WorldWideScience

Sample records for boundary leak tightness

  1. Hermetic compartments leak-tightness enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murani, J.

    2000-01-01

    In connection with the enhancement of the nuclear safety of the Jaslovske Bohunice V-1 NPP actions for the increase of the leak tightness are performed. The reconstruction has been done in the following directions: hermetic compartments leak tightness enhancement; air lock installation; installation of air lock in SP 4 vent system; integrated leakage rate test to hermetic compartments with leak detection. After 'major' leaks on the hermetic boundary components had been eliminated, since 1994 works on a higher qualitative level began. The essence of the works consists in the detection and identification of leaks in the structural component of the hermetic boundary during the planned refueling outages. The results of the Small Reconstruction and gradual enhancement of leak tightness are presented

  2. Study on water leak-tightness of small leaks on a 1 inch cylinder valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazawa, T.; Kasai, Y.; Inabe, N.; Aritomi, M.

    2002-01-01

    Practical thresholds for water leak-tightness of small leaks were determined by experimentation. Measurements for small leak samples were taken of air leakage rates and water leakage rates for identical leak samples in order to identify parameters that influence water leak-tightness threshold. Four types of leaks were evaluated: a fine wire inserted in an O-ring seal, a glass capillary tube, a stainless steel orifice, and a scratched valve stem on a 1 inch UF 6 cylinder valve. Experimental results demonstrated that the key parameter for water leak-tightness is the opening size of the leak hole. The maximum allowable hole size to achieve water leak-tightness ranged from 10 to 20 μm in diameter in this study. Experimental results with 1 inch UF 6 cylinder valve samples demonstrated that the acceptance criteria for preshipment leakage test, 1x10 -3 ref-cm 3 .s -1 , as prescribed in ANSI N14.5 is an appropriate value from the point of view of water leak-tightness for enriched UF 6 packages. The mechanism of water leak-tightness is plugging by tiny particles existing in water. The water used in experiments in this study contained far fewer particles than in water assumed to be encountered under accident conditions of transport. Therefore, the water leak-tightness threshold determined in this study is a conservative value in a practical evaluation. (author)

  3. Prediction of Gas Leak Tightness of Superplastically Formed Products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, Q.H.C.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Barlat, F; Moon, Y.H.; Lee, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    In some applications, in this case an aluminium box in a subatomic particle detector containing highly sensitive detecting devices, it is important that a formed sheet should show no gas leak from one side to the other. In order to prevent a trial-and-error procedure to make this leak tight box, a

  4. Maintaining leak tightness capability of Caorso BWR containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsanti, P.; Di Palo, L.; Grimaldi, G.

    1988-01-01

    In 1987 the local leak rate test (LLRT) results of the primary containment were revised, with the following main goals: to highlight recurring problems, leading to lack of leak tightness of the primary containment; to individuate the pertinent degradation mechanisms; to assess the corrective actions already implemented and to plan further improvements, if necessary; and to optimize the preventive maintenance program on the containment, particularly the inspection frequency. All LLRTs in the past operating period, both before (as found) and after (as left) maintenance were analyzed, in terms of leakage rate and equivalent area of leak, for each penetration. Corrective actions already implemented included replacement of some valves with better quality type one, passivation of the carbon steel pipes and improvement of the pertinent surveillance procedures. Long term corrective actions, now under consideration, will include the following: more extensive passivation of pipes, carrying humid air, so that oxidation could be drastically reduced; better chemistry control in fluid systems; extensive replacement of the butterfly valves presently used; implementation of the LLRT practice, such to quantitatively measure the leakage rate, also in presence of large leak; and reduction of the time interval between periodical tests, on the basis of the results of the previous ones. Following these guidelines, future overall leakage tests would be performed in as found condition, aimed to verify the effectiveness of the entire maintenance and testing program of the primary containment and of its capability to maintain leak tightness during the time between two subsequent tests

  5. Containment leak-tightness enhancement at VVER 440 NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prandorfy, M.

    2001-01-01

    The hermetic compartments of VVER 440 NPPs fulfil the function of the containment used at NPPs all over the word. The purpose of the containment is to protect the NPP personal against radioactive impact as well as to prevent radioactive leakage to the environment during a lost of coolant accident. Leak-tightness enhancement in NPPs with VVER 440/213 and VVER 440/230 reactors is an important safety issue. New procedures, measures and methods were adopted at NPPs in Mochovce, J. Bohunice, Dukovany and Paks for leak identification and sealing works performed by VUEZ Levice. (authors)

  6. Containment leak-tightness enhancement at VVER 440 NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prandorfy, M.

    2000-01-01

    The hermetic compartments of WWER 440 NPPs fulfil the function of the containment used at NPPs all over the world. The purpose of the containment is to protect the NPP personnel against radioactive impact as well as to prevent radioactive leakage to the. environ ent during a lost of coolant accident. Leak-tightness enhancement in NPPs with WWER 440/213 and WWER 440/230 reactors is an important safety issue. New procedures, measures and methods were adopted at NPPs in Mochovce, Jaslovske Bohunice, Dukovany and PAKS for leak identification and sealing works performed by VUEZ Levice. (authors)

  7. Testing underground tanks for leak tightness at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, R.K.; Sites, R.L.; Sledge, M.

    1986-01-01

    Two types of tank systems are present at the Livermore Site: tanks and associated piping for the storage of fuel (forty-three systems), and tanks or sumps and associated piping for the retention of potentially contaminated wastewater (forty systems). The fuel systems were tested using commercially available test methods: Petro-Tite, Hunter Leak Lokator, Ezy-Chek, and Associated Environmental Systems (A.E.S.). In contrast to fuel tank systems, wastewater systems have containers that are predominantly open at the top and not readily testable. Therefore, a project to test and evaluate all available testing methods was initiated and completed. The commercial method Tank Auditor was determined to be appropriate for testing open-top tanks and sumps and this was the method used to test the majority of the open-top containers. Of the 81 tanks tested, 61 were found to be leak tight, 9 were shown to have leaks, and 11 yielded inconclusive results. Two tanks have not yet been tested because of operational constraints; they are sheduled to be tested within the next two months. Schedules are being developed for the retesting of tanks and for remedial actions

  8. Development of pressure boundaries leak detection technology for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yao; Zhang Dafa; Chen Dengke; Zhang Liming

    2008-01-01

    The leak detection for the pressure boundaries is an important safeguard in nuclear reactor operation. In the paper, the status and the characters on the development of the pressure boundaries leak detection technology for the nuclear reactor were reviewed, especially, and the advance of the radiation leak detection technology and the acoustic emission leak detection technology were analyzed. The new advance trend of the leak detection technology was primarily explored. According to the analysis results, it is point out that the advancing target of the leak detection technology is to enhance its response speed, sensitivity, and reliability, and to provide effective information for operator and decision-maker. The realization of the global leak detection and the whole life cycle health monitoring for the nuclear boundaries is a significant advancing tendency of the leak detection technology. (authors)

  9. Gas leak tightness of SiC/SiC composites at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayasaka, Daisuke, E-mail: hayasaka@oasis.muroran-it.ac.jp [OASIS, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan); Park, Joon-Soo. [OASIS, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan); Kishimoto, Hirotatsu [OASIS, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan); Kohyama, Akira [OASIS, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • NITE-SiC/SiC has extremely densified microstructure compared with other SiC/SiC composite like CVI. • Excellent helium and hydrogen gas-leak tightness of SiC/SiC composites by DEMO-NITE method from prototype industrialization production line was presented. • The excellence against stainless steel and Zircaloy at elevated temperature, together with generic excellent properties of SiC will be inevitable for innovative blanket and divertors for DEMO- and power- fusion reactors. - Abstract: SiC/SiC composite materials are attractive candidates for high heat flux components and blanket of fusion reactor, mainly due to their high temperature properties, radiation damage tolerance and low induced radioactivity. One of the challenges for SiC/SiC application in fusion reactors is to satisfy sufficient gas leak tightness of hydrogen and helium isotopes. Although many efforts have been carried-out, SiC/SiC composites by conventional processes have not been successful to satisfy the requirements, except SiC/SiC composites by NITE-methods. Toward the early realization of SiC/SiC components into fusion reactor systems process development of NITE-process has been continued. Followed to the brief introduction of recently developed DEMO-NITE process, baseline properties and hydrogen and helium gas leak tightness is presented. SiC/SiC claddings with 10 mm in diameter and 1 mm in wall thickness are tested by gas leak tightness system developed. The leak tightness measurements are done room temperature to 400 °C. Excellent gas leak tightness equivalent or superior to Zircaloy claddings for light water fission reactors is confirmed. The excellent gas leak tightness suggests nearly perfect suppression of large gas leak path in DEMO-NITE SiC/SiC.

  10. Device to test the leak-tightness of a container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, A.E.; Davey, P.G.

    1978-01-01

    A device is described by which the sensitivity and exactness leak detectors with flow meters may be increased. For this, the flow meter is equipped with two thermal flow sensers and one heating element acting on the two sensors. (RW) [de

  11. Long-Term Leak Tightness Of O-Ring Seals In The 9975 Shipping Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.; Skidmore, E.; Daugherty, W.

    2010-01-01

    O-ring seals in the 9975 shipping package containment vessels are fabricated from a Viton GLT or GLT-S compound. Long-term testing of these O-rings has been performed to support service life predictions for packages used for long-term storage. Since the only criterion for O-ring performance is to maintain a leak-tight seal, leak testing is the primary indicator of service life. Fixtures have been aging at elevated temperatures to provide data for service life predictions. Limited leak test failures have been observed at the higher temperatures. This provides the opportunity for comparison to trends based on other O-ring properties, such as compression stress relaxation. Initial data suggest that the CSR data have some predictive value for a leak-tight service life, but other factors can complicate efforts to draw definitive conclusions.

  12. Device for providing a leak-tight penetration for electric cables through a reactor vault roof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyral, M.; Mahe, A.

    1979-01-01

    The device for providing a cable penetration through the vault roof of a liquid sodium cooled fast reactor comprises a vertical tube closed at the top end by a flange-plate. Electric cables connected to measuring and detecting instruments are passed through the flange-plate which is joined to the reactor vault roof in leak-tight manner and enclosed within a removable hood. At least one horizontal plate is mounted within the vertical tube and provided with orifices for the leak-tight passage of the cables. Cable storage reels are placed within the tube and can be locked in position or released by controlled mechanical means

  13. Fuel assembly leak tightness control on WWER-1000 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, R.; Gerchev, N.; Mateev, A.

    2001-01-01

    The main index for integrity of the fuel rods cladding is the specific activity value of the primary coolant. This value determines the safe operation of the reactor. The limit for safe operation of WWER-1000 reactor is the value of the total activity of Iodine isotopes in the primary coolant 5.0x10 -3 Ci/l. The paper briefly describes the methodology for performing a fuel tightness test (sipping test) and shows the results from these tests performed during the period 1987 -1999 in units 5 and 6 at the Kozloduy NPP. An additional index related to the safe operation is defined to characterize the fuel cladding integrity Fuel Reliability Index (FRI). The FRI is defined as value of the average activity of 131 I in the primary coolant, corrected with a part of precipitated 235 U migration and fixed to the general permanent purification frequency. Two criteria (quantitative and statistic) are determined to qualify the fuel cladding integrity. The results from sipping tests show good reliability of the fuel irradiated in unit 5 and 6 at the Kozloduy NPP

  14. Leak tight sealants and joint details for concrete structure in RAPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singha Roy, P.K.; Baste, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    Leak tightness may pertain to either air or water and in extreme cases each will require separate consideration based on general basic requirements. Leak-tight sealants against air pressure are required in the construction joints and around penetrations in the concrete containment structures. The containment structures should be able to withstand the maximum anticipated design pressure during the incident of a MCA with only minimal leakage (0.1% of bldg. volume per day in RAPP) which is mostly through these joints. Apart from proper joint design and preparation the sealant itself must have superb adhesion to the concrete surface and integrify throughout its service life to prevent any rupture or micro-cracks at any section of the joint. Leak tightness pertains to water tightness as well. A critical water-tight joint at the bottom dome of the prestressed concrete dousing tank at its junction with the 36 inches dia dousing water pipes constructed in RAPP-2, which should be able to withstand the water pressure, continuous submergence in the water of the tank and the longitudinal and lateral movement of the water pipes during opening and closure of the dousing valves, has been made and hydrostatically tested when not even the slight sweating was found. The construction and materials of the above joints and the sealant along with the properties and performance observed during testing/use are described. As the sealant used is an imported poly-sulphide caulking compound suggestions have also been made, which may be kept in mind while developing an Indian substitute. (author)

  15. Design of sealing arrangements for development of leak tight articulated manipulator for waste management and reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, Satish B.; Mudaiya, Avinash K.

    2016-01-01

    As a part of development of Remote handling equipment and gadgets, Leak tight Articulated Manipulator (ARTM) has been developed for shielded facilities of Nuclear Recycle Plant. The ARTM is a Master Slave Manipulator having 8 Kg Payload capacity and most suitable for shielded sampling cubicles of Waste Management plants and dilution hot cells of Reprocessing plants. All the motions and forces are transmitted from Master to slave arm through the mechanical linkages, which are housed inside the wall tube. The mechanical linkages and wall tube run across the shielded wall. The applications involving seal tightness of the glove boxes and dilution hot cells intend to use all the accessories including MSMs to be leak tight. During the design of leak tight ARTM, all the potential leak paths through the components of existing ARTM were examined critically and static and dynamic seals were designed based on the geometry and requirement of particular leak path. A leak proof testing set up was fabricated for evaluating the leak rates across the manipulator contemplating the actual operating conditions. The manipulator was subjected to the Friction, Rigidity and Leak tests. The results of the tests are satisfactory and as per the International standards available. The leak rates measured for different manipulators were in the range of 0.05 to 0.1 % of air volume/hr @ 200 mm of water columndifferential negative pressure. (author)

  16. Design of the ATLAS New Small Wheel Gas Leak Tightness Station for the Micromegas Detector Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Gazis, Evangelos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In this work we describe advanced data processing and analysis techniques intended to be used in the gas tightness station at CERN for Quality Assurance and Quality Control of the New Small Wheel Micromegas Quadruplets. We combine two methods: a conventional one based on the Pressure Decay Rate and an alternative-novel one, based on the Flow Rate Loss. A prototype setup has been developed based on a Lock-in Amplifier device and should be operated in conjunction with the gas leak test via the Flow Rate Loss. Both methods have been tested by using emulated leak branches based on specific thin medical needles. The semi-automatic data acquisition, monitoring and processing system is presented also in this work while a more sophisticated environment based on the WinCC-OA SCADA is under development.

  17. Leak-tightness characteristics concerning the containment structures of the HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaba, Nariaki; Iigaki, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Masaaki; Emori, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    The containment structures of the HTTR consist of the reactor containment vessel, the service area, and the emergency air purification system, which minimise the release of fission products in postulated accidents, which lead to fission product release from the reactor facilities. The reactor containment vessel is designed to withstand the temperature and pressure transients and to be leak-tight in the case of a rupture of the primary concentric hot-gas duct, etc. The pressure inside the service area is maintained at a negative pressure by the emergency air purification system. The emergency air purification system will also remove airborne radioactivity and will maintain a correct pressure in the service area. The leak-tightness characteristics of the containment structures are described in this paper. The measured leakage rates of the reactor containment vessel were enough less than the specified leakage limit of 0.1%/d confirmed during the commissioning tests and annual inspections. The service area was kept in a way that the design pressure becomes well below its allowable limitation by the emergency air purification system, which filters efficiency of particle removal and iodine removal well over the limited values. The obtained data demonstrate that the reactor containment structures were fabricated to minimise the release of fission products in the postulated accidents with fission product release from the reactor facilities

  18. Roll-expanded plugs for steam generator heating tubes verification of leak tightness over the component lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, J.; Ziegler, R.; Schönheit, N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Design description of roll-expanded plugs. • Experimental simulation of 40 years lifetime of plugged steam generator tubes. • Destructive testing for off-design loads. • Evaluation of release pressure and tightness before and after the tests. -- Abstract: Steam generator heating tubes are the boundary between the irradiated primary cycle and the conventional secondary cycle in a pressurized water reactor. Despite their operational task to transfer the heat from the primary to the secondary cycle, these tubes have a crucial safety function: the retention of irradiated primary coolant inside the circuit in all operating, emergency and off-design conditions. The heating tubes are subject to various degradation mechanisms during operation. To verify the integrity of each single tube, nuclear power plants carry out frequent in-service inspections. In case of a tube wall degradation beyond the permissible limit, the tube needs to be taken out of service in order to maintain the overall component integrity. The most common method to do so is to plug a damaged tube by a roll-expanded plug. After plugging, the roll-expanded plug acts as pressure boundary between the primary and the secondary cycle instead of the damaged heating tube. The plug must be able to maintain this function, previously provided by the heating tube, in all operational, emergency and off-design conditions. This article describes the approach to this verification by launching several comprehensive process qualification programmes consisting of mechanical analyses as well as static and dynamic testing programmes. The result was a qualified roll-expanded plug which remains leak-tight even during off-design conditions

  19. Leak testing of bubble-tight dampers using tracer gas techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagus, P.L. [Lagus Applied Technology, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); DuBois, L.J. [Commonwealth Edison, Zion, IL (United States); Fleming, K.M. [NCS Corporation, Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-01

    Recently tracer gas techniques have been applied to the problem of measuring the leakage across an installed bubble-tight damper. A significant advantage of using a tracer gas technique is that quantitative leakage data are obtained under actual operating differential pressure conditions. Another advantage is that leakage data can be obtained using relatively simple test setups that utilize inexpensive materials without the need to tear ducts apart, fabricate expensive blank-off plates, and install test connections. Also, a tracer gas technique can be used to provide an accurate field evaluation of the performance of installed bubble-tight dampers on a periodic basis. Actual leakage flowrates were obtained at Zion Generating Station on four installed bubble-tight dampers using a tracer gas technique. Measured leakage rates ranged from 0.01 CFM to 21 CFM. After adjustment and subsequent retesting, the 21 CFM damper leakage was reduced to a leakage of 3.8 CFM. In light of the current regulatory climate and the interest in Control Room Habitability issues, imprecise estimates of critical air boundary leakage rates--such as through bubble-tight dampers--are not acceptable. These imprecise estimates can skew radioactive dose assessments as well as chemical contaminant exposure calculations. Using a tracer gas technique, the actual leakage rate can be determined. This knowledge eliminates a significant source of uncertainty in both radioactive dose and/or chemical exposure assessments.

  20. Leak-tightness assessment of demountable joints for the super fluid helium system of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunet, J.C.; Poncet, A.; Trilhe, P.

    1994-01-01

    The future high energy accelerator LHC presently considered at CERN, will make heavy use of demountable cryogenic joints operating at superfluid helium temperatures (1.8 K). These joints will be required for connecting the cryomagnets to their feeding lines, helium safety valves to cold masses, both on their measuring benches and eventually in their final installation set-up. The very large size of the future machine and, consequently, the large number of cryogenic joints imply that their reliability in leak tightness be very high, in particular after extreme loading conditions such as the high helium pressures resulting from superconducting magnet quenches. For these reasons, a test set-up has been especially built at CERN to reproduce these conditions, and to assess the leak tightness reliability of commercially available joints. A description of the facility is presented, together with the first test results

  1. Boundary effect on liquid invasion in tight gas reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid invasion is an important transport phenomenon in many geophysical and environmental applications. A new capillary model considering boundary effect is proposed to reveal its mechanism. The boundary fluid layer not only reduces the effective flow radius, but also changes the viscosity of fluid. Thus the capillary force and viscosity resistance increases, however, the increase of capillary force is faster than that of viscosity resistance, therefore the invasion front arrives at the critical distance earlier.

  2. Diffuse boundary extraction of breast masses on ultrasound by leak plugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, T.W.; Conant, E.F.; Arger, P.H.; Sehgal, C.M.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a semiautomated seeded boundary extraction algorithm that delineates diffuse region boundaries by finding and plugging their leaks. The algorithm not only extracts boundaries that are partially diffuse, but in the process finds and quantifies those parts of the boundary that are diffuse, computing local sharpness measurements for possible use in computer-aided diagnosis. The method treats a manually drawn seed region as a wellspring of pixel 'fluid' that flows from the seed out towards the boundary. At indistinct or porous sections of the boundary, the growing region will leak into surrounding tissue. By changing the size of structuring elements used for growing, the algorithm changes leak properties. Since larger elements cannot leak as far from the seed, they produce compact, less detailed boundary approximations; conversely, growing from smaller elements results in less constrained boundaries with more local detail. This implementation of the leak plugging algorithm decrements the radius of structuring disks and then compares the regions grown from them as they increase in both area and boundary detail. Leaks are identified if the outflows between grown regions are large compared to the areas of the disks. The boundary is plugged by masking out leaked pixels, and the process continues until one-pixel-radius resolution. When tested against manual delineation on scans of 40 benign masses and 40 malignant tumors, the plugged boundaries overlapped and correlated well in area with manual tracings, with mean overlap of 0.69 and area correlation R 2 of 0.86, but the algorithm's results were more reproducible

  3. A hydrogen leak-tight, transparent cryogenic sample container for ultracold-neutron transmission measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döge, Stefan; Hingerl, Jürgen

    2018-03-01

    The improvement of the number of extractable ultracold neutrons (UCNs) from converters based on solid deuterium (sD2) crystals requires a good understanding of the UCN transport and how the crystal's morphology influences its transparency to the UCNs. Measurements of the UCN transmission through cryogenic liquids and solids of interest, such as hydrogen (H2) and deuterium (D2), require sample containers with thin, highly polished and optically transparent windows and a well defined sample thickness. One of the most difficult sealing problems is that of light gases like hydrogen and helium at low temperatures against high vacuum. Here we report on the design of a sample container with two 1 mm thin amorphous silica windows cold-welded to aluminum clamps using indium wire gaskets, in order to form a simple, reusable, and hydrogen-tight cryogenic seal. The container meets the above-mentioned requirements and withstands up to 2 bar hydrogen gas pressure against isolation vacuum in the range of 10-5 to 10-7 mbar at temperatures down to 4.5 K. Additionally, photographs of the crystallization process are shown and discussed.

  4. A hydrogen leak-tight, transparent cryogenic sample container for ultracold-neutron transmission measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döge, Stefan; Hingerl, Jürgen

    2018-03-01

    The improvement of the number of extractable ultracold neutrons (UCNs) from converters based on solid deuterium (sD 2 ) crystals requires a good understanding of the UCN transport and how the crystal's morphology influences its transparency to the UCNs. Measurements of the UCN transmission through cryogenic liquids and solids of interest, such as hydrogen (H 2 ) and deuterium (D 2 ), require sample containers with thin, highly polished and optically transparent windows and a well defined sample thickness. One of the most difficult sealing problems is that of light gases like hydrogen and helium at low temperatures against high vacuum. Here we report on the design of a sample container with two 1 mm thin amorphous silica windows cold-welded to aluminum clamps using indium wire gaskets, in order to form a simple, reusable, and hydrogen-tight cryogenic seal. The container meets the above-mentioned requirements and withstands up to 2 bar hydrogen gas pressure against isolation vacuum in the range of 10 -5 to 10 -7 mbar at temperatures down to 4.5 K. Additionally, photographs of the crystallization process are shown and discussed.

  5. Analysis of events related to cracks and leaks in the reactor coolant pressure boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballesteros, Antonio, E-mail: Antonio.Ballesteros-Avila@ec.europa.eu [JRC-IET: Institute for Energy and Transport of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Postbus 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Sanda, Radian; Peinador, Miguel; Zerger, Benoit [JRC-IET: Institute for Energy and Transport of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Postbus 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Negri, Patrice [IRSN: Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (France); Wenke, Rainer [GRS: Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • The important role of Operating Experience Feedback is emphasised. • Events relating to cracks and leaks in the reactor coolant pressure boundary are analysed. • A methodology for event investigation is described. • Some illustrative results of the analysis of events for specific components are presented. - Abstract: The presence of cracks and leaks in the reactor coolant pressure boundary may jeopardise the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Analysis of cracks and leaks related events is an important task for the prevention of their recurrence, which should be performed in the context of activities on Operating Experience Feedback. In response to this concern, the EU Clearinghouse operated by the JRC-IET supports and develops technical and scientific work to disseminate the lessons learned from past operating experience. In particular, concerning cracks and leaks, the studies carried out in collaboration with IRSN and GRS have allowed to identify the most sensitive areas to degradation in the plant primary system and to elaborate recommendations for upgrading the maintenance, ageing management and inspection programmes. An overview of the methodology used in the analysis of cracks and leaks related events is presented in this paper, together with the relevant results obtained in the study.

  6. Leak-tight compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogomolova, L.K.; Vasilenko, A.T.

    1974-01-01

    The publication describes the construction and operating principle of the sealed uniflow compressor. This compressor insures against substantial contamination of the medium handled. Use of the slot-type sealing of the piston and rejection of the sliding bearings result in insuring high purity of the medium handled. The compressor performance is as follows: maximum air throughput - 262.6 1/h at 24 deg C and absolute outlet pressure being 1.14 kgf/cm 2 , minimum air throughput - 82.6 1/h at 24 deg C and absolute outlet pressure being 1.4 kgf/cm 2 ; inlet pressure equals 1 kgf/cm 2 . The compressor is provided with a solenoid-operated drive. The prototype has been in service for 6 months, with accumulated service time amounting to 500 h. The compressor has given a good account of itself within this period. The compressor is to be used in the gas purification circuit when this gas is used as a working medium in the spark or streamer chambers

  7. Leak tightness tests on actively cooled plasma facing components: Lessons learned from Tore Supra experience and perspectives for the new fusion machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chantant, M., E-mail: michel.chantant@cea.fr; Lambert, R.; Gargiulo, L.; Hatchressian, J.-C.; Guilhem, D.; Samaille, F.; Soler, B.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Test procedures for the qualification of the tightness of actively cooled plasma facing components were defined. • The test is performed after the component manufacturing and before its set-up in the vacuum vessel. • It allows improving the fusion machine availability. • The lessons of tests over 20 years at Tore Supra are presented. - Abstract: The fusion machines under development or construction (ITER, W7X) use several hundreds of actively cooled plasma facing components (ACPFC). They are submitted to leak tightness requirements in order to get an appropriate vacuum level in the vessel to create the plasma. During the ACPFC manufacturing and before their installation in the machine, their leak tightness performance must be measured to check that they fulfill the vacuum requirements. A relevant procedure is needed which allows to segregate potential defects. It must also be optimized in terms of test duration and costs. Tore Supra, as an actively cooled Tokamak, experienced several leaks on ACPFCs during the commissioning and during the operation of the machine. A test procedure was then defined and several test facilities were set-up. Since 1990 the tightness of all the new ACPFCs is systematically tested before their installation in Tore Supra. During the qualification test, the component is set up in a vacuum test tank, and its cooling circuits are pressurized with helium. It is submitted to 3 temperature cycles from room temperature up to the baking temperature level in Tore Supra (200 °C) and two pressurization tests are performed (6 MPa at room temperature and 4 MPa at 200 °C) at each stage. At the end of the last cycle when the ACPFC is at room temperature and pressurized with helium at 6 MPa, the measured leak rate must be lower than 5 × 10{sup −11} Pa m{sup 3} s{sup −1}, the pressure in the test tank being <5 × 10{sup −5} Pa. A large experience has been gained on ACPFCs with carbon parts on stainless steel and Cu

  8. Leak detection : Principles and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rama Rao, V.V.K.

    1981-01-01

    Principles of leak detection are explained and various aspects of leak detection techniques and leak detectors are reviewed. The review covers: units for leaks and leak tightness, classification of leaks, timing of leak testing, designing for ease of leak testing of any job, methods of leak detection, their ranges of application and limitations, leak detectors, response time of leak test, minimum detectable concentration of search gas during leak tests, and validity of leak tests. Helium mass spectrometer type leak detector and technique are described in detail. Recent improvements in leak detectors and techniques, particularly mass spectrometer leak detectors using gases other than helium (e.g. hydrogen, argon) are also covered in the review. (M.G.B.)

  9. Evaluation of design, leak monitoring, dnd NDEA strategies to assure PBMR Helium pressure boundary reliability - HTR2008-58037

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, K. N.; Smit, K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the reliability and integrity management (RIM) strategies that have been applied in the design of the PBMR passive metallic components for the helium pressure boundary (HPB) to meet reliability targets and to evaluate what combination of strategies are needed to meet the targets. The strategies considered include deterministic design strategies to reduce or eliminate the potential for specific damage mechanisms, use of an on-line leak monitoring system and associated design provisions that provide a high degree of leak detection reliability, and periodic nondestructive examinations combined with repair and replacement strategies to reduce the probability that degradation would lead to pipe ruptures. The PBMR RIM program for passive metallic piping components uses a leak-before-break philosophy. A Markov model developed for use in LWR risk-informed in-service inspection evaluations was applied to investigate the impact of alternative RIM strategies and plant age assumptions on the pipe rupture frequencies as a function of rupture size. Some key results of this investigation are presented in this paper. (authors)

  10. On a strong solution of the non-stationary Navier-Stokes equations under slip or leak boundary conditions of friction type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwabara, Takahito

    Strong solutions of the non-stationary Navier-Stokes equations under non-linearized slip or leak boundary conditions are investigated. We show that the problems are formulated by a variational inequality of parabolic type, to which uniqueness is established. Using Galerkin's method and deriving a priori estimates, we prove global and local existence for 2D and 3D slip problems respectively. For leak problems, under no-leak assumption at t=0 we prove local existence in 2D and 3D cases. Compatibility conditions for initial states play a significant role in the estimates.

  11. Study on the leak rate test for HANARO reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y. S.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, M. J.; Park, J. M.; Woo, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    The reactor building of HANARO adopts the confinement concept, which allows a certain amount of air leakage. In order to restrict the air leakage through the confinement boundary, negative pressure of at least 2.5 mmWG is maintained in normal operating condition while maintaining 25 mmWG of negative pressure in abnormal condition, the inside air filtered by a train of charcoal filter is released to the atmosphere through the stack. In this situation, if the emergency ventilation system is not operable, the reactor building is isolated from the outside then the trapped air inside will be leaked out through the building by ground release concept. As the leak rate may be affected by an effect of wind velocity outside the reactor building, the air tightness of confinement should be maintained to limit the leak rate below the allowable value. The local leak rate test method was used since the beginning of the commissioning until July 1999. However it has been pointed out as a defect that the method is so susceptible to the change of temperature and atmospheric pressure during testing. For more accurate leak rate testing, we have introduced a new test method. We have periodically carried out the new leak rate testing and the results indicate that the bad effect by the temperature and atmospheric pressure change is considerably reduced, which gives more stable leak rate measurement

  12. Leak-rate qualification of the FFTF control area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billings, M.P.; Swenson, L.D.

    1983-06-01

    Positive experience with the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Control Area boundary has demonstrated that strigent requirements for reactor control room leak-tightness can be met and maintained. Guidance contained in 10CFR50, Appendix A, Criteria 4 and 19, and Regulatory Guides 1.78 and 1.95 provided criteria for control room habitability, to provide safe, central control of the FFTF plant under normal and accident conditions. A leak rate criterion of 178 scfm for the approximate 53,000 cu. ft. Volume of the Control Area was established for the limiting condition of airborne sodium oxide aerosols from a postulated fire in one of the three secondary sodium loops. Numerous tests utilizing a variety of leak identification techniques were conducted

  13. Leak detection system for RBMK coolant circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkashov, Ju.M.; Strelkov, B.P.; Korolev, Yu.V.; Eperin, A.P.; Kozlov, E.P.; Belyanin, L.A.; Vanukov, V.N.

    1996-01-01

    In report the description of an object of the control is submitted, requests to control of leak-tightness and functioning of system are formulated, analysis of a current status on NPP with RBMK is submitted, review of methods of the leak-tightness monitoring, their advantage and defects with reference to conditions and features of a design RBMK is indicated, some results of tests and operation of various monitoring methods are submitted, requests on interaction of operative staff, leak-tightness monitoring system and protection system of reactor are submitted. (author). 11 figs, 1 tab

  14. Leak detection system for RBMK coolant circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkashov, Ju M; Strelkov, B P; Korolev, Yu V; Eperin, A P; Kozlov, E P; Belyanin, L A; Vanukov, V N [Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant, Leningrad (Russian Federation). Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering

    1997-12-31

    In report the description of an object of the control is submitted, requests to control of leak-tightness and functioning of system are formulated, analysis of a current status on NPP with RBMK is submitted, review of methods of the leak-tightness monitoring, their advantage and defects with reference to conditions and features of a design RBMK is indicated, some results of tests and operation of various monitoring methods are submitted, requests on interaction of operative staff, leak-tightness monitoring system and protection system of reactor are submitted. (author). 11 figs, 1 tab.

  15. Leak testing using helium leak detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparicio, G.; Mathot, S.; Munoz, C.; Orlando, O.

    1997-01-01

    Most of the equipment used in the industry and particularly in the nuclear activity need to be, vacuum or pressure tight, for operative and safety requirements. These devices have to satisfy particular regulations in order to be qualified by means of operating licences. One of the most efficient system to ensure leaktightnes is using a helium leak detector with a mass spectrometer. In this paper we show the equipment and the devices employed in fuel rods fabrication for CAREM project, and some typical material defects. Operating system and the sensitivity of this method is also described. (author) [es

  16. Hermetic Seal Leak Detection Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is a hermetic seal leak detection apparatus, which can be used to test for hermetic seal leaks in instruments and containers. A vacuum tight chamber is created around the unit being tested to minimize gas space outside of the hermetic seal. A vacuum inducing device is then used to increase the gas chamber volume inside the device, so that a slight vacuum is pulled on the unit being tested. The pressure in the unit being tested will stabilize. If the stabilized pressure reads close to a known good seal calibration, there is not a leak in the seal. If the stabilized pressure reads closer to a known bad seal calibration value, there is a leak in the seal. The speed of the plunger can be varied and by evaluating the resulting pressure change rates and final values, the leak rate/size can be accurately calculated.

  17. Improved method of measurement for outer leak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Guang

    2012-01-01

    Pneumatic pipeline is installed for the airborne radioactivity measurement equipment, air tightness and outer leak rate are essential for the testing of the characteristics, both in the national criteria and ISO standards, an improved practical method is available for the measurement of the outer air leak rate based on the engineering experiences for the equipment acceptance and testing procedure. (authors)

  18. Basis UST leak detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveria, V.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that gasoline and other petroleum products are leaking from underground storage tanks (USTs) at an alarming rate, seeping into soil and groundwater. Buried pipes are an even greater culprit, accounting for most suspected and detected leaks according to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates. In response to this problem, the EPA issued regulations setting standards for preventing, detecting, reporting, and cleaning up leaks, as well as fiscal responsibility. However, federal regulations are only a minimum; some states have cracked down even harder Plant managers and engineers have a big job ahead of them. The EPA estimates that there are more than 75,000 fuel USTs at US industrial facilities. When considering leak detection systems, the person responsible for making the decision has five primary choices: inventory reconciliation combined with regular precision tightness tests; automatic tank gauging; groundwater monitoring; interstitial monitoring of double containment systems; and vapor monitoring

  19. Mobile leak testing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungr, F.

    The design and implementation are described of a mobile testing unit ULTRATEST M for helium leak tests. The equipment has been developed by Leybold-Heraeus GmbH in Cologne and is in-built in a Mercedes-Benz 208 van. The equipment is designed for the operative use in assembly and construction of nuclear power plants and its throughput is sufficient for checking the whole upper reactor block. It may also be used for removing defects of vacuum equipment requiring a high level of tightness or equally demanding equipment used in the chemical industry. Experience with the equipment is described. (B.S.)

  20. PFR evaporator leak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smedley, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    PFR has three heat removal circuits each one having an evaporator, superheater, reheater; all separate units. The status of the system was that circuit No 3 was steaming with 10 MW thermal nuclear power; No 1 circuit was filled with sodium but with the evaporator awaiting modification to cure gas entrainment problems already reported. The leak was in No 2 circuit and was located in the evaporator unit. The evaporator is rated at 120 M thermal at full power and as such is a large unit. The circuit was filled with both sodium and water for the first time three weeks before the conference so it was recent history being reported and therefore any figures quoted should be taken as indicative only. The history of the steam generator was that it was built at works to a very high standard and underwent all the usual tests of strength, inspection of welds and helium leak testing. The steam generator is of U tube design with a tube plate to which the boiler tubes are welded, with all the welds in one of two gas spaces. The inlet and outlet sides are separated by a baffle and the salient features are illustrated in the attached figure. The unit achieved a leak tightness better than the detection limit in the helium leak test at works. This limit was assessed as being less than an equivalent leak of 10 -6 g/s water under steam generator service conditions. However even though all the steam generator units passed this test at works a further test was carried out when the circuits had been completed. The test was carried out during commissioning after sodium filling and with the units hot. The method was to introduce a mixture of helium/ argon at 500 pounds/square inch into the water side of the steam generators and measure the helium concentration in the sodium side gas spaces of the circuit. The test lasted many days and under these conditions the sensitivity is such that a leak equivalent to somewhere between 10 -7 to 10 -6 g/s equivalent water leak could be detected, i

  1. PFR evaporator leak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedley, J A

    1975-07-01

    PFR has three heat removal circuits each one having an evaporator, superheater, reheater; all separate units. The status of the system was that circuit No 3 was steaming with 10 MW thermal nuclear power; No 1 circuit was filled with sodium but with the evaporator awaiting modification to cure gas entrainment problems already reported. The leak was in No 2 circuit and was located in the evaporator unit. The evaporator is rated at 120 M thermal at full power and as such is a large unit. The circuit was filled with both sodium and water for the first time three weeks before the conference so it was recent history being reported and therefore any figures quoted should be taken as indicative only. The history of the steam generator was that it was built at works to a very high standard and underwent all the usual tests of strength, inspection of welds and helium leak testing. The steam generator is of U tube design with a tube plate to which the boiler tubes are welded, with all the welds in one of two gas spaces. The inlet and outlet sides are separated by a baffle and the salient features are illustrated in the attached figure. The unit achieved a leak tightness better than the detection limit in the helium leak test at works. This limit was assessed as being less than an equivalent leak of 10{sup -6} g/s water under steam generator service conditions. However even though all the steam generator units passed this test at works a further test was carried out when the circuits had been completed. The test was carried out during commissioning after sodium filling and with the units hot. The method was to introduce a mixture of helium/ argon at 500 pounds/square inch into the water side of the steam generators and measure the helium concentration in the sodium side gas spaces of the circuit. The test lasted many days and under these conditions the sensitivity is such that a leak equivalent to somewhere between 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -6} g/s equivalent water leak could be

  2. Tight turns

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    The Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN) has successfully tested the first model of a new fast-ramping curved dipole magnet. This is great news for CERN, which sees the advance as holding potential for the future of the SPS.   The first model of a new fast-ramping curved dipole magnet being prepared for cryogenic testing at the LASA laboratory (INFN Milano, Italy). On 16 July INFN introduced an innovative dipole magnet. With a length of some 4 metres, it can produce a 4.5 Tesla magnetic field and achieve a tighter bend than ever before (the bending radius has been squeezed to a remarkable 66.7 metres). This new magnet was designed in the first instance for GSI’s SIS300 synchrotron (in Germany), which will require 60 dipoles of this type. "Achieving such a tight bend demanded a major R&D effort," stressed Pasquale Fabbricatore, the spokesman of the INFN collaboration responsible for the magnet’s development. "We had to not o...

  3. Water tight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postel, S

    1993-01-01

    Many cities worldwide have gone beyond the limits of their water supply. Growing urban populations increase their demand for water, thereby straining local water supplies and requiring engineers to seek our even more distant water sources. It is costly to build and maintain reservoirs, canals, pumping stations, pipes, sewers, and treatment plants. Water supply activities require much energy and chemicals, thereby contributing to environmental pollution. Many cities are beginning to manage the water supply rather than trying to keep up with demand. Pumping ground water for Mexico City's 18 million residents (500,000 people added/year) surpasses natural replenishment by 50% to 80%, resulting in falling water tables and compressed aquifers. Mexico City now ambitiously promotes replacement of conventional toilets with 1.6 gallon toilets (by late 1991, this had saved almost 7.4 billion gallons of water/year). Continued high rural-urban migration and high birth rates could negate any savings, however. Waterloo, Ontario, has also used conservation efforts to manage water demand. These efforts include retrofit kits to make plumbing fixtures more efficient, efficiency standards for plumbing fixtures, and reduction of water use outdoors. San Jose, California, has distributed water savings devices to about 220,000 households with a 90% cooperation rate. Boston, Massachusetts, not only promoted water saving devices but also repaired leaks and had an information campaign. Increasing water rates to actually reflect true costs also leads to water conservation, but not all cities in developing countries use water meters. All households in Edmonton, Alberta, are metered and its water use is 1/2 of that of Calgary, where only some households are metered. Tucson, Arizona, reduced per capita water use 16% by raising water rates and curbing water use on hot days. Bogor, Indonesia, reduced water use almost 30% by increasing water rates. In the US, more and more states are mandating use

  4. Numerical Study on POSRV Leak Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Yong Sang; Baik, Se Jin; Cho, Yoon Jae; Yune, Seok Jeong; Kim, Eun Kee

    2015-01-01

    This study shows that the selected temperature measuring locations on the discharge lines of MV, MOPV, SLPV0 and SLPV1 are adequate for POSRV leakage detection. The analyzed temperature can be used as an alarm setpoint for leakage detection. Spring-Loaded Pilot Valve (SLPV) acts as a Reactor Coolant Pressure Boundary (RCPB) isolator in the closed position during the normal operation, but it opens automatically when the system pressure increases to its set pressure. The POSRVs shall be closed tightly to maintain the integrity of RCPB during the normal operation. Leakage through the RCPB is limited extremely. Each POSRV has several discharge lines for MV and auxiliary valves. Temperature instruments are installed on each discharge lines for leakage detection. In this study, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analyses using FLUENT are conducted to evaluate the temperature measurement for POSRV leakage detection. The followings are concluded from this study: 1) The determined temperature measuring points are adequate for effective leak detection, which are at the downstream of the first bend of each discharge line as close as to the discharge nozzle. 2) The alarm set point for detecting a leak is adequate and can be determined with considering the analysis results. 3) The temperature rise is sufficiently high to detect a small leakage. 4) The temperature sensing method is appropriate for finding a valve leakage

  5. He leak testing of Indus-2 dipole vacuum chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindal, B.K.; Bhavsar, S.T.; Shukla, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Centre for Advanced Technology is developing its second synchrotron radiation source INDUS-2 which is a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring. Dipole vacuum chambers are the vital components of Indus-2 vacuum system. Each of these chambers is approx. 3.6 m long and 0.67 m wide with 24 nos. of ports of various sizes. The dipole chambers were made by machining two halves and they are then lip welded together. The dipole chamber has approx. 14 m of total weld length and it was leak tested for leak tightness of the order of 10 -10 mbar 1/s. Helium mass spectrometer leak detector (HMSLD) was utilized for the leak testing. Subsequently the leaks of various orders in welding joints were repaired and leak tightness achieved. This paper describes the experiences during leak testing of 20 nos. of aluminum dipole chambers for INDUS-2

  6. On the helium gas leak test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Akira; Ozaki, Susumu

    1975-01-01

    The helium gas leak test (Helium mass spectrometer testing) has a leak detection capacity of the highest level in practical leak tests and is going to be widely applied to high pressure vessels, atomic and vacuum equipments that require high tightness. To establish a standard test procedure several series of experiments were conducted and the results were investigated. The conclusions are summarized as follows: (1) The hood method is quantitatively the most reliable method. The leak rate obtained by tests using 100% helium concentration should be the basis of the other method of test. (2) The integrating method, bell jar method, and vacuum spray method can be considered quantitative when particular conditions are satisfied. (3) The sniffer method is not to be considered quantitive. (4) The leak rate of the hood, integrating, and bell jar methods is approximately proportional to the square of the helium partial pressure. (auth.)

  7. Prime tight frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemvig, Jakob; Miller, Christopher; Okoudjou, Kasso A.

    2014-01-01

    to suggest effective analysis and synthesis computation strategies for such frames. Finally, we describe all prime frames constructed from the spectral tetris method, and, as a byproduct, we obtain a characterization of when the spectral tetris construction works for redundancies below two.......We introduce a class of finite tight frames called prime tight frames and prove some of their elementary properties. In particular, we show that any finite tight frame can be written as a union of prime tight frames. We then characterize all prime harmonic tight frames and use thischaracterization...

  8. Leak rate models and leak detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Leak detection may be carried out by a number of detection systems, but selection of the systems must be carefully adapted to the fluid state and the location of the leak in the reactor coolant system. Computer programs for the calculation of leak rates contain different models to take into account the fluid state before its entrance into the crack, and they have to be verified by experiments; agreement between experiments and calculations is generally not satisfactory for very small leak rates resulting from narrow cracks or from a closing bending moment

  9. Hydrogen detection systems leak response codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmas, T.; Kong, N.; Maupre, J.P.; Schindler, P.; Blanc, D.

    1990-01-01

    A loss in tightness of a water tube inside a Steam Generator Unit of a Fast Reactor is usually monitored by hydrogen detection systems. Such systems have demonstrated in the past their ability to detect a leak in a SGU. However, the increase in size of the SGU or the choice of ferritic material entails improvement of these systems in order to avoid secondary leak or to limit damages to the tube bundle. The R and D undertaken in France on this subject is presented. (author). 11 refs, 10 figs

  10. Humos monitoring system of leaks in to the containment atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matal, O.; Zaloudek, J.; Matal, O. Jr.; Klinga, J.; Brom, J.

    1997-01-01

    HUmidity MOnitoring System (HUMOS) has been developed and designed to detect the presence of leak in selected primary circuit high energy pipelines and components that are evaluated from the point of view of Leak Before Break (LBB) requirements. It also requires to apply technical tools for detection and identification of coolant leaks from primary circuit and components of PWRs reactors. Safety significant of leaks depend on: leak source (location); leak rate, and leak duration. Therefore to detect and monitor coolant leaks in to the containment atmosphere during reactor operation is one of important safety measures. As potential leak sources flange connection in the upper head region of WWER reactors can be considered. HUMOS does not rely on the release of radioactivity to detect leaks but rather the relies on detection of moisture in the air resulting from a primary boundary leak. Because HUMOS relies on moisture and temperature detection, leaks can be detected without requiring the reactor to be critical. Therefore leaks can be detected during integrity pressure tests and any other mode of operation provided the reactor ventilation system is operating and primary circuit and components are pressurized. 3 figs

  11. Management of vacuum leak-detection processes, calibration, and standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, N.G.

    1985-01-01

    Vacuum leak detection requires integrated management action to ensure the successful production of apparatus having required leak tightness. Implementation of properly planned, scheduled, and engineered procedures and test arrangements are an absolute necessity to prevent unexpected, impractical, technically inadequate, or unnecessarily costly incidents in leak-testing operations. The use of standard procedures, leak standards appropriate to the task, and accurate calibration systems or devices is necessary to validate the integrity of any leak-test procedure. In this paper, the need for implementing these practices is discussed using case histories of typical examples of large complex vacuum systems. Aggressive management practices are of primary importance throughout a project's life cycle to ensure the lowest cost; this includes successful leak testing of components. It should be noted that the opinions and conclusions expressed in this paper are those of the author and are not those of the Los Alamos National Laboratory or the Department of Energy

  12. Cold Leak Tests of LHC Beam Screens

    CERN Document Server

    Collomb-Patton, C; Jenninger, B; Kos, N

    2009-01-01

    In order to guide the high energy proton beams inside its two 27 km long vacuum rings, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva, makes use of superconducting technology to create the required magnetic fields. More than 4000 beam screens, cooled at 7 20 K, are inserted inside the 1.9 K beam vacuum tubes to intercept beam induced heat loads and to provide dynamic vacuum stability. As extremely high helium leak tightness is required, all beam screens have been leak tested under cold conditions in a dedicated test stand prior to their installation. After describing the beam screen design and its functions, this report focuses on the cold leak test sequence and discusses the results.

  13. Evaluation of pipeline leak detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glauz, W.D.; Flora, J.D.; Hennon, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    Leaking underground storage tank system presents an environmental concern and a potential health hazard. It is well known that leaks in the piping associated with these systems account for a sizeable fraction of the leaks. EPA has established performance standards for pipeline leak detection systems, and published a document presenting test protocols for evaluating these systems against the standards. This paper discusses a number of facets and important features of evaluating such systems, and presents results from tests of several systems. The importance of temperature differences between the ground and the product in the line is shown both in theory and with test data. The impact of the amount of soil moisture present is addressed, along with the effect of frozen soil. These features are addressed both for line tightness test systems, which must detect leaks of 0.10 gal/h (0.38 L/h) at 150% of normal line pressure, or 0.20 gal/h (0.76 L/h) at normal line pressure, and for automatic line leak detectors that must detect leaks of 3 gal/h (11 L/h) at 10 psi (69 kPa) within an hour of the occurrence of the leak. This paper also addresses some statistical aspects of the evaluation of these systems. Reasons for keeping the evaluation process ''blind'' to the evaluated company are given, along with methods for assuring that the tests are blind. Most importantly, a test procedure is presented for evaluating systems that report a flow rate (not just a pass/fail decision) that is much more efficient than the procedure presented in the EPA protocol, and is just as stringent

  14. Detection of primary coolant leaks in NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavov, S.; Bakalov, I.; Vassilev, H.

    2001-01-01

    The thermo-hydraulic analyses of the SG box behaviour of Kozloduy NPP units 3 and 4 in case of small primary circuit leaks and during normal operation of the existing ventilation systems in order to determine the detectable leakages from the primary circuit by analysing different parameters used for the purposes of 'Leak before break' concept, performed by ENPRO Consult Ltd. are presented. The following methods for leak detection: measurement of relative air humidity in SG box (can be used for detection of leaks with flow rate 3.78 l/min within one hour at ambient parameters - temperature 40 0 - 60 0 C and relative humidity form 30% to 60%); measurement of water level in SG box sumps (can not be used for reliable detection of small primary circuit leakages with flow rate about 3.78 l/min); measurement of gaseous radioactivity in SG box( can be used as a general global indication for detection of small leakages from the primary circuit); measurement of condensate flow after the air coolers of P-1 venting system (can be used for primary circuit leak detection) are considered. For determination of the confinement behaviour, a model used with computer code MELCOR has been developed by ENPRO Consult Ltd. A brief summary based on the capabilities of the different methods of leak detection, from the point of view of the applicability of a particular method is given. For both Units 3 and 4 of Kozloduy NPP a qualified complex system for small leak detection is planned to be constructed. Such a system has to unite the following systems: acoustic system for leak detection 'ALUS'; system for control of the tightness of the main primary circuit pipelines by monitoring the local humidity; system for primary circuit leakage detection by measuring condensate run-off in collecting tank after ventilation system P-1 air coolers

  15. Recent Progress in Technology of Leak detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, H. K.; Kim, S. H.; Cho, J. W.; Joo, Y. S.; Yang, D. J

    2005-07-15

    It is very important to check for leakage points of fluids and gases on primary pressure boundary of nuclear power plants in order to maintain and manage various structures safely. Even though much investigation has been performed by a number of researchers, there are a lot of problems to detect the leakage under some areas to which people can not approach. In particular, it is certainly necessary to find the leakage point in order to repair and replace the pressure boundaries. In this report, the basic principle and application situations for the development of the leak detection system which can detect micro-leaks are introduced. As the technologies and performances of recent sensors have been improving, the application range of leak detection has been increasing steadily. Therefore the sensor technologies written in this report will be able to contribute to nuclear safety to detect the leakage rate and the leakage point with an on-line monitoring system in the near future.

  16. Leak detection/verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krhounek, V.; Zdarek, J.; Pecinka, L. [Nuclear Research Institute, Rez (Czech Republic)

    1997-04-01

    Loss of coolant accident (LOCA) experiments performed as part of a Leak Before Break (LBB) analysis are very briefly summarized. The aim of these experiments was to postulate the leak rates of the coolant. Through-wall cracks were introduced into pipes by fatigue cycling and hydraulically loaded in a test device. Measurements included coolant pressure and temperature, quantity of leaked coolant, displacement of a specimen, and acoustic emission. Small cracks were plugged with particles in the coolant during testing. It is believed that plugging will have no effect in cracks with leak rates above 35 liters per minute. The leak rate safety margin of 10 is sufficient for cracks in which the leak rate is more than 5 liters per minute.

  17. Probabilistic pipe fracture evaluations for leak-rate-detection applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D.; Wilkowski, G.

    1995-04-01

    Regulatory Guide 1.45, open-quotes Reactor Coolant Pressure Boundary Leakage Detection Systems,close quotes was published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1973, and provides guidance on leak detection methods and system requirements for Light Water Reactors. Additionally, leak detection limits are specified in plant Technical Specifications and are different for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). These leak detection limits are also used in leak-before-break evaluations performed in accordance with Draft Standard Review Plan, Section 3.6.3, open-quotes Leak Before Break Evaluation Proceduresclose quotes where a margin of 10 on the leak detection limit is used in determining the crack size considered in subsequent fracture analyses. This study was requested by the NRC to: (1) evaluate the conditional failure probability for BWR and PWR piping for pipes that were leaking at the allowable leak detection limit, and (2) evaluate the margin of 10 to determine if it was unnecessarily large. A probabilistic approach was undertaken to conduct fracture evaluations of circumferentially cracked pipes for leak-rate-detection applications. Sixteen nuclear piping systems in BWR and PWR plants were analyzed to evaluate conditional failure probability and effects of crack-morphology variability on the current margins used in leak rate detection for leak-before-break

  18. The benefits of SCADA integrated pipeline leak detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichler, Ruprecht M.J. [Pichler Engineering GmbH, Munich (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Software based leak detection and locating for pipelines based upon evaluation of hydraulic parameters is a widely used approach to online pipeline integrity monitoring. Typically, these software packages are installed in a stand-alone configuration with a narrow bandwidth interface to the pipeline SCADA system. However, the performance characteristics of the SCADA system and interface do have a substantial impact on the performance of the leak detection system. By a tight integration of leak detection software into the SCADA system, a source of false alarms typically experienced with leak detection systems can be eliminated, the overall performance of the leak detection system can be improved, and the project costs can be reduced. (author)

  19. Permanent underwater leak detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, L; McStay, D; Moodie, D; Kane, D

    2009-01-01

    A new optoelectronic sensor for the real time monitoring of key components such as valves and connectors within the subsea production equipment for leaks of hydraulic fluid is reported. The sensor is capable of detecting low concentrations of such fluids, allowing the early detection of small leaks, and the ability to monitor the evolution of the leak-rate with time, hence providing an important new tool in complying with environmental requirements, enabling early intervention and optimising subsea production

  20. GASFLOW analysis of a tritium leak accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farman, R.F.; Fujita, R.K.; Travis, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The consequences of an earthquake-induced fire involving a tritium leak were analyzed using the GASFLOW computer code. Modeling features required by the analysis include ventilation boundary conditions, flow of a gas mixture in an enclosure containing obstacles, thermally induced buoyancy, and combustion phenomena. (author). 2 refs., 6 figs

  1. GASFLOW analysis of a tritium leak accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farman, R.F.; Fujita, R.K.; Travis, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The consequences of an earthquake-induced fire involving a tritium leak were analyzed using the GASFLOW computer code. Modeling features required by the analysis include ventilation boundary conditions, flow of a gas mixture in an enclosure containing obstacles, thermally induced buoyancy, and combustion phenomena

  2. Ultrasensitive leak detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelman, C.R.; Davidson, H.G.

    1978-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop a method of detecting leaks to a sensitivity of 1.0 x 10 -13 std/cm 3 /s in vacuum devices and to develop a qualifiable standard leak to provide system calibration at this leak rate. The development work demonstrated that minimum detectable leak rates of 6.5 x 10 -14 std/cm 3 /s and 5.5 x 10 -15 std/cm 3 /s are possible for respective analog and digital measurement modes

  3. Leak detection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a method for removing nuclear fuel elements from a fabrication building while at the same time testing the fuel elements for leaks without releasing contaminants from the fabrication building or from the fuel elements. The vacuum source used, leak detecting mechanism and fuel element fabrication building are specified to withstand environmental hazards. (UK)

  4. Specialists meeting on leak detection and location in LMFBR steam generators. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-10-01

    The following topics covered at the meeting were: with leak detection and location methods and equipment, including concentration measurements, helium tests, and electromagnetic methods; acoustic leak detection and related equipment; techniques and experiences in ensuring and measuring steam generator tightness during manufacturing, installation and repair, tube inspection methods for periodic control and damage assessment following leaks, influence of these methods on design of steam generators for LMFBR type reactors.

  5. Specialists meeting on leak detection and location in LMFBR steam generators. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-10-01

    The following topics covered at the meeting were: with leak detection and location methods and equipment, including concentration measurements, helium tests, and electromagnetic methods; acoustic leak detection and related equipment; techniques and experiences in ensuring and measuring steam generator tightness during manufacturing, installation and repair, tube inspection methods for periodic control and damage assessment following leaks, influence of these methods on design of steam generators for LMFBR type reactors

  6. VOLUMETRIC LEAK DETECTION IN LARGE UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS - VOLUME I

    Science.gov (United States)

    A set of experiments was conducted to determine whether volumetric leak detection system presently used to test underground storage tanks (USTs) up to 38,000 L (10,000 gal) in capacity could meet EPA's regulatory standards for tank tightness and automatic tank gauging systems whe...

  7. Leak testing at Westinghouse Hanford Company for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, C.N.

    1981-01-01

    Described leak testing applications require an arsenal of test equipment, a diverse range of testing techniques and a cadre of technical talent. A wide range helium mass spectrometer leak detector, a volume change tester and a halogen detector are employed to cover the 1 x 10 -8 to 1 atm cc/sec leak rate range encountered. Leak testing techniques, equipment problems, costs, and recommendations are discussed for examination of reactor pressure boundary and other ancillary components of the FFTF

  8. A constitutive model for the superplastic material ALNOVI-1 including leak risk information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, Corijn H.C.; Snippe, Q.H.C.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Pietzyk, M.; Kusiak, J.; Majta, J.; Hartley, P.; Lin, J.; Mori, K.

    2008-01-01

    For some applications, it is important that a formed sheet of material is completely gas tight, therefore it is beneficial to be able to predict whether a formed sheet will be leak tight for gases or not. Superplastic materials show the ability to attain very high plastic strains before failure.

  9. Analysis of small leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, W.; Hofmann, K.

    1979-01-01

    Problems associated with 'small leaks' are described and requirements are derived for experimental facilities and computer codes. Based on these requirements, a valuation of the existing experimental facilities and codes is presented. Facilities for integral tests in relatively large scale (ex. LOFT) are suitable for small leak test in principle, however minor changes (instrumentation, secondary side) are necessary for the evaluation of certain phenomena. The 'advanced blowdown codes' are capable of describing most of the phenomena occurring during small leak events, however a substantial amount of code development and verification is still needed. In addition, the use of transient codes in small leak analysis is demonstrated. There are some areas (neutronics feedback, influence of control system) in which the use of transient codes is possible and advantageous. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 BRE [de

  10. Traumatic orbital CSF leak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borumandi, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    Compared to the cerebrospinalfluid (CSF) leak through the nose and ear, the orbital CSF leak is a rare and underreported condition following head trauma. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with oedematous eyelid swelling and ecchymosis after a seemingly trivial fall onto the right orbit. Apart from the above, she was clinically unremarkable. The CT scan revealed a minimally displaced fracture of the orbital roof with no emphysema or intracranial bleeding. The fractured orbital roof in combination with the oedematous eyelid swelling raised the suspicion for orbital CSF leak. The MRI of the neurocranium demonstrated a small-sized CSF fistula extending from the anterior cranial fossa to the right orbit. The patient was treated conservatively and the lid swelling resolved completely after 5 days. Although rare, orbital CSF leak needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of periorbital swelling following orbital trauma. PMID:24323381

  11. Continuous Shearlet Tight Frames

    KAUST Repository

    Grohs, Philipp

    2010-10-22

    Based on the shearlet transform we present a general construction of continuous tight frames for L2(ℝ2) from any sufficiently smooth function with anisotropic moments. This includes for example compactly supported systems, piecewise polynomial systems, or both. From our earlier results in Grohs (Technical report, KAUST, 2009) it follows that these systems enjoy the same desirable approximation properties for directional data as the previous bandlimited and very specific constructions due to Kutyniok and Labate (Trans. Am. Math. Soc. 361:2719-2754, 2009). We also show that the representation formulas we derive are in a sense optimal for the shearlet transform. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  12. WRSS jumper leak assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BAILEY, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment is: (1) to assemble and document the facts associated with three recently installed jumpers which have leaked either during actual process operation or during post installation testing; (2) to describe the corrective actions taken and to identify any process improvements which need to be implemented in the Hanford jumper design and installation activities; and (3) to document WRSS jumper leak lessons learned for use by future projects and other jumper design, fabrication, and installation activities

  13. Small liquid sodium leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufresne, J.; Rochedereux, Y.; Antonakas, D.; Casselman, C.; Malet, J.C.

    1986-05-01

    Usually, pessimistic considerations inassessing the safety of secondary sodium loops in LMFBR reactor lead to assume guillotine rupture releasing a large amount of sodium estimate the consequences of large sodium fires. In order to reduce these consequences, one has to detect the smallest leak as soon as possible and to evaluate the future of an initial small leak. Analysis of the relationship between crack size and sodium outflow rate; Analysis of a sodium pipe with a small open crack

  14. Pipeline Leak Detection Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Chis, Timur

    2009-01-01

    Leak detection systems range from simple, visual line walking and checking ones to complex arrangements of hard-ware and software. No one method is universally applicable and operating requirements dictate which method is the most cost effective. The aim of the paper is to review the basic techniques of leak detection that are currently in use. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed and some indications of applicability are outlined.

  15. Pipeline Leak Detection Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timur Chis, Ph.D., Dipl.Eng.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leak detection systems range from simple, visual line walking and checking ones to complex arrangements of hard-ware and software. No one method is universally applicable and operating requirements dictate which method is the most cost effective. The aim of the paper is to review the basic techniques of leak detection that are currently in use. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed and some indications of applicability are outlined.

  16. Low Level Leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    NASA has transferred the improved portable leak detector technology to UE Systems, Inc.. This instrument was developed to detect leaks in fluid systems of critical launch and ground support equipment. This system incorporates innovative electronic circuitry, improved transducers, collecting horns, and contact sensors that provide a much higher degree of reliability, sensitivity and versatility over previously used systems. Potential commercial uses are pipelines, underground utilities, air-conditioning systems, petrochemical systems, aerospace, power transmission lines and medical devices.

  17. Ammonia Leak Locator Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Franklin T.; Wuest, Martin P.; Deffenbaugh, Danny M.

    1995-01-01

    The thermal control system of International Space Station Alpha will use liquid ammonia as the heat exchange fluid. It is expected that small leaks (of the order perhaps of one pound of ammonia per day) may develop in the lines transporting the ammonia to the various facilities as well as in the heat exchange equipment. Such leaks must be detected and located before the supply of ammonia becomes critically low. For that reason, NASA-JSC has a program underway to evaluate instruments that can detect and locate ultra-small concentrations of ammonia in a high vacuum environment. To be useful, the instrument must be portable and small enough that an astronaut can easily handle it during extravehicular activity. An additional complication in the design of the instrument is that the environment immediately surrounding ISSA will contain small concentrations of many other gases from venting of onboard experiments as well as from other kinds of leaks. These other vapors include water, cabin air, CO2, CO, argon, N2, and ethylene glycol. Altogether, this local environment might have a pressure of the order of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -6) torr. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) was contracted by NASA-JSC to provide support to NASA-JSC and its prime contractors in evaluating ammonia-location instruments and to make a preliminary trade study of the advantages and limitations of potential instruments. The present effort builds upon an earlier SwRI study to evaluate ammonia leak detection instruments [Jolly and Deffenbaugh]. The objectives of the present effort include: (1) Estimate the characteristics of representative ammonia leaks; (2) Evaluate the baseline instrument in the light of the estimated ammonia leak characteristics; (3) Propose alternative instrument concepts; and (4) Conduct a trade study of the proposed alternative concepts and recommend promising instruments. The baseline leak-location instrument selected by NASA-JSC was an ion gauge.

  18. Helium leak testing of large pressure vessels or subassemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, J.S.; Valania, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Specifications for pressure-vessel components [such as the intermediate heat exchangers (IHX)] for service in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor facilities require helium leak testing of pressure boundaries to very exacting standards. The experience of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation (FWEC) in successfully leak-testing the IHX shells and bundle assemblies now installed in the Fast Flux Test Facility at Richland, WA is described. Vessels of a somewhat smaller size for the closed loop heat exchanger system in the Fast Flux Test Facility have also been fabricated and helium leak tested for integrity of the pressure boundary by FWEC. Specifications on future components call for helium leak testing of the tube to tubesheet welds of the intermediate heat exchangers

  19. SEALING SIMULATED LEAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-09-01

    This report details the testing equipment, procedures and results performed under Task 7.2 Sealing Simulated Leaks. In terms of our ability to seal leaks identified in the technical topical report, Analysis of Current Field Data, we were 100% successful. In regards to maintaining seal integrity after pigging operations we achieved varying degrees of success. Internal Corrosion defects proved to be the most resistant to the effects of pigging while External Corrosion proved to be the least resistant. Overall, with limitations, pressure activated sealant technology would be a viable option under the right circumstances.

  20. Fuel rod leak detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Womack, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    A typical embodiment of the invention detects leaking fuel rods by means of a radiation detector that measures the concentration of xenon-133 ( 133 Xe) within each individual rod. A collimated detector that provides signals related to the energy of incident radiation is aligned with one of the ends of a fuel rod. A statistically significant sample of the gamma radiation (γ-rays) that characterize 133 Xe is accumulated through the detector. The data so accumulated indicates the presence of a concentration of 133 Xe appropriate to a sound fuel rod, or a significantly different concentration that reflects a leaking fuel rod

  1. Design of a leak detection device for marine airtight container

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Zhu, Faxin; Lu, Jinshu; Li, Yule; Wu, Wenfeng; Zhang, Jianwei; Qin, Beichen

    2018-04-01

    The ship airtight container as the research object, according to the tightness of the traditional detection methods of sealed container from the shortcomings of the design of modern ship sealed container leak detection device based on the requirements of the use of AutoCAD to design a ship leakage detection device using airtight container, and introduces its working principle and main components. Finally, from the aspects of technology, structure, operation and economy, the feasibility analysis of the leak detection device for marine airtight container is designed, and it is concluded that the device has the advantages of simple operation, short detection time, easy maintenance and cost control, and has high feasibility.

  2. Sodium leak at Monju (II): Sodium leak, burning and aerosol behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funada, T.; Yamagishi, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The amount of leaked sodium was estimated as approximately 640 kg during the 220 minute leak. The ventilation duct and the walkway grating under the leak site were severely damaged by Na-Fe-O reaction, but the floor liner and the concrete wall were not. A total 100 kg of sodium aerosol was deposited in the reactor auxiliary building and 230 kg was released to the atmosphere. The sodium concentration at the site boundary was calculated as 0.05 mg/m 3 , NaOH equivalent, which was low in comparison with the permitted level of 2 mg/m 3 . The tritium quantity released was estimated as 4.4 x 10 7 Bq, which was about 0.03% of the average released value per month for a LWR. (author)

  3. Less-Tight versus Tight Control of Hypertension in Pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magee, Laura A.; von Dadelszen, Peter; Rey, Evelyne; Ross, Susan; Asztalos, Elizabeth; Murphy, Kellie E.; Menzies, Jennifer; Sanchez, Johanna; Singer, Joel; Gafni, Amiram; Gruslin, Andrée; Helewa, Michael; Hutton, Eileen; Lee, Shoo K.; Lee, Terry; Logan, Alexander G.; Ganzevoort, Wessel; Welch, Ross; Thornton, Jim G.; Moutquin, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The effects of less-tight versus tight control of hypertension on pregnancy complications are unclear. METHODS We performed an open, international, multicenter trial involving women at 14 weeks 0 days to 33 weeks 6 days of gestation who had nonproteinuric preexisting or gestational

  4. Ultrasonic leak detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, R.V.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning ultrasonic microphone was used to detect the presence and locate the sources of hydraulic noises in piping systems in a reactor environment. The intensity changes of the noises correspond to changes of flow conditions within the system caused by throttled valves, flow rate changes, and leaks. (author)

  5. Tight junctions and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Norimasa; Murata, Masaki; Kikuchi, Keisuke; Osanai, Makoto; Tobioka, Hirotoshi; Kojima, Takashi; Chiba, Hideki

    2003-09-01

    Tight junctions are intercellular junctions adjacent to the apical end of the lateral membrane surface. They have two functions, the barrier (or gate) function and the fence function. The barrier function of tight junctions regulates the passage of ions, water, and various macromolecules, even of cancer cells, through paracellular spaces. The barrier function is thus relevant to edema, jaundice, diarrhea, and blood-borne metastasis. On the other hand, the fence function maintains cell polarity. In other words, tight junctions work as a fence to prevent intermixing of molecules in the apical membrane with those in the lateral membrane. This function is deeply involved in cancer cell biology, in terms of loss of cell polarity. Of the proteins comprising tight junctions, integral membrane proteins occludin, claudins, and JAMs have been recently discovered. Of these molecules, claudins are exclusively responsible for the formation of tight-junction strands and are connected with the actin cytoskeleton mediated by ZO-1. Thus, both functions of tight junctions are dependent on the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton as well as ATP. Mutations in the claudin14 and the claudin16 genes result in hereditary deafness and hereditary hypomagnesemia, respectively. Some pathogenic bacteria and viruses target and affect the tight-junction function, leading to diseases. In this review, the relationship between tight junctions and human diseases is summarized.

  6. Tight closure and vanishing theorems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.E.

    2001-01-01

    Tight closure has become a thriving branch of commutative algebra since it was first introduced by Mel Hochster and Craig Huneke in 1986. Over the past few years, it has become increasingly clear that tight closure has deep connections with complex algebraic geometry as well, especially with those areas of algebraic geometry where vanishing theorems play a starring role. The purpose of these lectures is to introduce tight closure and to explain some of these connections with algebraic geometry. Tight closure is basically a technique for harnessing the power of the Frobenius map. The use of the Frobenius map to prove theorems about complex algebraic varieties is a familiar technique in algebraic geometry, so it should perhaps come as no surprise that tight closure is applicable to algebraic geometry. On the other hand, it seems that so far we are only seeing the tip of a large and very beautiful iceberg in terms of tight closure's interpretation and applications to algebraic geometry. Interestingly, although tight closure is a 'characteristic p' tool, many of the problems where tight closure has proved useful have also yielded to analytic (L2) techniques. Despite some striking parallels, there had been no specific result directly linking tight closure and L∼ techniques. Recently, however, the equivalence of an ideal central to the theory of tight closure was shown to be equivalent to a certain 'multiplier ideal' first defined using L2 methods. Presumably, deeper connections will continue to emerge. There are two main types of problems for which tight closure has been helpful: in identifying nice structure and in establishing uniform behavior. The original algebraic applications of tight closure include, for example, a quick proof of the Hochster-Roberts theorem on the Cohen-Macaulayness of rings of invariants, and also a refined version of the Brianqon-Skoda theorem on the uniform behaviour of integral closures of powers of ideals. More recent, geometric

  7. Less-tight versus tight control of hypertension in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Laura A; von Dadelszen, Peter; Rey, Evelyne; Ross, Susan; Asztalos, Elizabeth; Murphy, Kellie E; Menzies, Jennifer; Sanchez, Johanna; Singer, Joel; Gafni, Amiram; Gruslin, Andrée; Helewa, Michael; Hutton, Eileen; Lee, Shoo K; Lee, Terry; Logan, Alexander G; Ganzevoort, Wessel; Welch, Ross; Thornton, Jim G; Moutquin, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-29

    The effects of less-tight versus tight control of hypertension on pregnancy complications are unclear. We performed an open, international, multicenter trial involving women at 14 weeks 0 days to 33 weeks 6 days of gestation who had nonproteinuric preexisting or gestational hypertension, office diastolic blood pressure of 90 to 105 mm Hg (or 85 to 105 mm Hg if the woman was taking antihypertensive medications), and a live fetus. Women were randomly assigned to less-tight control (target diastolic blood pressure, 100 mm Hg) or tight control (target diastolic blood pressure, 85 mm Hg). The composite primary outcome was pregnancy loss or high-level neonatal care for more than 48 hours during the first 28 postnatal days. The secondary outcome was serious maternal complications occurring up to 6 weeks post partum or until hospital discharge, whichever was later. Included in the analysis were 987 women; 74.6% had preexisting hypertension. The primary-outcome rates were similar among 493 women assigned to less-tight control and 488 women assigned to tight control (31.4% and 30.7%, respectively; adjusted odds ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.77 to 1.35), as were the rates of serious maternal complications (3.7% and 2.0%, respectively; adjusted odds ratio, 1.74; 95% CI, 0.79 to 3.84), despite a mean diastolic blood pressure that was higher in the less-tight-control group by 4.6 mm Hg (95% CI, 3.7 to 5.4). Severe hypertension (≥160/110 mm Hg) developed in 40.6% of the women in the less-tight-control group and 27.5% of the women in the tight-control group (Phypertension. (Funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research; CHIPS Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN71416914; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01192412.).

  8. Leaking Fuel Impacts and Practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hozer, Zoltan; Szabo, Peter; Somfai, Barbara; Cherubini, Marco; Aldworth, Robin; Waeckel, Nicolas; Delorme, Tim; Dickson, Raymond; Fujii, Hajime; Rey Gayo, Jose Maria; Grant, Wade; Gorzel, Andreas; Hellwig, Christian; Kamimura, Katsuichiro; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Klouzal, Jan; Miklos, Marek; Nagase, Fumihisa; Nilsson, Marcus; Petit, Marc; Richards, Stuart; Lundqvist Saleh, Tobias; Stepniewski, Marek; Sim, Ki Seob; ); Rehacek, Radomir; Kissane, Martin; )

    2014-01-01

    The impact of leaking fuel rods on the operation of nuclear power plants and the practices of handling leaking fuel has been reviewed by the CSNI Working Group on Fuel Safety in order to promote a better understanding on the handling of leaking fuel in power reactors, as well as to discuss and review the current practices in member countries to help in decisions on the specification of reactor operation conditions with leaking fuel rods and on the handling of leaking fuel after removal from reactor. Experts from 15 countries provided data on the handling of leaking fuel in PWR, BWR, VVER and PHWR reactor types. The review covered the operation of NPP reactors with leaking fuel, wet and dry storage and transport of leaking assemblies. The methods and applied instruments to identify leaking fuel assemblies and the repair of them were addressed in the review. Special attention was paid to the activity release from leaking rods in the reactor and under storage conditions. The consideration of leaking fuel in safety analyses on core behaviour during postulated accidents was also discussed in the review. The main conclusions of the review pointed out that the activity release from leaking fuel rods in the reactor can be handled by technological systems, or in case of failure of too many rods the reactor can be shutdown to minimize activity release. Under accident conditions and operational transients the leaking rods may produce coolant activity concentration peaks. The storage of spent leaking fuel is normally characterised by moderate release of radionuclides from the fuel. The power plants apply limits for activity concentration to limit the amount of leaking rods in the core. In different countries, the accident analyses take into consideration the potential release from leaking fuel rods in design basis accidents in different ways. Some power plants apply special tools for handling and repair of leaking assemblies and rods. The leaking rods are stored together with

  9. Hazardous fluid leak detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Harold E.; McLaurin, Felder M.; Ortiz, Monico; Huth, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A device or system for monitoring for the presence of leaks from a hazardous fluid is disclosed which uses two electrodes immersed in deionized water. A gas is passed through an enclosed space in which a hazardous fluid is contained. Any fumes, vapors, etc. escaping from the containment of the hazardous fluid in the enclosed space are entrained in the gas passing through the enclosed space and transported to a closed vessel containing deionized water and two electrodes partially immersed in the deionized water. The electrodes are connected in series with a power source and a signal, whereby when a sufficient number of ions enter the water from the gas being bubbled through it (indicative of a leak), the water will begin to conduct, thereby allowing current to flow through the water from one electrode to the other electrode to complete the circuit and activate the signal.

  10. Natural gas leak mapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, Thomas A [Livermore, CA; Luong, Amy Khai [Dublin, CA; Kulp, Thomas J [Livermore, CA; Devdas, Sanjay [Albany, CA

    2008-05-20

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  11. Back pressure helium leak testing of fuel elements for Dhruva research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, N G; Ahmad, Anis; Kulkarni, P G; Purushotham, D S.C. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Atomic Fuels Div.

    1994-12-31

    Leak tightness specification on fuel elements for reactor use is always very stringent. The fuel element fabricated for Dhruva reactor is specified to be leak-tight up to 1 x 10{sup -8} std. cc/sec. The fuel element consists of natural metallic uranium rod around 12.5 mm diameter and 3 meter long in encased in aluminium tube and seal welded at both ends. Since helium gas is not filled inside the fuel element while doing seal welding, the only way to do helium leak testing of such fuel rods is by back-pressure technique. This paper describes the development of test facility for carrying out such test and discusses the experiences of carrying out helium leak testing by back-pressure technique on more than 700 numbers of fuel rods for Dhruva reactor. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Does a dyon leak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, B.

    1983-01-01

    In the presence of a CP-nonconservation measured by an angle theta, the ground state of a point magnetic monopole is shown to have an electric charge of value -etheta/2π which changes discontinuously to zero for massless fermions. A new version of Levinson's theorem is also given. The latter effect as well as the S-wave helicity flip of a dyon can be interpreted as a leak at the origin

  13. Aspects of leak detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chivers, T.C.

    1997-01-01

    A requirement of a Leak before Break safety case is that the leakage from the through wall crack be detected prior to any growth leading to unacceptable failure. This paper sets out to review some recent developments in this field. It does not set out to be a comprehensive guide to all of the methods available. The discussion concentrates on acoustic emission and how the techniques can be qualified and deployed on operational plant

  14. Aspects of leak detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chivers, T.C. [Berkeley Technology Centre, Glos (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    A requirement of a Leak before Break safety case is that the leakage from the through wall crack be detected prior to any growth leading to unacceptable failure. This paper sets out to review some recent developments in this field. It does not set out to be a comprehensive guide to all of the methods available. The discussion concentrates on acoustic emission and how the techniques can be qualified and deployed on operational plant.

  15. Modeling leaks from liquid hydrogen storage systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents a series of models for describing intended and unintended discharges from liquid hydrogen storage systems. Typically these systems store hydrogen in the saturated state at approximately five to ten atmospheres. Some of models discussed here are equilibrium-based models that make use of the NIST thermodynamic models to specify the states of multiphase hydrogen and air-hydrogen mixtures. Two types of discharges are considered: slow leaks where hydrogen enters the ambient at atmospheric pressure and fast leaks where the hydrogen flow is usually choked and expands into the ambient through an underexpanded jet. In order to avoid the complexities of supersonic flow, a single Mach disk model is proposed for fast leaks that are choked. The velocity and state of hydrogen downstream of the Mach disk leads to a more tractable subsonic boundary condition. However, the hydrogen temperature exiting all leaks (fast or slow, from saturated liquid or saturated vapor) is approximately 20.4 K. At these temperatures, any entrained air would likely condense or even freeze leading to an air-hydrogen mixture that cannot be characterized by the REFPROP subroutines. For this reason a plug flow entrainment model is proposed to treat a short zone of initial entrainment and heating. The model predicts the quantity of entrained air required to bring the air-hydrogen mixture to a temperature of approximately 65 K at one atmosphere. At this temperature the mixture can be treated as a mixture of ideal gases and is much more amenable to modeling with Gaussian entrainment models and CFD codes. A Gaussian entrainment model is formulated to predict the trajectory and properties of a cold hydrogen jet leaking into ambient air. The model shows that similarity between two jets depends on the densimetric Froude number, density ratio and initial hydrogen concentration.

  16. An algorithm for leak point detection of underground pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Sup; Yoon, Dong Jin

    2004-01-01

    Leak noise is a good source to identify the exact location of a leak point of underground water pipelines. Water leak generates broadband noise from a leak location and can be propagated to both directions of water pipes. However, the necessity of long-range detection of this leak location makes to identify low-frequency acoustic waves rather than high frequency ones. Acoustic wave propagation coupled with surrounding boundaries including cast iron pipes is theoretically analyzed and the wave velocity was confirmed with experiment. The leak locations were identified both by the acoustic emission (AE) method and the cross-correlation method. In a short-range distance, both the AE method and cross-correlation method are effective to detect leak position. However, the detection for a long-range distance required a lower frequency range accelerometers only because higher frequency waves were attenuated very quickly with the increase of propagation paths. Two algorithms for the cross-correlation function were suggested, and a long-range detection has been achieved at real underground water pipelines longer than 300 m.

  17. Air-Leak Effects on Ear-Canal Acoustic Absorbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasetshwane, Daniel M.; Kopun, Judy G.; Gorga, Michael P.; Neely, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Accurate ear-canal acoustic measurements, such as wideband acoustic admittance, absorbance, and otoacoustic emissions, require that the measurement probe be tightly sealed in the ear canal. Air leaks can compromise the validity of the measurements, interfere with calibrations, and increase variability. There are no established procedures for determining the presence of air leaks or criteria for what size leak would affect the accuracy of ear-canal acoustic measurements. The purpose of this study was to determine ways to quantify the effects of air leaks and to develop objective criteria to detect their presence. Design: Air leaks were simulated by modifying the foam tips that are used with the measurement probe through insertion of thin plastic tubing. To analyze the effect of air leaks, acoustic measurements were taken with both modified and unmodified foam tips in brass-tube cavities and human ear canals. Measurements were initially made in cavities to determine the range of critical leaks. Subsequently, data were collected in ears of 21 adults with normal hearing and normal middle-ear function. Four acoustic metrics were used for predicting the presence of air leaks and for quantifying these leaks: (1) low-frequency admittance phase (averaged over 0.1–0.2 kHz), (2) low-frequency absorbance, (3) the ratio of compliance volume to physical volume (CV/PV), and (4) the air-leak resonance frequency. The outcome variable in this analysis was the absorbance change (Δabsorbance), which was calculated in eight frequency bands. Results: The trends were similar for both the brass cavities and the ear canals. ΔAbsorbance generally increased with air-leak size and was largest for the lower frequency bands (0.1–0.2 and 0.2–0.5 kHz). Air-leak effects were observed in frequencies up to 10 kHz, but their effects above 1 kHz were unpredictable. These high-frequency air leaks were larger in brass cavities than in ear canals. Each of the four predictor variables

  18. Leak in spiral weld in a 16 inches gas pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazzini, Pablo G; Bona, Jeremias de [GIE S.A., Mar del Plata (Argentina); Otegui, Jose L [University of Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2009-07-01

    This paper discusses a failure analysis after a leak in the spiral weld of a 16 inches natural gas pipeline, in service since 1974. The leak was the result of the coalescence of two different defects, on each surface of the pipe wall, located in the center of the inner cord of the helical DSAW weld. Fractographic and metallographic studies revealed that the leak was a combination of three conditions. During fabrication of the pipe, segregation in grain boundary grouped in mid weld. During service, these segregations underwent a process of selective galvanic corrosion. One of these volumetric defects coincided with a tubular pore in the outer weld. Pigging of the pipeline in 2005 for cleaning likely contributed to the increase of the leak flow, when eliminating corrosion product plugs. Although these defects are likely to repeat, fracture mechanics shows that a defect of this type is unlikely to cause a blowout. (author)

  19. Localization of leaks in underground pipes with the application of radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klupa, A.; Morawiec, J.

    1983-01-01

    A method of leaks localization on gas pipe-lines during resistance and tightness tests was elaborated. The leaks were localized using tracer technique. Sodium 24 was used as a tracer for short sections of the pipe-line (up to 30 km). Only 1 m 3 of water with a tracer was introduced into the pipe-line. A measuring probe was also put into pipe-line. All leaks were detected and the method appeared useful. For the longer sections of the pipe-line iodine 131 ought to be used. (A.S.)

  20. Helium Leak Test for the PLS Storage Ring Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, M. H.; Kim, H. J.; Choi, W. C.

    1993-01-01

    The storage ring vacuum system for the Pohang Light Source (PLS) has been designed to maintain the vacuum pressure of 10 1 0 Torr which requires UHV welding to have helium leak rate less than 1x10 1 0 Torr·L/sec. In order to develop new technique (PLS) welding technique), a prototype vacuum chamber has been welded by using Tungsten Inert Gas welding method and all the welded joints have been tested with a non-destructive method, so called helium leak detection, to investigate the vacuum tightness of the weld joints. The test was performed with a detection limit of 1x10 1 0 Torr·L/sec for helium and no detectable leaks were found for all the welded joints. Thus the performance of welding technique is proven to meet the criteria of helium leak rate required in the PLS Storage Ring. Both the principle and the procedure for the helium leak detection are also discussed

  1. Operational experiences with on line BWR condenser tube leak verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, R.A.; Duvall, W.E.; Kirkley, W.B.; Zavadoski, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Verifying condenser tube leaks at a boiling water reactor is, at best, a difficult task carried out in hot steamy water boxes with concurrent radiation exposure. For small apparent leaks with slight chemical changes there is always uncertainty of whether the problem is a condenser tube leak or a feedback from radwaste. Most conventional methods (e.g soap tests, Saran wrap suction, and helium tests) usually involve a load reduction to isolate the water boxes one at a time and hours of drain down on each box. The sensitivity of the most sensitive test (helium) is of the order of 7500 l per day per box. Sulfur hexafluoride has been successfully used at a BWR to identify one leaking water box out of four while the unit was at 100 % power. The actual tubes leakig in the water box were identified by injecting helium during drain down of the box and subsequent manifold testing. Additional tests with sulfur hexafluoride on the second BWR unit indicated tight water boxes to within the sensitivity of the measurement, i.e. less than 19 l per day for all four boxes. Problems encountered in both tests included sulfur hexafluoride carry over from the plume of the cooling towers and off gas considerations. In brief sulfur hexafluoride can be used to quickly identify which particular water box has a condenser tube leak or, just as quickly, establish the integrity of all the water boxes to a level not previously attainable. (author)

  2. Containment integrity and leak testing. Procedures applied and experiences gained in European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Containment systems are the ultimate safety barrier for preventing the escape of gaseous, liquid and solid radioactive materials produced in normal operation, not retained in process systems, and for keeping back radioactive materials released by system malfunction or equipment failure. A primary element of the containment shell is therefore its leak-tight design. The report describes the present containment concepts mostly used in European countries. The leak-testing procedures applied and the experiences gained in their application are also discussed. The report refers more particularly to pre-operational testing, periodic testing and extrapolation methods of leak rates measured at test conditions to expected leak rates at calculated accident conditions. The actual problems in periodic containment leak rate testing are critically reviewed. In the appendix to the report a summary is given of the regulations and specifications applied in different member countries

  3. Study of Internal and External Leaks in Tests of Anode-Supported SOFCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens Foldager Bregnballe; Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Hagen, Anke

    2008-01-01

    A planar anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) has been tested to investigate gas tightness of the electrolyte and the applied seals. Gas leaks reduce the efficiency of the SOFC and it is thus important to determine and minimise them. Probe gases (He and Ar) and a Quadrupole Mass Spectrome......A planar anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) has been tested to investigate gas tightness of the electrolyte and the applied seals. Gas leaks reduce the efficiency of the SOFC and it is thus important to determine and minimise them. Probe gases (He and Ar) and a Quadrupole Mass...... Spectrometer were used to detect both internal (through electrolyte) and external (through seals) gas leaks. The internal gas leak through the electrolyte was quantified under different conditions, as was the external leak from the surroundings to the anode. The internal gas leak did not depend on the pressure...... difference between the anode and the cathode gas compartment, and can thus be described as diffusion driven. External leaks between the surroundings and the anode, but not the cathode gas compartment was observed. They were influenced by the pressure difference and are thus driven by both concentration...

  4. Deconstructing Gender Stereotypes in Leak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengah Bawa Atmadja

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The belief of Balinese people towards leak still survive. Leak is a magic based on durgaism that can transform a person from human to another form, such as apes, pigs, etc. People tend to regard leak as evil. In general, the evilness is constructed in gender stereotypes, so it is identified that leak are always women. This idea is a power game based on the ideology of patriarchy that provides legitimacy for men to dominate women with a plea for social harmony. As a result, women are marginalized in the Balinese society. Women should be aware of so it would provide encouragement for them to make emancipatory changes dialogically. Kepercayaan orang Bali terhadap leak tetap bertahan sampai saat ini. Leak adalah sihir yang berbasiskan durgaisme yang dapat mengakibatkan seseorang bisa merubah bentuk dari manusia ke wujud yang lain, misalnya kera, babi, dll. Leak termasuk magi hitam sehingga dinilai bersifat jelek. Pada umumnya perempuan diidentikkan dengan leak sehingga melahirkan asumsi yang bermuatan steriotip gender bahwa leak = perempuan. Gagasan ini merupakan permainan kekuasaan berbasis ideologi patriarkhi dan sekaligus memberikan legitimasi bagi laki-laki untuk menguasai perempuan dengan dalih demi keharmonisan sosial. Akibatnya, perempuan menjadi termarginalisasi pada masyarakat Bali.  Perempuan harus menyadarinya sehingga memberikan dorongan bagi mereka untuk melakukan perubahan secara dialogis emansipatoris.

  5. Radiation leaking protection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunami, Yoshio; Mitsumori, Kojiro

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent radioactivity from leaking outside of a reactor container by way of pipeways passing therethrough, by supplying pressurized fluid between each of a plurality of valves for separating the pipeways. Constitution: Pressurized fluid is supplied between each of a plurality of valves for separating pipeways. For instance, water in a purified water tank is pressurized by a pressure pump and the pressure of the pressurized water is controlled by a differential pressure detector, a pressure controller and a pressure control valve. In the case if a main steam pipe is ruptured outside of the reactor container or to be repaired, the separation valves are wholly closed and then the pressurizing device is actuated to supply pressurized water containing no radioactivity from the purified water tank to the position between the valves. The pressure in the pressurized water is controlled such that it is always higher by a predetermined level than the pressure in the reactor. This prevents the radioacitivity in the reactor core from leaking outside of the container passing through the valves, whereby radiation exposure in the working can be reduced and the circumferential contamination upon accident of pipeway rupture can be decreased. (Kawakami, Y.)

  6. Development of a leak-before break procedure for pressurised components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langston, D.B.

    1989-05-01

    For pressurised components there is an increasing interest in the use of leak-before-break arguments to show that defects will behave in a ''failsafe'' manner by growing in such a way as to cause a detectable leak before a disruptive failure of the pressure boundary can occur. The CEGB operates a wide variety of plant and has recognised the need for a flexible leak-before-break procedure which can be applied in a variety of different situations including part-through defects. This paper describes the development of such a procedure and discusses some of the key aspects of the leak-before-break procedure. (author)

  7. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak repair. 63.1005 Section 63.1005... Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 1 § 63.1005 Leak repair. (a) Leak repair schedule. The owner or operator shall repair each leak detected no later than 15 calendar days after it is detected, except as...

  8. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak repair. 63.1024 Section 63.1024... Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 2 Standards § 63.1024 Leak repair. (a) Leak repair schedule. The owner or operator shall repair each leak detected as soon as practical, but not later than 15 calendar...

  9. 40 CFR 65.105 - Leak repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak repair. 65.105 Section 65.105... FEDERAL AIR RULE Equipment Leaks § 65.105 Leak repair. (a) Leak repair schedule. The owner or operator shall repair each leak detected as soon as practical but not later than 15 calendar days after it is...

  10. Experiments in LEENA facility with modified wire type leak detector layout in large sodium pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, G.; Chandramouli, S.; Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P.; Rajan, K.K.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • FBR large horizontal secondary pipeline were simulated and five sodium leak experiments were conducted by providing modified wire type leak detector layout at 550 °C. • Early detection of sodium leak is needed for minimizing the sodium leaked out and consequent damages. • PFBR leak detector layout on large horizontal pipelines can detect a leak rate of 200 g/h within 6 h. • By reducing the distance between leak point and detector to half, detection time was reduced to 1/6th and found that a leak rate of 200 g/h can be detected in one hour. • A relationship between leak rate and detection time was established based on experimental results. - Abstract: Sodium cooled Fast Breeder Reactors (SFRs) are envisaged in the second phase of Indian nuclear power programme. Liquid sodium is used as the coolant in the SFRs due to its favourable nuclear properties and excellent heat transfer properties. Leaks in sodium systems have the potential of being exceptionally hazardous due to the reaction of liquid sodium with oxygen and water vapour in the air. When a sodium leak occurs, the sodium leak rate, the total quantity of sodium leaked and leak detector layout governs the detection time. Other factors to be considered are insulation material packing condition, distance between the leak point and detector, heater layout, pipe geometry, temperature etc. Potential regions of leakage in Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) sodium circuits are near welds, high stress areas and regions subjected to thermal striping. Early detection of leak is needed for minimizing the quantity of sodium leaked to outside and consequent damages. Three wire type leak detectors (WLDs positioned at 90°, 180° and 270°) working on conductivity principle are used for detecting sodium leak in the large horizontal secondary sodium pipelines of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR). It was found from the upper boundary curve based on LEENA (LEak Experiments in NAtrium) facility experimental

  11. Are tight gas resources overstated?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, P.

    2004-11-01

    According to conventional wisdom, North America's tight gas resources are continuous, regional accumulations of water-free methane, trapped in low-permeability rock, and involving very little exploration risk. Backing up conventional wisdom, EnCana Corporation is investing heavily in technology-intensive and capital-intensive tight gas plays in Western Canada and the Rocky Mountain regions of the United States. On the other hand, a recent study in the Greater Green River Basin of southwestern Wyoming says that tight gas resources have been significantly overestimated, by as much as three to five times too high, and the risks of exploration are every bit as high as those for conventional exploration. This study essentially dismisses the whole idea of tight gas, or basin-centred gas as a myth, the authors being firmly convinced that tight gas formations should be viewed as conventional hydrocarbon systems, with the usual risks of exploration. This paper discusses the controversy created by this recent study and the implications for natural gas reserves on a basin and individual company level, and the risks associated with exploration. The views of EnCana Corporation, being the company most heavily involved in tight gas and coalbed methane, and those of John Masters, co-founder of Canadian Hunter Exploration Ltd., and discoverer of the blockbuster Elsmworth tight gas deposit in northeastern Alberta in the mid-1970s, are explained in considerable detail, in an effort to dismiss the doubters. EnCana officials and Masters argue that the points raised by the authors of the Greater Green River study do not hold water: Tight gas or basin gas is a distinct hydrocarbon formation, characterized by low permeability, therefore it is to be expected that the gas will take longer to come out of the ground. Neither is the role of water in basin-centred gas systems the major problem as claimed by the doubters. They also characterize it as imprudent to claim to know what the

  12. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Luke; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha; Smith, Trent; Tate, LaNetra; Raissi, Ali; Mohajeri, Nahid; Muradov, Nazim; Bokerman, Gary

    2009-01-01

    At NASA, hydrogen safety is a key concern for space shuttle processing. Leaks of any level must be quickly recognized and addressed due to hydrogen s lower explosion limit. Chemo - chromic devices have been developed to detect hydrogen gas in several embodiments. Because hydrogen is odorless and colorless and poses an explosion hazard, there is an emerging need for sensors to quickly and accurately detect low levels of leaking hydrogen in fuel cells and other advanced energy- generating systems in which hydrogen is used as fuel. The device incorporates a chemo - chromic pigment into a base polymer. The article can reversibly or irreversibly change color upon exposure to hydrogen. The irreversible pigment changes color from a light beige to a dark gray. The sensitivity of the pigment can be tailored to its application by altering its exposure to gas through the incorporation of one or more additives or polymer matrix. Furthermore, through the incorporation of insulating additives, the chemochromic sensor can operate at cryogenic temperatures as low as 78 K. A chemochromic detector of this type can be manufactured into any feasible polymer part including injection molded plastic parts, fiber-spun textiles, or extruded tapes. The detectors are simple, inexpensive, portable, and do not require an external power source. The chemochromic detectors were installed and removed easily at the KSC launch pad without need for special expertise. These detectors may require an external monitor such as the human eye, camera, or electronic detector; however, they could be left in place, unmonitored, and examined later for color change to determine whether there had been exposure to hydrogen. In one type of envisioned application, chemochromic detectors would be fabricated as outer layers (e.g., casings or coatings) on high-pressure hydrogen storage tanks and other components of hydrogen-handling systems to provide visible indications of hydrogen leaks caused by fatigue failures or

  13. Device provides controlled gas leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kami, S. K.; King, H. J.

    1968-01-01

    Modified palladium leak device provides a controlled release /leak/ of very small quantities of gas at low or medium pressures. It has no moving parts, requires less than 5 watts to operate, and is capable of releasing the gas either continuously or in pulses at adjustable flow rates.

  14. Tank car leaks gasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    On January 27, 1994, a Canadian National (CN) tank car loaded with gasoline began to leak from a crack in the tank shell on the end of the car near the stub sill. The tank car had been damaged from impact switching. A part of the tank car was sent for laboratory analysis which concluded that: (1) the fracture originated in two locations in welds, (2) the cracks propagated in a symmetrical manner and progressed into the tank plate, (3) the fracture surface revealed inadequate weld fusion. A stress analysis of the tank car was conducted to determine the coupling force necessary to cause the crack. It was noted that over the last decade several problems have occurred pertaining to stub sill areas of tank cars that have resulted in hazardous material spills. An advisory was sent to Transport Canada outlining many examples where tank cars containing serious defects had passed CN inspections that were specifically designed to identify such defects. 4 figs

  15. The Leaking Pipeline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Inge; Højgaard, Lis

    2002-01-01

    negotiations of cultural prescriptions of gendered subjectivity and identities, organizational understandings and procedures embedded in specific university cultures, traditional of different science disciplines, and the systemic logic and political rationale of the education and research system....... these positions, and one that maintains that a closer look at the statistics does not support this optimism because women’s percentage in recruitment positions is not increasing as the pool of potential female researchers increases, or to put it metaphorically, “the pipeline is leaking women all along” (Alper...... it identifies and describes a Danish verion of ‘the leaky pipeline’ from analyses of the ratios of women in science from high school through tenured positions. Finally it illustrates the cultural mechanisms at play in this process, based on the results of three studies. The first two analyze the educational...

  16. Tightness of the thermal envelope of office and educational buildings; Klimaskaermens taethed i kontor- og undervisningsbygninger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergsoee, N.C. (SBi, Aalborg (Denmark)); Radisch, N.H.; Nickel, J.; Treldal, J. (Ramboell Danmark A/S, Koebenhavn (Denmark)); Bundesen, E.W.; Nielsen, Carsten (DanEjendomme, Hellerup (Denmark))

    2011-07-01

    In 2006 tightening of the energy regulations in the Danish Building Regulations were introduced including requirements regarding the tightness of the building envelope. The requirements are, with minor changes, continued in the current Building Regulations, BR10. During the past few years experience has been gained regarding both the actual execution of air tightness measurements and solutions that will lead to more air tight building envelopes. Experiences, however, are primarily related to single family houses. The report presents results of measurements in large buildings and discusses reasons for lack of knowledge and experience on the tightness of the building envelope in large buildings. Apparently, there is a need for dissemination of knowledge on the importance of a tight building envelope both in terms of energy consumption and indoor climate and in terms of the difficulties and costs associated with repairing leaks in a completed envelope. Air tightness must be brought into focus at an early stage in the planning process, and during the construction phase air tightness measurements should be performed, e.g. on facade sections or in parts of the building. The project team has attended a number of measurements in large buildings and further gained access to results of a large number of measurements. In summary, the results show that it is possible to achieve the required tightness, and in most buildings the results are better than the requirement of a maximum of 1.5 l/s per m{sub 2}. (Author)

  17. Experiments on leak-selfwastage and leak-propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, J.; Vagt, P.; Westenbrugge, J.K. van; Joziasse, J.

    1984-01-01

    During the last years a considerable number of selfwastage experiments with small leaks of different shape and size and for different ferritic materials (2 1/4% Cr - and 12% Cr-steel) were performed by TNO and by INTERATOM, using several sodium test facilities. Many fabrication-methods of artificial micro-leaks were applied and examined. Selfplugging-, selfwastage- and reopening-effects were observed and evaluated during different time periods and under various test conditions. The main results will be discussed. Concerning the leak propagation program of INTERATOM, the first series of experiments was carried out this year. A short status report and some first results will be given. (author)

  18. Boundary-Object Trimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus; Jensen, Lotte Groth; Udsen, Flemming Witt

    2014-01-01

    implementation, which also coupled the work of medical secretaries more tightly to that of other staff, and led to task drift among professions. Medical secretaries have been relatively invisible to health informatics and CSCW, and we propose the term ‘boundary-object trimming’ to foreground and conceptualize...

  19. Aerospace Payloads Leak Test Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lvovsky, Oleg; Grayson, Cynthia M.

    2010-01-01

    Pressurized and sealed aerospace payloads can leak on orbit. When dealing with toxic or hazardous materials, requirements for fluid and gas leakage rates have to be properly established, and most importantly, reliably verified using the best Nondestructive Test (NDT) method available. Such verification can be implemented through application of various leak test methods that will be the subject of this paper, with a purpose to show what approach to payload leakage rate requirement verification is taken by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The scope of this paper will be mostly a detailed description of 14 leak test methods recommended.

  20. Sodium leak channel, non-selective contributes to the leak current in human myometrial smooth muscle cells from pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinl, Erin L; Cabeza, Rafael; Gregory, Ismail A; Cahill, Alison G; England, Sarah K

    2015-10-01

    Uterine contractions are tightly regulated by the electrical activity of myometrial smooth muscle cells (MSMCs). These cells require a depolarizing current to initiate Ca(2+) influx and induce contraction. Cationic leak channels, which permit a steady flow of cations into a cell, are known to cause membrane depolarization in many tissue types. Previously, a Gd(3+)-sensitive, Na(+)-dependent leak current was identified in the rat myometrium, but the presence of such a current in human MSMCs and the specific ion channel conducting this current was unknown. Here, we report the presence of a Na(+)-dependent leak current in human myometrium and demonstrate that the Na(+)-leak channel, NALCN, contributes to this current. We performed whole-cell voltage-clamp on fresh and cultured MSMCs from uterine biopsies of term, non-laboring women and isolated the leak currents by using Ca(2+) and K(+) channel blockers in the bath solution. Ohmic leak currents were identified in freshly isolated and cultured MSMCs with normalized conductances of 14.6 pS/pF and 10.0 pS/pF, respectively. The myometrial leak current was significantly reduced (P < 0.01) by treating cells with 10 μM Gd(3+) or by superfusing the cells with a Na(+)-free extracellular solution. Reverse transcriptase PCR and immunoblot analysis of uterine biopsies from term, non-laboring women revealed NALCN messenger RNA and protein expression in the myometrium. Notably, ∼90% knockdown of NALCN protein expression with lentivirus-delivered shRNA reduced the Gd(3+)-sensitive leak current density by 42% (P < 0.05). Our results reveal that NALCN, in part, generates the leak current in MSMCs and provide the basis for future research assessing NALCN as a potential molecular target for modulating uterine excitability. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. The Development of Leak Test Techniques by Means Helium Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigit Asmara Santa; Puradwi lsmu Wahyono; Deddy Haryanto; Joko Irianto; Ismu Handoyo

    2003-01-01

    The auxiliary vacuum tube used for helium leak detection has been designed. The aim is to increase measured leak test sensitivity of existing helium leak detection system from the level of 10 -3 ∼10 -5 standard cm 3 /second to 10 -8 ∼10 -10 standard cm 3 /second. The goals of installed auxiliary vacuum tube in the existing leak detection system are used for quality control test product of Fission Product Molybdenum (FPM) capsule and AgInCd safety control rod. The design requirements were established based on both of their quality control test requirement to assure their safety and reliability. The vacuum tube length was designed at least as long as 100 cm with 6 inch diameter and have leakage tightness till as low as 10 10 standard cm 3 /second. The temperature and pressure could be controlled up to 100 o C and negative pressure 10 inch Hg respectively. The vacuum tube was equipped with temperature controller system consisting of covered heater and installed 3 thermocouples which were evenly distributed along the length of tube. Pressure control system controls the inside pressure vacuum tube according to prior setpoint values. Vacuum tube temperature and pressure were controlled using combination of both prior its set-up temperature and pressure. Aluminum disks were installed at the end of covered heater used for cooling system and to protect heat hazard to operator. (author)

  2. Tube leak detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Bunji; Takamura, Koichi; Matsuda, Shigehiro; Kiyosawa, Shun-ichi; Asami, Toru; Yamada, Hiroshi; Naruse, Shin-ichi.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention detects occurrence of leakage in a steam generator, a steam heating tube, or a heat exchanger of a nuclear power plant. Namely, an vibration sensor is disposed at the rear end of a rod-like supersonic resonance member. A node portion for the vibrations of the resonance member is held by a holding member and attached to a wall surface of a can such as a boiler. With such a constitution, the resonance member is resonated by supersonic waves generated upon leakage of the tube. The vibrations are measured by the vibration sensor at the rear end. Presence of leakage is detected by utilizing one or more of resonance frequencies. Since the device adopts a resonance phenomenon, a conduction efficiency of the vibrations is high, thereby enabling to detect leakage at high sensitivity. In addition, the supersonic wave resonance member has its top end directly protruded into a pressure vessel such as a boiler by using a metal or a ceramic which is excellent in heat and pressure resistance. Accordingly, the sound of leak can be detected efficiently. (I.S.)

  3. Tightness of voter model interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sturm, A.; Swart, Jan M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 13, - (2008), s. 165-174 ISSN 1083-589X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/06/1323; GA ČR GA201/07/0237 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : long range voter model * swapping voter model * interface tightness * exclusion process Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 0.392, year: 2008 http://www.emis.de/journals/EJP-ECP/_ejpecp/index.html

  4. Analysis of SX farm leak histories - Historical leak model (HLM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredenburg, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    This report uses readily available historical information to better define the volume, chemical composition, and Cs-137/Sr-90 amounts for leaks that have occurred in the past for tanks SX-108, SX-109, SX-111, and SX-112. In particular a Historical Leak Model (HLM) is developed that is a month by month reconciliation of tank levels, fill records, and calculated boil-off rates for these tanks. The HLM analysis is an independent leak estimate that reconstructs the tank thermal histories thereby deriving each tank's evaporative volume loss and by difference, its unaccounted losses as well. The HLM analysis was meant to demonstrate the viability of its approach, not necessarily to establish the HLM leak estimates as being definitive. Past leak estimates for these tanks have invariably resorted to soil wetting arguments but the extent of soil contaminated by each leak has always been highly uncertain. There is also a great deal of uncertainty with the HLM that was not quantified in this report, but will be addressed later. These four tanks (among others) were used from 1956 to 1975 for storage of high-level waste from the Redox process at Hanford. During their operation, tank waste temperatures were often as high as 150 C (300 F), but were more typically around 130 C. The primary tank cooling was by evaporation of tank waste and therefore periodic replacement of lost volume with water was necessary to maintain each tank's inventory. This active reflux of waste resulted in very substantial turnovers in tank inventory as well as significant structural degradation of these tanks. As a result of the loss of structural integrity, each of these tanks leaked during their active periods of operation. Unfortunately, the large turnover in tank volume associated with their reflux cooling has made a determination of leak volumes very difficult. During much of these tanks operational histories, inventory losses because of evaporative cooling could have effectively masked any volume

  5. Tight or sick building syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thirumalaikolundusubramanian, P; Shanmuganadan, S [Madurai Kamaraj Univ. (India). Dept. of Geography; Uma, A [Madurai Medical Coll. (India). Dept. of Medicine and Microbiology

    1991-01-01

    Modern buildings are designed with the usual heating, air-conditioning and ventilation equipment. In most of these buildings, air is continuously recirculated and, as a result, workers suffer from tight or sick building syndrome. This syndrome is discussed with reference to symptoms of air contamination, ventilation system standards and research needs. The most common symptoms of tight building syndrome are eye, nose and throat irritation, headache, fatigue, sneezing, difficulty in wearing contact lenses, chest tightness, nausea, dizziness and dermatitis. Symptoms experienced by 50 doctors and 50 paramedical personnel working in an air-conditioned intensive care unit and operating theatres of the Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai in India were studied by means of a questionnaire survey. In the present study, respiratory and ocular symptoms were observed more in those working in operating theatres and were believed to be due to excessive use of formaldehyde used for sterilization. Various suggestions were made to prevent sick building syndrome. Moreover, the physicians treating sick individuals should be aware of the symptoms caused by indoor air pollutants as sufferers invariably require a change of environment rather than drugs. (orig.).

  6. Concentration device for leak liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kaname; Matsuda, Ken; Takabori, Ken-ichi.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve radioactivity recovery and volume-reducing rates, as well as enable safety and easy handling for leak liquids resulted from reptures in coolant circuits. Constitution: The device of the invention comprises an evaporation vessel filled with leak fluids to a predetermined level, an airtight vessel disposed in the evaporation vessel containing hydrophilic porous material partially immersed in the leak fluids and means for heating the hydrophilic material. In this device, leak liquids are absorbed in the hydrophilic porous material, a great amount of water is evaporated from the outer surface of the hydrophilic porous material exposed above the liquid surface, and salts and radioactive material are remained on the inside and the outer surface of the porous material. The evaporated water content is condensated and recovered in a cooler and the remaining salts, etc. are discarded together with the porous material. The volume-reducing property can be improved by constituting the porous material with burnable material. (Takahashi, M.)

  7. The tightness of the globe valves in the exploitations practice of the gas pipe-lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrak, T.; Rudzki, Z.; Surmacz, W.

    2006-01-01

    Technological units of the Transit Gas Pipeline (i.e. Compressor Stations, Valve Stations, Stations or National Network Service Installations) have been fitted with Ball Valves as shut-off devices (block valves). Internal tightness of the valves' seat becomes major factor in securing proper service conditions during normal pipeline operation as well as for isolating of pipeline sections in emergency situations (loss of pipeline integrity or uncontrolled gas escape). Internal tightness of the valves is being inspected during scheduled maintenance of the pipeline units. Any leak revealed during inspection is being repaired, following instructions provided in the Manufacturer's Valve Manual. After a time, some cases have been identified, when repair of the revealed leak was found to be difficult, despite close following of the repair manuals. The paper presents analysis of the issue and corrective actions taken accordingly. (authors)

  8. Mapping urban pipeline leaks: Methane leaks across Boston

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Nathan G.; Ackley, Robert; Crosson, Eric R.; Down, Adrian; Hutyra, Lucy R.; Brondfield, Max; Karr, Jonathan D.; Zhao Kaiguang; Jackson, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Natural gas is the largest source of anthropogenic emissions of methane (CH 4 ) in the United States. To assess pipeline emissions across a major city, we mapped CH 4 leaks across all 785 road miles in the city of Boston using a cavity-ring-down mobile CH 4 analyzer. We identified 3356 CH 4 leaks with concentrations exceeding up to 15 times the global background level. Separately, we measured δ 13 CH 4 isotopic signatures from a subset of these leaks. The δ 13 CH 4 signatures (mean = −42.8‰ ± 1.3‰ s.e.; n = 32) strongly indicate a fossil fuel source rather than a biogenic source for most of the leaks; natural gas sampled across the city had average δ 13 CH 4 values of −36.8‰ (±0.7‰ s.e., n = 10), whereas CH 4 collected from landfill sites, wetlands, and sewer systems had δ 13 CH 4 signatures ∼20‰ lighter (μ = −57.8‰, ±1.6‰ s.e., n = 8). Repairing leaky natural gas distribution systems will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, increase consumer health and safety, and save money. Highlights: ► We mapped 3356 methane leaks in Boston. ► Methane leaks in Boston carry an isotopic signature of pipeline natural gas. ► Replacing failing gas pipelines will provide safety, environmental, and economic benefits. - We identified 3356 methane leaks in Boston, with isotopic characteristics consistent with pipeline natural gas.

  9. Mitigated Transfer Line Leaks that Result in Surface Pools and Spray Leaks into Pits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEY, B.E.

    1999-12-07

    This analysis provides radiological and toxicological consequence calculations for postulated mitigated leaks during transfers of six waste compositions. Leaks in Cleanout Boxes equipped with supplemental covers and leaks in pits are analyzed.

  10. Mitigated Transfer Line Leaks that Result in Surface Pools and Spray Leaks into Pits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HEY, B.E.

    1999-01-01

    This analysis provides radiological and toxicological consequence calculations for postulated mitigated leaks during transfers of six waste compositions. Leaks in Cleanout Boxes equipped with supplemental covers and leaks in pits are analyzed

  11. Increasing of leak-tightness of hermetic zone and other important components in NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murani, J.

    2001-01-01

    The performed by VUEZ resealing works in the hermetic compartments/containment of WWER 440 and WWER 1000 NPPs in Slovakia (Jaslovske Bohunice V-1 NPP, Jaslovske Bohunice V-2 NPP, Mochovce NPP), the Czech Republic (Dukovany NPP, Temelin NPP) and Hungary (Pask NPP) are presented. The leakage rate from hermetic compartments at individual NPP reactor units are shown.The VUEZ activities in field of resealing of weld joints in pools and tanks in the Jaslovske Bohunice V-1 NPP and innovation of the seal of reactor pit protective hood (kolpak) are described. The principle of operation and practical experience of the SMU-V system implemented in the Jaslovske Bohunice V-1 NPP (WWER 440 - V 230) for NPP primary circuit leakage monitoring are also given

  12. Diagnosing the tight building syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, S.A.

    1987-12-01

    Formaldehyde is but one of many chemicals capable of causing the tight building syndrome or environmentally induced illness (EI). The spectrum of symptoms it may induce includes attacks of headache, flushing, laryngitis, dizziness, nausea, extreme weakness, arthralgia, unwarranted depression, dysphonia, exhaustion, inability to think clearly, arrhythmia or muscle spasms. The nonspecificity of such symptoms can baffle physicians from many specialties. Presented herein is a simple office method for demonstrating that formaldehyde is among the etiologic agents triggering these symptoms. The very symptoms that patients complain of can be provoked within minutes, and subsequently abolished, with an intradermal injection of the appropriate strength of formaldehyde. This injection aids in convincing the patient of the cause of the symptoms so he can initiate measure to bring his disease under control.

  13. Invasive tightly coupled processor arrays

    CERN Document Server

    LARI, VAHID

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces new massively parallel computer (MPSoC) architectures called invasive tightly coupled processor arrays. It proposes strategies, architecture designs, and programming interfaces for invasive TCPAs that allow invading and subsequently executing loop programs with strict requirements or guarantees of non-functional execution qualities such as performance, power consumption, and reliability. For the first time, such a configurable processor array architecture consisting of locally interconnected VLIW processing elements can be claimed by programs, either in full or in part, using the principle of invasive computing. Invasive TCPAs provide unprecedented energy efficiency for the parallel execution of nested loop programs by avoiding any global memory access such as GPUs and may even support loops with complex dependencies such as loop-carried dependencies that are not amenable to parallel execution on GPUs. For this purpose, the book proposes different invasion strategies for claiming a desire...

  14. Sensors for Fluid Leak Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Pajares Martinsanz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluid leak detection represents a problem that has attracted the interest of researchers, but not exclusively because in industries and services leaks are frequently common. Indeed, in water or gas supplies, chemical or thermal plants, sea-lines or cooling/heating systems leakage rates can cause important economic losses and sometimes, what it is more relevant, environmental pollution with human, animal or plant lives at risk. This last issue has led to increased national and international regulations with different degrees of severity regarding environmental conservation.[...

  15. RCSLK9: reactor coolant system leak rate determination for PWRs. User's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, D.C.; Woodruff, R.W.; Holland, R.A.

    1984-12-01

    RCSLK9 is a computer program that was developed to analyze the leak tightness of the primary cooling system for any pressurized water reactor. From system conditions, water levels in tanks, and certain system design parameters, RCSLK9 calculates the loss of water from the cooling system and the increase of water in the leakage collection system during an arbitrary time interval. The program determines the system leak rates and displays or prints a report of the results. For initial application of the program at a reactor, RCSLK9 creates a file of system parameters and stores it for future use. RCSLK9 is written for use on the IBM PC

  16. An algorithm for leak locating using coupled vibration of pipe-water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Sup; Yoon, Dong Jin

    2004-01-01

    Leak noise is a good source to identify the exact location of a leak point of underground water pipelines. Water leak generates broadband sound from a leak location and this sound propagation due to leak in water pipelines is not a non-dispersive wave any more because of the surrounding pipes and soil. However, the necessity of long-range detection of this leak location makes to identify low-frequency acoustic waves rather than high frequency ones. Acoustic wave propagation coupled with surrounding boundaries including cast iron pipes is theoretically analyzed and the wave velocity was confirmed with experiment. The leak locations were identified both by the Acoustic Emission (AE) method and the cross-correlation method. In a short-range distance, both the AE method and cross-correlation method are effective to detect leak position. However, the detection for a long-range distance required a lower frequency range accelerometers only because higher frequency waves were attenuated very quickly with the increase of propagation paths. Two algorithms for the cross-correlation function were suggested, and a long-range detection has been achieved at real underground water pipelines longer than 300m

  17. MWTF jumper connector integral seal block development and leak testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruff, E.S.; Jordan, S.R.

    1995-01-01

    In fiscal year 1993, tests of an o-ring/tetraseal retainer designed to replace a gasket-type seal used in PUREX-type process jumper connectors encouraged the design of an improved seal block. This new seal block combines several parts into one unitized component called an integral seal block. This report summarizes development and leak testing of the new integral seal block. The integral seal block uses a standard o-ring nested in a groove to accomplish leak tightness. This seal block eliminates the need to machine acme threads into the lower skirt casting and seal retainers, eliminates tolerance stack-up, reduces parts inventory, and eliminates an unnecessary leak path in the jumper connector assembly. This report also includes test data on various types of o-ring materials subjected to heat and pressure. Materials tested included Viton, Kalrez, and fluorosilicone, with some incidental data on teflon coated silicone o-rings. Test experience clearly demonstrates the need to test each seal material for temperature and pressure in its intended application. Some materials advertised as being open-quotes betterclose quotes at higher temperatures did not perform up to expectations. Inspection of the fluorosilicone and Kalrez seals after thermal testing indicates that they are much more susceptible to heat softening than Viton

  18. Detecting leaks in vacuum bags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlstrom, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    Small leaks in vacuum bag can be readily detected by eye, using simple chemical reaction: combination of ammonia and acetic acid vapors to produce cloudy white smoke. Technique has been successfully used to test seam integrity and to identify minute pinholes in vacuum bag used in assembly of ceramic-tile heat shield for Space Shuttle Orbiter.

  19. LOCATING LEAKS WITH ACOUSTIC TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many water distribution systems in this country are almost 100 years old. About 26 percent of piping in these systems is made of unlined cast iron or steel and is in poor condition. Many methods that locate leaks in these pipes are time-consuming, costly, disruptive to operations...

  20. Pipe Leak Detection Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has determined that one of the nation’s biggest infrastructural needs is the replacement or rehabilitation of the water distribution and transmission systems. The institution of more effective pipe leak detection technology will im...

  1. Reliability of leak detection systems in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.

    1986-10-01

    In this paper, NRC guidelines for leak detection will be reviewed, current practices described, potential safety-related problems discussed, and potential improvements in leak detection technology (with emphasis on acoustic methods) evaluated

  2. Stochastic Consequence Analysis for Waste Leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HEY, B.E.

    2000-01-01

    This analysis evaluates the radiological consequences of potential Hanford Tank Farm waste transfer leaks. These include ex-tank leaks into structures, underneath the soil, and exposed to the atmosphere. It also includes potential misroutes, tank overflow

  3. Simulation of leaking fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hozer, Z.

    2006-01-01

    The behaviour of failed fuel rods includes several complex phenomena. The cladding failure initiates the release of fission product from the fuel and in case of large defect even urania grains can be released into the coolant. In steady state conditions an equilibrium - diffusion type - release is expected. During transients the release is driven by a convective type leaching mechanism. There are very few experimental data on leaking WWER fuel rods. For this reason the activity measurements at the nuclear power plants provide very important information. The evaluation of measured data can help in the estimation of failed fuel rod characteristics and the prediction of transient release dynamics in power plant transients. The paper deals with the simulation of leaking fuel rods under steady state and transient conditions and describes the following new results: 1) A new algorithm has been developed for the simulation of leaking fuel rods under steady state conditions and the specific parameters of the model for the Paks NPP has been determined; 2) The steady state model has been applied to calculation of leaking fuel characteristics using iodine and noble gas activity measurement data; 3) A new computational method has been developed for the simulation of leaking fuel rods under transient conditions and the specific parameters for the Paks NPP has been determined; 4) The transient model has been applied to the simulation of shutdown process at the Paks NPP and for the prediction of the time and magnitude of 123 I activity peak; 5) Using Paks NPP data a conservative value has been determined for the upper limit of the 123 I release from failed fuel rods during transients

  4. Imaging review of cerebrospinal fluid leaks

    OpenAIRE

    Naga V Vemuri; Lakshmi S P Karanam; Venkatesh Manchikanti; Srinivas Dandamudi; Sampath K Puvvada; Vineet K Vemuri

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak occurs due to a defect in the dura and skull base. Trauma remains the most common cause of CSF leak; however, a significant number of cases are iatrogenic, and result from a complication of functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Early diagnosis of CSF leak is of paramount importance to prevent life-threatening complications such as brain abscess and meningitis. Imaging plays a crucial role in the detection and characterization of CSF leaks. Three-dimensiona...

  5. Helium leak testing methods in nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Anis

    2004-01-01

    Helium mass-spectrometer leak test is the most sensitive leak test method. It gives very reliable and sensitive test results. In last few years application of helium leak testing has gained more importance due to increased public awareness of safety and environment pollution caused by number of growing chemical and other such industries. Helium leak testing is carried out and specified in most of the critical area applications like nuclear, space, chemical and petrochemical industries

  6. Calibration of a leak detection spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geller, R.

    1958-01-01

    This paper describes a study of the possible methods for calibrating a leak detection spectrometer, and the estimation of outputs from the leaks is considered. With this in mind the question of sensitivity of leak detection is tackled on a very general level; first the sensitivity of the isolated instrument is determined, and then the sensitivity of an instrument connected to an installation where leaks may be suspected. Finally, practical solutions are proposed. (author) [fr

  7. Intraoperative leak testing has no correlation with leak after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Monica; Zagzag, Jonathan; Patel, Karan; Magrath, Melissa; Somoza, Eduardo; Parikh, Manish S; Saunders, John K; Ude-Welcome, Aku; Schwack, Bradley F; Kurian, Marina S; Fielding, George A; Ren-Fielding, Christine J

    2016-03-01

    Staple line leak is a serious complication of sleeve gastrectomy. Intraoperative methylene blue and air leak tests are routinely used to evaluate for leak; however, the utility of these tests is controversial. We hypothesize that the practice of routine intraoperative leak testing is unnecessary during sleeve gastrectomy. A retrospective cohort study was designed using a prospectively collected database of seven bariatric surgeons from two institutions. All patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy from March 2012 to November 2014 were included. The performance of intraoperative leak testing and the type of test (air or methylene blue) were based on surgeon preference. Data obtained included BMI, demographics, comorbidity, presence of intraoperative leak test, result of test, and type of test. The primary outcome was leak rate between the leak test (LT) and no leak test (NLT) groups. SAS version 9.4 was used for univariate and multivariate analyses. A total of 1550 sleeve gastrectomies were included; most were laparoscopic (99.8%), except for one converted and two open cases. Routine intraoperative leak tests were performed in 1329 (85.7%) cases, while 221 (14.3%) did not have LTs. Of the 1329 cases with LTs, there were no positive intraoperative results. Fifteen (1%) patients developed leaks, with no difference in leak rate between the LT and NLT groups (1 vs. 1%, p = 0.999). After adjusting for baseline differences between the groups with a propensity analysis, the observed lack of association between leak and intraoperative leak test remained. In this cohort, leaks presented at a mean of 17.3 days postoperatively (range 1-67 days). Two patients with staple line leaks underwent repeat intraoperative leak testing at leak presentation, and the tests remained negative. Intraoperative leak testing has no correlation with leak due to laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and is not predictive of the later development of staple line leak.

  8. Crack growth of throughwall flaw in Alloy 600 tube during leak testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahn, Chi Bum; Majumdar, Saurin

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A series of leak testing was conducted at a constant pressure and room temperature. • The time-dependent increase in the leak rate was observed. • The fractography revealed slip offsets and crystallographic facets. • Time-dependent plasticity at the crack tip caused the slip offsets. • Fatigue by jet/structure interaction caused the crystallographic facets. - Abstract: We examined the issue of whether crack growth in a full thickness material can occur in a leaking crack. A series of leak tests was conducted at a room temperature and constant pressure (17.3 MPa) with Alloy 600 tube specimens containing a tight rectangular throughwall axial fatigue crack. To exclude a potential pulsation effect by a high pressure pump, the test water was pressurized by using high pressure nitrogen gas. Fractography showed that crack growth in the full thickness material can occur in the leaking crack by two mechanisms: time-dependent plasticity at the crack tip and fatigue induced by jet/structure interaction. The threshold leak rate at which the jet/structure interaction was triggered was between 1.3 and 3.3 L/min for the specific heat of the Alloy 600 tube tested

  9. Tightly Secure Signatures From Lossy Identification Schemes

    OpenAIRE

    Abdalla , Michel; Fouque , Pierre-Alain; Lyubashevsky , Vadim; Tibouchi , Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we present three digital signature schemes with tight security reductions in the random oracle model. Our first signature scheme is a particularly efficient version of the short exponent discrete log-based scheme of Girault et al. (J Cryptol 19(4):463–487, 2006). Our scheme has a tight reduction to the decisional short discrete logarithm problem, while still maintaining the non-tight reduction to the computational version of the problem upon which the or...

  10. Passive Leak Detection Using Commercial Hydrogen Colorimetric Indicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Kevin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, William [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rivkin, Carl [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Element One, Inc. (www.elem.com), a small business with in Boulder, CO, has been developing hydrogen detection technology based upon a highly selective colorimetric indicator. In its native state, the indicator pigment is a pale gray color, but becomes black upon exposure to hydrogen. The colorimetric change can be readily observed by the naked eye without the need for supplemental electronics or other hardware. Recently, the colorimetric indicator was integrated into a pliable, self-adhesive tape that can readily wrap around pneumatic fittings to serve as a hydrogen leak detector. A prototype version of the Element One indicator tape was tested within an NREL hydrogen system and successfully identified the unexpected presence of a small leak; a summary document for this case study is presented in Appendix 1. The tape was subsequently configured into 10-foot rolls as a product prototype that has just recently been commercialized and marketed under the tradename DetecTape(R). Figure 1 shows the commercial version of DetecTape along with an indicator sample in its native state and one that had been exposed to hydrogen. DetecTape is a self-adhesive silicone-based tape impregnated with a proprietary hydrogen-sensitive indicator based on transition metal oxides. A length of the tape can be cut from the roll and stretched by a factor of two or three times around a fitting. Due to the self-adhesive property of the tape, this provides a tight seal around the fitting. The seal is not hermetic, and is not intended to prevent the release of a leaking gas. However, a portion of the hydrogen leaking from a wrapped fitting will pass through the tape and react with the active indicator impregnated within the tape, thereby inducing blackening.

  11. Nuclear fuel element leak detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, C.D. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a leak detection system integral with a wall of a building used to fabricate nuclear fuel elements for detecting radiation leakage from the nuclear fuel elements as the fuel elements exit the building. The leak detecting system comprises a shielded compartment constructed to withstand environmental hazards extending into a similarly constructed building and having sealed doors on both ends along with leak detecting apparatus connected to the compartment. The leak detecting system provides a system for removing a nuclear fuel element from its fabrication building while testing for radiation leaks in the fuel element

  12. Leak testing and repair of fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozman, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    The leak testing, reporting and vacuum leak repair techniques of the MFTF yin-yang number one magnet system, the world's largest superconducting magnet system, are discussed. Based on this experience, techniques will be developed for testing and repairing leaks on the 42 MFTF-B magnets. The leak-hunting techniques for the yin-yang magnet systems were applied to two helium circuits (the coil bundle and guard vacuum; both require helium flow for magnet cooldown), their associated piping, liquid nitrogen radiation shields, and piping. Additionally, during MFTF-B operation there will be warm water plasma shields and piping that require leak checking

  13. Leak rate measurements and detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.; Shack, W.J.; Claytor, T.

    1983-10-01

    A research program is under way to evaluate and develop improve leak detection systems. The primary focus of the work has been on acoustic emission detection of leaks. Leaks from artificial flaws, laboratory-generated IGSCCs and thermal fatigue cracks, and field-induced intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCCs) from reactor piping have been examined. The effects of pressure, temperature, and leak rate and geometry on the acoustic signature are under study. The use of cross-correlation techniques for leak location and pattern recognition and autocorrelation for source discrimination is also being considered

  14. Leak detection by vibrational diagnostic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siklossy, P.

    1983-01-01

    The possibilities and methods of leak detection due to mechanical failures in nuclear power plants are reviewed on the basis of the literature. Great importance is attributed to vibrational diagnostic methods for their adventageous characteristics which enable them to become final leak detecting methods. The problems of noise analysis, e.g. leak detection by impact sound measurements, probe characteristics, gain problems, probe selection, off-line analysis and correlation functions, types of leak noises etc. are summarized. Leak detection based on noise analysis can be installed additionally to power plants. Its maintenance and testing is simple. On the other hand, it requires special training and measuring methods. (Sz.J.)

  15. The role of leak air in a double-wall chimney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenegger, Klaus; Hebenstreit, Babette; Pointner, Christian; Schmidl, Christoph; Höftberger, Ernst

    2015-06-01

    In modern buildings with tight shells, often room-independent air supply is required for proper operation of biomass stoves. One possibility to arrange this supply is to use a double-wall chimney with flue gas leaving through the pipe and fresh air entering through the annular gap. A one-dimensional quasi-static model based on balance equations has been developed and compared with experimental data. Inclusion of leak air is crucial for reproduction of the experimental results.

  16. Leaking electricity in domestic appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, Alan; Rosen, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Many types of home electronic equipment draw electric power when switched off or not performing their principal functions. Standby power use (or ''leaking electricity'') for most appliances ranges from 1 - 20 watts. Even though standby use of each device is small, the combined standby power use of all appliances in a home can easily exceed 50 watts. Leaking electricity is already responsible for 5 to 10 percent of residential electricity use in the United States and over 10 percent in Japan. An increasing number of white goods also have standby power requirements. There is a growing international effort to limit standby power to around one watt per device. New and existing technologies are available to meet this target at little or no extra cost

  17. Leak testing. Environment and workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Workplaces specified for leak testing are divided into clean workplaces of the 1st degree, clean workplaces of the second degree, clean workplaces of the third degree and semi-clean workplaces. Clean workplaces are further subdivided into permanent and temporary workplaces. For all said types of workplaces the standard sets the following provisions: basic equipment, machines and instrumentation, permitted and prohibited working activities and principles for maintenance and inspection. (E.S.)

  18. Hydrogen Leak Detection Sensor Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Barton D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the characteristics of the Hydrogen Sensor database. The database is the result of NASA's continuing interest in and improvement of its ability to detect and assess gas leaks in space applications. The database specifics and a snapshot of an entry in the database are reviewed. Attempts were made to determine the applicability of each of the 65 sensors for ground and/or vehicle use.

  19. Repair of EL4 leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    The reactor shutdown was decided on the 15th of November 1984, because the evolution of the carbon dioxide quantity in the helium blanket of the heavy water. Leaks have been localized on three different channels. Repairs have been made in hard conditions taking into account the reactor state (materials strongly irradiated). The restart has been authorized on the 24th of January 1985 [fr

  20. Steam and electroheating remediation of tight soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balshaw-Biddle, K.; Oubre, C.L.; Ward, C.H. [eds.; Dablow, J.F. III; Pearce, J.A.; Johnson, P.C.

    2000-07-01

    In the past few decades the need for soil remediation has become urgent, even more necessary--innovative, cost effective methods. Steam and Electroheating Remediation of Tight Soils presents the results of a field study testing the cleanup of semi-volatile fuels from tight soils using combination of hydraulic fracturing and soil heating technologies.

  1. Development of sodium leak detectors for PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sylvia, J.I.; Rao, P. Vijayamohana; Babu, B.; Madhusoodanan, K.; Rajan, K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sodium leak detection system developed for PFBR using diverse principle. ► Miniature, remotely locatable diverse leak detector developed for Main Vessel. ► Mutual inductance type leak detectors designed and adapted for different locations. ► Sodium Ionisation detectors used for area monitoring. ► Crosswire type leak detector designed, developed and tested. - Abstract: The 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is under advanced stage of construction at Kalpakkam near Chennai in India. The wide and high operating temperature, highly chemically active nature of sodium and its reaction with air make the sodium instrumentation complex over the conventional instrumentation. Over the years, traditional instruments such as wire type leak detectors, spark plug type leak detectors were developed and used in different sodium systems. The redundant and diverse leak detection method calls for development of special instrumentation for sodium systems which include sodium ionization (leak) detector for detecting minute sodium leak in addition to those systems based on mutual inductance principle. For detection of sodium leak from reactor Main Vessel (MV), diverse methods are used such as miniature, remotely locatable, Mutual Inductance type Leak Detector(MILD) and specially modified spark plug type leak detector. The design of MILD is suitably modified for detecting leak in double wall pipes and Diverse Safety Rod drive Mechanism (DSRDM). Steam/water leak in steam generator produces hydrogen and leads to high pressure and temperature in the system. Rupture disc is used as a safety device which punctures itself due to sudden pressure rise. To detect the discharge of sodium and its reaction products at the downstream of the rupture disc due to bursting of the rupture disc, cross wire type leak detector has been designed, developed and tested. The selection of the leak detection system depends on the location where leak has to be detected. This paper

  2. Leak detection capability in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azer, N.; Barber, D.H.; Boucher, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper addresses the moisture leak detection capability of Ontario Hydro CANDU reactors which has been demonstrated by performing tests on the reactor. The tests confirmed the response of the annulus gas system (AGS) to the presence of moisture injected to simulate a pressure tube leak and also confirmed the dew point response assumed in leak before break assessments. The tests were performed on Bruce A Unit 4 by injecting known and controlled rates of heavy water vapor. To avoid condensation during test conditions, the amount of moisture which could be injected was small (2-3.5 g/hr). The test response demonstrated that the AGS is capable of detecting and annunciating small leaks. Thus confidence is provided that it would alarm for a growing pressure tube leak where the leak rate is expected to increase to kg/hr rapidly. The measured dew point response was close to that predicted by analysis

  3. Leak detection capability in CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azer, N.; Barber, D.H.; Boucher, P.J. [and others

    1997-04-01

    This paper addresses the moisture leak detection capability of Ontario Hydro CANDU reactors which has been demonstrated by performing tests on the reactor. The tests confirmed the response of the annulus gas system (AGS) to the presence of moisture injected to simulate a pressure tube leak and also confirmed the dew point response assumed in leak before break assessments. The tests were performed on Bruce A Unit 4 by injecting known and controlled rates of heavy water vapor. To avoid condensation during test conditions, the amount of moisture which could be injected was small (2-3.5 g/hr). The test response demonstrated that the AGS is capable of detecting and annunciating small leaks. Thus confidence is provided that it would alarm for a growing pressure tube leak where the leak rate is expected to increase to kg/hr rapidly. The measured dew point response was close to that predicted by analysis.

  4. Acoustic leak detection of LMFBR steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo

    1993-01-01

    The development of a water leak detector with short response time for LMFBR steam generators is required to prevent the failure propagation caused by the sodium-water reaction and to maintain structural safety in steam generators. The development of an acoustic leak detector assuring short response time has attracted. The purpose of this paper is to confirm the basic detection feasibility of the active acoustic leak detector, and to investigate the leak detection method by erasing the background noise by spectrum analysis of the passive acoustic leak detector. From a comparison of the leak detection sensitivity of the active and the passive method, the active method is not influenced remarkably by the background noise, and it has possibility to detect microleakage with short response time. We anticipate a practical application of the active method in the future. (author)

  5. Paravalvular Leak in Structural Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Kashish; Eleid, Mackram F

    2018-03-06

    This review will summarize the growing importance of diagnosing and managing paravalvular leak associated with surgical and transcatheter valves. The burden of paravalvular leak is increasing; however, advanced imaging techniques and high degree of clinical suspicion are required for diagnosis and management. The latest data from pivotal clinical trials in the field of transcatheter aortic valve replacement suggest that any paravalvular leak greater than mild was associated with worse clinical outcomes. Percutaneous techniques for paravalvular leak closure are now the preferred approach, and surgical repair is reserved for contraindications and unsuccessful procedures. Recent data from studies evaluating paravalvular leak closure outcomes report a greater than 90% success rate with a significant improvement in patient symptoms. Paravalvular leak is a growing problem in the structural heart disease arena. Percutaneous closure is successful in more than 90% of the procedures with a low complication rate.

  6. Benign Biliary Strictures and Leaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devière, Jacques

    2015-10-01

    The major causes of benign biliary strictures include surgery, chronic pancreatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and autoimmune cholangitis. Biliary leaks mainly occur after surgery and, rarely, abdominal trauma. These conditions may benefit from a nonsurgical approach in which endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) plays a pivotal role in association with other minimally invasive approaches. This approach should be evaluated for any injury before deciding about the method for repair. ERCP, associated with peroral cholangioscopy, plays a growing role in characterizing undeterminate strictures, avoiding both unuseful major surgeries and palliative options that might compromise any further management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Leak detection of KNI seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranyai, G.; Peter, A.; Windberg, P.

    1990-03-01

    In Unit 3 and 4 of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary, KNI type seals are used as lead-throughs with conical nickel sealing rings. Their failure can be critical for the operation of the reactor. An Acoustical Leak Detection System (ALDS) was constructed and tested for the operational testing of the seals. Some individual papers are presented in this collection on the calibration and testing of the ALDS intended to be placed on the top of the reactor vessels. The papers include simulation measurements of Unit 3 of NPP, laboratory experiments, evaluation of measurements, and further development needs with the ALDS. (R.P.) 50 figs.; 19 tabs

  8. Vacuum leak detector and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jr., David

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting leakage in a vacuum system involves a moisture trap chamber connected to the vacuum system and to a pressure gauge. Moisture in the trap chamber is captured by freezing or by a moisture adsorbent to reduce the residual water vapor pressure therein to a negligible amount. The pressure gauge is then read to determine whether the vacuum system is leaky. By directing a stream of carbon dioxide or helium at potentially leaky parts of the vacuum system, the apparatus can be used with supplemental means to locate leaks.

  9. Ultrasensitive leak detection during ultrahigh vacuum evacuation by quadrupole mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xu; Huang Tianbin; Wang Ligong; Jin Qiji; Cha Liangzhen

    2006-01-01

    One must do ultrasensitive leak detection during ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) evacuation, especially just before the device is sealed off from the vacuum system, to guarantee the longevity of the sealed high-vacuum or even UHV devices with small volume. A quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) with an UHV evacuation system can be used under accumulation mode to do the testing. Possible accumulate modes, as well as their advantages and shortcomings, are studied experimentally and discussed in this paper. We found that the opening action of the metal valve during accumulation mode always severely affects the height of the peak indicated by QMS and causes considerable errors. If we determine the leak rate by the peak area instead of the peak height, the situation is much improved. This method has proven quite useful in ensuring the tightness quality for complex sealed UHV devices with small volumes. Ultrasensitive leak detection has been carried out for such real evacuating devices, and a leak rate of 2x10 -14 Pa·m 3 /s was detected, which is far lower than its dynamic mode and the detection limit of the current advanced commercial leak detectors

  10. Acoustic emission leak monitoring system LMS-96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, J.; Cvrcek, M.; Mueller, L.

    1997-01-01

    On-line acoustic emission leak monitoring under industrial conditions of nuclear power plants is a problem with specific features setting specific demands on the leak monitoring system. The paper briefly reviews those problems (attenuation pattern of a real structure, acoustic background, alarm system, etc.) and the solution of some of them is discussed. Information is presented on the Acoustic Emission Leak Monitoring System LMS-96 by SKODA NUCLEAR MACHINERY and the system's function is briefly described. (author)

  11. Leak detection using structure-borne noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Stephen D. (Inventor); Chimenti, Dale E. (Inventor); Roberts, Ronald A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for detection and location of air leaks in a pressure vessel, such as a spacecraft, includes sensing structure-borne ultrasound waveforms associated with turbulence caused by a leak from a plurality of sensors and cross correlating the waveforms to determine existence and location of the leak. Different configurations of sensors and corresponding methods can be used. An apparatus for performing the methods is also provided.

  12. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy in patients with bile leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carichner, S.L.; Nagle, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy has been recognized as a useful tool in detecting the presence and sites of bile leaks. The clinical settings in which bile leaks are likely to occur, as well as some of the scintigraphic patterns seen in patients with bile leaks, are reviewed here. Tips for technologists are offered on interventions that might enhanced the quality of information available to the nuclear physician

  13. Role of non-destructive examinations in leak testing of glove boxes for industrial scale plutonium handling at nuclear fuel fabrication facility along with case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aher, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Non Destructive Examinations has the prominent role at Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Facilities. Specifically NDE has contributed at utmost stratum in Leak Testing of Glove Boxes and qualifying them as a Class-I confinement for safe Plutonium handling at industrial scale. Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility, BARC, Tarapur is engaged in fabrication of Plutonium based MOX (PuO 2 , DDUO 2 ) fuel with different enrichments for first core of PFBR reactor. Alpha- Leak Tight Glove Boxes along with HEPA Filters and dynamic ventilation form the promising engineering system for safe and reliable handling of plutonium bearing materials considering the radiotoxicity and risk associated with handling of plutonium. Leak Testing of Glove Boxes which involves the leak detection, leak rectification and leak quantifications is major challenging task. To accomplish this challenge, various Non Destructive Testing methods have assisted in promising way to achieve the stringent leak rate criterion for commissioning of Glove Box facilities for plutonium handling. This paper highlights the Role of various NDE techniques like Soap Solution Test, Argon Sniffer Test, Pressure Drop/Rise Test etc. in Glove Box Leak Testing along with procedure and methodology for effective rectification of leakage points. A Flow Chart consisting of Glove Box leak testing procedure starting from preliminary stage up to qualification stage along with a case study and observations are discussed in this paper. (author)

  14. Tight connection between fission gas discharge channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, W.; Peehs, M.; Rau, P.; Krug, W.; Stechemesser, H.

    1978-01-01

    The invention is concerned with the tight connection between the fission gas discharge channel, leading away from the support plate of a gas-cooled reactor, and the top of the fuel element suspended from this support plate. The closure is designed to be gas-tight for the suspended as well as for the released fuel element. The tight connection has got an annular body resting on the core support plate in the mouth region of the fission gas discharge channel. This body is connected with the fission gas discharge channel in the fuel element top fitting via a gas-tight part and supported by a compression spring. Care is taken for sealing if the fuel element is removal. (RW) [de

  15. Acoustic surveillance techniques for SGU leak monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, J.A.; Rowley, R.; Beesley, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents a brief review of the acoustic techniques applicable to the detection of steam generator unit leaks that have been studied in the UK. Before discussion of the acoustic detection methods a reference representation of the required performance as developed in the UK is given. The conclusion is made that preliminary specification for the acoustic leak detection of sodium/water leaks in steam generating units suggests that it will be necessary to detect better than a leak rate of 3 g/s within a few seconds. 10 refs, 12 figs

  16. Experimental investigations concerning the suitability of channel systems for liner leak detection and drainage of a prestressed concrete vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, M.; Breitbach, G.; Altes, J.; Escherich, K.H.; Wolters, J.

    1985-02-01

    The iternal surfaces of prestressed concrete pressure vessels are fitted with a steel liner to preserve the gas tightness of the primary circuit. Because of the high quality manufacture and the loading conditions a linear failure can be practically excluded. However, if it is hypothetically assumed, that a leak develops during reactor operation, it may be difficult to determine the position of the leak, because the linear area is very large. For tightness surveillance and for venting channel systems installed in close proximity to the linear are suitable. The suitability of such channels for leak detection, localisation and venting was investigated experimentally. A concrete wall (length 2.5 m, height 2.0 m, thickness 0.5 m) was constructed, covered on one side with a steel liner. Behind the liner two different channel systems have been installed. For the simulation of leaks holes were drilled into the liner. The experimental programm contained the following measurements: determination of gas flow rates into the different leaks, distribution of leakage gas over the array of channels and determination of pressures into the concrete and immediately behind the liner. The experiments have shown, that channel arrays immediately adjacent to the liner are the most suitable systems for localisation and controlled exhaust of leakage gas. The suitability decreases, if the channels are set into the concrete somewhat distant from the liner. (orig.) [de

  17. Summary of PWR leak detection studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, J.H.; Elia, F.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic analysis can be used to determine the location and magnitude of leaks inside and location of leaks outside a pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment as required by plant technical specifications. The major advantage of this detection method is that it minimizes radiation exposure of maintenance personnel because most of the leak detection process is performed from the control room outside containment. Plant-specific analyses are utilized to predict change in parameters such as local dew point temperature, relative humidity, dry bulb temperature, and flow rate to sump for various leak rates and enthalpies. These parameter responses are then programmed into the plant computer and instrumentation is provided for area monitoring. The actual inputs are continuously monitored and compared to the predicted plant responses to identify the leak location and quantify the leak. This study concludes that a system that monitors dew point (or relative humidity) and dry bulb temperature changes together with the flow rate to the sump will provide the capability to both locate and quantify a leak inside a containment, while a system that monitors dew point temperature (or relative humidity) changes will provide the capability to locate a leak outside a containment

  18. ISOLDE Off-line Gas Leak Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Kristoffer Bested

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates gas injection system of the ISOLDE Off-line separator. A quadrupole mass spectrometer is used to analysis the composition of the gas. Based on these measurements a contamination of the injected gas is found and a system upgrade is purposed. Furthermore a calibration of the leak rate of the leak valve is made.

  19. Leak testing requirements at a research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    Since September, 1952, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has conducted pioneering research in applied science. A vital part of this activity has been the development of a variety of high vacuum and ultrahigh vacuum systems. Leaks occur in everything, including vacuum systems. The mass spectrometer leak detection equipment is described

  20. Capacitive system detects and locates fluid leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Electronic monitoring system automatically detects and locates minute leaks in seams of large fluid storage tanks and pipelines covered with thermal insulation. The system uses a capacitive tape-sensing element that is adhesively bonded over seams where fluid leaks are likely to occur.

  1. Helium leak and chemical impurities control technology in HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochio, Daisuke; Shimizu, Atsushi; Hamamoto, Shimpei; Sakaba, Nariaki

    2014-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has designed and developed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) hydrogen cogeneration system named gas turbine high-temperature reactor (GTHTR300C) as a commercial HTGR. Helium gas is used as the primary coolant in HTGR. Helium gas is easy to leak, and the primary helium leakage should be controlled tightly from the viewpoint of preventing the release of radioactive materials to the environment. Moreover from the viewpoint of preventing the oxidization of graphite and metallic material, the helium coolant chemistry should be controlled tightly. The primary helium leakage and the helium coolant chemistry during the operation is the major factor in the HTGR for commercialization of HTGR system. This paper shows the design concept and the obtained operational experience on the primary helium leakage control and primary helium impurity control in the high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) of JAEA. Moreover, the future plan to obtain operational experience of these controls for commercialization of HTGR system is shown. (author)

  2. Leak detector of liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himeno, Yoshiaki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To arrange a cable core connected to a leakage current detector on the outer wall of piping for liquid sodium, devices or the like and apply a voltage to said core and outer wall to quickly and securely detect the leakage of liquid sodium. Structure: A cable, which is composed of metal coating formed of metal material (copper, steel, stainless, etc.) which is apt to be corroded by reaction products of liquid sodium with water and oxygen in air, and metal oxide (such as magnesium oxide, beryllium oxide, aluminum oxide) as an electric insulator is arranged on the outer wall of pipes or devices. In the event sodium is leaked from the pipes or devices, said metal coating and the insulator are corroded, and the leakage of sodium is sensed by a leakage current detector through the core in the cable. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Leak detection for underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durgin, P.B.; Young, T.M.

    1993-01-01

    This symposium was held in New Orleans, Louisiana on January 29, 1992. The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on leak detection for underground storage tanks that leaked fuel. A widespread concern was protection of groundwater supplies from these leaking tanks. In some cases, the papers report on research that was conducted two or three years ago but has never been adequately directed to the underground storage tank leak-detection audience. In other cases, the papers report on the latest leak-detection research. The symposium was divided into four sessions that were entitled: Internal Monitoring; External Monitoring; Regulations and Standards; and Site and Risk Evaluation. Individual papers have been cataloged separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  4. SCTI chemical leak detection test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Tests will be conducted on the CRBRP prototype steam generator at SCTI to determine the effects of steam generator geometry on the response of the CRBRP chemical leak detection system to small water-to-sodium leaks in various regions of the steam generator. Specifically, small injections of hydrogen gas (simulating water leaks) will be made near the two tubesheets, and the effective transport times to the main stream exit and vent line hydrogen meters will be measured. The magnitude and time characteristics of the meters' response will also be measured. This information will be used by the Small Leak Protection Base Program (SG027) for improved predictions of meter response times and leak detection sensitivity

  5. Small sodium-to-gas leak behavior in relation to LMFBR leak detection system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopenfeld, J.; Taylor, G.R.; James, L.A.

    1976-01-01

    Various aspects of sodium-to-gas leaks which must be considered in the design of leak detection systems for LMFBR's are discussed. Attention is focused primarily on small, weeping type leaks. Corrosion rates of steels in fused sodium hydroxide and corrosion damage observed at the site of small leaks lead to the conclusion that the sodium-gas reaction products could attack the primary hot leg piping at rates up to 0.08 mils per hour. Based on theoretical considerations of the corrosion mechanism and on visual observations of pipe topography following small sodium leak tests, it is concluded that pipe damage will be manifested by the formation of small detectable leaks prior to the appearance of larger leaks. The case for uniform pipe corrosion along the pipe circumference or along a vertical section of the pipe is also examined. Using a theoretical model for the gravity flow of sodium and reaction products along the pipe surface and a mass transport controlled corrosion process, it is shown that below sodium leak rates of about 30 g/hr for the primary piping corrosion damage will not extend beyond one radius distance from the leak site. A method of estimating the time delay between the initiation of such leaks and the development of a larger leak due to increased pipe stresses resulting from corrosion is presented

  6. Leak Signature Space: An Original Representation for Robust Leak Location in Water Distribution Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna V. Casillas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an original model-based scheme for leak location using pressure sensors in water distribution networks is introduced. The proposed approach is based on a new representation called the Leak Signature Space (LSS that associates a specific signature to each leak location being minimally affected by leak magnitude. The LSS considers a linear model approximation of the relation between pressure residuals and leaks that is projected onto a selected hyperplane. This new approach allows to infer the location of a given leak by comparing the position of its signature with other leak signatures. Moreover, two ways of improving the method’s robustness are proposed. First, by associating a domain of influence to each signature and second, through a time horizon analysis. The efficiency of the method is highlighted by means of a real network using several scenarios involving different number of sensors and considering the presence of noise in the measurements.

  7. A mathematical model for leak location and leak area determination in pipeline networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyedokun O.I.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prompt leak location and leak area determination in oil and gas pipeline installations is an indispensable approach to controlling petroleum products wastages in pipes. However, there is an evident lack of literature information on this subject. In this paper, we modelled leak location detection and leak area determination in pipes by applying two methodologies and gave an illustrative example using simulated data with the aid of Matlab. A comparison of these two approaches resulted in an error of 6.24%, suggesting that the closer the leak is to the measurement station, the lower will be the time interval between two successive waves that will pass through the leak and get to the measurement station. The relationship between the pipe area and coefficient of reflection is parabolic. This contribution is valuable to pipeline engineers in the economic control of leaks.

  8. Ultrasonic Detectors Safely Identify Dangerous, Costly Leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In 1990, NASA grounded its space shuttle fleet. The reason: leaks detected in the hydrogen fuel systems of the Space Shuttles Atlantis and Columbia. Unless the sources of the leaks could be identified and fixed, the shuttles would not be safe to fly. To help locate the existing leaks and check for others, Kennedy Space Center engineers used portable ultrasonic detectors to scan the fuel systems. As a gas or liquid escapes from a leak, the resulting turbulence creates ultrasonic noise, explains Gary Mohr, president of Elmsford, New York-based UE Systems Inc., a long-time leader in ultrasonic detector technologies. "In lay terms, the leak is like a dog whistle, and the detector is like the dog ear." Because the ultrasound emissions from a leak are highly localized, they can be used not only to identify the presence of a leak but also to help pinpoint a leak s location. The NASA engineers employed UE s detectors to examine the shuttle fuel tanks and solid rocket boosters, but encountered difficulty with the devices limited range-certain areas of the shuttle proved difficult or unsafe to scan up close. To remedy the problem, the engineers created a long-range attachment for the detectors, similar to "a zoom lens on a camera," Mohr says. "If you are on the ground, and the leak is 50 feet away, the detector would now give you the same impression as if you were only 25 feet away." The enhancement also had the effect of reducing background noise, allowing for a clearer, more precise detection of a leak s location.

  9. An introduction to finite tight frames

    CERN Document Server

    Waldron, Shayne F D

    2018-01-01

    This textbook is an introduction to the theory and applications of finite tight frames, an area that has developed rapidly in the last decade. Stimulating much of this growth are the applications of finite frames to diverse fields such as signal processing, quantum information theory, multivariate orthogonal polynomials, and remote sensing. Key features and topics: * First book entirely devoted to finite frames * Extensive exercises and MATLAB examples for classroom use * Important examples, such as harmonic and Heisenberg frames, are presented in preliminary chapters, encouraging readers to explore and develop an intuitive feeling for tight frames * Later chapters delve into general theory details and recent research results * Many illustrations showing the special aspects of the geometry of finite frames * Provides an overview of the field of finite tight frames * Discusses future research directions in the field Featuring exercises and MATLAB examples in each chapter, the book is well suited as a textbook ...

  10. Imaging review of cerebrospinal fluid leaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemuri, Naga V; Karanam, Lakshmi S P; Manchikanti, Venkatesh; Dandamudi, Srinivas; Puvvada, Sampath K; Vemuri, Vineet K

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak occurs due to a defect in the dura and skull base. Trauma remains the most common cause of CSF leak; however, a significant number of cases are iatrogenic, and result from a complication of functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Early diagnosis of CSF leak is of paramount importance to prevent life-threatening complications such as brain abscess and meningitis. Imaging plays a crucial role in the detection and characterization of CSF leaks. Three-dimensional, isotropic, high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) accurately detects the site and size of the bony defect. CT cisternography, though invasive, helps accurately identify the site of CSF leak, especially in the presence of multiple bony defects. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) accurately detects CSF leaks and associated complications such as the encephaloceles and meningoceles. In this review, we emphasize the importance and usefulness of 3D T2 DRIVE MR cisternography in localizing CSF leaks. This sequence has the advantages of effective bone and fat suppression, decreased artefacts, faster acquisition times, three-dimensional capability, y and high spatial resolution in addition to providing very bright signal from the CSF.

  11. Imaging review of cerebrospinal fluid leaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naga V Vemuri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leak occurs due to a defect in the dura and skull base. Trauma remains the most common cause of CSF leak; however, a significant number of cases are iatrogenic, and result from a complication of functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS. Early diagnosis of CSF leak is of paramount importance to prevent life-threatening complications such as brain abscess and meningitis. Imaging plays a crucial role in the detection and characterization of CSF leaks. Three-dimensional, isotropic, high resolution computed tomography (HRCT accurately detects the site and size of the bony defect. CT cisternography, though invasive, helps accurately identify the site of CSF leak, especially in the presence of multiple bony defects. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI accurately detects CSF leaks and associated complications such as the encephaloceles and meningoceles. In this review, we emphasize the importance and usefulness of 3D T2 DRIVE MR cisternography in localizing CSF leaks. This sequence has the advantages of effective bone and fat suppression, decreased artefacts, faster acquisition times, three-dimensional capability, y and high spatial resolution in addition to providing very bright signal from the CSF.

  12. Successful Endoscopic Therapy of Traumatic Bile Leaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Spinn

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic bile leaks often result in high morbidity and prolonged hospital stay that requires multimodality management. Data on endoscopic management of traumatic bile leaks are scarce. Our study objective was to evaluate the efficacy of the endoscopic management of a traumatic bile leak. We performed a retrospective case review of patients who were referred for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP after traumatic bile duct injury secondary to blunt (motor vehicle accident or penetrating (gunshot trauma for management of bile leaks at our tertiary academic referral center. Fourteen patients underwent ERCP for the management of a traumatic bile leak over a 5-year period. The etiology included blunt trauma from motor vehicle accident in 8 patients, motorcycle accident in 3 patients and penetrating injury from a gunshot wound in 3 patients. Liver injuries were grade III in 1 patient, grade IV in 10 patients, and grade V in 3 patients. All patients were treated by biliary stent placement, and the outcome was successful in 14 of 14 cases (100%. The mean duration of follow-up was 85.6 days (range 54-175 days. There were no ERCP-related complications. In our case review, endoscopic management with endobiliary stent placement was found to be successful and resulted in resolution of the bile leak in all 14 patients. Based on our study results, ERCP should be considered as first-line therapy in the management of traumatic bile leaks.

  13. Pipeline leak detection using volatile tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.M.; Golding, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of leak detection for underground storage tanks and pipelines adds volatile tracers to the products in the tanks and analyzes the surrounding shallow soil gases for tracer vapors. This method has several advantages: the success of the test is not limited by the size and structural design of the vessels, tanks can be tested at any fill level without taking the tank out of service, the location of a leak along a pipeline is clearly marked by the location of the tracer, and liquid leaks as small as 0.2 liters per hour (lph) can be detected. A limitation is: the backfill material must have some degree of air permeability in the zone above the water table. Several field tests document the success achieved using this method. A tracer leak detection system was installed at Homestead AFB after several other testing methods failed to locate a leak at a valve pit location along approximately 4 kilometers of fuel transfer piping. The leak was detected to the side of the valve pit at a depth of approximately 2.5 meters below the ground surface. Another installation of Edwards AFB involved the collection of 415 soil gas samples along approximately 3,050 meters of 15.25-centimeter fiberglass pipeline. Fourteen separate leaks were detected

  14. Vacuum leak test technique of JT-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminaga, Atsushi; Arai, Takashi; Kodama, Kozo; Sasaki, Noboru; Saidoh, Masahiro

    1998-01-01

    Since a vacuum vessel of JT-60 is very large (167 m 3 ) and is combined with many components, such as magnetic coils, neutral beam injection systems and RF heating systems, etc., the position of leak testing exceeds 700. The two kind of techniques for vacuum leak test used in JT-60 has been described. Firstly the probe helium gas can be fed remotely in the three-dimensionally sectioned 54 regions of the JT-60 torus. The leak test was very rapidly performed by using this method. Secondly the helium detector system has been modified by the additional installation of the cryopump, which reduced the background level of the deuterium gas. The sensitivity of vacuum leak test with the cryopump was two orders of magnitude larger than that of without it. The examples of the performed vacuum leak test are stated. The vacuum leaks during experiments were 9 times. They were caused by thermal strain and plasma discharge. The vacuum leaks just after maintenance are 36 times which mainly caused by mis-installation. (author)

  15. A 3D regression surface for the room temperature tightness gasket data reduction and bolt load design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolly, Pascal; Marchand, Luc

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to propose a new approach for modelling the tightness behaviour of the gaskets used in bolted flange joints. This new approach consists of developing a mathematical model for a three-dimensional (3D) representation of the gasket tightness performance. Rather than considering a 2D graph for characterizing the complete gasket behaviour, a third axis is added to the S g vs. Tp plot to dissociate the unloading cycles from initial gasket tightening. This leads to the definition of a surface that is represented by a simple polynomial equation that contains six coefficients that are determined by a simple regression calculation. In the first part of the paper, the new approach is tested through a database of 406 room temperature tightness (ROTT) tests performed on different gasket styles. Then, a statistical analysis of the predictions made with the new model demonstrates its ability to predict gasket leak rates much more accurately than it was previously possible with the gasket constants derived from the ROTT Draft 9 or 10 methods. It is also demonstrated that the new approach can be used to model successfully complex gasket behaviours such as the tightness hardening phenomenon. Secondly, the effect of gas pressure change on the leak rate is analysed. It turns out that at high gasket stresses, the actual scheme of the ROTT tests may not allow enough time for reaching a stabilized leak rate value because of a transitory time effect in the porous structure of gaskets. Then, in order to evaluate the characteristic waiting period (dwell time) before a stabilized flow rate is achieved following a change in the gas pressure level, a simple phenomenological analysis of the flow is performed

  16. Transient leak detection in crude oil pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beushausen, R.; Tornow, S.; Borchers, H. [Nord-West Oelleitung, Wilhelmshaven (Germany); Murphy, K.; Zhang, J. [Atmos International Ltd., Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Nord-West Oelleitung (NWO) operates 2 crude oil pipelines from Wilhemshaven to Koln and Hamburg respectively. German regulations for transporting flammable substances stipulate that 2 independent continuously working procedures be used to detect leaks. Leak detection pigs are used routinely to complement the surveillance system. This paper described the specific issues of transient leak detection in crude oil pipelines. It was noted that traditional methods have failed to detect leaks that occur immediately after pumps are turned on or off because the pressure wave generated by the transient dominates the pressure wave that results from the leak. Frequent operational changes in a pipeline are often accompanied by an increased number of false alarms and failure to detect leaks due to unsteady operations. NWO therefore decided to have the Atmos statistical pipeline leak detection (SPLD) system installed on their pipelines. The key to the SPLD system is the sequential probability ratio test. Comprehensive data validation is performed following reception of pipeline data from the supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system. The validated data is then used to calculate the corrected flow imbalance, which is fed into the SPRT to determine if there is an increase in the flow imbalance. Pattern recognition is then used to distinguish a leak from operational changes. The SPLD is unique because it uses 3 computational pipeline monitoring methods simultaneously, namely modified volume balance, statistical analysis, and pressure and flow monitoring. The successful installation and testing of the SPLD in 2 crude oil pipelines was described along with the main difficulties associated with transient leaks. Field results were presented for both steady-state and transient conditions. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 16 figs.

  17. Absolute tightness: the chemists hesitate to invest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    The safety requirements of industries as nuclear plants and the strengthening of regulations in the field of environment (more particularly those related to volatile organic compounds) have lead the manufacturers to build absolute tightness pumps. But these equipments do not answer all the problems and represent a high investment cost. In consequence, the chemists hesitate to invest. (O.L.)

  18. Acoustic leak detector in Monju steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachi, E.; Inoue, T.

    1990-01-01

    Acoustic leak detectors are equipped with the Monju steam generators for one of the R and D activities, which are the same type of the detectors developed in the PNC 50MW Steam Generator Test Facility. Although they are an additional leak detection system to the regular one in Monju SG, they would also detect the intermediate or large leaks of the SG tube failures. The extrapolation method of a background noise analysis is expected to be verified by Monju SG data. (author). 4 figs

  19. Means for preventing radioactive fluid leaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akatsu, Jun-ichi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To permit prevention of leakage of radioactive fluid from line and valve leak sections while also recovering the liquid by producing a vacuum state in a leak-off line by means of a water ejector. Structure: A portion of the water from a condenser is forced by a condensed water pump through a water ejector tank to a recovery tank while controlling an orifice and valve, whereby a vacuum state is produced in the leak-off line to withdraw the leakage fluid. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. Development of leak-rupture criteria for axially through-wall cracked pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X.K.; Leis, B.N. [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2009-07-01

    In this study, J-integral based fracture mechanics were used to characterize the fracture behaviour of a pipeline from crack initiation and stable growth to tearing instability. The aim of the study was to develop an effective leak-rupture criterion for pipelines with axial through-wall cracks (TWC). The J driving force for cracked plates and pipes was estimated using a plastic influence function method. The EPRI estimation scheme and R6 method were used to obtain a general estimate of the J-integral of the pipe. The failure pressures of a TWC pipe at fracture initiation and instability were then modelled in order to define a leak-rupture boundary. Fracture initiation and instability analyses for the TWC pipeline were illustrated. Results of the study showed that the method can be used to improve the accuracy of J driving force estimation and the leak-rupture criterion for pipeline applications. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  1. The leak microstructure, preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, M.

    1997-01-01

    The leak microstructure, a new type of element for position-sensitive proportional gas counter, is introduced. For every single detected ionizing radiation it gives a pair of ''induced'' charges of the same quantity (pulses of the same amplitude), of opposite sign, with the same collection time and essentially in time coincidence, that are proportional to the collected primary ionization. A gas multiplication up to 1.5 x 10 5 was achieved. The complete absence of insulating materials in the active volume of this microstructure enables to avoid problems of charging-up and makes its behaviour stable and repeatable. By using the charge-pair generated, it allows the development of a position-sensitive detecting board with a two-dimensional read-out. Between the two external surfaces of this board it is possible to insert an intermediate third conducting layer which reduces (or practically suppresses) the capacitive cross-talk between the X and Y read-out strip systems. Furthermore, this intermediate layer can give a very fast trigger to coordinate the charge-pair and to govern the data acquisition system. By reading every strip separately it is possible to resolve the multi hit problem in two-dimensions. Using isobutane as the gas, an energy resolution of about 8% FWHM was recorded with α-particles from an 241 Am source. In isobutane gas, X-rays from a 55 Fe source and β-particles from a 14 C source were also detected. (orig.)

  2. Definition of task (Phase II) B, 'Leak testing'; Definicija zadatka (II faza) B, 'Ispitivanje hermeticnosti'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavicevic, M; Nikolic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-01-15

    In order to ensure safe Ra reactor operation and fulfilling the conditions for performing irradiation experiments it was necessary to test and verify the leak tightness of the sample containers and thermocouples, as well as the irradiation capsule before it was placed in the VISA-2 channel. Leak testing of VISA-2 channel with capsules and thermocouples was done before and after it was built-in the reactor. [Serbo-Croat] U cilju bezbednosti i sigurnosti rada reaktora RA i ispunjavanja uslova ozracivanja izvrsena je provera hermeticnosti kenera sa uzorcima i termoparovima, kao i hermeticnost kapsule pre ugradjivanja kapsule u kanal VISA-2. Izvrseno je i ispitivanje hermeticnosti kanala VISA-2 sa kapsulama i termoparovima pre ugradjivanja u reaktor i posle montaze.

  3. Detecting subsurface fluid leaks in real-time using injection and production rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harpreet; Huerta, Nicolas J.

    2017-12-01

    CO2 injection into geologic formations for either enhanced oil recovery or carbon storage introduces a risk for undesired fluid leakage into overlying groundwater or to the surface. Despite decades of subsurface CO2 production and injection, the technologies and methods for detecting CO2 leaks are still costly and prone to large uncertainties. This is especially true for pressure-based monitoring methods, which require the use of simplified geological and reservoir flow models to simulate the pressure behavior as well as background noise affecting pressure measurements. In this study, we propose a method to detect the time and volume of fluid leakage based on real-time measurements of well injection and production rates. The approach utilizes analogies between fluid flow and capacitance-resistance modeling. Unlike other leak detection methods (e.g. pressure-based), the proposed method does not require geological and reservoir flow models to simulate the behavior that often carry significant sources of uncertainty; therefore, with our approach the leak can be detected with greater certainty. The method can be applied to detect when a leak begins by tracking a departure in fluid production rate from the expected pattern. The method has been tuned to detect the effect of boundary conditions and fluid compressibility on leakage. To highlight the utility of this approach we use our method to detect leaks for two scenarios. The first scenario simulates a fluid leak from the storage formation into an above-zone monitoring interval. The second scenario simulates intra-reservoir migration between two compartments. We illustrate this method to detect fluid leakage in three different reservoirs with varying levels of geological and structural complexity. The proposed leakage detection method has three novelties: i) requires only readily-available data (injection and production rates), ii) accounts for fluid compressibility and boundary effects, and iii) in addition to

  4. Endoscopic management of bile leaks after laparoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endoscopic management of bile leaks after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. ... endoscopic management at a median of 12 days (range 2 - 104 days) after surgery. Presenting features included intra-abdominal collections with pain in 58 cases ...

  5. Evaluation of leak rate by EPRI code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isozaki, Toshikuni; Hashiguchi, Issei; Kato, Kiyoshi; Miyazono, Shohachiro

    1987-08-01

    From 1987, a research on the leak rate from a cracked pipe under BWR or PWR operating condition is going to be carried out at the authors' laboratory. This report describes the computed results by EPRI's leak rate code which was mounted on JAERI FACOM-M380 machine. Henry's critical flow model is used in this program. For the planning of an experimental research, the leak rate from a crack under BWR or PWR operating condition is computed, varying a crack length 2c, crack opening diameter COD and pipe diameter. The COD value under which the minimum detectable leak rate of 5 gpm is given is 0.22 mm or 0.21 mm under the BWR or PWR condition with 2c = 100 mm and 16B pipe geometry. The entire lists are shown in the appendix. (author)

  6. The new CSA standard for leak detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietsch, Ulli [TAU, Edmonton, Alberta, (Canada); Scott, Don [TransCanada Pipelines, Edmonton, Alberta, (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Standards need to be updated regularly to reflect current technology and industry practices. This paper describes the new Canadian Standards Association (CSA) for leak detection called Recommended Practice for Liquid Hydrocarbon Pipeline System Leak Detection, Annex E, which can be found in the CSA Z662 Oil and Gas Pipeline Systems standard. The CSA formed a task force of industry experts and regulators for a period of 18 months to draft the new standards. Several comparisons were made with the American Petroleum Institute (API) recommended practice API 1130. This new version introduces and defines the terms, critical instrument, critical process and dependent instrument. The most significant improvement made by the new Annex E is the new requirement that an operating company must develop a leak detection strategy. The writing of a leak detection manual is given high priority. The use of both Annex E and API 1130 is recommended.

  7. Postoperative ascitic leaks: the ongoing challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemurgy, A S; Statman, R C; Murphy, C G; Albrink, M H; McAllister, E W

    1992-06-01

    The leak of ascitic fluid from surgical incisions is thought to be associated with a very high mortality rate. There have been few reports, however, focusing on the clinical characteristics, management, or mortality rates of this condition. During a 10-year period, 18 patients with postoperative ascitic fluid leaks were treated. All patients had ascites before surgery and all had liver disease; in 13 of the 18 patients alcoholic liver disease was the cause of ascites. Ten of the 18 patients died (56%). Midline incisions were more often associated with recalcitrant leaks and fatal complications than were transverse incisions. Early consideration of fascial dehiscence and prompt repair is emphasized. The most effective predictor of survival was cessation of the leak.

  8. Helium leak testing the Westinghouse LCP coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merritt, P.A.; Attaar, M.H.; Hordubay, T.D.

    1983-01-01

    The tests, equipment, and techniques used to check the Westinghouse LCP coil for coolant flow path integrity and helium leakage are unique in terms of test sensitivity and application. This paper will discuss the various types of helium leak testing done on the LCP coil as it enters different stages of manufacture. The emphasis will be on the degree of test sensitivity achieved under shop conditions, and what equipment, techniques and tooling are required to achieve this sensitivity (5.9 x 10 -8 scc/sec). Other topics that will be discussed are helium flow and pressure drop testing which is used to detect any restrictions in the flow paths, and the LCP final acceptance test which is the final leak test performed on the coil prior to its being sent for testing. The overall allowable leak rate for this coil is 5 x 10 -6 scc/sec. A general evaluation of helium leak testing experience are included

  9. Leak Detectives Saving Money, Water in Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    “Circuit riders” from the Virginia Rural Water Association (VRWA) are traveling to small communities across the Commonwealth using special equipment financed by EPA to locate expensive and wasteful leaks in drinking water distribution systems.

  10. Acoustic leak detection in piping systems, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, Akira; Naohara, Nobuyuki; Aihara, Akihiko

    1983-01-01

    To monitor a high-pressure piping of nuclear power plants, a possibility of acoustic leak detection method has been experimentally studied in practical field tests and laboratory tests. Characteristics of background noise in field test and the results of experiment are summarized as follows: (1) The level of background noise in primary loop (PWR) was almost constant under actual plant operation. But it is possible that it rises at the condition of the pressure in primary loop. (2) Based on many experience of laboratory tests and practical field tests. The leak monitoring system for practical field was designed and developed. To improve the reliability, a judgment of leak on this system is used three factors of noise level, duration time of phenomena and frequency spectrum of noise signal emitted from the leak point. (author)

  11. Acoustic leak detection in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    For several years now, utilities have been utilizing acoustic leak detection methods as an operating tool in their nuclear power stations. The purpose for using the leak detection system at the various stations vary from safety, ALARA, improved operations, preventive maintenance, or increased plant availability. This paper describes the various acoustic techniques and their application. The techniques are divided into three categories: specific component leakage, intersystem leakage, and pipe through-wall crack leakage. The paper addresses each category in terms of motivation to monitor, method of application and operation, and benefits to be gained. Current requirements are reviewed and analyzed with respect to the acoustic techniques. The paper shows how acoustic leak detection is one of the most effective leak detection tools available. 9 figures, 1 table

  12. Leaking Underground Storage Tank Sites in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) sites where petroleum contamination has been found. There may be more than one LUST site per UST site.

  13. Routine intraoperative leak testing for sleeve gastrectomy: is the leak test full of hot air?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Jason; Lallemand, Michael; Barron, Morgan; Kuckelman, John; Carter, Preston; Blair, Kelly; Martin, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    Staple line leak after sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is a rare but dreaded complication with a reported incidence of 0% to 8%. Many surgeons routinely test the staple line with an intraoperative leak test (IOLT), but there is little evidence to validate this practice. In fact, there is a theoretical concern that the leak test may weaken the staple line and increase the risk of a postop leak. Retrospective review of all SGs performed over a 7-year period was conducted. Cases were grouped by whether an IOLT was performed, and compared for the incidence of postop staple line leaks. The ability of the IOLT for identifying a staple line defect and for predicting a postoperative leak was analyzed. Five hundred forty-two SGs were performed between 2007 and 2014. Thirteen patients (2.4%) developed a postop staple line leak. The majority of patients (n = 494, 91%) received an IOLT, including all 13 patients (100%) who developed a subsequent clinical leak. There were no (0%) positive IOLTs and no additional interventions were performed based on the IOLT. The IOLT sensitivity and positive predictive value were both 0%. There was a trend, although not significant, to increase leak rates when a routine IOLT was performed vs no routine IOLT (2.6% vs 0%, P = .6). The performance of routine IOLT after SG provided no actionable information, and was negative in all patients who developed a postoperative leak. The routine use of an IOLT did not reduce the incidence of postop leak, and in fact was associated with a higher leak rate after SG. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Cable-Based Water Leak Detection Technology

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Water leaks can be considered as a serious problem from many sources such as water supply and return chains, air conditioning units, cold-water chillers, clogged drains, damaged skylights or windows, or even construction errors. The new water leak detection technologies can provide significant advantages in cost, reliability, and easy adoption have continued since the traditional technology mainly focusing on a spot detector revealed several limitations.

  15. Leak of draft report on radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Environment Committee's second report discusses the leak of the draft report on radioactive waste. The circumstances of the leak are discussed and ''The Times'' and ''The Guardian'' articles of December 1985 are printed in full, as are the letter from the Chairman of the environmental committee to the members and their replies. The letters from Mr John Large of Large and Associates to the Chairman of the Environment Committee, and Mr Large's correspondence with Greenpeace are also printed. (UK)

  16. Leak detection systems for VVER units based on leak before break concept. PowerPoint presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matal, Oldrich

    2010-01-01

    To comply with international standards, independent leak monitoring systems should be installed based on the monitoring of different physical parameters capable of detecting any small leak within one hour from the start of the leak. Such leak detection systems are based mainly on acoustic emission monitoring, humidity monitoring and/or radiation monitoring. Advanced systems integrate the monitoring of different physical parameters into one integrated leak detection system. The Integrated Leak Detection System (ILDS) for NPP Metsamor is described. This system consists of three independent leak detection subsystems, viz. LEMOP (LEak MOnitoring of Pipelines) based on acoustic emission monitoring, HUMOS (HUmidity MOnitoring System) based on humidity monitoring, and RAMOS (RAdiation MOnitoring System) based on radiation monitoring). The Integrated Leak Detection System (ILDS) collects data from the three systems, performs data evaluation, data storage, generates alarms and provides a user interface for the whole system including all subsystems. An example of DiagAssist user interface in the ILDS system in the pictorial form. (P.A.)

  17. Wireless sensor network for sodium leak detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satya Murty, S.A.V.; Raj, Baldev; Sivalingam, Krishna M.; Ebenezer, Jemimah; Chandran, T.; Shanmugavel, M.; Rajan, K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Early detection of sodium leak is mandatory in any reactor handling liquid sodium. ► Wireless sensor networking technology has been introduced for detecting sodium leak. ► We designed and developed a wireless sensor node in-house. ► We deployed a pilot wireless sensor network for handling nine sodium leak signals. - Abstract: To study the mechanical properties of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor component materials under the influence of sodium, the IN Sodium Test (INSOT) facility has been erected and commissioned at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research. Sodium reacts violently with air/moisture leading to fire. Hence early detection of sodium leak if any is mandatory for such plants and almost 140 sodium leak detectors are placed throughout the loop. All these detectors are wired to the control room for data collection and monitoring. To reduce the cost, space and maintenance that are involved in cabling, the wireless sensor networking technology has been introduced in the sodium leak detection system of INSOT. This paper describes about the deployment details of the pilot wireless sensor network and the measures taken for the successful deployment.

  18. Helium leak testing of scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Anis; Tripathi, S.K.; Mukherjee, D.

    2015-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is a specialized electron-optical device which is used for imaging of miniscule features on topography of material specimens. Conventional SEMs used finely focused high energy (about 30 KeV) electron beam probes of diameter of about 10nm for imaging of solid conducting specimens. Vacuum of the order of 10"-"5 Torr is prerequisite for conventional Tungsten filament type SEMs. One such SEM was received from one of our laboratory in BARC with a major leak owing to persisting poor vacuum condition despite continuous pumping for several hours. He-Leak Detection of the SEM was carried out at AFD using vacuum spray Technique and various potential leak joints numbering more than fifty were helium leak tested. The major leak was detected in the TMP damper bellow. The part was later replaced and the repeat helium leak testing of the system was carried out using vacuum spray technique. The vacuum in SEM is achieved is better than 10"-"5 torr and system is now working satisfactorily. (author)

  19. Leak detector for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Mikio.

    1991-01-01

    A branched pipe is disposed to a leak off pipeline led from a flange surface which connects the main body and the upper lid of a reactor pressure vessel. An exhaust pump is disposed to the branched pipe and a moisture gage is disposed on the side of the exhaustion and a dry air supplier is connected to the branched pipe. Upon conducting a pressure-proof leak test for the reactor pressure vessel, the exhaust pump is operated and an electromagnet valve disposed at the upstream of the dry air supplier is opened and closed repeatedly. The humidity of air sucked by the exhaust pump is detected by the moisture gage. If leaks should be caused in the joining surface of the flange, leaked water is diffused as steams. Accordingly, occurrence of leak can be detected instantly based on the comparison with the moisture level of the dry air as a standard. In this way, a leak test can be conducted reliably in a short period of time with no change of for the reactor pressure container itself. (I.N.)

  20. 40 CFR 63.424 - Standards: Equipment leaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....424 Standards: Equipment leaks. (a) Each owner or operator of a bulk gasoline terminal or pipeline... location of all equipment in gasoline service at the facility. (c) Each detection of a liquid or vapor leak... replacement of leaking equipment shall be completed within 15 calendar days after detection of each leak...

  1. Small leak shutdown, location, and behavior in LMFBR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandusky, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    The paper summarizes an experimental study of small leaks tested under LMFBR steam generator conditions. Defected tubes were exposed to flowing sodium and steam. The observed behavior of the defected tubes is reported along with test results of shutdown methods. Leak location methods were investigated. Methods were identified to open plugged defects for helium leak testing and detect plugged leaks by nondestructive testing

  2. 40 CFR 86.328-79 - Leak checks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak checks. 86.328-79 Section 86.328... Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.328-79 Leak checks. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could...

  3. Mechanical experiments on the superplastic material ALNOVI-1, including leak information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snippe, Q.H.C.; Meinders, T.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Mechanical testing of superplastic materials, in particular ALNOVI-1. → Uniaxial tests to show the one-dimensional stress-strain behaviour and the high amount of strain rate sensitivity. → Void volume fractions have been observed. → Free bulge experiments to show the dependence on the backpressure during the forming stage. → Measuring leak tightness of superplastically formed sheets. → Experiments are used in order to develop a constitutive model in a later stage. - Abstract: In subatomic particle physics, unstable particles can be detected with a so-called vertex detector, placed inside a particle accelerator. A detecting unit close to the accelerator bunch of charged particles must be separated from the accelerator vacuum. A thin sheet with a complex 3D shape prevents the detector vacuum from polluting the accelerator vacuum. Therefore, this sheet has to be completely leak tight. However, this can conflict with restrictions concerning maximum sheet thickness of the product. To produce such a complex thin sheet, superplastic forming can be very attractive in cases where a small number of products is needed. In order to predict gas permeability of these formed sheets, many mechanical experiments are necessary, where the gas leak has to be measured. To obtain insight in the mechanical behaviour of the used material, ALNOVI-1, tensile experiments were performed to describe the uniaxial stress-strain behaviour. From these experiments, a high strain rate sensitivity was measured. The flow stress of this material under superplastic conditions was low and the material behaved in an isotropic manner upon large plastic strains. The results of these experiments were used to predict the forming pressure as a function of time in a free bulge experiment, such that a predefined target strain rate will not be exceeded in the material. An extra parameter within these bulging experiments is the application of a hydrostatic pressure during the

  4. Leak-thight seals got high pressure testing of pipes, tanks, valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrade, J.

    1985-01-01

    Leak-tight seals ensure quick, safe and efficient testing of pipes with plain-ended or flanged openings, valves with flanged or welded edges, manifields, recipients, etc. They are inserted into the pipe end manually then simply a slight turn of the seal treated wheel commences the pressure test. Hydraulic pressure is supplied by a pump through the inlet seal and air is purged through the outlet seal which then closes. The higher the pressure, the greater the sealing strength of the seal which prevents accidental unplugging. There are different types of seals: for interior plain-ended openings, for pipes with plain-ended opening, for flanged pipes. (author)

  5. Improving horizontal completions on heterogeneous tight shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Rivera, Roberto; Deenadayalu, Chaitanya; Chertov, Maxim; Novalo Hartanto, Ricardo; Gathogo, Patrick [Schlumberger (United States); Kunjir, Rahul [University of Utah (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Evaluation of the two formation characteristics conducive to economic well production is important when tight shale formation characterization and completion design are being considered. This paper presents the basic understanding required to improve the efficiency of horizontal completions in oil and gas producing shales. Guidelines are defined for effective perforation and fracturing to improve the efficiency and sustainability of horizontal completions using extensive laboratory characterization of mechanical properties on core, core/log integration and continuous mapping of these properties by logging-while-drilling (LWD) methods. The objective is to improve completion design efficiency. This is accomplished by suitable selection of perforation intervals based on an understanding of the relevant physical processes and rock characterization. Conditions at two reservoir regions, the near-wellbore and the far-wellbore, are outlined and are essential to completion design. From the study, it can be concluded that tight shales are strongly anisotropic and cannot be approximated using isotropic models.

  6. Tight fitting garter springs-MODAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazimer, D. [Bruce Power, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Annulus spacers are used in CANDU reactors to maintain the annular gap between two tubes - an inner pressure tube (PT) and the outer calandria tube (CT). Typically four annulus spacers are used in one fuel channel assembly, each at a specified axial position. Bruce Unit 8 and many other CANDU units were constructed with tight-fitting garter springs (TFGS). The TFGS were not designed to be detected or relocated by the conventional tool, Spacer Location And Repositioning (SLAR) processes. Due to non-optimal 'As Left' construction locations for the Bruce Unit 8 TFGS, PT/CT contact has been predicted to occur well prior to its End of Life (EOL). Bruce Power entered a Project with AECL-CRL to design, manufacture and test and implement a new tooling system that would detect and reposition tight fitting annulus spacers. (author)

  7. Surface Passivation in Empirical Tight Binding

    OpenAIRE

    He, Yu; Tan, Yaohua; Jiang, Zhengping; Povolotskyi, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard; Kubis, Tillmann

    2015-01-01

    Empirical Tight Binding (TB) methods are widely used in atomistic device simulations. Existing TB methods to passivate dangling bonds fall into two categories: 1) Method that explicitly includes passivation atoms is limited to passivation with atoms and small molecules only. 2) Method that implicitly incorporates passivation does not distinguish passivation atom types. This work introduces an implicit passivation method that is applicable to any passivation scenario with appropriate parameter...

  8. Equiangular tight frames and unistochastic matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goyeneche, D.; Turek, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 24 (2017), č. článku 245304. ISSN 1751-8113 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-01706S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : equiangular tight frames * unistochastic matrices * SIC POVM Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Atomic, molecular and chemical physics (physics of atoms and molecules including collision, interaction with radiation, magnetic resonances, Mössbauer effect) Impact factor: 1.857, year: 2016

  9. Field tests and commercialization of natural gas leak detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, D S; Jeon, J S; Kim, K D; Cho, Y A [R and D Center, Korea Gas Corporation, Ansan (Korea)

    1999-09-01

    Objectives - (1) fields test of industrial gas leak detection monitoring system. (2) commericialization of residential gas leak detector. Contents - (1) five sets of gas leak detection monitoring system were installed at natural gas transmition facilities and tested long term stability and their performance. (2) improved residential gas leak detector was commercialised. Expected benefits and application fields - (1) contribution to the improvement of domestic gas sensor technology. (2) localization of fabrication technology for gas leak detectors. 23 refs., 126 figs., 37 tabs.

  10. Remote leak localization approach for fusion machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durocher, Au.; Bruno, V.; Chantant, M.; Gargiulo, L.; Gherman, T.; Hatchressian, J.-C.; Houry, M.; Le, R.; Mouyon, D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Description of leaks issue. ► Selection of leak localization concepts. ► Qualification of leak localization concepts. -- Abstract: Fusion machine operation requires high-vacuum conditions and does not tolerate water or gas leak in the vacuum vessels, even if they are micrometric. Tore Supra, as a fully actively cooled tokamak, has got a large leak management experience; 34 water leaks occurred since the beginning of its operation in 1988. To handle this issue, after preliminary machine protection phases, the current process for leak localization is based on water or helium pressurization network by network. It generally allows the identification of a set of components where the leakage element is located. However, the unique background of CEA-IRFM laboratory points needs of accuracy and promptness out in the leak localization process. Moreover, in-vessel interventions have to be performed trying to minimize time and risks for the persons. They are linked to access conditions, radioactivity, tracer gas high pressure and vessel conditioning. Remote operation will be one of the ways to improve these points on future fusion machines. In this case, leak sensors would have to be light weight devices in order to be integrated on a carrier or to be located outside with a sniffing process set up. A leak localization program is on-going at CEA-IRFM Laboratory with the first goal of identifying and characterizing relevant concepts to localize helium or water leaks on ITER. In the same time, CEA has developed robotic carrier for effective in-vessel intervention in a hostile environment. Three major tests campaigns with the goal to identify leak sensors have been achieved on several CEA test-beds since 2010. Very promising results have been obtained: relevant scenario of leak localization performed, concepts tested in a high volume test-bed called TITAN, and, in several conditions of pressure and temperature (ultrahigh vacuum to atmospheric pressure and 20

  11. Remote leak localization approach for fusion machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durocher, Au., E-mail: aurelien.durocher@cea.fr [CEA-IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Bruno, V.; Chantant, M.; Gargiulo, L. [CEA-IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Gherman, T. [Floralis UJF Filiale, F-38610 Gières (France); Hatchressian, J.-C.; Houry, M.; Le, R.; Mouyon, D. [CEA-IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Description of leaks issue. ► Selection of leak localization concepts. ► Qualification of leak localization concepts. -- Abstract: Fusion machine operation requires high-vacuum conditions and does not tolerate water or gas leak in the vacuum vessels, even if they are micrometric. Tore Supra, as a fully actively cooled tokamak, has got a large leak management experience; 34 water leaks occurred since the beginning of its operation in 1988. To handle this issue, after preliminary machine protection phases, the current process for leak localization is based on water or helium pressurization network by network. It generally allows the identification of a set of components where the leakage element is located. However, the unique background of CEA-IRFM laboratory points needs of accuracy and promptness out in the leak localization process. Moreover, in-vessel interventions have to be performed trying to minimize time and risks for the persons. They are linked to access conditions, radioactivity, tracer gas high pressure and vessel conditioning. Remote operation will be one of the ways to improve these points on future fusion machines. In this case, leak sensors would have to be light weight devices in order to be integrated on a carrier or to be located outside with a sniffing process set up. A leak localization program is on-going at CEA-IRFM Laboratory with the first goal of identifying and characterizing relevant concepts to localize helium or water leaks on ITER. In the same time, CEA has developed robotic carrier for effective in-vessel intervention in a hostile environment. Three major tests campaigns with the goal to identify leak sensors have been achieved on several CEA test-beds since 2010. Very promising results have been obtained: relevant scenario of leak localization performed, concepts tested in a high volume test-bed called TITAN, and, in several conditions of pressure and temperature (ultrahigh vacuum to atmospheric pressure and 20

  12. SINGLE-SHELL TANKS LEAK INTEGRITY ELEMENTS/SX FARM LEAK CAUSES AND LOCATIONS - 12127

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VENETZ TJ; WASHENFELDER D; JOHNSON J; GIRARDOT C

    2012-01-25

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-9IF Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal I-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX-111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and drywells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to

  13. Single-Shell Tanks Leak Integrity Elements/ SX Farm Leak Causes and Locations - 12127

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girardot, Crystal [URS- Safety Management Solutions, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Harlow, Don [ELR Consulting Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Venetz, Theodore; Washenfelder, Dennis [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Johnson, Jeremy [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-91F Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal 1-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX- 111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and dry-wells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to

  14. Capillary leak syndrome: etiologies, pathophysiology, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddall, Eric; Khatri, Minesh; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2017-07-01

    In various human diseases, an increase in capillary permeability to proteins leads to the loss of protein-rich fluid from the intravascular to the interstitial space. Although sepsis is the disease most commonly associated with this phenomenon, many other diseases can lead to a "sepsis-like" syndrome with manifestations of diffuse pitting edema, exudative serous cavity effusions, noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, hypotension, and, in some cases, hypovolemic shock with multiple-organ failure. The term capillary leak syndrome has been used to describe this constellation of disease manifestations associated with an increased capillary permeability to proteins. Diseases other than sepsis that can result in capillary leak syndrome include the idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome or Clarkson's disease, engraftment syndrome, differentiation syndrome, the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, viral hemorrhagic fevers, autoimmune diseases, snakebite envenomation, and ricin poisoning. Drugs including some interleukins, some monoclonal antibodies, and gemcitabine can also cause capillary leak syndrome. Acute kidney injury is commonly seen in all of these diseases. In addition to hypotension, cytokines are likely to be important in the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury in capillary leak syndrome. Fluid management is a critical part of the treatment of capillary leak syndrome; hypovolemia and hypotension can cause organ injury, whereas capillary leakage of administered fluid can worsen organ edema leading to progressive organ injury. The purpose of this article is to discuss the diseases other than sepsis that produce capillary leak and review their collective pathophysiology and treatment. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Operational Philosophy Concerning Manned Spacecraft Cabin Leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSimpelaere, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The last thirty years have seen the Space Shuttle as the prime United States spacecraft for manned spaceflight missions. Many lessons have been learned about spacecraft design and operation throughout these years. Over the next few decades, a large increase of manned spaceflight in the commercial sector is expected. This will result in the exposure of commercial crews and passengers to many of the same risks crews of the Space Shuttle have encountered. One of the more dire situations that can be encountered is the loss of pressure in the habitable volume of the spacecraft during on orbit operations. This is referred to as a cabin leak. This paper seeks to establish a general cabin leak response philosophy with the intent of educating future spacecraft designers and operators. After establishing a relative definition for a cabin leak, the paper covers general descriptions of detection equipment, detection methods, and general operational methods for management of a cabin leak. Subsequently, all these items are addressed from the perspective of the Space Shuttle Program, as this will be of the most value to future spacecraft due to similar operating profiles. Emphasis here is placed upon why and how these methods and philosophies have evolved to meet the Space Shuttle s needs. This includes the core ideas of: considerations of maintaining higher cabin pressures vs. lower cabin pressures, the pros and cons of a system designed to feed the leak with gas from pressurized tanks vs. using pressure suits to protect against lower cabin pressures, timeline and consumables constraints, re-entry considerations with leaks of unknown origin, and the impact the International Space Station (ISS) has had to the standard Space Shuttle cabin leak response philosophy. This last item in itself includes: procedural management differences, hardware considerations, additional capabilities due to the presence of the ISS and its resource, and ISS docking/undocking considerations with a

  16. Standard practice for leaks using ultrasonics

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 Practice A, Pressurization—This practice covers procedures for calibration of ultrasonic instruments, location, and estimated measurements of gas leakage to atmosphere by the airborne ultrasonic technique. 1.2 In general practice this should be limited to leaks detected by two classifications of instruments, Class I and Class II. Class I instruments should have a minimum detectable leak rate of 6.7 × 10−7 mol/s (1.5 × 10−2 std. cm3/s at 0°C) or more for the pressure method of gas leakage to atmosphere. Class II instruments should have a minimal detectable leak rate of 6.7 × 10−6 mol/s (1.5 × 10−1 std. cm3/s at 0°C) or more for the pressure method of gas leakage to atmosphere. Refer to Guide E432 for additional information. 1.3 Practice B, Ultrasonic Transmitter—For object under test not capable of being pressurized but capable of having ultrasonic tone placed/injected into the test area to act as an ultrasonic leak trace source. 1.3.1 This practice is limited to leaks producing leakage o...

  17. Leak processing system for valve gland portion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Masami

    1990-01-01

    When a process fluid for a valve to be checked is at such a normal temperature as during reactor operation, leaked fluid can be detected depending on the temperature increase accompanying the leakage. However, detection is difficult if the temperature of the process fluid for the valve to be checked is low and, if leakage is detected after the reactor start-up, repair has to be applied after the shutdown of the plant. Then, gland leak is detected by detecting the pressure instead of the temperature in the pipeline system and the leak flow rate is calculated based on the pressure. As a result, leakage is detected irrespective of the temperature of the leaked fluid and, for instance, leakage can be detected even in a case where the temperature is not high as in the case of pressure proof test for the pressure vessel before start-up. It can contribute much to the improvement of the plant operation efficiency and can determine the leak flow rate at a high accuracy. (N.H.)

  18. Emerging boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvschal, Mette

    2014-01-01

    of temporal and material variables have been applied as a means of exploring the processes leading to their socioconceptual anchorage. The outcome of this analysis is a series of interrelated, generative boundary principles, including boundaries as markers, articulations, process-related devices, and fixation...

  19. Changing Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodkin, Evelyn; Larsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    project that is altering the boundary between the democratic welfare state and the market economy. We see workfare policies as boundary-changing with potentially profound implications both for individuals disadvantaged by market arrangements and for societies seeking to grapple with the increasing...

  20. Air tightness of new houses in the U.S.: A preliminary report; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

    2002-01-01

    Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S. dwellings over the past decades. LBNL has collected the available data on residential infiltration into its Residential Diagnostics Database, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy. This report documents the envelope air leakage section of the LBNL database, with particular emphasis on new construction. The work reported here is an update of similar efforts carried out a decade ago, which used available data largely focused on the housing stock, rather than on new construction. The current effort emphasizes shell tightness measurements made on houses soon after they are built. These newer data come from over two dozen datasets, including over 73,000 measurements spread throughout a majority of the U.S. Roughly one-third of the measurements are for houses identified as energy-efficient through participation in a government or utility program. As a result, the characteristics reported here provide a quantitative estimate of the impact that energy-efficiency programs have on envelope tightness in the US, as well as on trends in construction

  1. Negotiating boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Ballegaard, Stinne Aaløkke

    2010-01-01

    to maintain the order of the home when managing disease and adopting new healthcare technology. In our analysis we relate this boundary work to two continuums of visibility-invisibility and integration-segmentation in disease management. We explore five factors that affect the boundary work: objects......, activities, places, character of disease, and collaboration. Furthermore, the processes are explored of how boundary objects move between social worlds pushing and shaping boundaries. From this we discuss design implications for future healthcare technologies for the home.......To move treatment successfully from the hospital to that of technology assisted self-care at home, it is vital in the design of such technologies to understand the setting in which the health IT should be used. Based on qualitative studies we find that people engage in elaborate boundary work...

  2. Tight Reference Frame–Independent Quantum Teleportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Verdon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We give a tight scheme for teleporting a quantum state between two parties whose reference frames are misaligned by an action of a finite symmetry group. Unlike previously proposed schemes, ours requires no additional tokens or data to be passed between the participants; the same amount of classical information is transferred as for ordinary quantum teleportation, and the Hilbert space of the entangled resource is of the same size. In the terminology of Peres and Scudo, our protocol relies on classical communication of unspeakable information.

  3. Tightly sealed facility of excellent in durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirano, Kenji; Chatani, Michio; Ebe, Shinji; Shimizu, Masatoshi; Seguchi, Tadao; Fukushima, Susumu; Hirata, Masaru; Shiosawa, Ken-ichi.

    1992-01-01

    It is found that a cross linked methacryl resin using an appropriate amount of a cross linking monomer also has a useful characteristic of an excellent chemical resistance and excellent γ-ray resistance. Then in the present invention, a cross linked methacryl resin molding product comprising 60 to 98 % by weight of methyl methacrylate units and 2 to 40 % by weight of cross linking monomer units is used as a material for transparent partition walls. A tightly sealed facility having the transparent partition wall materials of excellent radiation resistance in addition to acid resistance can be attained. (T.M.)

  4. Location of leaks in pressurized underground pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckert, E.G.; Maresca, J.W. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Millions of underground storage tanks (UST) are used to store petroleum and other chemicals. The pressurized underground pipelines associated with USTs containing petroleum motor fuels are typically 2 in. in diameter and 50 to 200 ft in length. These pipelines typically operate at pressures of 20 to 30 psi. Longer lines, with diameters up to 4 in., are found in some high-volume facilities. There are many systems that can be used to detect leaks in pressurized underground pipelines. When a leak is detected, the first step in the remediation process is to find its location. Passive-acoustic measurements, combined with advanced signal-processing techniques, provide a nondestructive method of leak location that is accurate and relatively simple, and that can be applied to a wide variety of pipelines and pipeline products

  5. Enhanced leak detection risk model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harron, Lorna; Barlow, Rick; Farquhar, Ted [Enbridge Pipelines Inc., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Increasing concerns and attention to pipeline safety have engaged pipeline companies and regulatory agencies to extend their approaches to pipeline integrity. The implementation of High Consequence Areas (HCAs) has especially had an impact on the development of integrity management protocols (IMPs) for pipelines. These IMPs can require that a risk based assessment of integrity issues be applied to specific HCA risk factors. This paper addresses the development of an operational risk assessment approach for pipeline leak detection requirements for HCAs. A detailed risk assessment algorithm that includes 25 risk variables and 28 consequence variables was developed for application to all HCA areas. This paper describes the consultative process that was used to workshop the development of this algorithm. Included in this description is how the process addressed various methods of leak detection across a wide variety of pipelines. The paper also looks at development challenges and future steps in applying operation risk assessment techniques to mainline leak detection risk management.

  6. Remote leak detection for the TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walthers, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    The planned design for the TFTR (TOKAMAK Fusion Test Reactor) remote leak detection system consists of a central console which controls the application of tracer gas to possible leak areas. Seals are tested by admitting tracer gas to machined cavities on the atmospheric side of the seal. The tracer gas is brought to the seal cavity by 1 / 8 -inch diameter tubes which connect to local tracer gas/vacuum manifolds located outside the protective radiation shielding. Vacuum shell walls and welds are checked by flowing tracer gas through annular heating/cooling passages. The detector will be either an MSLD (mass spectrometer leak detector) or an RGA (residual gas analyzer), the location of which is not finalized. Feasibility tests performed and planned include response and sensitivity measurements of possible tubing/detector configurations with several tracer gases

  7. Combustion suppressing device for leaked sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooto, Akihiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress the atmospheric temperature to secure the building safety and shorten the recovery time after the leakage in a chamber for containing sodium leaked from coolant circuit equipments or pipeways of LMFBR type rector by suppressing the combustion of sodium contained in the chamber. Constitution: To the inner wall of a chamber for containing sodium handling equipments, are vertically disposed a panel having a coolant supply port at the upper portion and a coolant discharge port at the lower portion thereof and defined with a coolant flowing channel and a panel for sucking the coolant discharged from the abovementioned panel and exhausting the same externally. Further, a corrugated combustion suppressing plate having apertures for draining the condensated leaked sodium is disposed near the sodium handling equipments. If ruptures are resulted to the sodium handling equipments or pipeway, leaked sodium is passed through the drain apertures in the suppressing plate and stored at the bottom of the containing chamber. (Horiuchi, T.)

  8. Numerical Leak Detection in a Pipeline Network of Complex Structure with Unsteady Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida-zade, K. R.; Ashrafova, E. R.

    2017-12-01

    An inverse problem for a pipeline network of complex loopback structure is solved numerically. The problem is to determine the locations and amounts of leaks from unsteady flow characteristics measured at some pipeline points. The features of the problem include impulse functions involved in a system of hyperbolic differential equations, the absence of classical initial conditions, and boundary conditions specified as nonseparated relations between the states at the endpoints of adjacent pipeline segments. The problem is reduced to a parametric optimal control problem without initial conditions, but with nonseparated boundary conditions. The latter problem is solved by applying first-order optimization methods. Results of numerical experiments are presented.

  9. Novel Methods of Hydrogen Leak Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushpinder S Puri

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of the fuel cell technology and a drive for clean fuel, hydrogen gas is emerging as a leading candidate for the fuel of choice. For hydrogen to become a consumer fuel for automotive and domestic power generation, safety is paramount. It is, therefore, desired to have a method and system for hydrogen leak detection using odorant which can incorporate a uniform concentration of odorant in the hydrogen gas, when odorants are mixed in the hydrogen storage or delivery means. It is also desired to develop methods where the odorant is not added to the bulk hydrogen, keeping it free of the odorization additives. When odorants are not added to the hydrogen gas in the storage or delivery means, methods must be developed to incorporate odorant in the leaking gas so that leaks can be detected by small. Further, when odorants are not added to the stored hydrogen, it may also be desirable to observe leaks by sight by discoloration of the surface of the storage or transportation vessels. A series of novel solutions are proposed which address the issues raised above. These solutions are divided into three categories as follows: 1. Methods incorporating an odorant in the path of hydrogen leak as opposed to adding it to the hydrogen gas. 2. Methods where odorants are generated in-situ by chemical reaction with the leaking hydrogen 3. Methods of dispensing and storing odorants in high pressure hydrogen gas which release odorants to the gas at a uniform and predetermined rates. Use of one or more of the methods described here in conjunction with appropriate engineering solutions will assure the ultimate safety of hydrogen use as a commercial fuel. (authors)

  10. CT assessment of anastomotic bowel leak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, N.; Atri, M.; Ryan, S.; Haddad, R.; Smith, A.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the predictors of clinically important gastrointestinal anastomotic leaks using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Subjects and methods: Ninety-nine patients, 73 with clinical suspicion of anastomotic bowel leak and 26 non-bowel surgery controls underwent CT to investigate postoperative sepsis. Fifty patients had undergone large bowel and 23 small bowel anastomoses. The time interval from surgery was 3-30 days (mean 10 ± 5.9 SD) for the anastomotic group and 3-40 days (mean 14 ± 11 SD) for the control group (p = 0.3). Two radiologists blinded to the final results reviewed the CT examinations in consensus and recorded the presence of peri-anastomotic air, fluid or combination of the two; distant loculated fluid or combination of fluid and air; free air or fluid; and intestinal contrast leak. Final diagnosis of clinically important anastomotic leak (CIAL) was confirmed at surgery or by chart review of predetermined clinical and laboratory criteria. Results: The prevalence of CIAL in the group undergoing CT was 31.5% (23/73). The CT examinations with documented leak were performed 5-28 (mean; 11.4 ± 6 SD) days after surgery. Nine patients required repeat operation, 10 percutaneous abscess drainage, two percutaneous drainage followed by surgery, and two prolonged antibiotic treatment and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Of the CT features examined, only peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air was more frequently seen in the CIAL group as opposed to the no leak group (p = 0.04). There was no intestinal contrast leakage in this cohort. Free air was present up to 9 days and loculated air up to 26 days without CIAL. Conclusion: Most postoperative CT features overlap between patients with and without CIAL. The only feature seen statistically more frequently with CIAL is peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air

  11. CT assessment of anastomotic bowel leak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, N. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Atri, M. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)]. E-mail: mostafa.atri@sw.ca; Ryan, S. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Haddad, R. [Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Smith, A. [Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2007-01-15

    Aim: To evaluate the predictors of clinically important gastrointestinal anastomotic leaks using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Subjects and methods: Ninety-nine patients, 73 with clinical suspicion of anastomotic bowel leak and 26 non-bowel surgery controls underwent CT to investigate postoperative sepsis. Fifty patients had undergone large bowel and 23 small bowel anastomoses. The time interval from surgery was 3-30 days (mean 10 {+-} 5.9 SD) for the anastomotic group and 3-40 days (mean 14 {+-} 11 SD) for the control group (p = 0.3). Two radiologists blinded to the final results reviewed the CT examinations in consensus and recorded the presence of peri-anastomotic air, fluid or combination of the two; distant loculated fluid or combination of fluid and air; free air or fluid; and intestinal contrast leak. Final diagnosis of clinically important anastomotic leak (CIAL) was confirmed at surgery or by chart review of predetermined clinical and laboratory criteria. Results: The prevalence of CIAL in the group undergoing CT was 31.5% (23/73). The CT examinations with documented leak were performed 5-28 (mean; 11.4 {+-} 6 SD) days after surgery. Nine patients required repeat operation, 10 percutaneous abscess drainage, two percutaneous drainage followed by surgery, and two prolonged antibiotic treatment and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Of the CT features examined, only peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air was more frequently seen in the CIAL group as opposed to the no leak group (p = 0.04). There was no intestinal contrast leakage in this cohort. Free air was present up to 9 days and loculated air up to 26 days without CIAL. Conclusion: Most postoperative CT features overlap between patients with and without CIAL. The only feature seen statistically more frequently with CIAL is peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air.

  12. LMFBR steam generator leak detection development in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, P M; Gerrels, E E; Greene, D A [General Electric Company, Sunnyvale, CA (United States); McKee, J [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    1978-10-01

    Leak detection for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor steam generators is an important economic factor in the shutdown, repair and restart of a plant. Development of leak detection systems in the U.S. has concentrated on four areas: (1) chemical (H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}) leak detection meters; (2) acoustic leak detection/location techniques; (3) investigation of leak behavior (enlargement, damage effects, plugging and unplugging); and (4) data management for plant operations. This paper discusses the status, design aspects, and applications of leak detection technology for LMFBR plants. (author)

  13. LMFBR steam generator leak detection development in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, P.M.; Gerrels, E.E.; Greene, D.A.; McKee, J.

    1978-01-01

    Leak detection for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor steam generators is an important economic factor in the shutdown, repair and restart of a plant. Development of leak detection systems in the U.S. has concentrated on four areas: (1) chemical (H 2 and O 2 ) leak detection meters; (2) acoustic leak detection/location techniques; (3) investigation of leak behavior (enlargement, damage effects, plugging and unplugging); and (4) data management for plant operations. This paper discusses the status, design aspects, and applications of leak detection technology for LMFBR plants. (author)

  14. Fuel leak detection on large transport airplanes

    OpenAIRE

    Behbahani-Pour, M.J.; Radice, G.

    2016-01-01

    Fuel leakage has the risk of being ignited by external ignition sources, and therefore it is important to detect\\ud any fuel leakage before the departure of the aircraft. Currently, there are no fuel leak detection systems installed\\ud on commercial aircrafts, to detect fuel tank leakage, while only a small number of more recent aircraft, have a fuel\\ud monitoring system, that generates a fuel leak-warning message in cockpit in the case of fuel imbalance between the\\ud tanks. The approach pro...

  15. Technique for detecting liquid metal leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauerle, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    In a system employing flowing liquid metal as a heat transfer medium in contact with tubular members containing a working fluid, i.e., steam, liquid metal leaks through the wall of the tubular member are detected by dislodging the liquid metal compounds forming in the tubular member at the leak locations and subsequently transporting the dislodged compound in the form of an aerosol to a detector responsive to the liquid metal compound. In the application to a sodium cooled tubular member, the detector would consist of a sodium responsive device, such as a sodium ion detector

  16. Acoustic leak detection development in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, D.A.; Malovrh, J.W.; Magee, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic monitoring systems that detect and locate a leak of water/steam from a defective tube in an LMFBR steam generator have been developed in the United States. A low frequency (approx. 10 KHz) system was developed by General Electric, and a high frequency (200 to 300 KHz) system by Rockwell International with support from Argonne National Laboratory. A comprehensive base technology program provided absolute signal amplitudes, background noise amplitudes, and signal source-to-detector transfer functions. Field tests of these systems demonstrated an ability to detect and locate simulated leaks under operating and quiescent conditions in an LMFBR steam generator. (author)

  17. Transanal Drainage of Coloanal Anastomotic Leaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Sherman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional operative intervention for leaks following coloanal anastomoses has been proximal fecal diversion with or without take-down of anastomosis. A few of these cases are also amenable to percutaneous drainage. Ostomies created in this situation are often permanent, specifically in cases where coloanal anastomoses are taken down at the time of reoperation. We present two patients who developed perianastomotic pelvic abscesses that were treated with transanal large bore catheter drainage resulting in successful salvage of coloanal anastomoses without the need for a laparotomy or ostomy creation. We propose this to be an effective therapeutic approach to leaks involving low coloanal anastomoses in the absence of generalized peritonitis.

  18. Apparatus for Leak Testing Pressurized Hoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Steve D. (Inventor); Garrison, Steve G. (Inventor); Gant, Bobby D. (Inventor); Palmer, John R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A hose-attaching apparatus for leak-testing a pressurized hose may include a hose-attaching member. A bore may extend through the hose-attaching member. An internal annular cavity may extend coaxially around the bore. At least one of a detector probe hole and a detector probe may be connected to the internal annular cavity. At least a portion of the bore may have a diameter which is at least one of substantially equal to and less than a diameter of a hose to be leak-tested.

  19. Single-Shell Tank Leak Integrity Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlow, D. G. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Girardot, C. L. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Venetz, T. J. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-26

    This document summarizes and evaluates the information in the Hanford Tri-Party Agreement Interim Milestone M-045-91F Targets completed between 2010 and 2015. 1) Common factors of SST liner failures (M-045-91F-T02), 2) the feasibility of testing for ionic conductivity between the inside and outside of SSTs (M-045-91F-T03, and 3) the causes, locations, and rates of leaks from leaking SSTs (M-045-91F-T04).

  20. NPP Krsko on-line low pressure containment tightness monitoring implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudas, M.; Basic, I.

    2004-01-01

    Containment Integrated Leak Rate Test (CILRT) 1999 in NPP Krsko was completely performed following regulation of 10CFR50 Appendix J Option A and ANSI/ANS 56.8-1987 at a design pressure (3.15 kp/cm2). In 2001 NPP Krsko proposed to Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) the Technical Specification (TS) and Updated Safety Analysis Report (USAR) changes that describe implementation of new test intervals for Type A, B and C tests according to 10CFR50, Appendix J, Option B. After the positive final independent review of proposed changes by Authorized Institution, NPP Krsko received the License Amendment requiring from NPP Krsko to define technical solution for surveillance of containment tightness between two 10-years CILRT. This paper intends to discuss proposed methods by NPP Krsko, test equipment, performed measurements in 2004, associated analyses and evaluation.(author)

  1. A Correlated Active Acoustic Leak Detection in a SFR Steam Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Joon; Jeong, Ji Young; Kim, Jong Man; Kim, Byung Ho; Kim, Yong Il

    2009-01-01

    The methods of acoustic leak detection are active acoustic leak detection and passive acoustic leak detection. The methods for passive acoustic leak detection are already established, but because our goal is development of passive acoustic leak detection for detecting a leakage range of small and micro leak rates, it is difficult detecting a leak in steam generator using this developed passive acoustic leak detection. Thus the acoustic leak detection system is required to be able to detect wide range of water leaks. From this view point we need to develop an active acoustic leak detection technology to be able to detect intermediate leak rates

  2. Supporting and guiding device that is leak-tight and can be dismantled for the shaft of a rotating machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tigoulet, Bernard; Fanchtein, J.P.; Dubost, Rene.

    1982-01-01

    This device includes a removable bearing casing crossed by at least one shaft of the machine, facilities for guiding this casing in parallel with the axis of the shaft so as to facilitate its removal and refitting, a system for supporting the shaft when the removable casing is not fitted in the machine frame. Application to machines for the extrusion of coating bitumen for radioactive waste [fr

  3. Eleventh interim status report: Model 9975 O-Ring fixture long-term leak performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-01

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. One approach has been to periodically evaluate the leak performance of O-rings being aged in mock-up 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) at elevated temperature. Other methods such as compression-stress relaxation (CSR) tests and field surveillance are also on-going to evaluate O-ring behavior. Seventy tests using PCV mock-ups were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they continue to meet the leak-tightness criterion defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Due to material substitution, fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF.

  4. Boundary Spanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    The paper explores how locals span boundaries between corporate and local levels. The aim is to better comprehend potentialities and challenges when MNCs draws on locals’ culture specific knowledge. The study is based on an in-depth, interpretive case study of boundary spanning by local actors in...... approach with pattern matching is a way to shed light on the tacit local knowledge that organizational actors cannot articulate and that an exclusively inductive research is not likely to unveil....

  5. Localized leak detection utilizing moisture sensitive tape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riddle, P.

    1984-01-01

    Moisture sensitive tape (MST) has been used in various nuclear power plants to detect leaks in reactor piping systems. The sensor assembly consists of MST, transponder, and sensor carrier, and is installed on the exterior of thermal insulation. The components, applications, installation, and purchasing information are discussed in the paper

  6. Steam generator leak detection using acoustic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goluchko, V.V.; Sokolov, B.M.; Bulanov, A.N.

    1982-05-01

    The main requirements to meet by a device for leak detection in sodium - water steam generators are determined. The potentialities of instrumentation designed based on the developed requirements have been tested using a model of a 550 kw steam generator [fr

  7. Detecting gas leaks by ultrasonic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo; Henriksen, Eigil

    1997-01-01

    The emission of noise in the frequency range 10 kHz to 25.6 kHz from an experimental gas leak in a flanged joint has been experimentally investigated. The overall conclusion is that the emitted noise is almost frequency independent in level within the considered frequency range.A small PC program...

  8. A Quick Guide to Paravalvular Leak Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafoor, Sameer; Franke, Jennifer; Bertog, Stefan; Lam, Simon; Vaskelyte, Laura; Hofmann, Ilona; Matic, Predrag

    2015-01-01

    Paravalvular leak (PVL) is a seldomly covered aspect of structural heart disease. However, this is a condition that frequently presents after valvular replacement. This article will cover the diagnosising and treating PVL (i.e. imaging, access, and device selection). In addition, specific aspects of aortic and mitral PVL closure will be covered in this review. PMID:29588686

  9. The concept of leak before failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellissier-Tanon, A.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to demonstrate the state of leak before failure introduce a new tangible element in the estimation of safety from which it becomes possible to estimate more rationnally the risks associated to crack formation. This paper presents the international positions on the full section break suppression of steam and primary pipes (Federal Republic of Germany, USA, France) [fr

  10. Artificial Leaks in Container Closure Integrity Testing: Nonlinear Finite Element Simulation of Aperture Size Originated by a Copper Wire Sandwiched between the Stopper and the Glass Vial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Alejandra; Roehl, Holger; Brown, Helen; Adler, Michael; Chalus, Pascal; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Container closure integrity (CCI) testing is required by different regulatory authorities in order to provide assurance of tightness of the container closure system against possible contamination, for example, by microorganisms. Microbial ingress CCI testing is performed by incubation of the container closure system with microorganisms under specified testing conditions. Physical CCI uses surrogate endpoints, such as coloration by dye solution ingress or gas flow (helium leakage testing). In order to correlate microbial CCI and physical CCI test methods and to evaluate the methods' capability to detect a given leak, artificial leaks are being introduced into the container closure system in a variety of different ways. In our study, artificial leaks were generated using inserted copper wires between the glass vial opening and rubber stopper. However, the insertion of copper wires introduces leaks of unknown size and shape. With nonlinear finite element simulations, the aperture size between the rubber stopper and the glass vial was calculated, depending on wire diameter and capping force. The dependency of the aperture size on the copper wire diameter was quadratic. With the data obtained, we were able to calculate the leak size and model leak shape. Our results suggest that the size as well as the shape of the artificial leaks should be taken into account when evaluating critical leak sizes, as flow rate does not, independently, correlate to hole size. Capping force also affected leak size. An increase in the capping force from 30 to 70 N resulted in a reduction of the aperture (leak size) by approximately 50% for all wire diameters. From 30 to 50 N, the reduction was approximately 33%. Container closure integrity (CCI) testing is required by different regulatory authorities in order to provide assurance of tightness of the container closure system against contamination, for example, by microorganisms. Microbial ingress CCI testing is performed by incubation of the

  11. Developments in steam generator leak detection at Ontario Hydro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, K.J.; Singh, V.P. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    A method for locating small tube leaks in steam generators has been developed and implemented at Ontario Hydro. The technique utilizes both helium leak detection and moisture leak detection. The combination of these two methods allows tube leaks to be detected in any part of the tube bundle, including those submerged below water near the tubesheet. The estimated detection limits for the helium and moisture leak detection systems are 0.001 kg/hr and 0.05 kg/hr respectively, expressed as leak rates measured at typical boiler operating conditions. This technology is best utilized in situations where the leak rate under operating conditions is smaller than the practical limit for fluorescein dye techniques ({approx}2 kg/hour). Other novel techniques have been utilized to increase the reliability and speed of the boiler leak search process. These include the use of argon carrier gas to stabilize the buoyant helium gas in the boiler secondary. (author)

  12. Developments in steam generator leak detection at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, K.J.; Singh, V.P.

    1998-01-01

    A method for locating small tube leaks in steam generators has been developed and implemented at Ontario Hydro. The technique utilizes both helium leak detection and moisture leak detection. The combination of these two methods allows tube leaks to be detected in any part of the tube bundle, including those submerged below water near the tubesheet. The estimated detection limits for the helium and moisture leak detection systems are 0.001 kg/hr and 0.05 kg/hr respectively, expressed as leak rates measured at typical boiler operating conditions. This technology is best utilized in situations where the leak rate under operating conditions is smaller than the practical limit for fluorescein dye techniques (∼2 kg/hour). Other novel techniques have been utilized to increase the reliability and speed of the boiler leak search process. These include the use of argon carrier gas to stabilize the buoyant helium gas in the boiler secondary. (author)

  13. Equiangular tight frames and unistochastic matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyeneche, Dardo; Turek, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that a complex equiangular tight frame composed of N vectors in dimension d , denoted ETF ( d , N ), exists if and only if a certain bistochastic matrix, univocally determined by N and d , belongs to a special class of unistochastic matrices. This connection allows us to find new complex ETFs in infinitely many dimensions and to derive a method to introduce non-trivial free parameters in ETFs. We present an explicit six-parametric family of complex ETF(6,16), which defines a family of symmetric POVMs. Minimal and maximal possible average entanglement of the vectors within this qubit–qutrit family are described. Furthermore, we propose an efficient numerical procedure to compute the unitary matrix underlying a unistochastic matrix, which we apply to find all existing classes of complex ETFs containing up to 20 vectors. (paper)

  14. Evaluation of tight-pitch PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, F.; Driscoll, M.J.; Lanning, D.D.

    1979-08-01

    The impact of tight pinch cores on the consumption of natural uranium ore has been evaluated for two systems of coupled PWR's namely one particular type of thorium system - 235 U/UO 2 : Pu/ThO 2 : 233 U/ThO 2 - and the conventional recycle-mode uranium system - 235 U/UO 2 : Pu/UO 2 . The basic parameter varied was the fuel-to-moderator volume ratio (F/M) of the (uniform) lattice for the last core in each sequence. Although methods and data verification in the range of present interest, 0.5 (current lattices) 1.0, the EPRI-LEOPARD and LASER programs used for the thorium and uranium calculations, respectively, were successfully benchmarked against several of the more pertinent experiments

  15. Surface Passivation in Empirical Tight Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu; Tan, Yaohua; Jiang, Zhengping; Povolotskyi, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard; Kubis, Tillmann

    2016-03-01

    Empirical Tight Binding (TB) methods are widely used in atomistic device simulations. Existing TB methods to passivate dangling bonds fall into two categories: 1) Method that explicitly includes passivation atoms is limited to passivation with atoms and small molecules only. 2) Method that implicitly incorporates passivation does not distinguish passivation atom types. This work introduces an implicit passivation method that is applicable to any passivation scenario with appropriate parameters. This method is applied to a Si quantum well and a Si ultra-thin body transistor oxidized with SiO2 in several oxidation configurations. Comparison with ab-initio results and experiments verifies the presented method. Oxidation configurations that severely hamper the transistor performance are identified. It is also shown that the commonly used implicit H atom passivation overestimates the transistor performance.

  16. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

  17. Random walks and polygons in tight confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diao, Y; Ernst, C; Ziegler, U

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the effect of confinement on the topology and geometry of tightly confined random walks and polygons. Here the walks and polygons are confined in a sphere of radius R ≥ 1/2 and the polygons are equilateral with n edges of unit length. We illustrate numerically that for a fixed length of random polygons the knotting probability increases to one as the radius decreases to 1/2. We also demonstrate that for random polygons (walks) the curvature increases to πn (π(n – 1)) as the radius approaches 1/2 and that the torsion decreases to ≈ πn/3 (≈ π(n – 1)/3). In addition we show the effect of length and confinement on the average crossing number of a random polygon

  18. Tight gas sand tax credit yields opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, F.W.; Osburn, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Internal Revenue Service on Apr. 1, 1991, released the inflation adjustments used in the calculations of Non-Conventional Fuel Tax Credits for 1990. The inflation adjustment, 1.6730, when applied to the base price of $3/bbl of oil equivalent, adjusts the tax credit to $5.019/bbl for oil and 86.53 cents/MMBTU for gas. The conversion factor for equivalent fuels is 5.8 MMBTU/bbl. Unfortunately, the tax credit for tight formation gas continues to be unadjusted for inflation and remains 52 cents/MMBTU. As many producers are aware, the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 expanded the dates of eligibility and the usage for-Non-Conventional Fuel Tax Credits. Among other provisions, eligible wells may be placed in service until Jan. 1, 1992, and once in place may utilize the credit for production through Dec. 31, 2002. Both dates are 2 year extensions from previous regulations

  19. Experiments and calculations to leak openings and leak rates on typical piping components and systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefler, A.; Grebner, H.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of leak opening and leak rate for through cracks in piping components have been performed. The analyses are pre- or mostly post-calculations to experiments performed at the HDR facility under PWR operating conditions. Piping components under consideration are small diameter straight pipes with circumferential cracks, pipe bends with longitudinal or circumferential cracks and pipe branches with weldment cracks. The component are loaded by internal pressure and opening as well as closing bending moment. The finite element method and two-phase flow leak rate programs are used for the calculations. Results of the analyses are presented as J-integral values, crack opening displacements and areas and leak rates as well as comparisons to the experimental results. 6 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Comparison of leak opening and leak rate calculations to HDR experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebner, H.; Hoefler, A.; Hunger, H.

    1993-01-01

    During the last years a number of calculations of leak opening and leak rate for through cracks in piping components have been performed. Analyses are pre- or mostly post-calculations to experiments performed at the HDR facility under PWR operating conditions. Piping components under consideration were small diameter straight pipes with circumferential cracks, pipe bends with longitudinal or circumferential cracks and pipe branches with weldment cracks. The components were loaded by internal pressure and opening as well as closing bending moment. The finite element method and two-phase flow leak rate programs were used for the calculations. Results of the analyses are presented as J-integral values, crack opening displacements and areas and leak rates as well as comparisons to the experimental results

  1. Performance evaluation of PFBR wire type sodium leak detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, G.; Rajan, K.K.; Nashine, B.K.; Chandramouli, S.; Madhusoodanan, K.; Kalyanasundaram, P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Performance evaluation of wire type leak detectors was conducted in LEENA facility by creating sodium leaks. → The lowest leak rate of 214 g/h was detected in 50 min and the highest detection time was 6 h for a leak rate of 222 g/h. → Factors affecting the leak detection time are packing density of thermal insulation, layout of heater, temperature, etc. → Relationship between leak rate and detection time was established and a leak rate of 100 g/h is likely to be detected in 11.1 h. → Contact resistance of leaked sodium increased to 3.5 kilo ohms in 20 h. - Abstract: Wire type leak detectors working on conductivity principle are used for detecting sodium leak in the secondary sodium circuits of fast breeder reactors. It is required to assess the performance of these detectors and confirm that they are meeting the requirements. A test facility by name LEENA was constructed at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam to test the wire type leak detector lay out by simulating different sodium leak rates. This test facility consists of a sodium dump tank, a test vessel, interconnecting pipelines with valves, micro filter and test section with leak simulators. There are three different test sections in the test set up of length 1000 mm each. These test sections simulate piping of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) secondary circuit and the wire type leak detector layout in full scale. All test sections are provided with leak simulators. A leak simulator consists of a hole of size one mm drilled in the test section and closed with a tapered pin. The tapered pin position in the hole is adjusted by a screw mechanism and there by the annular gap of flow area is varied for getting different leak rates. Various experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the leak detectors by creating different sodium leak rates. This paper deals with the details of wire type leak detector layout for the secondary sodium circuit of

  2. Vector fields in a tight laser focus: comparison of models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peatross, Justin; Berrondo, Manuel; Smith, Dallas; Ware, Michael

    2017-06-26

    We assess several widely used vector models of a Gaussian laser beam in the context of more accurate vector diffraction integration. For the analysis, we present a streamlined derivation of the vector fields of a uniformly polarized beam reflected from an ideal parabolic mirror, both inside and outside of the resulting focus. This exact solution to Maxwell's equations, first developed in 1920 by V. S. Ignatovsky, is highly relevant to high-intensity laser experiments since the boundary conditions at a focusing optic dictate the form of the focus in a manner analogous to a physical experiment. In contrast, many models simply assume a field profile near the focus and develop the surrounding vector fields consistent with Maxwell's equations. In comparing the Ignatovsky result with popular closed-form analytic vector models of a Gaussian beam, we find that the relatively simple model developed by Erikson and Singh in 1994 provides good agreement in the paraxial limit. Models involving a Lax expansion introduce a divergences outside of the focus while providing little if any improvement in the focal region. Extremely tight focusing produces a somewhat complicated structure in the focus, and requires the Ignatovsky model for accurate representation.

  3. Endoscopic management of biliary injuries and leaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T S Chandrasekar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bile duct injuries and subsequent leaks can occur following laparoscopic and open cholecystectomies and also during other hepatobiliary surgeries. Various patient related and technical factors are implicated in the causation of biliary injuries. Over a period of twenty five years managing such patients of biliary injuries our team has found a practical approach to assess the cause of biliary injuries based on the symptoms, clinical examination and imaging. Bismuth classification is helpful in most of the cases. Immediate referral to a centre experienced in the management of bile duct injury and timely intervention is associated with improved outcomes. Resuscitation, correcting dyselectrolytemia, aspiration of undrained biloma and antibiotics take the priority in the management. The goal is to restore the bile conduit, and to prevent short and longterm complications such as biliary fistula, intra-abdominal abscess, biliary stricture, recurrent cholangitis and secondary biliary cirrhosis. Endoscopic therapy by reducing the transpapillary pressure gradient helps in reducing the leak. Endoscopic therapy with biliary sphincterotomy alone or with additional placement of a biliary stent/ nasobiliary drainage is advocated. In our tertiary care referral unit, we found endoscopic interventions are useful in situations where there is leak with associated CBD calculus or a foreign body, peripheral bile duct injury, cystic duct stump leak and partial bile duct injury with leak/ narrowing of the lumen. Endotherapy is not useful in case of complete transection (total cut off and complete stricture involving common hepatic or common bile ducts. In conclusion, endoscopic treatment can be considered a highly effective therapy and should be the first-line therapy in such patients. Though less successful, an endoscopic attempt is warranted in patients suffering from central bile duct leakages failing which surgical management is recommended.

  4. Investigation for the sodium leak in Monju. Sodium leak and fire test-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, Koji; Ohno, Shuji; Miyahara, Shinya; Miyake, Osamu; Tanabe, Hiromi

    2000-08-01

    As a part of the work for investigating the sodium leak accident which occurred in the Monju reactor (hereinafter referred to as Monju) on December 8, 1995, three tests, (1) a sodium leak test, (2) a sodium leak and fire test-1, and (3) a sodium leak and fire test-II, were carried out at OEC/PEC. The main objectives of these tests were to confirm the leak and burning behavior of sodium from the damaged thermometer, and the effects of the sodium fire on the integrity of the surrounding structure. This report describes the results of the sodium fire test-I carried out as a preliminary test. The test was performed using the SOLFA-2 (Sodium Leak, Fire and Aerosol) facility on April 8, 1996. In this test, sodium heated to 480degC was leaked for approximately 1.5 hours from a leak simulating apparatus and caused to drop onto a ventilation duct and a grating with the same dimensions and layout as those in Monju. The main conclusions obtained from the test are shown below: 1) Observation from video cameras in the test revealed that in the early stages of the sodium leak, sodium dripped out of the flexible tube of the thermometer. This dripping and burning expanded in range as the sodium splashed on the duct. 2) No damage to the duct itself was detected. However, the aluminum louver frame of the ventilation duct's lower inlet was damaged. Its machine screws came off, leaving half of the grill (on the grating side) detached. 3) No large hole, like the one seen at Monju, was found when the grating was removed from the testing system for inspection, although the area centered on the point were the sodium dripped was damaged in a way indicating the first stages of grating failure. The 5mm square lattice was corroded through in some parts, and numerous blades (originally 3.2 mm thick) had become sharpened like the blade of a knife. 4) The burning pan underside thermocouple near the leak point measured 700degC in within approximately 10 minutes, and for the next hour remained

  5. Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations

  6. Dynamic pressure measures for long pipeline leak detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likun Wang; Hongchao Wang; Min Xiong; Bin Xu; Dongjie Tan; Hengzhang Zhou [PetroChina Pipeline Company, Langfang (China). R and D Center

    2009-07-01

    Pipeline leak detection method based on dynamic pressure is studied. The feature of dynamic pressure which is generated by the leakage of pipeline is analyzed. The dynamic pressure method is compared with the static pressure method for the advantages and disadvantages in pipeline leak detection. The dynamic pressure signal is suitable for pipeline leak detection for quick-change of pipeline internal pressure. Field tests show that the dynamic pressure method detects pipeline leak rapidly and precisely. (author)

  7. Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G. [and others

    1997-04-01

    In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations.

  8. Vehicle-based Methane Mapping Helps Find Natural Gas Leaks and Prioritize Leak Repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Fischer, J. C.; Weller, Z.; Roscioli, J. R.; Lamb, B. K.; Ferrara, T.

    2017-12-01

    Recently, mobile methane sensing platforms have been developed to detect and locate natural gas (NG) leaks in urban distribution systems and to estimate their size. Although this technology has already been used in targeted deployment for prioritization of NG pipeline infrastructure repair and replacement, one open question regarding this technology is how effective the resulting data are for prioritizing infrastructure repair and replacement. To answer this question we explore the accuracy and precision of the natural gas leak location and emission estimates provided by methane sensors placed on Google Street View (GSV) vehicles. We find that the vast majority (75%) of methane emitting sources detected by these mobile platforms are NG leaks and that the location estimates are effective at identifying the general location of leaks. We also show that the emission rate estimates from mobile detection platforms are able to effectively rank NG leaks for prioritizing leak repair. Our findings establish that mobile sensing platforms are an efficient and effective tool for improving the safety and reducing the environmental impacts of low-pressure NG distribution systems by reducing atmospheric methane emissions.

  9. Acoustic leak detection at complicated topologies using neural netwoks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessel, G.; Schmitt, W.; Weiss, F.P.

    1994-01-01

    Considering the shortcomings of all the existing leak detecting principles, a new method again based on the measurement of the leak induced sound but also applying pattern recognition is being developed. The capability of neural networks to localize leaks at the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) head of VVER-440 reactors is discussed. (orig./DG)

  10. Damage phenomena at target surface by small leak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kyung Chai; Jeong, J. Y.; Kim, B. H.; Kim, T. J.; Choi, J. H.

    2001-04-01

    Design of the steam generator should be considered the safety about the sodium-water reaction occurred by water leak in heat transfer tube. Water leak mainly occurred from welding defect at the process of tube connection, the vibration of heat transfer tube bundle in steam generating system, fretting, and pin hole in original tube manufacturing. The classification of water leak divided to two parts, roughly, in case of the water leak studies. One is small leak phenomena analysis, and the other is it of large leak which was mainly treated to the evaluation on pressure increasing from hydrogen gas formed by sodium-water reaction in sodium system. In small water leak, the leak propagation phenomena and the development of leak detecting system at initial stage of small water leak were studied, mainly. In this study, the corrosion phenomena on the target tube surface appeared by sodium-water reaction was analyzed through the small water leak experiments, and, also, the jet phenomena formed by N 2 gas injection through the leak nozzle under water medium was observed

  11. Small leak detection requirements for SNR-300 steam generator operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumm, K.

    1975-01-01

    The leak detection philosophy of the SNR-300 steam generators is described. Due to operational demands small leaks have already to be detectable at a stage where secondary tube damage has not yet occurred. The requirements on a leak detection instrument are developed and the instrument itself is described. (author)

  12. Double Shell Tank AY-102 Radioactive Waste Leak Investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washenfelder, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    PowerPoint. The objectives of this presentation are to: Describe Effort to Determine Whether Tank AY-102 Leaked; Review Probable Causes of the Tank AY-102 Leak; and, Discuss Influence of Leak on Hanford's Double-Shell Tank Integrity Program

  13. 1999 Leak Detection, Monitoring, and Mitigation Strategy Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OHL, P.C.

    1999-01-01

    This document is a complete revision of WHC-SD-WM-ES-378, Rev 1. This update includes recent developments in Leak Detection, Leak Monitoring, and Leak Mitigation technologies, as well as, recent developments in single-shell tank retrieval technologies. In addition, a single-shell tank retrieval release protection strategy is presented

  14. Special storage of leaking fuel at Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, Janos; Szőke, L.; Burján, T.; Lukács, R.; Hózer, H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the activities related with spent, hermetic as well as leaking fuel handling and storage, including: Spent fuel pool; Transportation criteria for the spent fuel assemblies and Interim spent fuel dry storage; Short-term storage in the spent fuel pool; Identification of the leaking assemblies by the TS-device; Present conception of Identification, handling of the leaking FAs; Modified transport procedure for the leaking FAs; Calculation of solved activity inside the leaking fuel rod; Solved activity limit values for the leaking FAs; Long-term storage in the interim spent Fuel dry storage are presented. At the end authors’ concluded that: 1) The leaking FA can be transported to the interim dry storage together with the other spent fuel assemblies in the transport container. 2) The transport-documentation of the leaking FA has to contain: isotope inventory, calculated solved activity values of the failed FA and the quantity of failed fuel rods. 3) Performing three leakage tests of the identified leaking FA before the transportation in the 5FP. it is useful to decrease the solved activity concentration inside the leaking FA and give additional information about the extent of the leakage. 4) We can calculate simply the solved activity of the leaking FA. 5) The modified transport procedure will have to be authorized. 6) The radiological effects of the leaking FA are negligible relative to the natural background radiation

  15. Final evaluation of advanced and current leak detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Carlson, R.; Brewer, W.; Lanham, R.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the adequacy of leak detection systems in light water reactors. The sources of numerous reported leaks and methods of detection have been documented. Research to advance the state of the art of acoustic leak detection is presented, and procedures for implementation are discussed

  16. Automated leak localization performance without detailed demand distribution data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moors, Janneke; Scholten, L.; van der Hoek, J.P.; den Besten, J.

    2018-01-01

    Automatic leak localization has been suggested to reduce the time and personnel efforts needed to localize
    (small) leaks. Yet, the available methods require a detailed demand distribution model for successful
    calibration and good leak localization performance. The main aim of this work was

  17. Water leaks in sodium-heated fast reactor boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    Constraints on plant design which may result from considerations of leak behaviour and leak detection limits are briefly considered. The sodium-water interface and reactions, the behaviour of small leaks, hydrogen bubbles and detection methods, including galvanic cell methods, are included. (UK)

  18. 40 CFR 63.648 - Equipment leak standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment leak standards. 63.648...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries § 63.648 Equipment leak...) through (c)(10) and (e) through (i) of this section. (1) The instrument readings that define a leak for...

  19. 40 CFR 63.769 - Equipment leak standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment leak standards. 63.769... § 63.769 Equipment leak standards. (a) This section applies to equipment subject to this subpart and... release to detect leaks, except under the following conditions. (i) The owner or operator has obtained...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1331 - Equipment leak provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equipment leak provisions. 63.1331... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins § 63.1331 Equipment leak... in pumps and agitator seals in light liquid service shall not be considered to be a leak. For...

  1. 10 CFR 39.35 - Leak testing of sealed sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leak testing of sealed sources. 39.35 Section 39.35 Energy....35 Leak testing of sealed sources. (a) Testing and recordkeeping requirements. Each licensee who uses... record of leak test results in units of microcuries and retain the record for inspection by the...

  2. 40 CFR 63.1434 - Equipment leak provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equipment leak provisions. 63.1434... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions for Polyether Polyols Production § 63.1434 Equipment leak provisions. (a) The owner or operator of each affected source shall comply with the HON equipment leak...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1410 - Equipment leak provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equipment leak provisions. 63.1410... leak provisions. The owner or operator of each affected source shall comply with the requirements of 40 CFR part 63, subpart UU (national emission standards for equipment leaks (control level 2)) for all...

  4. 49 CFR 195.444 - CPM leak detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.444 Section 195.444... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.444 CPM leak detection. Each computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system installed on a hazardous liquid pipeline transporting liquid in single...

  5. 49 CFR 195.134 - CPM leak detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.134 Section 195.134... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.134 CPM leak detection. This section applies to each hazardous liquid... computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system and each replaced component of an existing CPM...

  6. Small leak detection requirements for SNR-300 steam generator operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumm, K

    1975-07-01

    The leak detection philosophy of the SNR-300 steam generators is described. Due to operational demands small leaks have already to be detectable at a stage where secondary tube damage has not yet occurred. The requirements on a leak detection instrument are developed and the instrument itself is described. (author)

  7. Non-intrusive measurement of tritium activity in waste drums by modelling a 3He leak quantified by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demange, D.

    2002-01-01

    This study deals with a new method that makes it possible to measure very low tritium quantities inside radioactive waste drums. This indirect method is based on measuring the decaying product, 3 He, and requires a study of its behaviour inside the drum. Our model considers 3 He as totally free and its leak through the polymeric joint of the drum as two distinct phenomena: permeation and laminar flow. The numerical simulations show that a pseudo-stationary state takes place. Thus, the 3 He leak corresponds to the tritium activity inside the drum but it appears, however, that the leak peaks when the atmospheric pressure variations induce an overpressure in the drum. Nevertheless, the confinement of a drum in a tight chamber makes it possible to quantify the 3 He leak. This is a non-intrusive measurement of its activity, which was experimentally checked by using reduced models, representing the drum and its confinement chamber. The drum's confinement was optimised to obtain a reproducible 3 He leak measurement. The gaseous samples taken from the chamber were purified using selective adsorption onto activated charcoals at 77 K to remove the tritium and pre-concentrate the 3 He. The samples were measured using a leak detector mass spectrometer. The adaptation of the signal acquisition and the optimisation of the analysis parameters made it possible to reach the stability of the external calibrations using standard gases with a 3 He detection limit of 0.05 ppb. Repeated confinement of the reference drums demonstrated the accuracy of this method. The uncertainty of this non-intrusive measurement of the tritium activity in 200-liter drums is 15% and the detection limit is about 1 GBq after a 24 h confinement. These results led to the definition of an automated tool able to systematically measure the tritium activity of all storage waste drums. (authors)

  8. Thermophysical instruments for non-destructive examination of tightness and internal gas pressure or irradiated power reactor fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastoushin, V.V.; Novikov, A.Yu.; Bibilashvili, Yu.K.

    1998-01-01

    The developed thermophysical method and technical instruments for non-destructive leak-tightness and gas pressure inspection inside irradiated power reactor fuel rods and FAs under poolside and hot cell conditions are described. The method of gas pressure measuring based on the examination of parameters of thermal convection that aroused in gas volume of rod plenum by special technical instruments. The developed method and technique allows accurate value determination of not only one of the main critical rod parameters, namely total internal gas pressure, that forms rod mean life in the reactor core, but also the partial pressure of every main constituent of gaseous mixture inside irradiated fuel rod, that provides the feasibility of authentic and reliable leak-tightness detection. The described techniques were experimentally checked during the examination of all types power reactor fuel rods existing in Russia (WWER, BN, RBMK) and could form the basis for new technique development for non-destructive examination of PWR (and other) type rods and FAs having gas plenum filled with spring or another elements of design. (author)

  9. Leak Detection Modeling and Simulation for Oil Pipeline with Artificial Intelligence Method

    OpenAIRE

    Sukarno, Pudjo; Sidarto, Kuntjoro Adji; Trisnobudi, Amoranto; Setyoadi, Delint Ira; Rohani, Nancy; Darmadi, Darmadi

    2007-01-01

    Leak detection is always interesting research topic, where leak location and leak rate are two pipeline leaking parameters that should be determined accurately to overcome pipe leaking problems. In this research those two parameters are investigated by developing transmission pipeline model and the leak detection model which is developed using Artificial Neural Network. The mathematical approach needs actual leak data to train the leak detection model, however such data could not be obtained ...

  10. Intraoperative air leak measured after lobectomy is associated with postoperative duration of air leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Alessandro; Salati, Michele; Pompili, Cecilia; Gentili, Paolo; Sabbatini, Armando

    2017-11-01

    To verify the association between the air leak objectively measured intraoperatively (IAL) using the ventilator and the air leak duration after pulmonary lobectomy. Prospective analysis on 111 patients submitted to pulmonary lobectomy (33 by video-assisted thoracic surgery). After resection, objective assessment of air leak (in milliliter per minute) was performed before closure of the chest by measuring the difference between a fixed inspired and expired volume, using a tidal volume of 8 ml/kg, a respiratory rate of 10 and a positive-end expiratory pressure of 5 cmH2O. A multivariable analysis was performed for identifying factors associated with duration of postoperative air leak. Average IAL was 158 ml/min (range 0-1500 ml/min). The best cut-off (receiver-operating characteristics analysis) associated with air leak longer than 5 days was 500 ml/min. Nine patients had IAL >500 ml/min (8%). They had a longer duration of postoperative air leak compared with those with a lower IAL (mean values, 10.1 days, SD 8.8 vs 1.5 days, SD 4.9 P leak duration after multivariable regression: left side resection (P = 0.018), upper site resection (P = 0.031) and IAL >500 ml/min (P leak duration was generated: 1.7 + 2.4 × left side + 2.2 × upper site + 8.8 × IAL >500. The air leak measurement using the ventilator parameters after lung resection may assist in estimating the risk of postoperative prolonged air leak. An IAL > 500 ml/min may warrant the use of intraoperative preventative measures, particularly after video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy where a submersion test is often unreliable. © 2017 European Society of Cardiology and European Atherosclerosis Association. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Blurring Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Nielsen, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    of welfare functions into EU law both from an internal market law and a constitutional law perspective. The main problem areas covered by the Blurring Boundaries project were studied in sub-projects on: 1) Internal market law and welfare services; 2) Fundamental rights and non-discrimination law aspects......; and 3) Services of general interest. In the Blurring Boundaries project, three aspects of the European Social Model have been particularly highlighted: the constitutionalisation of the European Social Model, its multi-level legal character, and the clash between market access justice at EU level...... and distributive justice at national level....

  12. Novel Methods of Hydrogen Leak Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushpinder S Puri

    2006-01-01

    For hydrogen to become a consumer fuel for automotive and domestic power generation, safety is paramount. Today's hydrogen systems are built with inherent safety measures and multiple levels of protection. However, human senses, in particular, the sense of smell, is considered the ultimate safeguards against leaks. Since hydrogen is an odorless gas, use of odorants to detect leaks, as is done in case of natural gas, is obvious solution. The odorants required for hydrogen used in fuel cells have a unique requirement which must be met. This is because almost all of the commercial odorants used in gas leak detection contain sulfur which acts as poison for the catalysts used in hydrogen based fuel cells, most specifically for the PEM (polymer electrolyte membrane or proton exchange membrane) fuel cells. A possible solution to this problem is to use non-sulfur containing odorants. Chemical compounds based on mixtures of acrylic acid and nitrogen compounds have been adopted to achieve a sulfur-free odorization of a gas. It is, therefore, desired to have a method and system for hydrogen leak detection using odorant which can incorporate a uniform concentration of odorant in the hydrogen gas, when odorants are mixed in the hydrogen storage or delivery means. It is also desired to develop methods where the odorant is not added to the bulk hydrogen, keeping it free of the odorization additives. A series of novel solutions are proposed which address the issues raised above. These solutions are divided into three categories as follows: 1. Methods incorporating an odorant in the path of hydrogen leak as opposed to adding it to the hydrogen gas. 2. Methods where odorants are generated in-situ by chemical reaction with the leaking hydrogen 3. Methods of dispensing and storing odorants in high pressure hydrogen gas which release odorants to the gas at a uniform and predetermined rates. Use of one or more of the methods described here in conjunction with appropriate engineering

  13. Application of acoustic leak detection technology for the detection and location of leaks in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Prine, D.; Mathieson, T.

    1988-10-01

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the adequacy of leak detection systems in light water reactors. The sources of numerous reported leaks and methods of detection have been documented. Research to advance the state of the art of acoustic leak detection is presented, and procedures for implementation are discussed. 14 refs., 70 figs., 10 tabs

  14. The Digital Journalist : the journalistic field, boundaries, and disquieting change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eldridge II, Scott; Franklin, Bob; Eldridge II, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This chapter looks at WikiLeaks and other ‘Interloper Media’ (Eldridge 2013, 2014) to explore the boundaries and identity dimensions of ‘being’ a digital journalist. Media technologies have long been connected with a disruption of journalism’s norms, and this disruption has been pronounced with

  15. Global Coal Trade. From Tightness to Oversupply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornot-Gandolphe, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Over the past four years, international coal trade has been reshaped by China's surging imports. China, which was still a net exporter in 2008, became the world's first coal importer in 2011, taking over the position that Japan has occupied for three decades. Its imports have continued their rising trend and reached a record level in 2012, despite the country's economic slowdown. China imported 289 million tons of coal in 2012, up 30% over 2011. It now accounts for 23% of global imports. Although China is the world's largest coal producer, several factors have contributed to the sudden rise in its imports, including the higher cost of domestic coal relative to international prices and bottlenecks in transporting domestic coal to south-eastern provinces. More recently, another event shook the international coal business: the United States have been back on the market. The collapse of U.S. gas prices, to $4/million Btu in 2011 and even $2.75/million Btu in 2012, linked with the 'shale gas revolution', has made coal uncompetitive in the electricity sector, its main outlet on the U.S. market. U.S. coal demand dropped 4% in 2011 and 11% in 2012. The reduction in domestic demand has forced U.S. miners to look for overseas outlets. Their exports surged by 31% in 2011 and 16% in 2012. They reached 112 million tons in 2012, more than twice the level of 2009. The United States, which almost disappeared from the international steam coal market in the 2000's, have regained a larger share of the total coal export market, 9% in 2012, against 6% in 2009. These developments, although not directly linked, have a huge impact on the global market and pricing of coal. Chinese imports have helped the market to quickly recover from its low level of 2008-2009. The speed and magnitude of China's coal imports even shifts the market from a sluggish to a tight situation. Prices started to rise after their collapse in the second half of 2008 caused by the economic and financial crisis

  16. Steam generator leak detection at Bruce A Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, K.J.; McInnes, D.E.; Singh, V.P.

    1997-01-01

    A new steam generator leak detection system was recently developed and utilized at Bruce A. The equipment is based on standard helium leak detection, with the addition of moisture detection and several other capability improvements. All but 1% of the Unit 1 Boiler 03 tubesheet was inspected, using a sniffer probe which inspected tubes seven at a time and followed by individual tube inspections. The leak search period was completed in approximately 24 hours, following a prerequisite period of several days. No helium leak indications were found anywhere on the boiler. A single water leak indication was found, which was subsequently confirmed as a through-wall defect by eddy current inspection. (author)

  17. Fluid pipeline leak detection and location with miniature RF tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Timothy J.

    2017-05-16

    Sensors locate troublesome leaks in pipes or conduits that carry a flowing medium. These sensors, through tailored physical and geometric properties, preferentially seek conduit leaks or breaches due to flow streaming. The sensors can be queried via transceivers outside the conduit or located and interrogated inside by submersible unmanned vehicle to identify and characterize the nature of a leak. The sensors can be functionalized with other capabilities for additional leak and pipeline characterization if needed. Sensors can be recovered from a conduit flow stream and reused for future leak detection activities.

  18. Tightness Entropic Uncertainty Relation in Quantum Markovian-Davies Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Liang; Han, Yan

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the tightness of entropic uncertainty relation in the absence (presence) of the quantum memory which the memory particle being weakly coupled to a decohering Davies-type Markovian environment. The results show that the tightness of the quantum uncertainty relation can be controlled by the energy relaxation time F, the dephasing time G and the rescaled temperature p, the perfect tightness can be arrived by dephasing and energy relaxation satisfying F = 2G and p = 1/2. In addition, the tightness of the memory-assisted entropic uncertainty relation and the entropic uncertainty relation can be influenced mainly by the purity. While in memory-assisted model, the purity and quantum correlation can also influence the tightness actively while the quantum entanglement can influence the tightness slightly.

  19. Experiences in integrated leak rate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirk, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    During a hypothetical design basis accident for nuclear power plants, the reactor containment system is relied upon to maintain radioactive exposure limits below acceptable limits. Integrated leak rate testing is a means of verifying that the leakage of radioactivity material from the reactor containment will be below allowable limits. Leakage rate computations are based on the ideal gas law. The absolute method of leakage rate testing utilizing mass point method of data analysis is recommended. Integrated leak rate testing data is obtained from pressure, drybulb temperature, dewpoint temperature, and flow measuring systems. Test data does not support the usual leakage (flow) - pressure square root relationship. The major source of potential leakage from the reactor containment is reactor containment isolation valves

  20. Monju secondary heat transport system sodium leak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takeo; Hiroi, Hiroshi; Usami, Shin; Iwata, Koji.

    1996-01-01

    On December 8, 1995, the sodium leakage from the secondary heat transport system (SHTS) occurred in the piping room of the reactor auxiliary building in Monju. The secondary sodium leaked through a temperature sensor, due to the breakaway of the tip of the well tube of the sensor installed near the outlet of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) in the C loop of SHTS. The reactor core remained cooled and thus, from the viewpoint of radiological hazards, the safety of the reactor was secured. There were no adverse effects for operating personnel or the surrounding environment. The cause of the well tube failure is considered to result from high cycle fatigue due to flow induced vibrations. Delay in draining the sodium from the leaking loop increased the consequential effects from sodium combustion products. (author)

  1. Development of leak detector by radiation. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Okano, Yasuhiro; Chisaka, Haruo

    1997-01-01

    Leak detector by radiation has been developed by cooperative research between Water Authority and us. In his fiscal year, the most suitable arrangement of detector system was simulated by Monte Carlo method. The first, the experimental values were compared with the results of simulation. The second, calculation was carried out by changing the quality of reflective materials and distance between radiation source and detector. The simulation results were agreed with the experimental results. On the basis of the rate of presence of leak, the most suitable arrangement of detector system was obtained under the conditions that both radiation source and detector covered with graphite or iron of 5 cm thickness and separated each other 3 cm apart. However, by comparing FOM (figure of merit), the suitable arrangement was that radiation source and detector adjoined each other and covered by graphite or iron of 20 cm thickness. (S.Y.)

  2. Heavy water leak detection using diffusion sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, M.L.; Hussain, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    In the Pressurrised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) detection of the sources of heavy water leaks is importent both for the purpose of radiation hazard control as well as for the reduction of escape/loss of heavy water which, is an expensive nuclear material. This paper describes an application of tritium diffusion sampler for heavy water leak detection. The diffusion sampler comprises an usual tritium counting glass vial with a special orifice. The counting vial has water vapour, deficient in HTO concentration. The HTO present outside diffuses in the vial through the orifice, gets exchanged with water of the wet filter paper kept at the bottom and the moisture in the vial atmosphere which has HTO concentration lower than that outside. This results in continuation of net movement of HTO in the vial. The exchanged tritium is counted in liquid scintillation spectrometer. The method has a sensitivity of 10000 dpm/DAC-h. (author). 2 figs., 2 ta bs

  3. Method for mapping a natural gas leak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, Thomas A [Livermore, CA; Luong, Amy Khai [Dublin, CA; Kulp, Thomas J [Livermore, CA; Devdas, Sanjay [Albany, CA

    2009-02-03

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formatted into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimposed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  4. Subsea leak detection systems - recommended practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Kristin Nergaard

    2010-07-01

    It is known in the industry that occasional leakages occur in subsea production systems. In spite of efforts to apply subsea leak detectors, the experience is that most leakages are either detected by ROV during routine inspections or interventions or as oil slicks on the surface . Operators and authority awareness towards the environmental impact of oil and gas production is increasing. The regulatory bodies in Norway, EU and USA specify requirements for detection of acute pollution. This paper presents the development of a Recommended Practice (RP) sponsored by OLF (The Norwegian Oil Industry Association). The JIP includes several major oil and gas operators. The objective of the RP is to serve as a technical and practical reference in the field of subsea leak detection. (Author)

  5. Fast leak in channel H9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, E.

    1987-01-01

    The loss of seal of the H9 channel in vacuum, freeing the entire cross section of the front part, leads to a fast leak that progresses rapidly. The effect of depressurizing the reflector can leads to shutdown of the shutdown rod pumps. The source changer associated with the channel fills completely before the valve closes. All of the leak water remains contained within the source changer containment. After the valves open, cooling of the fuel element is handled by natural convection, requiring a reversal of the flow between the plates. This changeover, which takes place at a relatively low pressure level, could lead to local boiling in the fuel element. Consequently, irreversible transformations cannot be excluded as possibilities for the fuel element and even for the control rod. Subsequently, the can is refilled with heavy water with establishment of the usual pressure levels

  6. Leak isolation self-repairing tape for a water storage vessel and piping against holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaya, Kosuke; Sekiguchi, Takahiro; Chen, Zhichao; Murakami, Iwanori

    2007-01-01

    A new type taping for a water storage vessel or piping is presented, in which water leakage is isolated automatically by its self-repairing mechanism against holes. The self-repairing unit (sealant layer) is consisting of three pieces of net with polymer particles inside lattices. Polymer particles, which expand their volume with water, is used for having self-repairing forces. In ordinary tapes, water leaks along the boundary between the tape and the vessel. In order to retain the leak isolation force, this article first discusses a method for making the sealant tape, then develops a method for fixing the sealant to the vessel. The portion of water leakage can be checked on this tape, and the method of detecting the hole or crack portion of the vessel is also presented by using the tape. (author)

  7. Improved Density Functional Tight Binding Potentials for Metalloid Aluminum Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    unlimited IMPROVED DENSITY-FUNCTIONAL TIGHT BINDING POTENTIALS FOR METALLOID ALUMINUM CLUSTERS by Joon H. Kim June 2016 Thesis Advisor...DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE IMPROVED DENSITY-FUNCTIONAL TIGHT BINDING POTENTIALS FOR METALLOID ALUMINUM CLUSTERS 5. FUNDING...repulsive potentials for use in density-functional tight binding (DFTB) simulations of low-valence aluminum metalloid clusters . These systems are under

  8. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-30

    In March, work continued on characterizing probabilities for determining natural fracturing associated with the GGRB for the Upper Cretaceous tight gas plays. Structural complexity, based on potential field data and remote sensing data was completed. A resource estimate for the Frontier and Mesa Verde play was also completed. Further, work was also conducted to determine threshold economics for the play based on limited current production in the plays in the Wamsutter Ridge area. These analyses culminated in a presentation at FETC on 24 March 1999 where quantified natural fracture domains, mapped on a partition basis, which establish ''sweet spot'' probability for natural fracturing, were reviewed. That presentation is reproduced here as Appendix 1. The work plan for the quarter of January 1, 1999--March 31, 1999 comprised five tasks: (1) Evaluation of the GGRB partitions for structural complexity that can be associated with natural fractures, (2) Continued resource analysis of the balance of the partitions to determine areas with higher relative gas richness, (3) Gas field studies, (4) Threshold resource economics to determine which partitions would be the most prospective, and (5) Examination of the area around the Table Rock 4H well.

  9. Fuel leak testing performance at NPP Jaslovske Bohunice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slugen, V.; Krnac, S.; Smiesko, I.

    1995-01-01

    The NPP Bohunice VVER-440 fuel leak testing experience are relatively extensive in comparison with other VVER-440 users. As the first Europe NPP was adapted Siemens (KWU) in core-sipping equipment to VVER-440 units and since this time were have done these tests also for NPP Paks (Hungary) and NPP Dukovany (Czech Republic). The occurrence of leaking fuel assemblies in NPP is in the last 5 years relatively stabilised and low. A significant difference can be observed between type V-230 (31 leaks) and type V-213 (1 leak). None of of the indicated leaking fuel assemblies has been investigated in the hot cell. Therefore cannot be confirm the effective causes of leak occurrence. Nevertheless, the fuel failure rate and the performance of leak testing in NPP Bohunice are comparable to the world standard at PWR's. 1 tab., 2 figs., 3 refs

  10. Fuel leak testing performance at NPP Jaslovske Bohunice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slugen, V; Krnac, S [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia); Smiesko, I [Nuclear Powr Plant EBO, Jaslovske Bohuce (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    The NPP Bohunice VVER-440 fuel leak testing experience are relatively extensive in comparison with other VVER-440 users. As the first Europe NPP was adapted Siemens (KWU) in core-sipping equipment to VVER-440 units and since this time were have done these tests also for NPP Paks (Hungary) and NPP Dukovany (Czech Republic). The occurrence of leaking fuel assemblies in NPP is in the last 5 years relatively stabilised and low. A significant difference can be observed between type V-230 (31 leaks) and type V-213 (1 leak). None of of the indicated leaking fuel assemblies has been investigated in the hot cell. Therefore cannot be confirm the effective causes of leak occurrence. Nevertheless, the fuel failure rate and the performance of leak testing in NPP Bohunice are comparable to the world standard at PWR`s. 1 tab., 2 figs., 3 refs.

  11. Stimulated leaks found with SmartBall tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2011-05-15

    Pure Technologies has developed a SmartBall leak detection tool which can be used in oil and gas pipelines. This tool contains acoustic sensors which listen for leaks and other problems in pipelines. Pig tracking units are used to track the tool along with receivers positioned on the pipe. With these technologies, SmartBall is able to detect small leaks that conventional methods would not detect and to assess their location accurately. Two runs on a Petrobras pipeline in Brazil highlighted the effectiveness of this technology, detecting three simulated leaks as small as 240mL/min. In addition, this system can give an estimation of the leak rate and traverse non piggable pipelines. Software is then used to analyze data and generate a report giving the size and location of the leaks identified. SmartBall is a technology capable of detecting small leaks and locating them in all sorts of oil and gas pipelines.

  12. Feedback regarding leaks in pipe work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerville, C.; Boudouin, E.

    2011-01-01

    Contaminated effluent from nuclear medicine departments is stored in decay tanks before being discharged via the sewage system. Generally speaking, these tanks are located outside hospital wards, within the hospital's maintenance rooms. Pipes leading from the evacuation points (e.g. toilets in isolation wards) to the tanks may nonetheless pass through various other parts of the hospital premises (wards, corridors, offices, etc.). Should a leak occur in any of these pipes, this may impact on the public, workers or the environment. (author)

  13. Natural gas pipeline leaks across Washington, DC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Robert B; Down, Adrian; Phillips, Nathan G; Ackley, Robert C; Cook, Charles W; Plata, Desiree L; Zhao, Kaiguang

    2014-01-01

    Pipeline safety in the United States has increased in recent decades, but incidents involving natural gas pipelines still cause an average of 17 fatalities and $133 M in property damage annually. Natural gas leaks are also the largest anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) in the U.S. To reduce pipeline leakage and increase consumer safety, we deployed a Picarro G2301 Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer in a car, mapping 5893 natural gas leaks (2.5 to 88.6 ppm CH4) across 1500 road miles of Washington, DC. The δ(13)C-isotopic signatures of the methane (-38.2‰ ± 3.9‰ s.d.) and ethane (-36.5 ± 1.1 s.d.) and the CH4:C2H6 ratios (25.5 ± 8.9 s.d.) closely matched the pipeline gas (-39.0‰ and -36.2‰ for methane and ethane; 19.0 for CH4/C2H6). Emissions from four street leaks ranged from 9200 to 38,200 L CH4 day(-1) each, comparable to natural gas used by 1.7 to 7.0 homes, respectively. At 19 tested locations, 12 potentially explosive (Grade 1) methane concentrations of 50,000 to 500,000 ppm were detected in manholes. Financial incentives and targeted programs among companies, public utility commissions, and scientists to reduce leaks and replace old cast-iron pipes will improve consumer safety and air quality, save money, and lower greenhouse gas emissions.

  14. Problems identified in quantifying leak before break in pressure containing structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darlaston, B.J.L.; Connors, D.C.; Hellen, R.A.J.

    1979-01-01

    The leak before break approach is often applied to pressure containing plant as part of the safety assessment. The assumptions used in this approach are sometimes very pessimistic. It is therefore desirable to be able to quantify the concept more precisely. The two aspects which are of considerable importance are the way the crack profile develops and what happens when the remaining ligament below the crack fails. These two aspects are receiving attention and together with the development of the basic concept of 'leak before break' form the basis of this paper. Some thirty burst tests have been carried out on straight pipes of various dimensions. The results have been analysed using the CEGB Failure Assessment Route for structures containing defects. It was shown that in most cases the leaks and the breaks could be separated by this procedure. However all these tests involved machined rather than fatigue grown defects. A complementary program on pipes has the objective of examining defect growth under cyclic loads. The tests on the 152 mm diameter pipes showed that these defects did not grow in a uniform manner but after a while began to tunnel through the wall locally leading to failure of part of the ligament. This implies that some defects considered to be in the break category would only lead to leaks. As a consequence of these results the experimental programme was redesigned to concentrate on the growth of defects which it was thought would span the boundary of leak and break. For the pipe dimensions and materials used, this represented long defects which would penetrate well into the wall before ligament failure occurred. The analysis and interpretation of this aspect of the programme is part analytical part empirical. (orig.)

  15. Anastomotic leak detection by electrolyte electrical resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeArmond, Daniel T; Cline, Adam M; Johnson, Scott B

    2010-08-01

    To characterize a new method of postoperative gastrointestinal leak detection based on electrical resistance changes due to extravasated electrolyte contrast. Postoperative gastrointestinal leak results in increased patient morbidity, mortality, and hospital costs that can be mitigated by early diagnosis. A sensitive and specific diagnostic test that could be performed at the bedside has the potential to shorten the time to diagnosis and thereby improve the quality of treatment. Anaesthetized rats underwent celiotomy and creation of a 5-mm gastrotomy. In experimental animals, electrical resistance changes were measured with a direct current ohmmeter after the introduction of 5 cc of 23.4% NaCl electrolyte solution via gavage and measured with a more sensitive alternating current ohmmeter after the gavage of 1-5 cc of 0.9% NaCl. Comparison was made to negative controls and statistical analysis was performed. Leakage from the gastrotomy induced by as little as 1 cc of gavage-delivered 0.9% NaCl contrast solution was detectable as a statistically significant drop in electrical resistance when compared to results from negative controls. Electrical resistance change associated with electrolyte-gated leak detection is highly sensitive and specific and has the potential to be rapidly translated into clinical settings.

  16. Color Changing Material for Hydrogen Leak Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Megan E.

    2014-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center scientists developed a hydrogen leak sensor utilizing a combination of chemochromic pigment and polymer that can be molded or fiber spun into rigid or flexible shapes such as tape. The sensor turns a dark color when exposed to hydrogen gas. This sensor has proven to be very effective for pinpointing the exact location of leaks in hydrogen gas lines and fittings at launch pads. Kennedy Space Center exclusively licensed this technology to the University of Central Florida (UCF), who also holds patents that are complimentary to KSC's. UCF has bundled the patents and exclusively licensed the portfolio to HySense Technology LLC, a startup company founded by a UCF professor who supports the UCF Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). HySense has fully developed its product (known as Intellipigment"TM"), and currently has five commercial customers. The company recently won the $100,000 first-place award at the CAT5 innovation competition at the Innovation Concourse of the Southeast: Safety & Manufacturing event in Orlando, FL. Commercial production and sales of this technology by HySense Technology will make this leak sensor widely available for use by NASA, DoD, and industries that utilize hydrogen gas.

  17. FFTF integrated leak rate computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a liquid-metal-cooled test reactor located on the Hanford site. The FFTF is the only reactor of this type designed and operated to meet the licensing requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Unique characteristics of the FFTF that present special challenges related to leak rate testing include thin wall containment vessel construction, cover gas systems that penetrate containment, and a low-pressure design basis accident. The successful completion of the third FFTF integrated leak rate test 5 days ahead of schedule and 10% under budget was a major achievement for the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The success of this operational safety test was due in large part to a special network (LAN) of three IBM PC/XT computers, which monitored the sensor data, calculated the containment vessel leak rate, and displayed test results. The equipment configuration allowed continuous monitoring of the progress of the test independent of the data acquisition and analysis functions, and it also provided overall improved system reliability by permitting immediate switching to backup computers in the event of equipment failure

  18. Leak rate test of containment personnel lock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julien, J.T.; Peters, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the US NRC Containment Integrity Program, a leak rate test was performed on a full size personnel airlock for a nuclear containment building. The airlock was subjected to conditions simulating severe accident conditions. The objective of the test was to characterize the performance of airlock door seals when subjected to conditions that exceeded design. The seals tested were a double dog-ear configuration and made from EPDM E603. The data obtained from this test will be used by SNL as a benchmark for development of analytical methods. In addition to leak rate information, strain, temperature, displacements, and pressure data were measured and recorded from over 330 transducers. The test lasted approximately 60 hours. Data were recorded at regular intervals and during heating, pressurization and depressurization. The inner airlock door and bulkhead were exposed to a maximum air temperature of 850 F and a maximum air pressure of 300 psig. The airlock was originally designed for 340 F and 60 psig. Two heating and pressurization cycles were planned; one to heat to 400 F and pressurize to 300 psig, and the second to heat to 800 F and pressurize to 300 psig. No significant leakage was recorded during these two cycles. A third cycle was added to the test program. The air temperature was increased to 850 F and held at this temperature for approximately 10 hours. The inner door seal failed quickly at a pressure of 150.5 psig. The maximum leak rate was 706 SCFM

  19. Confidence Leak in Perceptual Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnev, Dobromir; Koizumi, Ai; McCurdy, Li Yan; D'Esposito, Mark; Lau, Hakwan

    2015-11-01

    People live in a continuous environment in which the visual scene changes on a slow timescale. It has been shown that to exploit such environmental stability, the brain creates a continuity field in which objects seen seconds ago influence the perception of current objects. What is unknown is whether a similar mechanism exists at the level of metacognitive representations. In three experiments, we demonstrated a robust intertask confidence leak-that is, confidence in one's response on a given task or trial influencing confidence on the following task or trial. This confidence leak could not be explained by response priming or attentional fluctuations. Better ability to modulate confidence leak predicted higher capacity for metacognition as well as greater gray matter volume in the prefrontal cortex. A model based on normative principles from Bayesian inference explained the results by postulating that observers subjectively estimate the perceptual signal strength in a stable environment. These results point to the existence of a novel metacognitive mechanism mediated by regions in the prefrontal cortex. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Waste Transfer Leaks Control Decision Record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RYAN, G.W.

    2000-01-01

    Control decision meetings for Waste Transfer Leaks were held on April 24,25,26, and 27, 2000. The agenda for the control decision meetings is included in Appendix A, and attendee lists are included in Appendix B. The purpose of the control decision meetings was to review and revise previously selected controls for the prevention or mitigation of waste transfer leak accidents. Re-evaluation of the controls is warranted due to revisions in the hazard and accident analysis for these Tank Farm events. In particular, calculated radiological consequences are significantly reduced from those currently reported in the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). Revised hazard and accident analysis and a revised control recommendation will be reflected in an Authorization Basis Amendment to be submitted at the Department of Energy, Office of River Protection's (ORP's) request by June 30, 2000 to satisfy ORP Performance Incentive (PI) 2.1.1, Revision 1, ''Authorization Basis Management Process Efficiency Improvement''. The scope of the control decision meetings was to address all waste transfer leak-related hazardous conditions identified in the Tank Farm hazard analysis database, excluding those associated with the use of the Replacement Cross-Site Transfer System (RCSTS) slurry line and sluicing of Tank 241-C-106, which is addressed in FSAR Addendum 1. The scope of this control decision process does include future waste feed delivery waste transfer operations

  1. Leak monitoring method for a reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Toshio.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To confirm leakages from a container upon nuclear reactor operation. Method: Leakages from a nuclear reactor container has been prevented by lowering the inner pressure of the container relative to the external pressure. In the conventional method of calculating the leakage by applying an inner pressure to the container and measuring the pressure change, etc. after the elapse of a pre-determined time, the measurement has to be conducted at periodical inspection when the nuclear reactor is shut-down. In view of the above, the leak test is conducted in the present invention by applying a slight inner pressure to the inside of the reactor container by supplying gases from a gas supply system and detecting the flow rate of the gases in the gas supply system while maintaining the slight inner pressure constant by controlling the supply and discharge of the gases. By applying such a inner pressure as causing no effect to the reactor operation, it is possible to monitor the leaks during operation and to detect the flow rate value surely and continuously if the leak is resulted. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. Airborne pipeline leak detection: UV or IR?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, François; Gravel, Jean-François; Allard, Martin

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a study of different approaches to the measurement of the above ground vapor plume created by the spill caused by a small 0.1 l/min (or less) leak in an underground liquid petroleum pipeline. The scenarios are those for the measurement from an airborne platform. The usual approach is that of IR absorption, but in the case of liquid petroleum products, there are drawbacks that will be discussed, especially when using alkanes to detect a leak. The optical measurements studied include UV enhanced Raman lidar, UV fluorescence lidar and IR absorption path integrated lidars. The breadboards used for testing the different approaches will be described along with the set-ups for leak simulation. Although IR absorption would intuitively be the most sensitive, it is shown that UV-Raman could be an alternative. When using the very broad alkane signature in the IR, the varying ground spectral reflectance are a problem. It is also determined that integrated path measurements are preferred, the UV enhanced Raman measurements showing that the vapor plume stays very close to the ground.

  3. Epidural block and neostigmine cause anastomosis leak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ataro G

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Getu Ataro Department of Anesthesia, Jimma University, Jimma, EthiopiaI read the article by Phillips entitled, “Reducing gastrointestinal anastomotic leak rates: review of challenges and solutions”, published in the journal of Open Access Surgery with enthusiasm and found it crucial for perioperative management of patients with gastrointestinal (GI surgery, particularly anastomosis. I appreciate the author’s exhaustive search of literature and discussion with some limitation on review basics like methodology, which may affect the reliability of the review findings. The effects of risk factors for anastomosis leak, such as malnutrition, smoking, steroid use, bowel preparation, chemotherapy, duration of surgery, use of pressors, intravenous fluid administration, blood transfusion, and surgical anastomotic technique, were well discussed.1 However, from anesthesia perspective, there are some other well-studied risk factors that can affect healing of anastomosis wound and cause anastomosis leak. Among others, the effect of neostigmine and epidural block has been reported in many studies since half a century ago. View the original paper by Phillips

  4. The detection of leaks on sodium pipes in a 'leak before break' approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonakas, D.

    1989-01-01

    The operation of circuits containing liquid sodium requires, given the chemical affinity of this fluid for air and water, a reliable detection of possible leaks. This system of detection should alert the operators to the occurrence of a leak in sufficient time to limit the potential consequences of a discharge of sodium in the building, leading to a severe sodium fire or at least to an extended corrosion of the pipe system. From a design point of view, the most likely event leading to this situation can be the consequence. of an initial undetected defect which develops under the effect of thermo-mechanical loadings, produces a sodium. leak below the dejection threshold remains undetectable white progressing and finally leads to a guillotine-type rupture when an incidental loading is superimposed to the normal one. The 'leak before break' approach which is now currently introduced in design considerations consists of insuring the detection of incipient leaks corresponding to through-the-wall cracks well below instability of the pipe. Under this short statement, lies a considerable and still necessary effort of research broadly presented in the present paper

  5. Digital Rock Studies of Tight Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, Dmitriy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-08-07

    This technical report summarizes some recently developed approaches to studies of rock properties at a pore scale. Digital rock approach is complementary to laboratory and field studies. It can be especially helpful in situations where experimental data are uncertain, or are difficult or impossible to obtain. Digitized binary images of the pore geometries of natural rocks obtained by different imaging techniques are the input data. Computer-generated models of natural rocks can be used instead of images in a case where microtomography data are unavailable, or the resolution of the tools is insufficient to adequately characterize the features of interest. Simulations of creeping viscous flow in pores produce estimates of Darcy permeability. Maximal Inscribed Spheres calculations estimate two-phase fluid distribution in capillary equilibrium. A combination of both produce relative permeability curves. Computer-generated rock models were employed to study two-phase properties of fractured rocks, or tight sands with slit-like pores, too narrow to be characterized with micro-tomography. Various scenarios can simulate different fluid displacement mechanisms, from piston-like drainage to liquid dropout at the dew point. A finite differences discretization of Stokes equation is developed to simulate flow in the pore space of natural rocks. The numerical schemes are capable to handle both no-slip and slippage flows. An upscaling procedure estimates the permeability by subsampling a large data set. Capillary equilibrium and capillary pressure curves are efficiently estimated with the method of maximal inscribed spheres both an arbitrary contact angle. The algorithms can handle gigobytes of data on a desktop workstation. Customized QuickHull algorithms model natural rocks. Capillary pressure curves evaluated from computer-generated images mimic those obtained for microtomography data.

  6. US production of natural gas from tight reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    For the purposes of this report, tight gas reservoirs are defined as those that meet the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) definition of tight. They are generally characterized by an average reservoir rock permeability to gas of 0.1 millidarcy or less and, absent artificial stimulation of production, by production rates that do not exceed 5 barrels of oil per day and certain specified daily volumes of gas which increase with the depth of the reservoir. All of the statistics presented in this report pertain to wells that have been classified, from 1978 through 1991, as tight according to the FERC; i.e., they are ''legally tight'' reservoirs. Additional production from ''geologically tight'' reservoirs that have not been classified tight according to the FERC rules has been excluded. This category includes all producing wells drilled into legally designated tight gas reservoirs prior to 1978 and all producing wells drilled into physically tight gas reservoirs that have not been designated legally tight. Therefore, all gas production referenced herein is eligible for the Section 29 tax credit. Although the qualification period for the credit expired at the end of 1992, wells that were spudded (began to be drilled) between 1978 and May 1988, and from November 5, 1990, through year end 1992, are eligible for the tax credit for a subsequent period of 10 years. This report updates the EIA's tight gas production information through 1991 and considers further the history and effect on tight gas production of the Federal Government's regulatory and tax policy actions. It also provides some high points of the geologic background needed to understand the nature and location of low-permeability reservoirs

  7. Evaluation of advanced and current leak detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Guide 1.45 recommends the use of at least three different detection methods in reactors to detect leakage. Monitoring of both sump-flow and airborne particulate radioactivity is mandatory. A third method can involve either monitoring of condensate flow rate from air coolers or monitoring of airborne gaseous radioactivity. Although the methods currently used for leak detection reflect the state of the art, other techniques may be developed and used. Since the recommendations of Regulatory Guide 1.45 are not mandatory, Licensee Event Report Compilations have been reviewed to help establish actual capabilities for leak detection. The review of event reports, which had previously covered the period of June 1985 to August 1986 has been extended, and now covers events to June 1987. The total number of significant events is now 83. These reports have provided documented, sometimes detailed, summaries of reactor leaks. They have helped establish the capabilities of existing systems to detect and locate leaks. Differences between PWRs and BWRs with regard to leak detection have now been analyzed. With regard to detection methods, the greatest differences between reactor types are as follows: (a) The sump pump is reported as the detection method more frequently in BWRs than in PWRs (64% vs. 35%). (b) The radiation monitor is reported as the detection method (excluding false alarms) more frequently in PWRs. Current efforts at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to evaluate advanced acoustic leak detection methods are directed toward the generation and analysis of acoustic data from large (0.5 to 10 gal/min) leaks and modification of the software of the GARD/ANL advanced acoustic leak detection system. In order to reach the goal of 10 gal/min leaks, the Steam Generator Test Facility at ANL has been modified to carry out the leak testing. Tests were carried out with water at 525 deg. F and 1100 psi leaking through a fatigue crack in a 4-in

  8. The experiment and analysis on small leak phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kyung Chai; Hwang, S. T.; Kim, B. H.; Jeong, J. Y.

    2000-07-01

    The liquid sodium which is used as a coolant in LMFBR, may give rise to a serious trouble in the safety aspect of steam generator. The defects in a heat transfer tube, such as pin-hole or tube welding defect, will result in a leakage of high pressure steam into the sodium side and production of hydrogen gas and corrosive sodium compounds which can cause significant damage to the tube wall of steam generator by using exothermic reaction. In significant damage to the tube wall of steam generator by using exothermic reaction. In this case, initial leak size will be enlarged with time and the leak rate developed to large leak through the micro, small, intermediate leaks. Therefore, the analysis of sodium-water reaction phenomena on the micro and small water leaks in the heat transfer tube is very important in the initial leak stage in the aspects of the protection of leak progress and safety evaluation of steam generator. In this study, firstly, the micro and small leaks phenomena, such as reopen size, shape, and time of leak path, self-wastage, corrosion of tube materials, was analyzed from the literature survey and water leakage experiments using the leak specimen. In small water leak experiments, the leak path was plugged by the sodium-water reaction products at the leak path of a specimen, and re-open phenomena were not observed in initial experiments. Other leak experiments, reopen phenomena of self-plugged leak path was observed. Re-open mechanism of sealed path could be explained by the thermal transient and vibration of heat transfer tube. As a result, perfect reopen time of self plugged leak path was observed to be about 130 minutes after water leak initiation. Reopen shape of a specimen was appeared with double layer of circular type, and reopen size of this specimen surface was about 2 mm diameter on sodium side. Also, the corrosion of a specimen initiated from sodium side, the segregation phenomena of Cr in the specimen was found much more than those of

  9. Environmental risk comparisons with internal methods of UST leak detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durgin, P.B.

    1993-01-01

    The past five years have seen a variety of advances in how leaks can be detected from within underground storage tanks. Any leak-detection approach employed within a storage tanks must be conducted at specific time intervals and meet certain leak-rate criteria according to federal and state regulations. Nevertheless, the potential environmental consequences of leak detection approaches differ widely. Internal, volumetric UST monitoring techniques have developed over time including: (1) inventory control with stick measurements, (2) precision tank testing, (3) automatic tank gauging (ATG), (4) statistical inventory reconciliation (SIR), and (5) statistical techniques with automatic tank gauging. An ATG focuses on the advantage of precise data but measured for only a brief period. On the other hand, stick data has less precision but when combined with SIR over extended periods it too can detect low leak rates. Graphs demonstrate the comparable amounts of fuel than can leak out of a tank before being detected by these techniques. The results indicate that annual tank testing has the greatest potential for large volumes of fuel leaking without detection while new statistical approaches with an ATG have the least potential. The environmental implications of the volumes of fuel leaked prior to detection are site specific. For example, if storage tank is surrounded by a high water table and in a sole-source aquifer even small leaks may cause problems. The user must also consider regulatory risks. The level of environmental and regulatory risk should influence selection of the UST leak detection method

  10. Fabrication of ultra-sensitive leak detection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelman, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    The primary difficulty with flow rate measurements below 10 -10 standard cubic centimeters per second (std. cc/sec) is that there are no commercially available standards. The requirements, however, dictate that the problem of design and construction of a qualifiable standard in the ultra-sensitive range had to be solved. There are a number of leak types which were considered - capillary leaks, orifice leaks, and the pore type leaks, among others. The capillary leak was not used because of the cracking or sorting effects that are common to this type leak. For example, a gas blend flowing through a capillary leak will result in the lighter gases passing through the leak first. The difficulty of fabricating the proper hole size in relation to the flow rate requirements ruled out the orifice type leak. The choice was the pore type leak which utilizes the basic concept of a stainless steel knife edge driven into a fixed section composed of stainless steel with a gold over-lay and maintained under force

  11. Prioritizing Test Cases for Memory Leaks in Android Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ju Qian; Di Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Mobile applications usually can only access limited amount of memory. Improper use of the memory can cause memory leaks, which may lead to performance slowdowns or even cause applications to be unexpectedly killed. Although a large body of research has been devoted into the memory leak diagnosing techniques after leaks have been discovered, it is still challenging to find out the memory leak phenomena at first. Testing is the most widely used technique for failure discovery. However, traditional testing techniques are not directed for the discovery of memory leaks. They may spend lots of time on testing unlikely leaking executions and therefore can be inefficient. To address the problem, we propose a novel approach to prioritize test cases according to their likelihood to cause memory leaks in a given test suite. It firstly builds a prediction model to determine whether each test can potentially lead to memory leaks based on machine learning on selected code features. Then, for each input test case, we partly run it to get its code features and predict its likelihood to cause leaks. The most suspicious test cases will be suggested to run at first in order to reveal memory leak faults as soon as possible. Experimental evaluation on several Android applications shows that our approach is effective.

  12. Gas leak characteristics of inner packaging components used in the D0T-Spec 6M container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.M.

    1985-09-01

    A test program was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to determine the gas leak characteristics of metal food pack cans and 2R vessels used to package radioactive material in a D0T 6M specification container. It can be concluded from the tests performed that the inner packaging components (2R vessel, metal product cans) used with a 6M container can be sealed so that they will be gas tight ( -5 cc/sec) under elevated temperature and pressure and impact conditions. To maintain gas tight seals under accident conditions, the metal cans must be sealed with a properly adjusted can-sealing machine; the threads of the 2R vessel must be luted with a sealing compound such as a silicone rubber compound; and the metal cans must be protected inside the 2R vessel with spacer plates and impact absorbers. 4 refs., 37 figs

  13. Air tightness measurements in older Danish single-family houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Bergsøe, Niels Christian

    2017-01-01

    of the building envelope of older buildings despite the fact that the air tightness has a major influence on the energy use. In connection with renovation of the Danish building stock, the coming years will see increased focus on the air tightness of the building envelope like in other countries. This paper...

  14. Differences between tight and loose cultures : A 33-nation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelfand, M.J.; Raver, R.L.; Nishii, L.; Leslie, L.M.; Lun, J.; Lim, B.C.; Van de Vliert, E.

    2011-01-01

    With data from 33 nations, we illustrate the differences between cultures that are tight (have many strong norms and a low tolerance of deviant behavior) versus loose (have weak social norms and a high tolerance of deviant behavior). Tightness-looseness is part of a complex, loosely integrated

  15. LEAK: A source term generator for evaluating release rates from leaking vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinton, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    An interactive computer code for estimating the rate of release of any one of several materials from a leaking tank or broken pipe leading from a tank is presented. It is generally assumed that the material in the tank is liquid. Materials included in the data base are acetonitrile, ammonia, carbon tetrachloride, chlorine, chlorine trifluoride, fluorine, hydrogen fluoride, nitric acid, nitrogen tetroxide, sodium hydroxide, sulfur hexafluoride, sulfuric acid, and uranium hexafluoride. Materials that exist only as liquid and/or vapor over expected ranges of temperature and pressure can easily be added to the data base file. The Fortran source code for LEAK and the data file are included with this report

  16. Dielectric response of molecules in empirical tight-binding theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boykin, Timothy B.; Vogl, P.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we generalize our previous approach to electromagnetic interactions within empirical tight-binding theory to encompass molecular solids and isolated molecules. In order to guarantee physically meaningful results, we rederive the expressions for relevant observables using commutation relations appropriate to the finite tight-binding Hilbert space. In carrying out this generalization, we examine in detail the consequences of various prescriptions for the position and momentum operators in tight binding. We show that attempting to fit parameters of the momentum matrix directly generally results in a momentum operator which is incompatible with the underlying tight-binding model, while adding extra position parameters results in numerous difficulties, including the loss of gauge invariance. We have applied our scheme, which we term the Peierls-coupling tight-binding method, to the optical dielectric function of the molecular solid PPP, showing that this approach successfully predicts its known optical properties even in the limit of isolated molecules.

  17. Acoustic detection for water/steam leak from a tube of LMFBR steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Masataka; Shindo, Yoshihisa

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic leak detector is useful for detecting more quickly intermediate leak than the existing hydrogen detector and is available for identification of leak location on the accident of water/steam leak from a tube of LMFBR steam generator. This paper presents the overview of HALD (High frequency Acoustics Leak Detection) system, which is more sensitive for leak detection and lower cost of equipment for identification of leak location than a low frequency type detector. (author)

  18. Impedance Method for Leak Detection in Zigzag Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay-Ekuakille, A.; Vergallo, P.; Trotta, A.

    2010-01-01

    Transportation of liquids is a primary aspect of human life. The most important infrastructure used accordingly is the pipeline. It serves as an asset for transporting different liquids and strategic goods. The latter are for example: chemical substances, oil, gas and water. Thus, it is necessary to monitor such infrastructures by means of specific tools. Leakage detection methods are used to reveal liquid leaks in pipelines for many applications, namely, waterworks, oil pipelines, industry heat exchangers, etc. The configuration of pipelines is a key issue because it impacts on the effectiveness of the method to be used and, consequently, on the results to be counterchecked. This research illustrated an improvement of the impedance method for zigzag pipeline by carrying out an experimental frequency analysis that has been compared with other methods based on frequency response. Hence, the impedance method is generally used for simple (straight) pipeline configurations because complicated pipelines with many curves introduce difficulties and major uncertainties in the calculation of characteristic impedance and in the statement of boundary conditions. The paper illustrates the case of a water pipeline where the leakage is acquired thanks to pressure transducers.

  19. Assessment of crack opening area for leak rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharples, J.K.; Bouchard, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper outlines the background to recommended crack opening area solutions given in a proposed revision to leak before break guidance for the R6 procedure. Comparisons with experimental and analytical results are given for some selected cases of circumferential cracks in cylinders. It is shown that elastic models can provide satisfactory estimations of crack opening displacement (and area) but they become increasingly conservative for values of L{sub r} greater than approximately 0.4. The Dugdale small scale yielding model gives conservative estimates of crack opening displacement with increasing enhancement for L{sub r} values greater than 0.4. Further validation of the elastic-plastic reference stress method for up to L{sub r} values of about 1.0 is presented by experimental and analytical comparisons. Although a more detailed method, its application gives a best estimate of crack opening displacement which may be substantially greater than small scale plasticity models. It is also shown that the local boundary conditions in pipework need to be carefully considered when evaluating crack opening area for through-wall bending stresses resulting from welding residual stresses or geometry discontinuities.

  20. Assessment of crack opening area for leak rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharples, J.K.; Bouchard, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper outlines the background to recommended crack opening area solutions given in a proposed revision to leak before break guidance for the R6 procedure. Comparisons with experimental and analytical results are given for some selected cases of circumferential cracks in cylinders. It is shown that elastic models can provide satisfactory estimations of crack opening displacement (and area) but they become increasingly conservative for values of L r greater than approximately 0.4. The Dugdale small scale yielding model gives conservative estimates of crack opening displacement with increasing enhancement for L r values greater than 0.4. Further validation of the elastic-plastic reference stress method for up to L r values of about 1.0 is presented by experimental and analytical comparisons. Although a more detailed method, its application gives a best estimate of crack opening displacement which may be substantially greater than small scale plasticity models. It is also shown that the local boundary conditions in pipework need to be carefully considered when evaluating crack opening area for through-wall bending stresses resulting from welding residual stresses or geometry discontinuities

  1. Effect of rock rheology on fluid leak- off during hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarushina, V. M.; Bercovici, D.; Oristaglio, M. L.

    2012-04-01

    of permanent, time-independent (plastic) rock deformation significantly increases the pore space compressibility (compaction), which becomes a leading term in the total compressibility. Inclusion of rock and fluid compressibilities in the model can explain both linear and nonlinear leak­off. In particular, inclusion of rock compaction and decompaction may be important for description of naturally fractured and tight gas reservoirs for which very strong dependence of permeability on porosity has been reported. Carter R.D. Derivation of the general equation for estimating the extent of the fractured area. Appendix I of "Optimum fluid characteristics for fracture extension", Drilling and Production Practice, G.C. Howard and C.R.Fast, New York, New York, USA, American Petroleum Institute (1957), 261-269.

  2. Leak detection and location in MONJU steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, T.; Kosugi, T.

    1978-01-01

    Leak detection system of MONJU steam generator depends mostly on in-sodium hydrogen detectors. The requirements on leak detector performance are determined from the point of view of protecting tube leak propagation due to wastage, and the process of determining the performance is shown briefly. Research and development activities on in-sodium hydrogen detectors are described and the specifications of leak detectors for MONJU are also presented. In-cover-gas hydrogen detector and acoustic detector are under development. Research and development activities on the leak location after steam generator shutdown by such methods as an electromagnetic method and ultrasonic method are described. The results of the research and development work on inserting the test probes into tubes are described also. An idea for finding the condition of tubes in the neighbourhood of the leak is also presented. (author)

  3. Leak detection and location in MONJU steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, T; Kosugi, T [Prototype Reactor Office, Tokyo (Japan)

    1978-10-01

    Leak detection system of MONJU steam generator depends mostly on in-sodium hydrogen detectors. The requirements on leak detector performance are determined from the point of view of protecting tube leak propagation due to wastage, and the process of determining the performance is shown briefly. Research and development activities on in-sodium hydrogen detectors are described and the specifications of leak detectors for MONJU are also presented. In-cover-gas hydrogen detector and acoustic detector are under development. Research and development activities on the leak location after steam generator shutdown by such methods as an electromagnetic method and ultrasonic method are described. The results of the research and development work on inserting the test probes into tubes are described also. An idea for finding the condition of tubes in the neighbourhood of the leak is also presented. (author)

  4. Leak Detection of High Pressure Feedwater Heater Using Empirical Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Song Kyu; Kim, Eun Kee; Heo, Gyun Young; An, Sang Ha

    2009-01-01

    Even small leak from tube side or pass partition within the high pressure feedwater heater (HPFWH) causes a significant deficiency in its performance. Plant operation under the HPFWH leak condition for long time will result in cost increase. Tube side leak within HPFWH can produce the high velocity jet of water and it can cause neighboring tube failures. However, most of plants are being operated without any information for internal leaks of HPFWH, even though it is prone to be damaged under high temperature and high pressure operating conditions. Leaks from tubes and/or pass partition of HPFWH occurred in many nuclear power plants, for example, Mihama PS-2, Takahama PS-2 and Point Beach Nuclear Plant Unit 1. If the internal leaks of HPFWH are monitored, the cost can be reduced by inexpensive repairs relative to loss in performance and moreover plant shutdown as well as further tube damages can be prevented

  5. Boundary issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alan R.; Porder, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    What is our point of no return? Caesar proclaimed 'the die is cast' while crossing the Rubicon, but rarely does modern society find so visible a threshold in our continued degradation of ecosystems and the services they provide. Humans have always used their surroundings to make a living— sometimes successfully, sometimes not (Diamond 2005)—and we intuitively know that there are boundaries to our exploitation. But defining these boundaries has been a challenge since Malthus first prophesied that nature would limit the human population (Malthus 1798). In 2009, Rockström and colleagues tried to quantify what the 6.8 billion (and counting) of us could continue to get away with, and what we couldn't (Rockström et al 2009). In selecting ten 'planetary boundaries', the authors contend that a sustainable human enterprise requires treating a number of environmental thresholds as points of no return. They suggest we breach these Rubicons at our own peril, and that we've already crossed three: biodiversity loss, atmospheric CO2, and disruption of the global nitrogen (N) cycle. As they clearly hoped, the very act of setting targets has provoked scientific inquiry about their accuracy, and about the value of hard targets in the first place (Schlesinger 2009). Such debate is a good thing. Despite recent emphasis on the science of human-ecosystem interactions, understanding of our planetary boundaries is still in its infancy, and controversy can speed scientific progress (Engelhardt and Caplan 1987). A few weeks ago in this journal, Carpenter and Bennett (2011) took aim at one of the more controversial boundaries in the Rockström analysis: that for human alteration of the global phosphorus (P) cycle. Rockström's group chose riverine P export as the key indicator, suggesting that humans should not exceed a value that could trigger widespread marine anoxic events—and asserting that we have not yet crossed this threshold. There are defensible reasons for a marine

  6. boundary dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Camurdan

    1998-01-01

    are coupled by appropriate trace operators. This overall model differs from those previously studied in the literature in that the elastic chamber floor is here more realistically modeled by a hyperbolic Kirchoff equation, rather than by a parabolic Euler-Bernoulli equation with Kelvin-Voight structural damping, as in past literature. Thus, the hyperbolic/parabolic coupled system of past literature is replaced here by a hyperbolic/hyperbolic coupled model. The main result of this paper is a uniform stabilization of the coupled PDE system by a (physically appealing boundary dissipation.

  7. Lessons learned from MONJU sodium leak accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Ryodai; Ito, Kazumoto; Nagata, Takashi

    2000-01-01

    MONJU sodium leak accident was a small accident with a large public impact. There was no injures or exposure to radiation, nor was there any loss of safety function such as reactor shutdown or reactor cooling. On the contrary a social impact is considerably large, whereby the plant remains shutdown. This paper describes the lessons learned from the accident, i.e. the impact of the accident and its cause, and the features on risk management in view of social aspect as well as technical aspect. (author)

  8. Leak before break experience in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, E.G.; Moan, G.D.; Coleman, C.E.

    1988-04-01

    The paper describes how the requirements for Leak-Before-Break are met in CANDU reactors. The requirements are based on operational and laboratory experience. After the onset of leakage in a fuel channel from a delayed hydride crack, time is available to the operator to take action before the crack grows to an unstable length. The time available is calculated using different models which use crack growth data from small specimen tests. When the results from crack growth behaviour experiments, carried out on components removed from reactor are used in the model, the time available for operator response is about 100 hours

  9. IR analyzer spots heavy water leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    A correlation spectrometer developed by Barringer Research Ltd. (in collaboration with Atomic Energy of Canada and Ontario Hydro) is used to measure HDO concentrations in DTO in the final (distillation) stage of heavy-water production. A unit has been installed at Bruce Heavy Water Plant. Previously, such spectrometers had been installed to detect heavy-water leaks in CANDU reactors. The principle on which the instrument works is explained, with illustrations. It works by comparing the absorption at 2.9 μm, due to HDO, with that at 2.6 μm, due to both HDO and D 2 O. (N.D.H.)

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid leak mimicking allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketti, Anthony J; Cleri, Dennis J; Porwancher, Richard B; Panesar, Mandip; Villota, Francisco J; Seelagy, Marc M

    2005-01-01

    Rhinitis and rhinorrhea are common clinical complaints that may be allergic or nonallergic in etiology. Distinguishing between allergic and nonallergic etiologies can be difficult but necessary for treatment. Here, we present a case of a 50-year-old woman with > 20 years of rhinorrhea before a diagnosis of cerebrospinal fluid leak and a life-threatening complication occurred. It is essential that no symptom, especially that which persists and resists treatment, is trivialized. Here, we establish how a careful history and evaluation will direct the clinician to the correct diagnosis.

  11. Leak detection device for reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Koichiro.

    1990-01-01

    In a light water cooled reactor, if reactor coolants are leaked from pipelines in a pipeline chamber, activated products (N-16) are diffused together to an atmosphere in the pipeline chamber. N-16 is sucked from an extracting tube which is always sucking the atmosphere in the pipeline chamber to a sucking blower. Then, β-rays released from N-16 are monitored by a radiation monitor in a measuring chamber which is radiation-shielded from the pipeline chamber. Accordingly, since the radiation monitor can detect even slight leakage, the slight leakage of reactor coolants in the pipelines can be detected at an early stage. (I.N.)

  12. 340 Facility secondary containment and leak detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendixsen, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    This document presents a preliminary safety evaluation for the 340 Facility Secondary Containment and Leak Containment system, Project W-302. Project W-302 will construct Building 340-C which has been designed to replace the current 340 Building and vault tank system for collection of liquid wastes from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory buildings in the 300 Area. This new nuclear facility is Hazard Category 3. The vault tank and related monitoring and control equipment are Safety Class 2 with the remainder of the structure, systems and components as Safety Class 3 or 4

  13. Detection of steam generator tube leaks in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, W.H.

    1984-11-01

    This report addresses the early detection of small steam generator tube leaks in pressurized water reactors. It identifies physical parameters, establishes instrumentation performance goals, and specifies sensor types and locations. It presents a simple algorithm that yields the leak rate as a function of known or measurable quantities. Leak rates of less than one-tenth gram per second should be detectable with existing instrumentation

  14. Design of a Novel In-Pipe Reliable Leak Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Chatzigeorgiou, Dimitrios; Youcef-Toumi, Kamal; Ben-Mansour, Rached

    2013-01-01

    Leakage is the major factor for unaccounted losses in every pipe network around the world (oil, gas, or water). In most cases, the deleterious effects associated with the occurrence of leaks may present serious economical and health problems. Therefore, leaks must be quickly detected, located, and repaired. Unfortunately, most state-of-the-art leak detection systems have limited applicability, are neither reliable nor robust, while others depend on the user experience. In this paper, we prese...

  15. Telescope sipping the optimum fuel leak detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleryd, R.

    1998-01-01

    The TELESCOPE Sipping technology is an evolutionary development from previous ABB fuel leak systems used in LWR reactors. The system utilizes the existing dynamics that cause numerous fission products to leak from a failed fuel rod when the fuel assembly is raised from a reactor core during core fuel alterations. The system can also be used by repair work in pool side inspection in order to detect leaking rods or to verify reconstituted assemblies as non leakers. (author)

  16. Detection of Leaks in Water Mains Using Ground Penetrating Radar

    OpenAIRE

    Alaa Al Hawari; Mohammad Khader; Tarek Zayed; Osama Moselhi

    2016-01-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is one of the most effective electromagnetic techniques for non-destructive non-invasive subsurface features investigation. Water leak from pipelines is the most common undesirable reason of potable water losses. Rapid detection of such losses is going to enhance the use of the Water Distribution Networks (WDN) and decrease threatens associated with water mains leaks. In this study, GPR approach was developed to detect leaks by implementing an appropriate imagin...

  17. Locating leaks in water mains using noise loggers

    OpenAIRE

    El-Abbasy, Mohammed S.; Mosleh, Fadi; Senouci, Ahmed; Zayed, Tarek; Al-Derham, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Because of their potential danger to public health, economic loss, environmental damage, and energy waste, underground water pipelines leaks have received more attention globally. Researchers have proposed active leakage control approaches to localize, locate, and pinpoint leaks. Noise loggers have usually been used only for localizing leaks while other tools were used for locating and pinpointing. These approaches have resulted in additional cost and time. Thus, regression and artificial neu...

  18. Margins in high temperature leak-before-break assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budden, P.J.; Hooton, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    Developments in the defect assessment procedure R6 to include high-temperature mechanisms in Leak-before-Break arguments are described. In particular, the effect of creep on the time available to detect a leak and on the crack opening area, and hence leak rate, is discussed. The competing influence of these two effects is emphasized by an example. The application to Leak-before-Break of the time-dependent failure assessment diagram approach for high temperature defect assessment is then outlined. The approach is shown to be of use in assessing the erosion of margins by creep

  19. Margins in high temperature leak-before-break assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budden, P.J.; Hooton, D.G.

    1997-04-01

    Developments in the defect assessment procedure R6 to include high-temperature mechanisms in Leak-before-Break arguments are described. In particular, the effect of creep on the time available to detect a leak and on the crack opening area, and hence leak rate, is discussed. The competing influence of these two effects is emphasized by an example. The application to Leak-before-Break of the time-dependent failure assessment diagram approach for high temperature defect assessment is then outlined. The approach is shown to be of use in assessing the erosion of margins by creep.

  20. Software-aided operation of modern industrial leak detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse Bley, W. [INFICON GmbH, Koeln (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    When leak-testing parts with the tracer gas method, the ''no-indication'' response of the leak detector leaves the operator with the question whether there is really no leak present or the test instrument may be in a faulty (= insensitive) condition. Moreover, an operator being absent-minded or distracted may easily move the sniffer tip to the wrong spot on the test object or at least not to all required test areas. To make sure that the uncertainty about sensitivity is avoided specific artificial leaks (''test leaks'') are routinely used for frequent verification of the correct function and calibration of the leak detector. However, absent-minded, distracted or even lazy operators are not detected in this way. Recent software features implemented into INFICON leak detectors can help prevent mistakes of the above kind. Such features include intelligent filtering of the signal (preventing spurious noise), suppression of interfering gas effects, dynamic zeroing of the signal, simple on-site function tests with a built-in test leak, a complete spectrum of indications (optical, acoustical, tactile,..) if the trigger for leaky objects is exceeded and more. As an example of the latest achievements in this field the operator-controlling features of the new ECOTEC E3000 refrigerant leak detector from INFICON are described in some detail. It will become quite clear that product quality (in this case of refrigerators and air conditioners) is greatly enhanced by such supervising functions. (orig.)

  1. New helium sniffing device for locating very fine leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Y.; Shimomura, Y.; Abe, T.; Obara, K.

    1984-01-01

    A new helium sniffing method for leak checking large vacuum vessels is described. The low sensitivity problem of the conventional helium sniffing method has been overcome by increasing the gas draw rate from around leaks into the detector up to about 0.1 Pa m 3 /s. The devised system consists of a flexible stainless steel capillary tube 0.6 mm i.d. and 10 m long, a sorption pump using molecular sieve, and a helium leak detector in series. This method is particularly useful for locating very fine leaks down to 10 -11 Pa m 3 /s. Relevant theoretical considerations and experimental results are presented

  2. Acoustic leak detection and ultrasonic crack detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Claytor, T.N.; Groenwald, R.

    1983-10-01

    A program is under way to assess the effectiveness of current and proposed techniques for acoustic leak detection (ALD) in reactor coolant systems. An ALD facility has been constructed and tests have begun on five laboratory-grown cracks (three fatigue and two thermal-fatigue and two field-induced IGSCC specimens. After ultrasonic testing revealed cracks in the Georgia Power Co. HATCH-1 BWR recirculation header, the utility installed an ALD system. Data from HATCH-1 have given an indication of the background noise level at a BWR recirculation header sweepolet weld. The HATCH leak detection system was tested to determine the sensitivity and dynamic range. Other background data have been acquired at the Watts Bar Nuclear Reactor in Tennessee. An ANL waveguide system, including transducer and electronics, was installed and tested on an accumulator safety injection pipe. The possibility of using ultrasonic wave scattering patterns to discriminate between IGSCCs and geometric reflectors has been explored. Thirteen reflectors (field IGSCCs, graphite wool IGSCCs, weld roots, and slits) were examined. Work with cast stainless steel (SS) included sound velocity and attenuation in isotropic and anisotropic cast SS. Reducing anisotropy does not help reduce attenuation in large-grained material. Large artificial flaws (e.g., a 1-cm-deep notch with a 4-cm path) could not be detected in isotropic centrifugally cast SS (1 to 2-mm grains) by longitudinal or shear waves at frequencies of 1 MHz or greater, but could be detected with 0.5-MHz shear waves. 13 figures

  3. Does the type of pancreaticojejunostomy after Whipple alter the leak rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Chad G; Howard, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Despite the overwhelming limitations that plague the literature surrounding the optimal method of reestablishing pancreatico-enteric continuity following a Whipple operation, it is clear that all successful techniques conform to sound surgical principles. These principles include a water-tight and tension-free anastomosis, preservation of adequate blood supply for both organs involved in the anastomosis, and minimal trauma to the pancreas gland. Although surgeon experience, gland texture, and pancreatic duct size are clearly the dominate risk factors from a long list of variables associated with pancreatic leaks following pancreatoduodenectomy, these are nonmodifiable covariates. Although the plethora of current literature cannot provide a single definitive technical solution for restoring pancreatico-enteric continuity, a small number of well-designed RCTs support the use of transanastomotic external stenting for high-risk pancreatic glands and an end-to-side invaginated pancreaticojejunostomy. The truth remains that an individual surgeon's mastery of a specific anastomotic technique, in conjunction with a large personal experience, is likely to be the best predictor of a low pancreas leak rate following pancreatoduodenectomy.

  4. Three-dimensional measurement of a tightly focused laser beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangsheng Xie

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The spatial structure of a tightly focused light field is measured with a double knife-edge scanning method. The measurement method is based on the use of a high-quality double knife-edge fabricated from a right-angled silicon fragment mounted on a photodetector. The reconstruction of the three-dimensional structures of tightly focused spots is carried out with both uniform and partially obstructed linearly polarized incident light beams. The optical field distribution is found to deviate substantially from the input beam profile in the tightly focused region, which is in good agreement with the results of numerical simulations.

  5. Pipeline leak detection and location by on-line-correlation with a process computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebert, H.; Isermann, R.

    1977-01-01

    A method for leak detection using a correlation technique in pipelines is described. For leak detection and also for leak localisation and estimation of the leak flow recursive estimation algorithms are used. The efficiency of the methods is demonstrated with a process computer and a pipeline model operating on-line. It is shown that very small leaks can be detected. (orig.) [de

  6. Risk Factors for Gastrointestinal Leak after Bariatric Surgery: MBASQIP Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Reza Fazl; Li, Shiri; Inaba, Colette; Penalosa, Patrick; Hinojosa, Marcelo W; Smith, Brian R; Stamos, Michael J; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2018-03-30

    Gastrointestinal leak remains one of the most dreaded complications in bariatric surgery. We aimed to evaluate risk factors and the impact of common perioperative interventions on the development of leak in patients who underwent laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Using the 2015 database of accredited centers, data were analyzed for patients who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB). Emergent, revisional, and converted cases were excluded. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze risk factors for leak, including provocative testing of anastomosis, surgical drain placement, and use of postoperative swallow study. Data from 133,478 patients who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (n = 92,495 [69.3%]) and LRYGB (n = 40,983 [30.7%]) were analyzed. Overall leak rate was 0.7% (938 of 133,478). Factors associated with increased risk for leak were oxygen dependency (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.97), hypoalbuminemia (AOR 1.66), sleep apnea (AOR 1.52), hypertension (AOR 1.36), and diabetes (AOR 1.18). Compared with LRYGB, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy was associated with a lower risk of leak (AOR 0.52; 95% CI 0.44 to 0.61; p leak rate was higher in patients with vs without a provocative test (0.8% vs 0.4%, respectively; p leak rate was higher in patients with vs without a surgical drain placed (1.6% vs 0.4%, respectively; p leak rate was similar between patients with vs without swallow study (0.7% vs 0.7%; p = 0.50). The overall rate of gastrointestinal leak in bariatric surgery is low. Certain preoperative factors, procedural type (LRYGB), and interventions (intraoperative provocative test and surgical drain placement) were associated with a higher risk for leaks. Copyright © 2018 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Review of low-energy construction, air tightness, ventilation strategies and indoor radon: results from Finnish houses and apartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvela, H.; Holmgren, O.; Reisbacka, H.; Vinha, J.

    2014-01-01

    Low-energy and passive house construction practices are characterised by increased insulation, high air tightness of the building shell and controlled mechanical ventilation with heat recovery. As a result of the interaction of mechanical ventilation and high air tightness, the pressure difference in a building can be markedly enhanced. This may lead to elevated indoor radon levels. Minor leakages in the foundation can affect the radon concentration, even in the case where such leaks do not markedly reduce the total air tightness. The potential for high pressures to affect indoor radon concentrations markedly increases when the air tightness ACH 50 , i.e. the air change per hour induced by a pressure difference of 50 Pa, is -1 . Pressure differences in Finnish low-rise residential houses having mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation with heat recovery (MSEV) are typically 2-3 Pa, clearly lower than the values of 5-9 Pa in houses with only mechanical exhaust ventilation (MEV). In MSEV houses, radon concentrations are typically 30 % lower than in MEV houses. In new MSEV houses with an ACH50 of 0.6 h -1 , the limit for passive construction, the analytical estimates predict an increase of 100 % in the radon concentration compared with older houses with an ACH50 of 4.0 h -1 . This poses a challenge for efficient radon prevention in new construction. Radon concentrations are typically 30 % lower in houses with two storeys compared with only one storey. The introduction of an MSEV ventilation strategy in typically very airtight apartments has markedly reduced pressure differences and radon concentrations. (authors)

  8. On tight multiparty Bell inequalities for many settings

    OpenAIRE

    Zukowski, Marek

    2006-01-01

    A derivation method is given which leads to a series of tight Bell inequalities for experiments involving N parties, with binary observables, and three possible local settings. The approach can be generalized to more settings. Ramifications are presented.

  9. Western tight gas sands advanced logging workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, J B; Carroll, Jr, H B [eds.

    1982-04-01

    An advanced logging research program is one major aspect of the Western Tight Sands Program. Purpose of this workshop is to help BETC define critical logging needs for tight gas sands and to allow free interchange of ideas on all aspects of the current logging research program. Sixteen papers and abstracts are included together with discussions. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 12 papers. (DLC)

  10. Hamstring tightness and Scheuermann's disease a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, J W; Baigent, M L

    1981-06-01

    The lateral radiographs of the dorsal spines of 20 patients presenting with mainly low back pain are studied. These patients had clinically evident loss of flexion in the low dorsal spine and very tight hamstring muscles. 85% of them showed definite evidence of previous Scheuermann's Disease. The possibility that tight hamstrings may be an important factor in the aetiology of this disease is discussed, and a further large scale study is proposed.

  11. Contraption and Prediction of Exhalation Tight Brownstone in Exhalation Cistern

    OpenAIRE

    XhingZhiwang, -; Xuchao, -

    2012-01-01

    The reservoir connate water saturation is high and gas wells generally produce water which seriously affects the productivity of gas wells in Xujiahe tight sandstone gas reservoirs in Sichuan Basin. Take the sixth formation for example, there are 39 wells producing water unequally in the 42 commissioning wells, and the excessive water production leads to the production of the gas well declining rapidly. Studying of the mechanism of water production in tight sandstone gas reservoirs and predic...

  12. Leak detection system for a high temperature fluid pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puyal, C.; Meuwisse, C.

    1989-01-01

    The leak detection system is made by a cable with at least two isolated electrical conductors, close to the wall of the pipe. The material of the cable is chosen so as to change its electrical characteristics if a leak causes heating of the cable. A detector at one end of the cable can measure the modifications of the electrical characteristics [fr

  13. Cook Strait cable leak investigation, March-June 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, B.J.; Fitzgerald, G.J.

    1985-09-01

    An investigation was made to locate a gas leak in an under-sea electric power cable. Krypton-85 was used as the tracer. Despite problems with the investigation there was strong evidence to suggest that the leak was in the joint between the land and sea portions of the cable. (auths)

  14. 241-AY-102 Leak Detection Pit Drain Line Inspection Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boomer, Kayle D.; Engeman, Jason K.; Gunter, Jason R.; Joslyn, Cameron C.; Vazquez, Brandon J.; Venetz, Theodore J.; Garfield, John S.

    2014-01-01

    This document provides a description of the design components, operational approach, and results from the Tank AY-102 leak detection pit drain piping visual inspection. To perform this inspection a custom robotic crawler with a deployment device was designed, built, and operated by IHI Southwest Technologies, Inc. for WRPS to inspect the 6-inch leak detection pit drain line

  15. Leak detection in LMFBR steam generators during operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumm, K [INTERATOM, Bergisch Gladbach (Germany)

    1978-10-01

    This paper deals with the following four main aspects: requirement on the leak detection of the SNR-300 steam generators; the hydrogen detector of SNR-300; remarks on the disadvantage of impurity detectors; and the first approach to acoustic leak detection systems.

  16. Commercial Grade Item (CGI) Dedication for Leak Detection Relays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.; JOHNS, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    This Test Plan provides a test method to dedicate the leak detection relays used on the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skids. The new skids are fabricated on-site. The leak detection system is a safety class system per the Authorization Basis

  17. Leak detection in LMFBR steam generators during operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumm, K.

    1978-01-01

    This paper deals with the following four main aspects: requirement on the leak detection of the SNR-300 steam generators; the hydrogen detector of SNR-300; remarks on the disadvantage of impurity detectors; and the first approach to acoustic leak detection systems

  18. Reliability evaluation of the Savannah River reactor leak detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, W.L.; Sindelar, R.L.; Wallace, I.T.

    1991-01-01

    The Savannah River Reactors have been in operation since the mid-1950's. The primary degradation mode for the primary coolant loop piping is intergranular stress corrosion cracking. The leak-before-break (LBB) capability of the primary system piping has been demonstrated as part of an overall structural integrity evaluation. One element of the LBB analyses is a reliability evaluation of the leak detection system. The most sensitive element of the leak detection system is the airborne tritium monitors. The presence of small amounts of tritium in the heavy water coolant provide the basis for a very sensitive system of leak detection. The reliability of the tritium monitors to properly identify a crack leaking at a rate of either 50 or 300 lb/day (0.004 or 0.023 gpm, respectively) has been characterized. These leak rates correspond to action points for which specific operator actions are required. High reliability has been demonstrated using standard fault tree techniques. The probability of not detecting a leak within an assumed mission time of 24 hours is estimated to be approximately 5 x 10 -5 per demand. This result is obtained for both leak rates considered. The methodology and assumptions used to obtain this result are described in this paper. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  19. Coil embolization of an anastomotic leak after ascending aorta replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Anders; Andersen, Lars Ib; Haahr, P.E.

    2008-01-01

    treated aneurysm in the ascending thoracic aorta complicated with an anastomotic leak. If a short prosthesis (6 cm) had been available, the anastomotic leak would have been treated with endovascular repair. In lack of this prosthesis, we were forced to treat the patient with a method not generally...

  20. Air leak after lung resection: pathophysiology and patients' implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Cecilia; Miserocchi, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Protocols for the management of air leaks are critical aspects in the postoperative course of patients following lung resections. Many investigations in the last decade are focusing on the chest tube modalities or preventative measures, however, little is known about the pathophysiology of air leak and the patient perception of this common complication. This review concentrates on understanding the reasons why a pulmonary parenchyma may start to leak or an air leak may be longer than others. Experimental works support the notion that lung overdistension may favor air leak. These studies may represent the basis of future investigations. Furthermore, the standardization of nomenclature in the field of pleural space management and the creation of novel air leak scoring systems have contributed to improve the knowledge among thoracic surgeons and facilitate the organization of trials on this matter. We tried to summarize available evidences about the patient perception of a prolonged air leak and about what would be useful for them in order to prevent worsening of their quality of life. Future investigations are warranted to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible of prolonged air leak in order to define tailored treatments and protocols. Improving the care at home with web-based telemonitoring or real time connected chest drainage may in a future improve the quality of life of the patients experience this complication and also enhance hospital finances.

  1. Measurement error in pressure-decay leak testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.N.

    1979-04-01

    The effect of measurement error in presssure-decay leak testing is considered, and examples are presented to demonstrate how it can be properly accomodated in analyzing data from such tests. Suggestions for more effective specification and conduct of leak tests are presented

  2. Cooling device for leaking fluid from a centrifugal pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, J.R.; Thomson, C.I.

    1978-01-01

    The patented device consists of an integrated heat exchanger in a centrifugal primary cooling circuit pump whose purpose is to cool the coolant medium which leaks along the pump shaft so that the shaft seals are not damaged. The cooling water passes through spirally arranged banks of tubes round the shaft, with baffle plates to direct the leaking coolant. (JIW)

  3. Regulation of Tight Junctions in Upper Airway Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kojima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mucosal barrier of the upper respiratory tract including the nasal cavity, which is the first site of exposure to inhaled antigens, plays an important role in host defense in terms of innate immunity and is regulated in large part by tight junctions of epithelial cells. Tight junction molecules are expressed in both M cells and dendritic cells as well as epithelial cells of upper airway. Various antigens are sampled, transported, and released to lymphocytes through the cells in nasal mucosa while they maintain the integrity of the barrier. Expression of tight junction molecules and the barrier function in normal human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs are affected by various stimuli including growth factor, TLR ligand, and cytokine. In addition, epithelial-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, which is a master switch for allergic inflammatory diseases including allergic rhinitis, enhances the barrier function together with an increase of tight junction molecules in HNECs. Furthermore, respiratory syncytial virus infection in HNECs in vitro induces expression of tight junction molecules and the barrier function together with proinflammatory cytokine release. This paper summarizes the recent progress in our understanding of the regulation of tight junctions in the upper airway epithelium under normal, allergic, and RSV-infected conditions.

  4. Leaking tankers: how much oil was spilled?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simecek-Beatty, D. A.; Lehr, W. J.; Lankford, J. F.

    1997-01-01

    A model to estimate leak rates from tankers has been developed for use in emergency situations when more direct oil-loss estimation methods are not available. The model includes algorithms for gravity outflow and air and water ingestion. Three laboratory tests were conducted using fresh water and canola oil to evaluate the model output. Comparison with results from the laboratory experiments indicate good correlation of model results with measured data. However, it is not yet possible in the case of very large crude carriers to answer the question 'how much oil was spilled?' Sensitivity analysis and further laboratory testing were suggested to determine the effect of factors such as: pressure vacuum relief valves that prevent cavitation in the event of tank puncture; changing outside water levels due to wave and tidal action; tank and hole dimensions; and the amount and density of the product.10 refs., 4 figs

  5. Applicability of the leak before break concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    Within the framework of the IAEA Extrabudgetary Programme on the Safety of WWER-440 Model 230 NPPs, a list of safety issues requiring broad studies of general interest have been agreed upon by an Advisory Group which met in Vienna in September 1990. The information on the status of the issues, and on amount of work already completed and under way in various countries, needs to be compiled. Moreover, an evaluation of what further work is required to resolve each of the issues is also necessary. In view of this, the IAEA has started the preparation of a series of status reports on the various issues. This report on the generic safety issue ''Applicability of the Leak Before Break Concept'' presents a comprehensive survey of technical information available in the field and identifies those which require further investigation. 50 refs, 15 figs, 2 tabs

  6. Fully automatic AI-based leak detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tylman, Wojciech; Kolczynski, Jakub [Dept. of Microelectronics and Computer Science, Technical University of Lodz in Poland, ul. Wolczanska 221/223, Lodz (Poland); Anders, George J. [Kinectrics Inc., 800 Kipling Ave., Toronto, Ontario M8Z 6C4 (Canada)

    2010-09-15

    This paper presents a fully automatic system intended to detect leaks of dielectric fluid in underground high-pressure, fluid-filled (HPFF) cables. The system combines a number of artificial intelligence (AI) and data processing techniques to achieve high detection capabilities for various rates of leaks, including leaks as small as 15 l per hour. The system achieves this level of precision mainly thanks to a novel auto-tuning procedure, enabling learning of the Bayesian network - the decision-making component of the system - using simulated leaks of various rates. Significant new developments extending the capabilities of the original leak detection system described in and form the basis of this paper. Tests conducted on the real-life HPFF cable system in New York City are also discussed. (author)

  7. Steam leak detection method in pipeline using histogram analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Se Oh; Jeon, Hyeong Seop; Son, Ki Sung; Chae, Gyung Sun [Saean Engineering Corp, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Won [Dept. of Information Communications Engineering, Chungnam NationalUnversity, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Leak detection in a pipeline usually involves acoustic emission sensors such as contact type sensors. These contact type sensors pose difficulties for installation and cannot operate in areas having high temperature and radiation. Therefore, recently, many researchers have studied the leak detection phenomenon by using a camera. Leak detection by using a camera has the advantages of long distance monitoring and wide area surveillance. However, the conventional leak detection method by using difference images often mistakes the vibration of a structure for a leak. In this paper, we propose a method for steam leakage detection by using the moving average of difference images and histogram analysis. The proposed method can separate the leakage and the vibration of a structure. The working performance of the proposed method is verified by comparing with experimental results.

  8. Reliability of leak detection systems in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Guide 1.45 recommends the use of at least three different detection methods in reactors to detect leakage. Monitoring of both sump-flow and airborne particulate radioactivity is recommended. A third method can involve either monitoring of condensate flow rate from air coolers or monitoring of airborne gaseous radioactivity. Although the methods currently used for leak detection reflect the state of the art, other techniques may be developed and used. Since the recommendations of Regulatory Guide 1.45 are not mandatory, the technical specifications for 74 operating plants have been reviewed to determine the types of leak detection methods employed. In addition, Licensee Event Report (LER) Compilations from June 1985 to June 1986 have been reviewed to help establish actual capabilities for detecting leaks and determining their source. Work at Argonne National Laboratory has demonstrated that improvements in leak detection, location, and sizing are possible with advanced acoustic leak detection technology

  9. Evaluation of methodologies for the calculation of leak rates for pressure retaining components with crack-like leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievers, Juergen; Heckmann, Klaus; Blaesius, Christoph

    2015-06-01

    For the demonstration of break preclusion for pressure retaining components in nuclear power plants, the nuclear safety standard KTA 3206 determines also the requirements for the leak-before-break verification. For this procedure, it has to be ensured that a wall-penetrating crack is subcritical with respect to instable growth, and that the resulting leakage under stationary operation conditions can be detected by a leak detection system. Within the scope of the project 3613R01332 analyses with respect to conservative estimates of the leak rates in case of detections regarding break preclusion were performed by means of leak rate models being available at GRS. For this purpose, conservative assumptions in the procedure were quantified by comparative calculations concerning selected leak rate experiments and the requirements regarding the determination of leak rates indicated in the KTA 3206 were verified and specified. Moreover, the models were extended and relevant recommendations for the calculation procedure were developed. During the investigations of leak rate tests the calculation methods were validated, qualified by means of both examples indicated in KTA 3206 and applied to a postulated leak accident in the cooling circuit of a PWR. For the calculation of leak rates several simplified solution methods which are included in the GRS program WinLeck were applied, and for the simulation of a leak accident the large-scale programs ANSYS Mechanical and ATHLET (thermohydraulics program developed by GRS) were used. When applying simplified methods for the calculation of leak rates using the limiting curve for the friction factor which has been derived during the project and which is included in the KTA 3206 attention has to be paid to the fact that in case of small flow lengths the entrance loss can dominate compared to the friction loss. However, the available data do not suffice in order to make a quantitative statement with respect to limits of applicability

  10. Transcatheter closure of paravalvular leaks using a paravalvular leak device – a prospective Polish registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Smolka

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Transcatheter paravalvular leak closure (TPVLC has become an established treatment option but is mostly performed with off-label use of different non-dedicated occluders. The first one specifically designed for TPVLC is the paravalvular leak device (PLD – Occlutech. Aim : We present initial short-term results of a prospective registry intended to assess the safety and efficacy of TPVLC with PLD. Material and methods : We screened patients with paravalvular leak (PVL after surgical valve replacement (SVR. Heart failure symptoms and/or hemolytic anemia were indications for TPVLC. Patients were selected according to PVL anatomy by RT 3D TEE. Only those considered appropriate for closure with a single PLD were enrolled. The procedures were performed via transvascular or transapical access using type W (waist PLDs only. Results : Thirty patients with 34 PVLs (18 aortic, 16 mitral were included. We implanted 35 PLDs with a total device success rate of 94.3% (100% for aortic, 88.2% for mitral. The procedural success rate, encompassing device success without in-hospital complications, was 94.1% (100% for aortic, 93.8% for mitral. During the follow-up period we recorded an increase of hemoglobin concentration (3.9 to 4.1 g/dl, red blood count (11.6 to 12.2 M/mm3 and functional improvement by NYHA class. Conclusions : Paravalvular leak device type W is a promising TPVLC device, but meticulous preselection of patients based on imaging of PVL anatomy is a prerequisite. A PLD should only be chosen for channels shorter than 5 mm. Size of the device should match the PVL cross-sectional area without any oversizing. Such an approach facilitates high device and procedural success rates.

  11. Steam leak detection in advance reactors via acoustics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Raj Kumar; Rao, A. Rama

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Steam leak detection system is developed to detect any leak inside the reactor vault. → The technique uses leak noise frequency spectrum for leak detection. → Testing of system and method to locate the leak is also developed and discussed in present paper. - Abstract: Prediction of LOCA (loss of coolant activity) plays very important role in safety of nuclear reactor. Coolant is responsible for heat transfer from fuel bundles. Loss of coolant is an accidental situation which requires immediate shut down of reactor. Fall in system pressure during LOCA is the trip parameter used for initiating automatic reactor shut down. However, in primary heat transport system operating in two phase regimes, detection of small break LOCA is not simple. Due to very slow leak rates, time for the fall of pressure is significantly slow. From reactor safety point of view, it is extremely important to find reliable and effective alternative for detecting slow pressure drop in case of small break LOCA. One such technique is the acoustic signal caused by LOCA in small breaks. In boiling water reactors whose primary heat transport is to be driven by natural circulation, small break LOCA detection is important. For prompt action on post small break LOCA, steam leak detection system is developed to detect any leak inside the reactor vault. The detection technique is reliable and plays a very important role in ensuring safety of the reactor. Methodology developed for steam leak detection is discussed in present paper. The methods to locate the leak is also developed and discussed in present paper which is based on analysis of the signal.

  12. Development of a new quantitative gas permeability method for dental implant-abutment connection tightness assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Most dental implant systems are presently made of two pieces: the implant itself and the abutment. The connection tightness between those two pieces is a key point to prevent bacterial proliferation, tissue inflammation and bone loss. The leak has been previously estimated by microbial, color tracer and endotoxin percolation. Methods A new nitrogen flow technique was developed for implant-abutment connection leakage measurement, adapted from a recent, sensitive, reproducible and quantitative method used to assess endodontic sealing. Results The results show very significant differences between various sealing and screwing conditions. The remaining flow was lower after key screwing compared to hand screwing (p = 0.03) and remained different from the negative test (p = 0.0004). The method reproducibility was very good, with a coefficient of variation of 1.29%. Conclusions Therefore, the presented new gas flow method appears to be a simple and robust method to compare different implant systems. It allows successive measures without disconnecting the abutment from the implant and should in particular be used to assess the behavior of the connection before and after mechanical stress. PMID:21492459

  13. On a stochastic Burgers equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina T. Kolkovska

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the one-dimensional Burgers equation perturbed by a white noise term with Dirichlet boundary conditions and a non-Lipschitz coefficient. We obtain existence of a weak solution proving tightness for a sequence of polygonal approximations for the equation and solving a martingale problem for the weak limit.

  14. Study on Leak Detection of the Pipeline System by Acoustic Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, D. J.; Kim, C. J.

    1987-01-01

    Leak detection testing for the pipeline system was performed by the acoustic emission method. It was found that the detected signal spectrum was influenced by the frequency response of sensors and pressure changes. AE parameters and frequency spectrum distributions were used to analyze the leak signals. The slope rise time of AE parameters were the important factors for distinguishing leak signals. The amplitude of leak signal was more affected by the changes of leak, rate and pressure than those of leak type

  15. ISS Ammonia Leak Detection Through X-Ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan; Barthelmy, Scott; Skinner, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia leaks are a significant concern for the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS has external transport lines that direct liquid ammonia to radiator panels where the ammonia is cooled and then brought back to thermal control units. These transport lines and radiator panels are subject to stress from micrometeorites and temperature variations, and have developed small leaks. The ISS can accommodate these leaks at their present rate, but if the rate increased by a factor of ten, it could potentially deplete the ammonia supply and impact the proper functioning of the ISS thermal control system, causing a serious safety risk. A proposed ISS astrophysics instrument, the Lobster X-Ray Monitor, can be used to detect and localize ISS ammonia leaks. Based on the optical design of the eye of its namesake crustacean, the Lobster detector gives simultaneously large field of view and good position resolution. The leak detection principle is that the nitrogen in the leaking ammonia will be ionized by X-rays from the Sun, and then emit its own characteristic Xray signal. The Lobster instrument, nominally facing zenith for its astrophysics observations, can be periodically pointed towards the ISS radiator panels and some sections of the transport lines to detect and localize the characteristic X-rays from the ammonia leaks. Another possibility is to use the ISS robot arm to grab the Lobster instrument and scan it across the transport lines and radiator panels. In this case the leak detection can be made more sensitive by including a focused 100-microampere electron beam to stimulate X-ray emission from the leaking nitrogen. Laboratory studies have shown that either approach can be used to locate ammonia leaks at the level of 0.1 kg/day, a threshold rate of concern for the ISS. The Lobster instrument uses two main components: (1) a microchannel plate optic (also known as a Lobster optic) that focuses the X-rays and directs them to the focal plane, and (2) a CCD (charge

  16. Leak testing of cryogenic components — problems and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S. P.; Pandarkar, S. P.; Unni, T. G.; Sinha, A. K.; Mahajan, K.; Suthar, R. L.

    2008-05-01

    A prototype of Cold Neutron Source (CNS) for Dhruva Reactor is being manufactured at Centre for Design and Manufacture (CDM), BARC, Mumbai for validating the mechanical and thermal engineering design aspects, besides checking the integrity of all joints and components at low temperature, 77K. Task of a Cold Neutron Source is to generate cold neutrons by cooling down the thermal neutrons, which are originally produced in a nuclear research reactor. The complete Cold Neutron Source system comprises a complex arrangement of moderator pot, transfer line (piping), pumps, refrigerators, storage tanks, a heat exchanger and associated controls and instrumentation. The heart of the system is moderator pot in which water (moderator) is cooled down by Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) being circulated through an annular cavity machined on the walls of the pot. Transfer lines for LN2 basically consist of two concentric Stainless Steel flexible pipes, which are joined to the inlet and outlet Aluminium tubes of the moderator pot through transition joints. Leak in any component may result in loss of liquid Nitrogen, degradation of vacuum, which in turn may affect the heat removal efficiency of the source. Hence, leak testing was considered a very important quality control tool and all joints and components were subjected to helium leak test using mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD) at cryogenic temperature. During one of the earlier experiments, flow of LN2 through inner flexible pipe of the transfer line resulted in rise of pressure in the vacuum annulus and sweating on the outer flexible pipe. After investigations it was found that large thermal stress compounded with mechanical stress resulted in cracks in the inner pipe. Accordingly design was modified to get leak proof transfer line assembly. Further, during leak testing of thin wall moderator pot, gross leak was observed on the outer jacket welded joint. Leak was so large that even a small amount of Helium gas in the vicinity of the

  17. Technology for Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Kristensen, Jannie Friis; Nielsen, Christina

    2003-01-01

    .After analysing the history and the current boundary work, the paper will propose new technological support for boundary work. In particular the paper will suggest means of supporting boundaries when these are productive and for changing boundaries when this seems more appropriate. In total, flexible technologies......This paper presents a study of an organisation, which is undergoing a process transforming organisational and technological boundaries. In particular, we shall look at three kinds of boundaries: the work to maintain and change the boundary between the organisation and its customers; boundaries...... seem a core issue when dealing with technology for boundaries....

  18. Incidence and risk factors predisposing anastomotic leak after transhiatal esophagectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabatabai, Abbas; Hashemi, Mozaffar; Mohajeri, Gholamreza; Ahmadinejad, Mojtaba; Khan, Ishfaq Abass; Haghdani, Saeid

    2009-01-01

    The objective of our study was to identify the incidence and risk factors of anastomotic leaks following transhiatal esophagectomy (THE). A prospective study was conducted on 61 patients treated for carcinoma of the esophagus between 2006 and 2007. We examined the following variables: age, gender, preoperative cardiovascular function, intraoperative complications such as hypotension, arrhythmia, mediastinal manipulation period, blood loss volume, blood transfusion, duration of surgery, postoperative complications such as anastomotic leak, anastomotic stricture, requiring reoperation, respiratory complications, and total morbidity and mortality. Variables were compared between the patients with and without anastomotic leak. T-test for quantitative variables and Chi-square test for qualitative variables were used to find out any relationship. P value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Out of 61 patients, anastomotic leaks occurred in 13 (21.3%). Weight loss, forced expiratory volume (FEV1) < 2 lit, preoperative albumin, intaoperative blood loss volume, and respiratory complication were associated with the anastomotic leak in patients undergoing THE. Anastomotic leaks were the leading cause of postoperative morbidity, anastomotic stricture, and reoperation. Anastomotic leakage is a life-threatening postoperative complication. Careful attention to the factors contributing to the development of a leak can reduce the incidence of anastomotic complications postoperatively. (author)

  19. Hollow-core fiber sensing technique for pipeline leak detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challener, W. A.; Kasten, Matthias A.; Karp, Jason; Choudhury, Niloy

    2018-02-01

    Recently there has been increased interest on the part of federal and state regulators to detect and quantify emissions of methane, an important greenhouse gas, from various parts of the oil and gas infrastructure including well pads and pipelines. Pressure and/or flow anomalies are typically used to detect leaks along natural gas pipelines, but are generally very insensitive and subject to false alarms. We have developed a system to detect and localize methane leaks along gas pipelines that is an order of magnitude more sensitive by combining tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLAS) with conventional sensor tube technology. This technique can potentially localize leaks along pipelines up to 100 km lengths with an accuracy of +/-50 m or less. A sensor tube buried along the pipeline with a gas-permeable membrane collects leaking gas during a soak period. The leak plume within the tube is then carried to the nearest sensor node along the tube in a purge cycle. The time-to-detection is used to determine leak location. Multiple sensor nodes are situated along the pipeline to minimize the time to detection, and each node is composed of a short segment of hollow core fiber (HCF) into which leaking gas is transported quickly through a small pressure differential. The HCF sensing node is spliced to standard telecom solid core fiber which transports the laser light for spectroscopy to a remote interrogator. The interrogator is multiplexed across the sensor nodes to minimize equipment cost and complexity.

  20. Detection of steam generator tube leaks in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    This report addresses the early detection of small steam generator tube leaks in pressurized water reactors. It discusses the third, and final, year's work on an NRC-funded project examining diagnostic instrumentation in water reactors. The first two years were broad in coverage, concentrating on anticipatory measurements for detection of potential problems in both pressurized- and boiling-water reactors, with recommendations for areas of further study. One of these areas, the early detection of small steam tube leaks in PWRs, formed the basis of study for the last year of the project. Four tasks are addressed in this study of the detection of steam tube leaks. (1) Determination of which physical parameters indicate the onset of steam generator tube leaks. (2) Establishing performance goals for diagnostic instruments which could be used for early detection of steam generator tube leaks. (3) Defining the diagnostic instrumentation and their location which satisfy Items 1 and 2 above. (4) Assessing the need for diagnostic data processing and display. Parameters are identified, performance goals established, and sensor types and locations are specified in the report, with emphasis on the use of existing instrumentation with a minimum of retrofitting. A simple algorithm is developed which yields the leak rate as a function of known or measurable quantities. The conclusion is that leak rates of less than one-tenth gram per second should be detectable with existing instrumentation. (orig./HP)

  1. Method of judging leak sources in a reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Katsuji.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable exact judgement for leak sources upon leak accident in a reactor container of BWR type power plants as to whether the sources are present in the steam system or coolant system. Method: If leak is resulted from the main steam system, the hydrogen density in the reactor container is about 170 times as high as the same amount of leak from the reactor water. Accordingly, it can be judged whether the leak source is present in the steam system or reactor water system based on the change in the indication of hydrogen densitometer within the reactor container, and the indication from the drain amount from the sump in the container or the indication of a drain flow meter in the container dehumidifier. Further, I-131, Na-24 and the like as the radioactive nucleides in sump water of the container are measured to determine the density ratio R = (I-131)/(Na-24), and it is judged that the leak is resulted in nuclear water if the density ratio R is equal to that of reactor water and that the leak is resulted from the main steam or like other steam system if the density ratio R is higher than by about 100 times than that of reactor water. (Horiuchi, T.)

  2. Autogenous Metallic Pipe Leak Repair in Potable Water Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Min; Triantafyllidou, Simoni; Edwards, Marc A

    2015-07-21

    Copper and iron pipes have a remarkable capability for autogenous repair (self-repair) of leaks in potable water systems. Field studies revealed exemplars that metallic pipe leaks caused by nails, rocks, and erosion corrosion autogenously repaired, as confirmed in the laboratory experiments. This work demonstrated that 100% (N = 26) of 150 μm leaks contacting representative bulk potable water in copper pipes sealed autogenously via formation of corrosion precipitates at 20-40 psi, pH 3.0-11.0, and with upward and downward leak orientations. Similar leaks in carbon steel pipes at 20 psi self-repaired at pH 5.5 and 8.5, but two leaks did not self-repair permanently at pH 11.0 suggesting that water chemistry may control the durability of materials that seal the leaks and therefore the permanence of repair. Larger 400 μm holes in copper pipes had much lower (0-33%) success of self-repair at pH 3.0-11.0, whereas all 400 μm holes in carbon steel pipes at 20 psi self-repaired at pH 4.0-11.0. Pressure tests indicated that some of the repairs created at 20-40 psi ambient pressure could withstand more than 100 psi without failure. Autogenous repair has implications for understanding patterns of pipe failures, extending the lifetime of decaying infrastructure, and developing new plumbing materials.

  3. Human zonulin, a potential modulator of intestinal tight junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W; Uzzau, S; Goldblum, S E; Fasano, A

    2000-12-01

    Intercellular tight junctions are dynamic structures involved in vectorial transport of water and electrolytes across the intestinal epithelium. Zonula occludens toxin derived from Vibrio cholerae interacts with a specific intestinal epithelial surface receptor, with subsequent activation of a complex intracellular cascade of events that regulate tight junction permeability. We postulated that this toxin may mimic the effect of a functionally and immunologically related endogenous modulator of intestinal tight junctions. Affinity-purified anti-zonula occludens toxin antibodies and the Ussing chamber assay were used to screen for one or more mammalian zonula occludens toxin analogues in both fetal and adult human intestine. A novel protein, zonulin, was identified that induces tight junction disassembly in non-human primate intestinal epithelia mounted in Ussing chambers. Comparison of amino acids in the active zonula occludens toxin fragment and zonulin permitted the identification of the putative receptor binding domain within the N-terminal region of the two proteins. Zonulin likely plays a pivotal role in tight junction regulation during developmental, physiological, and pathological processes, including tissue morphogenesis, movement of fluid, macromolecules and leukocytes between the intestinal lumen and the interstitium, and inflammatory/autoimmune disorders.

  4. The media of sociology: tight or loose translations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenheim, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Sociologists have increasingly come to recognize that the discipline has unduly privileged textual representations, but efforts to incorporate visual and other media are still only in their beginning. This paper develops an analysis of the ways objects of knowledge are translated into other media, in order to understand the visual practices of sociology and to point out unused possibilities. I argue that the discourse on visual sociology, by assuming that photographs are less objective than text, is based on an asymmetric media-determinism and on a misleading notion of objectivity. Instead, I suggest to analyse media with the concept of translations. I introduce several kinds of translations, most centrally the distinction between tight and loose ones. I show that many sciences, such as biology, focus on tight translations, using a variety of media and manipulating both research objects and representations. Sociology, in contrast, uses both tight and loose translations, but uses the latter only for texts. For visuals, sociology restricts itself to what I call 'the documentary': focusing on mechanical recording technologies without manipulating either the object of research or the representation. I conclude by discussing three rare examples of what is largely excluded in sociology: visual loose translations, visual tight translations based on non-mechanical recording technologies, and visual tight translations based on mechanical recording technologies that include the manipulation of both object and representation. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2015.

  5. An integrated leak detection system for the ALMR steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayal, Y.; Gaubatz, D.C.; Wong, K.K.; Greene, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    The steam generator (SG) of the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) system serves as a heat exchanger between the shell side secondary loop hot liquid sodium and the tube side water/steam mixture. A leak in the tube will result in the injection of the higher pressure water/steam into the sodium and cause an exothermic sodium-water reaction. An initial small leak (less than 1 gm/sec) can escalate into an intermediate size leak in a relatively short time by self enlargement of the original flaw and by initiating leaks in neighboring tubes. If not stopped, complete rupture of one or more tubes can cause injection rates of thousands of gm/sec and result in the over pressurization of the secondary loop rupture disk and dumping of the sodium to relieve pressure. The down time associated with severe sodium-water reaction damage has great adverse economic consequence. An integrated leak detection system (ILDS) has been developed which utilizes both chemical and acoustic sensors for improved leak detection. The system provides SG leak status to the reactor operator and is reliable enough to trigger automatic control action to protect the SG. The ILDS chemical subsystem uses conventional in-sodium and cover gas hydrogen detectors and incorporates knowledge based effects due to process parameters for improved reliability. The ILDS acoustic subsystem uses an array of acoustic sensors and incorporates acoustic beamforming technology for highly reliable and accurate leak identification and location. The new ILDS combines the small leak detection capability of the chemical system with the reliability and rapid detection/location capability of the acoustic system to provide a significantly improved level of protection for the SG over a wide range of operation conditions. (author)

  6. Autologous Blood Pleurodesis In Patients With Persistent Air Leaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agkajanzadeh M

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Persistent air leaks occur after Spontaneous pneumothorax both primary and secondary, and after lungs trauma and lung surgeries are sever problems encountered chest surgeons with. Persistent air leak causes longer patients hospitalization."nMaterials and Methods: We used autologous blood pleurodesis in patients with persistent air leak for 30patients with more than 8 days air leaks, during a three years period 1377-1380 (1999-2002."nResults: The patients had 19 years up to 70 years old. Eight patients had thoracotomy and lobectomy and /or segmentectomies 6 with primary pneumothorax, 10 with secondary pneumothorax, and four with penetrated or blunt thoracic traumas. Blood was obtained from femoral or brachial veins and 70-150 mis. Injected in chest tubes. Chest bottle was first lied 80cm higher than body levels. After 24 hours repositioned in normal levels, and patients were supervised. Via chest tube we injected blood 70-100ml.for young patients, and 100-150 ml for older patients into intra pleural space. There were no clamped chest tubes. There were no pain, respiratory distress, fever, or cough in pleurodesized patients. The only patient's complaint was local pain in femoral vein or brachial vein because blood sampling and blood obtaining, although there was no local visible complication as hematoma or bleeding. After 48 hours in 24 patients air leak ceased. In six patients because persistent air leak autologous blood pleurodesis repeated, two patients after 48hours"nair leak ceased, remaining four patients underwent for thoracotomies, success rate"nwas 86.6%."nConclusion: According above success rate we suggest autologous blood pleurodesis in patients with persistent air leak is a reliable, effective, and no complicated procedure for persistent air leaks.

  7. Pumping and leak detection system of the HL-2A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Zeng; Xu Yunxian; Fu Weidong

    2001-01-01

    The pumping system is a combination of 8 turbomolecular pumps with three stages pumping for HL-2A vacuum vessel, a total effective pumping speed at the vessel of 12 m 3 ·s -1 for nitrogen. The leak detection of element and vessel is performed with inspiration, case of leak detection and two mass spectrometry. The total leak rate of vessel is bellow 1 x 10 -5 Pa ·m 3 ·s -1 . The base pressure is 1 x 10 -5 Pa

  8. Timing tests: automatic valve closure for tritium leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanel, S.

    1976-01-01

    How fast can an automotive valve be closed after a tritium leak occurs in a system. Tests described found that a valve can be closed within fifteen seconds of leakage. In one practical example considered, this delay would limit loss of tritium from a plumbing leak in a tritium system to 1 1 / 4 g. The tests were made in a typical LLL air-flush hood in which a tritium handling system had been installed. Incidental observations suggest that further study be made of a possible leak-actuated recovery system for an entire tritium facility

  9. The pressure and leak tests in Atucha II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This work deals with the pressure and leak tests of the containment sphere in the Atucha II Nuclear Power Plant's reactor building. This sphere is a metallic container, made in highly resistant steel plate, that is, built for providing the plant with a biological and structural barrier, which -in turn- provides safety and environmental protection. The applicable rules for these tests establish that the containment erection must be complete and in equivalent conditions to those that will prevail during the NPP operation. Particularly, pressure tests were carried out for assessing the structural condition of the sphere, while the leak test is aimed at the detection of tentative leaks [es

  10. Evaluation of primary coolant leaks and assessment of detection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassette, P.; Giroux, C.; Roche, H.; Seveon, J.J.

    1984-11-01

    A review of French PWR situation concerning primary coolant leaks is presented, including a description of operating technical specifications, of the collecting system of primary coolant leakage into the containment and of the detection methods. It is mainly based on a compilation over three years, 1981 to 1983, of almost all occurred leaks, their natures, causes, consequences and methods used for their detection. By analysing these data it is possible to evaluate the efficiency of the primary coolant leak detection system and the problems raised by the compliance with the criteria defined in the operating technical specifications

  11. Evaluation of primary coolant leaks and assessment of detection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassette, P.; Giroux, C.; Roche, H.; Seveon, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the French PWR situation concerning primary coolant leaks is presented, including a description of operating technical specifications, of the collecting system of primary coolant leakage into the containment and of the detection methods. It is mainly based on a compilation over three years, 1981 to 1983, of almost all actual leaks, their natures, causes, consequences and methods used for their detection. By analysing these data it is possible to evaluate the efficiency of the primary coolant leak detection system and the problems raised by compliance with the criteria defined in the operating technical specifications

  12. Evaluation of methods to leak test sealed radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbeau, N.D.; Scott, C.K.

    1987-04-01

    The methods for the leak testing of sealed radiation sources were reviewed. One hundred and thirty-one equipment vendors were surveyed to identify commercially available leak test instruments. The equipment is summarized in tabular form by radiation type and detector type for easy reference. The radiation characteristics of the licensed sources were reviewed and summarized in a format that can be used to select the most suitable detection method. A test kit is proposed for use by inspectors when verifying a licensee's test procedures. The general elements of leak test procedures are discussed

  13. Experimental study on reflooding in advanced tight lattice PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, K.; Kodama, J.; Teramae, T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is related to the experimental study on the feasibility of core cooling by re-flooding in a large break loss of coolant accident (LOCA) for the advanced tight lattice pressurized water reactor (PWR). The tight lattice core design should be adopted to improve the conversion ratio. Major one of the key questions of such tight lattice core is the cooling capability under the re-flood condition in a large break LOCA. Forced feed bottom re-flooding experiments have been performed by use of a 4x4 triangular array rod bundle. The rod gap is 0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, or 1.5 mm. The measured peak temperature is below around 1273 K even in case of 1.0/0.5 mm rod gap. And, the evaluation based on the experimental results of rod temperatures and core pressure drop also shows that the core cooling under re-flooding condition is feasible. (author)

  14. A tightly-coupled domain-decomposition approach for highly nonlinear stochastic multiphysics systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taverniers, Søren; Tartakovsky, Daniel M., E-mail: dmt@ucsd.edu

    2017-02-01

    Multiphysics simulations often involve nonlinear components that are driven by internally generated or externally imposed random fluctuations. When used with a domain-decomposition (DD) algorithm, such components have to be coupled in a way that both accurately propagates the noise between the subdomains and lends itself to a stable and cost-effective temporal integration. We develop a conservative DD approach in which tight coupling is obtained by using a Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JfNK) method with a generalized minimum residual iterative linear solver. This strategy is tested on a coupled nonlinear diffusion system forced by a truncated Gaussian noise at the boundary. Enforcement of path-wise continuity of the state variable and its flux, as opposed to continuity in the mean, at interfaces between subdomains enables the DD algorithm to correctly propagate boundary fluctuations throughout the computational domain. Reliance on a single Newton iteration (explicit coupling), rather than on the fully converged JfNK (implicit) coupling, may increase the solution error by an order of magnitude. Increase in communication frequency between the DD components reduces the explicit coupling's error, but makes it less efficient than the implicit coupling at comparable error levels for all noise strengths considered. Finally, the DD algorithm with the implicit JfNK coupling resolves temporally-correlated fluctuations of the boundary noise when the correlation time of the latter exceeds some multiple of an appropriately defined characteristic diffusion time.

  15. Acoustic Leak Detection under Micro and Small Water Steam Leaks into Sodium for a Protection of the SFR Steam Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae-Joon; Jeong, Ji-Young; Kim, Jong-Man; Kim, Byung-Ho; Hahn, Do-Hee; Yugay, Valeriy S.

    2008-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of water in a sodium leak noise spectrum formation related with a leak noise attenuation and absorption, and at various rates of water into a sodium leak, smaller than 1.0 g/s, are presented. We focused on studying the micro leak dynamics with an increasing rate of water into sodium owing to a self-development from 0.005 till 0.27 g/s. Conditions and ranges for the existence of bubbling and jetting modes in a water steam outflow into circulating sodium through an injector device, for simulating a defect in a wall of a heat-transmitting tube of a sodium water steam generator were determined. On the basis of the experimental leak noise data the simple dependency of an acoustic signal level from the rate of a micro and small leak at different frequency bands is presented to understand the principal analysis for the development of an acoustic leak detection methodology used in a K- 600 steam generator, with the operational experiences for the noise analysis and measurements in BN-600

  16. FY2017 status report: Model 9975 O-ring fixture long-term leak performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-07-27

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT and GLT-S O-rings used in the Model 9975 shipping package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. One approach has been to periodically evaluate the leak performance of O-rings being aged in mock-up 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) at elevated temperature. Other methods such as compression-stress relaxation (CSR) tests and field surveillance are also on-going to evaluate O-ring behavior. Seventy tests using PCV mock-ups with GLT O-rings were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they continue to meet the leak-tightness criterion defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Due to material substitution, a smaller test matrix with fourteen additional tests was initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF. Leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 ºF and higher temperatures, and in 8 fixtures aging at 300 ºF. The 300 °F GLT O-ring fixtures failed after 2.8 to 5.7 years at temperature. The remaining GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 ºF were retired from testing following more than 5 years at temperature without failure. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 ºF for 9 to 10.5 years, or in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 270 ºF for 5.7 years. These aging temperatures bound O-ring temperatures anticipated during normal storage in K-Area Complex (KAC). Leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 300 ºF and above. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 and 250 ºF for 6.9 to 7.5 years. Data from the O-ring fixtures are generally consistent with results from compression stress relaxation testing, and provide confidence in the predictive models based on those results

  17. Leak detection device on flange surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanai, Koi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the response to fine leakage thereby enabling to leakage detection at high sensitivity, by detecting the humidity by the use of an inert dry gas. Constitution: Annular grooves are coaxially engraved to a flange and an annular water channel groove is also engraved between each of the annular grooves. Dry nitrogen flown out is blown along the circumferential direction of the water channel grooves, turned there around and then released from the end of the pipeway. If there is any water leakage, the dry nitrogen absorbs leaked water to be wettened and then reach a humidity sensor. The sensor detects the humidity in the nitrogen and delivers an output into a signal processing circuit. The processing circuit judges the absence or presence of the leakage in accordance with the detected humidity to generate an alarm signal. The time required for the blown out dry nitrogen, which turn around the water channel groove and enter the sensor, is about several minutes and the device shows excellent response even for minute leakage. (Yoshino, Y.)

  18. Numerical simulation of flow behavior in tight lattice rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yiqi; Yang Yanhua; Gu Hanyang; Cheng Xu; Song Xiaoming; Wang Xiaojun

    2009-01-01

    The Numerical investigation is performed on the air turbulent flow in triangular rod bundle array. Based on the experimental data, the eddy viscosity turbulent model and the Reynold stress turbulent model are evaluated to simulate the flow behavior in the tight lattice. The results show that SSG Reynolds Stress Model has shown superior predictive performance than other Reynolds-stress models, which indicates that the simulation of the anisotropy of the turbulence is significant in the tight lattice. The result with different Reynolds number and geometry shows that the magnitude of the secondary flow is almost independent of the Reynolds number, but it increases with the decrease of the P/D. (authors)

  19. Caveolin1 Is Required for Th1 Cell Infiltration, but Not Tight Junction Remodeling, at the Blood-Brain Barrier in Autoimmune Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Lutz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lymphocytes cross vascular boundaries via either disrupted tight junctions (TJs or caveolae to induce tissue inflammation. In the CNS, Th17 lymphocytes cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB before Th1 cells; yet this differential crossing is poorly understood. We have used intravital two-photon imaging of the spinal cord in wild-type and caveolae-deficient mice with fluorescently labeled endothelial tight junctions to determine how tight junction remodeling and caveolae regulate CNS entry of lymphocytes during the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model for multiple sclerosis. We find that dynamic tight junction remodeling occurs early in EAE but does not depend upon caveolar transport. Moreover, Th1, but not Th17, lymphocytes are significantly reduced in the inflamed CNS of mice lacking caveolae. Therefore, tight junction remodeling facilitates Th17 migration across the BBB, whereas caveolae promote Th1 entry into the CNS. Moreover, therapies that target both tight junction degradation and caveolar transcytosis may limit lymphocyte infiltration during inflammation.

  20. Plasmonic leak-free focusing lens under radially polarized illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaowei; Tan, Qiaofeng; Bai, Benfeng; Jin, Guofan

    2010-01-01

    A plasmonic leak-free focusing lens with two asymmetric concentric ring slits under radially polarized illumination is proposed. Each ring slit in the plasmonic lens is designed to generate surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) with a relative initial phase controlled by the ring slit parameters. Through mutual interference of the SPPs with different phases excited by the two concentric ring slits at the output metal–dielectric interface, the field intensity towards the center of the focusing lens can be enhanced while that leaking to the counter-focus direction is effectively suppressed. The optimal parameters of the plasmonic leak-free lens are theoretically obtained by satisfying the above condition and its focusing performance is demonstrated by numerical simulation. Furthermore, a plasmonic leak-free lens with multiple double-slit groups is proposed and discussed, which exhibits a higher energy density at the focusing spot of the output interface

  1. Water leak detection in steam generator of SUPER PHENIX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunet, M.; Garnaud, P.; Ghaleb, D.; Kong, N.

    1988-01-01

    With the intent of detecting water leaks inside steam generators, we developed a third system, called acoustic detector, to complement hydrogen detectors and rupture disks (burst disks). The role of the acoustic system is to enable rapid intervention in the event of a leak growing rapidly which could rupture neighbouring tubes. In such a case, the detectable flow rate of the leak varies from a few tens of g/s to a few hundred g/s. At the SUPER PHENIX, three teams work in [20-100 kHz] and CEA/STA* [50-300 kHz]. The simulation of water leaks in the steam generator by the argon injections performed to date at 50% of the rated power has shown promising results. An anomaly in the evolution of the background noise at more than 50% loading of one of the two instrumented steam generators would make difficult any extrapolation to full power behaviour. (author)

  2. The world is polluted with leaked cyber data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burke, Ivan D

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Data breaches are becoming more common and numerous every day, where huge amount of data (corporate and personal) are leaked more frequently than ever. Corporate responses to data breaches are insufficient, when commonly remediation is minimal...

  3. Analysis of Bracket Assembly for Portable Leak Detector Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZIADA, H.H.

    1999-01-01

    This Supporting Document Presents Structural and Stress Analysis of a Portable Leak Detector Station for Tank Farms. The results show that the bracket assembly meets the requirements for dead load and natural phenomena hazards loads (seismic and wind)

  4. Leaking Underground Tanks in Rhode Island; LUSTs12

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — This dataset shows the location of storage tanks and associated piping used for petroleum and certain hazardous substances that have experienced leaks as determined...

  5. Anastomotic leak after oesophagectomy and stent implantation: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Kanatas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anastomotic leaks following oesophageal cancer resection have a high mortality. Stents have an established position in the palliation of dysphagia due to malignancy and in treating malignant perforation or fistula. They are increasingly used for benign conditions such as spontaneous oesophageal perforation with encouraging results. In this systematic review we examine the available evidence and attempt to define the role of stents in the management of oesophageal anastomotic leaks after resection for cancer. It is evident from the review that plastic- and metal-covered stents are an effective strategy for the treatment of anastomotic leaks. Vigilance is required as complications such as stent migration and incomplete sealing are not uncommon. Further clinical studies with greater methodological rigor in terms of sample size and study design may confirm that stents have an important contribution to make in the management of oesophageal anastomotic leak.

  6. Tube tightness survey during Phenix steam generator operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambillard, E.

    1976-01-01

    Phenix steam generators are once-through vessels with single-wall heat-exchange tubes. This design means that any leakage of water into the sodium must be detected as quickly as possible so that the installation can be shut down before extensive damage occurs. The detection of water leaks in Phenix steam generators is based on measurement of the concentration in the sodium, of hydrogen produced by the sodium-water reaction. Since the various modules--evaporators, superheaters, and reheaters--have no free sodium surfaces, detection of hydrogen in argon is not used in Phenix steam generators. The measurement systems employ a probe made of nickel tubes 0.3 mm thick. Hydrogen in the sodium diffuses into a chamber kept under vacuum by an ion pump. The hydrogen pressure in the chamber is measured by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The nine measurement systems (three per steam generator) are calibrated by injecting hydrogen into the sodium of the secondary circuits. The data-processing computer calculates the hydrogen concentration in the sodium from the spectrometer signals and the probe temperatures, which are not regulated in Phenix; it generates instructions that enable the operator to act if a leak appears. So far, no leaks have been detected. These systems also make it possible to determine rates of hydrogen diffusion caused by corrosion of the steel walls on the water side

  7. Assessment of the Density Functional Tight Binding Method for Protic Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addicoat, Matthew A; Stefanovic, Ryan; Webber, Grant B; Atkin, Rob; Page, Alister J

    2014-10-14

    Density functional tight binding (DFTB), which is ∼100-1000 times faster than full density functional theory (DFT), has been used to simulate the structure and properties of protic ionic liquid (IL) ions, clusters of ions and the bulk liquid. Proton affinities for a wide range of IL cations and anions determined using DFTB generally reproduce G3B3 values to within 5-10 kcal/mol. The structures and thermodynamic stabilities of n -alkyl ammonium nitrate clusters (up to 450 quantum chemical atoms) predicted with DFTB are in excellent agreement with those determined using DFT. The IL bulk structure simulated using DFTB with periodic boundary conditions is in excellent agreement with published neutron diffraction data.

  8. Relaxed and partially relaxed magnetic equilibria in tight-aspect-ratio tori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browning, P.K.; Clegg, J.R.; Duck, R.C.; Rusbridge, M.G.

    1993-01-01

    Force-free equilibrium magnetic fields in tight-aspect-ratio toroidal configurations are investigated. The study is mainly directed to modelling field configurations in the 'rodomak', a modification to the SPHEX gun-injected spheromak in which a current-carrying rod is inserted along the geometric axis. A family of analytical relaxed states (∇ x B = μB, μ constant) is presented for a torus of rectangular cross section, with boundary conditions allowing for flux embedded in the walls, representing the gun. Numerically calculated fields in SPHEX geometry, with μ profiles relevant to the driven phase of operation, are also given. The dependence of the field configurations and global quantities such as energy, helicity and toroidal current on the controlling parameters (gun flux, gun current and rod current) and geometry is discussed. (author)

  9. Rio Vista gas leak study: Belleaire Gas Field, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkey, P.L.

    1992-08-01

    The Rio Vista gas leak study evaluated methods for remotely sensing gas leaks from buried pipelines and developed methods to elucidate methane transport and microbial oxidation in soils. Remote-sensing methods were evaluated by singing gas leaks along an abandoned Pacific Gas and Electric (PG ampersand E) gas field collection line in northern California and applying surface-based and airborne remote-sensing techniques in the field, including thermal imaging, laser imaging, and multispectral imagery. The remote-sensing techniques exhibited limitations in range and in their ability to correlate with ground truth data. To elucidate methane transport and microbial oxidation in soils, a study of a controlled leak permitted field testing of methods so that such processes could be monitored and evaluated. Monitoring and evaluation techniques included (1) field measurement of soil-gas concentrations, temperatures, and pressures; (2) laboratory measurement of soil physical/chemical properties and activity of methane-oxidizing microorganisms by means of field samples; and (3) development of a preliminary numerical analysis technique for combined soil-gas transport/methane oxidation. Soil-gas concentrations at various depths responded rapidly to the high rate of gas leakage. The number of methane-oxidizing microorganisms in site soils rapidly increased when the gas leak was initiated and decreased after the leak was terminated. The preliminary field, laboratory, and numerical analysis techniques tested for this study of a controlled gas leak could be successfully applied to future studies of gas leaks. Because soil-gas movement is rapid and temporally variable, the use of several complementary techniques that permit generalization of site-specific results is favored

  10. Space Shuttle RCS Oxidizer Leak Repair for STS-26

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delventhal, R. A.; Faget, N. M.

    1989-01-01

    Following propellant loading of the Space Shuttle's reaction control system (RCS) for mission STS 26, an oxidizer leak was detected in the left orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod, where the RCS is located. Subsequent investigation determined that the leak was isolated at a mechanical Dynatube fitting near the RCS nitrogen tetroxide tank. An intense effort was initiated to design, fabricate, and qualify a sealing device to stop the oxidizer leak externally so that the Space Shuttle launch could proceed. It was discovered that sealing devices called clamshells were widely used throughout the petrochemical and power generation industries to stop leaks developed in large diameter pipes which carry steam or other hazardous fluids. These clamshells are available in different diameters and strengths and are placed around the pipe at the location of the leak. A sealing compound is then injected under high pressure into the clamshell to stop the leak. This technology was scaled down and applied to the problem of stopping the leak on the Orbiter, which was on a half-inch diameter line in a nearly inaccessible location. Many obstacles had to be overcome such as determining that the sealing material would be compatible with the nitrogen tetroxide and ensuring that the clamshell would actually fit around the Dynatube fitting without interfering with other lines which were in close proximity. The effort at the NASA Johnson Space Center included materials compatibility testing of several sealants, design of a clamshell to fit in the confined compartment, and manufacture and qualification of the flight hardware. A clamshell was successfully placed around the Dynatube fitting on the Orbiter and the oxidizer leak was terminated. Then it was decided to apply this technology further and design clamshells for other mechanical fittings onboard the Orbiter and develop sealing compounds which will be compatible with fuels such as monomethyl hydrazine (MMH). The potential exists for

  11. Tig welding produces leak-proof joints for nuclear application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    A pulsed welding apparatus using a Hobart Cyber-tig power source with programmed pulsed current has been developed to produce leak-free welds required for a new hermetically sealed leak-free valve for use in nuclear power plants. Advantages of the technique are precise control over travel speed and filler metal addition allowing the weld to be repeated with precision. (R.A.)

  12. Method for fuel element leak detection in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, U.

    1983-01-01

    The method is aimed at detecting fuel element leaks during reactor operation. It is based on neutron flux measurements at many points in the core, using at least two detectors at a time. The detectors must be arranged in the direction of the coolant flow. Values obtained from periodic measurements are compared with threshold values. The location of fuel element leaks is determined from those values exceeding the threshold of individual detectors

  13. EBR-II water-to-sodium leak detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrightson, M.M.; McKinley, K.; Ruther, W.E.; Holmes, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    The water-to-sodium leak detection system installed at EBR-II in April, 1975, is described in detail. Topics covered include operational characteristics, maintenance problems, alarm functions, background hydrogen level data, and future plans for refinements to the system. Particular emphasis is given to the failures of eight of the ten leak detectors due to sodium-to-vacuum leakage, and the program anticipated for complete recovery of the system

  14. Identification of sewage leaks by active remote-sensing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldshleger, Naftaly; Basson, Uri

    2016-04-01

    The increasing length of sewage pipelines, and concomitant risk of leaks due to urban and industrial growth and development is exposing the surrounding land to contamination risk and environmental harm. It is therefore important to locate such leaks in a timely manner, to minimize the damage. Advances in active remote sensing Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Frequency Domain Electromagnetic (FDEM) technologies was used to identify leaking potentially responsible for pollution and to identify minor spills before they cause widespread damage. This study focused on the development of these electromagnetic methods to replace conventional acoustic methods for the identification of leaks along sewage pipes. Electromagnetic methods provide an additional advantage in that they allow mapping of the fluid-transport system in the subsurface. Leak-detection systems using GPR and FDEM are not limited to large amounts of water, but enable detecting leaks of tens of liters per hour, because they can locate increases in environmental moisture content of only a few percentage along the pipes. The importance and uniqueness of this research lies in the development of practical tools to provide a snapshot and monitoring of the spatial changes in soil moisture content up to depths of about 3-4 m, in open and paved areas, at relatively low cost, in real time or close to real time. Spatial measurements performed using GPR and FDEM systems allow monitoring many tens of thousands of measurement points per hectare, thus providing a picture of the spatial situation along pipelines and the surrounding. The main purpose of this study was to develop a method for detecting sewage leaks using the above-proposed geophysical methods, since their contaminants can severely affect public health. We focused on identifying, locating and characterizing such leaks in sewage pipes in residential and industrial areas.

  15. FUZZY INFERENCE BASED LEAK ESTIMATION IN WATER PIPELINES SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    N. Lavanya; G. Anand; S. Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Pipeline networks are the most widely used mode for transporting fluids and gases around the world. Leakage in this pipeline causes harmful effects when the flowing fluid/gas is hazardous. Hence the detection of leak becomes essential to avoid/minimize such undesirable effects. This paper presents the leak detection by spectral analysis methods in a laboratory pipeline system. Transient in the pressure signal in the pipeline is created by opening and closing the exit valve. These pressure var...

  16. Isotopic method of leaks detection in oil pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Listwam, W.; Mottl, J.

    1974-01-01

    Isotopic method of leaks detection in oil pipelines of diameter 200-800 mm is described. Tracer is injected into pipeline in the form of CH 3 Br 82 . After few hours one or two detectors are passed through pipeline to detect leaks. Detector set consists of scintillation radiometer with Na I/Tl crystal, electronic blecks with one-channel analyzer, recorder and storage batteries. Detector set is built on integrated circuits. (Z.M.)

  17. Operational tank leak detection and minimization during retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzel, J.S.

    1996-03-01

    This report evaluates the activities associated with the retrieval of wastes from the single-shell tanks proposed under the initial Single-Shell Tank Retrieval System. This report focuses on minimizing leakage during retrieval by using effective leak detection and mitigating actions. After reviewing the historical data available on single-shell leakage, and evaluating current leak detection technology, this report concludes that the only currently available leak detection method which can function within the most probable leakage range is the mass balance system. If utilized after each sluicing campaign, this method should allow detection at a leakage value well below the leakage value where significant health effects occur which is calculated for each tank. Furthermore, this report concludes that the planned sequence or sluicing activities will serve to further minimize the probability and volume of leaks by keeping liquid away from areas with the greatest potential for leaking. Finally, this report identifies a series of operational responses which when used in conjunction with the recommended sluicing sequence and leak detection methods will minimize worker exposure and environmental safety health risks

  18. Leak test fixture and method for using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Lawrence S.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided which are especially useful for leak testing seams such as an end closure or joint in an article. The test does not require an enclosed pressurized volume within the article or joint section to be leak checked. A flexible impervious membrane is disposed over an area of the seamed surfaces to be leak checked and sealed around the outer edges. A preselected vacuum is applied through an opening in the membrane to evacuate the area between the membrane and the surface being leak checked to essentially collapse the membrane to conform to the article surface or joined adjacent surfaces. A pressure differential is concentrated at the seam bounded by the membrane and only the seam experiences a pressure differential as air or helium molecules are drawn into the vacuum system through a leak in the seam. A helium detector may be placed in a vacuum exhaust line from the membrane to detect the helium. Alternatively, the vacuum system may be isolated at a preselected pressure and leaks may be detected by a subsequent pressure increase in the vacuum system.

  19. Gas Leak Detection by Dilution of Atmospheric Oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Lambrecht

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas leak detection is an important issue in infrastructure monitoring and industrial production. In this context, infrared (IR absorption spectroscopy is a major measurement method. It can be applied in an extractive or remote detection scheme. Tunable laser spectroscopy (TLS instruments are able to detect CH4 leaks with column densities below 10 ppm·m from a distance of 30 m in less than a second. However, leak detection of non-IR absorbing gases such as N2 is not possible in this manner. Due to the fact that any leaking gas displaces or dilutes the surrounding background gas, an indirect detection is still possible. It is shown by sensitive TLS measurements of the ambient background concentration of O2 that N2 leaks can be localized with extractive and standoff methods for distances below 1 m. Minimum leak rates of 0.1 mbar·L/s were determined. Flow simulations confirm that the leakage gas typically effuses in a narrow jet. The sensitivity is mainly determined by ambient flow conditions. Compared to TLS detection of CH4 at 1651 nm, the indirect method using O2 at 761 nm is experimentally found to be less sensitive by a factor of 100. However, the well-established TLS of O2 may become a universal tool for rapid leakage screening of vessels that contain unknown or inexpensive gases, such as N2.

  20. Depressurization as a means of leak checking large vacuum vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callis, R.W.; Langhorn, A.; Petersen, P.I.; Ward, C.; Wesley, J.

    1985-01-01

    A common problem associated with large vacuum vessels used in magnetic confinement fusion experiments is that leak checking is hampered by the inaccessibility to most of the vacuum vessel surface. This inaccessibility is caused by the close proximity of magnetic coils, diagnostics and, for those vessels that are baked, the need to completely surround the vessel with a thermal insulation blanket. These obstructions reduce the effectiveness of the standard leak checking method of using a mass spectrometer and spraying a search gas such as helium on the vessel exterior. Even when the presence of helium is detected, its entry point into the vessel cannot always be pinpointed. This paper will describe a method of overcoming this problem. By slightly depressurizing the vessel, an influx of helium through the leak is created. The leak site can then be identified by personnel within the vessel using standard sniffing procedures. There are two conditions which make this method of leak checking practical. First, the vessel need only be depressurized 2 psi, thus allowing personnel inside to perform the sniffing operation. Second, the sniffing probe used (Leybold--Heraus ''Quick Test'') could detect a change in helium concentration as small as 100 ppb, which allows for faster scanning of the vessel inferior. Use of this technique to find an elusive 10 -3 Torrxl/s leak in the Doublet III tokamak vacuum vessel will be presented

  1. Measurement of Submerged Oil/Gas Leaks using ROV Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Franklin; de Vera, Giorgio; Lee, Kenneth; Savas, Ömer

    2013-11-01

    Drilling for oil or gas in the Gulf of Mexico is increasing rapidly at depths up to three miles. The National Commission on the Deepwater Horizon Oil Leak concluded that inaccurate estimates of the leak rate from the Deepwater Horizon caused an inadequate response and attempts to cap the leak to fail. The first response to a submerged oil/gas leak will be to send a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) down to view the leak. During the response to the Deepwater Horizon crisis, the authors Savas and Shaffer were members of the Flow Rate Technical Group's Plume Team who used ROV video to develop the FRTG's first official estimates of the oil leak rate. Savas and Shaffer developed an approach using the larger, faster jet features (e.g., turbulent eddies, vortices, entrained particles) in the near-field developing zone to measure discharge rates. The authors have since used the Berkeley Tow Tank to test this approach on submerged dye-colored water jets and compressed air jets. Image Correlation Velocimetry has been applied to measure the velocity of visible features. Results from tests in the Berkeley Tow Tank and submerged oil jets in the OHMSETT facility will be presented.

  2. Occurrence of occult CSF leaks during standard FESS procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, S; Kugler, A; Probst, E; Epprecht, L; Stadler, R S; Holzmann, D; Soyka, M B

    2018-03-18

    To determine the incidence of occult cerebrospinal fluid leaks (CSF) after functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) and to evaluate the diagnostic performance of beta2-transferrin in blood-contaminated conditions. Prospective cohort study. An analysis of 57 intraoperative samples using hydrogel 6 beta2-transferrin assay after FESS was undertaken. In case of CSF positive samples and continuing rhinorrhea, reanalysis after more than 1 year was conducted. In-vivo analysis of a primary spontaneous CSF leak sample took place to verify difficulties in detecting beta2-transferrin in blood-contaminated settings. Own titrations were performed to evaluate detection limits of CSF by beta2-transferrin and beta-trace protein assays in these settings. An incidence of 13% for occult CSF leaks after FESS was found. In blood-contaminated conditions, routine beta2-transferrin assays showed low sensitivity. In over 1 year follow-up, all samples were negative for CSF and none of them developed clinical relevant CSF leaks or meningitis. Occult and clinically irrelevant CSF leaks do occur in a significant proportion of patients during and shortly after FESS. Intra- and postoperatively, routine beta2-transferrin assays show low sensitivity. They should not be used in these settings. The clinical course of patients with occult CSF leaks indicated possibility of an uneventful follow-up.

  3. Detection of pressure tube leaks relying on moisture beetles only

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenchington, J.M.; Choi, A.; Jin, Y.

    2004-01-01

    A major decision was made for Pickering NGS A Annulus Gas System (ACS) that detection of a pressure tube (PT) leak should be achieved by using only moisture beetles and that dew point monitors would provide 'early warning' without status to shut down the reactor. Experience with Unit 3 has shown that dew point monitoring of pressure tube leaks was particularly subject to gas leaks and surface adsorption effects. Unit 4 was the first one to be converted during the full scale pressure tube replacement programme. Because of the fundamental change in design philosophy, moisture injection tests were carried out during commissioning to demonstrate that performance matched design. In particular it was necessary to show that leak before break (LBB) would be achieved if a leak occurred in the limiting string. Units 1 and 3 have since been converted. No decision has been taken to convert Pickering B units as gas leaks are small and no significant adsorption effects are anticipated. Hence dew point monitoring will not be impaired. (author)

  4. Influence of Crack Morphology on Leak Before Break Margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weilin Zang

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the project is to evaluate the deterministic LBB-margins for different pipe systems in a Swedish PWR-plant and using different crack morphology parameters. Results: - The influence of crack morphology on Leak Before Break (LBB) margins is studied. The subject of the report is a number of LBB-submittals to SKI where deterministic LBB-margins are reported. These submittals typically uses a surface roughness of 0.0762 mm (300 microinch) and number of turns equal to zero and an in-house code for the leak rate evaluations. The present report has shown that these conditions give the largest LBB-margins both in terms of the quotient between the critical crack length and the leakage crack size and for the leak rate margin. - Crack morphology parameters have a strong influence on the leak rate evaluations. Using the SQUIRT code and more recent recommendations for crack morphology parameters, it is shown that in many cases the evaluated margins, using 1 gpm as the reference leak rate detection limit, are below the safety factor of 2 on crack size and 10 on leak rate, which is generally required for LBB approval. - The effect of including weld residual stresses on the LBB margins is also investigated. It is shown that for the two examples studied, weld residual stresses were important for the small diameter thin wall pipe whereas it was negligible for the large diameter thick wall pipe which had a self-balanced weld residual stress distribution

  5. FUZZY INFERENCE BASED LEAK ESTIMATION IN WATER PIPELINES SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lavanya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pipeline networks are the most widely used mode for transporting fluids and gases around the world. Leakage in this pipeline causes harmful effects when the flowing fluid/gas is hazardous. Hence the detection of leak becomes essential to avoid/minimize such undesirable effects. This paper presents the leak detection by spectral analysis methods in a laboratory pipeline system. Transient in the pressure signal in the pipeline is created by opening and closing the exit valve. These pressure variations are captured and power spectrum is obtained by using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT method and Filter Diagonalization Method (FDM. The leaks at various positions are simulated and located using these methods and the results are compared. In order to determine the quantity of leak a 2 × 1 fuzzy inference system is created using the upstream and downstream pressure as input and the leak size as the output. Thus a complete leak detection, localization and quantification are done by using only the pressure variations in the pipeline.

  6. Local Leak Detection and Health Monitoring of Pressurized Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt; Witherow, William; Korman, Valentin; Sinko, John; Hendrickson, Adam

    2011-01-01

    An optical gas-detection sensor safely monitors pressurized systems (such as cryogenic tanks) and distribution systems for leaks. This sensor system is a fiber-coupled, solid optical body interferometer that allows for the miniaturized sensing element of the device to be placed in the smallest of recesses, and measures a wide range of gas species and densities (leaks). The deflection of the fringe pattern is detected and recorded to yield the time-varying gas density in the gap. This technology can be used by manufacturers or storage facilities with toxic, hazardous, or explosive gases. The approach is to monitor the change in the index of refraction associated with low-level gas leaks into a vacuum environment. The completion of this work will provide NASA with an enabling capability to detect gas system leaks in space, and to verify that pressurized systems are in a safe (i.e. non-leaking) condition during manned docking and transit operations. By recording the output of the sensor, a time-history of the leak can be constructed to indicate its severity. Project risk is mitigated by having several interferometric geometries and detection techniques available, each potentially leveraging hardware and lessons learned to enhance detectability.

  7. 40 CFR 63.1086 - How must I monitor for leaks to cooling water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... monitor for leaks to cooling water? You must monitor for leaks to cooling water by monitoring each heat... system so that the cooling water flow rate is 51,031 liters per minute or less so that a leak of 3.06 kg... detected a leak. (b) Individual heat exchangers. Monitor the cooling water at the entrance and exit of each...

  8. 40 CFR 63.1087 - What actions must I take if a leak is detected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What actions must I take if a leak is... leak is detected? If a leak is detected, you must comply with the requirements in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section unless repair is delayed according to § 63.1088. (a) Repair the leak as soon as...

  9. Tight Temporal Bounds for Dataflow Applications Mapped onto Shared Resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alizadeh Ara, H.; Geilen, M.; Basten, T.; Behrouzian, A.R.B.; Hendriks, M.; Goswami, D.

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis method that provides tight temporal bounds for applications modeled by Synchronous Dataflow Graphs and mapped to shared resources. We consider the resource sharing effects on the temporal behaviour of the application by embedding worst case resource availability curves in the

  10. Ultra-Tightly Coupled GNSS/INS for small UAVs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Daniel; Jakobsen, Jakob; Knudsen, Per

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes an ultra-tight integration of a Global Navigation Satellite System ( GNSS) receiver and an Inertial Navigation System ( INS) for small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles ( UAVs). The system is based on a low-cost and low-weight GNSS Intermediate Frequency ( IF) sampler which has been...

  11. Management of Small Urethrocutaneous Fistula by Tight Ligation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After identifying the fistulous opening, the fistula tract was circumferentially and meticulously dissected ,then the dissected tract was lifted up and the base was ligated tightly with 5/0 vicryl, the external epithelium of the dissected tract was fulgurated with the diathermy, then a second layer of local soft tissue was secured over ...

  12. A characterization of tight and dual generalized translation invariant frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Mads Sielemann; Lemvig, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    such systems form tight frames, and when two GTI Bessel systems form dual frames for L2(G). In particular, this offers a unified approach to the theory of discrete and continuous frames and, e.g., yields well known results for discrete and continuous Gabor and wavelet systems....

  13. Envelopes of Sets of Measures, Tightness, and Markov Control Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, J.; Hernandez-Lerma, O.

    1999-01-01

    We introduce upper and lower envelopes for sets of measures on an arbitrary topological space, which are then used to give a tightness criterion. These concepts are applied to show the existence of optimal policies for a class of Markov control processes

  14. Local thermal-hydraulic behaviour in tight 7-rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, X.; Yu, Y.Q.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced water-cooled reactor concepts with tight lattices have been proposed worldwide to improve the fuel utilization and the economic competitiveness. In the present work, experimental investigations were performed on thermal-hydraulic behaviour in tight hexagonal 7-rod bundles under both single-phase and two-phase conditions. Freon-12 was used as working fluid due to its convenient operating parameters. Tests were carried out under both single-phase and two-phase flow conditions. Rod surface temperatures are measured at a fixed axial elevation and in various circumferential positions. Test data with different radial power distributions are analyzed. Measured surface temperatures of unheated rods are used for the assessment of and comparison with numerical codes. In addition, numerical simulation using sub-channel analysis code MATRA and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code ANSYS-10 is carried out to understand the experimental data and to assess the validity of these codes in the prediction of flow and heat transfer behaviour in tight rod bundle geometries. Numerical results are compared with experimental data. A good agreement between the measured temperatures on the unheated rod surface and the CFD calculation is obtained. Both sub-channel analysis and CFD calculation indicates that the turbulent mixing in the tight rod bundle is significantly stronger than that computed with a well established correlation.

  15. Trapping of Rydberg atoms in tight magnetic microtraps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boetes, A.Q.G.; Skannrup, R.V.; Naber, J.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.; Spreeuw, R.J.C.

    2018-01-01

    We explore the possibility to trap Rydberg atoms in tightly confining magnetic microtraps. The trapping frequencies for Rydberg atoms are expected to be influenced strongly by magnetic-field gradients. We show that there are regimes where Rydberg atoms can be trapped. Moreover, we show that

  16. Dielectric constant of graphene-on-polarized substrate: A tight ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sivabrata Sahu

    Corresponding author. E-mail: gcr@iopb.res.in. Published online 24 June 2017. Abstract. We report here a microscopic tight-binding theoretical study of the dynamic dielectric response of graphene-on-polarizable substrate with impurity. The Hamiltonian consists of first, second and third nearest- neighbour electron hopping ...

  17. Dielectric constant of graphene-on-polarized substrate: A tight ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-06-24

    Jun 24, 2017 ... We report here a microscopic tight-binding theoretical study of the dynamic dielectric response of graphene-on-polarizable substrate with impurity. The Hamiltonian consists of first, second and third nearest neighbour electron hopping interactions besides doping and substrate-induced effects on graphene.

  18. Loosen up? Cultural tightness and national entrepreneurial activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harms, Rainer; Groen, Arend J.

    The level of entrepreneurship between countries differs consistently. A source of this variance lies in national culture differences. Recently, the cultural dimension “tightness” has been introduced in the literature. Tightness refers to the degree to which a nation has strong norms and a low

  19. Sit-Tight Syndrome and Tenure Elongation in African Politics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The post-independence politics of African countries has been dominated by the phenomenon of sit-tight African heads of state and government who had acceeded to office by election or coup d'etat. This paper examines this recurring problem in post-independence African politics by examining its general and specific ...

  20. The pump and leak steady-state concept with a variety of regulated leak pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, E K

    2001-01-01

    . This had a major influence on my later description of a swelling-activated Cl- conductance. (ii) The pump-leak steady-state concept for cell volume control was introduced by Krogh in 1946, but it was developed in detail by Leaf and Ussing in 1959. This concept was the basis for me and others, when we later...... found that the passive ion leaks play an active role in cell volume control. (iii) The use of isotopes and Ussing's famous flux ratio equation provided an ingenious instrument for distinguishing the various transport routes. We used this to identify the Na,K,2Cl cotransport system as accounting...... for maintaining a [Cl-]i in the EATC far above thermodynamic equilibrium, as well as accounting for the ion uptake during a regulatory volume increase (RVI) in EATC, similar to what Ussing had found in frog skin. (iv) Short-circuit current setup in the Ussing chamber is still used in laboratories around the world...

  1. Active acoustic leak detection for LMFBR steam generators. Pt. 7. Potential for small leak detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo

    1998-01-01

    In order to prevent the expansion of tube damage and to maintain structural integrity in the steam generators (SGs) of fast breeder reactors (FBR), it is necessary to detect precisely and immediately the leakage of water from heat transfer tubes. Therefore, an active acoustic method, which detects the sound attenuation due to bubbles generated in the sodium-water reactions, is being developed. Previous studies have revealed that the active acoustic method can detect bubbles of 10 l/s (equivalence water leak rate about 10 g/s) within 10 seconds in practical steam generators. In order to prevent the expansion of damage to neighboring tubes, however, it is necessary to detect smaller leakage of water from heat transfer tubes. In this study, in order to evaluate the detection sensitivity of the active method, the signal processing methods for emitter and receiver sound and the detection method for leakage within 1 g/s are investigated experimentally, using an SG full-sector model that simulates the actual SGs. A typical result shows that detection of 0.4 l/s air bubbles (equivalent water leak rate about 0.4 g/s) takes about 80 seconds, which is shorter than the propagation time of damage to neighboring tubes. (author)

  2. Leak before break piping evaluation diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabi, R.J.; Peck, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    Traditionally Leak Before Break (LBB) has been applied to the evaluation of piping in existing nuclear plants. This paper presents a simple method for evaluating piping systems for LBB during the design process. This method produces a piping evaluation diagram (PED) which defines the LBB requirements to the piping designer for use during the design process. Several sets of LBB analyses are performed for each different pipe size and material considered in the LBB application. The results of this method are independent of the actual pipe routing. Two complete LBB evaluations are performed to determine the maximum allowable stability load, one evaluation for a low normal operating load, and the other evaluation for a high normal operating load. These normal operating loads span the typical loads for the particular system being evaluated. In developing the allowable loads, the appropriate LBB margins are included in the PED preparation. The resulting LBB solutions are plotted as a set of allowable curves for the maximum design basis load, such is the seismic load versus the normal operating load. Since the required margins are already accounted for in the LBB PED, the piping designer can use the diagram directly with the results of the piping analysis and determine immediately if the current piping arrangement passes LBB. Since the LBB PED is independent of pipe routing, changes to the piping system can be evaluated using the existing PED. For a particular application, all that remains is to confirm that the actual materials and pipe sizes assumed in creating the particular design are built into the plant

  3. The ISS 2B PVTCS Ammonia Leak: An Operational History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vareha, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the Photovoltaic Thermal Control System (PVTCS) for the International Space Station's 2B power channel began leaking ammonia at a rate of approximately 1.5lbm/year (out of a starting approximately 53lbm system ammonia mass). Initially, the operations strategy was "feed the leak," a strategy successfully put into action via Extra Vehicular Activity during the STS-134 mission. During this mission the system was topped off with ammonia piped over from a separate thermal control system. This recharge was to have allowed for continued power channel operation into 2014 or 2015, at which point another EVA would have been required. Without these periodic EVAs to refill the 2B coolant system, the channel would eventually leak enough fluid as to risk pump cavitation and system failure, resulting in the loss of the 2B power channel - the most critical of the Space Station's 8 power channels. In mid-2012, the leak rate increased to approximately 5lbm/year. Once discovered, an EVA was planned and executed within a 5 week timeframe to drastically alter the architecture of the PVTCS via connection to a dormant thermal control system not intended to be utilized as anything other than spare components. The purpose of this rerouting of the TCS was to increase system volume and to isolate the photovoltaic radiator, thought to be the likely leak source. This EVA was successfully executed on November 1st, 2012 and left the 2B PVTCS in a configuration where the system was now being adequately cooled via a totally different radiator than what the system was designed to utilize. Unfortunately, data monitoring over the next several months showed that the isolated radiator was not leaking, and the system itself continued to leak steadily until May 9th, 2013. It was on this day that the ISS crew noticed the visible presence of ammonia crystals escaping from the 2B channel's truss segment, signifying a rapid acceleration of the leak from 5lbm/year to 5lbm/day. Within 48 hours of the

  4. Leaks detection in the amplifier boxes of underwater cables; Detection de fuites dans les boitiers amplificateurs de cables sous-marins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, P

    1950-12-01

    The aim of this work is to detect leaks inside tight boxes which will be immersed in the bottom of the sea at a 4000 m depth. Radioactive sodium in the form of CO{sub 3}Na{sub 2} in aqueous solution is used as tracer. The method consists in placing the box inside a pressure cell filled up with the active solution and submitting the box to a pressure of 400 kg/cm{sup 2}. After washing with acetone and water, the activity of the box is measured. Any anomalous activity indicates the penetration of the active solution inside the box. (J.S.)

  5. Location estimation method of steam leak in pipeline using leakage area analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Se Oh; Jeon, Hyeong Seop; Son, Ki Sung; Park, Jong Won

    2016-01-01

    It is important to have a pipeline leak-detection system that determines the presence of a leak and quickly identifies its location. Current leak detection methods use a acoustic emission sensors, microphone arrays, and camera images. Recently, many researchers have been focusing on using cameras for detecting leaks. The advantage of this method is that it can survey a wide area and monitor a pipeline over a long distance. However, conventional methods using camera monitoring are unable to target an exact leak location. In this paper, we propose a method of detecting leak locations using leak-detection results combined with multi-frame analysis. The proposed method is verified by experiment

  6. Location estimation method of steam leak in pipeline using leakage area analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Se Oh; Jeon, Hyeong Seop; Son, Ki Sung [Sae An Engineering Corp., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Won [Dept. of Information Communications Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    It is important to have a pipeline leak-detection system that determines the presence of a leak and quickly identifies its location. Current leak detection methods use a acoustic emission sensors, microphone arrays, and camera images. Recently, many researchers have been focusing on using cameras for detecting leaks. The advantage of this method is that it can survey a wide area and monitor a pipeline over a long distance. However, conventional methods using camera monitoring are unable to target an exact leak location. In this paper, we propose a method of detecting leak locations using leak-detection results combined with multi-frame analysis. The proposed method is verified by experiment.

  7. Science of Water Leaks: Validated Theory for Moisture Flow in Microchannels and Nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wenwen; Fong, Nicole; Yin, Yongbai; Svehla, Martin; McKenzie, David R

    2015-10-27

    Water is ubiquitous; the science of its transport in micro- and nanochannels has applications in electronics, medicine, filtration, packaging, and earth and planetary science. Validated theory for water vapor and two-phase water flows is a "missing link"; completing it enables us to define and quantify flow in a set of four standard leak configurations with dimensions from the nanoscale to the microscale. Here we report the first measurements of water vapor flow rates through four silica microchannels as a function of humidity, including under conditions when air is present as a background gas. An important finding is that the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC) is strongly modified by surface layers of adsorbed water molecules, in agreement with previous work on the TMAC for nitrogen molecules impacting a silica surface in the presence of moisture. We measure enhanced flow rates for two-phase flows in silica microchannels driven by capillary filling. For the measurement of flows in nanochannels we use heavy water mass spectrometry. We construct the theory for the flow rates of the dominant modes of water transport through each of the four standard configurations and benchmark it against our new measurements in silica and against previously reported measurements for nanochannels in carbon nanotubes, carbon nanopipes, and porous alumina. The findings show that all behavior can be described by the four standard leak configurations and that measurements of leak behavior made using other molecules, such as helium, are not reliable. Single-phase water vapor flow is overestimated by a helium measurement, while two-phase flows are greatly underestimated for channels larger than 100 nm or for all channels when boundary slip applies, to an extent that depends on the slip length for the liquid-phase flows.

  8. Unconventional Tight Reservoirs Characterization with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, C. J. S.; Solatpour, R.; Kantzas, A.

    2017-12-01

    The increase in tight reservoir exploitation projects causes producing many papers each year on new, modern, and modified methods and techniques on estimating characteristics of these reservoirs. The most ambiguous of all basic reservoir property estimations deals with permeability. One of the logging methods that is advertised to predict permeability but is always met by skepticism is Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The ability of NMR to differentiate between bound and movable fluids and providing porosity increased the capability of NMR as a permeability prediction technique. This leads to a multitude of publications and the motivation of a review paper on this subject by Babadagli et al. (2002). The first part of this presentation is dedicated to an extensive review of the existing correlation models for NMR based estimates of tight reservoir permeability to update this topic. On the second part, the collected literature information is used to analyze new experimental data. The data are collected from tight reservoirs from Canada, the Middle East, and China. A case study is created to apply NMR measurement in the prediction of reservoir characterization parameters such as porosity, permeability, cut-offs, irreducible saturations etc. Moreover, permeability correlations are utilized to predict permeability. NMR experiments were conducted on water saturated cores. NMR T2 relaxation times were measured. NMR porosity, the geometric mean relaxation time (T2gm), Irreducible Bulk Volume (BVI), and Movable Bulk Volume (BVM) were calculated. The correlation coefficients were computed based on multiple regression analysis. Results are cross plots of NMR permeability versus the independently measured Klinkenberg corrected permeability. More complicated equations are discussed. Error analysis of models is presented and compared. This presentation is beneficial in understanding existing tight reservoir permeability models. The results can be used as a guide for choosing

  9. Engineering study of tank leaks related to hydraulic retrieval of sludge from tank 241-C-106

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, S.S.; Carlos, W.C.; Irwin, J.J.; Khaleel, R.; Kline, N.W.; Ludowise, J.D.; Marusich, R.M.; Rittman, P.D.

    1993-01-01

    This study evaluates hydraulic retrieval (sluicing) of the waste in single-shell tank 241-C-106 with respect to the likelihood of tank leaks, gross volumes of potential leaks, and their consequences. A description of hydraulic retrieval is developed to establish a baseline for the study. Leak models are developed based on postulated leak mechanisms to estimate the amount of waste that could potentially leak while sluicing. Transport models describe the movement of the waste constituents in the surrounding soil and groundwater after a leak occurs. Environmental impact and risk associated with tank leaks are evaluated. Transport of leaked material to the groundwater is found to be dependent on the rate of recharge of moisture in the soil for moderate-sized leaks. Providing a cover over the tank and surrounding area would eliminate the recharge. The bulk of any leaked material would remain in the vicinity of the tank for remedial action

  10. Analysis on signal properties due to concurrent leaks at two points in water supply pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Sup

    2015-01-01

    Intelligent leak detection is an essential component of a underground water supply pipeline network such as a smart water grid system. In this network, numerous leak detection sensors are needed to cover all of the pipelines in a specific area installed at specific regular distances. It is also necessary to determine the existence of any leaks and estimate its location within a short time after it occurs. In this study, the leak signal properties and feasibility of leak location detection were investigated when concurrent leaks occurred at two points in a pipeline. The straight distance between the two leak sensors in the 100A sized cast-iron pipeline was 315.6 m, and their signals were measured with one leak and two concurrent leaks. Each leak location was described after analyzing the frequency properties and cross-correlation of the measured signals.

  11. Analysis on signal properties due to concurrent leaks at two points in water supply pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Sup [Dept. of Embedded Systems Engineering, Incheon National University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Intelligent leak detection is an essential component of a underground water supply pipeline network such as a smart water grid system. In this network, numerous leak detection sensors are needed to cover all of the pipelines in a specific area installed at specific regular distances. It is also necessary to determine the existence of any leaks and estimate its location within a short time after it occurs. In this study, the leak signal properties and feasibility of leak location detection were investigated when concurrent leaks occurred at two points in a pipeline. The straight distance between the two leak sensors in the 100A sized cast-iron pipeline was 315.6 m, and their signals were measured with one leak and two concurrent leaks. Each leak location was described after analyzing the frequency properties and cross-correlation of the measured signals.

  12. A study on the evaluation of internal leak in valve using acoustic emission method(3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Guk; Lee, Wook Ryun; Park, Jong Hyuck; Kim, Kwang Hong

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate the feasibility of acoustic emission method for the internal leak from the valves. In this study, valve leak tests using various types of specimen simulated seat damage were performed in order to analyzer acoustic emission properties when leaks arise in valve seat. As a result of leak test for specimens simulated valve seat, we conformed that leak sound level increased in proportion to the increase of hole diameter and leak velocity, and decreased in proportion to the increase of leak depth. And also, leak sound level has hysteresis for leak velocity. From the experimental results, it was suggested that the acoustic emission method for monitoring of leak was feasible.

  13. Intelligence Leaks: What Is the Role of the Leak and the Leaker in U.S. Democracy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    WikiLeaks, the government did not fight a battle against the media due, in part, to the jurisprudence established by the Pentagon Papers . (The U.S...Accountability.” University of Georgia, School of Public and International Affairs, Occasional Paper . Johnson, Lyndon B. “Special Message to the Congress on...between the Pentagon Papers and WikiLeaks to Edward Snowden. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Bradley Manning, Daniel Ellsberg, executive

  14. Don’t let your mail leak

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2012-01-01

    At CERN, data privacy is of paramount importance, and we are currently developing a comprehensive data protection policy. For example, your CERN mailbox and your “private” folders on AFS and DFS are considered yours...   You might feel like you have nothing to hide, but we are not only talking about personal e-mail: data privacy also pertains to financial mail (acquisitions, tenders), mail related to HR (contracts, assessments), medical information, etc.  As this is considered “private” even if it is work-related, the data cannot normally be accessed by your supervisor, the AFS/DFS/mail service administrators or even the Computer Security Team. Tight procedures have been established for the rare cases where such access is necessary, and these require the prior approval of the CERN Computer Security Officer or the IT Department Head, the Legal Service and the DG (see here for more details). Data privacy is not only the responsibility of the O...

  15. Study on the Measurement of Valve Leak Rate Using Acoustic Emission Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Guk; Park, Jong-Hyuck; Yoo, Keun-Bae; Lee, Sun-Ki; Hong, Sung-Yull

    2006-01-01

    This study is to estimate the feasibility of acoustic emission(AE) method for the internal leak from the valves. In this study, 4 inch ball water valve leak tests using three different leak path and various leak rates were performed in order to analyze AE properties when leaks arise in valve seat. As a result of leak test for specimens simulated valve seat, we conformed that leak sound amplitude increased in proportion to the increase of leak rate, and leak rates were plotted versus peak acoustic amplitudes recorded within those two narrow frequency bands on each spectrum plot. The resulting plots of leak rate versus peak AE amplitude were the primary basis for determining the feasibility of quantifying leak acoustically. The large amount of data attained also allowed a favorable investigation of the effects of different leak paths, leak rates, pressure differentials and AE sensors on the AE amplitude spectrum. From the experimental results, it was suggested that the AE method for monitoring of leak was feasible. This paper describes quantitative measurements of fluid valve leak rates by the analysis of AE. Experimental apparatus were fabricated to accept a variety of leaking water valves in order to determine what characteristics of AE signal change with leak rate. The data for each valve were generated by varying the leak rate and recording the time averaged amplitude of AE versus frequency. Leak rates were varied by modifying the valve seating surfaces in ways designed to simulate actual defects observed in service. Most of the data analysis involved plotting the leak rate versus signal amplitude at a specific frequency to determine how well the two variables correlate in terms of accuracy, resolution, and repeatability

  16. Innovative Acoustic Sensor Technologies for Leak Detection in Challenging Pipe Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-30

    the level of water leakage within the water distribution system. Table 7-3. Cost Summary for LeakFinderRT LeakFinderRT Leak Detection Cost...and to limit the drawdown of local water supplies. Implementation of improved leak detection technologies and the timely repair of water mains will...6-5. Water -filled Valve Box in Vicinity of Leak Detected by ZoneScan Alpha System

  17. Study on heat transfer process during leaks of high pressure argon through a realistic crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai, Gang; Liu, Yinghua; Wah Ng, Heong

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for simulating the heat transfer process of high pressure argon gas leaking through a narrow crack which causes the Joule-Thomson cooling effect (JT cooling effect). A once-through (decoupled) model was developed to firstly calculate the gas pressure drop at different crack depth, followed by the temperature drop. A MATLAB code was also developed to iteratively calculate the properties of leaking gas in a crack which was fitted as formula as boundary conditions in heat transfer simulation in COMSOL program. The simulated lowest temperature of the test plate in the vicinity of the crack is 13.8 C after decreasing from the temperature of 30 C with initial argon gas pressure of 91 bar. An experiment test rig designed and tested under the same conditions showed a good agreement between the simulation and experiment at the obtained lowest temperature in the test plate. The method is useful for predicting the lowest temperature in the vicinity of the crack caused by the JT cooling effect. (authors)

  18. Rigid supersymmetry with boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, D.V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Van Nieuwenhuizen, P. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). C.N. Yang Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2008-01-15

    We construct rigidly supersymmetric bulk-plus-boundary actions, both in x-space and in superspace. For each standard supersymmetric bulk action a minimal supersymmetric bulk-plus-boundary action follows from an extended F- or D-term formula. Additional separately supersymmetric boundary actions can be systematically constructed using co-dimension one multiplets (boundary superfields). We also discuss the orbit of boundary conditions which follow from the Euler-Lagrange variational principle. (orig.)

  19. Sodium fire tests for investigating the sodium leak in Monju

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Shinya; Miyake, Osamu; Tanabe, Hiromi

    1996-01-01

    As a part of the work for investigating the sodium leak accident which occurred in Monju on December 8, 1995, three tests, (1) sodium leak test, (2) sodium fire test-I, and (3) sodium fire test-II, were carried out at OEC/PNC. Main objectives of these tests are to confirm leak and burning behavior of sodium from the damaged thermometer, and effects of the sodium fire on integrity of the surrounding structure, etc. The main conclusions obtained from the tests are shown as below. 1) Average sodium leak rate obtained from the sodium leak test was about 50 g/sec. This was equivalent to the value estimated from level change in the sodium overflow tank in the Monju accident. 2) Observation from video cameras in the sodium fire tests revealed that in early stages of sodium leak, sodium dropped down out of the flexible tube of thermometer in drips. This dripping and burning were expanded in range as sodium splashed on the duct. 3) Though, in the sodium fire test-I, there was a decrease of about 1 mm at a thickness of the burning pan in the vicinity in just under in the leak point, there were completely no crack and failure. In the meantime, in the sodium fire test-II the six open holes were found in the floor liner. By this liner failure, the reaction between sodium and concrete might take place. At present, while the detailed evaluation on the sodium fire test-II has been mainly carried out, the investigation for clarifying the cause of the liner failure has been also carried out. (author)

  20. Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

    2007-06-19

    The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical