lack of public awareness of the condition create anxiety and uncertainty for people with the disease. This review aims to raise awareness of SPS and to improve the likelihood of its earlier diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21921002

  20. High-gain adaptive regulator for a string equation with uncertain harmonic disturbance under boundary output feedback control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baozhu GUO; Wei GUO

    2003-01-01

    This paper considers the boundary stabilization and parameter estimation of a one-dimensional wave equation in the case when one end is fixed and control and harmonic disturbance with uncertain amplitude are input at another end. A high-gain adaptive regulator is designed in terms of measured collocated end velocity. The existence and uniqueness of the classical solution of the closed-loop system is proven. It is shown that the state of the system approaches the standstill as time goes to infitv and meanwhile, the estimated parameter converges to the unknown parameter.

  1. 77 FR 23425 - Revisions of Boundaries, Regulations and Zoning Scheme for Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... operations and projects, including education and outreach, research and science, regulations and enforcement.... Pursuant to 36 CFR 800.16(1)(1), historic properties includes: ``any prehistoric or historic district,...

  2. Western boundary currents regulated by interaction between ocean eddies and the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaohui; Jing, Zhao; Chang, Ping; Liu, Xue; Montuoro, Raffaele; Small, R. Justin; Bryan, Frank O.; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Brandt, Peter; Wu, Dexing; Lin, Xiaopei; Wu, Lixin

    2016-07-01

    Current climate models systematically underestimate the strength of oceanic fronts associated with strong western boundary currents, such as the Kuroshio and Gulf Stream Extensions, and have difficulty simulating their positions at the mid-latitude ocean’s western boundaries. Even with an enhanced grid resolution to resolve ocean mesoscale eddies—energetic circulations with horizontal scales of about a hundred kilometres that strongly interact with the fronts and currents—the bias problem can still persist; to improve climate models we need a better understanding of the dynamics governing these oceanic frontal regimes. Yet prevailing theories about the western boundary fronts are based on ocean internal dynamics without taking into consideration the intense air–sea feedbacks in these oceanic frontal regions. Here, by focusing on the Kuroshio Extension Jet east of Japan as the direct continuation of the Kuroshio, we show that feedback between ocean mesoscale eddies and the atmosphere (OME-A) is fundamental to the dynamics and control of these energetic currents. Suppressing OME-A feedback in eddy-resolving coupled climate model simulations results in a 20–40 per cent weakening in the Kuroshio Extension Jet. This is because OME-A feedback dominates eddy potential energy destruction, which dissipates more than 70 per cent of the eddy potential energy extracted from the Kuroshio Extension Jet. The absence of OME-A feedback inevitably leads to a reduction in eddy potential energy production in order to balance the energy budget, which results in a weakened mean current. The finding has important implications for improving climate models’ representation of major oceanic fronts, which are essential components in the simulation and prediction of extratropical storms and other extreme events, as well as in the projection of the effect on these events of climate change.

  3. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries regulates formation of membrane vesicles in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind-Kezunovic, D.; Nielsen, C.H.; Wojewodzka, U.;

    2008-01-01

    Ternary lipid compositions in model membranes segregate into large-scale liquid-ordered (L(o)) and liquid-disordered (L(d)) phases. Here, we show mum-sized lipid domain separation leading to vesicle formation in unperturbed human HaCaT keratinocytes. Budding vesicles in the apical portion of the....... Based on these observations we describe the energetic requirements for plasma membrane vesiculation. We propose that the decrease in total 'L(o)/L(d)' boundary line tension arising from the coalescence of smaller L(d)-like domains makes it energetically favourable for L(d)-like domains to bend from flat...

  4. Dynamically variable negative stiffness structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Christopher B.; Shahan, David W.; Smith, Sloan P.; Keefe, Andrew C.; McKnight, Geoffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Variable stiffness structures that enable a wide range of efficient load-bearing and dexterous activity are ubiquitous in mammalian musculoskeletal systems but are rare in engineered systems because of their complexity, power, and cost. We present a new negative stiffness–based load-bearing structure with dynamically tunable stiffness. Negative stiffness, traditionally used to achieve novel response from passive structures, is a powerful tool to achieve dynamic stiffness changes when configured with an active component. Using relatively simple hardware and low-power, low-frequency actuation, we show an assembly capable of fast (100×) dynamic stiffness control. This approach mitigates limitations of conventional tunable stiffness structures that exhibit either small (humanoid robotic limbs and lightweight adaptive vibration isolators. PMID:26989771

  5. Pharmacological modulation of arterial stiffness.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2011-09-10

    Arterial stiffness has emerged as an important marker of cardiovascular risk in various populations and reflects the cumulative effect of cardiovascular risk factors on large arteries, which in turn is modulated by genetic background. Arterial stiffness is determined by the composition of the arterial wall and the arrangement of these components, and can be studied in humans non-invasively. Age and distending pressure are two major factors influencing large artery stiffness. Change in arterial stiffness with drugs is an important endpoint in clinical trials, although evidence for arterial stiffness as a therapeutic target still needs to be confirmed. Drugs that independently affect arterial stiffness include antihypertensive drugs, mostly blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, hormone replacement therapy and some antidiabetic drugs such as glitazones. While the quest continues for \\'de-stiffening drugs\\

  6. Cholesterol Regulates Syntaxin 6 Trafficking at trans-Golgi Network Endosomal Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meritxell Reverter

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of cholesterol export from late endosomes causes cellular cholesterol imbalance, including cholesterol depletion in the trans-Golgi network (TGN. Here, using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1 mutant cell lines and human NPC1 mutant fibroblasts, we show that altered cholesterol levels at the TGN/endosome boundaries trigger Syntaxin 6 (Stx6 accumulation into VAMP3, transferrin, and Rab11-positive recycling endosomes (REs. This increases Stx6/VAMP3 interaction and interferes with the recycling of αVβ3 and α5β1 integrins and cell migration, possibly in a Stx6-dependent manner. In NPC1 mutant cells, restoration of cholesterol levels in the TGN, but not inhibition of VAMP3, restores the steady-state localization of Stx6 in the TGN. Furthermore, elevation of RE cholesterol is associated with increased amounts of Stx6 in RE. Hence, the fine-tuning of cholesterol levels at the TGN-RE boundaries together with a subset of cholesterol-sensitive SNARE proteins may play a regulatory role in cell migration and invasion.

  7. Thompson's quadricepsplasty for stiff knee

    OpenAIRE

    Kundu, ZS; Sangwan, SS; Guliani, G; Siwach, RC; Kamboj, P; Singh, Raj

    2007-01-01

    Background: Stiffness of the knee after trauma and/or surgery for femoral fractures is one of the most common complications and is difficult to treat. Stiffness in extension is more common and can be reduced by vigorous physiotherapy. If it does not improve then quadricepsplasty is indicated. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the results of Thompsons quadricepsplasty. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two male patients (age range 20-45 years) with posttraumatic knee stiffness following...

  8. Horizontal Stiffness of Wood Diaphragms

    OpenAIRE

    Bott, James Wescott

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the stiffness of wood diaphragms. Currently there is no method to calculate wood diaphragm stiffness that can reliably account for all of the various framing configurations. Diaphragm stiffness is important in the design of wood framed structures to calculate the predicted deflection and thereby determine if a diaphragm may be classified as rigid or flexible. This classification controls the method by which load is transferred from the d...

  9. Collaborative jurisdiction in the regulation of electric utilities: A new look at jurisdictional boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    This conference is one of several activities initiated by FERC, DOE and NARUC to improve the dialogue between Federal and State regulators and policymakers. I am pleased to be here to participate in this conference and to address, with you, electricity issues of truly national significance. I would like to commend Ashley Brown and the NARUC Electricity Committee for its foresight in devising a conference on these issues at this critical juncture in the regulation of the electric utility industry. I also would like to commend Chairman Allday and the FERC for their efforts to improve communication between Federal and State electricity regulators; both through FERC`s Public Conference on Electricity Issues that was held last June, and through the FERC/NARUC workshops that are scheduled to follow this conference. These collaborative efforts are important and necessary steps in addressing successfully the many issues facing the electric utility industry those who regulate it, and those who depend upon it - in other words, about everyone.

  10. Quantifying Local Stiffness Variations in Radiofrequency Ablations with Dynamic Indentation

    OpenAIRE

    DeWall, Ryan J.; Varghese, Tomy; Brace, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Elastographic imaging can be used to monitor ablation procedures, however confident and clear determination of the ablation boundary is essential to ensure complete treatment of the pathological target. To investigate the potential for ablation boundary representation on elastographic images, local variations in the viscoelastic properties in radiofrequency ablated regions that were formed in vivo in porcine liver tissue were quantified using dynamic indentation. Spatial stiffness maps were t...

  11. vox homeobox gene: a novel regulator of midbrain-hindbrain boundary development in medaka fish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Peter; Pantzartzi, Chrysoula N; Kozmikova, Iryna; Kozmik, Zbynek

    2016-03-01

    The midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) is one of the key organizing centers of the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS). Its patterning is governed by a well-described gene regulatory network (GRN) involving several transcription factors, namely, pax, gbx, en, and otx, together with signaling molecules of the Wnt and Fgf families. Here, we describe the onset of these markers in Oryzias latipes (medaka) early brain development in comparison to previously known zebrafish expression patterns. Moreover, we show for the first time that vox, a member of the vent gene family, is expressed in the developing neural tube similarly to CNS markers. Overexpression of vox leads to profound changes in the gene expression patterns of individual components of MHB-specific GRN, most notably of fgf8, a crucial organizer molecule of MHB. Our data suggest that genes from the vent family, in addition to their crucial role in body axis formation, may play a role in regionalization of vertebrate CNS. PMID:26965282

  12. Stiffness detection and reduction in discrete stochastic simulation of biochemical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang; Watson, Layne T.; Cao, Yang

    2011-02-01

    Typical multiscale biochemical models contain fast-scale and slow-scale reactions, where "fast" reactions fire much more frequently than "slow" ones. This feature often causes stiffness in discrete stochastic simulation methods such as Gillespie's algorithm and the Tau-Leaping method leading to inefficient simulation. This paper proposes a new strategy to automatically detect stiffness and identify species that cause stiffness for the Tau-Leaping method, as well as two stiffness reduction methods. Numerical results on a stiff decaying dimerization model and a heat shock protein regulation model demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed methods for multiscale biochemical systems.

  13. Stiffness of desiccating insect wings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengesha, T E; Vallance, R R [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The George Washington University, 738 Phillips Hall, 801 22nd St NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Mittal, R, E-mail: vallance@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 126 Latrobe Hall, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    The stiffness of insect wings is typically determined through experimental measurements. Such experiments are performed on wings removed from insects. However, the wings are subject to desiccation which typically leads to an increase in their stiffness. Although this effect of desiccation is well known, a comprehensive study of the rate of change in stiffness of desiccating insect wings would be a significant aid in planning experiments as well as interpreting data from such experiments. This communication presents a comprehensive experimental analysis of the change in mass and stiffness of gradually desiccating forewings of Painted Lady butterflies (Vanessa cardui). Mass and stiffness of the forewings of five butterflies were simultaneously measured every 10 min over a 24 h period. The averaged results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 21.1% over this time period with a time constant of 9.8 h, while wing stiffness increased linearly by 46.2% at a rate of 23.4 {mu}N mm{sup -1} h{sup -1}. For the forewings of a single butterfly, the experiment was performed over a period of 1 week, and the results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 52.2% with a time constant of 30.2 h until it reached a steady-state level of 2.00 mg, while wing stiffness increased exponentially by 90.7% until it reached a steady-state level of 1.70 mN mm{sup -1}. (communication)

  14. Analytical theory for shape stiffness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The shape stiffness of mill m is defined as the crosswise rigidity of the unit width of steel plate, that is, m=k/b. By differentiating the steel plate crown equation in the vector model of steel plate shape, a new concise equation for the shape stiffness, kc=m+q, is obtained. Furthermore, by combining the calculation equation for steel plate crown derived from Castigliano's theorem, an analytical calculation equation for the shape rigidity of rolled steel plate is derived. The correctness and practicability of the theory for the shape stiffness are demonstrated by comparing the results from the numerical calculation with the practical data of a rolling mill.

  15. Analytical theory for shape stiffness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张进之

    2000-01-01

    The shape stiffness of mill m is defined as the crosswise rigidity of the unit width of steel plate, that is, m = k/b. By differentiating the steel plate crown equation in the vector model of steel plate shape, a new concise equation for the shape stiffness, kc = m + q, is obtained. Furthermore, by combining the calculation equation for steel plate crown derived from Castigliano’s theorem, an analytical calculation equation for the shape rigidity of rolled steel plate is derived. The correctness and practicability of the theory for the shape stiffness are demonstrated by comparing the results from the numerical calculation with the practical data of a rolling mill.

  16. Level Classifications of Foundation Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Liingaard, Morten

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a foundation module developed and implemented in both HAWC and FLEX capable of to simulate the frequency dependent stiffness and damping of foundations e.g. pile, gravitation and bucket foundations....

  17. Morphological Computation of Haptic Perception of a Controllable Stiffness Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornkarn, Nantachai; Dasgupta, Prokar; Nanayakkara, Thrishantha

    2016-01-01

    When people are asked to palpate a novel soft object to discern its physical properties such as texture, elasticity, and even non-homogeneity, they not only regulate probing behaviors, but also the co-contraction level of antagonistic muscles to control the mechanical impedance of fingers. It is suspected that such behavior tries to enhance haptic perception by regulating the function of mechanoreceptors at different depths of the fingertips and proprioceptive sensors such as tendon and spindle sensors located in muscles. In this paper, we designed and fabricated a novel two-degree of freedom variable stiffness indentation probe to investigate whether the regulation of internal stiffness, indentation, and probe sweeping velocity (PSV) variables affect the accuracy of the depth estimation of stiff inclusions in an artificial silicon phantom using information gain metrics. Our experimental results provide new insights into not only the biological phenomena of haptic perception but also new opportunities to design and control soft robotic probes. PMID:27257814

  18. Tachocline dynamics: convective overshoot at stiff interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Benjamin; Lecoanet, Daniel; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Burns, Keaton; Vasil, Geoffrey M.

    2016-05-01

    The solar tachocline lies at the base of the solar convection zone. At this internal interface, motions from the unstable convection zone above overshoot and penetrate downward into the stiffly stable radiative zone below, driving gravity waves, mixing, and possibly pumping and storing magnetic fields. Here we study the dynamics of convective overshoot across very stiff interfaces with some properties similar to the internal boundary layer within the Sun. We use the Dedalus pseudospectral framework and study fully compressible dynamics at moderate to high Peclet number and low Mach number, probing a regime where turbulent transport is important. In this preliminary work, we find that the depth of convective overshoot is well described by a simple buoyancy equilibration model, and we consider implications for dynamics at the solar tachocline.

  19. A Review of Genetics, Arterial Stiffness, and Blood Pressure in African Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Jennifer L.; Duprez, Daniel A; Barac, Ana; Rich, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in African Americans in the United States is amongst the highest in the world and increasing. The identification of genes and pathways regulating blood pressure in African Americans has been challenging. An early predictor of hypertension is arterial stiffness. The prevalence of arterial stiffness is significantly higher in African Americans compared to Caucasians. Approximately 20% of the variance in arterial stiffness is estimated to be heritable. Identifying ...

  20. Extracellular matrix stiffness dictates Wnt expression through integrin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jing; Zu, Yan; Li, Jing; Du, Shuyuan; Xu, Yipu; Zhang, Lang; Jiang, Li; Wang, Zhao; Chien, Shu; Yang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness plays a significant role in regulating the phenotypes and behaviors of many cell types. However, the mechanism underlying the sensing of mechanical cues and subsequent elasticity-triggered pathways remains largely unknown. We observed that stiff ECM significantly enhanced the expression level of several members of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in both bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and primary chondrocytes. The activation of β-catenin by stiff ECM is not dependent on Wnt signals but is elevated by the activation of integrin/ focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathway. The accumulated β-catenin then bound to the wnt1 promoter region to up-regulate the gene transcription, thus constituting a positive feedback of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. With the amplifying effect of positive feedback, this integrin-activated β-catenin/Wnt pathway plays significant roles in mediating the enhancement of Wnt signal on stiff ECM and contributes to the regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and primary chondrocyte phenotype maintenance. The present integrin-regulated Wnt1 expression and signaling contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cell behaviors by ECM elasticity. PMID:26854061

  1. Lase Ultrasonic Web Stiffness tester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Patterson, Ph.D., IPST at Ga Tech

    2009-01-12

    The objective is to provide a sensor that uses non-contact, laser ultrasonics to measure the stiffness of paper during the manufacturing process. This will allow the manufacturer to adjust the production process in real time, increase filler content, modify fiber refining and as result produce a quality product using less energy. The sensor operates by moving back and forth across the paper web, at pre-selected locations firing a laser at the sheet, measuring the out-of-plane velocity of the sheet then using that measurement to calculate sheet stiffness.

  2. Modulation of ankle stiffness during postural sway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Christopher B; Kearney, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Ankle stiffness is a nonlinear, time-varying system which contributes to the control of human upright stance. This study sought to examine the nature of the contribution of stiffness to postural control by determining how intrinsic and reflex stiffnesses varied with sway. Subjects were instructed to stand quietly on a bilateral electro-hydraulic actuator while perturbations were applied about the ankle. Subjects performed three types of trials: normal stance, forward lean, and backward lean. Position, torque, and EMGs from the tibialis anterior and triceps surae were recorded. Background torque, intrinsic stiffness and reflex stiffness were calculated for each perturbation. Intrinsic and reflex stiffnesses were heavily modulated by postural sway. Moreover, they were modulated in a complimentary manner; intrinsic stiffness was lowest when reflex gain was highest, and vice versa. These findings suggest that intrinsic stiffness is modulated simultaneously with reflex stiffness to optimize the control of balance. PMID:25570884

  3. Analysis and Design of Variable Stiffness Composite Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatting, Brian F.; Guerdal, Zafer

    1998-01-01

    An investigation of the possible performance improvements of thin circular cylindrical shells through the use of the variable stiffness concept is presented. The variable stiffness concept implies that the stiffness parameters change spatially throughout the structure. This situation is achieved mainly through the use of curvilinear fibers within a fiber-reinforced composite laminate, though the possibility of thickness variations and discrete stiffening elements is also allowed. These three mechanisms are incorporated into the constitutive laws for thin shells through the use of Classical Lamination Theory. The existence of stiffness variation within the structure warrants a formulation of the static equilibrium equations from the most basic principles. The governing equations include sufficient detail to correctly model several types of nonlinearity, including the formation of a nonlinear shell boundary layer as well as the Brazier effect due to nonlinear bending of long cylinders. Stress analysis and initial buckling estimates are formulated for a general variable stiffness cylinder. Results and comparisons for several simplifications of these highly complex governing equations are presented so that the ensuing numerical solutions are considered reliable and efficient enough for in-depth optimization studies. Four distinct cases of loading and stiffness variation are chosen to investigate possible areas of improvement that the variable stiffness concept may offer over traditional constant stiffness and/or stiffened structures. The initial investigation deals with the simplest solution for cylindrical shells in which all quantities are constant around the circumference of the cylinder. This axisymmetric case includes a stiffness variation exclusively in the axial direction, and the only pertinent loading scenarios include constant loads of axial compression, pressure, and torsion. The results for these cases indicate that little improvement over traditional

  4. Energy-Efficient Variable Stiffness Actuators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Ludo C.; Carloni, Raffaella; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Variable stiffness actuators are a particular class of actuators that is characterized by the property that the apparent output stiffness can be changed independent of the output position. To achieve this, variable stiffness actuators consist of a number of elastic elements and a number of actuated

  5. Negative stiffness in gear contact

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Půst, Ladislav; Pešek, Luděk; Radolfová, Alena

    Plzeň : University of West Bohemia, 2015 - (Adámek, V.). s. 93-94 ISBN 978-80-261-0568-8. [Computational Mechanics 2015 /31./. 09.11.2015-11.11.2015, Špičák] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA04011656 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : gear box * planetary gear s * gear trains * radial contact stiffness Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  6. In-plane dynamic stiffness matrix for a free orthotropic plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbel, O.; Casimir, J. B.; Hammami, L.; Tawfiq, I.; Haddar, M.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a procedure for computing the dynamic stiffness matrix relative to the in-plane effect for an orthotropic rectangular plate. The dynamic stiffness matrix is calculated for free edge boundary conditions. The formulation is based on strong solutions for the equations of motion for an orthotropic plate obtained with the Levy series and a Gorman decomposition of the free boundary conditions. The results obtained for the in-plane harmonic response are validated by the Finite Element Method.

  7. Temperature compensating stiff pipe clamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of non-integral pipe attachment for nuclear piping seismic restraint that allows the pipe free thermal diametric expansion without constraint when using dissimilar pipe and clamp material is described. The clamp has a high spring rate that can be controlled by variable stiffness parameters in the design. Described in detail are thermal constraint stress, load stress distribution, spring rates, load angles and design philosophy. Analytical methods of code design, fabrication techniques, cost benefits and lead time reduction techniques are presented. 5 refs

  8. Non-Cooperative Exercise Boundaries and Regulation under Uncertainty: The Case of Cost-Reducing R&D

    OpenAIRE

    Anastasios Xepapadeas

    2001-01-01

    This paper extends the concept of the exercise boundary as an analytical tool in determining when an optimizing agent might undertake an irreversible action under uncertainty. to situations where the objective function of optimizing agents depends on decisions taken by other agents. By using the case of cost redusing R&D in a fixed numbers oligopoly under demand and technological uncertainty, the exercise bounadaries and the corresponding optimal R&D accumulation paths are determined fot the ...

  9. Effects of substrate stiffness and cell-cell contact on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Angelo S; Shin, Jae-Won; Mooney, David J

    2016-08-01

    The mechanical properties of the microenvironment and direct contact-mediated cell-cell interactions are two variables known to be important in the determination of stem cell differentiation fate, but little is known about the interplay of these cues. Here, we use a micropatterning approach on polyacrylamide gels of tunable stiffnesses to study how homotypic cell-cell contacts and mechanical stiffness affect different stages of osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Nuclear localization of transcription factors associated with osteogenesis depended on substrate stiffness and was independent of the degree of cell-cell contact. However, expression of alkaline phosphatase, an early protein marker for osteogenesis, increased only in cells with both direct contact with neighboring cells and adhesion to stiffer substrates. Finally, mature osteogenesis, as assessed by calcium deposition, was low in micropatterned cells, even on stiff substrates and in multicellular clusters. These results indicate that substrate stiffness and the presence of neighboring cells regulate osteogenesis in MSCs. PMID:27203745

  10. Thompson′s quadricepsplasty for stiff knee

    OpenAIRE

    Kundu Z; Sangwan S; Guliani G; Siwach R; Kamboj P; Singh Raj

    2007-01-01

    Background : Stiffness of the knee after trauma and/or surgery for femoral fractures is one of the most common complications and is difficult to treat. Stiffness in extension is more common and can be reduced by vigorous physiotherapy. If it does not improve then quadricepsplasty is indicated. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the results of Thompsons quadricepsplasty. Materials and Methods : 22 male patients (age range 20-45 years) with posttraumatic knee stiffness following dist...

  11. Research on Detection of Machine Stiffness

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Li-Jie; Shi Wei-Chao; Xu De-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Machine tool stiffness is a principal factor affecting machine tool precision, traditional methods can only be used to detect limited categories of machine tools. The paper introduces a new scheme to detect machine tool stiffness on the basis of dynamic detection of machine tool stiffness considering its characteristics and stress state during processing. An experiment conducted in turn-milling machining center CH7516GS indicated by comparison that statics analysis of finite elements matched ...

  12. A new approach to determine press stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Wanheim, Tarras

    2004-01-01

    deflections are designed. The press stiffness is presented as a 6 by 6 flexibility matrix. The approach has been tested by measuring the stiffness of a 5000 kN O-frame, ring element, hydraulic press, a 10000 kN O-frame, pillar element, hydraulic press and a 10000 kN O-frame, ring element mechanical press......A new procedure is proposed for measuring press stiffness, including separated horizontal and vertical loading of the press frame. The load can be eccentrically positioned for measuring rotational stiffnesses. Two loading devices and corresponding measuring equipment for registration of press...

  13. WAY TO DETERMINE STIFFNESS FUNCTION OF STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-ming; GAI Bing-zheng

    2005-01-01

    For calculating the stiffness function of a structure, the differential equation of the vibration of the structure was divided into the differential equation on the original stiffness function that was known, and Fredholm integral equation of the first kind on the undetermined stiffness function that was unknown. And the stable solutions of the integral equation, when the smooth factor was equal to zero, was solved by the extrapolation with p smooth factors. So the stiffness function of the structure is obtained. Applied examples show that the method is feasible and effective.

  14. The wave equation for stiff strings and piano tuning

    CERN Document Server

    Gràcia, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    We study the wave equation for a string with stiffness. We solve the equation and provide a uniqueness theorem with suitable boundary conditions. For a pinned string we compute the spectrum, which is slightly inharmonic. Therefore, the widespread scale of 12 equal divisions of the just octave is not the best choice to tune instruments like the piano. Basing in the theory of dissonance, we provide a way to tune the piano in order to improve its consonance. A good solution is obtained by tuning a note and its fifth by minimizing their beats.

  15. Flexural Stiffness of Myosin Va Subdomains as Measured from Tethered Particle Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalek, Arthur J; Kennedy, Guy G; Warshaw, David M; Ali, M Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Myosin Va (MyoVa) is a processive molecular motor involved in intracellular cargo transport on the actin cytoskeleton. The motor's processivity and ability to navigate actin intersections are believed to be governed by the stiffness of various parts of the motor's structure. Specifically, changes in calcium may regulate motor processivity by altering the motor's lever arm stiffness and thus its interhead communication. In order to measure the flexural stiffness of MyoVa subdomains, we use tethered particle microscopy, which relates the Brownian motion of fluorescent quantum dots, which are attached to various single- and double-headed MyoVa constructs bound to actin in rigor, to the motor's flexural stiffness. Based on these measurements, the MyoVa lever arm and coiled-coil rod domain have comparable flexural stiffness (0.034 pN/nm). Upon addition of calcium, the lever arm stiffness is reduced 40% as a result of calmodulins potentially dissociating from the lever arm. In addition, the flexural stiffness of the full-length MyoVa construct is an order of magnitude less stiff than both a single lever arm and the coiled-coil rod. This suggests that the MyoVa lever arm-rod junction provides a flexible hinge that would allow the motor to maneuver cargo through the complex intracellular actin network. PMID:26770194

  16. Infinitely stiff composite via a rotation-stabilized negative-stiffness phase

    OpenAIRE

    Kochmann, D. M.; Drugan, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    We show that an elastic composite material having a component with sufficiently negative stiffness to produce positive-infinite composite stiffness can be stabilized by the gyroscopic forces produced by composite rotation.

  17. Microenvironmental stiffness enhances glioma cell proliferation by stimulating epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhavi Umesh

    Full Text Available The aggressive and rapidly lethal brain tumor glioblastoma (GBM is associated with profound tissue stiffening and genomic lesions in key members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR pathway. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that increasing microenvironmental stiffness in culture can strongly enhance glioma cell behaviors relevant to tumor progression, including proliferation, yet it has remained unclear whether stiffness and EGFR regulate proliferation through common or independent signaling mechanisms. Here we test the hypothesis that microenvironmental stiffness regulates cell cycle progression and proliferation in GBM tumor cells by altering EGFR-dependent signaling. We began by performing an unbiased reverse phase protein array screen, which revealed that stiffness modulates expression and phosphorylation of a broad range of signals relevant to proliferation, including members of the EGFR pathway. We subsequently found that culturing human GBM tumor cells on progressively stiffer culture substrates both dramatically increases proliferation and facilitates passage through the G1/S checkpoint of the cell cycle, consistent with an EGFR-dependent process. Western Blots showed that increasing microenvironmental stiffness enhances the expression and phosphorylation of EGFR and its downstream effector Akt. Pharmacological loss-of-function studies revealed that the stiffness-sensitivity of proliferation is strongly blunted by inhibition of EGFR, Akt, or PI3 kinase. Finally, we observed that stiffness strongly regulates EGFR clustering, with phosphorylated EGFR condensing into vinculin-positive focal adhesions on stiff substrates and dispersing as microenvironmental stiffness falls to physiological levels. Our findings collectively support a model in which tissue stiffening promotes GBM proliferation by spatially and biochemically amplifying EGFR signaling.

  18. Microenvironmental stiffness enhances glioma cell proliferation by stimulating epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh, Vaibhavi; Rape, Andrew D; Ulrich, Theresa A; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The aggressive and rapidly lethal brain tumor glioblastoma (GBM) is associated with profound tissue stiffening and genomic lesions in key members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that increasing microenvironmental stiffness in culture can strongly enhance glioma cell behaviors relevant to tumor progression, including proliferation, yet it has remained unclear whether stiffness and EGFR regulate proliferation through common or independent signaling mechanisms. Here we test the hypothesis that microenvironmental stiffness regulates cell cycle progression and proliferation in GBM tumor cells by altering EGFR-dependent signaling. We began by performing an unbiased reverse phase protein array screen, which revealed that stiffness modulates expression and phosphorylation of a broad range of signals relevant to proliferation, including members of the EGFR pathway. We subsequently found that culturing human GBM tumor cells on progressively stiffer culture substrates both dramatically increases proliferation and facilitates passage through the G1/S checkpoint of the cell cycle, consistent with an EGFR-dependent process. Western Blots showed that increasing microenvironmental stiffness enhances the expression and phosphorylation of EGFR and its downstream effector Akt. Pharmacological loss-of-function studies revealed that the stiffness-sensitivity of proliferation is strongly blunted by inhibition of EGFR, Akt, or PI3 kinase. Finally, we observed that stiffness strongly regulates EGFR clustering, with phosphorylated EGFR condensing into vinculin-positive focal adhesions on stiff substrates and dispersing as microenvironmental stiffness falls to physiological levels. Our findings collectively support a model in which tissue stiffening promotes GBM proliferation by spatially and biochemically amplifying EGFR signaling. PMID:25000176

  19. A novel variable stiffness mechanism capable of an infinite stiffness range and unlimited decoupled output motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothuis, Stefan; Carloni, Raffaella; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel variable stiffness mechanism is presented, which is capable of achieving an output stiffness with infinite range and an unlimited output motion, i.e., the mechanism output is completely decoupled from the rotor motion, in the zero stiffness configuration. The mechanism makes u

  20. Flexural Stiffness of Myosin Va Subdomains as Measured from Tethered Particle Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Michalek, Arthur J.; Kennedy, Guy G.; Warshaw, David M.; M. Yusuf Ali

    2015-01-01

    Myosin Va (MyoVa) is a processive molecular motor involved in intracellular cargo transport on the actin cytoskeleton. The motor’s processivity and ability to navigate actin intersections are believed to be governed by the stiffness of various parts of the motor’s structure. Specifically, changes in calcium may regulate motor processivity by altering the motor’s lever arm stiffness and thus its interhead communication. In order to measure the flexural stiffness of MyoVa subdomains, we use tet...

  1. Observed variations of monopile foundation stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallehave, Dan; Thilsted, C.L.; Diaz, Alberto Troya

    2015-01-01

    The soil-structure stiffness of monopile foundations for offshore wind turbines has a high impact on the fatigue loading during normal operating conditions. Thus, a robust design must consider the evolution of pile-soil stiffness over the lifetime of the wind farm. This paper present and discuss ...

  2. Arterial Stiffness and Dialysis Calcium Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Mac-Way

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffness is the major determinant of isolated systolic hypertension and increased pulse pressure. Aortic stiffness is also associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease, hypertension, and general population. Hemodynamically, arterial stiffness results in earlier aortic pulse wave reflection leading to increased cardiac workload and decreased myocardial perfusion. Although the clinical consequence of aortic stiffness has been clearly established, its pathophysiology in various clinical conditions still remains poorly understood. The aim of the present paper is to review the studies that have looked at the impact of dialysis calcium concentration on arterial stiffness. Overall, the results of small short-term studies suggest that higher dialysis calcium is associated with a transient but significant increase in arterial stiffness. This calcium dependant increase in arterial stiffness is potentially explained by increased vascular smooth muscle tone of the conduit arteries and is not solely explained by changes in mean blood pressure. However, the optimal DCa remains to be determined, and long term studies are required to evaluate its impact on the progression of arterial stiffness.

  3. Static progressive splinting for posttraumatic elbow stiffness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.N. Doornberg; D. Ring; J.B. Jupiter

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the value of static progressive splinting in helping patients with posttraumatic elbow stiffness regain functional motion and avoid operative treatment for stiffness. Design: Retrospective case series. Setting: Level I Trauma Center. Patients and Intervention: Over a 3-year

  4. An acoustic startle alters knee joint stiffness and neuromuscular control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, A I; Needle, A R; Kaminski, T W; Royer, T R; Knight, C A; Swanik, C B

    2015-08-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the nervous system contributes to non-contact knee ligament injury, but limited evidence has measured the effect of extrinsic events on joint stability. Following unanticipated events, the startle reflex leads to universal stiffening of the limbs, but no studies have investigated how an acoustic startle influences knee stiffness and muscle activation during a dynamic knee perturbation. Thirty-six individuals were tested for knee stiffness and muscle activation of the quadriceps and hamstrings. Subjects were seated and instructed to resist a 40-degree knee flexion perturbation from a relaxed state. During some trials, an acoustic startle (50 ms, 1000 Hz, 100 dB) was applied 100 ms prior to the perturbation. Knee stiffness, muscle amplitude, and timing were quantified across time, muscle, and startle conditions. The acoustic startle increased short-range (no startle: 0.044 ± 0.011 N·m/deg/kg; average startle: 0.047 ± 0.01 N·m/deg/kg) and total knee stiffness (no startle: 0.036 ± 0.01 N·m/deg/kg; first startle 0.027 ± 0.02 N·m/deg/kg). Additionally, the startle contributed to decreased [vastus medialis (VM): 13.76 ± 33.6%; vastus lateralis (VL): 6.72 ± 37.4%] but earlier (VM: 0.133 ± 0.17 s; VL: 0.124 ± 0.17 s) activation of the quadriceps muscles. The results of this study indicate that the startle response can significantly disrupt knee stiffness regulation required to maintain joint stability. Further studies should explore the role of unanticipated events on unintentional injury. PMID:25212407

  5. Negative-stiffness-mechanism vibration isolation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platus, David L.

    1992-02-01

    A new type of vibration isolation system offers significant improvement in performance compared with current state-of-the-art systems. The system uses negative-stiffness mechanisms to cancel the stiffness of a spring suspension. Reduction in stiffness magnifies the damping inherent in the system creating a practical means for achieving high hysteretic damping. The result is a simple, compact 6-DOF passive isolation system capable of system resonant frequencies below 0.2 Hz and first isolator resonances above 100 Hz. Resonant transmissibilities below 1.4 can be achieved with transmissibilities at the higher frequencies close to that of the ideal undamped system. The negative-stiffness mechanisms can cancel the stiffness of power cables, hoses or other lines connected to payloads. This paper develops the theory, describes typical configurations and summarizes test data with prototype systems.

  6. Conceptual Design and Analysis of Four Types of Variable Stiffness Actuators Based on Spring Pretension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jishu Guo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The variable stiffness actuator (VSA is an open research field. This paper introduces the conceptual design and analysis of four types of novel variable stiffness actuators (VSAs. The main novelty of this paper is focused on the convenience control of the torque and stiffness of the actuator. We do not need to design complicated control strategies to achieve the desired actuating torque and output stiffness. This feature is beneficial for real-time control. In order to achieve this advantage, three types of approximate quadratic springs and four types of stiffness regulation mechanisms are presented. For the first VSA, the relationship between the output stiffness and angular deflection is close to linear, and the fitted quadratic spring is easy to implement and compact. For the second VSA, the output stiffness is only related to the working radius, and the relationship between the exerted torque and angular deflection is linear. For the third VSA, two equivalent quadratic torsion springs are used. Compared with the existing quadratic torsion springs, the design method is simple and the structure size is compact. The stiffness and torque is a linear function of the kinematic parameters of the VSA. The novelty of the fourth VSA is the use of the tension spring set. The approximate quadratic tension spring is compact and easy to implement. The relationship between the output stiffness and the angular deflection is fairly linear. The conceptual layouts and working principles are elaborated for the four actuators. The characteristics of torque and stiffness of the VSAs are presented, and the mechanical solutions are illustrated.

  7. High performance composites with active stiffness control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tridech, Charnwit; Maples, Henry A; Robinson, Paul; Bismarck, Alexander

    2013-09-25

    High performance carbon fiber reinforced composites with controllable stiffness could revolutionize the use of composite materials in structural applications. Here we describe a structural material, which has a stiffness that can be actively controlled on demand. Such a material could have applications in morphing wings or deployable structures. A carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy composite is described that can undergo an 88% reduction in flexural stiffness at elevated temperatures and fully recover when cooled, with no discernible damage or loss in properties. Once the stiffness has been reduced, the required deformations can be achieved at much lower actuation forces. For this proof-of-concept study a thin polyacrylamide (PAAm) layer was electrocoated onto carbon fibers that were then embedded into an epoxy matrix via resin infusion. Heating the PAAm coating above its glass transition temperature caused it to soften and allowed the fibers to slide within the matrix. To produce the stiffness change the carbon fibers were used as resistance heating elements by passing a current through them. When the PAAm coating had softened, the ability of the interphase to transfer load to the fibers was significantly reduced, greatly lowering the flexural stiffness of the composite. By changing the moisture content in PAAm fiber coating, the temperature at which the PAAm softens and the composites undergo a reduction in stiffness can be tuned. PMID:23978266

  8. Genetic determinants of arterial stiffness: Results from the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.S. Sie (Mark)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractArterial stiffness increases with age. It is also associated with various diseases, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Recently, arterial stiffness has also been found to independently predict cardiovascular disease. The pathogenesis of arterial stiffness, however, has n

  9. LSODPK, Ordinary Differential Equations Solver for Stiff and Non-stiff System with Krylov Corrector Iteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: LSODPK, written jointly with Peter N. Brown, is a set of FORTRAN subroutines for solving the initial value problem for stiff and non-stiff systems of ordinary differential equations. In solving stiff systems, LSODPK uses a corrector iteration composed of Newton iteration and one of four preconditioned Krylov subspace iteration methods. The user must select the desired Krylov method and supply a pair of routine to evaluate, pre-process, and solve the (left and/or right) pre-conditioner matrices. Aside from preconditioning, the implementation is matrix-free, meaning that explicit storage of the Jacobian (or related) matrix is not required. The method is experimental because the scope of problems for which it is effective is not well-known, and users are forewarned that LSODPK may or may not be competitive with traditional methods on a given problem. LSODPK also includes an option for a user-supplied linear system solver to be used without Krylov iteration. The LSODKR source is commented extensively to facilitate modification. Both a single-precision version and a double-precision version are available. 2 - Methods: It is assumed that the ODEs are given explicitly, so that the system can be written in the form dy/dt = f(t,y), where y is the vector of dependent variables, and t is the independent variable. The Krylov methods are based on Arnoldi's method, the Generalized Minimum Residual method, and the Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient method, with scaling added. This program solves a stiff ODE system that arises from a system of partial differential equations. The PDE system is a food web population model, with predator-prey interaction and diffusion on the unit square in two dimensions. The dependent variable vector is c = (c1, c2,..., cns) and the PDEs are as follows: dci /dt = d(i)*(cxxi + cyyi) + fi (x,y,c) (i=1,...,ns) where fi (x,y,c) = ci *(b(i) + j=1sumns a(i,j)*cj) The number of species is ns = 2*np, with the first np

  10. Research on Detection of Machine Stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Li-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Machine tool stiffness is a principal factor affecting machine tool precision, traditional methods can only be used to detect limited categories of machine tools. The paper introduces a new scheme to detect machine tool stiffness on the basis of dynamic detection of machine tool stiffness considering its characteristics and stress state during processing. An experiment conducted in turn-milling machining center CH7516GS indicated by comparison that statics analysis of finite elements matched the experimental result well, which provided precise original data for design of improved machine tool precision and access to design of precision detection equipment for other types of machine tools.

  11. Materials analogue of zero-stiffness structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Subramaniam, Anandh

    2011-04-01

    Anglepoise lamps and certain tensegrities are examples of zero-stiffness structures. These structures are in a state of neutral equilibrium with respect to changes in configuration of the system. Using Eshelby's example of an edge dislocation in a thin plate that can bend, we report the discovery of a non-trivial new class of material structures as an analogue to zero-stiffness structures. For extended positions of the edge dislocation in these structures, the dislocation experiences a zero image force. Salient features of these material structures along with the key differences from conventional zero-stiffness structures are pointed out.

  12. Axial Stiffness of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Zavalniuk, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The axial stiffness of MWCNTs is demonstrated to be determined only by several external shells (usually 3-5 and up to 15 for the extremely large nanotubes and high elongations) what is in a good agreement with experimentally observed inverse relation between the radius and Young modulus (i.e., stiffness) of MWCNTs. This result is a consequence of the van der Waals intershell interaction. The interpolating formula is obtained for the actual axial stiffness of MWCNT as a function of the tube ex...

  13. Strength and stiffness of engineering systems

    CERN Document Server

    Leckie, Frederick A

    2009-01-01

    This book on the stiffness and strength of engineering systems integrates a wide array of topics into a unified text, including plasticity, fracture, composite materials, energy approaches, and mechanics of microdevices (MEMs)..

  14. Vascular Stiffness in Insulin Resistance and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghong eJia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes are associated with a substantially increased prevalence of vascular fibrosis and stiffness, with attendant increased risk of cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Although the underlying mechanisms and mediators of vascular stiffness are not well understood, accumulating evidence supports the role of metabolic and immune dysregulation related to increased adiposity, activation of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system, reduced bioavailable nitric oxide, increased vascular extracellular matrix (ECM and ECM remodeling in the pathogenesis of vascular stiffness. This review will give a brief overview of the relationship between obesity, insulin resistance and increased vascular stiffness to provide a contemporary understanding of the proposed underlying mechanisms and potential therapeutic strategies.

  15. Programmable variable stiffness 2D surface design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabia, Sarah; Hwang, Taeseon; Yim, Woosoon

    2014-03-01

    Variable stiffness features can contribute to many engineering applications ranging from robotic joints to shock and vibration mitigation. In addition, variable stiffness can be used in the tactile feedback to provide the sense of touch to the user. A key component in the proposed device is the Biased Magnetorheological Elastomer (B-MRE) where iron particles within the elastomer compound develop a dipole interaction energy. A novel feature of this device is to introduce a field induced shear modulus bias via a permanent magnet which provides an offset with a current input to the electromagnetic control coil to change the compliance or modulus of a base elastomer in both directions (softer or harder). The B-MRE units can lead to the design of a variable stiffness surface. In this preliminary work, both computational and experimental results of the B-MRE are presented along with a preliminary design of the programmable variable stiffness surface design.

  16. Stiff person syndrome and myasthenia gravis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan P

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Association of stiff person syndrome, an immune related disorder of anterior horn cells and myasthenia gravis an endplate disorder with similar pathogenesis, is rare. This communication documents this association in the Indian literature for the first time.

  17. Radial Stiffness of a ferrofluid seal

    OpenAIRE

    Ravaud, Romain; Pinho, Marcos; Lemarquand, Guy; Dauchez, Nicolas; Génevaux, Jean-Michel; Lemarquand, Valérie; Brouard, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model for calculating the shape and the radial stiffness of ferrofluid seals used as radial bearings and this theoretical value of the radial stiffness is compared to measured values. This approach is interesting for the design of loudspeakers. Moreover, the concept of magnetic pressure is used to determine the seal shape as well as its energy. This paper corresponds to the case in which the ferrofluid seal is submitted to a high magnetic field. Furthermore, ...

  18. Experimental determination of bagasse stiffness coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson Arzola de la Peña

    2010-01-01

    The experimentally determined stiffness coefficient of bagasse is described in this paper. This property defines the behaviour of the reaction forces exerted upon the bagasse layer when being compressed during juice-extraction in a sugar-cane mill. This information is important for correctly analysing sugar-cane mill operation and design. An experimental device was used for obtaining the stiffness coefficient; it consisted of a piston, a piston-skirt, a hydraulic press and instrumentation for...

  19. Physical inactivity and arterial stiffness in COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Sievi NA; Franzen D; Kohler M.; Clarenbach CF

    2015-01-01

    Noriane A Sievi,1 Daniel Franzen,1 Malcolm Kohler,1,2 Christian F Clarenbach1 1Division of Pulmonology, University Hospital of Zurich, 2Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Background: Arterial stiffness is an important predictor of cardiovascular risk besides classic cardiovascular risk factors. Previous studies showed that arterial stiffness is increased in patients with COPD compared to healthy controls and exercise training may reduce ...

  20. Stiffness of Railway Soil-Steel Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Machelski Czesław

    2015-01-01

    The considerable influence of the soil backfill properties and that of the method of compacting it on the stiffness of soil-steel structures is characteristic of the latter. The above factors (exhibiting randomness) become apparent in shell deformation measurements conducted during construction and proof test loading. A definition of soil-shell structure stiffness, calculated on the basis of shell deflection under the service load, is proposed in the paper. It is demonstrated that the stiffne...

  1. Paradoxical impact of cholesterol on lipid packing and cell stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayee, Manuela A; Levitan, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Cell stiffness or deformability is a fundamental property that is expected to play a major role in multiple cellular functions. It is well known that cell stiffness is dominated by the intracellular cytoskeleton that, together with the plasma membrane, forms a membrane-cytoskeleton envelope. However, our understanding of how lipid composition of plasma membrane regulates physical properties of the underlying cytoskeleton is only starting to emerge. In this review, we first briefly describe the impact of cholesterol on the physical properties of lipid bilayers in model membranes and in living cells, with the dominant effect of increasing the order of membrane lipids and decreasing membrane fluidity. Then, we discuss accumulating evidence that removal of cholesterol, paradoxically, decreases the mobility of membrane proteins and increases cellular stiffness, with both effects being dependent on the integrity of the cytoskeleton. Finally, we discuss emerging evidence that oxidized modifications of low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) have the same effects on endothelial biomechanical properties as cholesterol depletion, an effect that is mediated by the incorporation of oxysterols into the membrane. PMID:27100504

  2. Stiffness of Railway Soil-Steel Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machelski, Czesław

    2015-12-01

    The considerable influence of the soil backfill properties and that of the method of compacting it on the stiffness of soil-steel structures is characteristic of the latter. The above factors (exhibiting randomness) become apparent in shell deformation measurements conducted during construction and proof test loading. A definition of soil-shell structure stiffness, calculated on the basis of shell deflection under the service load, is proposed in the paper. It is demonstrated that the stiffness is the inverse of the deflection influence function used in structural mechanics. The moving load methodology is shown to be useful for testing, since it makes it possible to map the shell deflection influence line also in the case of group loads (concentrated forces), as in bridges. The analyzed cases show that the shell's span, geometry (static scheme) and the height of earth fill influence the stiffness of the structure. The soil-steel structure's characteristic parameter in the form of stiffness k is more suitable for assessing the quality of construction works than the proposed in code geometric index ω applied to beam structures. As shown in the given examples, parameter k is more effective than stiffness parameter λ used to estimate the deformation of soil-steel structures under construction. Although the examples concern railway structures, the methodology proposed in the paper is suitable also for road bridges.

  3. Stiffness of Railway Soil-Steel Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machelski Czesław

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The considerable influence of the soil backfill properties and that of the method of compacting it on the stiffness of soil-steel structures is characteristic of the latter. The above factors (exhibiting randomness become apparent in shell deformation measurements conducted during construction and proof test loading. A definition of soil-shell structure stiffness, calculated on the basis of shell deflection under the service load, is proposed in the paper. It is demonstrated that the stiffness is the inverse of the deflection influence function used in structural mechanics. The moving load methodology is shown to be useful for testing, since it makes it possible to map the shell deflection influence line also in the case of group loads (concentrated forces, as in bridges. The analyzed cases show that the shell’s span, geometry (static scheme and the height of earth fill influence the stiffness of the structure. The soil-steel structure’s characteristic parameter in the form of stiffness k is more suitable for assessing the quality of construction works than the proposed in code geometric index ω applied to beam structures. As shown in the given examples, parameter k is more effective than stiffness parameter λ used to estimate the deformation of soil-steel structures under construction. Although the examples concern railway structures, the methodology proposed in the paper is suitable also for road bridges.

  4. Modal analysis of sailplane and transport aircraft wings using the dynamic stiffness method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, J. R.

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide theory, results, discussion and conclusions arising from an in-depth investigation on the modal behaviour of high aspect ratio aircraft wings. The illustrative examples chosen are representative of sailplane and transport airliner wings. To achieve this objective, the dynamic stiffness method of modal analysis is used. The wing is represented by a series of dynamic stiffness elements of bending-torsion coupled beams which are assembled to form the overall dynamic stiffness matrix of the complete wing. With cantilever boundary condition applied at the root, the eigenvalue problem is formulated and finally solved with the help of the Wittrick-Williams algorithm to yield the eigenvalues and eigenmodes which are essentially the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the wing. Results for wings of two sailplanes and four transport aircraft are discussed and finally some conclusions are drawn

  5. Physical inactivity and arterial stiffness in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sievi NA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Noriane A Sievi,1 Daniel Franzen,1 Malcolm Kohler,1,2 Christian F Clarenbach1 1Division of Pulmonology, University Hospital of Zurich, 2Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Background: Arterial stiffness is an important predictor of cardiovascular risk besides classic cardiovascular risk factors. Previous studies showed that arterial stiffness is increased in patients with COPD compared to healthy controls and exercise training may reduce arterial stiffness. Since physical inactivity is frequently observed in patients with COPD and exercise training may improve arterial stiffness, we hypothesized that low daily physical activity may be associated with increased arterial stiffness. Methods: In 123 patients with COPD (72% men; mean [standard deviation] age: 62 [7.5] years; median [quartile] forced expiratory volume in 1 second 35 [27/65] %predicted, arterial stiffness was assessed by augmentation index (AI. Daily physical activity level (PAL was measured by an activity monitor (SenseWear Pro™ >1 week. The association between AI and PAL was investigated by univariate and multivariate regression analysis, taking into account disease-specific characteristics and comorbidities. Results: Patients suffered from moderate (35%, severe (32%, and very severe (33% COPD, and 22% were active smokers. Median (quartile PAL was 1.4 (1.3/1.5 and mean (standard deviation AI 26% (9.2%. PAL showed a negative association with AI (B=-9.32, P=0.017 independent of age, sex, blood pressure, and airflow limitation. Conclusion: In COPD patients, a higher PAL seems to favorably influence arterial stiffness and therefore may reduce cardiovascular risk. Clinical Trial Registration: www.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01527773 Keywords: activity monitor, airflow limitation, COPD, physical activity level

  6. The stable stiffness triangle - drained sand during deformation cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaliauskas, Tomas; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic, drained sand stiffness was observed using the Danish triaxial appa- ratus. New, deformation dependant soil property (the stable stiffness triangle) was detected. Using the the stable stiffness triangle, secant stiffness of drained sand was plausible to predict (and control) even during...

  7. Dynamic stiffness of suction caissons - torsion, sliding and rocking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Liingaard, M.; Andersen, Lars

    2006-12-15

    This report concerns the dynamic soil-structure interaction of steel suction caissons applied as foundations for offshore wind turbines. An emphasis is put on torsional vibrations and coupled sliding/rocking motion, and the influence of the foundation geometry and the properties of the surrounding soil is examined. The soil is simplified as a homogenous linear viscoelastic material and the dynamic stiffness of the suction caisson is expressed in terms of dimensionless frequency-dependent coefficients corresponding to the different degrees of freedom. The dynamic stiffness coefficients for the skirted foundation are evaluated by means of a three-dimensional coupled boundary element/finite element model. Comparisons with known analytical and numerical solutions indicate that the static and dynamic behaviour of the foundation are predicted accurately with the applied model. The analysis has been carried out for different combinations of the skirt length and the Poisson's ratio of the subsoil. Finally, the high-frequency impedance has been determined for future use in lumped-parameter models of wind turbine foundations in aero-elastic codes. (au)

  8. Cosmology with a stiff matter era

    CERN Document Server

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2014-01-01

    We provide a simple analytical solution of the Friedmann equations for a universe made of stiff matter, dust matter, and dark energy. A stiff matter era is present in the cosmological model of Zel'dovich (1972) where the primordial universe is assumed to be made of a cold gas of baryons. It also occurs in certain cosmological models where dark matter is made of relativistic self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). When the energy density of the stiff matter is positive, the primordial universe is singular. It starts from a state with a vanishing scale factor and an infinite density. We consider the possibility that the energy density of the stiff matter is negative (anti-stiff matter). This happens, for example, when the BECs have an attractive self-interaction. In that case, the primordial universe is non-singular. It starts from a state in which the scale factor is finite and the energy density is equal to zero. For the sake of generality, we consider a cosmological constant of arbitrary sign. Whe...

  9. A Novel Variable Stiffness Mechanism Capable of an Infinite Stiffness Range and Unlimited Decoupled Output Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Groothuis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel variable stiffness mechanism is presented, which is capable of achieving an output stiffness with infinite range and an unlimited output motion, i.e., the mechanism output is completely decoupled from the rotor motion, in the zero stiffness configuration. The mechanism makes use of leaf springs, which are engaged at different positions by means of two movable supports, to realize the variable output stiffness. The Euler–Bernoulli leaf spring model is derived and validated through experimental data. By shaping the leaf springs, it is shown that the stiffness characteristic of the mechanism can be changed to fulfill different application requirements. Alternative designs can achieve the same behavior with only one leaf spring and one movable support pin.

  10. Extreme stiffness hyperbolic elastic metamaterial for total transmission subwavelength imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyuk; Oh, Joo Hwan; Seung, Hong Min; Cho, Seung Hyun; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-04-01

    Subwavelength imaging by metamaterials and extended work to pursue total transmission has been successfully demonstrated with electromagnetic and acoustic waves very recently. However, no elastic counterpart has been reported because earlier attempts suffer from considerable loss. Here, for the first time, we realize an elastic hyperbolic metamaterial lens and experimentally show total transmission subwavelength imaging with measured wave field inside the metamaterial lens. The main idea is to compensate for the decreased impedance in the perforated elastic metamaterial by utilizing extreme stiffness, which has not been independently actualized in a continuum elastic medium so far. The fabricated elastic lens is capable of directly transferring subwavelength information from the input to the output boundary. In the experiment, this intriguing phenomenon is confirmed by scanning the elastic structures inside the lens with laser scanning vibrometer. The proposed elastic metamaterial lens will bring forth significant guidelines for ultrasonic imaging techniques.

  11. Closed-Form Formula of the Transverse Dynamic Stiffness of a Shallowly Inclined Taut Cable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-hui Dan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The segmented vibration-governed equations and their general solutions for cables acted upon by intermediate transverse forces are derived by applying Hamilton’s principle. Including the effects of sagging, flexible stiffness, clamped boundary conditions, and inclination angle of the cable, the element-wise dynamic stiffness for each cable segment, split into segments having unique transverse forces, is derived. By using methods from the global stiffness assembly process of FEM, the global level of the cables’ dynamic equilibrium equation is obtained, and, as a result, the final closed-form formula of transverse dynamic stiffness is derived. Additionally, the corresponding analytic form, without considering sagging effects, is also obtained. Case studies are conducted on the aspects of accuracy, rationality of the distribution on the spatial field, and frequency domains of dynamic stiffness calculations. By comparison with the Guyan-based static FEM reduction method, it is shown that the result obtained from the proposed closed-form solution, which includes sagging effects, is exact and rational, thus creating a powerful tool in transverse vibration analysis.

  12. Lattice model of linear telechelic polymer melts. II. Influence of chain stiffness on basic thermodynamic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lattice cluster theory (LCT) for semiflexible linear telechelic melts, developed in Paper I, is applied to examine the influence of chain stiffness on the average degree of self-assembly and the basic thermodynamic properties of linear telechelic polymer melts. Our calculations imply that chain stiffness promotes self-assembly of linear telechelic polymer melts that assemble on cooling when either polymer volume fraction ϕ or temperature T is high, but opposes self-assembly when both ϕ and T are sufficiently low. This allows us to identify a boundary line in the ϕ-T plane that separates two regions of qualitatively different influence of chain stiffness on self-assembly. The enthalpy and entropy of self-assembly are usually treated as adjustable parameters in classical Flory-Huggins type theories for the equilibrium self-assembly of polymers, but they are demonstrated here to strongly depend on chain stiffness. Moreover, illustrative calculations for the dependence of the entropy density of linear telechelic polymer melts on chain stiffness demonstrate the importance of including semiflexibility within the LCT when exploring the nature of glass formation in models of linear telechelic polymer melts

  13. Hyper-damping properties of a stiff and stable linear oscillator with a negative stiffness element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, I.; Chronopoulos, D.; Spitas, V.; Koulocheris, D.

    2015-06-01

    A simple, stiff, statically and dynamically stable linear oscillator incorporating a negative stiffness element is used as a template to provide a generic theoretical basis for a novel vibration damping and isolation concept. This oscillator is designed to present the same overall static stiffness, the same mass and to use the same damping element as a reference classical linear SDoF oscillator. Thus, no increase of the structure mass or the viscous damping is needed, as in the case of a traditional linear isolator, no decrease of the overall structure stiffness is required as in the case of 'zero-stiffness' oscillators with embedded negative stiffness elements. The difference from these two templates consists entirely in the proper redistribution and reallocation of the stiffness and the damping elements of the system. Once such an oscillator is optimally designed, it is shown to exhibit an extraordinary apparent damping ratio, which is even several orders of magnitude higher than that of the original SDoF system, especially in cases where the original damping of the SDoF system is extremely low. This extraordinary damping behavior is a result of the phase difference between the positive and the negative stiffness elastic forces, which is in turn a consequence of the proper redistribution of the stiffness and the damping elements. This fact ensures that an adequate level of elastic forces exists throughout the entire frequency range, able to counteract the inertial and the excitation forces. Consequently, a resonance phenomenon, which is inherent in the original linear SDoF system, cannot emerge in the proposed oscillator. The optimal parameter selection for the design of the negative stiffness oscillator is discussed. To further exhibit the advantages that such a design can generate, the suggested oscillator is implemented within a periodic acoustic metamaterial structure, inducing a radical increase in the damping of the propagating acoustic waves. The concept

  14. Determination of 6 stiffnesses for a press

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Eriksen, Morten; Wanheim, Tarras

    2000-01-01

    The industry is increasingly demanding for better tolerances at cold forged products caused by the tough competition at the market. Near net-shape or net-shape production save resources for machining and reduce therefore also the material costs. During the forming process, the reaction forces from...... the workpiece will result in deflections of the press, which will decrease the tolerances of the component. At present, it is possible to measure the reaction forces from the workpiece, for instance by use of the model material technique as described in [1-2]. If the stiffness and clearances of the...... press is known too, the final dimensions can be predicted by divide the force by the stiffness and add the clearance. If the stiffness of the press is known, it is possible to optimize the orientation of the workpiece too, so the direction, in which the best tolerances is demanded, is equal to the...

  15. Stiffness of Hot-Mix Asphalt

    OpenAIRE

    Pellinen, Terhi K.; Xiao, Shangzhi

    2006-01-01

    This research was initiated from a need to evaluate marginal mixtures that do not meet the Superpave mix design criteria for the air voids content requirements for the construction of hot mix asphalt pavements. The developed criteria is comprised of the base criteria derived from test data of as-placed field cores normalized to 7.5% air voids content, which provides the minimum stiffness and strength requirements for a mixture as a function of the traffic level. The stiffness of pavement core...

  16. LSODE, 1. Order Stiff or Non-Stiff Ordinary Differential Equations System Initial Value Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: LSODE (Livermore Solver for Ordinary Differential Equations) solves stiff and non-stiff systems of the form dy/dt = f. In the stiff case, it treats the Jacobian matrix df/dy as either a dense (full) or a banded matrix, and as either user-supplied or internally approximated by difference quotients. It uses Adams methods (predictor-corrector) in the non-stiff case, and Backward Differentiation Formula (BDF) methods (the Gear methods) in the stiff case. The linear systems that arise are solved by direct methods (LU factor/solve). The LSODE source is commented extensively to facilitate modification. Both a single-precision version and a double-precision version are available. 2 - Methods: It is assumed that the ODEs are given explicitly, so that the system can be written in the form dy/dt = f(t,y), where y is the vector of dependent variables, and t is the independent variable. LSODE contains two variable-order, variable- step (with interpolatory step-changing) integration methods. The first is the implicit Adams or non-stiff method, of orders one through twelve. The second is the backward differentiation or stiff method (or BDF method, or Gear's method), of orders one through five. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The differential equations must be given in explicit form, i.e., dy/dt = f(y,t). Problems with intermittent high-speed transients may cause inefficient or unstable performance

  17. On the Free Vibration Modeling of Spindle Systems: A Calibrated Dynamic Stiffness Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Gaber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of bearings on the vibrational behavior of machine tool spindles is investigated. This is done through the development of a calibrated dynamic stiffness matrix (CDSM method, where the bearings flexibility is represented by massless linear spring elements with tuneable stiffness. A dedicated MATLAB code is written to develop and to assemble the element stiffness matrices for the system’s multiple components and to apply the boundary conditions. The developed method is applied to an illustrative example of spindle system. When the spindle bearings are modeled as simply supported boundary conditions, the DSM model results in a fundamental frequency much higher than the system’s nominal value. The simply supported boundary conditions are then replaced by linear spring elements, and the spring constants are adjusted such that the resulting calibrated CDSM model leads to the nominal fundamental frequency of the spindle system. The spindle frequency results are also validated against the experimental data. The proposed method can be effectively applied to predict the vibration characteristics of spindle systems supported by bearings.

  18. Influence of String Stiffness on Piano Tone

    CERN Document Server

    Nie, Lai-Mei

    2010-01-01

    Piano tones vary according to how pianist touches the keys. Many possible factors contribute to the relations between piano touch and tone. Focusing on the stiffness of string, we establish a model for vibration of a real piano string and derive a semi-analytical solution to the vibration equation.

  19. Detonation capturing for stiff combustion chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkenbosch, A.C.; Kaasschieter, E.F.; Klein, R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper contributes to the topic of unphysical one-cell-per-time-step travelling combustion wave solutions in numerical computations of detonation waves in the presence of stiff chemical source terms. These false weak detonation solutions appear when a gas-dynamics-chemistry operator-splitting te

  20. Difference methods for stiff delay differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delay differential equations of the form y'(t) = f(y(t), z(t)), where z(t) = [y1(α1(y(t))),..., y/sub n/(α/sub n/(y(t)))]/sup T/ and α/sub i/(y(t)) less than or equal to t, arise in many scientific and engineering fields when transport lags and propagation times are physically significant in a dynamic process. Difference methods for approximating the solution of stiff delay systems require special stability properties that are generalizations of those employed for stiff ordinary differential equations. By use of the model equation y'(t) = py(t) + qy(t-1), with complex p and q, the definitions of A-stability, A( )-stability, and stiff stability have been generalize to delay equations. For linear multistep difference formulas, these properties extend directly from ordinary to delay equations. This straight forward extension is not true for implicit Runge-Kutta methods, as illustrated by the midpoint formula, which is A-stable for ordinary equations, but not for delay equations. A computer code for stiff delay equations was developed using the BDF. 24 figures, 5 tables

  1. The stiffness characteristics of hybrid Ilizarov fixators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Onder; Havitcioglu, Hasan; Tatari, Hasan; Cecen, Berivan

    2008-10-20

    The use of hybrid Ilizarov models around femoral area is gaining clinical popularity lately. Hybrid systems show different mechanical properties. The purpose of this report is to examine the stiffness characteristics of the C-arch and half-pins on the hybrid Ilizarov fixators. Eight models that included standard Ilizarov and hybrid models were applied to six femoral sawbones. The distal part of fixation was composed of a two-ring frame applied identically to all bones. The difference of the configuration was at the proximal part, where half-pins with or without C-arches were either added to the proximal two-ring frame or replaced the proximal one- or two-ring frame. Osteotomy was performed in the femoral diaphysis and the bone was distracted 2cm. The stability of the system was tested with the axial compression testing machine. Displacements between the adjacent fracture sides were measured with the video extensometer in three dimensions. We found that proximal half-pin applications alone had less stiffness, but half-pins with C-arch had more stiffness than the model including only half-pins. Additional half-pins onto one- or two-ring frames had more longitudinal stiffness, but this system showed weak resistance against transverse displacement. PMID:18789446

  2. Vibrating Beam With Spatially Periodic Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, John S.

    1989-01-01

    Report presents theoretical analysis of vibrations of simply supported beam, bending stiffness varying about steady value, sinusoidally with position along length. Problem of practical importance because related to vibrations of twisted-pair electric-power transmission lines. Twists promote nonuniform shedding of vortexes and prevents resonant accumulation of vibrational energy from wind.

  3. Measurement and Treatment of Passive Muscle Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Henrik

    whether strength training improves gait function. The study shows that explosive strength training increases RFD in the ankle dorsiflexors, and facilitates a larger active ROM during gait, without any changes in passive muscle stiffness. Based on study II and III, adults with CP will benefit from...

  4. Experimental determination of bagasse stiffness coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Arzola de la Peña

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The experimentally determined stiffness coefficient of bagasse is described in this paper. This property defines the behaviour of the reaction forces exerted upon the bagasse layer when being compressed during juice-extraction in a sugar-cane mill. This information is important for correctly analysing sugar-cane mill operation and design. An experimental device was used for obtaining the stiffness coefficient; it consisted of a piston, a piston-skirt, a hydraulic press and instrumentation for measuring the pressures so produced and piston position at different times. Compression rate, humidity level and degree of bagasse fragmentation were the experimental factors taken into account in the experimental design. The investigation was carried out with 40%-80% humidity level and up to 0.06 compression rates. All experimental factors proved statistically significant in the bagasse stiffness coefficient experimental model so obtained. Bagasse was seen to behave as a very rigid elastic material under normal sugar-mill pressure operating conditions, having 50 MPa to 20,000 MPa stiffness coefficient values.

  5. Non-singular inhomogeneous stiff fluid cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Jambrina, L

    2009-01-01

    In this talk we show a stiff fluid solution of the Einstein equations for a cylindrically symmetric spacetime. The main features of this metric are that it is non-separable in comoving coordinates for the congruence of the worldlineS of the fluid and that it yields regular curvature invariants.

  6. Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loitsianskii. L. G.

    1956-01-01

    The fundamental, practically the most important branch of the modern mechanics of a viscous fluid or a gas, is that branch which concerns itself with the study of the boundary layer. The presence of a boundary layer accounts for the origin of the resistance and lift force, the breakdown of the smooth flow about bodies, and other phenomena that are associated with the motion of a body in a real fluid. The concept of boundary layer was clearly formulated by the founder of aerodynamics, N. E. Joukowsky, in his well-known work "On the Form of Ships" published as early as 1890. In his book "Theoretical Foundations of Air Navigation," Joukowsky gave an account of the most important properties of the boundary layer and pointed out the part played by it in the production of the resistance of bodies to motion. The fundamental differential equations of the motion of a fluid in a laminar boundary layer were given by Prandtl in 1904; the first solutions of these equations date from 1907 to 1910. As regards the turbulent boundary layer, there does not exist even to this day any rigorous formulation of this problem because there is no closed system of equations for the turbulent motion of a fluid. Soviet scientists have done much toward developing a general theory of the boundary layer, and in that branch of the theory which is of greatest practical importance at the present time, namely the study of the boundary layer at large velocities of the body in a compressed gas, the efforts of the scientists of our country have borne fruit in the creation of a new theory which leaves far behind all that has been done previously in this direction. We shall herein enumerate the most important results by Soviet scientists in the development of the theory of the boundary layer.

  7. LSODA, Ordinary Differential Equation Solver for Stiff or Non-Stiff System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: LSODA, written jointly with L. R. Petzold, solves systems dy/dt = f with a dense or banded Jacobian when the problem is stiff, but it automatically selects between non-stiff (Adams) and stiff (BDF) methods. It uses the non-stiff method initially, and dynamically monitors data in order to decide which method to use. The LSODA source is commented extensively to facilitate modification. Both a single-precision version and a double-precision version are available. 2 - Methods: It is assumed that the ODEs are given explicitly, so that the system can be written in the form dy/dt = f(t,y), where y is the vector of dependent variables, and t is the independent variable. If the errors are too large, or other difficulty occurs, a warning message is printed

  8. Boundary Spanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    The paper explores how locals span boundaries between corporate and local levels. The aim is to better comprehend potentialities and challenges when MNCs draws on locals’ culture specific knowledge. The study is based on an in-depth, interpretive case study of boundary spanning by local actors in...... approach with pattern matching is a way to shed light on the tacit local knowledge that organizational actors cannot articulate and that an exclusively inductive research is not likely to unveil....

  9. Vascular Smooth Muscle Sirtuin-1 Protects Against Diet-Induced Aortic Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Jessica L; Al Sayah, Leona; Weisbrod, Robert M; Van Roy, Isabelle; Weng, Xiang; Cohen, Richard A; Bachschmid, Markus M; Seta, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Arterial stiffness, a major cardiovascular risk factor, develops within 2 months in mice fed a high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS) diet, serving as a model of human metabolic syndrome, and it is associated with activation of proinflammatory and oxidant pathways in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. Sirtuin-1 (SirT1) is an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase regulated by the cellular metabolic status. Our goal was to study the effects of VSM SirT1 on arterial stiffness in the context of diet-induced metabolic syndrome. Overnight fasting acutely decreased arterial stiffness, measured in vivo by pulse wave velocity, in mice fed HFHS for 2 or 8 months, but not in mice lacking SirT1 in VSM (SMKO). Similarly, VSM-specific genetic SirT1 overexpression (SMTG) prevented pulse wave velocity increases induced by HFHS feeding, during 8 months. Administration of resveratrol or S17834, 2 polyphenolic compounds known to activate SirT1, prevented HFHS-induced arterial stiffness and were mimicked by global SirT1 overexpression (SirT1 bacterial artificial chromosome overexpressor), without evident metabolic improvements. In addition, HFHS-induced pulse wave velocity increases were reversed by 1-week treatment with a specific, small molecule SirT1 activator (SRT1720). These beneficial effects of pharmacological or genetic SirT1 activation, against HFHS-induced arterial stiffness, were associated with a decrease in nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) activation and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) and p47phox protein expressions, in aorta and VSM cells. In conclusion, VSM SirT1 activation decreases arterial stiffness in the setting of obesity by stimulating anti-inflammatory and antioxidant pathways in the aorta. SirT1 activators may represent a novel therapeutic approach to prevent arterial stiffness and associated cardiovascular complications in overweight/obese individuals with metabolic syndrome. PMID:27432859

  10. A review on in situ stiffness adjustment methods in MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, M. L. C.; Pérez Garza, H. H.; Herder, J. L.; Ghatkesar, M. K.

    2016-06-01

    In situ stiffness adjustment in microelectromechanical systems is used in a variety of applications such as radio-frequency mechanical filters, energy harvesters, atomic force microscopy, vibration detection sensors. In this review we provide designers with an overview of existing stiffness adjustment methods, their working principle, and possible adjustment range. The concepts are categorized according to their physical working principle. It is concluded that the electrostatic adjustment principle is the most applied method, and narrow to wide ranges in stiffness can be achieved. But in order to obtain a wide range in stiffness change, large, complex devices were designed. Mechanical stiffness adjustment is found to be a space-effective way of obtaining wide changes in stiffness, but these methods are often discrete and require large tuning voltages. Stiffness adjustment through stressing effects or change in Young’s modulus was used only for narrow ranges. The change in second moment of inertia was used for stiffness adjustment in the intermediate range.

  11. Association between arterial stiffness and atherosclerosis: the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.M-L. van Popele (Nicole); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); M.L. Bots (Michiel); R. Asmar (Roland); J. Topouchian; R.S. Reneman; A.P.G. Hoeks; D.A. van der Kuip (Deirdre); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Studies of the association between arterial stiffness and atherosclerosis are contradictory. We studied stiffness of the aorta and the common carotid artery in relation to several indicators of atherosclerosis. METHODS: This study was conducted w

  12. Stiffness-activated GEF-H1 expression exacerbates LPS-induced lung inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Mambetsariev

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is accompanied by decreased lung compliance. However, a role of tissue mechanics in modulation of inflammation remains unclear. We hypothesized that bacterial lipopolysacharide (LPS stimulates extracellular matrix (ECM production and vascular stiffening leading to stiffness-dependent exacerbation of endothelial cell (EC inflammatory activation and lung barrier dysfunction. Expression of GEF-H1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, ECM proteins fibronectin and collagen, lysyl oxidase (LOX activity, interleukin-8 and activation of Rho signaling were analyzed in lung samples and pulmonary EC grown on soft (1.5 or 2.8 kPa and stiff (40 kPa substrates. LPS induced EC inflammatory activation accompanied by expression of ECM proteins, increase in LOX activity, and activation of Rho signaling. These effects were augmented in EC grown on stiff substrate. Stiffness-dependent enhancement of inflammation was associated with increased expression of Rho activator, GEF-H1. Inhibition of ECM crosslinking and stiffening by LOX suppression reduced EC inflammatory activation and GEF-H1 expression in response to LPS. In vivo, LOX inhibition attenuated LPS-induced expression of GEF-H1 and lung dysfunction. These findings present a novel mechanism of stiffness-dependent exacerbation of vascular inflammation and escalation of ALI via stimulation of GEF-H1-Rho pathway. This pathway represents a fundamental mechanism of positive feedback regulation of inflammation.

  13. Animals prefer leg stiffness values that may reduce the energetic cost of locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, ZhuoHua; Seipel, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Despite the neuromechanical complexity and wide diversity of running animals, most run with a center-of-mass motion that is similar to a simple mass bouncing on a spring. Further, when animals׳ effective leg stiffness is measured and normalized for size and weight, the resulting relative leg stiffness that most animals prefer lies in a narrow range between 7 and 27. Understanding why this nearly universal preference exists could shed light on how whole animal behaviors are organized. Here we show that the biologically preferred values of relative leg stiffness coincide with a theoretical minimal energetic cost of locomotion. This result strongly implies that animals select and regulate leg stiffness in order to reduce the energy required to move, thus providing animals an energetic advantage. This result also helps explain how high level control targets such as energy efficiency might influence overall physiological parameters and the underlying neuromechanics that produce it. Overall, the theory presented here provides an explanation for the existence of a nearly universal preferred leg stiffness. Also, the results of this work are beneficial for understanding the principles underlying human and animal locomotion, as well as for the development of prosthetic, orthotic and robotic devices. PMID:25234232

  14. On prestress stiffness analysis of bolt-plate contact assemblies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard; Pedersen, Pauli

    2008-01-01

    Bolt connections are among the most important connections used in structures. The stiffnesses of the bolt and of the connected members are the primary qualities that control the lifetime of the connection. The stiffness of the bolt can be estimated rather easily, in contrast to the member stiffness...

  15. A novel energy-efficient rotational variable stiffness actuator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, Shodhan; Carloni, Raffaella; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the working principle, the design and realization of a novel rotational variable stiffness actuator, whose stiffness can be varied independently of its output angular position. This actuator is energy-efficient, meaning that the stiffness of the actuator can be varied by keeping

  16. Spin Glass Stiffness in zero Dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Boettcher, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    A unique analytical result for the Migdal-Kadanoff hierarchical lattice is obtained. The scaling of the defect energy for a zero-dimensional spin glass is derived for a bond distribution that is continuous at the origin. The value of the ``stiffness'' exponent in zero dimensions, y_0=-1, corresponds to the value also found in one dimension. This result complements and completes earlier findings for y_d at d>0.

  17. Transparent and Shaped Stiffness Reflection for Telesurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Willaert, Bert; Goethals, Pauwel; Reynaerts, Dominiek; Van Brussel, Hendrik; Poorten, Emmanuel B. Vander

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this chapter is to demonstrate the potential benefits of controllers of the third concept, i.e. controllers with model-based haptic feedback, especially for telesurgical applications. Hereto, this chapter describes the practical implementation of the Stiffness Reflecting Controller. The experiments described in Section 5 support the claim that such controllers show good robustness properties. It is shown that, for the SRC, the compliance of the position controller does not in...

  18. Stiff modes in spinvalve simulations with OOMMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitropoulos, Spyridon; Tsiantos, Vassilis; Ovaliadis, Kyriakos; Kechrakos, Dimitris; Donahue, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Micromagnetic simulations are an important tool for the investigation of magnetic materials. Micromagnetic software uses various techniques to solve differential equations, partial or ordinary, involved in the dynamic simulations. Euler, Runge-Kutta, Adams, and BDF (Backward Differentiation Formulae) are some of the methods used for this purpose. In this paper, spinvalve simulations are investigated. Evidence is presented showing that these systems have stiff modes, and that implicit methods such as BDF are more effective than explicit methods in such cases.

  19. Stiff-Person Syndrome: Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jin Jung

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Stiff-person syndrome (SPS is a rare disorder, characterized by progressive fluctuating muscular rigidity and spasms. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD antibody is primarily involved in the pathogenesis of SPS and SPS is strongly associated with other autoimmune disease. Here we report three cases of patients with classical SPS finally confirmed by high serum level of GAD antibodies. All of our patients respond favorably to gamma amino butyric acid-enhancing drugs and immunotherapies.

  20. Efficient Method for Calculating the Composite Stiffness of Parabolic Leaf Springs with Variable Stiffness for Vehicle Rear Suspension

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-ku Shi; Cheng Liu; Zhi-yong Chen; Wei He; Qing-hua Zu

    2016-01-01

    The composite stiffness of parabolic leaf springs with variable stiffness is difficult to calculate using traditional integral equations. Numerical integration or FEA may be used but will require computer-aided software and long calculation times. An efficient method for calculating the composite stiffness of parabolic leaf springs with variable stiffness is developed and evaluated to reduce the complexity of calculation and shorten the calculation time. A simplified model for double-leaf spr...

  1. The stiffness change and the increase in the ultimate capacity for a stiff pile resulting from a cyclic loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lada, Aleksandra; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Nicolai, Giulio

    In the paper the experimental results of small-scale tests on a stiff monopile are presented to outline the change in stiffness during the cyclic loading and the change in the ultimate pile capacity. The results confirm the increase of stiffness and the increase in bearing capacity resulting from...

  2. Emerging boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvschal, Mette

    2014-01-01

    and formalization. These principles are then used to argue the case for socioconceptual emergence and causality between the lines. This causality appears only in a long-term perspective and implies that, although the development of these boundaries was chronologically displaced across northwestern......This article proposes a processual ontology for the emergence of man-made, linear boundaries across northwestern Europe, particularly in the first millennium BC. Over a significant period of time, these boundaries became new ways of organizing the landscape and settlements—a phenomenon that has...... Europe, elements of this phenomenon emerged along equivalent trajectories. At the same time, variation in the regional incorporation of these linear phenomena points toward situation-specific applications and independent development....

  3. Cell stiffness, contractile stress and the role of extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Steven S., E-mail: san@jhsph.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Kim, Jina [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Ahn, Kwangmi [Division of Biostatistics, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Trepat, Xavier [CIBER, Enfermedades Respiratorias, 07110 Bunyola (Spain); Drake, Kenneth J. [Division of Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kumar, Sarvesh; Ling, Guoyu; Purington, Carolyn; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Kensler, Thomas W.; Mitzner, Wayne [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Fredberg, Jeffrey J. [Division of Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Biswal, Shyam [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    Here we have assessed the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and rigidity on mechanical properties of the human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. Cell stiffness and contractile stress showed appreciable changes from the most relaxed state to the most contracted state: we refer to the maximal range of these changes as the cell contractile scope. The contractile scope was least when the cell was adherent upon collagen V, followed by collagen IV, laminin, and collagen I, and greatest for fibronectin. Regardless of ECM composition, upon adherence to increasingly rigid substrates, the ASM cell positively regulated expression of antioxidant genes in the glutathione pathway and heme oxygenase, and disruption of a redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor (Nrf2), culminated in greater contractile scope. These findings provide biophysical evidence that ECM differentially modulates muscle contractility and, for the first time, demonstrate a link between muscle contractility and Nrf2-directed responses.

  4. Cell stiffness, contractile stress and the role of extracellular matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we have assessed the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and rigidity on mechanical properties of the human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. Cell stiffness and contractile stress showed appreciable changes from the most relaxed state to the most contracted state: we refer to the maximal range of these changes as the cell contractile scope. The contractile scope was least when the cell was adherent upon collagen V, followed by collagen IV, laminin, and collagen I, and greatest for fibronectin. Regardless of ECM composition, upon adherence to increasingly rigid substrates, the ASM cell positively regulated expression of antioxidant genes in the glutathione pathway and heme oxygenase, and disruption of a redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor (Nrf2), culminated in greater contractile scope. These findings provide biophysical evidence that ECM differentially modulates muscle contractility and, for the first time, demonstrate a link between muscle contractility and Nrf2-directed responses.

  5. Static stiffness modeling of a novel hybrid redundant robot machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a modeling method to study the stiffness of a hybrid serial-parallel robot IWR (Intersector Welding Robot) for the assembly of ITER vacuum vessel. The stiffness matrix of the basic element in the robot is evaluated using matrix structural analysis (MSA); the stiffness of the parallel mechanism is investigated by taking account of the deformations of both hydraulic limbs and joints; the stiffness of the whole integrated robot is evaluated by employing the virtual joint method and the principle of virtual work. The obtained stiffness model of the hybrid robot is analytical and the deformation results of the robot workspace under certain external load are presented.

  6. Blurring Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Nielsen, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    welfare functions into EU law both from an internal market law and a constitutional law perspective. The main problem areas covered by the Blurring Boundaries project were studied in sub-projects on: 1) Internal market law and welfare services; 2) Fundamental rights and non-discrimination law aspects; and...... 3) Services of general interest. In the Blurring Boundaries project, three aspects of the European Social Model have been particularly highlighted: the constitutionalisation of the European Social Model, its multi-level legal character, and the clash between market access justice at EU level and...

  7. Cosmology with a stiff matter era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2015-11-01

    We consider the possibility that the Universe is made of a dark fluid described by a quadratic equation of state P =K ρ2 , where ρ is the rest-mass density and K is a constant. The energy density ɛ =ρ c2+K ρ2 is the sum of two terms: a rest-mass term ρ c2 that mimics "dark matter" (P =0 ) and an internal energy term u =K ρ2=P that mimics a "stiff fluid" (P =ɛ ) in which the speed of sound is equal to the speed of light. In the early universe, the internal energy dominates and the dark fluid behaves as a stiff fluid (P ˜ɛ , ɛ ∝a-6). In the late universe, the rest-mass energy dominates and the dark fluid behaves as pressureless dark matter (P ≃0 , ɛ ∝a-3). We provide a simple analytical solution of the Friedmann equations for a universe undergoing a stiff matter era, a dark matter era, and a dark energy era due to the cosmological constant. This analytical solution generalizes the Einstein-de Sitter solution describing the dark matter era, and the Λ CDM model describing the dark matter era and the dark energy era. Historically, the possibility of a primordial stiff matter era first appeared in the cosmological model of Zel'dovich where the primordial universe is assumed to be made of a cold gas of baryons. A primordial stiff matter era also occurs in recent cosmological models where dark matter is made of relativistic self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). When the internal energy of the dark fluid mimicking stiff matter is positive, the primordial universe is singular like in the standard big bang theory. It expands from an initial state with a vanishing scale factor and an infinite density. We consider the possibility that the internal energy of the dark fluid is negative (while, of course, its total energy density is positive), so that it mimics anti-stiff matter. This happens, for example, when the BECs have an attractive self-interaction with a negative scattering length. In that case, the primordial universe is nonsingular and

  8. An exact dynamic stiffness matrix for axially loaded double-beam systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Li Xiaobin; Xu Shuangxi; Wu Weiguo; Li Jun

    2014-06-01

    An exact dynamic stiffness method is presented in this paper to determine the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the axially loaded double-beam systems,which consist of two homogeneous and prismatic beams with a distributed spring in parallel between them.The effects of the axial force, shear deformation and rotary inertia are considered, as shown in the theoretical formulation. The dynamic stiffness influence coefficients are formulated from the governing differential equations of the axially loaded double-beam system in free vibration by using the Laplace transform method. An example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, in which ten boundary conditions are investigated and the effect of the axial force on the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the double-beam system are further discussed.

  9. A review of shear strength models for rock joints subjected to constant normal stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivanathan Thirukumaran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The typical shear behaviour of rough joints has been studied under constant normal load/stress (CNL boundary conditions, but recent studies have shown that this boundary condition may not replicate true practical situations. Constant normal stiffness (CNS is more appropriate to describe the stress–strain response of field joints since the CNS boundary condition is more realistic than CNL. The practical implications of CNS are movements of unstable blocks in the roof or walls of an underground excavation, reinforced rock wedges sliding in a rock slope or foundation, and the vertical movement of rock-socketed concrete piles. In this paper, the highlights and limitations of the existing models used to predict the shear strength/behaviour of joints under CNS conditions are discussed in depth.

  10. Leg stiffness and joint stiffness while running to and jumping over an obstacle

    OpenAIRE

    Mauroy, Geoffrey; Schepens, Bénédicte; Willems, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    During running, muscles of the lower limb act like a linear spring bouncing on the ground. When approaching an obstacle, the overall stiffness of this leg-spring system (kleg) is modified during the two steps preceding the jump to enhance the movement of the center of mass of the body while leaping the obstacle. The aim of the present study is to understand how kleg is modified during the running steps preceding the jump. Since kleg depends on the joint torsional stiffness and on the leg geom...

  11. Laser application on haptics: Tactile stiffness measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, L.; Memeo, M.; Cannella, F.; Valente, M.; Caldwell, D. G.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2012-06-01

    There is a great interest in exploring the proprieties of the sense of the touch, its detailed knowledge in fact is a key issue in the area of robotics, haptics and human-machine interaction. In this paper, the authors focus their attention on a novel measurement method for the assessment of the tactile stiffness based on a original test rig; tactile stiffness is defined as the ratio between force, exerted by the finger, and the displacement of the finger tip operated during the test. To reach this scope, the paper describes a specific experimental test-rig used for the evaluation of subject tactile sensitivity, where finger force applied during tests as well as displacement and velocity of displacement, operated by the subject under investigation, are measured. Results show that tactile stiffness is linear respect to stimuli spatial difference (which is proportional to the difficulty to detect the variation of them). In particular, it has been possible to relate the force and displacement measured during the tests. The relationship between the response of the subject to the grating, velocity and force is determined. These results permit to carry out the further experimental tests on the same subject avoiding the use of a load cell and therefore simplifying the measurement test rig and data post-processing. Indeed, the first aspect (use of a load cell) can be relevant, because the grating positions are different, requiring a specific re-calibration and setting before each trial; while the second aspect allows simplify the test rig complexity and the processing algorithm.

  12. Arterial stiffness in mild primary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Mishaela R; Maurer, Mathew S; McMahon, Donald J; Bilezikian, John P; Silverberg, Shonni J

    2005-06-01

    When primary hyperparathyroidism was a more symptomatic disease, it was often associated with increased cardiovascular risk. As the clinical manifestations of the disease have changed to a milder, more asymptomatic disorder, investigation is shifting to more subtle cardiovascular abnormalities. We measured arterial stiffness in 39 patients with mild primary hyperparathyroidism [serum calcium, 2.66 +/- 0.2 mmol/liter (10.7 +/- 0.6 mg/dl); PTH, 21.7 +/- 9.5 pmol/liter (89 +/- 39 pg/ml)] and in 134 controls. Arterial stiffness was measured mathematically at the radial artery with a noninvasive device as the "augmentation index" (AIx). The AIx measures the difference between the second and first systolic peaks in the pressure waveform and correlates with increased cardiovascular risk. When physiological variables affecting augmentation index and potentially confounding cardiovascular risk factors (age, gender, heart rate, height, blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, smoking, and hyperlipidemia) were adjusted for, primary hyperparathyroidism was an independent predictor of increased augmentation index (B = 3.37; P < 0.03). A matched-pair analysis showed that 15% of the variance in AIx was uniquely accounted for by the presence of primary hyperparathyroidism. The presence of primary hyperparathyroidism was a stronger predictor of elevated AIx than age, gender, smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, or diabetes mellitus. AIx was also directly correlated with evidence of more active parathyroid disease, including higher PTH levels (r = +0.42; P < 0.05) and lower bone mineral density at the distal one-third radius (r = -0.33; P < 0.05). The diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism was therefore an independent predictor of increased AIx, an early measure of arterial stiffness, and the increase was associated with evidence of more active parathyroid disease. PMID:15769995

  13. Thompson′s quadricepsplasty for stiff knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundu Z

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Stiffness of the knee after trauma and/or surgery for femoral fractures is one of the most common complications and is difficult to treat. Stiffness in extension is more common and can be reduced by vigorous physiotherapy. If it does not improve then quadricepsplasty is indicated. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the results of Thompsons quadricepsplasty. Materials and Methods : 22 male patients (age range 20-45 years with posttraumatic knee stiffness following distal femoral fractures underwent Thompson′s quadricepsplasty where knee flexion range was less than 45°. The index injury in these patients was treated with plaster cast (n=5, plates (n=3, intramedullary nailing (n=3 and external fixator for open fractures (n=9. Thompson′s quadricepsplasty was performed in all the patients using anterior approach, with incision extending from upper thigh to tibial tubercle. Release of rectus femoris from underlying vastus intermedius and release of intraarticular adhesions were performed. After surgery the patients needed parentral analgesia for three days and then oral analgesics for three weeks. Active assisted knee mobilization exercises were started on the first post-operative day. Continous passive motion machine was used from the same day. Supervised physiotherapy was continued in hospital for six weeks followed by intensive knee flexion and extension exercise including cycling at home for atleast another six months. Results : Out of 22 patients, 20 had excellent to good results and two patients had poor results using criteria devised by Judet. One poor result was due to peroperative fracture of patella which was then internally fixed and hence the flexion of knee could not be started immediately. There was peroperative avulsion of tibial tuberosity in another patient who finally gained less than 50° knee flexion and hence a poor result. Conclusion : Thompsons quadricepsplasty followed by a strict and rigourous

  14. In-situ fracture stiffness determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-situ experiments to determine the hydrologic and mechanical characteristics of large naturally occurring fractures have been conducted at the NAGRA test site in Grimsel, Switzerland. In addition to seismic measurements across a fracture resulting from pressurization of the zone was also measured. The deformation is modeled in three different ways: as a mathematical crack employing linear elastic fracture mechanics; as a mathematical crack with an additional restraining stiffness between the faces of the crack, and as a row of coplanar two-dimensional cracks. 6 refs., 6 figs

  15. POST-TRAUMATIC STIFFNESS OF THE ELBOW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filh, Geraldo Motta; Galvão, Marcus Vinicius

    2015-01-01

    Elbow stiffness is a common problem after joint trauma, causing functional impairment of the upper limb. The severity of the dysfunction depends on the nature of the initial trauma and the treatment used. Appropriate clinical evaluation and complementary examinations are essential for therapeutic planning. Several surgical techniques are now available and the recommendation must be made in accordance with patient characteristics, degree of joint limitation and the surgeon's skill. Joint incongruence and degeneration have negative effects on the prognosis, but heterotrophic ossification alone has been correlated with a favorable surgical prognosis. PMID:27022563

  16. Rotor/bearing system dynamic stiffness measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    Sweep perturbation testing as used in Modal Analysis when applied to a rotating machine has to take into consideration the machine dynamic state of equilibrium at its operational rotative speed. This stands in contrasts to a static equilibrium of nonrotating structures. The rotational energy has a significant influence on rotor dynamic characteristics. The best perturbing input for rotating machines is a forward or reverse rotating, circular force applied directly to the shaft. Determination of Dynamic Stiffness Characteristics of the rotor bearing system by nonsynchronous perturbation of a symmetric rotating shaft supported in one relatively rigid and one oil lubricated bearing.

  17. The bend stiffness of S-DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Storm, C; Storm, Cornelis; Nelson, Philip

    2002-01-01

    We formulate and solve a two-state model for the elasticity of nicked, double-stranded DNA that borrows features from both the Worm Like Chain and the Bragg--Zimm model. Our model is computationally simple, and gives an excellent fit to recent experimental data through the entire overstretching transition. The fit gives the first value for the bending stiffness of the overstretched state as about 10 nm*kbt, a value quite different from either B-form or single-stranded DNA.

  18. Albedo Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-510, 11 October 2003The sharp, nearly straight line that runs diagonally across the center of this April 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image is an albedo boundary. Albedois a term that refers to reflectance of sunlight. A surface with a low albedo is one that appears dark because it reflects less light than a high albedo (bright) surface. On Mars, albedo boundaries occur between two materials of differing texture, particle size, or composition, or some combination of these three factors. The boundary shown here is remarkable because it is so sharp and straight. This is caused by wind. Most likely, the entire surface was once covered with the lower-albedo (darker) material that is now seen in the upper half of the image. At some later time, wind stripped away this darker material from the surfaces in the lower half of the image. The difference in albedo here might be related to composition, and possibly particle size. This picture is located near the southwest rim of Schiaparelli Basin at 5.5oS, 345.9oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  19. Elastic metamaterial beam with remotely tunable stiffness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Wei [University of Michigan–Shanghai Jiao Tong University Joint Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yu, Zhengyue [School of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wang, Xiaole [School of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Lai, Yun [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy & Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Yellen, Benjamin B., E-mail: yellen@duke.edu [University of Michigan–Shanghai Jiao Tong University Joint Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, P.O. Box 90300, Hudson Hall, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2016-02-07

    We demonstrate a dynamically tunable elastic metamaterial, which employs remote magnetic force to adjust its vibration absorption properties. The 1D metamaterial is constructed from a flat aluminum beam milled with a linear array of cylindrical holes. The beam is backed by a thin elastic membrane, on which thin disk-shaped permanent magnets are mounted. When excited by a shaker, the beam motion is tracked by a Laser Doppler Vibrometer, which conducts point by point scanning of the vibrating element. Elastic waves are unable to propagate through the beam when the driving frequency excites the first elastic bending mode in the unit cell. At these frequencies, the effective mass density of the unit cell becomes negative, which induces an exponentially decaying evanescent wave. Due to the non-linear elastic properties of the membrane, the effective stiffness of the unit cell can be tuned with an external magnetic force from nearby solenoids. Measurements of the linear and cubic static stiffness terms of the membrane are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements of the bandgap shift as a function of the applied force. In this implementation, bandgap shifts by as much as 40% can be achieved with ∼30 mN of applied magnetic force. This structure has potential for extension in 2D and 3D, providing a general approach for building dynamically tunable elastic metamaterials for applications in lensing and guiding elastic waves.

  20. Multifunctional Stiff Carbon Foam Derived from Bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ye; Ding, Yujie; Wang, Chunhui; Xu, Fan; Lin, Zaishan; Qin, Yuyang; Li, Ying; Yang, Minglong; He, Xiaodong; Peng, Qingyu; Li, Yibin

    2016-07-01

    The creation of stiff yet multifunctional three-dimensional porous carbon architecture at very low cost is still challenging. In this work, lightweight and stiff carbon foam (CF) with adjustable pore structure was prepared by using flour as the basic element via a simple fermentation and carbonization process. The compressive strength of CF exhibits a high value of 3.6 MPa whereas its density is 0.29 g/cm(3) (compressive modulus can be 121 MPa). The electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness measurements (specific EMI shielding effectiveness can be 78.18 dB·cm(3)·g(-1)) indicate that CF can be used as lightweight, effective shielding material. Unlike ordinary foam structure materials, the low thermal conductivity (lowest is 0.06 W/m·K) with high resistance to fire makes CF a good candidate for commercial thermal insulation material. These results demonstrate a promising method to fabricate an economical, robust carbon material for applications in industry as well as topics regarding environmental protection and improvement of energy efficiency. PMID:27295106

  1. Elastic metamaterial beam with remotely tunable stiffness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate a dynamically tunable elastic metamaterial, which employs remote magnetic force to adjust its vibration absorption properties. The 1D metamaterial is constructed from a flat aluminum beam milled with a linear array of cylindrical holes. The beam is backed by a thin elastic membrane, on which thin disk-shaped permanent magnets are mounted. When excited by a shaker, the beam motion is tracked by a Laser Doppler Vibrometer, which conducts point by point scanning of the vibrating element. Elastic waves are unable to propagate through the beam when the driving frequency excites the first elastic bending mode in the unit cell. At these frequencies, the effective mass density of the unit cell becomes negative, which induces an exponentially decaying evanescent wave. Due to the non-linear elastic properties of the membrane, the effective stiffness of the unit cell can be tuned with an external magnetic force from nearby solenoids. Measurements of the linear and cubic static stiffness terms of the membrane are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements of the bandgap shift as a function of the applied force. In this implementation, bandgap shifts by as much as 40% can be achieved with ∼30 mN of applied magnetic force. This structure has potential for extension in 2D and 3D, providing a general approach for building dynamically tunable elastic metamaterials for applications in lensing and guiding elastic waves

  2. Elastic metamaterial beam with remotely tunable stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei; Yu, Zhengyue; Wang, Xiaole; Lai, Yun; Yellen, Benjamin B.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate a dynamically tunable elastic metamaterial, which employs remote magnetic force to adjust its vibration absorption properties. The 1D metamaterial is constructed from a flat aluminum beam milled with a linear array of cylindrical holes. The beam is backed by a thin elastic membrane, on which thin disk-shaped permanent magnets are mounted. When excited by a shaker, the beam motion is tracked by a Laser Doppler Vibrometer, which conducts point by point scanning of the vibrating element. Elastic waves are unable to propagate through the beam when the driving frequency excites the first elastic bending mode in the unit cell. At these frequencies, the effective mass density of the unit cell becomes negative, which induces an exponentially decaying evanescent wave. Due to the non-linear elastic properties of the membrane, the effective stiffness of the unit cell can be tuned with an external magnetic force from nearby solenoids. Measurements of the linear and cubic static stiffness terms of the membrane are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements of the bandgap shift as a function of the applied force. In this implementation, bandgap shifts by as much as 40% can be achieved with ˜30 mN of applied magnetic force. This structure has potential for extension in 2D and 3D, providing a general approach for building dynamically tunable elastic metamaterials for applications in lensing and guiding elastic waves.

  3. Chorein Sensitivity of Actin Polymerization, Cell Shape and Mechanical Stiffness of Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Alesutan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Endothelial cell stiffness plays a key role in endothelium-dependent control of vascular tone and arterial blood pressure. Actin polymerization and distribution of microfilaments is essential for mechanical cell stiffness. Chorein, a protein encoded by the VPS13A gene, defective in chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc, is involved in neuronal cell survival as well as cortical actin polymerization of erythrocytes and blood platelets. Chorein is expressed in a wide variety of further cells, yet nothing is known about the impact of chorein on cells other than neurons, erythrocytes and platelets. The present study explored whether chorein is expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and addressed the putative role of chorein in the regulation of cytoskeletal architecture, stiffness and survival of those cells. Methods: In HUVECs with or without silencing of the VPS13A gene, VPS13A mRNA expression was determined utilizing quantitative RT-PCR, cytoskeletal organization visualized by confocal microscopy, G/F actin ratio and phosphorylation status of focal adhesion kinase quantified by western blotting, cell death determined by flow cytometry, mechanical properties studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM and cell morphology analysed by scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM. Results: VPS13A mRNA expression was detectable in HUVECs. Silencing of the VPS13A gene attenuated the filamentous actin network, decreased the ratio of soluble G-actin over filamentous F-actin, reduced cell stiffness and changed cell morphology as compared to HUVECs silenced with negative control siRNA. These effects were paralleled by a significant decrease in FAK phosphorylation following VPS13A silencing. Moreover, silencing of the VPS13A gene increased caspase 3 activity and induced necrosis in HUVECs. Conclusions: Chorein is a novel regulator of cytoskeletal architecture, cell shape, mechanical stiffness and survival of vascular endothelial cells.

  4. Estimation of Hysteretic Interfacial Stiffness of Contact Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nohyu [Dept. of Mechatronic Engineering, Korea University of Technology and Education, Chunan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    This paper proposes an ultrasonic method for measurement of linear and hysteretic interfacial stiffness of contacting surfaces between two steel plates subjected to nominal compression pressure. Interfacial stiffness was evaluated by the reflection and transmission coefficients obtained from three consecutive reflection waves from solid-solid surface using the shear wave. A nonlinear hysteretic spring model was proposed and used to define the quantitative interfacial stiffness of interface with the reflection and transmission coefficients. Acoustic model for 1-D wave propagation across interfaces is developed to formulate the reflection and transmission waves and to determine the linear and nonlinear hysteretic interfacial stiffness. Two identical plates are put together to form a contacting surface and pressed by bolt-fastening to measure interfacial stiffness at different states of contact pressure. It is found from experiment that the linear and hysteretic interfacial stiffness are successfully determined by the reflection and transmission coefficient at the contact surfaces through ultrasonic pulse-echo measurement.

  5. Is tendon stiffness correlated to the dissipation coefficient?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of Achilles tendon mechanical properties in vivo has received much attention in the literature. Many studies investigated mechanical properties by assessing tendon stiffness. Despite tendon dissipative properties being representative of a storage-recoil process, its determination has received minimal attention in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine if Achilles tendon stiffness is associated with dissipative properties. The cross-sectional area, stiffness and dissipation coefficient of the Achilles tendon were measured in 35 subjects. No significant correlation was found between stiffness and the dissipation coefficient, irrespective of stiffness normalization with cross-sectional area (P > 0.05). Thus, it appears that both stiffness and dissipative properties must be assessed to determine the storage-recoil process capacities of the Achilles tendon in order to precisely characterize changes in the tendon mechanical properties after chronic interventions or rehabilitation programs. (note)

  6. ARTERIAL STIFFNESS AND CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Kobalava

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. CKD is characterized by accelerated aging of vessels in which the age-related arterial stiffness increase is exacerbated by a number of uremia-related processes. Increased arterial stiffness is associated with structural and functional disorders, as well as with the increase in cardiovascular mortality in patients with CKD. Increased arterial stiffness is diagnosed at an early stage of CKD. Modern understanding of the mechanisms of increased risk of cardiovascular complications in CKD, the factors contributing to the loss of elasticity of the arteries, arterial stiffness increase consequences are analyzed. Data illustrating the twoway interaction between CKD and arterial stiffness and mechanisms of accelerated progression of arterial stiffness in CKD are presented.

  7. Stiff-system problems and solutions at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindmarsh, A.C.

    1982-03-01

    Difficult stiff system problems encountered at LLNL are typified by those arising from various atmospheric kinetics models, which include reaction kinetics and transport in up to two space dimensions. Approaches devised for these problems resulted in several general purpose stiff system solvers. These have since evolved into a new systematized collection of solvers, called ODEPACK, based on backward differentiation formulas in the stiff case. A model kinetics-transport problem is used to illustrate the various solvers.

  8. Arterial stiffness, hypertension, and rational use of nebivolol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Agabiti-Rosei

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Enrico Agabiti-Rosei, Enzo Porteri, Damiano RizzoniClinica Medica, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Brescia, ItalyAbstract: Arterial stiffness plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system. Some indices of arterial stiffness (pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, characteristics of central blood pressure waveform may be presently calculated and evaluated in the clinical setting. Age and blood pressure are the two major clinical determinants of increased arterial stiffness, while molecular determinants of arterial stiffness are related to fibrotic components of the extracellular matrix, mainly elastin, collagen and fibronectin. Increased arterial stiffness has been consistently observed in conditions such as hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes. Arterial stiffness evaluated by means of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity yielded prognostic significance beyond and above traditional risk factors. A more favorable effect of calcium channel blockers, diuretics and ACE inhibitors compared with β-blockers on indices of arterial stiffness was observed in several studies. It is conceivable that newer β-blockers with additional vasodilating properties, such as nebivolol, which has favorable effects on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, as well as on endothelial function and on oxidative stress, may have favorable effects on arterial stiffness, compared with atenolol. In fact, in recent studies, nebivolol was demonstrated to improve artery stiffness to a greater extent than older β-blockers. Because endothelial dysfunction and increased arterial stiffness play an important role in the early atherosclerotic processes and are associated with poor outcomes and increased mortality, independently of blood pressure, the ability of nebivolol to enhance release of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, and consequently improve endothelial function and arterial stiffness, may have significant clinical

  9. Cartesian stiffness matrix of manipulators with passive joints: analytical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Pashkevich, Anatoly; Caro, Stéphane; Chablat, Damien

    2011-01-01

    The paper focuses on stiffness matrix computation for manipulators with passive joints. It proposes both explicit analytical expressions and an efficient recursive procedure that are applicable in general case and allow obtaining the desired matrix either in analytical or numerical form. Advantages of the developed technique and its ability to produce both singular and non-singular stiffness matrices are illustrated by application examples that deal with stiffness modeling of two Stewart-Gough platforms.

  10. Stiffness matrix of manipulators with passive joints: computational aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Klimchik, Alexandr; Caro, Stéphane; Chablat, Damien; 10.1109/TRO.2012.2187395

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on stiffness matrix computation for manipulators with passive joints, compliant actuators and flexible links. It proposes both explicit analytical expressions and an efficient recursive procedure that are applicable in the general case and allow obtaining the desired matrix either in analytical or numerical form. Advantages of the developed technique and its ability to produce both singular and non-singular stiffness matrices are illustrated by application examples that deal with stiffness modeling of two Stewart-Gough platforms.

  11. Lateral Stiffness of Unreinforced Masonry Circular Columns under Cracked Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    GÜREL, M. Arif

    2006-01-01

    Both walls and columns are main structural elements of monumental buildings. In resisting seismic forces, the lateral stiffness of these elements is an essential parameter. Earthquakes may cause cracks in the masonry, and this reduces the lateral stiffness of the walls and columns. Using an efficient numerical model, this study investigates the effects of cracking on the lateral stiffness of unreinforced masonry cantilever columns with circular cross-section. On the basis of the ob...

  12. Method for estimating tyre cornering stiffness from basic tyre information

    OpenAIRE

    Hewson, P

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a simple mathematical tyre model that estimates tyre cornering stiffness. The model is derived by considering the tyre to be a combination of two independent systems. The sidewalls are assumed to be negligibly stiff in the lateral direction, and hence their influence on the lateral dynamics of the tyre will be ignored. The belt and tread area of the tyre will be considered to be an homogeneous uniform band, and its stiffness will be estimated with reference to measured tyr...

  13. Stiffness calculation and application of spline-ball bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bo-Zhong; Zhou, Yu-Ming; Yang, De-Hua

    2006-12-01

    Spline-ball bearing is widely adopted in large precision instruments because of its distinctive performance. For the sake of carrying out detail investigation of a full instrument system, practical stiffness formulae of such bearing are introduced with elastic contact mechanics, which are successfully applied for calculating the stiffness of the bearing used in astronomical telescope. Appropriate treatment of the stiffness of such bearing in the finite element analysis is also discussed and illustrated.

  14. Aortic stiffness: pathophysiology, clinical implications, and approach to treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sethi S; Rivera O.; Oliveros R; Chilton R

    2014-01-01

    Salil Sethi, Oscar Rivera, Rene Oliveros, Robert Chilton University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, USA Abstract: Aortic stiffness is a hallmark of aging, and classic cardiovascular risk factors play a role in accelerating this process. Current changes in medicine, which focus on preventive care, have led to a growing interest in noninvasive evaluation of aortic stiffness. Aortic stiffness has emerged as a good tool for further risk stratification because it has been linked ...

  15. Arterial stiffness and chronic kidney disease: causes and consequences

    OpenAIRE

    J.D. Kobalava; Yu.V. Kotovskaya; S.V. Villevalde; A.E.Soloveva; I.M. Amirbegishvili

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. CKD is characterized by accelerated aging of vessels in which the age-related arterial stiffness increase is exacerbated by a number of uremia-related processes. Increased arterial stiffness is associated with structural and functional disorders, as well as with the increase in cardiovascular mortality in patients with CKD. Increased arterial stiffness is diagnosed at an early stage of CKD. Modern understanding of ...

  16. Smooth Muscle Cell Mineralocorticoid Receptors Are Mandatory for Aldosterone–Salt to Induce Vascular Stiffness

    OpenAIRE

    Galmiche, Guillaume; Pizard, Anne; Gueret, Alexandre; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Ouvrard-Pascaud, Antoine; Berger, Stefan; Challande, Pascal; Jaffe, Iris Z.; Labat, Carlos; Lacolley, Patrick; Jaisser, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is recognized as a risk factor for many cardiovascular diseases. Aldosterone via its binding to and activation of the mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) is a main regulator of blood pressure by controlling renal sodium reabsorption. Although both clinical and experimental data indicate that MR activation by aldosterone is involved in arterial stiffening, the molecular mechanism is not known. In addition to the kidney, MR is expressed in both endothelial and vascular smooth m...

  17. Stiffness and Adhesivity Control Aortic Valve Interstitial Cell Behavior within Hyaluronic Acid Based Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A.; Kapetanovic, Edi; Kang, Kevin H.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive and biodegradable hydrogels that mimic the extracellular matrix and regulate valve interstitial cells (VIC) behavior are of great interest as three dimensional (3D) model systems for understanding mechanisms of valvular heart disease pathogenesis in vitro and the basis for regenerative templates for tissue engineering. However, the role of stiffness and adhesivity of hydrogels in VIC behavior remains poorly understood. This study reports synthesis of oxidized and methacrylated hyalu...

  18. Synthesis of stiffness and mass matrices from experimental vibration modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    With highly complex structures, it is sometimes desirable to derive a dynamic model of the system from experimental vibration data. This paper presents algorithms for synthesizing the mass and stiffness matrices from experimentally derived modal data in a way which preserves the physical significance of the individual mass and stiffness elements. The synthesizing procedures allow for the incorporation of other mass and stiffness data, whether empirical or based on the analyst's insight. The mass and stiffness matrices are derived for a cantilever beam example and are compared with those obtained using earlier techniques.

  19. Tensile Stiffness Analysis on Ocean Dynamic Power Umbilical

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤明刚; 阎军; 王野; 岳前进

    2014-01-01

    Tensile stiffness of ocean dynamic power umbilical is an important design parameter for functional implementation and structural safety. A column with radial stiffness which is wound by helical steel wires is constructed to predict the tensile stiffness value of umbilicals in the paper. The relationship between the tension and axial deformation is expressed analytically so the radial contraction of the column is achieved in the relationship by use of a simple finite element method. With an agreement between the theoretical prediction and the tension test results, the method is proved to be simple and efficient for the estimation of tensile stiffness of the ocean dynamic power umbilical.

  20. Low frequency noise reduction using stiff light composite panels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Yongchang; LIN Weizheng

    2003-01-01

    The experiment presented in this paper is to investigate and analyze the noise reduction at low frequency using stiff light composite panels. Since these composite panels are made of lightweight and stiff materials, this actuation strategy will enable the creation of composite panels for duct noise control without using traditional heavy structural mass. The results suggest that the mass-spring resonance absorption in the case of a comparatively stiff thick panel with a thin flexible plate is more efficient with minimum weight, when subjected to low-frequency (<500 Hz). The efficiency of the panel absorber depends on the mass of the thin flexible plate and the stiffness of the panel.

  1. Stiffness Analysis Of Multi-Chain Parallel Robotic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Pashkevich, Anatoly; Wenger, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a new stiffness modelling method for multi-chain parallel robotic manipulators with flexible links and compliant actuating joints. In contrast to other works, the method involves a FEA-based link stiffness evaluation and employs a new solution strategy of the kinetostatic equations, which allows computing the stiffness matrix for singular postures and to take into account influence of the internal forces. The advantages of the developed technique are confirmed by application examples, which deal with stiffness analysis of the Orthoglide manipulator.

  2. Stiffness Analysis Of Multi-Chain Parallel Robotic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Pashkevich, Anatoly; Chablat, Damien; Wenger, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a new stiffness modelling method for multi-chain parallel robotic manipulators with flexible links and compliant actuating joints. In contrast to other works, the method involves a FEA-based link stiffness evaluation and employs a new solution strategy of the kinetostatic equations, which allows computing the stiffness matrix for singular postures and to take into account influence of the external forces. The advantages of the developed technique are confirmed by application examples, which deal with stiffness analysis of a parallel manipulator of the Orthoglide family

  3. Relationship of rolling bearing stiffness with diameter of roller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭茂林; 王刚; 张瑞

    2002-01-01

    The theoretical formula of roller bearing stiffness is induced and compared with its empirical formula.In the experience formula the stiffness of roller bearing has nothing to do with the roller diameter. The relation-ship of roller bearing stiffness with roller diameter was studied using Hz contacting theory. It is concluded thatconclusion in experience formula is only approximate result of data processing under special conditions, and therelation between stiffness of roller bearing and roller diameter must be taken into consideration while designingor selecting roller bearings.

  4. Boundary issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alan R.; Porder, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    What is our point of no return? Caesar proclaimed 'the die is cast' while crossing the Rubicon, but rarely does modern society find so visible a threshold in our continued degradation of ecosystems and the services they provide. Humans have always used their surroundings to make a living— sometimes successfully, sometimes not (Diamond 2005)—and we intuitively know that there are boundaries to our exploitation. But defining these boundaries has been a challenge since Malthus first prophesied that nature would limit the human population (Malthus 1798). In 2009, Rockström and colleagues tried to quantify what the 6.8 billion (and counting) of us could continue to get away with, and what we couldn't (Rockström et al 2009). In selecting ten 'planetary boundaries', the authors contend that a sustainable human enterprise requires treating a number of environmental thresholds as points of no return. They suggest we breach these Rubicons at our own peril, and that we've already crossed three: biodiversity loss, atmospheric CO2, and disruption of the global nitrogen (N) cycle. As they clearly hoped, the very act of setting targets has provoked scientific inquiry about their accuracy, and about the value of hard targets in the first place (Schlesinger 2009). Such debate is a good thing. Despite recent emphasis on the science of human-ecosystem interactions, understanding of our planetary boundaries is still in its infancy, and controversy can speed scientific progress (Engelhardt and Caplan 1987). A few weeks ago in this journal, Carpenter and Bennett (2011) took aim at one of the more controversial boundaries in the Rockström analysis: that for human alteration of the global phosphorus (P) cycle. Rockström's group chose riverine P export as the key indicator, suggesting that humans should not exceed a value that could trigger widespread marine anoxic events—and asserting that we have not yet crossed this threshold. There are defensible reasons for a marine

  5. Decoupling the role of stiffness from other hydroxyapatite signalling cues in periosteal derived stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Giorgio; Ferretti, Concetta; Tirella, Annalisa; Ahluwalia, Arti; Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Bone extracellular matrix (ECM) is a natural composite made of collagen and mineral hydroxyapatite (HA). Dynamic cell-ECM interactions play a critical role in regulating cell differentiation and function. Understanding the principal ECM cues promoting osteogenic differentiation would be pivotal for both bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Altering the mineral content generally modifies the stiffness as well as other physicochemical cues provided by composite materials, complicating the “cause-effect” analysis of resultant cell behaviour. To isolate the contribution of mechanical cues from other HA-derived signals, we developed and characterised composite HA/gelatin scaffolds with different mineral contents along with a set of stiffness-matched HA-free gelatin scaffolds. Samples were seeded with human periosteal derived progenitor cells (PDPCs) and cultured over 7 days, analysing their resultant morphology and gene expression. Our results show that both stiffness and HA contribute to directing PDPC osteogenic differentiation, highlighting the role of stiffness in triggering the expression of osteogenic genes and of HA in accelerating the process, particularly at high concentrations. PMID:26035412

  6. Efficient integration of stiff kinetics with phase change detection for reactive reservoir processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Rode; Gerritsen, Margot G.; Thomsen, Per Grove;

    2007-01-01

    convergence problems for the integration method. We propose an algorithm for detection and location of phase changes based on discrete event system theory. Experiments show that the algorithm improves the robustness of the integration process near phase boundaries by lowering the number convergence and error......We propose the use of implicit one-step Explicit Singly Diagonal Implicit Runge-Kutta (ESDIRK) methods for integration of the stiff kinetics in reactive, compositional and thermal processes that are solved using operator-splitting type approaches. To facilitate the algorithmic development we...... test failures by more than 50% compared to direct integration without the new algorithm....

  7. The Role of the Regulated Sector in the UK Anti-Money Laundering Framework: Pushing the Boundaries of the Private Police

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Egan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that the conceptualisation of private police in current academic literature requires expansion to accommodate the role of the regulated sector in the Anti- Money Laundering (AML framework. Firstly, it evaluates the literature on ‘private police’ and argues that its current parameters are too narrow to accommodate the ‘policing’ role of the regulated sector. Secondly, it lays out the legislative framework that has developed to deal with the problem of money laundering. Thirdly, it contextualises the role of the regulated sector, examining the domestic inter-agency policing relationships within the suspicious activity regime as operationalised in Scotland. Finally, it takes a closer look at how the courts have interpreted the ‘failure to report offence’ under s330 of the Proceeds of Crime Act (POCA 2002 and its consequential effect on the engagement of the regulated sector with the SARs regime.

  8. Regulation of Stem Cell Proliferation and Cell Fate Specification by Wingless/Wnt Signaling Gradients Enriched at Adult Intestinal Compartment Boundaries.

    OpenAIRE

    Ai Tian; Hassina Benchabane; Zhenghan Wang; Yashi Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal stem cell (ISC) self-renewal and proliferation are directed by Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mammals, whereas aberrant Wnt pathway activation in ISCs triggers the development of human colorectal carcinoma. Herein, we have utilized the Drosophila midgut, a powerful model for ISC regulation, to elucidate the mechanisms by which Wingless (Wg)/Wnt regulates intestinal homeostasis and development. We provide evidence that the Wg signaling pathway, activation of which peaks at each of the m...

  9. Salt-induced aggregation of stiff polyelectrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulation techniques are used to study the process of aggregation of highly charged stiff polyelectrolytes due to the presence of multivalent salt. The dominant kinetic mode of aggregation is found to be the case of one end of one polyelectrolyte meeting others at right angles, and the kinetic pathway to bundle formation is found to be similar to that of flocculation dynamics of colloids as described by Smoluchowski. The aggregation process is found to favor the formation of finite bundles of 10-11 filaments at long times. Comparing the distribution of the cluster sizes with the Smoluchowski formula suggests that the energy barrier for the aggregation process is negligible. Also, the formation of long-lived metastable structures with similarities to the raft-like structures of actin filaments is observed within a range of salt concentration.

  10. Cellular mechanoadaptation to substrate mechanical properties: contributions of substrate stiffness and thickness to cell stiffness measurements using AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichare, Shirish; Sen, Shamik; Inamdar, Mandar M

    2014-02-28

    Mechanosensing by adherent cells is usually studied by quantifying cell responses on hydrogels that are covalently linked to a rigid substrate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) represents a convenient way of characterizing the mechanoadaptation response of adherent cells on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Since AFM measurements reflect the effective cell stiffness, therefore, in addition to measuring real cytoskeletal alterations across different conditions, these measurements might also be influenced by the geometry and physical properties of the substrate itself. To better understand how the physical attributes of the gel influence AFM stiffness measurements of cells, we have used finite element analysis to simulate the indentation of cells of various spreads resting on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Consistent with experimental results, our simulation results indicate that for well spread cells, stiffness values are significantly over-estimated when experiments are performed on cells cultured on soft and thin gels. Using parametric studies, we have developed scaling relationships between the effective stiffness probed by AFM and the bulk cell stiffness, taking cell and tip geometry, hydrogel properties, nuclear stiffness and cell contractility into account. Finally, using simulated mechanoadaptation responses, we have demonstrated that a cell stiffening response may arise purely due to the substrate properties. Collectively, our results demonstrate the need to take hydrogel properties into account while estimating cell stiffness using AFM indentation. PMID:24651595

  11. Three-dimensional stiffness of the carpal arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabra, Joseph N; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The carpal arch of the wrist is formed by irregularly shaped carpal bones interconnected by numerous ligaments, resulting in complex structural mechanics. The purpose of this study was to determine the three-dimensional stiffness characteristics of the carpal arch using displacement perturbations. It was hypothesized that the carpal arch would exhibit an anisotropic stiffness behavior with principal directions that are oblique to the conventional anatomical axes. Eight (n=8) cadavers were used in this study. For each specimen, the hamate was fixed to a custom stationary apparatus. An instrumented robot arm applied three-dimensional displacement perturbations to the ridge of trapezium and corresponding reaction forces were collected. The displacement-force data were used to determine a three-dimensional stiffness matrix using least squares fitting. Eigendecomposition of the stiffness matrix was used to identify the magnitudes and directions of the principal stiffness components. The carpal arch structure exhibited anisotropic stiffness behaviors with a maximum principal stiffness of 16.4±4.6N/mm that was significantly larger than the other principal components of 3.1±0.9 and 2.6±0.5N/mm (p<0.001). The principal direction of the maximum stiffness was pronated within the cross section of the carpal tunnel which is accounted for by the stiff transverse ligaments that tightly bind distal carpal arch. The minimal principal stiffness is attributed to the less constraining articulation between the trapezium and scaphoid. This study provides advanced characterization of the wrist׳s three-dimensional structural stiffness for improved insight into wrist biomechanics, stability, and function. PMID:26617368

  12. Physically Inspired Models for the Synthesis of Stiff Strings with Dispersive Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Testa I

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the derivation and design of digital waveguides from physical models of stiff systems, useful for the synthesis of sounds from strings, rods, and similar objects. A transform method approach is proposed to solve the classic fourth-order equations of stiff systems in order to reduce it to two second-order equations. By introducing scattering boundary matrices, the eigenfrequencies are determined and their dependency is discussed for the clamped, hinged, and intermediate cases. On the basis of the frequency-domain physical model, the numerical discretization is carried out, showing how the insertion of an all-pass delay line generalizes the Karplus-Strong algorithm for the synthesis of ideally flexible vibrating strings. Knowing the physical parameters, the synthesis can proceed using the generalized structure. Another point of view is offered by Laguerre expansions and frequency warping, which are introduced in order to show that a stiff system can be treated as a nonstiff one, provided that the solutions are warped. A method to compute the all-pass chain coefficients and the optimum warping curves from sound samples is discussed. Once the optimum warping characteristic is found, the length of the dispersive delay line to be employed in the simulation is simply determined from the requirement of matching the desired fundamental frequency. The regularization of the dispersion curves by means of optimum unwarping is experimentally evaluated.

  13. Dynamic stiffness matrix of thin-walled composite I-beam with symmetric and arbitrary laminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Il; Shin, Dong Ku; Park, Young-Suk

    2008-11-01

    For the spatially coupled free vibration analysis of thin-walled composite I-beam with symmetric and arbitrary laminations, the exact dynamic stiffness matrix based on the solution of the simultaneous ordinary differential equations is presented. For this, a general theory for the vibration analysis of composite beam with arbitrary lamination including the restrained warping torsion is developed by introducing Vlasov's assumption. Next, the equations of motion and force-displacement relationships are derived from the energy principle and the first order of transformed simultaneous differential equations are constructed by using the displacement state vector consisting of 14 displacement parameters. Then explicit expressions for displacement parameters are derived and the exact dynamic stiffness matrix is determined using force-displacement relationships. In addition, the finite-element (FE) procedure based on Hermitian interpolation polynomials is developed. To verify the validity and the accuracy of this study, the numerical solutions are presented and compared with analytical solutions, the results from available references and the FE analysis using the thin-walled Hermitian beam elements. Particular emphasis is given in showing the phenomenon of vibrational mode change, the effects of increase of the modulus and the bending-twisting coupling stiffness for beams with various boundary conditions.

  14. Functional bacterial amyloid increases Pseudomonas biofilm hydrophobicity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Vad, Brian Stougaard; Dueholm, Morten Simonsen;

    2015-01-01

    and increases biofilm stiffness 20-fold. Deletion of any one of the individual members of in the fap operon (except the putative chaperone FapA) abolishes this ability to increase biofilm stiffness and correlates with the loss of amyloid. We conclude that amyloid makes major contributions to biofilm...

  15. Mechanically stiff, electrically conductive composites of polymers and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Hamza, Alex V.

    2015-07-21

    Using SWNT-CA as scaffolds to fabricate stiff, highly conductive polymer (PDMS) composites. The SWNT-CA is immersing in a polymer resin to produce a SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin. The SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin is cured to produce the stiff and electrically conductive composite of carbon nanotube aerogel and polymer.

  16. Spin stiffness of graphene and zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Jun-Won; Moon, Kyungsun

    2010-03-01

    We theoretically study the spin stiffness of graphene and graphene nanoribbon based on the Hubbard-type Hamiltonian. Using the Hartree-Fock method with the inclusion of the adiabatic spin twist, we have obtained the effective energy functional and investigated the magnetic excitations of the two-dimensional graphene and zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR). We have analyzed the spin stiffness of the system with varying temperature and the strength of on-site Coulomb repulsion. For ZGNR, we have also studied the effect of the lateral electric field on the spin stiffness. As the field increases, the spin stiffness decreases and reaches less than the half of the zero-field value. However, we remarkably notice that there exists a critical value of the electric field above which the stiffness starts to increase showing a cusp-like behavior. This critical point is found to coincide exactly with the metal-insulator transition point of ZGNR.

  17. LeftyA decreases Actin Polymerization and Stiffness in Human Endometrial Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salker, Madhuri S.; Schierbaum, Nicolas; Alowayed, Nour; Singh, Yogesh; Mack, Andreas F.; Stournaras, Christos; Schäffer, Tilman E.; Lang, Florian

    2016-01-01

    LeftyA, a cytokine regulating stemness and embryonic differentiation, down-regulates cell proliferation and migration. Cell proliferation and motility require actin reorganization, which is under control of ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and p21 protein-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). The present study explored whether LeftyA modifies actin cytoskeleton, shape and stiffness of Ishikawa cells, a well differentiated endometrial carcinoma cell line. The effect of LeftyA on globular over filamentous actin ratio was determined utilizing Western blotting and flow cytometry. Rac1 and PAK1 transcript levels were measured by qRT-PCR as well as active Rac1 and PAK1 by immunoblotting. Cell stiffness (quantified by the elastic modulus), cell surface area and cell volume were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). As a result, 2 hours treatment with LeftyA (25 ng/ml) significantly decreased Rac1 and PAK1 transcript levels and activity, depolymerized actin, and decreased cell stiffness, surface area and volume. The effect of LeftyA on actin polymerization was mimicked by pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 and PAK1. In the presence of the Rac1 or PAK1 inhibitor LeftyA did not lead to significant further actin depolymerization. In conclusion, LeftyA leads to disruption of Rac1 and Pak1 activity with subsequent actin depolymerization, cell softening and cell shrinkage. PMID:27404958

  18. Efficient Method for Calculating the Composite Stiffness of Parabolic Leaf Springs with Variable Stiffness for Vehicle Rear Suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-ku Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The composite stiffness of parabolic leaf springs with variable stiffness is difficult to calculate using traditional integral equations. Numerical integration or FEA may be used but will require computer-aided software and long calculation times. An efficient method for calculating the composite stiffness of parabolic leaf springs with variable stiffness is developed and evaluated to reduce the complexity of calculation and shorten the calculation time. A simplified model for double-leaf springs with variable stiffness is built, and a composite stiffness calculation method for the model is derived using displacement superposition and material deformation continuity. The proposed method can be applied on triple-leaf and multileaf springs. The accuracy of the calculation method is verified by the rig test and FEA analysis. Finally, several parameters that should be considered during the design process of springs are discussed. The rig test and FEA analytical results indicate that the calculated results are acceptable. The proposed method can provide guidance for the design and production of parabolic leaf springs with variable stiffness. The composite stiffness of the leaf spring can be calculated quickly and accurately when the basic parameters of the leaf spring are known.

  19. Controlled Unusual Stiffness of Mechanical Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wooju; Kang, Da-Young; Song, Jihwan; Moon, Jun Hyuk; Kim, Dongchoul

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical metamaterials that are engineered with sub-unit structures present unusual mechanical properties depending on the loading direction. Although they show promise, their practical utility has so far been somewhat limited because, to the best of our knowledge, no study about the potential of mechanical metamaterials made from sophisticatedly tailored sub-unit structures has been made. Here, we present a mechanical metamaterial whose mechanical properties can be systematically designed without changing its chemical composition or weight. We study the mechanical properties of triply periodic bicontinuous structures whose detailed sub-unit structure can be precisely fabricated using various sub-micron fabrication methods. Simulation results show that the effective wave velocity of the structures along with different directions can be designed to introduce the anisotropy of stiffness by changing a volume fraction and aspect ratio. The ratio of Young’s modulus to shear modulus can be increased by up to at least 100, which is a 3500% increase over that of isotropic material (2.8, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene). Furthermore, Poisson’s ratio of the constituent material changes the ratio while Young’s modulus does not influence it. This study presents the promising potential of mechanical metamaterials for versatile industrial and biomedical applications.

  20. Stiffness and Angular Deflection analysis of Revolute Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pundru Srinivasa Rao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed to determine the Cartesian stiffness matrix and angular deflection analysis of revolute manipulator. The selected manipulator has rigid fixed link, two movable links and two rotary joints with joint stiffness coefficients are taken into account. The kinematic model of revolute joint manipulator has considered as a planar kinematic chain, which is composed by rigid fixed link and two revolute joints with clearance and deformable elements. The calculation of stiffness matrix depends on Jacobian matrix and change of configuration. The rotational joints are modeled as torsion springs with the same stiffness constant. The relative angular deflections are proportional to the actuated torques taken into account. The subject of this paper has to describe a method for stiffness analysis of serial manipulator. In the present work is to derive the stiffness matrix and angular deflection equations in the Robotic manipulator under the consideration of two-link optimum geometry model for rotary joint manipulator. The stiffness values are measured by displacements of its revolute links loaded by force.

  1. Simvastatin Ameliorates Matrix Stiffness-Mediated Endothelial Monolayer Disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha C Lampi

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffening accompanies both aging and atherosclerosis, and age-related stiffening of the arterial intima increases RhoA activity and cell contractility contributing to increased endothelium permeability. Notably, statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors whose pleiotropic effects include disrupting small GTPase activity; therefore, we hypothesized the statin simvastatin could be used to attenuate RhoA activity and inhibit the deleterious effects of increased age-related matrix stiffness on endothelial barrier function. Using polyacrylamide gels with stiffnesses of 2.5, 5, and 10 kPa to mimic the physiological stiffness of young and aged arteries, endothelial cells were grown to confluence and treated with simvastatin. Our data indicate that RhoA and phosphorylated myosin light chain activity increase with matrix stiffness but are attenuated when treated with the statin. Increases in cell contractility, cell-cell junction size, and indirect measurements of intercellular tension that increase with matrix stiffness, and are correlated with matrix stiffness-dependent increases in monolayer permeability, also decrease with statin treatment. Furthermore, we report that simvastatin increases activated Rac1 levels that contribute to endothelial barrier enhancing cytoskeletal reorganization. Simvastatin, which is prescribed clinically due to its ability to lower cholesterol, alters the endothelial cell response to increased matrix stiffness to restore endothelial monolayer barrier function, and therefore, presents a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent atherogenesis initiated by age-related arterial stiffening.

  2. Stiffness identification of four-point-elastic-support rigid plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭利平; 刘初升; 武继达; 王帅

    2015-01-01

    As the stiffness of the elastic support varies with the physical-chemical erosion and mechanical friction, model catastrophe of a single degree-of-freedom (DOF) isolation system may occur. A 3-DOF four-point-elastic-support rigid plate (FERP) structure is presented to describe the catastrophic isolation system. Based on the newly-established structure, theoretical derivation for stiffness matrix calculation by free response (SMCbyFR) and the method of stiffness identification by stiffness matrix disassembly (SIbySMD) are proposed. By integrating the SMCbyFR and the SIbySMD and defining the stiffness assurance criterion (SAC), the procedures for stiffness identification of a FERP structure (SIFERP) are summarized. Then, a numerical example is adopted for the SIFERP validation, in which the simulated tested free response data are generated by the numerical methods, and operation for filtering noise is conducted to imitate the practical application. Results in the numerical example demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of the developed SIFERP for stiffness identification.

  3. Stiffness analysis of parallel leaf-spring flexures

    OpenAIRE

    Brouwer, D. M.; Meijaard, J.P.; Jonker, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    Approximate straight displacements are often made using a parallel leaf-spring flexure. This flexure serves as a typical case for studying the influence of shear and the compliance of the reinforced mid sections of the leaf-springs in the support stiffnesses cz and cy. The conclusions drawn, however, hold true for the rotational stiffness crx also, while the stiffness in the ry and rz direction can be approximated based on cz and cy. It turns out that shear plays an important role for short r...

  4. PARALLEL COMPOUND METHODS FOR SOLVING PARTITIONED STIFF SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-rong Chen; De-gui Liu

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the solution of partitioned systems of nonlinear stiff differential equations. Given a differential system, the user may specify some equations to be stiff and others to be nonstiff. For the numerical solution of such a system Parallel Compound Methods(PCMs) are studied. Nonstiff equations are integrated by a parallel explicit RK method while a parallel Rosenbrock method is used for the stiff part of the system. Their order conditions, their convergence and their numerical stability are discussed,and the numerical tests are conducted on a personal computer and a parallel computer.

  5. Heart Rate Dependency of Large Artery Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Isabella; Spronck, Bart; Kiat, Hosen; Barin, Edward; Reesink, Koen D; Delhaas, Tammo; Avolio, Alberto P; Butlin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) quantifies large artery stiffness, it is used in hemodynamic research and is considered a useful cardiovascular clinical marker. cfPWV is blood pressure (BP) dependent. Intrinsic heart rate (HR) dependency of cfPWV is unknown because increasing HR is commonly accompanied by increasing BP. This study aims to quantify cfPWV dependency on acute, sympathovagal-independent changes in HR, independent of BP. Individuals (n=52, age 40-93 years, 11 female) with in situ cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators were paced at 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 bpm. BP and cfPWV were measured at each HR. Both cfPWV (mean [95% CI], 0.31 [0.26-0.37] m/s per 10 bpm; Parea; and (3) using measured BP dependency of cfPWV derived from changes in BP induced by orthostatic changes (seated and supine) in a subset of subjects (n=17). The BP-independent effects of HR on cfPWV were quantified as 0.20 [0.11-0.28] m/s per 10 bpm (P<0.001, method 1), 0.16 [0.11-0.22] m/s per 10 bpm (P<0.001, method 2), and 0.16 [0.11-0.21] m/s per 10 bpm (P<0.001, method 3). With a mean HR dependency in the range of 0.16 to 0.20 m/s per 10 bpm, cfPWV may be considered to have minimal physiologically relevant changes for small changes in HR, but larger differences in HR must be considered as contributing to significant differences in cfPWV. PMID:27245180

  6. Stiffness Analysis and Optimization of a Co-axial Spherical Parallel Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanglei Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the stiffness characteristics of spherical parallel manipulators. By virtue of singular value decomposition, the 6x6 dimensionally inhomogeneous Cartesian stiffness matrix is transformed into two homogeneous ones, i.e., the rotational and translational stiffness matrices. The decomposed singular values and the corresponding vectors indicate the directions of high/weak stiffness and the stiffness isotropy for the manipulator at a given configuration. Two indices, one for rotation and the other for translation, are introduced to optimize the manipulator stiffness and to map the stiffness isocontours over the workspace to show an image of the overall stiffness.

  7. Quaternion representations of stiffness and momentum of the forces, acting in vibration isolating systems with stiffness compensators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurova, E. G.

    2016-04-01

    This research is devoted to development of the spatial vibration isolation devices. The description of the vibration isolation systems has been presented through quaternions of the forces, momentums, and stiffness. The considered method allows taking into account the stochastic vibrations and describes it with the help of the hypercomplex numbers. The theory suggests the development of the vibration isolation devices, which have traction characteristics with zero stiffness area. To obtain such area in traction characteristic, a spatial vibration isolator is presented as a resilient element and the stiffness compensator, which is connected in parallel with it.

  8. Operator-Based Preconditioning of Stiff Hyperbolic Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce an operator-based scheme for preconditioning stiff components encountered in implicit methods for hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations posed on regular grids. The method is based on a directional splitting of the implicit operator, followed by a characteristic decomposition of the resulting directional parts. This approach allows for solution to any number of characteristic components, from the entire system to only the fastest, stiffness-inducing waves. We apply the preconditioning method to stiff hyperbolic systems arising in magnetohydro- dynamics and gas dynamics. We then present numerical results showing that this preconditioning scheme works well on problems where the underlying stiffness results from the interaction of fast transient waves with slowly-evolving dynamics, scales well to large problem sizes and numbers of processors, and allows for additional customization based on the specific problems under study

  9. Accuracy Improvement for Stiffness Modeling of Parallel Manipulators

    CERN Document Server

    Pashkevich, Anatoly; Chablat, Damien; Wenger, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The paper focuses on the accuracy improvement of stiffness models for parallel manipulators, which are employed in high-speed precision machining. It is based on the integrated methodology that combines analytical and numerical techniques and deals with multidimensional lumped-parameter models of the links. The latter replace the link flexibility by localized 6-dof virtual springs describing both translational/rotational compliance and the coupling between them. There is presented detailed accuracy analysis of the stiffness identification procedures employed in the commercial CAD systems (including statistical analysis of round-off errors, evaluating the confidence intervals for stiffness matrices). The efficiency of the developed technique is confirmed by application examples, which deal with stiffness analysis of translational parallel manipulators.

  10. Towards ultra-stiff materials: Surface effects on nanoporous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Dingjie; Xie, Yi Min; Huang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Shiwei, E-mail: shiwei.zhou@rmit.edu.au [Centre for Innovative Structures and Materials, School of Civil, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne 3001 (Australia); Li, Qing [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2014-09-08

    The significant rise in the strength and stiffness of porous materials at nanoscale cannot be described by conventional scaling laws. This letter investigates the effective Young's modulus of such materials by taking into account surface effect in a microcellular architecture designed for an ultralight material whose stiffness is an order of magnitude higher than most porous materials. We find that by considering the surface effects the predicted stiffness using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory compares well to experimental data for spongelike nanoporous gold with random microstructures. Analytical results show that, of the two factors influencing the effective Young's modulus, the residual stress is more important than the surface stiffness.

  11. Estimation of the elastic stiffness of the leaf spring assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, K.N.; Kang, H.S.; Yoon, K.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-11-01

    Based on the Euler beam theory and the strain energy method, an elastic stiffness formula of the hold down spring assembly consisting of several leaves was previously derived. Even though the formula was known to be useful to estimate the elastic stiffness of the hold down spring assembly only with the geometric data and the material properties of the leaf, it was reported that the elastic stiffness from the formula deviates much more from the test results as the number of leaves increases. In this study, in order to resolve such an increasing deviation as the number of leaves the formula has been extended to be able to consider normal reaction forces and friction forces acting on interfaces between the leaves. The elastic stiffness of various specimens of the leaf spring assembly is analyzed using the extended formula and compared with test results. (author). 9 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Stiffness Analysis and Improvement of Bolt-Plate Contact Assemblies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard; Pedersen, Pauli

    2008-01-01

    In a previous study it was shown that, a simplified expression for the stiffness of the plate member in a bolt-plate assembly can be found. The stiffnesses of the bolt and the connected plates are the primary quantities that control the lifetime of a dynamically loaded connection. The present study...... of stiffnesses is extended to include different material parameters by including the influence of Poisson's ratio. Two simple practical formulas are suggested and their accuracies are documented for different bolts and different material (Poisson's ratio). Secondly, the contact analysis between the...... bolt head and the plate is extended by the possibility of designing a gap, that is, a nonuniform distance between the bolt and plate before prestressing. Designing the gap function generates the possibility for a better stress field by which the stiffness of the bolt is lowered, and at the same time...

  13. Arterial stiffness in insulin resistance: The role of nitric oxide and angiotensin II receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divina G Brillante

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Divina G Brillante1, Anthony J O’Sullivan1, Laurence G Howes21St. George Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Kogarah, NSW, Australia; 2Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics and Department of Cardiology, Griffith and Bond University, Gold Coast Hospital, Southport, QLD, AustraliaAbstract: The insulin resistance syndrome (INSR is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, and affects up to 25% of the Australian population aged >20 years. Increased arterial stiffness has been proposed as a common pathway by which INSR leads to increased cardiovascular risk. We have reviewed the role of nitric oxide (NO and angiotensin II receptors in the modulation of arterial stiffness in the setting of insulin resistance. There is emerging evidence that early stages of INSR may be characterized by increased basal nitric oxide activity and increased activity of non-NO vasodilators such as endothelial derived hyperpolarization factor (EDHF which is manifest by reduced arterial stiffness. Depletion of NO or ineffectiveness of NO mediated vasodilator mechanisms associated with the progression of INSR to type 2 diabetes may result in increased arterial stiffness, which predicts the development of cardiovascular disease. Thus in the early stages of INSR, increased NO and EDHF activity may represent compensatory mechanisms to early vascular damage. The renin-angiotensin system is activated in diseased vascular beds, with up regulation of the two known angiotensin II receptors: the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R and the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R. Increased AT1R mediated activity in the vasculature is central to the development of increased arterial stiffness and is enhanced in INSR states. AT2R activity is increased in early in INSR and may contribute to the apparent increase in basal NO activity. AT1R blockade may therefore be valuable treatment for early INSR as antagonism of AT1 receptors would allow angiotensin II to act

  14. The interleukin-6 –174 G/C promoter polymorphism and arterial stiffness; the Rotterdam Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark PS Sie

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Mark PS Sie1, Francesco US Mattace-Raso2, André G Uitterlinden2, Pascal P Arp2, Albert Hofman1, Huibert AP Pols2, Arnold PG Hoeks3, Robert S Reneman4, Roland Asmar5, Cornelia M van Duijn1, Jacqueline CM Witteman11Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 3Department of Biophysics, 4Department of Physiology, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands; 5Cardiovascular Institute, Paris, FranceAbstract: Arterial stiffness normally increases with age and has been established as a precursor of cardiovascular disease. Interleukin-6 is a pleiotropic inflammatory cytokine with an important role in the inflammatory cascade, such as up-regulation of C-reactive protein (CRP. The interleukin-6 –174-G/C promoter polymorphism appears to infl uence levels of inflammatory markers, which have been shown to be associated with arterial stiffness. We studied the association of this polymorphism with levels of interleukin-6 and CRP and with arterial stiffness. The study (n = 3849 was embedded in the Rotterdam Study, a prospective, population-based study. Analyses on the association between the –174-G/C polymorphism and pulse wave velocity, distensibility coefficient, and pulse pressure were performed using analyses of variance. Analyses on the levels of inflammatory markers and arterial stiffness were performed using linear regression analyses. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, known cardiovascular risk factors, and atherosclerosis. We found pulse wave velocity to be 0.35 m/s higher for CC-homozygotes vs. wildtype GG-homozygotes (p = 0.018 with evidence for an allele-dose effect (p trend = 0.013, and a similar pattern for pulse pressure (p trend = 0.041. No apparent consistent association with the distensibility coefficient was found. CRP levels were associated with pulse wave

  15. Optimal Torque and Stiffness Control in Compliantly Actuated Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, DJ; Petit, F; Huber, F.; Haddadin, S.; van der Smagt, P.; Albu-Schaffer, A.; Vijayakumar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropomorphic robots that aim to approach human performance agility and efficiency are typically highly redundant not only in their kinematics but also in actuation. Variable-impedance actuators, used to drive many of these devices, are capable of modulating torque and passive impedance (stiffness and/or damping) simultaneously and independently. Here, we propose a framework for simultaneous optimisation of torque and impedance (stiffness) profiles in order to optimise task performance, tun...

  16. Effects of safflower seed extract on arterial stiffness

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Katsuya; Tsubaki, Shigekazu; Fujita, Masami; Koyama, Naoto; Takahashi, Michio; Takazawa, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Safflower seed extract (SSE) contains characteristic polyphenols and serotonin derivatives (N-( p-coumaroyl) serotonin and N-feruloylserotonin), which are reported to inhibit oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), formation of atherosclerotic plaques, and improve arterial stiffness as assessed by pulse wave analysis in animal models. The effects of long-term supplementation with SSE on arterial stiffness in human subjects were evaluated. This doubleblind, placebo-controlled study was con...

  17. Stiffness and vibration properties of slender tensegrity structures

    OpenAIRE

    Dalil Safaei, Seif

    2012-01-01

    The stiffness and frequency properties of tensegrity structures are functions of the pre-stress, topology, configuration, and axial stiffness of the elements. The tensegrity structures considered are tensegrity booms, tensegrity grids, and tensegrity power lines. A study has been carried out on the pre-stress design. It includes (i) finding the most flexible directions for different pre-stress levels, (ii) finding the pre-stress pattern which maximizes the first natural frequency. To find the...

  18. Arterial stiffness and cognitive function in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Hazzouri, Adina Zeki Al; Yaffe, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive decline and dementia are a major cause of disability and mortality among older adults. Cross-sectional evidence from observational studies suggests that greater arterial stiffness is associated with worse cognitive performance. These associations have been observed on measures of global cognition and across multiple domains of cognition. Epidemiologic evidence on the association between arterial stiffness and rate of cognitive decline has been less definitive, and very few studies h...

  19. A nonlinear truss finite element with varying stiffness

    OpenAIRE

    Ďuriš R.; Murín J.

    2007-01-01

    This contribution deals with a new truss element with varying stiffness intended to geometric and physically nonlinear analysis of composite structures. We present a two-node straight composite truss finite element derived by new nonincremental full geometric nonlinear approach. Stiffness matrix of this composite truss contains transfer constants, which accurately describe the polynomial longitudinal variation of cross-section area and material properties. These variations could be caused by ...

  20. A multiwell platform for studying stiffness-dependent cell biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin D Mih

    Full Text Available Adherent cells are typically cultured on rigid substrates that are orders of magnitude stiffer than their tissue of origin. Here, we describe a method to rapidly fabricate 96 and 384 well platforms for routine screening of cells in tissue-relevant stiffness contexts. Briefly, polyacrylamide (PA hydrogels are cast in glass-bottom plates, functionalized with collagen, and sterilized for cell culture. The Young's modulus of each substrate can be specified from 0.3 to 55 kPa, with collagen surface density held constant over the stiffness range. Using automated fluorescence microscopy, we captured the morphological variations of 7 cell types cultured across a physiological range of stiffness within a 384 well plate. We performed assays of cell number, proliferation, and apoptosis in 96 wells and resolved distinct profiles of cell growth as a function of stiffness among primary and immortalized cell lines. We found that the stiffness-dependent growth of normal human lung fibroblasts is largely invariant with collagen density, and that differences in their accumulation are amplified by increasing serum concentration. Further, we performed a screen of 18 bioactive small molecules and identified compounds with enhanced or reduced effects on soft versus rigid substrates, including blebbistatin, which abolished the suppression of lung fibroblast growth at 1 kPa. The ability to deploy PA gels in multiwell plates for high throughput analysis of cells in tissue-relevant environments opens new opportunities for the discovery of cellular responses that operate in specific stiffness regimes.

  1. Therapeutic modification of arterial stiffness: An update and comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Liu, Pang-Yen; Wu, Tsung-Jui; Hung, Yuan; Yang, Shih-Ping; Lin, Gen-Min

    2015-11-26

    Arterial stiffness has been recognized as a marker of cardiovascular disease and associated with long-term worse clinical outcomes in several populations. Age, hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, known as traditional vascular risk factors, as well as diabetes, obesity, and systemic inflammation lead to both atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. Targeting multiple modifiable risk factors has become the main therapeutic strategy to improve arterial stiffness in patients at high cardiovascular risk. Additionally to life style modifications, long-term ω-3 fatty acids (fish oil) supplementation in diet may improve arterial stiffness in the population with hypertension or metabolic syndrome. Pharmacological treatment such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists, metformin, and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors were useful in individuals with hypertension and diabetes. In obese population with obstructive sleep apnea, weight reduction, aerobic exercise, and continuous positive airway pressure treatment may also improve arterial stiffness. In the populations with chronic inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, a use of antibodies against tumor necrosis factor-alpha could work effectively. Other therapeutic options such as renal sympathetic nerve denervation for patients with resistant hypertension are investigated in many ongoing clinical trials. Therefore our comprehensive review provides knowledge in detail regarding many aspects of pathogenesis, measurement, and management of arterial stiffness in several populations, which would be helpful for physicians to make clinical decision. PMID:26635922

  2. Sex Differences in Limb and Joint Stiffness in Recreational Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinclair Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Female runners are known to be at greater risk from chronic running injuries than age-matched males, although the exact mechanisms are often poorly understood. The aim of the current investigation was to determine if female recreational runners exhibit distinct limb and joint stiffness characteristics in relation to their male counterparts. Methods. Fourteen male and fourteen female runners ran over a force platform at 4.0 m · s-1. Lower limb kinematics were collected using an eight-camera optoelectric motion capture system operating at 250 Hz. Measures of limb and joint stiffness were calculated as a function of limb length and joint moments divided by the extent of limb and joint excursion. All stiffness and joint moment parameters were normalized to body mass. Sex differences in normalized limb and knee and ankle joint stiffness were examined statistically using independent samples t tests. Results. The results indicate that normalized limb (male = 0.18 ± 0.07, female = 0.37 ± 0.10 kN · kg · m-1 and knee stiffness (male = 5.59 ± 2.02, female = 7.34 ± 1.78 Nm · kg · rad-1 were significantly greater in female runners. Conclusions. On the basis that normalized knee and limb stiffness were shown to be significantly greater in female runners, the findings from the current investigation may provide further insight into the aetiology of the distinct injury patterns observed between sexes.

  3. Muscle Synergies Heavily Influence the Neural Control of Arm Endpoint Stiffness and Energy Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Joshua M; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J

    2016-02-01

    Much debate has arisen from research on muscle synergies with respect to both limb impedance control and energy consumption. Studies of limb impedance control in the context of reaching movements and postural tasks have produced divergent findings, and this study explores whether the use of synergies by the central nervous system (CNS) can resolve these findings and also provide insights on mechanisms of energy consumption. In this study, we phrase these debates at the conceptual level of interactions between neural degrees of freedom and tasks constraints. This allows us to examine the ability of experimentally-observed synergies-correlated muscle activations-to control both energy consumption and the stiffness component of limb endpoint impedance. In our nominal 6-muscle planar arm model, muscle synergies and the desired size, shape, and orientation of endpoint stiffness ellipses, are expressed as linear constraints that define the set of feasible muscle activation patterns. Quadratic programming allows us to predict whether and how energy consumption can be minimized throughout the workspace of the limb given those linear constraints. We show that the presence of synergies drastically decreases the ability of the CNS to vary the properties of the endpoint stiffness and can even preclude the ability to minimize energy. Furthermore, the capacity to minimize energy consumption-when available-can be greatly affected by arm posture. Our computational approach helps reconcile divergent findings and conclusions about task-specific regulation of endpoint stiffness and energy consumption in the context of synergies. But more generally, these results provide further evidence that the benefits and disadvantages of muscle synergies go hand-in-hand with the structure of feasible muscle activation patterns afforded by the mechanics of the limb and task constraints. These insights will help design experiments to elucidate the interplay between synergies and the mechanisms of

  4. Muscle Synergies Heavily Influence the Neural Control of Arm Endpoint Stiffness and Energy Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Joshua M.; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Much debate has arisen from research on muscle synergies with respect to both limb impedance control and energy consumption. Studies of limb impedance control in the context of reaching movements and postural tasks have produced divergent findings, and this study explores whether the use of synergies by the central nervous system (CNS) can resolve these findings and also provide insights on mechanisms of energy consumption. In this study, we phrase these debates at the conceptual level of interactions between neural degrees of freedom and tasks constraints. This allows us to examine the ability of experimentally-observed synergies—correlated muscle activations—to control both energy consumption and the stiffness component of limb endpoint impedance. In our nominal 6-muscle planar arm model, muscle synergies and the desired size, shape, and orientation of endpoint stiffness ellipses, are expressed as linear constraints that define the set of feasible muscle activation patterns. Quadratic programming allows us to predict whether and how energy consumption can be minimized throughout the workspace of the limb given those linear constraints. We show that the presence of synergies drastically decreases the ability of the CNS to vary the properties of the endpoint stiffness and can even preclude the ability to minimize energy. Furthermore, the capacity to minimize energy consumption—when available—can be greatly affected by arm posture. Our computational approach helps reconcile divergent findings and conclusions about task-specific regulation of endpoint stiffness and energy consumption in the context of synergies. But more generally, these results provide further evidence that the benefits and disadvantages of muscle synergies go hand-in-hand with the structure of feasible muscle activation patterns afforded by the mechanics of the limb and task constraints. These insights will help design experiments to elucidate the interplay between synergies and the

  5. Stiffness threshold of randomly distributed carbon nanotube networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuli; Pan, Fei; Guo, Zaoyang; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Jianyu

    2015-11-01

    For carbon nanotube (CNT) networks, with increasing network density, there may be sudden changes in the properties, such as the sudden change in electrical conductivity at the electrical percolation threshold. In this paper, the change in stiffness of the CNT networks is studied and especially the existence of stiffness threshold is revealed. Two critical network densities are found to divide the stiffness behavior into three stages: zero stiffness, bending dominated and stretching dominated stages. The first critical network density is a criterion to judge whether or not the network is capable of carrying load, defined as the stiffness threshold. The second critical network density is a criterion to measure whether or not most of the CNTs in network are utilized effectively to carry load, defined as bending-stretching transitional threshold. Based on the geometric probability analysis, a theoretical methodology is set up to predict the two thresholds and explain their underlying mechanisms. The stiffness threshold is revealed to be determined by the statical determinacy of CNTs in the network, and can be estimated quantitatively by the stabilization fraction of network, a newly proposed parameter in this paper. The other threshold, bending-stretching transitional threshold, which signs the conversion of dominant deformation mode, is verified to be well evaluated by the proposed defect fraction of network. According to the theoretical analysis as well as the numerical simulation, the average intersection number on each CNT is revealed as the only dominant factor for the electrical percolation and the stiffness thresholds, it is approximately 3.7 for electrical percolation threshold, and 5.2 for the stiffness threshold of 2D networks. For 3D networks, they are 1.4 and 4.4. And it also affects the bending-stretching transitional threshold, together with the CNT aspect ratio. The average intersection number divided by the fourth root of CNT aspect ratio is found to be

  6. An optimised stiffness reduction method for simulating infinite elastic space using commercial Finite Elements codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common goal when using Finite Element (FE) modelling in time domain wave scattering problems is to minimise model size by only considering a region immediately surrounding a scatterer or feature of interest. The model boundaries must simulate infinite space by minimising the reflection of incident waves. This is a significant and long-standing challenge that has only achieved partial success. Industrial companies wishing to perform such modelling are keen to use established commercial FE packages that offer a thorough history of validation and testing. Unfortunately, this limits the flexibility available to modellers preventing the use of popular research tools such as Perfectly Matched Layers (PML). Unlike PML, Absorbing Layers by Increasing Damping (ALID) have proven successful offering practical implementation into any solver that has representation of material damping. Despite good performance further improvements are desirable. Here, a Stiffness Reduction Method (SRM) has been developed and optimised to operate within a significantly reduced spatial domain. The technique is applied by altering damping and stiffness matrices, inducing decay of incident waves. Variables are expressed as a function of known model constants, easing implementation for generic problems. Analytical and numerical solutions have shown that SRM out performs ALID, with results approaching those of PML

  7. Ionic polymer cluster energetics: Computational analysis of pendant chain stiffness and charge imbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Lisa Mauck; Leo, Donald J.

    2005-06-01

    In recent years there has been considerable study of the potential mechanisms underlying the electromechanical response of ionic-polymer-metal composites. The most recent models have been based on the response of the ion-containing clusters that are formed when the material is synthesized. Most of these efforts have employed assumptions of uniform ion distribution within spherical cluster shapes. This work investigates the impact of dispensing with these assumptions in order to better understand the parameters that impact cluster shape, size, and ion transport potential. A computational micromechanics model applying Monte Carlo methodology is employed to predict the equilibrium state of a single cluster of a solvated ionomeric polymer. For a constant solvated state, the model tracks the position of individual ions within a given cluster in response to ion-ion interaction, mechanical stiffness of the pendant chain, cluster surface energy, and external electric-field loading. Results suggest that cluster surface effects play a significant role in the equilibrium cluster state, including ion distribution; pendant chain stiffness also plays a role in ion distribution but to a lesser extent. Moreover, ion pairing is rarely complete even in cation-rich clusters; this in turn supports the supposition of the formation of anode and cathode boundary layers.

  8. Technology for Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Kristensen, Jannie Friis; Nielsen, Christina;

    2003-01-01

    .After analysing the history and the current boundary work, the paper will propose new technological support for boundary work. In particular the paper will suggest means of supporting boundaries when these are productive and for changing boundaries when this seems more appropriate. In total, flexible technologies......This paper presents a study of an organisation, which is undergoing a process transforming organisational and technological boundaries. In particular, we shall look at three kinds of boundaries: the work to maintain and change the boundary between the organisation and its customers; boundaries...... between competencies within the organisation; and boundaries between various physical locations of work, in particular between what is done in the office and what is done on site. Maintaining and changing boundaries are the processes through which a particular community sustains its identity and practice...

  9. Stiffness Analysis of Corrugated Flexure Beam Used in Compliant Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Nianfeng; LIANG Xiaohe; ZHANG Xianmin

    2015-01-01

    Conventional flexible joints generally have limited range of motion and high stress concentration. To overcome these shortcomings, corrugated flexure beam(CF beam) is designed because of its large flexibility obtained from longer overall length on the same span. The successful design of compliant mechanisms using CF beam requires manipulation of the stiffnesses as the design variables. Empirical equations of the CF beam stiffness components, except of the torsional stiffness, are obtained by curve-fitting method. The application ranges of all the parameters in each empirical equation are also discussed. The ratio of off-axis to axial stiffness is considered as a key characteristic of an effective compliant joint. And parameter study shows that the radius of semi-circular segment and the length of straight segment contribute most to the ratio. At last, CF beam is used to design translational and rotational flexible joints, which also verifies the validity of the empirical equations. CF beam with large flexibility is presented, and empirical equations of its stiffness are proposed to facilitate the design of flexible joint with large range of motion.

  10. NAFLD and Increased Aortic Stiffness: Parallel or Common Physiopathological Mechanisms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane A. Villela-Nogueira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has become the leading cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. Liver inflammation and fibrosis related to NAFLD contribute to disease progression and increasing liver-related mortality and morbidity. Increasing data suggest that NAFLD may be linked to atherosclerotic vascular disease independent of other established cardiovascular risk factors. Central arterial stiffness has been recognized as a measure of cumulative cardiovascular risk marker load, and the measure of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV is regarded as the gold standard assessment of aortic stiffness. It has been shown that increased aortic stiffness predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several clinical settings, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, a well-known condition associated with advanced stages of NAFLD. Furthermore, recently-published studies reported a strong association between NAFLD and increased arterial stiffness, suggesting a possible link in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and NAFLD. We sought to review the published data on the associations between NAFLD and aortic stiffness, in order to better understand the interplay between these two conditions and identify possible common physiopathological mechanisms.

  11. Evaluating pulp stiffness from fibre bundles by ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karppinen, Timo; Montonen, Risto; Määttänen, Marjo; Ekman, Axel; Myllys, Markko; Timonen, Jussi; Hæggström, Edward

    2012-06-01

    A non-destructive ultrasonic tester was developed to measure the stiffness of pulp bundles. The mechanical properties of pulp are important when estimating the behaviour of paper under stress. Currently available pulp tests are tedious and alter the fibres structurally and mechanically. The developed tester employs (933 ± 15) kHz tweezer-like ultrasonic transducers and time-of-flight measurement through (9.0 ± 2.5) mm long and (0.8 ± 0.1) mm thick fibre bundles kept at (19.1 ± 0.4) °C and (62 ± 1)% RH. We determined the stiffness of soft wood pulps produced by three kraft pulping modifications: standard kraft pulp, (5.2 ± 0.4) GPa, prehydrolysis kraft pulp, (4.3 ± 0.4) GPa, and alkali extracted prehydrolysis kraft pulp, (3.3 ± 0.4) GPa. Prehydrolysis and alkali extraction processes mainly lowered the hemicellulose content of the pulps, which essentially decreased the fibre-wall stiffness hence impairing the stiffness of the fibre networks. Our results indicate that the method allows ranking of pulps according to their stiffness determined from bundle-like samples taken at an early phase of the papermaking process.

  12. Evaluating pulp stiffness from fibre bundles by ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non-destructive ultrasonic tester was developed to measure the stiffness of pulp bundles. The mechanical properties of pulp are important when estimating the behaviour of paper under stress. Currently available pulp tests are tedious and alter the fibres structurally and mechanically. The developed tester employs (933 ± 15) kHz tweezer-like ultrasonic transducers and time-of-flight measurement through (9.0 ± 2.5) mm long and (0.8 ± 0.1) mm thick fibre bundles kept at (19.1 ± 0.4) °C and (62 ± 1)% RH. We determined the stiffness of soft wood pulps produced by three kraft pulping modifications: standard kraft pulp, (5.2 ± 0.4) GPa, prehydrolysis kraft pulp, (4.3 ± 0.4) GPa, and alkali extracted prehydrolysis kraft pulp, (3.3 ± 0.4) GPa. Prehydrolysis and alkali extraction processes mainly lowered the hemicellulose content of the pulps, which essentially decreased the fibre-wall stiffness hence impairing the stiffness of the fibre networks. Our results indicate that the method allows ranking of pulps according to their stiffness determined from bundle-like samples taken at an early phase of the papermaking process. (paper)

  13. Optimal semi-active damping of cables with bending stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boston, C.; Weber, F.; Guzzella, L.

    2011-05-01

    The problem of optimal semi-active damping of cables with bending stiffness is investigated with an evolutionary algorithm. The developed damping strategy is validated on a single strand cable with a linear motor attached close to the anchor position. The motor is operated in force feedback mode during free decay of cable vibrations, during which time the decay ratios of the cable modes are measured. It is shown from these experiments that the damping ratios predicted in simulation are close to those measured. The semi-active damping strategy found by the evolutionary algorithm is very similar in character to that for a cable without bending stiffness, being the superposition of an amplitude-dependent friction and negative stiffness element. However, due to the bending stiffness of the cable, the tuning of the above elements as a function of the relevant cable parameters is greatly altered, especially for damper positions close to a fixed end anchor, where the mode shape depends strongly on bending stiffness. It is furthermore demonstrated that a semi-active damper is able to dissipate significantly more energy for a cable with simply supported ends compared to fixed ends due to larger damper strokes and thereby increased energy dissipation in the device.

  14. Online Identification and Verification of the Elastic Coupling Torsional Stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanyou Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To analyze the torsional vibration of a diesel engine shaft, the torsional stiffness of the flexible coupling is a key kinetic parameter. Since the material properties of the elastic element of the coupling might change after a long-time operation due to the severe working environment or improper use and the variation of such properties will change dynamic feature of the coupling, it will cause a relative large calculation error of torsional vibration to the shaft system. Moreover, the torsional stiffness of the elastic coupling is difficult to be determined, and it is inappropriate to measure this parameter by disassembling the power unit while it is under normal operation. To solve these problems, this paper comes up with a method which combines the torsional vibration test with the calculation of the diesel shafting and uses the inherent characteristics of shaft torsional vibration to identify the dynamic stiffness of the elastic coupling without disassembling the unit. Analysis results show that it is reasonable and feasible to identify the elastic coupling dynamic torsional stiffness with this method and the identified stiffness is accurate. Besides, this method provides a convenient and practical approach to examine the dynamic behavior of the long running elastic coupling.

  15. Rigid supersymmetry with boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We construct rigidly supersymmetric bulk-plus-boundary actions, both in x-space and in superspace. For each standard supersymmetric bulk action a minimal supersymmetric bulk-plus-boundary action follows from an extended F- or D-term formula. Additional separately supersymmetric boundary actions can be systematically constructed using co-dimension one multiplets (boundary superfields). We also discuss the orbit of boundary conditions which follow from the Euler-Lagrange variational principle. (orig.)

  16. Stiffness Analysis and Optimization of a Co-axial Spherical Parallel Manipulator

    OpenAIRE

    Guanglei Wu

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the stiffness characteristics of spherical parallel manipulators. By virtue of singular value decomposition, the 6x6 dimensionally inhomogeneous Cartesian stiffness matrix is transformed into two homogeneous ones, i.e., the rotational and translational stiffness matrices. The decomposed singular values and the corresponding vectors indicate the directions of high/weak stiffness and the stiffness isotropy for the manipulator at a given configuration. Two indices, one fo...

  17. Rocking stiffness of mounting arrangements in electrical cabinets and control panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several studies have shown that the consideration of a rigid body-rocking mode in a cabinet is necessary to evaluate accurate incabinet spectra. Observations from finite element analyses are used to study cabinet rocking behavior and to show that accurate representation of the boundary conditions at the cabinet base is essential in the evaluation of correct rocking mode. Simple formulations for evaluating the rocking stiffness are developed by conducting detailed analytical studies for three different types of cabinet mounting arrangements. Availability of these formulations enables incorporation of a cabinet rocking mode in the Ritz vector approach [Nucl. Eng. Des. 190 (1990) 225] for evaluating the cabinet dynamic properties in significant mode and for generating the incabinet response spectra

  18. Computational methods for the identification of spatially varying stiffness and damping in beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, H. T.; Rosen, I. G.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical approximation scheme for the estimation of functional parameters in Euler-Bernoulli models for the transverse vibration of flexible beams with tip bodies is developed. The method permits the identification of spatially varying flexural stiffness and Voigt-Kelvin viscoelastic damping coefficients which appear in the hybrid system of ordinary and partial differential equations and boundary conditions describing the dynamics of such structures. An inverse problem is formulated as a least squares fit to data subject to constraints in the form of a vector system of abstract first order evolution equations. Spline-based finite element approximations are used to finite dimensionalize the problem. Theoretical convergence results are given and numerical studies carried out on both conventional (serial) and vector computers are discussed.

  19. Brownian Motion of Stiff Filaments in a Crowded Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Nikta; MacKintosh, Frederick C.; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent; Pasquali, Matteo

    2010-12-01

    The thermal motion of stiff filaments in a crowded environment is highly constrained and anisotropic; it underlies the behavior of such disparate systems as polymer materials, nanocomposites, and the cell cytoskeleton. Despite decades of theoretical study, the fundamental dynamics of such systems remains a mystery. Using near-infrared video microscopy, we studied the thermal diffusion of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) confined in porous agarose networks. We found that even a small bending flexibility of SWNTs strongly enhances their motion: The rotational diffusion constant is proportional to the filament-bending compliance and is independent of the network pore size. The interplay between crowding and thermal bending implies that the notion of a filament’s stiffness depends on its confinement. Moreover, the mobility of SWNTs and other inclusions can be controlled by tailoring their stiffness.

  20. Mixed, Nonsplit, Extended Stability, Stiff Integration of Reaction Diffusion Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Alzahrani, Hasnaa H.

    2016-07-26

    A tailored integration scheme is developed to treat stiff reaction-diffusion prob- lems. The construction adapts a stiff solver, namely VODE, to treat reaction im- plicitly together with explicit treatment of diffusion. The second-order Runge-Kutta- Chebyshev (RKC) scheme is adjusted to integrate diffusion. Spatial operator is de- scretised by second-order finite differences on a uniform grid. The overall solution is advanced over S fractional stiff integrations, where S corresponds to the number of RKC stages. The behavior of the scheme is analyzed by applying it to three simple problems. The results show that it achieves second-order accuracy, thus, preserving the formal accuracy of the original RKC. The presented development sets the stage for future extensions, particularly, to multidimensional reacting flows with detailed chemistry.

  1. Stiffness Analysis of Parallel Manipulators with Preloaded Passive Joints

    CERN Document Server

    Pashkevich, Anatoly; Chablat, Damien

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents a methodology for the enhanced stiffness analysis of parallel manipulators with internal preloading in passive joints. It also takes into account influence of the external loading and allows computing both the non-linear "load-deflection" relation and the stiffness matrices for any given location of the end-platform or actuating drives. Using this methodology, it is proposed the kinetostatic control algorithm that allows to improve accuracy of the classical kinematic control and to compensate position errors caused by elastic deformations in links/joints due to the external/internal loading. The results are illustrated by an example that deals with a parallel manipulator of the Orthoglide family where the internal preloading allows to eliminate the undesired buckling phenomena and to improve the stiffness in the neighborhood of its kinematic singularities.

  2. Effective Stiffness: Generalizing Effective Resistance Sampling to Finite Element Matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Avron, Haim

    2011-01-01

    We define the notion of effective stiffness and show that it can used to build sparsifiers, algorithms that sparsify linear systems arising from finite-element discretizations of PDEs. In particular, we show that sampling $O(n\\log n)$ elements according to probabilities derived from effective stiffnesses yields an high quality preconditioner that can be used to solve the linear system in a small number of iterations. Effective stiffness generalizes the notion of effective resistance, a key ingredient of recent progress in developing nearly linear symmetric diagonally dominant (SDD) linear solvers. Solving finite elements problems is of considerably more interest than the solution of SDD linear systems, since the finite element method is frequently used to numerically solve PDEs arising in scientific and engineering applications. Unlike SDD systems, which are relatively easy to precondition, there has been limited success in designing fast solvers for finite element systems, and previous algorithms usually tar...

  3. Spurious Behavior of Shock-Capturing Methods: Problems Containing Stiff Source Terms and Discontinuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Helen M. C.; Kotov, D. V.; Wang, Wei; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to relate numerical dissipations that are inherited in high order shock-capturing schemes with the onset of wrong propagation speed of discontinuities. For pointwise evaluation of the source term, previous studies indicated that the phenomenon of wrong propagation speed of discontinuities is connected with the smearing of the discontinuity caused by the discretization of the advection term. The smearing introduces a nonequilibrium state into the calculation. Thus as soon as a nonequilibrium value is introduced in this manner, the source term turns on and immediately restores equilibrium, while at the same time shifting the discontinuity to a cell boundary. The present study is to show that the degree of wrong propagation speed of discontinuities is highly dependent on the accuracy of the numerical method. The manner in which the smearing of discontinuities is contained by the numerical method and the overall amount of numerical dissipation being employed play major roles. Moreover, employing finite time steps and grid spacings that are below the standard Courant-Friedrich-Levy (CFL) limit on shockcapturing methods for compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations containing stiff reacting source terms and discontinuities reveals surprising counter-intuitive results. Unlike non-reacting flows, for stiff reactions with discontinuities, employing a time step and grid spacing that are below the CFL limit (based on the homogeneous part or non-reacting part of the governing equations) does not guarantee a correct solution of the chosen governing equations. Instead, depending on the numerical method, time step and grid spacing, the numerical simulation may lead to (a) the correct solution (within the truncation error of the scheme), (b) a divergent solution, (c) a wrong propagation speed of discontinuities solution or (d) other spurious solutions that are solutions of the discretized counterparts but are not solutions of the governing equations

  4. Modifiable risk factors for increased arterial stiffness in outpatient nephrology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama Elewa

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV, is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality. Arterial stiffness increases with age. However, modifiable risk factors such as smoking, BP and salt intake also impact on PWV. The finding of modifiable risk factors may lead to the identification of treatable factors, and, thus, is of interest to practicing nephrologist. We have now studied the prevalence and correlates of arterial stiffness, assessed by PWV, in 191 patients from nephrology outpatient clinics in order to identify modifiable risk factors for arterial stiffness that may in the future guide therapeutic decision-making. PWV was above normal levels for age in 85/191 (44.5% patients. Multivariate analysis showed that advanced age, systolic BP, diabetes mellitus, serum uric acid and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy or calcium-containing medication were independent predictors of PWV. A new parameter, Delta above upper limit of normal PWV (Delta PWV was defined to decrease the weight of age on PWV values. Delta PWV was calculated as (measured PWV - (upper limit of the age-adjusted PWV values for the general population. Mean±SD Delta PWV was 0.76±1.60 m/sec. In multivariate analysis, systolic blood pressure, active smoking and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy remained independent predictors of higher delta PWV, while age, urinary potassium and beta blocker therapy were independent predictors of lower delta PWV. In conclusion, arterial stiffness was frequent in nephrology outpatients. Systolic blood pressure, smoking, serum uric acid, calcium-containing medications, potassium metabolism and non-use of beta blockers are modifiable factors associated with increased arterial stiffness in Nephrology outpatients.

  5. The Progression of Diabetic Microvascular Complications and Increased Vascular Stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgescu Olivia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus it might be helpful to use, for risk stratification, non-invasive techniques as markers of early atherosclerosis. Arterial stiffness shows the functional vascular properties and can be estimated by pulse wave velocity (PWV and augmentation index (AIX. Typical for type 2 diabetes is premature arterial stiffening which appears before the onset of clinically micro or macrovascular disease and is increased in the presence of microvascular complications. Further studies are needed to determine whether therapeutic interventions for reducing vascular stiffness may decrease the cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  6. Fast Stiffness Matrix Calculation for Nonlinear Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir Gülümser

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a fast stiffness matrix calculation technique for nonlinear finite element method (FEM. Nonlinear stiffness matrices are constructed using Green-Lagrange strains, which are derived from infinitesimal strains by adding the nonlinear terms discarded from small deformations. We implemented a linear and a nonlinear finite element method with the same material properties to examine the differences between them. We verified our nonlinear formulation with different applications and achieved considerable speedups in solving the system of equations using our nonlinear FEM compared to a state-of-the-art nonlinear FEM.

  7. Weight reduction and aortic stiffness in obese children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, K. N.; Olsen, M. H.; Ibsen, H.;

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of weight reduction on aortic stiffness and especially so in the young. The present study investigates whether weight reduction influences aortic stiffness in obese children and adolescents. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) and augmentation index at heart...... rate 75 (AIx@HR75) were measured in 72 obese patients aged 10-18 years at baseline and after 1-year of lifestyle intervention (follow-up). We found that although the degree of obesity decreased (Delta body mass index z-score: -0.24 +/- 0.45, P ....27 +/- 0.47 ms(-1), P obesity measures. No significant change...

  8. Tilting pad journal bearings - Measured and predicted stiffness coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkins, D. W.; Horner, D.

    1993-07-01

    This paper presents measured and calculated characteristics of a tilting pad journal bearing suitable for high speed machinery. Descriptions are given of the experimental techniques used with this variety of bearing and the theoretical model for predicting performance. Measured values of pad temperature, eccentricity, attitude angle, and the four stiffness coefficients are given for a range of loads and rotational speeds. Data are given for both load on pad and between pad configurations, the two principal loading arrangements. Comparisons are made between the measured and predicted bearing temperatures and stiffness coefficients over a wide range of values.

  9. Beam section stiffness properties usig 3D finite elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couturier, Philippe; Krenk, Steen; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2013-01-01

    The cross-section properties of a beam is characterized by a six by six stiffness matrix, relating the six generalized strains to the conjugate section forces. The problem is formulated as a single-layer finite element model of a slice of the beam, on which the six deformation modes are imposed via...... Lagrange multipliers. The Lagrange multipliers represent the constraining forces, and thus combine to form the cross-section stiffness matrix. The theory is illustrated by a simple isotropic cross-section....

  10. An analysis of valve train behavior considering stiffness effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To maintain the specific volumetric efficiency of a heavy-duty diesel engine, an understanding of the behavior of each part of the valve train system is very important. The stiffness of the valve train system has a strong influence on the behavior of the valve train than value clearance, heat-resistance, or the durability of parts. In this study, a geometrical cam design profile using a finite element model of the valve train system is suggested. The results of the valve behavior according to the change in stiffness is analyzed for further tuning of the valve train system

  11. Beam section stiffness properties usig 3D finite elements

    OpenAIRE

    Couturier, Philippe; Krenk, Steen; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2013-01-01

    The cross-section properties of a beam is characterized by a six by six stiffness matrix, relating the six generalized strains to the conjugate section forces. The problem is formulated as a single-layer finite element model of a slice of the beam, on which the six deformation modes are imposed via Lagrange multipliers. The Lagrange multipliers represent the constraining forces, and thus combine toform the cross-section stiffness matrix. The theory is illustrated by a simple isotropic cross-s...

  12. Thermal Testing of Tow-Placed, Variable Stiffness Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Guerdal, Zafer

    2001-01-01

    Commercial systems for precise placement of pre-preg composite tows are enabling technology that allows fabrication of advanced composite structures in which the tows may be precisely laid down along curvilinear paths within a given ply. For laminates with curvilinear tow paths, the fiber orientation angle varies continuously throughout the laminate, and is not required to be straight and parallel in each ply as in conventional composite laminates. Hence, the stiffness properties vary as a function of location in the laminate, and the associated composite structure is called a "variable stiffness" composite structure.

  13. Effect of Hybridization on Stiffness Properties of Woven Textile Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejan, Liliana; Taranu, Nicolae; Sîrbu, Adriana

    2013-04-01

    The present study focuses on stiffness properties of woven textile reinforced polymeric composites with respect to hybridization, and geometry of reinforcement. The analyzed composites represent combinations of different fibre materials (E-glass, Kevlar 49, carbon HM) in a predetermined fabric geometry (a plane weave embedded in thermosetting polymeric resin) serving controlled properties and required performance. The effects of hybridization on the stiffness properties of woven textile composites have been studied with respect to the fibres materials, the unbalancing degree of fabrics, and the variation of compactness and undulation of yarns. Some undesirable effects in fabric geometry can be overcome by the combined effects of hybridization and compactness.

  14. Investigation of the stability of blocks around underground openings by using the boundary element method

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Ünal

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a two-dimensional software was developed by using the boundary element method, in order to model and solve the rock mechanics problems encountered in surface and underground excavations. Stability of rock wedges formed at the roof of underground excavations were investigated in detail by using this software. The behaviour of the symmetric wedge on different joint stiffnesses was studied using a modified boundary element software. Then the results obtained were discussed and com...

  15. A method of solving the stiffness problem in Biot's poroelastic equations using a staggered high-order finite-difference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Hai-Bo; Wang Xiu-Ming; Chen Hao

    2006-01-01

    In modelling elastic wave propagation in a porous medium, when the ratio between the fluid viscosity and the medium permeability is comparatively large, the stiffness problem of Biot's poroelastic equations will be encountered. In the paper, a partition method is developed to solve the stiffness problem with a staggered high-order finite-difference. The method splits the Biot equations into two systems. One is stiff, and solved analytically, the other is nonstiff,and solved numerically by using a high-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme. The time step is determined by the staggered finite-difference algorithm in solving the nonstiff equations, thus a coarse time step 05 be employed.Therefore, the computation efficiency and computational stability are improved greatly. Also a perfect by matched layer technology is used in the split method as absorbing boundary conditions. The numerical results are compared with the analytical results and those obtained from the conventional staggered-grid finite-difference method in a homogeneous model, respectively. They are in good agreement with each other. Finally, a slightly more complex model is investigated and compared with related equivalent model to illustrate the good performance of the staggered-grid finite-difference scheme in the partition method.

  16. Stiffness, Workspace Analysis and Optimization for 3UPU Parallel Robot Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Guohua

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an approach based on the particle swarm optimization is used to optimize the workspace and global stiffness of the 3UPU mechanism simultaneously due to the fact that the workspace is affected while optimizing the stiffness of the mechanism and vice versa. When optimizing one particular performance, one needs to have an objective function. Here the workspace volume of the mechanism is used as an objective function to evaluate the workspace performance of the mechanism. The leading diagonal elements of the stiffness matrix represent pure stiffness in each direction, but this stiffness changes when the moving platform position changes. We call this stiffness as local stiffness. When using the local stiffness as an objective function for stiffness optimization, it can only represent the stiffness in one particular position. Here the global stiffness of the mechanism is used as an objective function to optimize the stiffness of the mechanism. The global stiffness represents mean stiffness over the workspace.  

  17. County Political Boundaries (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — County boundaries with political limit - boundaries extending into the ocean (NTAD 2015). The TIGER/Line shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) are an extract...

  18. HUD GIS Boundary Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The HUD GIS Boundary Files are intended to supplement boundary files available from the U.S. Census Bureau. The files are for community planners interested in...

  19. State Agency Administrative Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This database comprises 28 State agency boundaries and point of contact. The Kansas Geological Survey collected legal descriptions of the boundaries for various...

  20. Bone Metabolism and Arterial Stiffness After Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsolya Cseprekál

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To assess the relationship between bone and vascular disease and its changes over time after renal transplantation. Metabolic bone disease (MBD is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD and is associated with cardiovascular (CV disease. Following transplantation (Tx, improvement in CV disease has been reported; however, data regarding changes in bone disease remain controversial. Methods: Bone turnover and arterial stiffness (pulse wave velocity (PWV were assessed in 47 Tx patients (38 (3-191 months after Tx. Results: Bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP, osteocalcin (OC and beta-crosslaps were significantly higher in Tx patients, and decreased significantly after one year. There was a negative correlation between BALP, OC and steroid administered (r=-0.35;r=-0.36 respectively. PWV increased in the Tx group (1.15 SD. In patients with a follow up of Conclusions: Increased bone turnover and arterial stiffness are present following kidney transplantation. While bone turnover decreases with time, arterial stiffness correlates initially with bone turnover, after which the influence of cholesterol becomes significant. Non-invasive estimation of bone metabolism and arterial stiffness may help to assess CKD-MBD following renal transplantation.

  1. Sport stretching : Effect on passive muscle stiffness of short hamstrings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halbertsma, JPK; vanBolhuis, AI; Goeken, LNH

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of one 10-minute stretch on muscle stiffness in subjects with short hamstrings. Design: Randomized control trial. Setting: Laboratory for human movement sciences in the department of rehabilitation of a university hospital. Subjects: Sixteen students from the Depar

  2. A comparison of stiff ODE solvers for atmospheric chemistry problems

    OpenAIRE

    Verwer, Jan; Blom, Joke; Loon, van, J.Th.; Spee, E.J.

    1995-01-01

    In the operator splitting solution of atmospheric transport-chemistry problems modeling air pollution, a major task is the numerical integration of the stiff ODE systems describing the chemical transformations. In this note a numerical comparison is presented between two special purpose solvers developed for this task.

  3. The Dynamic Stiffness of Surface Footings for Offshore Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vahdatirad, Mohammadjavad; Andersen, Lars; Clausen, Johan;

    2011-01-01

    This study concerns the dynamic stiffness of foundations for large offshore wind turbines. Especially, the purpose of the analysis is to quantify the uncertainties related to the first natural frequency of a turbine supported by a surface footing on layered soil. The dynamic properties of the...... uncertainties and discuss the utilization of reliability-based design of surface footings for wind turbines....

  4. Force and stiffness characteristics of superconducting bearing prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radial-axial superconducting bearing prototype was designed, fabricated and tested. The YBaCuO high-temperature superconducting (HTS) monodomain disks diameter 28 mm and thickness of h = 4; 6; 8; 10 mm, capable to trap magnetic field 1 T, were fabricated to be employed in bearing prototype. Force interaction of single field cooled HTS disks with NdFeB magnets depending on disk thickness under 1 mm magnet air gap was studied. It was found that the increase in disk thickness results in reducing radial stiffness and in growing axial one. The results obtained were used for optimization of HTS-PM arrangement, and for developing the bearing design. The designed bearing incorporates a rotor with 7 HTS disks of 4 mm thickness, total mass 90 g, and stator with two pairs of permanent annular magnets of NdFeB. It is established that the force-displacement dependencies of the bearing have three zones: non-hysteresis (elastic) zone with high stiffness up to 560 N/mm; zone of elastic interaction with stiffness 190 N/mm; hysteretic zone with stiffness 150 N/mm in which a rotor residual displacement being observed after unloading. The outer bearing diameter is 130 mm, thickness 30 mm, and mass 1.8 kg. The maximal radial load capacity of the bearing is 190 N at the rotor displacement of 1.3 mm, and the maximal axial load capacity is 85 N at the displacement of 1 mm

  5. Wide Stiffness Range Cavity Optomechanical Sensors for Atomic Force Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yuxiang; Aksyuk, Vladimir; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2012-01-01

    We report on progress in developing compact sensors for atomic force microscopy (AFM), in which the mechanical transducer is integrated with near-field optical readout on a single chip. The motion of a nanoscale, doubly-clamped cantilever was transduced by an adjacent high quality factor silicon microdisk cavity. In particular, we show that displacement sensitivity on the order of 1 fm/(Hz)^(1/2) can be achieved while the cantilever stiffness is varied over four orders of magnitude (\\approx 0.01 N/m to \\approx 290 N/m). The ability to transduce both very soft and very stiff cantilevers extends the domain of applicability of this technique, potentially ranging from interrogation of microbiological samples (soft cantilevers) to imaging with high resolution (stiff cantilevers). Along with mechanical frequencies (> 250 kHz) that are much higher than those used in conventional AFM probes of similar stiffness, these results suggest that our cavity optomechanical sensors may have application in a wide variety of hig...

  6. Stiffness, not inertial coupling, determines path curvature of wrist motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Steven K; Hogan, Neville

    2012-02-01

    When humans rotate their wrist in flexion-extension, radial-ulnar deviation, and combinations, the resulting paths (like the path of a laser pointer on a screen) exhibit a distinctive pattern of curvature. In this report we show that the passive stiffness of the wrist is sufficient to account for this pattern. Simulating the dynamics of wrist rotations using a demonstrably realistic model under a variety of conditions, we show that wrist stiffness can explain all characteristics of the observed pattern of curvature. We also provide evidence against other possible causes. We further demonstrate that the phenomenon is robust against variations in human wrist parameters (inertia, damping, and stiffness) and choice of model inputs. Our findings explain two previously observed phenomena: why faster wrist rotations exhibit more curvature and why path curvature rotates with pronation-supination of the forearm. Our results imply that, as in reaching, path straightness is a goal in the planning and control of wrist rotations. This requires humans to predict and compensate for wrist dynamics, but, unlike reaching, nonlinear inertial coupling (e.g., Coriolis acceleration) is insignificant. The dominant term to be compensated is wrist stiffness. PMID:22131378

  7. Difference methods for stiff delay differential equations. [DDESUB, in FORTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Mitchell G.

    1980-12-01

    Delay differential equations of the form y'(t) = f(y(t), z(t)), where z(t) = (y/sub 1/(..cap alpha../sub 1/(y(t))),..., y/sub n/(..cap alpha../sub n/(y(t))))/sup T/ and ..cap alpha../sub i/(y(t)) less than or equal to t, arise in many scientific and engineering fields when transport lags and propagation times are physically significant in a dynamic process. Difference methods for approximating the solution of stiff delay systems require special stability properties that are generalizations of those employed for stiff ordinary differential equations. By use of the model equation y'(t) = py(t) + qy(t-1), with complex p and q, the definitions of A-stability, A( )-stability, and stiff stability have been generalize to delay equations. For linear multistep difference formulas, these properties extend directly from ordinary to delay equations. This straight forward extension is not true for implicit Runge-Kutta methods, as illustrated by the midpoint formula, which is A-stable for ordinary equations, but not for delay equations. A computer code for stiff delay equations was developed using the BDF. 24 figures, 5 tables.

  8. Design optimization of a twist compliant mechanism with nonlinear stiffness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A contact-aided compliant mechanism called a twist compliant mechanism (TCM) is presented in this paper. This mechanism has nonlinear stiffness when it is twisted in both directions along its axis. The inner core of the mechanism is primarily responsible for its flexibility in one twisting direction. The contact surfaces of the cross-members and compliant sectors are primarily responsible for its high stiffness in the opposite direction. A desired twist angle in a given direction can be achieved by tailoring the stiffness of a TCM. The stiffness of a compliant twist mechanism can be tailored by varying thickness of its cross-members, thickness of the core and thickness of its sectors. A multi-objective optimization problem with three objective functions is proposed in this paper, and used to design an optimal TCM with desired twist angle. The objective functions are to minimize the mass and maximum von-Mises stress observed, while minimizing or maximizing the twist angles under specific loading conditions. The multi-objective optimization problem proposed in this paper is solved for an ornithopter flight research platform as a case study, with the goal of using the TCM to achieve passive twisting of the wing during upstroke, while keeping the wing fully extended and rigid during the downstroke. Prototype TCMs have been fabricated using 3D printing and tested. Testing results are also presented in this paper. (paper)

  9. Stiffness analysis of parallel leaf-spring flexures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, D.M.; Meijaard, J.P.; Jonker, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    Approximate straight displacements are often made using a parallel leaf-spring flexure. This flexure serves as a typical case for studying the influence of shear and the compliance of the reinforced mid sections of the leaf-springs in the support stiffnesses cz and cy. The conclusions drawn, however

  10. Elastic element showing low stiffness loss at large deflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, D.M.; Meijaard, J.P.; Jonker, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    Compliant mechanisms like a parallel guidance and a cross pivot flexure contain leaf-springs. The basic elastic elements like leaf-springs and wire flexures constrain Degrees-Of-Freedom (DOFs) when flat or straight respectively. However, when deflected these elastic elements lose stiffness rapidly.

  11. Pre-diabetes and arterial stiffness in uraemic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Mads; Clausen, Peter; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Hansen, Jesper Melchior; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    In order to address factors of relevance for new onset diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease after kidney transplantation, we investigated the presence of pre-diabetes, arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) accepted for kidney...

  12. A Novel Tactile Force Probe for Tissue Stiffness Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behafarid Darvish

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have proposed a new type of tactile sensor that is capable of detecting the stiffness of soft objects. The sensor consists of a brass cylinder with an axial bore. An iron core can easily move inside the bore. Three peripheral bobbins were machined in the cylinder around which three coils have been wound. One of the coils was excited with an alternating current which caused a voltage to be induced in two other coils. A return spring was used to return the core to its initial position after it has been moved. The sensor was pressed against the surface of the object whose stiffness was going to be measured. The position of the core in this state was depended on the stiffness of the given object and the spring constant and was measured by measuring the change in the induced voltage in secondary coils. The proposed sensor was capable of measuring two contact parameters namely the applied force and the stiffness of the object. Using the data of this sensor, three different objects, made of polyurethane, silicon rubber and paraffin gel were discriminated. Thus, this sensor could be used in robot hands and minimally invasive surgery tools to improve their operation.

  13. Arterial stiffness of lifelong Japanese female pearl divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hirofumi; Tomoto, Tsubasa; Kosaki, Keisei; Sugawara, Jun

    2016-05-15

    Japanese female pearl divers called Ama specialize in free diving in the cold sea for collecting foods and pearls in oysters. Exercising in the water combined with marked bradycardia and pressor responses provides a circulatory challenge to properly buffer or cushion elevated cardiac pulsations. Because Ama perform repeated free dives throughout their lives, it is possible that they may have adapted similar arterial structure and function to those seen in diving mammals. We compared arterial stiffness of lifelong Japanese pearl divers with age-matched physically inactive adults living in the same fishing villages. A total of 115 Japanese female pearl divers were studied. Additionally, 50 physically inactive adults as well as 33 physically active adults (participating in community fitness programs) living in the same coastal villages were also studied. There were no differences in age (∼65 yr), body mass index, and brachial blood pressure between the groups. Measures of arterial stiffness, cardio-ankle vascular index and β-stiffness index were lower (P < 0.05) in pearl divers and physically active adults than in their physically inactive peers. Augmentation pressure and augmentation index adjusted for the heart rate of 75 beats/min were lower (P < 0.05) in pearl divers than in other groups. These results indicate that lifelong Japanese pearl divers demonstrate reduced arterial stiffness and arterial wave reflection compared with age-matched physically inactive peers living in the same fishing villages. PMID:26984889

  14. Riparian Sediment Delivery Ratio: Stiff Diagrams and Artifical Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Various methods are used to estimate sediment transport through riparian buffers and grass jilters with the sediment delivery ratio having been the most widely applied. The U.S. Forest Service developed a sediment delivery ratio using the stiff diagram and a logistic curve to int...

  15. Simultaneously high stiffness and damping in nanoengineered microtruss composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaud, Julien; Sain, Trisha; Yeom, Bongjun; Park, Sei Jin; Shoultz, Anna Brieland; Hulbert, Gregory; Ma, Zheng-Dong; Kotov, Nicholas A; Hart, A John; Arruda, Ellen M; Waas, Anthony M

    2014-04-22

    Materials combining high stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation are needed in automotive, aviation, construction, and other technologies where structural elements are exposed to dynamic loads. In this paper we demonstrate that a judicious combination of carbon nanotube engineered trusses held in a dissipative polymer can lead to a composite material that simultaneously exhibits both high stiffness and damping. Indeed, the combination of stiffness and damping that is reported is quite high in any single monolithic material. Carbon nanotube (CNT) microstructures grown in a novel 3D truss topology form the backbone of these nanocomposites. The CNT trusses are coated by ceramics and by a nanostructured polymer film assembled using the layer-by-layer technique. The crevices of the trusses are then filled with soft polyurethane. Each constituent of the composite is accurately modeled, and these models are used to guide the manufacturing process, in particular the choice of the backbone topology and the optimization of the mechanical properties of the constituent materials. The resulting composite exhibits much higher stiffness (80 times) and similar damping (specific damping capacity of 0.8) compared to the polymer. Our work is a step forward in implementing the concept of materials by design across multiple length scales. PMID:24620996

  16. Influence of passive stiffness of hamstrings on postural stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuszewski, Michał; Gnat, Rafał; Sobota, Grzegorz; Myśliwiec, Andrzej

    2015-03-29

    The aim of the study was to explore whether passive stiffness of the hamstrings influences the strategy of maintaining postural stability. A sample of 50 subjects was selected; the final analyses were based on data of 41 individuals (33 men, 8 women) aged 21 to 29 (mean = 23.3, SD = 1.1) years. A quasi- experimental ex post facto design with repeated measures was used. Categories of independent variables were obtained directly prior to the measurement of the dependent variables. In stage one of the study, passive knee extension was measured in the supine position to assess hamstring stiffness. In stage two, the magnitude of postural sway in antero-posterior direction was measured, while varying the body position on a stabilometric platform, both with and without visual control. The margin of safety was used as a measure of postural control. The magnitude of the margin of safety increased significantly between the open-eye and closed-eye trials. However, although we registered a visible tendency for a larger increase of the margin of safety associated with lower levels of passive hamstrings stiffness, no significant differences were found. Therefore, this study demonstrated that hamstring stiffness did not influence the strategy used to maintain postural stability. PMID:25964809

  17. Influence of Passive Stiffness of Hamstrings on Postural Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuszewski Michał

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to explore whether passive stiffness of the hamstrings influences the strategy of maintaining postural stability. A sample of 50 subjects was selected; the final analyses were based on data of 41 individuals (33 men, 8 women aged 21 to 29 (mean = 23.3, SD = 1.1 years. A quasi- experimental ex post facto design with repeated measures was used. Categories of independent variables were obtained directly prior to the measurement of the dependent variables. In stage one of the study, passive knee extension was measured in the supine position to assess hamstring stiffness. In stage two, the magnitude of postural sway in antero-posterior direction was measured, while varying the body position on a stabilometric platform, both with and without visual control. The margin of safety was used as a measure of postural control. The magnitude of the margin of safety increased significantly between the open-eye and closed-eye trials. However, although we registered a visible tendency for a larger increase of the margin of safety associated with lower levels of passive hamstrings stiffness, no significant differences were found. Therefore, this study demonstrated that hamstring stiffness did not influence the strategy used to maintain postural stability.

  18. Stiffness of modified Type 1a linear external skeletal fixators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaugh, H F; Rochat, M C; Bruce, C W; Galloway, D S; Payton, M E

    2007-01-01

    Modifications of a Type 1a external skeletal fixator (ESF) frame were evaluated by alternately placing transfixation pins on opposite sides of the connecting rod (Type 1a-MOD) or by placing additional connecting rods on either of the two inside (Type 1a-INSIDE) or two outside (Type 1a-OUTSIDE) transfixation pins. The objective of this study was to evaluate the stiffness of these modifications in terms of axial compression (AC), cranial-caudal bending (CCB), and medial-lateral bending (MLB). We hypothesized that these designs would allow significant increase in unilateral frame stiffness, over Type 1a, without proportional increase in frame complexity or technical difficulty of application. All of the ESF frames were constructed using large IMEX SKtrade mark clamps, 3.2 mm threaded fixation pins, 9.5 mm carbon fibre connecting rods and Delrin rods as bone models. Nine, eight pin frames of each design were constructed, and subjected to repetitive non-destructive loading forces (AC, CCB, MLB) using a materials testing machine. Frame construct stiffness for each force (AC, CCB, MLB) was derived from load-deformation curve analysis and displayed in N/mm. Data revealed the 1a-MOD and 1a-OUTSIDE constructs had significantly increased stiffness in CCB and AC as compared to the Type 1a constructs while all of the modified constructs were significantly stiffer in MLB than the Type 1a constructs. PMID:18038001

  19. IMPACT OF OVERHEAT ON DISABLED SWIMMERS’ SKELETAL MUSCLE STIFFNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prystupa Tetyana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary athletic recovery involves the range of treatments combined with training and restitution processes and are designed to optimize rest as well as minimize the effects of sports overstrain. Sportsmen benefit enormously from recovery treatments during both preparation and competition phases as they help remove frequent pathogenic pre-start conditions which could reduce work capacity and affect adversely results achieved. Purpose: The paper is aimed to specify the impact of overheat on easing the stiffness of disabled sportspeople’s biceps muscle of arm and the central part of the deltoid muscle. It has been assumed that overheating in a Finnish sauna will facilitate muscle condition and recovery of a swimmer’s body. Material: The research involved 20 disabled swimmers - 10 competitors based in the Start sports club in Kalisz and 10 contestants based in Start sports club in Wroclaw. The Tonus-1 myotonometer was used to measure the stiffness of biceps muscle of arm (biceps brachii and the central part of the deltoid muscle (deltoideus - pars acromialic. The research was carried out in two stages: training mesocycle with no recovery and training mesocycle with recovery. The mesocycles comprised three one-week-long microcycles each. Results: The research proved the overheating to ease rest muscle stiffness . Conclusions: The upshot of the discussion was that the Finnish sauna has a tonic effect on a disable swimmer’s body. Reduction of post work-out muscle stiffness will facilitate effective recovery and bring forward next training activities.

  20. Stiffness and hysteresis properties of some prosthetic feet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsveld, van H.W.L.; Grootenboer, H.J.; Vries, de J.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    A prosthetic foot is an important element of a prosthesis, although it is not always fully recognized that the properties of the foot, along with the prosthetic knee joint and the socket, are in part responsible for the stability and metabolic energy cost during walking. The stiffness and the hyst

  1. Relationships between surface roughness/stiffness of chitosan coatings and fabrication of corneal keratocyte spheroids: Effect of degree of deacetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shih-Feng; Lai, Jui-Yang; Cho, Ching-Hsien; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2016-06-01

    Fabrication of the cell spheroids from corneal keratocytes has important implications to the advance in tissue engineering while stimulation from the interface of a biopolymer coating has the ability to modulate this event. This study aims to investigate the dependence of keratocyte migration, proliferation, and differentiation on the surface roughness/stiffness of the chitosan coatings through modifications by degree of deacetylation (DD). After a series of deacetylation process, chitosan coatings with increasing DD exhibited significantly decreased surface roughness and increased surface stiffness. Relationships between the behaviors of rabbit corneal keratocytes (RCKs) and biopolymer coatings with varying DDs (between 75% and 96%) were also found during in vitro cultivation. Both the surface roughness increase and stiffness decrease could lead to enhanced cell migration, which is the main driving force for the early stage spheroid formation on chitosan substrates (e.g., within 8h). With these stimulations from the substrate interfaces, the size and morphology of RCK spheroids were greatly affected by the DD of chitosan. When fabricated on a lowered DD of chitosan material, the spheroids had a larger size with abundant extracellular matrix produced around the cells. At a later stage of spheroid cultivation (e.g., 5 days), significantly higher amount of RCKs on chitosan coatings was noted with increasing DD, indicating the substrate interface effects on cell proliferation. The keratocan expression of RCK spheroids grown on a lowered DD of chitosan was up-regulated, suggesting that both the surface roughness increase and stiffness decrease may facilitate the microenvironment for preservation of cellular phenotype. Overall, our work contributes to the scientific understanding of the keratocyte behaviors and spheroid fabrications in response to DD-mediated surface roughness/stiffness of chitosan coatings. PMID:26945162

  2. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs are associated with increased aortic stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Claridge

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Martin Claridge1, Simon Hobbs1, Clive Quick2, Nick Day3, Andrew Bradbury1, Teun Wilmink11Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Birmingham, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital Birmingham, UK; 2Department of Surgery, Hinchingbrooke Hospital, Huntingdon, UK; 3Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UKObjectives: Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDS have been shown to retard aneurysm growth in animal models. In vitro studies have shown an inhibitory effect of NSAIDS on matrix metalloproteinase-9, interleukin-1β, and IL-6 mediated arterial wall elastolysis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of NSAIDs on arterial stiffness, a surrogate marker of elastolysis.Methods: 447 subjects enrolled in a community-based abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA screening program were assessed for age, blood pressure, smoking status, and drug history. Aortic diameter and stiffness were measured by M-Mode ultrasound. The concentration of the amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen was used as a proxy measurement of type III collagen turnover.Results: NSAID ingestion was significantly (p = 0.006 associated with increased aortic wall stiffness after adjusting for age, aortic diameter, blood pressure, and smoking status. No such effect was seen for β-blockers, calcium channel antagonists, nitrates, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, diuretics, or antiplatelet agents.Discussion: These novel data show that NSAIDS are associated with increased aortic stiffness, possibly through the effects of cytokine mediated elastolysis. This in turn may prevent aortic expansion and the development of AAA.Keywords: nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, abdominal aortic aneurysm, aortic stiffness, elastolysis

  3. Treatment and Rehabilitation of Knee Joints Straight Stiffness After Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jinshu; Xu, Minghuo; Wu, Wenwen; Hu, Yuan; Shi, Xiuxiu; Hou, Shuxun

    2015-12-01

    The knee release surgery and postoperative rehabilitation of patients after burns and knee straight stiffness were investigated. Eleven patients were treated for 16 side burns and knee stiffness who consisted of nine males and two females, aged 19 to 54 years (mean = 33.2). The duration of the patients' knee stiffness ranged from 8 to 26 months, with an average of 12.6 months. Their preoperative flexion ranged from 5° to 50°, with an average of 26.2°. Their preoperative Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) knee scores ranged from 46 to 72 points, with an average of 55.8 points. All stiff knees were treated with release surgery, along with total release of intra-articular adhesion and excision of vastus intermedius. After the arthrolysis of the stiff knee joint, the tight skin was completely loose in the adhesions. The soft tissue contracture was not grafted, but the shade fascia was freed to increase skin ductility. All knee joints were released to more than 90° of flexion in the operation, and reversed fascia flaps were used to suture the loss of the deep fascia at the position of flexion of 90°. After the operation, the knee joint was fixed in flexion for 72 h while being actively cared for by early rehabilitation. Subsequently, the patient's skin coverage, joint motion, and joint function recovery were observed. Based on the follow-up of the patients for the following 16 to 36 months (mean = 25.7), the knee flexion of the patients ranged from 110° to 135°, with an average of 122.2° and 96° increase (P fascia, thus avoiding the need to undergo skin grafting. Short-term fixation of the joints after surgery and active flexion rehabilitation may also be the key to improve skin ductility and joint function of the patients. PMID:27011516

  4. Watershed Boundaries - Watershed Boundary Database for Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This data set is a complete digital hydrologic unit boundary layer of the Subbasins (8-digit), Watersheds (10-digit), and Subwatersheds (12-digit) for Montana. This...

  5. Novel bioinspired control approaches to increase the stiffness variability in multi-muscle driven joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antagonistic muscle pairs pulling on a joint are in general able to modulate stiffness through co-activation. Closer analysis of the stiffness, however, shows that, depending on the muscle and joint parameters, domains might occur in joint angle space for which stiffness variation is limited (low stiffness variability) or even impossible (stiffness nodes). As a consequence, stiffness control utilizing pure co-activation might fail. This work presents novel strategies for simultaneous control of torque and stiffness in a hinge joint actuated by two antagonistic muscle pairs. One strategy handles stiffness nodes by shifting them away from the current joint position and thus regaining stiffness controllability. To prevent domains of low stiffness variation, an optimal muscle configuration is sought and finally defined which allows for a maximal stiffness variation across a wide joint angle range. Based on this optimal configuration, four additional control strategies are proposed and tested which deliver stiffnesses and torques comparable to those obtained in the optimal case. The strategies combine torque control and stiffness control by co-activation with novel ideas like activation overflow and an inverse model approach. All strategies are tested in simulation and the results are compared with those of the optimal setup.

  6. Future Chronological Boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, S G

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to establish, in a categorical manner, the universality of the Geroch-Kronheimer-Penrose causal boundary when considering the types of causal structures that may profitably be put on any sort of boundary for a spacetime. Actually, this can only be done for the future causal boundary (or the past causal boundary) separately; furthermore, only the chronology relation, not the causality relation, is considered, and the GKP topology is eschewed. The final result is that there is a unique map, with the proper causal properties, from the future causal boundary of a spacetime onto any ``reasonable" boundary which supports some sort of chronological structure and which purports to consist of a future completion of the spacetime. Furthermore, the future causal boundary construction is categorically unique in this regard.

  7. Free vibration analysis of plate assemblies using the dynamic stiffness method based on the higher order shear deformation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarevic, Nevenka; Marjanović, Miroslav; Nefovska-Danilovic, Marija; Petronijevic, Mira

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with the free vibration analysis of isotropic plate assemblies using the dynamic stiffness method (DSM) based on the Reddy's higher-order shear deformation theory (HSDT). Using the proposed method, the isotropic rectangular plate assemblies of non-uniform thickness and material properties can be analyzed. The proposed model does not have any restrictions regarding the boundary conditions or the frequency limitations. It enables free vibration analysis of both thin and thick plates, making it advantageous in comparison with the conventional finite element method (FEM) regarding the computational cost and the accuracy of the results. Three coupled Euler-Lagrange equations of motion based on the HSDT have been transformed into two uncoupled equations of motion introducing a boundary layer function. The dynamic stiffness matrix for a completely free rectangular plate element has been derived using the superposition and the projection method. The proposed numerical model has been applied in the free vibration analysis of rectangular plate assemblies. Along with the convergence study, the results for natural frequencies have been validated against the existing data from the literature, the previous results from the authors as well as the results obtained by using the finite element software Abaqus. Excellent agreement has been obtained. Finally, a variety of new results is provided as a benchmark for future investigations.

  8. Longitudinal relaxation of initially straight flexible and stiff polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrakopoulos, Panagiotis; Dissanayake, Inuka

    2004-11-01

    The present talk considers the relaxation of a single flexible or stiff polymer chain from an initial straight configuration in a viscous solvent. This problem commonly arises when strong flows are turned off in both industrial and biological applications. The problem is also motivated by recent experiments with single biopolymer molecules relaxing after being fully extended by applied forces as well as by the recent development of micro-devices involving stretched tethered biopolymers. Our results are applicable to a wide array of synthetic polymers such as polyacrylamides, Kevlar and polyesters as well as biopolymers such as DNA, actin filaments, microtubules and MTV. In this talk we discuss the mechanism of the polymer relaxation as was revealed through Brownian Dynamics simulations covering a broad range of time scales and chain stiffness. After the short-time free diffusion, the chain's longitudinal reduction at early intermediate times is shown to constitute a universal behavior for any chain stiffness caused by a quasi-steady relaxation of tensions associated with the deforming action of the Brownian forces. Stiff chains are shown to exhibit a late intermediate-time longitudinal reduction associated with a relaxation of tensions affected by the deforming Brownian and the restoring bending forces. The longitudinal and transverse relaxations are shown to obey different laws, i.e. the chain relaxation is anisotropic at all times. In the talk, we show how from the knowledge of the relaxation mechanism, we can predict and explain the polymer properties including the polymer stress and the solution birefringence. In addition, a generalized stress-optic law is derived valid for any time and chain stiffness. All polymer properties which depend on the polymer length are shown to exhibit two intermediate-time behaviors with the early one to constitute a universal behavior for any chain stiffness. This work was supported in part by the Minta Martin Research Fund. The

  9. Conceptual Design and Analysis of Four Types of Variable Stiffness Actuators Based on Spring Pretension

    OpenAIRE

    Jishu Guo; Guohui Tian

    2015-01-01

    The variable stiffness actuator (VSA) is an open research field. This paper introduces the conceptual design and analysis of four types of novel variable stiffness actuators (VSAs). The main novelty of this paper is focused on the convenience control of the torque and stiffness of the actuator. We do not need to design complicated control strategies to achieve the desired actuating torque and output stiffness. This feature is beneficial for real-time control. In order to achieve this advantag...

  10. Stiffness Model of a 3-DOF Parallel Manipulator with Two Additional Legs

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Guang; Wu, Jun; Wang, Liping

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the stiffness modelling of a 3-DOF parallel manipulator with two additional legs. The stiffness model in six directions of the 3-DOF parallel manipulator with two additional legs is derived by performing condensation of DOFs for the joint connection and treatment of the fixed-end connections. Moreover, this modelling method is used to derive the stiffness model of the manipulator with zero/one additional legs. Two performance indices are given to compare the stiffness ...

  11. Effects of mechanical properties and geometric conditions on stiffness of Hyperboloid Shallow Shell

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Lihong; Yu Haiping; Xing Zhongwen; Lei Chengxi

    2015-01-01

    The experiment models based on the hyperboloid shallow shells that represent automobile panel's surface features are established. The effects of material properties and geometric conditions condition on the stiffness of hyperboloid shallow shell are investigated experimentally. The influences of panel thickness and geometric conditions on stiffness are very obvious. Stiffness increases with increasing of the panel thickness, and stiffness doubled as increasing in thickness with 0.1 mm. The ef...

  12. Evaluating railway track support stiffness from trackside measurements in the absence of wheel load data

    OpenAIRE

    Le Pen, Louis; Milne, David; Thompson, David; Powrie, William

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that track support stiffness is a major factor controlling rates of track geometry deterioration, particularly where the track support stiffness changes abruptly. There is, therefore, considerable potential benefit in being able to quantify and detect changes in the track support stiffness. In recent years, trackside techniques using various types of transducer have been developed to determine track deflections as trains pass. However, deducing the track support stiff...

  13. A Novel Technique of Quantifying Flexural Stiffness of Rod-Like Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Da-Kang; Shao, Jin-Yu

    2008-01-01

    In cellular and molecular biomechanics, extensional stiffness of rod-like structures such as leukocyte microvilli can be easily measured with many techniques, but not many techniques are available for measuring their flexural stiffness. In this paper, we report a novel technique of measuring the flexural stiffness of rod-like structures. This technique is based on image deconvolution and, as an example, it was used for determining the flexural stiffness of neutrophil microvilli. The probes we...

  14. Effects of Acute Resistance Exercise on Arterial Stiffness in Young Men

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Eun Sun; Jung, Su Jin; Cheun, Sung Kun; Oh, Yoo Sung; Kim, Seol Hyang; Jae, Sae Young

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives Increased central arterial stiffness is an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Acute aerobic exercise reduces arterial stiffness, while acute resistance exercise may increase arterial stiffness, but this is not a universal finding. We tested whether an acute resistance exercise program was associated with an increase in arterial stiffness in healthy young men. Subjects and Methods Thirteen healthy subjects were studied under parallel experimental conditi...

  15. Comparative numerical solutions of stiff Ordinary differential equations using magnus series expansion method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SURE KÖME

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigated the effect of Magnus Series Expansion Method on homogeneous stiff ordinary differential equations with different stiffness ratios. A Magnus type integrator is used to obtain numerical solutions of two different examples of stiff problems and exact and approximate results are tabulated. Furthermore, absolute error graphics are demonstrated in detail.

  16. Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography for regional evaluation of aortic stiffness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Nemes (Attila); M.L. Geleijnse (Marcel); O.I.I. Soliman (Osama Ibrahim Ibrahim); A.M. Anwar (Ashraf); W.B. Vletter (Wim); F.J. ten Cate (Folkert)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAortic stiffness is an important predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Non-invasive measurement of aortic stiffness is a promising challenge for echocardiography. The most important limitation of previous studies was that regional differences for aortic stiffness were not

  17. A relation between blood pressure and stiffness of joints and skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uiterwaal, CSPM; Grobbee, DE; Sakkers, RJB; Helders, PJM; Bank, RA; Engelbert, RHH

    2003-01-01

    Background. Blood pressure, particularly pulse pressure, is associated with arterial wall stiffness, but little is known about its relation to stiffness of other parts of the body. We examined the extent to which blood pressure levels in young healthy children are related to stiffness of various tis

  18. A nonlinear truss finite element with varying stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ďuriš R.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This contribution deals with a new truss element with varying stiffness intended to geometric and physically nonlinear analysis of composite structures. We present a two-node straight composite truss finite element derived by new nonincremental full geometric nonlinear approach. Stiffness matrix of this composite truss contains transfer constants, which accurately describe the polynomial longitudinal variation of cross-section area and material properties. These variations could be caused by nonhomogenous temperature field or by varying components volume fractions of the composite or/and functionally graded materials (FGM´s. Numerical examples were solved to verify the established relations. The accuracy of the new proposed finite truss element are compared and discused.

  19. An integrated design of quasi-zero stiffness mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Hyeong Joon; Lim, Sung Hun; Park, Chang Kun [Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Nonlinear Quasi-zero stiffness (QZS) mechanisms were studied to overcome the weakness of linear isolators. This paper presents an integrated design of the QZS mechanism. First, various types of QZS vibration mechanisms are analyzed and a generalized model for QZS mechanisms is derived. The generalized model consists of two main parts: link and horizontal spring. The motion equation of the QZS mechanism is a Duffing equation with nonlinear stiffness. Based on the generalized model, the design problem of the QZS mechanism is converted into the kinematic design of a link element. For simplicity, the link is generalized with a cam-roller mechanism. The integrated design approach shows that the QZS mechanism can have desired QZS characteristics with properly designed cam geometry.

  20. INFLUENCE OF PIEZOELECTRIC TRANSDUCER TO GLASS FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITE STIFFNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Rządkowski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The main goal was to determine if transducers based on piezoelectric materials are suitable for strain calculations in thin GFRP specimens. Numerous experimental studies, both physical and numerical, performed by the authors, have shown that there is a huge influence of bonded piezoelectric transducer on the overall stiffness of the measured object. The paper presents tensile test performed on strength machine with Digital Image Correlation strain and deflection observations. Test were compared with FEM models for detailed investigation. The main conclusion is piezoelectric transducers has huge influence on local stiffness of measured object. That is critical especially when they are used as strain sensors, when presence of sensor is influencing to measured results.

  1. AFFECTION OF ER FLUID ON STIFFNESS OF VIBRATION SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    On the application of an electric field, the mechanical properties of ER(Electro-rheological) fluid are very complex. The damping force of ER fluid is linear without electric field and is nonlinear when an electric field is applied. By increasing the strength of the electric field, the behavior of ER fluid changes from linear viscous to nonlinear viscoelastic-plastic. External electric fluid changes natural behavior of system with ER fluid besides the mechanical properties of ER fluid. The affect of ER fluid on the stiffness of nonlinear vibration system with ER dampers is analyzed by iterative perturbation method. The results show that the stiffness of structure would be increased with growing of the strength of the electric field.

  2. Associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ried-Larsen, M; Grøntved, A; Østergaard, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness, independent of objectively measured moderate-and-vigorous physical activity. This cross-sectional study included 375 adolescents (age 15.7 ± 0.4 years) from the Danish site of the European...... Youth Heart Study. Total frequency of bicycle usage was assessed by self-report, and carotid arterial stiffness was assessed using B-mode ultrasound. After adjusting for pubertal status, body height, and objectively measured physical activity and other personal lifestyle and demographic factors, boys...... using their bicycle every day of the week displayed a higher carotid arterial compliance {standard beta 0.47 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07-0.87]} and distension [standard beta 0.38 (95% CI -0.04 to 0.81)]. Boys using their bicycle every day of the week furthermore displayed a lower Young's elastic...

  3. Stiff Stability of the Hydrogen atom in dissipative Fokker electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    De Luca, J

    2005-01-01

    We introduce an ad-hoc electrodynamics with advanced and retarded Lienard-Wiechert interactions plus the dissipative Lorentz-Dirac self-interaction force. We study the covariant dynamical system of the electromagnetic two-body problem, i.e., the hydrogen atom. We perform the linear stability analysis of circular orbits for oscillations perpendicular to the orbital plane. In particular we study the normal modes of the linearized dynamics that have an arbitrarily large imaginary eigenvalue. These large eigenvalues are fast frequencies that introduce a fast (stiff) timescale into the dynamics. As an application, we study the phenomenon of resonant dissipation, i.e., a motion where both particles recoil together in a drifting circular orbit (a bound state), while the atom dissipates center-of-mass energy only. This balancing of the stiff dynamics is established by the existence of a quartic resonant constant that locks the dynamics to the neighborhood of the recoiling circular orbit. The resonance condition quant...

  4. Stiff spinning torus of electromagnetic two-body motion

    CERN Document Server

    De Luca, J

    2005-01-01

    We study an orbit of the electromagnetic two-body problem that involves a fast (stiff) spinning motion about a circular orbit. We give a multiscale method of solution that solves for the fast timescale first. The solvability condition of the asymptotic expansion demands resonances for the fast dynamics. The stiff resonant tori are found precisely in the atomic magnitude and agree with many features of the Bohr atom in quantitative and qualitative detail; We calculate every first emission line of the first 13 observable spectroscopic series of hydrogen within a few percent deviation. The resonant orbits have angular momenta that are approximate multiples of Planck's constant and the emitted frequencies are given by a difference of two linear eigenvalues. This Lorentz-invariant two-body dynamics exhibts the phenomenon of resonant dissipation, i.e., the metastable dynamics radiates the center-of-mass energy while the particles perform fast spinning oscillations of small amplitude about a circular orbit, a collec...

  5. Arterial Stiffness, Central Pulsatile Hemodynamic Load, and Orthostatic Hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Si; Wan, Shixi; Zhou, Yufei; Pan, Pei; Wen, Bo; Zhang, Xin; Liao, Hang; Shi, Di; Shi, Rufeng; Chen, Xiaoping; Jangala, Tulasiram

    2016-07-01

    The association between central pulsatile hemodynamic load, arterial stiffness, and orthostatic hypotension (OH) is unclear. The authors recruited 1099 participants from the community. Questionnaire, physical examination, and laboratory tests were performed. To assess the correlation between central pulsatile hemodynamic load, arterial stiffness, and OH, multiple logistic regression analysis was performed, and the discriminatory power was assessed by the area under the receiver operating curve. The prevalence of OH in this population was 5.6%. After adjusting for potential confounders, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (BaPWV) was significantly and positively correlated with OH in both the hypertension and nonhypertension groups (all Ppower than CSBP in both subgroups. BaPWV appears to be a better indicator of OH than CSBP in routine clinical practice. PMID:26543017

  6. Stiffness analysis of the sarafix external fixator of composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedim Pervan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a structural analysis of the CAD model three versions fixators Sarafix which to explore the possibility of introducing composite materials in the construction of the connecting rod fixators comparing values of displacement and stiffness at characteristic points structure. Namely, we investigated constructional performance of fixators Sarafix with a connecting rod formed from three different composite materials, the same matrix (epoxy resin with three different types of fibers (E glass, kevlar 49 and carbon M55J. Results of structural analysis fixators Sarafix with a connecting rod made of composite materials are compared with the results of tubular connecting rod fixators made of stainless steel. After comparing the results, from the aspect of stiffness, we gave the final considerations about composite material which provides an adequate substitution for the existing material.

  7. Acoustic transmission enhancement through a soft interlayer with a reactance boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Li; Qian, Feng; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen

    2015-08-01

    Research has shown that acoustic transmission enhancement (ATE) can occur in stiff materials with high acoustic impedance that include a soft interlayer with low acoustic impedance inserted between them without any opening (i.e., without any links between the two stiff materials). Previously, ATE was induced either by coupling acoustic surface waves or Love waves with the Fabry-Perot resonant modes inside the apertures or by the locally resonant modes of the structure. However, in this article ATE is achieved using wave-vector redistribution induced by a reactance boundary. An optimal boundary was designed to adjust the wave vector in the propagation direction, decreasing reflection caused by impedance differences. The role of boundary conditions on ATE was also clarified. PMID:26328694

  8. Optimal boundaries for decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carfi', David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we state and prove some new results on the optimal boundaries. These boundaries (called Pareto boundaries too are of increasing importance in the applications to Decision Theory. First of all the Pareto boundaries are the first and most important generalization of the concept of optimum; on the other hand, if f is a real functional defined on a non empty set X and K is a part of X, the determination of the optimal boundaries of the part K with respect to some preorder of X for which f is strictly increasing permits to reduce the optimization problem (f, K, inf (or (f, K, sup to the problem (f, minP(K, inf (resp. (f, maxP(K, sup, where by minP(K we denoted the minimal boundary of K (that in general is greatly smoller than K.

  9. Hamiltonian systems with boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lately, to provide a solid ground for quantization of the open string theory with a constant B-field it has been proposed to treat the boundary conditions as hamiltonian constraints. It seems that this proposal is quite general and it should be applicable to a wide range of models defined on manifolds with boundaries. The goal of the present paper is to show how the boundary conditions can arise as constraints in a purely algebraic fashion within the Hamiltonian approach without any reference to the Lagrangian formulation of the theory. The construction of the boundary Dirac brackets is also given and some subtleties are pointed out. We consider four examples of field theories with boundaries: the topological sigma model, the open string theory with and without a constant B-field and electrodynamics with topological term. A curious result about electrodynamics on a manifold with boundaries is presented. (author)

  10. SLE boundary visits

    CERN Document Server

    Jokela, Niko; Kytölä, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    We study the probabilities with which chordal Schramm-Loewner Evolutions (SLE) visit small neighborhoods of boundary points. We find explicit formulas for general chordal SLE boundary visiting probability amplitudes, also known as SLE boundary zig-zags or order refined SLE multi-point Green's functions on the boundary. Remarkably, an exact answer can be found to this important SLE question for an arbitrarily large number of marked points. The main technique employed is a spin chain - Coulomb gas correspondence between tensor product representations of a quantum group and functions given by Dotsenko-Fateev type integrals. We show how to express these integral formulas in terms of regularized real integrals, and we discuss their numerical evaluation. The results are universal in the sense that apart from an overall multiplicative constant the same formula gives the amplitude for many different formulations of the SLE boundary visit problem. The formula also applies to renormalized boundary visit probabilities f...

  11. Translocation of a stiff polymer in a microchannel

    OpenAIRE

    Ten Bosch, Alexandra; Cheyssac, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    International audience The voltage-driven dynamics of a stiff polymer through a nanopore are treated with a bend elastic model. In contrast to flexible polymers described by a stretch elasticity, bend elastic chains can be oriented in an external field, here the anchoring field created by the pore atoms. The trajectory of the chain is calculated using the Langevin equation of motion. The dynamical equation is solved by a normal mode analysis of the elastic curve with free ends. Interaction...

  12. Comparison between tensile, stiffness and fatigue life tests results

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Hugo Manuel Ribeiro Dias da; Pais, Jorge C.; Pereira, Paulo A. A.

    2003-01-01

    A laboratory mechanical test is being implemented in the University of Minho to evaluate the asphalt-aggregate interaction. This test measures the tensile properties of the bituminous mixture in the interface between the asphalt and the aggregates. By using the tensile test it is intended to observe how the asphalt-aggregate interaction influences the mechanical properties of the bituminous mixtures, namely, stiffness modulus and fatigue life. The tensile test results must have a good correla...

  13. Optimum lay-up design of variable stiffness composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Van Campen, J.M.J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Advancements in automated fibre-placement (AFP) technology make it possible to take laminate tailoring further than just stacking sequence optimisation; they enable the designer to vary the fibre orientation angle spatially within each ply. Spatial variation of fibre orientation angles results in a variable stiffness (VS) laminate. The work presented in this thesis constitutes a possible second step of a two-step design process for VS composite structures. The first step is to optimise a VS c...

  14. The Transition from Stiff to Compliant Materials in Squid Beaks

    OpenAIRE

    Miserez, Ali; Schneberk, Todd; Sun, Chengjun; Zok, Frank W.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The beak of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas represents one of the hardest and stiffest wholly organic materials known. As it is deeply embedded within the soft buccal envelope, the manner in which impact forces are transmitted between beak and envelope is a matter of considerable scientific interest. Here, we show that the hydrated beak exhibits a large stiffness gradient, spanning two orders of magnitude from the tip to the base. This gradient is correlated with a chemical gradient involv...

  15. "Stiff" Field Theory of Interest Rates and Psychological Future Time

    OpenAIRE

    Belal Baaquie; Jean-Philippe Bouchaud

    2004-01-01

    The simplest field theory description of the multivariate statistics of forward rate variations over time and maturities, involves a quadratic action containing a gradient squared rigidity term. However, this choice leads to a spurious kink (infinite curvature) of the normalized correlation function for coinciding maturities. Motivated by empirical results, we consider an extended action that contains a squared Laplacian term, which describes the bending stiffness of the FRC. With the extra i...

  16. Practical identifiability of the manipulator link stiffness parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Klimchik, Alexandr; Caro, Stéphane; Pashkevich, Anatol

    2013-01-01

    The paper addresses a problem of the manipulator stiffness modeling, which is extremely important for the precise manufacturing of contemporary aeronautic materials where the machining force causes significant compliance errors in the robot end-effector position. The main contributions are in the area of the elastostatic parameters identification. Particular attention is paid to the practical identifiability of the model parameters, which completely differs from the theoretical one that relie...

  17. Shear behaviour and stiffness of naturally cemented sands

    OpenAIRE

    Cuccovillo, T.

    1995-01-01

    The behaviour of natural soils is highly influenced by structural features arising from their geological history and was recognised to lie outside current frameworks which account only for the stress-volume state of the soil. The objective of the research was to compare the shear behaviour and stiffness of two naturally cemented sands: a calcarenite with relatively low densities, weak particles and strong bonding and a silica sandstone with high densities, strong particles and weak bonding. C...

  18. On a high-potential variable flexural stiffness device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Markus; Gerlach, Gerald

    2013-05-01

    There are great efforts in developing effective composite structures for lightweight constructions for nearly every field of engineering. This concerns for example aeronautics and spacecrafts, but also automotive industry and energy harvesting applications. Modern concepts of lightweight components try to make use of structures with properties which can be adjusted in a controllable was. However, classic composite materials can only slightly adapt to varying environmental conditions because most materials, like carbon or glass-fiber composites show properties which are time-constant and not changeable. This contribution describes the development, the potential and the limitations of novel smart, self-controlling structures which can change their mechanical properties - e.g. their flexural stiffness - by more then one order of magnitude. These structures use a multi-layer approach with a 10-layer stack of 0.75 mm thick polycarbonate. The set-up is analytically described and its mechanical behavior is predicted by finite element analysis done with ABAQUS. The layers are braided together by an array of shape memory alloy (SMA) wires, which can be activated independently. Depending on the temperature applied by the electrical current flowing through the wires and the corresponding contraction the wires can tightly clamp the layers so that they cannot slide against each other due to friction forces. In this case the multilayer acts as rigid beam with high stiffness. If the friction-induced shear stress is smaller than a certain threshold, then the layers can slide over each other and the multilayer becomes compliant under bending load. The friction forces between the layers and, hence, the stiffness of the beam is controlled by the electrical current through the wires. The more separate parts of SMA wires the structure has the larger is the number of steps of stiffness changes of the flexural beam.

  19. Derivation of stiffness and mass matrices with symbolic computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formula manipulation codes like MACSYMA, MATHEMATICA or MAPLE are versatile tools for symbolic analysis. In structural mechanics they can be used to automize the development of computer programs for the numerical calculation. The treatment of basic problems in structural mechanics using symbolic computation is discussed in literature. In this paper it is briefly outlined how MACSYMA can be used to derive stiffness and mass matrices for shell vibration analysis in a very comfortable and efficient way. (author)

  20. Passive stiffness of rat skeletal muscle undernourished during fetal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Elisa Toscano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of fetal undernutrition on the passive mechanical properties of skeletal muscle of weaned and young adult rats. INTRODUCTION: A poor nutrition supply during fetal development affects physiological functions of the fetus. From a mechanical point of view, skeletal muscle can be also characterized by its resistance to passive stretch. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided into two groups according to their mother's diet during pregnancy: a control group (mothers fed a 17% protein diet and an isocaloric low-protein group (mothers fed a 7.8% protein diet. At birth, all mothers received a standardized meal ad libitum. At the age of 25 and 90 days, the soleus muscle and extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscles were removed in order to test the passive mechanical properties. A first mechanical test consisted of an incremental stepwise extension test using fast velocity stretching (500 mm/s enabling us to measure, for each extension stepwise, the dynamic stress (σd and the steady stress (σs. A second test consisted of a slow velocity stretch in order to calculate normalized stiffness and tangent modulus from the stress-strain relationship. RESULTS: The results for the mechanical properties showed an important increase in passive stiffness in both the soleus and EDL muscles in weaned rat. In contrast, no modification was observed in young adult rats. CONCLUSIONS: The increase in passive stiffness in skeletal muscle of weaned rat submitted to intrauterine undernutrition it is most likely due to changes in muscle passive stiffness.

  1. Injections and physiotherapy for the painful stiff shoulder.

    OpenAIRE

    Dacre, J E; Beeney, N; Scott, D L

    1989-01-01

    Cost effective treatment is needed for common self limiting rheumatological conditions. Periarthritis of the shoulder is an example. There is no consensus for one type of treatment, though local steroids or physiotherapy are conventionally used. Their cost and efficacy were compared in a prospective randomised observer-blind trial--in essence a medical audit of the treatment of a common rheumatological problem. Sixty two consecutive patients presenting with a painful stiff shoulder were studi...

  2. ERROR COMPENSATION OF COORDINATE MEASURING MACHINES WITH LOW STIFFNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A technique for compensating the errors of coordinate measuring machines (CMMs) with low stiffness is proposed. Some additional it ems related with the force deformation are introduced to the error compensation equations. The research was carried on a moving column horizontal arm CMM. Experimental results show that both the effects of systematic components of error motions and force deformations are greatly reduced, which shows the effectiveness o proposed technique.

  3. Increased Post-Operative Stiffness after Arthroscopic Suprapectoral Biceps Tenodesis

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Brian C.; Pehlivan, Hakan C.; Hart, Joseph M.; Carson, Eric W.; Diduch, David R.; Miller, Mark D.; Brockmeier, Stephen F.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Biceps tenodesis can be performed open or arthroscopically and can be positioned in a suprapectoral or subpectoral position. Suprapectoral tenodesis can be carried out arthroscopically, whereas the subpectoral tenodesis is performed as an open procedure. The goal of this study is to compare the incidence of postoperative stiffness between arthroscopic suprapectoral and open subpectoral biceps tenodesis and evaluate risk factors for its occurrence. Methods: Study Design: The charts...

  4. EFFECT OF SODIUM-POTASSIUM INTAKE ON ARTERIAL STIFFNESS

    OpenAIRE

    J GOLSHAHI; Z MOBADI; N. Zamani

    2001-01-01

    Introduction. Hypertension is one of the most common causes of cardiovascular problems in our society. Diet is the cheapest and the most accessible method of blood pressure (BP) control. BP is associated with arterial stiffness which affects cardiac afterload. This study evaluate the effect of diertary Na and K on vascular compliance. Methods. We selected ninty six patients referred to Isfahan cardovascular Research center (affiliated to IUMSHS). Inclusion criteria were mild hypertension...

  5. The influence of inhomogeneous on the cantilever beam stiffness

    OpenAIRE

    Шамровский, Александр Дмитриевич; Колесник, Дмитрий Николаевич; Михайлуца, Елена Николаевна

    2013-01-01

    It is proposed in the paper to conduct a computational experiment on  the determination of the influence of inhomogeneities on the canti­lever beam stiffness using a discrete model of the continuous medium. This approach allows to consider the materials with arbitrary discrete inhomogeneity. Inhomogeneities are represented by various variants of the composition of two materials with different elastic modulus and Poisson’s ratios. The study of the influence of these inhomogeneities is supposed...

  6. Relationship between DCP, Stiffness, Shear Strength, and R-value

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, David; Harvey, John T.

    2005-01-01

    A brief review of some studies undertaken reveal that direct relationships between DCP penetration and R-value are not reliable for general use in California. Limited studies appear to have been carried out and any relationships developed are based on very small samples that have significant variation. Good correlations between DCP penetration and shear strength and DCP penetration and stiffness have been developed, although these are material property dependent and need to be used with cauti...

  7. Stiffness compatibility of coralline hydroxyapatite bone substitute under dynamic loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN ChaoFeng; HOU ZhenDe; ZHAO Wei

    2009-01-01

    When hydroxyapatite bone substitutes are implanted in human bodies, bone tissues will grow into their porous structure, which will reinforce their strength and stiffness. The concept of mechanical com-patibility of bone substitutes implies that their mechanical properties are similar to the bone tissues around, as if they were part of the bone. The mechanical compatibility of bone substitutes includes both static and dynamic behavior, due to the mechanical properties of bone depending on the strain rate. In this study, split Hopkinson pressure bar technique (SHPB) was employed to determine the dy-namic mechanical properties of coralline hydroxyapatite, bones with and bones without organic com-ponents, and their dynamic stress-strain curves of the three materials were obtained. The mechanical effects of collagens in bone were assessed, by comparing the difference between the Young's moduli of the three materials. As the implanted bone substitute becomes a part of bone, it can be regarded as an inclusion composite. The effective modulus of the composite was also evaluated in order to estimate its mechanical compatibility on stiffness. The evaluated result shows that the suitable porosity of HA is0.8, which is in favor of both static and dynamic stiffness compatibility.

  8. Stiffness compatibility of coralline hydroxyapatite bone substitute under dynamic loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    When hydroxyapatite bone substitutes are implanted in human bodies,bone tissues will grow into their porous structure,which will reinforce their strength and stiffness.The concept of mechanical com-patibility of bone substitutes implies that their mechanical properties are similar to the bone tissues around,as if they were part of the bone.The mechanical compatibility of bone substitutes includes both static and dynamic behavior,due to the mechanical properties of bone depending on the strain rate.In this study,split Hopkinson pressure bar technique(SHPB) was employed to determine the dy-namic mechanical properties of coralline hydroxyapatite,bones with and bones without organic com-ponents,and their dynamic stress-strain curves of the three materials were obtained.The mechanical effects of collagens in bone were assessed,by comparing the difference between the Young’s moduli of the three materials.As the implanted bone substitute becomes a part of bone,it can be regarded as an inclusion composite.The effective modulus of the composite was also evaluated in order to estimate its mechanical compatibility on stiffness.The evaluated result shows that the suitable porosity of HA is 0.8,which is in favor of both static and dynamic stiffness compatibility.

  9. Modeling of Axial Spring Stiffness in Active Vibration Controlled Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao William

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available During drilling process, substantial amount of vibration and shock are induced to the drill string. Active vibration controlled drilling is introduced to reduce the vibration and increase the efficiency of drilling process. In this system, two main components that determine the damping coefficient are magnetorheological (MR damper and spring assembly. Performance of vibration damping system is depending on the viscosity of MR fluid in the damper and spring constant of spring assembly. One of the key issues that are unclear from the design is the correlation between the axial spring stiffness configuration and the damping force which needs to be tuned actively. There has been lack of studies on how the viscosity of MR fluid on the active vibration damper affects the damping stiffness of the whole system. The objective of the project is to extract the correlations for the viscous damping coefficient, equivalent spring stiffness and power input to the system. Simplified vibration model is thus created using Simulink, together with experimental data fed from APS Technology’s in-house team. Inputs of the simulation such as force exerted, mass of mandrel, spring constant and step time are based on the experimental data and can be adjusted to suit different experiments. By having the model, behavior of the system can be studied and analyzed. From the simulation, it is also observed that the relationship between damping coefficient and power input of the system is linear.

  10. Reflex ankle stiffness is inversely correlated with natural body sway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Brianna L; Bendrups, Andrew P

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to determine whether effective ankle stiffness (EAS), measured during slow unperceived perturbations of stance, is related to natural anterior-posterior body sway. Because the perturbations are not perceived, any neural component of the response to perturbation is assumed to be "reflex", in the broad sense of an involuntary response to a stimulus. Subjects stood on a force platform for three 10-min trials. EAS was obtained from the average slope (Δτ/Δα) of the relation between ankle torque (τ) and ankle angle (α), recorded during repeated perturbations delivered at the waist by a weak spring. EAS was normalised using the subject's "load stiffness" (LS), calculated from mass (m) and height (h) above the ankle joint (m·g·h). Sway was obtained from fluctuations in ankle angle prior to perturbation. Variation in EAS and sway between subjects provided spread of data for correlation. There were no significant changes in EAS or sway across trials. All subjects had higher EAS than LS and mean EAS (1124Nm/rad) was significantly greater (pinverted pendulum with a stiffness of about twice LS and that EAS is largely generated by neural modulation of postural muscles. The inverse correlation between EAS and body sway suggests that the reflex mechanisms responding to perturbation also influence the extent of natural sway. PMID:27004645

  11. Role of Inflammation and Substrate Stiffness in Cancer Cell Transmigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilla, Susan; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2013-03-01

    Cancer metastasis, the ability for cancer cells to break away from the primary tumor site and spread to other organs of the body, is one of the main contributing factors to the deadliness of the disease. One of the rate-limiting steps in cancer metastasis that is not well understood is the adhesion of tumor cells to the endothelium followed by transmigration. Other factors include substrate stiffness and inflammation. To test these parameters, we designed an in vitro model of transendothelial migration. Our results suggest that cancer cell transmigration is a two-step process in which they first incorporate into the endothelium before migrating through. It was observed that the cumulative fraction of cancer cells that incorporate into the endothelium increases over time. Unlike leukocytes, which can directly transmigrate through the endothelium, cancer cells appear to have a two-step process of transmigration. Our results indicate that inflammation does not act as a signal for cancer cells to localize at specific sites and transmigrate similarly to leukocytes. Cancer cell transmigration also does not vary with substrate stiffness indicating that tissue stiffness may not play a role in cancer's propensity to metastasize to certain tissues.

  12. Forced vibration of flexible body systems. A dynamic stiffness method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T. S.; Lin, J. C.

    1993-10-01

    Due to the development of high speed machinery, robots, and aerospace structures, the research of flexible body systems undergoing both gross motion and elastic deformation has seen increasing importance. The finite element method and modal analysis are often used in formulating equations of motion for dynamic analysis of the systems which entail time domain, forced vibration analysis. This study develops a new method based on dynamic stiffness to investigate forced vibration of flexible body systems. In contrast to the conventional finite element method, shape functions and stiffness matrices used in this study are derived from equations of motion for continuum beams. Hence, the resulting shape functions are named as dynamic shape functions. By applying the dynamic shape functions, the mass and stiffness matrices of a beam element are derived. The virtual work principle is employed to formulate equations of motion. Not only the coupling of gross motion and elastic deformation, but also the stiffening effect of axial forces is taken into account. Simulation results of a cantilever beam, a rotating beam, and a slider crank mechanism are compared with the literature to verify the proposed method.

  13. Photoplethysmographic signal waveform index for detection of increased arterial stiffness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this research was to assess the validity of the photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveform index PPGAI for the estimation of increased arterial stiffness. For this purpose, PPG signals were recorded from 24 healthy subjects and from 20 type II diabetes patients. The recorded PPG signals were processed with the analysis algorithm developed and the waveform index PPGAI similar to the augmentation index (AIx) was calculated. As a reference, the aortic AIx was assessed and normalized for a heart rate of 75 bpm (AIx@75) by a SphygmoCor device. A strong correlation (r = 0.85) between the PPGAI and the aortic AIx@75 and a positive correlation of both indices with age were found. Age corrections for the indices PPGAI and AIx@75 as regression models from the signals of healthy subjects were constructed. Both indices revealed a significant difference between the groups of diabetes patients and healthy controls. However, the PPGAI provided the best statistical discrimination for the group of subjects with increased arterial stiffness. The waveform index PPGAI based on the inexpensive PPG technology can be considered as a perspective measure of increased arterial stiffness estimation in clinical screenings. (paper)

  14. Arterial stiffness, central hemodynamics, and cardiovascular risk in hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palatini P

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Palatini1, Edoardo Casiglia1, Jerzy Gąsowski2, Jerzy Głuszek3, Piotr Jankowski4, Krzysztof Narkiewicz5, Francesca Saladini1, Katarzyna Stolarz-Skrzypek4, Valérie Tikhonoff1, Luc Van Bortel6, Wiktoria Wojciechowska4, Kalina Kawecka-Jaszcz41Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Padova, Padua, Italy; 2Department of Internal Medicine and Gerontology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland; 3Department of Arterial Hypertension, University Hospital, Poznan, Poland; 4First Department of Cardiology and Hypertension, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland; 5Department of Hypertension and Diabetology, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland; 6Heymans Institute of Pharmacology, Ghent University, Ghent, BelgiumAbstract: This review summarizes several scientific contributions at the recent Satellite Symposium of the European Society of Hypertension, held in Milan, Italy. Arterial stiffening and its hemodynamic consequences can be easily and reliably measured using a range of noninvasive techniques. However, like blood pressure (BP measurements, arterial stiffness should be measured carefully under standardized patient conditions. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has been proposed as the gold standard for arterial stiffness measurement and is a well recognized predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcome. Systolic BP and pulse pressure in the ascending aorta may be lower than pressures measured in the upper limb, especially in young individuals. A number of studies suggest closer correlation of end-organ damage with central BP than with peripheral BP, and central BP may provide additional prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk. Moreover, BP-lowering drugs can have differential effects on central aortic pressures and hemodynamics compared with brachial BP. This may explain the greater beneficial effect provided by newer antihypertensive drugs beyond peripheral BP

  15. Scaling of Fluid Flow and Seismic Stiffness of Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovitch, C.; Nolte, D.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    A firm understanding of the relationship between the hydraulic and mechanical properties of fractures has been long sought. Seismic techniques probe the mechanical properties of fractures, e.g. fracture specific stiffness. Providing a connection between fluid flow and fracture stiffness would enable remote estimation of the flow properties in the subsurface. Linking theses two properties would improve society's ability to assess the risk related to the extraction of drinkable water, oil production, and the storage of CO2 in subsurface reservoirs. This relationship is complicated because the subsurface is composed of a hierarchy of structures and processes that span a large range of length and time scales. A scaling approach enables researchers to translate laboratory measurements towards the field scale and vise a versa. We performed a computational study of the scaling of the flow-stiffness relationship for planar fractures with uncorrelated aperture distributions. Three numerical models were required to study the scaling properties of the flow-stiffness relationship for single fractures. Firstly, the fracture topologies where constructed using a stratified continuum percolation method. Only uncorrelated fracture geometries were considered to provide a baseline of understanding for the different interacting critical thresholds occurring in the hydraulic and mechanical properties. Secondly, fracture stiffness was calculated by modeling the deformation of asperities and a deformable half space. This model computed the displacement-stress curves for a given fracture, from which the stiffness was extracted. Thirdly, due to the sensitive nature of the critical phenomena associated with fluid flow through fractures, two network flow models were used for verification. The fractures were first modeled as a network of elliptical pipes and the corresponding linear system of equations was solved. The second method consisted of using a lattice grid network, where the flow is

  16. Theoretical Design and Characteristics Analysis of a Quasi-Zero Stiffness Isolator Using a Disk Spring as Negative Stiffness Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingshuai Meng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel quasi-zero stiffness (QZS isolator designed by combining a disk spring with a vertical linear spring. The static characteristics of the disk spring and the QZS isolator are investigated. The optimal combination of the configurative parameters is derived to achieve a wide displacement range around the equilibrium position in which the stiffness has a low value and changes slightly. By considering the overloaded or underloaded conditions, the dynamic equations are established for both force and displacement excitations. The frequency response curves (FRCs are obtained by using the harmonic balance method (HBM and confirmed by the numerical simulation. The stability of the steady-state solution is analyzed by applying Floquet theory. The force, absolute displacement, and acceleration transmissibility are defined to evaluate the isolation performance. Effects of the offset displacement, excitation amplitude, and damping ratio on the QZS isolator and the equivalent system (ELS are studied. The results demonstrate that the QZS isolator for overloaded or underloaded can exhibit different stiffness characteristics with changing excitation amplitude. If loaded with an appropriate mass, excited by not too large amplitude, and owned a larger damper, the QZS isolator can possess better isolation performance than its ELS in low frequency range.

  17. Automatic generation of 2D micromechanical finite element model of silicon–carbide/aluminum metal matrix composites: Effects of the boundary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai

    2013-01-01

    brittle damage model are developed within Abaqus/Standard Subroutine USDFLD, respectively. An Abaqus/Standard Subroutine MPC, which allows defining multi-point constraints, is developed to realize the symmetric boundary condition (SBC) and periodic boundary condition (PBC). A series of computational...... experiments are performed to study the influence of boundary condition, particle number and volume fraction of the representative volume element (RVE) on composite stiffness and strength properties....

  18. Effects of mechanical properties and geometric conditions on stiffness of Hyperboloid Shallow Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Lihong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The experiment models based on the hyperboloid shallow shells that represent automobile panel's surface features are established. The effects of material properties and geometric conditions condition on the stiffness of hyperboloid shallow shell are investigated experimentally. The influences of panel thickness and geometric conditions on stiffness are very obvious. Stiffness increases with increasing of the panel thickness, and stiffness doubled as increasing in thickness with 0.1 mm. The effect of thickness on stiffness is far greater than that of blank holding force. The greater the arc height of punch, the greater the stiffness. And stiffness increases nearly by five times with arc height of punch is from 3mm to 9mm. The effect of arc height of punch on stiffness is far greater than that of materials mechanical properties. The stiffness is varied with different panel material properties by the same forming and stiffness test conditions. The decrease of yield strength is beneficial to the panel stiffness. The appropriate choice of materials and forming process condition is important in meeting necessary requirements for the energy-saving, lightweight and reducing wind resistance design in automotive industry.

  19. Stiffness and progressive damage analysis on random chopped fiber composite using FEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi

    The need of vehicle weight reduction and fuel efficiency in the automotive industry calls for substituting traditional materials with lightweight ones. With the maturity of the preforming technologies, random chopped fiber composites have received increasing attention in recent years as replacement for traditional structural materials. In order to expand their application, accurate material characterization is required. Material properties such as effective elastic stiffness, material damage behavior, and strength are of primary interest. In this thesis, a micro-mechanics based finite element analysis method for the random chopped fiber composite is developed. In order to obtain the effective material properties of random chopped fiber composites, a modified random sequential adsorption technique is proposed to generate the representative volume element of random chopped fiber composites. In the three-dimensional representative volume element generation algorithm, a fiber is bended locally to avoid intersecting other fibers and consequently to overcome the "jamming limit" in the existing techniques. The volume fraction of a representative volume element generated by the modified random sequential adsorption is as high as that of the specimens provided by industry, which is about 35% to 40%. A homogenization scheme is applied to the finite element solution of the boundary value problem, defined in the representative volume element with proper boundary conditions, to compute the effective elastic stiffness constants of the composite. An automatic procedure based on a moving window technique is also presented to determine the proper size of the representative volume element of the random chopped fiber composite. Investigation on the damage behavior of the composite is carried out by using constituent's mechanical properties. Three damage mechanisms are considered, namely, the matrix cracking, interfacial debonding, and fiber breakage. The cohesive zone model is

  20. Relationship between cell stiffness and stress fiber amount, assessed by simultaneous atomic force microscopy and live-cell fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S

    2016-06-01

    Actomyosin stress fibers, one of the main components of the cell's cytoskeleton, provide mechanical stability to adherent cells by applying and transmitting tensile forces onto the extracellular matrix (ECM) at the sites of cell-ECM adhesion. While it is widely accepted that changes in spatial and temporal distribution of stress fibers affect the cell's mechanical properties, there is no quantitative knowledge on how stress fiber amount and organization directly modulate cell stiffness. We address this key open question by combining atomic force microscopy with simultaneous fluorescence imaging of living cells, and combine for the first time reliable quantitative parameters obtained from both techniques. We show that the amount of myosin and (to a lesser extent) actin assembled in stress fibers directly modulates cell stiffness in adherent mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3). In addition, the spatial distribution of stress fibers has a second-order modulatory effect. In particular, the presence of either fibers located in the cell periphery, aligned fibers or thicker fibers gives rise to reinforced cell stiffness. Our results provide basic and significant information that will help design optimal protocols to regulate the mechanical properties of adherent cells via pharmacological interventions that alter stress fiber assembly or via micropatterning techniques that restrict stress fiber spatial organization. PMID:26206449

  1. Boundary definition of a multiverse measure

    CERN Document Server

    Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan; Rosenhaus, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    We propose to regulate the infinities of eternal inflation by relating a late time cut-off in the bulk to a short distance cut-off on the future boundary. The light-cone time of an event is defined in terms of the volume of its future light-cone on the boundary. We seek an intrinsic definition of boundary volumes that makes no reference to bulk structures. This requires taming the fractal geometry of the future boundary, and lifting the ambiguity of the conformal factor. We propose to work in the conformal frame in which the boundary Ricci scalar is constant. We explore this proposal in the FRW approximation for bubble universes. Remarkably, we find that the future boundary becomes a round three-sphere, with smooth metric on all scales. Our cut-off yields the same relative probabilities as a previous proposal that defined boundary volumes by projection into the bulk along timelike geodesics. Moreover, it is equivalent to an ensemble of causal patches defined without reference to bulk geodesics. It thus yields...

  2. A METHOD OF DETERMINING THE COORDINATES OF THE STIFFNESS CENTER AND THE STIFFNESS PRINCIPAL AXIS OF THE VIBRATING SYSTEM WITH DAMPING

    OpenAIRE

    Dang Xuan Truong; Tran Duc Chinh

    2014-01-01

    The report presents a methodology to determine the directions of the stiffness principal axis (in this case subject to the linear displacement and forced rotation angle) of a solid object interact with the surrounding environment by resilient bearing supports. The results also show that determining the coordinates of the stiffness center in the vibrating system with damping factors is necessary in our research.

  3. Effects of safflower seed extract on arterial stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Suzuki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Katsuya Suzuki1, Shigekazu Tsubaki2, Masami Fujita3, Naoto Koyama1, Michio Takahashi1, Kenji Takazawa41Research Institute for Health Fundamentals, Ajinomoto Co., Inc., Kawasaki; 2Samoncho Clinic, Tokyo; 3Shinanozaka Clinic, Tokyo; 4Tokyo Medical University Hachioji Medical Center, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Safflower seed extract (SSE contains characteristic polyphenols and serotonin derivatives (N-(p-coumaroyl serotonin and N-feruloylserotonin, which are reported to inhibit oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL, formation of atherosclerotic plaques, and improve arterial stiffness as assessed by pulse wave analysis in animal models. The effects of long-term supplementation with SSE on arterial stiffness in human subjects were evaluated. This double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 77 males (35–65 years and 15 postmenopausal females (55–65 years with high-normal blood pressure or mild hypertension who were not undergoing treatment. Subjects received SSE (70 mg/day as serotonin derivatives or placebo for 12 weeks, and pulse wave measurements, ie, second derivative of photoplethysmogram (SDPTG, augmentation index, and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV were conducted at baseline, and at weeks 4, 8, and 12. Vascular age estimated by SDPTG aging index improved in the SSE-supplemented group when compared with the placebo group at four (P = 0.0368 and 12 weeks (P = 0.0927. The trend of augmentation index reduction (P = 0.072 versus baseline was observed in the SSE-supplemented group, but reduction of baPWV by SSE supplementation was not observed. The SSE-supplemented group also showed a trend towards a lower malondialdehyde-modified-LDL autoantibody titer at 12 weeks from baseline. These results suggest long-term ingestion of SSE in humans could help to improve arterial stiffness.Keywords: safflower, serotonin derivatives, antioxidants, augmentation index, pulse wave velocity

  4. Short range stiffness elastic limit depends on joint velocity

    OpenAIRE

    De Vlugt, E.; Van Eesbeek, S.; Baines, P.; Hilte, J.; Meskers, C. G. M.; De Groot, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Muscles behave as elastic springs during the initial strain phase, indicated as short range stiffness (SRS). Beyond a certain amount of strain the muscle demonstrates a more viscous behavior. The strain at which the muscle transits from elastic- to viscous-like behavior is called the elastic limit and is believed to be the result of breakage of cross-bridges between the contractile filaments. The aim of this study was to test whether the elastic limit, measured in vivo at the wrist joint, dep...

  5. Stiffness design of geometrically nonlinear structures using topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Thomas; Pedersen, Claus B. Wittendorf; Sigmund, Ole

    2000-01-01

    The paper deals with topology optimization of structures undergoing large deformations. The geometrically nonlinear behaviour of the structures are modelled using a total Lagrangian finite element formulation and the equilibrium is found using a Newton-Raphson iterative scheme. The sensitivities of...... linear response. The problem is circumvented by optimizing the structures for multiple loading conditions or by minimizing the complementary elastic work. Examples show that differences in stiffnesses of structures optimized using linear and nonlinear modelling are generally small but they can be large...

  6. Analytical stiffness matrices with Green-Lagrange strain measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pauli

    2005-01-01

    Separating the dependence on material and stress/strain state from the dependence on initial geometry, we obtain analytical secant and tangent stiffness matrices. For the case of a linear displacement triangle with uniform thickness and uniform constitutive behaviour closed-form results are listed......, directly suited for coding in a finite element program. The nodal positions of an element and the displacement assumption give three basic matrices of order three. These matrices do not depend on material and stress/strain state, and thus are unchanged during the necessary iterations for obtaining...

  7. On modeling hydraulic fracture in proper variables: stiffness, accuracy, sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Mishuris, Gennady; Linkov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The problem of hydraulic fracture propagation is considered by using its recently suggested modified formulation in terms of the particle velocity, the opening in the proper degree, appropriate spatial coordinates and $\\varepsilon$-regularization. We show that the formulation may serve for significant increasing the efficiency of numerical tracing the fracture propagation. Its advantages are illustrated by re-visiting the Nordgren problem. It is shown that the modified formulation facilitates (i) possibility to have various stiffness of differential equations resulting after spatial discretization, (ii) obtaining highly accurate and stable numerical results with moderate computational effort, and (iii) sensitivity analysis. The exposition is extensively illustrated by numerical examples.

  8. Photoinduced variable stiffness of spiropyran-based composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantitative demonstration of reversible stiffness upon appropriate light stimulus in a spiropyran-polymeric composite is presented. The polymeric films containing 3% wt. of the photochromic spiropyran were irradiated with alternating ultraviolet and visible light and the storage modulus was measured. A reversible change in modulus of about 7% was observed. The modulus change was attributed to an interaction of the polar merocyanine with the polymeric chains and/or to a variation of effective free volume induced by merocyanine aggregates formed in the polymer upon ultraviolet irradiation. The effect is fully reversed when the merocyanine isomers turn back to the spiropyran state after visible irradiation.

  9. Numerical Solution for Stiff Dynamic Equations of Flexible Multibody System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Yan-ping; WU Guo-rong

    2008-01-01

    A nonlinear numerical integration method, based on forward and backward Euler integration methods, is proposed for solving the stiff dynamic equations of a flexible multibody system, which are transformed from the second order to the first order by adop- ring state variables. This method is of A0 stability and infinity stability. The numerical solutions violating the constraint equations are corrected by Blajer's modification approach. Simulation results of a slider-crank mechanism by the proposed method are in good a- greement with ones from other literature.

  10. Task dependency of grip stiffness--a study of human grip force and grip stiffness dependency during two different tasks with same grip forces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Höppner

    Full Text Available It is widely known that the pinch-grip forces of the human hand are linearly related to the weight of the grasped object. Less is known about the relationship between grip force and grip stiffness. We set out to determine variations to these dependencies in different tasks with and without visual feedback. In two different settings, subjects were asked to (a grasp and hold a stiffness-measuring manipulandum with a predefined grip force, differing from experiment to experiment, or (b grasp and hold this manipulandum of which we varied the weight between trials in a more natural task. Both situations led to grip forces in comparable ranges. As the measured grip stiffness is the result of muscle and tendon properties, and since muscle/tendon stiffness increases more-or-less linearly as a function of muscle force, we found, as might be predicted, a linear relationship between grip force and grip stiffness. However, the measured stiffness ranges and the increase of stiffness with grip force varied significantly between the two tasks. Furthermore, we found a strong correlation between regression slope and mean stiffness for the force task which we ascribe to a force stiffness curve going through the origin. Based on a biomechanical model, we attributed the difference between both tasks to changes in wrist configuration, rather than to changes in cocontraction. In a new set of experiments where we prevent the wrist from moving by fixing it and resting it on a pedestal, we found subjects exhibiting similar stiffness/force characteristics in both tasks.

  11. Multi-fingered haptic palpation utilizing granular jamming stiffness feedback actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a multi-fingered haptic palpation method using stiffness feedback actuators for simulating tissue palpation procedures in traditional and in robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery. Soft tissue stiffness is simulated by changing the stiffness property of the actuator during palpation. For the first time, granular jamming and pneumatic air actuation are combined to realize stiffness modulation. The stiffness feedback actuator is validated by stiffness measurements in indentation tests and through stiffness discrimination based on a user study. According to the indentation test results, the introduction of a pneumatic chamber to granular jamming can amplify the stiffness variation range and reduce hysteresis of the actuator. The advantage of multi-fingered palpation using the proposed actuators is proven by the comparison of the results of the stiffness discrimination performance using two-fingered (sensitivity: 82.2%, specificity: 88.9%, positive predicative value: 80.0%, accuracy: 85.4%, time: 4.84 s) and single-fingered (sensitivity: 76.4%, specificity: 85.7%, positive predicative value: 75.3%, accuracy: 81.8%, time: 7.48 s) stiffness feedback. (paper)

  12. A New Decoupling Method for Explicit Stiffness Analysis of Kinematically Redundant Planar Parallel Kinematic Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Pyo Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimization and control of stiffness for parallel kinematic mechanisms (PKM are critical issues because stiffness is directly related to the precision and response characteristics of the end-effector of PKMs. Unlike nonredundant PKMs, redundant PKMs have additional actuators exceeding their essential degrees-of-freedom (DOF, resulting in an increase in the redundancy of control. The stiffness of redundant PKMs is divided into passive and active stiffness. Active stiffness is changeable even in cases of fixed kinematic parameters and end-effector posture. However, it is not easy and intuitive to control the active stiffness of redundant PKMs for the complexity of Hessian matrix operations. This paper describes a new decoupling method for explicit stiffness analysis of redundant PKM with the well-known two-DOF and one-redundant planar five-bar PKM. Three actuating joints are decoupled to three groups containing two actuating joints. With this mathematical configuration, the stiffness matrix for one-redundant actuation is also divided into three stiffness matrices for nonredundant actuation, and the contribution of each actuator can be intuitively investigated. Stiffness matrices for the original and decoupled cases are compared in detail. In particular, this decoupling method is applicable to redundant PKMs with many passive joints. Finding optimal joints for one- or two-redundant actuation with various candidates is more intuitive with this decoupling method.

  13. Technical Validation of ARTSENS–An Image Free Device for Evaluation of Vascular Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Ravikumar; Kusmakar, Shitanshu; Thrivikraman, Arya Sree; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2015-01-01

    Vascular stiffness is an indicator of cardiovascular health, with carotid artery stiffness having established correlation to coronary heart disease and utility in cardiovascular diagnosis and screening. State of art equipment for stiffness evaluation are expensive, require expertise to operate and not amenable for field deployment. In this context, we developed ARTerial Stiffness Evaluation for Noninvasive Screening (ARTSENS), a device for image free, noninvasive, automated evaluation of vascular stiffness amenable for field use. ARTSENS has a frugal hardware design, utilizing a single ultrasound transducer to interrogate the carotid artery, integrated with robust algorithms that extract arterial dimensions and compute clinically accepted measures of arterial stiffness. The ability of ARTSENS to measure vascular stiffness in vivo was validated by performing measurements on 125 subjects. The accuracy of results was verified with the state-of-the-art ultrasound imaging-based echo-tracking system. The relation between arterial stiffness measurements performed in sitting posture for ARTSENS measurement and sitting/supine postures for imaging system was also investigated to examine feasibility of performing ARTSENS measurements in the sitting posture for field deployment. This paper verified the feasibility of the novel ARTSENS device in performing accurate in vivo measurements of arterial stiffness. As a portable device that performs automated measurement of carotid artery stiffness with minimal operator input, ARTSENS has strong potential for use in large-scale screening. PMID:27170892

  14. The relationship between passive stiffness and evoked twitch properties: the influence of muscle CSA normalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passive stiffness measurements are often used as a clinical tool to examine a muscle's passive lengthening characteristics. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between passive stiffness and evoked twitch properties prior to and following normalization of passive stiffness to muscle cross-sectional area (CSA). Ten healthy volunteers (mean ± SD age = 23 ± 3 year) performed passive range of motion, evoked twitch, and muscle CSA assessments of the plantar flexor muscles. Passive stiffness was determined from the slope of the final 5° of the angle–torque curve. Peak twitch torque (PTT) and rate of torque development (RTD) were determined via transcutaneous electrical stimulation, and muscle CSA was assessed using a peripheral quantitative computed tomography scanner. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients (r) were used to assess the relationships between passive stiffness and PTT and RTD and normalized passive stiffness (passive stiffness . muscle CSA−1) and PTT and RTD. Significant positive relationships were observed between passive stiffness and PTT (P = 0.003, r = 0.828) and RTD (P = 0.003, r = 0.825). There were no significant relationships between normalized passive stiffness and PTT (P = 0.290, r = 0.372) or RTD (P = 0.353, r = 0.329) demonstrating that stiffness did not account for a significant portion of the variance in twitch properties. Passive stiffness was largely influenced by the amount of muscle tissue in this study. Future studies that examine muscle stiffness and its relationship with performance measures, among different populations, and following various interventions may consider normalizing stiffness measurements to muscle CSA

  15. Tax Unit Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Statewide GIS Tax Unit boundary file was created through a collaborative partnership between the State of Kansas Department of Revenue Property Valuation...

  16. Minnesota County Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Minnesota county boundaries derived from a combination of 1:24,000 scale PLS lines, 1:100,000 scale TIGER, 1:100,000 scale DLG, and 1:24,000 scale hydrography...

  17. National Forest Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This theme shows the USFS national forest boundaries in the state. This data was acquired from the GIS coordinators at both the Chippewa National Forest and the...

  18. State Park Statutory Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Legislative statutory boundaries for sixty six state parks, six state recreation areas, and eight state waysides. These data are derived principally from DNR's...

  19. Allegheny County Parcel Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains parcel boundaries attributed with county block and lot number. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s...

  20. Haleakala National Park Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The park boundary of Haleakala National Park was digitized from USGS quadrangle maps. Haleakala National Park was established in September 1960. Recent NPS land...

  1. BoundaryOther_SUNIONS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — BoundaryOther_SUNIONS was intended to provide outlines of all Vermont school supervisory unions for use in displaying demographic data pertinent to each union, and...

  2. Minnesota County Boundaries - lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Minnesota county boundaries derived from a combination of 1:24,000 scale PLS lines, 1:100,000 scale TIGER, 1:100,000 scale DLG, and 1:24,000 scale hydrography...

  3. NM School District Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The dataset represents the boundaries of all public school districts in the state of New Mexico. The source for the data layer is the New Mexico Public Education...

  4. FWS Approved Acquisition Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This data layer depicts the external boundaries of lands and waters that are approved for acquisition by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in North...

  5. HUC 8 Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set is a digital hydrologic unit boundary that is at the 4-digit, 6-digit, 8-digit, and 11-digit level. The data set was developed by delineating the...

  6. Linking systemic arterial stiffness among adolescents to adverse childhood experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Stephen A; Chirico, Daniele; O'Leary, Deborah D; Cairney, John; Wade, Terrance J

    2016-06-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been linked with cardiovascular disease and early mortality among adults. Most research examines this relationship retrospectively. Examining the association between ACEs and children's cardiovascular health is required to understand the time course of this association. We examined the relationship between ACEs exposure and ECG-to-toe pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of systemic arterial stiffness that is strongly related to cardiovascular mortality among adults. PWV (distance/transit time; m/s) was calculated using transit times from the ECG R-wave to the pulse wave contour at the toe. Transit times were collected over 15 heartbeats and the distance from the sternal notch to the left middle toe was used. A total of 221 children (119 females) aged 10-14 years participated in data collection of PWV, hemodynamic and anthropometric variables. Parents of these children completed a modified inventory of ACEs taken from the Childhood Trust Events Survey. Multivariable regression assessed the relationship between ACEs group (<4 ACEs versus ≥4 ACEs) and PWV. Analyses yielded an ACEs group by sex interaction, with males who experienced four or more ACEs having higher PWV (p<0.01). This association was independent of hemodynamic, anthropometric and sociodemographic variables (R(2)=0.346; p<0.01). Four or more ACEs is associated with greater arterial stiffness in male children aged 10-14 years. Addressing stress and trauma exposure in childhood is an important target for public health interventions to reduce early cardiovascular risk. PMID:27107504

  7. A New Hybrid Gyroscope with Electrostatic Negative Stiffness Tuning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Chu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A variety of gyroscopes have been extensively studied due to their capability of precision detection of rotation rates and extensive applications in navigation, guidance and motion control. In this work, a new Hybrid Gyroscope (HG which combines the traditional Dynamically Tuned Gyroscope (DTG with silicon micromachined technology is investigated. The HG not only has the potentiality of achieving the same high precision as the traditional DTG, but also features a small size and low cost. The theoretical mechanism of the HG with a capacitance transducer and an electrostatic torquer is derived and the influence of the installation errors from the capacitance plate and the disc rotor module is investigated. A new tuning mechanism based on negative stiffness rather than the traditional dynamic tuning is proposed. The experimental results prove that the negative stiffness tuning is practicable and a tuning voltage of as high as 63 V is demonstrated. Due to the decreased installation error, the non-linearity of the scale factor is reduced significantly from 11.78% to 0.64%, as well as the asymmetry from 93.3% to 1.56% in the open loop condition. The rebalancing close-loop control is simulated and achieved experimentally, which proves that the fundamental principle of the HG is feasible.

  8. Negative stiffness induced by shear along wavy interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Erin; Li, Ruizhi; Chew, Huck Beng

    2014-02-01

    The extension of an elastic body almost always leads to mechanical tension in the stretching direction. Here, we report an unusual phenomenon of global mechanical compression in the stretching direction of an elastic body containing sinusoidal wavy interfaces. When the elastic body with a wavy interface is subjected to tensile loading, the local stress state along the interface is mixed-mode. Finite element simulations show that the resistance of the interface to shear-slip locks the interface together, and generates a moment couple which rotates the interface. Once the local adhesive shear strength of the interface is reached, the interface slips and separates. Then, the rotated interface triggers a restoring moment couple which releases the stored elastic energy. The structure subsequently undergoes global compression in the stretching direction until the interface completely separates. This moment-couple-induced internal energy storage and release mechanism leads to a material structure that exhibits high initial strength and toughness, followed by post-peak compliant softening with negative stiffness. This structural negative stiffness behavior is closely-tied with the ability of the interface to store and release energy by rotation, and is also exhibited by polycrystalline structures where grain rotation is possible.

  9. Planetary boundaries: guiding human development on a changing planet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steffen, W.; Richardson, K.; Rockström, J.; Cornell, S.E.; Fetzer, I.; Bennett, E.; Biggs, R.; Vries, de W.

    2015-01-01

    The planetary boundaries framework defines a safe operating space for humanity based on the intrinsic biophysical processes that regulate the stability of the Earth System. Here, we revise and update the planetary boundaries framework, with a focus on the underpinning biophysical science, based on t

  10. Shifting Institutional Boundaries through Cross-Border Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Alberto; Tavares, Orlanda; Cardoso, Sónia; Sin, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Cross-border higher education (CBHE) has been changing the organizational boundaries of higher education institutions (HEIs). This study aims to analyze the shifting boundaries of Portuguese HEIs through the lens of the identity concept in organization theories, considering three contexts with different levels of regulation: African…

  11. A Comparison of Total and Intrinsic Muscle Stiffness Among Flexors and Extensors of the Ankle, Knee and Elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Sandra M.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined 3 methods that assessed muscle stiffness. Muscle stiffness has been quantified by tissue reactive force (transverse stiffness), vibration, and force (or torque) over displacement. Muscle stiffness also has two components: reflex (due to muscle sensor activity) and intrinsic (tonic firing of motor units, elastic nature of actin and myosin cross bridges, and connective tissue). This study compared three methods of measuring muscle stiffness of agonist-antagonist muscle pairs of the ankle, knee and elbow.

  12. Stiffness Model of a 3-DOF Parallel Manipulator with Two Additional Legs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Yu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the stiffness modelling of a 3-DOF parallel manipulator with two additional legs. The stiffness model in six directions of the 3-DOF parallel manipulator with two additional legs is derived by performing condensation of DOFs for the joint connection and treatment of the fixed-end connections. Moreover, this modelling method is used to derive the stiffness model of the manipulator with zero/one additional legs. Two performance indices are given to compare the stiffness of the parallel manipulators with two additional legs with those of the manipulators with zero/one additional legs. The method not only can be used to derive the stiffness model of a redundant parallel manipulator, but also to model the stiffness of non-redundant parallel manipulators.

  13. Sensitivity analysis of design variables on elastic stiffness for the leaf type holddown spring assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitivity analysis on the elastic stiffness of TW-HDSs and TT-HDSs has been carried out sing elastic stiffness formulas which have been analytically derived by applying the simple beam theory and Castigliano's theorem based on the total strain energy, and using the gradient vectors of the elastic stiffness formulas which have been calculated form the midpoint formula. As the results of the sensitivity analysis, it is found that sensitivities of the elastic stiffness at six design variables for TT-HDSs or seven design variables for TW-HDSs of all 17 design variables are remarkable, and that sensitivities of the elastic stiffness at the leaf thickness is at least fifteen times for TW-HDSs and that sensitivities of the elastic stiffness at above mentioned remarkable design variables are dominantly in linear correlations with the leaf thickness. 34 tabs., 22 figs., 20 refs. (Author)

  14. Accurate spring constant calibration for very stiff atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Zehnder, Alan T. [Field of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Gates, Richard S.; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Smith, Douglas T.; Cook, Robert F. [Nanomechanical Properties Group, Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    There are many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications that rely on quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The AFM does not explicitly measure force, however, so in such cases knowledge of the cantilever stiffness is required. In most cases, the forces of interest are very small, thus compliant cantilevers are used. A number of methods have been developed that are well suited to measuring low stiffness values. However, in some cases a cantilever with much greater stiffness is required. Thus, a direct, traceable method for calibrating very stiff (approximately 200 N/m) cantilevers is presented here. The method uses an instrumented and calibrated nanoindenter to determine the stiffness of a reference cantilever. This reference cantilever is then used to measure the stiffness of a number of AFM test cantilevers. This method is shown to have much smaller uncertainty than previously proposed methods. An example application to fracture testing of nanoscale silicon beam specimens is included.

  15. Analysis of the variation in the stiffness modulus through four point bending tests

    OpenAIRE

    Pais, Jorge; Pereira, Paulo; Minhoto, Manuel; Fontes, Liseane; Kumar, D.S.N.V.A.; Silva, B. T. A.

    2009-01-01

    Pavement layers are characterized by basic material properties, among which the stiffness modulus and the Poisson ratio assume a preponderant importance in linear elastic anal-ysis. The stiffness modulus is usually assessed through samples extracted from a pavement or prepared in laboratory. The number of specimens used to calculate the stiffness modulus of an asphalt mixture plays an important role in the precision of pavement design. Thus, this paper presents a study to evaluate the number ...

  16. Use of a static progressive stretch orthosis to treat post-traumatic ankle stiffness

    OpenAIRE

    Costa Christopher R; McElroy Mark J; Johnson Aaron J; Lamm Bradley M; Mont Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic ankle stiffness can develop for numerous reasons after traumatic injury, and may adversely affect patient gait, mobility, and function. Although standard physical therapeutic techniques typically resolve this stiffness, some cases may be recalcitrant to these measures, making it difficult to restore range-of-motion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a static progressive stretch orthosis for the treatment of chronic ankle stiffness. Methods Twenty-six patien...

  17. Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness using oscillometric blood pressure measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Komine Hidehiko; Asai Yoshiyuki; Yokoi Takashi; Yoshizawa Mutsuko

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Arterial stiffness is a major contributor to cardiovascular diseases. Because current methods of measuring arterial stiffness are technically demanding, the purpose of this study was to develop a simple method of evaluating arterial stiffness using oscillometric blood pressure measurement. Methods Blood pressure was conventionally measured in the left upper arm of 173 individuals using an inflatable cuff. Using the time series of occlusive cuff pressure and the amplitudes ...

  18. In vivo assessment of arterial stiffness in the isoflurane anesthetized spontaneously hypertensive rat

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Eric E.; Casabianca, Andrew B; Khouri, Samer J; Kalinoski, Andrea L. Nestor

    2014-01-01

    Background Rodent models are increasingly used to study the development and progression of arterial stiffness. Both the non-invasive Doppler derived Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) and the invasively determined arterial elastance index (EaI) have been used to assess arterial stiffness in rats and mice, but the need for anesthetic agents to make these in vivo estimates may limit their utility. Thus, we sought to determine: 1) if known differences in arterial stiffness in spontaneously hypertensive r...

  19. A mechanism to compensate undesired stiffness in joints of prosthetic hands

    OpenAIRE

    Smit, G; Plettenbrug, D.H.; van der Helm, F. C. T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cosmetic gloves that cover a prosthetic hand have a parasitic positive stiffness that counteracts the flexion of a finger joint. Objectives: Reducing the required input torque to move a finger of a prosthetic hand by compensating the parasitic stiffness of the cosmetic glove. Study design: Experimental, test bench. Methods: The parasitic positive stiffness and the required input torques of a polyvinyl chloride glove and a silicone glove were measured when flexing a metacarpophalan...

  20. Novel Method to Evaluate Angular Stiffness of Prosthetic Feet From Linear Compression Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Adamczyk, Peter G.; Roland, Michelle; Hahn, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Lower limb amputee gait during stance phase is related to the angular stiffness of the prosthetic foot, which describes the dependence of ankle torque on angular progression of the shank. However, there is little data on angular stiffness of prosthetic feet, and no method to directly measure it has been described. The objective of this study was to derive and evaluate a method to estimate the angular stiffness of prosthetic feet using a simple linear compression test. Linear vertical compress...

  1. Optimization of Variable Stiffness Laminates and Sandwiches Undergoing Impulsive Dynamic Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Ugo Icardi; Federico Sola

    2015-01-01

    This paper, which deals with variable stiffness composites, is aimed at showing the effects of optimization on the response characteristics and stress fields of these materials. A new optimization technique that has recently been developed is used to find spatially variable distributions of stiffness properties at any point, which minimize the interlaminar stresses without significant stiffness loss. After solving the Euler–Lagrange equations obtained by the strain energy extremization with v...

  2. Stiffness of Diphenylalanine-Based Molecular Solids from First Principles Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuri, Ido; Hod, Oded; Gazit, Ehud; Kronik, Leeor

    2013-03-01

    Diphenylalanine-based peptide nanotubes were found to be unexpectedly stiff, with a Young modulus of 19 GPa. Here, we calculate the Young modulus from first principles, using density functional theory with dispersive corrections. This allows us to show that at least half of the stiffness of the material comes from dispersive interactions and to identify the nature of the interactions that contribute most to the stiffness. This presents a general strategy for the analysis of bioinspired functional materials.

  3. In vivo and in vitro measurements of pulmonary arterial stiffness: A brief review

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Lian; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2012-01-01

    During the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH), proximal pulmonary arteries (PAs) undergo remodeling such that they become thicker and the elastic modulus increases. Both of these changes increase the vascular stiffness. The increase in pulmonary vascular stiffness contributes to increased right ventricular (RV) afterload, which causes RV hypertrophy and eventually failure. Studies have found that proximal PA stiffness or its inverse, compliance, is strongly related to morbidity and mo...

  4. Analysis of structural - acoustic coupling of elastic rectangular enclosure with arbitrary boundary conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The structural acoustic coupling characteristics of a rectangular enclosure consisting of two elastic supported flexible plates and four rigid plates are analyzed. A general formulation considering the full coupling between the plates and cavity is developed by using Hamiltonian function and Rayleigh-Ritz method. By means of continuous distributions of artificial springs along boundary of flexible plates, a wide variety of boundary conditions and structure joint conditions are considered. To demonstrate the validity of the analytical model,the responses of sound pressure in the cavity and plate velocity are worked out. The analytical results coincides well with Kim's experimental results. The result is satisfactory. Finally, analytical results on the structure vibration and the sound field inside the cavity are presented.These results indicate that the coupling of the combined structure is relatively weak, so the internal cavity sound is controlled by plate directly excited,and the translational stiffness affects the sound more than the rotational stiffness does.

  5. Critical appraisal of the differential effects of antihypertensive agents on arterial stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Kum

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Francesca Kum, Janaka KarallieddeUnit for Metabolic Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Kings College-Waterloo Campus, King’s College London, United KingdomAbstract: Increased central arterial stiffness, involving accelerated vascular ageing of the aorta, is a powerful and independent risk factor for early mortality and provides prognostic information above and beyond traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD. Central arterial stiffness is an important determinant of pulse pressure; therefore, any pathological increase may result in left ventricular hypertrophy and impaired coronary perfusion. Central artery stiffness can be assessed noninvasively by measurement of aortic pulse wave velocity, which is the gold standard for measurement of arterial stiffness. Earlier, it was believed that changes in arterial stiffness, which are primarily influenced by long-term pressure-dependent structural changes, may be slowed but not reversed by pharmacotherapy. Recent studies with drugs that inhibit the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system, advanced glycation end products crosslink breakers, and endothelin antagonists suggest that blood pressure (BP-independent reduction and reversal of arterial stiffness are feasible. We review the recent literature on the differential effect of antihypertensive agents either as monotherapy or combination therapy on arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness is an emerging therapeutic target for CVD risk reduction; however, further clinical trials are required to confirm whether BP-independent changes in arterial stiffness directly translate to a reduction in CVD events.Keywords: aortic pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, blood pressure, renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system

  6. Vanishing spin stiffness in the spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain for any nonzero temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmelo, J. M. P.; Prosen, T.; Campbell, D. K.

    2015-10-01

    Whether at the zero spin density m =0 and finite temperatures T >0 the spin stiffness of the spin-1 /2 X X X chain is finite or vanishes remains an unsolved and controversial issue, as different approaches yield contradictory results. Here we explicitly compute the stiffness at m =0 and find strong evidence that it vanishes. In particular, we derive an upper bound on the stiffness within a canonical ensemble at any fixed value of spin density m that is proportional to m2L in the thermodynamic limit of chain length L →∞ , for any finite, nonzero temperature, which implies the absence of ballistic transport for T >0 for m =0 . Although our method relies in part on the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz (TBA), it does not evaluate the stiffness through the second derivative of the TBA energy eigenvalues relative to a uniform vector potential. Moreover, we provide strong evidence that in the thermodynamic limit the upper bounds on the spin current and stiffness used in our derivation remain valid under string deviations. Our results also provide strong evidence that in the thermodynamic limit the TBA method used by X. Zotos [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1764 (1999), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.82.1764] leads to the exact stiffness values at finite temperature T >0 for models whose stiffness is finite at T =0 , similar to the spin stiffness of the spin-1 /2 Heisenberg chain but unlike the charge stiffness of the half-filled 1D Hubbard model.

  7. Effect on the Floor Response Spectra by the Initial Stiffness of Seismic Isolators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyung-Kui; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Min Kyu; Choi, In-Kil [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The floor response spectra (FRS) of the structure should be sought for evaluating of the integrity of the internal equipment. The floor response spectrum depends on the height of the floor of the structure. Also FRS depends on the characteristics of the seismic base isolation system such as the natural frequency, damping ratio. An evaluation of the structural integrity using the equivalent stiffness of the seismic base isolation system was satisfactory. In this study, the effect of the non-linearity of isolated system in the floor response spectrum of the structure is analyzed. If the initial stiffness of the seismic isolators changes, it can influence the floor response spectrum. In this study, the analysis of an initial stiffness effect on the floor response spectrum was performed. In this study, the response of the seismic base isolation system based on the initial stiffness ratio effects was analyzed. By analyzing the time history result, while there is no alteration in the maximum shear force of seismic base isolation system, it is confirmed that the shear force is generally more decreased in a low initial stiffness ratio that most parts. Due to the overall decreased shear force, the floor response spectrum is more reduced in a low initial stiffness ratio than in a high initial stiffness ratio. The FRS of the high initial stiffness ratio is able to confirm an increase of 26.5% at the nature frequency of superstructure. It appears to be a result of a initial stiffness effect of the seismic base isolatior.

  8. Composite sizing and ply orientation for stiffness requirements using a large finite element structural model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovcich, N. A.; Gentile, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    A NASTRAN bulk dataset preprocessor was developed to facilitate the integration of filamentary composite laminate properties into composite structural resizing for stiffness requirements. The NASCOMP system generates delta stiffness and delta mass matrices for input to the flutter derivative program. The flutter baseline analysis, derivative calculations, and stiffness and mass matrix updates are controlled by engineer defined processes under an operating system called CBUS. A multi-layered design variable grid system permits high fidelity resizing without excessive computer cost. The NASCOMP system uses ply layup drawings for basic input. The aeroelastic resizing for stiffness capability was used during an actual design exercise.

  9. Stiffness Analysis of 3-d.o.f. Overconstrained Translational Parallel Manipulators

    CERN Document Server

    Pashkevich, Anatoly; Wenger, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a new stiffness modelling method for overconstrained parallel manipulators, which is applied to 3-d.o.f. translational mechanisms. It is based on a multidimensional lumped-parameter model that replaces the link flexibility by localized 6-d.o.f. virtual springs. In contrast to other works, the method includes a FEA-based link stiffness evaluation and employs a new solution strategy of the kinetostatic equations, which allows computing the stiffness matrix for the overconstrained architectures and for the singular manipulator postures. The advantages of the developed technique are confirmed by application examples, which deal with comparative stiffness analysis of two translational parallel manipulators.

  10. Supersymmetry from boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study breaking and restoration of supersymmetry in five-dimensional theories by determining the mass spectrum of fermions from their equations of motion. Boundary conditions can be obtained from either the action principle by extremizing an appropriate boundary action (interval approach) or by assigning parities to the fields (orbifold approach). In the former, fields extend continuously from the bulk to the boundaries, while in the latter the presence of brane mass-terms cause fields to jump when one moves across the branes. We compare the two approaches and in particular we carefully compute the non-trivial jump profiles of the wavefunctions in the orbifold picture for very general brane mass terms. We also include the effect of the Scherk-Schwarz mechanism in either approach and point out that for a suitable tuning of the boundary actions supersymmetry is present for arbitrary values of the Scherk-Schwarz parameter. As an application of the interval formalism we construct bulk and boundary actions for super-Yang-Mills theory. Finally we extend our results to the warped Randall-Sundrum background

  11. Wavelet multiresolution analyses adapted for the fast solution of boundary value ordinary differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawerth, Bjoern; Sweldens, Wim

    1993-01-01

    We present ideas on how to use wavelets in the solution of boundary value ordinary differential equations. Rather than using classical wavelets, we adapt their construction so that they become (bi)orthogonal with respect to the inner product defined by the operator. The stiffness matrix in a Galerkin method then becomes diagonal and can thus be trivially inverted. We show how one can construct an O(N) algorithm for various constant and variable coefficient operators.

  12. Reproducibility of the ambulatory arterial stiffness index in hypertensive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechering, D.G.; Steen, M.S. van der; Adiyaman, A.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We studied the repeatability of the ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI), which can be computed from 24-h blood pressure (BP) recordings as unity minus the regression slope of diastolic on systolic BP. METHODS: One hundred and fifty-two hypertensive outpatients recruited in...... Nijmegen (mean age = 46.2 years; 76.3% with systolic and diastolic hypertension) and 145 patients enrolled in the Systolic Hypertension in Europe (Syst-Eur) trial (71.0 years) underwent 24-h BP monitoring at a median interval of 8 and 31 days, respectively. We used the repeatability coefficient, which is...... were approximately 30%. Differences in AASI between paired recordings were correlated with differences in the goodness of fit (r2) of the AASI regression line as well as with differences in the night-to-day BP ratio. However, in sensitivity analyses stratified for type of hypertension, r2, or dipping...

  13. Blending stiffness and strength disorder can stabilize fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpas, Ehud D; Kun, Ferenc

    2016-03-01

    Quasibrittle behavior, where macroscopic failure is preceded by stable damaging and intensive cracking activity, is a desired feature of materials because it makes fracture predictable. Based on a fiber-bundle model with global load sharing we show that blending strength and stiffness disorder of material elements leads to the stabilization of fracture, i.e., samples that are brittle when one source of disorder is present become quasibrittle as a consequence of blending. We derive a condition of quasibrittle behavior in terms of the joint distribution of the two sources of disorder. Breaking bursts have a power-law size distribution of exponent 5/2 without any crossover to a lower exponent when the amount of disorder is gradually decreased. The results have practical relevance for the design of materials to increase the safety of constructions. PMID:27078436

  14. The Transition from Stiff to Compliant Materials in Squid Beaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miserez, Ali; Schneberk, Todd; Sun, Chengjun; Zok, Frank W.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2008-03-01

    The beak of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas represents one of the hardest and stiffest wholly organic materials known. As it is deeply embedded within the soft buccal envelope, the manner in which impact forces are transmitted between beak and envelope is a matter of considerable scientific interest. Here, we show that the hydrated beak exhibits a large stiffness gradient, spanning two orders of magnitude from the tip to the base. This gradient is correlated with a chemical gradient involving mixtures of chitin, water, and His-rich proteins that contain 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (dopa) and undergo extensive stabilization by histidyl-dopa cross-link formation. These findings may serve as a foundation for identifying design principles for attaching mechanically mismatched materials in engineering and biological applications.

  15. The transition from stiff to compliant materials in squid beaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miserez, Ali; Schneberk, Todd; Sun, Chengjun; Zok, Frank W; Waite, J Herbert

    2008-03-28

    The beak of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas represents one of the hardest and stiffest wholly organic materials known. As it is deeply embedded within the soft buccal envelope, the manner in which impact forces are transmitted between beak and envelope is a matter of considerable scientific interest. Here, we show that the hydrated beak exhibits a large stiffness gradient, spanning two orders of magnitude from the tip to the base. This gradient is correlated with a chemical gradient involving mixtures of chitin, water, and His-rich proteins that contain 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (dopa) and undergo extensive stabilization by histidyl-dopa cross-link formation. These findings may serve as a foundation for identifying design principles for attaching mechanically mismatched materials in engineering and biological applications. PMID:18369144

  16. Torsional Stiffness Verification of an Adhesively Bonded Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annicchiarico, A.; Caputo, F.; De Angelis, G.; Frascà, F.; Lamanna, G.

    2010-06-01

    In the present work numerical-experimental analysis for the characterization of a structural adhesive has been performed. The numerical analysis has been carried out through the finite element method by using, for the phases pre / post processing were used commercial programs while for the phase of numerical solution the Abaqus code was used. The experimental analyses were carried out at laboratories of C.R.F. S.C.p.A. by using of a standard quasi static testing machine. Later numerical analysis was performed comparing the torsional stiffness of a vehicle in which the welded connection between the pavilion and the flank has been substituted by bonded one. This comparison has allowed to demonstrate the ability of the bonded joint discussed to provide mechanical performances comparable with those of a welded joint widely used in the automotive industry.

  17. Packaging stiff polymers in small containers: A molecular dynamics study

    CERN Document Server

    Rapaport, D C

    2016-01-01

    The question of how stiff polymers are able to pack into small containers is particularly relevant to the study of DNA packaging in viruses. A reduced version of the problem based on coarse-grained representations of the main components of the system -- the DNA polymer and the spherical viral capsid -- has been studied by molecular dynamics simulation. The results, involving longer polymers than in earlier work, show that as polymers become more rigid there is an increasing tendency to self-organize as spools that wrap from the inside out, rather than the inverse direction seen previously. In the final state, a substantial part of the polymer is packed into one or more coaxial spools, concentrically layered with different orientations, a form of packaging achievable without twisting the polymer.

  18. Blending stiffness and strength disorder can stabilize fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpas, Ehud D.; Kun, Ferenc

    2016-03-01

    Quasibrittle behavior, where macroscopic failure is preceded by stable damaging and intensive cracking activity, is a desired feature of materials because it makes fracture predictable. Based on a fiber-bundle model with global load sharing we show that blending strength and stiffness disorder of material elements leads to the stabilization of fracture, i.e., samples that are brittle when one source of disorder is present become quasibrittle as a consequence of blending. We derive a condition of quasibrittle behavior in terms of the joint distribution of the two sources of disorder. Breaking bursts have a power-law size distribution of exponent 5 /2 without any crossover to a lower exponent when the amount of disorder is gradually decreased. The results have practical relevance for the design of materials to increase the safety of constructions.

  19. Quantitative Elastography for Cervical Stiffness Assessment during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fruscalzo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Feasibility and reliability of tissue Doppler imaging-(TDI- based elastography for cervical quantitative stiffness assessment during all three trimesters of pregnancy were evaluated. Materials and Methods. Prospective case-control study including seventy-four patients collected between the 12th and 42nd weeks of gestation. The tissue strain (TS was measured by two independent operators as natural strain. Intra- and interoperator intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC agreements were evaluated. Results. TS measurement was always feasible and exhibited a high performance in terms of reliability (intraoperator ICC-agreement = 0.93; interoperator ICC agreement = 0.89 and 0.93 for a single measurement and for the average of two measurements, resp.. Cervical TS showed also a significant correlation with gestational age, cervical length, and parity. Conclusions. TS measurement during pregnancy demonstrated high feasibility and reliability. Furthermore, TS significantly correlated with gestational age, cervical length, and parity.

  20. Nonlinear Effects in Stiffness Modeling of Robotic Manipulators

    CERN Document Server

    Pashkevich, Anatoly; Chablat, Damien

    2009-01-01

    The paper focuses on the enhanced stiffness modeling of robotic manipulators by taking into account influence of the external force/torque acting upon the end point. It implements the virtual joint technique that describes the compliance of manipulator elements by a set of localized six-dimensional springs separated by rigid links and perfect joints. In contrast to the conventional formulation, which is valid for the unloaded mode and small displacements, the proposed approach implicitly assumes that the loading leads to the non-negligible changes of the manipulator posture and corresponding amendment of the Jacobian. The developed numerical technique allows computing the static equilibrium and relevant force/torque reaction of the manipulator for any given displacement of the end-effector. This enables designer detecting essentially nonlinear effects in elastic behavior of manipulator, similar to the buckling of beam elements. It is also proposed the linearization procedure that is based on the inversion of ...

  1. On the difference between stiff and soft membranes: Capillary Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jaksch, Sebastian; Ohl, Michael; Frielinghaus, Henrich

    2015-01-01

    One problem of non-crystalline condensed matter (soft matter) is creating the right equilibrium between elasticity and viscosity, referred to as viscoelasticity. Manifestations of that can be found in everyday live, where the viscoelasticity in a tire needs to be balanced so it is still flexible and can dissipate shock-energy, yet hard enough for energy-saving operation. Similarly, the cartilage in joints needs to absorb shocks while operating at low- level friction with high elasticity. Two such examples with a biological applicability are stiff membranes, which allow for the sliding of joints and therefore maintain their function over the lifetime of the corresponding individual (decades) and the softening of cell membranes, for example for antimicrobial effects by dissolution in the case of bacteria (seconds). While the first should allow for low- friction operation at high elasticity, in the second scenario energy dissipated into the membrane eventually leads to membrane destruction. Here we address the i...

  2. Probabilistic boundary element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse, T. A.; Raveendra, S. T.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the Probabilistic Structural Analysis Method (PSAM) project is to develop structural analysis capabilities for the design analysis of advanced space propulsion system hardware. The boundary element method (BEM) is used as the basis of the Probabilistic Advanced Analysis Methods (PADAM) which is discussed. The probabilistic BEM code (PBEM) is used to obtain the structural response and sensitivity results to a set of random variables. As such, PBEM performs analogous to other structural analysis codes such as finite elements in the PSAM system. For linear problems, unlike the finite element method (FEM), the BEM governing equations are written at the boundary of the body only, thus, the method eliminates the need to model the volume of the body. However, for general body force problems, a direct condensation of the governing equations to the boundary of the body is not possible and therefore volume modeling is generally required.

  3. Adaptive Sentence Boundary Disambiguation

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, D D; Palmer, David D.; Hearst, Marti A.

    1994-01-01

    Labeling of sentence boundaries is a necessary prerequisite for many natural language processing tasks, including part-of-speech tagging and sentence alignment. End-of-sentence punctuation marks are ambiguous; to disambiguate them most systems use brittle, special-purpose regular expression grammars and exception rules. As an alternative, we have developed an efficient, trainable algorithm that uses a lexicon with part-of-speech probabilities and a feed-forward neural network. After training for less than one minute, the method correctly labels over 98.5\\% of sentence boundaries in a corpus of over 27,000 sentence-boundary marks. We show the method to be efficient and easily adaptable to different text genres, including single-case texts.

  4. Free-boundary equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A self-contained MHD description of the Helias class stellarators is obtained by determining appropriate external currents (coils) producing the Helias vacuum field and by the subsequent computing of the free-boundary equilibrium. Coil configurations are calculated with the NESCOIL code, the free-boundary equilibrium is studied via the NEMEC code, which combines the 3D fixed-boundary VMEC code and the NESTOR code for determining the vacuum field surrounding the plasma. Results for the 5081 Helias configuration, being considered for the W VII-X device are shown. The 5081 is a five-period device with aspect ratio 10 and a rotational transform between 0.8 and 1.0. It is MHD stable up to a beta value of 0.05

  5. Spectrum of local boundary operators from boundary form factor bootstrap

    OpenAIRE

    Szots, M.; Takacs, G.

    2007-01-01

    Using the recently introduced boundary form factor bootstrap equations, we map the complete space of their solutions for the boundary version of the scaling Lee-Yang model and sinh-Gordon theory. We show that the complete space of solutions, graded by the ultraviolet behaviour of the form factors can be brought into correspondence with the spectrum of local boundary operators expected from boundary conformal field theory, which is a major evidence for the correctness of the boundary form fact...

  6. Spectrum of local boundary operators from boundary form factor bootstrap

    CERN Document Server

    Szots, M

    2007-01-01

    Using the recently introduced boundary form factor bootstrap equations, we map the complete space of their solutions for the boundary version of the scaling Lee-Yang model and sinh-Gordon theory. We show that the complete space of solutions, graded by the ultraviolet behaviour of the form factors can be brought into correspondence with the spectrum of local boundary operators expected from boundary conformal field theory, which is a major evidence for the correctness of the boundary form factor bootstrap framework.

  7. Arterial stiffness &Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies. PMID:27586642

  8. Stiffness and strength of composite acrylic bone cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Knets

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Different acrylic bone cements based upon PMMA-MMA system are applicable for implant fixation inbone tissue. The aim of present study is the optimisation of the structure of some new bone acrylic cements madeon the basis of PMMA-ethylmethacrylate-triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate and bone cements having additives (HAand radio pacifier, and the finding of the effect of these modifications on the flexural strength and stiffness.Design/methodology/approach: Different new bone cements on the basis of PMMA-EMA-TEGDMA system(ABC were developed experimentally. The stiffness and strength of the samples of these modified cements weredetermined in the special three point bending equipment.Findings: A comparison of the flexural properties of new PMMA-EMA-TEGDMA cements and commercialavailable PMMA-MMA cement showed that commercial bone cement had larger values of ultimate strengthand modulus of elasticity, but the difference is not very important. As concerns the polymerisation peaktemperature, then there is a significant difference between commercial PMMA-MMA cement (~ 800C andPMMA-EMA-TEGDMA modified cements (50 – 600C. The introduction of 10% and 18% of HA into solidphase does not influence essentially strength and modulus of elasticity of the PMMA-EMA-TEGDMA bonecements. The introduction of radio pacifier BaSO4 into bone cement leads to flexural strength diminishing.Low polymerisation peak temperature and appropriate mechanical properties of bone cements developed allowsregarding new 3-D structure acrylic bone cements as promising biomaterials.Research limitations/implications: It is supposed to carry out animal testing to learn more about reaction ofmodified implanted material on the biological environment.Practical implications: The new materials could be efficiently used as bone cements because they will notdamage surrounding biological tissue during curing.Originality/value: Paper is providing the new information about possibilities to

  9. Leg and Joint Stiffness in Children with Spastic Diplegic Cerebral Palsy during Level Walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ming Wang

    Full Text Available Individual joint deviations are often identified in the analysis of cerebral palsy (CP gait. However, knowledge is limited as to how these deviations affect the control of the locomotor system as a whole when striving to meet the demands of walking. The current study aimed to bridge the gap by describing the control of the locomotor system in children with diplegic CP in terms of their leg stiffness, both skeletal and muscular components, and associated joint stiffness during gait. Twelve children with spastic diplegia CP and 12 healthy controls walked at a self-selected pace in a gait laboratory while their kinematic and forceplate data were measured and analyzed during loading response, mid-stance, terminal stance and pre-swing. For calculating the leg stiffness, each of the lower limbs was modeled as a non-linear spring, connecting the hip joint center and the corresponding center of pressure, with varying stiffness that was calculated as the slope (gradient of the axial force vs. the deformation curve. The leg stiffness was further decomposed into skeletal and muscular components considering the alignment of the lower limb. The ankle, knee and hip of the limb were modeled as revolute joints with torsional springs whose stiffness was calculated as the slope of the moment vs. the angle curve of the joint. Independent t-tests were performed for between-group comparisons of all the variables. The CP group significantly decreased the leg stiffness but increased the joint stiffness during stance phase, except during terminal stance where the leg stiffness was increased. They appeared to rely more on muscular contributions to achieve the required leg stiffness, increasing the muscular demands in maintaining the body posture against collapse. Leg stiffness plays a critical role in modulating the kinematics and kinetics of the locomotor system during gait in the diplegic CP.

  10. A METHOD OF DETERMINING THE COORDINATES OF THE STIFFNESS CENTER AND THE STIFFNESS PRINCIPAL AXIS OF THE VIBRATING SYSTEM WITH DAMPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang Xuan Truong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The report presents a methodology to determine the directions of the stiffness principal axis (in this case subject to the linear displacement and forced rotation angle of a solid object interact with the surrounding environment by resilient bearing supports. The results also show that determining the coordinates of the stiffness center in the vibrating system with damping factors is necessary in our research.

  11. Stiffnesses by (TtN) ensemble molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbits, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    Calculation of elastic constants requires initializing a lattice of atoms, an h matrix defining the computational cell boundaries, and the parameters defining the interatomic potentials, then numerically integrating the equations of motion for the atoms and the computational cell boundaries, calculating strains and stresses at each timestep, and updating at each timestep the average quantities required for calculation of fluctuations. Enforcements of the DYNAMO FORTRAN code included addition of documentation, improved memory management and data flow, and enabling use of several interatomic potentials. Documentation included headers for each subroutine, which document the parameters input to the routine, algorithms employed, and output.

  12. Molecular dynamics study on atomic elastic stiffness in Si under tension: homogenization by external loading and its limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a series of studies that discuss the onset of inelastic deformation based on atomic elastic stiffness (AES), we investigated the AES in silicon by the Tersoff interatomic potential. For a comprehensive discussion including the effect of structural inhomogeneity by surface and grain boundaries, we performed tensile simulations on bulk/nanowire of Si single crystal, laminate bulk/bamboo nanowire with Σ5 twist grain boundary under a very low temperature (T = 1 K). Not only the stress–strain response, but also the AESs at each atom point, Bijα, were evaluated numerically by Δσiα/Δεj (Voigt notation) against local strain perturbation. The deviation of detBijα vanishes/diminishes by tension both in the homogeneous case of bulk perfect lattice and inhomogeneous ones with surface and grain boundaries; however, there is a certain limit for the homogenization. That is, the subtle deviation of AES in the perfect bulk vanishes by tension but it increases again like an onset of resonance, showing precursor stress decrease just before the unstable stress drop. In the inhomogeneous cases, we demonstrated that the near-zero AESs at the initial structural defects, e.g. surface or grain boundary, do not change but the positive AESs of other stable atoms approach zero by tension. When these distributions overlap each other, the standard deviation of AES increases again as if it were the first homogenization limit. However, the real homogenization starts at that point; that is, the AES distribution changes its shape to have a single peak at the detBijα=0 border, suggesting that the difference of initial defects and other stable part vanishes before the system instability. (paper)

  13. Solid on solid model for an interface crossing a grain boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, D B [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Mustonen, Ville [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Wood, A J [Laboratory of Computational Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology, PO Box 9203, FIN-02015 (Finland)

    2004-06-18

    Recent work has demonstrated a new structural transition occurring at an internal defect in a two-dimensional Ising model. The new behaviour is induced by boundary conditions that constrain the interface to lie at an angle across the defect line. This gives rise to the energy-entropy competition familiar from other examples of pinning-depinning transitions. We demonstrate how a horizontal solid-on-solid (SOS) model can be used to obtain comparable results to this exact calculation. This simpler model can then be easily extended to encompass a situation where the interface has a differing stiffness on either side of the grain boundary. (letter to the editor)

  14. Transport, boundary physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the contributions presented at the 18th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in the field of transport and boundary physics will be summarised with reference to the following distinct issues: H-mode physics, Internal Transport Barrier formation, transport studies, Radiative Improved modes and impurity seeding, divertor and He exhaust, new configurations. (author)

  15. Challenging the Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Nina

    2004-01-01

    To many people, challenging the boundaries between the traditional disciplines in foreign language studies means doing cultural studies. The aim of this article is to pull in a different direction by suggesting how the interface between linguistics and literature may be another fertile field to e...

  16. Boundaries of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Glasby, John S

    2013-01-01

    The boundaries of space exploration are being pushed back constantly, but the realm of the partially understood and the totally unknown is as great as ever. Among other things this book deals with astronomical instruments and their application, recent discoveries in the solar system, stellar evolution, the exploding starts, the galaxies, quasars, pulsars, the possibilities of extraterrestrial life and relativity.

  17. Effect of annealing temperature on exchange stiffness of CoFeB thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jaehun; Jung, Jinyong; Cho, Shin-Yong; You, Chun-Yeol, E-mail: cyyou@inha.ac.kr

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the exchange stiffness constants of 28-nm-thick CoFeB film using Brillouin light scattering. Series of CoFeB films are prepared on the MgO(001) substrate with or without additional 5-nm thick MgO buffer layer, the effect of the annealing temperature on the exchange stiffness constants are studied. We found that the exchange stiffness constant of 400 °C annealed sample with MgO buffer increased by 10% form the 200 °C annealed sample (=0.73±0.01×10{sup −11} J/m), while the exchange stiffness constant of without MgO buffer layer sample increase by 6% from the as-grown sample (=1.11±0.02×10{sup −11} J/m). - Highlights: • We investigate the exchange stiffness constants of CoFeB film using BLS. • The exchange stiffness constant of without MgO buffer layer increase by 6%. • The exchange stiffness constant of annealed sample with MgO increased by 10%. • The exchange stiffness constants are varied with buffer and annealing conditions.

  18. Intraventricular filling under increasing left ventricular wall stiffness and heart rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaee, Milad; Lai, Hong Kuan; Schovanec, Joseph; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Nagueh, Sherif

    2015-11-01

    Heart failure with normal ejection fraction (HFNEF) is a clinical syndrome that is prevalent in over 50% of heart failure patients. HFNEF patients show increased left ventricle (LV) wall stiffness and clinical diagnosis is difficult using ejection fraction (EF) measurements. We hypothesized that filling vortex circulation strength would decrease with increasing LV stiffness irrespective of heart rate (HR). 2D PIV and hemodynamic measurements were acquired on LV physical models of varying wall stiffness under resting and exercise HRs. The LV models were comparatively tested in an in vitro flow circuit consisting of a two-element Windkessel model driven by a piston pump. The stiffer LV models were tested in comparison with the least stiff baseline model without changing pump amplitude, circuit compliance and resistance. Increasing stiffness at resting HR resulted in diminishing cardiac output without lowering EF below 50% as in HFNEF. Increasing HR to 110 bpm in addition to stiffness resulted in lowering EF to less than 50%. The circulation strength of the intraventricular filling vortex diminished with increasing stiffness and HR. The results suggest that filling vortex circulation strength could be potentially used as a surrogate measure of LV stiffness. This research was supported by the Oklahoma Center for Advancement of Science and Technology (HR14-022).

  19. Effect of sprung (suspended) floor on lower extremity stiffness during a force-returning ballet jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, James; Brummel, Sara; Becker, Dana; Selbo, Aubrey; Koons, Sandra; Stewart, Meredith

    2011-12-01

    Our objective in this study was to compare stiffness of bilateral lower extremities (LEs) in ballet dancers performing sauté on a low-stiffness "sprung floor" to that during the same movement on a high-stiffness floor (wood on concrete). LE stiffness was calculated as the ratio of vertical ground reaction force (in kN) to compression of the lower limb (in meters). Seven female dancers were measured for five repetitions each at the point of maximum leg compression while performing sauté on both of the surfaces, such that 43 ms of data were represented for each trial. The stiffness of bilateral LEs at the point of maximum compression was higher by a mean difference score of 2.48 ± 2.20 kN/m on the low-stiffness floor compared to a high-stiffness floor. Paired t-test analysis of the difference scores yielded a one-tailed probability of 0.012. This effect was seen in six out of seven participants (one participant showed no difference between floor conditions). The finding of increased stiffness of the LEs in the sprung floor condition suggests that some of the force of landing the jump was absorbed by the surface, and therefore did not need to be absorbed by the participants' LEs themselves. This in turn implies that a sprung dance floor may help to prevent dance-related injuries. PMID:22211195

  20. A Lightweight Model for Gear Mesh Dynamics Incorporating Variable Mesh Stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fokas Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Variable stiffness of the gear tooth mesh for a pair of spur gears is computed using an accurate lightweight mathematical formulation. This is used to simulate gear dynamic behavior. Gear eigenfrequencies are calculated for the SDOF system and correlated with gear physical properties and the effect of stiffness variation during a mesh cycle is studied.

  1. Assessment of a portable device for the quantitative measurement of ankle joint stiffness in spastic individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Jakob; Grey, Michael J; Geertsen, Svend Sparre;

    2012-01-01

    Neurokinetics RA1 Ridgidity Analyzer to measure stiffness of the ankle joint in 46 controls, 14 spinal cord injured (SCI) and 23 multiple sclerosis (MS) participants. METHODS: Ankle stiffness measures were made twice by two raters, at speeds above and below the expected stretch reflex threshold. Ankle torque...

  2. Conservative management of the post-traumatic stiff elbow: a physiotherapist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Val

    2016-04-01

    Elbow stiffness is a common consequence following trauma with the management of this condition posing a challenge to therapists and surgeons alike. This paper discusses the role of conservative treatment, such as exercise and splinting, in the prevention and management of the stiff elbow, along with a review of available evidence, to justify their usage. PMID:27583012

  3. A mechanism to compensate undesired stiffness in joints of prosthetic hands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, G.; Plettenbrug, D.H.; Van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cosmetic gloves that cover a prosthetic hand have a parasitic positive stiffness that counteracts the flexion of a finger joint. Objectives: Reducing the required input torque to move a finger of a prosthetic hand by compensating the parasitic stiffness of the cosmetic glove. Study des

  4. Stiffness analysis and comparison of a Biglide parallel grinder with alternative spatial modular parallelograms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Guanglei; Zou, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the stiffness modeling, analysis and comparison of a Biglide parallel grinder with two alternative modular parallelograms. It turns out that the Cartesian stiffness matrix of the manipulator has the property that it can be decoupled into two homogeneous matrices, correspondi...

  5. Estimation of axial stiffness of plant fibres from compaction of non-woven mats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamstedt, E. K.; Bommier, E.; Madsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Plant fibres are known to show a large variability in stiffness, which makes it time-consuming to experimentally characterize this property by conventional tensile testing. In this work, an alternative method is used, where the average fibre stiffness is back-calculated from compaction tests of in...

  6. PolyMUMPs MEMS device to measure mechanical stiffness of single cells in aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of experimentally determining the mechanical stiffness of single cells by using differential displacement measurements in a two stage spring system is presented. The spring system consists of a known MEMS reference spring and an unknown cellular stiffness: the ratio of displacements is related to the ratio of stiffness. A polyMUMPs implementation for aqueous media is presented and displacement measurements made from optical microphotographs using a FFT based displacement method with a repeatability of ∼20 nm. The approach was first validated on a MEMS two stage spring system of known stiffness. The measured stiffness ratios of control structures (i) MEMS spring systems and (ii) polystyrene microspheres were found to agree with theoretical values. Mechanical tests were then performed on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker’s yeast) in aqueous media. Cells were placed (using a micropipette) inside MEMS measuring structures and compressed between two jaws using an electrostatic actuator and displacements measured. Tested cells showed stiffness values between 5.4 and 8.4 N m−1 with an uncertainty of 11%. In addition, non-viable cells were tested by exposing viable cells to methanol. The resultant mean cell stiffness dropped by factor of 3 × and an explicit discrimination between viable and non-viable cells based on mechanical stiffness was seen. (paper)

  7. Adaptive gravity and joint stiffness compensation methods for force-controlled arm supports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobo-Prat, Joan; Keemink, Arvid Q.L.; Koopman, Bart F.J.M.; Stienen, Arno H.A.; Veltink, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    People with muscular weakness can benefit from arm supports that compensate the weight of their arms. Due to the disuse of the arms, passive joint stiffness increases and providing only gravity compensation becomes insufficient to support the arm function. Hence, joint stiffness compensation is also

  8. Aortic stiffness is associated with atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries in older adults : the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Popele, Nicole M.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Asmar, Roland; van der Kuip, Deirdre A. M.; Hofman, Albert; de Feijter, Pim J.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective Aortic stiffness can lead to low diastolic blood pressure, thereby possibly limiting coronary perfusion. Therefore, the simultaneous occurrence of both aortic stiffness and coronary atherosclerosis can lead to an increased risk of subendocardial ischaemia. The aim of the present study was

  9. Aortic stiffness is associated with atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries in older adults: the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Popele, N.M.; Mattace-Raso, F.U.S.; Vliegenthart, R.; Grobbee, D.E.; Asmar, R.; van der Kuip, D.A.M.; Hofman, A.; de Feijter, P.J.; Oudkerk, M.; Witteman, J.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective Aortic stiffness can lead to low diastolic blood pressure, thereby possibly limiting coronary perfusion. Therefore, the simultaneous occurrence of both aortic stiffness and coronary atherosclerosis can lead to an increased risk of subendocardial ischaemia. The aim of the present study was

  10. Stiffness matrix formulation for double row angular contact ball bearings: Analytical development and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Aydin; Singh, Rajendra

    2013-10-01

    Though double row angular contact ball bearings are widely used in industrial, automotive, and aircraft applications, the scientific literature on double row bearings is sparse. It is also shown that the stiffness matrices of two single row bearings may not be simply superposed to obtain the stiffness matrix of a double row bearing. To overcome the deficiency in the literature, a new, comprehensive, analytical approach is proposed based on the Hertzian theory for back-to-back, face-to-face, and tandem arrangements. The elements of the five-dimensional stiffness matrix for double row angular contact ball bearings are computed given either the mean bearing displacement or the mean load vector. The diagonal elements of the proposed stiffness matrix are verified with a commercial code for all arrangements under three loading scenarios. Some changes in stiffness coefficients are investigated by varying critical kinematic and geometric parameters to provide more insight. Finally, the calculated natural frequencies of a shaft-bearing experiment are successfully compared with measurements, thus validating the proposed stiffness formulation. For double row angular contact ball bearings, the moment stiffness and cross-coupling stiffness terms are significant, and the contact angle changes under loads. The proposed formulation is also valid for paired (duplex) bearings which behave as an integrated double row unit when the surrounding structural elements are sufficiently rigid.

  11. Substrate stiffness modulates lung cancer cell migration but not epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, V C; Higuita-Castro, N; Nana-Sinkam, P; Ghadiali, S N

    2016-05-01

    Biomechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment, including matrix/substrate stiffness, play a significant role in tumor evolution and metastasis. Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is a fundamental biological process that is associated with increased cancer cell migration and invasion. The goal of this study was to investigate (1) how substrate stiffness modulates the migration behaviors of lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) and (2) if stiffness-induced changes in cell migration correlate with biochemical markers of EMT. Collagen-coated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates and an Ibidi migration assay were used to investigate how substrate stiffness alters the migration patterns of A549 cells. RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to investigate how substrate stiffness alters biochemical markers of EMT, that is, E-cadherin and N-cadherin, and the phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins. Increases in substrate stiffness led to slower, more directional migration but did not alter the biochemical markers of EMT. Interestingly, growth factor (i.e., Transforming Growth Factor-β) stimulation resulted in similar levels of EMT regardless of substrate stiffness. We also observed decreased levels of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin on stiffer substrates which correlated with slower cell migration. These results indicate that substrate stiffness modulates lung cancer cell migration via focal adhesion signaling as opposed to EMT signaling. PMID:26779779

  12. Hand-held resonance sensor for tissue stiffness measurements—a theoretical and experimental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A piezoelectric transducer in a feedback circuit operating in a resonance state is the basis of a resonance sensor. Upon contact with a soft object a change in the resonance frequency reflects the acoustic impedance. Together with force measurement it is possible to obtain the elastic stiffness of the object. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concept of a hand-held resonance sensor for tissue stiffness measurement. A time derivative analysis of the force and the frequency change showed that a stiffness-sensitive parameter was independent of the impression speed. Soft tissue phantoms of gelatin were used in an experimental validation of the theory. A force indentation method was used as a reference method for assessing the gelatin's elastic stiffness. Results from the hand-held measurements showed that the stiffness parameter accurately measured the elastic stiffness of the gelatin (R2 = 0.94, p 2 = 0.15) and non-significantly (p > 0.05, 14 out of 17) dependent on an impression speed parameter. On average, a small amount of the total variance was explained by the impression speed. In conclusion, soft tissue stiffness can be objectively measured with free-hand measurement with a resonance sensor. This study contributes a theoretical analysis and an experimental demonstration of the concept of a hand-held resonance sensor for stiffness measurements

  13. TRPV4 Regulates Breast Cancer Cell Extravasation, Stiffness and Actin Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Wen Hsin Lee; Lee Yee Choong; Naing Naing Mon; SsuYi Lu; Qingsong Lin; Brendan Pang; Benedict Yan; Vedula Sri Ram Krishna; Himanshu Singh; Tuan Zea Tan; Jean Paul Thiery; Chwee Teck Lim; Patrick Boon Ooi Tan; Martin Johansson; Christian Harteneck

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is a significant health issue. The standard mode of care is combination of chemotherapy and targeted therapeutics but the 5-year survival rate remains low. New/better drug targets that can improve outcomes of patients with metastatic disease are needed. Metastasis is a complex process, with each step conferred by a set of genetic aberrations. Mapping the molecular changes associated with metastasis improves our understanding of the etiology of this disease and contributes to the pi...

  14. TRPV4 Regulates Breast Cancer Cell Extravasation, Stiffness and Actin Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen Hsin; Choong, Lee Yee; Mon, Naing Naing; Lu, SsuYi; Lin, Qingsong; Pang, Brendan; Yan, Benedict; Krishna, Vedula Sri Ram; Singh, Himanshu; Tan, Tuan Zea; Thiery, Jean Paul; Lim, Chwee Teck; Tan, Patrick Boon Ooi; Johansson, Martin; Harteneck, Christian; Lim, Yoon Pin

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is a significant health issue. The standard mode of care is combination of chemotherapy and targeted therapeutics but the 5-year survival rate remains low. New/better drug targets that can improve outcomes of patients with metastatic disease are needed. Metastasis is a complex process, with each step conferred by a set of genetic aberrations. Mapping the molecular changes associated with metastasis improves our understanding of the etiology of this disease and contributes to the pipeline of targeted therapeutics. Here, phosphoproteomics of a xenograft-derived in vitro model comprising 4 isogenic cell lines with increasing metastatic potential implicated Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid subtype 4 in breast cancer metastasis. TRPV4 mRNA levels in breast, gastric and ovarian cancers correlated with poor clinical outcomes, suggesting a wide role of TRPV4 in human epithelial cancers. TRPV4 was shown to be required for breast cancer cell invasion and transendothelial migration but not growth/proliferation. Knockdown of Trpv4 significantly reduced the number of metastatic nodules in mouse xenografts leaving the size unaffected. Overexpression of TRPV4 promoted breast cancer cell softness, blebbing, and actin reorganization. The findings provide new insights into the role of TRPV4 in cancer extravasation putatively by reducing cell rigidity through controlling the cytoskeleton at the cell cortex. PMID:27291497

  15. CD44 alternative splicing in gastric cancer cells is regulated by culture dimensionality and matrix stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco da Cunha, Cristiana; Klumpers, Darinka D; Koshy, Sandeep T; Weaver, James C; Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Seruca, Raquel; Carneiro, Fátima; Granja, Pedro L; Mooney, David J

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cultures often fail to mimic key architectural and physical features of the tumor microenvironment. Advances in biomaterial engineering allow the design of three-dimensional (3D) cultures within hydrogels that mimic important tumor-like features, unraveling cancer cell behaviors that would not have been observed in traditional 2D plastic surfaces. This study determined how 3D cultures impact CD44 alternative splicing in gastric cancer (GC) cells. In 3D cultures, GC cells lost expression of the standard CD44 isoform (CD44s), while gaining CD44 variant 6 (CD44v6) expression. This splicing switch was reversible, accelerated by nutrient shortage and delayed at lower initial cell densities, suggesting an environmental stress-induced response. It was further shown to be dependent on the hydrogel matrix mechanical properties and accompanied by the upregulation of genes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), metabolism and angiogenesis. The 3D cultures reported here revealed the same CD44 alternative splicing pattern previously observed in human premalignant and malignant gastric lesions. These findings indicate that fundamental features of 3D cultures - such as soluble factors diffusion and mechanical cues - influence CD44 expression in GC cells. Moreover, this study provides a new model system to study CD44 dysfunction, whose role in cancer has been in the spotlight for decades. PMID:27187279

  16. Gait training reduces ankle joint stiffness and facilitates heel strike in children with Cerebral Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Lorentzen, Jakob; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2014-01-01

    facilitate heel strike in children with CP? METHODS: Seventeen children with CP (4-14 years) were recruited. Muscle stiffness and gait ability were measured twice before and twice after training with an interval of one month. Passive and reflex-mediated stiffness were measured by a dynamometer which applied......BACKGROUND: Foot drop and toe walking are frequent concerns in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Increased stiffness of the ankle joint muscles may contribute to these problems. OBJECTIVE: Does four weeks of daily home based treadmill training with incline reduce ankle joint stiffness and...... stiffness following training (P = 0.01). Toe lift in the swing phase (P = 0.014) and heel impact (P = 0.003) increased significantly following the training during both treadmill and over-ground walking. CONCLUSIONS: Daily intensive gait training may influence the elastic properties of ankle joint muscles...

  17. Performance analysis of a semi-active mount made by a new variable stiffness spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadi, Mojtaba; Behzadipour, Saeed; Faulkner, Garry

    2011-06-01

    A new variable stiffness mount (VSM), is created and its performance is experimentally measured and analyzed. VSMs have extensive applications in the vibration control of machineries including automotive industry. The variable stiffness in this design is realized by the prestress stiffness of a cable-based mechanism at a singular configuration. Changing the prestress, through a piezo actuator and a simple on-off controller, results in significant stiffness change in short time and at low energy costs. The stiffness of the VSM is characterized through static and dynamic tests. The performance of the VSM is then evaluated and compared with an equivalent passive mount in two main areas of transmissibility and shock absorption. The response time of the semi-active VSM is also measured in a realistic scenario. A summary of the performance tests are presented at the end.

  18. Research on a novel high stiffness axial passive magnetic bearing for DGMSCMG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinji; Wang, Chun'e.; Le, Yun

    2016-08-01

    To increase the displacement stiffness and decrease power loss of double gimbals magnetically suspended control momentum gyro (DGMSCMG), this paper researches a new structure of axial passive magnetic bearing (APMB). Different from the existing APMB, the proposed APMB is composed of segmented permanent magnets and magnetic rings. The displacement stiffness and angular stiffness expressions are derived by equivalent magnetic circuit method and infinitesimal method based on the end magnetic flux. The relationships are analyzed between stiffness and structure parameters such as length of air gap, length of permanent magnet, height of permanent magnet and end length of magnetic ring. Besides, the axial displacement stiffness measurement method of the APMB is proposed, and it verified the correctness of proposed theoretical method. The DGMSCMG prototype is manufactured and the slow-down characteristic experiment is carried out, and the experimental result reflects the low power loss feature of the APMB.

  19. Analysis on stability of pillar and stiff roof system in the gob area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong; HU Qian-ting; WANG Jin-an; LI Jian-gong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the open stope method, the stability of the gob area was decided by pillars and stiff roof. Therefore, it was dispensable to leave pillars with long-term strength and enough size to support the stiff roof during mining activities. Based on the mining conditions of Baixiang wollastonite mine in Changxing County of Zhejiang, while consider-ing pillars with different shape, irregular size, and distribution, the load imposed on the pil-lars was analyzed, and the safety coefficient was calculated in order to determine their support status. The strength of stiff roof was calculated by means of analytical solu-tion-theory of rectangle thin plate rested on elastic foundation. The system stability of pillar and stiff roof was analyzed according to the proportion of the total cross section area of pillars to the stiff roof area above the mined area.

  20. High-strength chemical-vapor-deposited graphene and grain boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gwan-Hyoung; Cooper, Ryan C; An, Sung Joo; Lee, Sunwoo; van der Zande, Arend; Petrone, Nicholas; Hammerberg, Alexandra G; Lee, Changgu; Crawford, Bryan; Oliver, Warren; Kysar, Jeffrey W; Hone, James

    2013-05-31

    Pristine graphene is the strongest material ever measured. However, large-area graphene films produced by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are polycrystalline and thus contain grain boundaries that can potentially weaken the material. We combined structural characterization by means of transmission electron microscopy with nanoindentation in order to study the mechanical properties of CVD-graphene films with different grain sizes. We show that the elastic stiffness of CVD-graphene is identical to that of pristine graphene if postprocessing steps avoid damage or rippling. Its strength is only slightly reduced despite the existence of grain boundaries. Indentation tests directly on grain boundaries confirm that they are almost as strong as pristine. Graphene films consisting entirely of well-stitched grain boundaries can retain ultrahigh strength, which is critical for a large variety of applications, such as flexible electronics and strengthening components. PMID:23723231

  1. Study of ultrasound stiffness imaging methods using tissue mimicking phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Seshadri, Suresh

    2014-02-01

    A pilot study was carried out to investigate the performance of ultrasound stiffness imaging methods namely Ultrasound Elastography Imaging (UEI) and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging. Specifically their potential for characterizing different classes of solid mass lesions was analyzed using agar based tissue mimicking phantoms. Composite tissue mimicking phantom was prepared with embedded inclusions of varying stiffness from 50 kPa to 450 kPa to represent different stages of cancer. Acoustic properties such as sound speed, attenuation coefficient and acoustic impedance were characterized by pulse echo ultrasound test at 5 MHz frequency and they are ranged from (1564 ± 88 to 1671 ± 124 m/s), (0.6915 ± 0.123 to 0.8268 ± 0.755 db cm(-1)MHz(-1)) and (1.61 × 10(6) ± 0.127 to 1.76 × 10(6) ± 0.045 kg m(-2)s(-1)) respectively. The elastic property Young's Modulus of the prepared samples was measured by conducting quasi static uni axial compression test under a strain rate of 0.5mm/min upto 10 % strain, and the values are from 50 kPa to 450 kPa for a variation of agar concentration from 1.7% to 6.6% by weight. The composite phantoms were imaged by Siemens Acuson S2000 (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) machine using linear array transducer 9L4 at 8 MHz frequency; strain and displacement images were collected by UEI and ARFI. Shear wave velocity 4.43 ± 0.35 m/s was also measured for high modulus contrast (18 dB) inclusion and X.XX m/s was found for all other inclusions. The images were pre processed and parameters such as Contrast Transfer Efficiency and lateral image profile were computed and reported. The results indicate that both ARFI and UEI represent the abnormalities better than conventional US B mode imaging whereas UEI enhances the underlying modulus contrast into improved strain contrast. The results are corroborated with literature and also with clinical patient images. PMID:24083832

  2. Hydrodynamic interactions of two nearly touching Brownian spheres in a stiff potential: Effect of fluid inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrodynamic interaction of two closely spaced micron-scale spheres undergoing Brownian motion was measured as a function of their separation. Each sphere was attached to the distal end of a different atomic force microscopy cantilever, placing each sphere in a stiff one-dimensional potential (0.08 Nm−1) with a high frequency of thermal oscillations (resonance at 4 kHz). As a result, the sphere’s inertial and restoring forces were significant when compared to the force due to viscous drag. We explored interparticle gap regions where there was overlap between the two Stokes layers surrounding each sphere. Our experimental measurements are the first of their kind in this parameter regime. The high frequency of oscillation of the spheres means that an analysis of the fluid dynamics would include the effects of fluid inertia, as described by the unsteady Stokes equation. However, we find that, for interparticle separations less than twice the thickness of the wake of the unsteady viscous boundary layer (the Stokes layer), the hydrodynamic interaction between the Brownian particles is well-approximated by analytical expressions that neglect the inertia of the fluid. This is because elevated frictional forces at narrow gaps dominate fluid inertial effects. The significance is that interparticle collisions and concentrated suspensions at this condition can be modeled without the need to incorporate fluid inertia. We suggest a way to predict when fluid inertial effects can be ignored by including the gap-width dependence into the frequency number. We also show that low frequency number analysis can be used to determine the microrheology of mixtures at interfaces

  3. Hydrodynamic interactions of two nearly touching Brownian spheres in a stiff potential: Effect of fluid inertia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiom, Milad, E-mail: milad.radiom@unige.ch; Ducker, William, E-mail: wducker@vt.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 (United States); Robbins, Brian; Paul, Mark [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The hydrodynamic interaction of two closely spaced micron-scale spheres undergoing Brownian motion was measured as a function of their separation. Each sphere was attached to the distal end of a different atomic force microscopy cantilever, placing each sphere in a stiff one-dimensional potential (0.08 Nm{sup −1}) with a high frequency of thermal oscillations (resonance at 4 kHz). As a result, the sphere’s inertial and restoring forces were significant when compared to the force due to viscous drag. We explored interparticle gap regions where there was overlap between the two Stokes layers surrounding each sphere. Our experimental measurements are the first of their kind in this parameter regime. The high frequency of oscillation of the spheres means that an analysis of the fluid dynamics would include the effects of fluid inertia, as described by the unsteady Stokes equation. However, we find that, for interparticle separations less than twice the thickness of the wake of the unsteady viscous boundary layer (the Stokes layer), the hydrodynamic interaction between the Brownian particles is well-approximated by analytical expressions that neglect the inertia of the fluid. This is because elevated frictional forces at narrow gaps dominate fluid inertial effects. The significance is that interparticle collisions and concentrated suspensions at this condition can be modeled without the need to incorporate fluid inertia. We suggest a way to predict when fluid inertial effects can be ignored by including the gap-width dependence into the frequency number. We also show that low frequency number analysis can be used to determine the microrheology of mixtures at interfaces.

  4. A Study of Thermo-mechanically Processed High Stiffness NiTiCo Shape Memory Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjeri, R. M.; Norwich, D.; Sczerzenie, F.; Huang, X.; Long, M.; Ehrlinspiel, M.

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates a vacuum induction melted-vacuum arc re-melted (VIM-VAR) and thermo-mechanically processed ternary NiTiCo shape memory alloy. The NiTiCo ingot was hot processed to 6.35-mm-diameter coiled wire. The coiled wire was subsequently cold drawn to a final wire diameter of 0.53 mm, with interpass anneals. The wires were shape set at 450 °C for 3.5 min. After electropolishing, the wires were subjected to microstructural, thermal, and mechanical characterization studies. Microstructural analysis was performed by transmission electron microscope (TEM), thermal analyses by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), and bend-free recovery and mechanical testing by uniaxial tensile testing. TEM did not reveal Ni-rich precipitates—either at the grain boundary or in the grain interior. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy showed a uniform distribution of Ni, Ti, and Co in the sample. The DSC results on the shape set wire showed a single-step transformation between the austenite and the R-phase, in the forward and reverse directions. Cyclic tensile tests of the shape set wire, processed under optimum conditions, showed minimum residual strain and a stable upper plateau stress. Further, the fatigue behavior of NiTi and NiTiCo alloys was studied by rotating beam testing. The results showed that the fatigue properties of NiTiCo, under zero mean strain, are equivalent to that of binary NiTi in the high-cycle and medium-cycle regimes, taking into account the higher stiffness of NiTiCo. The above analyses helped in establishing the processing-structure-property correlation in a VIM-VAR-melted NiTiCo shape memory alloy.

  5. TX型方钢管相贯节点X支管平面内抗弯刚度分析%Analysis on In-plane Bending Stiffness of X Branch Pipe of TX-type Square Steel Tubular Joint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张婷婷; 夏军武; 陈婷; 王秋芬

    2012-01-01

    为了分析TX型方钢管相贯节点在复杂边界条件下X支管平面内抗弯刚度的影响,以相贯节点足尺试验为基础,采用量纲分析得到影响相贯节点抗弯刚度的主要无量纲参数,利用有限元软件分析X支管平面内抗弯刚度受主要无量纲参数的影响,并展开研究.试验表明:主管的轴向拉力可以略微提高X支管平面内抗弯刚度.通过分析几何因素对抗弯刚度的影响,结果表明:X支管平面内抗弯刚度主要取决于X支管与主管的宽度比和宽厚比.%In order to analyze the influence of in-plane bending stiffness of X branch pipe under complex boundary of spatial TX-type square steel tubular joint,we got dimensionless parameters which influence bending stiffness of tubular joint through dimensional analysis based on full-scale test of tubular joint.Meanwhile,we analyzed and studied main dimensionless parameters' influence on in-plane bending stiffness of X branch pipe using finite element software.The test shows that axial tension of the main tubular can slightly improve in-plane bending stiffness of X branch pipe.Through the analysis of geometrical factors' influence on bending stiffness,the result shows that in-plane bending stiffness of X branch pipe mainly depends on the width ratio of X branch to main tubular and width-thickness ratio of the main tubular.

  6. Grain Boundary Segregation in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Lejcek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Grain boundaries are important structural components of polycrystalline materials used in the vast majority of technical applications. Because grain boundaries form a continuous network throughout such materials, their properties may limit their practical use. One of the serious phenomena which evoke these limitations is the grain boundary segregation of impurities. It results in the loss of grain boundary cohesion and consequently, in brittle fracture of the materials. The current book deals with fundamentals of grain boundary segregation in metallic materials and its relationship to the grain boundary structure, classification and other materials properties.

  7. Reactor pressure boundary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a long-term operation of nuclear power plants, the component materials are degraded under severe reactor conditions such as neutron irradiation, high temperature, high pressure and corrosive environment. It is necessary to establish the reliable and practical technologies for improving and developing the component materials and for evaluating the mechanical properties. Especially, it is very important to investigate the technologies for reactor pressure boundary materials such as reactor vessel and pipings in accordance with their critical roles. Therefore, this study was focused on developing and advancing the microstructural/micro-mechanical evaluation technologies, and on evaluating the neutron irradiation characteristics and radiation effects analysis technology of the reactor pressure boundary materials, and also on establishing a basis of nuclear material property database

  8. Exploring system boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Autopoiesis is normally considered to be the systems theory in law. In this paper complexity theory is presented as an alternative systems approach. In order to position complexity theory as a plausible alternative to autopoiesis I discuss the differing understanding of boundary within each theory, and use this as a vehicle to critique autopoiesis. My critique is situated within systems theory thinking but is external to both autopoiesis and complexity theory (although I must oscillate betwee...

  9. Boundary transfer matrices and boundary quantum KZ equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlaar, Bart, E-mail: Bart.Vlaar@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    A simple relation between inhomogeneous transfer matrices and boundary quantum Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov (KZ) equations is exhibited for quantum integrable systems with reflecting boundary conditions, analogous to an observation by Gaudin for periodic systems. Thus, the boundary quantum KZ equations receive a new motivation. We also derive the commutativity of Sklyanin’s boundary transfer matrices by merely imposing appropriate reflection equations, in particular without using the conditions of crossing symmetry and unitarity of the R-matrix.

  10. Effect of meal ingestion on liver stiffness in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Berzigotti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Liver stiffness is increasingly used in the non-invasive evaluation of chronic liver diseases. Liver stiffness correlates with hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG in patients with cirrhosis and holds prognostic value in this population. Hence, accuracy in its measurement is needed. Several factors independent of fibrosis influence liver stiffness, but there is insufficient information on whether meal ingestion modifies liver stiffness in cirrhosis. We investigated the changes in liver stiffness occurring after the ingestion of a liquid standard test meal in this population. METHODS: In 19 patients with cirrhosis and esophageal varices (9 alcoholic, 9 HCV-related, 1 NASH; Child score 6.9±1.8, liver stiffness (transient elastography, portal blood flow (PBF and hepatic artery blood flow (HABF (Doppler-Ultrasound were measured before and 30 minutes after receiving a standard mixed liquid meal. In 10 the HVPG changes were also measured. RESULTS: Post-prandial hyperemia was accompanied by a marked increase in liver stiffness (+27±33%; p<0.0001. Changes in liver stiffness did not correlate with PBF changes, but directly correlated with HABF changes (r = 0.658; p = 0.002. After the meal, those patients showing a decrease in HABF (n = 13 had a less marked increase of liver stiffness as compared to patients in whom HABF increased (n = 6; +12±21% vs. +62±29%,p<0.0001. As expected, post-prandial hyperemia was associated with an increase in HVPG (n = 10; +26±13%, p = 0.003, but changes in liver stiffness did not correlate with HVPG changes. CONCLUSIONS: Liver stiffness increases markedly after a liquid test meal in patients with cirrhosis, suggesting that its measurement should be performed in standardized fasting conditions. The hepatic artery buffer response appears an important factor modulating postprandial changes of liver stiffness. The post-prandial increase in HVPG cannot be predicted by changes in

  11. The open boundary equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Diederen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a new equation describing the hydrodynamics in infinitely long tidal channels (i.e., no reflection under the influence of oceanic forcing. The proposed equation is a simple relationship between partial derivatives of water level and velocity. It is formally derived for a progressive wave in a frictionless, prismatic, tidal channel with a horizontal bed. Assessment of a large number of numerical simulations, where an open boundary condition is posed at a certain distance landward, suggests that it can also be considered accurate in the more natural case of converging estuaries with nonlinear friction and a bed slope. The equation follows from the open boundary condition and is therefore a part of the problem formulation for an infinite tidal channel. This finding provides a practical tool for evaluating tidal wave dynamics, by reconstructing the temporal variation of the velocity based on local observations of the water level, providing a fully local open boundary condition and allowing for local friction calibration.

  12. On-machine ultrasonic sensors for paper stiffness. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Maclin S.; Jackson, Theodore G.; Brown, Ernest (Andy)

    2000-04-01

    This final report presents the results of a 5-year effort by the Institute of Paper Science and Technology (IPST) and its participating partners. The objective of this work was to develop and demonstrate sensors capable of measuring the velocity of ultrasound in the out-of-plane (ZD) and in-plane directions of paper as it is being produced on a commercial paper machine. On-machine ultrasonic measurements can be used to determine various mechanical properties of paper and to monitor process status and product quality. This report first presents a review of the background and potential benefits of on-machine ultrasonic measurements, then summarizes the results of previous work. The ZD measurement system involving the use of ultrasonic transducers in fluid-filled wheels is described in detail, including the method of measurement, the wheel mounting hardware, the on-machine operation, and an overview of the system software. Mill-trial results from two bump tests when producing 69{number_sign} and 55{number_sign} linearboard are presented. For the 69{number_sign} trial the correlation of ZD transit time with plybond and with ZDT (Z-direction tensile or internal bond strength) was greater than 0.8 (R squared). Also observed were ZD stiffness responses to refining and to calendering. ABB Industrial Systems Inc. was responsible for the in-plane sensor. A paper describing ABB's sensor and mill experience is appended.

  13. The treatment of post-traumatic stiffness of the elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatti, G; Ferrari, D; Tigani, D; Scardovi, M; Trentanti, P; Trentani, F; Giunti, A

    2000-01-01

    The authors present the results observed in 12 patients affected with post-traumatic stiffness of the elbow treated by an external fixator in distraction to obtain functional recovery of range of movement; in all of the cases anterior and posterior release and resection of the apex of the olecranon was carried out, while in 2 cases interposition arthroplasty with freeze-dried dura madre was associated. The series includes 12 cases with a long-term follow-up that ranges from 8 to 33 months after surgery. The mean arch of movement during the preoperative phase was 35 degrees (minimum 0 degree-maximum 90 degrees) in flexion extension and 80 degrees (minimum 0 degree-maximum 150 degrees) in pronosupination. Recovery of mean joint excursion in flexion-extension was 91 degrees and in pronosupination it was 127 degrees. Complications included loosening of the nails in 2 cases, breakage of the nails in 1 case, and transitory deficit of the ulnar nerve in 4 cases. A total of 11 patients (91.66%) declared that they were satisfied with the considerable improvement in their ability to do daily activities. The results of arthroplasty in distraction in the elbow are satisfactory even if much attention must be paid to the selection of the patients because of the intense collaboration that is required during postoperative rehabilitation. PMID:11569362

  14. Time simulation of flutter with large stiffness changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpel, Mordechay; Wieseman, Carol D.

    1992-01-01

    Time simulation of flutter, involving large local structural changes, is formulated with a state-space model that is based on a relatively small number of generalized coordinates. Free-free vibration modes are first calculated for a nominal finite-element model with relatively large fictitious masses located at the area of structural changes. A low-frequency subset of these modes is then transformed into a set of structural modal coordinates with which the entire simulation is performed. These generalized coordinates and the associated oscillatory aerodynamic force coefficient matrices are used to construct an efficient time-domain, state-space model for a basic aeroelastic case. The time simulation can then be performed by simply changing the mass, stiffness, and damping coupling terms when structural changes occur. It is shown that the size of the aeroelastic model required for time simulation with large structural changes at a few apriori known locations is similar to that required for direct analysis of a single structural case. The method is applied to the simulation of an aeroelastic wind-tunnel model. The diverging oscillations are followed by the activation of a tip-ballast decoupling mechanism that stabilizes the system but may cause significant transient overshoots.

  15. Modulating surface stiffness of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with kiloelectronvolt ion patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boyin; Fu, Jing

    2015-06-01

    This study is to investigate the modulated surface properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with kiloelectronvolt ions. By irradiating the PDMS surface with a focused ion beam (FIB, keV Ga+), nano/microscale patterns of controlled stiffness can be fabricated with ion fluence ranging from 0.1-20 pC µm-2. The following nanoindentation measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM) revealed that Young’s modulus increased exponentially with the increase of ion fluence and reached 2 GPa. The stiffening was found to be less significant with irradiation at a higher ion incident angle and lower accelerating voltage. Raman spectroscopy results also confirmed that disordering caused by cross-linking and hydrogen release occurred on the target PDMS surface. By modelling and experimenting on PDMS-Si3N4 bilayer structures, the volume reduction ratios of PDMS with ion beam and electron beam irradiation were estimated. The proposed site specific modulating method and understanding of detailed governing mechanisms will allow the tuning of the PDMS surface with great accuracy and flexibility towards future applications in tissue engineering and microfabrication.

  16. Shape memory polymer hexachiral auxetic structures with tunable stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Takashima, Kazuto; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Walters, Peter; Mukai, Toshiharu

    2014-04-01

    Planar auxetic structures have the potential to impact on a wide range of applications from deployable and morphing structures to space-filling composite and medical treatments. The ability to fabricate auxetics from smart materials greatly enhances this facility by building in controllable actuation and deployment. A smart auxetic device can be compressed and fixed into a storage state. When deployment is required the device can be appropriately stimulated and the stored elastic energy is released, resulting in a marked structural expansion. Instead of using a conventional external actuator to drive deployment the material is made to undergo phase transition where one stimulus (e.g. heat) initiates a mechanical response. Here we show how smart material auxetics can be realized using a thermally responsive shape memory polymer composites. We show how a shape memory polymer auxetic hexachiral structure can be tailored to provide a tunable stiffness response in its fully deployed state by varying the angle of inter-hub connections, and yet is still able to undergo thermally stimulated deployment.

  17. Bearing Capacity of Mixed Pile with Stiffness Core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Jianwei; JIANG Xinliang; LING Guangrong

    2006-01-01

    To study load transfer mechanism and bearing capacity of a mixed pile with stiffness core (MPSC), which is formed by inserting a precast reinforced concrete pile (PRCP), in-situ tests involving MPSCs with different lengths, diameters, water cement ratios and PRCPs, cement mixed piles, and drilling hole piles, were carried out.Limit bearing capacities, load-settlement curves and stress distribution of MPSCs and mixed piles were obtained.The load transfer between cement soil and PRCP was analyzed by finite element method (FEM).Test results and FEM analysis show that an MPSC has fully utilized the big friction from a cement mixed pile and the high compressive strength from a PRCP which transfers outer top load into the inner cement soil, and that inserting a PRCP into a mixed pile changes the stress distribution of a mixed pile and improves frictional resistance between a mixed pile and soil.The length and the section area on PRCP of an MPSC both have an optimum value.Adopting MPSC is effective in improving the bearing capacity of soft soil ground.

  18. Sugary interfaces mitigate contact damage where stiff meets soft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hee Young; Iordachescu, Mihaela; Huang, Jun; Hennebert, Elise; Kim, Sangsik; Rho, Sangchul; Foo, Mathias; Flammang, Patrick; Zeng, Hongbo; Hwang, Daehee; Waite, J. Herbert; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-06-01

    The byssal threads of the fan shell Atrina pectinata are non-living functional materials intimately associated with living tissue, which provide an intriguing paradigm of bionic interface for robust load-bearing device. An interfacial load-bearing protein (A. pectinata foot protein-1, apfp-1) with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)-containing and mannose-binding domains has been characterized from Atrina's foot. apfp-1 was localized at the interface between stiff byssus and the soft tissue by immunochemical staining and confocal Raman imaging, implying that apfp-1 is an interfacial linker between the byssus and soft tissue, that is, the DOPA-containing domain interacts with itself and other byssal proteins via Fe3+-DOPA complexes, and the mannose-binding domain interacts with the soft tissue and cell membranes. Both DOPA- and sugar-mediated bindings are reversible and robust under wet conditions. This work shows the combination of DOPA and sugar chemistry at asymmetric interfaces is unprecedented and highly relevant to bionic interface design for tissue engineering and bionic devices.

  19. Modulating surface stiffness of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with kiloelectronvolt ion patterning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is to investigate the modulated surface properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with kiloelectronvolt ions. By irradiating the PDMS surface with a focused ion beam (FIB, keV Ga+), nano/microscale patterns of controlled stiffness can be fabricated with ion fluence ranging from 0.1–20 pC µm−2. The following nanoindentation measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM) revealed that Young’s modulus increased exponentially with the increase of ion fluence and reached 2 GPa. The stiffening was found to be less significant with irradiation at a higher ion incident angle and lower accelerating voltage. Raman spectroscopy results also confirmed that disordering caused by cross-linking and hydrogen release occurred on the target PDMS surface. By modelling and experimenting on PDMS-Si3N4 bilayer structures, the volume reduction ratios of PDMS with ion beam and electron beam irradiation were estimated. The proposed site specific modulating method and understanding of detailed governing mechanisms will allow the tuning of the PDMS surface with great accuracy and flexibility towards future applications in tissue engineering and microfabrication. (paper)

  20. The causal boundary and its relations with the conformal boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, J, E-mail: jherrera@agt.cie.uma.e [Departamento de Algebra, GeometrIa y TopologIa, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, Campus Teatinos, 29071 Malaga (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    Our aim in this note is to present the results (obtained in [2]) which ensure that, under certain regularity conditions, the conformal boundary becomes equal to the causal boundary, not only as a point set, but in a topological and chronological level. In particular, under these conditions the conformal boundary becomes a powerful tool to compute the causal one.

  1. N-Cadherin Induction by ECM Stiffness and FAK Overrides the Spreading Requirement for Proliferation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keeley L. Mui

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the accepted pro-proliferative effect of cell-matrix adhesion, the proliferative effect of cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion remains unresolved. Here, we studied the effect of N-cadherin on cell proliferation in the vasculature. We show that N-cadherin is induced in smooth muscle cells (SMCs in response to vascular injury, an in vivo model of tissue stiffening and proliferation. Complementary experiments performed with deformable substrata demonstrated that stiffness-mediated activation of a focal adhesion kinase (FAK-p130Cas-Rac signaling pathway induces N-cadherin. Additionally, by culturing paired and unpaired SMCs on microfabricated adhesive islands of different areas, we found that N-cadherin relaxes the spreading requirement for SMC proliferation. In vivo SMC deletion of N-cadherin strongly reduced injury-induced cycling. Finally, SMC-specific deletion of FAK inhibited proliferation after vascular injury, and this was accompanied by reduced induction of N-cadherin. Thus, a stiffness- and FAK-dependent induction of N-cadherin connects cell-matrix to cell-cell adhesion and regulates the degree of cell spreading needed for cycling.

  2. Four-order stiffness variation of laser-fabricated photopolymer biodegradable scaffolds by laser parameter modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, Balázs; Romano, Ilaria; Ceseracciu, Luca; Diaspro, Alberto [Department of Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Brandi, Fernando [Department of Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Beke, Szabolcs, E-mail: szabolcs.beke@iit.it [Department of Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    The effects of various fabrication parameters of our Mask Projection Excimer Laser StereoLithography (MPExSL) system were investigated. We demonstrate that laser parameters directly change the physical properties (stiffness, thermal degradation, and height/thickness) of the poly(propylene fumarate) (PFF) scaffold structures. The tested parameters were the number of pulses, fluence per pulse and laser repetition rate. We present a four-order tuning capability of MPExSL-fabricated structures' stiffness without altering the resin composition or using cumbersome post-treatment procedures. Thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry confirmed this tuning capability. Prototype-segmented scaffold designs are presented and analyzed to further expand the concept and exploit this in situ stiffness tuning capability of the scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. - Highlights: • Facile stiffness control of scaffolds is beneficial in tissue engineering. • Four-order tuning capability of structures' stiffness is presented. • Scaffold's stiffness can be tuned in four orders (4 MPa–4 GPa). • All scaffolds have been fabricated from the same polymer resin in a broad stiffness range.

  3. The influence of golf club shaft stiffness on clubhead kinematics at ball impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worobets, Jay; Stefanyshyn, Darren

    2012-06-01

    The role of shaft stiffness on the golf swing is not well understood. Studies in which golfers hit balls with clubs of varying shaft flex have reported changes in ball distance. The results of mathematical models suggest that shaft stiffness affects only the orientation of the clubhead at impact, not the speed of the clubhead, but there are no experimental results validating these findings. The purpose of this study was therefore to experimentally examine the influence of shaft stiffness on clubhead kinematics at ball impact. Forty golfers hit 10 balls with each of five drivers varying in shaft stiffness from 'Ladies' to 'Extra-Stiff', in a double-blind study design. The motions of three reflective markers attached to the clubhead were captured with a high-speed motion analysis system. At ball impact, shaft stiffness had a statistically significant influence on clubhead speed for 27 subjects, on loft angle for 11 subjects, and on lie angle for all 40 subjects. No effect was observed on face angle, in to out path angle, or attack angle. These results show that shaft stiffness can affect ball launch conditions by altering clubhead speed and/or loft angle. PMID:22900404

  4. The leg stiffnesses animals use may improve the stability of locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, ZhuoHua; Seipel, Justin

    2015-07-21

    Despite a wide diversity of running animals, their leg stiffness normalized by animal size and weight (a relative leg stiffness) resides in a narrow range between 7 and 27. Here we determine if the stability of locomotion could be a driving factor for the tight distribution of animal leg stiffness. We simulated an established physics-based model (the actuated Spring-Loaded Inverted Pendulum model) of animal running and found that, with the same energetic cost, perturbations to locomotion are optimally corrected when relative leg stiffness is within the biologically observed range. Here we show that the stability of locomotion, in combination with energetic cost, could be a significant factor influencing the nearly universally observed animal relative leg stiffness range. The energetic cost of locomotion has been widely acknowledged as influencing the evolution of physiology and locomotion behaviors. Specifically, its potential importance for relative leg stiffness has been demonstrated. Here, we demonstrate that stability of locomotion may also be a significant factor influencing relative leg stiffness. PMID:25908205

  5. MR elastography analysis of stiffness change induced by muscle contraction. President award proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) was originally advocated in 1995 and has been the subject of recent attention. We employed MRE to characterize the stiffness of skeletal muscle of the lower thigh and changes in that stiffness. We obtained MRE images using a gradient recalled echo pulse sequence with parameters: repetition time (TR)/echo time (TE), 20/3.6 ms; number of excitations (NEX), 3; flip angle, 20deg; matrix, 512 x 512; scan time, 32 s; flex coil; and vibration frequency, 50 Hz. We made a vibration pad of 2 divergence types to excite the lower thigh from both sides evenly. When contraction and relaxation about the skeletal muscles, we enforced MRE. We drew regions of interest (ROI) on the stiffness images and measured it by using sclerometer to compare stiffness. We MRE enabled visualization of changes in the stiffness of skeletal muscles as a result of contraction and relaxation. The lateral gastrocnemius and soleus muscle demonstrated significant difference in stiffness at muscle contraction. MRE also permitted measurement of deep muscle using the muscle sclerometer. MRE allows evaluation of stiffness in a given biological section from the surface to deep tissue. (author)

  6. Four-order stiffness variation of laser-fabricated photopolymer biodegradable scaffolds by laser parameter modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of various fabrication parameters of our Mask Projection Excimer Laser StereoLithography (MPExSL) system were investigated. We demonstrate that laser parameters directly change the physical properties (stiffness, thermal degradation, and height/thickness) of the poly(propylene fumarate) (PFF) scaffold structures. The tested parameters were the number of pulses, fluence per pulse and laser repetition rate. We present a four-order tuning capability of MPExSL-fabricated structures' stiffness without altering the resin composition or using cumbersome post-treatment procedures. Thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry confirmed this tuning capability. Prototype-segmented scaffold designs are presented and analyzed to further expand the concept and exploit this in situ stiffness tuning capability of the scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. - Highlights: • Facile stiffness control of scaffolds is beneficial in tissue engineering. • Four-order tuning capability of structures' stiffness is presented. • Scaffold's stiffness can be tuned in four orders (4 MPa–4 GPa). • All scaffolds have been fabricated from the same polymer resin in a broad stiffness range

  7. Stiffness modulus of Polyethylene Terephthalate modified asphalt mixture: A statistical analysis of the laboratory testing results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Effect of PET modification on stiffness property of asphalt mixture was examined. • Different temperatures and loading amounts were designated. • Statistical analysis was used to find interactions between selected variables. • A good agreement between experimental results and predicted values was obtained. • Optimal amount of PET was calculated to achieve the highest mixture performance. - Abstract: Stiffness of asphalt mixture is a fundamental design parameter of flexible pavement. According to literature, stiffness value is very susceptible to environmental and loading conditions. In this paper, effects of applied stress and temperature on the stiffness modulus of unmodified and Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) modified asphalt mixtures were evaluated using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). A quadratic model was successfully fitted to the experimental data. Based on the results achieved in this study, the temperature variation had the highest impact on the mixture’s stiffness. Besides, PET content and amount of stress showed to have almost the same effect on the stiffness of mixtures. The optimal amount of PET was found to be 0.41% by weight of aggregate particles to reach the highest stiffness value

  8. In vivo and in vitro measurements of pulmonary arterial stiffness: A brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lian; Chesler, Naomi C

    2012-10-01

    During the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH), proximal pulmonary arteries (PAs) undergo remodeling such that they become thicker and the elastic modulus increases. Both of these changes increase the vascular stiffness. The increase in pulmonary vascular stiffness contributes to increased right ventricular (RV) afterload, which causes RV hypertrophy and eventually failure. Studies have found that proximal PA stiffness or its inverse, compliance, is strongly related to morbidity and mortality in patients with PH. Therefore, accurate in vivo measurement of PA stiffness is useful for prognoses in patients with PH. It is also important to understand the structural changes in PAs that occur with PH that are responsible for stiffening. Here, we briefly review the most common parameters used to quantify stiffness and in vivo and in vitro methods for measuring PA stiffness in human and animal models. For in vivo approaches, we review invasive and noninvasive approaches that are based on measurements of pressure and inner or outer diameter or cross-sectional area. For in vitro techniques, we review several different testing methods that mimic one, two or several aspects of physiological loading (e.g., uniaxial and biaxial testing, dynamic inflation-force testing). Many in vivo and in vitro measurement methods exist in the literature, and it is important to carefully choose an appropriate method to measure PA stiffness accurately. Therefore, advantages and disadvantages of each approach are discussed. PMID:23372936

  9. Optimization of a variable-stiffness skin for morphing high-lift devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the possibilities for the next generation of smart high-lift devices is to use a seamless morphing structure. A passive composite variable-stiffness skin as a solution to the dilemma of designing the structure to have high enough stiffness to withstand aerodynamic loading and low stiffness to enable morphing is proposed. The variable-stiffness skin is achieved by allowing for a spatial fibre angle and skin thickness variation on a morphing high-lift system. The stiffness distribution is tailored to influence the deformation of the structure beneficially. To design a realistic stiffness distribution, it is important to take aerodynamic and actuation loads into account during the optimization. A two-dimensional aero-servo-elastic framework is created for this purpose. Skin optimization is performed using a gradient-based optimizer, where sensitivity information is found through application of the adjoint method. The implementation of the aero-servo-elastic environment is addressed and initial optimization results presented. The results indicate that a variable-stiffness skin increases the design space. Moreover, the importance of taking the change in aerodynamic loads due to morphing skin deformation into account during optimization is demonstrated

  10. Twin boundary interactions with grain boundaries investigated in pure rhenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical behavior of pure rhenium was investigated using uniaxial compression tests, transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction characterization. The plasticity was characterized by a large amount of twin formation and propagation, including twin transmission across grain boundaries. In-depth analysis of the interactions of {112¯1}〈1¯1¯26〉 twins with grain boundaries found that grain boundaries with misorientation angles below ∼25° allowed twin transmission, while grain boundaries with higher angles did not. Similar to dislocation interactions with grain boundaries, twin transmission was largely dictated by the minimization of the angle between the shear vectors of the incoming and outgoing twins

  11. A review of models of vertical, leg, and knee stiffness in adults for running, jumping or hopping tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpell, Benjamin G; Ball, Nick B; Scarvell, Jennie M; Smith, Paul N

    2012-01-01

    The 'stiffness' concept originates from Hooke's law which states that the force required to deform an object is related to a spring constant and the distance that object is deformed. Research into stiffness in the human body is undergoing unprecedented popularity; possibly because stiffness has been associated with sporting performance and some lower limb injuries. However, some inconsistencies surrounding stiffness measurement exists bringing into question the integrity of some research related to stiffness. The aim of this study was to review literature which describes how vertical, leg and knee stiffness has been measured in adult populations while running, jumping or hopping. A search of the entire MEDLINE, PubMed and SPORTDiscus databases and an iterative reference check was performed. Sixty-seven articles were retrieved; 21 measured vertical stiffness, 51 measured leg stiffness, and 22 measured knee stiffness. Thus, some studies measured several 'types' of stiffness. Vertical stiffness was typically the quotient of ground reaction force and centre of mass displacement. For leg stiffness it was and change in leg length, and for the knee it was the quotient of knee joint moments and change in joint angle. Sample size issues and measurement techniques were identified as limitations to current research. PMID:22845059

  12. The impact of boundary conditions on CO2 capacity estimation in aquifers

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, D.J.; Bentham, M.; Holloway, S.; Noy, D.J.; Chadwick, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    The boundary conditions of an aquifer determine the extent to which fluids (including formation water and CO2) and pressure can be transferred into adjacent geological formations, either laterally or vertically. Aquifer boundaries can be faults, lithological boundaries, formation pinch-outs, salt walls, or outcrop. In many cases compliance with regulations preventing CO2 storage influencing areas outside artificial boundaries defined by non-geological criteria (international bound...

  13. Lateral Stiffness Analysis of Fuel Assembly as Contact Condition for PGSFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the fuel assembly bowing in the core, the lateral stiffness analysis is needed. In the fuel assembly, there are two load pads. One is the top load pad (TLP) and the other is above the core load pad (ACLP). These load pads supply the impact surface among the fuel assemblies. In this paper, the lateral stiffness analysis of the fuel assembly as the core contact condition will be executed using the finite element method. The lateral stiffness of a fuel assembly is established by the FE method. These analysis results will be utilized in a fuel assembly bowing analysis in the core

  14. Estimate of dynamic stiffness and damping by forced excitation test of foundation on bedrock. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the results of forced excitation tests of foundations on bedrock, dynamic complex stiffness (dynamic stiffness and damping) were obtained at many nuclear power plant sites. Experimental results were investigated by three-dimensional wave propagation theory considering layered stratum of bedrock. It is shown dynamic stiffness can be estimated with sufficient accuracy by considering layered stratum of bedrock. Also it is shown that by two-layered ground model estimate of damping characteristics is possible for foundations on multi-layered bedrock. (orig./HP)

  15. Strain energy release rate, interlaminar stresses, and 3-D transformation of stiffnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    In this analysis, a delamination between the belt and core sections is assumed to grow parallel to the belt direction in the tapered and uniform sections. These delaminations in each section are denoted by a and b respectively. The core section in the taper portion is modeled by two equivalent sublaminates. The stiffness properties are smeared to obtain effective cracked and uncracked stiffnesses which are designated A (u) and A (c). These stiffnesses change from one ply drop group to another with crack growth a by experiencing a sudden change at discrete locations. Therefore, A (u) and A (c) can be represented in three consecutive regions.

  16. Boundaries and Boundary Marks - Substantive Cultural Heritage of Extensive Importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldhaeusl, P.; Koenig, H.; Mansberger, R.

    2015-08-01

    The Austrian Society for surveying and Geoinformation (ASG) has proposed to submit "Boundaries and Boundary Marks" for the UNESCO World Heritage title. It was time that boundaries, borders and limits of all types as well as ownership rights would find the proper attention in the global public. Landmarks symbolize the real property and the associated rights and obligations, in a figurative sense, the property generally and all legal limits. A democratic state of law is impossible at today's population density without a functioning land administration system with surveying and jurisdiction. As monumental World Heritage representatives of the geodetic artwork "Boundaries and Boundary Marks" are specifically proposed: remaining monuments of the original cadastral geodetic network, the first pan-Austrian surveying headquarters in Vienna, and a specific selection of outstanding boundary monuments. Landmarks are monuments to the boundaries which separate rights and obligations, but also connect the neighbors peacefully after written agreement. "And cursed be he who does not respect the boundaries" you wrote already 3000 years ago. Boundaries and Boundary Marks are a real thing; they all belong to the tangible or material heritage of human history. In this context also the intangible heritage is discussed. This refers to oral tradition and expressions, performing arts; social practices, rituals and festive events; as well as to knowledge and practices handling nature and the universe. "Boundaries and Boundary Marks" do not belong to it, but clearly to the material cultural world heritage. "Boundary and Boundary Marks" is proposed to be listed according to the criteria (ii),(iv),(vi).

  17. Open boundary molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Buscalioni, R.; Sablić, J.; Praprotnik, M.

    2015-09-01

    This contribution analyzes several strategies and combination of methodologies to perform molecular dynamic simulations in open systems. Here, the term open indicates that the total system has boundaries where transfer of mass, momentum and energy can take place. This formalism, which we call Open Boundary Molecular Dynamics (OBMD), can act as interface of different schemes, such as Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS) and Hybrid continuum-particle dynamics to link atomistic, coarse-grained (CG) and continuum (Eulerian) fluid dynamics in the general framework of fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations. The core domain of the simulation box is solved using all-atom descriptions. The CG layer introduced using AdResS is located at the outer part of the open box to make feasible the insertion of large molecules into the system. Communications between the molecular system and the outer world are carried out in the outer layers, called buffers. These coupling preserve momentum and mass conservation laws and can thus be linked with Eulerian hydro- dynamic solvers. In its simpler form, OBMD allows, however, to impose a local pressure tensor and a heat flux across the system's boundaries. For a one component molecular system, the external normal pressure and temperature determine the external chemical potential and thus the independent parameters of a grand-canonical ensemble simulation. Extended ensembles under non-equilibrium stationary states can also be simulated as well as time dependent forcings (e.g. oscillatory rheology). To illustrate the robustness of the combined OBMD-AdResS method, we present simulations of star-polymer melts at equilibrium and in sheared flow.

  18. Determinants of arterial stiffness in chronic kidney disease stage 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha J McIntyre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with increased cardiovascular (CV risk but underlying mechanisms remain uncertain. Arterial stiffness (AS is associated with increased CV risk in advanced CKD, but it is unclear whether AS is relevant to CV disease (CVD in early CKD. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: 1717 patients with previous estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR 59-30 mL/min/1.73 m(2; mean age 73±9y, were recruited from 32 general practices in primary care. OUTCOMES: Increased arterial stiffness. MEASUREMENTS: Medical history was obtained and participants underwent clinical assessment, urine and serum biochemistry testing. Carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV was determined as a measure of AS, using a Vicorder™ device. RESULTS: Univariate analysis revealed significant correlations between PWV and risk factors for CVD including age (r = 0.456; p<0.001, mean arterial pressure (MAP (r = 0.228; p<0.001, body mass index (r = -0.122; p<0.001, log urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (r = 0.124; p<0.001, Waist to Hip ratio (r = 0.124, p<0.001, eGFR (r = -0.074; p = 0.002, log high sensitivity c-reactive protein (r = 0.066; p = 0.006, HDL (r = -0.062; p = 0.01 and total cholesterol (r = -0.057; p = 0.02. PWV was higher in males (9.6 m/sec vs.10.3 m/sec; p<0.001, diabetics (9.8 m/sec vs. 10.3 m/sec; p<0.001, and those with previous CV events (CVE (9.8 m/s vs. 10.3 m/sec; p<0.001. Multivariable analysis identified age, MAP and diabetes as strongest independent determinants of higher PWV (adjusted R² = 0.29. An interactive term indicated that PWV increased to a greater extent with age in males versus females. Albuminuria was a weaker determinant of PWV and eGFR did not enter the model. LIMITATIONS: Data derived from one study visit, with absence of normal controls. CONCLUSION: In this cohort, age and traditional CV risk factors were

  19. Beyond the Boundary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorm Hansen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    . Drawing on interviews with the head of a research center in plant biology, this article argues that biology and biotech are symbionts. In order to be viable and productive, symbiosis needs to be carefully managed and given room for divergence within mutual dependence. This process does not take place as...... the negotiation of a preexisting science-industry boundary. Rather, viability is obtained through a strategy of circumventing the science-industry food chain and sequestering biotech components within the research center. Symbiosis allows academic scientists to do biology while at the same time...

  20. Beyond the Boundary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorm Hansen, Birgitte

    2011-01-01

    . Drawing on interviews with the head of a research center in plant biology, this article argues that biology and biotech are "symbionts". In order to be viable and productive, symbiosis needs to be carefully managed and given room for divergence within mutual dependence. This process does not take place as...... the negotiation of a preexisting science-industry boundary. Rather, viability is obtained through a strategy of "circumventing" the science-industry food chain and "sequestering" biotech components within the research center. Symbiosis allows academic scientists to do biology while at the same time...

  1. The Boundaries of Fictio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Ivanova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This essay surveys four articles of the section dedicated to the boundaries of fiction in literature, scientific discourse, and other areas of human creativity. The section is supposed to contribute to the study of a broad range of the problems of literary theory, such as the interaction between literature and other social practices, resulting in the creation of a particular discourse of ‘reality’ and ‘objectivity’, and the highly controversial issue of the relationship between ‘material’ and ‘form’ in the literary text.

  2. Testing of the LORI stiff brush skimmer sweep system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new concept utilizing a sweep system in conjunction with stiff cylindrical brushes mounted on an endless chain has been developed for recovering heavy oils and emulsions from water surfaces. One such system, the LORI Side Collector system, was quantitatively tested in an indoor wave tank using diesel, crude oil, emulsified crude, and bunker oil. The skimmer was tested in 4 degree C water at current velocities in the 0.15-0.65 m/s range, in calm water conditions, and in waves of 5-7 cm height. The brush speed was varied between 6 and 30 cm/s. The skimmer was evaluated in terms of fluid recovery rate and oil recovery rate. The maximum capacity of the skimmer may not have been reached due to current velocity limitations of the tank. The effect of brush speed and oil encounter rate were determined. Skimmer performance increased with increasing oil viscosity. Higher current speeds and waves also enhanced recovery. Following the tank trials, the system was installed on a 8.5 m sea truck and trials were conducted on the St. Lawrence River. These tests assessed the stability, maneuverability, sea keeping, and operation of the system. Oil was not used in these tests, but the system was evaluated as to its ability to deal with debris and to direct an oil-substitute towards and into the skimmer entrance. In general, the skimmer did not adversely hamper the maneuverability of the sea truck. The oil-substitute was satisfactorily recovered at velocities up to 1.5-2 m/s. 13 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Application of the Broyden method to stiff transport equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Johan; Cary, John R.; Cohen, Ron

    2002-11-01

    Plasma turbulence generates fluxes (of particles, energy, etc.) that are said to be stiff, that is a small change in temperature, density, or some other quantity, can lead to a large change in flux. The dependence of the diffusivities on the temperature and density profiles, and their gradients, also introduces nonlinearity. Irrespective of whether the fluxes are given by transport models, such as IFS/PPPL, GLF23, or MMM95, or are directly calculated, the resulting system of transport equations is thus numerically challenging to solve. Efficient transport solvers must also take into account that the evaluation of the diffusivities (or their gradients: the fluxes) is numerically costly. We have developed a new iterative transport solver that combines the stability of a relaxation scheme with the fast convergence of a Newton solver. The new solver uses a gradually decreasing relaxation parameter for the first few iterations and once it is inside the radius of convergence it switches over to a quasi-Newton method where a Broyden-like scheme is used to approximate the Jacobian. By taking advantage of the structure of the matrix (tri-diagonal if a second-order spatial finite differencing is used) the Broyden algorithm[1] gives a good approximation of the Jacobian after only a few iterations. We have implemented the new transport solver in the form of a C++ library called the Transport Analysis Tool. To make the library easy to access from codes written in other languages, a C interface is also provided. We will present the new transport solver in detail, as well as benchmark results and examples of how to use the Transport Analysis Tool library. [1] C. G. Broyden, in Mathematics of Computation, vol. 19, 1965, pp. 577--593.

  4. Antimicrobials Influence Bond Stiffness and Detachment of Oral Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, L; Hou, J; van der Mei, H C; Veeregowda, D H; Busscher, H J; Sjollema, J

    2016-07-01

    Oral biofilm can never be fully removed by oral hygiene measures. Biofilm left behind after brushing is often left behind on the same sites and exposed multiple times to antimicrobials from toothpastes and mouthrinses, after which removal becomes increasingly difficult. On the basis of this observation, we hypothesize that oral bacteria adhering to salivary conditioning films become more difficult to remove after adsorption of antimicrobials due to stiffening of their adhesive bond. To verify this hypothesis, bacteria adhering to bare and saliva-coated glass were exposed to 3 different mouthrinses, containing chlorhexidine-digluconate, cetylpyridinium-chloride, or amine-fluoride, after which bacterial vibration spectroscopy was carried out or a liquid-air interface was passed over the adhering bacteria to stimulate their detachment. Brownian motion-induced nanoscopic vibration amplitudes of 4 oral streptococcal strains, reflecting their bond stiffness, decreased after exposure to mouthrinses. Concurrently, the percentage detachment of adhering bacteria upon the passage of a liquid-air interface decreased after exposure to mouthrinses. A buffer control left both vibration amplitudes and detachment percentages unaffected. Exposure to either of the selected mouthrinses yielded more positively charged bacteria by particulate microelectrophoresis, suggesting antimicrobial adsorption to bacterial cell surface components. To rule out that exposure of adhering bacteria to the mouthrinses stimulated polysaccharide production with an impact on their detachment, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was carried out on bacteria adhering to an internal reflection element, prior to and after exposure to the mouthrinses. Infrared absorption band areas indicated no significant change in amount of polysaccharides after exposure of adhering bacteria to mouthrinses, but wave number shifts demonstrated stiffening of polysaccharides in the bond, as a result of antimicrobial

  5. Simulation methods with extended stability for stiff biochemical Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rué Pau

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With increasing computer power, simulating the dynamics of complex systems in chemistry and biology is becoming increasingly routine. The modelling of individual reactions in (biochemical systems involves a large number of random events that can be simulated by the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA. The key quantity is the step size, or waiting time, τ, whose value inversely depends on the size of the propensities of the different channel reactions and which needs to be re-evaluated after every firing event. Such a discrete event simulation may be extremely expensive, in particular for stiff systems where τ can be very short due to the fast kinetics of some of the channel reactions. Several alternative methods have been put forward to increase the integration step size. The so-called τ-leap approach takes a larger step size by allowing all the reactions to fire, from a Poisson or Binomial distribution, within that step. Although the expected value for the different species in the reactive system is maintained with respect to more precise methods, the variance at steady state can suffer from large errors as τ grows. Results In this paper we extend Poisson τ-leap methods to a general class of Runge-Kutta (RK τ-leap methods. We show that with the proper selection of the coefficients, the variance of the extended τ-leap can be well-behaved, leading to significantly larger step sizes. Conclusions The benefit of adapting the extended method to the use of RK frameworks is clear in terms of speed of calculation, as the number of evaluations of the Poisson distribution is still one set per time step, as in the original τ-leap method. The approach paves the way to explore new multiscale methods to simulate (biochemical systems.

  6. Arterial stiffness and sedentary lifestyle: Role of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessiani, Gianfranco; Santilli, Francesca; Boccatonda, Andrea; Iodice, Pierpaolo; Liani, Rossella; Tripaldi, Romina; Saggini, Raoul; Davì, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Sedentary lifestyle is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease, and leads to a quantifiable impairment in vascular function and arterial wall stiffening. We tested the hypothesis of oxidative stress as a determinant of arterial stiffness (AS) in physically inactive subjects, and challenged the reversibility of these processes after the completion of an eight-week, high-intensity exercise training (ET). AS was assessed before and after ET, measuring carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) with a Vicorder device. At baseline and after ET, participants performed urine collection and underwent fasting blood sampling. Urinary 8-iso-PGF2α, an in vivo marker of lipid peroxidation, total, HDL and LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations were measured. ET was associated with significantly reduced urinary 8-iso-PGF2α(p<0.0001) levels. PWV was significantly reduced after ET completion (p<0.0001), and was directly related to urinary 8-iso-PGF2α(Rho=0.383, p=0.021). After ET, cardiovascular fitness improved [peak oxygen consumption (p<0.0001), peak heart rate (p<0.0001)]. However, no improvement in lipid profile was observed, apart from a significant reduction of triglycerides (p=0.022). PWV and triglycerides were significantly related (Rho=0.466, p=0.005) throughout the study period. PWV levels were also related to urinary 8-iso-PGF2α in our previously sedentary subjects. We conclude that regular physical exercise may be a natural antioxidant strategy, lowering oxidant stress and thereby the AS degree. PMID:26044182

  7. The Hale solar sector boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalgaard, L.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    A Hale solar-sector boundary is defined as that half (northern hemisphere or southern hemisphere) of a sector boundary in which the change of sector-magnetic-field polarity is the same as the change of polarity from a preceding spot to a following spot. Above a Hale sector boundary the green corona has maximum brightness, while above a non-Hale boundary the green corona has a minimum brightness. The Hale portion of a photospheric sector boundary tends to have maximum magnetic-field strength, while the non-Hale portion has minimum field strength.

  8. The Hale solar sector boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Hale solar sector boundary is defined as the half (northern hemisphere or southern hemisphere) of a sector boundary in which the change of sector magnetic field polarity is the same as the change of polarity from a preceding spot to a following spot. Above a Hale sector boundary the green corona has maximum brightness, while above a non-Hale boundary the green corona has a minimum brightness. The Hale portion of a photospheric sector boundary tends to have maximum magnetic field strength, while the non-Hale portion has minimum field strength. (Auth.)

  9. Boundary Anomalies and Correlation Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    It was shown recently that boundary terms of conformal anomalies recover the universal contribution to the entanglement entropy and also play an important role in the boundary monotonicity theorem of odd-dimensional quantum field theories. Motivated by these results, we investigate relationships between boundary anomalies and the stress tensor correlation functions in conformal field theories. In particular, we focus on how the conformal Ward identity and the renormalization group equation are modified by boundary central charges. Renormalized stress tensors induced by boundary Weyl invariants are also discussed, with examples in spherical and cylindrical geometries.

  10. A mixed-grid finite element method with PML absorbing boundary conditions for seismic wave modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a mixed-grid finite element method (MGFEM) to simulate seismic wave propagation in 2D structurally complex media. This method divides the physical domain into two subdomains. One subdomain covering the major part of the physical domain is divided by regular quadrilateral elements, while the other subdomain uses triangular elements to correctly fit a rugged free surface topography. The local stiffness matrix of any quadrilateral element is identical and matrix-vector production is calculated using an element-by-element technique, which avoids assembling a huge global stiffness matrix. As only a few triangular elements exist in the subdomain containing the rugged free surface topography, the memory requirements for storing the assembled subdomain global stiffness matrix are significantly reduced. To eliminate artificial boundary reflections, the MGFEM is also implemented to solve the system equations of PML absorbing boundary conditions (PML ABC). The accuracy and efficiency of the MGFEM is tested in numerical experiments by comparing it with conventional methods, and numerical comparisons also indicate its tremendous ability to describe rugged surfaces. (paper)

  11. Task Dependency of Grip Stiffness-A Study of Human Grip Force and Grip Stiffness Dependency during Two Different Tasks with Same Grip Forces

    OpenAIRE

    Höppner, Hannes; McIntyre, Joseph; van der Smagt, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    It is widely known that the pinch-grip forces of the human hand are linearly related to the weight of the grasped object. Less is known about the relationship between grip force and grip stiffness. We set out to determine variations to these dependencies in different tasks with and without visual feedback. In two different settings, subjects were asked to (a) grasp and hold a stiffness-measuring manipulandum with a predefined grip force, differing from experiment to experiment, or (b) grasp a...

  12. Boundary effects in entanglement entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Berthiere, Clement

    2016-01-01

    We present a number of explicit calculations of Renyi and entanglement entropies in situations where the entangling surface intersects the boundary in $d$-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. When the boundary is a single plane we compute the contribution to the entropy due to this intersection, first in the case of the Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, and then in the case of a generic Robin type boundary condition. The flow in the boundary coupling between the Neumann and Dirichlet phases is analyzed in arbitrary dimension $d$ and is shown to be monotonic, the peculiarity of $d=3$ case is noted. We argue that the translational symmetry along the entangling surface is broken due the presence of the boundary which reveals that the entanglement is not homogeneous. In order to characterize this quantitatively, we introduce a density of entanglement entropy and compute it explicitly. This quantity clearly indicates that the entanglement is maximal near the boundary. We then consider the situation where the ...

  13. Charismatic leadership, boundary issues, and collusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorian, B J; Dunbar, C; Frayn, D; Garfinkel, P E

    2000-01-01

    The authors suggest that a charismatic leadership style has an impact on the maintenance of boundaries and standards of practice within a department of psychiatry. They also underline the need for all members of a self-regulated professional group to assume responsibility for the maintenance of standards within the group. An overview of leadership tasks and styles, with particular emphasis on the qualities of charismatic leadership, is provided, and the impacts of boundary violations committed by members of a psychiatric department or institute on the integrity of the professional group are also elaborated. The authors then develop several hypotheses regarding the phenomenon of emotional collusion that occurs in departments in which a charismatic leader becomes sexually involved with patients. The individual internal psychological mechanisms and companion group dynamics that may allow the leader to be supported at the cost of ethical standards, principles of practice, and the ultimate creativity and viability of the group are then discussed. The authors conclude that the maintenance of standards within a self-regulating professional group must be the shared responsibility of all members. The example of boundary violations by a charismatic leader is used to illustrate the need for open debate regarding fundamental principles required to maintain a healthy functioning of critical checks and balances within the psychiatric profession. PMID:10928245

  14. Shared care and boundaries:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winthereik, Brit Ross

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – The paper seeks to examine how an online maternity record involving pregnant women worked as a means to create shared maternity care. Design/methodology/approach – Ethnographic techniques have been used. The paper adopts a theoretical/methodological framework based on science and techno......Purpose – The paper seeks to examine how an online maternity record involving pregnant women worked as a means to create shared maternity care. Design/methodology/approach – Ethnographic techniques have been used. The paper adopts a theoretical/methodological framework based on science...... and technology studies. Findings – The paper shows how a version of “the responsible patient” emerges from the project which is different from the version envisioned by the project organisation. The emerging one is concerned with the boundary between primary and secondary sector care, and not with the boundary...... of responsibilities entailed in shared care projects. Rather than seeking to connect all actors in an unbounded space, shared care might instead suggest a space for patients and professionals to experiment with new roles and responsibilities. Practical implications – When designing coordination tools for health care...

  15. Modeling the dynamic stiffness of cracked reinforced concrete beams under low-amplitude vibration loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tengfei; Castel, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a model, initially developed to calculate the stiffness of cracked reinforced concrete beams under static loading, is used to assess the dynamic stiffness. The model allows calculating the average inertia of cracked beams by taking into account the effect of bending cracks (primary cracks) and steel-concrete bond damage (i.e. interfacial microcracks). Free and forced vibration experiments are used to assess the performance of the model. The respective influence of bending cracks and steel-concrete bond damage on both static and dynamic responses is analyzed. The comparison between experimental and simulated deflections confirms that the effects of both bending cracks and steel-concrete bond loss should be taken into account to assess reinforced concrete stiffness under service static loading. On the contrary, comparison of experimental and calculated dynamic responses reveals that localized steel-concrete bond damages do not influence significantly the dynamic stiffness and the fundamental frequency.

  16. Inheritance and performance of the stiff-strawed mutant in Vicia faba L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The tall and leafy types are considered to produce more vegetative mass than is necessary for high grain yield. A mutant with stunted growth, smaller leaves with dark green colour, and a stiff stem showing excellent lodging resistance, found special interest among breeders. This stiff-stem growth-type was selected as a spontaneous mutation in a breeding population. A stiff-stem line was crossed with the varieties 'Alfred' and 'Minica'. The stiff-stem recombinants showed a 20% shorter plant height, excellent lodging resistance, higher harvest index and a promise of 30% yield increase. The monogenic inheritance of the mutant trait is an advantage for further breeding work. We propose the symbol st for the new allele. (author)

  17. Association between arterial stiffness and the deformability of red blood cells (RBCs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.S. Lee; N.J. Kim; K. Sun; J.G. Dobbe; M.R. Hardeman; J.F. Antaki; K.H. Ahn; S.J. Lee

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between the flexibility of atherosclerotic vessels and RBC deformability has been investigated. A significant difference of RBC deformability was found among the arterial stiffness groups classified by oscillometric measurement of blood pressure. The deformability was determined by

  18. Ultra-Flexible Advanced Stiffness Truss for Large Solar Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — LGarde will develop a lightweight Ultra-Flexible Advanced Stiffness Truss (Ultra-FAST) that will prove to have greater material metrics and structural...

  19. Dynamic stiffness of pile groups in a multilayered soil. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rational analysis method is presented for calculation of the dynamic stiffness of pile groups in multilayered soil. In this paper, thin layered method is applied, and the dynamic stiffness matrix is evaluated at the pile heads. The pile is modelled as compressible Timoshenko-beam elements and the soil as visco-elastic thin layered elements. After the correlation studies between the analysis and the test results of the pile foundation with a gap between the foundation bottom and the ground surface, the analysis method is amended for the dynamic stiffness of the pile foundation without a gap or with embedment. For these correlation analyses, the presented methods are verified to be applicable for the evaluation of pile group foundation stiffness

  20. Increased liver stiffness in alcoholic liver disease: Differentiating fibrosis from steatohepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Sebastian; Millonig, Gunda; Sarovska, Lucie; Friedrich, Stefanie; Reimann, Frank M; Pritsch, Maria; Eisele, Silke; Stickel, Felix; Longerich, Thomas; Schirmacher, Peter; Seitz, Helmut Karl

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To test if inflammation also interferes with liver stiffness (LS) assessment in alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and to provide a clinical algorithm for reliable fibrosis assessment in ALD by FibroScan® (FS).