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Sample records for boundaries regulates formation

  1. Regulating health: transcending disciplinary boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Toby

    2013-03-01

    Health and health care problems can be addressed from multiple disciplinary perspectives. This raises challenges for how to do cross-disciplinary scholarship in ways that are still robust, rigorous and coherent. This paper sets out one particular approach to cross-cutting research--regulation--which has proved extremely fertile for scholars working in diverse fields, from coal mine safety to tax compliance. The first part of the paper considers how regulatory ideas might be applied to health and health care research in general. The second part goes on to sketch out how a regulation perspective on one specific area, illicit drug policy, can open up new directions for research. In conclusion, a future research agenda is outlined for regulatory scholarship on health and health care.

  2. ON A PARABOLIC FREE BOUNDARY EQUATION MODELING PRICE FORMATION

    KAUST Repository

    MARKOWICH, P. A.

    2009-10-01

    We discuss existence and uniqueness of solutions for a one-dimensional parabolic evolution equation with a free boundary. This problem was introduced by Lasry and Lions as description of the dynamical formation of the price of a trading good. Short time existence and uniqueness is established by a contraction argument. Then we discuss the issue of global-in-time-extension of the local solution which is closely related to the regularity of the free boundary. We also present numerical results. © 2009 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  3. Boundary-layer model of pattern formation in solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1984-01-01

    A model of pattern formation in crystal growth is proposed, and its analytic properties are investigated. The principal dynamical variables in this model are the curvature of the solidification front and the thickness (or heat content) of a thermal boundary layer, both taken to be functions of position along the interface. This model is mathematically much more tractable than the realistic, fully nonlocal version of the free-boundary problem, and still recaptures many of the features that seem essential for studying dendritic behavior, for example. Preliminary numerical solutions produce snowflakelike patterns similar to those seen in nature.

  4. Swan Queen, shipping, and boundary regulation in fandom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria M. Gonzalez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There are a number of fan activities and practices that are subject to regulation. The mechanisms of regulation in shipping, however, are not always clear. Shipping, the fan activity of romantically pairing two fictional characters, has become a popular and contentious facet of fan interaction. The case that will be examined in this article is that of the Swan Queen ship, which pairs two female characters from Once Upon a Time (2011–. The lengths that fans have gone to support and promote this ship led to rather intense discussion and infighting among members of the Once Upon a Time fandom. I utilize comments and posts made on Tumblr to examine the mechanisms that dictate inclusion and exclusion in shipper communities. In doing so, I hope to identify the kinds of shipper activities that are subject to regulation and the kinds of boundaries that this regulation establishes. Shipping is dictated not only by fans' imaginations but also by boundaries that are performed and regulated on digital forums.

  5. Dwarf galaxy formation with H2-regulated star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhlen, M; Madau, P; Smith, B; Wise, J

    2011-01-01

    We describe cosmological galaxy formation simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo that incorporate a star formation prescription regulated by the local abundance of molecular hydrogen. We show that this H2-regulated prescription leads to a suppression of star formation in low mass halos (M_h 4, alleviating some of the dwarf galaxy problems faced by theoretical galaxy formation models. H2 regulation modifies the efficiency of star formation of cold gas directly, rather than indirectly reducing the cold gas content with "supernova feedback". We determine the local H2 abundance in our most refined grid cells (76 proper parsec in size at z=4) by applying the model of Krumholz, McKee, & Tumlinson, which is based on idealized 1D radiative transfer calculations of H2 formation-dissociation balance in ~100 pc atomic--molecular complexes. Our H2-regulated simulations are able to reproduce the empirical (albeit lower z) Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, including the low Sigma_gas cutoff due to the transi...

  6. HOW GALACTIC ENVIRONMENT REGULATES STAR FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meidt, Sharon E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie/Königstuhl 17 D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-02-10

    In a new simple model I reconcile two contradictory views on the factors that determine the rate at which molecular clouds form stars—internal structure versus external, environmental influences—providing a unified picture for the regulation of star formation in galaxies. In the presence of external pressure, the pressure gradient set up within a self-gravitating turbulent (isothermal) cloud leads to a non-uniform density distribution. Thus the local environment of a cloud influences its internal structure. In the simple equilibrium model, the fraction of gas at high density in the cloud interior is determined simply by the cloud surface density, which is itself inherited from the pressure in the immediate surroundings. This idea is tested using measurements of the properties of local clouds, which are found to show remarkable agreement with the simple equilibrium model. The model also naturally predicts the star formation relation observed on cloud scales and at the same time provides a mapping between this relation and the closer-to-linear molecular star formation relation measured on larger scales in galaxies. The key is that pressure regulates not only the molecular content of the ISM but also the cloud surface density. I provide a straightforward prescription for the pressure regulation of star formation that can be directly implemented in numerical models. Predictions for the dense gas fraction and star formation efficiency measured on large-scales within galaxies are also presented, establishing the basis for a new picture of star formation regulated by galactic environment.

  7. On a price formation free boundary model by Lasry & Lions: The Neumann problem

    CERN Document Server

    Caffarelli, Luis A; Wolfram, Marie-Therese

    2011-01-01

    We discuss local and global existence and uniqueness for the price formation free boundary model with homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions introduced by Lasry & Lions in 2007. The results are based on a transformation of the problem to the heat equation with nonstandard boundary conditions. The free boundary becomes the zero level set of the solution of the heat equation. The transformation allows us to construct an explicit solution and discuss the behavior of the free boundary. Global existence can be verified under certain conditions on the free boundary and examples of non-existence are given.

  8. LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN transcription factors direct callus formation in Arabidopsis regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingzhu Fan; Chongyi Xu; Ke Xu; Yuxin Hu

    2012-01-01

    The remarkable regeneration capability of plant tissues or organs under culture conditions has underlain an extensive practice for decades.The initial step in plant in vitro regeneration often involves the induction of a pluripotent cell mass termed callus,which is driven by the phytohormone auxin and occurs via a root development pathway.However,the key molecules governing callus formation remain unknown.Here we demonstrate that Arabidopsis LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD)/ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2-LIKE (ASL) transcription factors are involved in the control of callus formation program.The four LBD genes downstream of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTORs (ARFs),LBD16,LBD17,LBD18 and LBD29,are rapidly and dramatically induced by callus-inducing medium (CIM) in multiple organs.Ectopic expression of each of the four LBD genes in Arabidopsis is sufficient to trigger spontaneous callus formation without exogenous phytohormones,whereas suppression of LBD function inhibits the callus formation induced by CIM.Moreover,the callus triggered by LBD resembles that induced by CIM by characteristics of ectopically activated root meristem genes and efficient regeneration capacity.These findings define LBD transcription factors as key regulators in the callus induction process,thereby establishing a molecular link between auxin signaling and the plant regeneration program.

  9. How galactic environment regulates star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Meidt, Sharon E

    2015-01-01

    In a new simple model I reconcile two contradictory views on the factors that determine the rate at which molecular clouds form stars -- internal structure vs. external, environmental influences -- providing a unified picture for the regulation of star formation in galaxies. In the presence of external pressure, the pressure gradient set up within a self-gravitating isothermal cloud leads to a non-uniform density distribution. Thus the local environment of a cloud influences its internal structure. In the simple equilibrium model, the fraction of gas at high density in the cloud interior is determined simply by the cloud surface density, which is itself inherited from the pressure in the immediate surroundings. This idea is tested using measurements of the properties of local clouds, which are found to show remarkable agreement with the simple equilibrium model. The model also naturally predicts the star formation relation observed on cloud scales and, at the same time, provides a mapping between this relatio...

  10. Maori intellectual property rights and the formation of ethnic boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijl, A.H.M. van

    2009-01-01

    This article questions and contextualizes the emergence of a discourse of intellectual property rights in Māori society. It is argued that Māori claims regarding intellectual property function primarily to demarcate ethnic boundaries between Māori and non-Māori. Māori consider the reinforcement of e

  11. Sociocultural Boundary Formations in College Life and Intercultural Capital Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomidoy, Eleni

    2015-01-01

    Based on selective findings from a qualitative study with first generation college students, this article presents the contradictory and complex ways in which the participants perceived sociocultural diversity on campus and their place within it. The students' narratives both affirmed existing boundaries of social belonging based on the…

  12. Regulating a Formation of a Large Number of Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    regulation problem as opposed to a formation control problem. In a formation control problem, convergence of a formation from random positions and...orientations is considered, and it may need a scheme to integrate multiple moving coordinates. On the contrary, in a formation regulation problem , it is...algorithms are applicable to a formation regulation problem where the vehicle models have six degrees of freedom. We will use a realistic six-degree-of

  13. Regulation of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, Jennifer A; Actis, Luis A

    2009-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative opportunistic nosocomial pathogen. This microorganism survives in hospital environments despite unfavorable conditions such as desiccation, nutrient starvation and antimicrobial treatments. It is hypothesized that its ability to persist in these environments, as well as its virulence, is a result of its capacity to form biofilms. A. baumannii forms biofilms on abiotic surfaces such as polystyrene and glass as well as biotic surfaces such as epithelial cells and fungal filaments. Pili assembly and production of the Bap surface-adhesion protein play a role in biofilm initiation and maturation after initial attachment to abiotic surfaces. Furthermore, the adhesion and biofilm phenotypes of some clinical isolates seem to be related to the presence of broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance. The regulation of the formation and development of these biofilms is as diverse as the surfaces on which this bacterium persists and as the cellular components that participate in this programmed multistep process. The regulatory processes associated with biofilm formation include sensing of bacterial cell density, the presence of different nutrients and the concentration of free cations available to bacterial cells. Some of these extracellular signals may be sensed by two-component regulatory systems such as BfmRS. This transcriptional regulatory system activates the expression of the usher-chaperone assembly system responsible for the production of pili, needed for cell attachment and biofilm formation on polystyrene surfaces. However, such a system is not required for biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces when cells are cultured in chemically defined media. Interestingly, the BfmRS system also controls cell morphology under particular culture conditions.

  14. Parabolic Free Boundary Price Formation Models Under Market Size Fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Markowich, Peter A.

    2016-10-04

    In this paper we propose an extension of the Lasry-Lions price formation model which includes uctuations of the numbers of buyers and vendors. We analyze the model in the case of deterministic and stochastic market size uctuations and present results on the long time asymptotic behavior and numerical evidence and conjectures on periodic, almost periodic, and stochastic uctuations. The numerical simulations extend the theoretical statements and give further insights into price formation dynamics.

  15. Mechanical regulation of vascular network formation in engineered matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesman, Ayelet; Rosenfeld, Dekel; Landau, Shira; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2016-01-15

    Generation of vessel networks within engineered tissues is critical for integration and perfusion of the implanted tissue in vivo. The effect of mechanical cues in guiding and stabilizing the vessels has begun to attract marked interest. This review surveys the impact of mechanical cues on formation of vascular networks in 2D and 3D gel matrices. We give less emphasis to regulation of endothelial monolayers and single endothelial cells. Several vascularization models have consistently found that the stress generated in the gel, and encountered by embedded cells, control various aspects of vascular network formation, including sprouting, branching, alignment, and vessel maturation. This internal stress is generated by cell contractile forces, and is balanced by gel stiffness and boundary constrains imposed on the gel. Actin and myosin II are key molecular players in controlling initiation of vessel sprouting and branching morphogenesis. Additionally, the impact of external mechanical cues on tissue vascularization, and studies supporting the notion that mechanical forces regulate vascularization in the live animal are reviewed.

  16. Stacking fault tetrahedra formation in the neighbourhood of grain boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Samaras, M; Van Swygenhoven, H; Victoria, M

    2003-01-01

    Large scale molecular dynamics computer simulations are performed to study the role of the grain boundary (GB) during the cascade evolution in irradiated nanocrystalline Ni. At all primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies in cascades near GBs, the damage produced after cooling down is vacancy dominated. Truncated stacking fault tetrahedra (TSFTs) are easily formed at 10 keV and higher PKA energies. At the higher energies a complex partial dislocation network forms, consisting of TSFTs. The GB acts as an interstitial sink without undergoing major structural changes.

  17. Boundary conditions for the formation of the Moon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuver, Maarten; de Meijer, R. J.; ten Kate, I. L.; van Westrenen, W.

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements of the chemical and isotopic composition of lunar samples indicate that the Moon's bulk composition shows great similarities with the composition of the silicate Earth. Moon formation models that attempt to explain these similarities make a wide variety of assumptions about the p

  18. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lauros

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the vertical profile of particle number distribution does not correspond to observations. Instead organic induced nucleation leads to good agreement confirming the relevance of the aerosol formation mechanism including organic compounds emitted by biosphere.

    Simulation of aerosol concentration inside the atmospheric boundary layer during nucleation days shows highly dynamical picture, where particle formation is coupled with chemistry and turbulent transport. We have demonstrated suitability of our turbulent mixing scheme in reproducing most important characteristics of particle dynamics inside the atmospheric boundary layer. Deposition and particle flux simulations show that deposition affects noticeably only the smallest particles at the lowest part of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  19. Lbx2 regulates formation of myofibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westerfield Monte

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skeletal muscle differentiation requires assembly of contractile proteins into organized myofibrils. The Drosophila ladybird homeobox gene (lad functions in founder cells of the segmental border muscle to promote myoblast fusion and muscle shaping. Tetrapods have two homologous genes (Lbx. Lbx1 functions in migration and/or proliferation of hypaxial myoblasts, whereas the function of Lbx2 is poorly understood. Results To elucidate the role of Lbx in vertebrate myogenesis, we examined Lbx function in zebrafish. Zebrafish lbx2 transcripts appear in newly formed paraxial mesoderm and become restricted to adaxial cells, precursors of slow muscle. Slow muscles lose lbx2 expression as they differentiate, while a subset of differentiating fast muscle cells transiently expresses lbx2. Fin and hyoid muscle express lbx2 later. In contrast, lbx1b expression first appears lateral to the somites at late segmentation stages and is later restricted to fin muscle. Morpholino knockdown of Lbx1b and Lbx2 suppresses hypaxial muscle development. Moreover, knockdown of Lbx2 results in malformation of muscle fibers and reduced fusion of fast precursors, although no obvious effects on induction or specification are observed. Expression of myofilament genes, including actin and myosin, requires the engrailed repressor domain of Lbx2. Conclusion Our results elucidate a new function of Lbx2 as a regulator of myofibril formation.

  20. Regulating mechanical tension at compartment boundaries in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Marcus; Dahmann, Christian

    2016-10-01

    During animal development, cells with similar function and fate often stay together and sort out from cells with different fates. In Drosophila wing imaginal discs, cells of anterior and posterior fates are separated by a straight compartment boundary. Separation of anterior and posterior cells requires the homeodomain-containing protein Engrailed, which is expressed in posterior cells. Engrailed induces the expression of the short-range signaling molecule Hedgehog in posterior cells and confines Hedgehog signal transduction to anterior cells. Transduction of the Hedgehog signal in anterior cells is required for the separation of anterior and posterior cells. Previous work showed that this separation of cells involves a local increase in mechanical tension at cell junctions along the compartment boundary. However, how mechanical tension was locally increased along the compartment boundary remained unknown. A recent paper now shows that the difference in Hedgehog signal transduction between anterior and posterior cells is necessary and sufficient to increase mechanical tension. The local increase in mechanical tension biases junctional rearrangements during cell intercalations to maintain the straight shape of the compartment boundary. These data highlight how developmental signals can generate patterns of mechanical tension important for tissue organization.

  1. On a price formation free boundary model by Lasry and Lions

    KAUST Repository

    Caffarelli, Luis A.

    2011-06-01

    We discuss global existence and asymptotic behaviour of a price formation free boundary model introduced by Lasry and Lions in 2007. Our results are based on a construction which transforms the problem into the heat equation with specially prepared initial datum. The key point is that the free boundary present in the original problem becomes the zero level set of this solution. Using the properties of the heat operator we can show global existence, regularity and asymptotic results of the free boundary. 2011 Académie des sciences.

  2. Surface transition on ice induced by the formation of a grain boundary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Pedersen

    Full Text Available Interfaces between individual ice crystals, usually referred to as grain boundaries, play an important part in many processes in nature. Grain boundary properties are, for example, governing the sintering processes in snow and ice which transform a snowpack into a glacier. In the case of snow sintering, it has been assumed that there are no variations in surface roughness and surface melting, when considering the ice-air interface of an individual crystal. In contrast to that assumption, the present work suggests that there is an increased probability of molecular surface disorder in the vicinity of a grain boundary. The conclusion is based on the first detailed visualization of the formation of an ice grain boundary. The visualization is enabled by studying ice crystals growing into contact, at temperatures between -20°C and -15°C and pressures of 1-2 Torr, using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy. It is observed that the formation of a grain boundary induces a surface transition on the facets in contact. The transition does not propagate across facet edges. The surface transition is interpreted as the spreading of crystal dislocations away from the grain boundary. The observation constitutes a qualitatively new finding, and can potentially increase the understanding of specific processes in nature where ice grain boundaries are involved.

  3. Nanocomposites with thermosetting matrix: structure formation at the interphase boundary

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    KOROLEV Evgenij Valerjevich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Composites with thermosetting matrix are often characterized by elevated values of operational properties – flexural and compressive strength, resistance to aggressive environments, etc. At the same time the cost of most thermosets (particularly – epoxy resins is quite high. Because of this the area of application of polymer composites in construction is limited. One of such application is the creation of multifunctional coatings. The high cost of resin dictates the need to improve the operational properties to ensure economic efficiency. So far, the known way to improve the operational properties is to produce nanoscale interfacial layer between fine filler and matrix in block. This way proved to be effective, but mechanism of the improvement is still uncertain. There areat least two different theories – so-called «adhesion theory» and «theory of deformable layer». The investigation is complicated by the variety of oligomers, hardeners (crosslinking agents and precursors of nanomodifiers. It is becoming more common lately to use adducts of aliphatic amines and epoxy oligomers as hardeners. As precursors of nanomodifiers the organosilicon compounds with siloxane bond in the main chain can be successfully used. In this paper we present results of investigation of a model system comprised of oligomer, crosslinking agent and precursor. The analysis of structure is carried out by means of Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. It is shown that at gelation point modifier has no significant effect on the chemical composition of the curing products; nevertheless, the admixture of modifier reduces the regularity of the emerging three-dimensional spatial net of thermoset. After completion of curing process the irregular spatial grid is still present. This indicates that in composites admixture of organosilicon precursors may lead to the formation of transition layer with reduced modulus of elasticity. Such layer, in turn, causes stress

  4. Numerical Simulation on a Possible Formation Mechanism of Interplanetary Magnetic Cloud Boundaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANQuan-Lin; WEIFeng-Si; FENGXue-Shang

    2003-01-01

    The formation med2aniRm of the interplanetary magnetic cloud (MC) boundaries is numerically investigated by simulating the interactions between an MC of some initial momentum and a local interplanetary current sheet.The compressible 2.51:) MHD equations are solved. R~sults show that the magnetic reconnection process is a possible formation mechanism when an MC interacts with a surrounding current sheet. A number of interesting features are found. For instance, the front boundary of the MCs is a magnetic reconnection boundary that could be caused by a driven reconnection ahead of the cloud, and the tail boundary might be caused by the driving of the entrained flow as a result of the Bernoulli principle. Analysis of the magnetic field and plasma data demonstrates that at these two boundaries appear large value of the plasma parameter β, clear increase of plasma temperature and density, distinct decrease of magnetic magnitude, and a transition of maguetic field direction of about 180 degrees. The outcome of the present simulation agrees qualitatively with the observational results on MC boundary inferred from IMP-8, etc.

  5. Boundaries of intergrowths between mineral individuals: A zone of secondary mineral formation in aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodskaya, R. L.; Bil'Skaya, I. V.; Lyakhnitskaya, V. D.; Markovsky, B. A.; Sidorov, E. G.

    2007-12-01

    Intergrowth boundaries between mineral individuals in dunite of the Gal’moenan massif in Koryakia was studied in terms of crystal morphology, crystal optics, and ontogenesis. The results obtained allowed us to trace the staged formation of olivine and chromite and four generations of these minerals. Micro-and nanotopography of boundary surfaces between intergrown mineral individuals of different generations was examined with optic, electron, and atomic force microscopes. The boundaries between mineral individuals of different generations are distinguished by their microsculpture for both olivine and chromite grains. Both minerals demonstrate a compositional trend toward refinement from older to younger generations. The decrease in the iron mole fraction in olivine and chromite is accompanied by the crystallization of magnetite along weakened zones in olivine of the first generation and as outer rims around the chromite grains of the second generation observable under optic and electronic microscopes. The subsequent refinement of chromite results in the release of PGE from its lattice, as established by atomic power microscopy. The newly formed PGM are localized at the boundaries between mineral individuals and, thus, mark a special stage in the ontogenetic evolution of mineral aggregates. Further recrystallization is expressed in the spatial redistribution of grain boundaries and the formation of monomineralic intergrowth boundaries, i.e., the glomerogranular structure of rock and substructures of PGM, chromite, and olivine grains as intermediate types of organization of the granular assemblies in the form of reticulate, chain, and cellular structures and substructures of aggregates.

  6. Topology of magnetic flux ropes and formation of fossil flux transfer events and boundary layer plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L. C.; Ma, Z. W.; Fu, Z. F.; Otto, A.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanism for the formation of fossil flux transfer events and the low-level boundary layer within the framework of multiple X-line reconnection is proposed. Attention is given to conditions for which the bulk of magnetic flux in a flux rope of finite extent has a simple magnetic topology, where the four possible connections of magnetic field lines are: IMF to MSP, MSP to IMF, IMF to IMF, and MSP to MSP. For a sufficient relative shift of the X lines, magnetic flux may enter a flux rope from the magnetosphere and exit into the magnetosphere. This process leads to the formation of magnetic flux ropes which contain a considerable amount of magnetosheath plasma on closed magnetospheric field lines. This process is discussed as a possible explanation for the formation of fossil flux transfer events in the magnetosphere and the formation of the low-latitude boundary layer.

  7. New-particle formation events in a continental boundary layer: first results from the SATURN experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Stratmann

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During the SATURN experiment, which took place from 27 May to 14 June 2002, new particle formation in the continental boundary layer was investigated. Simultaneous ground-based and tethered-balloon-borne measurements were performed, including meteorological parameters, particle number concentrations and size distributions, gaseous precursor concentrations and SODAR and LIDAR observations. Newly formed particles were observed inside the residual layer, before the break-up process of the nocturnal inversion, and inside the mixing layer throughout the break-up of the nocturnal inversion and during the evolution of the planetary boundary layer.

  8. Epigenetic Regulation of Memory Formation and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zovkic, Iva B.; Guzman-Karlsson, Mikael C.; Sweatt, J. David

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the formation and maintenance of memories is a central goal of the neuroscience community. It is well regarded that an organism's ability to lastingly adapt its behavior in response to a transient environmental stimulus relies on the central nervous system's capability for structural…

  9. Formative Justice: The Regulative Principle of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background/Context: Concepts of justice relevant to making personal and public decisions about education. Purpose: To clarify a concept of formative justice that persons and the public often ignore in making decisions about educational effort. Setting: "The windmills of your mind" Research Design: Reflective essay.…

  10. Boundaries determine the formation energies of lattice defects in two-dimensional buckled materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sandeep K.; Juričić, Vladimir; Barkema, Gerard T.

    2016-07-01

    Lattice defects are inevitably present in two-dimensional materials, with direct implications on their physical and chemical properties. We show that the formation energy of a lattice defect in buckled two-dimensional crystals is not uniquely defined as it takes different values for different boundary conditions even in the thermodynamic limit, as opposed to their perfectly planar counterparts. Also, the approach to the thermodynamic limit follows a different scaling: inversely proportional to the logarithm of the system size for buckled materials, rather than the usual power-law approach. In graphene samples of ˜1000 atoms, different boundary conditions can cause differences exceeding 10 eV. Besides presenting numerical evidence in simulations, we show that the universal features in this behavior can be understood with simple bead-spring models. Fundamentally, our findings imply that it is necessary to specify the boundary conditions for the energy of the lattice defects in the buckled two-dimensional crystals to be uniquely defined, and this may explain the lack of agreement in the reported values of formation energies in graphene. We argue that boundary conditions may also have an impact on other physical observables such as the melting temperature.

  11. Numerical Simulation on a Possible Formation Mechanism of Interplanetary Magnetic Cloud Boundaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Quan-Lin; WEI Feng-Si; FENG Xue-Shang

    2003-01-01

    The formation mechanism of the interplanetary magnetic cloud (MC) boundaries is numerically investigatedby simulating the interactions between an MC of some initial momentum and a local interplanetary current sheet.The compressible 2.5D MHD equations are solved. Results show that the magnetic reconnection process is a possibleformation mechanism when an MC interacts with a surrounding current sheet. A number of interesting features arefound. For instance, the front boundary of the MCs is a magnetic reconnection boundary that could be caused by adriven reconnection ahead of the cloud, and the tail boundary might be caused by the driving of the entrained flowas a result of the Bernoulli principle. Analysis of the magnetic field and plasma data demonstrates that at these twoboundaries appear large value of the plasma parameterβ, clear increase of plasma temperature and density, distinctdecrease of magnetic magnitude, and a transition of magnetic field direction of about 180 degrees. The outcome of thepresent simulation agrees qualitatively with the observational results on MC boundary inferred from IMP-8, etc.

  12. Ammonoid discoveries in the Antimonio Formation, Sonora, Mexico: new constraints on the Triassic Jurassic boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-León, C. M.; Stanley, G. D.; Taylor, D. G.

    2000-11-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic systemic boundary was recently reported in the middle part of the Antimonio Formation, northwestern Sonora, where five informal sedimentary packages were delineated and characteristic ammonoid faunas were used to establish age control within the succession. The boundary was suggested to lie within the middle part of the 24 m-thick package 4, in relatively unfossiliferous and organic-rich, laminated clay-silt mudstone. Despite the absence of diagnostic Hettangian fossils above the postulated boundary interval, its existence was predicted on characteristic uppermost Triassic Crickmayi Zone Choristoceras ammonoids occurring below in package 3 and upper Hettangian to lower Sinemurian (Badouxia Zone) ammonoids found above in package 5. Recent field investigations yielded new ammonoids of the uppermost Triassic Crickmayi Zone, which are described herein. They are assigned to Choristoceras cf. C. nobile Mojsisovics and Rhabdoceras cf. R. suessi Hauer. These characteristic ammonoids occur within the middle and top of package 4. Their discovery along with other stratigraphic evidence necessitates a revision of the boundary and recognition of a previously unrealized unconformity at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary in Sonora. A revised sea-level curve is necessary to account for these new stratigraphic and paleontological findings.

  13. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Cigana Schenkel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases.

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of carbon formation boundary and reforming performance for steam reforming of dimethyl ether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faungnawakij, Kajornsak; Kikuchi, Ryuji; Eguchi, Koichi

    Thermodynamic analysis of dimethyl ether steam reforming (DME SR) was investigated for carbon formation boundary, DME conversion, and hydrogen yield for fuel cell application. The equilibrium calculation employing Gibbs free minimization was performed to figure out the required steam-to-carbon ratio (S/C = 0-5) and reforming temperature (25-1000 °C) where coke formation was thermodynamically unfavorable. S/C, reforming temperature and product species strongly contributed to the coke formation and product composition. When chemical species DME, methanol, CO 2, CO, H 2, H 2O and coke were considered, complete conversion of DME and hydrogen yield above 78% without coke formation were achieved at the normal operating temperatures of molten carbonate fuel cell (600 °C) and solid oxide fuel cell (900 °C), when S/C was at or above 2.5. When CH 4 was favorable, production of coke and that of hydrogen were significantly suppressed.

  15. Formation of self-regulation culture of physical education faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudin S.F.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to experimentally substantiate effectiveness of pedagogic conditions of self-regulation culture formation of future physical culture teachers. Material: in the research 110 3rd year students of physical education faculty participated. The students were questioned. The level of students’ anxiety was assessed. Results: Implementation of the author’s course in educational process facilitated formation of students’ self-regulation skills and abilities; raises confidence and self estimation; influences positively on functional state. It was found that students acquire ability to consciously observe their own verbal constructs of negative thinking and create positive alternatives. Conclusions: preparing of future physical culture teachers stipulates his (her ability to effectively fulfill professional functioning in the aspect of health preservation. The necessary conditions of self-regulation culture formation are formation of students’ holistic value-meaningful attitude to individual health and health of surrounding people.

  16. The molecular clock mediates leptin-regulated bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Loning; Patel, Millan S; Bradley, Allan; Wagner, Erwin F; Karsenty, Gerard

    2005-09-01

    The hormone leptin is a regulator of bone remodeling, a homeostatic function maintaining bone mass constant. Mice lacking molecular-clock components (Per and Cry), or lacking Per genes in osteoblasts, display high bone mass, suggesting that bone remodeling may also be subject to circadian regulation. Moreover, Per-deficient mice experience a paradoxical increase in bone mass following leptin intracerebroventricular infusion. Thus, clock genes may mediate the leptin-dependent sympathetic regulation of bone formation. We show that expression of clock genes in osteoblasts is regulated by the sympathetic nervous system and leptin. Clock genes mediate the antiproliferative function of sympathetic signaling by inhibiting G1 cyclin expression. Partially antagonizing this inhibitory loop, leptin also upregulates AP-1 gene expression, which promotes cyclin D1 expression, osteoblast proliferation, and bone formation. Thus, leptin determines the extent of bone formation by modulating, via sympathetic signaling, osteoblast proliferation through two antagonistic pathways, one of which involves the molecular clock.

  17. Molecular cloud regulated star formation in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, C M; Okamoto, T

    2007-01-01

    We describe a numerical implementation of star formation in disk galaxies, in which the conversion of cooling gas to stars in the multiphase interstellar medium is governed by the rate at which molecular clouds are formed and destroyed. In the model, clouds form from thermally unstable ambient gas and get destroyed by feedback from massive stars and thermal conduction. Feedback in the ambient phase cycles gas into a hot galactic fountain or wind. We model the ambient gas hydrodynamically using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). However, we cannot resolve the Jeans mass in the cold and dense molecular gas and, therefore, represent the cloud phase with ballistic particles that coagulate when colliding. We show that this naturally produces a multiphase medium with cold clouds, a warm disk, hot supernova bubbles and a hot, tenuous halo. Our implementation of this model is based on the Gadget N-Body code. We illustrate the model by evolving an isolated Milky Way-like galaxy and study the properties of a disk f...

  18. Influence of Grain Boundary Character on Creep Void Formation in Alloy 617

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Thomas; Cole, James; Frary, Megan; Schlegel, Scott

    2009-12-01

    Alloy 617, a high-temperature creep-resistant, nickel-based alloy, is being considered for the primary heat exchanger for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which will operate at temperatures exceeding 760 °C and a helium pressure of approximately 7 MPa. Observations of the crept microstructure using optical microscopy indicate creep stress does not significantly influence the creep void fraction at a given creep strain over the relatively narrow set of creep conditions studied. Void formation was found to occur only after significant creep in the tertiary regime (>5 pct total creep strain) had occurred. Also, orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) was used to characterize the grain boundaries in the vicinity of creep voids that develop during high-temperature creep tests (900 °C to 1000 °C at creep stresses ranging from 20 to 40 MPa) terminated at creep strains ranging from 5 to 40 pct. Preliminary analysis of the OIM data indicates voids tend to form on grain boundaries parallel, perpendicular, or 45 deg to the tensile axis, while few voids are found at intermediate inclinations to the tensile axis. Random grain boundaries intersect most voids, while coincident site lattice (CSL)-related grain boundaries did not appear to be consistently associated with void development. Similar results were found in oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OFHC) copper, severely deformed using equal channel angular extrusion, and creep tested at 450 °C and 14 MPa.

  19. The Role of Boundary Spanners in the Formation of Customer Attractiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Kim Sundtoft

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the question of how to understand the formation of suppliers perceived customer attractiveness. It argues that existing conceptualization of buyer–supplier relationships are too simplistic to understand the full complexity involved in the formation of such perceptions......, and models the buyer–supplier relationship as a set of micro-dyads and intra-, inter-organizational exchange relationships. In exploring these micro-dyads this research apply an embedded case study approach and explores three buyer–supplier relationships. Following Bacharach et al. [Bacharach, S...... of action” is deployed. The analysis demonstrates how suppliers' formation of perceptions related to customer attractiveness can be understood as constituted through a set of discrete historical means/ends alignments and misalignments between boundary spanning roles in the involved organizations....

  20. The Formation of Boundary Clinopyroxenes and Associated Glass Veins in Type B1 CAIs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paque, J M; Beckett, J R; Ishii, H A; Toppani, A; Burnett, D S; Teslich, N; Dai, Z R; Bradley, J P

    2008-05-18

    We used focused ion beam thin section preparation and scanning transmission electron microscopy (FIB/STEM) to examine the interfacial region between spinel and host melilite for three spinel grains, two from the mantle and one from the core of an Allende type B1 inclusion, and a second pair of spinel grains from a type B1 inclusion from the Leoville carbonaceous chondrite. The compositions of boundary clinopyroxenes decorating spinel surfaces are generally consistent with those of coarser clinopyroxenes from the same region of the inclusion, suggesting little movement of spinels between mantle and core regions after the formation of boundary clinopyroxenes. The host melilite displays no anomalous compositions near the interface, and anorthite or other late-stage minerals are not observed, suggesting that crystallization of residual liquid was not responsible for the formation of boundary clinopyroxenes. Allende spinels display either direct spinel-melilite contact or an intervening boundary clinopyroxene between the two phases. In the core, boundary clinopyroxene is mantled by a thin (1-2 {micro}m thick) layer of normally zoned (X{sub Ak} increasing away from the melilite-clinopyroxene contact) melilite with X{sub Ak} matching that of the host melilite at the melilite-melilite contact. In the mantle, X{sub Ak} near boundary spinels is constant. Spinels in a Leoville type B1 inclusion are more complex with boundary clinopyroxene, as observed in Allende, but also variable amounts of glass ({approx}1 {micro}m width), secondary calcite, perovskite, and an unknown Mg-, Al-, OH-rich and Ca-, Si-poor crystalline phase that may be a layered double hydrate. Glass compositions are consistent to first order with a precursor consisting mostly of Mg-carpholite or sudoite with some aluminous diopside. One possible scenario of formation for the glass veins is that open system alteration of melilite produced a porous, hydrated aggregate of Mg-carpholite or sudoite + aluminous

  1. Influence of Polyalkylmethacrylate VIIs on Boundary Film Formation,Friction,Wear and Efficiency of Lubricants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Müller; Hugh Spikes; Alex Tsay

    2006-01-01

    Polyalkylmethacrylates (PAMAs) are well-known as viscosity index improvers and dispersant boosters. This paper shows that PAMAs are able to adsorb from oil solution on to metal surfaces, to produce thick, viscous boundary films.These films enhance lubricant film formation in slow speed and high temperature conditions and thus produce a significant reduction of friction. A systematic study of this phenomenon has made use of the highly flexible nature of PAMA chemistry. A range of dispersant and non-dispersant polymethacrylates has been synthesized. The influence of different functionalities, molecular weights and architectures on both boundary film formation and friction has been explored using optical interferometry and friction-speed charting. From the results, guidelines have been developed for designing PAMAs having optimal boundary lubricating properties.Through their ability to form boundary films PAMAs can significantly contribute to reduce wear in engine, gear and hydraulic lubrication. As a consequence of their viscometric and tribological performance PAMAs can furthermore improve fuel and energy efficiency in different, namely engine and hydraulic applications.Extensive work is currently conducted in the lubricant industry to develop engine oils with lower sulfur, phosphorus and metal content (low SAPS) and to optimize their frictional properties through the use of friction modifiers or synthetic base stocks. We have investigated the contribution of PAMA viscosity index improvers and boosters to improve fuel economy and to reduce wear levels. This paper reports our efforts to develop a new range of PAMAs that have been optimized in terms of composition, architecture, molecular weight and functionality and which can be used in low viscosity, low SAPS formulations to help meet the stringent requirements of modern engine oils.

  2. A Comparison of the Regulation of Health Professional Boundaries across OECD Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivy Lynn Bourgeault

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased attention has been paid recently to the issue of the regulation of professional boundaries. In this paper, we undertake an international comparison of the regulation of health professional boundaries across the OECD countries of Canada, the U.S., the U.K. and Australia. Our case studies focus on the inter-professional boundary negotiation between medicine and nursing and the intra-professional boundary negotiation between domestic and internationally trained physicians. Our analysis draws upon the complementary interdisciplinary theoretical perspectives of institutional economics and the concept of professional closure from the sociology of professions. In applying these lenses to the two case studies in these four country contexts, we reveal that there has been a shift in the context of professional regulation towards a more coordinated national approach to licensure. There has also been a broad scale move towards breaking down at least the regulatory barriers to inter-professional collaboration between physicians and nurses which has included the expansion of the scope of nursing practice to take up traditionally exclusive domains of medicine. The seemingly protectionist professional regulatory policies vis-a-vis international medical graduates also seem to be breaking down primarily through government measures. Overall, there has been an increased permeability of professional boundaries both inter-professionally and intra-professionally, and market-oriented systems seem to be in a better position to overcome medical dominance than state-led ones, even though they do not change the main rules of regulation at the macro-level.

  3. True boundary for the formation of homoleptic transition-metal hydride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shigeyuki; Iijima, Yuki; Sato, Toyoto; Saitoh, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Otomo, Toshiya; Miwa, Kazutoshi; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Aoki, Katsutoshi; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2015-05-04

    Despite many exploratory studies over the past several decades, the presently known transition metals that form homoleptic transition-metal hydride complexes are limited to the Groups 7-12. Here we present evidence for the formation of Mg3 CrH8 , containing the first Group 6 hydride complex [CrH7 ](5-) . Our theoretical calculations reveal that pentagonal-bipyramidal H coordination allows the formation of σ-bonds between H and Cr. The results are strongly supported by neutron diffraction and IR spectroscopic measurements. Given that the Group 3-5 elements favor ionic/metallic bonding with H, along with the current results, the true boundary for the formation of homoleptic transition-metal hydride complexes should be between Group 5 and 6. As the H coordination number generally tends to increase with decreasing atomic number of transition metals, the revised boundary suggests high potential for further discovery of hydrogen-rich materials that are of both technological and fundamental interest.

  4. Characterizing the formation and regeneration of hairpin vortices in a laminar boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, Daniel R.; Maharjan, Rijan

    2015-12-01

    A free surface water channel is used to study hairpin vortex formation created by fluid injection through a narrow slot into a laminar boundary layer. Particle image velocimetry flow-field measurements of injections into quiescent cross-flow conditions confirm that elongated ring vortices are produced with a nondimensionalized circulation strength that is approximately linear with formation time. Unlike circular ring vortices, a limiting strength is not observed at a nondimensional formation time of 4 due to the proximity of the counter-rotating vortex pair. Identical injections are made into a laminar boundary layer at different free-stream velocities and streamwise slot positions (485 ≤ Reδ∗ ≤ 584) with average injection velocity ratios between 0.08 and 0.16. Visualizations indicate that the shear layer between the low x-momentum injected fluid and the boundary layer creates a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that forms the hairpin vortex head which then monotonically decreases in circulation strength with downstream distance. A similar process can form, or regenerate, a secondary hairpin vortex upstream of the primary vortex with a circulation strength of the head that is comparable to the strength of the primary head at the time of regeneration. However, the legs of the primary vortex continue to strengthen up to regeneration. The peak circulation in the legs is not directly correlated to the strength of the original elongated ring vortex. However, when the circulation is scaled with the injection momentum ratio it is linearly related to scaled injection time. It is proposed that the injection momentum ratio and nondimensionalized injection time based on the wall normal penetration time can be used to identify threshold conditions which produce a secondary vortex. It is suggested that this criterion may be used to identify the minimum strength of flow structures that would be capable of regeneration and thus transition initiation.

  5. Prostaglandins temporally regulate cytoplasmic actin bundle formation during Drosophila oogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Spracklen, Andrew J.; Kelpsch, Daniel J.; Chen, Xiang; Spracklen, Cassandra N.; Tootle, Tina L.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs)—lipid signals produced downstream of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes—regulate actin dynamics in cell culture and platelets, but their roles during development are largely unknown. Here we define a new role for Pxt, the Drosophila COX-like enzyme, in regulating the actin cytoskeleton—temporal restriction of actin remodeling during oogenesis. PGs are required for actin filament bundle formation during stage 10B (S10B). In addition, loss of Pxt results in extensive early actin ...

  6. MicroRNA filters Hox temporal transcription noise to confer boundary formation in the spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chung-Jung; Hong, Tian; Tung, Ying-Tsen; Yen, Ya-Ping; Hsu, Ho-Chiang; Lu, Ya-Lin; Chang, Mien; Nie, Qing; Chen, Jun-An

    2017-03-01

    The initial rostrocaudal patterning of the neural tube leads to differential expression of Hox genes that contribute to the specification of motor neuron (MN) subtype identity. Although several 3' Hox mRNAs are expressed in progenitors in a noisy manner, these Hox proteins are not expressed in the progenitors and only become detectable in postmitotic MNs. MicroRNA biogenesis impairment leads to precocious expression and propagates the noise of Hoxa5 at the protein level, resulting in an imprecise Hoxa5-Hoxc8 boundary. Here we uncover, using in silico simulation, two feed-forward Hox-miRNA loops accounting for the precocious and noisy Hoxa5 expression, as well as an ill-defined boundary phenotype in Dicer mutants. Finally, we identify mir-27 as a major regulator coordinating the temporal delay and spatial boundary of Hox protein expression. Our results provide a novel trans Hox-miRNA circuit filtering transcription noise and controlling the timing of protein expression to confer robust individual MN identity.

  7. Evolution and formation of shear layers in a developing turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junghoon; Monty, Jason; Hutchins, Nicholas

    2016-11-01

    The evolution and formation mechanism of shear layers in the outer region of a turbulent boundary layer are investigated using time-resolved PIV datasets of a developing turbulent boundary layer from inception at the trip up to Reτ = 3000 . An analysis of a sequence of instantaneous streamwise velocity fluctuation fields reveals that strong streamwise velocity gradients are prevalent along interfaces where low- and high-speed regions interact. To provide an insight on how such regions are associated with the formation of shear layers in the outer regions, we compute conditional averages of streamwise velocity fluctuations based on a strong shear layer. Our results reveal that one possible mechanism for the generation of shear layers in the outer region is due to the mismatch in the convection velocities between low- and high-speed regions. The results also indicate that the angle of the inclined shear layer is developing in time. In addition, the conditionally averaged velocity fluctuations exhibit a local instability along these shear layers, leading to a shear layer roll-up event as the layers evolve in time. Based on these findings, we propose a conceptual model which describes dynamic interactions of shear layers and their associated large-scale coherent motions. The authors wish to acknowledge the financial support of the Australian Research Council.

  8. Leptin regulates bone formation via the sympathetic nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Shu; Elefteriou, Florent; Levasseur, Regis; Liu, Xiuyun; Zhao, Liping; Parker, Keith L.; Armstrong, Dawna; Ducy, Patricia; Karsenty, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    We previously showed that leptin inhibits bone formation by an undefined mechanism. Here, we show that hypothalamic leptin-dependent antiosteogenic and anorexigenic networks differ, and that the peripheral mediators of leptin antiosteogenic function appear to be neuronal. Neuropeptides mediating leptin anorexigenic function do not affect bone formation. Leptin deficiency results in low sympathetic tone, and genetic or pharmacological ablation of adrenergic signaling leads to a leptin-resistant high bone mass. beta-adrenergic receptors on osteoblasts regulate their proliferation, and a beta-adrenergic agonist decreases bone mass in leptin-deficient and wild-type mice while a beta-adrenergic antagonist increases bone mass in wild-type and ovariectomized mice. None of these manipulations affects body weight. This study demonstrates a leptin-dependent neuronal regulation of bone formation with potential therapeutic implications for osteoporosis.

  9. Inside-Out Planet Formation. III. Planet-disk interaction at the dead zone inner boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Xiao; Tan, Jonathan C; Chatterjee, Sourav

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler mission has discovered more than 4000 exoplanet candidates. Many are in systems with tightly packed inner planets. Inside-Out Planet Formation (IOPF) has been proposed to explain these systems. It involves sequential in situ planet formation at the local pressure maximum of a retreating dead zone inner boundary (DZIB). Pebbles accumulate at this pressure trap, which builds up a ring, and then a planet. The planet is expected to grow until it opens a gap, which helps to both truncate pebble accretion and induce DZIB retreat that sets the location of formation of the next planet. This simple scenario may be modified if the planet migrates significantly from its formation location. Thus planet-disk interactions play a crucial role in the IOPF scenario. We present numerical simulations that first assess migration of planets of various masses that are forming at the DZIB of an active accretion disk, where the effective viscosity rapidly increases in the radially inward direction. We find that the disk's...

  10. Instantons near a tachyonic top in anti de Sitter and the no-boundary regulator

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Ro, Daeho; Yeom, Dong-han

    2014-01-01

    We investigate instantons near the tachyonic top in the anti de Sitter (AdS) background. If the mass around the hill-top is above the Breitenlohner-Freedman (BF) bound, then the top is classically stable. When the BF bound is satisfied, it is already known that there can exist instantons with a non-zero probability, though fine-tunings of the potential are required. On the other hand, we may consider the possibility to obtain instantons with a non-zero probability for more natural shape of potentials. We found that the no-boundary regulator is useful to assign a non-zero probability for general instantons near the tachyonic top within a consistent framework. To use the no-boundary regulator, we need to introduce the complexification of fields. One interesting feature is that, for these AdS instantons, the classicality may not be satisfied after the Wick rotation and hence after the nucleation. This magnifies a novel difference between dS and AdS; a semi-classical boundary observer in AdS may notice the disper...

  11. Evolution of Prolate Molecular Clouds at HII Boundaries: I. Formation of fragment-core structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kinnear, Timothy M; White, Glenn J; Goodwin, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of a prolate cloud at an Hii boundary is investigated using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). The prolate molecular clouds in our investigation are set with their semi-major axis perpendicular to the radiative direction of a plane parallel ionising Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) flux. Simulations on three high mass prolate clouds reveal that EUV radiation can trigger distinctive high density core formation embedded in a final linear structure. This contrasts with results of the previous work in which only an isotropic Far Ultraviolet (FUV) interstellar background flux was applied. A systematic investigation on a group of prolate clouds of equal mass but different initial densities and geometric shapes finds that the distribution of the cores over the final linear structure changes with the initial conditions of the prolate cloud and the strength of the EUV radiation flux. These highly condensed cores may either scatter over the full length of the final linear structure or form two groups of high...

  12. The boundary layer characteristics in the heavy fog formation process over Beijing and its adjacent areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Guangzhi; BIAN; Lingeng; WANG; Jizhi; YANG; Yuanqi

    2005-01-01

    By utilizing the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) observational data made available from the project "973" under the auspices of the Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China - entitled the Beijing City Air Pollution Observation Field Experiment (BECAPEX), including the measurements by a wind profiler, captive airships, tower-based boundary layer wind and temperature gradient observational instruments (ultrasonic anemometers and electronic thermometers), air composition samplers, conventional upper-air, surface and Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) observations, this paper herewith analyzes, in a comprehensive manner, the occurrence of a heavy fog event over Beijing in February 2001, including its formation, development, persistence, dynamic and thermodynamic features as well as evolving stratification structures within the boundary layer at different stages. The results suggested: (i) as a typical case of urban heavy fog, before the fog onset over Beijing, a temperature inversion existed in the lower atmosphere, the smokes and the pollutants like SO2 and NO2 had been accumulated at a lower level. Proceeding the fog event, with the increase of SO2 and NO2 concentrations, condensability increased sharply. On the contrary, during the fog process, with increasing condensability, SO2 and NO2 concentrations decreased. This indicated that, acting as condensation nucleus, these accumulated pollutants were playing a key role in catalyzing the fog condensation. (ii) By analyzing mean gradient-, pulsation- and turbulence-distribution patterns derived from the wind measurements taken by the aforementioned tower-based instruments, they all indicated that about 10 hours before the fog onset, a signal foretelling potential strong disturbances in the lower boundary layer was detected, and a significant rise of both mean and disturbance kinetic energies was observed, revealing that the low-level wind shear was strengthened before the fog onset

  13. Notch1-Dll4 signalling and mechanical force regulate leader cell formation during collective cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Reza; Sun, Jian; Wang, Shue; Long, Min; Zhang, Donna D; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-03-13

    At the onset of collective cell migration, a subset of cells within an initially homogenous population acquires a distinct 'leader' phenotype with characteristic morphology and motility. However, the factors driving the leader cell formation as well as the mechanisms regulating leader cell density during the migration process remain to be determined. Here we use single-cell gene expression analysis and computational modelling to show that the leader cell identity is dynamically regulated by Dll4 signalling through both Notch1 and cellular stress in a migrating epithelium. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that Dll4 is induced in leader cells after the creation of the cell-free region and leader cells are regulated via Notch1-Dll4 lateral inhibition. Furthermore, mechanical stress inhibits Dll4 expression and leader cell formation in the monolayer. Collectively, our findings suggest that a reduction of mechanical force near the boundary promotes Notch1-Dll4 signalling to dynamically regulate the density of leader cells during collective cell migration.

  14. Regulation of biofilm formation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simm, Roger; Ahmad, Irfan; Rhen, Mikael; Le Guyon, Soazig; Römling, Ute

    2014-01-01

    In animals, plants and the environment, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium forms the red dry and rough (rdar) biofilm characterized by extracellular matrix components curli and cellulose. With complex expression control by at least ten transcription factors, the bistably expressed orphan response regulator CsgD directs rdar morphotype development. CsgD expression is an integral part of the Hfq regulon and the complex cyclic diguanosine monophosphate signaling network partially controlled by the global RNA-binding protein CsrA. Cell wall turnover and the periplasmic redox status regulate csgD expression on a post-transcriptional level by unknown mechanisms. Furthermore, phosphorylation of CsgD is a potential inactivation and degradation signal in biofilm dissolution. Including complex incoherent feed-forward loops, regulation of biofilm formation versus motility and virulence is of recognized complexity.

  15. Specific posttranslational modification regulates early events in mammary carcinoma formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hua-Bei; Johnson, Heather; Randolph, Matthew; Nagy, Tamas; Blalock, Ryan; Pierce, Michael

    2010-12-07

    The expression of an enzyme, GnT-V, that catalyzes a specific posttranslational modification of a family of glycoproteins, namely a branched N-glycan, is transcriptionally up-regulated during breast carcinoma oncogenesis. To determine the molecular basis of how early events in breast carcinoma formation are regulated by GnT-V, we studied both the early stages of mammary tumor formation by using 3D cell culture and a her-2 transgenic mouse mammary tumor model. Overexpression of GnT-V in MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells in 3D culture disrupted acinar morphogenesis with impaired hollow lumen formation, an early characteristic of mammary neoplastic transformation. The disrupted acinar morphogenesis of mammary tumor cells in 3D culture caused by her-2 expression was reversed in tumors that lacked GnT-V expression. Moreover, her-2-induced mammary tumor onset was significantly delayed in the GnT-V null tumors, evidence that the lack of the posttranslational modification catalyzed by GnT-V attenuated tumor formation. Inhibited activation of both PKB and ERK signaling pathways was observed in GnT-V null tumor cells. The proportion of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in the mammary tumors from GnT-V null mice was significantly reduced compared with controls, and GnT-V null TICs displayed a reduced ability to form secondary tumors in NOD/SCID mice. These results demonstrate that GnT-V expression and its branched glycan products effectively modulate her-2-mediated signaling pathways that, in turn, regulate the relative proportion of tumor initiating cells and the latency of her-2-driven tumor onset.

  16. How stellar feedback simultaneously regulates star formation and drives outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Christopher C.; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-02-01

    We present an analytic model for how momentum deposition from stellar feedback simultaneously regulates star formation and drives outflows in a turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). Because the ISM is turbulent, a given patch of ISM exhibits sub-patches with a range of surface densities. The high-density patches are `pushed' by feedback, thereby driving turbulence and self-regulating local star formation. Sufficiently low-density patches, however, are accelerated to above the escape velocity before the region can self-adjust and are thus vented as outflows. When the gas fraction is ≳ 0.3, the ratio of the turbulent velocity dispersion to the circular velocity is sufficiently high that at any given time, of the order of half of the ISM has surface density less than the critical value and thus can be blown out on a dynamical time. The resulting outflows have a mass-loading factor (η ≡ dot{M}_{out}/M_{star}) that is inversely proportional to the gas fraction times the circular velocity. At low gas fractions, the star formation rate needed for local self-regulation, and corresponding turbulent Mach number, declines rapidly; the ISM is `smoother', and it is actually more difficult to drive winds with large mass-loading factors. Crucially, our model predicts that stellar-feedback-driven outflows should be suppressed at z ≲ 1 in M⋆ ≳ 1010 M⊙ galaxies. This mechanism allows massive galaxies to exhibit violent outflows at high redshifts and then `shut down' those outflows at late times, thereby enabling the formation of a smooth, extended thin stellar disc. We provide simple fitting functions for η that should be useful for sub-resolution and semi-analytic models.

  17. Molecular hydrogen regulated star formation in cosmological SPH simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Robert; Jaacks, Jason; Choi, Jun-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown observationally that star formation (SF) correlates tightly with the presence of molecular hydrogen (H2). Therefore it would be important to investigate its implication on galaxy formation in a cosmological context. In the present work, we track the H2 mass fraction within our cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code GADGET-3 using an equilibrium analytic model by Krumholz et al. This model allows us to regulate the star formation in our simulation by the local abundance of H2 rather than the total cold gas density, and naturally introduce the dependence of star formation on metallicity. We investigate implications of the equilibrium H2-based SF model on galaxy population properties, such as the stellar-to-halo mass ratio (SHMR), baryon fraction, cosmic star formation rate density (SFRD), galaxy specific SFR, galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMF), and Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relationship. The advantage of our work over the previous ones is having a large sample of simulated gala...

  18. Boundary layer new particle formation over East Antarctic sea ice – possible Hg-driven nucleation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Humphries

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol observations above the Southern Ocean and Antarctic sea ice are scarce. Measurements of aerosols and atmospheric composition were made in East Antarctic pack ice on board the Australian icebreaker Aurora Australis during the spring of 2012. One particle formation event was observed during the 32 days of observations. This event occurred on the only day to exhibit extended periods of global irradiance in excess of 600 W m−2. Within the single air mass influencing the measurements, number concentrations of particles larger than 3 nm (CN3 reached almost 7700 cm−3 within a few hours of clouds clearing, and grew at rates of 5.6 nm h−1. Formation rates of 3 nm particles were in the range of those measured at other Antarctic locations at 0.2–1.1 ± 0.1 cm−3 s−1. Our investigations into the nucleation chemistry found that there were insufficient precursor concentrations for known halogen or organic chemistry to explain the nucleation event. Modelling studies utilising known sulfuric acid nucleation schemes could not simultaneously reproduce both particle formation or growth rates. Surprising correlations with total gaseous mercury (TGM were found that, together with other data, suggest a mercury-driven photochemical nucleation mechanism may be responsible for aerosol nucleation. Given the very low vapour pressures of the mercury species involved, this nucleation chemistry is likely only possible where pre-existing aerosol concentrations are low and both TGM concentrations and solar radiation levels are relatively high (∼ 1.5 ng m−3 and ≥ 600 W m−2, respectively, such as those observed in the Antarctic sea ice boundary layer in this study or in the global free troposphere, particularly in the Northern Hemisphere.

  19. Quorum-sensing regulates biofilm formation in Vibrio scophthalmi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Aljaro Cristina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a previous study, we demonstrated that Vibrio scophthalmi, the most abundant Vibrio species among the marine aerobic or facultatively anaerobic bacteria inhabiting the intestinal tract of healthy cultured turbot (Scophthalmus maximus, contains at least two quorum-sensing circuits involving two types of signal molecules (a 3-hydroxy-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone and the universal autoinducer 2 encoded by luxS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the functions regulated by these quorum sensing circuits in this vibrio by constructing mutants for the genes involved in these circuits. Results The presence of a homologue to the Vibrio harveyi luxR gene encoding a main transcriptional regulator, whose expression is modulated by quorum–sensing signal molecules in other vibrios, was detected and sequenced. The V. scophthalmi LuxR protein displayed a maximum amino acid identity of 82% with SmcR, the LuxR homologue found in Vibrio vulnificus. luxR and luxS null mutants were constructed and their phenotype analysed. Both mutants displayed reduced biofilm formation in vitro as well as differences in membrane protein expression by mass-spectrometry analysis. Additionally, a recombinant strain of V. scophthalmi carrying the lactonase AiiA from Bacillus cereus, which causes hydrolysis of acyl homoserine lactones, was included in the study. Conclusions V. scophthalmi shares two quorum sensing circuits, including the main transcriptional regulator luxR, with some pathogenic vibrios such as V. harveyi and V. anguillarum. However, contrary to these pathogenic vibrios no virulence factors (such as protease production were found to be quorum sensing regulated in this bacterium. Noteworthy, biofilm formation was altered in luxS and luxR mutants. In these mutants a different expression profile of membrane proteins were observed with respect to the wild type strain suggesting that quorum sensing could play a role in the regulation of

  20. Vesicle Size Regulates Nanotube Formation in the Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qian Peter; Du, Wanqing; Ji, Qinghua; Xue, Boxin; Jiang, Dong; Zhu, Yueyao; Lou, Jizhong; Yu, Li; Sun, Yujie

    2016-04-07

    Intracellular membrane nanotube formation and its dynamics play important roles for cargo transportation and organelle biogenesis. Regarding the regulation mechanisms, while much attention has been paid on the lipid composition and its associated protein molecules, effects of the vesicle size has not been studied in the cell. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are often used for in vitro membrane deformation studies, but they are much larger than most intracellular vesicles and the in vitro studies also lack physiological relevance. Here, we use lysosomes and autolysosomes, whose sizes range between 100 nm and 1 μm, as model systems to study the size effects on nanotube formation both in vivo and in vitro. Single molecule observations indicate that driven by kinesin motors, small vesicles (100-200 nm) are mainly transported along the tracks while a remarkable portion of large vesicles (500-1000 nm) form nanotubes. This size effect is further confirmed by in vitro reconstitution assays on liposomes and purified lysosomes and autolysosomes. We also apply Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to measure the initiation force for nanotube formation. These results suggest that the size-dependence may be one of the mechanisms for cells to regulate cellular processes involving membrane-deformation, such as the timing of tubulation-mediated vesicle recycling.

  1. Prostaglandins temporally regulate cytoplasmic actin bundle formation during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, Andrew J; Kelpsch, Daniel J; Chen, Xiang; Spracklen, Cassandra N; Tootle, Tina L

    2014-02-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs)--lipid signals produced downstream of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes--regulate actin dynamics in cell culture and platelets, but their roles during development are largely unknown. Here we define a new role for Pxt, the Drosophila COX-like enzyme, in regulating the actin cytoskeleton--temporal restriction of actin remodeling during oogenesis. PGs are required for actin filament bundle formation during stage 10B (S10B). In addition, loss of Pxt results in extensive early actin remodeling, including actin filaments and aggregates, within the posterior nurse cells of S9 follicles; wild-type follicles exhibit similar structures at a low frequency. Hu li tai shao (Hts-RC) and Villin (Quail), an actin bundler, localize to all early actin structures, whereas Enabled (Ena), an actin elongation factor, preferentially localizes to those in pxt mutants. Reduced Ena levels strongly suppress early actin remodeling in pxt mutants. Furthermore, loss of Pxt results in reduced Ena localization to the sites of bundle formation during S10B. Together these data lead to a model in which PGs temporally regulate actin remodeling during Drosophila oogenesis by controlling Ena localization/activity, such that in S9, PG signaling inhibits, whereas at S10B, it promotes Ena-dependent actin remodeling.

  2. Signaling by bone morphogenetic proteins directs formation of an ectodermal signaling center that regulates craniofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppiano, Silvia; Hu, Diane; Marcucio, Ralph S

    2007-12-01

    We previously described a signaling center, the Frontonasal Ectodermal Zone (FEZ) that regulates growth and patterning of the frontonasal process (FNP). The FEZ is comprised of FNP ectoderm flanking a boundary between Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) expression domains. Our objective was to examine BMP signaling during formation of the FEZ. We blocked BMP signaling throughout the FNP prior to FEZ formation by infecting chick embryos at stage 10 (HH10) with a replication-competent avian retrovirus encoding the BMP antagonist Noggin. We assessed gene expression patterns in the FNP 72 h after infection (approximately HH22) and observed that Shh expression was reduced or absent. In the mesenchyme, we observed that Bmp2 transcripts were absent while the Bmp4 expression domain was expanded proximally. In addition to the molecular changes, infected embryos also exhibited facial malformations at 72 and 96 h after infection suggesting that the FEZ did not form. Our data indicate that reduced cell proliferation, but not apoptosis, in the mesenchyme contributed to the phenotype that we observed. Additionally, adding exogenous SHH into the mesenchyme of RCAS-Noggin-infected embryos did not restore Bmp2 and Bmp4 to a normal pattern of expression. These data indicate that BMP signaling mediates interactions between tissues in the FNP that regulate FEZ formation; and that the correct pattern of Bmp2 and Bmp4, but not Bmp7, expression in the FNP mesenchyme requires signaling by the BMP pathway.

  3. Soil-plant-atmosphere conditions regulating convective cloud formation above southeastern US pine plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Novick, Kimberly; Oishi, Andrew Christopher; Noormets, Asko; Marani, Marco; Katul, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.) occupy more than 20% of the forested area in the southern United States, represent more than 50% of the standing pine volume in this region, and remove from the atmosphere about 500 g C m-2 per year through net ecosystem exchange. Hence, their significance as a major regional carbon sink can hardly be disputed. What is disputed is whether the proliferation of young plantations replacing old forest in the southern United States will alter key aspects of the hydrologic cycle, including convective rainfall, which is the focus of the present work. Ecosystem fluxes of sensible (Hs) and latent heat (LE) and large-scale, slowly evolving free atmospheric temperature and water vapor content are known to be first-order controls on the formation of convective clouds in the atmospheric boundary layer. These controlling processes are here described by a zero-order analytical model aimed at assessing how plantations of different ages may regulate the persistence and transition of the atmospheric system between cloudy and cloudless conditions. Using the analytical model together with field observations, the roles of ecosystem Hs and LE on convective cloud formation are explored relative to the entrainment of heat and moisture from the free atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that cloudy-cloudless regimes at the land surface are regulated by a nonlinear relation between the Bowen ratio Bo=Hs/LE and root-zone soil water content, suggesting that young/mature pines ecosystems have the ability to recirculate available water (through rainfall predisposition mechanisms). Such nonlinearity was not detected in a much older pine stand, suggesting a higher tolerance to drought but a limited control on boundary layer dynamics. These results enable the generation of hypotheses about the impacts on convective cloud formation driven by afforestation/deforestation and groundwater depletion projected to increase following increased human population in the

  4. Regulation of calcium phosphate formation by native amelogenins in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Seo-Young; Kim, Sonia; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Simmer, James P; Beniash, Elia; Margolis, Henry C

    2014-08-01

    Our previous in vitro studies have shown that recombinant full-length porcine amelogenin rP172 can transiently stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and uniquely guide the formation of well-aligned bundles of hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals, as seen in the secretory stage of amelogenesis. This functional capacity is dependent on the hydrophilic C-terminal domain of full-length amelogenin. However, we have also found that native phosphorylated (single S-16 site) forms of full-length (P173) and C-terminal cleaved (P148) amelogenins can stabilize ACP for > 2 d and prevent HA formation. The present study was carried out to test the hypothesis that, at reduced concentrations, native full-length P173 also has the capacity to guide ordered HA formation. The effect of P148 and P173 concentrations (0.2-2.0 mg/ml) on the rate of spontaneous calcium phosphate precipitation was monitored via changes in solution pH, while mineral phases formed were assessed using TEM. At higher P173 concentrations (1.0-2.0 mg/ml), limited mineral formation occurred and only ACP nanoparticles were observed during a 48 h period. However, at 0.4 mg/ml P173, a predominance of organized bundles of linear, needle-like HA crystals were observed. At 0.2 mg/ml of P173, limited quantities of less organized HA crystals were found. Although P148 similarly stabilized ACP, it did not guide ordered HA formation, like P173. Hence, the establishment of the hierarchical enamel structure during secretory stage amelogenesis may be regulated by the partial removal of full-length amelogenin via MMP20 proteolysis, while predominant amelogenin degradation products, like P148, serve to prevent uncontrolled mineral formation.

  5. Homeostatic regulation of meiotic DSB formation by ATM/ATR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Tim J; Wardell, Kayleigh; Garcia, Valerie; Neale, Matthew J

    2014-11-15

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and RAD3-related (ATR) are widely known as being central players in the mitotic DNA damage response (DDR), mounting responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) respectively. The DDR signalling cascade couples cell cycle control to damage-sensing and repair processes in order to prevent untimely cell cycle progression while damage still persists [1]. Both ATM/ATR are, however, also emerging as essential factors in the process of meiosis; a specialised cell cycle programme responsible for the formation of haploid gametes via two sequential nuclear divisions. Central to achieving accurate meiotic chromosome segregation is the introduction of numerous DSBs spread across the genome by the evolutionarily conserved enzyme, Spo11. This review seeks to explore and address how cells utilise ATM/ATR pathways to regulate Spo11-DSB formation, establish DSB homeostasis and ensure meiosis is completed unperturbed.

  6. Homeostatic regulation of meiotic DSB formation by ATM/ATR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Tim J.; Wardell, Kayleigh; Garcia, Valerie; Neale, Matthew J., E-mail: m.neale@sussex.ac.uk

    2014-11-15

    Ataxia–telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and RAD3-related (ATR) are widely known as being central players in the mitotic DNA damage response (DDR), mounting responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) respectively. The DDR signalling cascade couples cell cycle control to damage-sensing and repair processes in order to prevent untimely cell cycle progression while damage still persists [1]. Both ATM/ATR are, however, also emerging as essential factors in the process of meiosis; a specialised cell cycle programme responsible for the formation of haploid gametes via two sequential nuclear divisions. Central to achieving accurate meiotic chromosome segregation is the introduction of numerous DSBs spread across the genome by the evolutionarily conserved enzyme, Spo11. This review seeks to explore and address how cells utilise ATM/ATR pathways to regulate Spo11-DSB formation, establish DSB homeostasis and ensure meiosis is completed unperturbed.

  7. Cthrc1 is a positive regulator of osteoblastic bone formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Kimura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone mass is maintained by continuous remodeling through repeated cycles of bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. This remodeling process is regulated by many systemic and local factors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified collagen triple helix repeat containing-1 (Cthrc1 as a downstream target of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2 in osteochondroprogenitor-like cells by PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization followed by differential hybridization, and found that Cthrc1 was expressed in bone tissues in vivo. To investigate the role of Cthrc1 in bone, we generated Cthrc1-null mice and transgenic mice which overexpress Cthrc1 in osteoblasts (Cthrc1 transgenic mice. Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT and bone histomorphometry analyses showed that Cthrc1-null mice displayed low bone mass as a result of decreased osteoblastic bone formation, whereas Cthrc1 transgenic mice displayed high bone mass by increase in osteoblastic bone formation. Osteoblast number was decreased in Cthrc1-null mice, and increased in Cthrc1 transgenic mice, respectively, while osteoclast number had no change in both mutant mice. In vitro, colony-forming unit (CFU assays in bone marrow cells harvested from Cthrc1-null mice or Cthrc1 transgenic mice revealed that Cthrc1 stimulated differentiation and mineralization of osteoprogenitor cells. Expression levels of osteoblast specific genes, ALP, Col1a1, and Osteocalcin, in primary osteoblasts were decreased in Cthrc1-null mice and increased in Cthrc1 transgenic mice, respectively. Furthermore, BrdU incorporation assays showed that Cthrc1 accelerated osteoblast proliferation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, overexpression of Cthrc1 in the transgenic mice attenuated ovariectomy-induced bone loss. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that Cthrc1 increases bone mass as a positive regulator of osteoblastic bone formation and offers an anabolic approach for the

  8. Regulation of Memory Formation by the Transcription Factor XBP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Martínez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Contextual memory formation relies on the induction of new genes in the hippocampus. A polymorphism in the promoter of the transcription factor XBP1 was identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease and bipolar disorders. XBP1 is a major regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR, mediating adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Using a phenotypic screen, we uncovered an unexpected function of XBP1 in cognition and behavior. Mice lacking XBP1 in the nervous system showed specific impairment of contextual memory formation and long-term potentiation (LTP, whereas neuronal XBP1s overexpression improved performance in memory tasks. Gene expression analysis revealed that XBP1 regulates a group of memory-related genes, highlighting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a key component in memory consolidation. Overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus reversed the XBP1-deficient phenotype. Our study revealed an unanticipated function of XBP1 in cognitive processes that is apparently unrelated to its role in ER stress.

  9. How stellar feedback simultaneously regulates star formation and drives outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Hayward, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytic model for how momentum deposition from stellar feedback simultaneously regulates star formation and drives outflows in a turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). Because the ISM is turbulent, a given patch of ISM exhibits sub-patches with a range of surface densities. The high-density patches are 'pushed' by feedback, thereby driving turbulence and self-regulating local star formation. Sufficiently low-density patches, however, are accelerated to above the escape velocity before the region can self-adjust and are thus vented as outflows. In the turbulent-pressure-supported regime, when the gas fraction is $\\gtrsim 0.3$, the ratio of the turbulent velocity dispersion to the circular velocity is sufficiently high that at any given time, of order half of the ISM has surface density less than the critical value and thus can be blown out on a dynamical time. The resulting outflows have a mass-loading factor ($\\eta \\equiv M_{\\rm out}/M_{\\star}$) that is inversely proportional to the gas fraction ...

  10. Regulation of Memory Formation by the Transcription Factor XBP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Gabriela; Vidal, René L; Mardones, Pablo; Serrano, Felipe G; Ardiles, Alvaro O; Wirth, Craig; Valdés, Pamela; Thielen, Peter; Schneider, Bernard L; Kerr, Bredford; Valdés, Jose L; Palacios, Adrian G; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Glimcher, Laurie H; Hetz, Claudio

    2016-02-16

    Contextual memory formation relies on the induction of new genes in the hippocampus. A polymorphism in the promoter of the transcription factor XBP1 was identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and bipolar disorders. XBP1 is a major regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), mediating adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Using a phenotypic screen, we uncovered an unexpected function of XBP1 in cognition and behavior. Mice lacking XBP1 in the nervous system showed specific impairment of contextual memory formation and long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas neuronal XBP1s overexpression improved performance in memory tasks. Gene expression analysis revealed that XBP1 regulates a group of memory-related genes, highlighting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key component in memory consolidation. Overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus reversed the XBP1-deficient phenotype. Our study revealed an unanticipated function of XBP1 in cognitive processes that is apparently unrelated to its role in ER stress.

  11. SMBH Spherically Symmetric Accretion Regulated by Violent Star Formation Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Silich, S; Tenorio-Tagle, G

    2008-01-01

    The mounting evidence for violent nuclear star formation in Seyfert galaxies has led us to consider the hydrodynamics of the matter reinserted by massive stars through strong stellar winds and supernovae, under the presence of a central massive BH. We show that in all cases there is a bimodal solution strongly weighted by the location of the stagnation radius (Rst), which splits the star cluster into two different zones. Matter reinserted within the stagnation volume is to be accreted by the BH while its outer counterpart would composed a star cluster wind. The mechanical power of the latter, ensures that there is no accretion of the ISM into the BH and thus the BH accretion and its luminosity is regulated by the star formation feedback. The location of the stagnation radius is a function of three parameters: the BH mass, the mechanical power (or mass) of the star formation event and the size of the star forming region. Here we present our self-consistent, stationary solution, discuss the accretion rates and ...

  12. Repo-Man/PP1 regulates heterochromatin formation in interphase

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Inês J.; Budzak, James; Di Giacinto, Maria L.; Ligammari, Lorena; Gokhan, Ezgi; Spanos, Christos; Moralli, Daniela; Richardson, Christine; de las Heras, Jose I.; Salatino, Silvia; Schirmer, Eric C.; Ullman, Katharine S.; Bickmore, Wendy A.; Green, Catherine; Rappsilber, Juri; Lamble, Sarah; Goldberg, Martin W.; Vinciotti, Veronica; Vagnarelli, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Repo-Man is a protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) targeting subunit that regulates mitotic progression and chromatin remodelling. After mitosis, Repo-Man/PP1 remains associated with chromatin but its function in interphase is not known. Here we show that Repo-Man, via Nup153, is enriched on condensed chromatin at the nuclear periphery and at the edge of the nucleopore basket. Repo-Man/PP1 regulates the formation of heterochromatin, dephosphorylates H3S28 and it is necessary and sufficient for heterochromatin protein 1 binding and H3K27me3 recruitment. Using a novel proteogenomic approach, we show that Repo-Man is enriched at subtelomeric regions together with H2AZ and H3.3 and that depletion of Repo-Man alters the peripheral localization of a subset of these regions and alleviates repression of some polycomb telomeric genes. This study shows a role for a mitotic phosphatase in the regulation of the epigenetic landscape and gene expression in interphase. PMID:28091603

  13. Estrogen regulates pulmonary alveolar formation, loss, and regeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, Donald; Massaro, Gloria Decarlo

    2004-12-01

    Lung tissue elastic recoil and the dimension and number of pulmonary gas-exchange units (alveoli) are major determinants of gas-exchange function. Loss of gas-exchange function accelerates after menopause in the healthy aged and is progressively lost in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The latter, a disease of midlife and later, though more common in men than in women, is a disease to which women smokers and never smokers may be more susceptible than men; it is characterized by diminished lung tissue elastic recoil and presently irremediable alveolar loss. Ovariectomy in sexually immature rats diminishes the formation of alveoli, and estrogen prevents the diminution. In the present work, we found that estrogen receptor-alpha and estrogen receptor-beta, the only recognized mammalian estrogen receptors, are required for the formation of a full complement of alveoli in female mice. However, only the absence of estrogen receptor-beta diminishes lung elastic tissue recoil. Furthermore, ovariectomy in adult mice results, within 3 wk, in loss of alveoli and of alveolar surface area without a change of lung volume. Estrogen replacement, after alveolar loss, induces alveolar regeneration, reversing the architectural effects of ovariectomy. These studies 1) reveal estrogen receptors regulate alveolar size and number in a nonredundant manner, 2) show estrogen is required for maintenance of already formed alveoli and induces alveolar regeneration after their loss in adult ovariectomized mice, and 3) offer the possibility estrogen can slow alveolar loss and induce alveolar regeneration in women with COPD.

  14. An instability of feedback regulated star formation in galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Torrey, Paul; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Vogelsberger, Mark; Quataert, Eliot; Kereš, Dušan; Murray, Norman

    2016-01-01

    We examine the stability of feedback-regulated star formation (SF) in galactic nuclei and contrast it to SF in extended discs. In galactic nuclei the dynamical time becomes shorter than the time over which feedback from young stars evolves. We argue analytically that the balance between stellar feedback and gravity is unstable in this regime. We study this using numerical simulations with pc-scale resolution and explicit stellar feedback taken from stellar evolution models. The nuclear gas mass, young stellar mass, and SFR within the central ~100 pc (the short-timescale regime) never reach steady-state, but instead go through dramatic, oscillatory cycles. Stars form until a critical surface density of young stars is present (such that feedback overwhelms gravity), at which point they begin to expel gas from the nucleus. Since the dynamical times are shorter than the stellar evolution times, the stars do not die as the gas is expelled, but continue to push, triggering a runaway quenching of star formation in t...

  15. Formation of the thermal-driven boundary jet in an f-plane mesoscale basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The paper adopts an f-plane quasi-geostrophic inertial model without linearization to investigate the perturbation temperature, boundary jet and upwelling (downwelling) in an idealized rectangular basin, under the consideration of west side friction layer and heat conservation. There is net heat input on the upper surface and equal quality heat dissipation on the west boundary, and without heat exchange on other boundaries, then the heat is conservation in the whole basin. Results show that there is thermal front due to denseness of the perturbation temperature in the west side boundary, the perturbation pressure and flow field are reversal on the upper layer and bottom layer. On the bottom layer, the west coastal current is northward, and the maximum perturbation pressure center is on the west, however, on the upper layer, the east coastal current is southward, and the maximum perturbation pressure center is on the east. There is strong vertical flow in narrow western boundary layer, and also in the central zone. The effect of different upper thermal forcings is also studied, and it can be concluded that there is always temperature denseness and boundary jet near the west boundary, and the appearance of flow field reversal, but the distribution of vertical flow is rather different.

  16. Direct observation of potential barrier formation at grain boundaries of SnO2 ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, D.; Cremades, A.; Piqueras, J.

    2004-11-01

    Remote electron beam induced current (REBIC) and cathodoluminescence (CL) modes in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) have been used to investigate SnO2 sintered samples. The study of the electrically active boundaries present in the oxide shows a characteristic peak and trough (PAT) contrast after thermal treatments in oxygen. Temperature-dependent measurements of the REBIC contrast show the presence of a shallow defect level 60 meV below the conduction band. This level is asigned to oxygen species adsorbed on the defect-rich boundaries. Evolution of REBIC contrast of the grain boundaries with excitation density enabled us to perform local measurements of minority carrier diffusion length.

  17. Feedback Regulated Star Formation in Cool Core Clusters of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Grant Russell

    2011-07-01

    act as observable "beacons" for assembling protoclusters. Probing the epoch of cluster assembly will be critical to a better understanding of the evolution of the cool core phenomenon and the history of cluster entropy regulation in general. The relative inability of X-ray cluster selection techniques to extend to these redshifts necessitates alternative detection methods, one of which we describe in this thesis. Finally, in Chapter 6 we discuss the main conclusions of this thesis, which can be summarized as follows: (1) AGN feedback is real, and likely plays a dominant role in regulating the pathway of entropy loss from hot ambient medium to cold gas to star formation; (2) AGN feedback does not establish an impassable "entropy floor" below which gas cannot cool; and (3) star formation plays an important role in determining the temperature and ionization of the warm (˜104 K) and cold (10 < T < 104 K) gas phases in brightest cluster galaxies.

  18. Effects of boundary layer particle formation on cloud droplet number and changes in cloud albedo from 1850 to 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Merikanto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We use a global aerosol microphysics model to estimate the effect of particle formation through activation nucleation in the boundary layer (BL on cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC on global and regional scales. The calculations are carried out for years 1850 and 2000 using historical emissions inventories for primary particles and aerosol precursor gases. Predicted CDNC in 2000 are in good agreement with in-situ observations when activation nucleation is included. We find that BL particle formation increases global annual mean CDNC by approximately the same relative amount in both years (16.0% in 1850 and 13.5% in 2000. As a result, global mean changes in cloud albedo are similar with and without BL particle formation. However, there are substantial regional effects of up to 50% enhancement or suppression of the 1850–2000 albedo change. Over most modern-day polluted northern hemisphere regions, including BL particle formation scheme suppresses the 1850–2000 increase in CDNC and cloud albedo because BL particle formation is already large in 1850. Over the Arctic the albedo change is suppressed by 23% in the annual mean and by 43% in summer when BL particle formation is taken into account. The albedo change of the persistent stratocumulus cloud deck west of Chile is enhanced by 49%.

  19. Effects of boundary layer particle formation on cloud droplet number and changes in cloud albedo from 1850 to 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Merikanto

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We use a global aerosol microphysics model to estimate the effect of boundary layer particle formation on cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC on global and regional scales. The calculations are carried out for years 1850 and 2000 using historical emissions inventories for primary particles and aerosol precursor gases. Predicted CDNC in 2000 are in good agreement with in-situ observations when particle formation is included. We find that particle formation increases global annual mean CDNC by approximately the same amount in both years (16.0% in 1850 and 13.5% in 2000. Thus, global mean changes in cloud albedo are similar with and without particle formation. However, there are substantial regional effects of up to 50% enhancement or suppression of the 1850–2000 albedo change. Over most modern-day polluted Northern Hemisphere regions particle formation suppresses the 1850–2000 increase in CDNC and cloud albedo. Over the Arctic the albedo change is suppressed by 23% in the annual mean and by 43% in summer when particle formation is taken into account. The albedo change of the persistent stratocumulus cloud deck west of Chile is enhanced by 49%.

  20. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauros, J.; Sogachev, Andrey; Smolander, S.;

    2011-01-01

    vertical profile of particle number concentration does not correspond to observations. Instead organic induced nucleation leads to good agreement confirming the relevance of the aerosol formation mechanism including organic compounds emitted by the biosphere. The simulation of aerosol concentration within......We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the simulated...

  1. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauros, J.; Sogachev, Andrey; Smolander, S.;

    2010-01-01

    profile of particle number distribution does not correspond to observations. Instead organic induced nucleation leads to good agreement confirming the relevance of the aerosol formation mechanism including organic compounds emitted by biosphere. Simulation of aerosol concentration inside the atmospheric......We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the vertical...

  2. Evolution of Prolate Molecular Clouds at Hii Boundaries: II. Formation of BRCs of asymmetrical morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Kinnear, T M; White, G J; Sugitani, K; Goodwin, S

    2015-01-01

    A systematic investigation on the evolution of a prolate cloud at an Hii boundary is conducted using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) in order to understand the mechanism for a variety of irregular morphological structures found at the boundaries of various Hii regions. The prolate molecular clouds in this investigation are set with their semi-major axes at inclinations between 0 and 90 degrees to a plane parallel ionizing radiation flux. A set of 4 parameters, the number density n, the ratio of major to minor axis gamma, the inclination angle phi and the incident flux F_EUV, are used to define the initial state of the simulated clouds. The dependence of the evolution of a prolate cloud under Radiation Driven Implosion (RDI) on each of the four parameters is investigated. It is found that: i) in addition to the well studied standard type A, B or C Bright Rimmed Clouds (BRCs), many other types such as asymmetrical BRCs, filamentary structures and irregular horse-head structures could also be developed at ...

  3. 20 CFR 633.103 - Format for these regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... set forth in 20 CFR part 633 and part 636. These parts contain all the regulations under the Act applicable to migrant and other seasonally employed farmworker programs. (b) Should the regulations at this... 633.103 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR MIGRANT...

  4. Determination of the boundary of carbon formation for dry reforming of methane in a solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assabumrungrat, S.; Laosiripojana, N.; Piroonlerkgul, P.

    The boundary of carbon formation for the dry reforming of methane in direct internal reforming solid oxide fuel cells (DIR-SOFCs) with different types of electrolyte (i.e., an oxygen ion-conducting electrolyte (SOFC-O 2-) and a proton-conducting electrolyte (SOFC-H +)) was determined by employing detailed thermodynamic analysis. It was found that the required CO 2/CH 4 ratio decreased with increasing temperature. The type of electrolyte influenced the boundary of carbon formation because it determined the location of water formed by the electrochemical reaction. The extent of the electrochemical reaction also played an important role in the boundary of carbon formation. For SOFC-O 2-, the required CO 2/CH 4 ratio decreased with the increasing extent of the electrochemical reaction due to the presence of electrochemical water in the anode chamber. Although for SOFC-H + the required CO 2/CH 4 ratio increased with the increasing extent of the electrochemical reaction at high operating temperature (T > 1000 K) following the trend previously reported for the case of steam reforming of methane with addition of water as a carbon suppresser, an unusual opposite trend was observed at lower operating temperature. The study also considered the use of water or air as an alternative carbon suppresser for the system. The required H 2O/CH 4 ratio and air/CH 4 ratio were determined for various inlet CO 2/CH 4 ratios. Even air is a less attractive choice compared to water due to the higher required air/CH 4 ratio than the H 2O/CH 4 ratio; however, the integration of exothermic oxidation and the endothermic reforming reactions may make the use of air attractive. Water was found to be more effective than carbon dioxide in suppressing the carbon formation at low temperatures but their effect was comparable at high temperatures. Although the results from the study were based on calculations of the SOFCs with different electrolytes, they are also useful for selecting suitable feed

  5. Study on Wear Reduction Mechanisms of Artificial Cartilage by Synergistic Protein Boundary Film Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Kazuhiro; Sawae, Yoshinori; Murakami, Teruo

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel is one of the anticipated materials for artificial cartilage. PVA hydrogel has high water content and a low elastic modulus similar to natural cartilage, but its major disadvantage is its lower strength. PVA hydrogel experienced rapid wear under severe conditions such as mixed or boundary lubrication. Therefore, the existence of a protective surface film with low friction becomes important to prevent surface failure. In this study, the reciprocating frictional tests for a sliding pair of PVA hydrogel and glass plate were carried out, and fluorescent observations were performed to identify the roles of adsorbed protein film. Albumin and γ-globulin, which are contained in natural synovial fluid, were used by mixing into the lubricant. It appears that groups of albumin molecules adsorb on the smooth γ-globulin adsorbed layer at content of 2.1wt% of proteins with an appropriate ratio. But in the case of a lubricant which has excessive protein at 2.8wt%, albumin and γ-globulin adsorbed separately. Considering the wear reduction at 2.1wt% content of protein, albumin and γ-globulin constituted synergistic adsorbed film for wear reduction. It is indicated that albumin constructs a low shear layer and γ-globulin forms a layer protecting PVA hydrogel from wear. It is considered that wear and friction of PVA hydrogel were reduced due to slip of the boundary of adsorbed albumin and γ-globulin layer. Content of protein and ratio of albumin to γ-globulin (AG ratio) are important to constitute the appropriate protein film.

  6. Marine boundary layer cloud regimes and POC formation in an LES coupled to a bulk aerosol scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Berner

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A large-eddy simulation (LES coupled to a new bulk aerosol scheme is used to study long-lived regimes of aerosol-boundary layer cloud-precipitation interaction and the development of pockets of open cells (POCs in subtropical stratocumulus cloud layers. The aerosol scheme prognoses mass and number concentration of a single log-normal accumulation mode with surface and entrainment sources, evolving subject to processing of activated aerosol and scavenging of dry aerosol by cloud and rain. The LES with the aerosol scheme is applied to a range of steadily-forced simulations idealized from a well-observed POC case. The long-term system evolution is explored with extended two-dimensional simulations of up to 20 days, mostly with diurnally-averaged insolation. One three-dimensional two-day simulation confirms the initial development of the corresponding two-dimensional case. With weak mean subsidence, an initially aerosol-rich mixed layer deepens, the capping stratocumulus cloud slowly thickens and increasingly depletes aerosol via precipitation accretion, then the boundary layer transitions within a few hours into an open-cell regime with scattered precipitating cumuli, in which entrainment is much weaker. The inversion slowly collapses for several days until the cumulus clouds are too shallow to efficiently precipitate. Inversion cloud then reforms and radiatively drives renewed entrainment, allowing the boundary layer to deepen and become more aerosol-rich, until the stratocumulus layer thickens enough to undergo another cycle of open-cell formation. If mean subsidence is stronger, the stratocumulus never thickens enough to initiate drizzle and settles into a steady state. With lower initial aerosol concentrations, this system quickly transitions into open cells, collapses, and redevelops into a different steady state with a shallow, optically thin cloud layer. In these steady states, interstitial scavenging by cloud droplets is the main sink of

  7. Operando formation of an ultra-low friction boundary film from synthetic magnesium silicon hydroxide additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Qiuying; Rudenko, Pavlo; Miller, Dean J.; Wen, Jianguo; Berman, Diana; Zhang, Yuepeng; Arey, Bruce; Zhu, Zihua; Erdemir, Ali

    2017-06-01

    The paper reports the operando and self-healing formation of DLC films at sliding contact surfaces by the addition of synthetic magnesium silicon hydroxide (MSH) nanoparticles to base oil. The formation of such films leads to a reduction of the coefficient of friction by nearly an order of magnitude and substantially reduces wear losses. The ultralow friction layer characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and Raman spectroscopy consists of amorphous DLC containing SiOx that forms in a continuous and self-repairing manner during operation. This environmentally benign and simple approach offers promise for significant advances in lubrication and reduced energy losses in engines and other mechanical systems.

  8. The Nature of the Microstructure and Interface Boundary Formation in Directionally Solidified Ceramic Boride Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-19

    Scientific Research European Office of Aerospace Research and Development Unit 4515, APO AE 09421-4515 Distribution Statement A: Approved for public...SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2015-0021 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Distribution A: Approved for public release...structure formation of self-reinforced composite materials. For this was supposed to study the eutectic morphology transformation from fiber-like to

  9. Distributed formation output regulation of switching heterogeneous multi-agent systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoli

    2013-11-01

    In this article, the distributed formation output regulation problem of linear heterogeneous multi-agent systems with uncertainty under switching topology is considered. It is a generalised framework for multi-agent coordination problems, which contains or concerns a variety of important multi-agent problems in a quite unified way. Its background includes active leader following formation for the agents to maintain desired relative distances and orientations to the leader with a predefined trajectory, and multi-agent formation with environmental inputs. With the help of canonical internal model we design a distributed dynamic output feedback to handle the distributed formation output regulation problem.

  10. Heterogeneous dislocation loop formation near grain boundaries in a neutron-irradiated commercial FeCrAl alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Kevin G.; Briggs, Samuel A.; Hu, Xunxiang; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Howard, Richard H.; Sridharan, Kumar

    2017-01-01

    FeCrAl alloys are an attractive class of materials for nuclear power applications because of their increased environmental compatibility compared with more traditional nuclear materials. Preliminary studies into the radiation tolerance of FeCrAl alloys under accelerated neutron testing between 300 and 400 °C have shown post-irradiation microstructures containing dislocation loops and a Cr-rich α‧ phase. Although these initial studies established the post-irradiation microstructures, there was little to no focus on understanding the influence of pre-irradiation microstructures on this response. In this study, a well-annealed commercial FeCrAl alloy, Alkrothal 720, was neutron irradiated to 1.8 displacements per atom (dpa) at 382 °C and then the effect of random high-angle grain boundaries on the spatial distribution and size of a dislocation loops, a/2 dislocation loops, and black dot damage was analyzed using on-zone scanning transmission electron microscopy. Results showed a clear heterogeneous dislocation loop formation with a/2 dislocation loops showing an increased number density and size, black dot damage showing a significant number density decrease, and a dislocation loops exhibiting an increased size in the vicinity of the grain boundary. These results suggest the importance of the pre-irradiation microstructure and, specifically, defect sink density spacing to the radiation tolerance of FeCrAl alloys.

  11. Disruption of Esrom and Ryk identifies the roof plate boundary as an intermediate target for commissure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Michael; Mathuru, Ajay Sriram; Wang, Hui; Silander, Olin; Kee, Michelle Zhi Ling; Jesuthasan, Suresh

    2008-02-01

    Growth cones are guided to their final destination by intermediate targets. Here, we identify intermediate targets and signaling components acting on zebrafish habenula commissural axons. Live imaging establishes that axons pause at the medial habenula before and after crossing the roof plate. esrom mutants axons fail to advance beyond the ipsilateral medial habenula. Tsc2 function is reduced in mutant axons, indicating cell autonomous defects in signaling. Consistent with signaling properties changing outside the roof plate, EphB is surface localized on axon segments within a zone demarcated by the medial habenula. wnt4a is expressed in the medial habenula and morpholino knockdown causes loss of the commissure. Electroporation of truncated Ryk causes axons to reenter the midline after reaching the contralateral habenula. These data identify Esrom as a mediator of growth cone navigation at an intermediate target and underscore the importance of midline boundaries as signaling centers for commissure formation.

  12. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries regulates formation of membrane vesicles in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind-Kezunovic, D.; Nielsen, C.H.; Wojewodzka, U.;

    2008-01-01

    fluorescein-labeled cholera toxin B subunit which labels ganglioside GM(1) enriched plasma membrane rafts. Cholesterol depletion with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin enhanced DiI vesiculation, GM(1)/DiI domain separation and was accompanied by a detachment of the subcortical cytoskeleton from the plasma membrane...

  13. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries regulates formation of membrane vesicles in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind-Kezunovic, Dina; Helix Nielsen, Claus; Wojewodzka, Urszula;

    2008-01-01

    -labeled cholera toxin B subunit which labels ganglioside GM(1) enriched plasma membrane rafts. Cholesterol depletion with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin enhanced DiI vesiculation, GM(1)/DiI domain separation and was accompanied by a detachment of the subcortical cytoskeleton from the plasma membrane. Based...

  14. Environmental regulation of cloud and star formation in galactic bars

    CERN Document Server

    Renaud, F; Emsellem, E; Agertz, O; Athanassoula, E; Combes, F; Elmegreen, B; Kraljic, K; Motte, F; Teyssier, R

    2015-01-01

    The strong time-dependence of the dynamics of galactic bars yields a complex and rapidly evolving distribution of dense gas and star forming regions. Although bars mainly host regions void of any star formation activity, their extremities can gather the physical conditions for the formation of molecular complexes and mini-starbursts. Using a sub-parsec resolution hydrodynamical simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy, we probe these conditions to explore how and where bar (hydro-)dynamics favours the formation or destruction of molecular clouds and stars. The interplay between the kpc-scale dynamics (gas flows, shear) and the parsec-scale (turbulence) is key to this problem. We find a strong dichotomy between the leading and trailing sides of the bar, in term of cloud fragmentation and in the age distribution of the young stars. After orbiting along the bar edge, these young structures slow down at the extremities of the bar, where orbital crowding increases the probability of cloud-cloud collision. We find tha...

  15. Study of formation boundary and dip attribute extraction based on edge detection technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yanbo; SUN Jianguoand SONG Chao

    2016-01-01

    In the seismic profile interpretation process,as the seismic data are big and the small geological fea-tures are difficult to identify,improvement of the efficiency is needed.In this study,structure tensor method in computer image edge detection processing is applied into the 2D seismic profile.Coherent attribute is used to extract formation edge.At the same time,extracting the eigenvalues and eigenvectors to calculate the seismic geometric properties which include dip and apparent dip,automatic identification is achieved.Testing the Gaussian kernel function with synthetic models and comparing the coherent attribute and dip attribute extraction results before and after,the conclusion that Gaussian filter can remove the random noise is obtained.

  16. Experimental study of boundary layers formation by thin film colorimetric interferometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MartinHartl; IvanKrupka; MiroslavLiska

    2001-01-01

    Thin film colorimetric interferometry was applied to the preliminary study of boundarylayers formation for a several liquids of known molecular structure that have been previously stud-ied by the force balance method. This technique intended for the study of very thin lubrication filmsdown to a few nanometers in a point contact between a steel ball and a transparent disk combinespowerful film thickness mapping capabilities with high accuracy. Central and minimum film thick-ness as well as film shape in the dependence on rolling speed was studied for hexadecane, oc-tamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS) and n-tetradecane. Results are compared with data obtainedfrom surface force apparatus measurements. OMCTS and n-tetradecane were found to formboundary films that result in a considerable enhancement in film thickness at slow speeds.

  17. From dynamic expression patterns to boundary formation in the presomitic mesoderm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik B Tiedemann

    Full Text Available The segmentation of the vertebrate body is laid down during early embryogenesis. The formation of signaling gradients, the periodic expression of genes of the Notch-, Fgf- and Wnt-pathways and their interplay in the unsegmented presomitic mesoderm (PSM precedes the rhythmic budding of nascent somites at its anterior end, which later develops into epithelialized structures, the somites. Although many in silico models describing partial aspects of somitogenesis already exist, simulations of a complete causal chain from gene expression in the growth zone via the interaction of multiple cells to segmentation are rare. Here, we present an enhanced gene regulatory network (GRN for mice in a simulation program that models the growing PSM by many virtual cells and integrates WNT3A and FGF8 gradient formation, periodic gene expression and Delta/Notch signaling. Assuming Hes7 as core of the somitogenesis clock and LFNG as modulator, we postulate a negative feedback of HES7 on Dll1 leading to an oscillating Dll1 expression as seen in vivo. Furthermore, we are able to simulate the experimentally observed wave of activated NOTCH (NICD as a result of the interactions in the GRN. We esteem our model as robust for a wide range of parameter values with the Hes7 mRNA and protein decays exerting a strong influence on the core oscillator. Moreover, our model predicts interference between Hes1 and HES7 oscillators when their intrinsic frequencies differ. In conclusion, we have built a comprehensive model of somitogenesis with HES7 as core oscillator that is able to reproduce many experimentally observed data in mice.

  18. Oxygen in zone-melting-recrystallized silicon-on-insulator films: Its distribution and possible role in sub-boundary formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, John C. C.; Tsaur, B.-Y.; Chen, C. K.; Dick, J. R.; Kazmerski, L. L.

    1984-06-01

    Using secondary-ion mass spectroscopy, we have found that oxygen is strongly concentrated at the sub-boundaries in zone-melting-recrystallized silicon-on-insulator films prepared by the graphite strip heater technique. This observation suggests that the formation of sub-boundaries during recrystallization may be caused by constitutional supercooling resulting from the presence of oxygen that is dissolved into the molten Si zone from the adjacent SiO2 layers.

  19. High-gain adaptive regulator for a string equation with uncertain harmonic disturbance under boundary output feedback control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baozhu GUO; Wei GUO

    2003-01-01

    This paper considers the boundary stabilization and parameter estimation of a one-dimensional wave equation in the case when one end is fixed and control and harmonic disturbance with uncertain amplitude are input at another end. A high-gain adaptive regulator is designed in terms of measured collocated end velocity. The existence and uniqueness of the classical solution of the closed-loop system is proven. It is shown that the state of the system approaches the standstill as time goes to infitv and meanwhile, the estimated parameter converges to the unknown parameter.

  20. Multi-seeded multi-mode formation of embedded clusters in the RMC: Structured star formation toward the south-east boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, J Z L M D

    2005-01-01

    The Rosette Molecular Complex contains embedded clusters with diverse properties and origins. We have previously explored the shell mode of formation in the north (Regions A & B) and the massive concentrations in the ridge (Region C). Here, we explore star formation towards the south of the complex, Region D, based on data from the spatially complete 2 Micron All Sky Survey. We find that stars are forming prolifically throughout this region in a highly structured mode with both clusters and loose aggregates detected. The most prominent cluster (Region D1) lies in the north-center. This cluster is over 20 pc to the south of the Monoceros ridge, the interface of the emerging young OB cluster NGC 2244 with its ambient molecular clouds. In addition, there are several branches stemming from AFGL 961 in Region C and extending to the south-east boundary of the cloud. We invoke a tree model to interpret this pattern, corresponding to probable tracks of abrupt turbulent excitation and subsequent decay. Alternative...

  1. Flow Regulation for Controlled River-Ice Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    BXO (L) .TAD*11XO(Ll) C COMPUTE THE WATER TEMPERATURE AND ITS SPACE DERIVATIVE. C TXSI=A1*TO(LI ) ,A2*T7(L),A3*TXO(L1 ) .A4*TXO(L) T(l) -((I. -DTAT2...I) BXO (I)-HX(I) V0O(I)-VX(I) TO(I)-T(I) TXO(I)-TX(I) CO(I)=C(I) CXO(I)-CX(I) ALPO(I)-ALP(I) 210 CONTINUE RETURN 500 FORMAT( V < THERMA&L CONDITION

  2. GABA Regulates Stem Cell Proliferation before Nervous System Formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Doris,; Kriegstein, Arnold; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2008-01-01

    International audience; HISTONE H2AX-DEPENDENT GABAA RECEPTOR REGULATION OF STEM CELL PROLIFERATION: Andäng M, Hjerling-Leffler J, Moliner A, Lundgren TK, Castelo-Branco G, Nanou E, Pozas E, Bryja V, Halliez S, Nishimaru H, Wilbertz J, Arenas E, Koltzenburg M, Charnay P, El Manira A, Ibañez CF, Ernfors P. Nature20084517177:460-46418185516 Stem cell self-renewal implies proliferation under continued maintenance of multipotency. Small changes in numbers of stem cells may lead to large differenc...

  3. Environment and self-regulation in galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Daniel; Schawinski, Kevin; Sarzi, Marc; Silk, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The environment is known to affect the formation and evolution of galaxies considerably best visible through the well-known morphology-density relationship. In this paper we study the effect of environment on the evolution of early-type galaxies by analysing the stellar population properties of 3,360 galaxies morphologically selected by visual inspection from the SDSS in the redshift range 0.05formation through their emissio...

  4. Vitamin C: A Novel Regulator of Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Natarajan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET formation was recently identified as a novel mechanism to kill pathogens. However, excessive NET formation in sepsis can injure host tissues. We have recently shown that parenteral vitamin C (VitC is protective in sepsis. Whether VitC alters NETosis is unknown. Methods: We used Gulo−/− mice as they lack the ability to synthesize VitC. Sepsis was induced by intraperitoneal infusion of a fecal stem solution (abdominal peritonitis, FIP. Some VitC deficient Gulo−/− mice received an infusion of ascorbic acid (AscA, 200 mg/kg 30 min after induction of FIP. NETosis was assessed histologically and by quantification for circulating free DNA (cf-DNA in serum. Autophagy, histone citrullination, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, NFκB activation and apoptosis were investigated in peritoneal PMNs. Results: Sepsis produced significant NETs in the lungs of VitC deficient Gulo−/− mice and increased circulating cf-DNA. This was attenuated in the VitC sufficient Gulo−/− mice and in VitC deficient Gulo−/− mice infused with AscA. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs from VitC deficient Gulo−/− mice demonstrated increased activation of ER stress, autophagy, histone citrullination, and NFκB activation, while apoptosis was inhibited. VitC also significantly attenuated PMA induced NETosis in PMNs from healthy human volunteers.

  5. Insight into Skin Tumorigenesis Highlighting the Function of Epigenetic Regulators in SCC Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Epigenetic regulation of cellular memory by the polycomb and trithorax group proteins . Annu Rev Genet 2004;38:413-443...lys 27. Genes Dev 2003;17:1823-1828. 9 Francis NJ, Kingston RE, Woodcock CL: Chromatin compaction by a polycomb group protein complex. Science...Highlighting the Function of Epigenetic Regulators in SCC Formation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jisheng Zhang CONTRACTING

  6. Relationship between Protein Accumulation Regulation and Yield Formation in Soybean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Lihua; LI Jie; LIU Lijun; ZU Wei

    2006-01-01

    Three different genotypes soybeans were adopted in this experiment under three fertilizer levels.The object of this study was to investigate protein accumulation regulation of soybean cultivars under the condition of different nutrient levels, and their effects on soybean yield and quality, and to provide theoretical evidence for breed, cultivation and agricultural production, also man-powered controllable locations. The concentration of N in the leaves declined after seedling stage, then increased again at stage of early flowering, and started to decrease up to leaf senescence, declined rapidly from seed-filling season to stage of yellow ripeness. The concentration of N in the stems and pod walls declined with growth stage. High seed protein genotypes exhibited higher N assimilating and partitioning during whole growth stages. Pod walls were media of N partitioning. Protein was accumulated mainly during the later period of reproductive growth stage up to harvest, so plant growth after stage of yellow ripeness could not be neglected.

  7. Cholesterol Regulates Syntaxin 6 Trafficking at trans-Golgi Network Endosomal Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meritxell Reverter

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of cholesterol export from late endosomes causes cellular cholesterol imbalance, including cholesterol depletion in the trans-Golgi network (TGN. Here, using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1 mutant cell lines and human NPC1 mutant fibroblasts, we show that altered cholesterol levels at the TGN/endosome boundaries trigger Syntaxin 6 (Stx6 accumulation into VAMP3, transferrin, and Rab11-positive recycling endosomes (REs. This increases Stx6/VAMP3 interaction and interferes with the recycling of αVβ3 and α5β1 integrins and cell migration, possibly in a Stx6-dependent manner. In NPC1 mutant cells, restoration of cholesterol levels in the TGN, but not inhibition of VAMP3, restores the steady-state localization of Stx6 in the TGN. Furthermore, elevation of RE cholesterol is associated with increased amounts of Stx6 in RE. Hence, the fine-tuning of cholesterol levels at the TGN-RE boundaries together with a subset of cholesterol-sensitive SNARE proteins may play a regulatory role in cell migration and invasion.

  8. Magnetically self-regulated formation of early protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Chabrier, Gilles; Marchand, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The formation of protoplanetary discs during the collapse of molecular dense cores is significantly influenced by angular momentum transport, notably by the magnetic torque. In turn, the evolution of the magnetic field is determined by dynamical processes and non-ideal MHD effects such as ambipolar diffusion. Considering simple relations between various timescales characteristic of the magnetized collapse, we derive an expression for the early disc radius, $ r \\simeq 18 \\, {\\rm AU} \\, \\left({\\eta_{\\rm AD} / 0.1 \\, {\\rm s}} \\right)^{2/9} \\left({B_z / 0.1\\, {\\rm G}} \\right) ^{-4/9} \\left({M / 0.1 \\msol} \\right) ^{1/3},$ where $M$ is the total disc plus protostar mass, $\\eta_\\mathrm{AD}$ is the ambipolar diffusion coefficient and $B_z$ is the magnetic field in the inner part of the core. This is about significantly smaller than the discs that would form if angular momentum was conserved. The analytical predictions are confronted against a large sample of 3D, non-ideal MHD collapse calculations covering variation...

  9. Rot is a key regulator of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mootz, Joe M.; Benson, Meredith A.; Heim, Cortney E.; Crosby, Heidi A.; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S.; Dunman, Paul M.; Kielian, Tammy; Torres, Victor J.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    AUTHOR SUMMARY Staphylococcus aureus is a significant cause of chronic biofilm infections on medical implants. We investigated the biofilm regulatory cascade and discovered that the repressor of toxins (Rot) is part of this pathway. A USA300 community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain deficient in Rot was unable to form a biofilm using multiple different assays, and we found rot mutants in other strain lineages were also biofilm deficient. By performing a global analysis of transcripts and protein production controlled by Rot, we observed that all the secreted protease genes were upregulated in a rot mutant, and we hypothesized that this regulation could be responsible for the biofilm phenotype. To investigate this question, we determined that Rot bound to the protease promoters, and we observed that activity levels of these enzymes, in particular the cysteine proteases, were increased in a rot mutant. By inactivating these proteases, biofilm capacity was restored to the mutant, demonstrating they are responsible for the biofilm negative phenotype. Finally, we tested the rot mutant in a mouse catheter model of biofilm infection and observed a significant reduction in biofilm burden. Thus S. aureus uses the transcription factor Rot to repress secreted protease levels in order to build a biofilm. PMID:25612137

  10. Magnetically Self-regulated Formation of Early Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Commerçon, Benoît; Chabrier, Gilles; Marchand, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    The formation of protoplanetary disks during the collapse of molecular dense cores is significantly influenced by angular momentum transport, notably by the magnetic torque. In turn, the evolution of the magnetic field is determined by dynamical processes and non-ideal MHD effects such as ambipolar diffusion. Considering simple relations between various timescales characteristic of the magnetized collapse, we derive an expression for the early disk radius, r≃ 18 {au} {({η }{AD}/0.1{{s}})}2/9{({B}z/0.1{{G}})}-4/9{(M/0.1{M}⊙ )}1/3, where M is the total disk plus protostar mass, {η }{AD} is the ambipolar diffusion coefficient, and B z is the magnetic field in the inner part of the core. This is significantly smaller than the disks that would form if angular momentum was conserved. The analytical predictions are confronted against a large sample of 3D, non-ideal MHD collapse calculations covering variations of a factor 100 in core mass, a factor 10 in the level of turbulence, a factor 5 in rotation, and magnetic mass-to-flux over critical mass-to-flux ratios 2 and 5. The disk radius estimates are found to agree with the numerical simulations within less than a factor 2. A striking prediction of our analysis is the weak dependence of circumstellar disk radii upon the various relevant quantities, suggesting weak variations among class-0 disk sizes. In some cases, we note the onset of large spiral arms beyond this radius.

  11. Crystallographic Fabrics, Grain Boundary Microstructure and Shape Preferred Orientation of Deformed Banded Iron Formations and their Significance for Deformation Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Carlos Fernando; Graça, Leonardo; Lagoeiro, Leonardo; Ferreira, Filippe

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of grain boundaries and shapes along with crystallographic preferred orientations (CPOs) are a key aspect of investigations of rock microstructures for their correlation with deformation mechanisms. Rapid developments have occurred in the studying rock microstructures due to recent improvements in analytical techniques such as Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). EBSD technique allows quick automated microtextural characteritzation. The deformed banded iron formations (BIFs) occurring in the Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF) province in Brazil have been studied extensively with EBSD. All studies have focused mainly in CPOs. The general agreement is that dislocation creep was the dominant process of deformation, for the strong c-axis fabric of hematite crystals. This idea is substantiated by viscoplastic self-consistent models for deformation of hematite. However there are limitations to analyzing natural CPOs alone, or those generated by deformation models. The strong c-axis fabric could be taken as equally powerful an evidence for other known deformation mechanisms. Some grain boundary types in BIFs of the QF are irregular and comprise equant grains in granoblastic texture (Figure 1a). CPOs for this kind are strong and consistent with a predominance of dislocation creep. Others are very regular and long parallel to basal planes of hematites forming large elongated crystals (lepidoblastic texture, Figure 1b). Such crystals are called specularite, and their formation has been previously attributed to dislocation creep. This is erroneous because of the high strains which would be required. Their shape must be due to anisotropic grain growth. Other types lie between the above end-textures. Both types of grain shape microstructures have the same core deformation mechanism. Describing their genetic differences is crucial, since specularite owe its shape to anisotropic grain growth. It is not possible yet to confirm that dislocation creep was the

  12. Collaborative jurisdiction in the regulation of electric utilities: A new look at jurisdictional boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    This conference is one of several activities initiated by FERC, DOE and NARUC to improve the dialogue between Federal and State regulators and policymakers. I am pleased to be here to participate in this conference and to address, with you, electricity issues of truly national significance. I would like to commend Ashley Brown and the NARUC Electricity Committee for its foresight in devising a conference on these issues at this critical juncture in the regulation of the electric utility industry. I also would like to commend Chairman Allday and the FERC for their efforts to improve communication between Federal and State electricity regulators; both through FERC`s Public Conference on Electricity Issues that was held last June, and through the FERC/NARUC workshops that are scheduled to follow this conference. These collaborative efforts are important and necessary steps in addressing successfully the many issues facing the electric utility industry those who regulate it, and those who depend upon it - in other words, about everyone.

  13. Position of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary and timing of the end-Triassic extinctions on land: Data from the Moenave Formation on the southern Colorado Plateau, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, S.G.; Tanner, L.H.; Donohoo-Hurley, L.; Geissman, J.W.; Kozur, H.W.; Heckert, A.B.; Weems, R.E.

    2011-01-01

    Strata of the Moenave Formation on and adjacent to the southern Colorado Plateau in Utah-Arizona, U.S.A., represent one of the best known and most stratigraphically continuous, complete and fossiliferous terrestrial sections across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. We present a synthesis of new biostratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic data collected from across the Moenave Formation outcrop belt, which extends from the St. George area in southwestern Utah to the Tuba City area in northern Arizona. These data include palynomorphs, conchostracans and vertebrate fossils (including footprints) and a composite polarity record based on four overlapping magnetostratigraphic sections. Placement of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary in strata of the Moenave Formation has long been imprecise and debatable, but these new data (especially the conchostracans) allow us to place the Triassic-Jurassic boundary relatively precisely in the middle part of the Whitmore Point Member of the Moenave Formation, stratigraphically well above the highest occurrence of crurotarsan body fossils or footprints. Correlation to marine sections based on this placement indicates that major terrestrial vertebrate extinctions preceded marine extinctions across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary and therefore were likely unrelated to the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) volcanism. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Biofilm Formation by Bacillus cereus Is Influenced by PlcR, a Pleiotropic Regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Somers, Eileen B.; Lereclus, Didier; Wong, Amy C. Lee

    2006-01-01

    The ΔplcR mutant of Bacillus cereus strain ATCC 14579 developed significantly more biofilm than the wild type and produced increased amounts of biosurfactant. Biosurfactant production is required for biofilm formation and may be directly or indirectly repressed by PlcR, a pleiotropic regulator. Coating polystyrene plates with surfactin, a biosurfactant from Bacillus subtilis, rescued the deficiency in biofilm formation by the wild type. PMID:16820512

  15. The Rho Target PRK2 Regulates Apical Junction Formation in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Sean W.; Magalhaes, Ana; Hall, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate multiple signaling pathways to control a number of cellular processes during epithelial morphogenesis. To investigate the downstream pathways through which Rho regulates epithelial apical junction formation, we screened a small interfering RNA (siRNA) library targeting 28 known Rho target proteins in 16HBE human bronchial epithelial cells. This led to the identification of the serine-threonine kinase PRK2 (protein kinase C-related kinase 2, also called PKN2). Depletion of...

  16. Role of VASP phosphorylation for the regulation of microglia chemotaxis via the regulation of focal adhesion formation/maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S; Chung, C Y

    2009-12-01

    Microglia activation and migration are known to play crucial roles for the response to brain injuries. Extracellular ADP was reported to induce microglia chemotaxis and membrane ruffles through P2Y12 receptor. In this study, we examined the role of VASP phosphorylation in ADP-induced microglia chemotaxis and membrane ruffle formation. ADP stimulation transiently increased intracellular cAMP level, VASP phosphorylation at Ser153, membrane ruffle formation, and chemotaxis. PKA inhibitor effectively inhibited VASP phosphorylation and chemotaxis, indicating that P2Y12-mediated activation of PKA and subsequent VASP phosphorylation are involved in the regulation of microglia chemotaxis. Forskolin and okadaic acid induced sustained VASP phosphorylation at a high level, causing a significant reduction of the retraction of membrane ruffles and chemotaxis. In forskolin- or okadaic acid-treated cells, phosphorylated VASP remained at the membrane cortex, and size and number of mature focal adhesions were not increased, indicating that prolonged phosphorylation of VASP could inhibit transformation of focal complexes into focal adhesions. VASP knockdown cells showed markedly reduced frequency and distance of membrane ruffling upon ADP stimulation, reinforcing the idea that VASP is required for the ruffle formation. Cells expressing GFP-VASP(S153A) also showed a significant reduction of protrusion distance during ruffle formation, but the frequency and the distance of retraction were not affected by FSK at all. This result suggests that dephosphorylation of VASP might be required for the growth of adhesion strength during membrane retraction. Our results suggest that VASP phosphorylation by PKA plays an important role in membrane ruffle formation and chemotaxis via the regulation of focal adhesion formation/maturation.

  17. HOXC9 regulates formation of parachordal lymphangioplasts and the thoracic duct in zebrafish via stabilin 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J Stoll

    Full Text Available HOXC9 belongs to the family of homeobox transcription factors, which are regulators of body patterning and development. HOXC9 acts as a negative regulator on blood endothelial cells but its function on lymphatic vessel development has not been studied. The hyaluronan receptor homologs stabilin 1 and stabilin 2 are expressed in endothelial cells but their role in vascular development is poorly understood. This study was aimed at investigating the function of HOXC9, stabilin 2 and stabilin 1 in lymphatic vessel development in zebrafish and in endothelial cells. Morpholino-based expression silencing of HOXC9 repressed parachordal lymphangioblast assembly and thoracic duct formation in zebrafish. HOXC9 positively regulated stabilin 2 expression in zebrafish and in HUVECs and expression silencing of stabilin 2 phenocopied the HOXC9 morphant vascular phenotype. This effect could be compensated by HOXC9 mRNA injection in stabilin 2 morphant zebrafish embryos. Stabilin 1 also regulated parachordal lymphangioblast and thoracic duct formation in zebrafish but acts independently of HOXC9. On a cellular level stabilin 1 and stabilin 2 regulated endothelial cell migration and in-gel sprouting angiogenesis in endothelial cells. HOXC9 was identified as novel transcriptional regulator of parachordal lymphangioblast assembly and thoracic duct formation in zebrafish that acts via stabilin 2. Stabilin 1, which acts independently of HOXC9, has a similar function in zebrafish and both receptors control important cellular processes in endothelial cells.

  18. Constraints on the upper boundary age of the Tiaojishan Formation volcanic rocks in West Liaoning-North Hebei by LA-ICP-MS dating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong; WANG MingXin; LIU XiaoMing

    2008-01-01

    In West Liaoning-North Hebei, the Tiaojishan Formation volcanic rocks are developed and many iso-topic ages with a very wide age range were obtained in them as well. These different ages have direct influence on confirming and interpreting the related geological issues in West Liaoning-North Hebei and have restricted the study of geological problems related. In the field, the Tiaojishan Formation and the overlying Tuchengzi Formation are in parallel unconformable contact. By systematical sampling and dating of LA-ICP-MS in the Tiaojishan Formation (especially in the upper part) in Luanping, Chengde basins of Northern Hebei Province and in Lingyuan, Jinlingsi-Yangshan basins of Western Liaoning Province, combined with the dating data obtained by previous researchers, results indicatethat the upper boundary age of the Tiaojishan Formation is from 156 to 153 Ma, and the lower boundary age of the Tiaojishan Formation is about 165 Ma, the Tiaojishan Formation was formed from the late of middle Jurassic to late Jurassic Epoch.

  19. Three Dimensional Hydrodynamic Simulations of Multiphase Galactic Disks with Star Formation Feedback: I. Regulation of Star Formation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chang-Goo; Kim, Woong-Tae

    2013-01-01

    The energy and momentum feedback from young stars has a profound impact on the interstellar medium (ISM), including heating and driving turbulence in the neutral gas that fuels future star formation. Recent theory has argued that this leads to a quasi-equilibrium self-regulated state, and for outer atomic-dominated disks results in the surface density of star formation $\\Sigma_{SFR}$ varying approximately linearly with the weight of the ISM (or midplane turbulent + thermal pressure). We use three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations to test the theoretical predictions for thermal, turbulent, and vertical dynamical equilibrium, and the implied functional dependence of $\\Sigma_{SFR}$ on local disk properties. Our models demonstrate that all equilibria are established rapidly, and that the expected proportionalities between mean thermal and turbulent pressures and $\\Sigma_{SFR}$ apply. For outer disk regions, this results in $\\Sigma_{SFR} \\propto \\Sigma \\sqrt{\\rho_{sd}}$, where $\\Sigma$ is the total ga...

  20. Biogenic VOC oxidation and organic aerosol formation in an urban nocturnal boundary layer: aircraft vertical profiles in Houston, TX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Brown

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Organic compounds are a large component of aerosol mass, but organic aerosol (OA sources remain poorly characterized. Recent model studies have suggested nighttime oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons as a potentially large OA source, but analysis of field measurements to test these predictions is sparse. We present nighttime vertical profiles of nitrogen oxides, ozone, VOCs and aerosol composition measured during low approaches of the NOAA P-3 aircraft to airfields in Houston, TX. This region has large emissions of both biogenic hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides. The latter serves as a source of the nitrate radical, NO3, a key nighttime oxidant. Biogenic VOCs (BVOC and urban pollutants were concentrated within the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL, which varied in depth from 100–400 m. Despite concentrated NOx at low altitude, ozone was never titrated to zero, resulting in rapid NO3 radical production rates of 0.2–2.7ppbv h-1 within the NBL. Monoterpenes and isoprene were frequently present within the NBL and underwent rapid oxidation (up to 1ppbv h−1, mainly by NO3 and to a lesser extent O3. Concurrent enhancement in organic and nitrate aerosol on several profiles was consistent with primary emissions and with secondary production from nighttime BVOC oxidation, with the latter equivalent to or slightly larger than the former. Ratios of organic aerosol to CO within the NBL ranged from 14 to 38 μg m−3 OA/ppmv CO. A box model simulation incorporating monoterpene emissions, oxidant formation rates and monoterpene SOA yields suggested overnight OA production of 0.5 to 9 μg m−3.

  1. The CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON3 gene is required for boundary and shoot meristem formation in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vroemen, Casper W; Mordhorst, Andreas P; Albrecht, Cathy

    2003-01-01

    From an enhancer trap screen for genes expressed in Arabidopsis embryos, we identified a gene expressed from the octant stage onward in the boundary between the two presumptive cotyledons and in a variety of postembryonic organ and meristem boundaries. This gene, CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON3 (CUC3...

  2. Regulation of type 1 fimbriae synthesis and biofilm formation by the transcriptional regulator LrhA of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Caroline; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Lehnen, Daniela; Heintz, Margit; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Nagy, Gábor; Michaelis, Kai; Emödy, Levente; Polen, Tino; Rachel, Reinhard; Wendisch, Volker F; Unden, Gottfried

    2005-10-01

    Type 1 fimbriae of Escherichia coli facilitate attachment to the host mucosa and promote biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. The transcriptional regulator LrhA, which is known as a repressor of flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes, regulates biofilm formation and expression of type 1 fimbriae. Whole-genome expression profiling revealed that inactivation of lrhA results in an increased expression of structural components of type 1 fimbriae. In vitro, LrhA bound to the promoter regions of the two fim recombinases (FimB and FimE) that catalyse the inversion of the fimA promoter, and to the invertible element itself. Translational lacZ fusions with these genes and quantification of fimE transcript levels by real-time PCR showed that LrhA influences type 1 fimbrial phase variation, primarily via activation of FimE, which is required for the ON-to-OFF transition of the fim switch. Enhanced type 1 fimbrial expression as a result of lrhA disruption was confirmed by mannose-sensitive agglutination of yeast cells. Biofilm formation was stimulated by lrhA inactivation and completely suppressed upon LrhA overproduction. The effects of LrhA on biofilm formation were exerted via the changed levels of surface molecules, most probably both flagella and type 1 fimbriae. Together, the data show a role for LrhA as a repressor of type 1 fimbrial expression, and thus as a regulator of the initial stages of biofilm development and, presumably, bacterial adherence to epithelial host cells also.

  3. Data supporting regulating temporospatial dynamics of morphogen for structure formation of the lacrimal gland by chitosan biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ya-Chuan; Yang, Tsung-Lin

    2017-02-01

    The lacrimal gland is responsible for tear synthesis and secretion, and is derived from the epithelia of ocular surface and generated by branching morphogenesis. The dataset presented in this article is to support the research results of the effect of chitosan biomaterials on facilitating the structure formation of the lacrimal gland by regulating temporospatial dynamics of morphogen. The embryonic lacrimal gland explants were used as the standard experimental model for investigating lacrimal gland branching morphogenesis. Chitosan biomaterials promoted lacrimal gland branching with a dose-dependent effect. It helped in vivo binding of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) related molecules in the epithelial-mesenchymal boundary of emerging epithelial branches. When mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) inhibitors applied, the chitosan effects reduced. Nonetheless, the ratios of MAPK and Akt/PKB phosphorylation were still greater in the chitosan group than the control. The data demonstrated here confirm the essential role of HGF-signaling in chitosan-promoted structure formation of the lacrimal gland.

  4. Data supporting regulating temporospatial dynamics of morphogen for structure formation of the lacrimal gland by chitosan biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Chuan Hsiao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The lacrimal gland is responsible for tear synthesis and secretion, and is derived from the epithelia of ocular surface and generated by branching morphogenesis. The dataset presented in this article is to support the research results of the effect of chitosan biomaterials on facilitating the structure formation of the lacrimal gland by regulating temporospatial dynamics of morphogen. The embryonic lacrimal gland explants were used as the standard experimental model for investigating lacrimal gland branching morphogenesis. Chitosan biomaterials promoted lacrimal gland branching with a dose-dependent effect. It helped in vivo binding of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF related molecules in the epithelial-mesenchymal boundary of emerging epithelial branches. When mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK or protein kinase B (Akt/PKB inhibitors applied, the chitosan effects reduced. Nonetheless, the ratios of MAPK and Akt/PKB phosphorylation were still greater in the chitosan group than the control. The data demonstrated here confirm the essential role of HGF-signaling in chitosan-promoted structure formation of the lacrimal gland.

  5. The orphan nuclear receptor SHP is a positive regulator of osteoblastic bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Byung-Chul; Lee, Yong-Soo; Bae, In-Ho; Lee, Chul-Ho; Shin, Hong-In; Ha, Hyun Jung; Franceschi, Renny T; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Koh, Jeong-Tae

    2010-02-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP; NR0B2) interacts with a diverse array of transcription factors and regulates a variety of cellular events such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism. However, the role of SHP in bone formation has not yet been elucidated. SHP expression is significantly increased during osteoblast differentiation, and its expression is partially regulated by bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), which plays an important role in bone formation. In our study, inhibition of SHP expression significantly repressed BMP-2-induced osteoblast differentiation and ectopic bone formation. In accordance with these in vitro and in vivo results, osteoblast differentiation in SHP(-/-) mice primary osteoblasts was significantly repressed, and the mice showed decreased bone mass resulting from decreased numbers of osteoblasts. Finally, SHP physically interacts and forms a complex with runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) on the osteocalcin gene promoter, and overexpression of SHP increased Runx2 transactivity via competition with histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4), an enzyme that inhibits DNA binding of Runx2 to its target genes. Taken together, these results indicate that SHP acts as a novel positive regulator of bone formation by augmenting osteoblast differentiation through regulation of the transcriptional activity of Runx2.

  6. Formative Feedback to Transfer Self-Regulation of Task-Oriented Reading Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, A. C.; Vidal-Abarca, E.; Cerdán, R.

    2016-01-01

    The study includes two experiments to analyse the effects of automatic formative feedback designed to promote the transfer of self-regulation of strategic decisions in task-oriented reading (e.g. answering questions from an available text). Secondary-school students read and answered multiple-choice comprehension questions from two texts having…

  7. THE CONTRADICTIONS OF THE FORMATION OF FUNCTIONAL AND TARGET REGULATION OF THE STOCK MARKET OF UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kalach

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of formation of the inversion type of the stock market and its contradictions were investigated, the necessity of transition to a functional-target regulation of the stock market was proved the ways of optimization of the institutional system by integrating the functions of regulatory authorities were proposed.

  8. VE-cadherin interacts with cell polarity protein Pals1 to regulate vascular lumen formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Benjamin F; Steinbacher, Tim; Hartmann, Christian; Kummer, Daniel; Pajonczyk, Denise; Mirzapourshafiyi, Fatemeh; Nakayama, Masanori; Weide, Thomas; Gerke, Volker; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-09-15

    Blood vessel tubulogenesis requires the formation of stable cell-to-cell contacts and the establishment of apicobasal polarity of vascular endothelial cells. Cell polarity is regulated by highly conserved cell polarity protein complexes such as the Par3-aPKC-Par6 complex and the CRB3-Pals1-PATJ complex, which are expressed by many different cell types and regulate various aspects of cell polarity. Here we describe a functional interaction of VE-cadherin with the cell polarity protein Pals1. Pals1 directly interacts with VE-cadherin through a membrane-proximal motif in the cytoplasmic domain of VE-cadherin. VE-cadherin clusters Pals1 at cell-cell junctions. Mutating the Pals1-binding motif in VE-cadherin abrogates the ability of VE-cadherin to regulate apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. In a similar way, deletion of the Par3-binding motif at the C-terminus of VE-cadherin impairs apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. Our findings indicate that the biological activity of VE-cadherin in regulating endothelial polarity and vascular lumen formation is mediated through its interaction with the two cell polarity proteins Pals1 and Par3.

  9. Essential roles and regulation of the Legionella pneumophila collagen-like adhesin during biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Mallegol

    Full Text Available Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila (Lp and is defined by a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5 to 80%. In a previous study, we showed that a glycosaminoglycan (GAG-binding adhesin of Lp, named Lcl, is produced during legionellosis and is unique to the L. pneumophila species. Importantly, a mutant depleted in Lcl (Δlpg2644 is impaired in adhesion to GAGs and epithelial cells and in biofilm formation. Here, we examine the molecular function(s of Lcl and the transcriptional regulation of its encoding gene during different stages of the biofilm development. We show that the collagen repeats and the C-terminal domains of Lcl are crucial for the production of biofilm. We present evidence that Lcl is involved in the early step of surface attachment but also in intercellular interactions. Furthermore, we address the relationship between Lcl gene regulation during biofilm formation and quorum sensing (QS. In a static biofilm assay, we show that Lcl is differentially regulated during growth phases and biofilm formation. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional regulation of lpg2644, mediated by a prototype of QS signaling homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL, may play a role during the biofilm development. Thus, transcriptional down-regulation of lpg2644 may facilitate the dispersion of Lp to reinitiate biofilm colonization on a distal surface.

  10. VCP and ATL1 regulate endoplasmic reticulum and protein synthesis for dendritic spine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-03-17

    Imbalanced protein homeostasis, such as excessive protein synthesis and protein aggregation, is a pathogenic hallmark of a range of neurological disorders. Here, using expression of mutant proteins, a knockdown approach and disease mutation knockin mice, we show that VCP (valosin-containing protein), together with its cofactor P47 and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology regulator ATL1 (Atlastin-1), regulates tubular ER formation and influences the efficiency of protein synthesis to control dendritic spine formation in neurons. Strengthening the significance of protein synthesis in dendritic spinogenesis, the translation blocker cyclohexamide and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduce dendritic spine density, while a leucine supplement that increases protein synthesis ameliorates the dendritic spine defects caused by Vcp and Atl1 deficiencies. Because VCP and ATL1 are the causative genes of several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, we suggest that impaired ER formation and inefficient protein synthesis are significant in the pathogenesis of multiple neurological disorders.

  11. Contributions of the wall boundary layer to the formation of the counter-rotating vortex pair in transverse jets

    KAUST Repository

    SCHLEGEL, FABRICE

    2011-04-08

    Using high-resolution 3-D vortex simulations, this study seeks a mechanistic understanding of vorticity dynamics in transverse jets at a finite Reynolds number. A full no-slip boundary condition, rigorously formulated in terms of vorticity generation along the channel wall, captures unsteady interactions between the wall boundary layer and the jet - in particular, the separation of the wall boundary layer and its transport into the interior. For comparison, we also implement a reduced boundary condition that suppresses the separation of the wall boundary layer away from the jet nozzle. By contrasting results obtained with these two boundary conditions, we characterize near-field vortical structures formed as the wall boundary layer separates on the backside of the jet. Using various Eulerian and Lagrangian diagnostics, it is demonstrated that several near-wall vortical structures are formed as the wall boundary layer separates. The counter-rotating vortex pair, manifested by the presence of vortices aligned with the jet trajectory, is initiated closer to the jet exit. Moreover tornado-like wall-normal vortices originate from the separation of spanwise vorticity in the wall boundary layer at the side of the jet and from the entrainment of streamwise wall vortices in the recirculation zone on the lee side. These tornado-like vortices are absent in the case where separation is suppressed. Tornado-like vortices merge with counter-rotating vorticity originating in the jet shear layer, significantly increasing wall-normal circulation and causing deeper jet penetration into the crossflow stream. © 2011 Cambridge University Press.

  12. Application of sensorimotor correction method in self-regulation formation disorder in primary school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.O. Sedova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The issue of formation of self-regulation is of interest to various psychological disciplines. The uncorrected violations of the formation of self-regulation can lead to school disadaptation. We presented results of applying the methodology of sensorimotor correction in work with self-regulation disorder in children of primary school age. The level of development of self-regulation was defined in the neuropsychological examination. The effect of sensorimotor correction for this type of deviation in mental development is due to the orientation on the mechanism of impaired mental dysontogenesis, through the influence on motor and sensory components of the whole psychic of the child. The result of the work conducted was a pronounced increase in the level of self-regulation in experimental group compared to the control. The features of individual stages of the correctional program are described. Additional ways of work to develop the skills of self-regulation are proposed. Particular attention is paid to the importance of parental involvement in the correctional process.

  13. The transcription factor p8 regulates autophagy during diapause embryo formation in Artemia parthenogenetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng; Jia, Sheng-Nan; Yang, Fan; Jia, Wen-Huan; Yu, Xiao-Jian; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Autophagy is an essential homeostatic process by which cytoplasmic components, including macromolecules and organelles, are degraded by lysosome. Increasing evidence suggests that phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) and target of rapamycin (TOR) play key roles in the regulation of autophagy. However, the regulation of autophagy in quiescent cells remains unclear, despite the fact that autophagy is known to be critical for normal development, regeneration, and degenerative diseases. Here, crustacean Artemia parthenogenetica was used as a model system because they produced and released encysted embryos that enter a state of obligate dormancy in cell quiescence to withstand various environmental threats. We observed that autophagy was increased before diapause stage but dropped to extremely low level in diapause cysts in Artemia. Western blot analyses indicated that the regulation of autophagy was AMPK/TOR independent during diapause embryo formation. Importantly, the level of p8 (Ar-p8), a stress-inducible transcription cofactor, was elevated at the stage just before diapause and was absent in encysted embryos, indicating that Ar-p8 may regulate autophagy. The results of Ar-p8 knockdown revealed that Ar-p8 regulated autophagy during diapause formation in Artemia. Moreover, we observed that activating transcription factors 4 and 6 (ATF4 and ATF6) responded to Ar-p8-regulated autophagy, indicating that autophagy targeted endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during diapause formation in Artemia. Additionally, AMPK/TOR-independent autophagy was validated in human gastric cancer MKN45 cells overexpressing Ar-p8. The findings presented here may provide insights into the role of p8 in regulating autophagy in quiescent cells.

  14. Original Mineralogy and Recognition of Upper Boundary of the Sarvak Formation Based on Geochemistry and Isotope Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asgari, M; Tahmasebi Poor, A; Barari, Amin

    2014-01-01

    Carbonate sequence of upper cretaceous (Cenomanian) of Sarvak Formation is a part of Bangestan Group with the thickness of 760m in Ahvaz oil field (well no. 63). This formation is overlain by the Kazhdumi Formation and is uncomfortably underlain by the Ilam Formation. In this study major and mino...

  15. Aggresome formation is regulated by RanBPM through an interaction with HDAC6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louisa M. Salemi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In conditions of proteasomal impairment, the build-up of damaged or misfolded proteins activates a cellular response leading to the recruitment of damaged proteins into perinuclear aggregates called aggresomes. Aggresome formation involves the retrograde transport of cargo proteins along the microtubule network and is dependent on the histone deacetylase HDAC6. Here we show that ionizing radiation (IR promotes Ran-Binding Protein M (RanBPM relocalization into discrete perinuclear foci where it co-localizes with aggresome components ubiquitin, dynein and HDAC6, suggesting that the RanBPM perinuclear clusters correspond to aggresomes. RanBPM was also recruited to aggresomes following treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 and the DNA-damaging agent etoposide. Strikingly, aggresome formation by HDAC6 was markedly impaired in RanBPM shRNA cells, but was restored by re-expression of RanBPM. RanBPM was found to interact with HDAC6 and to inhibit its deacetylase activity. This interaction was abrogated by a RanBPM deletion of its LisH/CTLH domain, which also prevented aggresome formation, suggesting that RanBPM promotes aggresome formation through an association with HDAC6. Our results suggest that RanBPM regulates HDAC6 activity and is a central regulator of aggresome formation.

  16. Radiative effects of tropospheric aerosols on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer and its feedback on the haze formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; Su, Hang; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-04-01

    Planetary boundary layer (PBL) plays a key role in air pollution dispersion and influences day-to-day air quality. Some studies suggest that high aerosol loadings during severe haze events may modify PBL dynamics by radiative effects and hence enhance the development of haze. This study mainly investigates the radiative effects of tropospheric aerosols on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer by conducting simulations with Weather Research and Forecasting single-column model (WRF-SCM). We find that high aerosol loading in PBL depressed boundary layer height (PBLH). But the magnitude of the changes of PBLH after adding aerosol loadings in our simulations are small and can't explain extreme high aerosol concentrations observed. We also investigate the impacts of the initial temperature and moisture profiles on the evolution of PBL. Our studies show that the impact of the vertical profile of moisture is comparable with aerosol effects.

  17. Formation mechanism of Ruddlesden-Popper-type antiphase boundaries during the kinetically limited growth of Sr rich SrTiO3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chencheng; Du, Hongchu; van der Torren, Alexander J. H.; Aarts, Jan; Jia, Chun-Lin; Dittmann, Regina

    2016-12-01

    We elucidated the formation process for Ruddlesden-Popper-type defects during pulsed laser deposition of Sr rich SrTiO3 thin films by a combined analysis of in-situ atomic force microscopy, low energy electron diffraction and high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. At the early growth stage of 1.5 unit cells, the excess Sr results in the formation of SrO on the surface, resulting in a local termination change from TiO2 to SrO, thereby forming a Sr rich (2 × 2) surface reconstruction. With progressive SrTiO3 growth, islands with thermodynamically stable SrO rock-salt structure are formed, coexisting with TiO2 terminated islands. During the overgrowth of these thermodynamically stable islands, both lateral as well as vertical Ruddlesden-Popper-type anti-phase boundaries are formed, accommodating the Sr excess of the SrTiO3 film. We suggest the formation of thermodynamically stable SrO rock-salt structures as origin for the formation of Ruddlesden-Popper-type antiphase boundaries, which are as a result of kinetic limitations confined to certain regions on the surface.

  18. Cross-regulation by CrcZ RNA controls anoxic biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusic, Petra; Tata, Muralidhar; Wolfinger, Michael T.; Sonnleitner, Elisabeth; Häussler, Susanne; Bläsi, Udo

    2016-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) can thrive in anaerobic biofilms in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here, we show that CrcZ is the most abundant PA14 RNA bound to the global regulator Hfq in anoxic biofilms grown in cystic fibrosis sputum medium. Hfq was crucial for anoxic biofilm formation. This observation complied with an RNAseq based transcriptome analysis and follow up studies that implicated Hfq in regulation of a central step preceding denitrification. CrcZ is known to act as a decoy that sequesters Hfq during relief of carbon catabolite repression, which in turn alleviates Hfq-mediated translational repression of catabolic genes. We therefore inferred that CrcZ indirectly impacts on biofilm formation by competing for Hfq. This hypothesis was supported by the findings that over-production of CrcZ mirrored the biofilm phenotype of the hfq deletion mutant, and that deletion of the crcZ gene augmented biofilm formation. To our knowledge, this is the first example where competition for Hfq by CrcZ cross-regulates an Hfq-dependent physiological process unrelated to carbon metabolism.

  19. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouki eYoshida

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications.

  20. New insights on molecular regulation of biofilm formation in plant-associated bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luisa F. Castiblanco; George W. Sundin

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are complex bacterial assemblages with a defined three-dimensional architecture, attached to solid surfaces, and surrounded by a self-produced matrix generally composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, lipids and extrac-ellular DNA. Biofilm formation has evolved as an adaptive strategy of bacteria to cope with harsh environmental conditions as well as to establish antagonistic or beneficial interactions with their host. Plant-associated bacteria attach and form biofilms on different tissues including leaves, stems, vasculature, seeds and roots. In this review, we examine the formation of biofilms from the plant-associated bacterial perspective and detail the recently-described mechanisms of genetic regulation used by these organisms to orchestrate biofilm formation on plant surfaces. In addition, we describe plant host signals that bacterial pathogens recognize to activate the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to multi-cellular behavior.

  1. Negative regulation of bone formation by the transmembrane Wnt antagonist Kremen-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Schulze

    Full Text Available Wnt signalling is a key pathway controlling bone formation in mice and humans. One of the regulators of this pathway is Dkk1, which antagonizes Wnt signalling through the formation of a ternary complex with the transmembrane receptors Krm1/2 and Lrp5/6, thereby blocking the induction of Wnt signalling by the latter ones. Here we show that Kremen-2 (Krm2 is predominantly expressed in bone, and that its osteoblast-specific over-expression in transgenic mice (Col1a1-Krm2 results in severe osteoporosis. Histomorphometric analysis revealed that osteoblast maturation and bone formation are disturbed in Col1a1-Krm2 mice, whereas bone resorption is increased. In line with these findings, primary osteoblasts derived from Col1a1-Krm2 mice display a cell-autonomous differentiation defect, impaired canonical Wnt signalling and decreased production of the osteoclast inhibitory factor Opg. To determine whether the observed effects of Krm2 on bone remodeling are physiologically relevant, we analyzed the skeletal phenotype of 24 weeks old Krm2-deficient mice and observed high bone mass caused by a more than three-fold increase in bone formation. Taken together, these data identify Krm2 as a regulator of bone remodeling and raise the possibility that antagonizing KRM2 might prove beneficial in patients with bone loss disorders.

  2. Signaling molecules regulating phenotypic conversions of astrocytes and glial scar formation in damaged nerve tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Yutaka

    2014-12-01

    Phenotypic conversion of astrocytes from resting to reactive (i.e., astrocytic activation) occurs in numerous brain disorders. Astrocytic activation in severely damaged brain regions often leads to glial scar formation. Because astrocytic activation and glial scar largely affect the vulnerability and tissue repair of damaged brain, numerous studies have been made to clarify mechanisms regulating the astrocytic phenotype. The phenotypic conversion is accompanied by the increased expression of intermediate filament proteins and the induction of hypertrophy in reactive astrocytes. Severe brain damage results in proliferation and migration of reactive astrocytes, which lead to glial scar formations at the injured areas. Gliogenesis from neural progenitors in the adult brain is also involved in astrocytic activation and glial scar formation. Recent studies have shown that increased expression of connexin 43, aquaporin 4, matrix metalloproteinase 9, and integrins alter the function of astrocytes. The transcription factors: STAT3, OLIG2, SMAD, NF-κB, and Sp1 have been suggested to play regulatory roles in astrocytic activation and glial scar formation. In this review, I discuss the roles of these key molecules regulating the pathophysiological functions of reactive astrocytes.

  3. Clumpy Disks as a Testbed for Feedback-regulated Galaxy Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Lucio; Tamburello, Valentina; Lupi, Alessandro; Keller, Ben; Wadsley, James; Madau, Piero

    2016-10-01

    We study the dependence of fragmentation in massive gas-rich galaxy disks at z > 1 on stellar feedback schemes and hydrodynamical solvers, employing the GASOLINE2 SPH code and the lagrangian mesh-less code GIZMO in finite mass mode. Non-cosmological galaxy disk runs with the standard delayed-cooling blastwave feedback are compared with runs adopting a new superbubble feedback, which produces winds by modeling the detailed physics of supernova-driven bubbles and leads to efficient self-regulation of star formation. We find that, with blastwave feedback, massive star-forming clumps form in comparable number and with very similar masses in GASOLINE2 and GIZMO. Typical clump masses are in the range 107-108 M ⊙, lower than in most previous works, while giant clumps with masses above 109 M ⊙ are exceedingly rare. By contrast, superbubble feedback does not produce massive star-forming bound clumps as galaxies never undergo a phase of violent disk instability. In this scheme, only sporadic, unbound star-forming overdensities lasting a few tens of Myr can arise, triggered by non-linear perturbations from massive satellite companions. We conclude that there is severe tension between explaining massive star-forming clumps observed at z > 1 primarily as the result of disk fragmentation driven by gravitational instability and the prevailing view of feedback-regulated galaxy formation. The link between disk stability and star formation efficiency should thus be regarded as a key testing ground for galaxy formation theory.

  4. Afadin regulates puncta adherentia junction formation and presynaptic differentiation in hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisaku Toyoshima

    Full Text Available The formation and remodeling of mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses in the stratum lucidum of the hippocampus are implicated in the cellular basis of learning and memory. Afadin and its binding cell adhesion molecules, nectin-1 and nectin-3, together with N-cadherin, are concentrated at puncta adherentia junctions (PAJs in these synapses. Here, we investigated the roles of afadin in PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. At these synapses in the mice in which the afadin gene was conditionally inactivated before synaptogenesis by using nestin-Cre mice, the immunofluorescence signals for the PAJ components, nectin-1, nectin-3 and N-cadherin, disappeared almost completely, while those for the presynaptic components, VGLUT1 and bassoon, were markedly decreased. In addition, these signals were significantly decreased in cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, the interevent interval of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents was prolonged in the cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons compared with control neurons, indicating that presynaptic functions were suppressed or a number of synapse was reduced in the afadin-deficient neurons. Analyses of presynaptic vesicle recycling and paired recordings revealed that the cultured afadin-deficient neurons showed impaired presynaptic functions. These results indicate that afadin regulates both PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in most mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses, while in a considerable population of these neurons, afadin regulates only PAJ formation but not presynaptic differentiation.

  5. Afadin Regulates Puncta Adherentia Junction Formation and Presynaptic Differentiation in Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Daisaku; Mandai, Kenji; Maruo, Tomohiko; Supriyanto, Irwan; Togashi, Hideru; Inoue, Takahito; Mori, Masahiro; Takai, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    The formation and remodeling of mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses in the stratum lucidum of the hippocampus are implicated in the cellular basis of learning and memory. Afadin and its binding cell adhesion molecules, nectin-1 and nectin-3, together with N-cadherin, are concentrated at puncta adherentia junctions (PAJs) in these synapses. Here, we investigated the roles of afadin in PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. At these synapses in the mice in which the afadin gene was conditionally inactivated before synaptogenesis by using nestin-Cre mice, the immunofluorescence signals for the PAJ components, nectin-1, nectin-3 and N-cadherin, disappeared almost completely, while those for the presynaptic components, VGLUT1 and bassoon, were markedly decreased. In addition, these signals were significantly decreased in cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, the interevent interval of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents was prolonged in the cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons compared with control neurons, indicating that presynaptic functions were suppressed or a number of synapse was reduced in the afadin-deficient neurons. Analyses of presynaptic vesicle recycling and paired recordings revealed that the cultured afadin-deficient neurons showed impaired presynaptic functions. These results indicate that afadin regulates both PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in most mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses, while in a considerable population of these neurons, afadin regulates only PAJ formation but not presynaptic differentiation. PMID:24587018

  6. Focus on Formative Feedback communication and self-regulated learning – a study in compulsory schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Preben Olund

    2016-01-01

    qualitative data from video recorded teaching sessions and student group interviews. Methodologically we are inspired by the ethnographical classroom research method. The empirical basis for studying these aspects is data from two compulsory schools in Denmark. This study is a work in progress. Our findings...... suggest that students can develop self-regulation skill by focusing on three key aspects: 1) Maintain focus on meta-reflection, 2) maintain focus on the construction of meaning and 3) rubrics can support self-regulated learning in group work.......This study addresses the conceptual challenge of providing students in compulsory schools with good quality formative feedback to enhance self-regulated learning in social interactions. Resent educational research indicates that social communicative interactions in the classroom, with a focus...

  7. Lipid nanotube formation using space-regulated electric field above interdigitated electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hongmei; Fu, Dingguo; Wang, Lei; Han, Xiaojun

    2014-04-22

    Lipid nanotubes have great potential in biology and nanotechnology. Here we demonstrate a method to form lipid nanotubes using space-regulated AC electric fields above coplanar interdigitated electrodes. The AC electric field distribution can be regulated by solution height above the electrodes. The ratio of field component in x axis (Ex) to field component in z axis (Ez) increases dramatically at solution height below 50 μm; therefore, at lower solution height, the force from Ex predominantly drives lipids to form lipid nanotubes along with the electric field direction. The forces exerted on the lipid nanotube during its formation were analyzed in detail, and an equation was obtained to describe the relationship among nanotube length and field frequency, amplitude, and time. We believe that the presented approach opens a way to design and prepare nanoscale materials with unique structural and functional properties using space-regulated electric fields.

  8. Outflow Feedback Regulated Massive Star Formation in Parsec-Scale Cluster Forming Clumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys.Dept.; Li, Zhi-Yun; /Virginia U., Astron. Dept.; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys.Dept.; Nakamura, Fumitaka; /Niigata U.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate massive star formation in turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clumps of molecular clouds including protostellar outflow feedback using three dimensional numerical simulations of effective resolution 2048{sup 3}. The calculations are carried out using a block structured adaptive mesh refinement code that solves the ideal MHD equations including self-gravity and implements accreting sink particles. We find that, in the absence of regulation by magnetic fields and outflow feedback, massive stars form readily in a turbulent, moderately condensed clump of {approx} 1,600 M{sub {circle_dot}} (containing {approx} 10{sup 2} initial Jeans masses), along with a cluster of hundreds of lower mass stars. The massive stars are fed at high rates by (1) transient dense filaments produced by large-scale turbulent compression at early times, and (2) by the clump-wide global collapse resulting from turbulence decay at late times. In both cases, the bulk of the massive star's mass is supplied from outside a 0.1 pc-sized 'core' that surrounds the star. In our simulation, the massive star is clump-fed rather than core-fed. The need for large-scale feeding makes the massive star formation prone to regulation by outflow feedback, which directly opposes the feeding processes. The outflows reduce the mass accretion rates onto the massive stars by breaking up the dense filaments that feed the massive star formation at early times, and by collectively slowing down the global collapse that fuel the massive star formation at late times. The latter is aided by a moderate magnetic field of strength in the observed range (corresponding to a dimensionless clump mass-to-flux ratio {lambda} {approx} a few); the field allows the outflow momenta to be deposited more efficiently inside the clump. We conclude that the massive star formation in our simulated turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clump is outflow-regulated and clump-fed (ORCF for short). An important implication

  9. A novel genetic mechanism regulates dorsolateral hinge-point formation during zebrafish cranial neurulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyholm, Molly K; Abdelilah-Seyfried, Salim; Grinblat, Yevgenya

    2009-06-15

    During neurulation, vertebrate embryos form a neural tube (NT), the rudiment of the central nervous system. In mammals and birds, a key step in cranial NT morphogenesis is dorsolateral hinge-point (DLHP) bending, which requires an apical actomyosin network. The mechanism of DLHP formation is poorly understood, although several essential genes have been identified, among them Zic2, which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor. We found that DLHP formation in the zebrafish midbrain also requires actomyosin and Zic function. Given this conservation, we used the zebrafish to study how genes encoding Zic proteins regulate DLHP formation. We demonstrate that the ventral zic2a expression border predicts DLHP position. Using morpholino (MO) knockdown, we show zic2a and zic5 are required for apical F-actin and active myosin II localization and junction integrity. Furthermore, myosin II activity can function upstream of junction integrity during DLHP formation, and canonical Wnt signaling, an activator of zic gene transcription, is necessary for apical active myosin II localization, junction integrity and DLHP formation. We conclude that zic genes act downstream of Wnt signaling to control cytoskeletal organization, and possibly adhesion, during neurulation. This study identifies zic2a and zic5 as crucial players in the genetic network linking patterned gene expression to morphogenetic changes during neurulation, and strengthens the utility of the zebrafish midbrain as a NT morphogenesis model.

  10. Iron-regulated biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus Newman requires ica and the secreted protein Emp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Miranda; Cockayne, Alan; Morrissey, Julie A

    2008-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation is induced in iron-restricted growth conditions in vitro. In this study, we showed that Emp and Eap play important roles in low-iron-induced biofilm formation of S. aureus Newman. Eap and Emp are secreted proteins which are non-covalently attached to the S. aureus cell surface and have previously been implicated in a number of aspects of S. aureus pathogenesis. We showed here that the transcription of these important virulence factors is induced by growth in low-iron medium, reflective of the in vivo environment. Our results show that iron regulation of Eap and Emp is Fur independent. However, Fur is required for full induction of eap and emp expression in low-iron conditions. In this study, we demonstrated that in addition to Fur, low-iron-induced biofilm formation requires Sae, Agr, and SarA. In iron-restricted growth conditions, Sae and Agr are essential for Emp and Eap expression and hence for biofilm formation, whereas SarA appears to have a less-significant role. We also showed that expression of the ica operon is required for biofilm formation in iron-restricted growth conditions. We demonstrated that in fact, ica is required for the expression of the important multifunctional virulence determinants eap and emp.

  11. Dynamic O-GlcNAc modification regulates CREB-mediated gene expression and memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexach, Jessica E; Clark, Peter M; Mason, Daniel E; Neve, Rachael L; Peters, Eric C; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C

    2012-01-22

    The transcription factor cyclic AMP-response element binding protein (CREB) is a key regulator of many neuronal processes, including brain development, circadian rhythm and long-term memory. Studies of CREB have focused on its phosphorylation, although the diversity of CREB functions in the brain suggests additional forms of regulation. Here we expand on a chemoenzymatic strategy for quantifying glycosylation stoichiometries to characterize the functional roles of CREB glycosylation in neurons. We show that CREB is dynamically modified with an O-linked β-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine sugar in response to neuronal activity and that glycosylation represses CREB-dependent transcription by impairing its association with CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC; also known as transducer of regulated CREB activity). Blocking glycosylation of CREB alters cellular function and behavioral plasticity, enhancing both axonal and dendritic growth and long-term memory consolidation. Our findings demonstrate a new role for O-glycosylation in memory formation and provide a mechanistic understanding of how glycosylation contributes to critical neuronal functions. Moreover, we identify a previously unknown mechanism for the regulation of activity-dependent gene expression, neural development and memory.

  12. Midline-derived Shh regulates mesonephric tubule formation through the paraxial mesoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashima, Aki; Akita, Hiroki; Okazawa, Mika; Kishigami, Satoshi; Nakagata, Naomi; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Yamada, Gen

    2014-02-01

    During organogenesis, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) possesses dual functions: Shh emanating from midline structures regulates the positioning of bilateral structures at early stages, whereas organ-specific Shh locally regulates organ morphogenesis at later stages. The mesonephros is a transient embryonic kidney in amniote, whereas it becomes definitive adult kidney in some anamniotes. Thus, elucidating the regulation of mesonephros formation has important implications for our understanding of kidney development and evolution. In Shh knockout (KO) mutant mice, the mesonephros was displaced towards the midline and ectopic mesonephric tubules (MTs) were present in the caudal mesonephros. Mesonephros-specific ablation of Shh in Hoxb7-Cre;Shh(flox/-) and Sall1(CreERT2/+);Shh(flox/-) mice embryos indicated that Shh expressed in the mesonephros was not required for either the development of the mesonephros or the differentiation of the male reproductive tract. Moreover, stage-specific ablation of Shh in Shh(CreERT2/flox) mice showed that notochord- and/or floor plate-derived Shh were essential for the regulation of the number and position of MTs. Lineage analysis of hedgehog (Hh)-responsive cells, and analysis of gene expression in Shh KO embryos suggested that Shh regulated nephrogenic gene expression indirectly, possibly through effects on the paraxial mesoderm. These data demonstrate the essential role of midline-derived Shh in local tissue morphogenesis and differentiation.

  13. TGF-b/BMP signaling and other molecular events:regulation of osteoblastogenesis and bone formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md Shaifur Rahman; Naznin Akhtar; Hossen Mohammad Jamil; Rajat Suvra Banik; Sikder M Asaduzzaman

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-b)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) plays a fundamental role in the regulation of bone organogenesis through the activation of receptor serine/threonine kinases. Perturbations of TGF-b/BMP activity are almost invariably linked to a wide variety of clinical outcomes, i.e., skeletal, extra skeletal anomalies, autoimmune, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases. Phosphorylation of TGF-b (I/II) or BMP receptors activates intracellular downstream Smads, the transducer of TGF-b/BMP signals. This signaling is modulated by various factors and pathways, including transcription factor Runx2. The signaling network in skeletal development and bone formation is overwhelmingly complex and highly time and space specific. Additive, positive, negative, or synergistic effects are observed when TGF-b/BMP interacts with the pathways of MAPK, Wnt, Hedgehog (Hh), Notch, Akt/mTOR, and miRNA to regulate the effects of BMP-induced signaling in bone dynamics. Accumulating evidence indicates that Runx2 is the key integrator, whereas Hh is a possible modulator, miRNAs are regulators, and b-catenin is a mediator/regulator within the extensive intracellular network. This review focuses on the activation of BMP signaling and interaction with other regulatory components and pathways highlighting the molecular mechanisms regarding TGF-b/BMP function and regulation that could allow understanding the complexity of bone tissue dynamics.

  14. Tessera terrain on Venus: Implications of tessera flooding models and boundary characteristics for global distribution and mode of formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, James W.; Ivanov, Mikhail

    1993-01-01

    Mapping of tessera terrain using Magellan global high-resolution data has shown that it comprises about 10 percent of the surface area of Venus, is not randomly distributed, is extremely highly deformed relative to intervening plains, lies at a wide range of elevations, is embayed by and largely predates adjacent volcanic plains, is generally negatively correlated with broad lowlands and volcanic rises, may underlie a considerable percentage of the superposed volcanic plains, and has linear/tectonic margins for about 27 percent of its boundaries. In this paper, we investigate further the distribution and origin of tessera through analysis of the changing nature of tessera occurrences during sequential flooding, and assessment of the nature and distribution of Type 2 (linear/tectonic) tessera boundaries.

  15. Through the Looking Glass: AdS-FT with time dependent boundary conditions and black hole formation

    CERN Document Server

    Copsey, K

    2004-01-01

    I solve for the behavior of scalars in Lorentzian AdS with time dependent boundary conditions, focusing in particular on the dilaton. This corresponds, via the AdS-CFT correspondence, to considering a gauge theory with a time dependent coupling. Changes which keep the gauge coupling nonzero result in finite but physically interesting states in the bulk, including black holes, while sending the gauge coupling to zero appears to produce a cosmological singularity in the bulk.

  16. Chondroitin 6-Sulfation Regulates Perineuronal Net Formation by Controlling the Stability of Aggrecan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Miyata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Perineuronal nets (PNNs are lattice-like extracellular matrix structures composed of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs. The appearance of PNNs parallels the decline of neural plasticity, and disruption of PNNs reactivates neural plasticity in the adult brain. We previously reported that sulfation patterns of chondroitin sulfate (CS chains on CSPGs influenced the formation of PNNs and neural plasticity. However, the mechanism of PNN formation regulated by CS sulfation remains unknown. Here we found that overexpression of chondroitin 6-sulfotransferase-1 (C6ST-1, which catalyzes 6-sulfation of CS chains, selectively decreased aggrecan, a major CSPG in PNNs, in the aged brain without affecting other PNN components. Both diffuse and PNN-associated aggrecans were reduced by overexpression of C6ST-1. C6ST-1 increased 6-sulfation in both the repeating disaccharide region and linkage region of CS chains. Overexpression of 6-sulfation primarily impaired accumulation of aggrecan in PNNs, whereas condensation of other PNN components was not affected. Finally, we found that increased 6-sulfation accelerated proteolysis of aggrecan by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain with thrombospondin motif (ADAMTS protease. Taken together, our results indicate that sulfation patterns of CS chains on aggrecan influenced the stability of the CSPG, thereby regulating formation of PNNs and neural plasticity.

  17. The Rho target PRK2 regulates apical junction formation in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Sean W; Magalhaes, Ana; Hall, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate multiple signaling pathways to control a number of cellular processes during epithelial morphogenesis. To investigate the downstream pathways through which Rho regulates epithelial apical junction formation, we screened a small interfering RNA (siRNA) library targeting 28 known Rho target proteins in 16HBE human bronchial epithelial cells. This led to the identification of the serine-threonine kinase PRK2 (protein kinase C-related kinase 2, also called PKN2). Depletion of PRK2 does not block the initial formation of primordial junctions at nascent cell-cell contacts but does prevent their maturation into apical junctions. PRK2 is recruited to primordial junctions, and this localization depends on its C2-like domain. Rho binding is essential for PRK2 function and also facilitates PRK2 recruitment to junctions. Kinase-dead PRK2 acts as a dominant-negative mutant and prevents apical junction formation. We conclude that PRK2 is recruited to nascent cell-cell contacts through its C2-like and Rho-binding domains and promotes junctional maturation through a kinase-dependent pathway.

  18. Reggies/flotillins regulate E-cadherin-mediated cell contact formation by affecting EGFR trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Gonzalo P; Schrock, Yvonne; Hülsbusch, Nikola; Wiechers, Marianne; Plattner, Helmut; Stuermer, Claudia A O

    2012-05-01

    The reggie/flotillin proteins are implicated in membrane trafficking and, together with the cellular prion protein (PrP), in the recruitment of E-cadherin to cell contact sites. Here, we demonstrate that reggies, as well as PrP down-regulation, in epithelial A431 cells cause overlapping processes and abnormal formation of adherens junctions (AJs). This defect in cell adhesion results from reggie effects on Src tyrosine kinases and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR): loss of reggies reduces Src activation and EGFR phosphorylation at residues targeted by Src and c-cbl and leads to increased surface exposure of EGFR by blocking its internalization. The prolonged EGFR signaling at the plasma membrane enhances cell motility and macropinocytosis, by which junction-associated E-cadherin is internalized and recycled back to AJs. Accordingly, blockage of EGFR signaling or macropinocytosis in reggie-deficient cells restores normal AJ formation. Thus, by promoting EGFR internalization, reggies restrict the EGFR signaling involved in E-cadherin macropinocytosis and recycling and regulate AJ formation and dynamics and thereby cell adhesion.

  19. AHL-type quorum sensing and its regulation on symplasmata formation in Pantoea agglomerans YS19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing; Wu, Suisui; Wang, Jieru; Feng, Yongjun

    2015-05-01

    Pantoea agglomerans YS19, an endophytic diazotrophic bacterium isolated from rice, is characterized by the formation of multicellular aggregate structure called symplasmata, which not only bestow the strong stress-resistance of the bacterium, but also contribute to the specific adaptation in the endophyte-host association. Acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), as the important signal molecule in the quorum sensing (QS) system of gram-negative bacteria, were demonstrated to regulate motility, cell-aggregation, and other bacterial behaviors. Here, the production of AHL by P. agglomerans YS19 and its regulation on the symplasmata formation were studied. It was revealed that the production of AHL by YS19 was initiated at the exponential growth stage and from then on, reached the peak values at the stationary growth stage in LB medium. The AHL was identified as N-3-oxooctanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (OOHL) by MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. The AHL synthesis gene pagI and receptor gene pagR in YS19 were cloned and phylogenetic analysis showed that they were high conservative among strains in species of P. agglomerans. It was revealed that AHL promoted the bacterial growth and symplasmata formation of YS19. Meanwhile, the colonization ability and growth-promoting effect of YS19 on the host plant were also enhanced by AHL. These results strongly suggest the pleiotropic effects of the AHL-type QS system in endophytic life of the strain.

  20. Shp2 in forebrain neurons regulates synaptic plasticity, locomotion, and memory formation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakari, Shinya; Saitow, Fumihito; Ago, Yukio; Shibasaki, Koji; Sato-Hashimoto, Miho; Matsuzaki, Yasunori; Kotani, Takenori; Murata, Yoji; Hirai, Hirokazu; Matsuda, Toshio; Suzuki, Hidenori; Matozaki, Takashi; Ohnishi, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Shp2 (Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2) regulates neural cell differentiation. It is also expressed in postmitotic neurons, however, and mutations of Shp2 are associated with clinical syndromes characterized by mental retardation. Here we show that conditional-knockout (cKO) mice lacking Shp2 specifically in postmitotic forebrain neurons manifest abnormal behavior, including hyperactivity. Novelty-induced expression of immediate-early genes and activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (Erk) were attenuated in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of Shp2 cKO mice, suggestive of reduced neuronal activity. In contrast, ablation of Shp2 enhanced high-K(+)-induced Erk activation in both cultured cortical neurons and synaptosomes, whereas it inhibited that induced by brain-derived growth factor in cultured neurons. Posttetanic potentiation and paired-pulse facilitation were attenuated and enhanced, respectively, in hippocampal slices from Shp2 cKO mice. The mutant mice also manifested transient impairment of memory formation in the Morris water maze. Our data suggest that Shp2 contributes to regulation of Erk activation and synaptic plasticity in postmitotic forebrain neurons and thereby controls locomotor activity and memory formation.

  1. FORMS OF ADDRESS IN REGULATED SPHERES OF COMMUNICATION: THE FORMATION OF A NEW STANDARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Zhukova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to analyze forms of address in regulated spheres of communication, such as communication with country leaders, police officers and judges in various types of proceedings. Regulated communication is communication restricted by the rules of an organization or a socio-political institute, as well as by the rules and standards of speech etiquette and corporate ethics adopted by an organization. The article is an attempt to interpret the formation of new standards of the use of forms of address in regulated spheres of communication. It is indicated that for modern linguistics conservative and restrictive perception of standards are not typical. A new view on the nature of the standard is being formed: the standard must be as close to the communicative situation as possible. Tendencies in the formation of standards are identified on the basis of the observation over modern word usage, on the analysis of native speakers’ metalinguistic reflection and on the surveys of preferable choices of form of address in a particular communicative situation. In conclusion it is emphasized that the new standards of functioning of the forms of address need further theoretical understanding of this problem, as well as analysis and recommendations for the use of new forms.

  2. Gibberellins regulate lateral root formation in Populus through interactions with auxin and other hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Jiqing; Strauss, Steven H; Tsai, Chung Jui; Fang, Kai; Chen, Yiru; Jiang, Xiangning; Busov, Victor B

    2010-03-01

    The role of gibberellins (GAs) in regulation of lateral root development is poorly understood. We show that GA-deficient (35S:PcGA2ox1) and GA-insensitive (35S:rgl1) transgenic Populus exhibited increased lateral root proliferation and elongation under in vitro and greenhouse conditions, and these effects were reversed by exogenous GA treatment. In addition, RNA interference suppression of two poplar GA 2-oxidases predominantly expressed in roots also decreased lateral root formation. GAs negatively affected lateral root formation by inhibiting lateral root primordium initiation. A whole-genome microarray analysis of root development in GA-modified transgenic plants revealed 2069 genes with significantly altered expression. The expression of 1178 genes, including genes that promote cell proliferation, growth, and cell wall loosening, corresponded to the phenotypic severity of the root traits when transgenic events with differential phenotypic expression were compared. The array data and direct hormone measurements suggested crosstalk of GA signaling with other hormone pathways, including auxin and abscisic acid. Transgenic modification of a differentially expressed gene encoding an auxin efflux carrier suggests that GA modulation of lateral root development is at least partly imparted by polar auxin transport modification. These results suggest a mechanism for GA-regulated modulation of lateral root proliferation associated with regulation of plant allometry during the stress response.

  3. Centriolar SAS-7 acts upstream of SPD-2 to regulate centriole assembly and pericentriolar material formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugioka, Kenji; Hamill, Danielle R; Lowry, Joshua B; McNeely, Marie E; Enrick, Molly; Richter, Alyssa C; Kiebler, Lauren E; Priess, James R; Bowerman, Bruce

    2017-01-16

    The centriole/basal body is a eukaryotic organelle that plays essential roles in cell division and signaling. Among five known core centriole proteins, SPD-2/Cep192 is the first recruited to the site of daughter centriole formation and regulates the centriolar localization of the other components in C. elegans and in humans. However, the molecular basis for SPD-2 centriolar localization remains unknown. Here we describe a new centriole component, the coiled-coil protein SAS-7, as a regulator of centriole duplication, assembly and elongation. We also show that SAS-7 binds SPD-2 and regulates SPD-2 centriolar recruitment, while SAS-7 centriolar localization is SPD-2-independent. Furthermore, pericentriolar material (PCM) formation is abnormal in sas-7 mutants, and the PCM-dependent induction of cell polarity that defines the anterior-posterior body axis frequently fails. We conclude that SAS-7 functions at the earliest step in centriole duplication yet identified and plays important roles in the orchestration of centriole and PCM assembly.

  4. Artificial induction of Sox21 regulates sensory cell formation in the embryonic chicken inner ear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Freeman

    Full Text Available During embryonic development, hair cells and support cells in the sensory epithelia of the inner ear derive from progenitors that express Sox2, a member of the SoxB1 family of transcription factors. Sox2 is essential for sensory specification, but high levels of Sox2 expression appear to inhibit hair cell differentiation, suggesting that factors regulating Sox2 activity could be critical for both processes. Antagonistic interactions between SoxB1 and SoxB2 factors are known to regulate cell differentiation in neural tissue, which led us to investigate the potential roles of the SoxB2 member Sox21 during chicken inner ear development. Sox21 is normally expressed by sensory progenitors within vestibular and auditory regions of the early embryonic chicken inner ear. At later stages, Sox21 is differentially expressed in the vestibular and auditory organs. Sox21 is restricted to the support cell layer of the auditory epithelium, while it is enriched in the hair cell layer of the vestibular organs. To test Sox21 function, we used two temporally distinct gain-of-function approaches. Sustained over-expression of Sox21 from early developmental stages prevented prosensory specification, and abolished the formation of both hair cells and support cells. However, later induction of Sox21 expression at the time of hair cell formation in organotypic cultures of vestibular epithelia inhibited endogenous Sox2 expression and Notch activity, and biased progenitor cells towards a hair cell fate. Interestingly, Sox21 did not promote hair cell differentiation in the immature auditory epithelium, which fits with the expression of endogenous Sox21 within mature support cells in this tissue. These results suggest that interactions among endogenous SoxB family transcription factors may regulate sensory cell formation in the inner ear, but in a context-dependent manner.

  5. SarA is a negative regulator of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christer; Heinze, C.; Busch, M.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation is essential for Staphylococcus epidermidis pathogenicity in implant-associated infections. Nonetheless, large proportions of invasive S. epidermidis isolates fail to show accumulative biofilm growth in vitro. We here tested the hypothesis that this apparent paradox is related...... to the existence of superimposed regulatory systems suppressing a multi-cellular biofilm life style in vitro. Transposon mutagenesis of clinical significant but biofilm-negative S. epidermidis 1585 was used to isolate a biofilm positive mutant carrying a Tn917 insertion in sarA,chief regulator of staphylococcal...... virulence. Genetic analysis revealed that inactivation of sarA induced biofilm formation via over-expression of the giant 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp), serving as an intercellular adhesin. In addition to Embp, increased extracellular DNA (eDNA) release significantly contributed...

  6. Self-regulation of charged defect compensation and formation energy pinning in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji-Hui; Yin, Wan-Jian; Park, Ji-Sang; Wei, Su-Huai

    2015-11-01

    Current theoretical analyses of defect properties without solving the detailed balance equations often estimate Fermi-level pinning position by omitting free carriers and assume defect concentrations can be always tuned by atomic chemical potentials. This could be misleading in some circumstance. Here we clarify that: (1) Because the Fermi-level pinning is determined not only by defect states but also by free carriers from band-edge states, band-edge states should be treated explicitly in the same footing as the defect states in practice; (2) defect formation energy, thus defect density, could be pinned and independent on atomic chemical potentials due to the entanglement of atomic chemical potentials and Fermi energy, in contrast to the usual expectation that defect formation energy can always be tuned by varying the atomic chemical potentials; and (3) the charged defect compensation behavior, i.e., most of donors are compensated by acceptors or vice versa, is self-regulated when defect formation energies are pinned. The last two phenomena are more dominant in wide-gap semiconductors or when the defect formation energies are small. Using NaCl and CH3NH3PbI3 as examples, we illustrate these unexpected behaviors. Our analysis thus provides new insights that enrich the understanding of the defect physics in semiconductors and insulators.

  7. Targeting P38 Pathway Regulates Bony Formation via MSC Recruitment during Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi-hui; Wu, Bao-lei; Ye, Chen; Jia, Sen; Yang, Xin-jie; Hou, Rui; Lei, De-lin; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a widely used self-tissue engineering. However, complications and discomfort due to the long treatment period are still the bottleneck of DO. Novel strategies to accelerate bone formation in DO are still needed. P38 is capable of regulating the osteogenic differentiation of both mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and osteoblasts, which are crucial to bone regeneration. However, it is not clear whether targeting p38 could regulate bony formation in DO. The purpose of the current work was to investigate the effects of local application of either p38 agonist anisomycin or p38 inhibitor SB203580 in a rat model of DO. 30 adult rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: (A) rats injected with DMSO served as the control group; (B) rats injected with p38 agonist anisomycin; (C) rats injected with p38 inhibitor SB203580. All the rats were subjected to mandibular distraction and the injection was performed daily during this period. The distracted mandibles were harvested on days 15 and 30 after surgery and subjected to the following analysis. Micro-computed tomography and histological evaluation results showed that local application of p38 agonist anisomycin increased new bone formation in DO, whereas p38 inhibitor SB203580 decreased it. Immunohistochemical analysis suggested that anisomycin promoted MSC recruitment in the distraction gap. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that local application of p38 agonist anisomycin can increase new bone formation during DO. This study may lead to a novel cell-based strategy for the improvement of bone regeneration. PMID:27766028

  8. Histone Arginine Methylation by PRMT7 Controls Germinal Center Formation via Regulating Bcl6 Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Zhengzhou; Mei, Mei; Zhang, Peizhun; Liu, Chunyi; He, Huacheng; Gao, Fei; Bao, Shilai

    2015-08-15

    B cells are the center of humoral immunity and produce Abs to protect against foreign Ags. B cell defects lead to diseases such as leukemia and lymphomas. Histone arginine methylation is important for regulating gene activation and silencing in cells. Although the process commonly exists in mammalian cells, its roles in B cells are unknown. To explore the effects of aberrant histone arginine methylation on B cells, we generated mice with a B cell-specific knockout of PRMT7, a member of the methyltransferases that mediate arginine methylation of histones. In this article, we showed that the loss of PRMT7 led to decreased mature marginal zone B cells and increased follicular B cells and promoted germinal center formation after immunization. Furthermore, mice lacking PRMT7 expression in B cells secreted low levels of IgG1 and IgA. Abnormal expression of germinal center genes (i.e., Bcl6, Prdm1, and Irf4) was detected in conditional knockout mice. By overexpressing PRMT7 in the Raji and A20 cell lines derived from B cell lymphomas, we validated the fact that PRMT7 negatively regulated Bcl6 expression. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR, we found that PRMT7 could recruit H4R3me1 and symmetric H4R3me2 to the Bcl6 promoter. These results provide evidence for the important roles played by PRMT7 in germinal center formation.

  9. Regulation of male sex determination: genital ridge formation and Sry activation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Satomi S; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2014-12-01

    Sex determination is essential for the sexual reproduction to generate the next generation by the formation of functional male or female gametes. In mammals, primary sex determination is commenced by the presence or absence of the Y chromosome, which controls the fate of the gonadal primordium. The somatic precursor of gonads, the genital ridge is formed at the mid-gestation stage and gives rise to one of two organs, a testis or an ovary. The fate of the genital ridge, which is governed by the differentiation of somatic cells into Sertoli cells in the testes or granulosa cells in the ovaries, further determines the sex of an individual and their germ cells. Mutation studies in human patients with disorders of sex development and mouse models have revealed factors that are involved in mammalian sex determination. In most of mammals, a single genetic trigger, the Y-linked gene Sry (sex determination region on Y chromosome), regulates testicular differentiation. Despite identification of Sry in 1990, precise mechanisms underlying the sex determination of bipotential genital ridges are still largely unknown. Here, we review the recent progress that has provided new insights into the mechanisms underlying genital ridge formation as well as the regulation of Sry expression and its functions in male sex determination of mice.

  10. Outflow Feedback Regulated Massive Star Formation in Parsec-Scale Cluster Forming Clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Peng; Abel, Tom; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) We investigate massive star formation in turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clumps of molecular clouds including protostellar outflow feedback using Enzo-based MHD simulations with accreting sink particles and effective resolution $2048^3$. We find that, in the absence of regulation by magnetic fields and outflow feedback, massive stars form readily in a turbulent, moderately condensed clump of $\\sim 1,600$ solar masses, along with a cluster of hundreds of lower mass stars. The massive stars are fed at high rates by (1) transient dense filaments produced by large-scale turbulent compression at early times, and (2) by the clump-wide global collapse resulting from turbulence decay at late times. In both cases, the bulk of the massive star's mass is supplied from outside a 0.1 pc-sized "core" that surrounds the star. In our simulation, the massive star is clump-fed rather than core-fed. The need for large-scale feeding makes the massive star formation prone to regulation by outflow feedback, which di...

  11. Chitosan facilitates structure formation of the salivary gland by regulating the basement membrane components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tsung-Lin; Hsiao, Ya-Chuan

    2015-10-01

    Tissue structure is important for inherent physiological function and should be recapitulated during tissue engineering for regenerative purposes. The salivary gland is a branched organ that is responsible for saliva secretion and regulation. The salivary glands develop from epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, and depend on the support of the basement membrane (BM). Chitosan-based biomaterials have been demonstrated to be competent in facilitating the formation of salivary gland tissue structure. However, the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. In the developing submandibular gland (SMG), the chitosan effect was found to diminish when collagen and laminin were removed from cultured SMG explants. Chitosan increased the expression of BM components including collagen, laminin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, and also facilitated BM components and the corresponding receptors to be expressed in tissue-specific patterns beneficial for SMG branching. The chitosan effect decreased when either laminin components or receptors were inhibited, as well when the downstream signaling was blocked. Our results revealed that chitosan promotes salivary glands branching through the BM. By regulating BM components and receptors, chitosan efficiently stimulated downstream signaling to facilitate salivary gland branching. The present study revealed the underlying mechanism of the chitosan effect in engineering SMG structure formation.

  12. Regulation of star formation in giant galaxies by precipitation, feedback and conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, G M; Donahue, M; Bryan, G L; McDonald, M

    2015-03-12

    The Universe's largest galaxies reside at the centres of galaxy clusters and are embedded in hot gas that, if left undisturbed, would cool quickly and create many more new stars than are actually observed. Cooling can be regulated by feedback from accretion of cooling gas onto the central black hole, but requires an accretion rate finely tuned to the thermodynamic state of the hot gas. Theoretical models in which cold clouds precipitate out of the hot gas via thermal instability and accrete onto the black hole exhibit the necessary tuning. Recent observational evidence shows that the abundance of cold gas in the centres of clusters increases rapidly near the predicted threshold for instability. Here we report observations showing that this precipitation threshold extends over a large range in cluster radius, cluster mass and cosmic time. We incorporate the precipitation threshold into a framework of theoretical models for the thermodynamic state of hot gas in galaxy clusters. According to that framework, precipitation regulates star formation in some giant galaxies, while thermal conduction prevents star formation in others if it can compensate for radiative cooling and shut off precipitation.

  13. Formative Self-Assessment College Classes Improves Self-Regulation and Retention in First/Second Year Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlberg, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    This research examined the influence formative self-assessment had on first/second year community college student self-regulatory practices. Previous research has shown that the ability to regulate one's learning activities can improve performance in college classes, and it has long been known that the use of formative assessment improves…

  14. Using Formative Assessment and Self-Regulated Learning to Help Developmental Mathematics Students Achieve: A Multi-Campus Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudesman, John; Crosby, Sara; Ziehmke, Niesha; Everson, Howard; Issac, Sharlene; Flugman, Bert; Zimmerman, Barry; Moylan, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe an Enhanced Formative Assessment and Self-Regulated Learning (EFA-SRL) program designed to improve the achievement of community college students enrolled in developmental mathematics courses. Their model includes the use of specially formatted quizzes designed to assess both the students' mathematics and metacognitive skill…

  15. PEM fuel cell cathode carbon corrosion due to the formation of air/fuel boundary at the anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hao; Qi, Zhigang; Ramani, Manikandan; Elter, John F.

    The impacts of unprotected start up and shut down on fuel cell performance degradation was investigated using both single cell and dual cell configurations. It was found that the air/fuel boundary developed at the anode side after a fuel cell shut down or during its restart caused extremely quick degradation of the cathode. The thickness, the electrochemical active surface area, and the performance of the cathode catalyst layer were significantly reduced. By using a dual cell configuration, cathode potential as high as two times of open circuit voltage was measured, and the corrosion current flowing externally between the two cells was detected and quantified. Carbon catalyst-support corrosion/oxidation at such a high potential was largely responsible for the accelerated fuel cell performance degradation.

  16. Relationships Between the Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF), Fluvial Channels, and the Dichotomy Boundary Southeast of Nicholson Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, B. A.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.

    2001-01-01

    We use Mars Global Surveyor's Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) and Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) data to investigate the Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF) and its relationship to fluvial channels southeast of Nicholson Crater. In this area the MFF shows small-scale layering and is draped over Labou Vallis. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Formative Evaluation of MyFit: A Curriculum to Promote Self-Regulation of Physical Activity among Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Melissa; Petosa, Rick; Hortz, Brian; Hunt, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous interventions to increase physical activity among middle school students have not produced long-term results. Often, students lack the self-regulation skills needed to support long-term adherence to physical activity. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a formative evaluation of a self-regulation based physical…

  18. cIAP1 regulates TNF-mediated cdc42 activation and filopodia formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marivin, A; Berthelet, J; Cartier, J; Paul, C; Gemble, S; Morizot, A; Boireau, W; Saleh, M; Bertoglio, J; Solary, E; Dubrez, L

    2014-11-27

    Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF) is a cytokine endowed with multiple functions, depending on the cellular and environmental context. TNF receptor engagement induces the formation of a multimolecular complex including the TNFR-associated factor TRAF2, the receptor-interaction protein kinase RIP1 and the cellular inhibitor of apoptosis cIAP1, the latter being essential for NF-κB activation. Here, we show that cIAP1 also regulates TNF-induced actin cytoskeleton reorganization through a cdc42-dependent, NF-κB-independent pathway. Deletion of cIAP1 prevents TNF-induced filopodia and cdc42 activation. The expression of cIAP1 or its E3-ubiquitin ligase-defective mutant restores the ability of cIAP1(-/-) MEFs to produce filopodia, whereas a cIAP1 mutant unable to bind TRAF2 does not. Accordingly, the silencing of TRAF2 inhibits TNF-mediated filopodia formation, whereas silencing of RIP1 does not. cIAP1 directly binds cdc42 and promotes its RhoGDIα-mediated stabilization. TNF decreases cIAP1-cdc42 interaction, suggesting that TNF-induced recruitment of cIAP1/TRAF2 to the receptor releases cdc42, which in turn triggers actin remodeling. cIAP1 also regulates cdc42 activation in response to EGF and HRas-V12 expression. A downregulation of cIAP1 altered the cell polarization, the cell adhesion to endothelial cells and cell intercalation, which are cdc42-dependent processes. Finally, we demonstrated that the deletion of cIAP1 regulated the HRas-V12-mediated transformation process, including anchorage-dependent cell growth, tumour growth in a xenograft model and the development of experimental metastasis in the lung.

  19. Mechanosensitive store-operated calcium entry regulates the formation of cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Wei; Chang, Shu-Jing; I-Chen Harn, Hans; Huang, Hui-Ting; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Shen, Meng-Ru; Tang, Ming-Jer; Chiu, Wen-Tai

    2015-09-01

    Ca(2+) -mediated formation of cell polarity is essential for directional migration which plays an important role in physiological and pathological processes in organisms. To examine the critical role of store-operated Ca(2+) entry, which is the major form of extracellular Ca(2+) influx in non-excitable cells, in the formation of cell polarity, we employed human bone osteosarcoma U2OS cells, which exhibit distinct morphological polarity during directional migration. Our analyses showed that Ca(2+) was concentrated at the rear end of cells and that extracellular Ca(2+) influx was important for cell polarization. Inhibition of store-operated Ca(2+) entry using specific inhibitors disrupted the formation of cell polarity in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the channelosomal components caveolin-1, TRPC1, and Orai1 were concentrated at the rear end of polarized cells. Knockdown of TRPC1 or a TRPC inhibitor, but not knockdown of Orai1, reduced cell polarization. Furthermore, disruption of lipid rafts or overexpression of caveolin-1 contributed to the downregulation of cell polarity. On the other hand, we also found that cell polarity, store-operated Ca(2+) entry activity, and cell stiffness were markedly decreased by low substrate rigidity, which may be caused by the disorganization of actin filaments and microtubules that occurs while regulating the activity of the mechanosensitive TRPC1 channel.

  20. Becoming popular: Interpersonal emotion regulation predicts relationship formation in real life social networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen eNiven

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Building relationships is crucial for satisfaction and success, especially when entering new social contexts. In the present paper, we investigate whether attempting to improve others’ feelings helps people to make connections in new networks. In Study 1, a social network study following new networks of people for a twelve-week period indicated that use of interpersonal emotion regulation (IER strategies predicted growth in popularity, as indicated by other network members’ reports of spending time with the person, in work and non-work interactions. In Study 2, linguistic analysis of the tweets from over 8000 Twitter users from formation of their accounts revealed that use of IER predicted greater popularity in terms of the number of followers gained. However, not all types of IER had positive effects. Behavioral IER strategies (which use behavior to reassure or comfort in order to regulate affect were associated with greater popularity, while cognitive strategies (which change a person’s thoughts about his or her situation or feelings in order to regulate affect were negatively associated with popularity. Our findings have implications for our understanding of how new relationships are formed, highlighting the important the role played by intentional emotion regulatory processes.

  1. Becoming popular: interpersonal emotion regulation predicts relationship formation in real life social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niven, Karen; Garcia, David; van der Löwe, Ilmo; Holman, David; Mansell, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Building relationships is crucial for satisfaction and success, especially when entering new social contexts. In the present paper, we investigate whether attempting to improve others' feelings helps people to make connections in new networks. In Study 1, a social network study following new networks of people for a 12-week period indicated that use of interpersonal emotion regulation (IER) strategies predicted growth in popularity, as indicated by other network members' reports of spending time with the person, in work and non-work interactions. In Study 2, linguistic analysis of the tweets from over 8000 Twitter users from formation of their accounts revealed that use of IER predicted greater popularity in terms of the number of followers gained. However, not all types of IER had positive effects. Behavioral IER strategies (which use behavior to reassure or comfort in order to regulate affect) were associated with greater popularity, while cognitive strategies (which change a person's thoughts about his or her situation or feelings in order to regulate affect) were negatively associated with popularity. Our findings have implications for our understanding of how new relationships are formed, highlighting the important the role played by intentional emotion regulatory processes.

  2. Effects of local pH on the formation and regulation of cristae morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dong Hoon; Park, Jonghyun; Philbert, Martin A.; Sastry, Ann Marie; Lu, Wei

    2014-08-01

    Cristae, folded subcompartments of the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM), have complex and dynamic morphologies. Since cristae are the major site of adenosine triphosphate synthesis, morphological changes of cristae have been studied in relation to functional states of mitochondria. In this sense, investigating the functional and structural significance of cristae may be critical for understanding progressive mitochondrial dysfunction. However, the detailed mechanisms of the formation and regulation of these cristae structures have not been fully elucidated. Among the hypotheses concerning the regulation of cristae morphologies, we exclusively investigate the effects of the local pH gradient on the cristae morphologies by using a numerical model. An area-difference induced curvature of the membrane is modeled as a function of local pH. This curvature is then applied to the finite element model of a closed lipid bilayer in order to find the energetically favorable membrane configuration. From this study, we substantiate the hypothesis that a tubular crista structure can be formed and regulated by the local pH gradient. Through the simulations with various initial conditions, we further demonstrate that the diameter of a crista is mainly determined by the local pH gradient, and the energetically favorable direction of crista growth is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of a mitochondrion. Finally, the simulation results at the mitochondrial scale suggest that the cristae membrane may have a lower local pH value and/or a higher cardiolipin composition than the other parts of the IMM.

  3. STAT3 regulates ABCA3 expression and influences lamellar body formation in alveolar type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Yohei; Besnard, Valérie; Clark, Jean C; Xu, Yan; Wert, Susan E; Ikegami, Machiko; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2008-05-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette A3 (ABCA3) is a lamellar body associated lipid transport protein required for normal synthesis and storage of pulmonary surfactant in type II cells in the alveoli. In this study, we demonstrate that STAT3, activated by IL-6, regulates ABCA3 expression in vivo and in vitro. ABCA3 mRNA and immunostaining were decreased in adult mouse lungs in which STAT3 was deleted from the respiratory epithelium (Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice). Consistent with the role of STAT3, intratracheal IL-6 induced ABCA3 expression in vivo. Decreased ABCA3 and abnormalities in the formation of lamellar bodies, the intracellular site of surfactant lipid storage, were observed in Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice. Expression of SREBP1a and 1c, SCAP, ABCA3, and AKT mRNAs was inhibited by deletion of Stat3 in type II cells isolated from Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice. The activities of PI3K and AKT were required for normal Abca3 gene expression in vitro. AKT activation induced SREBP expression and increased the activity of the Abca3 promoter in vitro, consistent with the role of STAT3 signaling, at least in part via SREBP, in the regulation of ABCA3. ABCA3 expression is regulated by IL-6 in a pathway that includes STAT3, PI3K, AKT, SCAP, and SREBP. Activation of STAT3 after exposure to IL-6 enhances ABCA3 expression, which, in turn, influences pulmonary surfactant homeostasis.

  4. Transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulations of gene expression during leaf polarity formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Xu; Li Yang; Hai Huang

    2007-01-01

    Leaf morphogenesis requires the establishment of adaxial-abaxial polarity after primordium initiation from the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Several families of transcription factors are known to play critical roles in promoting adaxial or abaxial leaf fate. Recently, post-transcriptional gene silencing pathways have been shown to regulate the establishment of leaf polarity, providing novel and exciting insights into leaf development. For example, microRNAs (miR165/166)and a trans-acting siRNA (TAS3-derived tasiR-ARF) have been shown to repress the expression of several key transcription factor genes. In addition, yet another level of regulation, post-translational regulation, has been revealed recently by studies on the role of the 26S proteasome in leaf polarity. Although our understanding regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying establishment of adaxial-abaxial polarity has greatly improved, there is still much that remains elusive.This review aims to discuss recent progress, as well as the remaining questions, regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying leaf polarity formation.

  5. Response to Bagavathiannan and Van Acker's "Transgenes and national boundaries - The need for international regulations": Biotechnology developers and regulators already consider transgene movement across national boundaries and the environmental risks posed by adventitious presence of unapproved events are overstated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickson, Thomas E; Raybould, Alan F

    2009-01-01

    Bagavathiannan and Van Acker propose greater international cooperation and information sharing in risk assessment for biotechnology-derived crops because pollen- and seed-mediated gene flow across political boundaries may lead to the adventitious presence of unapproved transgenes at sites along the borders of neighboring countries. However, they fail to convince us that something is wrong with the current situation and provide no details of how it could be improved.

  6. THE FORMATION OF ENTS ADAPTIVE REACTIONS DEPENDING ON THE TYPE OF PSYCHO-VEGETATIVE REGULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Kazin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the students (12 to 15 years old examination was to identify the integrative criteria of assessing the nature of the functional relationships between the parameters of the psychosocial and physiological adaptation of students, depending on age, individual-typological peculiarities of vegetative regulation, personal potential at different stages of school education.The study of the characteristics of vegetative regulation of the cardiovascular system was made with a help of an automatic cardiac-rhythm programs. The research of psychophysiological parameters was fulfiled using an automatic complex. The measurement of the speed of simple visual-motor reaction (PSMR, reaction to a moving object (WFD, the level of functional mobility of nervous processes (WFP and health brain (DDM were made before. Features psychosocial adaptation was analyzed using 8-color Luscher test.All examinee were divided into three groups on the basis of the statistical characteristics of the cardiac rhythm by the tone source autonomic tone: “vagotonia” (with a predominance of parasympathetic sistems, “somatotonic” (with domination of the sympatholytic effects, “atonic” (balanced type of vegetative nervous system.Based on the analysis of psychodynamic, neurodynamic and vegetative functions showed that students with initial vagotonies tone are characterized by high levels of situational and personal anxiety, low psychosocial adaptation, decreased activity of neurodynamic functions and psychodynamic processes in the learning dynamics, whereas the individuals with dominance of sympatotonics type regulation have high level of neurodynamic processes, psychosocial adaptation, against the background of significant stress mechanisms of vegetative regulation.Students with initial vegetative tone demonstrate a sufficient level of psychosocial adaptation, activity psychodynamic and neuromotor processes, accompanied by the preservation of the functionality of

  7. Isotopic constraints on the role of hypohalous acids in sulfate aerosol formation in the remote marine boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qianjie; Geng, Lei; Schmidt, Johan A.; Xie, Zhouqing; Kang, Hui; Dachs, Jordi; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Schauer, Andrew J.; Camp, Madeline G.; Alexander, Becky

    2016-09-01

    Sulfate is an important component of global atmospheric aerosol, and has partially compensated for greenhouse gas-induced warming during the industrial period. The magnitude of direct and indirect radiative forcing of aerosols since preindustrial times is a large uncertainty in climate models, which has been attributed largely to uncertainties in the preindustrial environment. Here, we report observations of the oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O) of sulfate aerosol collected in the remote marine boundary layer (MBL) in spring and summer in order to evaluate sulfate production mechanisms in pristine-like environments. Model-aided analysis of the observations suggests that 33-50 % of sulfate in the MBL is formed via oxidation by hypohalous acids (HOX = HOBr + HOCl), a production mechanism typically excluded in large-scale models due to uncertainties in the reaction rates, which are due mainly to uncertainties in reactive halogen concentrations. Based on the estimated fraction of sulfate formed via HOX oxidation, we further estimate that daily-averaged HOX mixing ratios on the order of 0.01-0.1 parts per trillion (ppt = pmol/mol) in the remote MBL during spring and summer are sufficient to explain the observations.

  8. An investigation of the formation and propagation of horseshoe vortices in a strut-boundary layer interaction, and their effect on inlet distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Matthew J.

    The formation and propagation of a horseshoe vortex system forming as a result of strut-boundary layer interaction is studied to determine its effect on stagnation pressure distortion in an axisymmetric supersonic inlet geometry. The effects of strut leading edge radius, pressure gradients, and curvature of the inlet walls on the vortex system are studied parametrically by performing a CFD simulation of strut-boundary layer interaction in a simplified duct geometry with flow conditions representative of the subsonic diffuser of a supersonic inlet. Leading edge fairings are studied to determine what parameters are most important for the control of the horseshoe vortex system and the reduction of stagnation pressure distortion at the fan. A fairing is designed for struts an axisymmetric, supersonic, mixed-compression inlet which reduces circumferential distortion intensity by 48% at cruise condition with 3 degrees angle of attack. Solutions are obtained to the steady state Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations using WIND, a finite-difference solver developed by NASA Glenn and the USAF Arnold Engineering Development Center. The Spalart-Allmaras one equation turbulence model is used to model eddy viscosity.

  9. Ras-Mek-Erk signaling regulates Nf1 heterozygous neointima formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Brian K; Bessler, Waylan K; Mali, Raghuveer; Mund, Julie A; Downing, Brandon D; Kapur, Reuben; Ingram, David A

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) results from mutations in the NF1 tumor-suppressor gene, which encodes neurofibromin, a negative regulator of diverse Ras signaling cascades. Arterial stenosis is a nonneoplastic manifestation of NF1 that predisposes some patients to debilitating morbidity and sudden death. Recent murine studies demonstrate that Nf1 heterozygosity (Nf1(+/-)) in monocytes/macrophages significantly enhances intimal proliferation after arterial injury. However, the downstream Ras effector pathway responsible for this phenotype is unknown. Based on in vitro assays demonstrating enhanced extracellular signal-related kinase (Erk) signaling in Nf1(+/-) macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells and in vivo evidence of Erk amplification without alteration of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling in Nf1(+/-) neointimas, we tested the hypothesis that Ras-Erk signaling regulates intimal proliferation in a murine model of NF1 arterial stenosis. By using a well-established in vivo model of inflammatory cell migration and standard cell culture, neurofibromin-deficient macrophages demonstrate enhanced sensitivity to growth factor stimulation in vivo and in vitro, which is significantly diminished in the presence of PD0325901, a specific inhibitor of Ras-Erk signaling in phase 2 clinical trials for cancer. After carotid artery injury, Nf1(+/-) mice demonstrated increased intimal proliferation compared with wild-type mice. Daily administration of PD0325901 significantly reduced Nf1(+/-) neointima formation to levels of wild-type mice. These studies identify the Ras-Erk pathway in neurofibromin-deficient macrophages as the aberrant pathway responsible for enhanced neointima formation.

  10. Transcriptional profiling reveals regulated genes in the hippocampus during memory formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Christine P.; Jensen, Roderick V.; Ochiishi, Tomoyo; Eisenstein, Ingrid; Zhao, Mingrui; Shors, Tracey; Kosik, Kenneth S.

    2002-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling (TP) offers a powerful approach to identify genes activated during memory formation and, by inference, the molecular pathways involved. Trace eyeblink conditioning is well suited for the study of regional gene expression because it requires the hippocampus, whereas the highly parallel task, delay conditioning, does not. First, we determined when gene expression was most regulated during trace conditioning. Rats were exposed to 200 trials per day of paired and unpaired stimuli each day for 4 days. Changes in gene expression were most apparent 24 h after exposure to 200 trials. Therefore, we profiled gene expression in the hippocampus 24 h after 200 trials of trace eyeblink conditioning, on multiple arrays using additional animals. Of 1,186 genes on the filter array, seven genes met the statistical criteria and were also validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. These genes were growth hormone (GH), c-kit receptor tyrosine kinase (c-kit), glutamate receptor, metabotropic 5 (mGluR5), nerve growth factor-beta (NGF-beta), Jun oncogene (c-Jun), transmembrane receptor Unc5H1 (UNC5H1), and transmembrane receptor Unc5H2 (UNC5H2). All these genes, except for GH, were downregulated in response to trace conditioning. GH was upregulated; therefore, we also validated the downregulation of the GH inhibitor, somatostatin (SST), even though it just failed to meet criteria on the arrays. By during situ hybridization, GH was expressed throughout the cell layers of the hippocampus in response to trace conditioning. None of the genes regulated in trace eyeblink conditioning were similarly affected by delay conditioning, a task that does not require the hippocampus. These findings demonstrate that transcriptional profiling can exhibit a repertoire of genes sensitive to the formation of hippocampal-dependent associative memories.

  11. Augmented feedback of COM and COP modulates the regulation of quiet human standing relative to the stability boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilby, Melissa C; Slobounov, Semyon M; Newell, Karl M

    2016-06-01

    The experiment manipulated real-time kinematic feedback of the motion of the whole body center of mass (COM) and center of pressure (COP) in anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) directions to investigate the variables actively controlled in quiet standing of young adults. The feedback reflected the current 2D postural positions within the 2D functional stability boundary that was scaled to 75%, 30% and 12% of its original size. The findings showed that the distance of both COP and COM to the respective stability boundary was greater during the feedback trials compared to a no feedback condition. However, the temporal safety margin of the COP, that is, the virtual time-to-contact (VTC), was higher without feedback. The coupling relation of COP-COM showed stable in-phase synchronization over all of the feedback conditions for frequencies below 1Hz. For higher frequencies (up to 5Hz), there was progressive reduction of COP-COM synchronization and local adaptation under the presence of augmented feedback. The findings show that the augmented feedback of COM and COP motion differentially and adaptively influences spatial and temporal properties of postural motion relative to the stability boundary while preserving the organization of the COM-COP coupling in postural control.

  12. Glass formation and unusual hygroscopic growth of iodic acid solution droplets with relevance for iodine mediated particle formation in the marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Murray

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Iodine oxide particles are known to nucleate in the marine boundary layer where gas phase molecular iodine and organoiodine species are produced by macroalgae. These ultra-fine particles may then grow through the condensation of other materials to sizes where they may serve as cloud condensation nuclei. There has been some debate over the chemical identity of the initially nucleated particles. In laboratory simulations, hygroscopic measurements have been used to infer that they are composed of insoluble I2O4, while elemental analysis of laboratory generated particles suggests soluble I2O5 or its hydrated form iodic acid, HIO3 (I2O5·H2O. In this paper we explore the response of super-micron sized aqueous iodic acid solution droplets to varying humidity using both Raman microscopy and single particle electrodynamic traps. These measurements reveal that the propensity of an iodic acid solution droplet to crystallise is negligible on drying to ~0% relative humidity (RH. On applying mechanical pressure to these droplets they shatter in a manner consistent with an ultra-viscous liquid or a brittle glass. Water retention in amorphous material at low RH is important for understanding the hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles and uptake of other condensable material. Subsequent water uptake between 10 and 20% RH causes their viscosity to reduce sufficiently that the cracked droplets flow and merge. The persistence of iodic acid solution in an amorphous state, rather than a crystalline state, suggests they will more readily accommodate other condensable material and are therefore more likely to grow to sizes where they may serve as cloud condensation nuclei. On increasing the humidity to ~90% the mass of the droplets only increases by ~20% with a corresponding increase in radius of only 6%, which is remarkably small for a highly soluble material. We suggest that the

  13. Location, formation and biosynthetic regulation of cellulases in the gliding bacteria Cytophaga hutchinsonii

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    Elijah Johnson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the recently published genome sequence of Cytophagahutchinsonii revealed an unusual collection of genes for an organism that can attackcrystalline cellulose. Consequently, questions were being raised by cellulase scientists, as towhat mechanism this organism uses to degrade its insoluble substrates. Cellulose, being ahighly polymeric compound and insoluble in water, cannot enter the cell walls ofmicroorganisms. Cellulose-degrading enzymes have therefore to be located on the surface ofthe cell wall or released extracellularly. The location of most cellulase enzymes has beenstudied. However, basic information on C. hutchinsonii cellulases is almost non-existent. Inthe present study, the location, formation and biosynthetic regulation of cellulases in C.hutchinsonii were demonstrated on different substrates. Various fractions isolated from C.hutchinsonii after cell rupture were assayed for carboxymethyl-cellulase activity (CMC.The cellulases were found to be predominantly cell-free during active growth on solka-flok,although 30% of activity was recorded on cell-bound enzymes. Relatively little CM-cellulase was formed when cells were grown on glucose and cellobiose. Apparently glucoseor labile substrates such as cellobiose seem to repress the formation of CM-cellulase. Thesefindings should provide some insight into possible hydrolysis mechanisms by C.hutchinsonii.

  14. Regulation of Star Formation Rates in Multiphase Galactic Disks: a Thermal/Dynamical Equilibrium Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ostriker, Eve C; Leroy, Adam K

    2010-01-01

    We develop a model for regulation of galactic star formation rates Sigma_SFR in disk galaxies, in which ISM heating by stellar UV plays a key role. By requiring simultaneous thermal and (vertical) dynamical equilibrium in the diffuse gas, and star formation at a rate proportional to the mass of the self-gravitating component, we obtain a prediction for Sigma_SFR as a function of the total gaseous surface density Sigma and the density of stars + dark matter, rho_sd. The physical basis of this relationship is that thermal pressure in the diffuse ISM, which is proportional to the UV heating rate and therefore to Sigma_SFR, must adjust to match the midplane pressure set by the vertical gravitational field. Our model applies to regions where Sigma < 100 Msun/pc^2. In low-Sigma_SFR (outer-galaxy) regions where diffuse gas dominates, the theory predicts Sigma_SFR \\propto Sigma (rho_sd)^1/2. The decrease of thermal equilibrium pressure when Sigma_SFR is low implies, consistent with observations, that star formatio...

  15. DNA Methylation Dynamics Regulate the Formation of a Regenerative Wound Epithelium during Axolotl Limb Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Aguilar

    Full Text Available The formation of a blastema during regeneration of an axolotl limb involves important changes in the behavior and function of cells at the site of injury. One of the earliest events is the formation of the wound epithelium and subsequently the apical epidermal cap, which involves in vivo dedifferentiation that is controlled by signaling from the nerve. We have investigated the role of epigenetic modifications to the genome as a possible mechanism for regulating changes in gene expression patterns of keratinocytes of the wound and blastema epithelium that are involved in regeneration. We report a modulation of the expression DNMT3a, a de novo DNA methyltransferase, within the first 72 hours post injury that is dependent on nerve signaling. Treatment of skin wounds on the upper forelimb with decitabine, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, induced changes in gene expression and cellular behavior associated with a regenerative response. Furthermore, decitabine-treated wounds were able to participate in regeneration while untreated wounds inhibited a regenerative response. Elucidation of the specific epigenetic modifications that mediate cellular dedifferentiation likely will lead to insights for initiating a regenerative response in organisms that lack this ability.

  16. Developmental regulation of expression of schizophrenia susceptibility genes in the primate hippocampal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, G; Banta Lavenex, P; Lavenex, P

    2012-10-23

    The hippocampal formation is essential for normal memory function and is implicated in many neurodevelopmental, neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. In particular, abnormalities in hippocampal structure and function have been identified in schizophrenic subjects. Schizophrenia has a strong polygenic component, but the role of numerous susceptibility genes in normal brain development and function has yet to be investigated. Here we described the expression of schizophrenia susceptibility genes in distinct regions of the monkey hippocampal formation during early postnatal development. We found that, as compared with other genes, schizophrenia susceptibility genes exhibit a differential regulation of expression in the dentate gyrus, CA3 and CA1, over the course of postnatal development. A number of these genes involved in synaptic transmission and dendritic morphology exhibit a developmental decrease of expression in CA3. Abnormal CA3 synaptic organization observed in schizophrenics might be related to some specific symptoms, such as loosening of association. Interestingly, changes in gene expression in CA3 might occur at a time possibly corresponding to the late appearance of the first clinical symptoms. We also found earlier changes in expression of schizophrenia susceptibility genes in CA1, which might be linked to prodromal psychotic symptoms. A number of schizophrenia susceptibility genes including APOE, BDNF, MTHFR and SLC6A4 are involved in other disorders, and thus likely contribute to nonspecific changes in hippocampal structure and function that must be combined with the dysregulation of other genes in order to lead to schizophrenia pathogenesis.

  17. Feedback Regulated Turbulence, Magnetic Fields, and Star Formation Rates in Galactic Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chang-Goo

    2015-01-01

    We use three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate the quasi-equilibrium states of galactic disks regulated by star formation feedback. We incorporate effects from massive-star feedback via time-varying heating rates and supernova (SN) explosions. We find that the disks in our simulations rapidly approach a quasi-steady state that satisfies vertical dynamical equilibrium. The star formation rate (SFR) surface density self-adjusts to provide the total momentum flux (pressure) in the vertical direction that matches the weight of the gas. We quantify feedback efficiency by measuring feedback yields, \\eta_c\\equiv P_c/\\Sigma_SFR (in suitable units), for each pressure component. The turbulent and thermal feedback yields are the same for HD and MHD simulations, \\eta_th~1 and \\eta_ turb~4, consistent with the theoretical expectations. In MHD simulations, turbulent magnetic fields are rapidly generated by turbulence, and saturate at a level corresponding to \\eta_mag,t~1. The presence of magn...

  18. The tomato SlSHINE3 transcription factor regulates fruit cuticle formation and epidermal patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian Xin; Adato, Avital; Alkan, Noam; He, Yonghua; Lashbrooke, Justin; Matas, Antonio J; Meir, Sagit; Malitsky, Sergey; Isaacson, Tal; Prusky, Dov; Leshkowitz, Dena; Schreiber, Lukas; Granell, Antonio R; Widemann, Emilie; Grausem, Bernard; Pinot, Franck; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Rogachev, Ilana; Rothan, Christophe; Aharoni, Asaph

    2013-01-01

    Fleshy tomato fruit typically lacks stomata; therefore, a proper cuticle is particularly vital for fruit development and interaction with the surroundings. Here, we characterized the tomato SlSHINE3 (SlSHN3) transcription factor to extend our limited knowledge regarding the regulation of cuticle formation in fleshy fruits. We created SlSHN3 overexpressing and silenced plants, and used them for detailed analysis of cuticular lipid compositions, phenotypic characterization, and the study on the mode of SlSHN3 action. Heterologous expression of SlSHN3 in Arabidopsis phenocopied overexpression of the Arabidopsis SHNs. Silencing of SlSHN3 results in profound morphological alterations of the fruit epidermis and significant reduction in cuticular lipids. We demonstrated that SlSHN3 activity is mediated by control of genes associated with cutin metabolism and epidermal cell patterning. As with SlSHN3 RNAi lines, mutation in the SlSHN3 target gene, SlCYP86A69, resulted in severe cutin deficiency and altered fruit surface architecture. In vitro activity assays demonstrated that SlCYP86A69 possesses NADPH-dependent ω-hydroxylation activity, particularly of C18:1 fatty acid to the 18-hydroxyoleic acid cutin monomer. This study provided insights into transcriptional mechanisms mediating fleshy fruit cuticle formation and highlighted the link between cutin metabolism and the process of fruit epidermal cell patterning.

  19. DNA Methylation Dynamics Regulate the Formation of a Regenerative Wound Epithelium during Axolotl Limb Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Cristian; Gardiner, David M

    2015-01-01

    The formation of a blastema during regeneration of an axolotl limb involves important changes in the behavior and function of cells at the site of injury. One of the earliest events is the formation of the wound epithelium and subsequently the apical epidermal cap, which involves in vivo dedifferentiation that is controlled by signaling from the nerve. We have investigated the role of epigenetic modifications to the genome as a possible mechanism for regulating changes in gene expression patterns of keratinocytes of the wound and blastema epithelium that are involved in regeneration. We report a modulation of the expression DNMT3a, a de novo DNA methyltransferase, within the first 72 hours post injury that is dependent on nerve signaling. Treatment of skin wounds on the upper forelimb with decitabine, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, induced changes in gene expression and cellular behavior associated with a regenerative response. Furthermore, decitabine-treated wounds were able to participate in regeneration while untreated wounds inhibited a regenerative response. Elucidation of the specific epigenetic modifications that mediate cellular dedifferentiation likely will lead to insights for initiating a regenerative response in organisms that lack this ability.

  20. Regulating temporospatial dynamics of morphogen for structure formation of the lacrimal gland by chitosan biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ya-Chuan; Yang, Tsung-Lin

    2017-01-01

    The lacrimal gland is an important organ responsible for regulating tear synthesis and secretion. The major work of lacrimal gland (LG) is to lubricate the ocular surface and maintain the health of eyes. Functional deterioration of the lacrimal gland happens because of aging, diseases, or therapeutic complications, but without effective treatments till now. The LG originates from the epithelium of ocular surface and develops by branching morphogenesis. To regenerate functional LGs, it is required to explore the way of recapitulating and facilitating the organ to establish the intricate and ramified structure. In this study, we proposed an approach using chitosan biomaterials to create a biomimetic environment beneficial to the branching structure formation of developing LG. The morphogenetic effect of chitosan was specific and optimized to promote LG branching. With chitosan, increase in temporal expression and local concentration of endogenous HGF-related molecules creates an environment around the emerging tip of LG epithelia. By efficiently enhancing downstream signaling of HGF pathways, the cellular activities and behaviors were activated to contribute to LG branching morphogenesis. The morphogenetic effect of chitosan was abolished by either ligand or receptor deprivation, or inhibition of downstream signaling transduction. Our results elucidated the underlying mechanism accounting for chitosan morphogenetic effects on LG, and also proposed promising approaches with chitosan to assist tissue structure formation of the LG.

  1. [Regulation of neurogenesis: factors affecting of new neurons formation in adult mammals brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respondek, Michalina; Buszman, Ewa

    2015-12-31

    Neurogenesis is a complex and multi-step process of generating completely functional neurons. This process in adult brain is based on pluripotentional neuronal stem cells (NSC), which are able to proliferation and differentiation into mature neurons or glial cells. NSC are located in subgranular zone inside hippocampus and in subventricular zone. The new neurons formation depends on many endo- and exogenous factors which modulate each step of neurogenesis. This article describes the most important regulators of adult neurogenesis, mainly: neurotrophins, growth factors, hormones, neurotransmitters and microenvironment of NSC. Some drugs, especially antipsychotics, antidepressants and normothymics may affect the neurogenic properties of adult brain. Moreover pathological processes such as neuroinflammation, stroke or epilepsy are able to induce proliferation of NSC. The proneurogenic effects of psychotropic drugs and pathological processes are associated with their ability to increase some hormones and neurotrophins level, as well as with rising the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein and metalloproteinase MMP-2. Additionaly, some drugs, for example haloperidol, are able to block prolactin and dopaminergic neuroblasts receptors. Down-regulation of adult neurogenesis is associated with alcohol abuse and high stress level. Negative effect of many drugs, such as cytostatics, COX-2 inhibitors and opioides was also observed. The proneurogenic effect of described factors suggest their broad therapeutic potential and gives a new perspective on an effective and modern treatment of many neuropsychiatric disorders. This effect can also help to clarify the pathogenesis of disorders associated with proliferation and degeneration of adult brain cells.

  2. Cbln family proteins promote synapse formation by regulating distinct neurexin signaling pathways in various brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Keiko; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2011-04-01

    Cbln1 (a.k.a. precerebellin) is a unique bidirectional synaptic organizer that plays an essential role in the formation and maintenance of excitatory synapses between granule cells and Purkinje cells in the mouse cerebellum. Cbln1 secreted from cerebellar granule cells directly induces presynaptic differentiation and indirectly serves as a postsynaptic organizer by binding to its receptor, the δ2 glutamate receptor. However, it remains unclear how Cbln1 binds to the presynaptic sites and interacts with other synaptic organizers. Furthermore, although Cbln1 and its family members Cbln2 and Cbln4 are expressed in brain regions other than the cerebellum, it is unknown whether they regulate synapse formation in these brain regions. In this study, we showed that Cbln1 and Cbln2, but not Cbln4, specifically bound to its presynaptic receptor -α and β isoforms of neurexin carrying the splice site 4 insert [NRXs(S4+)] - and induced synaptogenesis in cerebellar, hippocampal and cortical neurons in vitro. Cbln1 competed with synaptogenesis mediated by neuroligin 1, which lacks the splice sites A and B, but not leucine-rich repeat transmembrane protein 2, possibly by sharing the presynaptic receptor NRXs(S4+). However, unlike neurexins/neuroligins or neurexins/leucine-rich repeat transmembrane proteins, the interaction between NRX1β(S4+) and Cbln1 was insensitive to extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. These findings revealed the unique and general roles of Cbln family proteins in mediating the formation and maintenance of synapses not only in the cerebellum but also in various other brain regions.

  3. Pyk2 regulates megakaryocyte-induced increases in osteoblast number and bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying-Hua; Hooker, R Adam; Nguyen, Khanh; Gerard-O'Riley, Rita; Waning, David L; Chitteti, Brahmananda R; Meijome, Tomas E; Chua, Hui Lin; Plett, Artur P; Orschell, Christie M; Srour, Edward F; Mayo, Lindsey D; Pavalko, Fredrick M; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Kacena, Melissa A

    2013-06-01

    Preclinical and clinical evidence from megakaryocyte (MK)-related diseases suggests that MKs play a significant role in maintaining bone homeostasis. Findings from our laboratories reveal that MKs significantly increase osteoblast (OB) number through direct MK-OB contact and the activation of integrins. We, therefore, examined the role of Pyk2, a tyrosine kinase known to be regulated downstream of integrins, in the MK-mediated enhancement of OBs. When OBs were co-cultured with MKs, total Pyk2 levels in OBs were significantly enhanced primarily because of increased Pyk2 gene transcription. Additionally, p53 and Mdm2 were both decreased in OBs upon MK stimulation, which would be permissive of cell cycle entry. We then demonstrated that OB number was markedly reduced when Pyk2-/- OBs, as opposed to wild-type (WT) OBs, were co-cultured with MKs. We also determined that MKs inhibit OB differentiation in the presence and absence of Pyk2 expression. Finally, given that MK-replete spleen cells from GATA-1-deficient mice can robustly stimulate OB proliferation and bone formation in WT mice, we adoptively transferred spleen cells from these mice into Pyk2-/- recipient mice. Importantly, GATA-1-deficient spleen cells failed to stimulate an increase in bone formation in Pyk2-/- mice, suggesting in vivo the important role of Pyk2 in the MK-induced increase in bone volume. Further understanding of the signaling pathways involved in the MK-mediated enhancement of OB number and bone formation will facilitate the development of novel anabolic therapies to treat bone loss diseases.

  4. Mechanisms and Regulation of Surface Interactions and Biofilm Formation in Agrobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason E. Heindl

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available For many pathogenic bacteria surface attachment is a required first step during host interactions. Attachment can proceed to invasion of host tissue or cells or to establishment of a multicellular bacterial community known as a biofilm. The transition from a unicellular, often motile, state to a sessile, multicellular, biofilm-associated state is one of the most important developmental decisions for bacteria. Agrobacterium tumefaciens genetically transforms plant cells by transfer and integration of a segment of plasmid-encoded transferred DNA (T-DNA into the host genome, and has also been a valuable tool for plant geneticists. A. tumefaciens attaches to and forms a complex biofilm on a variety of biotic and abiotic substrates in vitro. Although rarely studied in situ, it is hypothesized that the biofilm state plays an important functional role in the ecology of this organism. Surface attachment, motility, and cell division are coordinated through a complex regulatory network that imparts an unexpected asymmetry to the A. tumefaciens life cycle. In this review we describe the mechanisms by which A. tumefaciens associates with surfaces, and regulation of this process. We focus on the transition between flagellar-based motility and surface attachment, and on the composition, production, and secretion of multiple extracellular components that contribute to the biofilm matrix. Biofilm formation by A. tumefaciens is linked with virulence both mechanistically and through shared regulatory molecules. We detail our current understanding of these and other regulatory schemes, as well as the internal and external (environmental cues mediating development of the biofilm state, including the second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, nutrient levels, and the role of the plant host in influencing attachment and biofilm formation. A. tumefaciens is an important model system contributing to our understanding of developmental transitions, bacterial cell biology, and

  5. A novel two-component response regulator links rpf with biofilm formation and virulence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Pi Huang

    Full Text Available Citrus bacterial canker caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is a serious disease that impacts citrus production worldwide, and X. axonopodis pv. citri is listed as a quarantine pest in certain countries. Biofilm formation is important for the successful development of a pathogenic relationship between various bacteria and their host(s. To understand the mechanisms of biofilm formation by X. axonopodis pv. citri strain XW19, the strain was subjected to transposon mutagenesis. One mutant with a mutation in a two-component response regulator gene that was deficient in biofilm formation on a polystyrene microplate was selected for further study. The protein was designated as BfdR for biofilm formation defective regulator. BfdR from strain XW19 shares 100% amino acid sequence identity with XAC1284 of X. axonopodis pv. citri strain 306 and 30-100% identity with two-component response regulators in various pathogens and environmental microorganisms. The bfdR mutant strain exhibited significantly decreased biofilm formation on the leaf surfaces of Mexican lime compared with the wild type strain. The bfdR mutant was also compromised in its ability to cause canker lesions. The wild-type phenotype was restored by providing pbfdR in trans in the bfdR mutant. Our data indicated that BfdR did not regulate the production of virulence-related extracellular enzymes including amylase, lipase, protease, and lecithinase or the expression of hrpG, rfbC, and katE; however, BfdR controlled the expression of rpfF in XVM2 medium, which mimics cytoplasmic fluids in planta. In conclusion, biofilm formation on leaf surfaces of citrus is important for canker development in X. axonopodis pv. citri XW19. The process is controlled by the two-component response regulator BfdR via regulation of rpfF, which is required for the biosynthesis of a diffusible signal factor.

  6. The Strip-Hippo Pathway Regulates Synaptic Terminal Formation by Modulating Actin Organization at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisako Sakuma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Synapse formation requires the precise coordination of axon elongation, cytoskeletal stability, and diverse modes of cell signaling. The underlying mechanisms of this interplay, however, remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that Strip, a component of the striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK complex that regulates these processes, is required to ensure the proper development of synaptic boutons at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. In doing so, Strip negatively regulates the activity of the Hippo (Hpo pathway, an evolutionarily conserved regulator of organ size whose role in synapse formation is currently unappreciated. Strip functions genetically with Enabled, an actin assembly/elongation factor and the presumptive downstream target of Hpo signaling, to modulate local actin organization at synaptic termini. This regulation occurs independently of the transcriptional co-activator Yorkie, the canonical downstream target of the Hpo pathway. Our study identifies a previously unanticipated role of the Strip-Hippo pathway in synaptic development, linking cell signaling to actin organization.

  7. A Genome-wide RNAi Screen for Microtubule Bundle Formation and Lysosome Motility Regulation in Drosophila S2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber L. Jolly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-distance intracellular transport of organelles, mRNA, and proteins (“cargo” occurs along the microtubule cytoskeleton by the action of kinesin and dynein motor proteins, but the vast network of factors involved in regulating intracellular cargo transport are still unknown. We capitalize on the Drosophila melanogaster S2 model cell system to monitor lysosome transport along microtubule bundles, which require enzymatically active kinesin-1 motor protein for their formation. We use an automated tracking program and a naive Bayesian classifier for the multivariate motility data to analyze 15,683 gene phenotypes and find 98 proteins involved in regulating lysosome motility along microtubules and 48 involved in the formation of microtubule filled processes in S2 cells. We identify innate immunity genes, ion channels, and signaling proteins having a role in lysosome motility regulation and find an unexpected relationship between the dynein motor, Rab7a, and lysosome motility regulation.

  8. The anatomy of a star-forming galaxy: pressure-driven regulation of star formation in simulated galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, S. M.; Wadsley, J.; Couchman, H. M. P.; Keller, B. W.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the regulation of star formation in star-forming galaxies through a suite of high-resolution isolated galaxy simulations. We use the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GASOLINE, including photoelectric heating and metal cooling, which produces a multi-phase interstellar medium (ISM). We show that representative star formation and feedback sub-grid models naturally lead to a weak, sub-linear dependence between the amount of star formation and changes to star formation parameters. We incorporate these sub-grid models into an equilibrium pressure-driven regulation framework. We show that the sub-linear scaling arises as a consequence of the non-linear relationship between scaleheight and the effective pressure generated by stellar feedback. Thus, simulated star formation regulation is sensitive to how well vertical structure in the ISM is resolved. Full galaxy discs experience density waves which drive locally time-dependent star formation. We develop a simple time-dependent, pressure-driven model that reproduces the response extremely well.

  9. The anatomy of a star-forming galaxy: Pressure-driven regulation of star formation in simulated galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Benincasa, S M; Couchman, H M P; Keller, B W

    2016-01-01

    We explore the regulation of star formation in star-forming galaxies through a suite of high-resolution isolated galaxy simulations. We use the SPH code GASOLINE, including photoelectric heating and metal cooling, which produces a multi-phase interstellar medium. We show that representative star formation and feedback sub-grid models naturally lead to a weak, sub-linear dependence between the amount of star formation and changes to star formation parameters. We incorporate these sub-grid models into an equilibrium pressure-driven regulation framework. We show that the sub-linear scaling arises as a consequence of the non-linear relationship between scale height and the effective pressure generated by stellar feedback. Thus, simulated star-formation regulation is sensitive to how well vertical structure in the ISM is resolved. Full galaxy disks experience density waves which drive locally time-dependent star formation. We develop a simple time-dependent, pressure-driven model that reproduces the response extre...

  10. Staphylococcus aureus sarA regulates inflammation and colonization during central nervous system biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica N Snowden

    Full Text Available Infection is a frequent and serious complication following the treatment of hydrocephalus with CSF shunts, with limited therapeutic options because of biofilm formation along the catheter surface. Here we evaluated the possibility that the sarA regulatory locus engenders S. aureus more resistant to immune recognition in the central nervous system (CNS based on its reported ability to regulate biofilm formation. We utilized our established model of CNS catheter-associated infection, similar to CSF shunt infections seen in humans, to compare the kinetics of bacterial titers, cytokine production and inflammatory cell influx elicited by wild type S. aureus versus an isogenic sarA mutant. The sarA mutant was more rapidly cleared from infected catheters compared to its isogenic wild type strain. Consistent with this finding, several pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-17, CXCL1, and IL-1β were significantly increased in the brain following infection with the sarA mutant versus wild type S. aureus, in agreement with the fact that the sarA mutant displayed impaired biofilm growth and favored a planktonic state. Neutrophil influx into the infected hemisphere was also increased in the animals infected with the sarA mutant compared to wild type bacteria. These changes were not attributable to extracellular protease activity, which is increased in the context of SarA mutation, since similar responses were observed between sarA and a sarA/protease mutant. Overall, these results demonstrate that sarA plays an important role in attenuating the inflammatory response during staphylococcal biofilm infection in the CNS via a mechanism that remains to be determined.

  11. The SILCC project - III. Regulation of star formation and outflows by stellar winds and supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Andrea; Walch, Stefanie; Naab, Thorsten; Girichidis, Philipp; Wünsch, Richard; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Clark, Paul C.; Peters, Thomas; Derigs, Dominik; Baczynski, Christian; Puls, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    We study the impact of stellar winds and supernovae on the multiphase interstellar medium using three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations carried out with FLASH. The selected galactic disc region has a size of (500 pc)2 × ±5 kpc and a gas surface density of 10 M⊙ pc-2. The simulations include an external stellar potential and gas self-gravity, radiative cooling and diffuse heating, sink particles representing star clusters, stellar winds from these clusters that combine the winds from individual massive stars by following their evolution tracks, and subsequent supernova explosions. Dust and gas (self-) shielding is followed to compute the chemical state of the gas with a chemical network. We find that stellar winds can regulate star (cluster) formation. Since the winds suppress the accretion of fresh gas soon after the cluster has formed, they lead to clusters that have lower average masses (102-104.3 M⊙) and form on shorter time-scales (10-3-10 Myr). In particular, we find an anticorrelation of cluster mass and accretion time-scale. Without winds, the star clusters easily grow to larger masses for ∼5 Myr until the first supernova explodes. Overall, the most massive stars provide the most wind energy input, while objects beginning their evolution as B-type stars contribute most of the supernova energy input. A significant outflow from the disc (mass loading ≳1 at 1 kpc) can be launched by thermal gas pressure if more than 50 per cent of the volume near the disc mid-plane can be heated to T > 3 × 105 K. Stellar winds alone cannot create a hot volume-filling phase. The models that are in best agreement with observed star formation rates drive either no outflows or weak outflows.

  12. Mass spectrometry evidence for formation of estrogen-homocysteine conjugates: estrogens can regulate homocysteine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Nilesh W

    2013-12-01

    Homocysteine (HCys), a sulfur-containing amino acid, is formed during the metabolism of methionine. An imbalance between the rate of production and the use of HCys during methionine metabolism can result in an increase in the plasma and urinary levels of HCys. HCys has been shown to be toxic to vascular endothelial cells through several pathways. Many earlier clinical studies have revealed an association between plasma HCys and cardiovascular and other diseases. In contrast, estrogens are suggested to lower the risk of cardiovascular disease. Several studies indicate that estrogen metabolites could be responsible for cardiovascular protection. It has been demonstrated that electrophilic estrogen quinones, E1(E2)-2,3-Q and E1(E2)-3,4-Q, can alkylate DNA as well as form conjugates with glutathione. I hypothesize that estrogen quinones generated in situ by oxidative enzymes, metal ions, or molecular oxygen can interact with HCys to form conjugates. This in turn could lower the levels of toxic HCys as well as quenching the reactive estrogen quinones, resulting in cardiovascular protective effects. To test the feasibility of a protective estrogen-HCys pathway, estrogen quinones were treated with HCys. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the assay mixture shows the formation of estrogen-HCys conjugates. Furthermore, incubation of catechol estrogens with myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the presence of HCys resulted in the formation of respective estrogen-HCys conjugates. The identities of estrogen-HCys conjugates in MPO assay extracts were confirmed by comparing them to pure synthesized estrogen-HCys standards. I propose that through conjugation estrogens could chemically regulate HCys levels; moreover these conjugates could be used as potential biomarkers in determining health.

  13. ROCK activity regulates functional tight junction assembly during blastocyst formation in porcine parthenogenetic embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongwoo Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein serine/threonine kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1 and ROCK2 are Rho subfamily GTPase downstream effectors that regulate cell migration, intercellular adhesion, cell polarity, and cell proliferation by stimulating actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Inhibition of ROCK proteins affects specification of the trophectoderm (TE and inner cell mass (ICM lineages, compaction, and blastocyst cavitation. However, the molecules involved in blastocyst formation are not known. Here, we examined developmental competence and levels of adherens/tight junction (AJ/TJ constituent proteins, such as CXADR, OCLN, TJP1, and CDH1, as well as expression of their respective mRNAs, after treating porcine parthenogenetic four-cell embryos with Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of ROCK, at concentrations of 0, 10, 20, 100 µM for 24 h. Following this treatment, the blastocyst development rates were 39.1, 20.7, 10.0, and 0% respectively. In embryos treated with 20 µM treatment, expression levels of CXADR, OCLN, TJP1, and CDH1 mRNA and protein molecules were significantly reduced (P < 0.05. FITC-dextran uptake assay revealed that the treatment caused an increase in TE TJ permeability. Interestingly, the majority of the four-cell and morula embryos treated with 20 µM Y-27643 for 24 h showed defective compaction and cavitation. Taken together, our results indicate that ROCK activity may differentially affect assembly of AJ/TJs as well as regulate expression of genes encoding junctional proteins.

  14. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  15. Regulation of phasin expression and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granule formation in Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pötter, Markus; Madkour, Mohamed H; Mayer, Frank; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2002-08-01

    Regulation of expression of the phasin PhaP, which is the major protein at the surface of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules in Ralstonia eutropha H16, was studied and analysed at the molecular level. The regulation of PhaP expression is achieved by an autoregulated repressor, which is encoded by phaR in R. eutropha. The occurrence of PhaR homologues and the organization of phaR genes was analysed in detail in 29 different bacteria. Three kinds of molecule to which PhaR binds were identified in cells of R. eutropha, as revealed by gel-mobility-shift assays, DNaseI footprinting, cell fractionation, immunoelectron microscopy studies employing anti-PhaR antibodies raised against purified N-terminal hexahistidine-tagged PhaR and in vitro binding studies employing artificial PHA granules. PhaR binds upstream of phaP at two sites comprising the transcriptional start site plus the -10 region and a region immediately upstream of the -35 region of the sigma(70) promoter of phaP, where two imperfect 12 bp repeat sequences (GCAMMAAWTMMD) were identified on the sense and anti-sense strands. PhaR also binds 86 bp upstream of the phaR translational start codon, where the sigma(54)-dependent promoter was identified. PhaR also binds to the surface of PHA granules. In the cytoplasm of a phaROmegaKm mutant of R. eutropha H16, increased quantities of PhaP were detected and the cells formed by this strain were much smaller and had many more PHA granules present than the wild-type. These data support the following model for the regulation of phaP expression. Under cultivation conditions not permissive for PHA biosynthesis or in mutants defective in PHA biosynthesis, PhaR binds to the phaP promoter region and represses transcription of this gene. After the onset of PHA biosynthesis, under conditions that are permissive for the formation of nascent granules, PhaR binds to PHA granules and phaP is transcribed. At the later stages of PHA accumulation, PhaR no longer binds to the granules

  16. Role of Ordering Energy in Formation of Grain Structure and Special Boundaries Spectrum in OrderedAlloys with L12 Superstructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    It was revealed that an average energy of special boundaries is proportional to APB energy in the alloys with the L12 superstructure. This fact proves the appearance of the GAPBs in the planes of location of special boundaries in coincidence sites of ordered alloys. It was determined that the more energy of special boundaries in ordered alloys, the more energy of complex stacking fault. There is a correlation between the distribution of special boundaries as a function its relative energy and ordering energy: the more ordering energy, the more degree of washed away of distribution. The correlation between average relative energy of special boundaries and ordering energy was detected: the more ordering energy, the more average energy of special boundaries. The reverse dependence between ordering energy and average number of special boundaries in grains limited by boundaries of general type was discovered.

  17. Renormalized Volumes with Boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A Rod

    2016-01-01

    We develop a general regulated volume expansion for the volume of a manifold with boundary whose measure is suitably singular along a separating hypersurface. The expansion is shown to have a regulator independent anomaly term and a renormalized volume term given by the primitive of an associated anomaly operator. These results apply to a wide range of structures. We detail applications in the setting of measures derived from a conformally singular metric. In particular, we show that the anomaly generates invariant (Q-curvature, transgression)-type pairs for hypersurfaces with boundary. For the special case of anomalies coming from the volume enclosed by a minimal hypersurface ending on the boundary of a Poincare--Einstein structure, this result recovers Branson's Q-curvature and corresponding transgression. When the singular metric solves a boundary version of the constant scalar curvature Yamabe problem, the anomaly gives generalized Willmore energy functionals for hypersurfaces with boundary. Our approach ...

  18. Dynamin regulates metaphase furrow formation and plasma membrane compartmentalization in the syncytial Drosophila embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikhy, Richa; Mavrakis, Manos; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The successive nuclear division cycles in the syncytial Drosophila embryo are accompanied by ingression and regression of plasma membrane furrows, which surround individual nuclei at the embryo periphery, playing a central role in embryo compartmentalization prior to cellularization. Here, we demonstrate that cell cycle changes in dynamin localization and activity at the plasma membrane (PM) regulate metaphase furrow formation and PM organization in the syncytial embryo. Dynamin was localized on short PM furrows during interphase, mediating endocytosis of PM components. Dynamin redistributed off ingressed PM furrows in metaphase, correlating with stabilized PM components and the associated actin regulatory machinery on long furrows. Acute inhibition of dynamin in the temperature sensitive shibire mutant embryo resulted in morphogenetic consequences in the syncytial division cycle. These included inhibition of metaphase furrow ingression, randomization of proteins normally polarized to intercap PM and disruption of the diffusion barrier separating PM domains above nuclei. Based on these findings, we propose that cell cycle changes in dynamin orchestrate recruitment of actin regulatory machinery for PM furrow dynamics during the early mitotic cycles in the Drosophila embryo. PMID:25661871

  19. Clumpy high-z galaxies as a testbed for feedback-regulated galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, Lucio; Lupi, Alessandro; Keller, Ben; Wadsley, James; Madau, Piero

    2016-01-01

    We study the dependence of fragmentation in massive gas-rich galaxy disks at $z > 1$ on feedback model and hydrodynamical method, employing the GASOLINE2 SPH code and the lagrangian mesh-less code GIZMO in finite mass mode. We compare non-cosmological galaxy disk runs with standard blastwave supernovae (SN)feedback, which introduces delayed cooling in order to drive winds, and runs with the new superbubble SN feedback, which produces winds naturally by modelling the detailed physics of SN-driven bubbles and leads to efficient self-regulation of star formation. We find that, with blastwave feedback, massive star forming clumps form in comparable number and with very similar masses in GASOLINE2 and GIZMO. The typical masses are in the range $10^7-10^8 M_{\\odot}$, lower than in most previous works, while giant clumps with masses above $10^9 M_{\\odot}$ are exceedingly rare. With superbubble feedback, instead, massive bound star forming clumps do not form because galaxies never undergo a phase of violent disk inst...

  20. Reciprocal regulation of Wnt and Gpr177/mouse Wntless is required for embryonic axis formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jiang; Jiang, Ming; Mirando, Anthony J; Yu, Hsiao-Man Ivy; Hsu, Wei

    2009-11-03

    Members of the Wnt family are secreted glycoproteins that trigger cellular signals essential for proper development of organisms. Cellular signaling induced by Wnt proteins is involved in diverse developmental processes and human diseases. Previous studies have generated an enormous wealth of knowledge on the events in signal-receiving cells. However, relatively little is known about the making of Wnt in signal-producing cells. Here, we describe that Gpr177, the mouse orthologue of Drosophila Wls, is expressed during formation of embryonic axes. Embryos with deficient Gpr177 exhibit defects in establishment of the body axis, a phenotype highly reminiscent to the loss of Wnt3. Although many different mammalian Wnt proteins are required for a wide range of developmental processes, the Wnt3 ablation exhibits the earliest developmental abnormality. This suggests that the Gpr177-mediated Wnt production cannot be substituted. As a direct target of Wnt, Gpr177 is activated by beta-catenin and LEF/TCF-dependent transcription. This activation alters the cellular distributions of Gpr177 which binds to Wnt proteins and assists their sorting and secretion in a feedback regulatory mechanism. Our findings demonstrate that the loss of Gpr177 affects Wnt production in the signal-producing cells, leading to alterations of Wnt signaling in the signal-receiving cells. A reciprocal regulation of Wnt and Gpr177 is essential for the patterning of the anterior-posterior axis during mammalian development.

  1. Hh and Wnt signaling regulate formation of olig2+ neurons in the zebrafish cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Karen A; Topczewska, Jolanta M; Weidinger, Gilbert; Dorsky, Richard I; Appel, Bruce

    2008-06-01

    The cerebellum, which forms from anterior hindbrain, coordinates motor movements and balance. Sensory input from the periphery is relayed and modulated by cerebellar interneurons, which are organized in layers. The mechanisms that specify the different neurons of the cerebellum and direct its layered organization remain poorly understood. Drawing from investigations of spinal cord, we hypothesized that the embryonic cerebellum is patterned on the dorsoventral axis by opposing morphogens. We tested this using zebrafish. Here we show that expression of olig2, which encodes a bHLH transcription factor, marks a distinct subset of neurons with similarities to eurydendroid neurons, the principal efferent neurons of the teleost cerebellum. In combination with other markers, olig2 reveals a dorsoventral organization of cerebellar neurons in embryos. Disruption of Hedgehog signaling, which patterns the ventral neural tube, produced a two-fold increase in the number of olig2(+) neurons. By contrast, olig2(+) neurons did not develop in embryos deficient for Wnt signaling, which patterns dorsal neural tube, nor did they develop in embryos deficient for both Hedgehog and Wnt signaling. Our data indicate that Hedgehog and Wnt work in opposition across the dorsoventral axis of the cerebellum to regulate formation of olig2(+) neurons. Specifically, we propose that Hedgehog limits the range of Wnt signaling, which is necessary for olig2(+) neuron development.

  2. Dynamin regulates metaphase furrow formation and plasma membrane compartmentalization in the syncytial Drosophila embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Rikhy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The successive nuclear division cycles in the syncytial Drosophila embryo are accompanied by ingression and regression of plasma membrane furrows, which surround individual nuclei at the embryo periphery, playing a central role in embryo compartmentalization prior to cellularization. Here, we demonstrate that cell cycle changes in dynamin localization and activity at the plasma membrane (PM regulate metaphase furrow formation and PM organization in the syncytial embryo. Dynamin was localized on short PM furrows during interphase, mediating endocytosis of PM components. Dynamin redistributed off ingressed PM furrows in metaphase, correlating with stabilized PM components and the associated actin regulatory machinery on long furrows. Acute inhibition of dynamin in the temperature sensitive shibire mutant embryo resulted in morphogenetic consequences in the syncytial division cycle. These included inhibition of metaphase furrow ingression, randomization of proteins normally polarized to intercap PM and disruption of the diffusion barrier separating PM domains above nuclei. Based on these findings, we propose that cell cycle changes in dynamin orchestrate recruitment of actin regulatory machinery for PM furrow dynamics during the early mitotic cycles in the Drosophila embryo.

  3. The SILCC project: III. Regulation of star formation and outflows by stellar winds and supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gatto, A; Naab, T; Girichidis, P; Wünsch, R; Glover, S C O; Klessen, R S; Clark, P C; Peters, T; Derigs, D; Baczynski, C; Puls, J

    2016-01-01

    We study the impact of stellar winds and supernovae on the multi-phase interstellar medium using three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations carried out with FLASH. The selected galactic disc region has a size of (500 pc)$^2$ x $\\pm$ 5 kpc and a gas surface density of 10 M$_{\\odot}$/pc$^2$. The simulations include an external stellar potential and gas self-gravity, radiative cooling and diffuse heating, sink particles representing star clusters, stellar winds from these clusters which combine the winds from indi- vidual massive stars by following their evolution tracks, and subsequent supernova explosions. Dust and gas (self-)shielding is followed to compute the chemical state of the gas with a chemical network. We find that stellar winds can regulate star (cluster) formation. Since the winds suppress the accretion of fresh gas soon after the cluster has formed, they lead to clusters which have lower average masses (10$^2$ - 10$^{4.3}$ M$_{\\odot}$) and form on shorter timescales (10$^{-3}$ - 10 Myr). In part...

  4. Eya1 protein phosphatase regulates tight junction formation in lung distal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hashash, Ahmed H K; Turcatel, Gianluca; Varma, Saaket; Berika, Mohamed; Al Alam, Denise; Warburton, David

    2012-09-01

    Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms underlying lung epithelial tight junction (TJ) assembly, which is inextricably linked to the preservation of epithelial polarity, and is highly coordinated by proteins that regulate epithelial cell polarity, such as aPKCζ. We recently reported that Eya1 phosphatase functions through aPKCζ-Notch1 signaling to control cell polarity in the lung epithelium. Here, we have extended these observations to TJ formation to demonstrate that Eya1 is crucial for the maintenance of TJ protein assembly in the lung epithelium, probably by controlling aPKCζ phosphorylation levels, aPKCζ-mediated TJ protein phosphorylation and Notch1-Cdc42 activity. Thus, TJs are disassembled after interfering with Eya1 function in vivo or during calcium-induced TJ assembly in vitro. These effects are reversed by reintroduction of wild-type Eya1 or partially inhibiting aPKCζ in Eya1siRNA cells. Moreover, genetic activation of Notch1 rescues Eya1(-/-) lung epithelial TJ defects. These findings uncover novel functions for the Eya1-aPKCζ-Notch1-Cdc42 pathway as a crucial regulatory mechanism of TJ assembly and polarity of the lung epithelium, providing a conceptual framework for future mechanistic and translational studies in this area.

  5. Phenotypically plastic traits regulate caste formation and soldier function in polyembryonic wasps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M S; Milton, I; Strand, M R

    2010-12-01

    Polyembryonic encyrtid wasps are parasitoids that have evolved a clonal form of embryogenesis and a caste system where some progeny become reproducing wasps whereas others develop into a sterile soldier caste. Theory based on the biology of Copidosoma floridanum predicts that the primary role of soldier larvae is to mediate conflict over sex ratio, which also favours female-biased soldier production. Other data, however, suggest that female-biased soldier production reflects a developmental constraint. Here, we assessed whether female-biased soldier function by polyembryonic wasps reflects sex-specific adaptation or constraint by conducting comparative studies with Copidosoma bakeri, a species that produces clutch sizes similar to C. floridanum yet rarely produces broods associated with sex ratio conflict. Our results indicate that the oviposition behaviour of adults, development of progeny and function of soldier larvae differ greatly between C. bakeri and C. floridanum. These findings indicate that caste formation and soldier function in polyembryonic encyrtid wasps are regulated by phenotypically plastic traits. Our results further suggest that the primary function of the soldier caste in some species is defence of host resources from competitors whereas in others it is the resolution of sex ratio conflict.

  6. The Enterococcus faecium enterococcal biofilm regulator, EbrB, regulates the esp operon and is implicated in biofilm formation and intestinal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, Janetta; Paganelli, Fernanda L; Zhang, Xinglin; van Schaik, Willem; Leavis, Helen L; van Luit-Asbroek, Miranda; van der Poll, Tom; Leendertse, Masja; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, Enterococcus faecium is one of the leading nosocomial pathogens worldwide. Strains causing clinical infections or hospital outbreaks are enriched in the enterococcal surface protein (Esp) encoding ICEEfm1 mobile genetic element. Previous studies showed that Esp is involved in biofilm formation, endocarditis and urinary tract infections. In this study, we characterized the role of the putative AraC type of regulator (locus tag EfmE1162_2351), which we renamed ebrB and which is, based on the currently available whole genome sequences, always located upstream of the esp gene, and studied its role in Esp surface exposure during growth. A markerless deletion mutant of ebrB resulted in reduced esp expression and complete abolishment of Esp surface exposure, while Esp cell-surface exposure was restored when this mutant was complemented with an intact copy of ebrB. This demonstrates a role for EbrB in esp expression. However, during growth, ebrB expression levels did not change over time, while an increase in esp expression at both RNA and protein level was observed during mid-log and late-log phase. These results indicate the existence of a secondary regulation system for esp, which might be an unknown quorum sensing system as the enhanced esp expression seems to be cell density dependent. Furthermore, we determined that esp is part of an operon of at least 3 genes putatively involved in biofilm formation. A semi-static biofilm model revealed reduced biofilm formation for the EbrB deficient mutant, while dynamics of biofilm formation using a flow cell system revealed delayed biofilm formation in the ebrB mutant. In a mouse intestinal colonization model the ebrB mutant was less able to colonize the gut compared to wild-type strain, especially in the small intestine. These data indicate that EbrB positively regulates the esp operon and is implicated in biofilm formation and intestinal colonization.

  7. The Enterococcus faecium enterococcal biofilm regulator, EbrB, regulates the esp operon and is implicated in biofilm formation and intestinal colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janetta Top

    Full Text Available Nowadays, Enterococcus faecium is one of the leading nosocomial pathogens worldwide. Strains causing clinical infections or hospital outbreaks are enriched in the enterococcal surface protein (Esp encoding ICEEfm1 mobile genetic element. Previous studies showed that Esp is involved in biofilm formation, endocarditis and urinary tract infections. In this study, we characterized the role of the putative AraC type of regulator (locus tag EfmE1162_2351, which we renamed ebrB and which is, based on the currently available whole genome sequences, always located upstream of the esp gene, and studied its role in Esp surface exposure during growth. A markerless deletion mutant of ebrB resulted in reduced esp expression and complete abolishment of Esp surface exposure, while Esp cell-surface exposure was restored when this mutant was complemented with an intact copy of ebrB. This demonstrates a role for EbrB in esp expression. However, during growth, ebrB expression levels did not change over time, while an increase in esp expression at both RNA and protein level was observed during mid-log and late-log phase. These results indicate the existence of a secondary regulation system for esp, which might be an unknown quorum sensing system as the enhanced esp expression seems to be cell density dependent. Furthermore, we determined that esp is part of an operon of at least 3 genes putatively involved in biofilm formation. A semi-static biofilm model revealed reduced biofilm formation for the EbrB deficient mutant, while dynamics of biofilm formation using a flow cell system revealed delayed biofilm formation in the ebrB mutant. In a mouse intestinal colonization model the ebrB mutant was less able to colonize the gut compared to wild-type strain, especially in the small intestine. These data indicate that EbrB positively regulates the esp operon and is implicated in biofilm formation and intestinal colonization.

  8. FOXO3A regulation by miRNA-29a Controls chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and cartilage formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérit, David; Brondello, Jean-Marc; Chuchana, Paul; Philipot, Didier; Toupet, Karine; Bony, Claire; Jorgensen, Christian; Noël, Danièle

    2014-06-01

    Skeletal development and cartilage formation require stringent regulation of gene expression for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to progress through stages of differentiation. Since microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate biological processes, the objective of the present study was to identify novel miRNAs involved in the modulation of chondrogenesis. We performed miRNA profiling and identify miR-29a as being one of the most down-regulated miRNAs during the chondrogenesis. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we showed that SOX9 down-regulates its transcription. Moreover, the over-expression of miR-29a strongly inhibited the expression of chondrocyte-specific markers during in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. We identified FOXO3A as a direct target of miR-29a and showed a down- and up-regulation of FOXO3a protein levels after transfection of, respectively, premiR- and antagomiR-29a oligonucleotides. Finally, we showed that using the siRNA or premiR approach, chondrogenic differentiation was inhibited to a similar extent. Together, we demonstrate that the down-regulation of miR-29a, concomitantly with FOXO3A up-regulation, is essential for the differentiation of MSCs into chondrocytes and in vivo cartilage/bone formation. The delivery of miRNAs that modulate MSC chondrogenesis may be applicable for cartilage regeneration and deserves further investigation.

  9. Influence of zinc dialkyldithiophosphate tribofilm formation on the tribological performance of self-mated diamond-like carbon contacts under boundary lubrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah Tasdemir, H., E-mail: habdullah46@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Tokoroyama, Takayuki; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Umehara, Noritsugu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Mabuchi, Yutaka [Nissan Motor Co. (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings offer excellent mechanical and tribological properties that make them suitable protective coatings for various industrial applications. In recent years, several engine and power train components in passenger cars, which work under boundary lubricated conditions, have been coated with DLC coatings. Since conventional lubricants and lubricant additives are formulated for metal surfaces, there are still controversial questions concerning chemical reactivity between DLC surfaces and common lubricant additives owing to the chemical inertness of DLC coatings. In this work, we present the influence of zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZnDTP) anti-wear additives on the tribological performance of various self-mated DLC coatings under boundary lubrication conditions. The effects of hydrogen, doping elements, and surface morphology on the reactivity of DLC coatings to form a ZnDTP-derived tribofilm were investigated by atomic force microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results confirmed that ZnDTP-derived pad-like or patchy tribofilm forms on the surfaces depending on the DLC coating. It is seen that hydrogen content and doping elements increase pad-like tribofilm formation. Doped DLC coatings are found to give better wear resistance than non-doped DLC coatings. Furthermore, the addition of ZnDTP additives to the base oil significantly improves the wear resistance of hydrogenated DLC, silicon-doped hydrogenated DLC, and chromium-doped hydrogenated DLC. Hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous DLC coatings provide the lowest friction coefficient both in PAO (poly-alpha-olefin) and PAO + ZnDTP oils. - Highlights: • Zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (DTP) tribofilm formation on various DLC surfaces was evidenced. • Pad-like tribofilm was found on a-C:H, a-C, Si-DLC and Cr-DLC. • Pad-like tribofilm on DLC surfaces greatly increased the wear resistance. • Hydrogenated and doped DLC coatings are

  10. PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 is a regulator of myosin-X localization and filopodia formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plantard, Laure; Arjonen, Antti; Lock, John G

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3] is a key regulator of cell signaling that acts by recruiting proteins to the cell membrane, such as at the leading edge during cell migration. Here, we show that PtdIns (3,4,5)P3 plays a central role in filopodia formation via the bindi...

  11. Differential Regulation of c-di-GMP Metabolic Enzymes by Environmental Signals Modulates Biofilm Formation in Yersinia pestis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Gai-Xian; Fan, Sai; Guo, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Shiyun; Sun, Yi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is essential for Yersinia pestis biofilm formation, which is important for flea-borne blockage-dependent plague transmission. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), HmsT and HmsD and one phosphodiesterase (PDE), HmsP are responsible for the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Here, we systematically analyzed the effect of various environmental signals on regulation of the biofilm phenotype, the c-di-GMP levels, and expression of HmsT, HmsD, and HmsP in Y. pestis. Biofilm formation was higher in the presence of non-lethal high concentration of CaCl2, MgCl2, CuSO4, sucrose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, or dithiothreitol, and was lower in the presence of FeCl2 or NaCl. In addition, we found that HmsD plays a major role in biofilm formation in acidic or redox environments. These environmental signals differentially regulated expression of HmsT, HmsP and HmsD, resulting in changes in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Our results suggest that bacteria can sense various environmental signals, and differentially regulate activity of DGCs and PDEs to coordinately regulate and adapt metabolism of c-di-GMP and biofilm formation to changing environments. PMID:27375563

  12. Differential Regulation of c-di-GMP Metabolic Enzymes by Environmental Signals Modulates Biofilm Formation in Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Gai-Xian; Fan, Sai; Guo, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Shiyun; Sun, Yi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is essential for Yersinia pestis biofilm formation, which is important for flea-borne blockage-dependent plague transmission. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), HmsT and HmsD and one phosphodiesterase (PDE), HmsP are responsible for the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Here, we systematically analyzed the effect of various environmental signals on regulation of the biofilm phenotype, the c-di-GMP levels, and expression of HmsT, HmsD, and HmsP in Y. pestis. Biofilm formation was higher in the presence of non-lethal high concentration of CaCl2, MgCl2, CuSO4, sucrose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, or dithiothreitol, and was lower in the presence of FeCl2 or NaCl. In addition, we found that HmsD plays a major role in biofilm formation in acidic or redox environments. These environmental signals differentially regulated expression of HmsT, HmsP and HmsD, resulting in changes in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Our results suggest that bacteria can sense various environmental signals, and differentially regulate activity of DGCs and PDEs to coordinately regulate and adapt metabolism of c-di-GMP and biofilm formation to changing environments.

  13. The Ubiquitin-Specific Protease 14 (USP14) Is a Critical Regulator of Long-Term Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarome, Timothy J.; Kwapis, Janine L.; Hallengren, Jada J.; Wilson, Scott M.; Helmstetter, Fred J.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested a role for ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated protein degradation in learning-dependent synaptic plasticity; however, very little is known about how protein degradation is regulated at the level of the proteasome during memory formation. The ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (USP14) is a proteasomal deubiquitinating enzyme…

  14. NMDA Receptor- and ERK-Dependent Histone Methylation Changes in the Lateral Amygdala Bidirectionally Regulate Fear Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta-Agarwal, Swati; Jarome, Timothy J.; Fernandez, Jordan; Lubin, Farah D.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that fear memory formation requires de novo gene transcription in the amygdala. We provide evidence that epigenetic mechanisms in the form of histone lysine methylation in the lateral amygdala (LA) are regulated by NMDA receptor (NMDAR) signaling and involved in gene transcription changes necessary for fear memory…

  15. Differential regulation of c-di-GMP metabolic enzymes by environmental signals modulates biofilm formation in Yersinia pestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gai-Xian eRen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP is essential for Yersinia pestis biofilm formation, which is important for flea-borne blockage-dependent plague transmission. Two diguanylate cyclases (DGCs, HmsT and HmsD and one phosphodiesterase (PDE, HmsP are responsible for the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Here, we systematically analyzed the effect of various environmental signals on regulation of the biofilm phenotype, the c-di-GMP levels, and expression of HmsT, HmsD and HmsP in Y. pestis. Biofilm formation was higher in the presence of nonlethal high concentration of CaCl2, MgCl2, CuSO4, sucrose, sodium dodecyl sulfonate, or dithiothreitol, and was lower in the presence of FeCl2 or NaCl. In addition, we found that HmsD plays a major role in biofilm formation in acidic or redox environments. These environmental signals differentially regulated expression of HmsT, HmsP and HmsD, resulting in changes in the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in Y. pestis. Our results suggest that bacteria can sense various environmental signals, and differentially regulates their DGCs and PDEs to coordinately regulate and adapt metabolism of c-di-GMP and biofilm formation to changing environments.

  16. WEREWOLF, a regulator of root hair pattern formation, controls flowering time through the regulation of FT mRNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Eunjoo; Yu, Jihyeon; Ryu, Kook Hui; Lee, Myeong Min; Lee, Ilha

    2011-08-01

    A key floral activator, FT, integrates stimuli from long-day, vernalization, and autonomous pathways and triggers flowering by directly regulating floral meristem identity genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Since a small amount of FT transcript is sufficient for flowering, the FT level is strictly regulated by diverse genes. In this study, we show that WEREWOLF (WER), a MYB transcription factor regulating root hair pattern, is another regulator of FT. The mutant wer flowers late in long days but normal in short days and shows a weak sensitivity to vernalization, which indicates that WER controls flowering time through the photoperiod pathway. The expression and double mutant analyses showed that WER modulates FT transcript level independent of CONSTANS and FLOWERING LOCUS C. The histological analysis of WER shows that it is expressed in the epidermis of leaves, where FT is not expressed. Consistently, WER regulates not the transcription but the stability of FT mRNA. Our results reveal a novel regulatory mechanism of FT that is non cell autonomous.

  17. Complex regulatory network controls initial adhesion and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli via regulation of the csgD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent-Combaret, C; Brombacher, E; Vidal, O; Ambert, A; Lejeune, P; Landini, P; Dorel, C

    2001-12-01

    The Escherichia coli OmpR/EnvZ two-component regulatory system, which senses environmental osmolarity, also regulates biofilm formation. Up mutations in the ompR gene, such as the ompR234 mutation, stimulate laboratory strains of E. coli to grow as a biofilm community rather than in a planktonic state. In this report, we show that the OmpR234 protein promotes biofilm formation by binding the csgD promoter region and stimulating its transcription. The csgD gene encodes the transcription regulator CsgD, which in turn activates transcription of the csgBA operon encoding curli, extracellular structures involved in bacterial adhesion. Consistent with the role of the ompR gene as part of an osmolarity-sensing regulatory system, we also show that the formation of biofilm by E. coli is inhibited by increasing osmolarity in the growth medium. The ompR234 mutation counteracts adhesion inhibition by high medium osmolarity; we provide evidence that the ompR234 mutation promotes biofilm formation by strongly increasing the initial adhesion of bacteria to an abiotic surface. This increase in initial adhesion is stationary phase dependent, but it is negatively regulated by the stationary-phase-specific sigma factor RpoS. We propose that this negative regulation takes place via rpoS-dependent transcription of the transcription regulator cpxR; cpxR-mediated repression of csgB and csgD promoters is also triggered by osmolarity and by curli overproduction, in a feedback regulation loop.

  18. Mixture formation and pre-reaction in an injection jet in Diesel engine boundary conditions; Gemischbildung und Vorreaktionen in einem Einspritzstrahl unter dieselmotorischen Randbedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisele, G.; Koss, H.J.; Knoche, K.F.

    1993-12-31

    To examine the mixture formation and combustion, fuel is injected in Diesel engine boundary conditions in a pressure chamber. Spectroscopic methods permit the noncontact investigation with high spatial and temporal resolution of the physical and chemical processes. The jet of an excimer laser is focussed in the injection jet for this purpose. The local mixture compostion is determined from the Raman spectra, and fluorescence spectra permit one to obtain qualitative information on the appearance and distribution of the OH and NH radicals in the injection jet. For example, it was found that with a chamber temperature of 500 C, the first clear OH fluorescence occurs about 1.8 ms after the start of injection at the edge of the jet in the area of lean mixture. (orig.) [Deutsch] Zur Untersuchung der Gemischbildung und Verbrennung wird Kraftstoff unter dieselmotorischen Randbedingungen in einer Druckkammer eingespritzt. Spektroskopische Methoden erlauben die beruehrungslose und zudem oertlich und zeitlich hochaufgeloeste Untersuchung der physikalischen und chemischen Vorgaenge. Dazu wird der Strahl eines Excimerlasers in den Einspritzstrahl fokussiert. Aus Ramanspektren laesst sich die lokale Gemischzusammensetzung bestimmen, Fluoreszenzspektren erlauben qualitative Aussagen ueber Auftreten und Verteilung der OH- und NH-Radikale im Einspritzstrahl. So zeigt sich zum Beispiel, dass bei einer Kammertemperatur von 500 C die ersten deutlichen OH-Fluoreszenzen ca. 1,8 ms nach Einspritzbeginn am Strahlrand im Bereich mageren Gemisches auftreten (orig.)

  19. The Catabolite Repressor Protein-Cyclic AMP Complex Regulates csgD and Biofilm Formation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagel, David A; Evans, Margery L; Greene, Sarah E; Pinkner, Jerome S; Hultgren, Scott J; Chapman, Matthew R

    2016-12-15

    The extracellular matrix protects Escherichia coli from immune cells, oxidative stress, predation, and other environmental stresses. Production of the E. coli extracellular matrix is regulated by transcription factors that are tuned to environmental conditions. The biofilm master regulator protein CsgD upregulates curli and cellulose, the two major polymers in the extracellular matrix of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) biofilms. We found that cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates curli, cellulose, and UPEC biofilms through csgD The alarmone cAMP is produced by adenylate cyclase (CyaA), and deletion of cyaA resulted in reduced extracellular matrix production and biofilm formation. The catabolite repressor protein (CRP) positively regulated csgD transcription, leading to curli and cellulose production in the UPEC isolate, UTI89. Glucose, a known inhibitor of CyaA activity, blocked extracellular matrix formation when added to the growth medium. The mutant strains ΔcyaA and Δcrp did not produce rugose biofilms, pellicles, curli, cellulose, or CsgD. Three putative CRP binding sites were identified within the csgD-csgB intergenic region, and purified CRP could gel shift the csgD-csgB intergenic region. Additionally, we found that CRP binded upstream of kpsMT, which encodes machinery for K1 capsule production. Together our work shows that cAMP and CRP influence E. coli biofilms through transcriptional regulation of csgD IMPORTANCE The catabolite repressor protein (CRP)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) complex influences the transcription of ∼7% of genes on the Escherichia coli chromosome (D. Zheng, C. Constantinidou, J. L. Hobman, and S. D. Minchin, Nucleic Acids Res 32:5874-5893, 2004, https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkh908). Glucose inhibits E. coli biofilm formation, and ΔcyaA and Δcrp mutants show impaired biofilm formation (D. W. Jackson, J.W. Simecka, and T. Romeo, J Bacteriol 184:3406-3410, 2002, https://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.184.12.3406-3410.2002). We determined that the c

  20. Direct and indirect regulation of spinal cord Ia afferent terminal formation by the γ-Protocadherins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuhina ePrasad

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Pcdh-γ gene cluster encodes 22 protocadherin adhesion molecules that interact as homophilic multimers and critically regulate synaptogenesis and apoptosis of interneurons in the developing spinal cord. Unlike interneurons, the two primary components of the monosynaptic stretch reflex circuit, dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons and ventral motor neurons, do not undergo excessive apoptosis in Pcdh-γdel/del null mutants, which die shortly after birth. However, as we show here, mutants exhibit severely disorganized Ia proprioceptive afferent terminals in the ventral horn. In contrast to the fine net-like pattern observed in wild-type mice, central Ia terminals in Pcdh-γ mutants are expanded, clumped, and fill the space between individual motor neurons; quantitative analysis shows a ~2.5 fold increase in the area of terminals. Concomitant with this, there is a 70% loss of the collaterals that Ia afferents extend to ventral interneurons, many of which undergo apoptosis in the mutants. The Ia afferent phenotype is ameliorated, though not entirely rescued, when apoptosis is blocked in Pcdh-γ null mice by introduction of a Bax null allele. This indicates that loss of ventral interneurons, which act as intermediate Ia afferent targets, contributes to the disorganization of terminals on motor pools. Restricted mutation of the Pcdh-γ cluster using conditional mutants and multiple Cre transgenic lines (Wnt1-Cre for sensory neurons; Pax2-Cre for ventral interneurons; Hb9-Cre for motor neurons also revealed a direct requirement for the γ-Pcdhs in Ia neurons and ventral interneurons, but not in motor neurons themselves. Together, these genetic manipulations indicate that the γ-Pcdhs are required for the formation of the Ia afferent circuit in two ways: First, they control the survival of ventral interneurons that act as intermediate Ia targets; and second, they provide a homophilic molecular cue between Ia afferents and target ventral interneurons.

  1. 一种编队控制的动态调整与规划方法%A Dynamic Regulation and Scheduling Scheme for Formation Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈余庆; 庄严; 王伟

    2007-01-01

    This article is concerned with cooperative control problems in formation of mobile robots under the nonholonomic constraints that certain geometrical constraints are imposed on multiple mobile robots throughout their travel. For this purpose, a new method of motion control for formation is presented, which is based on the dynamic regulation and scheduling scheme. It is attractive for its adaptability to the formation structure and desired trajectory. The quality of formation keeping can be evaluated by the instantaneous errors of formation offset and spacing distance. Some kinematics laws are developed to regulate and maintain the formation shape. Simulation results and data analysis show the validity of the proposed approach for a group of robots.

  2. CRP-Mediated Carbon Catabolite Regulation of Yersinia pestis Biofilm Formation Is Enhanced by the Carbon Storage Regulator Protein, CsrA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willias, Stephan P; Chauhan, Sadhana; Lo, Chien-Chi; Chain, Patrick S G; Motin, Vladimir L

    2015-01-01

    The natural transmission of Yersinia pestis is reliant upon biofilm blockage of the flea vector. However, the environmentally-responsive adaptive regulators which facilitate Y. pestis biofilm production in accordance with the flea midgut milieu are not well understood. We seek to establish the impact of available carbon source metabolism and storage upon Y. pestis biofilm production. Our findings demonstrate that Y. pestis biofilm production is subject to carbon catabolite regulation in which the presence of glucose impairs biofilm production; whereas, the sole metabolism of alternate carbon sources promotes robust biofilm formation. This observation is facilitated by the cAMP receptor protein, CRP. In accordance with a stark growth defect, deletion of crp in both CO92 and KIM6+ Y. pestis strains significantly impaired biofilm production when solely utilizing alternate carbon sources. Media supplementation with cAMP, a small-molecule activator of CRP, did not significantly alter Y. pestis biofilm production. Furthermore, CRP did not alter mRNA abundance of previously-characterized hms biofilm synthesis and regulation factors. Therefore, our findings indicate CRP does not confer a direct stimulatory effect, but may indirectly promote Y. pestis biofilm production by facilitating the alternate carbon source expression profile. Additionally, we assessed the impact of the carbon storage regulator protein, CsrA, upon Y. pestis biofilm production. Contrary to what has been described for E. coli, Y. pestis biofilm formation was found to be enhanced by CsrA. Regardless of media composition and available carbon source, deletion of csrA significantly impaired Y. pestis biofilm production. CsrA was found to promote Y. pestis biofilm production independent of glycogen regulation. Loss of csrA did not significantly alter relative hmsH, hmsP, or hmsT mRNA abundance. However, deletion of hmsP in the csrA-deficient mutant enabled excessive biofilm production, suggesting Csr

  3. Receptor-Type Guanylyl Cyclase at 76C (Gyc76C) Regulates De Novo Lumen Formation during Drosophila Tracheal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Unisha

    2016-01-01

    Lumen formation and maintenance are important for the development and function of essential organs such as the lung, kidney and vasculature. In the Drosophila embryonic trachea, lumena form de novo to connect the different tracheal branches into an interconnected network of tubes. Here, we identify a novel role for the receptor type guanylyl cyclase at 76C (Gyc76C) in de novo lumen formation in the Drosophila trachea. We show that in embryos mutant for gyc76C or its downsteam effector protein kinase G (PKG) 1, tracheal lumena are disconnected. Dorsal trunk (DT) cells of gyc76C mutant embryos migrate to contact each other and complete the initial steps of lumen formation, such as the accumulation of E-cadherin (E-cad) and formation of an actin track at the site of lumen formation. However, the actin track and E-cad contact site of gyc76C mutant embryos did not mature to become a new lumen and DT lumena did not fuse. We also observed failure of the luminal protein Vermiform to be secreted into the site of new lumen formation in gyc76C mutant trachea. These DT lumen formation defects were accompanied by altered localization of the Arf-like 3 GTPase (Arl3), a known regulator of vesicle-vesicle and vesicle-membrane fusion. In addition to the DT lumen defect, lumena of gyc76C mutant terminal cells were shorter compared to wild-type cells. These studies show that Gyc76C and downstream PKG-dependent signaling regulate de novo lumen formation in the tracheal DT and terminal cells, most likely by affecting Arl3-mediated luminal secretion. PMID:27642749

  4. Genetic interaction of two abscisic acid signaling regulators, HY5 and FIERY1, in mediating lateral root formation

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hao

    2011-01-01

    Root architecture is continuously shaped in a manner that helps plants to better adapt to the environment. Gene regulation at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional levels largely controls this environmental response. Recently, RNA silencing has emerged as an important player in gene regulation and is involved in many aspects of plant development, including lateral root formation. In a recent study, we found that FIERY1, a bifunctional abiotic stress and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling regulator and an endogenous RNA silencing suppressor, mediates auxin response during lateral root formation in Arabidopsis. We proposed that FRY1 regulates lateral root development through its activity on adenosine 3,5-bisphosphate (PAP), a strong inhibitor of exoribonucleases (XRNs). Interestingly, some of the phenotypes of fry1, such as enhanced response to light in repressing hypocotyl elongation and hypersensitivity to ABA in lateral root growth, are opposite to those of another light- and ABA-signaling mutant, hy5. Here we analyzed the hy5 fry1 double mutant for root and hypocotyl growth. We found that the hy5 mutation can suppress the enhanced light sensitivity in fry1 hypocotyl elongation and restore the lateral root formation. The genetic interaction between HY5 and FRY1 indicates that HY5 and FRY1 may act in overlapping pathways that mediate light signaling and lateral root development. © 2011 Landes Bioscience.

  5. Grainyhead-like factor Get1/Grhl3 regulates formation of the epidermal leading edge during eyelid closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhengquan; Bhandari, Ambica; Mannik, Jaana; Pham, Thu; Xu, Xiaoman; Andersen, Bogi

    2008-07-01

    Grainyhead transcription factors play an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating epidermal terminal differentiation. One such factor, the mammalian Grainyhead-like epithelial transactivator (Get1/Grhl3), is important for epidermal barrier formation. In addition to a role in barrier formation, Grainyhead genes play roles in closure of several structures such as the mouse neural tube and Drosophila wounds. Consistent with these observations, we found that Get1 knockout mice have an eye-open at birth phenotype. The failure of eyelid closure appears to be due to critical functions of Get1 in promoting F-actin polymerization, filopodia formation, and the cell shape changes that are required for migration of the keratinocytes at the leading edge during eyelid closure. The expression of TGFalpha, a known regulator of leading edge formation, is decreased in the eyelid tip of Get1(-/-) mice. Levels of phospho-EGFR and phospho-ERK are also decreased at the leading edge tip. Furthermore, in an organ culture model, TGFalpha can increase levels of phospho-EGFR and promote cell shape changes as well as leading edge formation in Get1(-/-) eyelids, indicating that in eyelid closure Get1 acts upstream of TGFalpha in the EGFR/ERK pathway.

  6. Comprehensive transcriptome analysis unravels the existence of crucial genes regulating primary metabolism during adventitious root formation in Petunia hybrida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirhossein Ahkami

    Full Text Available To identify specific genes determining the initiation and formation of adventitious roots (AR, a microarray-based transcriptome analysis in the stem base of the cuttings of Petunia hybrida (line W115 was conducted. A microarray carrying 24,816 unique, non-redundant annotated sequences was hybridized to probes derived from different stages of AR formation. After exclusion of wound-responsive and root-regulated genes, 1,354 of them were identified which were significantly and specifically induced during various phases of AR formation. Based on a recent physiological model distinguishing three metabolic phases in AR formation, the present paper focuses on the response of genes related to particular metabolic pathways. Key genes involved in primary carbohydrate metabolism such as those mediating apoplastic sucrose unloading were induced at the early sink establishment phase of AR formation. Transcriptome changes also pointed to a possible role of trehalose metabolism and SnRK1 (sucrose non-fermenting 1- related protein kinase in sugar sensing during this early step of AR formation. Symplastic sucrose unloading and nucleotide biosynthesis were the major processes induced during the later recovery and maintenance phases. Moreover, transcripts involved in peroxisomal beta-oxidation were up-regulated during different phases of AR formation. In addition to metabolic pathways, the analysis revealed the activation of cell division at the two later phases and in particular the induction of G1-specific genes in the maintenance phase. Furthermore, results point towards a specific demand for certain mineral nutrients starting in the recovery phase.

  7. Negative carbon isotopic excursion on the Lower/Middle Cambrian boundary of Kaili Formation, Taijiang County,Guizhou Province, China: Implications for mass extinction and stratigraphic division and correlation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Ruidong(杨瑞东); ZHU; Lijun(朱立军); WANG; Shijie(王世杰)

    2003-01-01

    The stratigraphic division and correlation of the Lower/Middle Cambrian boundary is a global problem that has not yet been perfectly solved up to now. That is because there existed two global biogeographic regions during the period from Early Cambrian to Middle Cambrian. Although much work has been done from the angle of paleontology and great achievements have been acquired in this aspect, no biological assemblage has yet been established for global stratigraphic correlations due to the coexistence of the two global biogeographic regions -- the Atlantic biogeographic region and the Indian-Pacific biogeographic region during the Early-Middle Cambrian. So, to develop and establish other approaches to the stratigraphic division and correlation of the Lower/Middle Cambrian on a global scale is a possible way to solve the puzzling problem. This work systematically studied acritarch fossils from the Early-Middle Cambrian Kaili Formation at Taijiang County, Guizhou Province. The Lower/Middle Cambrian boundary was divided in terms of acritarch fossil assemblage. The divided boundary is generally consistent with what was divided by trilobite and can be correlated with the Lower/Middle Cambrian boundaries divided by acritarch assemblage in Siberia and Europe. On this basis, the Lower/Middle Cambrian boundary is divided in terms of an obvious carbon isotopic excursion on a global scale during the transitional period from Early Cambrian to Middle Cambrian boundaries in Siberia and North America. The method for the stratigraphic division and correlation of the Lower/Middle Cambrian boundary in terms of carbon isotopic oscillations is helpful to solving the global problem on the division and correlation of the Lower/Middle Cambrian boundary. It is also evidenced that the extinction of a lot of trilobites at the end of Early Cambrian is closely related with this event of carbon isotopic excursion.

  8. The molecular mechanism of photodynamic therapy to fibrosis: Regulation on the pyridinoline cross-link formation in collagen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JuCheng; LIU Wei; YI ZhongZhou; CHEN Rui; LI Ying; MIN Yong

    2009-01-01

    Fibrotic processes in tissues are characterised by an excessive accumulation of collagen containing increased levels of pyridinoline cross-links,which has been taken as an important criterion to diagnose the fibrosis.Hypocrellin B (HB) is a natural photosensitizer with excellent photodynamic activity but very low dark-toxicity.In the current work,main purpose was to clarify if photodynamic action of HB could be applied to regulating the level of pyridinoline cross-link in collagen.To use gelatin as a model collagen,it was observed that the pyridinoline cross-link formation was effectively degraded by HB photodynamic action in the gelatin,suggesting the level of pyridinoline cross-link formation in collagen may be photodynamically regulated to a normal level.Furthermore,mechanism of the photodynamic action of HB was studied.

  9. Unusual dealloying effect in gold/copper alloy thin films: the role of defects and column boundaries in the formation of nanoporous gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Boukli-Hacene, Farah; Molina-Luna, Leopoldo; Bouts, Nicolas; Chauvin, Adrien; Thiry, Damien; Gautron, Eric; Gautier, Nicolas; Tessier, Pierre-Yves

    2015-02-04

    Understanding the dealloying mechanisms of gold-based alloy thin films resulting in the formation of nanoporous gold with a sponge-like structure is essential for the future design and integration of this novel class of material in practical devices. Here we report on the synthesis of nanoporous gold thin films using a free-corrosion approach in nitric acid applied to cosputtered Au-Cu thin films. A relationship is established between the as-grown Au-Cu film characteristics (i.e., composition, morphology, and structure) and the porosity of the sponge-like gold thin films. We further demonstrate that the dealloying approach can be applied to nonhomogenous Au-Cu alloy thin films consisting of periodic and alternate Au-rich/Au-poor nanolayers. In such a case, however, the dealloying process is found to be altered and unusual etching stages arise. Thanks to defects and column boundaries playing the role of channels, the nitric acid is found to quickly penetrate within the films and then laterally (i.e., parallel to the film surface) attacks the nanolayers rather than perpendicularly. As a consequence to this anisotropic etching, the Au-poor layers are etched preferentially and transform into Au pillars holding the Au-rich layers and preventing them against collapsing. A further exposure to nitric acid results in the collapsing of the Au-rich layers accompanied by a transition from a multilayered to a sponge-like structure. A scenario, supported by experimental observations, is further proposed to provide a detailed explanation of the fundamental mechanisms occurring during the dealloying process of films with a multilayered structure.

  10. Phloem parenchyma transfer cells in Arabidopsis – an experimental system to identify transcriptional regulators of wall ingrowth formation

    OpenAIRE

    Arun Chinnappa, Kiruba S.; Nguyen, Thi Thu S.; Hou, Jiexi; Wu, Yuzhou; McCurdy, David W.

    2013-01-01

    In species performing apoplasmic loading, phloem cells adjacent to sieve elements often develop into transfer cells (TCs) with wall ingrowths. The highly invaginated wall ingrowths serve to amplify plasma membrane surface area to achieve increased rates of apoplasmic transport, and may also serve as physical barriers to deter pathogen invasion. Wall ingrowth formation in TCs therefore plays an important role in phloem biology, however, the transcriptional switches regulating the deposition of...

  11. Data supporting regulating temporospatial dynamics of morphogen for structure formation of the lacrimal gland by chitosan biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Ya-Chuan Hsiao; Tsung-Lin Yang

    2016-01-01

    The lacrimal gland is responsible for tear synthesis and secretion, and is derived from the epithelia of ocular surface and generated by branching morphogenesis. The dataset presented in this article is to support the research results of the effect of chitosan biomaterials on facilitating the structure formation of the lacrimal gland by regulating temporospatial dynamics of morphogen. The embryonic lacrimal gland explants were used as the standard experimental model for investigating lacrimal...

  12. The Sensor Kinase GacS Negatively Regulates Flagellar Formation and Motility in a Biocontrol Bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Soo Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The GacS/GacA two component system regulates various traits related to the biocontrol potential of plant-associated pseudomonads. The role of the sensor kinase, GacS, differs between strains in regulation of motility. In this study, we determined how a gacS mutation changed cell morphology and motility in Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. The gacS mutant cells were elongated in stationary-phase compared to the wild type and the complemented gacS mutant, but cells did not differ in length in logarithmic phase. The gacS mutant had a two-fold increase in the number of flagella compared with the wild type strain; flagella number was restored to that of the wild type in the complemented gacS mutant. The more highly flagellated gacS mutant cells had greater swimming motilities than that of the wild type strain. Enhanced flagella formation in the gacS mutant correlated with increased expression of three genes, fleQ, fliQ and flhF, involved in flagellar formation. Expression of these genes in the complemented gacS mutant was similar to that of the wild type. These findings show that this root-colonizing pseudomonad adjusts flagella formation and cell morphology in stationary-phase using GacS as a major regulator.

  13. GAS REGULATION OF GALAXIES: THE EVOLUTION OF THE COSMIC SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, THE METALLICITY-MASS-STAR-FORMATION RATE RELATION, AND THE STELLAR CONTENT OF HALOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Pipino, Antonio; Peng Yingjie [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Renzini, Alvio [Department of Physics and Astronomy Galileo Galilei, Universita degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    A very simple physical model of galaxies is one in which the formation of stars is instantaneously regulated by the mass of gas in a reservoir with mass loss scaling with the star-formation rate (SFR). This model links together three different aspects of the evolving galaxy population: (1) the cosmic time evolution of the specific star-formation rate (sSFR) relative to the growth of halos, (2) the gas-phase metallicities across the galaxy population and over cosmic time, and (3) the ratio of the stellar to dark matter mass of halos. The gas regulator is defined by the gas consumption timescale ({epsilon}{sup -1}) and the mass loading {lambda} of the wind outflow {lambda}{center_dot}SFR. The simplest regulator, in which {epsilon} and {lambda} are constant, sets the sSFR equal to exactly the specific accretion rate of the galaxy; more realistic situations lead to an sSFR that is perturbed from this precise relation. Because the gas consumption timescale is shorter than the timescale on which the system evolves, the metallicity Z is set primarily by the instantaneous operation of the regulator system rather than by the past history of the system. The metallicity of the gas reservoir depends on {epsilon}, {lambda}, and sSFR, and the regulator system therefore naturally produces a Z(m{sub star}, SFR) relation if {epsilon} and {lambda} depend on the stellar mass m{sub star}. Furthermore, this relation will be the same at all epochs unless the parameters {epsilon} and {lambda} themselves change with time. A so-called fundamental metallicity relation is naturally produced by these conditions. The overall mass-metallicity relation Z(m{sub star}) directly provides the fraction f{sub star}(m{sub star}) of incoming baryons that are being transformed into stars. The observed Z(m{sub star}) relation of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies implies a strong dependence of stellar mass on halo mass that reconciles the different faint-end slopes of the stellar and halo mass

  14. Phosphorylation of K[superscript +] Channels at Single Residues Regulates Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Jeffrey; Irvine, Elaine E.; Peters, Marco; Jeyabalan, Jeshmi; Giese, K. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification of proteins, and a known physiological regulator of K[superscript +] channel function. Phosphorylation of K[superscript +] channels by kinases has long been presumed to regulate neuronal processing and behavior. Although circumstantial evidence has accumulated from behavioral studies…

  15. Developing Young Adolescents' Self-Regulation by Means of Formative Assessment: A Theoretical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusen-Beekman, Kelly D.; Joosten-ten Brinke, Desirée; Boshuizen, Henny P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Fostering self-regulated learning (SRL) has become increasingly important at various educational levels. Most studies on SRL have been conducted in higher education. The present literature study aims toward understanding self-regulation processes of students in primary and secondary education. We explored the development of young students'…

  16. Low-mass galaxy assembly in simulations: regulation of early star formation by radiation from massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Colin, Pedro; Ceverino, Daniel; Arraki, Kenza; Primack, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent success in forming realistic disc galaxies at redshift zero, simulations still form the bulk of their stars prematurely. We investigate the process of stellar mass assembly in low-mass simulated galaxies, a dwarf and a typical spiral, focusing on the effects of radiation from young stellar clusters. We employ a novel model of star formation in which stars form deterministically with a small efficiency per free-fall time, as observed in molecular clouds. Stellar feedback includes radiation pressure from massive stars and energy from supernova explosions and stellar winds. In galaxies with masses up to those of typical spirals, radiation efficiently suppresses star formation by dispersing and heating high density gas, mostly in the central regions, preventing the formation of a massive bulge. Once the galaxies reach this radiation-regulated growth regime, their global properties are robust to the specific choice of model parameters. Only when radiative feedback is included, do galaxies exhibit co...

  17. In site bioimaging of hydrogen sulfide uncovers its pivotal role in regulating nitric oxide-induced lateral root formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Jun Li

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is an important gasotransmitter in mammals. Despite physiological changes induced by exogenous H2S donor NaHS to plants, whether and how H2S works as a true cellular signal in plants need to be examined. A self-developed specific fluorescent probe (WSP-1 was applied to track endogenous H2S in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum roots in site. Bioimaging combined with pharmacological and biochemical approaches were used to investigate the cross-talk among H2S, nitric oxide (NO, and Ca(2+ in regulating lateral root formation. Endogenous H2S accumulation was clearly associated with primordium initiation and lateral root emergence. NO donor SNP stimulated the generation of endogenous H2S and the expression of the gene coding for the enzyme responsible for endogenous H2S synthesis. Scavenging H2S or inhibiting H2S synthesis partially blocked SNP-induced lateral root formation and the expression of lateral root-related genes. The stimulatory effect of SNP on Ca(2+ accumulation and CaM1 (calmodulin 1 expression could be abolished by inhibiting H2S synthesis. Ca(2+ chelator or Ca(2+ channel blocker attenuated NaHS-induced lateral root formation. Our study confirmed the role of H2S as a cellular signal in plants being a mediator between NO and Ca(2+ in regulating lateral root formation.

  18. Implementation of training programs in self-regulated learning strategies in Moodle format: results of a experience in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, José Carlos; Cerezo, Rebeca; Bernardo, Ana; Rosário, Pedro; Valle, Antonio; Fernández, Estrella; Suárez, Natalia

    2011-04-01

    This paper tests the efficacy of an intervention program in virtual format intended to train studying and self-regulation strategies in university students. The aim of this intervention is to promote a series of strategies which allow students to manage their learning processes in a more proficient and autonomous way. The program has been developed in Moodle format and hosted by the Virtual Campus of the University of Oviedo. The present study had a semi-experimental design, included an experimental group (n=167) and a control one (n=206), and used pretest and posttest measures (self-regulated learning strategies' declarative knowledge, self-regulated learning macro-strategy planning-execution-assessment, self-regulated learning strategies on text, surface and deep learning approaches, and academic achievement). Data suggest that the students enrolled in the training program, comparing with students in the control group, showed a significant improvement in their declarative knowledge, general and on text use of learning strategies, increased their deep approach to learning, decreased their use of a surface approach and, in what concerns to academic achievement, statistically significant differences have been found in favour of the experimental group.

  19. TCPs, WUSs, and WINDs: Families of transcription factors that regulate shoot meristem formation, stem cell maintenance, and somatic cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho eIkeda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to somatic mammalian cells, which cannot alter their fate, plant cells can dedifferentiate to form totipotent callus cells and regenerate a whole plant, following treatment with specific phytohormones. However, the regulatory mechanisms and key factors that control differentiation-dedifferentiation and cell totipotency have not been completely clarified in plants. Recently, several plant transcription factors that regulate meristem formation and dedifferentiation have been identified and include members of the TEOSINTE BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PROLIFERATING CELL FACTOR (TCP, WUSCHEL (WUS, and WOUND INDUCED DEDIFFERENTIATION (WIND1 families. WUS and WIND positively control plant cell totipotency, while TCP negatively controls it. Interestingly, TCP is a transcriptional activator that acts as a negative regulator of shoot meristem formation, and WUS is a transcriptional repressor that positively maintains totipotency of the stem cells of the shoot meristem. We describe here the functions of TCP, WUS and WIND transcription factors in the regulation of differentiation-dedifferentiation by positive and negative transcriptional regulators.

  20. The expression pattern and inhibitory influence of Tenascin-C on the growth of spiral ganglion neurons suggest a regulatory role as boundary formation molecule in the postnatal mouse inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, M; Reinhard, J; Roll, L; Kraft, N; Dazert, S; Faissner, A; Volkenstein, S

    2016-04-05

    Sensorineural hearing loss, as a consequence of acoustic trauma, aging, genetic defects or ototoxic drugs, is highly associated with irreversible damage of cochlear hair cells (HCs) and secondary degeneration of spiral ganglion (SG) cells. Cochlear implants (CIs), which bypass the lost HC function by direct electrical stimulation of the remaining auditory neurons, offer an effective therapy option. Several studies imply that components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have a great impact on the adhesion and growth of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) during development. Based on these findings, ECM proteins might act as bioactive CI substrates to optimize the electrode-nerve interface and to improve efficacy of these implants. In the present study, we focused on the ECM glycoproteins Tenascin-C (TN-C), Laminin (LN), and Fibronectin (FN), which show a prominent expression along the growth route of SGNs and the niche around HCs during murine postnatal development in vivo. We compared their influence on adhesion, neurite length, and neurite number of SGNs in vitro. Moreover, we studied the expression of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) dermatan sulfate-dependent proteoglycan-1 (DSD-1-PG), an interaction partner of TN-C. In sum, our in vitro data suggest that TN-C acts as an anti-adhesive and inhibitory factor for the growth of SGNs. The DSD-1 carbohydrate epitope is specifically localized to HC stereocilia and SG fibers. Interestingly, TN-C and the DSD-1-PG exhibit a mutually exclusive expression pattern, with the exception of a very restricted region beneath the habenula perforata, where SG neurites grow through the basilar membrane (BM) toward the HCs. The complementary expression of TN-C, LN, FN, and the DSD-1 epitope suggests that TN-C may act as an important boundary formation molecule in the developing postnatal mouse inner ear, which makes it a promising candidate to regulate neurite outgrowth in the light of CIs.

  1. Galaxy Formation with Self-Consistently Modeled Stars and Massive Black Holes. I: Feedback-Regulated Star Formation and Black Hole Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-hoon; Wise, John H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept.; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; /Canadian Inst. Theor. Astrophys.; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-11-04

    There is mounting evidence for the coevolution of galaxies and their embedded massive black holes (MBHs) in a hierarchical structure formation paradigm. To tackle the nonlinear processes of galaxy-MBH interaction, we describe a self-consistent numerical framework which incorporates both galaxies and MBHs. The high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code Enzo is modified to model the formation and feedback of molecular clouds at their characteristic scale of 15.2 pc and the accretion of gas onto an MBH. Two major channels of MBH feedback, radiative feedback (X-ray photons followed through full three-dimensional adaptive ray tracing) and mechanical feedback (bipolar jets resolved in high-resolution AMR), are employed. We investigate the coevolution of a 9.2 x 10{sup 11} M {circle_dot} galactic halo and its 10{sup 5} {circle_dot} M embedded MBH at redshift 3 in a cosmological CDM simulation. The MBH feedback heats the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) up to 10{sup 6} K through photoionization and Compton heating and locally suppresses star formation in the galactic inner core. The feedback considerably changes the stellar distribution there. This new channel of feedback from a slowly growing MBH is particularly interesting because it is only locally dominant and does not require the heating of gas globally on the disk. The MBH also self-regulates its growth by keeping the surrounding ISM hot for an extended period of time.

  2. Shoot bending promotes flower bud formation by miRNA-mediated regulation in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Libo; Zhang, Dong; Zhao, Caiping; Li, Youmei; Ma, Juanjuan; An, Na; Han, Mingyu

    2016-02-01

    Flower induction in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) trees plays an important life cycle role, but young trees produce fewer and inferior quality flower buds. Therefore, shoot bending has become an important cultural practice, significantly promoting the capacity to develop more flower buds during the growing seasons. Additionally, microRNAs (miRNAs) play essential roles in plant growth, flower induction and stress responses. In this study, we identified miRNAs potentially involved in the regulation of bud growth, and flower induction and development, as well as in the response to shoot bending. Of the 195 miRNAs identified, 137 were novel miRNAs. The miRNA expression profiles revealed that the expression levels of 68 and 27 known miRNAs were down-regulated and up-regulated, respectively, in response to shoot bending, and that the 31 differentially expressed novel miRNAs between them formed five major clusters. Additionally, a complex regulatory network associated with auxin, cytokinin, abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) plays important roles in cell division, bud growth and flower induction, in which related miRNAs and targets mediated regulation. Among them, miR396, 160, 393, and their targets associated with AUX, miR159, 319, 164, and their targets associated with ABA and GA, and flowering-related miRNAs and genes, regulate bud growth and flower bud formation in response to shoot bending. Meanwhile, the flowering genes had significantly higher expression levels during shoot bending, suggesting that they are involved in this regulatory process. This study provides a framework for the future analysis of miRNAs associated with multiple hormones and their roles in the regulation of bud growth, and flower induction and formation in response to shoot bending in apple trees.

  3. Nephron proximal tubule patterning and corpuscles of Stannius formation are regulated by the sim1a transcription factor and retinoic acid in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Christina N; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2015-03-01

    The mechanisms that establish nephron segments are poorly understood. The zebrafish embryonic kidney, or pronephros, is a simplified yet conserved genetic model to study this renal development process because its nephrons contain segments akin to other vertebrates, including the proximal convoluted and straight tubules (PCT, PST). The zebrafish pronephros is also associated with the corpuscles of Stannius (CS), endocrine glands that regulate calcium and phosphate homeostasis, but whose ontogeny from renal progenitors is largely mysterious. Initial patterning of zebrafish renal progenitors in the intermediate mesoderm (IM) involves the formation of rostral and caudal domains, the former being reliant on retinoic acid (RA) signaling, and the latter being repressed by elevated RA levels. Here, using expression profiling to gain new insights into nephrogenesis, we discovered that the gene single minded family bHLH transcription factor 1a (sim1a) is dynamically expressed in the renal progenitors-first marking the caudal domain, then becoming restricted to the proximal segments, and finally exhibiting specific CS expression. In loss of function studies, sim1a knockdown expanded the PCT and abrogated both the PST and CS populations. Conversely, overexpression of sim1a modestly expanded the PST and CS, while it reduced the PCT. These results show that sim1a activity is necessary and partially sufficient to induce PST and CS fates, and suggest that sim1a may inhibit PCT fate and/or negotiate the PCT/PST boundary. Interestingly, the sim1a expression domain in renal progenitors is responsive to altered levels of RA, suggesting that RA regulates sim1a, directly or indirectly, during nephrogenesis. sim1a deficient embryos treated with exogenous RA formed nephrons that were predominantly composed of PCT segments, but lacked the enlarged PST observed in RA treated wild-types, indicating that RA is not sufficient to rescue the PST in the absence of sim1a expression. Alternately

  4. IL-33 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation through the regulation of Blimp-1 and IRF-8 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiyomiya, Hiroyasu [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Ariyoshi, Wataru; Okinaga, Toshinori [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Kaneuji, Takeshi [Division of Oral Medicine, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Mitsugi, Sho [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Sakurai, Takuma [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Habu, Manabu [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Yoshioka, Izumi [Division of Oral Medicine, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); Tominaga, Kazuhiro [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Science of Physical Functions, Kyushu Dental University, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 803-8580 (Japan); and others

    2015-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 is a recently discovered proinflammatory cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family. Several studies have reported that IL-33 inhibits osteoclast differentiation. However, the mechanism of IL-33 regulation of osteoclastogenesis remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of IL-33 on osteoclast formation in vitro. IL-33 suppressed osteoclast formation in both mouse bone marrow cells and monocyte/macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells induced by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and/or macrophage stimulating factor (M-CSF). IL-33 also inhibited the expression of RANKL-induced nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), thereby decreasing the expression of osteoclastogenesis-related marker genes, including Cathepsin K, Osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein (Oc-stamp) and Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (Trap). Blockage of IL-33-ST2 binding suppressed the IL-33-mediated inhibition of NFATc1. RANKL-induced B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1) expression was also suppressed by IL-33, which was followed by the stimulation of anti-osteoclastic genes such as interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8). These results suggest that IL-33-ST2 interactions down-regulate both RANKL-induced NFATc1 activation and osteoclast differentiation via the regulation of Blimp-1 and IRF-8 expression. - Highlights: • IL-33 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. • IL-33 has inhibitory effect on the RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression. • IL-33-induced NFATc1 suppression depends on the regulation of Blimp-1 and IRF-8.

  5. CRP-Mediated Carbon Catabolite Regulation of Yersinia pestis Biofilm Formation Is Enhanced by the Carbon Storage Regulator Protein, CsrA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan P Willias

    Full Text Available The natural transmission of Yersinia pestis is reliant upon biofilm blockage of the flea vector. However, the environmentally-responsive adaptive regulators which facilitate Y. pestis biofilm production in accordance with the flea midgut milieu are not well understood. We seek to establish the impact of available carbon source metabolism and storage upon Y. pestis biofilm production. Our findings demonstrate that Y. pestis biofilm production is subject to carbon catabolite regulation in which the presence of glucose impairs biofilm production; whereas, the sole metabolism of alternate carbon sources promotes robust biofilm formation. This observation is facilitated by the cAMP receptor protein, CRP. In accordance with a stark growth defect, deletion of crp in both CO92 and KIM6+ Y. pestis strains significantly impaired biofilm production when solely utilizing alternate carbon sources. Media supplementation with cAMP, a small-molecule activator of CRP, did not significantly alter Y. pestis biofilm production. Furthermore, CRP did not alter mRNA abundance of previously-characterized hms biofilm synthesis and regulation factors. Therefore, our findings indicate CRP does not confer a direct stimulatory effect, but may indirectly promote Y. pestis biofilm production by facilitating the alternate carbon source expression profile. Additionally, we assessed the impact of the carbon storage regulator protein, CsrA, upon Y. pestis biofilm production. Contrary to what has been described for E. coli, Y. pestis biofilm formation was found to be enhanced by CsrA. Regardless of media composition and available carbon source, deletion of csrA significantly impaired Y. pestis biofilm production. CsrA was found to promote Y. pestis biofilm production independent of glycogen regulation. Loss of csrA did not significantly alter relative hmsH, hmsP, or hmsT mRNA abundance. However, deletion of hmsP in the csrA-deficient mutant enabled excessive biofilm production

  6. Molecular cloning, phylogenetic analysis, and expression patterns of LATERAL SUPPRESSOR-LIKE and REGULATOR OF AXILLARY MERISTEM FORMATION-LIKE genes in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fambrini, Marco; Salvini, Mariangela; Pugliesi, Claudio

    2016-12-29

    The wild sunflower (Helianthus annuus) plants develop a highly branched form with numerous small flowering heads. The origin of a no branched sunflower, producing a single large head, has been a key event in the domestication process of this species. The interaction between hormonal factors and several genes organizes the initiation and outgrowth of axillary meristems (AMs). From sunflower, we have isolated two genes putatively involved in this process, LATERAL SUPPRESSOR (LS)-LIKE (Ha-LSL) and REGULATOR OF AXILLARY MERISTEM FORMATION (ROX)-LIKE (Ha-ROXL), encoding for a GRAS and a bHLH transcription factor (TF), respectively. Typical amino acid residues and phylogenetic analyses suggest that Ha-LSL and Ha-ROXL are the orthologs of the branching regulator LS and ROX/LAX1, involved in the growth habit of both dicot and monocot species. qRT-PCR analyses revealed a high accumulation of Ha-LSL transcripts in roots, vegetative shoots, and inflorescence shoots. By contrast, in internodal stems and young leaves, a lower amount of Ha-LSL transcripts was observed. A comparison of transcription patterns between Ha-LSL and Ha-ROXL revealed some analogies but also remarkable differences; in fact, the gene Ha-ROXL displayed a low expression level in all organs analyzed. In situ hybridization (ISH) analysis showed that Ha-ROXL transcription was strongly restricted to a small domain within the boundary zone separating the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and the leaf primordia and in restricted regions of the inflorescence meristem, beforehand the separation of floral bracts from disc flower primordia. These results suggested that Ha-ROXL may be involved to establish a cell niche for the initiation of AMs as well as flower primordia. The accumulation of Ha-LSL transcripts was not restricted to the boundary zones in vegetative and inflorescence shoots, but the mRNA activity was expanded in other cellular domains of primary shoot apical meristem as well as AMs. In addition, Ha

  7. A putative ABC transporter is involved in negative regulation of biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xinna; Long, Fei; Chen, Yonghui

    2008-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes may persist for long periods in food processing environments. In some instances, this may be due to aggregation or biofilm formation. To investigate the mechanism controlling biofilm formation in the food-borne pathogen L. monocytogenes, we characterized LM-49, a mutant...... with enhanced ability of biofilm-formation generated via transposon Tn917 mutagenesis of L. monocytogenes 4b G. In this mutant, a Tn917 insertion has disrupted the coding region of the gene encoding a putative ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter permease identical to Lmof2365_1771 (a putative ABC......-transporter permease) presented in the sequenced strain L. monocytogenes str. 4b F2365. This disrupted gene, denoted lm.G_1771, encoded a protein with 10 transmembrane helixes. The revertant, LM-49RE, was obtained by replacing lm.G_1771::Tn917 with lm.G_1771 via homologous recombination. We found that LM-49RE formed...

  8. The transcriptional regulator c2h2 accelerates mushroom formation in Agaricus bisporus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelkmans, Jordi F; Vos, Aurin M; Scholtmeijer, Karin; Hendrix, Ed; Baars, Johan J P; Gehrmann, Thies; Reinders, Marcel J T; Lugones, Luis G; Wösten, Han A B

    2016-08-01

    The Cys2His2 zinc finger protein gene c2h2 of Schizophyllum commune is involved in mushroom formation. Its inactivation results in a strain that is arrested at the stage of aggregate formation. In this study, the c2h2 orthologue of Agaricus bisporus was over-expressed in this white button mushroom forming basidiomycete using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Morphology, cap expansion rate, and total number and biomass of mushrooms were not affected by over-expression of c2h2. However, yield per day of the c2h2 over-expression strains peaked 1 day earlier. These data and expression analysis indicate that C2H2 impacts timing of mushroom formation at an early stage of development, making its encoding gene a target for breeding of commercial mushroom strains.

  9. Neurotrophin receptor homolog (NRH1) proteins regulate mesoderm formation and apoptosis during early Xenopus development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Dunja; Messenger, Nigel; Ahmed Rana, Amer; Smith, James C

    2006-12-15

    Recent experiments suggest that Xenopus Neurotrophin Receptor Homolog 1 (NRH1) proteins act through the planar cell polarity pathway to regulate convergent extension movements during gastrulation and neurulation. We show in this paper that NRH1 proteins are also required for the proper expression of mesodermally expressed genes such as Xbra and Chordin, and to a lesser extent, of Xwnt11. Loss of NRH1 function is followed, during gastrula and neurula stages, by a dramatic increase in apoptosis. Apoptosis is delayed by injection of Xbra RNA, suggesting that cell death is a consequence, at least in part, of the down-regulation of this gene, and it is also delayed by expression of activated forms of Rho, Rac and Cdc42. These small GTPases have previously been implicated in the planar cell polarity pathway in Xenopus and, in other systems, in the regulation of apoptosis. We conclude that the effects of NRH1 proteins include the regulation of mesodermal gene expression and that the disruption of gastrulation that is caused by their loss of function is a consequence of the down-regulation of Xbra and other genes, in addition to direct interference with the planar cell polarity pathway. The apoptosis observed in embryos lacking NRH1 function is not an indirect consequence of the disruption of gastrulation, and indeed it may contribute to the observed morphological defects.

  10. SWAP-70 controls formation of the splenic marginal zone through regulating T1B-cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Michaël; Quemeneur, Laurence; Ripich, Tatsiana; Jessberger, Rolf

    2010-12-01

    T1 and T2 transitional B cells are precursors for marginal zone B cells (MZB), which surround splenic follicles. MZB are essential for marginal zone formation, are central to the innate immune response, and contribute to adaptive immunity. Differentiation, migration, and homing of MZB and their precursors remain to be fully understood. We show that SWAP-70, a RhoGTPase-interacting and F-actin-binding protein with functions in cell polarization, migration, and adhesion regulates MZB development and marginal zone formation. The percentage of MZB in spleen of Swap70(-/-) mice was reduced to about one-third of that found in WT mice. Swap70(-/-) T1 cells accumulated in integrin ligand(high) regions of the splenic red pulp and failed to efficiently develop into T2 cells. Adoptive transfer and mixed BM chimera experiments demonstrated this to be a B-cell intrinsic phenotype. T-cell-independent antibody production was not impaired, however, and thus suggests that this process does not require correct homing of MZB precursors. B-cell adhesion through α(L)β(2) and α(4)β(1) integrins was hyper-activated in vitro and on tissue sections, and S1P-stimulated chemokinesis of MZB was reduced in the absence of SWAP-70. Thus, SWAP-70 acts as a regulator of the adhesion process, particularly important for differentiation control of B-cell precursors and their contribution to splenic tissue formation.

  11. Clathrin-Mediated Auxin Efflux and Maxima Regulate Hypocotyl Hook Formation and Light-Stimulated Hook Opening in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qinqin; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Juan; Yan, Xu; Wang, Chao; Xu, Jian; Pan, Jianwei

    2016-01-04

    The establishment of auxin maxima by PIN-FORMED 3 (PIN3)- and AUXIN RESISTANT 1/LIKE AUX1 (LAX) 3 (AUX1/LAX3)-mediated auxin transport is essential for hook formation in Arabidopsis hypocotyls. Until now, however, the underlying regulatory mechanism has remained poorly understood. Here, we show that loss of function of clathrin light chain CLC2 and CLC3 genes enhanced auxin maxima and thereby hook curvature, alleviated the inhibitory effect of auxin overproduction on auxin maxima and hook curvature, and delayed blue light-stimulated auxin maxima reduction and hook opening. Moreover, pharmacological experiments revealed that auxin maxima formation and hook curvature in clc2 clc3 were sensitive to auxin efflux inhibitors 1-naphthylphthalamic acid and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid but not to the auxin influx inhibitor 1-naphthoxyacetic acid. Live-cell imaging analysis further uncovered that loss of CLC2 and CLC3 function impaired PIN3 endocytosis and promoted its lateralization in the cortical cells but did not affect AUX1 localization. Taken together, these results suggest that clathrin regulates auxin maxima and thereby hook formation through modulating PIN3 localization and auxin efflux, providing a novel mechanism that integrates developmental signals and environmental cues to regulate plant skotomorphogenesis and photomorphogenesis.

  12. HD-GYP domain proteins regulate biofilm formation and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryan, Robert P.; Lucey, Jean; O'Donovan, Karen

    2009-01-01

    2572 had a negative influence on swarming that was cryptic and was revealed only after removal of an uncharacterized C-terminal domain. Mutation of PA4108, PA4781 and PA2572 had distinct effects on biofilm formation and architecture of P. aeruginosa. All three proteins contributed to virulence of P...... residues (YN-GYP). Here we have investigated the role of these proteins in biofilm formation, virulence factor synthesis and virulence of P. aeruginosa. Mutation of PA4108 and PA4781 led to an increase in the level of cyclic-di-GMP in P. aeruginosa, consistent with the predicted activity of the encoded...

  13. Obliquity along plate boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippon, Mélody; Corti, Giacomo

    2016-12-01

    Most of the plate boundaries are activated obliquely with respect to the direction of far field stresses, as roughly only 8% of the plate boundaries total length shows a very low obliquity (ranging from 0 to 10°, sub-orthogonal to the plate displacement). The obliquity along plate boundaries is controlled by (i) lateral rheological variations within the lithosphere and (ii) consistency with the global plate circuit. Indeed, plate tectonics and magmatism drive rheological changes within the lithosphere and consequently influence strain localization. Geodynamical evolution controls large-scale mantle convection and plate formation, consumption, and re-organization, thus triggering plate kinematics variations, and the adjustment and re-orientation of far field stresses. These geological processes may thus result in plate boundaries that are not perpendicular but oblique to the direction of far field stresses. This paper reviews the global patterns of obliquity along plate boundaries. Using GPlate, we provide a statistical analysis of present-day obliquity along plate boundaries. Within this framework, by comparing natural examples and geological models, we discuss deformation patterns and kinematics recorded along oblique plate boundaries.

  14. Involvement of cyclin K posttranscriptional regulation in the formation of Artemia diapause cysts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Artemia eggs tend to develop ovoviviparously to yield nauplius larvae in good rearing conditions; while under adverse situations, they tend to develop oviparously and encysted diapause embryos are formed instead. However, the intrinsic mechanisms regulating this process are not well understood. PRINCIPAL FINDING: This study has characterized the function of cyclin K, a regulatory subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb in the two different developmental pathways of Artemia. In the diapause-destined embryo, Western blots showed that the cyclin K protein was down-regulated as the embryo entered dormancy and reverted to relatively high levels of expression once development resumed, consistent with the fluctuations in phosphorylation of position 2 serines (Ser2 in the C-terminal domain (CTD of the largest subunit (Rpb1 of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II. Interestingly, the cyclin K transcript levels remained constant during this process. In vitro translation data indicated that the template activity of cyclin K mRNA stored in the postdiapause cyst was repressed. In addition, in vivo knockdown of cyclin K in developing embryos by RNA interference eliminated phosphorylation of the CTD Ser2 of RNAP II and induced apoptosis by inhibiting the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK survival signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these findings reveal a role for cyclin K in regulating RNAP II activity during diapause embryo development, which involves the post-transcriptional regulation of cyclin K. In addition, a further role was identified for cyclin K in regulating the control of cell survival during embryogenesis through ERK signaling pathways.

  15. Proteins with GGDEF and EAL domains regulate Pseudomonas putida biofilm formation and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjermansen, Morten; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2006-01-01

    H protein, which contains an EAL domain, strongly inhibited biofilm formation. Induction of YhjH expression in P. putida cells situated in established biofilms led to rapid dispersion of the biofilms. These results support the emerging theme that GGDEF-domain and EAL-domain proteins are involved...

  16. Regulation of Amidase Formation in Mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO Lacking Glutamine Synthetase Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Herst, Patricia M.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    The formation of amidase was studied in mutants from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO lacking glutamine synthetase activity. It appeared that catabolite repression of amidase synthesis by succinate was partially relieved when cellular growth was limited by glutamine. Under these conditions, a correlation

  17. The self regulating star formation of gas rich dwarf galaxies in quiescent phase

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, M A R; Kobayashi, Masakazu A.R.; Kamaya, Hideyuki

    2004-01-01

    The expected episodic or intermittent star formation histories (SFHs) of gas rich dwarf irregular galaxies (dIrrs) are the longstanding puzzles to understand their whole evolutional history. Solving this puzzle, we should grasp what physical mechanism causes the quiescent phase of star formation under the very gas rich condition after the first starburst phase. We consider that this quiescent phase is kept by lack of H2, which can be important coolant to generate the next generation of stars in the low-metal environment like dIrrs. Furthermore, in dIrrs, H2 formation through gas-phase reactions may dominate the one on dust-grain surfaces because their interstellar medium (ISM) are very plentiful and the typical dust-to-gas ratio of dIrrs (D_dIrrs = 1.31 x 10^-2 D_MW, where D_MW is its value for the local ISM) is on the same order with a critical value D_cr ~ 10^-2 D_MW. We show that the lack of H2 is mainly led by H- destruction when gas-phase H2 formation dominates since H- is important intermediary of gas-p...

  18. VANG-1 and PRKL-1 cooperate to negatively regulate neurite formation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Sanchez-Alvarez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuritogenesis is a critical early step in the development and maturation of neurons and neuronal circuits. While extracellular directional cues are known to specify the site and orientation of nascent neurite formation in vivo, little is known about the genetic pathways that block inappropriate neurite emergence in order to maintain proper neuronal polarity. Here we report that the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologues of Van Gogh (vang-1, Prickle (prkl-1, and Dishevelled (dsh-1, core components of planar cell polarity (PCP signaling, are required in a subset of peripheral motor neurons to restrict neurite emergence to a specific organ axis. In loss-of-function mutants, neurons display supernumerary neurites that extend inappropriately along the orthogonal anteroposterior (A/P body axis. We show that autonomous and non-autonomous gene activities are required early and persistently to inhibit the formation or consolidation of growth cone protrusions directed away from organ precursor cells. Furthermore, prkl-1 overexpression is sufficient to suppress neurite formation and reorient neuronal polarity in a vang-1- and dsh-1-dependent manner. Our findings suggest a novel role for a PCP-like pathway in maintaining polarized neuronal morphology by inhibiting neuronal responses to extrinsic or intrinsic cues that would otherwise promote extraneous neurite formation.

  19. Transcriptomic analysis reveals ethylene as stimulator and auxin as regulator of adventitious root formation in petunia cuttings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe eDruege

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Adventitious root (AR formation in the stem base of cuttings is the basis for propagation of many plant species and petunia is used as model to study this developmental process. Following AR formation from 2 to 192 hours after excision (hpe of cuttings, transcriptome analysis by microarray revealed a change of the character of the rooting zone from stem base to root identity. The greatest shift in the number of differentially expressed genes was observed between 24 and 72 hpe, when the categories storage, mineral nutrient acquisition, anti-oxidative and secondary metabolism, and biotic stimuli showed a notable high number of induced genes. Analyses of phytohormone-related genes disclosed multifaceted changes of the auxin transport system, auxin conjugation and the auxin signal perception machinery indicating a reduction in auxin sensitivity and phase-specific responses of particular auxin-regulated genes. Genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis and action showed a more uniform pattern as a high number of respective genes were generally induced during the whole process of AR formation. The important role of ethylene for stimulating AR formation was demonstrated by the application of inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis and perception as well as of the precursor aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, all changing the number and length of AR. A model is proposed showing the putative role of polar auxin transport and resulting auxin accumulation in initiation of subsequent changes in auxin homeostasis and signal perception with a particular role of Aux/IAA expression. These changes might in turn guide the entrance into the different phases of AR formation. Ethylene biosynthesis, which is stimulated by wounding and does probably also respond to other stresses and auxin, acts as important stimulator of AR formation probably via the expression of ethylene responsive transcription factor genes, whereas the timing of different phases seems to be controlled

  20. Plant stanols induce intestinal tumor formation by up-regulating Wnt and EGFR signaling in Apc Min mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marttinen, Maija; Päivärinta, Essi; Storvik, Markus; Huikko, Laura; Luoma-Halkola, Heli; Piironen, Vieno; Pajari, Anne-Maria; Mutanen, Marja

    2013-01-01

    The rate of APC mutations in the intestine increases in middle-age. At the same period of life, plant sterol and stanol enriched functional foods are introduced to diet to lower blood cholesterol. This study examined the effect of plant stanol enriched diet on intestinal adenoma formation in the Apc(Min) mouse. Apc(Min) mice were fed 0.8% plant stanol diet or control diet for nine weeks. Cholesterol, plant sterols and plant stanols were analyzed from the caecum content and the intestinal mucosa. Levels of β-catenin, cyclin D1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) were measured from the intestinal mucosa by Western blotting. Gene expression was determined from the intestinal mucosa using Affymetrix and the data were analyzed for enriched categories and pathways. Plant stanols induced adenoma formation in the small intestine, however, the adenoma size was not affected. We saw increased levels of nuclear β-catenin, phosphorylated β-catenin (Ser675 and Ser552), nuclear cyclin D1, total and phosphorylated EGFR and phosphorylated ERK1/2 in the intestinal mucosa after plant stanol feeding. The Affymetrix data demonstrate that several enzymes of cholesterol synthesis pathway were up-regulated, although the cholesterol level in the intestinal mucosa was not altered. We show that plant stanols induce adenoma formation by activating Wnt and EGFR signaling. EGFR signaling seems to have promoted β-catenin phosphorylation and its translocation into the nucleus, where the expression of cyclin D1 was increased. Up-regulated cholesterol synthesis may partly explain the increased EGFR signaling in the plant stanol-fed mice.

  1. The redox-sensing regulator Rex modulates central carbon metabolism, stress tolerance response and biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob P Bitoun

    Full Text Available The Rex repressor has been implicated in regulation of central carbon and energy metabolism in gram-positive bacteria. We have previously shown that Streptococcus mutans, the primary causative agent of dental caries, alters its transcriptome upon Rex-deficiency and renders S. mutans to have increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, aberrations in glucan production, and poor biofilm formation. In this study, we showed that rex in S. mutans is co-transcribed as an operon with downstream guaA, encoding a putative glutamine amidotransferase. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that recombinant Rex bound promoters of target genes avidly and specifically, including those down-regulated in response to Rex-deficiency, and that the ability of recombinant Rex to bind to selected promoters was modulated by NADH and NAD(+. Results suggest that Rex in S. mutans can function as an activator in response to intracellular NADH/NAD(+ level, although the exact binding site for activator Rex remains unclear. Consistent with a role in oxidative stress tolerance, hydrogen peroxide challenge assays showed that the Rex-deficient mutant, TW239, and the Rex/GuaA double mutant, JB314, were more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide killing than the wildtype, UA159. Relative to UA159, JB314 displayed major defects in biofilm formation, with a decrease of more than 50-fold in biomass after 48-hours. Collectively, these results further suggest that Rex in S. mutans regulates fermentation pathways, oxidative stress tolerance, and biofilm formation in response to intracellular NADH/NAD(+ level. Current effort is being directed to further investigation of the role of GuaA in S. mutans cellular physiology.

  2. Flower-bud formation in explants of photoperiodic and day-neutral Nicotiana biotypes and its bearing on the regulation of flower formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeevan, M.S.; Lang, A. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (United States))

    1993-05-15

    The capacity to form flower buds in thin-layer explants was studied in Nicotiana of several species, cultivars, and lines of differing in their response to photoperiod. This capacity was found in all biotypes examined and could extend into sepals and corolla. It varied depending on genotype, source tissue and its developmental state, and composition of the culture medium, particularly the levels of glucose, auxin, and cytokinin. It was greatest in the two day-neutral plants examined, Samsun tobacco and Nicotiana rustica, where it extended from the inflorescence region down the vegetative stem, in a basipetally decreasing gradient; it was least in the two qualitative photoperiodic plants studied, the long-day plant Nicotiana silvestris and the short-day plant Maryland Mammoth tobacco, the quantitative long-day plant Nicotiana alata and the quantitative short-day plant Nicotiana otophora line 38-G-81, where it was limited to the pedicels (and, in some cases, the sepals). Regardless of the photoperiodic response of the source plants, the response was the same in explants cultured under long and short days. The capacity to form flow buds in explants is present in all Nicotiana biotypes studied supports the idea that it is regulated by the same mechanism(s), regardless of the plant's photoperiodic character. However, flower formation in the explants is not identical with de novo flower formation in a hitherto vegetative plant: it is rather the expression of a floral state already established in the plant, although it can vary widely in extent and spatial distribution. Culture conditions that permit flower-bud formation in an explant are conditions that maintain the floral state and encourage its expression; conditions under which no flower buds are formed reduce this state and/or prevent its expression. 14 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Regulation of Star Formation Rates in Multiphase Galactic Disks: Numerical Tests of the Thermal/Dynamical Equilibrium Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chang-Goo; Ostriker, Eve C

    2011-01-01

    We use vertically-resolved numerical hydrodynamic simulations to study star formation and the interstellar medium (ISM) in galactic disks. We focus on outer disk regions where diffuse HI dominates, with gas surface densities Sigma_SFR=3-20 Msun/kpc^2/yr and star-plus-dark matter volume densities rho_sd=0.003-0.5 Msun/pc^3. Star formation occurs in very dense, cold, self-gravitating clouds. Turbulence, driven by momentum feedback from supernova events, destroys bound clouds and puffs up the disk vertically. Time-dependent radiative heating (FUV) offsets gas cooling. We use our simulations to test a new theory for self-regulated star formation. Consistent with this theory, the disks evolve to a state of vertical dynamical equilibrium and thermal equilibrium with both warm and cold phases. The range of star formation surface densities and midplane thermal pressures is Sigma_SFR ~ 0.0001 - 0.01 Msun/kpc^2/yr and P_th/k_B ~ 100 -10000 cm^-3 K. In agreement with observations, turbulent velocity dispersions are ~7 k...

  4. The formin DIAPH1 (mDia1) regulates megakaryocyte proplatelet formation by remodeling the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jiajia; Lordier, Larissa; Meyran, Deborah; Rameau, Philippe; Lecluse, Yann; Kitchen-Goosen, Susan; Badirou, Idinath; Mokrani, Hayat; Narumiya, Shuh; Alberts, Arthur S; Vainchenker, William; Chang, Yunhua

    2014-12-18

    Megakaryocytes are highly specialized precursor cells that produce platelets via cytoplasmic extensions called proplatelets. Proplatelet formation (PPF) requires profound changes in microtubule and actin organization. In this work, we demonstrated that DIAPH1 (mDia1), a mammalian homolog of Drosophila diaphanous that works as an effector of the small GTPase Rho, negatively regulates PPF by controlling the dynamics of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. Moreover, we showed that inhibition of both DIAPH1 and the Rho-associated protein kinase (Rock)/myosin pathway increased PPF via coordination of both cytoskeletons. We provide evidence that 2 major effectors of the Rho GTPase pathway (DIAPH1 and Rock/myosin II) are involved not only in Rho-mediated stress fibers assembly, but also in the regulation of microtubule stability and dynamics during PPF.

  5. HARMONIZATION OF CROATIAN LEGAL REGULATIONS WITH EU DIRECTIVES CONCERNING PETROLEUM INDUSTRY WASTE DISPOSAL INTO SUITABLE GEOLOGICAL FORMATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Brkić

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Exploration and production of mineral resources, especially hydrocarbons, are from ecological point of view, one of the most sensitive activities. Concerning global ecological standards, which have also been enforced into petroleum industry, exploration and production of mineral energy sources have to be based on compliance with introduced environmental and human health protection requirements. Since it is expected that Croatia will join European Union in the near future, it is necessary to develop institutional and legislative frameworks for enabling and regulating the harmonization of mineral resources exploration and production waste disposal with European Union directives and regulations. Petroleum industry waste disposal by injection into suitable geological formations is one of environmentally acceptable methods for petroleum industry waste management (the paper is published in Croatian.

  6. GABAergic Transmission in Rat Pontine Reticular Formation Regulates the Induction Phase of Anesthesia and Modulates Hyperalgesia Caused by Sleep Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Vanini, Giancarlo; Nemanis, Kriste; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    The oral part of the pontine reticular formation (PnO) contributes to the regulation of sleep, anesthesia, and pain. The role of PnO GABA in modulating these states remains incompletely understood. The present study used time to Loss and time to Resumption of Righting Response (LoRR and RoRR) as surrogate measures of loss and resumption of consciousness. This study tested three hypotheses: (1) pharmacologically manipulating GABA levels in rat PnO alters LoRR, RoRR, and nociception; (2) propof...

  7. Reciprocal regulation of microRNA and mRNA profiles in neuronal development and synapse formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Seth GN

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synapse formation and the development of neural networks are known to be controlled by a coordinated program of mRNA synthesis. microRNAs are now recognized to be important regulators of mRNA translation and stability in a wide variety of organisms. While specific microRNAs are known to be involved in neural development, the extent to which global microRNA and mRNA profiles are coordinately regulated in neural development is unknown. Results We examined mouse primary neuronal cultures, analyzing microRNA and mRNA expression. Three main developmental patterns of microRNA expression were observed: steady-state levels, up-regulated and down-regulated. Co-expressed microRNAs were found to have related target recognition sites and to be encoded in distinct genomic locations. A number of 43 differentially expressed miRNAs were located in five genomic clusters. Their predicted mRNA targets show reciprocal levels of expression. We identified a set of reciprocally expressed microRNAs that target mRNAs encoding postsynaptic density proteins and high-level steady-state microRNAs that target non-neuronal low-level expressed mRNAs. Conclusion We characterized hundreds of miRNAs in neuronal culture development and identified three major modes of miRNA expression. We predict these miRNAs to regulate reciprocally expressed protein coding genes, including many genes involved in synaptogenesis. The identification of miRNAs that target mRNAs during synaptogenesis indicates a new level of regulation of the synapse.

  8. The jaw of the worm: GTPase-activating protein EAT-17 regulates grinder formation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straud, Sarah; Lee, Inhwan; Song, Bomi; Avery, Leon; You, Young-Jai

    2013-09-01

    Constitutive transport of cellular materials is essential for cell survival. Although multiple small GTPase Rab proteins are required for the process, few regulators of Rabs are known. Here we report that EAT-17, a novel GTPase-activating protein (GAP), regulates RAB-6.2 function in grinder formation in Caenorhabditis elegans. We identified EAT-17 as a novel RabGAP that interacts with RAB-6.2, a protein that presumably regulates vesicle trafficking between Golgi, the endoplasmic reticulum, and plasma membrane to form a functional grinder. EAT-17 has a canonical GAP domain that is critical for its function. RNA interference against 25 confirmed and/or predicted RABs in C. elegans shows that RNAi against rab-6.2 produces a phenotype identical to eat-17. A directed yeast two-hybrid screen using EAT-17 as bait and each of the 25 RAB proteins as prey identifies RAB-6.2 as the interacting partner of EAT-17, confirming that RAB-6.2 is a specific substrate of EAT-17. Additionally, deletion mutants of rab-6.2 show grinder defects identical to those of eat-17 loss-of-function mutants, and both RAB-6.2 and EAT-17 are expressed in the terminal bulb of the pharynx where the grinder is located. Collectively, these results suggest that EAT-17 is a specific GTPase-activating protein for RAB-6.2. Based on the conserved function of Rab6 in vesicular transport, we propose that EAT-17 regulates the turnover rate of RAB-6.2 activity in cargo trafficking for grinder formation.

  9. NOA1 functions in a temperature-dependent manner to regulate chlorophyll biosynthesis and Rubisco formation in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaosong Yang

    Full Text Available NITRIC OXIDE-ASSOCIATED1 (NOA1 encodes a circularly permuted GTPase (cGTPase known to be essential for ribosome assembly in plants. While the reduced chlorophyll and Rubisco phenotypes were formerly noticed in both NOA1-suppressed rice and Arabidopsis, a detailed insight is still necessary. In this study, by using RNAi transgenic rice, we further demonstrate that NOA1 functions in a temperature-dependent manner to regulate chlorophyll and Rubisco levels. When plants were grown at 30°C, the chlorophyll and Rubisco levels in OsNOA1-silenced plants were only slightly lower than those in WT. However, at 22°C, the silenced plants accumulated far less chlorophyll and Rubisco than WT. It was further revealed that the regulation of chlorophyll and Rubisco occurs at the anabolic level. Etiolated WT seedlings restored chlorophyll and Rubisco accumulations readily once returned to light, at either 30°C or 15°C. Etiolated OsNOA1-silenced plants accumulated chlorophyll and Rubisco to normal levels only at 30°C, and lost this ability at low temperature. On the other hand, de-etiolated OsNOA1-silenced seedlings maintained similar levels of chlorophyll and Rubisco as WT, even after being shifted to 15°C for various times. Further expression analyses identified several candidate genes, including OsPorA (NADPH: protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase A, OsrbcL (Rubisco large subunit, OsRALyase (Ribosomal RNA apurinic site specific lyase and OsPuf4 (RNA-binding protein of the Puf family, which may be involved in OsNOA1-regulated chlorophyll biosynthesis and Rubisco formation. Overall, our results suggest OsNOA1 functions in a temperature-dependent manner to regulate chlorophyll biosynthesis, Rubisco formation and plastid development in rice.

  10. The chemokine SDF-1 regulates blastema formation during zebrafish fin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufourcq, Pascale; Vriz, Sophie

    2006-10-01

    The work presented in this study focuses on blastema formation in epimorphic regeneration. We describe the expression pattern of Sdf1a and Sdf1b (the chemokines stromal-cell-derived factor-1a and 1b) and their two receptors Cxcr4a and Cxcr4b during zebrafish fin regeneration. We demonstrate that Sdf1a/Cxcr4a plays a critical role in fin regeneration and more precisely in epidermal cell proliferation, an important process for blastema formation. In mammals, a single cxcr4 gene is involved both in chemotaxis and cell proliferation and survival; we discuss in this study a possible functional division of the two cxcr4 zebrafish genes.

  11. Gravity-regulated formation of the peg in developing cucumber seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H.; Scott, T. K.

    1994-01-01

    It has been proposed that peg formation in the vascular transition region (TR zone) between the hypocotyl and the root in Cucurbitaceae seedlings is a gravimorphogenetic phenomenon. Initiation of the peg became visible 36 h after imbibition when cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Burpee Hybrid II) seeds were germinated in a horizontal position at 24 degrees C in the dark. Simultaneously, sedimented amyloplasts (putative statoliths) were apparent in the sheath cells surrounding the vascular strands, and in the cortical cells immediately adjacent to them, in the TR zone. In contrast, the other cortical cells, some of which were destined to develop into the peg, contained amyloplasts which were not sedimented. These results suggest that the graviperception mechanism for peg formation may be like that of statoliths in shoot gravitropism. By 48 h following imbibition, the cells of the TR zone still had sedimented amyloplasts but had lost their sensitivity to gravity, possibly because of their maturation.

  12. Differential mechanisms of de-regulated bone formation in rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldring, Steven R

    2016-12-01

    The inflammatory arthropathies share in common their tendency to produce marked alterations in skeletal remodelling and architecture. This review will focus on RA and the seronegative spondyloarthopathies (SpA), which share common features with respect to their tendency to produce localized bone destruction at sites of articular and peri-articular inflammation. However, there are significant differences in the skeletal pathology in these conditions, which include the unique involvement of the axial skeleton and the presence of inflammation in the extra-articular entheses in SpA. There also are differences in the pattern of bone formation and repair associated with the articular and peri-articular inflammation. This review will highlight the molecular and cellular processes that are involved in the pathogenesis of the skeletal pathology in these two forms of inflammatory arthritis with specific focus on the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the differential patterns of bone formation and repair.

  13. Regulation of EGFR nanocluster formation by ionic protein-lipid interaction

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The abnormal activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is strongly associated with a variety of human cancers but the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood. By using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), we find that EGFR proteins form nanoclusters in the cell membrane of both normal lung epithelial cells and lung cancer cells, but the number and size of clusters significantly increase in lung cancer cells. The formation of EGFR clusters is...

  14. Operon Formation is Driven by Co-Regulation and Not by Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Morgan N.; Huang, Katherine H.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, Eric J.

    2005-04-12

    Although operons are often subject to horizontal gene transfer (HGT), non-HGT genes are particularly likely to be in operons. To resolve this apparent discrepancy and to determine whether HGT is involved in operon formation, we examined the evolutionary history of the genes and operons in Escherichia coli K12. We show that genes that have homologs in distantly related bacteria but not in close relatives of E. coli (indicating HGTi) form new operons at about the same rates as native genes. Furthermore, genes in new operons are no more likely than other genes to have phylogenetic trees that are inconsistent with the species tree. In contrast, essential genes and ubiquitous genes without paralogs (genes believed to undergo HGT rarely) often form new operons. We conclude that HGT is not associated with operon formation, but instead promotes the prevalence of pre-existing operons. To explain operon formation, we propose that new operons reduce the amount of regulatory information required to specify optimal expression patterns. Consistent with this hypothesis, operons have greater amounts of conserved regulatory sequences than do individually transcribed genes.

  15. Site-specific function and regulation of Osterix in tooth root formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Y. D.; Sui, B. D.; Li, M.; Huang, J.; Chen, S.; Wu, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital diseases of tooth roots, in terms of developmental abnormalities of short and thin root phenotypes, can lead to loss of teeth. A more complete understanding of the genetic molecular pathways and biological processes controlling tooth root formation is required. Recent studies have revealed that Osterix (Osx), a key mesenchymal transcriptional factor participating in both the processes of osteogenesis and odontogenesis, plays a vital role underlying the mechanisms of developmental differences between root and crown. During tooth development, Osx expression has been identified from late embryonic to postnatal stages when the tooth root develops, particularly in odontoblasts and cementoblasts to promote their differentiation and mineralization. Furthermore, the site-specific function of Osx in tooth root formation has been confirmed, because odontoblastic Osx-conditional knockout mice demonstrate primarily short and thin root phenotypes with no apparent abnormalities in the crown (Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 30, 2014 and 742, Journal of Dental Research 94, 2015 and 430). These findings suggest that Osx functions to promote odontoblast and cementoblast differentiation and root elongation only in root, but not in crown formation. Mechanistic research shows regulatory networks of Osx expression, which can be controlled through manipulating the epithelial BMP signalling, mesenchymal Runx2 expression and cellular phosphorylation levels, indicating feasible routes of promoting Osx expression postnatally (Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 114, 2013 and 975). In this regard, a promising approach might be available to regenerate the congenitally diseased root and that regenerative therapy would be the best choice for patients with developmental tooth diseases. PMID:26599722

  16. Evolution‐development congruence in pattern formation dynamics: Bifurcations in gene expression and regulation of networks structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohsokabe, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Search for possible relationships between phylogeny and ontogeny is important in evolutionary‐developmental biology. Here we uncover such relationships by numerical evolution and unveil their origin in terms of dynamical systems theory. By representing developmental dynamics of spatially located cells with gene expression dynamics with cell‐to‐cell interaction under external morphogen gradient, gene regulation networks are evolved under mutation and selection with the fitness to approach a prescribed spatial pattern of expressed genes. For most numerical evolution experiments, evolution of pattern over generations and development of pattern by an evolved network exhibit remarkable congruence. Both in the evolution and development pattern changes consist of several epochs where stripes are formed in a short time, while for other temporal regimes, pattern hardly changes. In evolution, these quasi‐stationary regimes are generations needed to hit relevant mutations, while in development, they are due to some gene expression that varies slowly and controls the pattern change. The morphogenesis is regulated by combinations of feedback or feedforward regulations, where the upstream feedforward network reads the external morphogen gradient, and generates a pattern used as a boundary condition for the later patterns. The ordering from up to downstream is common in evolution and development, while the successive epochal changes in development and evolution are represented as common bifurcations in dynamical‐systems theory, which lead to the evolution‐development congruence. Mechanism of exceptional violation of the congruence is also unveiled. Our results provide a new look on developmental stages, punctuated equilibrium, developmental bottlenecks, and evolutionary acquisition of novelty in morphogenesis. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 326B:61–84, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution

  17. Evolution-development congruence in pattern formation dynamics: Bifurcations in gene expression and regulation of networks structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohsokabe, Takahiro; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    Search for possible relationships between phylogeny and ontogeny is important in evolutionary-developmental biology. Here we uncover such relationships by numerical evolution and unveil their origin in terms of dynamical systems theory. By representing developmental dynamics of spatially located cells with gene expression dynamics with cell-to-cell interaction under external morphogen gradient, gene regulation networks are evolved under mutation and selection with the fitness to approach a prescribed spatial pattern of expressed genes. For most numerical evolution experiments, evolution of pattern over generations and development of pattern by an evolved network exhibit remarkable congruence. Both in the evolution and development pattern changes consist of several epochs where stripes are formed in a short time, while for other temporal regimes, pattern hardly changes. In evolution, these quasi-stationary regimes are generations needed to hit relevant mutations, while in development, they are due to some gene expression that varies slowly and controls the pattern change. The morphogenesis is regulated by combinations of feedback or feedforward regulations, where the upstream feedforward network reads the external morphogen gradient, and generates a pattern used as a boundary condition for the later patterns. The ordering from up to downstream is common in evolution and development, while the successive epochal changes in development and evolution are represented as common bifurcations in dynamical-systems theory, which lead to the evolution-development congruence. Mechanism of exceptional violation of the congruence is also unveiled. Our results provide a new look on developmental stages, punctuated equilibrium, developmental bottlenecks, and evolutionary acquisition of novelty in morphogenesis.

  18. Regulation of Mammary Tumor Formation and Lipid Biosynthesis by Spot14

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    metabolism and altering the way they use the Citric Acid cycle in the mitochondria, tumor cells also increase de novo fatty acid synthesis. This is thought...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Spot14 (S14), encoded by the THRSP gene, regulates de novo fatty acid synthesis in the liver, adipose...and lactating mammary gland. S14 has recently been shown to stimulate FASN activity, increasing the synthesis of medium chain fatty acids in mammary

  19. Blowing off steam: Tuffisite formation as a regulator for lava dome eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie Evan Kendrick

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tuffisites are veins of variably sintered, pyroclastic particles that form in conduits and lava domes as a result of localized fragmentation events during gas-and-ash explosions. Those observed in-situ on the active 2012 lava dome of Volcán de Colima range from voids with intra-clasts showing little movement and interpreted to be failure-nuclei, to sub-parallel lenses of sintered granular aggregate interpreted as fragmentation horizons, through to infilled fractures with evidence of viscous remobilization. All tuffisites show evidence of sintering. Further examination of the complex fracture-and-channel patterns reveals viscous backfill by surrounding magma, suggesting that lava fragmentation was followed by stress relaxation and continued viscous deformation as the tuffisites formed. The natural tuffisites are more permeable than the host andesite, and have a wide range of porosity and permeability compared to a narrower window for the host rock, and gauging from their significant distribution across the dome, we posit that the tuffisite veins may act as important outgassing pathways. To investigate tuffisite formation we crushed and sieved andesite from the lava dome and sintered it at magmatic temperatures for different times. We then assessed the healing and sealing ability by measuring porosity and permeability, showing that sintering reduces both over time. During sintering the porosity-permeability reduction occurs due to the formation of viscous necks between adjacent grains, a process described by the neck-formation model of Frenkel (1945. This process leads the granular starting material to a porosity-permeability regime anticipated for effusive lavas, and which describes the natural host lava as well as the most impervious of natural tuffisites. This suggests that tuffisite formation at Volcán de Colima constructed a permeable network that enabled gas to bleed passively from the magma. We postulate that this progressively reduced

  20. Zinc regulates iNOS-derived nitric oxide formation in endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam M. Cortese-Krott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant production of nitric oxide (NO by inducible NO synthase (iNOS has been implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease. Mechanisms responsible for the fine-tuning of iNOS activity in inflammation are still not fully understood. Zinc is an important structural element of NOS enzymes and is known to inhibit its catalytical activity. In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of zinc on iNOS activity and expression in endothelial cells. We found that zinc down-regulated the expression of iNOS (mRNA+protein and decreased cytokine-mediated activation of the iNOS promoter. Zinc-mediated regulation of iNOS expression was due to inhibition of NF-κB transactivation activity, as determined by a decrease in both NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter activity and expression of NF-κB target genes, including cyclooxygenase 2 and IL-1β. However, zinc did not affect NF-κB translocation into the nucleus, as assessed by Western blot analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Taken together our results demonstrate that zinc limits iNOS-derived high output NO production in endothelial cells by inhibiting NF-κB-dependent iNOS expression, pointing to a role of zinc as a regulator of iNOS activity in inflammation.

  1. Zinc regulates iNOS-derived nitric oxide formation in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Kulakov, Larissa; Opländer, Christian; Kolb-Bachofen, Victoria; Kröncke, Klaus-D; Suschek, Christoph V

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant production of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease. Mechanisms responsible for the fine-tuning of iNOS activity in inflammation are still not fully understood. Zinc is an important structural element of NOS enzymes and is known to inhibit its catalytical activity. In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of zinc on iNOS activity and expression in endothelial cells. We found that zinc down-regulated the expression of iNOS (mRNA+protein) and decreased cytokine-mediated activation of the iNOS promoter. Zinc-mediated regulation of iNOS expression was due to inhibition of NF-κB transactivation activity, as determined by a decrease in both NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter activity and expression of NF-κB target genes, including cyclooxygenase 2 and IL-1β. However, zinc did not affect NF-κB translocation into the nucleus, as assessed by Western blot analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Taken together our results demonstrate that zinc limits iNOS-derived high output NO production in endothelial cells by inhibiting NF-κB-dependent iNOS expression, pointing to a role of zinc as a regulator of iNOS activity in inflammation.

  2. Emerging boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvschal, Mette

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a processual ontology for the emergence of man-made, linear boundaries across northwestern Europe, particularly in the first millennium BC. Over a significant period of time, these boundaries became new ways of organizing the landscape and settlements—a phenomenon that has...... of this phenomenon emerged along equivalent trajectories. At the same time, variation in the regional incorporation of these linear phenomena points toward situation-specific applications and independent development....

  3. SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating of the uppermost Cretaceous Furao Formation near the Heilong River:An age closest to the K/T boundary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xianhua; YAN Wei; LI Wuxian; CHEN Peiji; WAN Xiaoqiao; LI Gang; SONG Biao; JIANG Jianhong; LIU Jicai; YIN Deshun

    2004-01-01

    @@ Since Alvarez et al.[1] suggested that the presence of a large iridium concentration anomaly in sediments at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary was evidence of a large bolide impact at this time that cause the K-T mass extinction, much attention has been paid to the precise age of this boundary with important geological event, mass extinction of organism and their mechanistic link. During the K-T boundary time, shocked quartz and microspherules were widely distributed in America, which were genetically related to the synchronous Chicxulub crater on the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico[2,3]. These findings indicate that the K-T mass extinction was most likely caused by an extraterrestrial impact at about 65 or 66.5 Ma. On the other hand, large explosive gas release from cratonic lithosphere triggered by mantle plume activity is considered as the main reason of the major mass extinctions during Phanerozoic time including the K-T boundary[4,5]. In addition, the K-T mass extinction is also probably caused by multiple impacts of small planets with volcanic explosions[6].

  4. Sialic Acid on the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Regulates PrP-mediated Cell Signaling and Prion Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; Williams, Alun

    2016-01-01

    The prion diseases occur following the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into disease-related isoforms (PrP(Sc)). In this study, the role of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor attached to PrP(C) in prion formation was examined using a cell painting technique. PrP(Sc) formation in two prion-infected neuronal cell lines (ScGT1 and ScN2a cells) and in scrapie-infected primary cortical neurons was increased following the introduction of PrP(C). In contrast, PrP(C) containing a GPI anchor from which the sialic acid had been removed (desialylated PrP(C)) was not converted to PrP(Sc). Furthermore, the presence of desialylated PrP(C) inhibited the production of PrP(Sc) within prion-infected cortical neurons and ScGT1 and ScN2a cells. The membrane rafts surrounding desialylated PrP(C) contained greater amounts of sialylated gangliosides and cholesterol than membrane rafts surrounding PrP(C). Desialylated PrP(C) was less sensitive to cholesterol depletion than PrP(C) and was not released from cells by treatment with glimepiride. The presence of desialylated PrP(C) in neurons caused the dissociation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 from PrP-containing membrane rafts and reduced the activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2. These findings show that the sialic acid moiety of the GPI attached to PrP(C) modifies local membrane microenvironments that are important in PrP-mediated cell signaling and PrP(Sc) formation. These results suggest that pharmacological modification of GPI glycosylation might constitute a novel therapeutic approach to prion diseases.

  5. The serpin PN1 is a feedback regulator of FGF signaling in germ layer and primary axis formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Helena; Iliev, Dobromir; Grahn, Tan Hooi Min; Gouignard, Nadège; Maccarana, Marco; Griesbach, Julia; Herzmann, Svende; Sagha, Mohsen; Climent, Maria; Pera, Edgar M

    2015-03-15

    Germ layer formation and primary axis development rely on Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). In Xenopus, the secreted serine protease HtrA1 induces mesoderm and posterior trunk/tail structures by facilitating the spread of FGF signals. Here, we show that the serpin Protease nexin-1 (PN1) is transcriptionally activated by FGF signals, suppresses mesoderm and promotes head development in mRNA-injected embryos. An antisense morpholino oligonucleotide against PN1 has the opposite effect and inhibits ectodermal fate. However, ectoderm and anterior head structures can be restored in PN1-depleted embryos when HtrA1 and FGF receptor activities are diminished, indicating that FGF signals negatively regulate their formation. We show that PN1 binds to and inhibits HtrA1, prevents degradation of the proteoglycan Syndecan 4 and restricts paracrine FGF/Erk signaling. Our data suggest that PN1 is a negative-feedback regulator of FGF signaling and has important roles in ectoderm and head development.

  6. Differential RNA-seq of Vibrio cholerae identifies the VqmR small RNA as a regulator of biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenfort, Kai; Förstner, Konrad U; Cong, Jian-Ping; Sharma, Cynthia M; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-02-17

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process of cell-to-cell communication that enables bacteria to transition between individual and collective lifestyles. QS controls virulence and biofilm formation in Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera disease. Differential RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of wild-type V. cholerae and a locked low-cell-density QS-mutant strain identified 7,240 transcriptional start sites with ∼ 47% initiated in the antisense direction. A total of 107 of the transcripts do not appear to encode proteins, suggesting they specify regulatory RNAs. We focused on one such transcript that we name VqmR. vqmR is located upstream of the vqmA gene encoding a DNA-binding transcription factor. Mutagenesis and microarray analyses demonstrate that VqmA activates vqmR transcription, that vqmR encodes a regulatory RNA, and VqmR directly controls at least eight mRNA targets including the rtx (repeats in toxin) toxin genes and the vpsT transcriptional regulator of biofilm production. We show that VqmR inhibits biofilm formation through repression of vpsT. Together, these data provide to our knowledege the first global annotation of the transcriptional start sites in V. cholerae and highlight the importance of posttranscriptional regulation for collective behaviors in this human pathogen.

  7. CRMP4 Inhibits Bone Formation by Negatively Regulating BMP and RhoA Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M.; Figeac, Florence; Larsen, Kenneth H.

    2017-01-01

    We identified the neuroprotein collapsing response mediator protein-4 (CRMP4) as a noncanonical osteogenic factor that regulates the differentiation of mouse bone marrow skeletal stem cells (bone marrow stromal stem cells [mBMSCs]) into osteoblastic cells. CRMP4 is the only member of the CRMP1-CRMP......5 family to be expressed by mBMSCs and in osteoprogenitors of both adult mouse and human bones. In vitro gain-of-function and loss-of-function of CRMP4 in murine stromal cells revealed its inhibitory effect on osteoblast differentiation. In addition, Crmp4-deficient mice (Crmp4(-/-) ) displayed a 40...

  8. Nogo-A and myelin-associated glycoprotein differently regulate oligodendrocyte maturation and myelin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet, Vincent; Joly, Sandrine; Christ, Franziska; Dimou, Leda; Schwab, Martin E

    2008-07-16

    Nogo-A is one of the most potent oligodendrocyte-derived inhibitors for axonal regrowth in the injured adult CNS. However, the physiological function of Nogo-A in development and in healthy oligodendrocytes is still unknown. In the present study, we investigated the role of Nogo-A for myelin formation in the developing optic nerve. By quantitative real-time PCR, we found that the expression of Nogo-A increased faster in differentiating oligodendrocytes than that of the major myelin proteins MBP (myelin basic protein), PLP (proteolipid protein)/DM20, and CNP (2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase). The analysis of optic nerves and cerebella of mice deficient for Nogo-A (Nogo-A(-/-)) revealed a marked delay of oligodendrocyte differentiation, myelin sheath formation, and axonal caliber growth within the first postnatal month. The combined deletion of Nogo-A and MAG caused a more severe transient hypomyelination. In contrast to MAG(-/-) mice, Nogo-A(-/-) mutants did not present abnormalities in the structure of myelin sheaths and Ranvier nodes. The common binding protein for Nogo-A and MAG, NgR1, was exclusively upregulated in MAG(-/-) animals, whereas the level of Lingo-1, a coreceptor, remained unchanged. Together, our results demonstrate that Nogo-A and MAG are differently involved in oligodendrocyte maturation in vivo, and suggest that Nogo-A may influence also remyelination in pathological conditions such as multiple sclerosis.

  9. Par3/Bazooka and phosphoinositides regulate actin protrusion formation during Drosophila dorsal closure and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Karen; Alves-Silva, Juliana; Goberdhan, Deborah; Millard, Tom H

    2013-02-01

    Effective wound closure mechanisms are essential for maintenance of epithelial structure and function. The repair of wounded epithelia is primarily driven by the cells bordering the wound, which become motile after wounding, forming dynamic actin protrusions along the wound edge. The molecular mechanisms that trigger wound edge cells to become motile following tissue damage are not well understood. Using wound healing and dorsal closure in Drosophila, we identify a direct molecular link between changes in cell-cell adhesion at epithelial edges and induction of actin protrusion formation. We find that the scaffolding protein Par3/Bazooka and the lipid phosphatase Pten are specifically lost from cell-cell junctions at epithelial edges. This results in a localized accumulation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3), which promotes the formation of actin protrusions along the epithelial edge. Depleting PIP3 results in defective epithelial closure during both dorsal closure and wound healing. These data reveal a novel mechanism that directly couples loss of epithelial integrity to activation of epithelial closure.

  10. Estrogen Receptor α Regulates β-Cell Formation During Pancreas Development and Following Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuchi, Yixing; Cai, Ying; Legein, Bart; De Groef, Sofie; Leuckx, Gunter; Coppens, Violette; Van Overmeire, Eva; Staels, Willem; De Leu, Nico; Martens, Geert; Van Ginderachter, Jo A; Heimberg, Harry; Van de Casteele, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Identifying pathways for β-cell generation is essential for cell therapy in diabetes. We investigated the potential of 17β-estradiol (E2) and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling for stimulating β-cell generation during embryonic development and in the severely injured adult pancreas. E2 concentration, ER activity, and number of ERα transcripts were enhanced in the pancreas injured by partial duct ligation (PDL) along with nuclear localization of ERα in β-cells. PDL-induced proliferation of β-cells depended on aromatase activity. The activation of Neurogenin3 (Ngn3) gene expression and β-cell growth in PDL pancreas were impaired when ERα was turned off chemically or genetically (ERα(-/-)), whereas in situ delivery of E2 promoted β-cell formation. In the embryonic pancreas, β-cell replication, number of Ngn3(+) progenitor cells, and expression of key transcription factors of the endocrine lineage were decreased by ERα inactivation. The current study reveals that E2 and ERα signaling can drive β-cell replication and formation in mouse pancreas.

  11. ApoE receptor 2 regulates synapse and dendritic spine formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya B Dumanis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoEr2 is a postsynaptic protein involved in long-term potentiation (LTP, learning, and memory through unknown mechanisms. We examined the biological effects of ApoEr2 on synapse and dendritic spine formation-processes critical for learning and memory. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a heterologous co-culture synapse assay, overexpression of ApoEr2 in COS7 cells significantly increased colocalization with synaptophysin in primary hippocampal neurons, suggesting that ApoEr2 promotes interaction with presynaptic structures. In primary neuronal cultures, overexpression of ApoEr2 increased dendritic spine density. Consistent with our in vitro findings, ApoEr2 knockout mice had decreased dendritic spine density in cortical layers II/III at 1 month of age. We also tested whether the interaction between ApoEr2 and its cytoplasmic adaptor proteins, specifically X11α and PSD-95, affected synapse and dendritic spine formation. X11α decreased cell surface levels of ApoEr2 along with synapse and dendritic spine density. In contrast, PSD-95 increased cell surface levels of ApoEr2 as well as synapse and dendritic spine density. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that ApoEr2 plays important roles in structure and function of CNS synapses and dendritic spines, and that these roles are modulated by cytoplasmic adaptor proteins X11α and PSD-95.

  12. pH-regulated antimony oxychloride nanoparticle formation on titanium oxide nanostructures: a photocatalytically active heterojunction

    KAUST Repository

    Buchholcz, Balázs

    2017-02-06

    Improving the catalytic activity of heterogeneous photocatalysts has become a hot topic recently. To this end, considerable progress has been made in the efficient separation of photogenerated charge carriers by e.g. the realization of heterojunction photocatalysts. V-VI-VII compound semiconductors, namely, bismuth oxyhalides, are popular photocatalysts. However, results on antimony oxyhalides [SbOX (X = Br, Cl, I)], the very promising alternatives to the well-known BiOX photomodifiers, are scarce. Here, we report the successful decoration of titanium oxide nanostructures with 8-11 nm diameter SbOX nanoparticles for the first time ever. The product size and stoichiometry could be controlled by the pH of the reactant mixture, while subsequent calcination could transform the structure of the titanate nanotube (TiONT) support and the prepared antimony oxychloride particles. In contrast to the ease of composite formation in the SbOX/TiONT case, anatase TiO could not facilitate the formation of antimony oxychloride nanoparticles on its surface. The titanate nanotube-based composites showed activity in a generally accepted quasi-standard photocatalytic test reaction (methyl orange dye decolorization). We found that the SbOCl/TiONT synthesized at pH = 1 is the most active sample in a broad temperature range.

  13. Caldecrin:A pancreas-derived hypocalcemic factor,regulates osteoclast formation and function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mineko; Tomomura; Akito; Tomomura

    2015-01-01

    Caldecrin was originally isolated from the pancreas as afactor that reduced serum calcium levels. This secreted serine protease has chymotrypsin-like activity and is also known as chymotrypsin C; it belongs to the elastase family. Although intravenous administration of caldecrin decreases the serum calcium concentration even when its protease activity is blocked,this effect does require cleavage of caldecrin’s pro-peptide by trypsin,converting it to the mature enzyme. Ectopic intramuscular expression of caldecrin prevented bone resorption in ovariectomized mice. Caldecrin inhibited parathyroid hormone-stimulated calcium release from fetal mouse long bone organ cultures. Furthermore,caldecrin suppressed the formation of osteoclasts from bone marrow cells by inhibiting the receptor activator of nuclear factor-k B ligand(RANKL)-stimulated phospholipase Cγ-calcium oscillation-calcineurinnuclear factor of activated T-cells,cytoplasmic 1 pathway. Caldecrin also suppressed the bone resorption activity of mature osteoclasts by preventing RANKL-stimulated Src activation,calcium entry,and actin ring formation. In vivo and in vitro studies have indicated that caldecrin is a unique multifunctional protease with anti-osteoclastogenic activities that are distinct from its protease activity. Caldecrin might be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of osteolytic diseases such as osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. This mini-review describes caldecrin’s historical background and its mechanisms of action.

  14. Effect of VN precipitates on formation of grain boundary and intragranular ferrite in a high N-V bearing steel; V-N tenkako no ryukai oyobi ryunai ferrite hentai ni oyobosu austenite chu no VN sekishutsu no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omori, A.; Oi, K.; Kawabata, F.; Amano, K. [Kawasaki Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    The enhancement of ferrite nucleation owing to vanadium nitride (VN) precipitated in the austenite phase was studied for a 0.14%C- 1.45%Mn-0.06%V-0.009%N steel and the isothermal ferrite transformation behavior associated with VN precipitation was also quantitatively discussed. Vanadium nitrides precipitate on the austenite grain boundary in preference to the grain interior and increase the density of grain boundary ferrites. On the other hand, VN precipitates in austenite grain interior are less effective to intragranular ferrite nucleation. The calculation based on the classical nucleation theory shows that the activation energy of VN precipitates for a critical ferrite nucleus formation is one-fifth lower than that in case of no precipitate. The ferrite nucleation potency of VN precipitates is kept high even in higher temperature range above 700degreeC. (author)

  15. Neural cell 3D microtissue formation is marked by cytokines' up-regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinzhi Lai

    Full Text Available Cells cultured in three dimensional (3D scaffolds as opposed to traditional two-dimensional (2D substrates have been considered more physiologically relevant based on their superior ability to emulate the in vivo environment. Combined with stem cell technology, 3D cell cultures can provide a promising alternative for use in cell-based assays or biosensors in non-clinical drug discovery studies. To advance 3D culture technology, a case has been made for identifying and validating three-dimensionality biomarkers. With this goal in mind, we conducted a transcriptomic expression comparison among neural progenitor cells cultured on 2D substrates, 3D porous polystyrene scaffolds, and as 3D neurospheres (in vivo surrogate. Up-regulation of cytokines as a group in 3D and neurospheres was observed. A group of 13 cytokines were commonly up-regulated in cells cultured in polystyrene scaffolds and neurospheres, suggesting potential for any or a combination from this list to serve as three-dimensionality biomarkers. These results are supportive of further cytokine identification and validation studies with cells from non-neural tissue.

  16. Biogeochemical factors which regulate the formation and fate of sulfide in wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Mark E.; Lyons, W. Berry; Gaudette, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    Coastal wetland areas occupy a small percentage of the terrestrial environment yet are extremely productive regions which support rapid rates of below ground bacterial activity. Wetlands appear to be significant as biogenic sources of gaseous sulfur, carbon, and nitrogen. These gases are important as tracers of man's activities, and they influence atmospheric chemistry. The interactions among wetland biogeochemical processes regulate the anaerobic production of reduced gases and influence the fate of these volatiles. Therefore, spatial and temporal variations in hydrology, salinity, temperature, and speciation and growth of vegetation affect the type and magnitude of gas emissions thus hindering predictive estimates of gas flux. The research is divided into two major parts, the first is the biogeochemical characterization of a selected tidal wetland area in terms of factors likely to regulate sulfide flux; the second is a direct measurement of gaseous sulfur flux as related to changes in these biogeochemical conditions. Variant factors affecting sulfide flux include the wetlands' tidal range, seasonal salinity, and other hydrological conditions, grass species and plant growth, soil composition, and microbial activity.

  17. PPARG Post-translational Modifications Regulate Bone Formation and Bone Resorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Stechschulte

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ regulates osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation, and is the molecular target of thiazolidinediones (TZDs, insulin sensitizers that enhance glucose utilization and adipocyte differentiation. However, clinical use of TZDs has been limited by side effects including a higher risk of fractures and bone loss. Here we demonstrate that the same post-translational modifications at S112 and S273, which influence PPARγ pro-adipocytic and insulin sensitizing activities, also determine PPARγ osteoblastic (pS112 and osteoclastic (pS273 activities. Treatment of either hyperglycemic or normoglycemic animals with SR10171, an inverse agonist that blocks pS273 but not pS112, increased trabecular and cortical bone while normalizing metabolic parameters. Additionally, SR10171 treatment modulated osteocyte, osteoblast, and osteoclast activities, and decreased marrow adiposity. These data demonstrate that regulation of bone mass and energy metabolism shares similar mechanisms suggesting that one pharmacologic agent could be developed to treat both diabetes and metabolic bone disease.

  18. Mind Bomb-2 Regulates Hippocampus-dependent Memory Formation and Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Somi; Kim, TaeHyun; Lee, Hye-Ryeon; Kong, Young-Yun; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2015-11-01

    Notch signaling is a key regulator of neuronal fate during embryonic development, but its function in the adult brain is still largely unknown. Mind bomb-2 (Mib2) is an essential positive regulator of the Notch pathway, which acts in the Notch signal-sending cells. Therefore, genetic deletion of Mib2 in the mouse brain might help understand Notch signaling-mediated cell-cell interactions between neurons and their physiological function. Here we show that deletion of Mib2 in the mouse brain results in impaired hippocampal spatial memory and contextual fear memory. Accordingly, we found impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity in Mib2 knock-out (KO) mice; however, basal synaptic transmission did not change at the Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses. Using western blot analysis, we found that the level of cleaved Notch1 was lower in Mib2 KO mice than in wild type (WT) littermates after mild foot shock. Taken together, these data suggest that Mib2 plays a critical role in synaptic plasticity and spatial memory through the Notch signaling pathway.

  19. Matrix Metalloproteinases: Inflammatory Regulators of Cell Behaviors in Vascular Formation and Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qishan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal angiogenesis and vascular remodeling contribute to pathogenesis of a number of disorders such as tumor, arthritis, atherosclerosis, restenosis, hypertension, and neurodegeneration. During angiogenesis and vascular remodeling, behaviors of stem/progenitor cells, endothelial cells (ECs, and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs and its interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM play a critical role in the processes. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, well-known inflammatory mediators are a family of zinc-dependent proteolytic enzymes that degrade various components of ECM and non-ECM molecules mediating tissue remodeling in both physiological and pathological processes. MMPs including MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-12, and MT1-MMP, are stimulated and activated by various stimuli in vascular tissues. Once activated, MMPs degrade ECM proteins or other related signal molecules to promote recruitment of stem/progenitor cells and facilitate migration and invasion of ECs and VSMCs. Moreover, vascular cell proliferation and apoptosis can also be regulated by MMPs via proteolytically cleaving and modulating bioactive molecules and relevant signaling pathways. Regarding the importance of vascular cells in abnormal angiogenesis and vascular remodeling, regulation of vascular cell behaviors through modulating expression and activation of MMPs shows therapeutic potential.

  20. Platelet-Derived CCL5 Regulates CXC Chemokine Formation and Neutrophil Recruitment in Acute Experimental Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changhui; Zhang, Songen; Wang, Yongzhi; Zhang, Su; Luo, Lingtao; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating data suggest that platelets not only regulate thrombosis and haemostasis but also inflammatory processes. Platelets contain numerous potent pro-inflammatory compounds, including the chemokines CCL5 and CXCL4, although their role in acute colitis remains elusive. The aim of this study is to examine the role of platelets and platelet-derived chemokines in acute colitis. Acute colitis is induced in female Balb/c mice by administration of 5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) for 5 days. Animals receive a platelet-depleting, anti-CCL5, anti-CXCL4, or a control antibody prior to DSS challenge. Colonic tissue is collected for quantification of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, CXCL5, CXCL2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and CCL5 levels as well as morphological analyses. Platelet depletion reduce tissue damage and clinical disease activity index in DSS-exposed animals. Platelet depletion not only reduces levels of CXCL2 and CXCL5 but also levels of CCL5 in the inflamed colon. Immunoneutralization of CCL5 but not CXCL4 reduces tissue damage, CXC chemokine expression, and neutrophil recruitment in DSS-treated animals. These findings show that platelets play a key role in acute colitis by regulating CXC chemokine generation, neutrophil infiltration, and tissue damage in the colon. Moreover, our results suggest that platelet-derived CCL5 is an important link between platelet activation and neutrophil recruitment in acute colitis.

  1. Negative Regulation of Leptin-induced Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Formation by Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Activation in Hypothalamic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, Letizia; Silvestri, Cristoforo; Imperatore, Roberta; Morello, Giovanna; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Martella, Andrea; Cristino, Luigia; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2015-05-29

    The adipocyte-derived, anorectic hormone leptin was recently shown to owe part of its regulatory effects on appetite-regulating hypothalamic neuropeptides to the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons. Leptin is also known to exert a negative regulation on hypothalamic endocannabinoid levels and hence on cannabinoid CB1 receptor activity. Here we investigated the possibility of a negative regulation by CB1 receptors of leptin-mediated ROS formation in the ARC. Through pharmacological and molecular biology experiments we report data showing that leptin-induced ROS accumulation is 1) blunted by arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) in a CB1-dependent manner in both the mouse hypothalamic cell line mHypoE-N41 and ARC neuron primary cultures, 2) likewise blocked by a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonist, troglitazone, in a manner inhibited by T0070907, a PPAR-γ antagonist that also inhibited the ACEA effect on leptin, 3) blunted under conditions of increased endocannabinoid tone due to either pharmacological or genetic inhibition of endocannabinoid degradation in mHypoE-N41 and primary ARC neuronal cultures from MAGL(-/-) mice, respectively, and 4) associated with reduction of both PPAR-γ and catalase activity, which are reversed by both ACEA and troglitazone. We conclude that CB1 activation reverses leptin-induced ROS formation and hence possibly some of the ROS-mediated effects of the hormone by preventing PPAR-γ inhibition by leptin, with subsequent increase of catalase activity. This mechanism might underlie in part CB1 orexigenic actions under physiopathological conditions accompanied by elevated hypothalamic endocannabinoid levels.

  2. Role of mineralization inhibitors in the regulation of hard tissue biomineralization: relevance to initial enamel formation and maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry C. Margolis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate mineralized tissues, i.e., enamel, dentin, cementum and bone, have unique hierarchical structures and chemical compositions. Although these tissues are similarly comprised of a crystalline calcium apatite mineral phase and a protein component, they differ with respect to crystal size and shape, level and distribution of trace mineral ions, the nature of the proteins present, and their relative proportions of mineral and protein components. Despite apparent differences, mineralized tissues are similarly derived by highly concerted extracellular processes involving matrix proteins, proteases, and mineral ion fluxes that collectively regulate the nucleation, growth and organization of forming mineral crystals. Nature, however, provides multiple ways to control the onset, rate, location, and organization of mineral deposits in developing mineralized tissues. Although our knowledge is quite limited in some of these areas, recent evidence suggests that hard tissue formation is, in part, controlled through the regulation of specific molecules that inhibit the mineralization process. This paper addresses the role of mineralization inhibitors in the regulation of biological mineralization with emphasis on the relevance of current findings to the process of amelogenesis. Mineralization inhibitors can also serve to maintain driving forces for calcium phosphate precipitation and prevent unwanted mineralization. Recent evidence shows that native phosphorylated amelogenins have the capacity to prevent mineralization through the stabilization of an amorphous calcium phosphate precursor phase, as observed in vitro and in developing teeth. Based on present findings, the author proposes that the transformation of initially formed amorphous mineral deposits to enamel crystals is an active process associated with the enzymatic processing of amelogenins. Such processing may serve to control both initial enamel crystal formation and subsequent maturation.

  3. Role of a GntR-family response regulator LbrA in Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Wassinger

    Full Text Available The formation of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms contributes to persistent contamination in food processing facilities. A microarray comparison of L. monocytogenes between the transcriptome of the strong biofilm forming strain (Bfm(s Scott A and the weak biofilm forming (Bfm(w strain F2365 was conducted to identify genes potentially involved in biofilm formation. Among 951 genes with significant difference in expression between the two strains, a GntR-family response regulator encoding gene (LMOf2365_0414, designated lbrA, was found to be highly expressed in Scott A relative to F2365. A Scott A lbrA-deletion mutant, designated AW3, formed biofilm to a much lesser extent as compared to the parent strain by a rapid attachment assay and scanning electron microscopy. Complementation with lbrA from Scott A restored the Bfm(s phenotype in the AW3 derivative. A second microarray assessment using the lbrA deletion mutant AW3 and the wild type Scott A revealed a total of 304 genes with expression significantly different between the two strains, indicating the potential regulatory role of LbrA in L. monocytogenes. A cloned copy of Scott A lbrA was unable to confer enhanced biofilm forming potential in F2365, suggesting that additional factors contributed to weak biofilm formation by F2365.

  4. The SOS Response Master Regulator LexA Is Associated with Sporulation, Motility and Biofilm Formation in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Beata M; Cartman, Stephen T; Minton, Nigel P; Butala, Matej; Rupnik, Maja

    2015-01-01

    The LexA regulated SOS network is a bacterial response to DNA damage of metabolic or environmental origin. In Clostridium difficile, a nosocomial pathogen causing a range of intestinal diseases, the in-silico deduced LexA network included the core SOS genes involved in the DNA repair and genes involved in various other biological functions that vary among different ribotypes. Here we describe the construction and characterization of a lexA ClosTron mutant in C. difficile R20291 strain. The mutation of lexA caused inhibition of cell division resulting in a filamentous phenotype. The lexA mutant also showed decreased sporulation, a reduction in swimming motility, greater sensitivity to metronidazole, and increased biofilm formation. Changes in the regulation of toxin A, but not toxin B, were observed in the lexA mutant in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of levofloxacin. C. difficile LexA is, therefore, not only a regulator of DNA damage but also controls many biological functions associated with virulence.

  5. Differential regulation of macropinocytosis in macrophages by cytokines: implications for foam cell formation and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Daryn R; Ashlin, Tim G; Davies, Charlotte S; Gallagher, Hayley; Stoneman, Thomas W; Buckley, Melanie L; Ramji, Dipak P

    2013-10-01

    A key event during the formation of lipid-rich foam cells during the progression of atherosclerosis is the uptake of modified low-density lipoproteins (LDL) by macrophages in response to atherogenic mediators in the arterial intima. In addition to scavenger receptor-dependent uptake of LDL, macropinocytosis is known to facilitate the uptake of LDL through the constitutive and passive internalization of large quantities of extracellular solute. In this study we confirm the ability of macropinocytosis to facilitate the uptake of modified LDL by human macrophages and show its modulation by TGF-β, IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-33. Furthermore we show that the TGF-β-mediated inhibition of macropinocytosis is a Smad-2/-3-independent process.

  6. The tumor suppressor PTEN and the PDK1 kinase regulate formation of the columnar neural epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grego-Bessa, Joaquim; Bloomekatz, Joshua; Castel, Pau; Omelchenko, Tatiana; Baselga, José; Anderson, Kathryn V

    2016-01-26

    Epithelial morphogenesis and stability are essential for normal development and organ homeostasis. The mouse neural plate is a cuboidal epithelium that remodels into a columnar pseudostratified epithelium over the course of 24 hr. Here we show that the transition to a columnar epithelium fails in mutant embryos that lack the tumor suppressor PTEN, although proliferation, patterning and apical-basal polarity markers are normal in the mutants. The Pten phenotype is mimicked by constitutive activation of PI3 kinase and is rescued by the removal of PDK1 (PDPK1), but does not depend on the downstream kinases AKT and mTORC1. High resolution imaging shows that PTEN is required for stabilization of planar cell packing in the neural plate and for the formation of stable apical-basal microtubule arrays. The data suggest that appropriate levels of membrane-associated PDPK1 are required for stabilization of apical junctions, which promotes cell elongation, during epithelial morphogenesis.

  7. Ewing sarcoma EWS protein regulates midzone formation by recruiting Aurora B kinase to the midzone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyewon; Turkalo, Timothy K; Nelson, Kayla; Folmsbee, Stephen Sai; Robb, Caroline; Roper, Brittany; Azuma, Mizuki

    2014-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is a malignant bone cancer that primarily occurs in children and adolescents. Eighty-five percent of Ewing sarcoma is characterized by the presence of the aberrant chimeric EWS/FLI1 fusion gene. Previously, we demonstrated that an interaction between EWS/FLI1 and wild-type EWS led to the inhibition of EWS activity and mitotic dysfunction. Although defective mitosis is considered to be a critical step in cancer initiation, it is unknown how interference with EWS contributes to Ewing sarcoma formation. Here, we demonstrate that EWS/FLI1- and EWS-knockdown cells display a high incidence of defects in the midzone, a midline structure located between segregating chromatids during anaphase. Defects in the midzone can lead to the failure of cytokinesis and can result in the induction of aneuploidy. The similarity among the phenotypes of EWS/FLI1- and EWS siRNA-transfected HeLa cells points to the inhibition of EWS as the key mechanism for the induction of midzone defects. Supporting this observation, the ectopic expression of EWS rescues the high incidence of midzone defects observed in Ewing sarcoma A673 cells. We discovered that EWS interacts with Aurora B kinase, and that EWS is also required for recruiting Aurora B to the midzone. A domain analysis revealed that the R565 in the RGG3 domain of EWS is essential for both Aurora B interaction and the recruitment of Aurora B to the midzone. Here, we propose that the impairment of EWS-dependent midzone formation via the recruitment of Aurora B is a potential mechanism of Ewing sarcoma development.

  8. Type II Na+-Pi cotransporters in osteoblast mineral formation: regulation by inorganic phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Patrik; Murer, Heini; Biber, Jürg

    2007-01-01

    During calcification of bone, large amounts of phosphate (P(i)) must be transported from the circulation to the osteoid. Likely candidates for osteoblast P(i) transport are the type II sodium-phosphate cotransporters NaPi-IIa and NaPi-IIb that facilitate transcellular P(i) flux in kidney and intestine, respectively. We have therefore determined the 'cotransporters' expression in osteoblast-like cells. We have also studied the 'cotransporters' regulation by P(i) and during mineralization in vitro. Phosphate uptake and cotransporter protein expression was investigated at early, late and mineralizing culture stages of mouse (MC3T3-E1) and rat (UMR-106) osteoblast-like cells. Both NaPi-IIa and NaPi-IIb were expressed by both osteoblast-like cell lines. NaPi-IIa was upregulated in both cell lines one week after confluency. After 7 days in 3mM P(i) NaPi-IIa was strongly upregulated in both cell lines. NaPi-IIb expression was unaffected by both culture stage and P(i) supplementation. The expression of both cotransporters was unaffected by P(i) deprivation. In vitro mineralization at 1.5mM P(i) was preceded by a three-fold increase in osteoblast sodium-dependent P(i) uptake and a corresponding upregulation of both NaPi-IIa and NaPi-IIb. Their expression thus seem regulated by phosphate in a manner consistent with their playing a role in transcellular P(i) flux during mineralization.

  9. The CRP/FNR family protein Bcam1349 is a c-di-GMP effector that regulates biofilm formation in the respiratory pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazli, Mustafa; O'Connell, Aileen; Nilsson, Martin

    2011-01-01

    to control a wide range of functions in bacteria, but little is known about these regulatory mechanisms in B. cenocepacia. Here we investigated the role that c-di-GMP plays in the regulation of biofilm formation and virulence in B. cenocepacia. Elevated intracellular levels of c-di-GMP promoted wrinkly...... colony, pellicle and biofilm formation in B. cenocepacia. A screen for transposon mutants unable to respond to elevated levels of c-di-GMP led to the identification of the mutant bcam1349 that did not display increased biofilm and pellicle formation with excessive c-di-GMP levels, and displayed a biofilm...... larvae infection model. Taken together, these findings suggest that the Bcam1349 protein is a transcriptional regulator that binds c-di-GMP and regulates biofilm formation and virulence in B. cenocepacia in response to the level of c-di-GMP....

  10. The exopolysaccharide gene cluster Bcam1330-Bcam1341 is involved in Burkholderia cenocepacia biofilm formation, and its expression is regulated by c-di-GMP and Bcam1349

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazli, Mustafa; McCarthy, Yvonne; Givskov, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In Burkholderia cenocepacia, the second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) has previously been shown to positively regulate biofilm formation and the expression of cellulose and type-I fimbriae genes through binding to the transcriptional regulator Bcam1349. Here, we provide...... evidence that cellulose and type-I fimbriae are not involved in B. cenocepacia biofilm formation in flow chambers, and we identify a novel Bcam1349/c-di-GMP-regulated exopolysaccharide gene cluster which is essential for B. cenocepacia biofilm formation. Overproduction of Bcam1349 in trans promotes wrinkly...... matrix exopolysaccharide and to be essential for flow-chamber biofilm formation. We demonstrate that Bcam1349 binds to the promoter region of genes in the Bcam1330-Bcam1341 cluster and that this binding is enhanced by the presence of c-di-GMP. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overproduction of both c...

  11. Growth plate regulation and osteochondroma formation: insights from tracing proteoglycans in zebrafish models and human cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrea, Carlos E; Prins, Frans A; Wiweger, Malgorzata I; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W

    2011-06-01

    Proteoglycans are secreted into the extracellular matrix of virtually all cell types and function in several cellular processes. They consist of a core protein onto which glycosaminoglycans (e.g., heparan or chondroitin sulphates), are attached. Proteoglycans are important modulators of gradient formation and signal transduction. Impaired biosynthesis of heparan sulphate glycosaminoglycans causes osteochondroma, the most common bone tumour to occur during adolescence. Cytochemical staining with positively charged dyes (e.g., polyethyleneimine-PEI) allows, visualisation of proteoglycans and provides a detailed description of how proteoglycans are distributed throughout the cartilage matrix. PEI staining was studied by electron and reflection contrast microscopy in human growth plates, osteochondromas and five different proteoglycan-deficient zebrafish mutants displaying one of the following skeletal phenotypes: dackel (dak/ext2), lacking heparan sulphate and identified as a model for human multiple osteochondromas; hi307 (β3gat3), deficient for most glycosaminoglycans; pinscher (pic/slc35b2), presenting with defective sulphation of glycosaminoglycans; hi954 (uxs1), lacking most glycosaminoglycans; and knypek (kny/gpc4), missing the protein core of the glypican-4 proteoglycan. The panel of genetically well-characterized proteoglycan-deficient zebrafish mutants serves as a convincing and comprehensive study model to investigate proteoglycan distribution and the relation of this distribution to the model mutation status. They also provide insight into the distributions and gradients that can be expected in the human homologue. Human growth plate, wild-type zebrafish and fish mutants with mild proteoglycan defects (hi307 and kny) displayed proteoglycans distributed in a gradient throughout the matrix. Although the mutants pic and hi954, which had severely impaired proteoglycan biosynthesis, showed no PEI staining, dak mutants demonstrated reduced PEI staining and no

  12. Galaxy Zoo and ALFALFA: Atomic Gas and the Regulation of Star Formation in Barred Disc Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Masters, Karen L; Haynes, Martha P; Keel, William C; Lintott, Chris; Simmons, Brooke; Skibba, Ramin; Bamford, Steven; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Schawinski, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We study the observed correlation between atomic gas content and the likelihood of hosting a large scale bar in a sample of 2090 disc galaxies. Such a test has never been done before on this scale. We use data on morphologies from the Galaxy Zoo project and information on the galaxies' HI content from the ALFALFA blind HI survey. Our main result is that the bar fraction is significantly lower among gas rich disc galaxies than gas poor ones. This is not explained by known trends for more massive (stellar) and redder disc galaxies to host more bars and have lower gas fractions: we still see at fixed stellar mass a residual correlation between gas content and bar fraction. We discuss three possible causal explanations: (1) bars in disc galaxies cause atomic gas to be used up more quickly, (2) increasing the atomic gas content in a disc galaxy inhibits bar formation, and (3) bar fraction and gas content are both driven by correlation with environmental effects (e.g. tidal triggering of bars, combined with strangu...

  13. Self-Regulated Star Formation in Galaxies via Momentum Input from Massive Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F; Murray, Norman

    2011-01-01

    Feedback from massive stars is believed to play a critical role in shaping the galaxy mass function, the structure of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies, and the slow conversion of gas into stars over many dynamical times. This paper is the first in a series studying stellar feedback in galaxy formation. We present a new numerical method for implementing stellar feedback via the momentum imparted to the ISM by radiation pressure, supernovae, and stellar winds. In contrast to the majority of the results in the literature, we do not artificially suppress cooling or 'turn off' the hydrodynamics for a subset of the gas: the gas can cool to <100K and so the ISM inevitably becomes highly inhomogeneous. For reasonable feedback efficiencies galaxies reach an approximate steady state in which gas collapses due to gravity to form giant molecular clouds and feedback disperses these dense regions back into the more diffuse ISM. This is true for a wide range of galaxy models, from SMC-like dwarfs and Milky-way a...

  14. How the First Stars Regulated Star Formation: Enrichment by Nearby Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Wollenberg, Katharina M J; Glover, Simon C O; Klessen, Ralf S

    2016-01-01

    Metals from Population III (Pop III) supernovae led to the formation of less massive Pop II stars in the early universe, altering the course of evolution of primeval galaxies and cosmological reionization. There are a variety of scenarios in which heavy elements from the first supernovae were taken up into second-generation stars, but cosmological simulations only model them on the largest scales. We present small-scale, high-resolution simulations of the chemical enrichment of a primordial halo by a nearby supernova after partial evaporation by the progenitor star. We find that ejecta from the explosion crash into and mix violently with ablative flows driven off the halo by the star, creating dense, enriched clumps capable of collapsing into Pop II stars. Metals may mix less efficiently with the partially exposed core of the halo, and it can form either Pop III or Pop II stars. Both Pop II and III stars may thus form after the collision if the ejecta do not strip all the gas from the halo. The partial evapor...

  15. Temporal self-regulation of transposition through host-independent transposase rodlet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Lauren E.; Downes, Laura M.; Lee, Yi-Chien; Kaja, Aparna; Terefe, Eyuel S.; Wilson, Matthew H.

    2017-01-01

    Transposons are highly abundant in eukaryotic genomes, but their mobilization must be finely tuned to maintain host organism fitness and allow for transposon propagation. Forty percent of the human genome is comprised of transposable element sequences, and the most abundant cut-and-paste transposons are from the hAT superfamily. We found that the hAT transposase TcBuster from Tribolium castaneum formed filamentous structures, or rodlets, in human tissue culture cells, after gene transfer to adult mice, and ex vivo in cell-free conditions, indicating that host co-factors or cellular structures were not required for rodlet formation. Time-lapsed imaging of GFP-laced rodlets in human cells revealed that they formed quickly in a dynamic process involving fusion and fission. We delayed the availability of the transposon DNA and found that transposition declined after transposase concentrations became high enough for visible transposase rodlets to appear. In combination with earlier findings for maize Ac elements, these results give insight into transposase overproduction inhibition by demonstrating that the appearance of transposase protein structures and the end of active transposition are simultaneous, an effect with implications for genetic engineering and horizontal gene transfer. PMID:27899587

  16. Modeling transcriptional networks regulating secondary growth and wood formation in forest trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijun; Filkov, Vladimir; Groover, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    The complex interactions among the genes that underlie a biological process can be modeled and presented as a transcriptional network, in which genes (nodes) and their interactions (edges) are shown in a graphical form similar to a wiring diagram. A large number of genes have been identified that are expressed during the radial woody growth of tree stems (secondary growth), but a comprehensive understanding of how these genes interact to influence woody growth is currently lacking. Modeling transcriptional networks has recently been made tractable by next-generation sequencing-based technologies that can comprehensively catalog gene expression and transcription factor-binding genome-wide, but has not yet been extensively applied to undomesticated tree species or woody growth. Here we discuss basic features of transcriptional networks, approaches for modeling biological networks, and examples of biological network models developed for forest trees to date. We discuss how transcriptional network research is being developed in the model forest tree genus, Populus, and how this research area can be further developed and applied. Transcriptional network models for forest tree secondary growth and wood formation could ultimately provide new predictive models to accelerate hypothesis-driven research and develop new breeding applications.

  17. Blurring Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Nielsen, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    ; and 3) Services of general interest. In the Blurring Boundaries project, three aspects of the European Social Model have been particularly highlighted: the constitutionalisation of the European Social Model, its multi-level legal character, and the clash between market access justice at EU level...... of welfare functions into EU law both from an internal market law and a constitutional law perspective. The main problem areas covered by the Blurring Boundaries project were studied in sub-projects on: 1) Internal market law and welfare services; 2) Fundamental rights and non-discrimination law aspects...... and distributive justice at national level....

  18. PPARγ negatively regulates T cell activation to prevent follicular helper T cells and germinal center formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hong-Jai; Kim, Do-Hyun; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Won-Ju; Kim, Ji Yun; Senejani, Alireza G; Hwang, Soo Seok; Kim, Lark Kyun; Tobiasova, Zuzana; Lee, Gap Ryol; Craft, Joseph; Bothwell, Alfred L M; Choi, Je-Min

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a transcription factor that regulates lipid and glucose metabolism. Although studies of PPARγ ligands have demonstrated its regulatory functions in inflammation and adaptive immunity, its intrinsic role in T cells and autoimmunity has yet to be fully elucidated. Here we used CD4-PPARγKO mice to investigate PPARγ-deficient T cells, which were hyper-reactive to produce higher levels of cytokines and exhibited greater proliferation than wild type T cells with increased ERK and AKT phosphorylation. Diminished expression of IκBα, Sirt1, and Foxo1, which are inhibitors of NF-κB, was observed in PPARγ-deficient T cells that were prone to produce all the signature cytokines under Th1, Th2, Th17, and Th9 skewing condition. Interestingly, 1-year-old CD4-PPARγKO mice spontaneously developed moderate autoimmune phenotype by increased activated T cells, follicular helper T cells (TFH cells) and germinal center B cells with glomerular inflammation and enhanced autoantibody production. Sheep red blood cell immunization more induced TFH cells and germinal centers in CD4-PPARγKO mice and the T cells showed increased of Bcl-6 and IL-21 expression suggesting its regulatory role in germinal center reaction. Collectively, these results suggest that PPARγ has a regulatory role for TFH cells and germinal center reaction to prevent autoimmunity.

  19. Axonal transport and neurodegenerative disease: vesicle-motor complex formation and their regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson EN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Eric N Anderson,* Joseph A White II,* Shermali GunawardenaDepartment of Biological Sciences, The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The process of axonal transport serves to move components over very long distances on microtubule tracks in order to maintain neuronal viability. Molecular motors – kinesin and dynein – are essential for the movement of neuronal cargoes along these tracks; defects in this pathway have been implicated in the initiation or progression of some neurodegenerative diseases, suggesting that this process may be a key contributor in neuronal dysfunction. Recent work has led to the identification of some of the motor-cargo complexes, adaptor proteins, and their regulatory elements in the context of disease proteins. In this review, we focus on the assembly of the amyloid precursor protein, huntingtin, mitochondria, and the RNA-motor complexes and discuss how these may be regulated during long-distance transport in the context of neurodegenerative disease. As knowledge of these motor-cargo complexes and their involvement in axonal transport expands, insight into how defects in this pathway contribute to the development of neurodegenerative diseases becomes evident. Therefore, a better understanding of how this pathway normally functions has important implications for early diagnosis and treatment of diseases before the onset of disease pathology or behavior. Keywords: kinesin, dynein, amyloid precursor protein, huntingtin, microtubules

  20. CREB Regulates Experience-Dependent Spine Formation and Enlargement in Mouse Barrel Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabella Pignataro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experience modifies synaptic connectivity through processes that involve dendritic spine rearrangements in neuronal circuits. Although cAMP response element binding protein (CREB has a key function in spines changes, its role in activity-dependent rearrangements in brain regions of rodents interacting with the surrounding environment has received little attention so far. Here we studied the effects of vibrissae trimming, a widely used model of sensory deprivation-induced cortical plasticity, on processes associated with dendritic spine rearrangements in the barrel cortex of a transgenic mouse model of CREB downregulation (mCREB mice. We found that sensory deprivation through prolonged whisker trimming leads to an increased number of thin spines in the layer V of related barrel cortex (Contra in wild type but not mCREB mice. In the barrel field controlling spared whiskers (Ipsi, the same trimming protocol results in a CREB-dependent enlargement of dendritic spines. Last, we demonstrated that CREB regulates structural rearrangements of synapses that associate with dynamic changes of dendritic spines. Our findings suggest that CREB plays a key role in dendritic spine dynamics and synaptic circuits rearrangements that account for new brain connectivity in response to changes in the environment.

  1. Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles regulate translocation across pulmonary surfactant monolayer and formation of lipoprotein corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guoqing; Jiao, Bao; Shi, Xinghua; Valle, Russell P; Fan, Qihui; Zuo, Yi Y

    2013-12-23

    Interaction with the pulmonary surfactant film, being the first line of host defense, represents the initial bio-nano interaction in the lungs. Such interaction determines the fate of the inhaled nanoparticles and their potential therapeutic or toxicological effect. Despite considerable progress in optimizing physicochemical properties of nanoparticles for improved delivery and targeting, the mechanisms by which inhaled nanoparticles interact with the pulmonary surfactant film are still largely unknown. Here, using combined in vitro and in silico methods, we show how hydrophobicity and surface charge of nanoparticles differentially regulate the translocation and interaction with the pulmonary surfactant film. While hydrophilic nanoparticles generally translocate quickly across the pulmonary surfactant film, a significant portion of hydrophobic nanoparticles are trapped by the surfactant film and encapsulated in lipid protrusions upon film compression. Our results support a novel model of pulmonary surfactant lipoprotein corona associated with inhaled nanoparticles of different physicochemical properties. Our data suggest that the study of pulmonary nanotoxicology and nanoparticle-based pulmonary drug delivery should consider this lipoprotein corona.

  2. Ect2, an ortholog of Drosophila Pebble, regulates formation of growth cones in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takahiro; Higashida, Chiharu; Aoki, Yoshihiko; Islam, Mohammad Saharul; Dohmoto, Mitsuko; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2012-11-01

    In collaboration with Marshall Nirenberg, we performed in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) genome-wide screening in Drosophila embryos. Pebble has been shown to be involved in Drosophila neuronal development. We have also reported that depletion of Ect2, a mammalian ortholog of Pebble, induces differentiation in NG108-15 neuronal cells. However, the precise role of Ect2 in neuronal development has yet to be studied. Here, we confirmed in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells that inhibition of Ect2 expression by RNAi stimulated neurite outgrowth, and in the mouse embryonic cortex that Ect2 was accumulated throughout the ventricular and subventricular zones with neuronal progenitor cells. Next, the effects of Ect2 depletion were studied in primary cultures of mouse embryonic cortical neurons: Loss of Ect2 did not affect the differentiation stages of neuritogenesis, the number of neurites, or axon length, while the numbers of growth cones and growth cone-like structures were increased. Taken together, our results suggest that Ect2 contributes to neuronal morphological differentiation through regulation of growth cone dynamics.

  3. Evidence of stratabound liquefaction in the formation of fractured topographic margins, cone chains and pit catenas along the Martian Dichotomy Boundary and in Isidis Planitia, Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, C.; Balme, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    On the low-lying plains along much of the Martian Dichotomy Boundary (MDB) and in the Isidis impact basin, cones and curving chains of cones, referred to as thumbprint terrain (TPT), are common. In the same settings, pit chains (catenas) occur in orthogonal to curving and conchoidal fracture sets between mesa-like crustal blocks, generally at or near topographic margins. Many of the fractures consist of linked pits rather than simple propagated cracks. These assemblages are often associated with the more disaggregated populations of blocks comprising chaos terrain. We show that the local planimetric arrangement of the cone chains, fractures and pit catenas is strikingly similar in both shape and scale, including lateral separation, length, longitudinal slope and radius of curvature. The summits of cones tend to be closely accordant along individual cone chains. Neighbouring cone chains tend to be mutually accordant on low gradient basin surfaces but generally stepped en echelon closer to the fractured basin margins. Similarly, the crustal blocks (including very isolated block sets) are often mutually stepped, and fractures between these en echelon blocks tend to be very close to horizontal. Hence, many cone chains, fractures and pit catenas in fractures share the property of being arranged along strike. They diverge morphologically by the cone chains being positive forms separated by narrow gulfs but the pit catenas being negative forms separated by planar blocks. All of these characteristics point to the possibility that the arcuate cone chains and the arcuate pit catenas have a common origin. In particular, we hypothesise that the cone chains characteristic of TPT along the MDB and in Isidis are filled, indurated and then exhumed pit catenas revealed by the stripping-away of intervening blocks [cf. 1]. Many other surfaces on Mars are pervaded by pits and pit catenas, with evidence of former water flow through the catenas suggesting that ground-ice thaw played a

  4. Increased abscess formation and defective chemokine regulation in CREB transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Y Wen

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP-response element-binding protein (CREB is a transcription factor implicated in growth factor-dependent cell proliferation and survival, glucose homeostasis, spermatogenesis, circadian rhythms, and synaptic plasticity associated with memory. To study the phenotype of CREB overexpression in vivo, we generated CREB transgenic (TG mice in which a myeloid specific hMRP8 promoter drives CREB expression. CREB TG mice developed spontaneous skin abscesses more frequently than wild type (WT mice. To understand the role of CREB in myeloid function and innate immunity, chemokine expression in bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs from CREB TG mice were compared with BMDMs from WT mice. Our results demonstrated decreased Keratinocyte-derived cytokine (KC in CREB TG BMDMs but not TNFα protein production in response to lipid A (LPA. In addition, mRNA expression of KC and IL-1β (Interleukin-1β was decreased in CREB TG BMDMs; however, there was no difference in the mRNA expression of TNFα, MCP-1, IL-6 and IL-12p40. The mRNA expression of IL-1RA and IL-10 was decreased in response to LPA. Nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB expression and a subset of its target genes were upregulated in CREB TG mouse BMDMs. Although neutrophil migration was the same in both CREB TG and WT mice, Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase activity was significantly increased in neutrophils from CREB TG mice. Taken together, CREB overexpression in myeloid cells results in increased abscess formation in vivo and aberrant cytokine and chemokine response, and neutrophil function in vitro.

  5. Regulation of biofilm formation and cellular buoyancy through modulating intracellular cyclic di-GMP levels in engineered cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostoni, Marco; Waters, Christopher M; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2016-02-01

    The second messenger cyclic dimeric (3'→5') GMP (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in the transition between motile and sessile lifestyles in bacteria. In this study, we demonstrate that biofilm formation, cellular aggregation or flocculation, and cellular buoyancy are under the control of c-di-GMP in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Synechocystis) and Fremyella diplosiphon. Synechocystis is a unicellular cyanobacterium and displays lower levels of c-di-GMP; F. diplosiphon is filamentous and displays higher intracellular c-di-GMP levels. We transformed Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon with a plasmid for constitutive expression of genes encoding diguanylate cylase (DGC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) proteins from Vibrio cholerae or Escherichia coli, respectively. These engineered strains allowed us to modulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels. Biofilm formation and cellular deposition were induced in the DGC-expressing Synechocystis strain which exhibited high intracellular levels of c-di-GMP; whereas strains expressing PDE in Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon to drive low intracellular levels of c-di-GMP exhibited enhanced cellular buoyancy. In addition, the PDE-expressing F. diplosiphon strain showed elevated chlorophyll levels. These results imply roles for coordinating c-di-GMP homeostasis in regulating native cyanobacterial phenotypes. Engineering exogenous DGC or PDE proteins to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels represents an effective tool for uncovering cryptic phenotypes or modulating phenotypes in cyanobacteria for practical applications in biotechnology applicable in photobioreactors and in green biotechnologies, such as energy-efficient harvesting of cellular biomass or the treatment of metal-containing wastewaters.

  6. Blurring Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Nielsen, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    This article builds on the results obtained in the so-called Blurring Boundaries project which was undertaken at the Law Department, Copenhagen Business School, in the period from 2007 to 2009. It looks at the sustainability of the Danish welfare state in an EU law context and on the integration ...

  7. Negotiating boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Ballegaard, Stinne Aaløkke

    2010-01-01

    To move treatment successfully from the hospital to that of technology assisted self-care at home, it is vital in the design of such technologies to understand the setting in which the health IT should be used. Based on qualitative studies we find that people engage in elaborate boundary work to ...

  8. The effects of formative assessment on student self-regulation, motivational beliefs, and achievement in elementary science

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Melissa Digennaro

    Goals 2000 set forth a bold vision for U.S. students: they would be "first in the world in science and mathematics" by the year 2000. Performance indicators such as the TIMSS-R (1999) and NAEP (2000) reports suggest that U.S. students have not yet reached that goal. This study intended to learn how specific assessment strategies might contribute to improved student performance in science. This quasi-experimental study investigated the effects of formative assessment with reflection on students' motivational beliefs, self-regulatory skills, and achievement in elementary science. The study aimed to find out whether and how classroom applications of formative assessment during science instruction might influence fifth-grade students' attitudes and self-perceptions about science learning, self-regulatory learning behaviors, and achievement. To explore the effects of the assessment intervention, the study utilized a mixed methods approach involving quantitative and qualitative investigations of treatment and control groups during a four-week intervention period. Quantitative measures included student self-report surveys administered pre- and post-treatment and an end-of-unit science test. Qualitative measures included classroom observations, student interviews (post-treatment), and a teacher interview (post-treatment). Findings indicated that the fifth-grade students in this study had positive attitudes toward science and high levels of self-efficacy for science. Results suggested that these elementary students employed a wide variety of cognitive and metacognitive strategies to support science learning. Findings revealed that these fifth graders believed formative assessment with reflection was beneficial for science learning outcomes. Research results did not show that the formative assessment intervention contributed to significant differences between treatment and control groups. However, the data revealed different levels of academic achievement and self-regulation

  9. FAM83H and casein kinase I regulate the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton and formation of desmosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuga, Takahisa; Sasaki, Mitsuho; Mikami, Toshinari; Miake, Yasuo; Adachi, Jun; Shimizu, Maiko; Saito, Youhei; Koura, Minako; Takeda, Yasunori; Matsuda, Junichiro; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Nakayama, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    FAM83H is essential for the formation of dental enamel because a mutation in the FAM83H gene causes amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). We previously reported that the overexpression of FAM83H often occurs and disorganizes the keratin cytoskeleton in colorectal cancer cells. We herein show that FAM83H regulates the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton and maintains the formation of desmosomes in ameloblastoma cells. FAM83H is expressed and localized on keratin filaments in human ameloblastoma cell lines and in mouse ameloblasts and epidermal germinative cells in vivo. FAM83H shows preferential localization to keratin filaments around the nucleus that often extend to cell-cell junctions. Alterations in the function of FAM83H by its overexpression, knockdown, or an AI-causing truncated mutant prevent the proper organization of the keratin cytoskeleton in ameloblastoma cells. Furthermore, the AI-causing mutant prevents desmosomal proteins from being localized to cell-cell junctions. The effects of the AI-causing mutant depend on its binding to and possible inhibition of casein kinase I (CK-1). The suppression of CK-1 by its inhibitor, D4476, disorganizes the keratin cytoskeleton. Our results suggest that AI caused by the FAM83H mutation is mediated by the disorganization of the keratin cytoskeleton and subsequent disruption of desmosomes in ameloblasts. PMID:27222304

  10. Vertical Equilibrium, Energetics, and Star Formation Rates in Magnetized Galactic Disks Regulated by Momentum Feedback from Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chang-Goo

    2015-01-01

    Recent hydrodynamic (HD) simulations have shown that galactic disks evolve to reach well-defined statistical equilibrium states. The star formation rate (SFR) self-regulates until energy injection by star formation feedback balances dissipation and cooling in the interstellar medium (ISM), and provides vertical pressure support to balance gravity. In this paper, we extend our previous models to allow for a range of initial magnetic field strengths and configurations, utilizing three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. We show that a quasi-steady equilibrium state is established as rapidly for MHD as for HD models unless the initial magnetic field is very strong or very weak, which requires more time to reach saturation. Remarkably, models with initial magnetic energy varying by two orders of magnitude approach the same asymptotic state. In the fully saturated state of the fiducial model, the integrated energy proportions E_kin:E_th:E_mag,t:E_mag,o are 0.35:0.39:0.15:0.11, while the proportions...

  11. SEUSS Integrates Gibberellin Signaling with Transcriptional Inputs from the SHR-SCR-SCL3 Module to Regulate Middle Cortex Formation in the Arabidopsis Root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xue; Flores-Vergara, Miguel A; Hong, Jing Han; Chu, Huangwei; Lim, Jun; Franks, Robert G; Liu, Zhongchi; Xu, Jian

    2016-03-01

    A decade of studies on middle cortex (MC) formation in the root endodermis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have revealed a complex regulatory network that is orchestrated by several GRAS family transcription factors, including SHORT-ROOT (SHR), SCARECROW (SCR), and SCARECROW-LIKE3 (SCL3). However, how their functions are regulated remains obscure. Here we show that mutations in the SEUSS (SEU) gene led to a higher frequency of MC formation. seu mutants had strongly reduced expression of SHR, SCR, and SCL3, suggesting that SEU positively regulates these genes. Our results further indicate that SEU physically associates with upstream regulatory sequences of SHR, SCR, and SCL3; and that SEU has distinct genetic interactions with these genes in the control of MC formation, with SCL3 being epistatic to SEU. Similar to SCL3, SEU was repressed by the phytohormone GA and induced by the GA biosynthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol, suggesting that SEU acts downstream of GA signaling to regulate MC formation. Consistently, we found that SEU mediates the regulation of SCL3 by GA signaling. Together, our study identifies SEU as a new critical player that integrates GA signaling with transcriptional inputs from the SHR-SCR-SCL3 module to regulate MC formation in the Arabidopsis root.

  12. Effect of growth regulator Kelpak SL on the formation of aboveground biomass of Festulolium braunii (K. Richt. A. Camus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Sosnowski

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A study on the cultivation of Festulolium braunii cv. 'Felopa' was carried out using polyurethane rings with a diameter of 36 cm and a height of 40 cm, which were sunk into the ground to a depth of 30 cm and filled with soil material. In this experiment, Kelpak SL was used as a bioregulator. It consists of natural plant hormones such as auxins (11 mg in dm3 and cytokinins (0.03 mg in dm3. The experimental factors were as follows: A1-control; A2 – 20% solution of the growth regulator; A3 – 40% solution; and A4 – 60% solution. The preparation was applied to all three regrowths in the form of spray, at a rate of 3 cm3 ring-1, at the stem elongation stage. The full period of this experiment was in the years 2010–2011. During this time, detailed investigations were carried out on aboveground biomass yield (g DM ring-1, number of shoots (pcs ring-1, leaf blade length (cm, width of the leaf blade base (mm, leaf greenness index (SPAD. The study showed a significant effect of the growth regulator on the formation of Festulolium braunii biomass. However, its highest effectiveness was observed when the 60% solution was applied.

  13. S1P-Yap1 signaling regulates endoderm formation required for cardiac precursor cell migration in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Hajime; Terai, Kenta; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Ayano; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2014-10-13

    To form the primary heart tube in zebrafish, bilateral cardiac precursor cells (CPCs) migrate toward the midline beneath the endoderm. Mutants lacking endoderm and fish with defective sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling exhibit cardia bifida. Endoderm defects lead to the lack of foothold for the CPCs, whereas the cause of cardia bifida in S1P signaling mutants remains unclear. Here we show that S1P signaling regulates CPC migration through Yes-associated protein 1 (Yap1)-dependent endoderm survival. Cardia bifida seen in spns2 (S1P transporter) morphants and s1pr2 (S1P receptor-2) morphants could be rescued by endodermal expression of nuclear localized form of yap1. yap1 morphants had decreased expression of the Yap1/Tead target connective tissue growth factor a (Ctgfa) and consequently increased endodermal cell apoptosis. Consistently, ctgfa morphants showed defects of the endodermal sheet and cardia bifida. Collectively, we show that S1pr2/Yap1-regulated ctgfa expression is essential for the proper endoderm formation required for CPC migration.

  14. The bifunctional abiotic stress signalling regulator and endogenous RNA silencing suppressor FIERY1 is required for lateral root formation

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hao

    2010-09-28

    The Arabidopsis FIERY1 (FRY1) locus was originally identified as a negative regulator of stress-responsive gene expression and later shown to be required for suppression of RNA silencing. In this study we discovered that the FRY1 locus also regulates lateral root formation. Compared with the wild type, fry1 mutant seedlings generated significantly fewer lateral roots under normal growth conditions and also exhibited a dramatically reduced sensitivity to auxin in inducing lateral root initiation. Using transgenic plants that overexpress a yeast homolog of FRY1 that possesses only the 3\\', 5\\'-bisphosphate nucleotidase activity but not the inositol 1-phosphatase activity, we demonstrated that the lateral root phenotypes in fry1 result from loss of the nucleotidase activity. Furthermore, a T-DNA insertion mutant of another RNA silencing suppressor, XRN4 (but not XRN2 or XRN3), which is an exoribonuclease that is inhibited by the substrate of the FRY1 3\\', 5\\'-bisphosphate nucleotidase, exhibits similar lateral root defects. Although fry1 and xrn4 exhibited reduced sensitivity to ethylene, our experiments demonstrated that restoration of ethylene sensitivity in the fry1 mutant is not sufficient to rescue the lateral root phenotypes of fry1. Our results indicate that RNA silencing modulated by FRY1 and XRN4 plays an important role in shaping root architecture. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. The Self-Made Puzzle: Integrating Self-Assembly and Pattern Formation Under Non-Random Genetic Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doursat, René

    On the one hand, research in self-assembling systems, whether natural or artificial, has traditionally focused on pre-existing components endowed with fixed shapes. Biological development, by contrast, dynamically creates new cells that acquire selective adhesion properties through differentiation induced by their neighborhood. On the other hand, pattern formation phenomena are generally construed as orderly states of activity on top of a continuous 2-D or 3-D substrate. Yet, again, the spontaneous patterning of an organism into domains of gene expression arises within a multicellular medium in perpetual expansion and reshaping. Finally, both phenomena are often thought in terms of stochastic events, whether mixed components that randomly collide in self-assembly, or spots and stripes that occur unpredictably from instabilities in pattern formation. Here too, these notions need significant revision if they are to be extended and applied to embryogenesis. Cells are not randomly mixed but pre-positioned where cell division occurs. Genetic identity domains are not randomly distributed but highly regulated in number and position. In this work, I present a computational model of program-mable and reproducible artificial morphogenesis that integrates self-assembly and pattern formation under the control of a nonrandom gene regulatory network. The specialized properties of cells (division, adhesion, migration) are determined by the gene expression domains to which they belong, while at the same time these domains further expand and segment into subdomains due to the self-assembly of specialized cells. Through this model, I also promote a new discipline, embryomorphic engineering to solve the paradox of "meta-designing" decentralized, autonomous systems.

  16. Transcription Factors Efg1 and Bcr1 Regulate Biofilm Formation and Virulence during Candida albicans-Associated Denture Stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Junko; Yu, Alika; Fidel, Paul L; Noverr, Mairi C

    2016-01-01

    Denture stomatitis (DS) is characterized by inflammation of the oral mucosa in direct contact with dentures and affects a significant number of otherwise healthy denture wearers. The disease is caused by Candida albicans, which readily colonizes and form biofilms on denture materials. While evidence for biofilms on abiotic and biotic surfaces initiating Candida infections is accumulating, a role for biofilms in DS remains unclear. Using an established model of DS in immunocompetent animals, the purpose of this study was to determine the role of biofilm formation in mucosal damage during pathogenesis using C. albicans or mutants defective in morphogenesis (efg1-/-) or biofilm formation (bcr1-/-). For in vivo analyses, rats fitted with custom dentures, consisting of fixed and removable parts, were inoculated with wild-type C. albicans, mutants or reconstituted strains and monitored weekly for fungal burden (denture and palate), body weight and tissue damage (LDH) for up to 8 weeks. C. albicans wild-type and reconstituted mutants formed biofilms on dentures and palatal tissues under in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo conditions as indicated by microscopy demonstrating robust biofilm architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM). In contrast, both efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants exhibited poor biofilm growth with little to no ECM. In addition, quantification of fungal burden showed reduced colonization throughout the infection period on dentures and palates of rats inoculated with efg1-/-, but not bcr1-/-, compared to controls. Finally, rats inoculated with efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants had minimal palatal tissue damage/weight loss while those inoculated with wild-type or reconstituted mutants showed evidence of tissue damage and exhibited stunted weight gain. These data suggest that biofilm formation is associated with tissue damage during DS and that Efg1 and Bcr1, both central regulators of virulence in C. albicans, have pivotal roles in pathogenesis of DS.

  17. Transcription Factors Efg1 and Bcr1 Regulate Biofilm Formation and Virulence during Candida albicans-Associated Denture Stomatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Yano

    Full Text Available Denture stomatitis (DS is characterized by inflammation of the oral mucosa in direct contact with dentures and affects a significant number of otherwise healthy denture wearers. The disease is caused by Candida albicans, which readily colonizes and form biofilms on denture materials. While evidence for biofilms on abiotic and biotic surfaces initiating Candida infections is accumulating, a role for biofilms in DS remains unclear. Using an established model of DS in immunocompetent animals, the purpose of this study was to determine the role of biofilm formation in mucosal damage during pathogenesis using C. albicans or mutants defective in morphogenesis (efg1-/- or biofilm formation (bcr1-/-. For in vivo analyses, rats fitted with custom dentures, consisting of fixed and removable parts, were inoculated with wild-type C. albicans, mutants or reconstituted strains and monitored weekly for fungal burden (denture and palate, body weight and tissue damage (LDH for up to 8 weeks. C. albicans wild-type and reconstituted mutants formed biofilms on dentures and palatal tissues under in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo conditions as indicated by microscopy demonstrating robust biofilm architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM. In contrast, both efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants exhibited poor biofilm growth with little to no ECM. In addition, quantification of fungal burden showed reduced colonization throughout the infection period on dentures and palates of rats inoculated with efg1-/-, but not bcr1-/-, compared to controls. Finally, rats inoculated with efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants had minimal palatal tissue damage/weight loss while those inoculated with wild-type or reconstituted mutants showed evidence of tissue damage and exhibited stunted weight gain. These data suggest that biofilm formation is associated with tissue damage during DS and that Efg1 and Bcr1, both central regulators of virulence in C. albicans, have pivotal roles in pathogenesis of DS.

  18. The Hamilton-Jacobi theory for solving two-point boundary value problems: Theory and numerics with application to spacecraft formation flight, optimal control and the study of phase space structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibout, Vincent M.

    This dissertation has been motivated by the need for new methods to address complex problems that arise in spacecraft formation design. As a direct result of this motivation, a general methodology for solving two-point boundary value problems for Hamiltonian systems has been found. Using the Hamilton-Jacobi theory in conjunction with the canonical transformation induced by the phase flow, it is shown that generating functions solve two-point boundary value problems. Traditional techniques for addressing these problems are iterative and require an initial guess. The method presented in this dissertation solves boundary value problems at the cost of a single function evaluation, although it requires knowledge of at least one generating function. Properties of this method are presented. Specifically, we show that it includes perturbation theory and generalizes it to nonlinear systems. Most importantly, it predicts the existence of multiple solutions and allows one to recover all of these solutions. To demonstrate the efficiency of this approach, an algorithm for computing the generating functions is proposed and its convergence properties are studied. As the method developed in this work is based on the Hamiltonian structure of the problem, particular attention must be paid to the numerics of the algorithm. To address this, a general framework for studying the discretization of certain dynamical systems is developed. This framework generalizes earlier work on discretization of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems on tangent and cotangent bundles respectively. In addition, it provides new insights into some symplectic integrators and leads to a new discrete Hamilton-Jacobi theory. Most importantly, it allows one to discretize optimal control problems. In particular, a discrete maximum principle is presented. This dissertation also investigates applications of the proposed method to solve two-point boundary value problems. In particular, new techniques for designing

  19. Endogenous expression of interleukin-4 regulates macrophage activation and confines cavity formation after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Ihm; Jeong, Soo Ryeong; Kang, Young Mi; Han, Dae Hee; Jin, Byung Kwan; Namgung, Uk; Kim, Byung G

    2010-08-15

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) triggers inflammatory reactions in which various types of cells and cytokines are involved. Several proinflammatory cytokines are up-regulated after SCI and play crucial roles in determining the extent of secondary tissue damage. However, relatively little is known about antiinflammatory cytokines and their roles in spinal cord trauma. Recent studies have shown that an antiinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-4 (IL-4), is expressed and exerts various modulatory effects in CNS inflammation. We found in the present study that IL-4 was highly expressed at 24 hr after contusive SCI in rats and declined thereafter, with concurrent up-regulation of IL-4 receptor subunit IL-4alpha. The majority of IL-4-producing cells were myeloperoxidase-positive neutrophils. Injection of neutralizing antibody against IL-4 into the contused spinal cord did not significantly affect the expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha or other antiinflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta. Instead, attenuation of IL-4 activity led to a marked increase in the extent of ED1-positive macrophage activation along the rostrocaudal extent at 7 days after injury. The enhanced macrophage activation was preceded by an increase in the level of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2). Finally, IL-4 neutralization resulted in more extensive cavitation at 4 weeks after injury. These results suggest that endogenous expression of antiinflammatory cytokine IL-4 regulates the extent of acute macrophage activation and confines the ensuing secondary cavity formation after spinal cord trauma.

  20. Beta- lactam antibiotics stimulate biofilm formation in non-typeable haemophilus influenzae by up-regulating carbohydrate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Siva; Li, Xiaojin; Gunawardana, Manjula; Maguire, Kathleen; Guerrero-Given, Debbie; Schaudinn, Christoph; Wang, Charles; Baum, Marc M; Webster, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common acute otitis media pathogen, with an incidence that is increased by previous antibiotic treatment. NTHi is also an emerging causative agent of other chronic infections in humans, some linked to morbidity, and all of which impose substantial treatment costs. In this study we explore the possibility that antibiotic exposure may stimulate biofilm formation by NTHi bacteria. We discovered that sub-inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotic (i.e., amounts that partially inhibit bacterial growth) stimulated the biofilm-forming ability of NTHi strains, an effect that was strain and antibiotic dependent. When exposed to sub-inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics NTHi strains produced tightly packed biofilms with decreased numbers of culturable bacteria but increased biomass. The ratio of protein per unit weight of biofilm decreased as a result of antibiotic exposure. Antibiotic-stimulated biofilms had altered ultrastructure, and genes involved in glycogen production and transporter function were up regulated in response to antibiotic exposure. Down-regulated genes were linked to multiple metabolic processes but not those involved in stress response. Antibiotic-stimulated biofilm bacteria were more resistant to a lethal dose (10 µg/mL) of cefuroxime. Our results suggest that beta-lactam antibiotic exposure may act as a signaling molecule that promotes transformation into the biofilm phenotype. Loss of viable bacteria, increase in biofilm biomass and decreased protein production coupled with a concomitant up-regulation of genes involved with glycogen production might result in a biofilm of sessile, metabolically inactive bacteria sustained by stored glycogen. These biofilms may protect surviving bacteria from subsequent antibiotic challenges, and act as a reservoir of viable bacteria once antibiotic exposure has ended.

  1. Beta- lactam antibiotics stimulate biofilm formation in non-typeable haemophilus influenzae by up-regulating carbohydrate metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Wu

    Full Text Available Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi is a common acute otitis media pathogen, with an incidence that is increased by previous antibiotic treatment. NTHi is also an emerging causative agent of other chronic infections in humans, some linked to morbidity, and all of which impose substantial treatment costs. In this study we explore the possibility that antibiotic exposure may stimulate biofilm formation by NTHi bacteria. We discovered that sub-inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotic (i.e., amounts that partially inhibit bacterial growth stimulated the biofilm-forming ability of NTHi strains, an effect that was strain and antibiotic dependent. When exposed to sub-inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics NTHi strains produced tightly packed biofilms with decreased numbers of culturable bacteria but increased biomass. The ratio of protein per unit weight of biofilm decreased as a result of antibiotic exposure. Antibiotic-stimulated biofilms had altered ultrastructure, and genes involved in glycogen production and transporter function were up regulated in response to antibiotic exposure. Down-regulated genes were linked to multiple metabolic processes but not those involved in stress response. Antibiotic-stimulated biofilm bacteria were more resistant to a lethal dose (10 µg/mL of cefuroxime. Our results suggest that beta-lactam antibiotic exposure may act as a signaling molecule that promotes transformation into the biofilm phenotype. Loss of viable bacteria, increase in biofilm biomass and decreased protein production coupled with a concomitant up-regulation of genes involved with glycogen production might result in a biofilm of sessile, metabolically inactive bacteria sustained by stored glycogen. These biofilms may protect surviving bacteria from subsequent antibiotic challenges, and act as a reservoir of viable bacteria once antibiotic exposure has ended.

  2. Deposition and alteration of carbonaceous series within a Neotethyan rift at the western boundary of the Arabian plate: The late Permian Um Irna Formation, NW Jordan, a petroleum system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dill, H.G.; Kus, J. [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, P.O. Box 51 01 53 D-30631 Hannover (Germany); Bechtel, A.; Gratzer, R. [Department of Applied Geosciences and Geophysics, University of Leoben, Peter Tunner Strasse 5, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Abu Hamad, A.M.B. [Geology Department, University of Jordan, Amman 11942 (Jordan)

    2010-01-07

    During the late Permian (Kungurian to Kazanian) a Neotethyan rift basin evolved at the western boundary of the Arabian Plate, in what is called today the Dead Sea Valley of western Jordan. The break-up of Pangaea was accompanied by low-sinuosity sandy braided- to meandering-fluvial drainage systems which were fed by the uplift of the Arabian Shield and by poorly aerated swamps and ponds that concentrated plant debris of the Cathaysian floral province in the Um Irna Formation. These proximal wet fan sediments are overlain by a dry fan characterized by extensive reddish floodplain deposits, anastomosing channel systems and paleosols. The wet fan is underlain by Cambrian sandstones. These units serve as the top and bottom seals of the OM-bearing system of the Um Irna Formation. The sedimentary rocks of the OM-bearing Um Irna Formation underwent supergene, diagenetic and epigenetic hydrothermal alteration under an elevated geothermal gradient. The temperature increased from the time of deposition of the wet to the time of deposition of the dry fan and caused remobilization of manganese already pre-concentrated in the Cambrian footwall rocks of the rift basin. The anomalous heat regime may be accounted for as a predecessor stage of the Dead Sea Rift which is still active today. Oil seeps are found along faults and fractures near this deep-seated lineamentary fault zone. The deposition and alteration of the organic matter in this late Permian rift are of great consequence for oil generation in the region. Organic petrographic investigations revealed that organic-rich terrestrial carbonaceous and coal rich sediments of mainly of type III kerogen are dominant in the Um Irna Formation. In addition, aquatic liptinite rich sedimentary input (fresh water lake and/or lacustrine swamp) of type I kerogen is also noted. Coal derived organic matter occurs in the form of coaly particles with ranks from subbituminous A to high volatile bituminous C. Higher plant-derived macerals as

  3. Changing Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodkin, Evelyn; Larsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, workfare-style policies have become part of the institutional architecture of welfare and labor market arrangements around the world. In this article, we offer a comparative, historical view of workfare´s advance. Our analysis recognizes the complexity and diversity of what we...... call the “policies of workfare” and highlights the different paths through which these policies have developed in the U.S. and parts of Europe. We argue that it is necessary to look beyond familiar policy labels and language in order to consider workfare-style policies as part of a broader political...... project that is altering the boundary between the democratic welfare state and the market economy. We see workfare policies as boundary-changing with potentially profound implications both for individuals disadvantaged by market arrangements and for societies seeking to grapple with the increasing...

  4. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase VdPbs2 of Verticillium dahliae Regulates Microsclerotia Formation, Stress Response, and Plant Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Longyan; Wang, Yonglin; Yu, Jun; Xiong, Dianguang; Zhao, Hengjun; Tian, Chengming

    2016-01-01

    Verticillium dahliae, a ubiquitous phytopathogenic fungus, forms resting structures, known as microsclerotia that play crucial roles in Verticillium wilt diseases. VdHog1, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), controls microsclerotia formation, virulence, and stress response in V. dahliae. In this study, we present detailed evidence that the conserved upstream component of VdHog1, VdPbs2, is a key regulator of microsclerotia formation, oxidative stress and fungicide response and plant virulence in V. dahliae. We identified VdPbs2, homologous to the yeast MAPK kinase Pbs2. Similar to the VdHog1 deletion mutant, VdPbs2 deletion strains exhibited delayed melanin synthesis and reduced formation of microsclerotia. When exposed to stresses, VdPbs2 mutants were more sensitive than the wild type to osmotic agents and peroxide, but more resistant to inhibitors of cell wall synthesis and some fungicides. Finally, VdPbs2 deletion mutants exhibited reduced virulence on smoke tree and tobacco seedlings. When taken together, we implicate that VdPbs2 and VdHog1 function in a cascade that regulates microsclerotia formation and virulence, but not all VdHog1 dependent functions are VdPbs2 regulated. This study thus provides novel insights into the signal transduction mechanisms that regulate microsclerotia formation and pathogenesis in this fungus. PMID:27729908

  5. 川东北三叠系雷口坡组与须家河组界线微球粒的发现%The discovery of the micropellets from the Triassic Leikoupo Formation-Xujiahe Formation boundary in northeastern Sichuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雁婷; 傅恒; 陈骥; 孙先长; 达丽亚; 刘欣; 孙利川; 岳文成

    2012-01-01

    The micropellets are recognized for the first time from the Triassic Leikoupo Formation-Xujiahe Formation boundary in northeastern Sichuan. These micropellets occur as single solid rounded pellets with the diameters from 3 to 4 μm, and compositionally they display the siliceous pellets in which the corrosion structures and textures are visible. It is probable that the meteorite-impact events once took place around the Triassic Leikoupo Formation-Xujiahe Formation boundary in northeastern Sichuan. The discovery of the micropellets in the study area may inspire some new approaches to fathom the terrestrial-marine transition and biotic succession during the Triassic in the Sichuan Basin.%在川东北地区三叠系雷口坡组与须家河组地层界线处首次发现微球粒.这些微球粒呈单球体,形状为实心圆球状,直径3~4μm.微球粒成分为硅质球,可见溶蚀结构,推测研究区在中、晚三叠世之交可能发生过陨击事件,为研究四川盆地三叠纪海陆演变、生物更替提供了一种新的研究思路.

  6. Small-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium type 2 channels regulate the formation of contextual fear memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana R K Murthy

    Full Text Available Small-conductance, Ca2+ activated K+ channels (SK channels are expressed at high levels in brain regions responsible for learning and memory. In the current study we characterized the contribution of SK2 channels to synaptic plasticity and to different phases of hippocampal memory formation. Selective SK2 antisense-treatment facilitated basal synaptic transmission and theta-burst induced LTP in hippocampal brain slices. Using the selective SK2 antagonist Lei-Dab7 or SK2 antisense probes, we found that hippocampal SK2 channels are critical during two different time windows: 1 blockade of SK2 channels before the training impaired fear memory, whereas, 2 blockade of SK2 channels immediately after the training enhanced contextual fear memory. We provided the evidence that the post-training cleavage of the SK2 channels was responsible for the observed bidirectional effect of SK2 channel blockade on memory consolidation. Thus, Lei-Dab7-injection before training impaired the C-terminal cleavage of SK2 channels, while Lei-Dab7 given immediately after training facilitated the C-terminal cleavage. Application of the synthetic peptide comprising a leucine-zipper domain of the C-terminal fragment to Jurkat cells impaired SK2 channel-mediated currents, indicating that the endogenously cleaved fragment might exert its effects on memory formation by blocking SK2 channel-mediated currents. Our present findings suggest that SK2 channel proteins contribute to synaptic plasticity and memory not only as ion channels but also by additionally generating a SK2 C-terminal fragment, involved in both processes. The modulation of fear memory by down-regulating SK2 C-terminal cleavage might have applicability in the treatment of anxiety disorders in which fear conditioning is enhanced.

  7. Phosphatidylcholine formation by LPCAT1 is regulated by Ca2+ and the redox status of the cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soupene Eric

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unsaturated fatty acids are susceptible to oxidation and damaged chains are removed from glycerophospholipids by phospholipase A2. De-acylated lipids are then re-acylated by lysophospholipid acyltransferase enzymes such as LPCAT1 which catalyses the formation of phosphatidylcholine (PC from lysoPC and long-chain acyl-CoA. Results Activity of LPCAT1 is inhibited by Ca2+, and a Ca2+-binding motif of the EF-hand type, EFh-1, was identified in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the protein. The residues Asp-392 and Glu-403 define the loop of the hairpin structure formed by EFh-1. Substitution of D392 and E403 to alanine rendered an enzyme insensitive to Ca2+, which established that Ca2+ binding to that region negatively regulates the activity of the acyltransferase amino-terminal domain. Residue Cys-211 of the conserved motif III is not essential for catalysis and not sufficient for sensitivity to treatment by sulfhydryl-modifier agents. Among the several active cysteine-substitution mutants of LPCAT1 generated, we identified one to be resistant to treatment by sulfhydryl-alkylating and sulfhydryl-oxidizer agents. Conclusion Mutant forms of LPCAT1 that are not inhibited by Ca2+ and sulfhydryl-alkylating and –oxidizing agents will provide a better understanding of the physiological function of a mechanism that places the formation of PC, and the disposal of the bioactive species lysoPC, under the control of the redox status and Ca2+ concentration of the cell.

  8. Dihydroaustrasulfone Alcohol (WA-25 Impedes Macrophage Foam Cell Formation by Regulating the Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chen Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is considered an inflammatory disease. However, clinically used anti-atherosclerotic drugs, such as simvastatin, have many side effects. Recently, several unique marine compounds have been isolated that possess a variety of bioactivities. In a previous study, we found a synthetic precursor of the marine compound (austrasulfone, which is dihydroaustrasulfone alcohol (WA-25, has anti-atherosclerotic effects in vivo. However, the detailed mechanisms remain unclear. Therefore, to clarify the mechanisms through which WA-25 exerts anti-atherosclerotic activity, we used RAW 264.7 macrophages as an in vitro model to evaluate the effects of WA-25. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, WA-25 significantly inhibited expression of the pro-inflammatory proteins, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2. In contrast, simvastatin increased the COX-2 expression compared to WA-25. In addition, WA-25 impedes foam cell formation and up-regulated the lysosomal and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP signaling pathway. We also observed that transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1 was up-regulated by WA-25 and simvastatin in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells, and the promising anti-atherosclerosis effects of WA-25 were disrupted by blockade of TGF-β1 signaling. Besides, WA-25 might act through increasing lipolysis than through alteration of lipid export. Taken together, these data demonstrate that WA-25 may have potential as an anti-atherosclerotic drug with anti-inflammatory effects.

  9. GABAergic transmission in rat pontine reticular formation regulates the induction phase of anesthesia and modulates hyperalgesia caused by sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanini, Giancarlo; Nemanis, Kriste; Baghdoyan, Helen A; Lydic, Ralph

    2014-07-01

    The oral part of the pontine reticular formation (PnO) contributes to the regulation of sleep, anesthesia and pain. The role of PnO γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in modulating these states remains incompletely understood. The present study used time to loss and time to resumption of righting response (LoRR and RoRR) as surrogate measures of loss and resumption of consciousness. This study tested three hypotheses: (i) pharmacologically manipulating GABA levels in rat PnO alters LoRR, RoRR and nociception; (ii) propofol decreases GABA levels in the PnO; and (iii) inhibiting GABA synthesis in the PnO blocks hyperalgesia caused by sleep deprivation. Administering a GABA synthesis inhibitor [3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA)] or a GABA uptake inhibitor [nipecotic acid (NPA)] into rat PnO significantly altered LoRR caused by propofol. 3-MPA significantly decreased LoRR for propofol (-18%). NPA significantly increased LoRR during administration of propofol (36%). Neither 3-MPA nor NPA altered RoRR following cessation of propofol or isoflurane delivery. The finding that LoRR was decreased by 3-MPA and increased by NPA is consistent with measures showing that extracellular GABA levels in the PnO were decreased (41%) by propofol. Thermal nociception was significantly decreased by 3-MPA and increased by NPA, and 3-MPA blocked the hyperalgesia caused by sleep deprivation. The results demonstrate that GABA levels in the PnO regulate the time for loss of consciousness caused by propofol, extend the concept that anesthetic induction and emergence are not inverse processes, and suggest that GABAergic transmission in the PnO mediates hyperalgesia caused by sleep loss.

  10. Late activation of the 9-oxylipin pathway during arbuscular mycorrhiza formation in tomato and its regulation by jasmonate signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Morcillo, Rafael Jorge; Ángel, José; Martín-Rodríguez; Vierheilig, Horst; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; García-Garrido, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The establishment of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiotic interaction is a successful strategy for the promotion of substantial plant growth, development, and fitness. Numerous studies have supported the hypothesis that plant hormones play an important role in the establishment of functional AM symbiosis. Particular attention has been devoted to jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivates, which are believed to play a major role in AM symbiosis. Jasmonates belong to a diverse class of lipid metabolites known as oxylipins that include other biologically active molecules. Recent transcriptional analyses revealed up-regulation of the oxylipin pathway during AM symbiosis in mycorrhizal tomato roots and indicate a key regulatory role for oxylipins during AM symbiosis in tomato, particularly those derived from the action of 9-lipoxygenases (9-LOXs). Continuing with the tomato as a model, the spatial and temporal expression pattern of genes involved in the 9-LOX pathway during the different stages of AM formation in tomato was analysed. The effects of JA signalling pathway changes on AM fungal colonization were assessed and correlated with the modifications in the transcriptional profiles of 9-LOX genes. The up-regulation of the 9-LOX oxylipin pathway in mycorrhizal wild-type roots seems to depend on a particular degree of AM fungal colonization and is restricted to the colonized part of the roots, suggesting that these genes could play a role in controlling fungal spread in roots. In addition, the results suggest that this strategy of the plant to control AM fungi development within the roots is at least partly dependent on JA pathway activation. PMID:22442425

  11. Overexpression of the pleiotropic regulator CodY decreases sporulation, attachment and pellicle formation in Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalani, Monisha; Dhiman, Alisha; Rahi, Amit; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2016-01-15

    CodY, a global transcriptional regulator, primarily functions as a nutrient and energy sensor. It is activated by metabolic effectors like BCAA and GTP. In low G + C Gram positive bacteria, it facilitates coupling of changes in the cellular metabolite pool with those required in the transcriptome of the cell. This pleiotropic regulator controls the expression of a vast number of genes as the cell transits from exponential to the stationary phase. Earlier studies have shown that CodY is required for the virulence of Bacillus anthracis. We sought to investigate the effect of its overexpression on the physiology of B. anthracis. In our study, we found that cellular CodY levels were unchanged during this phase-transition. Expression of endogenous CodY remained the same in different nutrient limiting conditions. Immunoblotting studies revealed CodY presence in the whole spore lysate of B. anthracis indicating it to be a component of the spore proteome. We could also detect CodY in the secretome of B. anthracis. Further, CodY was overexpressed in B. anthracis Sterne strain and this led to a 100-fold decrease in the sporulation titer and a 2.5-fold decrease in the in vitro attachment ability of the bacteria. We also observed a decrease in the pellicle formation by CodY overexpressed strain when compared to wildtype bacilli. The CodY overexpressed strain showed chaining phenotype during growth in liquid media and pellicle.

  12. Auxin signaling modules regulate maize inflorescence architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Mary; Liu, Qiujie; Moss, Britney L; Malcomber, Simon; Li, Wei; Gaines, Craig; Federici, Silvia; Roshkovan, Jessica; Meeley, Robert; Nemhauser, Jennifer L; Gallavotti, Andrea

    2015-10-27

    In plants, small groups of pluripotent stem cells called axillary meristems are required for the formation of the branches and flowers that eventually establish shoot architecture and drive reproductive success. To ensure the proper formation of new axillary meristems, the specification of boundary regions is required for coordinating their development. We have identified two maize genes, BARREN INFLORESCENCE1 and BARREN INFLORESCENCE4 (BIF1 and BIF4), that regulate the early steps required for inflorescence formation. BIF1 and BIF4 encode AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (Aux/IAA) proteins, which are key components of the auxin hormone signaling pathway that is essential for organogenesis. Here we show that BIF1 and BIF4 are integral to auxin signaling modules that dynamically regulate the expression of BARREN STALK1 (BA1), a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional regulator necessary for axillary meristem formation that shows a striking boundary expression pattern. These findings suggest that auxin signaling directly controls boundary domains during axillary meristem formation and define a fundamental mechanism that regulates inflorescence architecture in one of the most widely grown crop species.

  13. Boundary issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alan R.; Porder, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    What is our point of no return? Caesar proclaimed 'the die is cast' while crossing the Rubicon, but rarely does modern society find so visible a threshold in our continued degradation of ecosystems and the services they provide. Humans have always used their surroundings to make a living— sometimes successfully, sometimes not (Diamond 2005)—and we intuitively know that there are boundaries to our exploitation. But defining these boundaries has been a challenge since Malthus first prophesied that nature would limit the human population (Malthus 1798). In 2009, Rockström and colleagues tried to quantify what the 6.8 billion (and counting) of us could continue to get away with, and what we couldn't (Rockström et al 2009). In selecting ten 'planetary boundaries', the authors contend that a sustainable human enterprise requires treating a number of environmental thresholds as points of no return. They suggest we breach these Rubicons at our own peril, and that we've already crossed three: biodiversity loss, atmospheric CO2, and disruption of the global nitrogen (N) cycle. As they clearly hoped, the very act of setting targets has provoked scientific inquiry about their accuracy, and about the value of hard targets in the first place (Schlesinger 2009). Such debate is a good thing. Despite recent emphasis on the science of human-ecosystem interactions, understanding of our planetary boundaries is still in its infancy, and controversy can speed scientific progress (Engelhardt and Caplan 1987). A few weeks ago in this journal, Carpenter and Bennett (2011) took aim at one of the more controversial boundaries in the Rockström analysis: that for human alteration of the global phosphorus (P) cycle. Rockström's group chose riverine P export as the key indicator, suggesting that humans should not exceed a value that could trigger widespread marine anoxic events—and asserting that we have not yet crossed this threshold. There are defensible reasons for a marine

  14. boundary dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Camurdan

    1998-01-01

    are coupled by appropriate trace operators. This overall model differs from those previously studied in the literature in that the elastic chamber floor is here more realistically modeled by a hyperbolic Kirchoff equation, rather than by a parabolic Euler-Bernoulli equation with Kelvin-Voight structural damping, as in past literature. Thus, the hyperbolic/parabolic coupled system of past literature is replaced here by a hyperbolic/hyperbolic coupled model. The main result of this paper is a uniform stabilization of the coupled PDE system by a (physically appealing boundary dissipation.

  15. Positive regulation of meiotic DNA double-strand break formation by activation of the DNA damage checkpoint kinase Mec1(ATR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Stephen; Allison, Rachal M; Garcia, Valerie; Goldman, Alastair S H; Neale, Matthew J

    2013-07-31

    During meiosis, formation and repair of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) create genetic exchange between homologous chromosomes-a process that is critical for reductional meiotic chromosome segregation and the production of genetically diverse sexually reproducing populations. Meiotic DSB formation is a complex process, requiring numerous proteins, of which Spo11 is the evolutionarily conserved catalytic subunit. Precisely how Spo11 and its accessory proteins function or are regulated is unclear. Here, we use Saccharomyces cerevisiae to reveal that meiotic DSB formation is modulated by the Mec1(ATR) branch of the DNA damage signalling cascade, promoting DSB formation when Spo11-mediated catalysis is compromised. Activation of the positive feedback pathway correlates with the formation of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) recombination intermediates and activation of the downstream kinase, Mek1. We show that the requirement for checkpoint activation can be rescued by prolonging meiotic prophase by deleting the NDT80 transcription factor, and that even transient prophase arrest caused by Ndt80 depletion is sufficient to restore meiotic spore viability in checkpoint mutants. Our observations are unexpected given recent reports that the complementary kinase pathway Tel1(ATM) acts to inhibit DSB formation. We propose that such antagonistic regulation of DSB formation by Mec1 and Tel1 creates a regulatory mechanism, where the absolute frequency of DSBs is maintained at a level optimal for genetic exchange and efficient chromosome segregation.

  16. The pattern of a specimen of Pycnogonum litorale (Arthropoda, Pycnogonida) with a supernumerary leg can be explained with the "boundary model" of appendage formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, Gerhard; Brenneis, Georg

    2016-02-01

    A malformed adult female specimen of Pycnogonum litorale (Pycnogonida) with a supernumerary leg in the right body half is described concerning external and internal structures. The specimen was maintained in our laboratory culture after an injury in the right trunk region during a late postembryonic stage. The supernumerary leg is located between the second and third walking legs. The lateral processes connecting to these walking legs are fused to one large structure. Likewise, the coxae 1 of the second and third walking legs and of the supernumerary leg are fused to different degrees. The supernumerary leg is a complete walking leg with mirror image symmetry as evidenced by the position of joints and muscles. It is slightly smaller than the normal legs, but internally, it contains a branch of the ovary and a gut diverticulum as the other legs. The causes for this malformation pattern found in the Pycnogonum individual are reconstructed in the light of extirpation experiments in insects, which led to supernumerary mirror image legs, and the "boundary model" for appendage differentiation.

  17. Lats1/2 Regulate Yap/Taz to Control Nephron Progenitor Epithelialization and Inhibit Myofibroblast Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Helen; Reginensi, Antoine

    2017-03-01

    In the kidney, formation of the functional filtration units, the nephrons, is essential for postnatal life. During development, mesenchymal progenitors tightly regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation to give rise to all nephron epithelia. Here, we investigated the functions of the Hippo pathway serine/threonine-protein kinases Lats1 and Lats2, which phosphorylate and inhibit the transcriptional coactivators Yap and Taz, in nephron progenitor cells. Genetic deletion of Lats1 and Lats2 in nephron progenitors of mice led to disruption of nephrogenesis, with an accumulation of spindle-shaped cells in both cortical and medullary regions of the kidney. Lineage-tracing experiments revealed that the cells that accumulated in the interstitium derived from nephron progenitor cells and expressed E-cadherin as well as vimentin, a myofibroblastic marker not usually detected after mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. The accumulation of these interstitial cells associated with collagen deposition and ectopic expression of the myofibroblastic markers vimentin and α-smooth-muscle actin in developing kidneys. Although these myofibroblastic cells had high Yap and Taz accumulation in the nucleus concomitant with a loss of phosphorylated Yap, reduction of Yap and/or Taz expression levels completely rescued the Lats1/2 phenotype. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Lats1/2 kinases restrict Yap/Taz activities to promote nephron progenitor cell differentiation in the mammalian kidney. Notably, our data also show that myofibroblastic cells can differentiate from nephron progenitors.

  18. Resistance to Cultural Intervention: Formation of Inhibitory Collective and children's Self-Defensive Regulation in a Chinese School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Aruna; Li, Xiao-Wen; Zhou, Lihua; Zhang, Qian

    2016-11-28

    A sequel to the previous article "Roots of Excellence: The Releasing Effect of Individual Potentials through Educational Cultural Intervention in a Chinese School" (in press), the present study is on the unexpected reversal phenomena in the process of cultural intervention. The goal of the intervention is to construct the dynamics of Jiti (well-organized collective in Chinese) through creative activities to promote students' development. In the intervention, the releasing effect (Wu et al. 2016) emerged as well, but the teacher's concern about worsening discipline and academic performance evoked and reinforced his habitual notions and practices of education, turning the joint activities into a way of strengthening discipline. The energy that had been discharging at the beginning of the intervention was inhibited, so that many more problematic behaviors took shape. The whole class formed an inhibitory atmosphere, within which pupils formed self-defensive regulation strategies. By comparing with the productive collective in which intervention was effective and analyzing this unexpected reversal process, we can not only see pupils' self-construction status in the inhibitory culture but illuminate the formation of the teacher's resistance to educational and cultural transformation as well. Resistance is originated from teachers not being able to interpret pupils' inner developmental needs but instead anxious about the ongoing problems.

  19. Definitive Endoderm Formation from Plucked Human Hair-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and SK Channel Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anett Illing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells present an extraordinary powerful tool to investigate embryonic development in humans. Essentially, they provide a unique platform for dissecting the distinct mechanisms underlying pluripotency and subsequent lineage commitment. Modest information currently exists about the expression and the role of ion channels during human embryogenesis, organ development, and cell fate determination. Of note, small and intermediate conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels have been reported to modify stem cell behaviour and differentiation. These channels are broadly expressed throughout human tissues and are involved in various cellular processes, such as the after-hyperpolarization in excitable cells, and also in differentiation processes. To this end, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs generated from plucked human hair keratinocytes have been exploited in vitro to recapitulate endoderm formation and, concomitantly, used to map the expression of the SK channel (SKCa subtypes over time. Thus, we report the successful generation of definitive endoderm from hiPSCs of ectodermal origin using a highly reproducible and robust differentiation system. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence that SKCas subtypes are dynamically regulated in the transition from a pluripotent stem cell to a more lineage restricted, endodermal progeny.

  20. Feedback regulation of beta-thujaplicin production and formation of its methyl ether in a suspension culture of Cupressus lusitanica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Junko; Fujita, Koki; Sakai, Kokki

    2002-07-01

    Suspension cell cultures of Cupressus lusitanica produce beta-thujaplicin, a tropolone found mostly in Cupressaceae heartwood. The factors controlling beta-thujaplicin accumulation in this cell culture system were investigated. Initial cell density of the cultures did not affect beta-thujaplicin levels, though initial addition of beta-thujaplicin suppressed its de novo production. When beta-thujaplicin accumulation reached a certain level (ca. 40 mg/l) in the medium, the cultures seemed to cease beta-thujaplicin production. However, beta-thujaplicin productivity was restored when the beta-thujaplicin-containing medium was exchanged for fresh medium; the formation of 2-methoxy-6-(methylethyl)cyclohepta-2,4,6-trien-1-one, an isomer of methylated beta-thujaplicin, in medium was also observed. These results suggest that beta-thujaplicin synthesis was regulated by product feedback mechanism in this cell line, and that excess accumulation of beta-thujaplicin is relieved by conversion of beta-thujaplicin to its methyl ether.

  1. The contribution of sulphuric acid to atmospheric particle formation and growth: a comparison between boundary layers in Northern and Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fiedler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric gaseous sulphuric acid was measured and its influence on particle formation and growth was investigated building on aerosol data. The measurements were part of the EU-project QUEST and took place at two different measurement sites in Northern and Central Europe (Hyytiälä, Finland, March-April 2003 and Heidelberg, Germany, March-April 2004. From a comprehensive data set including sulphuric acid, particle number size distributions and meteorological data, particle growth rates, particle formation rates and source rates of condensable vapors were inferred. Growth rates were determined in two different ways, from particle size distributions as well as from a so-called timeshift analysis. Moreover, correlations between sulphuric acid and particle number concentration between 3 and 6 nm were examined and the influence of air masses of different origin was investigated. Measured maximum concentrations of sulphuric acid were in the range from 1x106 to 16x106cm-3. The gaseous sulphuric acid lifetime with respect to condensation on aerosol particles ranged from 2 to 33min in Hyytiälä and from 0.5 to 8 min in Heidelberg. Most calculated values (growth rates, formation rates, vapor source rates were considerably higher in Central Europe (Heidelberg, due to the more polluted air and higher preexistent aerosol concentrations. Close correlations between H2SO4 and nucleation mode particles (size range: 3-6 nm were found on most days at both sites. The percentage contribution of sulphuric acid to particle growth was below 10% at both places and to initial growth below 20%. An air mass analysis indicated that at Heidelberg new particles were formed predominantly in air advected from southwesterly directions.

  2. Pseudo steady states of HONO measured in the nocturnal marine boundary layer: a conceptual model for HONO formation on aqueous surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Wojtal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A complete understanding of the formation mechanism of nitrous acid (HONO in the ambient atmosphere is complicated by a lack of understanding of processes occurring when aqueous water is present. We report nocturnal measurements of HONO, SO2 and NO2 by differential optical absorption spectroscopy over the ocean surface in a polluted marine environment. In this aqueous environment, we observed reproducible pseudo steady states (PSS of HONO every night, that are fully formed shortly after sunset, much faster than seen in urban environments. During the PSS period, HONO is constant with time, independent of air mass source and independent of the concentration of NO2. The independence of HONO on the concentration of NO2 implies a 0° order formation process, likely on a saturated surface, with reversible partitioning of HONO to the gas phase, through vaporization and deposition to the surface. We observed median HONO/NO2 ratios starting at 0.13 at the beginning of the PSS period (with an apparent lower bound of 0.03, rising to median levels of ~0.30 at the end of the PSS period (with an upper bound >1.0. The implication of these numbers is that they suggest a common surface mechanism on terrestrial and aqueous surfaces, with an increase in the HONO/NO2 ratio with the amount of water available at the surface. The levels of HONO during the nocturnal PSS period are positively correlated with temperature, consistent with a partitioning of HONO from the surface to the gas phase with an apparent enthalpy of vaporization of ΔHSNL (HONO=55.5±5.4 kJ mole-1. The formation mechanism on aqueous surfaces is independent of relative humidity (RH, despite observation of a negative HONO-RH correlation. A conceptual model for HONO formation on ambient aqueous surfaces is presented, with the main elements being the presence of a surface nanolayer (SNL, highly acidic and

  3. The dynamic specification of surfaces and boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, D W; Shipley, T F; Kellman, P J

    1998-01-01

    Sequential changes in small separated texture elements can produce perception of a moving form with continuous boundaries. This process of spatiotemporal boundary formation may exist to provide a robust means of detecting moving objects that occlude more distant textured surfaces. Whereas most research on spatiotemporal boundary formation has been focused on boundary and shape perception, two experiments are reported here on the perception of surface qualities in spatiotemporal boundary formation. In experiment 1 a free-report procedure was used to investigate whether surface perception can be determined by dynamic information alone, apart from static spatial differences. Results showed that dynamic information was sufficient to determine the appearance of a surface. This dynamic information may play an important role in other aspects of perception. In experiment 2, it was shown that dynamically specifying an extended, opaque surface facilitated edge perception. Implications for the relation of boundary and surface perception and for theories of perceptual transparency are discussed.

  4. Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 RpoN (Sigma 54) is a Pleiotropic Regulator of Growth, Carbohydrate, Metabolism, Motility, Biofilm Formation and Toxin Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayrapetyan, H.; Tempelaars, M.H.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Abee, T.

    2015-01-01

    Sigma 54 is a transcriptional regulator predicted to play a role in physical interaction of bacteria with their environment, including virulence and biofilm formation. In order to study the role of Sigma 54 in Bacillus cereus, a comparative transcriptome and phenotypic study was performed using B. c

  5. Hints of the early Jehol Biota: important dinosaur footprint assemblages from the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary Tuchengzi Formation in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lida; Zhang, Jianping; Lockley, Martin G; McCrea, Richard T; Klein, Hendrik; Alcalá, Luis; Buckley, Lisa G; Burns, Michael E; Kümmell, Susanna B; He, Qing

    2015-01-01

    New reports of dinosaur tracksites in the Tuchengzi Formation in the newly established Yanqing Global Geopark, Beijing, China, support previous inferences that the track assemblages from this formation are saurischian-dominated. More specifically, the assemblages appear theropod-dominated, with the majority of well-preserved tracks conforming to the Grallator type (sensus lato), thus representing relatively small trackmakers. Such ichnofaunas supplement the skeletal record from this unit that lacks theropods thus far, proving a larger diversity of dinosaur faunas in that region. Sauropods are represented by medium to large sized and narrow and wide-gauge groups, respectively. The latter correspond with earlier discoveries of titanosauriform skeletons in the same unit. Previous records of ornithischian tracks cannot be positively confirmed. Purported occurrences are re-evaluated here, the trackways and imprints, except of a single possible specimen, re-assigned to theropods. Palecologically the Tuchengzi ichnofauna is characteristic of semi-arid fluvio-lacustrine inland basins with Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous deposits in northern China that all show assemblages with abundant theropod and sauropod tracks and minor components of ornithopod, pterosaur and bird tracks.

  6. Hints of the early Jehol Biota: important dinosaur footprint assemblages from the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary Tuchengzi Formation in Beijing, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lida Xing

    Full Text Available New reports of dinosaur tracksites in the Tuchengzi Formation in the newly established Yanqing Global Geopark, Beijing, China, support previous inferences that the track assemblages from this formation are saurischian-dominated. More specifically, the assemblages appear theropod-dominated, with the majority of well-preserved tracks conforming to the Grallator type (sensus lato, thus representing relatively small trackmakers. Such ichnofaunas supplement the skeletal record from this unit that lacks theropods thus far, proving a larger diversity of dinosaur faunas in that region. Sauropods are represented by medium to large sized and narrow and wide-gauge groups, respectively. The latter correspond with earlier discoveries of titanosauriform skeletons in the same unit. Previous records of ornithischian tracks cannot be positively confirmed. Purported occurrences are re-evaluated here, the trackways and imprints, except of a single possible specimen, re-assigned to theropods. Palecologically the Tuchengzi ichnofauna is characteristic of semi-arid fluvio-lacustrine inland basins with Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous deposits in northern China that all show assemblages with abundant theropod and sauropod tracks and minor components of ornithopod, pterosaur and bird tracks.

  7. Glass formation and unusual hygroscopic growth of iodic acid solution droplets with relevance for iodine oxide particles in the coastal marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Murray

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Iodine oxide particles are known to nucleate in the marine boundary layer where gas phase molecular iodine and organoiodine species are produced by macroalgae. There has been some debate over the chemical identity of these particles. Hygroscopic measurements have been used to infer that they are composed of insoluble I2O4, while elemental analysis of laboratory generated particles suggests soluble I2O5 or its hydrated form iodic acid, HIO3 (I2O5 · H2O. In this paper we explore the response of super-micron sized aqueous iodic acid solution droplets to varying humidity using both Raman microscopy and single particle electrodynamic traps. These measurements reveal that the propensity of an iodic acid solution droplet to crystallise is negligible on drying to ~0% relative humidity (RH. On applying mechanical pressure to these droplets they shatter in a manner consistent with an ultra-viscous liquid or a brittle glass, but subsequent water uptake between 10 and 20% RH causes their viscosity to reduce sufficiently that the cracked droplets flow and merge. The persistence of iodic acid solution in an amorphous state, rather than a crystalline state, suggests they will more readily accommodate other condensable material and are therefore more likely to grow to sizes where they may serve as cloud condensation nuclei. On increasing the humidity to ~90% the mass of the droplets only increases by ~20% with a corresponding increase in radius of only ~6 %, which is remarkably small for a highly soluble material. We suggest that the small growth factor of aqueous iodic acid solution droplets is consistent with the small aerosol growth factors observed in field experiments.

  8. The Role of the Regulated Sector in the UK Anti-Money Laundering Framework: Pushing the Boundaries of the Private Police

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Egan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that the conceptualisation of private police in current academic literature requires expansion to accommodate the role of the regulated sector in the Anti- Money Laundering (AML framework. Firstly, it evaluates the literature on ‘private police’ and argues that its current parameters are too narrow to accommodate the ‘policing’ role of the regulated sector. Secondly, it lays out the legislative framework that has developed to deal with the problem of money laundering. Thirdly, it contextualises the role of the regulated sector, examining the domestic inter-agency policing relationships within the suspicious activity regime as operationalised in Scotland. Finally, it takes a closer look at how the courts have interpreted the ‘failure to report offence’ under s330 of the Proceeds of Crime Act (POCA 2002 and its consequential effect on the engagement of the regulated sector with the SARs regime.

  9. Type III methyltransferase M.NgoAX from Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 regulates biofilm formation and human cell invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka eKwiatek

    2015-12-01

    , but more easily penetrate inside the host cells. All these data suggest that the NgoAX methyltransferase, may be implicated in N. gonorrhoeae pathogenicity, involving regulation of biofilm formation, adhesion to host cells and epithelial cell invasion.

  10. Sex-Dependent Up-Regulation of Two Splicing Factors, Psf and Srp20, during Hippocampal Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes-Martins, Ana; Mizuno, Keiko; Irvine, Elaine E.; Lepicard, Eve M.; Giese, K. Peter

    2007-01-01

    Gene transcription is required for long-term memory (LTM) formation. LTM formation is impaired in a male-specific manner in mice lacking either of the two Ca[superscript 2+] / calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase ("Camkk") genes. Since altered transcription was suggested to cause these impairments in LTM formation, we used microarrays to screen for…

  11. Interactions between Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases and growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases regulate tracheal tube formation in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mili Jeon

    2012-04-01

    The respiratory (tracheal system of the Drosophila melanogaster larva is an intricate branched network of air-filled tubes. Its developmental logic is similar in some ways to that of the vertebrate vascular system. We previously described a unique embryonic tracheal tubulogenesis phenotype caused by loss of both of the Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs, Ptp4E and Ptp10D. In Ptp4E Ptp10D double mutants, the linear tubes in unicellular and terminal tracheal branches are converted into bubble-like cysts that incorporate apical cell surface markers. This tube geometry phenotype is modulated by changes in the activity or expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr tyrosine kinase (TK. Ptp10D physically interacts with Egfr. Here we demonstrate that the Ptp4E Ptp10D phenotype is the consequence of the loss of negative regulation by the RPTPs of three growth factor receptor TKs: Egfr, Breathless and Pvr. Reducing the activity of any of the three kinases by tracheal expression of dominant-negative mutants suppresses cyst formation. By competing dominant-negative and constitutively active kinase mutants against each other, we show that the three RTKs have partially interchangeable activities, so that increasing the activity of one kinase can compensate for the effects of reducing the activity of another. This implies that SH2-domain downstream effectors that are required for the phenotype are likely to be able to interact with phosphotyrosine sites on all three receptor TKs. We also show that the phenotype involves increases in signaling through the MAP kinase and Rho GTPase pathways.

  12. Breaking Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    for granted the question of meaning-formation. This volume intends to gauge cultural dimensions in contemporary socio-political processes of globalisation, especially through the prism of sudden irruptions of existential crisis in people’s lives, loss of meaning, ambivalence, and disorientation......, the cultural dimension of human experience is not an obstacle to a more rational and organized world but is creative in transforming the social world by means of rituals, myths, and symbols....

  13. Boundary condition for toroidal plasma flow imposed at the separatrix in high confinement JT-60U plasmas with edge localized modes and the physics process in pedestal structure formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, K.; Honda, M.; Urano, H.; Yoshida, M.; Kamada, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan); Itoh, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    Modulation charge eXchange recombination spectroscopy measurements with high spatial and temporal resolution have made the evaluation of the toroidal plasma flow of fully stripped carbon impurity ions (V{sub ϕ}{sup C6+}) in the JT-60U tokamak peripheral region (including, in particular, the separatrix) possible with a better signal-to-noise ratio. By comparing co- and counter-neutral beam injection discharges experimentally, we have identified the boundary condition of V{sub ϕ}{sup C6+} and radial electric field shear (∇E{sub r}) imposed at the separatrix in high confinement (H-mode) plasmas with edge localized modes (ELMs). The V{sub ϕ}{sup C6+} value at the separatrix is not fixed at zero but varies with the momentum input direction. On the other hand, the ∇E{sub r} value is nearly zero (or very weakly positive) at the separatrix. Furthermore, the edge localized mode perturbation does not appear to affect both V{sub ϕ}{sup C6+} and ∇E{sub r} values at the separatrix as strongly as that in the pedestal region. The above experimental findings based on the precise edge measurements have been used to validate a theoretical model and develop a new empirical model. A better understanding of the physical process in the edge transport barrier (ETB) formation due to the sheared E{sub r} formation is also discussed.

  14. Boundary layer regulation in the southeast Atlantic cloud microphysics during the biomass burning season as seen by the A-train satellite constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painemal, David; Kato, Seiji; Minnis, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    Solar radiation absorption by biomass burning aerosols has a strong warming effect over the southeast Atlantic. Interactions between the overlying smoke aerosols and low-level cloud microphysics and the subsequent albedo perturbation are, however, generally ignored in biomass burning radiative assessments. In this study, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) are combined with Aqua satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E), and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) to assess the effect of variations in the boundary layer height and the separation distance between the cloud and aerosol layers on the cloud microphysics. The merged data analyzed at a daily temporal resolution suggest that overlying smoke aerosols modify cloud properties by decreasing cloud droplet size despite an increase in the cloud liquid water as boundary layer deepens, north of 5°S. These changes are controlled by the proximity of the aerosol layer to the cloud top rather than increases in the column aerosol load. The correlations are unlikely driven by meteorological factors, as three predictors of cloud variability, lower tropospheric stability, surface winds, and mixing ratio suggest that cloud effective radius, cloud top height, and liquid water path should correlate positively. Because cloud effective radius anticorrelates with cloud liquid water over the region with large microphysical changes—north of 5°S—the overall radiative consequence at the top of the atmosphere is a strong albedo susceptibility, equivalent to a 3% albedo increase due to a 10% decrease in cloud effective radius. This albedo enhancement partially offsets the aerosol solar absorption. Our analysis emphasizes the importance of accounting for the indirect effect of smoke aerosols in the cloud microphysics when estimating the radiative impact of the biomass burning at the

  15. SIMULATIVE INVESTIGATION OF GRAIN BOUNDARIES IN NiAl ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Using embedded atom potentials and molecular static relaxation method or Monte Carlo relaxation method, the grain boundary atomic structures of a series of [100], [110] and [111] symmetric tilt grain boundaries in NiAl with different geometrical indexes and compositions were studied. The grain boundary energies, grain boundary cohesive energies and point defects formation energies at the grain boundary were calculated. The results show that the grain boundaries of NiAl alloy have a periodic unit structure. Grain boundary energies of Al rich grain boundary is very high, but the cohesive energies are lower than those of others. The interaction of point defects and grain boundaries shows that grain boundaries incline to absorb point defects to decrease their orders and to relax the distortions caused by point defects. The boundary atomic structures relaxed by Monte Carlo method show that the disorder of them, grain boundary energies and cohesive energies increase with increasing temperature.

  16. Up-regulation of Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling in the spinal cord impairs neural cell migration, neurogenesis, synapse formation, and dendritic spine development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Fu-jiang; ZHANG Xu; LIU Tao; LI Xia-wen; Mazar Malik; FENG Shi-qing

    2013-01-01

    Background The Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway controls many cellular responses such as cell proliferation,migration,differentiation,and death.In the nervous system,emerging evidence also points to a death-promoting role for ERK1/2 in both in vitro and in vivo models of neuronal death.To further investigate how Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 up-regulation may lead to the development of spinal cord injury,we developed a cellular model of Raf/ERK up-regulation by overexpressing c-Raf in cultured spinal cord neurons (SCNs) and dorsal root ganglions (DRGs).Methods DRGs and SCNs were prepared from C57BL/6J mouse pups.DRGs or SCNs were infected with Ad-Raf-1 or Ad-Null adenovirus alone.Cell adhesion assay and cell migration assay were investigated,Dil labeling was employed to examine the effect of the up-regulation of Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling on the dendritic formation of spinal neurons.We used the TO-PRO-3 staining to examine the apoptotic effect of c-Raf on DRGs or SCNs.The effect on the synapse formation of neurons was measured by using immunofluorescence.Results We found that Raf/ERK up-regulation stimulates the migration of both SCNs and DRGs,and impairs the formation of excitatory synapses in SCNs.In addition,we found that Raf/ERK up-regulation inhibits the development of mature dendritic spines in SCNs.Investigating the possible mechanisms through which Raf/ERK up-regulation affects the excitatory synapse formation and dendritic spine development,we discovered that Raf/ERK up-regulation suppresses the development and maturation of SCNs.Conclusion The up-regulation of the Raf/ERK signaling pathway may contribute to the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury through both its impairment of the SCN development and causing neural circuit imbalances.

  17. Genome-wide mutagenesis of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri reveals novel genetic determinants and regulation mechanisms of biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyun Li

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac causes citrus canker disease, a major threat to citrus production worldwide. Accumulating evidence suggests that the formation of biofilms on citrus leaves plays an important role in the epiphytic survival of this pathogen prior to the development of canker disease. However, the process of Xac biofilm formation is poorly understood. Here, we report a genome-scale study of Xac biofilm formation in which we identified 92 genes, including 33 novel genes involved in biofilm formation and 7 previously characterized genes, colR, fhaB, fliC, galU, gumD, wxacO, and rbfC, known to be important for Xac biofilm formation. In addition, 52 other genes with defined or putative functions in biofilm formation were identified, even though they had not previously reported been to be associated with biofilm formation. The 92 genes were isolated from 292 biofilm-defective mutants following a screen of a transposon insertion library containing 22,000 Xac strain 306 mutants. Further analyses indicated that 16 of the novel genes are involved in the production of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 7 genes are involved in signaling and regulatory pathways, and 5 genes have unknown roles in biofilm formation. Furthermore, two novel genes, XAC0482, encoding a haloacid dehalogenase-like phosphatase, and XAC0494 (designated as rbfS, encoding a two-component sensor protein, were confirmed to be biofilm-related genes through complementation assays. Our data demonstrate that the formation of mature biofilm requires EPS, LPS, both flagellum-dependent and flagellum-independent cell motility, secreted proteins and extracellular DNA. Additionally, multiple signaling pathways are involved in Xac biofilm formation. This work is the first report on a genome-wide scale of the genetic processes of biofilm formation in plant pathogenic bacteria. The report provides significant new information about the genetic

  18. 保持边界的地形网格简化算法与组织格式%Simplification Algorithm and Format Organization for Terrain Grid Based on Holding-Boundary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘思江; 翁璐斌; 秦树鑫; 杨一平; 蒋永实

    2013-01-01

    To deal with cracks between terrain blocks, one approach is to repair them precisely on primitive level, which consumes much computing resource, while another masks them visually, causing incoherence in geometric and texture spaces. Based on Melax's fast polygon reduction algorithm, a terrain simplification algorithm was proposed that used holding-boundary and edge collapse. Firstly concepts of holding vertex and controlling vertex were defined, and quantity choice of holding vertex and reduction strategy of controlling vertex were provided. By improving edge collapse rules and cost formulae, grid simplification with fixed boundary was realized. Then according to the clustering hierarchy representation, simplified grids were overlapped with original regular grids, using vertex indices to ensure fast and batched terrain manipulations. Thus the terrain format featuring holding-boundary was presented. Experiment results show that the proposed algorithm can lower densities of boundary primitives and maintain more terrain features; the terrain format shows high frame rate and seamless visual effect in flight cruising test.%针对目前大范围地形绘制中对地形块间裂缝进行图元级精确修补会额外占用计算机资源,或者进行简单视觉掩饰而导致几何与纹理空间缺乏连贯性的问题,基于Melax快速网格简化算法,提出了保持边界的边折叠地形简化算法.首先定义了保持点与控制点概念,给出保持点的数量选择方法与控制点的精简策略,并通过改进边折叠规则和代价计算公式实现了边界不变的网格简化;然后按聚类层次结构表示思想,将简化网格与原规则网格层叠组织,以顶点索引方式保证地形整体快速批量操作,构造出一种具有保持边界特性的地形格式.实验结果证明,该算法在保持地形边界的同时,能有效地缓解边界图元稠密现象,且比Melax算法更好地保留了地形特征;在此基础上形成的

  19. Live imaging of Drosophila gonad formation reveals roles for Six4 in regulating germline and somatic cell migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarman Andrew P

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Movement of cells, either as amoeboid individuals or in organised groups, is a key feature of organ formation. Both modes of migration occur during Drosophila embryonic gonad development, which therefore provides a paradigm for understanding the contribution of these processes to organ morphogenesis. Gonads of Drosophila are formed from three distinct cell types: primordial germ cells (PGCs, somatic gonadal precursors (SGPs, and in males, male-specific somatic gonadal precursors (msSGPs. These originate in distinct locations and migrate to associate in two intermingled clusters which then compact to form the spherical primitive gonads. PGC movements are well studied, but much less is known of the migratory events and other interactions undergone by their somatic partners. These appear to move in organised groups like, for example, lateral line cells in zebra fish or Drosophila ovarian border cells. Results We have used time-lapse fluorescence imaging to characterise gonadal cell behaviour in wild type and mutant embryos. We show that the homeodomain transcription factor Six4 is required for the migration of the PGCs and the msSGPs towards the SGPs. We have identified a likely cause of this in the case of PGCs as we have found that Six4 is required for expression of Hmgcr which codes for HMGCoA reductase and is necessary for attraction of PGCs by SGPs. Six4 affects msSGP migration by a different pathway as these move normally in Hmgcr mutant embryos. Additionally, embryos lacking fully functional Six4 show a novel phenotype in which the SGPs, which originate in distinct clusters, fail to coalesce to form unified gonads. Conclusion Our work establishes the Drosophila gonad as a model system for the analysis of coordinated cell migrations and morphogenesis using live imaging and demonstrates that Six4 is a key regulator of somatic cell function during gonadogenesis. Our data suggest that the initial association of SGP clusters

  20. Distribution of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript in the hippocampal formation of the guinea pig and domestic pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolenkiewicz, M; Robak, A; Równiak, M; Bogus-Nowakowska, K; Całka, J; Majewski, M

    2009-02-01

    This study provides a detailed description concerning the distribution of cocaineand amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) subunits - CART(61-102) and rhCART(28-116) - in the hippocampal formation (HF) of the guinea pig and domestic pig, focussing on the dentate gyrus (DG) and hippocampus proper (HP). Although in both studied species CART-immunoreactive (CART-IR) neuronal somata and processes were present generally in the same layers, some species-specific differences were still found. In the granular layer (GL) of both species, the ovalshaped neurons and some thick varicose fibres were encountered. In the guinea pig there was an immunoreactive "band of dots", probably representing crosssectioned terminals within the DG molecular layer (MOL), whereas in the domestic pig, some varicose fibres were detected, thus suggesting a different orientation of, at least, some nerve terminals. Furthermore, some CART-positive cells and fibres were observed in the hilus (HL) of the guinea pig, whereas in the analogical part of the domestic pig only nerve terminals were labelled. In both species, in the pyramidal layer (PL) of the hippocampus proper, CART-IR triangular somata were observed in the CA3 sector, as well as some positive processes in MOL; however, a few immunoreactive perikarya were found only in the CA1 sector of the guinea pig. As regards the localization patterns of two isoforms of CART in the guinea pig, both peptide fragments were present simultaneously in each of the labelled neurons or fibres, whereas in the domestic pig three types of fibres may be distinguished within the area of the DG. In the hilus and MOL of the dentate gyrus, there were fibres expressing both isoforms of CART in their whole length (fibres of the first type). Fibres of the second type (in GL) coexpressed both peptides only on their short segments, and the last ones (in MOL) expressed solely rhCART(28-116). These results indicate that the distribution of the two CART isoforms are

  1. Technology for Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Kristensen, Jannie Friis; Nielsen, Christina

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a study of an organisation, which is undergoing a process transforming organisational and technological boundaries. In particular, we shall look at three kinds of boundaries: the work to maintain and change the boundary between the organisation and its customers; boundaries.......After analysing the history and the current boundary work, the paper will propose new technological support for boundary work. In particular the paper will suggest means of supporting boundaries when these are productive and for changing boundaries when this seems more appropriate. In total, flexible technologies...... seem a core issue when dealing with technology for boundaries....

  2. The two-component signal transduction system ArlRS regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation in an ica-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wu

    Full Text Available Due to its ability to form biofilms on medical devices, Staphylococcus epidermidis has emerged as a major pathogen of nosocomial infections. In this study, we investigated the role of the two-component signal transduction system ArlRS in regulating S. epidermidis biofilm formation. An ArlRS-deficient mutant, WW06, was constructed using S. epidermidis strain 1457 as a parental strain. Although the growth curve of WW06 was similar to that of SE1457, the mutant strain was unable to form biofilms in vitro. In a rabbit subcutaneous infection model, sterile disks made of polymeric materials were implanted subcutaneously followed with inoculation of WW06 or SE1457. The viable bacteria cells of WW06 recovered from biofilms on the embedded disks were much lower than that of SE1457. Complementation of arlRS genes expression from plasmid in WW06 restored biofilm-forming phenotype both in vivo and in vitro. WW06 maintained the ability to undergo initial attachment. Transcription levels of several genes involved in biofilm formation, including icaADBC, sigB, and sarA, were decreased in WW06, compared to SE1457; and icaR expression was increased in WW06, detected by real-time reverse-transcription PCR. The biofilm-forming phenotype was restored by overexpressing icaADBC in WW06 but not by overexpressing sigB, indicating that ArlRS regulates biofilm formation through the regulation of icaADBC. Gel shift assay showed that ArlR can bind to the promoter region of the ica operon. In conclusion, ArlRS regulates S. epidermidis biofilm formation in an ica-dependent manner, distinct from its role in S. aureus.

  3. [Nitrogen oxide is involved in the regulation of the Fe-S cluster assembly in proteins and the formation of biofilms by Escherichia coli cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, S V; Streltsova, D A; Starostina, I A; Sanina, N A

    2013-01-01

    The functions of nitrogen oxide (NO) in the regulation of the reversible processes of Fe-S cluster assembly in proteins and the formation of Escherichia coli biofilms have been investigated. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and crystalline nitrosyl complexes of iron with sulfur-containing aliphatic ligands cisaconite (CisA) and penaconite have been used as NO donors for the first time. Wild-type E. coli cells of the strain MC4100, mutants deltaiscA and deltasufA, and the double paralog mutant deltaiscA/sufA with deletions in the alternative pathways of Fe2+ supply for cluster assembly (all derived from the above-named strain) were used in this study. Plankton growth of bacterial cultures, the mass of mature biofilms, and the expression of the SoxRS[2Fe-2S] regulon have been investigated and shown to depend on strain genotype, the process of Fe-S cluster assembly in iron-sulfur proteins, NO donor structure, and the presence of Fe2+ chelator ferene in the incubation medium. The antibiotic ciprofloxacine (CF) was used as an inhibitor of E. coli biofilm formation in the positive control. NO donors regulating Fe-S cluster assembly in E. coli have been shown to control plankton growth of the cultures and the process of mature biofilm formation; toxic doses of NO caused a dramatic (3- to 4-fold) stimulation of cell entry into biofilms as a response to nitrosative stress; NO donors CisA and GSNO in physiological concentrations suppressed the formation of mature biofilms, and the activity of these compounds was comparable to that of CE Regulation of both Fe-S cluster assembly in iron-sulfur proteins and biofilm formation by NO is indicative of the connection between these processes in E. coli.

  4. PtoMYB156 is involved in negative regulation of phenylpropanoid metabolism and secondary cell wall biosynthesis during wood formation in poplar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Zhao, Xin; Ran, Lingyu; Li, Chaofeng; Fan, Di; Luo, Keming

    2017-01-01

    Some R2R3 MYB transcription factors have been shown to be major regulators of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway and impact secondary wall formation in plants. In this study, we describe the functional characterization of PtoMYB156, encoding a R2R3-MYB transcription factor, from Populus tomentosa. Expression pattern analysis showed that PtoMYB156 is widely expressed in all tissues examined, but predominantly in leaves and developing wood cells. PtoMYB156 localized to the nucleus and acted as a transcriptional repressor. Overexpression of PtoMYB156 in poplar repressed phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes, leading to a reduction in the amounts of total phenolic and flavonoid compounds. Transgenic plants overexpressing PtoMYB156 also displayed a dramatic decrease in secondary wall thicknesses of xylem fibers and the content of cellulose, lignin and xylose compared with wild-type plants. Transcript accumulation of secondary wall biosynthetic genes was down-regulated by PtoMYB156 overexpression. Transcriptional activation assays revealed that PtoMYB156 was able to repress the promoter activities of poplar CESA17, C4H2 and GT43B. By contrast, knockout of PtoMYB156 by CRISPR/Cas9 in poplar resulted in ectopic deposition of lignin, xylan and cellulose during secondary cell wall formation. Taken together, these results show that PtoMYB156 may repress phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and negatively regulate secondary cell wall formation in poplar. PMID:28117379

  5. Formation and dimerization of the phosphodiesterase active site of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa MorA, a bi-functional c-di-GMP regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phippen, Curtis William; Mikolajek, Halina; Schlaefli, Henry George; Keevil, Charles William; Webb, Jeremy Stephen; Tews, Ivo

    2014-12-20

    Diguanylate cyclases (DGC) and phosphodiesterases (PDE), respectively synthesise and hydrolyse the secondary messenger cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), and both activities are often found in a single protein. Intracellular c-di-GMP levels in turn regulate bacterial motility, virulence and biofilm formation. We report the first structure of a tandem DGC-PDE fragment, in which the catalytic domains are shown to be active. Two phosphodiesterase states are distinguished by active site formation. The structures, in the presence or absence of c-di-GMP, suggest that dimerisation and binding pocket formation are linked, with dimerisation being required for catalytic activity. An understanding of PDE activation is important, as biofilm dispersal via c-di-GMP hydrolysis has therapeutic effects on chronic infections.

  6. Lrp4 regulates initiation of ureteric budding and is crucial for kidney formation--a mouse model for Cenani-Lenz syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney M Karner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Development of the kidney is initiated when the ureteric bud (UB branches from the Wolffian duct and invades the overlying metanephric mesenchyme (MM triggering the mesenchymal/epithelial interactions that are the basis of organ formation. Multiple signaling pathways must be integrated to ensure proper timing and location of the ureteric bud formation. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have used gene targeting to create an Lrp4 null mouse line. The mutation results in early embryonic lethality with a subpenetrant phenotype of kidney agenesis. Ureteric budding is delayed with a failure to stimulate the metanephric mesenchyme in a timely manner, resulting in failure of cellular differentiation and resulting absence of kidney formation in the mouse as well as comparable malformations in humans with Cenani-Lenz syndrome. CONCLUSION: Lrp4 is a multi-functional receptor implicated in the regulation of several molecular pathways, including Wnt and Bmp signaling. Lrp4(-/- mice show a delay in ureteric bud formation that results in unilateral or bilateral kidney agenesis. These data indicate that Lrp4 is a critical regulator of UB branching and lack of Lrp4 results in congenital kidney malformations in humans and mice.

  7. Continental Shelf Boundary - Alaska NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Continental Shelf Boundaries (CSB) lines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Alaska Region. The CSB defines the seaward limit of federally...

  8. Atlantic NAD 83 Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB) lines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Atlantic Region. The CSB defines the seaward limit of federally...

  9. Outer Continental Shelf Submerged Lands Act Boundary - Atlantic Region NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains the Submerged Lands Act (SLA) boundary line (also known as State Seaward Boundary (SSB), or Fed State Boundary) in ESRI shapefile formats for...

  10. Outer Continental Shelf Submerged Lands Act Boundary - Alaska Region NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains the Submerged Lands Act (SLA) boundary (also known as State Seaward Boundary (SSB), or Fed State Boundary) in ESRI shapefile format for the...

  11. Outer Continental Shelf Submerged Lands Act Boundary - Gulf of Mexico Region NAD27

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains the Submerged Lands Act (SLA) boundary line (also known as State Seaward Boundary (SSB), or Fed State Boundary)in ESRI shapefile formats for...

  12. Streptococcus suis small RNA rss04 contributes to the induction of meningitis by regulating capsule synthesis and by inducing biofilm formation in a mouse infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Genhui; Tang, Huanyu; Zhang, Shouming; Ren, Haiyan; Dai, Jiao; Lai, Liying; Lu, Chengping; Yao, Huochun; Fan, Hongjie; Wu, Zongfu

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus suis (SS) is an important pathogen for pigs, and it is also considered as a zoonotic agent for humans. Meningitis is one of the most common features of the infection caused by SS, but little is known about the mechanisms of SS meningitis. Recent studies have revealed that small RNAs (sRNAs) have emerged as key regulators of the virulence in several bacteria. In the previous study, we reported that SS sRNA rss04 was up-regulated in pig cerebrospinal fluid and contributes to SS virulence in a zebrafish infection model. Here, we show that rss04 facilitates SS invasion of mouse brain and lung in vivo. Label-free quantitation mass spectrometry analysis revealed that rss04 regulates transcriptional regulator CcpA and several virulence factors including LuxS. Transmission electron microscope and Dot-blot analyses indicated that rss04 represses capsular polysaccharide (CPS) production, which in turn facilitates SS adherence and invasion of mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells bEnd.3 in vitro and activates the mRNA expression of TLR2, CCL2, IL-6 and TNF-α in mouse brain in vivo at 12h post-infection. In addition, rss04 positively regulates SS biofilm formation. Survival analysis of infected mice showed that biofilm state in brain contributes to SS virulence by intracranial subarachnoidal route of infection. Together, our data reveal that SS sRNA rss04 contributes to the induction of meningitis by regulating the CPS synthesis and by inducing biofilm formation, thereby increasing the virulence in a mouse infection model. To our knowledge, rss04 represents the first bacterial sRNA that plays definitive roles in bacterial meningitis.

  13. The curli biosynthesis regulator CsgD co-ordinates the expression of both positive and negative determinants for biofilm formation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombacher, Eva; Dorel, Corinne; Zehnder, Alexander J B; Landini, Paolo

    2003-10-01

    Production of curli, extracellular structures important for biofilm formation, is positively regulated by OmpR, which constitutes with the EnvZ protein an osmolarity-sensing two-component regulatory system. The expression of curli is cryptic in most Escherichia coli laboratory strains such as MG1655, due to the lack of csgD expression. The csgD gene encodes a transcription activator of the curli-subunit-encoding csgBA operon. The ompR234 up-mutation can restore csgD expression, resulting in curli production and increased biofilm formation. In this report, it is shown that ompR234-dependent csgD expression, in addition to csgBA activation during stationary phase of growth, stimulates expression of the yaiC gene and negatively regulates at least two other genes, pepD and yagS. The promoter regions of these four genes share a conserved 11 bp sequence (CGGGKGAKNKA), necessary for csgBA and yaiC regulation by CsgD. While at both the csgBA and yaiC promoters the sequence is located upstream of the promoter elements, in both yagS and pepD it overlaps either the putative -10 sequence or the transcription start point, suggesting that CsgD can function as both an activator and a repressor. Adhesion experiments show that csgD-independent expression of both yagS and pepD from a multicopy plasmid negatively affects biofilm formation, which, in contrast, is stimulated by yaiC expression. Thus it is proposed that CsgD stimulates biofilm formation in E. coli by contemporary activation of adhesion positive determinants (the curli-encoding csg operons and the product of the yaiC gene) and repression of negative effectors such as yagS and pepD.

  14. Vocational teachers' identity formation through boundary crossing

    OpenAIRE

    Fejes, Andreas; Köpsén, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Vocational teachers’ prior occupational experiences are construed as those that will guarantee high-quality teaching in vocational education, although individuals are no longer required to have formal teaching qualifications to be employed as teachers in Sweden. This lack of strict requirements raises the issue of the preparedness of vocational teachers to teach their subject matter. Drawing on a socio-cultural understanding of identity, and based on twenty semi-structured interviews with voc...

  15. Vocational Teachers' Identity Formation through Boundary Crossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejes, Andreas; Köpsén, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Vocational teachers' prior occupational experiences are construed as those that will guarantee high-quality teaching in vocational education, although individuals are no longer required to have formal teaching qualifications to be employed as teachers in Sweden. This lack of strict requirements raises the issue of the preparedness of vocational…

  16. IGF-I Signaling in Osterix-Expressing Cells Regulates Secondary Ossification Center Formation, Growth Plate Maturation, and Metaphyseal Formation During Postnatal Bone Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongmei; Menendez, Alicia; Fong, Chak; ElAlieh, Hashem Z; Kubota, Takuo; Long, Roger; Bikle, Daniel D

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the role of IGF-I signaling in osterix (OSX)-expressing cells in the skeleton, we generated IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) knockout mice ((OSX)IGF-IRKO) (floxed-IGF-IR mice × OSX promoter-driven GFP-labeled cre-recombinase [(OSX)GFPcre]), and monitored postnatal bone development. At day 2 after birth (P2), (OSX)GFP-cre was highly expressed in the osteoblasts in the bone surface of the metaphysis and in the prehypertrophic chondrocytes (PHCs) and inner layer of perichondral cells (IPCs). From P7, (OSX)GFP-cre was highly expressed in PHCs, IPCs, cartilage canals (CCs), and osteoblasts (OBs) in the epiphyseal secondary ossification center (SOC), but was only slightly expressed in the OBs in the metaphysis. Compared with the control mice, the IPC proliferation was decreased in the (OSX)IGF-IRKOs. In these mice, fewer IPCs invaded into the cartilage, resulting in delayed formation of the CC and SOC. Immunohistochemistry indicated a reduction of vessel number and lower expression of VEGF and ephrin B2 in the IPCs and SOC of (OSX)IGF-IRKOs. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the mRNA levels of the matrix degradation markers, MMP-9, 13 and 14, were decreased in the (OSX)IGF-IRKOs compared with the controls. The (OSX)IGF-IRKO also showed irregular morphology of the growth plate and less trabecular bone in the tibia and femur from P7 to 7 weeks, accompanied by decreased chondrocyte proliferation, altered chondrocyte differentiation, and decreased osteoblast differentiation. Our data indicate that during postnatal bone development, IGF-I signaling in OSX-expressing IPCs promotes IPC proliferation and cartilage matrix degradation and increases ephrin B2 production to stimulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and vascularization. These processes are required for normal CC formation in the establishment of the SOC. Moreover, IGF-I signaling in the OSX-expressing PHC is required for growth plate maturation and osteoblast differentiation in

  17. A universal, turbulence-regulated star formation law: from Milky Way clouds to high-redshift disk and starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Salim, Diane M; Kewley, Lisa J

    2015-01-01

    Whilst the star formation rate (SFR) of molecular clouds and galaxies is key in understanding galaxy evolution, the physical processes which determine the SFR remain unclear. This uncertainty about the underlying physics has resulted in various different star formation laws, all having substantial intrinsic scatter. Extending upon previous works that define the column density of star formation (Sigma_SFR) by the gas column density (Sigma_gas), we develop a new universal star formation (SF) law based on the multi-freefall prescription of gas. This new SF law relies predominantly on the probability density function (PDF) and on the sonic Mach number of the turbulence in the star-forming clouds. By doing so we derive a relation where the star formation rate (SFR) correlates with the molecular gas mass per multi-freefall time, whereas previous models had used the average, single-freefall time. We define a new quantity called maximum (multi-freefall) gas consumption rate (MGCR) and show that the actual SFR is only...

  18. Platelet rich plasma promotes skeletal muscle cell migration in association with up-regulation of FAK, paxillin, and F-Actin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Chung; Yu, Tung-Yang; Lin, Li-Ping; Lin, Mioa-Sui; Tsai, Ting-Ta; Pang, Jong-Hwei S

    2017-02-24

    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) contains various cytokines and growth factors which may be beneficial to the healing process of injured muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and molecular mechanism of PRP on migration of skeletal muscle cells. Skeletal muscle cells intrinsic to Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with PRP. The cell migration was evaluated by transwell filter migration assay and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. The spreading of cells was evaluated microscopically. The formation of filamentous actin (F-actin) cytoskeleton was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. The protein expressions of paxillin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were assessed by Western blot analysis. Transfection of paxillin small-interfering RNA (siRNAs) to muscle cells was performed to validate the role of paxillin in PRP-mediated promotion of cell migration. Dose-dependently PRP promotes migration of and spreading and muscle cells. Protein expressions of paxillin and FAK were up-regulated dose-dependently. F-actin formation was also enhanced by PRP treatment. Furthermore, the knockdown of paxillin expression impaired the effect of PRP to promote cell migration. It was concluded that PRP promoting migration of muscle cells is associated with up-regulation of proteins expression of paxillin and FAK as well as increasing F-actin formation. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  19. Auxin and Epigenetic Regulation of SKP2B, an F-Box That Represses Lateral Root Formation1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Concepción; Ramirez-Parra, Elena; Casimiro, Ilda; Otero, Sofía; Desvoyes, Bénédicte; De Rybel, Bert; Beeckman, Tom; Casero, Pedro; Gutierrez, Crisanto; C. del Pozo, Juan

    2012-01-01

    In plants, lateral roots originate from pericycle founder cells that are specified at regular intervals along the main root. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SKP2B (for S-Phase Kinase-Associated Protein2B), an F-box protein, negatively regulates cell cycle and lateral root formation as it represses meristematic and founder cell divisions. According to its function, SKP2B is expressed in founder cells, lateral root primordia and the root apical meristem. We identified a novel motif in the SKP2B promoter that is required for its specific root expression and auxin-dependent induction in the pericycle cells. Next to a transcriptional control by auxin, SKP2B expression is regulated by histone H3.1/H3.3 deposition in a CAF-dependent manner. The SKP2B promoter and the 5′ end of the transcribed region are enriched in H3.3, which is associated with active chromatin states, over H3.1. Furthermore, the SKP2B promoter is also regulated by H3 acetylation in an auxin- and IAA14-dependent manner, reinforcing the idea that epigenetics represents an important regulatory mechanism during lateral root formation. PMID:22837358

  20. Identification of a chemical inhibitor for nuclear speckle formation: Implications for the function of nuclear speckles in regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurogi, Yutaro; Matsuo, Yota; Mihara, Yuki; Yagi, Hiroaki; Shigaki-Miyamoto, Kaya; Toyota, Syukichi; Azuma, Yuko [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Igarashi, Masayuki [Laboratory of Disease Biology, Institute of Microbial Chemistry, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-0021 (Japan); Tani, Tokio, E-mail: ttani@sci.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • We identified tubercidin as a compound inducing aberrant formation of the speckles. • Tubercidin causes delocalization of poly (A){sup +}RNAs from nuclear speckles. • Tubercidin induces dispersion of splicing factors from nuclear speckles. • Tubercidin affects alternative pre-mRNA splicing. • Nuclear speckles play a role in regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing. - Abstract: Nuclear speckles are subnuclear structures enriched with RNA processing factors and poly (A){sup +} RNAs comprising mRNAs and poly (A){sup +} non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Nuclear speckles are thought to be involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, such as pre-mRNA splicing. By screening 3585 culture extracts of actinomycetes with in situ hybridization using an oligo dT probe, we identified tubercidin, an analogue of adenosine, as an inhibitor of speckle formation, which induces the delocalization of poly (A){sup +} RNA and dispersion of splicing factor SRSF1/SF2 from nuclear speckles in HeLa cells. Treatment with tubercidin also decreased steady-state MALAT1 long ncRNA, thought to be involved in the retention of SRSF1/SF2 in nuclear speckles. In addition, we found that tubercidin treatment promoted exon skipping in the alternative splicing of Clk1 pre-mRNA. These results suggest that nuclear speckles play a role in modulating the concentration of splicing factors in the nucleoplasm to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing.

  1. Identification of flgZ as a flagellar gene encoding a PilZ domain protein that regulates swimming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Navazo, Ana; Barahona, Emma; Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; González de Heredia, Elena; Baena, Irene; Martín-Martín, Irene; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase enzymatic activities control c-di-GMP levels modulating planktonic versus sessile lifestyle behavior in bacteria. The PilZ domain is described as a sensor of c-di-GMP intracellular levels and the proteins containing a PilZ domain represent the best studied class of c-di-GMP receptors forming part of the c-di-GMP signaling cascade. In P. fluorescens F113 we have found two diguanylate cyclases (WspR, SadC) and one phosphodiesterase (BifA) implicated in regulation of swimming motility and biofilm formation. Here we identify a flgZ gene located in a flagellar operon encoding a protein that contains a PilZ domain. Moreover, we show that FlgZ subcellular localization depends on the c-di-GMP intracellular levels. The overexpression analysis of flgZ in P. fluorescens F113 and P. putida KT2440 backgrounds reveal a participation of FlgZ in Pseudomonas swimming motility regulation. Besides, the epistasis of flgZ over wspR and bifA clearly shows that c-di-GMP intracellular levels produced by the enzymatic activity of the diguanylate cyclase WspR and the phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm formation through FlgZ.

  2. Effect of Negative Pressure on Proliferation, Virulence Factor Secretion, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence-Regulated Gene Expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Qi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effect of negative pressure conditions induced by NPWT on P. aeruginosa. Methods. P. aeruginosa was cultured in a Luria–Bertani medium at negative pressure of −125 mmHg for 24 h in the experimental group and at atmospheric pressure in the control group. The diameters of the colonies of P. aeruginosa were measured after 24 h. ELISA kit, orcinol method, and elastin-Congo red assay were used to quantify the virulence factors. Biofilm formation was observed by staining with Alexa Fluor® 647 conjugate of concanavalin A (Con A. Virulence-regulated genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Results. As compared with the control group, growth of P. aeruginosa was inhibited by negative pressure. The colony size under negative pressure was significantly smaller in the experimental group than that in the controls (p<0.01. Besides, reductions in the total amount of virulence factors were observed in the negative pressure group, including exotoxin A, rhamnolipid, and elastase. RT-PCR results revealed a significant inhibition in the expression level of virulence-regulated genes. Conclusion. Negative pressure could significantly inhibit the growth of P. aeruginosa. It led to a decrease in the virulence factor secretion, biofilm formation, and a reduction in the expression level of virulence-regulated genes.

  3. Identification of flgZ as a flagellar gene encoding a PilZ domain protein that regulates swimming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Martínez-Granero

    Full Text Available Diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase enzymatic activities control c-di-GMP levels modulating planktonic versus sessile lifestyle behavior in bacteria. The PilZ domain is described as a sensor of c-di-GMP intracellular levels and the proteins containing a PilZ domain represent the best studied class of c-di-GMP receptors forming part of the c-di-GMP signaling cascade. In P. fluorescens F113 we have found two diguanylate cyclases (WspR, SadC and one phosphodiesterase (BifA implicated in regulation of swimming motility and biofilm formation. Here we identify a flgZ gene located in a flagellar operon encoding a protein that contains a PilZ domain. Moreover, we show that FlgZ subcellular localization depends on the c-di-GMP intracellular levels. The overexpression analysis of flgZ in P. fluorescens F113 and P. putida KT2440 backgrounds reveal a participation of FlgZ in Pseudomonas swimming motility regulation. Besides, the epistasis of flgZ over wspR and bifA clearly shows that c-di-GMP intracellular levels produced by the enzymatic activity of the diguanylate cyclase WspR and the phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm formation through FlgZ.

  4. Comprehension of texts in Digital Format versus Printed Texts and Self-Regulated Learning in University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Gabriela Flores-Carrasco

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims (1 to describe the levels of self-regulation and reading comprehension of scientific expository texts; (2 to establish the relationship between self-regulation and reading comprehension; and (3 to compare the performance in comprehension when the printed media (paper or digital media (computer is used. A quasi-experimental, quantitative, descriptive and correlative design was implemented. The sample was composed of 55 university students from four careers of Education; they were in 1st and 3rd year of study at a regional university of the Council of Rectors of Chilean Universities. Three measuring instruments were used: a questionnaire of self-regulated learning and two comprehension tests based on the understanding of Parodi’s (2005 assessment model. The implementation was made in two consecutive moments; first, the self-questionnaire; then, the tests for reading comprehension in both media. With the data obtained, statistical tests of variance, one-way ANOVA, Pearson’s correlation, and means comparison with Bruner and Munzel and U-Mann Whitney’s tests were calculated. In conclusion, and different from the initial statement, it was obtained that university students have an adequate level of self-regulation and low reading comprehension in both data, even the scores are relatively lower in digital data. In both data the output is inverse to the complexity of the questions. Between 1st and 3rd year, there is no increase either in the self-regulation or in reading comprehension; but, exceptionally, the career of Primary General Education specialist on Language and History did. There is a strong relationship between reading comprehension in printed media and self-regulation (ARATEX. The support does not affect reading comprehension, but individual reading skills of the subjects do. A competent reader will have similar performance in both reading supports.

  5. De novo appearance and "strain" formation of yeast prion [PSI+] are regulated by the heat-shock transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Won; Hahn, Ji-Sook; Fan, Qing; Thiele, Dennis J; Li, Liming

    2006-05-01

    Yeast prions are non-Mendelian genetic elements that are conferred by altered and self-propagating protein conformations. Such a protein conformation-based transmission is similar to that of PrP(Sc), the infectious protein responsible for prion diseases. Despite recent progress in understanding the molecular nature and epigenetic transmission of prions, the underlying mechanisms governing prion conformational switch and determining prion "strains" are not understood. We report here that the evolutionarily conserved heat-shock transcription factor (HSF) strongly influences yeast prion formation and strain determination. An hsf1 mutant lacking the amino-terminal activation domain inhibits the yeast prion [PSI+] formation whereas a mutant lacking the carboxyl-terminal activation domain promotes [PSI+] formation. Moreover, specific [PSI+] strains are preferentially formed in these mutants, demonstrating the importance of genetic makeup in determining de novo appearance of prion strains. Although these hsf1 mutants preferentially support the formation of certain [PSI+] strains, they are capable of receiving and faithfully propagating nonpreferable strains, suggesting that prion initiation and propagation are distinct processes requiring different cellular components. Our findings establish the importance of HSF in prion initiation and strain determination and imply a similar regulatory role of mammalian HSFs in the complex etiology of prion disease.

  6. The K/T-boundary carbonate breccia succession at the Cantarell Field, Campeche Bay area: a representative example of the influence of the Chicxulub meteorite-impact event on the formation of extraordinary petroleum reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo-Muñeton, G.; Grajales-Nishimura, J. M.; Velasquillo-Martínez, L. G.; García-Hernández, J.

    2013-05-01

    Over the last decade, intense petroleum exploration and exploitation activities have been conducted in the Campeche Bay area. Detailed stratigraphic studies in this region based on seismic, well logs, and core data have allowed the documentation of numerous deep-water carbonate breccia deposits throughout the Cretaceous stratigraphic column. However, the uppermost carbonate breccia succession is very distinctive in terms of its sedimentological properties compared to the underlying and older calcareous breccia layers. The unique characteristics of this deposit include: its unusual thickness, stratigraphic position, distribution, and content of impact-metamorphic constituents. At the Cantarell field, this carbonate breccia sedimentary package is a representative example of how the Chuxulub meteorite-impact event influenced the formation of a remarkable carbonate reservoir. This deposit was the most important oil-producing stratigraphic horizon for long time in that field. Nevertheless, this reservoir is still important not only in that field but also in other fields in offshore Campeche. The K/T boundary carbonate breccia succession is a typical fining-upward deposit made up, from base to top, of three units. The 50 to 300-m thick, basal Unit 1 consists of a coarse-grained carbonate breccia. Unit 2 is a 10 to 20 m-thick, fine-grained carbonate breccia. The 25 to 30 m-thick, uppermost Unit 3 is a greenish interval of friable sand, silt and clay-sized constituents with abundant ejecta material. In some wells, a 10 to 20 m-thick, non-oil producing fine-grained calcareous breccia occurs interbedded within Unit 3. The K/T boundary carbonate sedimentary package is underlain and overlain by deep-water shaly calcareous facies of Upper Maastrichtian and Lower Paleocene age, respectively. Studies of cronostratigraphic-equivalent outcrop analogs of this K/T boundary carbonate reservoir carried out by the authors in the Sierra de Chiapas (El Guayal, Tabasco and Bochil, Chiapas

  7. Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Molecular Clouds Regulated by Radiation Feedback Forces. I. Star Formation Rate and Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskutti, Sudhir; Ostriker, Eve C.; Skinner, M. Aaron

    2016-10-01

    Radiation feedback from stellar clusters is expected to play a key role in setting the rate and efficiency of star formation in giant molecular clouds. To investigate how radiation forces influence realistic turbulent systems, we have conducted a series of numerical simulations employing the Hyperion radiation hydrodynamics solver, considering the regime that is optically thick to ultraviolet and optically thin to infrared radiation. Our model clouds cover initial surface densities between Σ cl,0∼ 10--300 M⊙ pc-2, with varying initial turbulence. We follow them through turbulent, self-gravitating collapse, star cluster formation, and cloud dispersal by stellar radiation. All our models display a log-normal distribution of gas surface density Σ for an initial virial parameter αvir,0=2, the log-normal standard deviation is σln Σ =1-1.5 and the star formation rate coefficient ɛff,ρ=0.3-0.5, both of which are sensitive to turbulence but not radiation feedback. The net star formation efficiency (SFE) ɛfinal increases with Σcl,0 and decreases with α vir,0. We interpret these results via a simple conceptual framework, whereby steady star formation increases the radiation force, such that local gas patches at successively higher Σ become unbound. Based on this formalism (with fixed σln Σ), we provide an analytic upper bound on ɛfinal, which is in good agreement with our numerical results. The final SFE depends on the distribution of Eddington ratios in the cloud and is strongly increased by the turbulent compression of gas.

  8. Feedback-regulated star formation and escape of LyC photons from mini-haloes during reionisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimm, Taysun; Katz, Harley; Haehnelt, Martin; Rosdahl, Joakim; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne

    2017-01-01

    Reionisation in the early Universe is likely driven by dwarf galaxies. Using cosmological radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, we study star formation and the escape of Lyman continuum (LyC) photons from mini-haloes with M_halo ≲ 10^8 M_⊙. Our simulations include a new thermo-turbulent star formation model, non-equilibrium chemistry, and relevant stellar feedback processes (photoionisation by young massive stars, radiation pressure, and mechanical supernova explosions). We find that feedback reduces star formation very efficiently in mini-haloes, resulting in the stellar mass consistent with the slope and normalisation reported in Kimm & Cen (2014) and the empirical stellar mass-to-halo mass relation derived in the local Universe. Because star formation is stochastic and dominated by a few gas clumps, the escape fraction in mini-haloes is generally determined by radiation feedback (heating due to photo-ionisation), rather than supernova explosions. We also find that the photon number-weighted mean escape fraction in mini-haloes is higher (˜20-40%) than that in atomic-cooling haloes, although the instantaneous fraction in individual haloes varies significantly. The escape fraction from Pop III stars is found to be significant (≳ 10%) only when the mass is greater than ˜100 M_⊙. Based on simple analytic calculations, we show that LyC photons from mini-haloes are, despite their high escape fractions, of minor importance for reionisation due to inefficient star formation. We confirm previous claims that stars in atomic-cooling haloes with masses 10^8 M_⊙ ≲ M_halo ≲ 10^{11} M_⊙ are likely to be the most important source of reionisation.

  9. Generalized Supersymetric Boundary State

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Following our previous paper (hep-th/9909027), we generalize a supersymmetric boundary state so that arbitrary configuration of the gauge field coupled to the boundary of the worldsheet is incorpolated. This generalized boundary state is BRST invariant and satisfy the non-linear boundary conditions with non-constant gauge field strength. This boundary state contains divergence which is identical with the loop divergence in a superstring sigma model. Hence vanishing of the beta function in the...

  10. Study of Boundary Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    THEORY OF ABC-CBA STACKING BOUNDARY IN fcc STRUCTURE .......... 11 - 4 TRANSITIONS AND PHASE EQUILIBRIA AMONG GRAIN BOUNDARY STRUCTURES...19 B THEORY OF ABC-CBA STACKING BOUNDARY IN fcc STRUCTURE .......... 37 C TRANSITIONS AND PHASE EQUILIBRIA AMONG GRAIN BOUNDARY...layer structure. 10 SECTION 3 THEORY OF ABC-CBA STACKING BOUNDARY IN fcc STRUCTURE The (111) planes of the fcc structure is stacked as ABCABC... as

  11. IL1RAPL1 associated with mental retardation and autism regulates the formation and stabilization of glutamatergic synapses of cortical neurons through RhoA signaling pathway.

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    Takashi Hayashi

    Full Text Available Interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein-like 1 (IL1RAPL1 is associated with X-linked mental retardation and autism spectrum disorder. We found that IL1RAPL1 regulates synapse formation of cortical neurons. To investigate how IL1RAPL1 controls synapse formation, we here screened IL1RAPL1-interacting proteins by affinity chromatography and mass spectroscopy. IL1RAPL1 interacted with Mcf2-like (Mcf2l, a Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor, through the cytoplasmic Toll/IL-1 receptor domain. Knockdown of endogenous Mcf2l and treatment with an inhibitor of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK, the downstream kinase of RhoA, suppressed IL1RAPL1-induced excitatory synapse formation of cortical neurons. Furthermore, we found that the expression of IL1RAPL1 affected the turnover of AMPA receptor subunits. Insertion of GluA1-containing AMPA receptors to the cell surface was decreased, whereas that of AMPA receptors composed of GluA2/3 was enhanced. Mcf2l knockdown and ROCK inhibitor treatment diminished the IL1RAPL1-induced changes of AMPA receptor subunit insertions. Our results suggest that Mcf2l-RhoA-ROCK signaling pathway mediates IL1RAPL1-dependent formation and stabilization of glutamatergic synapses of cortical neurons.

  12. The small GTPase Rab5 homologue Ypt5 regulates cell morphology, sexual development, ion-stress response and vacuolar formation in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Yuta; Katayama, Chisako [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Shinohara, Miki; Shinohara, Akira [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Maekawa, Shohei [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Miyamoto, Masaaki, E-mail: miya@kobe-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Multiple functions of Rab5 GTPase in fission yeast were found. •Roles of Rab5 in fission yeast were discussed. •Relation between Rab5 and actin cytoskeleton were discussed. -- Abstract: Inner-membrane transport is critical to cell function. Rab family GTPases play an important role in vesicle transport. In mammalian cells, Rab5 is reported to be involved in the regulation of endosome formation, phagocytosis and chromosome alignment. Here, we examined the role of the fission yeast Rab5 homologue Ypt5 using a point mutant allele. Mutant cells displayed abnormal cell morphology, mating, sporulation, endocytosis, vacuole fusion and responses to ion stress. Our data strongly suggest that fission yeast Rab5 is involved in the regulation of various types of cellular functions.

  13. Formation of proximal and anterior limb skeleton requires early function of Irx3 and Irx5 and is negatively regulated by Shh signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Danyi; Sakuma, Rui; Vakili, Niki A; Mo, Rong; Puviindran, Vijitha; Deimling, Steven; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Hopyan, Sevan; Hui, Chi-chung

    2014-04-28

    Limb skeletal pattern relies heavily on graded Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. As a morphogen and growth cue, Shh regulates identities of posterior limb elements, including the ulna/fibula and digits 2 through 5. In contrast, proximal and anterior structures, including the humerus/femur, radius/tibia, and digit 1, are regarded as Shh independent, and mechanisms governing their specification are unclear. Here, we show that patterning of the proximal and anterior limb skeleton involves two phases. Irx3 and Irx5 (Irx3/5) are essential in the initiating limb bud to specify progenitors of the femur, tibia, and digit 1. However, these skeletal elements can be restored in Irx3/5 null mice when Shh signaling is diminished, indicating that Shh negatively regulates their formation after initiation. Our data provide genetic evidence supporting the concept of early specification and progressive determination of anterior limb pattern.

  14. Genistein, isoflavonoids in soybeans, prevents the formation of excess radiation-induced centrosomes via p21 up-regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Mikio; Kato, Akihiro [Department of Genome Repair Dynamics, Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Yoshida-konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Habu, Toshiyuki [Department of Radiation System Biology, Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Komatsu, Kenshi, E-mail: komatsu@house.rbc.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Genome Repair Dynamics, Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Yoshida-konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2011-11-01

    The centrosome is a cytoplasmic organelle which duplicates once during each cell cycle, and the presence of excess centrosomes promote chromosome instability through chromosome missegregation following cytokinesis. Ionizing radiation (IR) can induce extra centrosomes by permitting the continuation of CDK2/Cyclin-A/E-mediated centrosome duplication when cells are arrested in the cell cycle after irradiation. The work described here shows that, in addition to IR, extra centrosomes were induced in human U2OS and mouse NIH3T3 cells after treatment with agents which include DNA adduct-forming chemicals: benzopyrene (BP), 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO), a DNA cross linker: cis-diamminedichloro-platinum (cisplatin), topoisomerase inhibitors: camptothecin, etoposide, genistein, and ultra-violet light (UV). These agents were divided into two categories with respect to the regulation of p21, which is an inhibitor of CDK2/Cyclin-A/E: specifically, p21 was up-regulated by an IR exposure and treatment with topoisomerase inhibitors. However, UV, BP, 4NQO and cisplatin down-regulated p21 below basal levels. When cells were irradiated with IR in combination with all of these agents, except genistein, enhanced induction of extra centrosomes was observed, regardless of the nature of p21 expression. Genistein significantly suppressed the frequency of IR-induced extra centrosomes in a dose-dependent manner, and 20 {mu}g/ml of genistein reduced this frequency to 66%. Consistent with this, genistein substantially up-regulated p21 expression over the induction caused by IR alone, while other agents down-regulated or marginally affected this. This suggests the inhibitory effect of genistein on the induction of extra centrosomes occurs through the inactivation of CDK2/Cyclin-A/E via p21 up-regulation. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that p21 knockdown with siRNA reduced the activity of CDK2/Cyclin-A/E and restored the enhanced effect of a combined treatment with genistein

  15. Transition in hypersonic boundary layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanhong Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Transition and turbulence production in a hypersonic boundary layer is investigated in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using Rayleigh-scattering visualization, fast-response pressure measurements, and particle image velocimetry. It is found that the second-mode instability is a key modulator of the transition process. Although the second-mode is primarily an acoustic wave, it causes the formation of high-frequency vortical waves, which triggers a fast transition to turbulence.

  16. A short-term zinc-deficient diet decreases bone formation through down-regulated BMP2 in rat bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takako; Katsumata, Shin-Ichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kazuharu

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the effects of a short-term dietary zinc deficiency on bone metabolism. Zinc deficiency increased the mRNA expression of zinc uptake transporters such as Zip1, Zip13, and Zip14 in bone. However, zinc deficiency might not maintain zinc storage in bone, resulting in a decrease in bone formation through downregulation of the expression levels of osteoblastogenesis-related genes.

  17. FORMATION OF A MEGA-REGULATOR AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR CREATING AN INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL CENTER IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia N. Snezhko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses long-term and short-term effects in the formation of the Russian Federation megaregulator financial market. Paying attention to the analysisof the stages of creating this structure.It is emphasized that megaregulator operate in many countries, but for the RussianFederation is a brand new structure, the creation of which correlates with the creation in Moscow an international financial center.

  18. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Regulates Dendritic Spine Formation and Maintenance of Cortical Neuron in the Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Naoki; He, Xiaojuan; Sasamoto, Kodai; Mishiba, Tomohide; Ohshima, Toshio

    2016-03-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) activity is dependent on its association with 1 of 2 neuron-specific activators, p35 or p39. Cdk5 and its activators play an important role in brain development as well as higher functions like synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Reduction in p35 was reported in postmortem schizophrenia brain, in which reduced dendritic spine density was observed. Previous in vitro experiments have shown that Cdk5 is involved in dendritic spine formation, although in vivo evidence is limited. We examined dendritic spine formation in inducible-p35 conditional knockout (p35 cKO); p39 KO mice. When we deleted the p35 gene either during early postnatal days or at adult stage, we observed reduced spine densities of layer V neurons in the cerebral cortex and CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus. We further generated CA1-specific p35 conditional knockout (CA1-p35 cKO) mice and also CA1-p35 cKO; p39 KO mice in which have specific deletion of p35 in the CA1 region of hippocampus. We found a greater reduction in spine densities in CA1 pyramidal neurons in CA1-p35 cKO; p39 KO mice than in CA1-p35 cKO mice. These results indicate that dendritic spine formation and neuronal maintenance are dependent on Cdk5 activity.

  19. Matrix metalloproteinases regulate the formation of dendritic spine head protrusions during chemically induced long-term potentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Szepesi

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are are small membranous protrusions that extend from neuronal dendrites and harbor the majority of excitatory synapses. Increasing evidence has shown that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, a family of extracellularly acting and Zn(2+-dependent endopeptidases, are able to rapidly modulate dendritic spine morphology. Spine head protrusions (SHPs are filopodia-like processes that extend from the dendritic spine head, representing a form of postsynaptic structural remodeling in response to altered neuronal activity. Herein, we show that chemically induced long-term potentiation (cLTP in dissociated hippocampal cultures upregulates MMP-9 activity that controls the formation of SHPs. Blocking of MMPs activity or microtubule dynamics abolishes the emergence of SHPs. In addition, autoactive recombinant MMP-9, promotes the formation of SHPs in organotypic hippocampal slices. Furthermore, spines with SHPs gained postsynaptic α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA receptors upon cLTP and the synaptic delivery of AMPA receptors was controlled by MMPs. The present results strongly imply that MMP-9 is functionally involved in the formation of SHPs and the control of postsynaptic receptor distribution upon cLTP.

  20. The regulation of star formation in cool-core clusters: imprints on the stellar populations of brightest cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Loubser, S I; Hoekstra, H; Mahdavi, A; Donahue, M; Bildfell, C; Voit, G M

    2015-01-01

    A fraction of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) shows bright emission in the UV and the blue part of the optical spectrum, which has been interpreted as evidence of recent star formation. Most of these results are based on the analysis of broadband photometric data. Here, we study the optical spectra of a sample of 19 BCGs hosted by X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.3, a subset from the Canadian Cluster Comparison Project (CCCP) sample. We identify plausible star formation histories of the galaxies by fitting Simple Stellar Populations (SSPs) as well as composite populations, consisting of a young stellar component superimposed on an intermediate/old stellar component, to accurately constrain their star formation histories. We detect prominent young (~200 Myr) stellar populations in 4 of the 19 galaxies. Of the four, the BCG in Abell 1835 shows remarkable A-type stellar features indicating a relatively large population of young stars, which is extremely unusual even amongst star forming BCG...

  1. Numerical Simulations of Turbulent, Molecular Clouds Regulated by Radiation Feedback Forces I: Star Formation Rate and Efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Raskutti, Sudhir; Skinner, M Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Radiation feedback from stellar clusters is expected to play a key role in setting the rate and efficiency of star formation in giant molecular clouds (GMCs). To investigate how radiation forces influence realistic turbulent systems, we have conducted a series of numerical simulations employing the {\\it Hyperion} radiation hydrodynamics solver, considering the regime that is optically thick to ultraviolet (UV) and optically thin to infrared (IR) radiation. Our model clouds cover initial surface densities between $\\Sigma_{\\rm cl,0} \\sim 10-300~M_{\\odot}~{\\rm pc^{-2}}$, with varying initial turbulence. We follow them through turbulent, self-gravitating collapse, formation of star clusters, and cloud dispersal by stellar radiation. All our models display a lognormal distribution of gas surface density $\\Sigma$; for an initial virial parameter $\\alpha_{\\rm vir,0} = 2$, the lognormal standard deviation is $\\sigma_{\\rm ln \\Sigma} = 1-1.5$ and the star formation rate coefficient $\\varepsilon_{\\rm ff,\\bar\\rho} = 0.3-...

  2. Metabolic regulation of neutrophil spreading, membrane tubulovesicular extensions (cytonemes) formation and intracellular pH upon adhesion to fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkina, Svetlana I; Sud'ina, Galina F; Klein, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Circulating leukocytes have a round cell shape and roll along vessel walls. However, metabolic disorders can lead them to adhere to the endothelium and spread (flatten). We studied the metabolic regulation of adhesion, spreading and intracellular pH (pHi) of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes) upon adhesion to fibronectin-coated substrata. Resting neutrophils adhered and spread on fibronectin. An increase in pHi accompanied neutrophil spreading. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation or inhibition of P- and F-type ATPases affected neither neutrophil spreading nor pHi. Inhibition of glucose metabolism or V-ATPase impaired neutrophil spreading, blocked the increase in the pHi and induced extrusion of membrane tubulovesicular extensions (cytonemes), anchoring cells to substrata. Omission of extracellular Na(+) and inhibition of chloride channels caused a similar effect. We propose that these tubulovesicular extensions represent protrusions of exocytotic trafficking, supplying the plasma membrane of neutrophils with ion exchange mechanisms and additional membrane for spreading. Glucose metabolism and V-type ATPase could affect fusion of exocytotic trafficking with the plasma membrane, thus controlling neutrophil adhesive state and pHi. Cl(-) efflux through chloride channels and Na(+) influx seem to be involved in the regulation of the V-ATPase by carrying out charge compensation for the proton-pumping activity and through V-ATPase in regulation of neutrophil spreading and pHi.

  3. [Participation of the antibiotics of Bac. pumilus and Bac. subtilis in the regulation of bacterial spore formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, A A; Korolev, V I

    1979-03-01

    Sporulation and antibiotic production, as well as the effect of exogenic antibacterial substances on bacterial sporogenesis were studied in various strains of Bac. pumilus and Bac. pumilus and Bac. subtilis. The bacteria were grown on a solid sporulation medium with and without the antibiotics. After 5-day incubation the presence of refractyl spores was determined with a phase-contrast method. It was found that in the strains of Bac. pumilus producing antibacterial substances the sporulation was normal. The loss of the capacity for synthesizing such substances resulted in asporegenicity or oligosporogenicity. This allowed a conclusion on existence of phenomenological connection between sporulation and antibiotic production. The study of the antibiotic effect on bacterial sporogenesis showed negative results which are discussed in the paper along two directions: (1) the antibiotics did not probably participate in regulation of the bacteria cell differentiation, (2) the antibiotics regulated the bacterial sporogenesis though their effect was not as yet detected because of methodical difficulties. Therefore, the problem of the antibiotic participation in regulation of sporulation in Bac. pumilus and Bac. subtilis remains open.

  4. A role for the retinoblastoma protein as a regulator of mouse osteoblast cell adhesion: implications for osteogenesis and osteosarcoma formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette Sosa-García

    Full Text Available The retinoblastoma protein (pRb is a cell cycle regulator inactivated in most human cancers. Loss of pRb function results from mutations in the gene coding for pRb or for any of its upstream regulators. Although pRb is predominantly known as a cell cycle repressor, our data point to additional pRb functions in cell adhesion. Our data show that pRb regulates the expression of a wide repertoire of cell adhesion genes and regulates the assembly of the adherens junctions required for cell adhesion. We conducted our studies in osteoblasts, which depend on both pRb and on cell-to-cell contacts for their differentiation and function. We generated knockout mice in which the RB gene was excised specifically in osteoblasts using the cre-lox P system and found that osteoblasts from pRb knockout mice did not assemble adherens junction at their membranes. pRb depletion in wild type osteoblasts using RNAi also disrupted adherens junctions. Microarrays comparing pRb-expressing and pRb-deficient osteoblasts showed that pRb controls the expression of a number of cell adhesion genes, including cadherins. Furthermore, pRb knockout mice showed bone abnormalities consistent with osteoblast adhesion defects. We also found that pRb controls the function of merlin, a well-known regulator of adherens junction assembly, by repressing Rac1 and its effector Pak1. Using qRT-PCR, immunoblots, co-immunoprecipitation assays, and immunofluorescent labeling, we observed that pRb loss resulted in Rac1 and Pak1 overexpression concomitant with merlin inactivation by Pak1, merlin detachment from the membrane, and adherens junction loss. Our data support a pRb function in cell adhesion while elucidating the mechanism for this function. Our work suggests that in some tumor types pRb inactivation results in both a loss of cell cycle control that promotes initial tumor growth as well as in a loss of cell-to-cell contacts, which contributes to later stages of metastasis.

  5. Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 RpoN (Sigma 54 Is a Pleiotropic Regulator of Growth, Carbohydrate Metabolism, Motility, Biofilm Formation and Toxin Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasmik Hayrapetyan

    Full Text Available Sigma 54 is a transcriptional regulator predicted to play a role in physical interaction of bacteria with their environment, including virulence and biofilm formation. In order to study the role of Sigma 54 in Bacillus cereus, a comparative transcriptome and phenotypic study was performed using B. cereus ATCC 14579 WT, a markerless rpoN deletion mutant, and its complemented strain. The mutant was impaired in many different cellular functions including low temperature and anaerobic growth, carbohydrate metabolism, sporulation and toxin production. Additionally, the mutant showed lack of motility and biofilm formation at air-liquid interphase, and this correlated with absence of flagella, as flagella staining showed only WT and complemented strain to be highly flagellated. Comparative transcriptome analysis of cells harvested at selected time points during growth in aerated and static conditions in BHI revealed large differences in gene expression associated with loss of phenotypes, including significant down regulation of genes in the mutant encoding enzymes involved in degradation of branched chain amino acids, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, flagella synthesis and virulence factors. Our study provides evidence for a pleiotropic role of Sigma 54 in B. cereus supporting its adaptive response and survival in a range of conditions and environments.

  6. Effects of Arg-Gly-Asp-modified elastin-like polypeptide on pseudoislet formation via up-regulation of cell adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong-Min; Jung, Gwon-Soo; Park, Jin-Kyu; Choi, Seong-Kyoon; Jeon, Won Bae

    2013-03-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in controlling the β-cell morphology, survival and insulin secretary functions. An RGD-modified elastin-like polypeptide (RGD-ELP), TGPG[VGRGD(VGVPG)(6)](20)WPC, has been reported previously as a bioactive matrix. In this study, to investigate whether RGD-ELP affects β-cell growth characteristics and insulin secretion, β-TC6 cells were cultured on the RGD-ELP coatings prepared via thermally induced phase transition. On RGD-ELP, β-TC6 cells clustered into an islet-like architecture with high cell viability. Throughout 7days' culture, the proliferation rate of the cells within a pseudoislet was similar to that of monolayer culture. Under high glucose (25mM), β-TC6 pseudoislets showed up-regulated insulin gene expression and exhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Importantly, the mRNA and protein abundances of cell adhesion molecules (CAM) E-cadherin and connexin-36 were much higher in pseudoislets than in monolayer cells. The siRNA-mediated inhibition of E-cadherin or connexin-36 expression severely limited pseudoislet formation. In addition, the mRNA levels of collagen types I and IV, fibronectin and laminin were significantly elevated in pseudoislets. The results suggest that RGD-ELP promotes pseudoislet formation via up-regulation of the CAM and ECM components. The functional roles of RGD-ELP are discussed in respect of its molecular composition.

  7. Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 RpoN (Sigma 54) Is a Pleiotropic Regulator of Growth, Carbohydrate Metabolism, Motility, Biofilm Formation and Toxin Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayrapetyan, Hasmik; Tempelaars, Marcel; Nierop Groot, Masja; Abee, Tjakko

    2015-01-01

    Sigma 54 is a transcriptional regulator predicted to play a role in physical interaction of bacteria with their environment, including virulence and biofilm formation. In order to study the role of Sigma 54 in Bacillus cereus, a comparative transcriptome and phenotypic study was performed using B. cereus ATCC 14579 WT, a markerless rpoN deletion mutant, and its complemented strain. The mutant was impaired in many different cellular functions including low temperature and anaerobic growth, carbohydrate metabolism, sporulation and toxin production. Additionally, the mutant showed lack of motility and biofilm formation at air-liquid interphase, and this correlated with absence of flagella, as flagella staining showed only WT and complemented strain to be highly flagellated. Comparative transcriptome analysis of cells harvested at selected time points during growth in aerated and static conditions in BHI revealed large differences in gene expression associated with loss of phenotypes, including significant down regulation of genes in the mutant encoding enzymes involved in degradation of branched chain amino acids, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, flagella synthesis and virulence factors. Our study provides evidence for a pleiotropic role of Sigma 54 in B. cereus supporting its adaptive response and survival in a range of conditions and environments.

  8. The master regulator for biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis governs the expression of an operon encoding secreted proteins required for the assembly of complex multicellular communities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branda, Steven S. (Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA); Losick, Richard (Harvard University, Cambridge, MA); Kolter, Roberto (Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA); Kearns, Daniel B. (Harvard University, Cambridge, MA); Chu, Frances (Harvard University, Cambridge, MA)

    2005-08-01

    Wild strains of Bacillus subtilis are capable of forming architecturally complex communities of cells known as biofilms. Critical to biofilm formation is the eps operon, which is believed to be responsible for the biosynthesis of an exopolysaccharide that binds chains of cells together in bundles. We report that transcription of eps is under the negative regulation of SinR, a repressor that was found to bind to multiple sites in the regulatory region of the operon. Mutations in sinR bypassed the requirement in biofilm formation of two genes of unknown function, ylbF and ymcA, and sinI, which is known to encode an antagonist of SinR. We propose that these genes are members of a pathway that is responsible for counteracting SinR-mediated repression. We further propose that SinR is a master regulator that governs the transition between a planktonic state in which the bacteria swim as single cells in liquid or swarm in small groups over surfaces, and a sessile state in which the bacteria adhere to each other to form bundled chains and assemble into multicellular communities.

  9. Ubiquitination of HTLV-I Tax in response to DNA damage regulates nuclear complex formation and nuclear export

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marriott Susan J

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HTLV-I oncoprotein, Tax, is a pleiotropic protein whose activity is partially regulated by its ability to interact with, and perturb the functions of, numerous cellular proteins. Tax is predominantly a nuclear protein that localizes to nuclear foci known as Tax Speckled Structures (TSS. We recently reported that the localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins are altered in response to various forms of genotoxic and cellular stress. The level of cytoplasmic Tax increases in response to stress and this relocalization depends upon the interaction of Tax with CRM1. Cellular pathways and signals that regulate the subcellular localization of Tax remain to be determined. However, post-translational modifications including sumoylation and ubiquitination are known to influence the subcellular localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins. The sumoylated form of Tax exists predominantly in the nucleus while ubiquitinated Tax exists predominantly in the cytoplasm. Therefore, we hypothesized that post-translational modifications of Tax that occur in response to DNA damage regulate the localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins. Results We found a significant increase in mono-ubiquitination of Tax in response to UV irradiation. Mutation of specific lysine residues (K280 and K284 within Tax inhibited DNA damage-induced ubiquitination. In contrast to wild-type Tax, which undergoes transient nucleocytoplasmic shuttling in response to DNA damage, the K280 and K284 mutants were retained in nuclear foci following UV irradiation and remained co-localized with the cellular TSS protein, sc35. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the localization of Tax, and its interactions with cellular proteins, are dynamic following DNA damage and depend on the post-translational modification status of Tax. Specifically, DNA damage induces the ubiquitination of Tax at K280 and K284

  10. Cbln1 regulates rapid formation and maintenance of excitatory synapses in mature cerebellar Purkinje cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito-Ishida, Aya; Miura, Eriko; Emi, Kyoichi; Matsuda, Keiko; Iijima, Takatoshi; Kondo, Tetsuro; Kohda, Kazuhisa; Watanabe, Masahiko; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2008-06-04

    Although many synapse-organizing molecules have been identified in vitro, their functions in mature neurons in vivo have been mostly unexplored. Cbln1, which belongs to the C1q/tumor necrosis factor superfamily, is the most recently identified protein involved in synapse formation in the mammalian CNS. In the cerebellum, Cbln1 is predominantly produced and secreted from granule cells; cbln1-null mice show ataxia and a severe reduction in the number of synapses between Purkinje cells and parallel fibers (PFs), the axon bundle of granule cells. Here, we show that application of recombinant Cbln1 specifically and reversibly induced PF synapse formation in dissociated cbln1-null Purkinje cells in culture. Cbln1 also rapidly induced electrophysiologically functional and ultrastructurally normal PF synapses in acutely prepared cbln1-null cerebellar slices. Furthermore, a single injection of recombinant Cbln1 rescued severe ataxia in adult cbln1-null mice in vivo by completely, but transiently, restoring PF synapses. Therefore, Cbln1 is a unique synapse organizer that is required not only for the normal development of PF-Purkinje cell synapses but also for their maintenance in the mature cerebellum both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, our results indicate that Cbln1 can also rapidly organize new synapses in adult cerebellum, implying its therapeutic potential for cerebellar ataxic disorders.

  11. Regulation of self-renewing neural progenitors by FGF/ERK signaling controls formation of the inferior colliculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Alexander; Li, Kairong; Heng, Xin; Guo, Qiuxia; Li, James Y H

    2016-10-15

    The embryonic tectum displays an anteroposterior gradient in development and produces the superior colliculus and inferior colliculus. Studies suggest that partition of the tectum is controlled by different strengths and durations of FGF signals originated from the so-called isthmic organizer at the mid/hindbrain junction; however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. We show that deleting Ptpn11, which links FGF with the ERK pathway, prevents inferior colliculus formation by depleting a previously uncharacterized stem cell zone. The stem-zone loss is attributed to shortening of S phase and acceleration of cell cycle exit and neurogenesis. Expression of a constitutively active Mek1 (Mek1(DD)), the known ERK activator, restores the tectal stem zone and the inferior colliculus without Ptpn11. By contrast, Mek1(DD) expression fails to rescue the tectal stem zone and the inferior colliculus in the absence of Fgf8 and the isthmic organizer, indicating that FGF and Mek1(DD) initiate qualitatively and/or quantitatively distinctive signaling. Together, our data show that the formation of the inferior colliculus relies on the provision of new cells from the tectal stem zone. Furthermore, distinctive ERK signaling mediates Fgf8 in the control of cell survival, tissue polarity and cytogenetic gradient during the development of the tectum.

  12. The OxyR homologue in Tannerella forsythia regulates expression of oxidative stress responses and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Kiyonobu; Mishima, Elina; Inagaki, Satoru; Sharma, Ashu

    2009-06-01

    Tannerella forsythia is an anaerobic periodontal pathogen that encounters constant oxidative stress in the human oral cavity due to exposure to air and reactive oxidative species from coexisting dental plaque bacteria as well as leukocytes. In this study, we sought to characterize a T. forsythia ORF with close similarity to bacterial oxidative stress response sensor protein OxyR. To analyse the role of this OxyR homologue, a gene deletion mutant was constructed and characterized. Aerotolerance, survival after hydrogen peroxide challenge and transcription levels of known bacterial antioxidant genes were then determined. Since an association between oxidative stress and biofilm formation has been observed in bacterial systems, we also investigated the role of the OxyR protein in biofilm development by T. forsythia. Our results showed that aerotolerance, sensitivity to peroxide challenge and the expression of oxidative stress response genes were significantly reduced in the mutant as compared with the wild-type strain. Moreover, the results of biofilm analyses showed that, as compared with the wild-type strain, the oxyR mutant showed significantly less autoaggregation and a reduced ability to form mixed biofilms with Fusobacterium nucleatum. In conclusion, a gene annotated in the T. forsythia genome as an oxyR homologue was characterized. Our studies showed that the oxyR homologue in T. forsythia constitutively activates antioxidant genes involved in resistance to peroxides as well as oxygen stress (aerotolerance). In addition, the oxyR deletion attenuates biofilm formation in T. forsythia.

  13. Transcriptional profiling of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) roots indicates down-regulation of lignin biosynthesis and up-regulation of starch biosynthesis at an early stage of storage root formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The number of fibrous roots that develop into storage roots determines sweetpotato yield. The aim of the present study was to identify the molecular mechanisms involved in the initiation of storage root formation, by performing a detailed transcriptomic analysis of initiating storage roots using next-generation sequencing platforms. A two-step approach was undertaken: (1) generating a database for the sweetpotato root transcriptome using 454-Roche sequencing of a cDNA library created from pooled samples of two root types: fibrous and initiating storage roots; (2) comparing the expression profiles of initiating storage roots and fibrous roots, using the Illumina Genome Analyzer to sequence cDNA libraries of the two root types and map the data onto the root transcriptome database. Results Use of the 454-Roche platform generated a total of 524,607 reads, 85.6% of which were clustered into 55,296 contigs that matched 40,278 known genes. The reads, generated by the Illumina Genome Analyzer, were found to map to 31,284 contigs out of the 55,296 contigs serving as the database. A total of 8,353 contigs were found to exhibit differential expression between the two root types (at least 2.5-fold change). The Illumina-based differential expression results were validated for nine putative genes using quantitative real-time PCR. The differential expression profiles indicated down-regulation of classical root functions, such as transport, as well as down-regulation of lignin biosynthesis in initiating storage roots, and up-regulation of carbohydrate metabolism and starch biosynthesis. In addition, data indicated delicate control of regulators of meristematic tissue identity and maintenance, associated with the initiation of storage root formation. Conclusions This study adds a valuable resource of sweetpotato root transcript sequences to available data, facilitating the identification of genes of interest. This resource enabled us to identify genes that are involved

  14. Defining an EPOR- regulated transcriptome for primary progenitors, including Tnfr-sf13c as a novel mediator of EPO- dependent erythroblast formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Seema; Dev, Arvind; Verma, Rakesh; Pradeep, Anamika; Sathyanarayana, Pradeep; Green, Jennifer M; Narayanan, Aishwarya; Wojchowski, Don M

    2012-01-01

    Certain concepts concerning EPO/EPOR action modes have been challenged by in vivo studies: Bcl-x levels are elevated in maturing erythroblasts, but not in their progenitors; truncated EPOR alleles that lack a major p85/PI3K recruitment site nonetheless promote polycythemia; and Erk1 disruption unexpectedly bolsters erythropoiesis. To discover novel EPO/EPOR action routes, global transcriptome analyses presently are applied to interrogate EPO/EPOR effects on primary bone marrow-derived CFUe-like progenitors. Overall, 160 EPO/EPOR target transcripts were significantly modulated 2-to 21.8-fold. A unique set of EPO-regulated survival factors included Lyl1, Gas5, Pim3, Pim1, Bim, Trib3 and Serpina 3g. EPO/EPOR-modulated cell cycle mediators included Cdc25a, Btg3, Cyclin-d2, p27-kip1, Cyclin-g2 and CyclinB1-IP-1. EPO regulation of signal transduction factors was also interestingly complex. For example, not only Socs3 plus Socs2 but also Spred2, Spred1 and Eaf1 were EPO-induced as negative-feedback components. Socs2, plus five additional targets, further proved to comprise new EPOR/Jak2/Stat5 response genes (which are important for erythropoiesis during anemia). Among receptors, an atypical TNF-receptor Tnfr-sf13c was up-modulated >5-fold by EPO. Functionally, Tnfr-sf13c ligation proved to both promote proerythroblast survival, and substantially enhance erythroblast formation. The EPOR therefore engages a sophisticated set of transcriptome response circuits, with Tnfr-sf13c deployed as one novel positive regulator of proerythroblast formation.

  15. The four-herb Chinese medicine ANBP enhances wound healing and inhibits scar formation via bidirectional regulation of transformation growth factor pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Qian; He, Wen-Jun; Hao, Hao-Jie; Han, Qing-Wang; Chen, Li; Dong, Liang; Liu, Jie-Jie; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Ya-Jing; Ma, Ying-Zhi; Han, Wei-Dong; Fu, Xiao-Bing

    2014-01-01

    The four-herb Chinese medicine ANBP is a pulverized mixture of four herbs including Agrimonia Eupatoria (A), Nelumbo Nucifera Gaertn (N), Boswellia Carteri (B) and Pollen Typhae Angustifoliae (P). The combination of the four herbs was first described in Chinese canonical medicine about 2000 years ago for treatment of various trauma disorders, such as hemostasis, antiinflammatory, analgesia, and wound healing, etc. However, the precise mechanisms of ANBP are still unclear. In our study, using rabbit ear hypertrophic scar models of full-thickness skin defect, we showed that local ANBP treatment not only significantly enhanced wound healing by relieving inflammation, increasing formation of granulation tissue and accelerating re-epithelialization, but also reduced scar formation by decreasing collagen production, protuberant height and volume of scars, and increasing collagen maturity. We demonstrated that these effects of ANBP are associated with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-mediated signalling pathways through Smad-dependent pathways. ANBP treatment significantly increased expression of TGF-β1 and Smad2/3 mRNA at the early stage of wound healing, and led to markedly decrease expression of TGF-β1 and Smad2/3 compared with the control group after 14 days post-wounding. Taken together, our results defined a bidirectional regulation role of ANBP for TGF-β1/Smad pathway in promoting wound healing and alleviating scar formation, which may be an effective therapy for human wounds at the earliest stage.

  16. The four-herb Chinese medicine ANBP enhances wound healing and inhibits scar formation via bidirectional regulation of transformation growth factor pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Hou

    Full Text Available The four-herb Chinese medicine ANBP is a pulverized mixture of four herbs including Agrimonia Eupatoria (A, Nelumbo Nucifera Gaertn (N, Boswellia Carteri (B and Pollen Typhae Angustifoliae (P. The combination of the four herbs was first described in Chinese canonical medicine about 2000 years ago for treatment of various trauma disorders, such as hemostasis, antiinflammatory, analgesia, and wound healing, etc. However, the precise mechanisms of ANBP are still unclear. In our study, using rabbit ear hypertrophic scar models of full-thickness skin defect, we showed that local ANBP treatment not only significantly enhanced wound healing by relieving inflammation, increasing formation of granulation tissue and accelerating re-epithelialization, but also reduced scar formation by decreasing collagen production, protuberant height and volume of scars, and increasing collagen maturity. We demonstrated that these effects of ANBP are associated with transforming growth factor (TGF-β1-mediated signalling pathways through Smad-dependent pathways. ANBP treatment significantly increased expression of TGF-β1 and Smad2/3 mRNA at the early stage of wound healing, and led to markedly decrease expression of TGF-β1 and Smad2/3 compared with the control group after 14 days post-wounding. Taken together, our results defined a bidirectional regulation role of ANBP for TGF-β1/Smad pathway in promoting wound healing and alleviating scar formation, which may be an effective therapy for human wounds at the earliest stage.

  17. RNA:DNA complex formation upon transcription of immunoglobulin switch regions: implications for the mechanism and regulation of class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, G A; Lieber, M R

    1995-01-01

    Central the regulation and mechanism of class switch recombination is the understanding of the relationship between transcription and DNA recombination. We demonstrated previously, using mini-chromosome substrates, that physiologically oriented transcription is required for recombination to occur between switch regions. In this report, we demonstrate the formation of an RNA:DNA complex under in vitro transcription conditions for these same and other switch DNA fragments. We find that cell-free transcription of repetitive murine switch regions (Smu, S gamma 2b and S gamma 3) leads to altered DNA mobility on agarose gels. These altered mobilities are resistant to RNase A but sensitive to RNase H. Transcription in the presence of labeled ribonucleotides demonstrates the stable physical association of the RNA with the DNA. Importantly, complex formation only occurs upon transcription in the physiologic orientation. Reaban and Griffin [1990 Nature, 348, 342-344] found an RNA:DNA hybrid structure that was limited to an atypical 143 nucleotide purine region within a 2.3 kb S alpha segment. Here we demonstrate RNA:DNA hybrid formation in more typical switch sequences (lacking the atypical 143 nucleotide purine tract) from a variety of switch regions that are only 60-70% purine on the non-template strand. These results suggest a general model involving an RNA:DNA complex as an intermediate during class switch recombination. Images PMID:8559658

  18. The Plasmasphere Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Carpenter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available As an inner magnetospheric phenomenon the plasmapause region is of interest for a number of reasons, one being the occurrence there of geophysically important interactions between the plasmas of the hot plasma sheet and of the cool plasmasphere. There is a need for a conceptual framework within which to examine and discuss these interactions and their consequences, and we therefore suggest that the plasmapause region be called the Plasmasphere Boundary Layer, or PBL. Such a term has been slow to emerge because of the complexity and variability of the plasma populations that can exist near the plasmapause and because of the variety of criteria used to identify the plasmapause in experimental data. Furthermore, and quite importantly in our view, a substantial obstacle to the consideration of the plasmapause region as a boundary layer has been the longstanding tendency of textbooks on space physics to limit introductory material on the plasmapause phenomenon to zeroth order descriptions in terms of ideal MHD theory, thus implying that the plasmasphere is relatively well understood. A textbook may introduce the concept of shielding of the inner magnetosphere from perturbing convection electric fields, but attention is not usually paid to the variety of physical processes reported to occur in the PBL, such as heating, instabilities, and fast longitudinal flows, processes which must play roles in plasmasphere dynamics in concert with the flow regimes associated with the major dynamo sources of electric fields. We believe that through the use of the PBL concept in future textbook discussions of the plasmasphere and in scientific communications, much progress can be made on longstanding questions about the physics involved in the formation of the plasmapause and in the cycles of erosion and recovery of the plasmasphere.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere; plasma convection; MHD waves and instabilities

  19. County Political Boundaries (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — County boundaries with political limit - boundaries extending into the ocean (NTAD 2015). The TIGER/Line shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) are an extract...

  20. Allegheny County Municipal Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the municipal boundaries in Allegheny County. Data was created to portray the boundaries of the 130 Municipalities in Allegheny County the...

  1. State Agency Administrative Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This database comprises 28 State agency boundaries and point of contact. The Kansas Geological Survey collected legal descriptions of the boundaries for various...

  2. HUD GIS Boundary Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The HUD GIS Boundary Files are intended to supplement boundary files available from the U.S. Census Bureau. The files are for community planners interested in...

  3. The histone H3K9 methylation and RNAi pathways regulate normalnucleolar and repeated DNA organization by inhibiting formation ofextrachromosomal DNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2006-06-15

    In order to identify regulators of nuclear organization, Drosophila mutants in the Su(var)3-9 histone H3K9 methyltransferase, RNAi pathway components, and other regulators of heterochromatin-mediated gene silencing were examined for altered nucleoli and positioning of repeated DNAs. Animals lacking components of the H3K9 methylation and RNAi pathways contained disorganized nucleoli, ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and satellite DNAs. The levels of H3K9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) in chromatin associated with repeated DNAs decreased dramatically in Su(var)3-9 and dcr-2 (dicer-2) mutant tissues compared to wild type. We also observed a substantial increase in extrachromosomal repeated DNAs in mutant tissues. The disorganized nucleolus phenotype depends on the presence of Ligase 4 (Lig4), and ecc DNA formation is not induced by removal of cohesin. We conclude that H3K9 methylation of rDNA and satellites, maintained by Su(var)3-9, HP1, and the RNAi pathway, is necessary for the structural stability of repeated DNAs, which is mediated through suppression of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). These results suggest a mechanism for how local chromatin structure can regulate genome stability, and the organization of chromosomal elements and nuclear organelles.

  4. The NDR/LATS kinase Cbk1 controls the activity of the transcriptional regulator Bcr1 during biofilm formation in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Gutiérrez-Escribano

    Full Text Available In nature, many microorganisms form specialized complex, multicellular, surface-attached communities called biofilms. These communities play critical roles in microbial pathogenesis. The fungal pathogen Candida albicans is associated with catheter-based infections due to its ability to establish biofilms. The transcription factor Bcr1 is a master regulator of C. albicans biofilm development, although the full extent of its regulation remains unknown. Here, we report that Bcr1 is a phosphoprotein that physically interacts with the NDR kinase Cbk1 and undergoes Cbk1-dependent phosphorylation. Mutating the two putative Cbk1 phosphoacceptor residues in Bcr1 to alanine markedly impaired Bcr1 function during biofilm formation and virulence in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis. Cells lacking Cbk1, or any of its upstream activators, also had reduced biofilm development. Notably, mutating the two putative Cbk1 phosphoacceptor residues in Bcr1 to glutamate in cbk1Δ cells upregulated the transcription of Bcr1-dependent genes and partially rescued the biofilm defects of a cbk1Δ strain. Therefore, our data uncovered a novel role of the NDR/LATS kinase Cbk1 in the regulation of biofilm development through the control of Bcr1.

  5. Regulation of Pattern Formation and Gene Amplification During Drosophila Oogenesis by the miR-318 microRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ge, Wanzhong; Deng, Qiannan; Guo, Ting;

    2015-01-01

    Pattern formation during epithelial development requires the coordination of multiple signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the functions of an ovary-enriched miRNA, miR-318, in epithelial development during Drosophila oogenesis. miR-318 maternal loss-of-function mutants were female sterile...... and laid eggs with abnormal morphology. Removal of miR-318 disrupted the dorsal-anterior follicle cell patterning, resulting in abnormal dorsal appendages. miR-318 mutant females also produced thin and fragile eggshells, due to impaired chorion gene amplification. We provide evidence that the ecdysone...... signaling pathway activates expression of miR-318 and that miR-318 cooperates with Tramtrack69 (Ttk69) to control the switch from endocycling to chorion gene amplification during differentiation of the follicular epithelium. The multiple functions of miR-318 in oogenesis illustrate the importance of mi...

  6. Pancreatic amylase is an environmental signal for regulation of biofilm formation and host interaction in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowiya, Waheed; Brunner, Katja; Abouelhadid, Sherif; Hussain, Haitham A; Nair, Sean P; Sadiq, Sohaib; Williams, Lisa K; Trantham, Emma K; Stephenson, Holly; Wren, Brendan W; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; Cogan, Tristan A; Laws, Andrew P; Wade, Jim; Dorrell, Nick; Allan, Elaine

    2015-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a commensal bacterium in the intestines of animals and birds and a major cause of food-borne gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. Here we show that exposure to pancreatic amylase leads to secretion of an α-dextran by C. jejuni and that a secreted protease, Cj0511, is required. Exposure of C. jejuni to pancreatic amylase promotes biofilm formation in vitro, increases interaction with human epithelial cell lines, increases virulence in the Galleria mellonella infection model, and promotes colonization of the chicken ileum. We also show that exposure to pancreatic amylase protects C. jejuni from stress conditions in vitro, suggesting that the induced α-dextran may be important during transmission between hosts. This is the first evidence that pancreatic amylase functions as an interkingdom signal in an enteric microorganism.

  7. GlgS, described previously as a glycogen synthesis control protein, negatively regulates motility and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Mehdi; Montero, Manuel; Almagro, Goizeder; Viale, Alejandro M; Sevilla, Ángel; Cánovas, Manuel; Muñoz, Francisco J; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Eydallin, Gustavo; Dose, Hitomi; Takeuchi, Rikiya; Mori, Hirotada; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2013-06-15

    Escherichia coli glycogen metabolism involves the regulation of glgBXCAP operon expression and allosteric control of the GlgC [ADPG (ADP-glucose) pyrophosphorylase]-mediated catalysis of ATP and G1P (glucose-1-phosphate) to ADPG linked to glycogen biosynthesis. E. coli glycogen metabolism is also affected by glgS. Though the precise function of the protein it encodes is unknown, its deficiency causes both reduced glycogen content and enhanced levels of the GlgC-negative allosteric regulator AMP. The transcriptomic analyses carried out in the present study revealed that, compared with their isogenic BW25113 wild-type strain, glgS-null (ΔglgS) mutants have increased expression of the operons involved in the synthesis of type 1 fimbriae adhesins, flagella and nucleotides. In agreement, ΔglgS cells were hyperflagellated and hyperfimbriated, and displayed elevated swarming motility; these phenotypes all reverted to the wild-type by ectopic glgS expression. Also, ΔglgS cells accumulated high colanic acid content and displayed increased ability to form biofilms on polystyrene surfaces. F-driven conjugation based on large-scale interaction studies of glgS with all the non-essential genes of E. coli showed that deletion of purine biosynthesis genes complement the glycogen-deficient, high motility and high biofilm content phenotypes of ΔglgS cells. Overall the results of the present study indicate that glycogen deficiency in ΔglgS cells can be ascribed to high flagellar propulsion and high exopolysaccharide and purine nucleotides biosynthetic activities competing with GlgC for the same ATP and G1P pools. Supporting this proposal, glycogen-less ΔglgC cells displayed an elevated swarming motility, and accumulated high levels of colanic acid and biofilm. Furthermore, glgC overexpression reverted the glycogen-deficient, high swarming motility, high colanic acid and high biofilm content phenotypes of ΔglgS cells to the wild-type. As on the basis of the present study Glg

  8. Bordetella pertussis fim3 gene regulation by BvgA: phosphorylation controls the formation of inactive vs. active transcription complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Alice; Moon, Kyung; Decker, Kimberly B; Chen, Qing; Knipling, Leslie; Stibitz, Scott; Hinton, Deborah M

    2015-02-10

    Two-component systems [sensor kinase/response regulator (RR)] are major tools used by microorganisms to adapt to environmental conditions. RR phosphorylation is typically required for gene activation, but few studies have addressed how and if phosphorylation affects specific steps during transcription initiation. We characterized transcription complexes made with RNA polymerase and the Bordetella pertussis RR, BvgA, in its nonphosphorylated or phosphorylated (BvgA∼P) state at P(fim3), the promoter for the virulence gene fim3 (fimbrial subunit), using gel retardation, potassium permanganate and DNase I footprinting, cleavage reactions with protein conjugated with iron bromoacetamidobenzyl-EDTA, and in vitro transcription. Previous work has shown that the level of nonphosphorylated BvgA remains high in vivo under conditions in which BvgA is phosphorylated. Our results here indicate that surprisingly both BvgA and BvgA∼P form open and initiating complexes with RNA polymerase at P(fim3). However, phosphorylation of BvgA is needed to generate the correct conformation that can transition to competent elongation. Footprints obtained with the complexes made with nonphosphorylated BvgA are atypical; while the initiating complex with BvgA synthesizes short RNA, it does not generate full-length transcripts. Extended incubation of the BvgA/RNA polymerase initiated complex in the presence of heparin generates a stable, but defective species that depends on the initial transcribed sequence of fim3. We suggest that the presence of nonphosphorylated BvgA down-regulates P(fim3) activity when phosphorylated BvgA is present and may allow the bacterium to quickly adapt to the loss of inducing conditions by rapidly eliminating P(fim3) activation once the signal for BvgA phosphorylation is removed.

  9. Watershed Boundaries - Watershed Boundary Database for Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This data set is a complete digital hydrologic unit boundary layer of the Subbasins (8-digit), Watersheds (10-digit), and Subwatersheds (12-digit) for Montana. This...

  10. Campylobacter jejuni CsrA complements an Escherichia coli csrA mutation for the regulation of biofilm formation, motility and cellular morphology but not glycogen accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fields Joshua A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although Campylobacter jejuni is consistently ranked as one of the leading causes of bacterial diarrhea worldwide, the mechanisms by which C. jejuni causes disease and how they are regulated have yet to be clearly defined. The global regulator, CsrA, has been well characterized in several bacterial genera and is known to regulate a number of independent pathways via a post transcriptional mechanism, but remains relatively uncharacterized in the genus Campylobacter. Previously, we reported data illustrating the requirement for CsrA in several virulence related phenotypes of C. jejuni strain 81–176, indicating that the Csr pathway is important for Campylobacter pathogenesis. Results We compared the Escherichia coli and C. jejuni orthologs of CsrA and characterized the ability of the C. jejuni CsrA protein to functionally complement an E. coli csrA mutant. Phylogenetic comparison of E. coli CsrA to orthologs from several pathogenic bacteria demonstrated variability in C. jejuni CsrA relative to the known RNA binding domains of E. coli CsrA and in several amino acids reported to be involved in E. coli CsrA-mediated gene regulation. When expressed in an E. coli csrA mutant, C. jejuni CsrA succeeded in recovering defects in motility, biofilm formation, and cellular morphology; however, it failed to return excess glycogen accumulation to wild type levels. Conclusions These findings suggest that C. jejuni CsrA is capable of efficiently binding some E. coli CsrA binding sites, but not others, and provide insight into the biochemistry of C. jejuni CsrA.

  11. Complex formation between malate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis is regulated by tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomae, Maike; Meyer, Frederik M; Commichau, Fabian M; Burkovski, Andreas; Hillen, Wolfgang; Seidel, Gerald

    2014-02-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, recent in vivo studies revealed that particular enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle form complexes that allow an efficient transfer of metabolites. Remarkably, a complex of the malate dehydrogenase (Mdh) (EC 1.1.1.37) with isocitrate dehydrogenase (Icd) (EC 1.1.1.42) was identified, although both enzymes do not catalyze subsequent reactions. In the present study, the interactions between these enzymes were characterized in vitro by surface plasmon resonance in the absence and presence of their substrates and cofactors. These analyses revealed a weak but specific interaction between Mdh and Icd, which was specifically stimulated by a mixture of substrates and cofactors of Icd: isocitrate, NADP(+) and Mg(2+). Wild-type Icd converted these substrates too fast, preventing any valid quantitative analysis of the interaction with Mdh. Therefore, binding of the IcdS104P mutant to Mdh was quantified because the mutation reduced the enzymatic activity by 174-fold but did not affect the stimulatory effect of substrates and cofactors on Icd-Mdh complex formation. The analysis of the unstimulated Mdh-IcdS104P interaction revealed kinetic constants of k(a) = 2.0 ± 0.2 × 10(2) m(-1) ·s(-1) and k(d) = 1.0 ± 0.1 × 10(-3) ·s(-1) and a K(D) value of 5.0 ± 0.1 μm. Addition of isocitrate, NADP(+) and Mg(2+) stimulated the affinity of IcdS104P to Mdh by 33-fold (K(D) = 0.15 ± 0.01 μm, k(a) = 1.7 ± 0.7 × 10(3) m(-1) ·s(-1), k(d) = 2.6 ± 0.6 × 10(-4) ·s(-1)). Analyses of the enzymatic activities of wild-type Icd and Mdh showed that Icd activity doubles in the presence of Mdh, whereas Mdh activity was slightly reduced by Icd. In summary, these data indicate substrate control of complex formation in the tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolon assembly and maintenance of the α-ketoglutarate supply for amino acid anabolism in vivo.

  12. Formation of post-confluence structure in human parotid gland acinar cells on PLGA through regulation of E-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yen-Hui; Huang, Tsung-Wei; Chou, Ya-Shuan; Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Su, Wei-Fang; Lou, Pei-Jen; Young, Tai-Horng

    2012-01-01

    As a potential solution for patients to retrieve their lost salivary gland functions, tissue engineering of an auto-secretory device is profoundly needed. Under serum-free environment, primary human parotid gland acinar (PGAC) cells can be obtained. After reaching confluence, PGAC cells spontaneously form three-dimension (3D) cell aggregations, termed post-confluence structure (PCS), and change their behaviors. Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) has been widely used in the field of biomedical applications because of its biodegradable properties for desired functions. Nonetheless, the role of PLGA in facilitating PGAC cells to form PCS has seldom been explored to recover epithelial characteristics. In this study, PGAC cells were found to have a greater tendency to form PCS on PLGA than on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). By tracing cell migration paths and modulating E-cadherin activity with specific inhibitor or antibody, we demonstrated that the static force of homophilic interaction on surfaces of individual cells, but not the dynamics of cell migration, played a more important role in PCS formation. Thus, PLGA was successfully confirmed to support PGAC cells to form more PCS through the effects on enhancing E-cadherin expression, which is associated with FAK/ILK/Snail expression in PGAC cells. This result indicates that selective appropriate biomaterials may be potentially useful in generating 3D PCS on two-dimension (2D) substrate without fabricating a complex 3D scaffold.

  13. Substrate-promoted formation of a catalytically competent binuclear center and regulation of reactivity in a glycerophosphodiesterase from Enterobacter aerogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadler, Kieran S; Tanifum, Eric A; Yip, Sylvia Hsu-Chen; Mitić, Natasa; Guddat, Luke W; Jackson, Colin J; Gahan, Lawrence R; Nguyen, Kelly; Carr, Paul D; Ollis, David L; Hengge, Alvan C; Larrabee, James A; Schenk, Gerhard

    2008-10-29

    The glycerophosphodiesterase (GpdQ) from Enterobacter aerogenes is a promiscuous binuclear metallohydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of mono-, di-, and triester substrates, including some organophosphate pesticides and products of the degradation of nerve agents. GpdQ has attracted recent attention as a promising enzymatic bioremediator. Here, we have investigated the catalytic mechanism of this versatile enzyme using a range of techniques. An improved crystal structure (1.9 A resolution) illustrates the presence of (i) an extended hydrogen bond network in the active site, and (ii) two possible nucleophiles, i.e., water/hydroxide ligands, coordinated to one or both metal ions. While it is at present not possible to unambiguously distinguish between these two possibilities, a reaction mechanism is proposed whereby the terminally bound H2O/OH(-) acts as the nucleophile, activated via hydrogen bonding by the bridging water molecule. Furthermore, the presence of substrate promotes the formation of a catalytically competent binuclear center by significantly enhancing the binding affinity of one of the metal ions in the active site. Asn80 appears to display coordination flexibility that may modulate enzyme activity. Kinetic data suggest that the rate-limiting step occurs after hydrolysis, i.e., the release of the phosphate moiety and the concomitant dissociation of one of the metal ions and/or associated conformational changes. Thus, it is proposed that GpdQ employs an intricate regulatory mechanism for catalysis, where coordination flexibility in one of the two metal binding sites is essential for optimal activity.

  14. Formation and Regulation Mechanism of Adaptive Response in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans%秀丽线虫适应响应的形成与调控机理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范孟雪; 王大勇

    2011-01-01

    Besides environmental exposure evaluation, model animal of Caenorhabditis elegans has also been used in the studies of formation and regulation mechanism of adaptive response in environmental toxicology. In this review, three types of adaptive response existed in C. Elegans were introduced, which are hormesis, cross-adaptation, and dietary restriction. Six known factors influencing the formation of adaptive response were analyzed. The possible mechanisms explaining adaptive response formation were discussed. Especially, the important roles of anti-oxidation system, heatshock, metallothioneins, and ghitathione in regulating the formation of adaptive response were summarized. On these bases, the questions need to be further solved, the contributions of adaptive response studies in C. Elegans to toxicology, and the suggestions for further studies on adaptive response in C. Elegans were discussed.%除了环境暴露评价,在环境毒理学研究中模式动物秀丽线虫也已经被应用于适应响应形成及其调控机理研究.在综述中,系统介绍了秀丽线虫中存在的几种形式毒物诱发的适应响应,即同一因素适应响应、交叉适应响应与特殊形式的适应响应;讨论了目前已经揭示出的6种影响适应响应形成因素;分析了适应响应形成可能机制,即抗氧化应激体系、热激蛋白、金属硫蛋白与谷胱苷肽在适应响应形成中具有的各种重要功能.在此基础上,分析了秀丽线虫适应响应研究中存在的问题,讨论了该方面工作对于毒理学研究的重要意义,并对未来的研究工作进行了展望.

  15. Kaiso is a key regulator of spleen germinal center formation by repressing Bcl6 expression in splenocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Dong-In; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Kyeong; An, Haemin; Kim, Min-Young; Hur, Man-Wook

    2013-12-13

    Kaiso was previously described as a methylated DNA-binding protein and a transcription repressor interacting with the corepressor protein complex NCoR. In the current study, we show that generation-3 Kaiso knockout mice show a phenotype of splenomegaly and large diffused germinal centers (GC). In the spleens of Kaiso knockout mice, Bcl6 (a transcriptional repressor that plays a critical role in GC development in spleen) and c-Myc were highly expressed, while the cell cycle arrest genes p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a were downregulated. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and transcription assays suggested that Kaiso represses Bcl6 expression, and in Kaiso knockout mice, derepressed Bcl6 increased cell proliferation by suppressing p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a, while upregulating the oncogene c-Myc. Further evidence for Kaiso regulation of splenomegaly was provided by B lymphocyte Ramos cells, in which ectopic KAISO repressed BCL6 and c-MYC expression, while concomitantly increasing the expression of the cell cycle arrestors p21, p27 and Gadd45a. In summary, derepressed Bcl6 expression may be responsible for increases in GC cell proliferation and splenomegaly of Kaiso knockout mice.

  16. RuBisCO in Non-Photosynthetic Alga Euglena longa: Divergent Features, Transcriptomic Analysis and Regulation of Complex Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristína Záhonová

    Full Text Available Euglena longa, a close relative of the photosynthetic model alga Euglena gracilis, possesses an enigmatic non-photosynthetic plastid. Its genome has retained a gene for the large subunit of the enzyme RuBisCO (rbcL. Here we provide new data illuminating the putative role of RuBisCO in E. longa. We demonstrated that the E. longa RBCL protein sequence is extremely divergent compared to its homologs from the photosynthetic relatives, suggesting a possible functional shift upon the loss of photosynthesis. Similarly to E. gracilis, E. longa harbors a nuclear gene encoding the small subunit of RuBisCO (RBCS as a precursor polyprotein comprising multiple RBCS repeats, but one of them is highly divergent. Both RBCL and the RBCS proteins are synthesized in E. longa, but their abundance is very low compared to E. gracilis. No RBCS monomers could be detected in E. longa, suggesting that processing of the precursor polyprotein is inefficient in this species. The abundance of RBCS is regulated post-transcriptionally. Indeed, blocking the cytoplasmic translation by cycloheximide has no immediate effect on the RBCS stability in photosynthetically grown E. gracilis, but in E. longa, the protein is rapidly degraded. Altogether, our results revealed signatures of evolutionary degradation (becoming defunct of RuBisCO in E. longa and suggest that its biological role in this species may be rather unorthodox, if any.

  17. RuBisCO in Non-Photosynthetic Alga Euglena longa: Divergent Features, Transcriptomic Analysis and Regulation of Complex Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Záhonová, Kristína; Füssy, Zoltán; Oborník, Miroslav; Eliáš, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Euglena longa, a close relative of the photosynthetic model alga Euglena gracilis, possesses an enigmatic non-photosynthetic plastid. Its genome has retained a gene for the large subunit of the enzyme RuBisCO (rbcL). Here we provide new data illuminating the putative role of RuBisCO in E. longa. We demonstrated that the E. longa RBCL protein sequence is extremely divergent compared to its homologs from the photosynthetic relatives, suggesting a possible functional shift upon the loss of photosynthesis. Similarly to E. gracilis, E. longa harbors a nuclear gene encoding the small subunit of RuBisCO (RBCS) as a precursor polyprotein comprising multiple RBCS repeats, but one of them is highly divergent. Both RBCL and the RBCS proteins are synthesized in E. longa, but their abundance is very low compared to E. gracilis. No RBCS monomers could be detected in E. longa, suggesting that processing of the precursor polyprotein is inefficient in this species. The abundance of RBCS is regulated post-transcriptionally. Indeed, blocking the cytoplasmic translation by cycloheximide has no immediate effect on the RBCS stability in photosynthetically grown E. gracilis, but in E. longa, the protein is rapidly degraded. Altogether, our results revealed signatures of evolutionary degradation (becoming defunct) of RuBisCO in E. longa and suggest that its biological role in this species may be rather unorthodox, if any. PMID:27391690

  18. The excreted polysaccharide of Pleurotus eryngii inhibits the foam-cell formation via down-regulation of CD36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingjing; Yong, Yangyang; Xia, Xian; Wang, Zeliang; Liang, Youxing; Zhang, Shizhu; Lu, Ling

    2014-11-04

    Previous study has verified the polysaccharide from the fruiting body of Pleurotus eryngii (PEPE) is capable of decreasing the lipid content in both of cell-line and mouse model. However, little is known about underlying mechanisms and whether this bioactive polysaccharide exists in submerged culture. Here, we verified the excreted polysaccharides EP and EP-1 from submersion culture of P. eryngii have the remarkable inhibitory effects on lipid accumulation in macrophage-derived foam cells. Structure analysis indicates EP-1 consists of D-types of glucose, galactose and mannose with the main β(1 → 3)-glucan glycosidic linkage branched at O-6 by α-D-glucose while EP digested by β-1,3-glucanase fails to decrease the lipid accumulation, suggesting that the special structure is essential for its function. Expression analysis suggests that EP is able to cause the down-regulation of the scavenger receptor-CD36 on both transcription and protein levels. Most importantly, EP can be obtained by fermentation in a mass-production.

  19. Ca2+ and endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase regulate the formation of silk fibers with favorable mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Yi; Xie, Kang; Yi, Qiying; Chen, Quanmei; Wang, Xiaohuan; Shen, Hong; Xia, Qingyou; Zhao, Ping

    2015-02-01

    Calcium ions (Ca(2+)) are crucial for the conformational transition of silk fibroin in vitro, and silk fibroin conformations correlate with the mechanical properties of silk fibers. To investigate the relationship between Ca(2+) and mechanical properties of silk fibers, CaCl2 was injected into silkworms (Bombyx mori). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis and mechanical testing revealed that injection of CaCl2 solution (7.5mg/g body weight) significantly increased the levels of α-helix and random coil structures of silk proteins. In addition, extension of silk fibers increased after CaCl2 injection. In mammals, sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase in muscle and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase in other tissues (together denoted by SERCA) are responsible for calcium balance. Therefore, we analyzed the expression pattern of silkworm SERCA (BmSERCA) in silk glands and found that BmSERCA was abundant in the anterior silk gland (ASG). After injection of thapsigargin (TG) to block SERCA activity, silkworms showed a silk-spinning deficiency and their cocoons had higher calcium content compared to that of controls. Moreover, FTIR analysis revealed that the levels of α-helix and β-sheet structures increased in silk fibers from TG-injected silkworms compared to controls. The results provide evidence that BmSERCA has a key function in calcium transportation in ASG that is related to maintaining a suitable ionic environment. This ionic environment with a proper Ca(2+) concentration is crucial for the formation of silk fibers with favorable mechanical performances.

  20. Kaiso is a key regulator of spleen germinal center formation by repressing Bcl6 expression in splenocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Dong-In; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Kyeong; An, Haemin; Kim, Min-Young; Hur, Man-Wook, E-mail: mwhur2@yuhs.ac

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •Knockout of Kaiso results in concordant high expression of Bcl6 and c-Myc in spleen. •Kaiso binds the Bcl6 promoter and represses Bcl6 transcription by recruiting NCoR. •Upregulated Bcl6 increases splenocyte proliferation and causes large diffused GC. •Cell cycle-inhibition genes such as Cdkn1b and Cdkn1a are repressed by Bcl6. -- Abstract: Kaiso was previously described as a methylated DNA-binding protein and a transcription repressor interacting with the corepressor protein complex NCoR. In the current study, we show that generation-3 Kaiso knockout mice show a phenotype of splenomegaly and large diffused germinal centers (GC). In the spleens of Kaiso knockout mice, Bcl6 (a transcriptional repressor that plays a critical role in GC development in spleen) and c-Myc were highly expressed, while the cell cycle arrest genes p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a were downregulated. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and transcription assays suggested that Kaiso represses Bcl6 expression, and in Kaiso knockout mice, derepressed Bcl6 increased cell proliferation by suppressing p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a, while upregulating the oncogene c-Myc. Further evidence for Kaiso regulation of splenomegaly was provided by B lymphocyte Ramos cells, in which ectopic KAISO repressed BCL6 and c-MYC expression, while concomitantly increasing the expression of the cell cycle arrestors p21, p27 and Gadd45a. In summary, derepressed Bcl6 expression may be responsible for increases in GC cell proliferation and splenomegaly of Kaiso knockout mice.

  1. Patterns in passive optical systems with boundary effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春萍; 沈柯

    2003-01-01

    Pattern formation is closely related to system boundary conditions in nonlinear dynamic systems, apart from the system control parameters. To avoid complexity, system boundary conditions are usually considered to be infinite or periodic, and the initial conditions spatially homogeneous. But it is not always the case in real situations, or sometimes periodic boundary conditions are not exact. To show the important and interesting boundary effects in real pattern formation, we suggest a simple universal boundary condition in a typical optical pattern formation system. Numerical simulations of the passive optical system show that pattern characteristics such as distribution symmetry, peak number,structure strength, evolution course and stability are all greatly influenced by the system boundary conditions.

  2. BMP-2 regulates the formation of oral sulcus in mouse tongue by altering the balance between TIMP-1 and MMP-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Tadayoshi; Suga, Takeo; Iida, Ryo-Hei; Morito, Mitsuhiko; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G H; Nakamura, Yoshiki; Yamane, Akira

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether BMP-2 regulates the oral sulcus formation of mouse embryonic tongue by modifying the expression of TIMP and MMP. The BMP-2 siRNA induced a 180% increase in the depth of oral sulcus cavity (P sulcus into the mesenchymal tissues consisting of tongue floor, whereas the recombinant BMP-2 suppressed the process in the organ culture system of mouse embryonic tongue. The BMP-2 siRNA induced a 60% decrease in the expression of TIMP-1 mRNA (P sulcus in the BMP-2 siRNA treated mandibles. The recombinant BMP-2 induced a 220% increases in the expression of TIMP-1 mRNA and the area of the immunostaining for TIMP-1 around the oral sulcus was larger in the mandibles treated with the recombinant BMP-2 than the vehicle. The BMP-2 siRNA induced a 60% increase in the expression of MMP-13 protein and a marked increase in the staining intensity for MMP-13 was observed in the epithelial region of the BMP-2 siRNA treated mandibles. The recombinant BMP-2 induced a 70% decrease in the expression of MMP-13 mRNA and the decrease was mainly observed in the tissues around oral sulcus. The expressions of BMP-2, TIMP-1, and MMP-13 were verified in the tissues around in vivo developing oral sulcus at E11, 12, and 13 by immunohistochemistry. These results suggest that BMP-2 regulates the formation of oral sulcus by altering the balance between TIMP-1 and MMP-13.

  3. MrkH, a novel c-di-GMP-dependent transcriptional activator, controls Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilm formation by regulating type 3 fimbriae expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Wilksch

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly amongst hospitalized individuals. The principle mechanism for pathogenesis in hospital environments involves the formation of biofilms, primarily on implanted medical devices. In this study, we constructed a transposon mutant library in a clinical isolate, K. pneumoniae AJ218, to identify the genes and pathways implicated in biofilm formation. Three mutants severely defective in biofilm formation contained insertions within the mrkABCDF genes encoding the main structural subunit and assembly machinery for type 3 fimbriae. Two other mutants carried insertions within the yfiN and mrkJ genes, which encode GGDEF domain- and EAL domain-containing c-di-GMP turnover enzymes, respectively. The remaining two isolates contained insertions that inactivated the mrkH and mrkI genes, which encode for novel proteins with a c-di-GMP-binding PilZ domain and a LuxR-type transcriptional regulator, respectively. Biochemical and functional assays indicated that the effects of these factors on biofilm formation accompany concomitant changes in type 3 fimbriae expression. We mapped the transcriptional start site of mrkA, demonstrated that MrkH directly activates transcription of the mrkA promoter and showed that MrkH binds strongly to the mrkA regulatory region only in the presence of c-di-GMP. Furthermore, a point mutation in the putative c-di-GMP-binding domain of MrkH completely abolished its function as a transcriptional activator. In vivo analysis of the yfiN and mrkJ genes strongly indicated their c-di-GMP-specific function as diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase, respectively. In addition, in vitro assays showed that purified MrkJ protein has strong c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity. These results demonstrate for the first time that c-di-GMP can function as an effector to stimulate the activity of a transcriptional activator, and explain how type 3 fimbriae

  4. The small GTPase RhoA, but not Rac1, is essential for conditioned aversive memory formation through regulation of actin rearrangements in rat dorsal hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun WANG; Yu-hua WANG; Yuan-yuan HOU; Tao XI; Yao LIU; Jing-gen LIU

    2013-01-01

    Aim:Actin rearrangements are induced in the dorsal hippocampus after conditioned morphine withdrawal,and involved in the formation of conditioned place aversion.In the present study,we investigated the mechanisms underlying the actin rearrangements in rat dorsal hippocampus induced by conditioned morphine withdrawal.Methods:The RhoA-ROCK pathway inhibitor Y27632 (8.56 μg/1 μL per side) or the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 (25 μg/1 μL per side) was microinjected into the dorsal hippocampus of rats.Conditioned place aversion (CPA) induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal was assessed.Crude synaptosomal fraction of hippocampus was prepared,and the amount of F-actin and G-actin was measured with an Actin Polymerization Assay Kit.Results:Conditioned morphine withdrawal significantly increased actin polymerization in the dorsal hippocampus at 1 h following the naloxone injection.Preconditioning with microinjection of Y27632,but not NSC23766,attenuated CPA,and blocked the increase in actin polymerization in the dorsal hippocampus.Conclusion:Our results suggest that the small GTPase RhoA,but not Rac1,in the dorsal hippocampus is responsible for CPA formation,mainly through its regulation of actin rearrangements.

  5. A novel function of RING finger protein 10 in transcriptional regulation of the myelin-associated glycoprotein gene and myelin formation in Schwann cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Hoshikawa

    Full Text Available Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG has been detected in Schwann cells prior to the onset of myelination, suggesting its functions in the initiation of myelination. However, transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of MAG remain to be elucidated. Here, we analyzed the promoter of the MAG gene by using luciferase reporter systems in the primary rat Schwann cells. We identified a novel cis-acting element located 160 bp upstream from the MAG transcription initiation site. Using the identified cis-element as a bait, we performed yeast one-hybrid screening and isolated a cDNA encoding a RNF10 as a putative trans-acting protein. When overexpressed in Schwann cells, RNF10 enhanced the activity of the MAG promoter. When RNF10 expression in Schwann cells was knocked down by siRNA, endogenous MAG mRNA and protein expression decreased. Furthermore, we evaluated myelin synthesis using Sc