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Sample records for bound water molecules

  1. Low-temperature FTIR spectroscopy provides evidence for protein-bound water molecules in eubacterial light-driven ion pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yurika; Ito, Shota; Teranishi, Miwako; Ono, Hikaru; Inoue, Keiichi; Kandori, Hideki

    2018-01-31

    Light-driven H + , Na + and Cl - pumps have been found in eubacteria, which convert light energy into a transmembrane electrochemical potential. A recent mutation study revealed asymmetric functional conversion between the two pumps, where successful functional conversions are achieved exclusively when mutagenesis reverses the evolutionary amino acid sequence changes. Although this fact suggests that the essential structural mechanism of an ancestral function is retained even after gaining a new function, questions regarding the essential structural mechanism remain unanswered. Light-induced difference FTIR spectroscopy was used to monitor the presence of strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules for all eubacterial H + , Na + and Cl - pumps, including a functionally converted mutant. This fact suggests that the strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules are maintained for these new functions during evolution, which could be the reason for successful functional conversion from Na + to H + , and from Cl - to H + pumps. This also explains the successful conversion of the Cl - to the H + pump only for eubacteria, but not for archaea. It is concluded that water-containing hydrogen-bonding networks constitute one of the essential structural mechanisms in eubacterial light-driven ion pumps.

  2. More loosely bound hadron molecules at CDF?

    CERN Document Server

    Bignamini, C; Piccinini, F; Polosa, A D; Riquer, V; Sabelli, C

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper we have proposed a method to estimate the prompt production cross section of X(3872) at the Tevatron assuming that this particle is a loosely bound molecule of a D and a D*bar meson. Under this hypothesis we find that it is impossible to explain the high prompt production cross section found by CDF at sigma(X(3872)) \\sim 30-70 nb as our theoretical prediction is about 300 times smaller than the measured one. Following our work, Artoisenet and Braaten, have suggested that final state interactions in the DD*bar system might be so strong to push the result we obtained for the cross section up to the experimental value. Relying on their conclusions we show that the production of another very narrow loosely bound molecule, the X_s=D_s D_s*bar, could be similarly enhanced. X_s should then be detectable at CDF with a mass of 4080 MeV and a prompt production cross section of sigma(X_s) \\sim 1-3 nb.

  3. Water, bound and mobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resolving the global transpiration flux is critical to constraining global carbon cycle models because carbon uptake by photosynthesis in terrestrial plants (Gross Primary Productivity, GPP) is directly related to water lost through transpiration. Quantifying GPP globally is cha...

  4. Experimental study on pion capture by hydrogen bound in molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, D.; Aniol, K.A.; Entezami, F.; Measday, D.F.; Noble, A.J.; Stanislaus, S.; Virtue, C.J.

    1988-08-01

    An experiment was performed at TRIUMF to study the formation of pionic hydrogen atoms and molecules in solids, particularly in groups of organic molecules of slightly different structure in order to help further clarify the problem. The nuclear capture of pions by hydrogen was measured using the charge exchange of stopped pions. The coincident photons emitted by the decaying π 0 mesons were detected by TRIUMF's two large NaI spectrometers. New experimental results were obtained for the capture probability of stopped π - mesons in the nuclei of hydrogen atoms, chemically bound in molecules of some simple hydrides, acid anhydrides, and sugar isomers. A linear relation was found between pion capture in hydrogen and melting point in sugar isomers. The pion capture probability in acid anhydrides is fairly well described by a simple atomic capture model in which the capture probability on the hydrogen dramatically increases as the hydrogen atom is separated from the strongly electronegative C 2 O 3 group. Both effects are consistent with a correlation between pion capture and electron density on hydrogen atoms. (Author) (38 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs.)

  5. Bound water in Kevlar 49 fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garza, R.G.; Pruneda, C.O.; Morgan, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    From elemental analyses, thermogravimetric-mass spectroscopy studies and re-evaluation of previous water diffusion studies in Kevlar 49 fibers it is concluded that these fibers can contain two types of sorbed moisture. The fibers can absorb up to approx. 6 wt % loosely bound water with an activation energy for outgassing by desorption of 6 kcal/mole. This loosely bound water is a direct result of the presence of Na 2 SO 4 impurities and the perturbations they induce on the packing of the rod-like poly (p-phenylene terephthalamide) macromolecules. Kevlar 49 fibers also inherently contain up to 30 wt % additional water which is tightly bound within the crystal lattice. This water exhibits an activation energy for outgassing by diffusion of approx. 40 kcal/mole and is only evolved from the fiber in significant quantities at t > 350 0 C over a period of hours

  6. Dynamics of water bound to crystalline cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Neill, Hugh; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Petridis, Loukas; He, Junhong; Mamontov, Eugene; Hong, Liang; Urban, Volker; Evans, Barbara; Langan, Paul; Smith, Jeremy C.; Davison, Brian H.

    2017-09-19

    Interactions of water with cellulose are of both fundamental and technological importance. Here, we characterize the properties of water associated with cellulose using deuterium labeling, neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering provided quantitative details about the dynamical relaxation processes that occur and was supported by structural characterization using small-angle neutron scattering and X-ray diffraction. We can unambiguously detect two populations of water associated with cellulose. The first is “non-freezing bound” water that gradually becomes mobile with increasing temperature and can be related to surface water. The second population is consistent with confined water that abruptly becomes mobile at ~260 K, and can be attributed to water that accumulates in the narrow spaces between the microfibrils. Quantitative analysis of the QENS data showed that, at 250 K, the water diffusion coefficient was 0.85 ± 0.04 × 10-10 m2sec-1 and increased to 1.77 ± 0.09 × 10-10 m2sec-1 at 265 K. MD simulations are in excellent agreement with the experiments and support the interpretation that water associated with cellulose exists in two dynamical populations. Our results provide clarity to previous work investigating the states of bound water and provide a new approach for probing water interactions with lignocellulose materials.

  7. Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of Weakly Bound Hydrated Cluster Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jonas

    The thermodynamic properties of condensed phases, the functionality of many materials and the molecular organization in biological organisms are all governed by the classes of non-covalent interactions that occur already on the microscopic scale between pairs of molecules. A detailed investigation...... of the intermolecular interactions between prototypical molecular assemblies are valuable for accurate descriptions of larger supramolecular systems such as materials, gas hydrates and biological macromolecules. The aim of this PhD dissertation is to investigate intermolecular interactions fora series of medium...... vibrational bands of the cluster molecules in the challenging far-infrared and terahertz spectral regions.A key parameter in the validation of the performance of theoretical predictions for weak non-covalent intermolecular interactions is the dissociation energy D0 that depends heavily on the class of large...

  8. Conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Teresa; Di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Pascarella, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    Water molecules occurring in the interior of protein structures often are endowed with key structural and functional roles. We report the results of a systematic analysis of conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases (SHMTs). SHMTs are an important group of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that catalyze the reversible conversion of l-serine and tetrahydropteroylglutamate to glycine and 5,10-methylenetetrahydropteroylglutamate. The approach utilized in this study relies on two programs, ProACT2 and WatCH. The first software is able to categorize water molecules in a protein crystallographic structure as buried, positioned in clefts or at the surface. The other program finds, in a set of superposed homologous proteins, water molecules that occur approximately in equivalent position in each of the considered structures. These groups of molecules are referred to as 'clusters' and represent structurally conserved water molecules. Several conserved clusters of buried or cleft water molecules were found in the set of 11 bacterial SHMTs we took into account for this work. The majority of these clusters were not described previously. Possible structural and functional roles for the conserved water molecules are envisaged. This work provides a map of the conserved water molecules helpful for deciphering SHMT mechanism and for rational design of molecular engineering experiments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Cooperation between bound waters and hydroxyls in controlling isotope-exchange rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasci, Adele F.; McAlpin, J. Gregory; Ohlin, C. André; Christensen, Shauna; Fettinger, James C.; Britt, R. David; Rustad, James R.; Casey, William H.

    2012-02-01

    Mineral oxides differ from aqueous ions in that the bound water molecules are usually attached to different metal centers, or vicinal, and thus separated from one another. In contrast, for most monomeric ions used to establish kinetic reactivity trends, such as octahedral aquo ions (e.g., Al(H 2O) 63+), the bound waters are closely packed, or geminal. Because of this structural difference, the existing literature about ligand substitution in monomer ions may be a poor guide to the reactions of geochemical interest. To understand how coordination of the reactive functional groups might affect the rates of simple water-exchange reactions, we synthesized two structurally similar Rh(III) complexes, [Rh(phen) 2(H 2O) 2] 3+ [ 1] and [Rh(phen) 2(H 2O)Cl] 2+ [ 2] where (phen) = 1,10-phenanthroline. Complex [ 1] has two adjacent, geminal, bound waters in the inner-coordination sphere and [ 2] has a single bound water adjacent to a bound chloride ion. We employed Rh(III) as a trivalent metal rather than a more geochemically relevant metal like Fe(III) or Al(III) to slow the rate of reaction, which makes possible measurement of the rates of isotopic substitution by simple mass spectrometry. We prepared isotopically pure versions of the molecules, dissolved them into isotopically dissimilar water, and measured the rates of exchange from the extents of 18O and 16O exchange at the bound waters. The pH dependency of rates differ enormously between the two complexes. Pseudo-first-order rate coefficients at 298 K for water exchanges from the fully protonated molecules are close: k0298 = 5 × 10 -8(±0.5 × 10 -8) s -1 for [ 1] and k0298 = 2.5 × 10 -9(±1 × 10 -9) for [ 2]. Enthalpy and entropy activation parameters (Δ H‡ and Δ S‡) were measured to be 119(±3) kJ mol -1, and 14(±1) J mol -1 K -1, respectively for [ 1]. The corresponding parameters for the mono-aquo complex, [ 2], are 132(±3) kJ mol -1 and 41.5(±2) J mol -1 K -1. Rates increase by many orders of magnitude

  10. Bound states and Cooper pairs of molecules in 2D optical lattices bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho-Guardian, A.; Dominguez-Castro, G.A.; Paredes, R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-08-15

    We investigate the formation of Cooper pairs, bound dimers and the dimer-dimer elastic scattering of ultracold dipolar Fermi molecules confined in a 2D optical lattice bilayer configuration. While the energy and their associated bound states are determined in a variational way, the correlated two-molecule pair is addressed as in the original Cooper formulation. We demonstrate that the 2D lattice confinement favors the formation of zero center mass momentum bound states. Regarding the Cooper pairs binding energy, this depends on the molecule populations in each layer. Maximum binding energies occur for non-zero (zero) pair momentum when the Fermi system is polarized (unpolarized). We find an analytic expression for the dimer-dimer effective interaction in the deep BEC regime. The present analysis represents a route for addressing the BCS-BEC crossover in dipolar Fermi gases confined in 2D optical lattices within the current experimental panorama. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Bound states of water in gelatin discriminated by near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yukiko; Shirakashi, Ryo; Hirakawa, Kazuhiko

    2017-11-01

    By near-infrared spectroscopy, we classified water molecules in hydrated gelatin membranes in a drying process. Absorbance spectra in the frequency range of 4500-5500 cm-1 were resolved into three peaks, S0, S1, and S2, that correspond to water molecules with different hydrogen bond states. From the areas of the absorbance peaks as a function of the water content of gelatin, together with the information on the freezing properties of water measured by differential scanning calorimetry, we found that, when the water content is less than 20%, free water disappears and only weakly and strongly bound waters remain. We also found that the weakly bound water consists of S0, S1, and S2 water molecules with a simple composition of \\text{S}0:\\text{S}1:\\text{S}2 ≈ 1:2:0. Using this information, most of the freezable water was determined to be free water. Our classification provides a simple method of estimating the retention and freezing properties of processed foods or drugs by infrared spectroscopy.

  12. Photoionization of water molecules by high energy photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Martini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically study the photoionization of water molecules by high energy photon impact. We develop a model in which the final state wavefunction is given by a Coulomb continuum wavefunction with effective charges and the water molecule bound states are represented using the Moccia's monocentric wavefunctions. We obtain analytical expressions for the transition matrix element that enable the computation of cross sections by numerical quadratures. We compare our predictions for photon energies between 20 and 300 eV with more elaborated theoretical results and experiments. We obtain a very good agreement with experiments, in particular, at enough high energies where there is a lack of elaborated results due to their high computational cost. Received: 15 March 2017, Accepted: 25 June 2017; Edited by: S. Kais; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4279/PIP.090006 Cite as: L Martini, D I R Boll, O A Fojón, Papers in Physics 9, 090006 (2017

  13. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn T J van Loenhout

    Full Text Available The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  14. Study on REE bound water-soluble polysaccharides in plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuqi; Guo Fanqing; Xu Lei; Chen Hongmin; Sun Jingxin; Cao Guoyin

    1999-01-01

    The binding of REE with water-soluble polysaccharides (PSs) in leaves of fern Dicranopteris Dichotoma (DD) has been studied by molecular activation analysis. The cold-water-soluble and hot-water-soluble PSs in leaves of DD were obtained by using biochemical separation techniques. The PSs of non-deproteinization and deproteinization, were separated on Sephadex G-200 gel permeation chromatography. The absorption curves of elution for the PSs were obtained by colorimetry, and the proteins were detected using Coomassic brilliant G-250. Eight REEs (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb and Lu) in these PSs were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The results obtained show that the REEs are bound firmly with the water-soluble PSs in the plant. A measurement demonstrates that the PSs bound with REEs are mainly of smaller molecular weight (10,000 to 20,000 Dalton)

  15. Study of Auger effect in DNA when bound to molecules containing platinum. A possible application to hadrontherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, K.; Usami, N.; Sasaki, I.; Frohlich, H.; Le Sech, C. E-mail: lesech@lcam.u-psud.fr

    2003-01-01

    Complexes made of DNA and Cyclo-Pt bound to plasmid DNA, were placed in aqueous solution and irradiated with monochromatic X-rays in the range E=8.5-13 keV, including the resonant photoabsorption energy of the L{sub III} shell of the platinum atom. The number of single- and double-strand breaks (ssb and dsb) induced by irradiation on a supercoiled DNA plasmid was measured by the production of circular-nicked and linear forms. In order to disentangle the contribution of the direct effects imparted to ionization, and the indirect effects due to a free radical attack, experiments have been performed in the presence of a small concentration (64 mmol l{sup -1}) of hydroxyl free radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). An enhancement of the number of ssb and dsb is observed when the plasmids contain the Pt intercalating molecules. Even when off-resonant X-rays are used, the strand break efficiency remains higher than expected based upon the absorption cross-section, as if the Pt bound to DNA is increasing the yield of strand breaks. A mechanism is suggested, involving photoelectrons generated from the ionization of water which efficiently ionize Pt atoms. This observation may provide an insight to understanding the effects of new radiotherapy protocols, associated chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin and ordinary radiotherapy for tumoral treatments.

  16. How Diverse are the Protein-Bound Conformations of Small-Molecule Drugs and Cofactors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Nils-Ole; Simsir, Méliné; Kirchmair, Johannes

    2018-03-01

    Knowledge of the bioactive conformations of small molecules or the ability to predict them with theoretical methods is of key importance to the design of bioactive compounds such as drugs, agrochemicals and cosmetics. Using an elaborate cheminformatics pipeline, which also evaluates the support of individual atom coordinates by the measured electron density, we compiled a complete set (“Sperrylite Dataset”) of high-quality structures of protein-bound ligand conformations from the PDB. The Sperrylite Dataset consists of a total of 10,936 high-quality structures of 4548 unique ligands. Based on this dataset, we assessed the variability of the bioactive conformations of 91 small molecules—each represented by a minimum of ten structures—and found it to be largely independent of the number of rotatable bonds. Sixty-nine molecules had at least two distinct conformations (defined by an RMSD greater than 1 Å). For a representative subset of 17 approved drugs and cofactors we observed a clear trend for the formation of few clusters of highly similar conformers. Even for proteins that share a very low sequence identity, ligands were regularly found to adopt similar conformations. For cofactors, a clear trend for extended conformations was measured, although in few cases also coiled conformers were observed. The Sperrylite Dataset is available for download from http://www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/sperrylite_dataset.

  17. Mass size distribution of particle-bound water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canepari, S.; Simonetti, G.; Perrino, C.

    2017-09-01

    The thermal-ramp Karl-Fisher method (tr-KF) for the determination of PM-bound water has been applied to size-segregated PM samples collected in areas subjected to different environmental conditions (protracted atmospheric stability, desert dust intrusion, urban atmosphere). This method, based on the use of a thermal ramp for the desorption of water from PM samples and the subsequent analysis by the coulometric KF technique, had been previously shown to differentiate water contributes retained with different strength and associated to different chemical components in the atmospheric aerosol. The application of the method to size-segregated samples has revealed that water showed a typical mass size distribution in each one of the three environmental situations that were taken into consideration. A very similar size distribution was shown by the chemical PM components that prevailed during each event: ammonium nitrate in the case of atmospheric stability, crustal species in the case of desert dust, road-dust components in the case of urban sites. The shape of the tr-KF curve varied according to the size of the collected particles. Considering the size ranges that better characterize the event (fine fraction for atmospheric stability, coarse fraction for dust intrusion, bi-modal distribution for urban dust), this shape is coherent with the typical tr-KF shape shown by water bound to the chemical species that predominate in the same PM size range (ammonium nitrate, crustal species, secondary/combustion species - road dust components).

  18. Electric dipole moments of nanosolvated acid molecules in water clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggemos, Nicholas; Slavíček, Petr; Kresin, Vitaly V

    2015-01-30

    The electric dipole moments of (H2O)nDCl (n=3-9) clusters have been measured by the beam-deflection method. Reflecting the (dynamical) charge distribution within the system, the dipole moment contributes information about the microscopic structure of nanoscale solvation. The addition of a DCl molecule to a water cluster results in a strongly enhanced susceptibility. There is evidence for a noticeable rise in the dipole moment occurring at n≈5-6. This size is consistent with predictions for the onset of ionic dissociation. Additionally, a molecular-dynamics model suggests that even with a nominally bound impurity an enhanced dipole moment can arise due to the thermal and zero-point motion of the proton and the water molecules. The experimental measurements and the calculations draw attention to the importance of fluctuations in defining the polarity of water-based nanoclusters and generally to the essential role played by motional effects in determining the response of fluxional nanoscale systems under realistic conditions.

  19. Structure of bound water and refinement of acid metmyoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghaven, N.V.; Schoenborn, B.P.

    1982-06-01

    The structure of myoglobin has been determined by x-ray diffraction for the acidmet, deoxy, and the oxy forms. Neutron diffraction work, done in this laboratory, has demonstrated that hydrogen and deuterium positions can be located. In addition to the localization of H and D, neutron diffraction provides a unique method for studying the water structure because of the strong scattering ability of D 2 O. The scattering factor of deuterium is nearly twice as large as that of hydrogen, and it increases the visibility of water molecules in Fourier maps, so that in a neutron map a water molecule appears about three times as strong as in an equivalent electron-density map. (DT)

  20. Using Electrochemical SERS to Measure the Redox Potential of Drug Molecules Bound to dsDNA—a Study of Mitoxantrone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghello, Marta; Papadopoulou, Evanthia; Ugo, Paolo; Bartlett, Philip N.

    2016-01-01

    Interaction with DNA plays an important role in the biological activity of some anticancer drug molecules. In this paper we show that electrochemical surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy at sphere segment void gold electrodes can be used as a highly sensitive technique to measure the redox potential of the anticancer drug mitoxantrone bound to dsDNA. For this system we show that we can follow the redox reaction of the bound molecule and can extract the redox potential for the molecule bound to dsDNA by deconvolution of the SER spectra recorded as a function of electrode potential. We find that mitoxantrone bound to dsDNA undergoes a 2 electron, 1 proton reduction and that the redox potential (-0.87 V vs. Ag/AgCl at pH 7.2) is shifted approximately 0.12 V cathodic of the corresponding value at a glassy carbon electrode. Our results also show that the reduced form of mitoxantrone remains bound to dsDNA and we are able to use the deconvoluted SER spectra of the reduced mitoxantrone as a function of electrode potential to follow the electrochemically driven melting of the dsDNA at more negative potentials.

  1. Autodissociation of a water molecule in liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geissler, Phillip L.; Dellago, Christoph; Chandler, David; Hutter, Jurg; Parrinello, Michele

    2000-04-01

    The dissociation of a water molecule in liquid water is the fundamental event in acid-base chemistry, determining the pH of water.Because the microscopic dynamics of this autodissociation are difficult to probe, both by experiment and by computer simulation, its mechanism has been unknown. Here we report several autodissociation trajectories generated by ab initio molecular dynamics [1]. These trajectories, which were harvested using transition path sampling [2-4], reveal the mechanism for the first time. Rare fluctuations in solvation energies destabilize an oxygen-hydrogen bond. Through the transfer of one or more protons along a hydrogen bond.

  2. Slow neutron scattering by water molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancic, V [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1970-07-01

    In this work some new, preliminary formulae for slow neutron scattering cross section calculation by heavy and light water molecules have been done. The idea was to find, from the sum which exists in well known Nelkin model, other cross sections in a more simple analytical form, so that next approximations may be possible. In order to sum a series it was starting from Euler-Mclaurin formula. Some new summation formulae have been derived there, and defined in two theorems. Extensive calculations, especially during the evaluation of residues, have been made at the CDC 3600 computer. validation of derived formulae was done by comparison with the BNL-325 results. Good agreement is shown. (author)

  3. Slow neutron scattering by water molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancic, V.

    1970-01-01

    In this work some new, preliminary formulae for slow neutron scattering cross section calculation by heavy and light water molecules have been done. The idea was to find, from the sum which exists in well known Nelkin model, other cross sections in a more simple analytical form, so that next approximations may be possible. In order to sum a series it was starting from Euler-Mclaurin formula. Some new summation formulae have been derived there, and defined in two theorems. Extensive calculations, especially during the evaluation of residues, have been made at the CDC 3600 computer. validation of derived formulae was done by comparison with the BNL-325 results. Good agreement is shown. (author)

  4. Role of Feshbach resonances in enhancing the production of deeply bound ultracold LiRb molecules with laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacesa, Marko; Ghosal, Subhas; Côté, Robin

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of forming deeply bound LiRb molecules in a two-color photoassociation experiment. Ultracold ^6Li and ^87Rb atoms colliding in the vicinity of a magnetic Feshbach resonance are photoassociated into an excited electronic state. A wavepacket is then formed by exciting a few vibrational levels of the excited state and allowed to propagate. We calculate the time-dependent overlaps between the wave packet and the lowest vibrational levels of the ground state. After the optimal overlap is obtained we use the second laser pulse to dump the wave packet and efficiently populate the deeply bound ro-vibrational levels of ^6Li^87Rb in the ground state. The resulting combination of Feshbach-optimized photoassociation (FOPA) with the time-dependent pump-dump approach will produce a large number of stable ultracold molecules in the ground state. This technique is general and applicable to other systems.

  5. Effects of quantum chemistry models for bound electrons on positron annihilation spectra for atoms and small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Feng; Ma Xiaoguang; Selvam, Lalitha; Gribakin, Gleb; Surko, Clifford M

    2012-01-01

    The Doppler-shift spectra of the γ-rays from positron annihilation in molecules were determined by using the momentum distribution of the annihilation electron–positron pair. The effect of the positron wavefunction on spectra was analysed in a recent paper (Green et al 2012 New J. Phys. 14 035021). In this companion paper, we focus on the dominant contribution to the spectra, which arises from the momenta of the bound electrons. In particular, we use computational quantum chemistry models (Hartree–Fock with two basis sets and density functional theory (DFT)) to calculate the wavefunctions of the bound electrons. Numerical results are presented for noble gases and small molecules such as H 2 , N 2 , O 2 , CH 4 and CF 4 . The calculations reveal relatively small effects on the Doppler-shift spectra from the level of inclusion of electron correlation energy in the models. For atoms, the difference in the full-width at half-maximum of the spectra obtained using the Hartree–Fock and DFT models does not exceed 2%. For molecules the difference can be much larger, reaching 8% for some molecular orbitals. These results indicate that the predicted positron annihilation spectra for molecules are generally more sensitive to inclusion of electron correlation energies in the quantum chemistry model than the spectra for atoms are. (paper)

  6. Ion collision-induced chemistry in pure and mixed loosely bound clusters of coronene and C60 molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domaracka, Alicja; Delaunay, Rudy; Mika, Arkadiusz; Gatchell, Michael; Zettergren, Henning; Cederquist, Henrik; Rousseau, Patrick; Huber, Bernd A

    2018-05-23

    Ionization, fragmentation and molecular growth have been studied in collisions of 22.5 keV He2+- or 3 keV Ar+-projectiles with pure loosely bound clusters of coronene (C24H12) molecules or with loosely bound mixed C60-C24H12 clusters by using mass spectrometry. The heavier and slower Ar+ projectiles induce prompt knockout-fragmentation - C- and/or H-losses - from individual molecules and highly efficient secondary molecular growth reactions before the clusters disintegrate on picosecond timescales. The lighter and faster He2+ projectiles have a higher charge and the main reactions are then ionization by ions that are not penetrating the clusters. This leads mostly to cluster fragmentation without molecular growth. However, here penetrating collisions may also lead to molecular growth but to a much smaller extent than with 3 keV Ar+. Here we present fragmentation and molecular growth mass distributions with 1 mass unit resolution, which reveals that the same numbers of C- and H-atoms often participate in the formation and breaking of covalent bonds inside the clusters. We find that masses close to those with integer numbers of intact coronene molecules, or with integer numbers of both intact coronene and C60 molecules, are formed where often one or several H-atoms are missing or have been added on. We also find that super-hydrogenated coronene is formed inside the clusters.

  7. Ficolins and FIBCD1: Soluble and membrane bound pattern recognition molecules with acetyl group selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Theresa; Schlosser, Anders; Holmskov, Uffe

    2011-01-01

    as pattern recognition molecules. Ficolins are soluble oligomeric proteins composed of trimeric collagen-like regions linked to fibrinogen-related domains (FReDs) that have the ability to sense molecular patterns on both pathogens and apoptotic cell surfaces and activate the complement system. The ficolins......D-containing molecules, and discusses structural resemblance but also diversity in recognition of acetylated ligands....

  8. Single-molecule folding mechanisms of the apo- and Mg2+-bound states of human neuronal calcium sensor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naqvi, Mohsin M; Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri; Otazo, Mariela R

    2015-01-01

    , at least transiently, at resting Ca(2+) conditions. Here, we used optical tweezers to study the folding behavior of individual NCS-1 molecules in the presence of Mg(2+) and in the absence of divalent ions. Under tension, the Mg(2+)-bound state of NCS-1 unfolds and refolds in a three-state process...... in a variety of cellular processes in which it has been linked to a number of disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. Despite extensive studies on the Ca(2+)-activated state of NCS proteins, little is known about the conformational dynamics of the Mg(2+)-bound and apo states, both of which are populated...... by populating one intermediate state consisting of a folded C-domain and an unfolded N-domain. The interconversion at equilibrium between the different molecular states populated by NCS-1 was monitored in real time through constant-force measurements and the energy landscapes underlying the observed transitions...

  9. Time-resolved entanglement of bound and dissociative atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, K.; Hayashi, M.; Lin, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we theoretically examine the time-independent and -dependent degrees of entanglement fidelities of bi-partite systems consisting of various bound two particles and of those of dissociative ones. The target maximally entangled state is defined as the non-interacting two particles: they are assumed to be infinitely far away from each other in the distant future. In this case, the potential energy functions which are non-local in nature can be regarded as entangling source. We investigate, how much we can make the target maximally entangled state from the initial (probably somewhat entangled) state without using any non-local external unitary transformation. Specifically, we investigate the cases where the two particles interact by attractive and repulsive Coulomb, harmonic, and Morse potentials which are ubiquitous in physics and chemistry. All of these omnipresent potentials exert non-local unitary transformations of multi-partite systems, which gives rise to the time-dependent entanglement according to the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. In the time-independent case, the bound state with identical mass or different mass shows a definite time-independent entanglement fidelity for each eigenstate. In the time-dependent case, time-dependence manifests itself both in the bound and the dissociative systems. In the former case, the entanglement shows regular oscillatory patterns in harmony with the wave packet revival in the harmonic potential and a prominent enhancement in the anharmonic potential while in the latter case the entanglement diminishes very quickly. From these results, we point out that the time-evolution of the entanglement is much more sensitive to the interaction (potential) of two particles and to the initial wavepacket than that of the autocorrelation function

  10. Studing electronic structure of water molecules in aquocomplexes by the method of pions minus capture by hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezhi, I.; Krumshtejn, Z.V.; Molnar, B.; Petrukhin, V.I.; Rybakov, V.N.; Suvorov, V.M.; Khorvat, D.; Tsisek, Z.; Yutlandov, I.A.

    1980-01-01

    Using the effect of electron shell state on π-meson capture by chemically bound hydrogen studied has been change of electron density in hydrogen atoms of water molecules bound into aquocomplexes. The fact of depression of π-meson capture probability by hydrogen of water in aquocomplexes has been established. The magnitudes of depression indicate essential decrease of electron density in a hydrogen atom of coordinated water. Interaction of ligands with oxygen-containing anions also essentially contributes to a magnitude of depression

  11. On the Several Molecules and Nanostructures of Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Kolb Whitney

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the water molecule from a variety of viewpoints. Water can involve different isotopes of Hydrogen and Oxygen, it can form differently shaped isomer molecules, and, when frozen, it occupies space differently than most other substances do. The tool for conducting the investigation of all this is called ‘Algebraic Chemistry’. This tool is a quantitative model for predicting the energy budget for all sorts of changes between different ionization states of atoms that are involved in chemical reactions and in changes of physical state. The model is based on consistent patterns seen in empirical data about ionization potentials, together with rational scaling laws that can interpolate and extrapolate for situations where no data are available. The results of the investigation of the water molecule include comments, both positive and negative, about technologies involving heavy water, poly water, Brown’s gas, and cold fusion.

  12. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the influence of the valency of counter-ions on the structure of freestanding bilayer membranes of the anionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipid at 310 K and 1 atm. At this temperature, the membrane is in the fluid...... compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have...... the sensitivity to confirm the diffusion of a small component of water bound to the lipids as found in the simulations. In addition, the orientation of the dipole moment of the water molecules has been determined as a function of their depth in the membrane. Previous indirect estimates of the electrostatic...

  13. Quantum Behavior of Water Molecules Confined to Nanocavities in Gemstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorshunov, Boris P; Zhukova, Elena S; Torgashev, Victor I; Lebedev, Vladimir V; Shakurov, Gil'man S; Kremer, Reinhard K; Pestrjakov, Efim V; Thomas, Victor G; Fursenko, Dimitry A; Dressel, Martin

    2013-06-20

    When water is confined to nanocavities, its quantum mechanical behavior can be revealed by terahertz spectroscopy. We place H2O molecules in the nanopores of a beryl crystal lattice and observe a rich and highly anisotropic set of absorption lines in the terahertz spectral range. Two bands can be identified, which originate from translational and librational motions of the water molecule isolated within the cage; they correspond to the analogous broad bands in liquid water and ice. In the present case of well-defined and highly symmetric nanocavities, the observed fine structure can be explained by macroscopic tunneling of the H2O molecules within a six-fold potential caused by the interaction of the molecule with the cavity walls.

  14. On-Demand Final State Control of a Surface-Bound Bistable Single Molecule Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Torres, José A; Simpson, Grant J; Adams, Christopher J; Früchtl, Herbert A; Schaub, Renald

    2018-04-12

    Modern electronic devices perform their defined action because of the complete reliability of their individual active components (transistors, switches, diodes, and so forth). For instance, to encode basic computer units (bits) an electrical switch can be used. The reliability of the switch ensures that the desired outcome (the component's final state, 0 or 1) can be selected with certainty. No practical data storage device would otherwise exist. This reliability criterion will necessarily need to hold true for future molecular electronics to have the opportunity to emerge as a viable miniaturization alternative to our current silicon-based technology. Molecular electronics target the use of single-molecules to perform the actions of individual electronic components. On-demand final state control over a bistable unimolecular component has therefore been one of the main challenges in the past decade (1-5) but has yet to be achieved. In this Letter, we demonstrate how control of the final state of a surface-supported bistable single molecule switch can be realized. On the basis of the observations and deductions presented here, we further suggest an alternative strategy to achieve final state control in unimolecular bistable switches.

  15. Stalled RNAP-II molecules bound to non-coding rDNA spacers are required for normal nucleolus architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire-Picos, M A; Landeira-Ameijeiras, V; Mayán, María D

    2013-07-01

    The correct distribution of nuclear domains is critical for the maintenance of normal cellular processes such as transcription and replication, which are regulated depending on their location and surroundings. The most well-characterized nuclear domain, the nucleolus, is essential for cell survival and metabolism. Alterations in nucleolar structure affect nuclear dynamics; however, how the nucleolus and the rest of the nuclear domains are interconnected is largely unknown. In this report, we demonstrate that RNAP-II is vital for the maintenance of the typical crescent-shaped structure of the nucleolar rDNA repeats and rRNA transcription. When stalled RNAP-II molecules are not bound to the chromatin, the nucleolus loses its typical crescent-shaped structure. However, the RNAP-II interaction with Seh1p, or cryptic transcription by RNAP-II, is not critical for morphological changes. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Towards ligand docking including explicit interface water molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Lemmon

    Full Text Available Small molecule docking predicts the interaction of a small molecule ligand with a protein at atomic-detail accuracy including position and conformation the ligand but also conformational changes of the protein upon ligand binding. While successful in the majority of cases, docking algorithms including RosettaLigand fail in some cases to predict the correct protein/ligand complex structure. In this study we show that simultaneous docking of explicit interface water molecules greatly improves Rosetta's ability to distinguish correct from incorrect ligand poses. This result holds true for both protein-centric water docking wherein waters are located relative to the protein binding site and ligand-centric water docking wherein waters move with the ligand during docking. Protein-centric docking is used to model 99 HIV-1 protease/protease inhibitor structures. We find protease inhibitor placement improving at a ratio of 9:1 when one critical interface water molecule is included in the docking simulation. Ligand-centric docking is applied to 341 structures from the CSAR benchmark of diverse protein/ligand complexes [1]. Across this diverse dataset we see up to 56% recovery of failed docking studies, when waters are included in the docking simulation.

  17. Pathogen-Specific Binding Soluble Down Syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecule (Dscam Regulates Phagocytosis via Membrane-Bound Dscam in Crab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Jie Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam gene is an extraordinary example of diversity that can produce thousands of isoforms and has so far been found only in insects and crustaceans. Cumulative evidence indicates that Dscam may contribute to the mechanistic foundations of specific immune responses in insects. However, the mechanism and functions of Dscam in relation to pathogens and immunity remain largely unknown. In this study, we identified the genome organization and alternative Dscam exons from Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis. These variants, designated EsDscam, potentially produce 30,600 isoforms due to three alternatively spliced immunoglobulin (Ig domains and a transmembrane domain. EsDscam was significantly upregulated after bacterial challenge at both mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, bacterial specific EsDscam isoforms were found to bind specifically with the original bacteria to facilitate efficient clearance. Furthermore, bacteria-specific binding of soluble EsDscam via the complete Ig1–Ig4 domain significantly enhanced elimination of the original bacteria via phagocytosis by hemocytes; this function was abolished by partial Ig1–Ig4 domain truncation. Further studies showed that knockdown of membrane-bound EsDscam inhibited the ability of EsDscam with the same extracellular region to promote bacterial phagocytosis. Immunocytochemistry indicated colocalization of the soluble and membrane-bound forms of EsDscam at the hemocyte surface. Far-Western and coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated homotypic interactions between EsDscam isoforms. This study provides insights into a mechanism by which soluble Dscam regulates hemocyte phagocytosis via bacteria-specific binding and specific interactions with membrane-bound Dscam as a phagocytic receptor.

  18. Computational modeling of chemical reactions and interstitial growth and remodeling involving charged solutes and solid-bound molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Nims, Robert J; Maas, Steve; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2014-10-01

    Mechanobiological processes are rooted in mechanics and chemistry, and such processes may be modeled in a framework that couples their governing equations starting from fundamental principles. In many biological applications, the reactants and products of chemical reactions may be electrically charged, and these charge effects may produce driving forces and constraints that significantly influence outcomes. In this study, a novel formulation and computational implementation are presented for modeling chemical reactions in biological tissues that involve charged solutes and solid-bound molecules within a deformable porous hydrated solid matrix, coupling mechanics with chemistry while accounting for electric charges. The deposition or removal of solid-bound molecules contributes to the growth and remodeling of the solid matrix; in particular, volumetric growth may be driven by Donnan osmotic swelling, resulting from charged molecular species fixed to the solid matrix. This formulation incorporates the state of strain as a state variable in the production rate of chemical reactions, explicitly tying chemistry with mechanics for the purpose of modeling mechanobiology. To achieve these objectives, this treatment identifies the specific theoretical and computational challenges faced in modeling complex systems of interacting neutral and charged constituents while accommodating any number of simultaneous reactions where reactants and products may be modeled explicitly or implicitly. Several finite element verification problems are shown to agree with closed-form analytical solutions. An illustrative tissue engineering analysis demonstrates tissue growth and swelling resulting from the deposition of chondroitin sulfate, a charged solid-bound molecular species. This implementation is released in the open-source program FEBio ( www.febio.org ). The availability of this framework may be particularly beneficial to optimizing tissue engineering culture systems by examining the

  19. Transport behavior of water molecules through two-dimensional nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Chongqin; Li, Hui; Meng, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Water transport through a two-dimensional nanoporous membrane has attracted increasing attention in recent years thanks to great demands in water purification and desalination applications. However, few studies have been reported on the microscopic mechanisms of water transport through structured nanopores, especially at the atomistic scale. Here we investigate the microstructure of water flow through two-dimensional model graphene membrane containing a variety of nanopores of different size by using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results clearly indicate that the continuum flow transits to discrete molecular flow patterns with decreasing pore sizes. While for pores with a diameter ≥15 Å water flux exhibits a linear dependence on the pore area, a nonlinear relationship between water flux and pore area has been identified for smaller pores. We attribute this deviation from linear behavior to the presence of discrete water flow, which is strongly influenced by the water-membrane interaction and hydrogen bonding between water molecules

  20. Structures of water molecules in carbon nanotubes under electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winarto,; Takaiwa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising for water transport through membranes and for use as nano-pumps. The development of CNT-based nanofluidic devices, however, requires a better understanding of the properties of water molecules in CNTs because they can be very different from those in the bulk. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of axial electric fields on the structure of water molecules in CNTs having diameters ranging from (7,7) to (10,10). The water dipole moments were aligned parallel to the electric field, which increases the density of water inside the CNTs and forms ordered ice-like structures. The electric field induces the transition from liquid to ice nanotubes in a wide range of CNT diameters. Moreover, we found an increase in the lifetime of hydrogen bonds for water structures in the CNTs. Fast librational motion breaks some hydrogen bonds, but the molecular pairs do not separate and the hydrogen bonds reform. Thus, hydrogen bonds maintain the water structure in the CNTs, and the water molecules move collectively, decreasing the axial diffusion coefficient and permeation rate

  1. The role of water molecules in computational drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Stephanie B A; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Although water molecules are small and only consist of two different atom types, they play various roles in cellular systems. This review discusses their influence on the binding process between biomacromolecular targets and small molecule ligands and how this influence can be modeled in computational drug design approaches. Both the structure and the thermodynamics of active site waters will be discussed as these influence the binding process significantly. Structurally conserved waters cannot always be determined experimentally and if observed, it is not clear if they will be replaced upon ligand binding, even if sufficient space is available. Methods to predict the presence of water in protein-ligand complexes will be reviewed. Subsequently, we will discuss methods to include water in computational drug research. Either as an additional factor in automated docking experiments, or explicitly in detailed molecular dynamics simulations, the effect of water on the quality of the simulations is significant, but not easily predicted. The most detailed calculations involve estimates of the free energy contribution of water molecules to protein-ligand complexes. These calculations are computationally demanding, but give insight in the versatility and importance of water in ligand binding.

  2. Dose contribution from metabolized organically bound tritium after chronic tritiated water intakes in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.; Lamothe, E.; Galeriu, D.

    2001-01-01

    Our earlier study of acute tritiated water intakes in humans has demonstrated that the dose contribution from metabolized organically bound tritium is less than 10% of the body water dose. To further demonstrate that the dose contribution from the organically bound tritium per unit intake of tritiated water is the same, regardless of whether the intake is acute (all at once) or chronic (spread over time), urine samples from six male radiation workers with chronic tritiated water intakes were collected and analyzed for tritium. These workers have a well-documented dose history and a well-controlled tritium bioassay database, providing assurance that their tritium intakes were in the form of tritiated water. Each month for a full calendar year, urine samples were collected from each exposed worker. The monthly concentration of tritium-in-urine for each exposed worker was no lower than 104 Bq L -1 but no higher than 105 Bq L -1 . These urine samples were analyzed for tritiated water and organically bound tritium to determine the ratio of these tritiated species in urine. The average ratio of tritiated water to organically bound tritium in urine for each exposed worker was 330-129 (range, 297-589). In calculating the dose to these workers, we assumed that, under steady-state conditions, the ratio of the specific activity of tritium ( 3 H activity per gH) in the organic matter and water fractions of urine is representative of the ratio of the specific activity of tritium in the organic matter and water fractions of soft tissue. A mathematical model was developed and used to estimate the dose increase from the metabolized organically bound tritium based on the ratio of tritiated water to organically bound tritium in urine. The resulting average dose from the organically bound tritium was 6.9-3.1% (range, 4.7-9.9%) of the body water dose for the six male workers, and agrees well with the value obtained from our acute tritiated water intakes study in humans. The observed

  3. Investigations of the potential functions of weakly bound diatomic molecules and laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goble, J.H. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    Three variations on the Dunham series expansion function of the potential of a diatomic molecule are compared. The differences among these expansions lie in the choice of the expansion variable, lambda. The functional form of these variables are lambda/sub s/ = l-r/sub e//r for the Simon-Parr-Finlan version, lambda/sub T/ - 1-(r/sub e//r)/sup p/ for that of Thakkar, and lambda/sub H/ = 1-exp(-rho(r/r/sub e/-1) for that of Huffaker. A wide selection of molecular systems are examined. It is found that, for potentials in excess of thirty kcal/mole, the Huffaker expansion provides the best description of the three, extrapolating at large internuclear separation to a value within 10% of the true dissociation energy. For potentials that result from the interaction of excited states, all series expansions show poor behavior away from the equilibrium internuclear separation of the molecule. The series representation of the potentials of weakly bound molecules are examined in more detail. The ground states of BeAr + , HeNe + , NaAr, and Ar 2 and the excited states of HeNe+, NaNe, and NaAr are best described by the Thakkar expansion. Finally, the observation of laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization in a flowing afterglow is reported. The reaction Ar( 3 P 2 ) + Ca + h nu → Ar + Ca + (5p 2 P/sub J/) + e - occurs when the photon energy, h nu, is approximately equal to the energy difference between the metastable argon and one of the fine structure levels of the ion's doublet. By monitoring the cascade fluorescence of the above reaction and comparing it to the flourescence from the field-free process Ar( 3 P 2 ) + Ca → Ar + Ca + (4p 2 P/sub J/) + e - a surprisingly large cross section of 6.7 x 10 3 A 2 is estimated

  4. Dielectric Relaxation of Bound Water versus Soil Matric Pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, M.A.; Dirksen, C.; Kampers, F.W.H.; Feddes, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    The electrical permittivity of soil is a function of the water content, which facilitates water content measurements. The permittivity of soil is also a function of the frequency of the applied electric field. This frequency dependence can be described by the relationship between the dielectric

  5. MALDI Mass Spectral Imaging of Bile Acids Observed as Deprotonated Molecules and Proton-Bound Dimers from Mouse Liver Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzagalinski, Ignacy; Hainz, Nadine; Meier, Carola; Tschernig, Thomas; Volmer, Dietrich A.

    2018-02-01

    Bile acids (BAs) play two vital roles in living organisms, as they are involved in (1) the secretion of cholesterol from liver, and (2) the lipid digestion/absorption in the intestine. Abnormal bile acid synthesis or secretion can lead to severe liver disorders. Even though there is extensive literature on the mass spectrometric determination of BAs in biofluids and tissue homogenates, there are no reports on the spatial distribution in the biliary network of the liver. Here, we demonstrate the application of high mass resolution/mass accuracy matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) to MS imaging (MSI) of BAs at high spatial resolutions (pixel size, 25 μm). The results show chemical heterogeneity of the mouse liver sections with a number of branching biliary and blood ducts. In addition to ion signals from deprotonation of the BA molecules, MALDI-MSI generated several further intense signals at larger m/z for the BAs. These signals were spatially co-localized with the deprotonated molecules and easily misinterpreted as additional products of BA biotransformations. In-depth analysis of accurate mass shifts and additional electrospray ionization and MALDI-FTICR experiments, however, confirmed them as proton-bound dimers. Interestingly, dimers of bile acids, but also unusual mixed dimers of different taurine-conjugated bile acids and free taurine, were identified. Since formation of these complexes will negatively influence signal intensities of the desired [M - H]- ions and significantly complicate mass spectral interpretations, two simple broadband techniques were proposed for non-selective dissociation of dimers that lead to increased signals for the deprotonated BAs. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Recrystallization of freezable bound water in aqueous solutions of medium concentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵立山; 潘礼庆; 纪爱玲; 曹则贤; 王强

    2016-01-01

    For aqueous solutions with freezable bound water, vitrification and recrystallization are mingled, which brings diffi-culty to application and misleads the interpretation of relevant experiments. Here, we report a quantification scheme for the freezable bound water based on the water-content dependence of glass transition temperature, by which also the concentra-tion range for the solutions that may undergo recrystallization finds a clear definition. Furthermore, we find that depending on the amount of the freezable bound water, different temperature protocols should be devised to achieve a complete recrys-tallization. Our results may be helpful for understanding the dynamics of supercooled aqueous solutions and for improving their manipulation in various industries.

  7. Water-assisted dehalogenation of thionyl chloride in the presence of water molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Chi Shun; Ng, Ping Leung; Guan, Xiangguo; Phillips, David Lee

    2010-04-01

    A second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) and density functional theory (DFT) investigation of the dehalogenation reactions of thionyl chloride is reported, in which water molecules (up to seven) were explicitly involved in the reaction complex. The dehalogenation processes of thionyl chloride were found to be dramatically catalyzed by water molecules. The reaction rate became significantly faster as more water molecules became involved in the reaction complex. The dehalogenation processes can be reasonably simulated by the gas-phase water cluster models, which reveals that water molecules can help to solvate the thionyl chloride molecules and activate the release of the Cl(-) leaving group. The computed activation energies were used to compare the calculations to available experimental data.

  8. Vibrational properties of water molecules adsorbed in different zeolitic frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crupi, V; Longo, F; Majolino, D; Venuti, V

    2006-01-01

    The perturbation of water 'sorbed' in samples of zeolites of different structural type, genesis, and cation composition (K-, Na-, Mg- and Ca-rich zeolites), namely the CHA framework of a synthetic K-chabazite, the LTA framework of synthetic Na-A and Mg50-A zeolites, and the NAT framework of a natural scolecite, has been studied by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy, in the -10 to +80 o C temperature range. The aim was to show how differences in the chemical composition and/or in the topology of the zeolite framework and, in particular, the possibility for the guest water molecules to develop guest-guest and/or host-guest interactions, lead to substantial differences in their vibrational dynamical properties. The spectra, collected in the O-H stretching and H 2 O bending mode regions, are complex, with multiple bands being observed. As far as water in the CHA and LTA frameworks is concerned, whose behaviour is governed by the balance of water-water, water-framework and water-extra-framework cations interactions, the assignment of the resolved components of the O-H stretching band has been discussed by fitting the band shapes into individual components attributed to H 2 O molecules engaged in different degrees of hydrogen bonding. A detailed quantitative picture of the connectivity pattern of water, as a function of temperature and according to the chemical and topological properties of the environment, is furnished. The H 2 O bending vibrational bands give additional information that perfectly agrees with the results obtained from the analysis of the O-H stretching spectral region. In the case of scolecite, a small-pored zeolite where water-water interactions are eliminated, the increased complexity observed in the infrared spectra in the O-H stretching and H 2 O bending regions was explained as due to the hydrogen bonding between the water molecules and the network, and also with the extra-framework cation. Furthermore, these observations have been correlated with the different

  9. Investigations of the potential functions of weakly bound diatomic molecules and laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goble, J.H. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    Three variations on the Dunham series expansion function of the potential of a diatomic molecule are compared. The differences among these expansions lie in the choice of the expansion variable, lambda. The functional form of these variables are lambda/sub s/ = l-r/sub e//r for the Simon-Parr-Finlan version, lambda/sub T/ - 1-(r/sub e//r)/sup p/ for that of Thakkar, and lambda/sub H/ = 1-exp(-rho(r/r/sub e/-1) for that of Huffaker. A wide selection of molecular systems are examined. It is found that, for potentials in excess of thirty kcal/mole, the Huffaker expansion provides the best description of the three, extrapolating at large internuclear separation to a value within 10% of the true dissociation energy. For potentials that result from the interaction of excited states, all series expansions show poor behavior away from the equilibrium internuclear separation of the molecule. The series representation of the potentials of weakly bound molecules are examined in more detail. The ground states of BeAr/sup +/, HeNe/sup +/, NaAr, and Ar/sub 2/ and the excited states of HeNe+, NaNe, and NaAr are best described by the Thakkar expansion. Finally, the observation of laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization in a flowing afterglow is reported. The reaction Ar(/sup 3/P/sub 2/) + Ca + h nu ..-->.. Ar + Ca/sup +/(5p /sup 2/P/sub J/) + e/sup -/ occurs when the photon energy, h nu, is approximately equal to the energy difference between the metastable argon and one of the fine structure levels of the ion's doublet. By monitoring the cascade fluorescence of the above reaction and comparing it to the flourescence from the field-free process Ar(/sup 3/P/sub 2/) + Ca ..-->.. Ar + Ca/sup +/(4p /sup 2/P/sub J/) + e/sup -/ a surprisingly large cross section of 6.7 x 10/sup 3/ A/sup 2/ is estimated.

  10. Characterization of metal-bound water in bioactive Fe(III)-cyclophane complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Medina, A. J.; Gámez-Corrales, R.; Ramírez, J. Z.; González-Aguilar, G. A.; Velázquez-Contreras, E. F.

    2018-02-01

    Binuclear Fe(III) complexes, Fe2PO and Fe2PC, have functions of antioxidants as well as superoxide dismutase and peroxidase mimickers. The role of water molecules in the non-cytotoxic properties of these complexes have been studied by thermogravimetric and IR/Raman-spectroscopic methods. The thermogravimetric analysis of Fe2PO shows the presence of nine water molecules (Fe2PO·9H2O), three of which are directly coordinated to the metallic ion; the remaining six molecules occupy the secondary coordination sphere. For Fe2PC, eight water molecules were detected (Fe2PC·8H2O), and only one of them directly coordinates to the metallic ion. IR/Raman spectrum analyses corroborate the presence of water molecules in both metallic complexes and the mode of coordination to the ligand, on the basis of bands characteristic of hydration water at ∼3300 cm-1 and bands of adsorbed water between 430 and 490 cm-1. A pentacoordinate geometry is proposed for Fe2PO and a hexacoordinated geometry for Fe2PC. Those results are consistent with theoretical calculations performed through a semiempirical PM7 method. The presence of coordinated water molecules is closely related to the reactivity of Fe2PO and Fe2PC in solution.

  11. Process for enriching a hydrogen isotope bound in water and device for carrying out the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drescher, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    In order to make compact construction in relatively small operating units with horizontally arranged separating columns possible for hydrogen isotope separation with different water phases moving in counterflow through a heating zone and a cooling zone, the water bound to a solid adsorption medium is moved in counterflow to a liquid phase of the water relative to the heating zone and the cooling zone. (orig.) [de

  12. Scattering of thermal neutron by the water molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, L.P.

    The calculation of the differenctial cross section for scattering of thermal neutrons by water, taking into account the translational, rotational and vibrational motions of the water molecule, is presented according to Nelkin' model. Some modifications are presented which have been introduced in the original method to improve the results and an application has been made to reactor physics, by calculating the thermal neutron flux in a homogenous medium containing water and absorver. Thirty thermal energy groups have been used to compute the spectra. Within the limits of error, better agreement has been obtained between theory and experiments by using a modified Nelkin kernel consisting of substituting the asymptotic formulae for the rotational and vibrational motions by more exact expressions, similar to the Buttler model for heavy water

  13. STICKING OF MOLECULES ON NONPOROUS AMORPHOUS WATER ICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco [Physics Department, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States); Acharyya, Kinsuk, E-mail: gvidali@syr.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2016-05-20

    Accurate modeling of physical and chemical processes in the interstellar medium (ISM) requires detailed knowledge of how atoms and molecules adsorb on dust grains. However, the sticking coefficient, a number between 0 and 1 that measures the first step in the interaction of a particle with a surface, is usually assumed in simulations of ISM environments to be either 0.5 or 1. Here we report on the determination of the sticking coefficient of H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2} on nonporous amorphous solid water. The sticking coefficient was measured over a wide range of surface temperatures using a highly collimated molecular beam. We showed that the standard way of measuring the sticking coefficient—the King–Wells method—leads to the underestimation of trapping events in which there is incomplete energy accommodation of the molecule on the surface. Surface scattering experiments with the use of a pulsed molecular beam are used instead to measure the sticking coefficient. Based on the values of the measured sticking coefficient, we suggest a useful general formula of the sticking coefficient as a function of grain temperature and molecule-surface binding energy. We use this formula in a simulation of ISM gas–grain chemistry to find the effect of sticking on the abundance of key molecules both on grains and in the gas phase.

  14. The spontaneous synchronized dance of pairs of water molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roncaratti, Luiz F.; Cappelletti, David; Pirani, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Molecular beam scattering experiments have been performed to study the effect of long-range anisotropic forces on the collision dynamics of two small polar molecules. The main focus of this paper is on water, but also ammonia and hydrogen sulphide molecules have been investigated, and some results will be anticipated. The intermolecular distances mainly probed are of the order of 1 nm and therefore much larger than the molecular dimensions. In particular, we have found that the natural electric field gradient, generated by different spatial orientations of the permanent electric dipoles, is able to promote the transformation of free rotations into coupled pendular states, letting the molecular partners involved in the collision complex swinging to and fro around the field direction. This long-ranged concerted motion manifested itself as large increases of the magnitude of the total integral cross section. The experimental findings and the theoretical treatment developed to shed light on the details of the process suggest that the transformation from free rotations to pendular states depends on the rotational level of both molecules, on the impact parameter, on the relative collision velocity, on the dipole moment product and occurs in the time scale of picoseconds. The consequences of this intriguing phenomenon may be important for the interpretation and, in perspective, for the control of elementary chemical and biological processes, given by polar molecules, ions, and free radicals, occurring in several environments under various conditions

  15. The spontaneous synchronized dance of pairs of water molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roncaratti, Luiz F. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università degli Studi di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910-900 Brasília (Brazil); Cappelletti, David, E-mail: david.cappelletti@unipg.it; Pirani, Fernando [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università degli Studi di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2014-03-28

    Molecular beam scattering experiments have been performed to study the effect of long-range anisotropic forces on the collision dynamics of two small polar molecules. The main focus of this paper is on water, but also ammonia and hydrogen sulphide molecules have been investigated, and some results will be anticipated. The intermolecular distances mainly probed are of the order of 1 nm and therefore much larger than the molecular dimensions. In particular, we have found that the natural electric field gradient, generated by different spatial orientations of the permanent electric dipoles, is able to promote the transformation of free rotations into coupled pendular states, letting the molecular partners involved in the collision complex swinging to and fro around the field direction. This long-ranged concerted motion manifested itself as large increases of the magnitude of the total integral cross section. The experimental findings and the theoretical treatment developed to shed light on the details of the process suggest that the transformation from free rotations to pendular states depends on the rotational level of both molecules, on the impact parameter, on the relative collision velocity, on the dipole moment product and occurs in the time scale of picoseconds. The consequences of this intriguing phenomenon may be important for the interpretation and, in perspective, for the control of elementary chemical and biological processes, given by polar molecules, ions, and free radicals, occurring in several environments under various conditions.

  16. Laboratory tests to determine the effect of Olkiluoto bounding brine water on buffer performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martikainen, J.; Schatz, T.

    2011-10-01

    This report presents a set of results from laboratory studies on the effect of bounding brine water exposure on buffer performance. In order to evaluate the effect of bounding brine water exposure on compacted bentonite buffer performance a series of experiments were conducted using swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity measurements as follows: Direct exposure measurements were performed on MX-80 bentonite samples encompassing a range of dry density values from 1334 to 1585 kg/m 3 . These samples were saturated directly with a 70 g/L solution composed of calcium and sodium chloride at a Ca 2+ /Na + mass ratio of 3:2. Direct exposure measurements were performed on IBECO RWC samples encompassing a range of dry density values from 1314 to 1564 kg/m 3 . These samples were saturated directly with a 68.45 g/L solution composed of calcium and sodium chloride at a Ca 2+ /Na + mass ratio of 3.2:2. A set of MX-80 and IBECO RWC samples encompassing a range of dry density values from 1018 to 1607 kg/m 3 were initially saturated with tap water followed by (indirect) exposure to a 68.45 g/L solution composed of calcium and sodium chloride at a Ca 2+ /Na + mass ratio of 3.2:2. Sample swelling pressures were continuously monitored and hydraulic conductivity measurements were performed at each constant swelling pressure condition. In some cases, exchangeable cation analyses were performed. The specific test results are summarized as follows: All of the measured swelling pressure values upon exposure to bounding brine water were lower than the corresponding values after saturation with tap water. The relative swelling pressure decrease for the IBECO RWC samples was approximately half of the corresponding decrease for the MX-80 samples. On exposure to bounding brine water, hydraulic conductivity values were increased at the lowest densities, for both the MX-80 and IBECO samples, while at higher densities hydraulic conductivity values were essentially equivalent, for both the

  17. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, G. H.; Hansen, F. Y.; Taub, H.; Miskowiec, A.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the influence of the valency of counter-ions on the structure of freestanding bilayer membranes of the anionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipid at 310 K and 1 atm. At this temperature, the membrane is in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The diffusion constant of water as a function of its depth in the membrane has been determined from mean-square-displacement calculations. Also, calculated incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering functions have been compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have the sensitivity to confirm the diffusion of a small component of water bound to the lipids as found in the simulations. In addition, the orientation of the dipole moment of the water molecules has been determined as a function of their depth in the membrane. Previous indirect estimates of the electrostatic potential within phospholipid membranes imply an enormous electric field of 10 8 –10 9 V m −1 , which is likely to have great significance in controlling the conformation of translocating membrane proteins and in the transfer of ions and molecules across the membrane. We have calculated the membrane potential for DMPG bilayers and found ∼1 V (∼2 ⋅ 10 8 V m −1 ) when in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and ∼1.4 V (∼2.8 ⋅ 10 8 V m −1 ) when in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The number of water molecules for a fully hydrated DMPG membrane has been estimated to be 9.7 molecules per lipid in the gel phase and 17.5 molecules in the fluid phase, considerably smaller than inferred experimentally for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3

  18. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, G. H.; Hansen, F. Y., E-mail: flemming@kemi.dtu.dk [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Denmark, IK 207 DTU, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Taub, H.; Miskowiec, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the University of Missouri Research Reactor,University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States)

    2016-04-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the influence of the valency of counter-ions on the structure of freestanding bilayer membranes of the anionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipid at 310 K and 1 atm. At this temperature, the membrane is in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The diffusion constant of water as a function of its depth in the membrane has been determined from mean-square-displacement calculations. Also, calculated incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering functions have been compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have the sensitivity to confirm the diffusion of a small component of water bound to the lipids as found in the simulations. In addition, the orientation of the dipole moment of the water molecules has been determined as a function of their depth in the membrane. Previous indirect estimates of the electrostatic potential within phospholipid membranes imply an enormous electric field of 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} V m{sup −1}, which is likely to have great significance in controlling the conformation of translocating membrane proteins and in the transfer of ions and molecules across the membrane. We have calculated the membrane potential for DMPG bilayers and found ∼1 V (∼2 ⋅ 10{sup 8} V m{sup −1}) when in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and ∼1.4 V (∼2.8 ⋅ 10{sup 8} V m{sup −1}) when in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The number of water molecules for a fully hydrated DMPG membrane has been estimated to be 9.7 molecules per lipid in the gel phase and 17.5 molecules in the fluid phase, considerably smaller than inferred experimentally for 1

  19. Hydrogen bonding characterization in water and small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi

    2017-06-01

    The prototypical hydrogen bond in water dimer and hydrogen bonds in the protonated water dimer, in other small molecules, in water cyclic clusters, and in ice, covering a wide range of bond strengths, are theoretically investigated by first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, considering not only a standard generalized gradient approximation functional but also, for the water dimer, hybrid and van der Waals corrected functionals. We compute structural, energetic, and electrostatic (induced molecular dipole moments) properties. In particular, hydrogen bonds are characterized in terms of differential electron density distributions and profiles, and of the shifts of the centres of maximally localized Wannier functions. The information from the latter quantities can be conveyed to a single geometric bonding parameter that appears to be correlated with the Mayer bond order parameter and can be taken as an estimate of the covalent contribution to the hydrogen bond. By considering the water trimer, the cyclic water hexamer, and the hexagonal phase of ice, we also elucidate the importance of cooperative/anticooperative effects in hydrogen-bonding formation.

  20. Continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popadic, A.; Praprotnik, M.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules. The governing Navier-Stokes equations are complemented with the Navier slip boundary condition with a slip length that is extracted from related molecular dynamics simulations. We find that several quantities of interest...... as computed by the present model are in good agreement with results from atomistic and atomistic-continuum simulations at a fraction of the cost. We simulate the flow past a single fullerene and an array of fullerenes and demonstrate that such nanoscale flows can be computed efficiently by continuum flow...

  1. Selective control of photodissociation in deutereted water molecule HOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.; Deshpande, Sarin; Sarma, Manabendra; Kurkal, Vandana; Mishra, M.K.

    2006-01-01

    Bond dissociation in the deutereted water molecule HOD has been investigated to explore the possibility of selective control of dissociation of O-H and O-D bonds using simple field profiles and initial states that do not require high overtone excitations. Preliminary results indicate that considerable selectivity in dissociation of O-H and O-D bonds can be achieved using fundamental and first overtone excitations only and use of field optimized initial state (FOIST) based scheme with appropriate choice of field parameters and initial states may enhance both selectivity and yield

  2. Bound water at protein-protein interfaces: partners, roles and hydrophobic bubbles as a conserved motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa H Ahmed

    Full Text Available There is a great interest in understanding and exploiting protein-protein associations as new routes for treating human disease. However, these associations are difficult to structurally characterize or model although the number of X-ray structures for protein-protein complexes is expanding. One feature of these complexes that has received little attention is the role of water molecules in the interfacial region.A data set of 4741 water molecules abstracted from 179 high-resolution (≤ 2.30 Å X-ray crystal structures of protein-protein complexes was analyzed with a suite of modeling tools based on the HINT forcefield and hydrogen-bonding geometry. A metric termed Relevance was used to classify the general roles of the water molecules.The water molecules were found to be involved in: a (bridging interactions with both proteins (21%, b favorable interactions with only one protein (53%, and c no interactions with either protein (26%. This trend is shown to be independent of the crystallographic resolution. Interactions with residue backbones are consistent for all classes and account for 21.5% of all interactions. Interactions with polar residues are significantly more common for the first group and interactions with non-polar residues dominate the last group. Waters interacting with both proteins stabilize on average the proteins' interaction (-0.46 kcal mol(-1, but the overall average contribution of a single water to the protein-protein interaction energy is unfavorable (+0.03 kcal mol(-1. Analysis of the waters without favorable interactions with either protein suggests that this is a conserved phenomenon: 42% of these waters have SASA ≤ 10 Å(2 and are thus largely buried, and 69% of these are within predominantly hydrophobic environments or "hydrophobic bubbles". Such water molecules may have an important biological purpose in mediating protein-protein interactions.

  3. Non-cooperative immobilization of residual water bound in lyophilized photosynthetic lamellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harańczyk, Hubert; Baran, Ewelina; Nowak, Piotr; Florek-Wojciechowska, Małgorzata; Leja, Anna; Zalitacz, Dorota; Strzałka, Kazimierz

    2015-12-01

    This study applied 1H-NMR in time and in frequency domain measurements to monitor the changes that occur in bound water dynamics at decreased temperature and with increased hydration level in lyophilizates of native wheat photosynthetic lamellae and in photosynthetic lamellae reconstituted from lyophilizate. Proton relaxometry (measured as free induction decay = FID) distinguishes a Gaussian component S within the NMR signal (o). This comes from protons of the solid matrix of the lamellae and consists of (i) an exponentially decaying contribution L1 from mobile membrane protons, presumably from lipids, and from water that is tightly bound to the membrane surface and thus restricted in mobility; and (ii) an exponentially decaying component L2 from more mobile, loosely bound water pool. Both proton relaxometry data and proton spectroscopy show that dry lyophilizate incubated in dry air, i.e., at a relative humidity (p/p0) of 0% reveals a relatively high hydration level. The observed liquid signal most likely originates from mobile membrane protons and a tightly bound water fraction that is sealed in pores of dry lyophilizate and thus restricted in mobility. The estimations suggest that the amount of sealed water does not exceed the value characteristic for the main hydration shell of a phospholipid. Proton spectra collected for dry lyophilizate of photosynthetic lamellae show a continuous decrease in the liquid signal component without a distinct freezing transition when it is cooled down to -60ºC, which is significantly lower than the homogeneous ice nucleation temperature [Bronshteyn, V.L. et al. Biophys. J. 65 (1993) 1853].

  4. Dose contribution from metabolized organically bound tritium after acute tritiated water intakes in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.; Galeriu, D.; Richardson, R.B.

    1997-01-01

    Urine samples from eight male radiation workers who had an unplanned acute tritiated water intake were measured for tritium-in-urine up to 300 d post-exposure. During the first month or so post-exposure, these individuals increased their fluid intakes to accelerate the turnover rate of tritium in the body for dose mitigation. Their daily fluid intakes reverted to normal levels in the latter period of the study. A non-linear regressional analysis of the tritium-in-urine data showed that the average biological half-life of tritium in body water, with standard deviation, was 63 ± 1.0 d (range, 5.0-8.1 d) and 8.4 ± 2.0 d (range, 6.2-12.8 d) during the respective periods of increased fluid intake and the later period of normal fluid intake. A longer term component of tritium excretion was also observed with average biological half-life of 74 ± 18 d (range, 58-104 d), indicating the incorporation of tritium, and its retention, in the organic fractions of the body. A mathematical model was developed and used to estimate the dose increase from the metabolized organically bound tritium on the basis of the kinetics of tritium-in-urine. The model accounts for a change in the rates of urinary excretion caused by variable fluid intakes. The average dose to the body, for the eight male workers, due to the metabolized organically bound tritium was estimated to be 6.2 ± 1.3% (range, 3.5% to 8.9%) of the committed effective dose due to tritium in the body water. This value for the dose increase from organically bound tritium is in the range of the current recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, i.e., organically bound tritium incorporated into the body contributes about 10% of the dose to the body water following tritiated water intakes. (author)

  5. Molecular dynamics study of water molecule diffusion in oil-paper insulation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Ruijin; Zhu Mengzhao; Yang Lijun; Zhou Xin; Gong Chunyan

    2011-01-01

    Moisture is an important factor that influences the safe operation of transformers. In this study, molecular dynamics was employed to investigate the diffusion behavior of water molecules in the oil-paper insulation materials of transformers. Two oil-cellulose models were built. In the first model, water molecules were initially distributed in oil, and in the second model, water molecules were distributed in cellulose. The non-bonding energies of interaction between water molecules and oil, and between water molecules and cellulose, were calculated by the Dreiding force field. The interaction energy was found to play a dominant role in influencing the equilibrium distribution of water molecules. The radial direction functions of water molecules toward oil and cellulose indicate that the hydrogen bonds between water molecules and cellulose are sufficiently strong to withstand the operating temperature of the transformer. Mean-square displacement analysis of water molecules diffusion suggests that water molecules initially distributed in oil showed anisotropic diffusion; they tended to diffuse toward cellulose. Water molecules initially distributed in cellulose diffused isotropically. This study provides a theoretical contribution for improvements in online monitoring of water in transformers, and for subsequent research on new insulation materials.

  6. Molecular dynamics study of water molecule diffusion in oil-paper insulation materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao Ruijin [State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System Security and New Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhu Mengzhao, E-mail: xiaozhupost@163.co [State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System Security and New Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang Lijun; Zhou Xin; Gong Chunyan [State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System Security and New Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2011-03-01

    Moisture is an important factor that influences the safe operation of transformers. In this study, molecular dynamics was employed to investigate the diffusion behavior of water molecules in the oil-paper insulation materials of transformers. Two oil-cellulose models were built. In the first model, water molecules were initially distributed in oil, and in the second model, water molecules were distributed in cellulose. The non-bonding energies of interaction between water molecules and oil, and between water molecules and cellulose, were calculated by the Dreiding force field. The interaction energy was found to play a dominant role in influencing the equilibrium distribution of water molecules. The radial direction functions of water molecules toward oil and cellulose indicate that the hydrogen bonds between water molecules and cellulose are sufficiently strong to withstand the operating temperature of the transformer. Mean-square displacement analysis of water molecules diffusion suggests that water molecules initially distributed in oil showed anisotropic diffusion; they tended to diffuse toward cellulose. Water molecules initially distributed in cellulose diffused isotropically. This study provides a theoretical contribution for improvements in online monitoring of water in transformers, and for subsequent research on new insulation materials.

  7. Irradiation techniques for the release of bound heavy metals in natural waters and blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batley, G.E.; Farrar, Y.J.

    1978-01-01

    Irradiation techniques are compared with conventional acid digestion procedures for the release of bound heavy metals in natural waters and in blood, before their determination by anodic stripping voltammetry. Ultra-violet irradiation of acidified water with a 550-W mercury vapour lamp releases bound zinc, cadmium, lead and copper after 4 h. The same results can be achieved with a 30 Mrad dose of high-energy γ-irradiation. These techniques are also effective for the release of metals in whole blood and blood plasma, where sample volumes as small as 200 μl are adequate in analyses for zinc, copper and lead. By comparison with acid digestion and solvent extraction methods, irradiation treatments offer the advantages of minimum sample manipulation and negligible reagent blanks. (Auth.)

  8. Molecular multipole moments of water molecules in ice Ih

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, E.R.; Xantheas, S.S.; Jonsson, H.

    1998-01-01

    We have used an induction model including dipole, dipole endash quadrupole, quadrupole endash quadrupole polarizability and first hyperpolarizability as well as fixed octopole and hexadecapole moments to study the electric field in ice. The self-consistent induction calculations gave an average total dipole moment of 3.09 D, a 67% increase over the dipole moment of an isolated water molecule. A previous, more approximate induction model study by Coulson and Eisenberg [Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 291, 445 (1966)] suggested a significantly smaller average value of 2.6 D. This value has been used extensively in recent years as a reference point in the development of various polarizable interaction potentials for water as well as for assessment of the convergence of water cluster properties to those of bulk. The reason for this difference is not due to approximations made in the computational scheme of Coulson and Eisenberg but rather due to the use of less accurate values for the molecular multipoles in these earlier calculations. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  9. An upper-bound assessment of the benefits of reducing perchlorate in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, Randall

    2014-10-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency plans to issue new federal regulations to limit drinking water concentrations of perchlorate, which occurs naturally and results from the combustion of rocket fuel. This article presents an upper-bound estimate of the potential benefits of alternative maximum contaminant levels for perchlorate in drinking water. The results suggest that the economic benefits of reducing perchlorate concentrations in drinking water are likely to be low, i.e., under $2.9 million per year nationally, for several reasons. First, the prevalence of detectable perchlorate in public drinking water systems is low. Second, the population especially sensitive to effects of perchlorate, pregnant women who are moderately iodide deficient, represents a minority of all pregnant women. Third, and perhaps most importantly, reducing exposure to perchlorate in drinking water is a relatively ineffective way of increasing iodide uptake, a crucial step linking perchlorate to health effects of concern. © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis.

  10. Using a Water Balance Model to Bound Potential Irrigation Development in the Upper Blue Nile Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain Figueroa, A.; McLaughlin, D.

    2016-12-01

    The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD), on the Blue Nile is an example of water resource management underpinning food, water and energy security. Downstream countries have long expressed concern about water projects in Ethiopia because of possible diversions to agricultural uses that could reduce flow in the Nile. Such diversions are attractive to Ethiopia as a partial solution to its food security problems but they could also conflict with hydropower revenue from GERD. This research estimates an upper bound on diversions above the GERD project by considering the potential for irrigated agriculture expansion and, in particular, the availability of water and land resources for crop production. Although many studies have aimed to simulate downstream flows for various Nile basin management plans, few have taken the perspective of bounding the likely impacts of upstream agricultural development. The approach is to construct an optimization model to establish a bound on Upper Blue Nile (UBN) agricultural development, paying particular attention to soil suitability and seasonal variability in climate. The results show that land and climate constraints impose significant limitations on crop production. Only 25% of the land area is suitable for irrigation due to the soil, slope and temperature constraints. When precipitation is also considered only 11% of current land area could be used in a way that increases water consumption. The results suggest that Ethiopia could consume an additional 3.75 billion cubic meters (bcm) of water per year, through changes in land use and storage capacity. By exploiting this irrigation potential, Ethiopia could potentially decrease the annual flow downstream of the UBN by 8 percent from the current 46 bcm/y to the modeled 42 bcm/y.

  11. Approximative Krieger-Nelkin orientation averaging and anisotropy of water molecules vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, M.I.

    1974-01-01

    Quantum-mechanics approach of water molecules dynamics should be taken into account for precise theoretical calculation of differential scattering cross sections of neutrons. Krieger and Nelkin have proposed an approximate method for averaging orientation of molecules regarding directions of incoming and scattered neutron. This paper shows that this approach can be successfully applied for general shape of water molecule vibration anisotropy

  12. Pre-rigor temperature and the relationship between lamb tenderisation, free water production, bound water and dry matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Carrick; Wells, Robyn; Lowe, Tim; Waller, John

    2014-01-01

    The M. longissimus from lambs electrically stimulated at 15 min post-mortem were removed after grading, wrapped in polythene film and held at 4 (n=6), 7 (n=6), 15 (n=6, n=8) and 35°C (n=6), until rigor mortis then aged at 15°C for 0, 4, 24 and 72 h post-rigor. Centrifuged free water increased exponentially, and bound water, dry matter and shear force decreased exponentially over time. Decreases in shear force and increases in free water were closely related (r(2)=0.52) and were unaffected by pre-rigor temperatures. © 2013.

  13. Distribution of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chempath, Shaji [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pratt, Lawrence R [TULANE UNIV

    2008-01-01

    Distributions of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface are obtained on the basis of molecular simulation with the SPC/E model of water. These binding energies together with the observed interfacial density profile are used to test a minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical statistical thermodynamic theory. Binding energy distributions for water molecules in that interfacial region clearly exhibit a composite structure. A minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical model that is accurate for the free energy of bulk liquid water breaks down for water molecules in the liquid-vapor interfacial region. This breakdown is associated with the fact that this minimally conditioned Gaussian model would be inaccurate for the statistical thermodynamics of a dilute gas. Aggressive conditioning greatly improves the performance of that Gaussian quasi-chemical model. The analogy between the Gaussian quasi-chemical model and dielectric models of hydration free energies suggests that naive dielectric models without the conditioning features of quasi-chemical theory will be unreliable for these interfacial problems. Multi-Gaussian models that address the composite nature of the binding energy distributions observed in the interfacial region might provide a mechanism for correcting dielectric models for practical applications.

  14. Rapid and accurate prediction and scoring of water molecules in protein binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A Ross

    Full Text Available Water plays a critical role in ligand-protein interactions. However, it is still challenging to predict accurately not only where water molecules prefer to bind, but also which of those water molecules might be displaceable. The latter is often seen as a route to optimizing affinity of potential drug candidates. Using a protocol we call WaterDock, we show that the freely available AutoDock Vina tool can be used to predict accurately the binding sites of water molecules. WaterDock was validated using data from X-ray crystallography, neutron diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations and correctly predicted 97% of the water molecules in the test set. In addition, we combined data-mining, heuristic and machine learning techniques to develop probabilistic water molecule classifiers. When applied to WaterDock predictions in the Astex Diverse Set of protein ligand complexes, we could identify whether a water molecule was conserved or displaced to an accuracy of 75%. A second model predicted whether water molecules were displaced by polar groups or by non-polar groups to an accuracy of 80%. These results should prove useful for anyone wishing to undertake rational design of new compounds where the displacement of water molecules is being considered as a route to improved affinity.

  15. Glutamate Water Gates in the Ion Binding Pocket of Na(+) Bound Na(+), K(+)-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Minwoo; Kopec, Wojciech; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2017-01-01

    III is always protonated. Glutamic acid residues in the three binding sites act as water gates, and their deprotonation triggers water entry to the binding sites. From DFT calculations of Na(+) binding energies, we conclude that three protons in the binding site are needed to effectively bind Na......The dynamically changing protonation states of the six acidic amino acid residues in the ion binding pocket of the Na(+), K(+) -ATPase (NKA) during the ion transport cycle are proposed to drive ion binding, release and possibly determine Na(+) or K(+) selectivity. We use molecular dynamics (MD......(+) from water and four are needed to release them in the next step. Protonation of Asp926 in site III will induce Na(+) release, and Glu327, Glu954 and Glu779 are all likely to be protonated in the Na(+) bound occluded conformation. Our data provides key insights into the role of protons in the Na...

  16. Fast Rotational Diffusion of Water Molecules in a 2D Hydrogen Bond Network at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisk, T. R.; Hoffmann, C.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Mamontov, E.; Podlesnyak, A. A.; Wang, X.; Kent, P. R. C.; Anovitz, L. M.

    2018-05-01

    Individual water molecules or small clusters of water molecules contained within microporous minerals present an extreme case of confinement where the local structure of hydrogen bond networks are dramatically altered from bulk water. In the zinc silicate hemimorphite, the water molecules form a two-dimensional hydrogen bond network with hydroxyl groups in the crystal framework. Here, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the structure and dynamics of water molecules within this network. The water molecules undergo a continuous phase transition in their orientational configuration analogous to a two-dimensional Ising model. The incoherent dynamic structure factor reveals two thermally activated relaxation processes, one on a subpicosecond timescale and another on a 10-100 ps timescale, between 70 and 130 K. The slow process is an in-plane reorientation of the water molecule involving the breaking of hydrogen bonds with a framework that, despite the low temperatures involved, is analogous to rotational diffusion of water molecules in the bulk liquid. The fast process is a localized motion of the water molecule with no apparent analogs among known bulk or confined phases of water.

  17. Upper Bound Solution for the Face Stability of Shield Tunnel below the Water Table

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xilin Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By FE simulation with Mohr-Coulomb perfect elastoplasticity model, the relationship between the support pressure and displacement of the shield tunnel face was obtained. According to the plastic strain distribution at collapse state, an appropriate failure mechanism was proposed for upper bound limit analysis, and the formula to calculate the limit support pressure was deduced. The limit support pressure was rearranged to be the summation of soil cohesion c, surcharge load q, and soil gravity γ multiplied by their corresponding coefficients Nc, Nq, and Nγ, and parametric studies were carried out on these coefficients. In order to consider the influence of seepage on the face stability, the pore water pressure distribution and the seepage force on the tunnel face were obtained by FE simulation. After adding the power of seepage force into the equation of the upper bound limit analysis, the total limit support pressure for stabilizing the tunnel face under seepage condition was obtained. The total limit support pressure was shown to increase almost linearly with the water table.

  18. Density, distribution, and orientation of water molecules inside and outside carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J A; McGaughey, A J H

    2008-02-28

    The behavior of water molecules inside and outside 1.1, 2.8, 6.9, and 10.4 nm diameter armchair carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is predicted using molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of CNT diameter on mass density, molecular distribution, and molecular orientation are identified for both the confined and unconfined fluids. Within 1 nm of the CNT surface, unconfined water molecules assume a spatially varying density profile. The molecules distribute nonuniformly around the carbon surface and have preferred orientations. The behavior of the unconfined water molecules is invariant with CNT diameter. The behavior of the confined water, however, can be correlated to tube diameter. Inside the 10.4 nm CNT, the molecular behavior is indistinguishable from that of the unconfined fluid. Within the smaller CNTs, surface curvature effects reduce the equilibrium water density and force water molecules away from the surface. This effect changes both the molecular distribution and preferred molecular orientations.

  19. Tritium metabolism in cow's milk after administration of tritiated water and of organically bound tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoek, J. van den

    1982-01-01

    Tritium was administered as THO and as organically bound tritium (OBT) to lactating cows. Urine and milk samples were collected and analyzed for tritium content. Plateau levels in milk water and in milk fat, lactose and casein were reached in about 20 days after feeding either THO or OBT. Comparison of the specific activity (pCi 3 H/g H) of the various milk constituents with the specific activity of the body water showed that, after administration of THO, the highest tritium incorporation occurred in lactose (0.58), followed by milk fat (0.36) and casein (0.27). Tritium incorporation in milk dry matter (0.45) is considerably higher than in most tissue components of several mammalian species after continuous ingestion of THO as reported in the literature. After feeding OBT, the highest tritium incorporation occurred in milk fat and to a lesser extent in casein. Tritium levels in lactose were surprisingly low and the reason for this is not clear. They were similar to those in milk water. Tritium levels in milk and urine water showed systematic differences during administration of OBT and after this was stopped. There was more tritium in milk water until the last day of OBT feeding and this situation was reversed after this. (author)

  20. Tritium metabolism in cow's milk after administration of tritiated water and of organically bound tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van den Hoek, J [Landbouwhogeschool Wageningen (Netherlands). Lab. voor Fysiologie der Dieren; Gerber, G; Kirchmann, R [Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium)

    1982-01-01

    Tritium was administered as THO and as organically bound tritium (OBT) to lactating cows. Urine and milk samples were collected and analyzed for tritium content. Plateau levels in milk water and in milk fat, lactose and casein were reached in about 20 days after feeding either THO or OBT. Comparison of the specific activity (pCi/sup 3/H/g H) of the various milk constituents with the specific activity of the body water showed that, after administration of THO, the highest tritium incorporation occurred in lactose (0.58), followed by milk fat (0.36) and casein (0.27). Tritium incorporation in milk dry matter (0.45) is considerably higher than in most tissue components of several mammalian species after continuous ingestion of THO as reported in the literature. After feeding OBT, the highest tritium incorporation occurred in milk fat and to a lesser extent in casein. Tritium levels in lactose were surprisingly low and the reason for this is not clear. They were similar to those in milk water. Tritium levels in milk and urine water showed systematic differences during administration of OBT and after this was stopped. There was more tritium in milk water until the last day of OBT feeding and this situation was reversed after this.

  1. Uncoupling between soil and xylem water isotopic composition: how to discriminate mobile and tightly-bound water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Gómez, Paula; Aguilera, Mònica; Pemán, Jesús; Gil Pelegrín, Eustaquio; Ferrio, Juan Pedro

    2014-05-01

    As a general rule, no isotopic fractionation occurs during water uptake and water transport, thus, xylem water reflects source water. However, this correspondence does not always happen. Isotopic enrichment of xylem water has been found in several cases and has been either associated to 'stem processes' like cuticular evaporation 1 and xylem-phloem communication under water stress 2,3 or to 'soil processes' such as species-specific use of contrasting water sources retained at different water potential forces in soil. In this regard, it has been demonstrated that mobile and tightly-bound water may show different isotopic signature 4,5. However, standard cryogenic distillation does not allow to separate different water pools within soil samples. Here, we carried out a study in a mixed adult forest (Pinus sylvestris, Quercus subpyrenaica and Buxus sempervirens) growing in a relatively deep loamy soil in the Pre-Pyrenees. During one year, we sampled xylem from twigs and soil at different depths (10, 30 and 50 cm). We also sampled xylem from trunk and bigger branches to assess whether xylem water was enriched in the distal parts of the tree. We found average deviations in the isotopic signature from xylem to soil of 4o 2o and 2.4o in δ18O and 18.3o 7.3o and 8.9o in δ2H, for P.sylvestris, Q.subpyrenaica and B.sempervirens respectively. Xylem water was always enriched compared to soil. In contrast, we did not find clear differences in isotopic composition between xylem samples along the tree. Declining the hypothesis that 'stem processes' would cause these uncoupling between soil and xylem isotopic values, we tested the possibility to separate mobile and tightly-bound water by centrifugation. Even though we could separate two water fractions in soils close to saturation, we could not recover a mobile fraction in drier soils. In this regard, we welcome suggestions on alternatives to separate different soil fractions in order to find the correspondence between soil and

  2. Analytical models for lower and upper bounds of the condensation-induced water hammer in long horizontal pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Moon Hyun; Park, Joo Wan; Nam, Ho Yun

    1992-01-01

    Improved analytical models have been proposed that can predict the lower and upper limits of the water hammer region for given flow conditions by incorporation of recent advances made in the understanding of phenomena associated with the condensation-induced water hammer into existing methods. Present models are applicable for steam-water counterflow in a long horizontal pipe geometry. Both lower and upper bounds of the water hammer region are expressed in terms of the 'critical inlet water flow rate' as a function of axial position. Water hammer region boundaries predicted by present and typical existing models are compared for particular flow conditions of the water hammer event occurred at San Onofre Unit 1 to assess the applicability of the models examined. The result shows that present models for lower and upper bounds of the water hammer region compare favorably with the best performing existing models

  3. Chemical reactions of water molecules on Ru(0001) induced by selective excitation of vibrational modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugarza, Aitor; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-05-07

    Tunneling electrons in a scanning tunneling microscope were used to excite specific vibrational quantum states of adsorbed water and hydroxyl molecules on a Ru(0 0 0 1) surface. The excited molecules relaxed by transfer of energy to lower energy modes, resulting in diffusion, dissociation, desorption, and surface-tip transfer processes. Diffusion of H{sub 2}O molecules could be induced by excitation of the O-H stretch vibration mode at 445 meV. Isolated molecules required excitation of one single quantum while molecules bonded to a C atom required at least two quanta. Dissociation of single H{sub 2}O molecules into H and OH required electron energies of 1 eV or higher while dissociation of OH required at least 2 eV electrons. In contrast, water molecules forming part of a cluster could be dissociated with electron energies of 0.5 eV.

  4. The optimization of peptide cargo bound to MHC class I molecules by the peptide-loading complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Tim; Williams, Anthony

    2005-10-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I complexes present peptides from both self and foreign intracellular proteins on the surface of most nucleated cells. The assembled heterotrimeric complexes consist of a polymorphic glycosylated heavy chain, non-polymorphic beta(2) microglobulin, and a peptide of typically nine amino acids in length. Assembly of the class I complexes occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum and is assisted by a number of chaperone molecules. A multimolecular unit termed the peptide-loading complex (PLC) is integral to this process. The PLC contains a peptide transporter (transporter associated with antigen processing), a thiooxido-reductase (ERp57), a glycoprotein chaperone (calreticulin), and tapasin, a class I-specific chaperone. We suggest that class I assembly involves a process of optimization where the peptide cargo of the complex is edited by the PLC. Furthermore, this selective peptide loading is biased toward peptides that have a longer off-rate from the assembled complex. We suggest that tapasin is the key chaperone that directs this action of the PLC with secondary contributions from calreticulin and possibly ERp57. We provide a framework model for how this may operate at the molecular level and draw parallels with the proposed mechanism of action of human leukocyte antigen-DM for MHC class II complex optimization.

  5. Influence of orientation averaging on the anisotropy of thermal neutrons scattering on water molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, M. I.; Radunovic, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    Determination of spatial distribution of neutron flux in water, most frequently used moderator in thermal reactors, demands microscopic scattering kernels dependence on cosine of thermal neutrons scattering angle when solving the Boltzmann equation. Since spatial orientation of water molecules influences this dependence it is necessary to perform orientation averaging or rotation-vibrational intermediate scattering function for water molecules. The calculations described in this paper and the obtained results showed that methods of orientation averaging do not influence the anisotropy of thermal neutrons scattering on water molecules, but do influence the inelastic scattering

  6. Relaxation time T/sub 1/ and bound water fraction of muscle by NMR imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, N.; Ikehira, H.; Yamane, T.; Tateno, Y.; Torii, S.; Matsumura, K.

    1986-05-01

    In order to establish the efficacy of NMR-CT in the diagnostic investigation of muscle disorders, proton NMR-CT imaging was performed and muscle longitudinal relaxation (T1) times were measured in 20 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients and normal controls (NC). In addition, the bound water fraction (BWF) was calculated from the measured T1 value in appropriate cases. Results show that in DMD muscle T1 values were above normal in the early clinical stages, declined rapidly with progress of the disease, and reached the same low level as the subcutaneous fat. This decrease of T1 values was not uniform for all muscles, being most prominent in gluteus maximus and least in sartorius and gracilis. In NC muscle BWF increased with maturation under the age of 10 years, and became fixed beyond that. In the early stages of DMD, BWF was below normal.

  7. The mechanism of 2-dimensional manipulation of DNA molecules by water and ethanol flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zigang; Huang Yibo; Li Bin; Zhang Yi

    2007-01-01

    Due to its unique physical and chemical properties, DNA has recently become a promising material for building blocks in nanofabrication. Many researches focus on how to use DNA molecules as a template for nanowires. Molecular Combing technique is one of important methods to manipulate DNA molecules by using a water meniscus and form specific DNA nano-structures on surfaces. In this paper, by employing a modified molecular combing technique, special patterns of DNA molecules was formed, and the interaction between liquid flows or meniscus and DNA molecules was analyzed, and the mechanism of manipulating DNA molecules by liquid was studied. (authors)

  8. Implication of Crystal Water Molecules in Inhibitor Binding at ALR2 Active Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hymavati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Water molecules play a crucial role in mediating the interaction between a ligand and a macromolecule. The solvent environment around such biomolecule controls their structure and plays important role in protein-ligand interactions. An understanding of the nature and role of these water molecules in the active site of a protein could greatly increase the efficiency of rational drug design approaches. We have performed the comparative crystal structure analysis of aldose reductase to understand the role of crystal water in protein-ligand interaction. Molecular dynamics simulation has shown the versatile nature of water molecules in bridge H bonding during interaction. Occupancy and life time of water molecules depend on the type of cocrystallized ligand present in the structure. The information may be useful in rational approach to customize the ligand, and thereby longer occupancy and life time for bridge H-bonding.

  9. Bounding analysis of containment of high pressure melt ejection in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Additon, S.L.; Fontana, M.H.; Carter, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the loadings on containment due to direct containment heating (DCH) as a result of high pressure melt ejection (HPME) in advanced light water reactors (ALWR) which were estimated using conservative, bounding analyses. The purpose of the analyses was to scope the magnitude of the possible loadings and to indicate the performance needed from potential mitigation methods, such as a cavity configuration that limits energy transfer to the upper containment volume. Analyses were performed for three cases which examined the effect of availability of high pressure reactor coolant system water at the time of reactor vessel melt through and the effect of preflooding of the reactor cavity. The amount of core ejected from the vessel was varied from 100% to 0% for all cases. Results indicate that all amounts of core debris dispersal could be accommodated by the containment for the case where the reactor cavity was preflooded. For the worst case, all the energy from in-vessel hydrogen generation and combustion plus that from 45% of the entire molten core would be required to equilibrate with the containment upper volume in order to reach containment failure pressure

  10. Changes in free and bound water in the hippocampus of patients with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Tetsuichi; Hanyu, Haruo

    2000-01-01

    We measured the T2 relaxation time using dual spin echo MRI, and also the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) using gradient echo MRI, in the hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and compared these factors to those of non-Alzheimer's dementia (non-AD) patients and of control subjects. The degree of medial temporal lobe atrophy in AD patients was similar to that of non-AD patients, although atrophy was more severe in AD and non-AD patients than in the control group. MTRs in the hippocampus were significantly lower in AD patients than in non-AD patients and in the control group. No significant differences in the T2 values of the three groups were found. The change of T2 x (1-MTR/100) in the hippocampus was significantly higher in AD patients than in non-AD patients and the control group and the change of T2 x MTR/100 was significantly lower in AD patients than in non-AD patients and the control group. Significant correlations between MMSE scores and MR parameters were found in AD patients, but not in non-AD patients. These results suggest that a decrease in the MTR in the hippocampus of AD, probably due to a decrease in bound water and an increase in free water, reflects underlying pathological changes which include a loss of neurons and gliosis. (author)

  11. Effect of lifetime intake of organically bound tritium and tritiated water on the oocytes of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak-Flis, Z.; Wasilewska-Gomulka, M.

    1984-01-01

    Rats were continuously exposed to constant activity of tritium in drinking water (HTO group) or to tritium organically bound in food (T-food group) in the period from conception of F 1 generation through maturity. Female offspring were killed at the age of 21 and 71 days and the oocytes in their ovaries were counted. Mean dose rates absorbed in the ovaries were for the HTO groups 7.25+-0.37 and 14.73+-0.79 mGy/day and for the T-food group 4.84+-0.25 mGy/day. Reduction in the oocyte number in the ovaries of females exposed to tritiated food was bigger than in the ovaries of females exposed to tritiated water. The dependence of the survival of small oocytes on the dose rate and the corresponding total accumulated dose had an exponential character. The damaging effect of tritium was for the period from conception to 21 days of age bigger than from 21 to 71 days of age. Of all stages of oocyte development, the highest sensitivity to tritium irradiation was observed in small oocytes and oocytes with one complete layer of follicle cells. As a result, relative number of the growing and large oocytes increased. (orig.)

  12. Theoretical investigation of the ultrafast dissociation of core-ionized water and uracil molecules immersed in liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stia, C.R.; Fojon, O.A. [Instituto de Fisica Rosario - CONICET-Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Rosario (Argentina); Gaigeot, M.P. [Laboratoire Analyse et Modelisation pour la Biologie et l' Environnement, LAMBE, UMR-CNRS 8587, Universite d' Evry-Val-d' Essonne, 91 - Evry (France); Institut Universitaire de France, 75 - Paris (France); Vuilleumier, R. [Departement de chimie, Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris (France); Herve du Penhoat, M.A.; Politis, M.F. [Institut de Mineralogie et de Physique des Milieux Condenses, IMPMC, UMR-CNRS 7590, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-10-15

    We present a series of ab initio density functional based calculations of the fragmentation dynamics of core-ionized biomolecules. The computations are performed for pure liquid water, aqueous and isolated Uracil. Core ionization is described by replacing the 1s{sup 2} pseudopotential of one atom of the target molecule (C, N or O) with a pseudopotential for a 1s{sup 1} core-hole state. Our results predict that the dissociation of core-ionized water molecules may be reached during the lifetime of inner-shell vacancy (less than 10 fs), leading to OH bond breakage as a primary outcome. We also observe a second fragmentation channel in which total Coulomb explosion of the ionized water molecule occurs. Fragmentation pathways are found similar for pure water or when the water molecule is in the primary hydration shell of the uracil molecule. In the latter case, the proton may be transferred towards the uracil oxygen atoms. When the core hole is located on the uracil molecule, ultrafast dissociation is only observed in the aqueous environment and for nitrogen-K vacancies, resulting in proton transfers towards the hydrogen-bonded water molecule. (authors)

  13. Femtosecond spectroscopic study of the solvation of amphiphilic molecules by water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezus, Y.L.A.; Bakker, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    We use polarization-resolved mid-infrared pump-probe spectroscopy to study the aqueous solvation of proline and N-methylacetamide. These molecules serve as models to study the solvation of proteins. We monitor the orientational dynamics of partly deuterated water molecules (HDO) that are present at

  14. Dynamics of water molecules in the active-site cavity of human cytochromes P450

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydberg, Patrik; Rod, Thomas Holm; Olsen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the dynamics of water molecules in six crystal structures of four human cytochromes P450, 2A6, 2C8, 2C9, and 3A4, with molecular dynamics simulations. In the crystal structures, only a few water molecules are seen and the reported sizes of the active-site cavity vary a lot....... In the simulations, the cavities are completely filled with water molecules, although with approximately 20% lower density than in bulk water. The 2A6 protein differs from the other three in that it has a very small cavity with only two water molecules and no exchange with the surroundings. The other three proteins...... channels, through which there is a quite frequent exchange of water molecules (one molecule is exchanged every 30-200 ps), except in 2A6. Most of the channels are observed also in the crystal structures, but two to three channels in each protein open only during the simulations. There are no water...

  15. Structural Arrangement of Water Molecules around Highly Charged Nanoparticles: Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eunae; Yeom, Min Sun

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to understand the structural arrangement of water molecules around highly charged nanoparticles under aqueous conditions. The effect of two highly charged nanoparticles on the solvation charge asymmetry has been examined. We calculated the radial distribution functions of the components of water molecules around nanoparticles which have four charge types at two different salt concentrations. Even though the distributions of water molecules surrounding a sodium ion and a chloride ion are hardly affected by the charges of nanoparticles and the salt concentrations, those around highly charged nanoparticles are strongly influenced by the charges of nanoparticles, but hardly by the charges of nanoparticles and salt concentrations. We find that the distributions of hydrogen atoms in water molecules around one highly charged nanoparticle are dependent on the magnitude of the nanoparticle charge

  16. Quantum Electric Dipole Lattice - Water Molecules Confined to Nanocavities in Beryl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressel, Martin; Zhukova, Elena S.; Thomas, Victor G.; Gorshunov, Boris P.

    2018-02-01

    Water is subject to intense investigations due to its importance in biological matter but keeps many of its secrets. Here, we unveil an even other aspect by confining H2O molecules to nanosize cages. Our THz and infrared spectra of water in the gemstone beryl evidence quantum tunneling of H2O molecules in the crystal lattice. The water molecules are spread out when confined in a nanocage. In combination with low-frequency dielectric measurements, we were also able to show that dipolar coupling among the H2O molecules leads towards a ferroelectric state at low temperatures. Upon cooling, a ferroelectric soft mode shifts through the THz range. Only quantum fluctuations prevent perfect macroscopic order to be fully achieved. Beside the significance to life science and possible application, nanoconfined water may become the prime example of a quantum electric dipolar lattice.

  17. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed

  18. Dose from organically bound tritium after an acute tritiated water intake in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, A; Richardson, R B; Galeriu, D [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

    1995-10-01

    We have analyzed the urinary excretion data from eight male workers following an acute intake of tritiated water (HTO) and assessed the dose contribution from organically bound tritium (OBT) in the body. The individuals affected increased their fluid intakes during the first month or more post-exposure, to accelerate the turnover of tritium in the body water for dose mitigation purposes. The volumes of cumulative 24 h urine samples were similar to Reference Man in the latter part of the study (100-300 d post-exposure). The workers` urine samples were analyzed for total tritium up to 300 d post-exposure. The results suggest that a measurement of the tritium activity per unit mass of organic matter in urine can provide an assessment of the specific activity of tritium in the organic fraction of the soft tissue, providing an equilibrium condition exists. A mathematical model is proposed to estimate the dose increase from the retained OBT by examining the kinetics of total tritium excretion in urine. The model accounts for the variable rates of fluid intake. The influence of measurement errors and the limited duration of the study (0-300 d post-exposure) on the OBT dose contribution was assessed through statistical analysis, while the role of direct OBT excretion in urine was estimated by using metabolic models. Based on the time series of tritium concentration in urine, the average dose increase to the workers from the metabolised OBT was calculated as 6.2 {+-} 1.3% of the HTO dose. 78 refs., 36 tabs., 11 figs.

  19. Dose from organically bound tritium after an acute tritiated water intake in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.; Richardson, R.B.; Galeriu, D.

    1995-10-01

    We have analyzed the urinary excretion data from eight male workers following an acute intake of tritiated water (HTO) and assessed the dose contribution from organically bound tritium (OBT) in the body. The individuals affected increased their fluid intakes during the first month or more post-exposure, to accelerate the turnover of tritium in the body water for dose mitigation purposes. The volumes of cumulative 24 h urine samples were similar to Reference Man in the latter part of the study (100-300 d post-exposure). The workers' urine samples were analyzed for total tritium up to 300 d post-exposure. The results suggest that a measurement of the tritium activity per unit mass of organic matter in urine can provide an assessment of the specific activity of tritium in the organic fraction of the soft tissue, providing an equilibrium condition exists. A mathematical model is proposed to estimate the dose increase from the retained OBT by examining the kinetics of total tritium excretion in urine. The model accounts for the variable rates of fluid intake. The influence of measurement errors and the limited duration of the study (0-300 d post-exposure) on the OBT dose contribution was assessed through statistical analysis, while the role of direct OBT excretion in urine was estimated by using metabolic models. Based on the time series of tritium concentration in urine, the average dose increase to the workers from the metabolised OBT was calculated as 6.2 ± 1.3% of the HTO dose. 78 refs., 36 tabs., 11 figs

  20. Tritiated water uptake kinetics in tissue-free water and organically-bound fractions of tomato plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, F.S.

    1984-03-01

    The kinetics of tritiated water (HTO) vapour uptake into tissue-free water tritium (TFWT) and organically bound tritium (OBT) fractions of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., cv Vendor, were investigated under controlled growing conditions. Most uptake data fitted a first-order kinetic model, C t = C ∞ (1-e -kt ), where C t is the tritium concentration at time t, Ca the steady-state concentration and k the uptake rate constant. During atmospheric-HTO exposure with clean-water irrigation in open pots the TFWT k values were 0.024 ± 0.023 h -1 for new foliage, 0.104 ± 0.067 h -1 for old foliage and 0.042 ± to 0.136 h -1 for new green fruit. OBT uptake rate constants were 20 percent less for new foliage and 76 percent less for new green fruit. Under steady-state conditions the ratio of tritium specific activities of TWFT to atmospheric HTO were 0.43 in new foliage, 0.46 in old foliage and 0.19 in green fruit. Within the plant, OBT and TFWT ratios were 0.70 for new foliage, 0.63 for old foliage (maximum) and between 0.72 and 1.92 for green fruit. The greater than unity tritium specific activity ratios in green fruit were not attributed to tritium enrichment but rather to the translocation of foliar OBT to the growing fruit which contained lower specific activity TFWT derived from soil water

  1. Adsorptionof polar organic molecules at oil/water interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aveyard, R; Chapman, J

    1975-03-15

    A study has been made of the adsorption of several esters of dicarboxylic acids at the alkane/water and the air/water interface. The adsorption of n-butanol and n-heptanol at the air/water surface also has been investigated. The surface pressure (pi) -surface area (A) isotherms are compared for the various films, and standard free energies of adsorption have been determined. Attempts have been made to fit the pi, A isotherms using surface equations of state based on the models, of both a 2-dimensional gas and a 2-dimensional solution. The solution model has proved reasonably successful for fairly dilute films at the air/water surface. At higher coverages, an equation derived by Smith for liquid expanded monolayers gives a moderately good description of films of heptanol on water. A simple application of the solution model on adsorbed monolayers at the liquid; liquid interface met with little success. However, it is found that 2-dimensional gas equations describe such systems surprisingly well for fairly low surface concentrations. (20 refs.)

  2. Roles of water molecules in bacteria and viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, C. S.

    1993-02-01

    In addition to water, microbes mainly comprise lipids, carbohydrates, proteins and nucleic acids. Their structure and function singularly and conjointly is affected by water activity. Desiccation leads to dramatic lipid phase changes whereas carbohydrates, proteins and nucleic acids initially suffer spontaneous, reversible low activation energy Maillard reactions forming products that more slowly re-arrange, cross-link etc. to give non-native states. While initial products spontaneously may reverse to native states by raising water activity, later products only do so through energy consumption and enzymatic activity eg. repair. Yet, native states of lipid membranes and associated enzymes are required to generate energy. Consequently, good reserves of high energy compounds (e.g. ATP) and of membrane stabilisers (e.g. trehalose) may be expected to enhance survival following drying and rehydration (e.g. anhydrobiotic organisms).

  3. Branch-and-Bound algorithm applied to uncertainty quantification of a Boiling Water Reactor Station Blackout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Joseph, E-mail: joseph.nielsen@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, 1955 N. Fremont Avenue, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); University of Idaho, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Program, 1776 Science Center Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83402-1575 (United States); Tokuhiro, Akira [University of Idaho, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Program, 1776 Science Center Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83402-1575 (United States); Hiromoto, Robert [University of Idaho, Department of Computer Science, 1776 Science Center Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83402-1575 (United States); Tu, Lei [University of Idaho, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Nuclear Engineering Program, 1776 Science Center Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83402-1575 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    state. Dynamic PRA (DPRA) methods provide a more rigorous analysis of complex dynamic systems. Unfortunately DPRA methods introduce issues associated with combinatorial explosion of states. This paper presents a methodology to address combinatorial explosion using a Branch-and-Bound algorithm applied to Dynamic Event Trees (DET), which utilize LENDIT (L – Length, E – Energy, N – Number, D – Distribution, I – Information, and T – Time) as well as a set theory to describe system, state, resource, and response (S2R2) sets to create bounding functions for the DET. The optimization of the DET in identifying high probability failure branches is extended to create a Phenomenological Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) methodology to evaluate modeling parameters important to safety of those failure branches that have a high probability of failure. The PIRT can then be used as a tool to identify and evaluate the need for experimental validation of models that have the potential to reduce risk. In order to demonstrate this methodology, a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Station Blackout (SBO) case study is presented.

  4. Branch-and-Bound algorithm applied to uncertainty quantification of a Boiling Water Reactor Station Blackout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Joseph; Tokuhiro, Akira; Hiromoto, Robert; Tu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    state. Dynamic PRA (DPRA) methods provide a more rigorous analysis of complex dynamic systems. Unfortunately DPRA methods introduce issues associated with combinatorial explosion of states. This paper presents a methodology to address combinatorial explosion using a Branch-and-Bound algorithm applied to Dynamic Event Trees (DET), which utilize LENDIT (L – Length, E – Energy, N – Number, D – Distribution, I – Information, and T – Time) as well as a set theory to describe system, state, resource, and response (S2R2) sets to create bounding functions for the DET. The optimization of the DET in identifying high probability failure branches is extended to create a Phenomenological Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) methodology to evaluate modeling parameters important to safety of those failure branches that have a high probability of failure. The PIRT can then be used as a tool to identify and evaluate the need for experimental validation of models that have the potential to reduce risk. In order to demonstrate this methodology, a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Station Blackout (SBO) case study is presented.

  5. Contamination of boreholes water by 76 pesticides molecules in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user2

    to be the cause of the degradation of the quality of sur- face and ground waters ... network and the nature of the soil generally clay lateritic with high permeability. .... 0.006 0.008 0.004 0.004 0.004 0.007 0.008 0.004 0.004 0.004 Malathion.

  6. Combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations for protein-ligand complexes: free energies of binding of water molecules in influenza neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Christopher J; Shaw, Katherine E; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2015-01-22

    The applicability of combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods for the calculation of absolute binding free energies of conserved water molecules in protein/ligand complexes is demonstrated. Here, we apply QM/MM Monte Carlo simulations to investigate binding of water molecules to influenza neuraminidase. We investigate five different complexes, including those with the drugs oseltamivir and peramivir. We investigate water molecules in two different environments, one more hydrophobic and one hydrophilic. We calculate the free-energy change for perturbation of a QM to MM representation of the bound water molecule. The calculations are performed at the BLYP/aVDZ (QM) and TIP4P (MM) levels of theory, which we have previously demonstrated to be consistent with one another for QM/MM modeling. The results show that the QM to MM perturbation is significant in both environments (greater than 1 kcal mol(-1)) and larger in the more hydrophilic site. Comparison with the same perturbation in bulk water shows that this makes a contribution to binding. The results quantify how electronic polarization differences in different environments affect binding affinity and also demonstrate that extensive, converged QM/MM free-energy simulations, with good levels of QM theory, are now practical for protein/ligand complexes.

  7. Study on the bound water of several high specific surface-area oxides (beryllia, alumina, silica-alumina)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouquerol, J.

    1964-11-01

    This study is concerned with the bound water of several oxides (beryllia, alumina, silica-alumina) at different steps of their dehydration (heating temperatures between 150 and 1100 deg. C). The following techniques have been used simultaneously: Thermal analysis (a new method has been developed), nitrogen adsorption (study of the texture), Diborane hydrolysis (qualitative and quantitative analysis of surface water), Infra-red spectrography (in the absorption range of water), Nuclear magnetic resonance (in the resonance range of protons). Thanks to these different techniques, five kinds of bound water have been observed. Attention is called on the great influence of the thermal treatment conditions on the evolution of the products resulting from the decomposition of alumina α-trihydrate Al(OH) 3 and beryllium α-hydroxide, in the course of the dehydration. Moreover, the author emphasizes the peculiar properties of the two kinds of oxides (alumina and beryllia) prepared through a new method of treatment under low pressure and constant speed of decomposition. Such particular features concern mainly texture, bound water, and consequently, also catalytic activity. (author) [fr

  8. Hydroxyl and water molecule orientations in trypsin: Comparison to molecular dynamics structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, R.S.; Kossiakoff, A.A. [Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A comparison is presented of experimentally observed hydroxyl and water hydrogens in trypsin determined from neutron density maps with the results of a 140ps molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Experimental determination of hydrogen and deuterium atom positions in molecules as large as proteins is a unique capability of neutron diffraction. The comparison addresses the degree to which a standard force-field approach can adequately describe the local electrostatic and van der Waals forces that determine the orientations of these hydrogens. Neutron densities, derived from 2.1{Angstrom} D{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}O difference Fourier maps, provide a database of 27 well-ordered hydroxyl hydrogens. Most of the simulated hydroxyl orientations are within a standard deviation of the experimentally-observed positions, including several examples in which both the simulation and the neutron density indicate that a hydroxyl group is shifted from a {open_quote}standard{close_quote} rotamer. For the most highly ordered water molecules, the hydrogen distributions calculated from the trajectory were in good agreement with neutron density; simulated water molecules that displayed multiple hydrogen bonding networks had correspondingly broadened neutron density profiles. This comparison was facilitated by development of a method to construct a pseudo 2{Angstrom} density map based on the hydrogen atom distributions from the simulation. The degree of disorder of internal water molecules is shown to result primarily from the electrostatic environment surrounding that water molecule as opposed to the cavity size available to the molecule. A method is presented for comparing the discrete observations sampled in a dynamics trajectory with the time- averaged data obtained from X-ray or neutron diffraction studies. This method is particularly useful for statically-disordered water molecules, in which the average location assigned from a trajectory may represent a site of relatively low occupancy.

  9. Sustainable Innovation in Network-Bound Systems: Implications for the Consumption of Water, Waste Water and Electricity Services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van B.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Network-bound systems are crucial in environmental governance as the usage of their services embody significant environmental impacts. Conditions for network-bound systems providing services to consumers have altered dramatically over the last decades. Liberalization and privatization have led to a

  10. Water-mediated influence of a crowded environment on internal vibrations of a protein molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffel, Anna; Zielkiewicz, Jan

    2016-02-14

    The influence of crowding on the protein inner dynamics is examined by putting a single protein molecule close to one or two neighboring protein molecules. The presence of additional molecules influences the amplitudes of protein fluctuations. Also, a weak dynamical coupling of collective velocities of surface atoms of proteins separated by a layer of water is detected. The possible mechanisms of these phenomena are described. The cross-correlation function of the collective velocities of surface atoms of two proteins was decomposed into the Fourier series. The amplitude spectrum displays a peak at low frequencies. Also, the results of principal component analysis suggest that the close presence of an additional protein molecule influences the high-amplitude, low-frequency modes in the most prominent way. This part of the spectrum covers biologically important protein motions. The neighbor-induced changes in the inner dynamics of the protein may be connected with the changes in the velocity power spectrum of interfacial water. The additional protein molecule changes the properties of solvation water and in this way it can influence the dynamics of the second protein. It is suggested that this phenomenon may be described, at first approximation, by a damped oscillator driven by an external random force. This model was successfully applied to conformationally rigid Choristoneura fumiferana antifreeze protein molecules.

  11. FORMATION OF ORGANIC MOLECULES AND WATER IN WARM DISK ATMOSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najita, Joan R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Adamkovics, Mate; Glassgold, Alfred E. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-12-20

    Observations from Spitzer and ground-based infrared spectroscopy reveal significant diversity in the molecular emission from the inner few AU of T Tauri disks. We explore theoretically the possible origin of this diversity by expanding on our earlier thermal-chemical model of disk atmospheres. We consider how variations in grain settling, X-ray irradiation, accretion-related mechanical heating, and the oxygen-to-carbon ratio can affect the thermal and chemical properties of the atmosphere at 0.25-40 AU. We find that these model parameters can account for many properties of the detected molecular emission. The column density of the warm (200-2000 K) molecular atmosphere is sensitive to grain settling and the efficiency of accretion-related heating, which may account, at least in part, for the large range in molecular emission fluxes that have been observed. The dependence of the atmospheric properties on the model parameters may also help to explain trends that have been reported in the literature between molecular emission strength and mid-infrared color, stellar accretion rate, and disk mass. We discuss whether some of the differences between our model results and the observations (e.g., for water) indicate a role for vertical transport and freezeout in the disk midplane. We also discuss how planetesimal formation in the outer disk (beyond the snowline) may imprint a chemical signature on the inner few AU of the disk and speculate on possible observational tracers of this process.

  12. FORMATION OF ORGANIC MOLECULES AND WATER IN WARM DISK ATMOSPHERES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najita, Joan R.; Ádámkovics, Máté; Glassgold, Alfred E.

    2011-01-01

    Observations from Spitzer and ground-based infrared spectroscopy reveal significant diversity in the molecular emission from the inner few AU of T Tauri disks. We explore theoretically the possible origin of this diversity by expanding on our earlier thermal-chemical model of disk atmospheres. We consider how variations in grain settling, X-ray irradiation, accretion-related mechanical heating, and the oxygen-to-carbon ratio can affect the thermal and chemical properties of the atmosphere at 0.25-40 AU. We find that these model parameters can account for many properties of the detected molecular emission. The column density of the warm (200-2000 K) molecular atmosphere is sensitive to grain settling and the efficiency of accretion-related heating, which may account, at least in part, for the large range in molecular emission fluxes that have been observed. The dependence of the atmospheric properties on the model parameters may also help to explain trends that have been reported in the literature between molecular emission strength and mid-infrared color, stellar accretion rate, and disk mass. We discuss whether some of the differences between our model results and the observations (e.g., for water) indicate a role for vertical transport and freezeout in the disk midplane. We also discuss how planetesimal formation in the outer disk (beyond the snowline) may imprint a chemical signature on the inner few AU of the disk and speculate on possible observational tracers of this process.

  13. Bounding the marginal cost of producing potable water including the use of seawater desalinization as a backstop potable water production technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, James J.

    2014-04-01

    The analysis presented in this technical report should allow for the creation of high, medium, and low cost potable water prices for GCAM. Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) based desalinization should act as a backstop for the cost of producing potable water (i.e., the literature seems clear that SWRO should establish an upper bound for the plant gate cost of producing potable water). Transporting water over significant distances and having to lift water to higher elevations to reach end-users can also have a significant impact on the cost of producing water. The three potable fresh water scenarios describe in this technical report are: low cost water scenario ($0.10/m3); medium water cost scenario ($1.00/m3); and high water cost scenario ($2.50/m3).

  14. Influence of the effective mass of water molecule on thermal neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, M.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of the effective water molecule mass on the thermal neutron scattering on the nucleus of the hydrogen atom has been investigated. Besides the actual water molecule mass (M = 18) the investigations have been carried out with its two effective values (M1 = 16 and M2 = 20). The differential and total cross sections have been calculated for the incident thermal neutron energy E o = 1 eV. Investigation results show different prominence of the quantum effects and for M2 the appearance of peaks in the quasielastic scattering. (author)

  15. Shear-stress-induced structural arrangement of water molecules in nanoscale Couette flow with slipping at wall boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jau-Wen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the structuring of water molecules in a nanoscale Couette flow with the upper plate subjected to lateral forces with various magnitudes and water slipping against a metal wall. It was found that when the upper plate is subjected to a force, the water body deforms into a parallelepiped. Water molecules in the channel are then gradually arranged into lattice positions, creating a layered structure. The structural arrangement of water molecules is caused by the water molecules accommodating themselves to the increase in energy under the application of a lateral force on the moving plate. The ordering arrangement of water molecules increases the rotational degree of freedom, allowing the molecules to increase their Coulomb potential energy through polar rotation that accounts for the energy input through the upper plate. With a force continuously applied to the upper plate, the water molecules in contact with the upper plate move forward until slip between the water and upper plate occurs. The relation between the structural arrangement of water molecules, slip at the wall, and the shear force is studied. The relation between the slip and the locking/unlocking of water molecules to metal atoms is also studied

  16. Sustainable Innovation in Network-Bound Systems: Implications for the Consumption of Water, Waste Water and Electricity Services

    OpenAIRE

    Vliet, van, B.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Network-bound systems are crucial in environmental governance as the usage of their services embody significant environmental impacts. Conditions for network-bound systems providing services to consumers have altered dramatically over the last decades. Liberalization and privatization have led to a differentiation in providers, technologies, products and services, very a-typical for sectors that were formerly characterized by public and uniform modes of provision and consumption. The paper gi...

  17. Transport of water molecules through noncylindrical pores in multilayer nanoporous graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbabaei, Majid; Kim, Daejoong

    2017-08-09

    In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to examine the water transport properties through asymmetric hourglass-shaped pores in multilayer nanoporous graphene with a constant interlayer separation of 6 Å. The properties of the tested asymmetric hourglass-shaped pores [with the models having long cone (l 1 , -P) and short cone (l 2 , +P) entrances] are compared to a symmetric pore model. The study findings indicate that the water occupancy increases across the asymmetric pore (l 1 , -P) compared to (l 2 , +P), because of the length effect. The asymmetric pore, (l 1 , -P), yields higher flux compared to (l 2 , +P) and even the symmetric model, which can be attributed to the increase in the hydrogen bonds. In addition, the single-file water molecules across the narrowest pore diameter inside the (l 2 , +P) pore exhibit higher viscosity compared to those in the (l 1 , -P) pore because of the increase in the water layering effect. Moreover, it is found that the permeability inside the multilayer hourglass-shaped pore depends on the length of the flow path of the water molecules before approaching the layer with the smallest pore diameter. The probability of dipole orientation exhibits wider distribution inside the (l 1 , -P) system compared to (l 2 , +P), implying an enhanced formation of hydrogen bonding of water molecules. This results in the fast flow of water molecules. The MD trajectory shows that the dipole orientation across the single-layer graphene has frequently flipped compared to the dipole orientation across the pores in multilayer graphene, which is maintained during the whole simulation time (although the dipole orientation has flipped for a few picoseconds at the beginning of the simulation). This can be attributed to the energy barrier induced by the individual layer. The diffusion coefficient of water molecules inside the (l 2 , +P) system increases with pressure difference, however, it decreases inside the (l 1 , -P) system because

  18. Sliding Mode Control for Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactors in load following operations with bounded xenon oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansarifar, G.R.; Saadatzi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present SMC which is a robust nonlinear controller to control the PWR power. • Xenon oscillations are kept bounded within acceptable limits. • The stability analysis has been based on Lyapunov approach. • Simulation results indicate the high performance of this new control. - Abstract: One of the important operations in nuclear power plants is load-following in which imbalance of axial power distribution induces xenon oscillations. These oscillations must be maintained within acceptable limits otherwise the nuclear power plant could become unstable. Therefore, bounded xenon oscillation considered to be a constraint for the load-following operation. In this paper, sliding mode control (SMC) which is a robust nonlinear controller is designed to control the Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor (PWR) power for the load-following operation problem that ensures xenon oscillations are kept bounded within acceptable limits. The proposed controller uses constant axial offset (AO) strategy to maintain xenon oscillations to be bounded. The constant AO is a robust state constraint for load-following problem. The reactor core is simulated based on the two-point nuclear reactor model and one delayed neutron group. The stability analysis is given by means Lyapunov approach, thus the control system is guaranteed to be stable within a large range. The employed method is easy to implement in practical applications and moreover, the sliding mode control exhibits the desired dynamic properties during the entire output-tracking process independent of perturbations. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller in terms of performance, robustness and stability. Results show that the proposed controller for the load-following operation is sufficiently effective so that the xenon oscillations are kept bounded in the considered region

  19. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  20. STABILIZATION OF THE NEUTRAL PROTEASE OF BACILLUS-STEAROTHERMOPHILUS BY REMOVAL OF A BURIED WATER MOLECULE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VRIEND, G; BERENDSEN, HJC; VANDERZEE, [No Value; VANDENBURG, B; VENEMA, G; EIJSINK, VGH

    1991-01-01

    Using site-directed mutagenesis, Ala166 in the neutral protease of Bacillus stearothermophilus was changed into Ser. Model building and molecular dynamics simulations of the mutant enzyme indicated that the Ser hydroxyl group fits well in a cavity which contains a water molecule in the wild-type

  1. Effects of Water Molecule on CO Oxidation by OH: Reaction Pathways, Kinetic Barriers, and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linyao; Yang, Li; Zhao, Yijun; Zhang, Jiaxu; Feng, Dongdong; Sun, Shaozeng

    2017-07-06

    The water dilute oxy-fuel combustion is a clean combustion technology for near-zero emission power; and the presence of water molecule could have both kinetic and dynamic effects on combustion reactions. The reaction OH + CO → CO 2 + H, one of the most important elementary reactions, has been investigated by extensive electronic structure calculations. And the effects of a single water molecule on CO oxidation have been studied by considering the preformed OH(H 2 O) complex reacts with CO. The results show little change in the reaction pathways, but the additional water molecule actually increases the vibrationally adiabatic energy barriers (V a G ). Further thermal rate constant calculations in the temperature range of 200 to 2000 K demonstrate that the total low-pressure limit rate constant for the water assisted OH(H 2 O) + CO → CO 2 + H 2 O + H reaction is 1-2 orders lower than that of the water unassisted one, which is consistent with the change of V a G . Therefore, the hydrated radical OH(H 2 O) would actually slow down the oxidation of CO. Meanwhile, comparisons show that the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ method gives a much better estimation in energy and thus is recommended to be employed for direct dynamics simulations.

  2. Integration or segregation: how do molecules behave at oil/water interfaces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, F G; Richmond, G L

    2008-06-01

    It has been over 250 years since Benjamin Franklin, fascinated with the wave-stilling effect of oil on water, performed his famous oil-drop experiments; nevertheless, the behavior of water molecules adjacent to hydrophobic surfaces continues to fascinate today. In the 18th century, the calming of the seas seemed the most pertinent application of such knowledge; today, we understand that oil-on-water phenomena underlie a range of important chemical, physical, and biological processes, including micelle and membrane formation, protein folding, chemical separation, oil extraction, nanoparticle formation, and interfacial polymerization. Beyond classical experiments of the oil-water interface, recent interest has focused on deriving a molecular-level picture of this interface or, more generally, of water molecules positioned next to any hydrophobic surface. This Account summarizes more than a decade's work from our laboratories aimed at understanding the nature of the hydrogen bonding occurring between water and a series of organic liquids in contact. Although the common perception is that water molecules and oil molecules positioned at the interface between the immiscible liquids want nothing to do with one another, we have found that weak interactions between these hydrophilic and hydrophobic molecules lead to interesting interfacial behavior, including highly oriented water molecules and layering of the organic medium that extends several molecular layers deep into the bulk organic liquid. For some organic liquids, penetration of oriented water into the organic layer is also apparent, facilitated by molecular interactions established at the molecularly thin region of first contact between the two liquids. The studies involve a combined experimental and computational approach. The primary experimental tool that we have used is vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS), a powerful surface-specific vibrational spectroscopic method for measuring the molecular

  3. Spatial distribution of organic contaminants in three rivers of Southern England bound to suspended particulate material and dissolved in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John L; Hooda, Peter S; Swinden, Julian; Barker, James; Barton, Stephen

    2017-09-01

    The spatial distribution of pharmaceuticals, personal care products (PPCPs) and other emerging contaminants (ECs) such as plasticisers, perflourinated compounds (PFCs) and illicit drug metabolites in water and bound to suspended particulate material (SPM) is not well-understood. Here, we quantify levels of thirteen selected contaminants in water (n=88) and their partition to suspended particulate material (SPM, n=16) in three previously-unstudied rivers of Greater London and Southern England during a key reproduction/spawning period. Analysis was conducted using an in-house validated method for Solid Phase Extraction followed by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass-Spectrometry. Analytes were extracted from SPM using an optimised method for ultrasonic-assisted solvent extraction. Detection frequencies of contaminants dissolved in water ranged from 3% (ethinylestradiol) to 100% (bisphenol-A). Overall mean concentrations in the aqueous-phase ranged from 14.7ng/L (benzoylecgonine) to 159ng/L (bisphenol-A). Sewage treatment works (STW) effluent was the predominant source of pharmaceuticals, while plasticisers/perfluorinated compounds may additionally enter rivers via other sources. In SPM, detection frequencies ranged from 44% (PFOA) to 94% (hydroxyacetophenone). Mean quantifiable levels of analytes bound to SPM ranged from 13.5ng/g dry SPM (0.33ng bound/L water) perfluorononanoic acid to 2830ng/g dry SPM (14.3ng bound/L water) perfluorooctanesulfonic acid. Long chain (>C7) amphipathic and acidic PFCs were found to more preferentially bind to SPM than short chain PFCs and other contaminants (Kd=34.1-75.5 vs contaminants entering rivers ranged from 0.157μg/person/day of benzoylecgonine (cocaine metabolite) to 58.6μg/person/day of bisphenol-A. The large sample size of this work (n=104) enabled ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD post-hoc tests to establish significant trends in PPCP/EC spatial distribution from headwaters through downstream stretches of studied

  4. Fractionation of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes between hydrated and free water molecules in aqueous urea solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakiuchi, M.; Matsuo, S.

    1985-01-01

    Ratios of D/H and 18 O/ 16 O in the vapor phase in equilibrium with aqueous urea solution with different urea molalities were measured at 15 and 25 0 C. Under the assumption that urea solutions consist of two species, i.e., the urea-water cluster and free water, the results are interpreted to give the average hydration number, i.e., the number of water molecules per urea molecule in the urea-water cluster. Good agreement was obtained for the hydration number estimated independently from hydrogen and oxygen isotopic fractions. On the basis of hydrogen isotopic data at 25 0 C, the average hydration number of urea in the cluster is 6.3 +/- 0.8 at 2.1 m and 2.75 +/- 0.08 at saturation (20.15 m). The corresponding average hydration numbers based on oxygen isotopic data were calculated to be 6.7 +/- 2.4 at 2.1 m and 2.75 +/- 0.25 at urea saturation. HD 16 O is enriched in the urea-water cluster and H 2 18 O is enriched in free water. Isotopic partitioning between the cluster and free water is markedly different from those between hydration spheres and free water in aqueous electrolyte solutions. 29 references, 6 figures, 5 tables

  5. Partition Coefficients of Organic Molecules in Squalane and Water/Ethanol Mixtures by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard, Rasmus; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Economou, Ioannis G.

    2011-01-01

    coefficient can be estimated for both a small hydrophilic and a hydrophobic organic molecules between squalane (used here to mimic low density poly ethylene) and water/ethanol solutes using thermodynamic integration to calculate the free energy of solvation. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed, using...... the GROMACS software, by slowly decoupling of firstly the electrostatic and then the Lennard–Jones interactions between molecules in the simulation box. These calculations depend very much on the choice of force field. Two force fields have been tested in this work, the TraPPE-UA (united-atom) and the OPLS...

  6. Measurements of water molecule density by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy in dielectric barrier discharges with gas-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Kunihide; Nakamura, Toshihiro; Kawasaki, Mitsuo; Morita, Tatsuo; Umekawa, Toyofumi; Kawasaki, Masahiro

    2018-01-01

    We measured water molecule (H2O) density by tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) for applications in dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) with a gas-water interface. First, the effects of water temperature and presence of gas flow were tested using a Petri dish filled with water and a gas injection nozzle. Second, the TDLAS system was applied to the measurements of H2O density in two types of DBDs; one was a normal (non-inverted) type with a dielectric-covered electrode above a water-filled counter electrode and the other was an inverted type with a water-suspending mesh electrode above a dielectric-covered counter electrode. The H2O density in the normal DBD was close to the density estimated from the saturated vapor pressure, whereas the density in the inverted DBD was about half of that in the former type. The difference is attributed to the upward gas flow in the latter type, that pushes the water molecules up towards the gas-water interface.

  7. Nonaqueous electrocatalytic water oxidation by a surface-bound Ru(bda)(L)₂ complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Matthew V; Sherman, Benjamin D; Wee, Kyung-Ryang; Marquard, Seth L; Gold, Alexander S; Meyer, Thomas J

    2016-04-21

    The rate of electrocatalytic water oxidation by the heterogeneous water oxidation catalyst [Ru(bda)(4-O(CH2)3P(O3H2)2-pyr)2], , (pyr = pyridine; bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylate) on metal oxide surfaces is greatly enhanced relative to water as the solvent. In these experiments with propylene carbonate (PC) as the nonaqueous solvent, water is the limiting reagent. Mechanistic studies point to atom proton transfer (APT) as the rate limiting step in water oxidation catalysis.

  8. Behavioral effects of chronic exposure to organically bound tritium and tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radwan, I.

    1982-01-01

    The results of developmental testing of F-1 and F-2-animals indicate that in HTO group no differences with control animals were observed, while there was delay in development of righting reflex in F-1-animals of T-food exposed rats, but the difference was not statistically significant. The comparison of data obtained for F-1 and F2-generation shows no cumulative effect of tritium irradiation in subsequent generations. The effects of HTO and organically bound tritium exposure on acute individual locomotor activity of 70 days old rats showed statistically significant hypoactivity of females of t-food group. The differences with the control animals were highest and statistically significant in first 20 minutes of their run in the maze, what suggests that tritium esposure alters the females reactivity to a novel situation. This effects may nor persists for the lifetime. The data of locomotor activity of 110 days old rats recorded in diurnal and nocturnal periods, showed no differences between HTO-group and control group and only slight but no statistically significant hypoactivity of females exposed to organically bound tritium. (orig./MG)

  9. QSPR Study of the Retention/release Property of Odorant Molecules in Water Using Statistical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assia Belhassan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An integrated approach physicochemistry and structures property relationships has been carried out to study the odorant molecules retention/release phenomenon in the water. This study aimed to identify the molecular properties (molecular descriptors that govern this phenomenon assuming that modifying the structure leads automatically to a change in the retention/release property of odorant molecules. ACD/ChemSketch, MarvinSketch, and ChemOffice programs were used to calculate several molecular descriptors of 51 odorant molecules (15 alcohols, 11 aldehydes, 9 ketones and 16 esters. A total of 37 molecules (2/3 of the data set were placed in the training set to build the QSPR models, whereas the remaining, 14 molecules (1/3 of the data set constitute the test set. The best descriptors were selected to establish the quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR of the retention/release property of odorant molecules in water using multiple linear regression (MLR, multiple non-linear regression (MNLR and an artificial neural network (ANN methods. We propose a quantitative model according to these analyses. The models were used to predict the retention/release property of the test set compounds, and agreement between the experimental and predicted values was verified. The descriptors showed by QSPR study are used for study and designing of new compounds. The statistical results indicate that the predicted values are in good agreement with the experimental results. To validate the predictive power of the resulting models, external validation multiple correlation coefficient was calculated and has both in addition to a performant prediction power, a favorable estimation of stability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v9i4.978 

  10. [WTP guidance technology: a comparison of payment card, single-bounded and double-bounded dichotomous formats for evaluating non-use values of Sanjiang Plain ecotourism water resources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Guang; Wang, Qiu-Dan; Li, Chen-Yang

    2014-09-01

    Contingent valuation method (CVM) is the most widespread method to assess resources and value of environmental goods and services. The guidance technology of willingness to pay (WTP) is an important means of CVM. Therefore, the study on the WTP guidance technology is an important approach to improve the reliability and validity of CVM. This article conducted comprehensive evaluation on non-use value of eco-tourism water resources in Sanjiang Plain by using payment card, single-bound dichotomous choice and double-bound dichotomous choice. Results showed that the socio-economic attributes were consistent with the willingness to pay in the three formats, and the tender value, age, educational level, annual income and the concern level had significant effect on the willingness to pay, while gender and job did not have significant influence. The WTP value was 112.46 yuan per capita with the payment card, 136.15 with the single-bound dichotomous choice, and 168.74 with the double-bound dichotomous choice. Comprehensive consideration of the nature of the investigation, investigation costs and statistical techniques, the result of double-bound dichotomous choice (47.86 x 10(8) yuan · a(-1)) was best in accordance with the reality, and could be used as non-use value of eco-tourism water resources in Sanjiang Plain. The format of questionnaire was very important to improve its validity, and made a great influence on the WTP.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Study of Water Molecules in Interlayer of 14 ^|^Aring; Tobermorite

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Seyoon

    2013-01-01

    The molecular structure and dynamics of interlayer water of 14 Å tobermorite are investigated based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Calculated structural parameters of the interlayer water configuration are in good agreement with current knowledge of the refined structure. The MD simulations provide detailed information on the position and mobility of the hydrogen and oxygen of interlayer water, as well as its self-diffusion coefficient, through the interlayer of 14 Å tobermorite. Comparison of the MD simulation results at 100 and 300 K demonstrates that water molecules in the interlayer maintain their structure but change their mobility. The dominant configuration and self-diffusion coefficient of interlayer water are obtained in this study. Copyright © 2013 Japan Concrete Institute.

  12. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Comparison of chlorthalidone, indapamide, trichloromethiazide, and furosemide X-ray crystal structures in adducts with isozyme II, when several water molecules make the difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperini, Claudia; Cecchi, Alessandro; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2009-02-01

    Thiazide and high ceiling diuretics were recently shown to inhibit all mammalian isoforms of carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) with a very different profile as compared to classical inhibitors, such as acetazolamide, methazolamide, and ethoxzolamide. Some of these structurally related compounds have a very different behavior against the widespread isozyme CA II, with chlorthalidone, trichloromethiazide, and furosemide being efficient inhibitors against CA II (K(I)s of 65-138 nM), whereas indapamide is a much weaker one (K(I) of 2520 nM). Furthermore, some of these diuretics are quite efficient (low nanomolar) inhibitors of other isoforms, for example, chlorthalidone against hCA VB, VII, IX, and XIII; indapamide against CA VII, IX, XII, and XIII, trichloromethiazide against CA VII and IX, and furosemide against CA I and XIV. Examining the four X-ray crystal structures of their CA II adducts, we observed several (2-3) active site water molecules interacting with the chlorthalidone, trichloromethiazide, and furosemide scaffolds which may be responsible for this important difference of activity. Indeed, indapamide bound to CA II has no interactions with active site water molecules. Chlorthalidone bound within the CA II active site is in an enolic (lactimic) tautomeric form, with the enolic OH also participating in two strong hydrogen bonds with Asn67 and a water molecule. The newly evidenced binding modes of these diuretics may be exploited for designing better CA II inhibitors as well as compounds with selectivity/affinity for various isoforms with medicinal chemistry applications.

  13. Water molecule-enhanced CO2 insertion in lanthanide coordination polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Liushan; Huang Xiaoyuan; Wang Ning; Wu Hongyan; Chen Wenbin; Feng Zihao; Zhu Huiping; Peng Xiaoling; Li Yongxian; Huang Ling; Yue Shantang; Liu Yingliang

    2009-01-01

    Two new lanthanide coordination polymers H 2 N(CH 3 ) 2 .[Eu III 2 (L 1 ) 3 (L 2 )] (1, L 1 =isophthalic acid dianion, L 2 =formic acid anion) and [La III (2,5-PDC)(L 2 )](2, 2,5-PDC=2,5-pyridinedicarboxylate dianion) were synthesized under solvothermal conditions. It is of interest that the formic ligand (L 2 ) is not contained in the stating materials, but arises from the water molecule-enhanced CO 2 insertion during the solvothermal process. Both of the two compounds exhibit complicated three dimensional sandwich-like frameworks. - Graphical abstract: Two new lanthanide coordination polymers involving water molecule-enhanced CO 2 insertion resulting in the formation of formic anion and dimethylammonium cation were synthesized under solvothermal conditions.

  14. Probabilistic and possibilistic approach for assessment of radiological risk due to organically bound and tissue free water tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahiya, Sudhir; Hegde, A.G.; Joshi, M.L.; Verma, P.C.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    This study illustrates use of two approaches namely probabilistic using Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) and possibilistic using fuzzy α-cut (FAC) to estimate the radiological cancer risk to the population from ingestion of organically bound tritium (OBT) and tissue free water tritium (TFWT) from fish consumption from the Rana Pratap Sagar Lake (RPSL), Kota. Using FAC technique, radiological cancer risk rate (year -1 ) at A αl.0 level were 1.15E-08 and 1.50E-09 for OBT and TFWT respectively from fish ingestion pathway. The radiological cancer risk rate (year -1 ) using MCS approach at 50th percentile (median) level is 1.14E-08 and 1.49E-09 for OBT and HTO respectively from ingestion of fresh water fish. (author)

  15. Investigation of the Hydantoin Monomer and its Interaction with Water Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruet, Sébastien; Perez, Cristobal; Schnell, Melanie

    2017-06-01

    Hydantoin (Imidazolidine-2,4-dione, C_3H_4N_2O_2) is a five-membered heterocyclic compound of astrobiological interest. This molecule has been detected in carbonaceous chondrites [1], and its formation can rise from the presence of glycolic acid and urea, two prebiotic molecules [2]. The hydrolysis of hydantoin under acidic conditions can also produce glycine [3], an amino acid actively searched for in the interstellar medium. Spectroscopic data of hydantoin is very limited and mostly dedicated to the solid phase. The high resolution study in gas phase is restricted to the work recently published by Ozeki et al. reporting the pure rotational spectra of the ground state and two vibrational states of the molecule in the millimeter-wave region (90-370 GHz)[4]. Using chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy, we recorded the jet-cooled rotational spectra of hydantoin with water between 2 to 8 GHz. We observed the ground state of hydantoin monomer and several water complexes with one or two water molecules. All the observed species exhibit a hyperfine structure due to the two nitrogen atoms present in the molecule, which were fully resolved and analyzed. Additional experiments with a ^{18}O enriched water sample were realized to determine the oxygen-atom positions of the water monomers. These experiments yielded accurate structural information on the preferred water binding sites. The observed complexes and the interactions that hold them together, mainly strong directional hydrogen bonds, will be presented and discussed. [1] Shimoyama, A. and Ogasawara, R., Orig. Life Evol. Biosph., 32, 165-179, 2002. DOI:10.1023/A:1016015319112. [2] Menor-Salván, C. and Marín-Yaseli, M.R., Chem. Soc. Rev., 41(16), 5404-5415, 2012. DOI:10.1039/c2cs35060b. [3] De Marcellus P., Bertrand M., Nuevo M., Westall F. and Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt L., Astrobiology. 11(9), 847-854, 2011. DOI:10.1089/ast.2011.0677. [4] Ozeki, H., Miyahara R., Ihara H., Todaka S., Kobayashi

  16. A Raman spectroscopy study on the effects of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on water molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fabing; Li, Zhanlong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Shenghan; Wang, Xiaojun; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2018-05-01

    The structural forms of water/deuterated water molecules located on the surface of borosilicate capillaries have been first investigated in this study on the basis of the Raman spectral data obtained at different temperatures and under atmospheric pressure for molecules in bulk and also for molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface. The strongest two fundamental bands locating at 3063 cm-1 (2438 cm-1) in the recorded Raman spectra are assigned here to the Osbnd H (Osbnd D) bond stretching vibrations and they are compared with the corresponding bands observed at 3124 cm-1 (2325 cm-1) in the Raman spectrum of ice Ih. Our spectroscopic observations have indicated that the structure of water and deuterated water molecules on borosilicate surface is similar to that of ice Ih (hexagonal phase of ice). These observations have also indicated that water molecules locate on the borosilicate surface so as to construct a bilayer structure and that strong and weak intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed between water/deuterated molecules and silanol groups on borosilicate surface. In accordance with these findings, water and deuterated water molecules at the interface of capillary have a higher melting temperature.

  17. Quantification of the Intracellular Life Time of Water Molecules to Measure Transport Rates of Human Aquaglyceroporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmgren, Madelene; Hernebring, Malin; Eriksson, Stefanie; Elbing, Karin; Geijer, Cecilia; Lasič, Samo; Dahl, Peter; Hansen, Jesper S; Topgaard, Daniel; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2017-12-01

    Orthodox aquaporins are transmembrane channel proteins that facilitate rapid diffusion of water, while aquaglyceroporins facilitate the diffusion of small uncharged molecules such as glycerol and arsenic trioxide. Aquaglyceroporins play important roles in human physiology, in particular for glycerol metabolism and arsenic detoxification. We have developed a unique system applying the strain of the yeast Pichia pastoris, where the endogenous aquaporins/aquaglyceroporins have been removed and human aquaglyceroporins AQP3, AQP7, and AQP9 are recombinantly expressed enabling comparative permeability measurements between the expressed proteins. Using a newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance approach based on measurement of the intracellular life time of water, we propose that human aquaglyceroporins are poor facilitators of water and that the water transport efficiency is similar to that of passive diffusion across native cell membranes. This is distinctly different from glycerol and arsenic trioxide, where high glycerol transport efficiency was recorded.

  18. Rock-Bound Arsenic Influences Ground Water and Sediment Chemistry Throughout New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gilpin R.; Ayotte, Joseph D.

    2007-01-01

    The information in this report was presented at the Northeastern Region Geological Society of America meeting held March 11-14, 2007, in Durham, New Hampshire. In the New England crystalline bedrock aquifer, concentrations of arsenic that exceed the drinking water standard of 10 ?g/L occur most frequently in ground water from wells sited in specific metamorphic and igneous rock units. Geochemical investigations indicate that these geologic units typically have moderately elevated whole-rock concentrations of arsenic compared to other rocks in the region. The distribution of ground water wells with As > 5 ?g/L has a strong spatial correlation with specific bedrock units where average whole-rock concentrations of arsenic exceed 1.1 mg/kg and where geologic and geochemical factors produce high pH ground water. Arsenic concentrations in stream sediments collected from small drainages reflect the regional distribution of this natural arsenic source and have a strong correlation with both rock chemistry and the distribution of bedrock units with elevated arsenic chemistry. The distribution of ground water wells with As > 5 ?g/L has a strong spatial correlation with the distribution of stream sediments where concentrations of arsenic exceed 6 mg/kg. Stream sediment chemistry also has a weak correlation with the distribution of agricultural lands where arsenical pesticides were used on apple, blueberry, and potato crops. Elevated arsenic concentrations in bedrock wells, however, do not correlate with agricultural areas where arsenical pesticides were used. These results indicate that both stream sediment chemistry and the solubility and mobility of arsenic in ground water in bedrock are influenced by host-rock arsenic concentrations. Stream sediment chemistry and the distribution of geologic units have been found to be useful parameters to predict the areas of greatest concern for elevated arsenic in ground water and to estimate the likely levels of human exposure to

  19. Single-Molecule Imaging of DNAs with Sticky Ends at Water/Fused Silica Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isailovic, Slavica [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) was used to study intermolecular interactions of DNAs with unpaired (sticky) ends of different lengths at water/fused silica interface at the single-molecule level. Evanescent field residence time, linear velocity and adsorption/desorption frequency were measured in a microchannel for individual DNA molecules from T7, Lambda, and PSP3 phages at various pH values. The longest residence times and the highest adsorption/desorption frequencies at the constant flow at pH 5.5 were found for PSP3 DNA, followed by lower values for Lambda DNA, and the lowest values for T7 DNA. Since T7, Lambda, and PSP3 DNA molecules contain none, twelve and nineteen unpaired bases, respectively, it was concluded that the affinity of DNAs for the surface increases with the length of the sticky ends. This confirms that hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions between sticky ends and fused-silica surface are driving forces for DNA adsorption at the fused-silica surface. Described single-molecule methodology and results therein can be valuable for investigation of interactions in liquid chromatography, as well as for design of DNA hybridization sensors and drug delivery systems.

  20. Modeling the Release Kinetics of Poorly Water-Soluble Drug Molecules from Liposomal Nanocarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Loew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Liposomes are frequently used as pharmaceutical nanocarriers to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs such as temoporfin, cyclosporine A, amphotericin B, and paclitaxel to their target site. Optimal drug delivery depends on understanding the release kinetics of the drug molecules from the host liposomes during the journey to the target site and at the target site. Transfer of drugs in model systems consisting of donor liposomes and acceptor liposomes is known from experimental work to typically exhibit a first-order kinetics with a simple exponential behavior. In some cases, a fast component in the initial transfer is present, in other cases the transfer is sigmoidal. We present and analyze a theoretical model for the transfer that accounts for two physical mechanisms, collisions between liposomes and diffusion of the drug molecules through the aqueous phase. Starting with the detailed distribution of drug molecules among the individual liposomes, we specify the conditions that lead to an apparent first-order kinetic behavior. We also discuss possible implications on the transfer kinetics of (1 high drug loading of donor liposomes, (2 attractive interactions between drug molecules within the liposomes, and (3 slow transfer of drugs between the inner and outer leaflets of the liposomes.

  1. Structural analysis on mutation residues and interfacial water molecules for human TIM disease understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Human triosephosphate isomerase (HsTIM) deficiency is a genetic disease caused often by the pathogenic mutation E104D. This mutation, located at the side of an abnormally large cluster of water in the inter-subunit interface, reduces the thermostability of the enzyme. Why and how these water molecules are directly related to the excessive thermolability of the mutant have not been investigated in structural biology. Results This work compares the structure of the E104D mutant with its wild type counterparts. It is found that the water topology in the dimer interface of HsTIM is atypical, having a "wet-core-dry-rim" distribution with 16 water molecules tightly packed in a small deep region surrounded by 22 residues including GLU104. These water molecules are co-conserved with their surrounding residues in non-archaeal TIMs (dimers) but not conserved across archaeal TIMs (tetramers), indicating their importance in preserving the overall quaternary structure. As the structural permutation induced by the mutation is not significant, we hypothesize that the excessive thermolability of the E104D mutant is attributed to the easy propagation of atoms' flexibility from the surface into the core via the large cluster of water. It is indeed found that the B factor increment in the wet region is higher than other regions, and, more importantly, the B factor increment in the wet region is maintained in the deeply buried core. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that for the mutant structure at normal temperature, a clear increase of the root-mean-square deviation is observed for the wet region contacting with the large cluster of interfacial water. Such increase is not observed for other interfacial regions or the whole protein. This clearly suggests that, in the E104D mutant, the large water cluster is responsible for the subunit interface flexibility and overall thermolability, and it ultimately leads to the deficiency of this enzyme. Conclusions Our study

  2. Biphasic and SAPC Hydroformylation Catalyzed by Rh-phosphines Bound to Water-Soluble Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Torsten; Andersson, Carlaxel; Hjortkjær, Jes

    1999-01-01

    Coupling of the triphenylphosphine moiety to poly-acrylic acid and poly-ethyleneimine respectively afford the macromolecular ligands PAA-PNH and PEI-PNH. Reaction of the ligands with Rh(CO)2(acac) give water-soluble complexes that are active as catalysts in the hydroformylation ofdifferent olefins...

  3. Mixing of alcohol and water molecules studied by neutron probe. Structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Koji

    2001-01-01

    Structure of water/alcohol mixing solution was studied by three methods such as an isotope-exchanged neutron scattering method, RISM (Reference Interaction Site Model) integral equation and a neutron spin echo method. The principle of methods, experiments and results were reported. The results of experiments of water/tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) solution by the isotope-exchange neutron scattering method showed TBA molecule associated with each other through end methyl group. Especially this effect was the largest at x TBA = 0.06 and decreased with increasing the concentration of TBA. However, hydrogen bonding of TBA was very rare at x TBA = 0.06. By the partial radial distribution function obtained from RISM integral equation, it indicated that the structure of pure TBA became chain structure by hydrogen bond but changed to the structure contacted directly each hydrophobic group with increasing the concentration of water. Water/2-butoxyethanol (BE) mixing solution was measured by a neutron spin echo method. The activation energy of the diffusion coefficients obtained agreed to the energy of hydrogen bonding. The temperature response of diffusion coefficients showed the inverse of the experimental results obtained by the dynamic light scattering method. The difference between two measurement methods was different time scale and space scale. Namely, the object of the neutron scattering method is nano meter and nano second, but one of light scattering method many times over. It was proved from the above results that there was the cluster consisted of the same kind of molecule in the homogeneous two components solution, but the cluster was not stable and constantly exchanged with molecule, where the production and decay of the cluster is repeated at about nano sec. (S.Y.)

  4. Influence of the water molecules near surface of viral protein on virus activation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O, Shepelenko S; S, Salnikov A; V, Rak S; P, Goncharova E; B, Ryzhikov A, E-mail: shep@vector.nsc.r, E-mail: shep@ngs.r [Federal State Research Institution State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology VECTOR of the Federal Service for Surveillance in Consumer Rights Protection and Human Well-being (FSRI SRC VB VECTOR) Koltsovo, Novosibirsk Region (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-01

    The infection of a cell with influenza virus comprises the stages of receptor binding to the cell membrane, endocytosis of virus particle, and fusion of the virus envelope and cell endosome membrane, which is determined by the conformational changes in hemagglutinin, a virus envelope protein, caused by pH decrease within the endosome. The pH value that induces conformation rearrangements of hemagglutinin molecule considerably varies for different influenza virus strains, first and foremost, due to the differences in amino acid structure of the corresponding proteins. The main goal of this study was to construct a model making it possible to assess the critical pH value characterizing the fusogenic activity of influenza virus hemagglutinin from the data on hemagglutinin structure and experimental verification of this model. Under this model, we assume that when the electrostatic force between interacting hemagglutinin molecules in the virus envelop exceeds a certain value, the hemagglutinin HA1 subunits are arranged so that they form a cavity sufficient for penetration of water molecules. This event leads to an irreversible hydration of the inner fragments of hemagglutinin molecule in a trimer and to the completion of conformational changes. The geometry of electrostatic field in hemagglutinin trimer was calculated taking into account the polarization effects near the interface of two dielectrics, aqueous medium and protein macromolecule. The critical pH values for the conformational changes in hemagglutinin were measured by the erythrocyte hemolysis induced by influenza virus particles when decreasing pH. The critical pH value conditionally separating the pH range into the regions with and without the conformational changes was calculated for several influenza virus H1N1 and H3N2 strains based on the data on the amino acid structure of the corresponding hemagglutinin molecules. Comparison of the theoretical and experimental values of critical pH values for

  5. Ab Initio Density Functional Theory Investigation of the Interaction between Carbon Nanotubes and Water Molecules during Water Desalination Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loay A. Elalfy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Density functional theory calculations using B3LYP/3-21G level of theory have been implemented on 6 carbon nanotubes (CNTs structures (3 zigzag and 3 armchair CNTs to study the energetics of the reverse osmosis during water desalination process. Calculations of the band gap, interaction energy, highest occupied molecular orbital, lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, electronegativity, hardness, and pressure of the system are discussed. The calculations showed that the water molecule that exists inside the CNT is about 2-3 Å away from its wall. The calculations have proven that the zigzag CNTs are more efficient for reverse osmosis water desalination process than armchair CNTs as the reverse osmosis process requires pressure of approximately 200 MPa for armchair CNTs, which is consistent with the values used in molecular dynamics simulations, while that needed when using zigzag CNTs was in the order of 60 MPa.

  6. The adsorption and dissociation of water molecule on goethite (010) surface: A DFT approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Long, E-mail: shuweixia@ouc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Xiu, Fangyuan [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Qiu, Meng [Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (China); Xia, Shuwei; Yu, Liangmin [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2017-01-15

    Graphical abstract: The optimized structure of hydrated goethite (010) surface with medium water coverage (water density about 6.7 H{sub 2}O/nm{sup 2}). - Highlights: • Stable adsorption and dissociation structure of H{sub 2}O on goethite (010) surface was investigated by DFT. • Reasonable path for water dissociation was proposed by transitional state analysis. • The mechanism of water adsorption on goethite and binding nature were revealed by PDOS. - Abstract: Using density functional theory (DFT) calculation, we investigate the configuration, stability and electronic properties of fresh cleaved (010) goethite surface (Pnma) and this surface exposed to water monolayer at low, medium and high coverage. Water is predicted to be chemisorbed to the surface, together with the surface reconstruction. The interaction energy of the most stable configuration of both low and medium coverage per water molecule is almost the same (−1.17 eV), while that of high coverage is much lower (less than 1.03 eV). It indicates that highly hydrated surface is less stable. PDOS analysis reveals the adsorption of H{sub 2}O is due to the formation of Fe−O bond, caused by overlapping of Fe's 3d and O's 2p orbitals. Dissociation processes at low and medium water coverage are non-spontaneous; while at high coverage, it can undertake spontaneously both thermodynamically and dynamically. The dissociation paths of all three water coverage are the similar. The proton from one adsorbed water is likely to dissociate to bind to the vicinal surface μ{sub 3}−O as an intermediate product; the proton belonged to μ{sub 3}−O transferred to the neighbor surface μ{sub 2}−O as the dissociative configuration.

  7. Multipole moments of water molecules in clusters and ice Ih from first principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, E.R.; Xantheas, S.S.; Jonsson, H.

    1999-01-01

    We have calculated molecular multipole moments for water molecules in clusters and in ice Ih by partitioning the charge density obtained from first principles calculations. Various schemes for dividing the electronic charge density among the water molecules were used. They include Bader close-quote s zero flux surfaces and Voronoi partitioning schemes. A comparison was also made with an induction model including dipole, dipole-quadrupole, quadrupole-quadrupole polarizability and first hyperpolarizability as well as fixed octopole and hexadecapole moments. We have found that the different density partitioning schemes lead to widely different values for the molecular multipoles, illustrating how poorly defined molecular multipoles are in clusters and condensed environments. For instance, the magnitude of the molecular dipole moment in ice Ih ranges between 2.3 D and 3.1 D depending on the partitioning scheme used. Within each scheme, though, the value for the molecular dipole moment in ice is larger than in the hexamer. The magnitude of the molecular dipole moment in the clusters shows a monotonic increase from the gas phase value to the one in ice Ih, with the molecular dipole moment in the water ring hexamer being smaller than the one in ice Ih for all the partitioning schemes used. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  8. Determination of bound and unbound water in dental alginate irreversible hydrocolloid by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellows, C M; Thomas, G A

    2009-04-01

    Alginate materials are considered unsuitable for precise fixed prosthetic rehabilitation due to their tendency to undergo spontaneous syneresis. Commercial alginate impression materials were investigated using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy to probe the relation between changes in the microscopic water environment and dimensional change to obtain a better understanding of spontaneous syneresis. NMR was used to measure the spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) of (1)H nuclei in water in alginate matrices to characterize changes in gel structure over time. These results were related to the dimensional stabilities of the alginate impression materials, their chemical compositions, and the Moisture Sorption Isotherms (MSI) obtained by incubation at fixed relative humidities. The rate of change of T(1) with time was found to be a better predictor of dimensional stability than MSI. The greatest dimensional stability for the alginate powders investigated was associated with a high filler:alginate ratio and a high Ca:Na ratio. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy may used to measure changes in alginate impression materials under conditions where no dimensional change can be observed directly. Changes occurred rapidly even at 100% humidity, suggesting the dimensional stability of alginate impression materials is partially independent of the rate of dehydration. The results may open a way to formulate alginate impression materials more suitable for precise fabrication of dental prostheses.

  9. Influence of the Debye length on the interaction of a small molecule-modified Au nanoparticle with a surface-bound bioreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukar, Natalia; Zhao, Sandy Shuo; Charbonneau, David M; Pelletier, Joelle N; Masson, Jean-Francois

    2014-05-18

    We report that a shorter Debye length and, as a consequence, decreased colloidal stability are required for the molecular interaction of folic acid-modified Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) to occur on a surface-bound receptor, human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR). The interaction measured using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing was optimal in a phosphate buffer at pH 6 and ionic strength exceeding 300 mM. Under these conditions, the aggregation constant of the Au NPs was approximately 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and the Debye length was below 1 nm, on the same length scale as the size of the folate anion (approximately 0.8 nm). Longer Debye lengths led to poorer SPR responses, revealing a reduced affinity of the folic acid-modified Au NPs for hDHFR. While high colloidal stability of Au NPs is desired in most applications, these conditions may hinder molecular interactions due to Debye lengths exceeding the size of the ligand and thus preventing close interactions with the surface-bound molecular receptor.

  10. Continuum Navier-Stokes modelling of water ow past fullerene molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, J. H.; Popadic, A.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    We present continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules. The governing Navier-Stokes equations are complemented with the Navier slip boundary condition with a slip length that is extracted from related molecular dynamics simulations. We find that several quantities of interest...... as computed by the present model are in good agreement with results from atomistic and atomistic-continuum simulations at a fraction of the computational cost. We simulate the flow past a single fullerene and an array of fullerenes and demonstrate that such nanoscale flows can be computed efficiently...

  11. Continuum Navier-Stokes modelling of water flow past fullerene molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, J. H.; Popadic, A.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    We present continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules. The governing Navier-Stokes equations are complemented with the Navier slip boundary condition with a slip length that is extracted from related molecular dynamics simulations. We find that several quantities of interest...... as computed by the present model are in good agreement with results from atomistic and atomistic-continuum simulations at a fraction of the computational cost. We simulate the flow past a single fullerene and an array of fullerenes and demonstrate that such nanoscale flows can be computed efficiently...

  12. Ifluence of the collisions of electrons and ions with atoms and molecules on the dynamic form-factors of bounded many-particle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakimenko, I.P.; Zagorodny, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    The kinetic theory of fluctuations is used to investigate the influence of the collisions of charged particles with atoms and molecules on the dynamic form-factors of semi-infinite weakly ionized plasma. It is shown that the collisions between the electrons and neutral particles and the diffuse processes connected with them lead to a much increased influence of the boundary on correlations in a plasma [ru

  13. Explicit Consideration of Water Molecules to Study Vibrational Circular DICHROÎSM of Monosaccharide's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussi, Sofiane; Ouamerali, Ourida

    2014-06-01

    Carbohydrates have multiples roles in biological systems. It has been found that the glycoside bond is fundamentally important in many aspects of chemistry and biology and forms the basis of carbohydrate chemistry. That means the stereochemical information, namely, glycosidic linkages α or β, gives an significant features of the carbohydrate glycosidation position of the glycosylic acceptor. For these reasons, much effort was made for the synthesis and analysis of the glycoside bond. Vibrational circular dichroism VCD has some advantages over conventional electronic circular dichroism (ECD) due to the applicability to all organic molecules and the reliability of ab initio quantum calculation. However, for a molecule with many chiral centers such as carbohydrates, determination of the absolute configuration tends to be difficult because the information from each stereochemical center is mixed and averaged over the spectrum. In the CH stretching region, only two VCD studies on carbohydrates have been reported and spectra--structure correlation, as determined for the glycoside band, remains to be investigated. T. Taniguchi and collaborators report that methyl glycosides exhibit a characteristic VCD peak, the sign of which solely reflects the C-1 absolute configuration. This work is a theoretical contribution to study the behaviour of VCD spectrum's of the monosaccharides when the water molecules are taken explicitly. This study is focused on six different monosaccharides in theirs absolute configuration R and S. We used the method of density functional theory DFT by means of the B3LYP hybrid functional and 6-31G * basis set.

  14. Bone Mineral 31P and Matrix-Bound Water Densities Measured by Solid-State 1H and 31P MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Alan C.; Li, Cheng; Rajapakse, Chamith S.; Bashoor- Zadeh, Mahdieh; Bhagat, Yusuf A.; Wright, Alexander C.; Zemel, Babette S.; Zavaliangos, Antonios; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2014-01-01

    Bone is a composite material consisting of mineral and hydrated collagen fractions. MRI of bone is challenging due to extremely short transverse relaxation times, but solid-state imaging sequences exist that can acquire the short-lived signal from bone tissue. Previous work to quantify bone density via MRI used powerful experimental scanners. This work seeks to establish the feasibility of MRI-based measurement on clinical scanners of bone mineral and collagen-bound water densities, the latter as a surrogate of matrix density, and to examine the associations of these parameters with porosity and donors’ age. Mineral and matrix-bound water images of reference phantoms and cortical bone from 16 human donors, ages 27-97 years, were acquired by zero-echo-time 31P and 1H MRI on whole body 7T and 3T scanners, respectively. Images were corrected for relaxation and RF inhomogeneity to obtain density maps. Cortical porosity was measured by micro-CT, and apparent mineral density by pQCT. MRI-derived densities were compared to x-ray-based measurements by least-squares regression. Mean bone mineral 31P density was 6.74±1.22 mol/L (corresponding to 1129±204 mg/cc mineral), and mean bound water 1H density was 31.3±4.2 mol/L (corresponding to 28.3±3.7 %v/v). Both 31P and bound water (BW) densities were correlated negatively with porosity (31P: R2 = 0.32, p bone mineralization ratio (expressed here as the ratio of 31P density to bound water density), which is proportional to true bone mineralization, was found to be uncorrelated with porosity, age, or pQCT density. This work establishes the feasibility of image-based quantification of bone mineral and bound water densities using clinical hardware. PMID:24846186

  15. Water and oxygen induced degradation of small molecule organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermenau, Martin; Riede, Moritz; Leo, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Small molecule organic solar cells were studied with respect to water and oxygen induced degradation by mapping the spatial distribution of reaction products in order to elucidate the degradation patterns and failure mechanisms. The active layers consist of a 30 nm bulk heterojunction formed......,4′-diamine p-doped with C60F36 (MeO-TPD:C60F36), which acted as hole transporting layer. Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) and aluminum served as hole and electron collecting electrode, respectively. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in conjunction...... of aluminum oxide at the BPhen/Al interface, and diffusion of water into the ZnPc:C60 layer where ZnPc becomes oxidized. Finally, diffusion from the electrodes was found to have no or a negligible effect on the device lifetime....

  16. Organically bound tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabate, S.; Strack, S.

    1993-01-01

    Tritium released into the environment may be incorporated into organic matter. Organically bound tritium in that case will show retention times in organisms that are considerably longer than those of tritiated water which has significant consequences on dose estimates. This article reviews the most important processes of organically bound tritium production and transport through food networks. Metabolic reactions in plant and animal organisms with tritiated water as a reaction partner are of great importance in this respect. The most important production process, in quantitative terms, is photosynthesis in green plants. The translocation of organically bound tritium from the leaves to edible parts of crop plants should be considered in models of organically bound tritium behavior. Organically bound tritium enters the human body on several pathways, either from the primary producers (vegetable food) or at a higher tropic level (animal food). Animal experiments have shown that the dose due to ingestion of organically bound tritium can be up to twice as high as a comparable intake of tritiated water in gaseous or liquid form. In the environment, organically bound tritium in plants and animals is often found to have higher specific tritium concentrations than tissue water. This is not due to some tritium enrichment effects but to the fact that no equilibrium conditions are reached under natural conditions. 66 refs

  17. Bioaccumulation of tritiated water in phytoplankton and trophic transfer of organically bound tritium to the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeschke, Benedict C.; Bradshaw, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Large releases of tritium are currently permitted in coastal areas due to assumptions that it rapidly disperses in the water and has a low toxicity due to its low energy emissions. This paper presents a laboratory experiment developed to identify previously untested scenarios where tritium may concentrate or transfer in biota relevant to Baltic coastal communities. Phytoplankton populations of Dunaliella tertiolecta and Nodularia spumigena were exposed at different growth-stages, to tritiated water (HTO; 10 MBq l −1 ). Tritiated D. tertiolecta was then fed to mussels, Mytilus edulis, regularly over a period of three weeks. Activity concentrations of phytoplankton and various tissues from the mussel were determined. Both phytoplankton species transformed HTO into organically-bound tritium (OBT) in their tissues. D. tertiolecta accumulated significantly more tritium when allowed to grow exponentially in HTO than if it had already reached the stationary growth phase; both treatments accumulated significantly more than the corresponding treatments of N. spumigena. No effect of growth phase on bioaccumulation of tritium was detectable in N. spumigena following exposure. After mussels were given 3 feeds of tritiated D. tertiolecta, significant levels of tritium were detected in the tissues. Incorporation into most mussel tissues appeared to follow a linear relationship with number of tritiated phytoplankton feeds with no equilibrium, highlighting the potential for biomagnification. Different rates of incorporation in species from a similar functional group highlight the difficulties in using a ‘representative’ species for modelling the transfer and impact of tritium. Accumulations of organic tritium into the mussel tissues from tritiated-phytoplankton demonstrate an environmentally relevant transfer pathway of tritium even when water-concentrations are reduced, adding weight to the assertion that organically bound tritium acts as a persistent organic pollutant. The

  18. Bioaccumulation of tritiated water in phytoplankton and trophic transfer of organically bound tritium to the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeschke, Benedict C; Bradshaw, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Large releases of tritium are currently permitted in coastal areas due to assumptions that it rapidly disperses in the water and has a low toxicity due to its low energy emissions. This paper presents a laboratory experiment developed to identify previously untested scenarios where tritium may concentrate or transfer in biota relevant to Baltic coastal communities. Phytoplankton populations of Dunaliella tertiolecta and Nodularia spumigena were exposed at different growth-stages, to tritiated water (HTO; 10 MBq l(-1)). Tritiated D. tertiolecta was then fed to mussels, Mytilus edulis, regularly over a period of three weeks. Activity concentrations of phytoplankton and various tissues from the mussel were determined. Both phytoplankton species transformed HTO into organically-bound tritium (OBT) in their tissues. D. tertiolecta accumulated significantly more tritium when allowed to grow exponentially in HTO than if it had already reached the stationary growth phase; both treatments accumulated significantly more than the corresponding treatments of N. spumigena. No effect of growth phase on bioaccumulation of tritium was detectable in N. spumigena following exposure. After mussels were given 3 feeds of tritiated D. tertiolecta, significant levels of tritium were detected in the tissues. Incorporation into most mussel tissues appeared to follow a linear relationship with number of tritiated phytoplankton feeds with no equilibrium, highlighting the potential for biomagnification. Different rates of incorporation in species from a similar functional group highlight the difficulties in using a 'representative' species for modelling the transfer and impact of tritium. Accumulations of organic tritium into the mussel tissues from tritiated-phytoplankton demonstrate an environmentally relevant transfer pathway of tritium even when water-concentrations are reduced, adding weight to the assertion that organically bound tritium acts as a persistent organic pollutant. The

  19. A pilot test of methods for determination of trace metals bound to colloids in surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Kersti (Geosigma AB (Sweden))

    2011-01-15

    Two methods have been tested for the determination of trace metals associated with colloid species in surface waters, using test water from Eckarfjaerden (PFM000070) in Forsmark; 1) fractionation (ultra filtration) using special membrane filters with cut-offs of 1 kD and 5 kD and 2) filtration using a system of standard membrane filters with varying pore sizes connected in series. Both methods were somewhat modified compared to previous methods for colloid determination in groundwater within the site investigations at Forsmark and Laxemar (PLU). The results show that, in general, the largest amounts of metals associated with a colloid phase were recovered in the fraction between 1kD and 5 kD which indicates that the metal ions are associated with low molecular weight organic acids. Similar amounts were recovered on the filters in the filtration experiment. A minor part of the colloidal phase metals was recovered in the fraction larger than 5 kD i.e. metal ions associated with larger organic acids or colloidal size clay minerals. The metals present preferably as colloids in the fractionation experiment were: iron, thorium, cerium, uranium, neodymium, titanium, zirconium and yttrium. The filtering experiment showed larger parts of titanium and aluminum in the colloid phase than the fractionation experiment while the iron and cerium portions were equal and the uranium, yttrium and neodymium portions were lower. The results from the fractionation test showed that the dissolved parts were large for barium, manganese, strontium and rubidium. In the filtration test, uranium, yttrium and rubidium, were also present mainly as dissolved ions. The detection limit for filter analysis of thorium was high, and the part of thorium present as colloids was determined to <50%. Issues and methodological problems: - Severe contamination caused interpretation difficulties for several metal ions, especially chromium, nickel and zinc. - Both methods are time consuming and difficult to

  20. Computational Elucidation of a Role That Brønsted Acidification of the Lewis Acid-Bound Water Might Play in the Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds with H2 in Lewis Basic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshmat, Mojgan; Privalov, Timofei

    2017-08-25

    Brønsted acidification of water by Lewis acid (LA) complexation is one of the fundamental principles in chemistry. Using transition-state calculations (TS), herein we investigate the role that Brønsted acidification of the LA-bound water might play in the mechanism of the hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds in Lewis basic solvents under non-anhydrous conditions. The potential energy scans and TS calculations were carried out with a series of eight borane LAs as well as the commonly known strong LA AlCl 3 in 1,4-dioxane or THF as Lewis basic solvents. Our molecular model consists of the dative LA-water adduct with hydrogen bonds to acetone and a solvent molecule plus one additional solvent molecule that participates is the TS structure describing the cleavage of H 2 at acetone's carbonyl carbon atom. In all the molecular models applied here, acetone (O=CMe 2 ) is the archetypical carbonyl substrate. We demonstrate that Brønsted acidification of the LA-bound water can indeed lower the barrier height of the solvent-involving H 2 -cleavage at the acetone's carbonyl carbon atom. This is significant because at present it is believed that the mechanism of the herein considered reaction is described by the same mechanism regardless of whether the reaction conditions are strictly anhydrous or non-anhydrous. Our results offer an alternative to this belief that warrants consideration and further study. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Conserved hydrogen bonds and water molecules in MDR HIV-1 protease substrate complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhigang [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Harbor Hospital Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Yong [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Yedidi, Ravikiran S. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dewdney, Tamaria G. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Reiter, Samuel J. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Brunzelle, Joseph S. [Northwestern Univ. Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Kovari, Iulia A. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Kovari, Ladislau C. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)

    2012-12-19

    Success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in anti-HIV therapy is severely compromised by the rapidly developing drug resistance. HIV-1 protease inhibitors, part of HAART, are losing their potency and efficacy in inhibiting the target. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84, 90) was selected for the present study to understand the binding to its natural substrates. The nine crystal structures of MDR769 HIV-1 protease substrate hepta-peptide complexes were analyzed in order to reveal the conserved structural elements for the purpose of drug design against MDR HIV-1 protease. Our structural studies demonstrated that highly conserved hydrogen bonds between the protease and substrate peptides, together with the conserved crystallographic water molecules, played a crucial role in the substrate recognition, substrate stabilization and protease stabilization. Additionally, the absence of the key flap-ligand bridging water molecule might imply a different catalytic mechanism of MDR769 HIV-1 protease compared to that of wild type (WT) HIV-1 protease.

  2. Tuning dissociation using isoelectronically doped graphene and hexagonal boron nitride: Water and other small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hamdani, Yasmine S. [Thomas Young Centre and London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Alfè, Dario [Thomas Young Centre and London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Earth Sciences, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lilienfeld, O. Anatole von [Institute of Physical Chemistry and National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (MARVEL), Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Michaelides, Angelos, E-mail: angelos.michaelides@ucl.ac.uk [Thomas Young Centre and London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-21

    Novel uses for 2-dimensional materials like graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) are being frequently discovered especially for membrane and catalysis applications. Still however, a great deal remains to be understood about the interaction of environmentally and industrially relevant molecules such as water with these materials. Taking inspiration from advances in hybridising graphene and h-BN, we explore using density functional theory, the dissociation of water, hydrogen, methane, and methanol on graphene, h-BN, and their isoelectronic doped counterparts: BN doped graphene and C doped h-BN. We find that doped surfaces are considerably more reactive than their pristine counterparts and by comparing the reactivity of several small molecules, we develop a general framework for dissociative adsorption. From this a particularly attractive consequence of isoelectronic doping emerges: substrates can be doped to enhance their reactivity specifically towards either polar or non-polar adsorbates. As such, these substrates are potentially viable candidates for selective catalysts and membranes, with the implication that a range of tuneable materials can be designed.

  3. Identification of Carboxylate, Phosphate, and Phenoxide Functionalities in Deprotonated Molecules Related to Drug Metabolites via Ion-Molecule Reactions with water and Diethylhydroxyborane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hanyu; Ma, Xin; Kong, John Y.; Zhang, Minli; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2017-10-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry based on ion-molecule reactions has emerged as a powerful tool for structural elucidation of ionized analytes. However, most currently used reagents were designed to react with protonated analytes, making them suboptimal for acidic analytes that are preferentially detected in negative ion mode. In this work we demonstrate that the phenoxide, carboxylate, and phosphate functionalities can be identified in deprotonated molecules by use of a combination of two reagents, diethylmethoxyborane (DEMB) and water. A novel reagent introduction setup that allowed DEMB and water to be separately introduced into the ion trap region of the mass spectrometer was developed to facilitate fundamental studies of this reaction. A new reagent, diethylhydroxyborane (DEHB), was generated inside the ion trap by hydrolysis of DEMB on introduction of water. Most carboxylates and phenoxides formed a DEHB adduct, followed by addition of one water molecule and subsequent ethane elimination (DEHB adduct +H2O - CH3CH3) as the major product ion. Phenoxides with a hydroxy group adjacent to the deprotonation site and phosphates formed a DEHB adduct, followed by ethane elimination (DEHB adduct - CH3CH3). Deprotonated molecules with strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds or without the aforementioned functionalities, including sulfates, were unreactive toward DEHB/H2O. Reaction mechanisms were explored via isotope labeling experiments and quantum chemical calculations. The mass spectrometry method allowed the differentiation of phenoxide-, carboxylate-, phosphate-, and sulfate-containing analytes. Finally, it was successfully coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the analysis of a mixture containing hymecromone, a biliary spasm drug, and its three possible metabolites. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Control of unidirectional transport of single-file water molecules through carbon nanotubes in an electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiaye; Guo, Hongxia

    2011-01-25

    The transport of water molecules through nanopores is not only crucial to biological activities but also useful for designing novel nanofluidic devices. Despite considerable effort and progress that has been made, a controllable and unidirectional water flow is still difficult to achieve and the underlying mechanism is far from being understood. In this paper, using molecular dynamics simulations, we systematically investigate the effects of an external electric field on the transport of single-file water molecules through a carbon nanotube (CNT). We find that the orientation of water molecules inside the CNT can be well-tuned by the electric field and is strongly coupled to the water flux. This orientation-induced water flux is energetically due to the asymmetrical water-water interaction along the CNT axis. The wavelike water density profiles are disturbed under strong field strengths. The frequency of flipping for the water dipoles will decrease as the field strength is increased, and the flipping events vanish completely for the relatively large field strengths. Most importantly, a critical field strength E(c) related to the water flux is found. The water flux is increased as E is increased for E ≤ E(c), while it is almost unchanged for E > E(c). Thus, the electric field offers a level of governing for unidirectional water flow, which may have some biological applications and provides a route for designing efficient nanopumps.

  5. Free and Cell Wall-Bound Polyamines under Long-Term Water Stress Applied at Different Growth Stages of ×Triticosecale Wittm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Hura

    Full Text Available Long-stemmed and semi-dwarf cultivars of triticale were exposed to water stress at tillering, heading and anthesis stage. Quantitative determination of free and cell wall-bound polyamines, i.e. agmatine, cadaverine, putrescine, spermidine and spermine, was supplemented with an analysis of quantitative relationships between free and cell wall-bound polyamines.The content of free and cell wall-bound polyamines varied depending on the development stage, both under optimal and water stress conditions. Drought-induced increase in free agmatine content was observed at all developmental stages in long-stemmed cultivar. A depletion of spermidine and putrescine was also reported in this cultivar, and spermidine was less abundant in semi-dwarf cultivar exposed to drought stress at the three analyzed developmental stages. Changes in the content of the other free polyamines did not follow a steady pattern reflecting the developmental stages. On the contrary, the content of cell wall-bound polyamines gradually increased from tillering, through heading and until anthesis period.Water stress seemed to induce a progressive decrease in the content of free polyamines and an accumulation of cell wall-bound polyamines.

  6. [Interactions of DNA bases with individual water molecules. Molecular mechanics and quantum mechanics computation results vs. experimental data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, E; Lino, J; Deriabina, A; Herrera, J N F; Poltev, V I

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate details of the DNA-water interactions we performed the calculations and systemaitic search for minima of interaction energy of the systems consisting of one of DNA bases and one or two water molecules. The results of calculations using two force fields of molecular mechanics (MM) and correlated ab initio method MP2/6-31G(d, p) of quantum mechanics (QM) have been compared with one another and with experimental data. The calculations demonstrated a qualitative agreement between geometry characteristics of the most of local energy minima obtained via different methods. The deepest minima revealed by MM and QM methods correspond to water molecule position between two neighbor hydrophilic centers of the base and to the formation by water molecule of hydrogen bonds with them. Nevertheless, the relative depth of some minima and peculiarities of mutual water-base positions in' these minima depend on the method used. The analysis revealed insignificance of some differences in the results of calculations performed via different methods and the importance of other ones for the description of DNA hydration. The calculations via MM methods enable us to reproduce quantitatively all the experimental data on the enthalpies of complex formation of single water molecule with the set of mono-, di-, and trimethylated bases, as well as on water molecule locations near base hydrophilic atoms in the crystals of DNA duplex fragments, while some of these data cannot be rationalized by QM calculations.

  7. Finite-bias electronic transport of molecules in a water solution

    KAUST Repository

    Rungger, Ivan; Chen, X.; Sanvito, Stefano; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2010-01-01

    The effects of water wetting conditions on the transport properties of molecular nanojunctions are investigated theoretically by using a combination of empirical-potential molecular-dynamics and first-principles electronic-transport calculations. These are at the level of the nonequilibrium Green’s-function method implemented for self-interaction corrected density-functional theory. We find that water effectively produces electrostatic gating to the molecular junction with a gating potential determined by the time-averaged water dipole field. Such a field is large for the polar benzene-dithiol molecule, resulting in a transmission spectrum shifted by about 0.6 eV with respect to that of the dry junction. The situation is drastically different for carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In fact, because of their hydrophobic nature the gating is almost negligible so that the average transmission spectrum of wet Au/CNT/Au junctions is essentially the same as that in dry conditions. This suggests that CNTs can be used as molecular interconnects also in water-wet situations, for instance, as tips for scanning tunnel microscopy in solution or in biological sensors.

  8. Finite-bias electronic transport of molecules in a water solution

    KAUST Repository

    Rungger, Ivan

    2010-06-04

    The effects of water wetting conditions on the transport properties of molecular nanojunctions are investigated theoretically by using a combination of empirical-potential molecular-dynamics and first-principles electronic-transport calculations. These are at the level of the nonequilibrium Green’s-function method implemented for self-interaction corrected density-functional theory. We find that water effectively produces electrostatic gating to the molecular junction with a gating potential determined by the time-averaged water dipole field. Such a field is large for the polar benzene-dithiol molecule, resulting in a transmission spectrum shifted by about 0.6 eV with respect to that of the dry junction. The situation is drastically different for carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In fact, because of their hydrophobic nature the gating is almost negligible so that the average transmission spectrum of wet Au/CNT/Au junctions is essentially the same as that in dry conditions. This suggests that CNTs can be used as molecular interconnects also in water-wet situations, for instance, as tips for scanning tunnel microscopy in solution or in biological sensors.

  9. Orbiting Water Molecules Dance to Tune Of Galaxy's "Central Engine," Astronomers Say

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    A disk of water molecules orbiting a supermassive black hole at the core of a galaxy 60 million light-years away is "reverberating" in response to variations in the energy output from the galaxy's powerful "central engine" close to the black hole, astronomers say. The team of astronomers used the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico and the 100-meter-diameter radio telescope of the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy at Effelsberg, Germany, to observe the galaxy NGC 1068 in the constellation Cetus. They announced their findings today at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Atlanta. The water molecules, in a disk some 5 light-years in diameter, are acting as a set of giant cosmic radio-wave amplifiers, called masers. Using energy radiated by the galaxy's "central engine," the molecules strengthen, or brighten, radio emission at a particular frequency as seen from Earth. "We have seen variations in the radio 'brightness' of these cosmic amplifiers that we believe were caused by variations in the energy output of the central engine," said Jack Gallimore, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Charlottesville, VA. "This could provide us with a valuable new tool for learning about the central engine itself," he added. Gallimore worked with Stefi Baum of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, MD; Christian Henkel of the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany; Ian Glass of the South African Astronomical Observatory; Mark Claussen of the NRAO in Socorro, NM; and Almudena Prieto of the European Southern Observatory in Munich, Germany. "Our observations show that NGC 1068 is the second-known case of a giant disk of water molecules orbiting a supermassive black hole at a galaxy's core," Gallimore said. The first case was the galaxy NGC 4258 (Messier 106), whose disk of radio-amplifying water molecules was measured by the NSF's Very Long Baseline

  10. Relationship between diffusivity of water molecules inside hydrating tablets and their drug release behavior elucidated by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Shingo; Onuki, Yoshinori; Kuribayashi, Hideto; Takayama, Kozo

    2012-01-01

    We reported previously that sustained release matrix tablets showed zero-order drug release without being affected by pH change. To understand drug release mechanisms more fully, we monitored the swelling and erosion of hydrating tablets using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three different types of tablets comprised of polyion complex-forming materials and a hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were used. Proton density- and diffusion-weighted images of the hydrating tablets were acquired at intervals. Furthermore, apparent self-diffusion coefficient maps were generated from diffusion-weighted imaging to evaluate the state of hydrating tablets. Our findings indicated that water penetration into polyion complex tablets was faster than that into HPMC matrix tablets. In polyion complex tablets, water molecules were dispersed homogeneously and their diffusivity was relatively high, whereas in HPMC matrix tablets, water molecule movement was tightly restricted within the gel. An optimal tablet formulation determined in a previous study had water molecule penetration and diffusivity properties that appeared intermediate to those of polyion complex and HPMC matrix tablets; water molecules were capable of penetrating throughout the tablets and relatively high diffusivity was similar to that in the polyion complex tablet, whereas like the HPMC matrix tablet, it was well swollen. This study succeeded in characterizing the tablet hydration process. MRI provides profound insight into the state of water molecules in hydrating tablets; thus, it is a useful tool for understanding drug release mechanisms at a molecular level.

  11. High-resolution crystal structures of the photoreceptor glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) with three and four-bound NAD molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Bo Y; Shi, Wuxian; Wang, Benlian; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the oxidative phosphorylation of d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (G3P) into 1,3-diphosphoglycerate (BGP) in the presence of the NAD cofactor. GAPDH is an important drug target because of its central role in glycolysis, and nonglycolytic processes such as nuclear RNA transport, DNA replication/repair, membrane fusion and cellular apoptosis. Recent studies found that GAPDH participates in the development of diabetic retinopathy and its progression after the cessation of hyperglycemia. Here, we report two structures for native bovine photoreceptor GAPDH as a homotetramer with differing occupancy by NAD, bGAPDH(NAD)4, and bGAPDH(NAD)3. The bGAPDH(NAD)4 was solved at 1.52 Å, the highest resolution for GAPDH. Structural comparison of the bGAPDH(NAD)4 and bGAPDH(NAD)3 models revealed novel details of conformational changes induced by cofactor binding, including a loop region (residues 54–56). Structure analysis of bGAPDH confirmed the importance of Phe34 in NAD binding, and demonstrated that Phe34 was stabilized in the presence of NAD but displayed greater mobility in its absence. The oxidative state of the active site Cys149 residue is regulated by NAD binding, because this residue was found oxidized in the absence of dinucleotide. The distance between Cys149 and His176 decreased upon NAD binding and Cys149 remained in a reduced state when NAD was bound. These findings provide an important structural step for understanding the mechanism of GAPDH activity in vision and its pathological role in retinopathies. PMID:25176140

  12. Anisotropic conductivity tensor imaging in MREIT using directional diffusion rate of water molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Oh In; Jeong, Woo Chul; Sajib, Saurav Z K; Kim, Hyung Joong; Woo, Eung Je

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is an emerging method to visualize electrical conductivity and/or current density images at low frequencies (below 1 KHz). Injecting currents into an imaging object, one component of the induced magnetic flux density is acquired using an MRI scanner for isotropic conductivity image reconstructions. Diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI) measures the intrinsic three-dimensional diffusion property of water molecules within a tissue. It characterizes the anisotropic water transport by the effective diffusion tensor. Combining the DT-MRI and MREIT techniques, we propose a novel direct method for absolute conductivity tensor image reconstructions based on a linear relationship between the water diffusion tensor and the electrical conductivity tensor. We first recover the projected current density, which is the best approximation of the internal current density one can obtain from the measured single component of the induced magnetic flux density. This enables us to estimate a scale factor between the diffusion tensor and the conductivity tensor. Combining these values at all pixels with the acquired diffusion tensor map, we can quantitatively recover the anisotropic conductivity tensor map. From numerical simulations and experimental verifications using a biological tissue phantom, we found that the new method overcomes the limitations of each method and successfully reconstructs both the direction and magnitude of the conductivity tensor for both the anisotropic and isotropic regions. (paper)

  13. Bond rearrangement caused by sudden single and multiple ionization of water molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Itzhak, I.; Sayler, A. Max; Leonard, M.; Maseberg, J.W.; Hathiramani, D.; Wells, E.; Smith, M.A.; Xia, Jiangfan; Wang, Pengqian; Carnes, K.D.; Esry, B.D.

    2005-01-01

    Bond rearrangement, namely the dissociation of water into H 2 + +O q+ following ionization by fast proton and highly charged ion impact, was investigated. Single ionization by fast proton impact exhibits a strong isotopic effect, the dissociation of H 2 O + ->H 2 + +O being about twice as likely as D 2 O + ->D 2 + +O, with HDO + ->HD + +O in between. This suggests that the bond rearrangement does not happen during the slow dissociation, but rather during the very fast ionization, and thus H 2 + should also be produced when the water molecule is multiply ionized. We observed that the H 2 + +O + and H 2 + +O 2+ production in 1MeV/amu F 7+ +H 2 O collisions are 0.209+/-0.006% and 0.0665+/-0.003%, respectively, of the main double-ionization dissociation product, H 2 O 2+ ->H + +OH + . This ratio is similar to the triple to double ionization ratio in similar collisions with atomic targets thus suggesting that the bond-rearrangement fraction out of each ionization level is approximately constant. Similar dissociation channels in the heavier water isotopes, which are expected to be smaller, are under study. Finally, the fragmentation of HDO exhibits very strong isotopic preference for breaking the OH bond over the OD bond

  14. Adsorption of ethyl xanthate on ZnS(110) surface in the presence of water molecules: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Xianhao [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Chen, Jianhua, E-mail: jhchen@gxu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Guangxi Colleges and University Key Laboratory of Minerals Engineering, 530004 (China); Chen, Ye, E-mail: fby18@126.com [College of Resources and Metallurgy, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China)

    2016-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Adsorption of water molecules decreases the reactivity of surface Zn atom. • Copper impurities decrease the band gap of ZnS surface. • Copper impurities enhance the adsorption of xanthate on the ZnS surface. • Water molecules have little influence on the properties of Cu-substituted ZnS surface. • The xanthate S atom can interact with the surface S atom of Cu-substituted ZnS surface. - Abstracts: The interaction of collector with the mineral surface plays a very important role in the froth flotation of sphalerite. The adsorptions occurred at the interface between the mineral surface and waters; however most of DFT simulations are performed in vacuum, without consideration of water effect. Semiconductor surface has an obvious proximity effect, which will greatly influence the surface reactivity. To understand the mechanism of xanthate interacting with sphalerite surface in the presence of water molecules, the ethyl xanthate molecule adsorption on un-activated and Cu-activated ZnS(110) surface in the absence and presence of water molecules were performed using the density functional theory (DFT) method. The calculated results show that the adsorption of water molecules dramatically changes the properties of ZnS surface, resulting in decreasing the reactivity of surface Zn atoms with xanthate. Copper activation of ZnS surface changes the surface properties, leading to the totally different adsorption behaviors of xanthate. The presence of waters has little influence on the properties of Cu-activated ZnS surface. The xanthate S atom can interact with the surface S atom of Cu-substituted ZnS surface, which would result in the formation of dixanthogen.

  15. Two-dimensional crystallography of amphiphilic molecules at the air-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacquemain, D.; Grayer Wolf, S.; Leveiller, F.

    1992-01-01

    The advent of well-collimated, high-intensity synchrotron X-ray sources and the consequent development of surface-specific X-ray diffraction and fluorescence techniques have recently revolutionized the study of Langmuir monolayers at the air-liquid interface. These methods allowed for the first......, and review recent results obtained from them for Langmuir films. The methods have been successfully applied in the elucidation of the structure of crystalline aggregates of amphiphilic molecules such as alcohols, carboxylic acids and their salts, alpha-amino acids, and phospholipids at the water surface....... In addition, it became possible to monitor by diffraction the growth and dissolution of the crystalline self-aggregates as well as structural changes occurring by phase transitions. Furthermore, the surface X-ray methods shed new light on the structure of the underlying ionic layer of attached solvent...

  16. Approximative Krieger-Nelkin orientation averaging and anisotropy of water molecules vibrations; Aproksimativno Krieger-Nelkinovo orijentacijsko usrednjenje i anozotropija vibracija molekula lake vode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovic, M I [Elektrothenicki fakultet, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1974-07-01

    Quantum-mechanics approach of water molecules dynamics should be taken into account for precise theoretical calculation of differential scattering cross sections of neutrons. Krieger and Nelkin have proposed an approximate method for averaging orientation of molecules regarding directions of incoming and scattered neutron. This paper shows that this approach can be successfully applied for general shape of water molecule vibration anisotropy.

  17. Electron Transfer Mediator Effects in Water Oxidation Catalysis by Solution and Surface-Bound Ruthenium Bpy-Dicarboxylate Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheridan, Matthew V.; Sherman, Benjamin D.; Marquard, Seth L.; Fang, Zhen; Ashford, Dennis L.; Wee, Kyung-Ryang; Gold, Alexander S.; Alibabaei, Leila; Rudd, Jennifer A.; Coggins, Michael K.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2015-11-12

    Electrocatalytic water oxidation by the catalyst, ruthenium 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylate (bda) bis-isoquinoline (isoq), [Ru(bda)(isoq)2], 1, was investigated at metal oxide electrodes surface-derivatized with electron transfer (ET) mediators. At indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) in pH 7.2 in H2PO4–/HPO42– buffers in 0.5 M NaClO4 with added acetonitrile (MeCN), the catalytic activity of 1 is enhanced by the surface-bound redox mediators [Ru (4,4'-PO3H2-bpy)(4,4'-R-bpy)2]2+ (RuPbpyR22+, R = Br, H, Me, or OMe, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine). Rate-limiting ET between the Ru3+ form of the mediator and the RuIV(O) form in the [RuV/IV(O)]+/0 couple of 1 is observed at relatively high concentrations of HPO42– buffer base under conditions where O···O bond formation is facilitated by atom-proton transfer (APT). For the solution [Ru(bpy)3]3+/2+ mediator couple and 1 as the catalyst, catalytic currents vary systematically with the concentration of mediator and the HPO42– buffer base concentration. Electron transfer mediation of water oxidation catalysis was also investigated on nanoparticle TiO2 electrodes co-loaded with catalyst [Ru(bda)(py-4-O(CH2)3-PO3H2)2], 2, (py = pyridine) and RuPbpyR22+ (R = H, Me, or OMe) with an interplay between rate-limiting catalyst oxidation and rate-limiting O···O bond formation by APT. Lastly, the co-loaded assembly RuPbpyR22+ + 2 has been investigated in a dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cell for water splitting.

  18. Synthesis of ZnO particles using water molecules generated in esterification reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šarić, Ankica; Gotić, Marijan; Štefanić, Goran; Dražić, Goran

    2017-07-01

    Zinc oxide particles were synthesized without the addition of water by autoclaving (anhydrous) zinc acetate/alcohol and zinc acetate/acetic acid/alcohol solutions at 160 °C. The solvothermal synthesis was performed in ethanol or octanol. The structural, optical and morphological characteristics of ZnO particles were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Vis spectroscopy, FE-SEM and TEM/STEM microscopy. 13C NMR spectroscopy revealed the presence of ester (ethyl- or octyl-acetate) in the supernatants which directly indicate the reaction mechanism. The formation of ester in this esterification reaction generated water molecule in situ, which hydrolyzed anhydrous zinc acetate and initiated nucleation and formation of ZnO. It was found that the size and shape of ZnO particles depend on the type of alcohol used as a solvent and on the presence of acetic acid in solution. The presence of ethanol in the ;pure; system without acetic acid favoured the formation of fine and uniform spherical ZnO nanoparticles (∼20 nm). With the addition of small amount of acetic acid the size of these small nanoparticles increased significantly up to a few hundred nanometers. The addition of small amount of acetic acid in the presence of octanol caused even more radical changes in the shape of ZnO particles, favouring the growth of huge rod-like particles (∼3 μm).

  19. Activation of a water molecule coordinated to manganese: four study cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassalle-Kaiser, B.

    2008-10-01

    The daunting energy consumption of western societies calls for the development of renewable energies. Among them, hydrogen stands as a major candidate. The cleanest way of producing hydrogen is water electro- or photolysis. This reaction is carried out in natural photosynthesis by a manganese-oxo cluster, the functioning of which remains unknown. Insight into this mechanism would greatly help the search for low-cost water splitting catalysts. Our contribution to this field is the understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the activation of water by manganese complexes. This manuscript describes our attempts to generate electrochemically mononuclear manganese(IV) complexes bearing a fully deprotonated water molecule (oxo ligand). We have studied four different cases, which reflect different possible coordination spheres capable of stabilizing such species. In the first chapter, we will give a brief overview of the present energetic challenges faced by western societies. In the second chapter, we will present general considerations about manganese chemistry and a description of the structure and functioning of the water oxidizing enzyme. We will also describe the basic requirements for the splitting of water and present the goals of our work. In the third chapter, we will present the synthesis of a new family of tetradentate ligands, together with the synthesis and full characterization of the corresponding nickel(II) complexes. The first results obtained with the manganese analogue will also be shown. Chapter four presents the formation and the full characterization of a mononuclear manganese(IV)-oxo complex, by electrochemical oxidation of a manganese(II)-aqua complex. We will present different pathways to generate this species and show which intermediates are involved in this 2 e - , 2 H + reaction. Chapter five describes the formation of a mononuclear manganese(IV) complex, by electrochemical oxidation of a manganese(III)-hydroxo complex. The

  20. (e,3e) and (e,3-1e) differential cross sections for the double ionization of water molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansouri, A.; Dal Cappello, C.; Kada, I.; Champion, C.; Roy, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    We report new results for differential cross sections for the double ionization of water molecule by 1 keV electron impact. The present calculation is based on the first Born approximation. We describe the water molecule by a single centre wave function of Moccia. For the final state, an approximation of the well-known 3C wave function is used. An extensive study has been made by varying the angles of detection and the energies of each ejected electron. We have investigated the double ionization of each molecular state (1b 1 , 3a 1 , 1b 2 and 2a 1 ) and identified the mechanisms of this process.

  1. Energy-switching potential energy surface for the water molecule revisited: A highly accurate singled-sheeted form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, B R L; Rodrigues, S P J; Varandas, A J C

    2008-07-28

    A global ab initio potential energy surface is proposed for the water molecule by energy-switching/merging a highly accurate isotope-dependent local potential function reported by Polyansky et al. [Science 299, 539 (2003)] with a global form of the many-body expansion type suitably adapted to account explicitly for the dynamical correlation and parametrized from extensive accurate multireference configuration interaction energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The new function mimics also the complicated Sigma/Pi crossing that arises at linear geometries of the water molecule.

  2. Chemopreventive effects of free and bound phenolics associated to steep waters (nejayote) obtained after nixtamalization of different maize types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-García, Carlos; García-Lara, Silverio; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio O; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A

    2012-03-01

    Free and bound phenolics extracts from nejayote solids were obtained after optimally lime-cooking blue, normal white, red, normal yellow, high-carotenoid and quality protein maize types. The extraction yield ranged from 4.47 to 10.05%. Bound phenolics extracts had higher content of total phenolics, antioxidant activity and ferulic acid compared to the free phenolics extracts. In general, free phenolics extracts were less cytotoxic than the bound phenolics counterparts. Bound phenolics extracts had higher induction of quinone reductase (QR) and particularly the normal yellow nejayote exerted the highest chemopreventive index tested in Hepa1c1c7 cells. When tested for monofunctional phase 2 induction capacity in BPrc1 cells, the bound phenolics extracts of blue, normal white and quality protein nejayotes were better inducers than the normal yellow counterpart. Particularly, the free phenolics extract of the white maize nejayote induced BPrc1 cells QR and exerted a higher chemopreventive index compared to the bound phenolics extract. Therefore, the nejayote of the normal white maize was the best source of monofunctional phase 2 enzyme inducers.

  3. Cavity mutants of Savinase. Crystal structures and differential scanning calorimetry experiments give hints of the function of the buried water molecules in subtilisins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, J T; Olsen, O H; Betzel, C; Eschenburg, S; Branner, S; Hastrup, S

    1994-09-23

    The subtilisin molecule possesses several internal water molecules, which may be characterised as an integral part of the protein structure. We have introduced specific mutations (T71I, T71S, T71V, T71A and T71G) at position 71 in the subtilisin variant Savinase from Bacillus lentus. This position is involved in a hydrogen bonded network with several internal water molecules, forming a water channel. The water channel and most of the other internal water molecules are positioned in the interface between two half-domains of the subtilisin molecule. The data presented here indicate that the internal water molecules are structural, and may be the result of trapping during the folding process.

  4. Anomalous diffusion of water molecules at grain boundaries in ice Ih.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Pedro Augusto Franco Pinheiro; Veiga, Roberto Gomes de Aguiar; Ribeiro, Ingrid de Almeida; Freitas, Rodrigo; Helfferich, Julian; de Koning, Maurice

    2018-05-23

    Using ab initio and classical molecular dynamics simulations, we study pre-melting phenomena in pristine coincident-site-lattice grain boundaries (GBs) in proton-disordered hexagonal ice Ih at temperatures just below the melting point Tm. Concerning pre-melt-layer thicknesses, the results are consistent with the available experimental estimates for low-disorder impurity-free GBs. With regard to molecular mobility, the simulations provide a key new insight: the translational motion of the water molecules is found to be subdiffusive for time scales from ∼10 ns up to at least 0.1 μs. Moreover, the fact that the anomalous diffusion occurs even at temperatures just below Tm where the bulk supercooled liquid still diffuses normally suggests that it is related to the confinement of the GB pre-melt layers by the surrounding crystalline environment. Furthermore, we show that this behavior can be characterized by continuous-time random walk models in which the waiting-time distributions decay according to power-laws that are very similar to those describing dynamics in glass-forming systems.

  5. Intercalated Water and Organic Molecules for Electrode Materials of Rechargeable Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Shin, Jaeho; Choi, Jang Wook

    2018-03-24

    The intrinsic limitations of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) with regard to safety, cost, and the availability of raw materials have promoted research on so-called "post-LIBs". The recent intense research of post-LIBs provides an invaluable lesson that existing electrode materials used in LIBs may not perform as well in post-LIBs, calling for new material designs compliant with emerging batteries based on new chemistries. One promising approach in this direction is the development of materials with intercalated water or organic molecules, as these materials demonstrate superior electrochemical performance in emerging battery systems. The enlarged ionic channel dimensions and effective shielding of the electrostatic interaction between carrier ions and the lattice host are the origins of the observed electrochemical performance. Moreover, these intercalants serve as interlayer pillars to sustain the framework for prolonged cycles. Representative examples of such intercalated materials applied to batteries based on Li + , Na + , Mg 2+ , and Zn 2+ ions and supercapacitors are considered, along with their impact in materials research. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. NO Exchange for a Water Molecule Favorably Changes Iontophoretic Release of Ruthenium Complexes to the Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle C. A. S. de Santana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ruthenium (Ru complexes have been studied as promising anticancer agents. Ru nitrosyl complex (Ru-NO is one which acts as a pro-drug for the release of nitric oxide (NO. The Ru-aqueous complex formed by the exchange of NO for a water molecule after NO release could also possess therapeutic effects. This study evaluates the influence of iontophoresis on enhancing the skin penetration of Ru-NO and Ru-aqueous and assesses its applicability as a tool in treating diverse skin diseases. Passive and iontophoretic (0.5 mA·cm−2 skin permeation of the complexes were performed for 4 h. The amount of Ru and NO in the stratum corneum (SC, viable epidermis (VE, and receptor solution was quantified while the influence of iontophoresis and irradiation on NO release from Ru-NO complex was also evaluated. Iontophoresis increased the amount of Ru-NO and Ru-aqueous recovered from the receptor solution by 15 and 400 times, respectively, as compared to passive permeation. Iontophoresis produced a higher accumulation of Ru-aqueous in the skin layers as compared to Ru-NO. At least 50% of Ru-NO penetrated the SC was stable after 4 h. The presence of Ru-NO in this skin layer suggests that further controlled release of NO can be achieved by photo-stimulation after iontophoresis.

  7. Microassay for measurement of binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woof, J.M.; Burton, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    An improved technique for measuring the binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules has been developed by modification of a procedure using centrifugation through a water-immiscible oil to separate free and cell-bound ligand. It maximises the percentage of ligand bound since cell-bound and free ligand can be separated easily and reproducibly even when very small reaction volumes are used. This permits low levels of ligand radiolabelling and relatively low numbers of cells to be used

  8. Viscosity of bound water and model of proton relaxation in fine-dispersed substances at the presence of adsorbed paramagnetic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedodeev, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    A microviscosity model of proton relaxation in pure liquids and in solutions of paramagnetic ions is examined. It is shown that the influence of adsorbed paramagnetic centers on proton relaxation in finely dispersed substances is significantly weaker than in solutions. A 'two-phase' relaxation model is used in determining the parameters of the bound liquid (water) using nuclear magnetic resonance data. The relations obtained with the model are used to compute the viscosity of water in clay. The value is of the same order of magnitude as that obtained by other methods

  9. Viscosity of bound water and model of proton relaxation in fine-dispersed substances at the presence of adsorbed paramagnetic ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedodeev, V I

    1975-09-01

    A microviscosity model of proton relaxation in pure liquids and in solutions of paramagnetic ions is examined. It is shown that the influence of adsorbed paramagnetic centers on proton relaxation in finely dispersed substances is significantly weaker than in solutions. A 'two-phase' relaxation model is used in determining the parameters of the bound liquid (water) using nuclear magnetic resonance data. The relations obtained with the model are used to compute the viscosity of water in clay. The value is of the same order of magnitude as that obtained by other methods.

  10. Proton-bound cluster ions in ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, R. G.; Eiceman, G. A.; Stone, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Gaseous oxygen and nitrogen bases, both singly and as binary mixtures, have been introduced into ion mobility spectrometers to study the appearance of protonated molecules, and proton-bound dimers and trimers. At ambient temperature it was possible to simultaneously observe, following the introduction of molecule A, comparable intensities of peaks ascribable to the reactant ion (H2O)nH+, the protonated molecule AH+ and AH+ H2O, and the symmetrical proton bound dimer A2H+. Mass spectral identification confirmed the identifications and also showed that the majority of the protonated molecules were hydrated and that the proton-bound dimers were hydrated to a much lesser extent. No significant peaks ascribable to proton-bound trimers were obtained no matter how high the sample concentration. Binary mixtures containing molecules A and B, in some cases gave not only the peaks unique to the individual compounds but also peaks due to asymmetrical proton bound dimers AHB+. Such ions were always present in the spectra of mixtures of oxygen bases but were not observed for several mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen bases. The dimers, which were not observable, notable for their low hydrogen bond strengths, must have decomposed in their passage from the ion source to the detector, i.e. in a time less than approximately 5 ms. When the temperature was lowered to -20 degrees C, trimers, both homogeneous and mixed, were observed with mixtures of alcohols. The importance of hydrogen bond energy, and hence operating temperature, in determining the degree of solvation of the ions that will be observed in an ion mobility spectrometer is stressed. The possibility is discussed that a displacement reaction involving ambient water plays a role in the dissociation.

  11. Effect of water molecule distribution on the quantitative XRD analysis in the case of Na-montmorillonite exchanged Cu2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oueslati, W.; Meftah, M.; Ben Rhaiem, H.; Ben Haj Amara, A.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Several theoretical models are proposed to describe hydration process for Wyoming-montmorillonite clay exchanged Na + or Cu 2+ . They propose some theoretical distribution and disposition for water molecule in the inter-lamellar space in the case of homogeneous and inter-stratified hydration states. For example, Ben Brahim et al. (1983a) studied the interlayer structure (atomic positions of interlayer cations) and associated H 2 O molecules of Na-saturated montmorillonite and beidellite samples. Moore and Hower (1986) studied ordered structures composed of mono-hydrated and collapsed interlayers in montmorillonite, and Cuadros (1996) estimated the H 2 O content of smectite as a function of the interlayer cation. Using similar approach, Ferrage et al (2005b) proposed a discreet distribution of water molecule layer in the same z coordinate of the exchangeable cation with inhomogeneous distribution. This heterogeneity was attributed to the surface charge. The main objective of this study is to characterize the structural changes in the theoretical XRD profile, induced by different water molecule distribution, used to simulate experimental XRD patterns in the case of Na-montmorillonite exchanged Cu 2+ . This problem was achieved by quantitative XRD analysis using an indirect method based on the comparison of the experimental 001 reflections obtained from oriented films patterns with those calculated from structural models. The starting materials were Ca-montmorillonite originated from bentonites of Wyoming (USA). The XRD patterns were obtained by reflection setting with a D8 ADVANCE Bruker installation using Cu-Kα radiation and equipped with solid state detector. Intensities were measured at an interval of 2Θ 0.04 deg. and 40-50 s counting time per step. The diffracted intensity was calculated according to the matrix formalism detailed by Drits and Tchoubar, (1990). The fitting strategies was detailed by Ferrage et

  12. Direct numerical solution of the Ornstein-Zernike integral equation and spatial distribution of water around hydrophobic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Doi, Junta

    1995-09-01

    The Ornstein-Zernike integral equation (OZ equation) has been used to evaluate the distribution function of solvents around solutes, but its numerical solution is difficult for molecules with a complicated shape. This paper proposes a numerical method to directly solve the OZ equation by introducing the 3D lattice. The method employs no approximation the reference interaction site model (RISM) equation employed. The method enables one to obtain the spatial distribution of spherical solvents around solutes with an arbitrary shape. Numerical accuracy is sufficient when the grid-spacing is less than 0.5 Å for solvent water. The spatial water distribution around a propane molecule is demonstrated as an example of a nonspherical hydrophobic molecule using iso-value surfaces. The water model proposed by Pratt and Chandler is used. The distribution agrees with the molecular dynamics simulation. The distribution increases offshore molecular concavities. The spatial distribution of water around 5α-cholest-2-ene (C27H46) is visualized using computer graphics techniques and a similar trend is observed.

  13. Degradation of Bacterial Quorum Sensing Signaling Molecules by the Microscopic Yeast Trichosporon loubieri Isolated from Tropical Wetland Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Siang Wong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteobacteria produce N-acylhomoserine lactones as signaling molecules, which will bind to their cognate receptor and activate quorum sensing-mediated phenotypes in a population-dependent manner. Although quorum sensing signaling molecules can be degraded by bacteria or fungi, there is no reported work on the degradation of such molecules by basidiomycetous yeast. By using a minimal growth medium containing N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine lactone as the sole source of carbon, a wetland water sample from Malaysia was enriched for microbial strains that can degrade N-acylhomoserine lactones, and consequently, a basidiomycetous yeast strain WW1C was isolated. Morphological phenotype and molecular analyses confirmed that WW1C was a strain of Trichosporon loubieri. We showed that WW1C degraded AHLs with N-acyl side chains ranging from 4 to 10 carbons in length, with or without oxo group substitutions at the C3 position. Re-lactonisation bioassays revealed that WW1C degraded AHLs via a lactonase activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of degradation of N-acyl-homoserine lactones and utilization of N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine as carbon and nitrogen source for growth by basidiomycetous yeast from tropical wetland water; and the degradation of bacterial quorum sensing molecules by an eukaryotic yeast.

  14. Communication: Toward an improved control of the fixed-node error in quantum Monte Carlo: The case of the water molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffarel, Michel; Applencourt, Thomas; Scemama, Anthony; Giner, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    All-electron Fixed-node Diffusion Monte Carlo calculations for the nonrelativistic ground-state energy of the water molecule at equilibrium geometry are presented. The determinantal part of the trial wavefunction is obtained from a selected Configuration Interaction calculation [Configuration Interaction using a Perturbative Selection done Iteratively (CIPSI) method] including up to about 1.4 × 10 6 of determinants. Calculations are made using the cc-pCVnZ family of basis sets, with n = 2 to 5. In contrast with most quantum Monte Carlo works no re-optimization of the determinantal part in presence of a Jastrow is performed. For the largest cc-pCV5Z basis set the lowest upper bound for the ground-state energy reported so far of −76.437 44(18) is obtained. The fixed-node energy is found to decrease regularly as a function of the cardinal number n and the Complete Basis Set limit associated with exact nodes is easily extracted. The resulting energy of −76.438 94(12) — in perfect agreement with the best experimentally derived value — is the most accurate theoretical estimate reported so far. We emphasize that employing selected configuration interaction nodes of increasing quality in a given family of basis sets may represent a simple, deterministic, reproducible, and systematic way of controlling the fixed-node error in diffusion Monte Carlo.

  15. Communication: Toward an improved control of the fixed-node error in quantum Monte Carlo: The case of the water molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffarel, Michel; Applencourt, Thomas; Scemama, Anthony [Laboratoire de Chimie et Physique Quantique, CNRS-Université de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Giner, Emmanuel [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Universit degli Studi di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy)

    2016-04-21

    All-electron Fixed-node Diffusion Monte Carlo calculations for the nonrelativistic ground-state energy of the water molecule at equilibrium geometry are presented. The determinantal part of the trial wavefunction is obtained from a selected Configuration Interaction calculation [Configuration Interaction using a Perturbative Selection done Iteratively (CIPSI) method] including up to about 1.4 × 10{sup 6} of determinants. Calculations are made using the cc-pCVnZ family of basis sets, with n = 2 to 5. In contrast with most quantum Monte Carlo works no re-optimization of the determinantal part in presence of a Jastrow is performed. For the largest cc-pCV5Z basis set the lowest upper bound for the ground-state energy reported so far of −76.437 44(18) is obtained. The fixed-node energy is found to decrease regularly as a function of the cardinal number n and the Complete Basis Set limit associated with exact nodes is easily extracted. The resulting energy of −76.438 94(12) — in perfect agreement with the best experimentally derived value — is the most accurate theoretical estimate reported so far. We emphasize that employing selected configuration interaction nodes of increasing quality in a given family of basis sets may represent a simple, deterministic, reproducible, and systematic way of controlling the fixed-node error in diffusion Monte Carlo.

  16. Identification of water soluble and particle bound compounds causing sublethal toxic effects. A field study on sediments affected by a chlor-alkali industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosch, Carme; Olivares, Alba; Faria, Melissa; Navas, Jose M.; Olmo, Ivan del; Grimalt, Joan O.; Pina, Benjamin; Barata, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    A combination of cost effective sublethal Daphnia magna feeding tests, yeast- and cell culture-based bioassays and Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures was used to characterize toxic compounds within sediments collected in a river area under the influence of the effluents from a chlor-alkali industry (Ebro River, NE Spain). Tests were designed to measure and identify toxic compounds in the particulate and filtered water fractions of sediment elutriates. The combined use of bioassays responding to elutriates and dioxin-like compounds evidenced the existence of three major groups of hazardous contaminants in the most contaminated site: (A) metals such as cadmium and mercury bound to sediment fine particles that could be easily resuspended and moved downstream, (B) soluble compounds (presumably, lye) able to alkalinize water to toxic levels, and (C) organochlorine compounds with high dioxin-like activity. These results provided evidence that elutriate D. magna feeding responses can be used as surrogate assays for more tedious chronic whole sediment tests, and that the incorporation of such tests in sediment TIE procedures may improve the ability to identify the toxicity of particle-bound and water-soluble contaminants in sediments.

  17. Metabolism of organically bound tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    The classic methodology for estimating dose to man from environmental tritium ignores the fact that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs may be directly assimilated in the bound compartment of tissues without previous oxidation. We propose a four-compartment model consisting of a free body water compartment, two organic compartments, and a small, rapidly metabolizing compartment. The utility of this model lies in the ability to input organically bound tritium in foodstuffs directly into the organic compartments of the model. We found that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs can increase cumulative total body dose by a factor of 1.7 to 4.5 times the free body water dose alone, depending on the bound-to-loose ratio of tritium in the diet. Model predictions are compared with empirical measurements of tritium in human urine and tissue samples, and appear to be in close agreement. 10 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  18. A theoretical model investigation of peptide bond formation involving two water molecules in ribosome supports the two-step and eight membered ring mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qiang; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Dongju; Liu, Chengbu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We theoretical studied peptide bond formation reaction mechanism with two water molecules. • The first water molecule can decrease the reaction barriers by forming hydrogen bonds. • The water molecule mediated three-proton transfer mechanism is the favorable mechanism. • Our calculation supports the two-step and eight membered ring mechanism. - Abstract: The ribosome is the macromolecular machine that catalyzes protein synthesis. The kinetic isotope effect analysis reported by Strobel group supports the two-step mechanism. However, the destination of the proton originating from the nucleophilic amine is uncertain. A computational simulation of different mechanisms including water molecules is carried out using the same reaction model and theoretical level. Formation the tetrahedral intermediate with proton transfer from nucleophilic nitrogen, is the rate-limiting step when two water molecules participate in peptide bond formation. The first water molecule forming hydrogen bonds with O9′ and H15′ in the A site can decrease the reaction barriers. Combined with results of the solvent isotope effects analysis, we conclude that the three-proton transfer mechanism in which water molecule mediate the proton shuttle between amino and carbon oxygen in rate-limiting step is the favorable mechanism. Our results will shield light on a better understand the reaction mechanism of ribosome

  19. Molecular Dynamics Study of Water Molecules in Interlayer of 14 ^|^Aring; Tobermorite

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Seyoon; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular structure and dynamics of interlayer water of 14 Å tobermorite are investigated based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Calculated structural parameters of the interlayer water configuration are in good agreement with current

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of water molecules at the surface of proteins and applications to binding site prediction and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuming, Thijs; Che, Ye; Abel, Robert; Kim, Byungchan; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu; Sherman, Woody

    2012-03-01

    Water plays an essential role in determining the structure and function of all biological systems. Recent methodological advances allow for an accurate and efficient estimation of the thermodynamic properties of water molecules at the surface of proteins. In this work, we characterize these thermodynamic properties and relate them to various structural and functional characteristics of the protein. We find that high-energy hydration sites often exist near protein motifs typically characterized as hydrophilic, such as backbone amide groups. We also find that waters around alpha helices and beta sheets tend to be less stable than waters around loops. Furthermore, we find no significant correlation between the hydration site-free energy and the solvent accessible surface area of the site. In addition, we find that the distribution of high-energy hydration sites on the protein surface can be used to identify the location of binding sites and that binding sites of druggable targets tend to have a greater density of thermodynamically unstable hydration sites. Using this information, we characterize the FKBP12 protein and show good agreement between fragment screening hit rates from NMR spectroscopy and hydration site energetics. Finally, we show that water molecules observed in crystal structures are less stable on average than bulk water as a consequence of the high degree of spatial localization, thereby resulting in a significant loss in entropy. These findings should help to better understand the characteristics of waters at the surface of proteins and are expected to lead to insights that can guide structure-based drug design efforts. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Precipitable water: Its linear retrieval using leaps and bounds procedure and its global distribution from SEASAT SMMR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, P. C.

    1982-01-01

    Eight subsets using two to five frequencies of the SEASAT scanning multichannel microwave radiometer are examined to determine their potential in the retrieval of atmospheric water vapor content. Analysis indicates that the information concerning the 18 and 21 GHz channels are optimum for water vapor retrieval. A comparison with radiosonde observations gave an rms accuracy of approximately 0.40 g sq cm. The rms accuracy of precipitable water using different subsets was within 10 percent. Global maps of precipitable water over oceans using two and five channel retrieval (average of two and five channel retrieval) are given. Study of these maps reveals the possibility of global moisture distribution associated with oceanic currents and large scale general circulation in the atmosphere. A stable feature of the large scale circulation is noticed. The precipitable water is maximum over the Bay of Bengal and in the North Pacific over the Kuroshio current and shows a general latitudinal pattern.

  2. Cutaneous water loss and covalently bound lipids of the stratum corneum in nestling house sparrows (Passer domesticus L.) from desert and mesic habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Michelle E; Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Williams, Joseph B

    2012-04-01

    Lipids of the stratum corneum (SC), the outer layer of the epidermis of birds and mammals, provide a barrier to water vapor diffusion through the skin. The SC of birds consists of flat dead cells, called corneocytes, and two lipid compartments: an intercellular matrix and a monolayer of covalently bound lipids (CBLs) attached to the outer surface of the corneocytes. We previously found two classes of sphingolipids, ceramides and cerebrosides, covalently bound to corneocytes in the SC of house sparrows (Passer domesticus L.); these lipids were associated with cutaneous water loss (CWL). In this study, we collected adult and nestling house sparrows from Ohio and nestlings from Saudi Arabia, acclimated them to either high or low humidity, and measured their rates of CWL. We also measured CWL for natural populations of nestlings from Ohio and Saudi Arabia, beginning when chicks were 2 days old until they fledged. We then evaluated the composition of the CBLs of the SC of sparrows using thin layer chromatography. We found that adult house sparrows had a greater diversity of CBLs in their SC than previously described. During ontogeny, nestling sparrows increased the amount of CBLs and developed their CBLs differently, depending on their habitat. Acclimating nestlings to different humidity regimes did not alter the ontogeny of the CBLs, suggesting that these lipids represent a fundamental component of SC organization that does not respond to short-term environmental change.

  3. Computation Results from a Parametric Study to Determine Bounding Critical Systems of Homogeneously Water-Moderated Mixed Plutonium--Uranium Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Y.

    2001-01-11

    This report provides computational results of an extensive study to examine the following: (1) infinite media neutron-multiplication factors; (2) material bucklings; (3) bounding infinite media critical concentrations; (4) bounding finite critical dimensions of water-reflected and homogeneously water-moderated one-dimensional systems (i.e., spheres, cylinders of infinite length, and slabs that are infinite in two dimensions) that were comprised of various proportions and densities of plutonium oxides and uranium oxides, each having various isotopic compositions; and (5) sensitivity coefficients of delta k-eff with respect to critical geometry delta dimensions were determined for each of the three geometries that were studied. The study was undertaken to support the development of a standard that is sponsored by the International Standards Organization (ISO) under Technical Committee 85, Nuclear Energy (TC 85)--Subcommittee 5, Nuclear Fuel Technology (SC 5)--Working Group 8, Standardization of Calculations, Procedures and Practices Related to Criticality Safety (WG 8). The designation and title of the ISO TC 85/SC 5/WG 8 standard working draft is WD 14941, ''Nuclear energy--Fissile materials--Nuclear criticality control and safety of plutonium-uranium oxide fuel mixtures outside of reactors.'' Various ISO member participants performed similar computational studies using their indigenous computational codes to provide comparative results for analysis in the development of the standard.

  4. Serine/threonine phosphatase tapp2cs might be served as an early signal molecule for water stress in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, K. H.; Tian, W. L.; Hou, B. Z.; Guo, J. X.; Mei, X. R.; Li, Y. Z.

    2015-01-01

    Much progress has been made towards understanding the role of serine/threonine phosphatases type 2C (PP2Cs) in abscisic acid (ABA) signaling transduction. However, how the negative regulator, PP2Cs, responds to plant water loss remains unclear. Here, we used a series of relative soil moisture (RSM: 85 percentage (well watered), 65 percentage (moderate stress), 45 percentage (severe stress) potted winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and the detached leaves to detect ABA levels and transcripts of PP2Cs, including PP2C40, PP2C45, PP2C59 and PP2C6 as well as the core downstream signals of ABA, including ABF, SnRK2.4 and SnRK2.5. The results showed that the continual loss of water led to a consistent increase in ABA levels, and that the mRNA expression levels of PP2Cs were dependent on plant water condition. PP2Cs expression could be induced by a slight loss of water, and inhibited under severe loss of water. These results were further confirmed by the transcripts of ABF, SnRK2.4 and SnRK2.5. Furthermore, in slight loss of water, 100 μM exogenous ABA could promote PP2Cs expression; in severe loss of water, it inhibited PP2Cs expression. In conclusion, ABA accumulation is controlled by water condition and the PP2C expression is dependent on plant water condition, suggesting that PP2Cs might be served as an early signal molecule for water stress in wheat. (author)

  5. Differential and total cross sections for the ionization of water molecule by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houamer, S.; Dal Cappello, C.; Mansouri, A.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical approach is presented to calculate multiply differential and total cross sections of the ionization of H 2 O molecule in the vapour phase. The wave function of the target is described by molecular orbitals consisting of a linear combination of slater type atomic orbitals centered on the heaviest atom which is the oxygen atom in this case. The calculations are carried out in the first Born approximation where the projectile is described by a plane wave while the ejected electron is described by a coulomb wave taking into account its interaction with the residual ion. The spherical average over the Euler solid angle due to the randomly oriented gaseous target molecule is carried out analytically using the rotation matrix properties. The differential and total cross sections are thus evaluated without any special difficulty and compared with experiments and distorted wave calculations. Fair agreements are observed

  6. Expressional Changes of Water Transport-related Molecules in the Efferent Ductules and Initial Segment of Mouse Treated with Bisphenol A-Containing Drinking Water for Two Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Su-Yong; Lee, Ki-Ho

    2013-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an estrogenic endocrine disrupter. However, depending on a way of treatment, the harmful effects of BPA have not been confirmed. Also, trans-generational effects of BPA on male reproduction are still controversial. Because the reabsorption of testicular fluid in the efferent ductules (ED) and initial segment (IS) is important for sperm maturation, the present study was designed to determine trans-generational effect of BPA administrated orally on expression of water transport-related molecules in the mouse ED and IS. Ethanol-dissolved BPA was diluted in water to be 100 ng (low), 10 μg (medium), and 1 mg/Ml water (high). BPA-containing water was provided for two generations. Expression of ion transporters and water channels in the ED and IS were measured by relative real-time PCR analysis. In the ED, BPA treatment caused expressional increases of carbonic anhydrase II, cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase α1 subunit, and aquaporin (AQP) 1. No change of Na(+)/H(+) exchange (NHE) 3 expression was detected. BPA treatment at medium dose resulted in an increase of AQP9 expression. In the IS, the highest expressional levels of all molecules tested were observed in medium-dose BPA treatment. Generally, high-dose BPA treatment resulted in a decrease or no change of gene expression. Fluctuation of NHE3 gene expression by BPA treatment at different concentrations was detected. These findings suggest that trans-generational exposure to BPA, even at low dose, could affect gene expression of water-transport related molecules. However, such effects of BPA would be differentially occurred in the ED and IS.

  7. Approach to calculating upper bounds on maximum individual doses from the use of contaminated well water following a WIPP repository breach. Report EEG-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegler, P.

    1981-09-01

    As part of the assessment of the potential radiological consequences of the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), this report evaluates the post-closure radiation dose commitments associated with a possible breach event which involves dissolution of the repository by groundwaters and subsequent transport of the nuclear waste through an aquifer to a well assumed to exist at a point 3 miles downstream from the repository. The concentrations of uranium and plutonium isotopes at the well are based on the nuclear waste inventory presently proposed for WIPP and basic assumptions concerning the transport of waste as well as treatment to reduce the salinity of the water. The concentrations of U-233, Pu-239, and Pu-240, all radionuclides originally emplaced as waste in the repository, would exceed current EPA drinking water limits. The concentrations of U-234, U-235, and U-236, all decay products of plutonium isotopes originally emplaced as waste, would be well below current EPA drinking water limits. The 50-year dose commitments from one year of drinking treated water contaminated with U-233 or Pu-239 and Pu-240 were found to be comparable to a one-year dose from natural background. The 50-year dose commitments from one year of drinking milk would be no more than about 1/5 the dose obtained from ingestion of treated water. These doses are considered upper bounds because of several very conservative assumptions which are discussed in the report

  8. Molecular motion of water molecules in lyotropic mesophases formed from fatty acid soaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszewski, K.J.; Pislewski, N.

    1980-01-01

    The results of study of self-diffusion coefficients and relaxation times for the mesophases formed from water mixtures of potassium laurate (denoted by C 12 K), myristate (C 14 K), and palmitate (C 16 K), are presented. The samples containing by weight 70% of soaps and 30% of water as well as samples containing 30% of soaps and 70% of water were examined. It allowed to obtain lamellar and middle phase respectively. (author)

  9. Effect of chronic ingestion of tritiated water and tritium organically bound in food on growth and reproductive functions of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak-Flis, Z.; Radwan, I.

    1982-01-01

    An effect of chronic ingestion of tritiated water and tritiated food on growth and reproduction of Wistar rats was evaluated. The animals were exposed during one or three successive generations. Ingestion of tritiated water at activity of 185.0 and 370.0 kBq/ml or tritiated food at activity of 144.3 kBq/g affected growth of the first generation (F 1 ) rats. In groups exposed to tritiated water the effect was transient. Exposure to tritiated food at 48.1 kBq/g or to tritiated water at the 37.0 kBq/ml affected the growth of F 2 generation rats only. A significant reduction in a relative testis tests weight was observed in a group exposed to tritiated water at activity of 370.0 kBq/ml, while sperm production was affected in all exposed groups. Ingestion of tritiated food caused higher reduction in sperm count than tritiated water. The effect of tritium on growth of rats and ability for sperm production depended on the absorbed dose and the form of ingested tritium. (author)

  10. Investigation of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) molecule production in Gram-negative bacteria isolated from cooling tower water and biofilm samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslan, Ezgi; Kimiran-Erdem, Ayten

    2013-09-01

    In this study, 99 Gram-negative rod bacteria were isolated from cooling tower water, and biofilm samples were examined for cell-to-cell signaling systems, N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecule types, and biofilm formation capacity. Four of 39 (10 %) strains isolated from water samples and 14 of 60 (23 %) strains isolated from biofilm samples were found to be producing a variety of AHL signal molecules. It was determined that the AHL signal molecule production ability and the biofilm formation capacity of sessile bacteria is higher than planktonic bacteria, and there was a statistically significant difference between the AHL signal molecule production of these two groups (p cooling tower water and biofilm samples produced different types of AHL signal molecules and that there were different types of AHL signal molecules in an AHL extract of bacteria. In the present study, it was observed that different isolates of the same strains did not produce the same AHLs or did not produce AHL molecules, and bacteria known as AHL producers did not produce AHL. These findings suggest that detection of signal molecules in bacteria isolated from cooling towers may contribute to prevention of biofilm formation, elimination of communication among bacteria in water systems, and blockage of quorum-sensing controlled virulence of these bacteria.

  11. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Water vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto

    2003-12-01

    Bibliographies of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for water vapour (H 2 O, D 2 O and HDO). About 1200 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is included. The bibliography covers the period 1915 through 2000 for H 2 O. Finally, author's comments for electron collision cross sections and photodissociation processes of H 2 O are given. (author)

  12. Coordination geometries of Zn(II) and Cd(II) in phosphotriesterase: Influence of water molecules in the active site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krauss, M; Olsen, Lars; Antony, J

    2002-01-01

    Models of the metal ion binding sites of native ZnZn and of cadmium-substituted ZnCd and CdCd phosphotriesterase, including full amino acid side chains, were geometry optimized with quantum mechanical methods, with effective fragment potentials (EFP) representing the protein environment surroundi...... to the Od1 of the carboxylate of the first-shell aspartate designated M 1, but the energy difference between Cd1Zn2 and the lowest energy Zn1Cd2 structure is only about 2 kcal/mol and decreasing with the addition of water molecules. The Zn1Cd2 arrangement is found experimentally....

  13. Prototropic tautomerism of 4-Methyl 1,2,4-Triazole-3-Thione molecule in solvent water medium: DFT and Car–Parrinello molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Bipan; De, Rina; Chowdhury, Joydeep

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The tautomerism of 4-MTTN molecule in solvent water medium has been investigated. • CPMD presage the possibility of PT reactions through the solvent water medium. • Concerted PT processes in 4-MTTN have been estimated from the DFT and NBO analyses. • Percentage evolution and breaking of the concerned bonds are estimated. - Abstract: The ground state prototropic tautomerism of 4-Methyl 1,2,4-Triazole-3-Thione molecule in solvent water medium has been investigated with the aid of DFT and Car–Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulation studies. The CPMD simulations envisage the possibility of proton transfer reactions of the molecule through the solvent water medium. Probable proton transfer pathways have been predicted from the DFT calculations which are substantiated by the natural bond orbital analyses. The evolution and breaking of the concerned bonds of the molecule for different proton transfer reaction pathways are also estimated.

  14. Boltzmann equation analysis of electron-molecule collision cross sections in water vapor and ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousfi, M.; Benabdessadok, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    Sets of electron-molecule collision cross sections for H 2 O and NH 3 have been determined from a classical technique of electron swarm parameter unfolding. This deconvolution method is based on a simplex algorithm using a powerful multiterm Boltzmann equation analysis established in the framework of the classical hydrodynamic approximation. It is well adapted for the simulation of the different classes of swarm experiments (i.e., time resolved, time of flight, and steady state experiments). The sets of collision cross sections that exist in the literature are reviewed and analyzed. Fitted sets of cross sections are determined for H 2 O and NH 3 which exhibit features characteristic of polar molecules such as high rotational excitation collision cross sections. The hydrodynamic swarm parameters (i.e., drift velocity, longitudinal and transverse diffusion coefficients, ionization and attachment coefficients) calculated from the fitted sets are in excellent agreement with the measured ones. These sets are finally used to calculate the transport and reaction coefficients needed for discharge modeling in two cases of typical gas mixtures for which experimental swarm data are very sparse or nonexistent (i.e., flue gas mixtures and gas mixtures for rf plasma surface treatment). copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  15. Theoretical study on microhydration of SeO42-: On the number of water molecules necessary to stabilize the dianion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Arup Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Microhydration of SeO42-·nH2O (n = 1-5) clusters are reported at B3LYP/Aug-cc-pvtz level of theory. Lower size hydrated clusters are stabilized by only double-hydrogen-bonding arrangements and the most stable conformer for higher size cluster (n > 3) contains a cyclic water ring. It is observed that at least one water molecule is necessary to stabilize the dianion in the gas phase against spontaneous electron loss. The microscopic theory based expression provides a route to predict the instability of bare SeO42- and to obtain the VDE for a wide range of cluster sizes including the bulk from the knowledge of the same for a few stable hydrated clusters.

  16. Aqueous Solvation of Polyalanine α-Helices with Specific Water Molecules and with the CPCM and SM5.2 Aqueous Continuum Models using Density Functional Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Marianski, Mateusz; Dannenberg, J. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the X3LYP/D95(d,p) level on the solvation of polyalanine α-helices in water. The study includes the effects of discrete water molecules and the CPCM and AMSOL SM5.2 solvent continuum model both separately and in combination. We find that individual water molecules cooperatively hydrogen-bond to both the C- and N-termini of the helix, which results in increases in the dipole moment of the helix/water complex to more than the vector sum...

  17. MSINDO quantum chemical modeling study of water molecule adsorption at nano-sized anatase TiO2 surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahab, Hilal S.; Bredow, Thomas; Aliwi, Salah M.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we studied the adsorption of water molecule onto the (1 0 0), (0 1 0) and (0 0 1) surfaces of nano-sized anatase TiO 2 with semiempirical SCF MO method, MSINDO. The anatase TiO 2 particles are modeled with free clusters (TiO 2 ) n, where n = 20-80. Whereas, the surfaces have been modeled with two saturated clusters, Ti 21 O 58 H 32 and Ti 36 O 90 H 36 . The surface lattice fivefold coordinated titanium atoms (Ti 5C ), which represent the Lewis acid sites, are selected as adsorption centers. We also investigated the effect of TiO 2 cluster size on the computed band gap energy. Results reveal that the electronic properties of a cluster in the lowest excited state differ from that of the ground state. Furthermore, the MSINDO band gap energies of 3.68-3.77 eV for the anatase TiO 2 are in a fair accordance with other literature data. In agreement with other computational and experimental studies, the dissociated form of water molecule adsorption on anatase TiO 2 surfaces is always more stabilized than the molecular form

  18. Investigation of the potential of polymer-bound co-ordination compounds as catalysts for the photolytic production of hydrogen from water. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, J M; Clear, J M; Grayson, D H; Johnston, D S; Pepper, D C; Vos, J G

    1981-01-01

    Organic polymers containing polymer-bound complexes of the type (Ru(bpy)/sub 2/(PVP)X)/sup n+/ (n=1, X=Cl; n=2, X=CO,py,H/sub 2/O,PVP) have been prepared. Synthetic routes proceed either from preformed polymer and Ru(bpy)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ or (Ru(bpy)/sub 2/(OH/sub 2/)/sub 2/)/sup 2 +/ or via polymerization of the corresponding monomer complex. The dependence of the chemical and physical properties on the nature of the polymer backbone and on the loading of the metal complex on the polymer (the Ru:PVP) ratio has been studied. The complexes prepared from homo-PVP are soluble in methanol and aqueous acid but not in neutral water. Water-soluble complexes may be prepared from water-soluble copolymers. (Ru(bpy)/sub 2/(PVP)Cl)/sup +/ and (Ru(bpy)/sub 2/(PVP)/sub 2/)/sup 2 +/ luminesce strongly in methanol at 77/sup 0/K but not at room temperature. Their behavior upon irradiation in methanol solution is similar to that of the pyridine complexes (Ru(bpy)/sub 2/(py)X)/sup n+/ which undergo photosubstitution and photoanation. The rate and extent of these reactions, which eventually lead to removal of the complex from the polymer backbone, are sensitive to the Ru:PVP ratio, and evidence has been found for intrachain recombination of the (Ru(bpy)/sub 2/X)/sup n+/ fragment with the polymer. This leads to enhanced photostability of the polymer. The water-soluble (Ru(bpy)/sub 2/(PVP)(OH/sub 2/))/sup 2 +/ is rather photostable. Water-insoluble films of the polymeric complexes may be cast on glass slides. Under these conditions they are luminescent at room temperature. They are quite photostable upon irradiation, even in water, and there is little tendency for dissociation of the metal complex from the polymer.

  19. Effect of anodizing voltage on the sorption of water molecules on porous alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrublevsky, I., E-mail: vrublevsky@bsuir.edu.by [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, Department of Micro and Nanoelectronics, 220013 Minsk (Belarus); Chernyakova, K. [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, Department of Micro and Nanoelectronics, 220013 Minsk (Belarus); Bund, A.; Ispas, A.; Schmidt, U. [Fachgebiet Elektrochemie und Galvanotechnik, Technische Universitaet Ilmenau, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2012-05-01

    The amount of water adsorbed on different centers on the surface of oxalic acid alumina films is a function of the anodizing voltage. It is decreased with increasing the anodizing voltage from 20 up to 50 V, came up to maximum value at 20-30 V and slightly increased at voltages above 50 V. Water adsorption by oxide films formed at voltages below 50 V can be due to the negative surface charge that is present on the alumina surface. The negative surface charge disappears in the films formed at voltages higher than 50 V, and thus, the water is adsorbed on aluminum ions in a tetrahedral and octahedral environment. The correlation between anodizing conditions of aluminum in oxalic acid and the structure and composition of anodic alumina was established by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses (TG/DTA).

  20. An approach for assessing potential sediment-bound contaminant threats near the intake of a drinking water treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Anderson, William B; Huck, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    To assist in assessing a potential contaminated sediment threat near a drinking water intake in a large lake, a technique known as the fingerprint analysis of leachate contaminants (FALCON), was investigated and enhanced to help draw more statistically significant definitive conclusions. This represents the first application of this approach, originally developed by the USEPA to characterize and track leachate penetration in groundwater and contaminant migration from waste and landfill sites, in a large lake from the point-of-view of source water protection. FALCON provided valuable information regarding contaminated sediment characterization, source attribution, and transport within a surface water context without the need for knowledge of local hydrodynamic conditions, potentially reducing reliance on complicated hydrodynamic analysis. A t-test to evaluate the significance of correlations was shown to further enhance the FALCON procedure. In this study, the sensitivity of FALCON was found to be improved by using concentration data from both conserved organics and heavy metals in combination. Furthermore, data analysis indicated that it may be possible to indirectly assess the success of remediation efforts (and the corresponding need to plan for a treatment upgrade in the event of escalating contaminant concentrations) by examining the temporal change in correlation between the source and intake sediment fingerprints over time. This method has potential for widespread application in situations where conserved contaminants such as heavy metals and higher molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), are being or have previously been deposited in sediment somewhere in, or within range of, an intake protection zone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A reexamination of cellulose carbon-bound hydrogen deltaD measurements and some factors affecting plant-water D/H relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yapp, C.J.; Epstein, S.

    1982-01-01

    The method of Epstein et al. (1976) for analysis of D/H ratios of cellulose carbon-bound hydrogen has been modified. This modified 'renitration' method yields deltaD values which are in agreement with those obtained by the sodium chlorite delignification method. Comparison of results obtained by the renitration method with the published results of Epstein et al. indicate some differences in the deltaD values of individual samples. However, the overall plant-water deltaD relationship determined by Epstein et al., is not greatly changed upon redetermination by the renitration method. Additional data from a variety of plants representing a wide geographical range reveal that relative humidity is an important variable in determining the deltaD value of cellulose C-H hydrogen on this inter-regional scale. The role of relative humidity can be reasonably explained by a leaf water model that assumes an isotopic steady-state during transpiration. These results reaffirm the conclusion of Epstein et al., that the deltaD variations of the source water are the dominant control of the deltaD variations of cellulose C-H hydrogen from naturally grown plants. Thus, there is an expectation that these cellulose deltaD variations can have climate significance. (author)

  2. Coherent Behavior and the Bound State of Water and K(+) Imply Another Model of Bioenergetics: Negative Entropy Instead of High-energy Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeken, Laurent; Vasilievich Matveev, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Observations of coherent cellular behavior cannot be integrated into widely accepted membrane (pump) theory (MT) and its steady state energetics because of the thermal noise of assumed ordinary cell water and freely soluble cytoplasmic K(+). However, Ling disproved MT and proposed an alternative based on coherence, showing that rest (R) and action (A) are two different phases of protoplasm with different energy levels. The R-state is a coherent metastable low-entropy state as water and K(+) are bound to unfolded proteins. The A-state is the higher-entropy state because water and K(+) are free. The R-to-A phase transition is regarded as a mechanism to release energy for biological work, replacing the classical concept of high-energy bonds. Subsequent inactivation during the endergonic A-to-R phase transition needs an input of metabolic energy to restore the low entropy R-state. Matveev's native aggregation hypothesis allows to integrate the energetic details of globular proteins into this view.

  3. Distinguishing Biologically Relevant Hexoses by Water Adduction to the Lithium-Cationized Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Matthew T; Chen, Dazhe; Wallbillich, Nicholas J; Glish, Gary L

    2017-10-03

    A method to distinguish the four most common biologically relevant underivatized hexoses, d-glucose, d-galactose, d-mannose, and d-fructose, using only mass spectrometry with no prior separation/derivatization step has been developed. Electrospray of a solution containing hexose and a lithium salt generates [Hexose+Li] + . The lithium-cationized hexoses adduct water in a quadrupole ion trap. The rate of this water adduction reaction can be used to distinguish the four hexoses. Additionally, for each hexose, multiple lithiation sites are possible, allowing for multiple structures of [Hexose+Li] + . Electrospray produces at least one structure that reacts with water and at least one that does not. The ratio of unreactive lithium-cationized hexose to total lithium-cationized hexose is unique for the four hexoses studied, providing a second method for distinguishing the isomers. Use of the water adduction reaction rate or the unreactive ratio provides two separate methods for confidently (p ≤ 0.02) distinguishing the most common biologically relevant hexoses using only femtomoles of hexose. Additionally, binary mixtures of glucose and fructose were studied. A calibration curve was created by measuring the reaction rate of various samples with different ratios of fructose and glucose. The calibration curve was used to accurately measure the percentage of fructose in three samples of high fructose corn syrup (<4% error).

  4. Incipient ferroelectricity of water molecules confined to nano-channels of beryl

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gorshunov, B. P.; Torgashev, V. I.; Zhukova, E.S.; Thomas, V.G.; Belyanchikov, M. A.; Kadlec, Christelle; Kadlec, Filip; Savinov, Maxim; Ostapchuk, Tetyana; Petzelt, Jan; Prokleška, J.; Tomas, P. V.; Pestrjakov, E.V.; Fursenko, D.A.; Shakurov, G.S.; Prokhorov, A. S.; Gorelik, V. S.; Kadyrov, L.S.; Uskov, V.V.; Kremer, R. K.; Dressel, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, Sep (2016), 1-10, č. článku 12842. ISSN 2041-1723 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-25639S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : water * beryl * ferroelectricity * quantum fluctuations * Curie–Weiss behaviour Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 12.124, year: 2016

  5. The added value of a water footprint approach: Micro- and macroeconomic analysis of cotton production, processing and export in water bound Uzbekistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, I.; Bekchanov, M.; Djanibekov, U.; Lamers, J. P. A.

    2013-11-01

    Since independence from the former Soviet Union in 1991, Uzbekistan is challenged to consolidate its efforts and identify and introduce suitable agricultural policies to ease the threat of advancing land, water and ecosystem deterioration. On the one hand, irrigated cotton production provides income, food and energy sources for a large part of the rural households, which accounts for about 70% of the total population. On the other hand, this sector is considered a major driver of the on-going environmental degradation. Due to this dual nature, an integrated approach is needed that allows the analyses of the cotton sector at different stages and, consequently, deriving comprehensive options for action. The findings of the economic based value chain analysis and ecologically-oriented water footprint analysis on regional level were complemented with the findings of an input-output model on national level. This combination gave an added value for better-informed decision-making to reach land, water and ecosystem sustainability, compared to the individual results of each approach. The synergy of approaches pointed at various options for actions, such as to (i) promote the shift of water use from the high water consuming agricultural sector to a less water consuming cotton processing sector, (ii) increase overall water use efficiency by expanding the highly water productive industrial sectors and concurrently decreasing sectors with inefficient water use, and (iii) reduce agricultural water use by improving irrigation and conveyance efficiencies. The findings showed that increasing water use efficiency, manufacturing products with higher value added and raising water users' awareness of the real value of water are essential for providing water security in Uzbekistan.

  6. The use of a heat transfer coefficient for describing the radiative exchange between water vapour and the bounding walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eifler, W.; Shepherd, I.M.

    1983-01-01

    During the ''severe-fuel-damage'' experiments of the SUPER SARA test program radiation heat transfer will play an important part. For the analysis of these experiments it should be modelled therefore in a particularly appropriate manner. Based on the same engineering type principles which are used in the radiation model of the TRAC code version for boiling water reactors a new model has been developed. This model is less computer time consuming than the TRAC model and particularly appropriate for the use in the subchannel - type bundle computer code which is planned to be developed for the analysis of the ''severe-fuel-damage'' experiments. Sample calculations for the ''severe-fuel-damage'' test array show that the difference between the results obtained with the new model and those obtained with the TRAC model is in general not significant

  7. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons. We begin with a brief history of the subject and discuss a few good candidates, and then abstract some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states. Next we argue that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches, and discuss some of our recent work in this area. We conclude with a discussion of a few more recent molecule candidates (notably the f o (1710)) which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures. (Author)

  8. Aqueous solvation of polyalanine α-helices with specific water molecules and with the CPCM and SM5.2 aqueous continuum models using density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianski, Mateusz; Dannenberg, J J

    2012-02-02

    We present density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the X3LYP/D95(d,p) level on the solvation of polyalanine α-helices in water. The study includes the effects of discrete water molecules and the CPCM and AMSOL SM5.2 solvent continuum model both separately and in combination. We find that individual water molecules cooperatively hydrogen-bond to both the C- and N-termini of the helix, which results in increases in the dipole moment of the helix/water complex to more than the vector sum of their individual dipole moments. These waters are found to be more stable than in bulk solvent. On the other hand, individual water molecules that interact with the backbone lower the dipole moment of the helix/water complex to below that of the helix itself. Small clusters of waters at the termini increase the dipole moments of the helix/water aggregates, but the effect diminishes as more waters are added. We discuss the somewhat complex behavior of the helix with the discrete waters in the continuum models.

  9. Clinical high-resolution mapping of the proteoglycan-bound water fraction in articular cartilage of the human knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhrara, Mustapha; Reiter, David A; Sexton, Kyle W; Bergeron, Christopher M; Zukley, Linda M; Spencer, Richard G

    2017-11-01

    We applied our recently introduced Bayesian analytic method to achieve clinically-feasible in-vivo mapping of the proteoglycan water fraction (PgWF) of human knee cartilage with improved spatial resolution and stability as compared to existing methods. Multicomponent driven equilibrium single-pulse observation of T 1 and T 2 (mcDESPOT) datasets were acquired from the knees of two healthy young subjects and one older subject with previous knee injury. Each dataset was processed using Bayesian Monte Carlo (BMC) analysis incorporating a two-component tissue model. We assessed the performance and reproducibility of BMC and of the conventional analysis of stochastic region contraction (SRC) in the estimation of PgWF. Stability of the BMC analysis of PgWF was tested by comparing independent high-resolution (HR) datasets from each of the two young subjects. Unlike SRC, the BMC-derived maps from the two HR datasets were essentially identical. Furthermore, SRC maps showed substantial random variation in estimated PgWF, and mean values that differed from those obtained using BMC. In addition, PgWF maps derived from conventional low-resolution (LR) datasets exhibited partial volume and magnetic susceptibility effects. These artifacts were absent in HR PgWF images. Finally, our analysis showed regional variation in PgWF estimates, and substantially higher values in the younger subjects as compared to the older subject. BMC-mcDESPOT permits HR in-vivo mapping of PgWF in human knee cartilage in a clinically-feasible acquisition time. HR mapping reduces the impact of partial volume and magnetic susceptibility artifacts compared to LR mapping. Finally, BMC-mcDESPOT demonstrated excellent reproducibility in the determination of PgWF. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Comparison of the solid-phase extraction efficiency of a bounded and an included cyclodextrin-silica microporous composite for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons determination in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri-Aucejo, Adela; Amorós, Pedro; Moragues, Alaina; Guillem, Carmen; Belenguer-Sapiña, Carolina

    2016-08-15

    Solid-phase extraction is one of the most important techniques for sample purification and concentration. A wide variety of solid phases have been used for sample preparation over time. In this work, the efficiency of a new kind of solid-phase extraction adsorbent, which is a microporous material made from modified cyclodextrin bounded to a silica network, is evaluated through an analytical method which combines solid-phase extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography to determine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples. Several parameters that affected the analytes recovery, such as the amount of solid phase, the nature and volume of the eluent or the sample volume and concentration influence have been evaluated. The experimental results indicate that the material possesses adsorption ability to the tested polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Under the optimum conditions, the quantification limits of the method were in the range of 0.09-2.4μgL(-1) and fine linear correlations between peak height and concentration were found around 1.3-70μgL(-1). The method has good repeatability and reproducibility, with coefficients of variation under 8%. Due to the concentration results, this material may represent an alternative for trace analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water trough solid-phase extraction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ubiquitous water-soluble molecules in aquatic plant exudates determine specific insect attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sérandour, Julien; Reynaud, Stéphane; Willison, John; Patouraux, Joëlle; Gaude, Thierry; Ravanel, Patrick; Lempérière, Guy; Raveton, Muriel

    2008-10-08

    Plants produce semio-chemicals that directly influence insect attraction and/or repulsion. Generally, this attraction is closely associated with herbivory and has been studied mainly under atmospheric conditions. On the other hand, the relationship between aquatic plants and insects has been little studied. To determine whether the roots of aquatic macrophytes release attractive chemical mixtures into the water, we studied the behaviour of mosquito larvae using olfactory experiments with root exudates. After testing the attraction on Culex and Aedes mosquito larvae, we chose to work with Coquillettidia species, which have a complex behaviour in nature and need to be attached to plant roots in order to obtain oxygen. This relationship is non-destructive and can be described as commensal behaviour. Commonly found compounds seemed to be involved in insect attraction since root exudates from different plants were all attractive. Moreover, chemical analysis allowed us to identify a certain number of commonly found, highly water-soluble, low-molecular-weight compounds, several of which (glycerol, uracil, thymine, uridine, thymidine) were able to induce attraction when tested individually but at concentrations substantially higher than those found in nature. However, our principal findings demonstrated that these compounds appeared to act synergistically, since a mixture of these five compounds attracted larvae at natural concentrations (0.7 nM glycerol, insect relationships in aquatic eco-systems.

  12. Open challenges in structure-based virtual screening: Receptor modeling, target flexibility consideration and active site water molecules description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyrakis, Francesca; Cavasotto, Claudio N

    2015-10-01

    Structure-based virtual screening is currently an established tool in drug lead discovery projects. Although in the last years the field saw an impressive progress in terms of algorithm development, computational performance, and retrospective and prospective applications in ligand identification, there are still long-standing challenges where further improvement is needed. In this review, we consider the conceptual frame, state-of-the-art and recent developments of three critical "structural" issues in structure-based drug lead discovery: the use of homology modeling to accurately model the binding site when no experimental structures are available, the necessity of accounting for the dynamics of intrinsically flexible systems as proteins, and the importance of considering active site water molecules in lead identification and optimization campaigns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamics of water around the complex structures formed between the KH domains of far upstream element binding protein and single-stranded DNA molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy, E-mail: sanjoy@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in [Molecular Modeling Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2015-07-28

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) binding proteins specifically bind to the single-stranded regions of the DNA and protect it from premature annealing, thereby stabilizing the DNA structure. We have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the aqueous solutions of two DNA binding K homology (KH) domains (KH3 and KH4) of the far upstream element binding protein complexed with two short ss-DNA segments. Attempts have been made to explore the influence of the formation of such complex structures on the microscopic dynamics and hydrogen bond properties of the interfacial water molecules. It is found that the water molecules involved in bridging the ss-DNA segments and the protein domains form a highly constrained thin layer with extremely retarded mobility. These water molecules play important roles in freezing the conformational oscillations of the ss-DNA oligomers and thereby forming rigid complex structures. Further, it is demonstrated that the effect of complexation on the slow long-time relaxations of hydrogen bonds at the interface is correlated with hindered motions of the surrounding water molecules. Importantly, it is observed that the highly restricted motions of the water molecules bridging the protein and the DNA components in the complexed forms originate from more frequent hydrogen bond reformations.

  14. Ubiquitous water-soluble molecules in aquatic plant exudates determine specific insect attraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Sérandour

    Full Text Available Plants produce semio-chemicals that directly influence insect attraction and/or repulsion. Generally, this attraction is closely associated with herbivory and has been studied mainly under atmospheric conditions. On the other hand, the relationship between aquatic plants and insects has been little studied. To determine whether the roots of aquatic macrophytes release attractive chemical mixtures into the water, we studied the behaviour of mosquito larvae using olfactory experiments with root exudates. After testing the attraction on Culex and Aedes mosquito larvae, we chose to work with Coquillettidia species, which have a complex behaviour in nature and need to be attached to plant roots in order to obtain oxygen. This relationship is non-destructive and can be described as commensal behaviour. Commonly found compounds seemed to be involved in insect attraction since root exudates from different plants were all attractive. Moreover, chemical analysis allowed us to identify a certain number of commonly found, highly water-soluble, low-molecular-weight compounds, several of which (glycerol, uracil, thymine, uridine, thymidine were able to induce attraction when tested individually but at concentrations substantially higher than those found in nature. However, our principal findings demonstrated that these compounds appeared to act synergistically, since a mixture of these five compounds attracted larvae at natural concentrations (0.7 nM glycerol, <0.5 nM uracil, 0.6 nM thymine, 2.8 nM uridine, 86 nM thymidine, much lower than those found for each compound tested individually. These results provide strong evidence that a mixture of polyols (glycerol, pyrimidines (uracil, thymine, and nucleosides (uridine, thymidine functions as an efficient attractive signal in nature for Coquillettidia larvae. We therefore show for the first time, that such commonly found compounds may play an important role in plant-insect relationships in aquatic eco-systems.

  15. Perceptron Mistake Bounds

    OpenAIRE

    Mohri, Mehryar; Rostamizadeh, Afshin

    2013-01-01

    We present a brief survey of existing mistake bounds and introduce novel bounds for the Perceptron or the kernel Perceptron algorithm. Our novel bounds generalize beyond standard margin-loss type bounds, allow for any convex and Lipschitz loss function, and admit a very simple proof.

  16. Study of water diffusion on single-supported bilayer lipid membranes by quasielastic neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bai, M.; Miskowiec, A.; Hansen, F. Y.

    2012-01-01

    High-energy-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering has been used to elucidate the diffusion of water molecules in proximity to single bilayer lipid membranes supported on a silicon substrate. By varying sample temperature, level of hydration, and deuteration, we identify three different types...... of diffusive water motion: bulk-like, confined, and bound. The motion of bulk-like and confined water molecules is fast compared to those bound to the lipid head groups (7-10 H2O molecules per lipid), which move on the same nanosecond time scale as H atoms within the lipid molecules. Copyright (C) EPLA, 2012...

  17. Physical capture and release of drug molecules, water and cations by a smectite clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho dos Santos, Éverton

    -fluorohectorite (LiFh, Li1.2(Mg4.8Li1.2)Si8O20F4), a synthetic clay mineral from the smectite family, have been experimentally analyzed. By means of X-rays powder diffraction (XRD), using both an in-house instrument and synchrotron radiation, UV-Vis spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric Analysis coupled to an Infrared......-analysis and inelastic neutron scattering data we established that the drug presence into the interlayer space of Fh is weakening the water-clay interactions. Furthermore, CIPRO’s release from Fh in synthetic gastric acid juice (SGA) as a function of time and temperature was also carefully followed. Our studies showed...... and toxicological tests, we demonstrated that the effectiveness and toxicity of pure CIPRO is unaffected in the clay-drug complex. To conclude, the high drug adsorption capacity as well as the slow and gradual release from CIPRO when intercalated in Fh adds this synthetic smectite to the list of promising drug...

  18. The effect of excitation and preparation pulses on nonslice selective 2D UTE bicomponent analysis of bound and free water in cortical bone at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shihong [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States); Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Yancheng Medical College, Jiangsu (China); The First People' s Hospital of Yancheng City, Jiangsu 224005 (China); Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92161 and Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States); Bae, Won C.; Du, Jiang, E-mail: jiangdu@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States); Hua, Yanqing [Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Zhou, Yi [The First People' s Hospital of Yancheng City, Jiangsu 224005 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of excitation, fat saturation, long T2 saturation, and adiabatic inversion pulses on ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging with bicomponent analysis of bound and free water in cortical bone for potential applications in osteoporosis. Methods: Six bovine cortical bones and six human tibial midshaft samples were harvested for this study. Each bone sample was imaged with eight sequences using 2D UTE imaging at 3T with half and hard excitation pulses, without and with fat saturation, long T2 saturation, and adiabatic inversion recovery (IR) preparation pulses. Single- and bicomponent signal models were utilized to calculate the T2{sup *}s and/or relative fractions of short and long T2{sup *}s. Results: For all bone samples UTE T2{sup *} signal decay showed bicomponent behavior. A higher short T2{sup *} fraction was observed on UTE images with hard pulse excitation compared with half pulse excitation (75.6% vs 68.8% in bovine bone, 79.9% vs 73.2% in human bone). Fat saturation pulses slightly reduced the short T2{sup *} fraction relative to regular UTE sequences (5.0% and 2.0% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 6.3% and 8.2% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). Long T2 saturation pulses significantly reduced the long T2{sup *} fraction relative to regular UTE sequence (18.9% and 17.2% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 26.4% and 27.7% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). With IR-UTE preparation the long T2{sup *} components were significantly reduced relative to regular UTE sequence (75.3% and 66.4% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 87.7% and 90.3% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). Conclusions: Bound and free water T2{sup *}s and relative fractions can

  19. Mitigation of organically bound sulphate from water treatment plants at Bruce NGS and impact on steam generator secondary side chemistry control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nashiem, R.; Davloor, R.; Harper, B.; Smith, K. [Bruce Power, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada); Gauthier, C. [CTGIX Services Inc., Burlington, Ontario (Canada); Schexnailder, S. [GE Water and Process Technologies, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Bruce Power is the source of more than 20 per cent of Ontario's electricity and currently operates six reactor units at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A (two units) and B (four units) stations located on Lake Huron. This paper discusses the challenges faced and operating experience (OPEX) gained in meeting WANO 1.0 chemistry performance objectives for steam generator secondary side chemistry control, particularly with control of steam generator sulphates. A detailed sampling and analysis program conducted as part of this study concluded that a major contributor to steam generator (SG) elevated sulphates is Organically Bound Sulphate (OBS) in Water Treatment Plants (WTP) effluent. The Bruce A and B WTPs consist of clarification with downstream sand and carbon filtration for Lake Water pre-treatment, which are followed by conventional Ion Exchange (IX) demineralization. Samples taken from various locations in the process stream were analyzed for a variety of parameters including both organic bound and inorganic forms of sulphate. The results are inconclusive with respect to finding the definitive source of OBS. This is primarily due to the condition that the OBS in the samples, which are in relatively low levels, are masked during chemical analysis by the considerably higher inorganic sulphate background. Additionally, it was also determined that on-line Total Organic Carbon (TOC) levels at different WTP locations did not always correlate well with OBS levels in the effluent, such that TOC could not be effectively used as a control parameter to improve OBS performance of the WTP operation. Improvement efforts at both plants focused on a number of areas including optimization of clarifier operation, replacement of IX resins, addition of downstream mobile polishing trailers, testing of new resins and adsorbents, pilot-scale testing with a Reverse Osmosis (RO) rig, review of resin regeneration and backwashing practices, and operating procedure improvements

  20. The effect of excitation and preparation pulses on nonslice selective 2D UTE bicomponent analysis of bound and free water in cortical bone at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shihong; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B.; Bae, Won C.; Du, Jiang; Hua, Yanqing; Zhou, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of excitation, fat saturation, long T2 saturation, and adiabatic inversion pulses on ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging with bicomponent analysis of bound and free water in cortical bone for potential applications in osteoporosis. Methods: Six bovine cortical bones and six human tibial midshaft samples were harvested for this study. Each bone sample was imaged with eight sequences using 2D UTE imaging at 3T with half and hard excitation pulses, without and with fat saturation, long T2 saturation, and adiabatic inversion recovery (IR) preparation pulses. Single- and bicomponent signal models were utilized to calculate the T2 * s and/or relative fractions of short and long T2 * s. Results: For all bone samples UTE T2 * signal decay showed bicomponent behavior. A higher short T2 * fraction was observed on UTE images with hard pulse excitation compared with half pulse excitation (75.6% vs 68.8% in bovine bone, 79.9% vs 73.2% in human bone). Fat saturation pulses slightly reduced the short T2 * fraction relative to regular UTE sequences (5.0% and 2.0% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 6.3% and 8.2% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). Long T2 saturation pulses significantly reduced the long T2 * fraction relative to regular UTE sequence (18.9% and 17.2% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 26.4% and 27.7% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). With IR-UTE preparation the long T2 * components were significantly reduced relative to regular UTE sequence (75.3% and 66.4% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 87.7% and 90.3% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). Conclusions: Bound and free water T2 * s and relative fractions can be assessed using UTE bicomponent

  1. Mitigation of organically bound sulphate from water treatment plants at Bruce NGS and impact on steam generator secondary side chemistry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashiem, R.; Davloor, R.; Harper, B.; Smith, K.; Gauthier, C.; Schexnailder, S.

    2010-01-01

    Bruce Power is the source of more than 20 per cent of Ontario's electricity and currently operates six reactor units at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A (two units) and B (four units) stations located on Lake Huron. This paper discusses the challenges faced and operating experience (OPEX) gained in meeting WANO 1.0 chemistry performance objectives for steam generator secondary side chemistry control, particularly with control of steam generator sulphates. A detailed sampling and analysis program conducted as part of this study concluded that a major contributor to steam generator (SG) elevated sulphates is Organically Bound Sulphate (OBS) in Water Treatment Plants (WTP) effluent. The Bruce A and B WTPs consist of clarification with downstream sand and carbon filtration for Lake Water pre-treatment, which are followed by conventional Ion Exchange (IX) demineralization. Samples taken from various locations in the process stream were analyzed for a variety of parameters including both organic bound and inorganic forms of sulphate. The results are inconclusive with respect to finding the definitive source of OBS. This is primarily due to the condition that the OBS in the samples, which are in relatively low levels, are masked during chemical analysis by the considerably higher inorganic sulphate background. Additionally, it was also determined that on-line Total Organic Carbon (TOC) levels at different WTP locations did not always correlate well with OBS levels in the effluent, such that TOC could not be effectively used as a control parameter to improve OBS performance of the WTP operation. Improvement efforts at both plants focused on a number of areas including optimization of clarifier operation, replacement of IX resins, addition of downstream mobile polishing trailers, testing of new resins and adsorbents, pilot-scale testing with a Reverse Osmosis (RO) rig, review of resin regeneration and backwashing practices, and operating procedure improvements

  2. Detecting Darwinism from Molecules in the Enceladus Plumes, Jupiter's Moons, and Other Planetary Water Lagoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Steven A

    2017-09-01

    To the astrobiologist, Enceladus offers easy access to a potential subsurface biosphere via the intermediacy of a plume of water emerging directly into space. A direct question follows: If we were to collect a sample of this plume, what in that sample, through its presence or its absence, would suggest the presence and/or absence of life in this exotic locale? This question is, of course, relevant for life detection in any aqueous lagoon that we might be able to sample. This manuscript reviews physical chemical constraints that must be met by a genetic polymer for it to support Darwinism, a process believed to be required for a chemical system to generate properties that we value in biology. We propose that the most important of these is a repeating backbone charge; a Darwinian genetic biopolymer must be a "polyelectrolyte." Relevant to mission design, such biopolymers are especially easy to recover and concentrate from aqueous mixtures for detection, simply by washing the aqueous mixtures across a polycharged support. Several device architectures are described to ensure that, once captured, the biopolymer meets two other requirements for Darwinism, homochirality and a small building block "alphabet." This approach is compared and contrasted with alternative biomolecule detection approaches that seek homochirality and constrained alphabets in non-encoded biopolymers. This discussion is set within a model for the history of the terran biosphere, identifying points in that natural history where these alternative approaches would have failed to detect terran life. Key Words: Enceladus-Life detection-Europa-Icy moon-Biosignatures-Polyelectrolyte theory of the gene. Astrobiology 17, 840-851.

  3. Dielectric and gravimetric studies of water binding to lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone, S.

    1996-01-01

    Time domain dielectric spectroscopy and hydration isotherm measurements as a function of temperature have been applied to hydrated lysozyme powder. Two dielectric dispersions were identified, the first centred at approximately 8 MHz and a second above 1 GHz. The higher dispersion is considered to be the result of rotational relaxation of water molecules bound to the enzyme. In this case the results indicate the existence of a population of 32 water molecules per lysozyme molecule which are irrotationally bound to the lysozyme structure. A larger population of water molecules is relatively free to respond to the electric field and exhibits a dipole moment close to that of vapour phase water molecules. Multi-temperature hydration isotherm measurements are used to calculate enthalpies and entropies associated with the binding of water to lysozyme. Discontinuities both in dielectric and in thermodynamic characteristics in the range 10-14% hydration are interpreted as a re-ordering of the water structure on the enzyme surface

  4. Circuit lower bounds in bounded arithmetics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pich, Ján

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 166, č. 1 (2015), s. 29-45 ISSN 0168-0072 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902 Keywords : bounded arithmetic * circuit lower bounds Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.582, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168007214000888

  5. Influence of the effective mass of water molecule on thermal neutron scattering; Uticaj efektivne mase molekula vode na rasejanje termalnih neutrona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovic, M [Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia). Elektrotehnicki Fakultet

    1981-07-01

    The influence of the effective water molecule mass on the thermal neutron scattering on the nucleus of the hydrogen atom has been investigated. Besides the actual water molecule mass (M = 18) the investigations have been carried out with its two effective values (M1 = 16 and M2 = 20). The differential and total cross sections have been calculated for the incident thermal neutron energy E{sub o} = 1 eV. Investigation results show different prominence of the quantum effects and for M2 the appearance of peaks in the quasielastic scattering. (author)

  6. Dihydrogen phosphate-water tape and layers vs dihydrogen phosphate layers tuned by hydrophobic isomeric pyridine-diamine functionalized molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Liu, Tong-Peng; Huo, Li-Hua; Deng, Zhao-Peng; Gao, Shan

    2017-01-01

    Assembly of six isomeric pyridine-diamine-based molecules, N,N‧-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine (M1), N,N‧-bis(pyridin-3-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine (M2), N,N‧-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine (M3), N,N‧-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethyl)propane-1,3-diamine (M4), N,N‧-bis(pyridin-3-ylmethyl)propane-1,2-diamine (M5), and N,N‧-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)propane-1,3-diamine (M6), with phosphoric acid (H3PO4) in different ratio (1:2 and 1:4), leads to the formation of nine salts, H2M12+·2H2PO4-·4H2O (1), H2M22+·2H2PO4-·2H2O (2), H2M32+·2H2PO4-·2H2O (3), H4M14+·4H2PO4- (4), H4M24+·4H2PO4- (5), H4M34+·4H2PO4- (6), H2M42+·2H2PO4-·3H2O (7), 2H2M52+·4H2PO4-·2H3PO4 (8), and H2M62+·2H2PO4- (9), which have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TG, PL, powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Structural analyses indicate that hydrogen-bonding patterns of H2PO4- anions, conformation of protonated cations can effectively influence the supramolecular architectures through diverse non-covalent interactions. Hydrous salts 1-3 and 7 present 2D and 3D host-guest supramolecular networks, in which the connection of H2PO4- anions and water molecules generates diverse tape and layer motifs. H2PO4- anions in anhydrous salts 4-6 interconnect with each other through hydrogen bonds to form two types of layers, which are joined by discrete H4M4+ cations into 3D inorganic-organic hybrid supramolecular networks. Salts 8-9 also present 2D and 3D host-guest supramolecular networks where the interconnection of H2PO4- anions and its combination with H3PO4 molecules leads to diverse layers. Luminescent analyses indicate that salts 1-9 exhibit violet and blue emission maximum in the range of 390-467 nm at room temperature.

  7. A combined prediction strategy increases identification of peptides bound with high affinity and stability to porcine MHC class I molecules SLA-1*04:01, SLA-2*04:01, and SLA-3*04:01

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    constitute an attractive protocol to select target peptides from the vast pool of viral proteome peptides. We have earlier reported the peptide binding motif of the porcine MHC-I molecules SLA-1*04:01 and SLA-2*04:01, identified by an ELISA affinity-based positional scanning combinatorial peptide library...

  8. Solvation study of the non-specific lipid transfer protein from wheat by intermolecular NOEs with water and small organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepinsh, Edvards; Sodano, Patrick; Tassin, Severine; Marion, Didier; Vovelle, Francoise; Otting, Gottfried

    1999-01-01

    Intermolecular nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) were measured between the protons of various small solvent or gas molecules and the non-specific lipid transfer protein (ns-LTP) from wheat. Intermolecular NOEs were observed with the hydrophobic pocket in the interior of wheat ns-LTP, which grew in intensity in the order cyclopropane (saturated solution) < methane (140 bar) < ethane (40 bar) < acetonitrile (5% in water) < cyclohexane (saturated solution) < benzene (saturated solution). No intermolecular NOEs were observed with dioxane (5% in water). The intermolecular NOEs were negative for all of the organic molecules tested. Intermolecular NOEs between wheat ns-LTP and water were weak or could not be distinguished from exchange-relayed NOEs. As illustrated by the NOEs with cyclohexane versus dioxane, the hydrophobic pocket in wheat ns-LTP preferably binds non-polar molecules. Yet, polar molecules like acetonitrile can also be accommodated. The pressure dependence of the NOEs between methane and wheat ns-LTP indicated incomplete occupancy, even at 190 bar methane pressure. In general, NOE intensities increased with the size of the ligand molecule and its vapor pressure. NMR of the vapor phase showed excellent resolution between the signals from the gas phase and those from the liquid phase. The vapor concentration of cyclohexane was fivefold higher than that of the dioxane solution, supporting the binding of cyclohexane versus uptake of dioxane

  9. Docking ligands into flexible and solvated macromolecules. 7. Impact of protein flexibility and water molecules on docking-based virtual screening accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, Eric; Weill, Nathanael; Tomberg, Anna; Corbeil, Christopher R; Lee, Devin; Moitessier, Nicolas

    2014-11-24

    The use of predictive computational methods in the drug discovery process is in a state of continual growth. Over the last two decades, an increasingly large number of docking tools have been developed to identify hits or optimize lead molecules through in-silico screening of chemical libraries to proteins. In recent years, the focus has been on implementing protein flexibility and water molecules. Our efforts led to the development of Fitted first reported in 2007 and further developed since then. In this study, we wished to evaluate the impact of protein flexibility and occurrence of water molecules on the accuracy of the Fitted docking program to discriminate active compounds from inactive compounds in virtual screening (VS) campaigns. For this purpose, a total of 171 proteins cocrystallized with small molecules representing 40 unique enzymes and receptors as well as sets of known ligands and decoys were selected from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and the Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD), respectively. This study revealed that implementing displaceable crystallographic or computationally placed particle water molecules and protein flexibility can improve the enrichment in active compounds. In addition, an informed decision based on library diversity or research objectives (hit discovery vs lead optimization) on which implementation to use may lead to significant improvements.

  10. Scattering by bound nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezuka, Hirokazu.

    1984-10-01

    Scattering of a particle by bound nucleons is discussed. Effects of nucleons that are bound in a nucleus are taken as a structure function. The way how to calculate the structure function is given. (author)

  11. Photoluminescence behaviors of single CdSe/ZnS/TOPO nanocrystals: Adsorption effects of water molecules onto nanocrystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Masaru; Hasegawa, Atsushi; Iwami, Noriya; Nishiura, Ken; Ando, Naohisa; Nishiyama, Akira; Horiuchi, Hiromi; Tani, Toshiro

    2007-01-01

    We report here the distinctive modifications of photoluminescence (PL) behaviors in single CdSe/ZnS/TOPO nanocrystals depending on their environments. Long-time traces of PL intensity from single nanocrystals have been obtained in both vacuum and a wet nitrogen atmosphere. While all of the nanocrystals in both environments exhibit PL blinking behaviors, i.e. on-off intermittency of PL intensity, as usual, some of the nanocrystals in the wet nitrogen atmosphere show significant increase in duration time of on-events. As for the duration time of blinking off-events, it is for the moment associated with the occasional events of carrier capturing at trap sites on or near the nanocrystal surfaces. We propose a model in which adsorbed water molecules at the trap sites on the nanocrystal surfaces transform them under light irradiation, which eventually decreases the occurrence of the trapping events due to their inactivation. It in turn increases the PL on-times. In addition to the drastic modification of the blinking profile, we also found that in the PL time traces some kinds of undulated behaviors, i.e. continuous and rather low frequency fluctuation of PL intensity, appear during each on-event in vacuum while they disappear totally in the wet nitrogen atmosphere. These results are also described on the basis of the inactivation model of the trap sites introduced above

  12. Thermodynamic properties of water molecules in the presence of cosolute depend on DNA structure: a study using grid inhomogeneous solvation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Miki; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Tanaka, Shigenori; Tama, Florence; Miyashita, Osamu; Nakano, Shu-ichi; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    In conditions that mimic those of the living cell, where various biomolecules and other components are present, DNA strands can adopt many structures in addition to the canonical B-form duplex. Previous studies in the presence of cosolutes that induce molecular crowding showed that thermal stabilities of DNA structures are associated with the properties of the water molecules around the DNAs. To understand how cosolutes, such as ethylene glycol, affect the thermal stability of DNA structures, we investigated the thermodynamic properties of water molecules around a hairpin duplex and a G-quadruplex using grid inhomogeneous solvation theory (GIST) with or without cosolutes. Our analysis indicated that (i) cosolutes increased the free energy of water molecules around DNA by disrupting water–water interactions, (ii) ethylene glycol more effectively disrupted water–water interactions around Watson–Crick base pairs than those around G-quartets or non-paired bases, (iii) due to the negative electrostatic potential there was a thicker hydration shell around G-quartets than around Watson–Crick-paired bases. Our findings suggest that the thermal stability of the hydration shell around DNAs is one factor that affects the thermal stabilities of DNA structures under the crowding conditions. PMID:26538600

  13. A nonpolar, nonamphiphilic molecule can accelerate adsorption of phospholipids and lower their surface tension at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuc Nghia; Trinh Dang, Thuan Thao; Waton, Gilles; Vandamme, Thierry; Krafft, Marie Pierre

    2011-10-04

    The adsorption dynamics of a series of phospholipids (PLs) at the interface between an aqueous solution or dispersion of the PL and a gas phase containing the nonpolar, nonamphiphilic linear perfluorocarbon perfluorohexane (PFH) was studied by bubble profile analysis tensiometry. The PLs investigated were dioctanoylphosphatidylcholine (DiC(8)-PC), dilaurylphosphatidylcholine, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. The gas phase consisted of air or air saturated with PFH. The perfluorocarbon gas was found to have an unexpected, strong effect on both the adsorption rate and the equilibrium interfacial tension (γ(eq)) of the PLs. First, for all of the PLs, and at all concentrations investigated, the γ(eq) values were significantly lower (by up to 10 mN m(-1)) when PFH was present in the gas phase. The efficacy of PFH in decreasing γ(eq) depends on the ability of PLs to form micelles or vesicles in water. For vesicles, it also depends on the gel or fluid state of the membranes. Second, the adsorption rates of all the PLs at the interface (as assessed by the time required for the initial interfacial tension to be reduced by 30%) are significantly accelerated (by up to fivefold) by the presence of PFH for the lower PL concentrations. Both the surface-tension reducing effect and the adsorption rate increasing effect establish that PFH has a strong interaction with the PL monolayer and acts as a cosurfactant at the interface, despite the absence of any amphiphilic character. Fitting the adsorption profiles of DiC(8)-PC at the PFH-saturated air/aqueous solution interface with the modified Frumkin model indicated that the PFH molecule lay horizontally at the interface. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Inorganics in Organics: Tracking down the Intrinsic Equilibriums between Organic Molecules and Trace Elements in Oceanic Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechtenfeld, O. J.; Koch, B. P.; Kattner, G.

    2010-12-01

    Recent developments in analytical instrumentation enable to describe biogeochemical processes in oceanic waters on a molecular level. This is the prerequisite to integrate biological and geochemical parameters and to develop chemical cycles on a global perspective. The state-of-the-art Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) applications for dissolved organic matter (DOM) focus mainly on carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen isotopes. Implementation of sulfur and especially phosphorus in the molecular formula assignment has been questionable because of ambiguous calculated elemental formulas. On the other hand, many compounds bearing these elements are well known to occur in the dissolved state as part of the permanent recycling processes (e.g. phospholipids, phosphonates) but analytics of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) and sulfur (DOS) are often hampered by the large inorganic P and S pools. Even less is known about complexation characteristics of the DOM moieties. Although electrochemical methods provide some information about trace metal speciation, the high amount of organic molecules and its insufficient description as chemical functional classes prevent the assignment of trace metals to ligand classes. Nevertheless, it is undoubtful that a varying but extensive amount of transition metals is bond in form of organic complexes. Hyphenation of reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) is a valuable tool to study these metal-organic interactions in a qualitative and quantitative approach. We established a desolvation method that allows direct transfer of high organic solvent loads into the plasma. Thus, in combination with internal standardization and external calibration, the investigation of a broad polarity scale was possible. This approach overcomes previous restrictions to non-organic solvent separation techniques like size

  15. Collisional properties of weakly bound heteronuclear dimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis, B.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.; Shlyapnikov, G.V.; Petrov, D.S.

    2008-01-01

    We consider collisional properties of weakly bound heteronuclear molecules (dimers) formed in a two-species mixture of atoms with a large mass difference. We focus on dimers containing light fermionic atoms as they manifest collisional stability due to an effective dimer-dimer repulsion originating

  16. A hot water extract of Curcuma longa inhibits adhesion molecule protein expression and monocyte adhesion to TNF-α-stimulated human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Kengo; Muroyama, Koutarou; Yamamoto, Norio; Murosaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    The recruitment of arterial leukocytes to endothelial cells is an important step in the progression of various inflammatory diseases. Therefore, its modulation is thought to be a prospective target for the prevention or treatment of such diseases. Adhesion molecules on endothelial cells are induced by proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and contribute to the recruitment of leukocytes. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hot water extract of Curcuma longa (WEC) on the protein expression of adhesion molecules, monocyte adhesion induced by TNF-α in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). Treatment of HUVECs with WEC significantly suppressed both TNF-α-induced protein expression of adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion. WEC also suppressed phosphorylation and degradation of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha (IκBα) induced by TNF-α in HUVECs, suggesting that WEC inhibits the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  17. Physical Uncertainty Bounds (PUB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, Diane Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Dean L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-19

    This paper introduces and motivates the need for a new methodology for determining upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulations of engineered systems due to limited fidelity in the composite continuum-level physics models needed to simulate the systems. We show that traditional uncertainty quantification methods provide, at best, a lower bound on this uncertainty. We propose to obtain bounds on the simulation uncertainties by first determining bounds on the physical quantities or processes relevant to system performance. By bounding these physics processes, as opposed to carrying out statistical analyses of the parameter sets of specific physics models or simply switching out the available physics models, one can obtain upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest.

  18. Electron interactions with polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of a number of the features of discrete and continuous spectra of electrons interacting with polar molecules. Attention is focused on the extent to which theoretical predictions concerning cross sections, resonances, and bound states are strongly influenced by the various approximations that are so ubiquitous in the treatment of such problems. Similarly, threshold scattering and photodetachment processes are examined for the case of weakly bound dipole states whose higher members overlap the continuum

  19. Photon virtual bound state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, J.; Ohtaka, K.

    2004-01-01

    We study virtual bound states in photonics, which are a vectorial extension of electron virtual bound states. The condition for these states is derived. It is found that the Mie resonant state which satisfies the condition that the size parameter is less than the angular momentum should be interpreted as a photon virtual bound state. In order to confirm the validity of the concept, we compare the photonic density of states, the width of which represents the lifetime of the photon virtual bound states, with numerical results

  20. The DMM Bound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emiris, Ioannis Z.; Mourrain, Bernard; Tsigaridas, Elias

    2010-01-01

    ) resultant by means of mixed volume, as well as recent advances on aggregate root bounds for univariate polynomials, and are applicable to arbitrary positive dimensional systems. We improve upon Canny's gap theorem [7] by a factor of O(dn-1), where d bounds the degree of the polynomials, and n is the number...... bound on the number of steps that subdivision-based algorithms perform in order to isolate all real roots of a polynomial system. This leads to the first complexity bound of Milne's algorithm [22] in 2D....

  1. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex, E [Brookfield, IL; Klingler, Robert J [Glenview, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL; Diaz, Rocio [Chicago, IL; Vukovic, Lela [Westchester, IL

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  2. The effect of water molecules on the thiol collector interaction on the galena (PbS) and sphalerite (ZnS) surfaces: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Xianhao [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Chen, Ye, E-mail: fby18@126.com [College of Resources and Metallurgy, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Chen, Jianhua, E-mail: jhchen@gxu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); College of Resources and Metallurgy, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Xu, Zhenghe; Liu, Qingxia [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2V4 (Canada); Du, Zheng [National Supercomputing Center in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Water adsorption has a greater effect on the electron distribution of ZnS surface than PbS surface. • Water adsorption decreases the reactivity of ZnS surface atoms but improves that of PbS. • Thiol collectors cannot interact with the hydrated ZnS surface. • The hydration has little influence on the interaction of thiol collectors with PbS surface. - Abstracts: In froth flotation the molecular interaction between reagents and mineral surfaces take place at the solid liquid interface. In this paper, the effect of water molecule on the three typical thiol collectors (xanthate, dithiocarbomate and dithiophosphate) interactions at the galena (PbS) and sphalerite (ZnS) surfaces has been studied adopting density functional theory (DFT). The results suggests that the presence of water molecule shows a greater influence on the electron distribution of ZnS surface than PbS surface, and reduce the reactivity of ZnS surface atoms but improves the reactivity of PbS surface atoms during the reaction with xanthate. Water adsorption could also reduce the covalent binding between Zn and S atoms but have little influence on Pb-S bond. In the presence of water, xanthate, dithiocarbomate (DTC) and dithiophosphate (DTP) could not adsorb on the sphalerite surface. And for galena (PbS) surface, the interaction of DTP is the strongest, then the DTC and the interaction of xanthate is the weakest. These results agree well with the flotation practice.

  3. The Comparative Study of the Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields and Infrasound on Water Molecule Dissociation and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    ISTC Project No. #1592P The Comparative Study of The Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields and Infrasound on Water Molecule...performed under the agreement with the International Science and Technology Center ( ISTC ), Moscow. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704...dissociation and generation of reactive oxygen spaces. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ISTC Registration No: A-1592p 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  4. Site-specific binding of a water molecule to the sulfa drugs sulfamethoxazole and sulfisoxazole: a laser-desorption isomer-specific UV and IR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlemann, Thomas; Seidel, Sebastian; Müller, Christian W

    2018-03-07

    To determine the preferred water molecule binding sites of the polybasic sulfa drugs sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and sulfisoxazole (SIX), we have studied their monomers and monohydrated complexes through laser-desorption conformer-specific UV and IR spectroscopy. Both the SMX and SIX monomer adopt a single conformer in the molecular beam. On the basis of their conformer-specific IR spectra in the NH stretch region, these conformers were assigned to the SMX and SIX global minimum structures, both exhibiting a staggered sulfonamide group and an intramolecular C-HO[double bond, length as m-dash]S hydrogen bond. The SMX-H 2 O and SIX-H 2 O complexes each adopt a single isomer in the molecular beam. Their isomeric structures were determined based on their isomer-specific IR spectra in the NH/OH stretch region. Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules analysis of the calculated electron densities revealed that in the SMX-H 2 O complex the water molecule donates an O-HN hydrogen bond to the heterocycle nitrogen atom and accepts an N-HO hydrogen bond from the sulfonamide NH group. In the SIX-H 2 O complex, however, the water molecule does not bind to the heterocycle but instead donates an O-HO[double bond, length as m-dash]S hydrogen bond to the sulfonamide group and accepts an N-HO hydrogen bond from the sulfonamide NH group. Both water complexes are additionally stabilized by a C ph -HOH 2 hydrogen bond. Interacting Quantum Atoms analysis suggests that all intermolecular hydrogen bonds are dominated by the short-range exchange-correlation contribution.

  5. Bounded Gaussian process regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjørn Sand; Nielsen, Jens Brehm; Larsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We extend the Gaussian process (GP) framework for bounded regression by introducing two bounded likelihood functions that model the noise on the dependent variable explicitly. This is fundamentally different from the implicit noise assumption in the previously suggested warped GP framework. We...... with the proposed explicit noise-model extension....

  6. Bounded Intention Planning Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Sievers Silvan; Wehrle Martin; Helmert Malte

    2014-01-01

    Bounded intention planning provides a pruning technique for optimal planning that has been proposed several years ago. In addition partial order reduction techniques based on stubborn sets have recently been investigated for this purpose. In this paper we revisit bounded intention planning in the view of stubborn sets.

  7. Bounding species distribution models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. STOHLGREN, Catherine S. JARNEVICH, Wayne E. ESAIAS,Jeffrey T. MORISETTE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for “clamping” model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART and maximum entropy (Maxent models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5: 642–647, 2011].

  8. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  9. KETERKAITAN BERBAGAI KONSEP INTERAKSI AIR DALAM PRODUK PANGAN [Interrelation on Water Interaction Concepts in Foods]--Komunikasi Singkat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dede R. Adawiyah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The idea of water interaction with chemicals in the food dry matter or solid was inspired from gas interaction with surface active chemicals, almost a hundred years ago, such as association of gases with active carbon. However, until now the mechanisms and consequences of water molecule associated with chemicals in food solid is still in debate among the food scientists. The concept of water interaction or association with chemicals in the food solid or dry matter was initially introduced as water activity (aw, then in the terminology of “Bound Water”. Water activity concept was further developed by Labuza in 1960s. The concept or idea of glass transition temperature (Tg from Polymers Science discipline was applied to foods in decade of 1980 by Slade & Levine, who denied or negated the earlier concepts of bound water and water activity. In glass transition concept of food products, water functions as a plasticizer related to the textural properties and safety of the products. Knowledge of structure and behaviours of water molecule is required to understand how water interacts or associates with chemicals in food solid. The unique nature of water molecule is a tetrahedral structure with 4 polar angles, which behaves strongly binding or being bound by polar or ionic chemicals in food solid. A number of physicochemical forces act how water molecules interact in complex ways with chemicals in food solid, and the interaction among water molecules in foods. Both types of water interaction lead to the consept of three fractions of bound water as well as to the varities of food characteristics, including preservability and food qualities, either appraisable or unacceptable by consummers. Relationship analyses among various parameter data of associated water in foods such as aw, Me, Tg, and enriched by NMR data, specific weight and specific heat of bound water, indicated that among the different concepts of water interaction in foods were

  10. Deeply bound pionic atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toki, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Toshimitsu

    1989-01-01

    The standard method of pionic atom formation does not produce deeply bound pionic atoms. A study is made on the properties of deeply bound pionic atom states by using the standard pion-nucleus optical potential. Another study is made to estimate the cross sections of the formation of ls pionic atom states by various methods. The pion-nucleus optical potential is determined by weakly bound pionic atom states and pion nucleus scattering. Although this potential may not be valid for deeply bound pionic atoms, it should provide some hint on binding energies and level widths of deeply bound states. The width of the ls state comes out to be 0.3 MeV and is well separated from the rest. The charge dependence of the ls state is investigated. The binding energies and the widths increase linearly with Z azbove a Z of 30. The report then discusses various methods to populate deeply bound pionic atoms. In particular, 'pion exchange' reactions are proposed. (n, pπ) reaction is discussed first. The cross section is calculated by assuming the in- and out-going nucleons on-shell and the produced pion in (n1) pionic atom states. Then, (n, dπ - ) cross sections are estimated. (p, 2 Heπ - ) reaction would have cross sections similar to the cross section of (n, dπ - ) reaction. In conclusion, it seems best to do (n, p) experiment on heavy nuclei for deeply bound pionic atom. (Nogami, K.)

  11. Active-Site Hydration and Water Diffusion in Cytochrome P450cam: A Highly Dynamic Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinglong [ORNL; Baudry, Jerome Y [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (300 ns) are performed on both the apo- (i.e., camphor-free) and camphor-bound cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). Water diffusion into and out of the protein active site is observed without biased sampling methods. During the course of the molecular dynamics simulation, an average of 6.4 water molecules is observed in the camphor-binding site of the apo form, compared to zero water molecules in the binding site of the substrate-bound form, in agreement with the number of water molecules observed in crystal structures of the same species. However, as many as 12 water molecules can be present at a given time in the camphor-binding region of the active site in the case of apo-P450cam, revealing a highly dynamic process for hydration of the protein active site, with water molecules exchanging rapidly with the bulk solvent. Water molecules are also found to exchange locations frequently inside the active site, preferentially clustering in regions surrounding the water molecules observed in the crystal structure. Potential-of-mean-force calculations identify thermodynamically favored trans-protein pathways for the diffusion of water molecules between the protein active site and the bulk solvent. Binding of camphor in the active site modifies the free-energy landscape of P450cam channels toward favoring the diffusion of water molecules out of the protein active site.

  12. Gibbs Free Energy of Hydrolytic Water Molecule in Acyl-Enzyme Intermediates of a Serine Protease: A Potential Application for Computer-Aided Discovery of Mechanism-Based Reversible Covalent Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Yosuke; Yamaotsu, Noriyuki; Hirono, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    In order to predict the potencies of mechanism-based reversible covalent inhibitors, the relationships between calculated Gibbs free energy of hydrolytic water molecule in acyl-trypsin intermediates and experimentally measured catalytic rate constants (k cat ) were investigated. After obtaining representative solution structures by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, hydration thermodynamics analyses using WaterMap™ were conducted. Consequently, we found for the first time that when Gibbs free energy of the hydrolytic water molecule was lower, logarithms of k cat were also lower. The hydrolytic water molecule with favorable Gibbs free energy may hydrolyze acylated serine slowly. Gibbs free energy of hydrolytic water molecule might be a useful descriptor for computer-aided discovery of mechanism-based reversible covalent inhibitors of hydrolytic enzymes.

  13. Exotic helium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portier, M.

    2007-12-01

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 P 0 ) molecule, or a 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 ± 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime τ = (1.4 ± 0.3) μs is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  14. Bounded Rationality and Budgeting

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Mukdad

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the theory of bounded rationality which had been introduced by Herbert Simon in the 1950s. Simon introduced the notion of bounded rationality stating that while decision-makers strive for rationality, they are limited by the effect of the environment, their information process capacity and by the constraints on their information storage and retrieval capabilities. Moreover, this article tries to specifically blend this notion into budgeting, using the foundations of inc...

  15. Virial Expansion Bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Stephen James

    2013-10-01

    In the 1960s, the technique of using cluster expansion bounds in order to achieve bounds on the virial expansion was developed by Lebowitz and Penrose (J. Math. Phys. 5:841, 1964) and Ruelle (Statistical Mechanics: Rigorous Results. Benjamin, Elmsford, 1969). This technique is generalised to more recent cluster expansion bounds by Poghosyan and Ueltschi (J. Math. Phys. 50:053509, 2009), which are related to the work of Procacci (J. Stat. Phys. 129:171, 2007) and the tree-graph identity, detailed by Brydges (Phénomènes Critiques, Systèmes Aléatoires, Théories de Jauge. Les Houches 1984, pp. 129-183, 1986). The bounds achieved by Lebowitz and Penrose can also be sharpened by doing the actual optimisation and achieving expressions in terms of the Lambert W-function. The different bound from the cluster expansion shows some improvements for bounds on the convergence of the virial expansion in the case of positive potentials, which are allowed to have a hard core.

  16. Bound and rebound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orzalesi, C.A.

    1979-01-01

    In relativistic quantum theory, bound states generate forces in the crossed channel; such forces can affect the binding and self-consistent solutions should be sought for the bound-state problem. The author investigates how self-consistency can be achieved by successive approximations, in a simple scalar model and with successive relativistic eikonal approximations (EAs). Within the generalized ladder approximation, some exact properties of the resulting ''first generation'' bound states are discussed. The binding energies in this approximation are rather small even for rather large values of the primary coupling constant. The coupling of the constituent particles to the first-generation reggeon is determined by a suitable EA and a new generalized ladder amplitude is constructed with rungs given either by the primary gluons or by the first-generation reggeons. The resulting new (second-generation) bound states are found in a reggeized EA. The size of the corrections to the binding energies due to the rebinding effects is surprisingly large. The procedure is then iterated, so as to find - again in an EA - the third-generation bound states. The procedure is found to be self-consistent already at this stage: the third-generation bound states coincide with those of second generation, and no further rebinding takes place in the higher iterations of the approximation method. Features - good and bad - of the model are discussed, as well as the possible relevance of rebinding mechanisms in hadron dynamics. (author)

  17. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces. E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 346-356 ...

  18. Phase-Transfer Energetics of Small-Molecule Alcohols Across the Water-Hexane Interface: Molecular Dynamics Simulation Using Charge Equilibration Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Brad A.; Zhong, Yang; Meninger, David J.; Davis, Joseph E.; Patel, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    We study the water-hexane interface using molecular dynamics (MD) and polarizable charge equilibration (CHEQ) force fields. Bulk densities for TIP4P-FQ water and hexane, 1.0086±0.0002 g/cm3 and 0.6378±0.0001 g/cm3, demonstrate excellent agreement with experiment. Interfacial width and interfacial tension are consistent with previously reported values. The in-plane component of the dielectric permittivity (ε∥) for water is shown to decrease from 81.7±0.04 to unity, transitioning longitudinally from bulk water to bulk hexane. ε∥ for hexane reaches a maximum in the interface, but this term represents only a small contribution to the total dielectric constant (as expected for a non-polar species). Structurally, net orientations of the molecules arise in the interfacial region such that hexane lies slightly parallel to the interface and water reorients to maximize hydrogen bonding. Interfacial potentials due to contributions of the water and hexane are calculated to be -567.9±0.13mV and 198.7±0.01mV, respectively, giving rise to a total potential in agreement with the range of values reported from previous simulations of similar systems. Potentials of mean force (PMF) calculated for methanol, ethanol, and 1-propanol for the transfer from water to hexane indicate an interfacial free energy minimum, corresponding to the amphiphilic nature of the molecules. The magnitudes of transfer free energies were further characterized from the solvation free energies of alcohols in water and hexane using thermodynamic integration. This analysis shows that solvation free energies for alcohols in hexane are 0.2-0.3 kcal/mol too unfavorable, whereas solvation of alcohols in water is approximately 1 kcal/mol too favorable. For the pure hexane-water interfacial simulations, we observe a monotonic decrease of the water dipole moment to near-vacuum values. This suggests that the electrostatic component of the desolvation free energy is not as severe for polarizable models than

  19. Dual reorientation relaxation routes of water molecules in oxyanion’s hydration shell: A molecular geometry perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wen Jun; Yang, Yi Isaac; Gao, Yi Qin, E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering and Biodynamic Optical Imaging Center, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we examine how complex ions such as oxyanions influence the dynamic properties of water and whether differences exist between simple halide anions and oxyanions. Nitrate anion is taken as an example to investigate the hydration properties of oxyanions. Reorientation relaxation of its hydration water can occur through two different routes: water can either break its hydrogen bond with the nitrate to form one with another water or switch between two oxygen atoms of the same nitrate. The latter molecular mechanism increases the residence time of oxyanion’s hydration water and thus nitrate anion slows down the translational motion of neighbouring water. But it is also a “structure breaker” in that it accelerates the reorientation relaxation of hydration water. Such a result illustrates that differences do exist between the hydration of oxyanions and simple halide anions as a result of different molecular geometries. Furthermore, the rotation of the nitrate solute is coupled with the hydrogen bond rearrangement of its hydration water. The nitrate anion can either tilt along the axis perpendicularly to the plane or rotate in the plane. We find that the two reorientation relaxation routes of the hydration water lead to different relaxation dynamics in each of the two above movements of the nitrate solute. The current study suggests that molecular geometry could play an important role in solute hydration and dynamics.

  20. Dual reorientation relaxation routes of water molecules in oxyanion’s hydration shell: A molecular geometry perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Wen Jun; Yang, Yi Isaac; Gao, Yi Qin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examine how complex ions such as oxyanions influence the dynamic properties of water and whether differences exist between simple halide anions and oxyanions. Nitrate anion is taken as an example to investigate the hydration properties of oxyanions. Reorientation relaxation of its hydration water can occur through two different routes: water can either break its hydrogen bond with the nitrate to form one with another water or switch between two oxygen atoms of the same nitrate. The latter molecular mechanism increases the residence time of oxyanion’s hydration water and thus nitrate anion slows down the translational motion of neighbouring water. But it is also a “structure breaker” in that it accelerates the reorientation relaxation of hydration water. Such a result illustrates that differences do exist between the hydration of oxyanions and simple halide anions as a result of different molecular geometries. Furthermore, the rotation of the nitrate solute is coupled with the hydrogen bond rearrangement of its hydration water. The nitrate anion can either tilt along the axis perpendicularly to the plane or rotate in the plane. We find that the two reorientation relaxation routes of the hydration water lead to different relaxation dynamics in each of the two above movements of the nitrate solute. The current study suggests that molecular geometry could play an important role in solute hydration and dynamics

  1. The effect of micro-environment on luminescence of aequorin: the role of amino acids and explicit water molecules on spectroscopic properties of coelenteramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuo-Sheng; Zou, Lu-Yi; Min, Chun-Gang; Ren, Ai-Min

    2013-10-05

    Despite the fact that the luminescence reaction mechanism of aequorin has been intensively investigated, details in luminescence such as the effect of important amino acids residues and explicit water molecules on spectroscopic properties of coelenteramide remain unclear. In this work, the effect of amino acids residues His16, Tyr82, Trp86, Phe113, Trp129, Tyr132, explicit water molecules Wat505 and Wat405 on the spectral properties of CLM(-) has been studied by CAM-B3LYP, TD M06L and TD CAM-B3LYP methods in hydrophobic environment and aqueous solution. In hydrophobic environment, the amino acids or water molecules have no significant effect on the absorption. Tyr82 and Trp86 move close to CLM(-) changes the hydrogen bond network, and thus, the spectral properties is significantly affected by the hydrogen bonds between His16H(+)+Tyr82+Trp86 and CLM(-). Tyr82, Trp86 hydrogen bonding to CLM(-) upshifts the excited energy and helps emission spectra shift to blue region. Therefore, it is concluded that His16H(+)+Tyr82+Trp86 modify the emission spectra. The molecular electrostatic potential indicated that the greater electron density is located at the oxygen atom of 6-p-hydroxyphenyl group of CLM(-), and it facilitates the formation of hydrogen bond with His16H(+)+Tyr82+Trp86. It is a critical condition for the modification of emission spectra. It is expected to help to understand the interactions between emitter and amino acids in the micro environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Dynamics of Irreversible Evaporation of a Water-Protein Droplet and a Problem of Structural and Dynamical Experiments with Single Molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaitan, K V; Armeev, G A; Shaytan, A K

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the effect of isothermal and adiabatic evaporation of water on the state of a water-protein droplet. The discussed problem is of current importance due to development of techniques to perform single molecule experiments using free electron lasers. In such structure-dynamic experiments the delivery of a sample into the X-ray beam is performed using the microdroplet injector. The time between the injection and delivery is in the order of microseconds. In this paper we developed a specialized variant of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for the study of irreversible isothermal evaporation of the droplet. Using in silico experiments we determined the parameters of isothermal evaporation of the water-protein droplet with the sodium and chloride ions in the concentration range of 0.3 M at different temperatures. The energy of irreversible evaporation determined from in silico experiments at the initial stages of evaporation virtually coincides with the specific heat of evaporation for water. For the kinetics of irreversible adiabatic evaporation an exact analytical solution was obtained in the limit of high thermal conductivity of the droplet (or up to the droplet size of -100 Å). This analytical solution incorporates parameters that are determined using in silico. experiments on isothermal droplet evaporation. We show that the kinetics of adiabatic evaporation and cooling of the droplet scales with the droplet size. Our estimates of the water-protemi droplet. freezing rate in the adiabatic regime in a vacuum chamber show that additional techniques for stabilizing the temperature inside the droplet should be used in order to study the conformational transitions of the protein in single molecules. Isothermal and quasi-isothermal conditions are most suitable for studying the conformational transitions upon object functioning. However, in this case it is necessary to take into account the effects of dehydration and rapid increase of ionic strength in an

  3. Bounded Tamper Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Faust, Sebastian; Mukherjee, Pratyay

    2013-01-01

    Related key attacks (RKAs) are powerful cryptanalytic attacks where an adversary can change the secret key and observe the effect of such changes at the output. The state of the art in RKA security protects against an a-priori unbounded number of certain algebraic induced key relations, e.......g., affine functions or polynomials of bounded degree. In this work, we show that it is possible to go beyond the algebraic barrier and achieve security against arbitrary key relations, by restricting the number of tampering queries the adversary is allowed to ask for. The latter restriction is necessary......-protocols (including the Okamoto scheme, for instance) are secure even if the adversary can arbitrarily tamper with the prover’s state a bounded number of times and obtain some bounded amount of leakage. Interestingly, for the Okamoto scheme we can allow also independent tampering with the public parameters. We show...

  4. Massive Galileon positivity bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rham, Claudia; Melville, Scott; Tolley, Andrew J.; Zhou, Shuang-Yong

    2017-09-01

    The EFT coefficients in any gapped, scalar, Lorentz invariant field theory must satisfy positivity requirements if there is to exist a local, analytic Wilsonian UV completion. We apply these bounds to the tree level scattering amplitudes for a massive Galileon. The addition of a mass term, which does not spoil the non-renormalization theorem of the Galileon and preserves the Galileon symmetry at loop level, is necessary to satisfy the lowest order positivity bound. We further show that a careful choice of successively higher derivative corrections are necessary to satisfy the higher order positivity bounds. There is then no obstruction to a local UV completion from considerations of tree level 2-to-2 scattering alone. To demonstrate this we give an explicit example of such a UV completion.

  5. Atkins' molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peters

    2003-01-01

    Originally published in 2003, this is the second edition of a title that was called 'the most beautiful chemistry book ever written'. In it, we see the molecules responsible for the experiences of our everyday life - including fabrics, drugs, plastics, explosives, detergents, fragrances, tastes, and sex. With engaging prose Peter Atkins gives a non-technical account of an incredible range of aspects of the world around us, showing unexpected connections, and giving an insight into how this amazing world can be understood in terms of the atoms and molecules from which it is built. The second edition includes dozens of extra molecules, graphical presentation, and an even more accessible and enthralling account of the molecules themselves.

  6. Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  7. Study on the bound water of several high specific surface-area oxides (beryllia, alumina, silica-alumina); Etude de l'eau de constitution de plusieurs oxydes a grande surface specifique (glucine, alumine, silice-alumine)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouquerol, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-11-01

    This study is concerned with the bound water of several oxides (beryllia, alumina, silica-alumina) at different steps of their dehydration (heating temperatures between 150 and 1100 deg. C). The following techniques have been used simultaneously: Thermal analysis (a new method has been developed), nitrogen adsorption (study of the texture), Diborane hydrolysis (qualitative and quantitative analysis of surface water), Infra-red spectrography (in the absorption range of water), Nuclear magnetic resonance (in the resonance range of protons). Thanks to these different techniques, five kinds of bound water have been observed. Attention is called on the great influence of the thermal treatment conditions on the evolution of the products resulting from the decomposition of alumina {alpha}-trihydrate Al(OH){sub 3} and beryllium {alpha}-hydroxide, in the course of the dehydration. Moreover, the author emphasizes the peculiar properties of the two kinds of oxides (alumina and beryllia) prepared through a new method of treatment under low pressure and constant speed of decomposition. Such particular features concern mainly texture, bound water, and consequently, also catalytic activity. (author) [French] Ce travail porte sur l'eau de constitution de plusieurs oxydes (glucine, alumine, silice-alumine) aux differents degres de leur deshydratation (temperatures de traitement comprises entre 150 et 1100 deg. C). Cette etude met simultanement en oeuvre: l'analyse thermique (proposition d'une nouvelle methode), l'adsorption d'azote (etude de texture), l'hydrolyse du diborane (analyse qualitative et quantitative de l'eau de surface), la spectrographie infra-rouge (dans le domaine d'absorption de l'eau), la resonance magnetique nucleaire (dans le domaine de resonance des protons). A l'aide de ces differentes techniques, cinq formes d'eau de constitution ont ete observees. L'attention est attiree sur la tres grande influence

  8. Study on the bound water of several high specific surface-area oxides (beryllia, alumina, silica-alumina); Etude de l'eau de constitution de plusieurs oxydes a grande surface specifique (glucine, alumine, silice-alumine)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouquerol, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-11-01

    This study is concerned with the bound water of several oxides (beryllia, alumina, silica-alumina) at different steps of their dehydration (heating temperatures between 150 and 1100 deg. C). The following techniques have been used simultaneously: Thermal analysis (a new method has been developed), nitrogen adsorption (study of the texture), Diborane hydrolysis (qualitative and quantitative analysis of surface water), Infra-red spectrography (in the absorption range of water), Nuclear magnetic resonance (in the resonance range of protons). Thanks to these different techniques, five kinds of bound water have been observed. Attention is called on the great influence of the thermal treatment conditions on the evolution of the products resulting from the decomposition of alumina {alpha}-trihydrate Al(OH){sub 3} and beryllium {alpha}-hydroxide, in the course of the dehydration. Moreover, the author emphasizes the peculiar properties of the two kinds of oxides (alumina and beryllia) prepared through a new method of treatment under low pressure and constant speed of decomposition. Such particular features concern mainly texture, bound water, and consequently, also catalytic activity. (author) [French] Ce travail porte sur l'eau de constitution de plusieurs oxydes (glucine, alumine, silice-alumine) aux differents degres de leur deshydratation (temperatures de traitement comprises entre 150 et 1100 deg. C). Cette etude met simultanement en oeuvre: l'analyse thermique (proposition d'une nouvelle methode), l'adsorption d'azote (etude de texture), l'hydrolyse du diborane (analyse qualitative et quantitative de l'eau de surface), la spectrographie infra-rouge (dans le domaine d'absorption de l'eau), la resonance magnetique nucleaire (dans le domaine de resonance des protons). A l'aide de ces differentes techniques, cinq formes d'eau de constitution ont ete observees. L'attention est attiree sur la tres grande influence des conditions de traitement thermique sur l'evolution des

  9. Hydrophobic fluorine mediated switching of the hydrogen bonding site as well as orientation of water molecules in the aqueous mixture of monofluoroethanol: IR, molecular dynamics and quantum chemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Saptarsi; Biswas, Biswajit; Nandy, Tonima; Singh, Prashant Chandra

    2017-09-20

    The local structures between water-water, alcohol-water and alcohol-alcohol have been investigated for aqueous mixtures of ethanol (ETH) and monofluoroethanol (MFE) by the deconvolution of IR bands in the OH stretching region, molecular dynamics simulation and quantum chemical calculations. It has been found that the addition of a small amount of ETH into the aqueous medium increases the strength of the hydrogen bonds between water molecules. In an aqueous mixture of MFE, the substitution of a single fluorine induces a change in the orientation as well as the hydrogen bonding site of water molecules from the oxygen to the fluorine terminal of MFE. The switching of the hydrogen bonding site of water in the aqueous mixture of MFE results in comparatively strong hydrogen bonds between MFE and water molecules as well as less clustering of water molecules, unlike the case of the aqueous mixture of ETH. These findings about the modification of a hydrogen bond network by the hydrophobic fluorine group probably make fluorinated molecules useful for pharmaceutical as well as biological applications.

  10. Symposium report: the Waters Bioanalysis World Tour: the broadening impact and future of the DMPK laboratory--addressing large-molecule therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vooght-Johnson, Ryan

    2011-03-01

    An evening symposium was held at the Museu de Historia de Catalunya (Barcelona, Spain) as a precursor to the European Bioanalysis Forum meeting, as part of the Waters Corporation Bioanalysis World Tour. The symposium was chaired by Robert Plumb and Jing Lin (Waters Corporation, MA, USA) with a focus on the future of the DMPK laboratory and its role in addressing large-molecule therapeutics and biomarkers. Lieve Dillen (Johnson and Johnson, Belgium) spoke on ultra-sensitive peptide quantification, Richard Kay (Quotient Bioresearch, UK) discussed quantifying proteins and peptides in plasma, Ian Wilson (AstraZeneca, UK) covered metabolic biomarkers and Robert Plumb concluded the evening with a presentation on the future of MS in DMPK studies. Following the presentations, all the speakers took questions from the audience and continued lively discussion over a cocktails and canapés reception.

  11. In-situ X-ray diffraction reveals the degradation of crystalline CH3NH3PbI3 by water-molecule collisions at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Masaki; Hasegawa, Yoichi; Nagaoka, Ryota; Miyake, Tomoya; Abdullaev, Ulugbek; Ota, Hiromi; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yoshifumi; Hayashi, Yasuhiko

    2018-02-01

    We have developed a vacuum-compatible chamber for in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies and have used it to characterize the changing crystal structure of an inorganic-organic hybrid perovskite material, CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3), during interactions with water vapor at room temperature. In the XRD spectra, we have observed the degradation of MAPbI3 and the creation of MAPbI3 hydrates, which follow simple rate equations. The time constant for the degradation of MAPbI3 during accelerated aging suggests that multiple collisions of water molecules with the MAPbI3 crystal trigger the degradation of the crystal.

  12. Ligand uptake in Mycobacterium tuberculosis truncated hemoglobins is controlled by both internal tunnels and active site water molecules [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Boron

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis, has two proteins belonging to the truncated hemoglobin (trHb family. Mt-trHbN presents well-defined internal hydrophobic tunnels that allow O2 and •ŸNO to migrate easily from the solvent to the active site, whereas Mt-trHbO possesses tunnels interrupted by a few bulky residues, particularly a tryptophan at position G8. Differential ligand migration rates allow Mt-trHbN to detoxify Ÿ•NO, a crucial step for pathogen survival once under attack by the immune system, much more efficiently than Mt-trHbO. In order to investigate the differences between these proteins, we performed experimental kinetic measurements, Ÿ•NO decomposition, as well as molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type Mt-trHbN and two mutants, VG8F and VG8W. These mutations affect both the tunnels accessibility as well as the affinity of distal site water molecules, thus modifying the ligand access to the iron. We found that a single mutation allows Mt-trHbN to acquire ligand migration rates comparable to those observed for Mt-trHbO, confirming that ligand migration is regulated by the internal tunnel architecture as well as by water molecules stabilized in the active site.

  13. Bounded variation and around

    CERN Document Server

    Appell, Jürgen; Merentes Díaz, Nelson José

    2013-01-01

    This monographis a self-contained exposition of the definition and properties of functionsof bounded variation and their various generalizations; the analytical properties of nonlinear composition operators in spaces of such functions; applications to Fourier analysis, nonlinear integral equations, and boundary value problems. The book is written for non-specialists. Every chapter closes with a list of exercises and open problems.

  14. Correlation between mechanical behavior of protein films at the air/water interface and intrinsic stability of protein molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, A.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Bos, M.A.; Vliet, T. van

    2005-01-01

    The relation between mechanical film properties of various adsorbed protein layers at the air/water interface and intrinsic stability of the corresponding proteins is discussed. Mechanical film properties were determined by surface deformation in shear and dilation. In shear, fracture stress, σf,

  15. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  16. Production and characterization of protonated molecular clusters containing a given number of water molecules with the DIAM set-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruny, G.

    2010-01-01

    nano-scale characterization of irradiation in bio-molecular systems requires observation of novel features which are now achievable with the recent technical progress. This work is a central part in the development of DIAM which is a new experimental set-up devoted to irradiation of bio-molecular clusters at the Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon. The development of the cluster source and of a double focusing mass spectrometer leads to the production of intense beams of mass selected protonated molecular clusters. Combined with this mass selected cluster beams an innovative detection technique is demonstrated in collision induced dissociation experiments. The results contribute to the knowledge of the stability and the structure of the small protonated water clusters and mixed clusters of water and pyridine. (author)

  17. Ab initio calculations of dissociative excitation of water and methane molecules upon electron impact at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, T.J.; McCurdy, C.W.; Rescigno, T.N.; Lengsfield, B.H. III

    1994-01-01

    The authors are reporting results of ab-initio calculations of electron-impact excitation of water and methane occurring at scattering energies up to 60 eV. The authors consider dissociative excited states of both systems since the understanding of their chemistry has considerable importance in plasma technology and atmospheric research. In the case of methane the authors are dealing with the promotion of a valence electron into Rydberg orbitals, while in water the excited states have one electron in an antibonding unoccupied valence orbital and support Feshbach resonances. The authors discuss issues related to convergence of the close-coupling expansion in the case of Rydberg excitation, where the authors have coupled up to 16 channels. The practical realization of the calculation within the framework of the complex Kohn variational principle represents merging of quantum chemistry and quantum scattering theory and is also discussed

  18. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  19. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule Matters - Dinitrogen. A G Samuelson J Jabadurai. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Author Affiliations. A G Samuelson1 J Jabadurai1. Department of Inroganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  20. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Molecule Matters - A Chromium Compound with a Quintuple Bond. K C Kumara Swamy. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 72-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Diatomic molecules in ultracold Fermi gases - Novel composite bosons

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov, D. S.; Salomon, C.; Shlyapnikov, G. V.

    2005-01-01

    We give a brief overview of recent studies of weakly bound homonuclear molecules in ultracold two-component Fermi gases. It is emphasized that they represent novel composite bosons, which exhibit features of Fermi statistics at short intermolecular distances. In particular, Pauli exclusion principle for identical fermionic atoms provides a strong suppression of collisional relaxation of such molecules into deep bound states. We then analyze heteronuclear molecules which are expected to be for...

  2. Maps of Bounded Rationality

    OpenAIRE

    Kahneman, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The work cited by the Nobel committee was done jointly with the late Amos Tversky (1937-1996) during a long and unusually close collaboration. Together, we explored the psychology of intuitive beliefs and choices and examined their bounded rationality. This essay presents a current perspective on the three major topics of our joint work: heuristics of judgment, risky choice, and framing effects. In all three domains we studied intuitions - thoughts and preferences that come to mind quickly an...

  3. Bounded Satisfiability for PCTL

    OpenAIRE

    Bertrand, Nathalie; Fearnley, John; Schewe, Sven

    2012-01-01

    While model checking PCTL for Markov chains is decidable in polynomial-time, the decidability of PCTL satisfiability, as well as its finite model property, are long standing open problems. While general satisfiability is an intriguing challenge from a purely theoretical point of view, we argue that general solutions would not be of interest to practitioners: such solutions could be too big to be implementable or even infinite. Inspired by bounded synthesis techniques, we turn to the more appl...

  4. A comparison of the mechanisms of photooxidative degradation of organic molecules on irradiated semiconductor powders and in aerated supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Marye Anne [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-08-01

    It is the purpose of this paper to survey evidence that suggests that control of the local environment is important in both heterogeneous TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis and in thermal oxidation reactions taking place in supercritical fluids, i.e. that the expected influences of these very different methods for microcompartmentalization do indeed influence the observed reaction kinetics in an easily observable way. Variations in reaction kinetics and the photophysical properties are described for (1) small semiconductor clusters, including their altered photocatalytic activity in and on inert supports; and (2) molecular probes dispersed within the self-aggregating clusters formed within supercritical water

  5. Sorption Characteristics of Mixed Molecules of Glutaraldehyde from Water on Mesoporous Acid-Amine Modified Low-Cost Activated Carbon: Mechanism, Isotherm, and Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukosha Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The environmental discharge of inefficiently treated waste solutions of the strong biocide glutaraldehyde (GA from hospitals has potential toxic impact on aquatic organisms. The adsorption characteristics of mixed polarized monomeric and polymeric molecules of GA from water on mesoporous acid-amine modified low-cost activated carbon (AC were investigated. It was found that the adsorption strongly depended on pH and surface chemistry. In acidic pH, the adsorption mechanism was elaborated to involve chemical sorption of mainly hydroxyl GA monomeric molecules on acidic surface groups, while in alkaline pH, the adsorption was elaborated to involve both chemical and physical sorption of GA polymeric forms having mixed functional groups (aldehyde, carboxyl, and hydroxyl on acidic and amine surface groups. The optimum pH of adsorption was about 12 with significant contribution by cooperative adsorption, elucidated in terms of hydrogen bonding and aldol condensation. Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models were fitted to isotherm data. The adsorption kinetics was dependent on initial concentration and temperature and described by the Elovich model. The adsorption was endothermic, while the intraparticle diffusion model suggested significant contribution by film diffusion. The developed low-cost AC could be used to supplement the GA alkaline deactivation process for efficient removal of residual GA aquatic toxicity.

  6. Fabrication of PLA/CaCO3 hybrid micro-particles as carriers for water-soluble bioactive molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtseva, Valeriya L; Zhao, Li; Tverdokhlebov, Sergei I; Sukhorukov, Gleb B

    2017-09-01

    We propose the use of polylactic acid/calcium carbonate (PLA/CaCO 3 ) hybrid micro-particles for achieving improved encapsulation of water-soluble substances. Biodegradable porous CaCO 3 microparticles can be loaded with wide range of bioactive substance. Thus, the formation of hydrophobic polymeric shell on surface of these loaded microparticles results on encapsulation and, hence, sealing internal cargo and preventing their release in aqueous media. In this study, to encapsulate proteins, we explore the solid-in-oil-in-water emulsion method for fabricating core/shell PLA/CaCO 3 systems. We used CaCO 3 particles as a protective core for encapsulated bovine serum albumin, which served as a model protein system. We prepared a PLA coating using dichloromethane as an organic solvent and polyvinyl alcohol as a surfactant for emulsification; in addition, we varied experimental parameters such as surfactant concentration and polymer-to-CaCO 3 ratio to determine their effect on particle-size distribution, encapsulation efficiency and capsule permeability. The results show that the particle size decreased and the size distribution narrowed as the surfactant concentration increased in the external aqueous phase. In addition, when the CaCO 3 /PLA mass ratio dropped below 0.8, the hybrid micro-particles were more likely to resist treatment by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and thus retained their bioactive cargos within the polymer-coated micro-particles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Formation of the prebiotic molecule NH2CHO on astronomical amorphous solid water surfaces: accurate tunneling rate calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lei; Kästner, Johannes

    2016-10-26

    Investigating how formamide forms in the interstellar medium is a hot topic in astrochemistry, which can contribute to our understanding of the origin of life on Earth. We have constructed a QM/MM model to simulate the hydrogenation of isocyanic acid on amorphous solid water surfaces to form formamide. The binding energy of HNCO on the ASW surface varies significantly between different binding sites, we found values between ∼0 and 100 kJ mol -1 . The barrier for the hydrogenation reaction is almost independent of the binding energy, though. We calculated tunneling rate constants of H + HNCO → NH 2 CO at temperatures down to 103 K combining QM/MM with instanton theory. Tunneling dominates the reaction at such low temperatures. The tunneling reaction is hardly accelerated by the amorphous solid water surface compared to the gas phase for this system, even though the activation energy of the surface reaction is lower than the one of the gas-phase reaction. Both the height and width of the barrier affect the tunneling rate in practice. Strong kinetic isotope effects were observed by comparing to rate constants of D + HNCO → NHDCO. At 103 K we found a KIE of 231 on the surface and 146 in the gas phase. Furthermore, we investigated the gas-phase reaction NH 2 + H 2 CO → NH 2 CHO + H and found it unlikely to occur at cryogenic temperatures. The data of our tunneling rate constants are expected to significantly influence astrochemical models.

  8. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  9. Tar removal from biosyngas in the biomass gasification process. (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium {water + solvent (paraxylene and methyl hexadecanoate) + model molecules of tar (benzene, toluene, phenol)}

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassil, Georgio; Mokbel, Ilham; Abou Naccoul, Ramy; Stephan, Juliette; Jose, Jacques; Goutaudier, Christelle

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► (Liquid + liquid) equilibria at atmospheric pressure. ► Solubility of benzene (or toluene or phenol) in paraxylene at (303 to 343) K. ► Solubility of benzene (or toluene or phenol) in methyl palmitate or methyl hexadecanoate at (303 to 343) K. ► Correlation of LLE using NRTL model. - Abstract: Tar is generated in the process by the condensation of the gas resulting from biomass gasification. The objective of this work is a contribution to the database on thermodynamic quantity which will be useful at the operation of tar removal from aqueous medium. With this aim, (liquid + liquid) equilibrium of {water + solvent (paraxylene and methyl hexadecanoate) + model molecules of tar (benzene, toluene, phenol)} was studied at temperatures (303.2, 323.2, and 343.2) K. The data obtained were correlated with the non-random two-liquid (NRTL) model.

  10. Emission spectra of the species ablated from a solid target submerged in liquid: vibrational temperature of C2 molecules in water-confined geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakka, Tetsuo; Saito, Kotaro; Ogata, Yukio H.

    2002-01-01

    Emission spectra of C 2 molecules produced at the water-graphite interface by pulsed laser irradiation were obtained at various delay times from the irradiation. Vibrational temperature was determined by the Boltzmann plot based on the vibrational bands in Δν=-1 branch of the Swan system. The results show that it was ca. 5000 K and did not change significantly with the delay time. With increasing the delay time up to ca. 500 ns the signal from the Swan band disappeared before the decrease of the vibrational temperature. The results were explained by the formation of a gas cavity and its collapse at several hundreds of nanoseconds from the laser pulse

  11. The organically bound tritium: an analyst vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoborlo, E.; Baglan, N.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report the work of a work group on tritium analysis. They recall the different physical forms of tritium: gas (HT, hydrogen-tritium), water vapour (HTO or tritiated water) or methane (CH3T), but also in organic compounds (OBT, organically bound tritium) which are either exchangeable or non-exchangeable. They evoke measurement techniques and methods, notably to determine the tritium volume activity. They discuss the possibilities to analyse and distinguish exchangeable and non-exchangeable OBTs

  12. Universal bounds on current fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C; Seifert, Udo

    2016-05-01

    For current fluctuations in nonequilibrium steady states of Markovian processes, we derive four different universal bounds valid beyond the Gaussian regime. Different variants of these bounds apply to either the entropy change or any individual current, e.g., the rate of substrate consumption in a chemical reaction or the electron current in an electronic device. The bounds vary with respect to their degree of universality and tightness. A universal parabolic bound on the generating function of an arbitrary current depends solely on the average entropy production. A second, stronger bound requires knowledge both of the thermodynamic forces that drive the system and of the topology of the network of states. These two bounds are conjectures based on extensive numerics. An exponential bound that depends only on the average entropy production and the average number of transitions per time is rigorously proved. This bound has no obvious relation to the parabolic bound but it is typically tighter further away from equilibrium. An asymptotic bound that depends on the specific transition rates and becomes tight for large fluctuations is also derived. This bound allows for the prediction of the asymptotic growth of the generating function. Even though our results are restricted to networks with a finite number of states, we show that the parabolic bound is also valid for three paradigmatic examples of driven diffusive systems for which the generating function can be calculated using the additivity principle. Our bounds provide a general class of constraints for nonequilibrium systems.

  13. A bound on chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldacena, Juan [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ (United States); Shenker, Stephen H. [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Stanford University,382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford, Douglas [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-08-17

    We conjecture a sharp bound on the rate of growth of chaos in thermal quantum systems with a large number of degrees of freedom. Chaos can be diagnosed using an out-of-time-order correlation function closely related to the commutator of operators separated in time. We conjecture that the influence of chaos on this correlator can develop no faster than exponentially, with Lyapunov exponent λ{sub L}≤2πk{sub B}T/ℏ. We give a precise mathematical argument, based on plausible physical assumptions, establishing this conjecture.

  14. selective excitation of vibrational modes of polyatomic molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Mode-selective dynamics of triatomic molecule in the electronic ground state under continuous wave laser pulse is investigated for the discrete vibrational bound states. A non-perturbative approach has been used to analyse the vibrational couplings and dynamics of the molecule. Keywords. Polyatomic molecule ...

  15. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging reveals the effects of different cooling temperatures on the diffusion of water molecules and perfusion within human skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, O.; Fukubayashi, T.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of local cooling on the diffusion of water molecules and perfusion within muscle at different cooling temperatures. Materials and methods: Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted (DW) images of the leg (seven males) were obtained before and after 30 min cooling (0, 10, and 20 o C), and after a 30 min recovery period. Two types of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC; ADC1, reflecting both water diffusion and perfusion within muscle, and ADC2, approximating the true water diffusion coefficient) of the ankle dorsiflexors were calculated from DW images. T2-weighted images were also obtained to calculate T2 values of the ankle dorsiflexors. The skin temperature was measured before, during, and after cooling. Results: Both ADC values significantly decreased after cooling under all cooling conditions; the rate of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used (ADC1: -36% at 0 o C, -27.8% at 10 o C, and -22.6% at 20 o C; ADC2: -26% at 0 o C, -21.1% at 10 o C, and -14.6% at 20 o C). These significant decreases were maintained during the recovery period. Conversely, the T2 value showed no significant changes. Under all cooling conditions, skin temperature significantly decreased during cooling; the rate of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used (-74.8% at 0 o C, -51.1% at 10 o C, and -26.8% at 20 o C). Decreased skin temperatures were not restored to pre-cooling values during the recovery period under any cooling conditions. Conclusion: Local cooling decreased the water diffusion and perfusion within muscle with decreased skin temperature; the rates of decrease depended on the cooling temperature used. These decreases were maintained for 30 min after cooling.

  16. Ethanol oxidation reactions catalyzed by water molecules: CH3CH2OH+n H2O→ CH3CHO+ H2+n H2O (n=0,1,2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H.; Hisaoka, S.; Nitta, T.

    2002-09-01

    Ab initio density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate the catalytic role of water molecules in the oxidation reaction of ethanol: CH3CH2OH+n H2O→ CH3CHO+ H2+n H2O (n=0,1,2) . The results show that the potential energy barrier for the reaction is 88.0 kcal/mol in case of n=0, while it is reduced by ˜34 kcal/mol when two water molecules are involved ( n=2) in the reaction. As a result, the rate constant increases to 3.31×10 -4 s-1, which shows a significant catalytic role of water molecules in the ethanol oxidation reactions.

  17. PHOTOCHEMISTRY IN THE INNER LAYERS OF CLUMPY CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVELOPES: FORMATION OF WATER IN C-RICH OBJECTS AND OF C-BEARING MOLECULES IN O-RICH OBJECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agundez, Marcelino; Cernicharo, Jose; Guelin, Michel

    2010-01-01

    A mechanism based on the penetration of interstellar ultraviolet photons into the inner layers of clumpy circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) around asymptotic giant branch stars is proposed to explain the non-equilibrium chemistry observed in such objects. We show through a simple modeling approach that in CSEs with a certain degree of clumpiness or with moderately low mass loss rates (a few 10 -7 M sun yr -1 ) a photochemistry can take place in the warm and dense inner layers, inducing important changes in the chemical composition. In carbon-rich objects water vapor and ammonia would be formed with abundances of 10 -8 -10 -6 relative to H 2 , while in oxygen-rich envelopes ammonia and carbon-bearing molecules such as HCN and CS would form with abundances of 10 -9 -10 -7 relative to H 2 . The proposed mechanism would explain the recent observation of warm water vapor in the carbon-rich envelope IRC+10216 with the Herschel Space Observatory and predict that H 2 O should be detectable in other carbon-rich objects.

  18. Observation of pendular butterfly Rydberg molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederprüm, Thomas; Thomas, Oliver; Eichert, Tanita; Lippe, Carsten; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H.; Ott, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    Engineering molecules with a tunable bond length and defined quantum states lies at the heart of quantum chemistry. The unconventional binding mechanism of Rydberg molecules makes them a promising candidate to implement such tunable molecules. A very peculiar type of Rydberg molecules are the so-called butterfly molecules, which are bound by a shape resonance in the electron–perturber scattering. Here we report the observation of these exotic molecules and employ their exceptional properties to engineer their bond length, vibrational state, angular momentum and orientation in a small electric field. Combining the variable bond length with their giant dipole moment of several hundred Debye, we observe counter-intuitive molecules which locate the average electron position beyond the internuclear distance. PMID:27703143

  19. Analysis of the organically bound tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baglan, N.; Alanic, G.

    2011-01-01

    In environmental samples, tritium is very often combined with the fraction of bulk water accumulated in the sample but also in the form of organically bound tritium. When the tritium is organically bound, 2 forms can coexist: the exchangeable fraction and the non-exchangeable fraction. The analysis of the different forms of tritium present in the sample is necessary to assess the sanitary hazards due to tritium. The total tritium is obtained from the analysis of the water released when the fresh sample is burnt while the organically bound tritium is obtained from the analysis of the water released when the dry extract of the sample is burnt. The measurement of the exchangeable fraction and the non-exchangeable fraction requires an additional stage of labile exchange. The exchangeable fraction is determined from the analysis of the water released during the labile exchange and the non-exchangeable fraction is determined from the water released during the combustion of the dry extract of the labile exchange

  20. Anion binding by biotin[6]uril in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisbjerg, Micke; Nielsen, Bjarne Enrico; Milhøj, Birgitte Olai

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution we show that the newly discovered 6 + 6 biotin-formaldehyde macrocycle Biotin[6]uril binds a variety of anionic guest molecules in water. We discuss how and why the anions are bound based on data obtained using NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, isothermal titration...

  1. Relativistic bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, Burke

    2006-01-01

    The Hamiltonian for Dirac's second-order equation depends nonlinearly on the potential V and the energy E. For this reason the magnetic contribution to the Hamiltonian for s-waves, which has a short range, is attractive for a repulsive Coulomb potential (V>0) and repulsive for an attractive Coulomb potential (V 2 . Usually solutions are found in the regime E=mc 2 +ε , where except for high Z, ε 2 . Here it is shown that for V>0 the attractive magnetic term and the linear repulsive term combine to support a bound state near E=0.5mc 2 corresponding to a binding energy E b =-ε =0.5mc 2

  2. Structure and dynamics of weakly bound complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skouteris, D.

    1998-01-01

    The present thesis deals with the spectroscopic and theoretical investigation of weakly bound complexes involving a methane molecule. Studies of these Van der Waals complexes can give valuable information on the relevant intermolecular dynamics and promote the understanding of the interactions between molecules (which can ultimately lead to chemical reactions). Especially interesting are complexes involving molecules of high symmetry (e.g. tetrahedral, such as methane) because of the unusual effects arising from it (selection rules, nuclear Spin statistical weights etc.). The infrared spectrum of the Van der Waals complex between a CH 4 and a N 2 O molecule has been recorded and most of it has been assigned in the region of the N - O stretch (approximately 2225.0 cm -1 ). Despite the fact that this is really a weakly bound complex, it is nevertheless rigid enough so that the standard model for asymmetric top spectra can be applied to it with the usual quantum numbers. From the value of the inertial defect, it turns out that the methane unit is locked in a rigid configuration within the complex rather than freely rotating. The intermolecular distance as well as the tilting angle of the N 2 O linear unit are determined from the rotational constants. The complex itself turns out to have a T - shaped configuration. The infrared spectrum of the Ar - CH 4 complex at the ν 4 (bending) band of methane is also assigned. This is different from the previous one in that the methane unit rotates almost freely Within the complex. As a result, the quantum numbers used to classify rovibrational energy levels include these of the free unit. The concept of 'overall symmetry' is made use of to rationalise selection rules in various sub-bands of the spectrum. Moreover, new terms in the potential anisotropy Hamiltonian are calculated through the use of the overall symmetry concept. These are termed 'mixed anisotropy' terms since they involve both rotational and vibrational degrees of

  3. Understanding water: Molecular dynamics simulations of solubilized and crystallized myoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Gu; Garcia, A.E.; Schoenborn, B.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on CO myoglobin to evaluate the stability of the bound water molecules as determined in a neutron diffraction analysis. The myoglobin structure derived from the neutron analysis provided the starting coordinate set used in the simulations. The simulations show that only a few water molecules are tightly bound to protein atoms, while most solvent molecules are labile, breaking and reforming hydrogen bonds. Comparison between myoglobin in solution and in a single crystal highlighted some of the packing effects on the solvent structure and shows that water solvent plays an indispensable role in protein dynamics and structural stability. The described observations explain some of the differences in the experimental results of protein hydration as observed in NMR, neutron and X-ray diffraction studies.

  4. Understanding water: Molecular dynamics simulations of solubilized and crystallized myoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Gu; Garcia, A.E.; Schoenborn, B.P.

    1994-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on CO myoglobin to evaluate the stability of the bound water molecules as determined in a neutron diffraction analysis. The myoglobin structure derived from the neutron analysis provided the starting coordinate set used in the simulations. The simulations show that only a few water molecules are tightly bound to protein atoms, while most solvent molecules are labile, breaking and reforming hydrogen bonds. Comparison between myoglobin in solution and in a single crystal highlighted some of the packing effects on the solvent structure and shows that water solvent plays an indispensable role in protein dynamics and structural stability. The described observations explain some of the differences in the experimental results of protein hydration as observed in NMR, neutron and X-ray diffraction studies

  5. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 12 December 2009 pp 1210-1222 ...

  6. Molecular Properties by Quantum Monte Carlo: An Investigation on the Role of the Wave Function Ansatz and the Basis Set in the Water Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Andrea; Luo, Ye; Sorella, Sandro; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods are accurate and promising many body techniques for electronic structure calculations which, in the last years, are encountering a growing interest thanks to their favorable scaling with the system size and their efficient parallelization, particularly suited for the modern high performance computing facilities. The ansatz of the wave function and its variational flexibility are crucial points for both the accurate description of molecular properties and the capabilities of the method to tackle large systems. In this paper, we extensively analyze, using different variational ansatzes, several properties of the water molecule, namely, the total energy, the dipole and quadrupole momenta, the ionization and atomization energies, the equilibrium configuration, and the harmonic and fundamental frequencies of vibration. The investigation mainly focuses on variational Monte Carlo calculations, although several lattice regularized diffusion Monte Carlo calculations are also reported. Through a systematic study, we provide a useful guide to the choice of the wave function, the pseudopotential, and the basis set for QMC calculations. We also introduce a new method for the computation of forces with finite variance on open systems and a new strategy for the definition of the atomic orbitals involved in the Jastrow-Antisymmetrised Geminal power wave function, in order to drastically reduce the number of variational parameters. This scheme significantly improves the efficiency of QMC energy minimization in case of large basis sets. PMID:24526929

  7. Bounding approaches to system identification

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, John; Piet-Lahanier, Hélène; Walter, Éric

    1996-01-01

    In response to the growing interest in bounding error approaches, the editors of this volume offer the first collection of papers to describe advances in techniques and applications of bounding of the parameters, or state variables, of uncertain dynamical systems. Contributors explore the application of the bounding approach as an alternative to the probabilistic analysis of such systems, relating its importance to robust control-system design.

  8. Market access through bound tariffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sala, Davide; Yalcin, Erdal; Schröder, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    on the risk that exporters face in destination markets. The present paper formalizes the underlying interaction of risk, fixed export costs and firms' market entry decisions based on techniques known from the real options literature; doing so we highlight the important role of bound tariffs at the extensive...... margin of trade. We find that bound tariffs are more effective with higher risk destination markets, that a large binding overhang may still command substantial market access, and that reductions in bound tariffs generate effective market access even when bound rates are above current and longterm...

  9. Market Access through Bound Tariffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sala, Davide; Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Yalcin, Erdal

    on the risk that exporters face in destination markets. The present paper formalizes the underlying interaction of risk, fixed export costs and firms' market entry decisions based on techniques known from the real options literature; doing so we highlight the important role of bound tariffs at the extensive...... margin of trade. We find that bound tariffs are more effective with higher risk destination markets, that a large binding overhang may still command substantial market access, and that reductions in bound tariffs generate effective market access even when bound rates are above current and long...

  10. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  11. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  12. Quivers of Bound Path Algebras and Bound Path Coalgebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Intan Muchtadi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available bras and coalgebras can be represented as quiver (directed graph, and from quiver we can construct algebras and coalgebras called path algebras and path coalgebras. In this paper we show that the quiver of a bound path coalgebra (resp. algebra is the dual quiver of its bound path algebra (resp. coalgebra.

  13. Hangman Catalysis for Photo–and Photoelectro–Chemical Activation of Water Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanisms of Small Molecule Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocera, Daniel G. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-03-15

    The weakest link for the large-scale deployment of solar energy and for that matter, any renewable energy source, is its storage. The energy needs of future society demands are so large that storage must be in the form of fuels owing to their high energy density. Indeed, society has intuitively understood this disparity in energy density as it has developed over the last century as all large-scale energy storage in our society is in the form of fuels. But these fuels are carbon-based. The imperative for the discipline of chemistry, and more generally science, is to develop fuel storage methods that are easily scalable, carbon-neutral and sustainable. These methods demand the creation of catalysts to manage the multi-electron, multi-proton transformations of the conversion of small molecules into fuels. The splitting of water using solar light is a fuel-forming reaction that meets the imperative of large scale energy storage. As light does not directly act on water to engender its splitting into its elemental components, we have designed “hangman” catalysts to effect the energy conversion processes needed for the fuel forming reactions. The hangman construct utilizes a pendant acid/base functionality within the secondary coordination sphere that is “hung” above the redox platform onto which substrate binds. In this way, we can precisely control the delivery of a proton to the substrate, thus ensuring efficient coupling between the proton and electron. An emphasis was on the coupling of electron and proton in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) on Ni, Co and Fe porphyrin platforms. Electrokinetic rate laws were developed to define the proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism. The HER of Co and Fe porphyrins was metal-centered. Surprisingly, HER this was not the case for Ni porphyrins. In this system, the PCET occurred at the porphyrin platform to give rise to a phlorin. This is one of the first examples of an HER occurring via ligand non

  14. Size exclusion and anion exchange high performance liquid chromatography for characterizing metals bound to marine dissolved organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Otero, Natalia; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fractionation methods for assessing metals bound to marine DOM were developed. ► SEC and AEC with UV detection and hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry were used. ► SEC-UV showed marine DOM of molecular weights from 16 to 1 kDa. ► Cobalt, manganese, strontium and zinc are bound to marine DOM. - Abstract: Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) followed by anion exchange chromatography (AEC) hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was applied for fractionating metals bound to marine dissolved organic matter (DOM). Surface seawater samples (100 L) were subjected to tangential flow ultrafiltration (10,000 Da cut off) for isolating and pre-concentrating dissolved large molecules. The isolated fraction (retentate) consisted of 1 L, which was further freeze-dried and re-dissolved to 250 mL with ultrapure water. After HI Trap desalting of the re-dissolved retentate, SEC with UV detection showed marine DOM ranging from 6.5 kDa (lower than the permeable volume of the SEC column) to 16 kDa. A further characterization of this fraction by AEC with UV detection revealed the existence of four groups of macromolecules exhibiting retention times of 2.3, 2.8, 4.5 and 14.0 min. AEC hyphenated with ICP-MS showed the presence of strontium and zinc in the first AE fraction isolated from the SEC fraction; while manganese was found to be bound to the second AE fraction. Cobalt was found to be bound to molecules comprising the third AE fraction.

  15. Bounds for Asian basket options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deelstra, Griselda; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vanmaele, Michèle

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we propose pricing bounds for European-style discrete arithmetic Asian basket options in a Black and Scholes framework. We start from methods used for basket options and Asian options. First, we use the general approach for deriving upper and lower bounds for stop-loss premia of sums of non-independent random variables as in Kaas et al. [Upper and lower bounds for sums of random variables, Insurance Math. Econom. 27 (2000) 151-168] or Dhaene et al. [The concept of comonotonicity in actuarial science and finance: theory, Insurance Math. Econom. 31(1) (2002) 3-33]. We generalize the methods in Deelstra et al. [Pricing of arithmetic basket options by conditioning, Insurance Math. Econom. 34 (2004) 55-57] and Vanmaele et al. [Bounds for the price of discrete sampled arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 185(1) (2006) 51-90]. Afterwards we show how to derive an analytical closed-form expression for a lower bound in the non-comonotonic case. Finally, we derive upper bounds for Asian basket options by applying techniques as in Thompson [Fast narrow bounds on the value of Asian options, Working Paper, University of Cambridge, 1999] and Lord [Partially exact and bounded approximations for arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Finance 10 (2) (2006) 1-52]. Numerical results are included and on the basis of our numerical tests, we explain which method we recommend depending on moneyness and time-to-maturity.

  16. Product differentiation under bounded rationality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, B.; Poutré, La J.A.; Kok, de A.G.; Pyka, A.; Handa, H.; Ishibuchi, H.; Ong, Y.-S.; Tan, K.-C.

    2015-01-01

    We study product differentiation equilibria and dynamics on the Salop circle under bounded rationality. Due to bounded rationality, firms tend to agglomerate in pairs. Upon adding a second tier of component suppliers, downstream assemblers may escape pairwise horizontal agglomeration. Moreover, we

  17. Tapping mode AFM study on the surface dynamics of a single glucose oxidase molecule on a Au(1 1 1) surface in water with implication for a surface-induced unfolding pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Ichiro; Yaoita, Masashi; Higano, Michi; Nagashima, Seiiichi; Kataoka, Ryoichi

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated a surface-induced unfolding dynamics of a single glucose oxidase (GO) molecule on Au(1 1 1) in air-saturated water, using tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM). We followed the unfolding process by measuring the maximum height of a well-isolated GO molecule on a terrace near a step-edge of the surface as a function of contact time. We find three linear portions with two intersections in a power-law fit to the selected values of the observed heights. The kinetic TMAFM result implies that there exist at least two distinct dynamic regimes in the unfolding

  18. Augmented-plane-wave calculations on small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serena, P.A.; Baratoff, A.; Soler, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    We have performed ab initio calculations on a wide range of small molecules, demonstrating the accuracy and flexibility of an alternative method for calculating the electronic structure of molecules, solids, and surfaces. It is based on the local-density approximation (LDA) for exchange and correlation and the nonlinear augmented-plane-wave method. Very accurate atomic forces are obtained directly. This allows for implementation of Car-Parrinello-like techniques to determine simultaneously the self-consistent electron wave functions and the equilibrium atomic positions within an iterative scheme. We find excellent agreement with the best existing LDA-based calculations and remarkable agreement with experiment for the equilibrium geometries, vibrational frequencies, and dipole moments of a wide variety of molecules, including strongly bound homopolar and polar molecules, hydrogen-bound and electron-deficient molecules, and weakly bound alkali and noble-metal dimers, although binding energies are overestimated

  19. In-situ quartz crystal microgravimetric studies of molecular adsorbates containing thiol and hydroquinone moieties bound to Au(111) surfaces in aqueous electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Y.; Sukenik, C.; Sandifer, M. [Case Western Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Barriga, R.J.; Soriaga, M.P.; Scherson, D. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The microgravimetric properties of monolayers of 2, 5-dihydroxythiophenol, 2,5-dihydroxybenzyl mercaptan, and 2, 5-dihydroxy-4-methylbenzyl mercaptan adsorbed on Au(111) single crystal electrodes were examined by in situ quartz crystal microbalance techniques in aqueous perchloric acid electrolytes. The results obtained are consistent with the reversible loss of an average of about three waters per adsorbed molecule as the layers are oxidized and subsequently reduced. These observations provide evidence for discrete changes in the extent of bound water within the hydroquinone/quinone layer as the oxidation state of the monolayer is changed. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Stability of matter-antimatter molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Lee, Teck-Ghee

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We examine stability of matter-antimatter molecules with four constituents. → The binding of matter-antimatter molecules is a common phenomenon. → Molecules have bound states if ratio of constituent masses greater than ∼4. → We evaluate molecular binding energies and annihilation lifetimes. - Abstract: We examine the stability of matter-antimatter molecules by reducing the four-body problem into a simpler two-body problem with residual interactions. We find that matter-antimatter molecules with constituents (m 1 + ,m 2 - ,m-bar 2 + ,m-bar 1 - ) possess bound states if their constituent mass ratio m 1 /m 2 is greater than about 4. This stability condition suggests that the binding of matter-antimatter molecules is a rather common phenomenon. We evaluate the binding energies and eigenstates of matter-antimatter molecules (μ + e - )-(e + μ - ),(π + e - )-(e + π - ),(K + e - )-(e + K - ),(pe - )-(e + p-bar),(pμ - )-(μ + p-bar), and (K + μ - ) - (μ + K - ), which satisfy the stability condition. We estimate the molecular annihilation lifetimes in their s states.

  1. Curvature bound from gravitational catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gies, Holger; Martini, Riccardo

    2018-04-01

    We determine bounds on the curvature of local patches of spacetime from the requirement of intact long-range chiral symmetry. The bounds arise from a scale-dependent analysis of gravitational catalysis and its influence on the effective potential for the chiral order parameter, as induced by fermionic fluctuations on a curved spacetime with local hyperbolic properties. The bound is expressed in terms of the local curvature scalar measured in units of a gauge-invariant coarse-graining scale. We argue that any effective field theory of quantum gravity obeying this curvature bound is safe from chiral symmetry breaking through gravitational catalysis and thus compatible with the simultaneous existence of chiral fermions in the low-energy spectrum. With increasing number of dimensions, the curvature bound in terms of the hyperbolic scale parameter becomes stronger. Applying the curvature bound to the asymptotic safety scenario for quantum gravity in four spacetime dimensions translates into bounds on the matter content of particle physics models.

  2. Combining Alphas via Bounded Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zura Kakushadze

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We give an explicit algorithm and source code for combining alpha streams via bounded regression. In practical applications, typically, there is insufficient history to compute a sample covariance matrix (SCM for a large number of alphas. To compute alpha allocation weights, one then resorts to (weighted regression over SCM principal components. Regression often produces alpha weights with insufficient diversification and/or skewed distribution against, e.g., turnover. This can be rectified by imposing bounds on alpha weights within the regression procedure. Bounded regression can also be applied to stock and other asset portfolio construction. We discuss illustrative examples.

  3. Improved Range Searching Lower Bounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green; Nguyen, Huy L.

    2012-01-01

    by constructing a hard input set and query set, and then invoking Chazelle and Rosenberg's [CGTA'96] general theorem on the complexity of navigation in the pointer machine. For the group model, we show that input sets and query sets that are hard for range reporting in the pointer machine (i.e. by Chazelle...... and Rosenberg's theorem), are also hard for dynamic range searching in the group model. This theorem allows us to reuse decades of research on range reporting lower bounds to immediately obtain a range of new group model lower bounds. Amongst others, this includes an improved lower bound for the fundamental...

  4. Tunneling Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Jens Søren Sieg

    2016-01-01

    When a molecule is subject to a strong laser field, there is a probability that an electron can escape, even though the electrons are bound by a large potential barrier. This is possible because electrons are quantum mechanical in nature, and they are therefore able to tunnel through potential...... barriers, an ability classical particles do not possess. Tunnelling is a fundamental quantum mechanical process, a process that is distinctly non-classical, so solving this tunnelling problem is not only relevant for molecular physics, but also for quantum theory in general. In this dissertation the theory...... of tunneling ionizaion of molecules is presented and the results of numerical calculations are shown. One perhaps surprising result is, that the frequently used Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down for weak fields when describing tunneling ionization. An analytic theory applicable in the weak-field limit...

  5. Molecular dynamics study of the solvation of calcium carbonate in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneval, Fabien; Donadio, Davide; Parrinello, Michele

    2007-10-25

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations of diluted solutions of calcium carbonate in water. To this end, we combined and tested previous polarizable models. The carbonate anion forms long-living hydrogen bonds with water and shows an amphiphilic character, in which the water molecules are expelled in a region close to its C(3) symmetry axis. The calcium cation forms a strongly bound ion pair with the carbonate. The first hydration shell around the CaCO(3) pair is found to be very similar to the location of the water molecules surrounding CaCO(3) in ikaite, the hydrated mineral.

  6. Channels with ordered water and bipyridine molecules in the porous coordination polymer {[Cu(SiF6(C10H8N22]·2C10N2H8·5H2O}n

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Aubert

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The coordination polymer {[Cu(SiF6(C10H8N22]·2C10H8N2·5H2O}n, systematic name: poly[[bis(μ2-4,4′-bipyridine(μ2-hexafluoridosilicatocopper(II] 4,4′-bipyridine disolvate pentahydrate], contains pores which are filled with water and 4,4′-bipyridine molecules. As a result of the presence of these ordered species, the framework changes its symmetry from P4/mmm to P21/c. The 4,4′-bipyridine guest molecules form chains inside the 6.5 × 6.9 Å pores parallel to [100] in which the molecules interact through π–π stacking. Ordered water molecules form infinite hydrogen-bonded chains inside a second pore system (1.6 × 5.3 Å free aperture perpendicular to the 4,4′-bipyridine channels.

  7. Bound states in string nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Marc Daniel; Dusuel, Sébastien; Vidal, Julien

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the emergence of bound states in the low-energy spectrum of the string-net Hamiltonian in the presence of a string tension. In the ladder geometry, we show that a single bound state arises either for a finite tension or in the zero-tension limit depending on the theory considered. In the latter case, we perturbatively compute the binding energy as a function of the total quantum dimension. We also address this issue in the honeycomb lattice where the number of bound states in the topological phase depends on the total quantum dimension. Finally, the internal structure of these bound states is analyzed in the zero-tension limit.

  8. On functions of bounded semivariation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Monteiro, Giselle Antunes

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 2 (2015), s. 233-276 ISSN 0147-1937 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : semivariation * functions of bounded variation * regulated functions Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://projecteuclid.org/euclid.rae/1491271216

  9. Computational Lower Bounds Using Diagonalization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 7. Computational Lower Bounds Using Diagonalization - Languages, Turing Machines and Complexity Classes. M V Panduranga Rao. General Article Volume 14 Issue 7 July 2009 pp 682-690 ...

  10. Rhodamine B in dissolved and nano-bound forms: Indicators for light-based advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabat-Hadas, Efrat; Mamane, Hadas; Gitis, Vitaly

    2017-10-01

    Rhodamine B (RhB) is a water-soluble fluorescent dye that is often used to determine flux and flow direction in biotechnological and environmental applications. In the current research, RhB in soluble (termed free) and virus-bound (termed nano-bound) forms was used as an efficiency indicator for three environmental processes. The degradation of free and nano-bound RhB by (i) direct UV photolysis and (ii) UV/H 2 O 2 advanced oxidation process (AOP) was studied in a collimated beam apparatus equipped with medium-pressure mercury vapor lamp. The degradation by (iii) solar light-induced photocatalysis was studied in a solar simulator with titanium dioxide and bismuth photocatalysts. Results showed negligible RhB degradation by direct UV and solar light, and its nearly linear degradation by UV/H 2 O 2 and photocatalysis/photosensitization in the presence of a solid catalyst. Considerable adsorption of free RhB on bismuth-based catalyst vs. no adsorption of nano-bound RhB on this catalyst or of any form of the dye on titanium dioxide produced two important conclusions. First, the better degradation of free RhB by the bismuth catalyst suggests that close proximity of a catalyst hole and the decomposing molecule significantly influences degradation. Second, the soluble form of the dye might not be the best option for its use as an indicator. Nano-bound RhB showed high potential as an AOP indicator, featuring possible separation from water after the analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 15 Issue 7 July 2010 pp 667-674. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  12. Isotopic exchange of carbon-bound hydrogen over geologic timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, Alex L.; Sylva, Sean P.; Summons, Roger E.; Hayes, John M.

    2004-04-01

    The increasing popularity of compound-specific hydrogen isotope (D/H) analyses for investigating sedimentary organic matter raises numerous questions about the exchange of carbon-bound hydrogen over geologic timescales. Important questions include the rates of isotopic exchange, methods for diagnosing exchange in ancient samples, and the isotopic consequences of that exchange. This article provides a review of relevant literature data along with new data from several pilot studies to investigate such issues. Published experimental estimates of exchange rates between organic hydrogen and water indicate that at warm temperatures (50-100°C) exchange likely occurs on timescales of 104 to 108 yr. Incubation experiments using organic compounds and D-enriched water, combined with compound-specific D/H analyses, provide a new and highly sensitive method for measuring exchange at low temperatures. Comparison of δD values for isoprenoid and n-alkyl carbon skeletons in sedimentary organic matter provides no evidence for exchange in young (exchange in ancient (>350 Ma) rocks. Specific rates of exchange are probably influenced by the nature and abundance of organic matter, pore-water chemistry, the presence of catalytic mineral surfaces, and perhaps even enzymatic activity. Estimates of equilibrium fractionation factors between organic H and water indicate that typical lipids will be depleted in D relative to water by ∼75 to 140‰ at equilibrium (30°C). Thus large differences in δD between organic molecules and water cannot be unambiguously interpreted as evidence against hydrogen exchange. A better approach may be to use changes in stereochemistry as a proxy for hydrogen exchange. For example, estimated rates of H exchange in pristane are similar to predicted rates for stereochemical inversion in steranes and hopanes. The isotopic consequences of this exchange remain in question. Incubations of cholestene with D2O indicate that the number of D atoms incorporated during

  13. Detecting high-density ultracold molecules using atom–molecule collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jun-Ren; Kao, Cheng-Yang; Chen, Hung-Bin; Liu, Yi-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing single-photon photoassociation, we have achieved ultracold rubidium molecules with a high number density that provides a new efficient approach toward molecular quantum degeneracy. A new detection mechanism for ultracold molecules utilizing inelastic atom–molecule collision is demonstrated. The resonant coupling effect on the formation of the X 1 Σ + g ground state 85 Rb 2 allows for a sufficient number of more deeply bound ultracold molecules, which induced an additional trap loss and heating of the co-existing atoms owing to the inelastic atom–molecule collision. Therefore, after the photoassociation process, the ultracold molecules can be investigated using the absorption image of the ultracold rubidium atoms mixed with the molecules in a crossed optical dipole trap. The existence of the ultracold molecules was then verified, and the amount of accumulated molecules was measured. This method detects the final produced ultracold molecules, and hence is distinct from the conventional trap loss experiment, which is used to study the association resonance. It is composed of measurements of the time evolution of an atomic cloud and a decay model, by which the number density of the ultracold 85 Rb 2 molecules in the optical trap was estimated to be >5.2 × 10 11 cm −3 . (paper)

  14. Analysis of experimental positron-molecule binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, J R; Surko, C M; Young, J A

    2010-01-01

    Experiments show that positron annihilation on molecules frequently occurs via capture into vibrational Feshbach resonances. In these cases, the downshifts in the annihilation spectra from the vibrational mode spectra provide measures of the positron-molecule binding energies. An analysis of these binding energy data is presented in terms of the molecular dipole polarizability, the permanent dipole moment, and the number of π bonds in aromatic molecules. The results of this analysis are in reasonably good agreement with other information about positron-molecule bound states. Predictions for other targets and promising candidate molecules for further investigation are discussed.

  15. Protein-bound toxins: added value in their removal with high convective volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Soraya; Vega, Almudena; Quiroga, Borja; Arroyo, David; Panizo, Nayara; Reque, Javier Eduardo; López-Gómez, Juan Manuel

    Chronic kidney disease is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. In recent years, protein-bound toxins have become more important due to their association with increased morbidity and mortality, characterised by inadequate clearance during dialysis. The purpose of this study is to assess the influence of high convective volumes on postdilution online haemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) on the removal of medium-sized molecules, small molecules and protein-bound molecules. In forty postdilutional OL-HDF sessions, the reduction rates of toxins of different molecular weights were measured in 13 patients, including protein-bound molecules such as p-cresyl sulphate, indoxyl sulphate and homocysteine. Total convective volume was 28.3 (5.1) litres (range 16.3-38.0 litres). Mean reduction rate of protein-bound molecules was 44.4% (15.7%), 48.7% (14.1%) and 58.6% (8.8%) for p-cresyl sulphate, indoxyl sulphate and homocysteine, respectively. Moreover, a statistically significant direct association was found between the reduction rates of all three molecules, the replacement volume and the Kt/V. High convective volumes during postdilution OL-HDF are associated with increased removal of protein-bound uraemic toxins. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Simulation bounds for system availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietjen, G.L.; Waller, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    System availability is a dominant factor in the practicality of nuclear power electrical generating plants. A proposed model for obtaining either lower bounds or interval estimates on availability uses observed data on ''n'' failure-to-repair cycles of the system to estimate the parameters in the time-to-failure and time-to-repair models. These estimates are then used in simulating failure/repair cycles of the system. The availability estimate is obtained for each of 5000 samples of ''n'' failure/repair cycles to form a distribution of estimates. Specific percentile points of those simulated distributions are selected as lower simulation bounds or simulation interval bounds for the system availability. The method is illustrated with operational data from two nuclear plants for which an exponential time-to-failure and a lognormal time-to-repair are assumed

  17. Relativistic bound state wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micu, L.

    2005-01-01

    A particular method of writing the bound state wave functions in relativistic form is applied to the solutions of the Dirac equation with confining potentials in order to obtain a relativistic description of a quark antiquark bound system representing a given meson. Concerning the role of the effective constituent in the present approach we first observe that without this additional constituent we couldn't expand the bound state wave function in terms of products of free states. Indeed, we notice that if the wave function depends on the relative coordinates only, all the expansion coefficients would be infinite. Secondly we remark that the effective constituent enabled us to give a Lorentz covariant meaning to the potential energy of the bound system which is now seen as the 4th component of a 4-momentum. On the other side, by relating the effective constituent to the quantum fluctuations of the background field which generate the binding, we provided a justification for the existence of some spatial degrees of freedom accompanying the interaction potential. These ones, which are quite unusual in quantum mechanics, in our model are the natural consequence of the the independence of the quarks and can be seen as the effect of the imperfect cancellation of the vector momenta during the quantum fluctuations. Related with all these we remark that the adequate representation for the relativistic description of a bound system is the momentum representation, because of the transparent and easy way of writing the conservation laws and the transformation properties of the wave functions. The only condition to be fulfilled is to find a suitable way to take into account the potential energy of the bound system. A particular feature of the present approach is that the confining forces are due to a kind of glue where both quarks are embedded. This recalls other bound state models where the wave function is factorized in terms of constituent wave functions and the confinement is

  18. Four-quark bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouzou, S.

    1986-01-01

    In the framework of simple non-relativistic potential models, we examine the system consisting of two quarks and two antiquarks with equal or unequal masses. We search for possible bound states below the threshold for the spontaneous dissociation into two mesons. We solve the four body problem by empirical or systematic variational methods and we include the virtual meson-meson components of the wave function. With standard two-body potentials, there is no proliferation of multiquarks. With unequal quark masses, we obtain however exotic (anti Qanti Qqq) bound states with a baryonic antidiquark-quark-quark structure very analogous to the heavy flavoured (Q'qq) baryons. (orig.)

  19. Bound entanglement and local realism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszlikowski, Dagomir; Zukowski, Marek; Gnacinski, Piotr

    2002-01-01

    We show using a numerical approach, which gives necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of local realism, that the bound entangled state presented in Bennett et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 5385 (1999)] admits a local and realistic description. We also find the lowest possible amount of some appropriate entangled state that must be ad-mixed to the bound entangled state so that the resulting density operator has no local and realistic description and as such can be useful in quantum communication and quantum computation

  20. Determination of total, and bound Se in sera by INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spate, V.L.; Mason, M.M.; Reams, C.L.; Baskett, C.K.; Morris, J.S.; Mills, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    The comparison between the total selenium in serum ('total Se') with that which is apparently bound to high molecular weight (> 12.000 D) species, presumably proteins ('bound Se') was reported. Nine hundred seventy seven (977) serum samples arising out of a population-based epidemiological study were prepared in duplicate for the determination of 'total Se' by pipeting directly into irradiation vials; and separate duplicate aliquots were dialyzed against DI water for the determination of 'bound Se'. All samples were analyzed by neutron activation analysis via 77m Se (17.4s) A small dialyzable Se component (∼ 6%) ('free Se'), defined as the difference between the 'total Se' minus the 'bound Se', was identified. (author) 2 refs.; 3 figs.; 5 tabs

  1. Hadronic molecules with hidden charm and bottom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Feng-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the new structures observed since 2003 in experiments in the heavy quarkonium mass region, such as the X(3872 and Zc (3900, are rather close to certain thresholds, and thus can be good candidates of hadronic molecules, which are loose bound systems of hadrons. We will discuss the consequences of heavy quark symmetry for hadronic molecules with heavy quarks. We will also emphasize that the hadronic molecular component of a given structure can be directly probed in long-distance processes, while the short-distance processes are not sensitive to it.

  2. Physical state of poorly water soluble therapeutic molecules loaded into SBA-15 ordered mesoporous silica carriers: a case study with itraconazole and ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellaerts, Randy; Jammaer, Jasper A G; Van Speybroeck, Michiel; Chen, Hong; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick; Van den Mooter, Guy; Martens, Johan A

    2008-08-19

    The ordered mesoporous silica material SBA-15 was loaded with the model drugs itraconazole and ibuprofen using three different procedures: (i) adsorption from solution, (ii) incipient wetness impregnation, and (iii) heating of a mixture of drug and SBA-15 powder. The location of the drug molecules in the SBA-15 particles and molecular interactions were investigated using nitrogen adsorption, TGA, DSC, DRS UV-vis, and XPS. The in vitro release of hydrophobic model drugs was evaluated in an aqueous environment simulating gastric fluid. The effectiveness of the loading method was found to be strongly compound dependent. Incipient wetness impregnation using a concentrated itraconazole solution in dichloromethane followed by solvent evaporation was most efficient for dispersing itraconazole in SBA-15. The itraconazole molecules were located on the mesopore walls and inside micropores of the mesopore walls. When SBA-15 was loaded by slurrying it in a diluted itraconazole solution from which the solvent was evaporated, the itraconazole molecules ended up in the mesopores that they plugged locally. At a loading of 30 wt %, itraconazole exhibited intermolecular interactions inside the mesopores revealed by UV spectroscopy and endothermic events traced with DSC. The physical mixing of itraconazole and SBA-15 powder followed by heating above the itraconazole melting temperature resulted in formulations in which glassy itraconazole particles were deposited externally on the SBA-15 particles. Loading with ibuprofen was successful with each of the three loading procedures. Ibuprofen preferably is positioned inside the micropores. In vitro release experiments showed fast release kinetics provided the drug molecules were evenly deposited over the mesoporous surface.

  3. Semiclassical bounds in magnetic bottles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barseghyan, Diana; Exner, Pavel; Kovařík, H.; Weidl, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2016), s. 1650002 ISSN 0129-055X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-06818S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : magnetic Laplacian * discrete spectrum * eigenvalue bounds Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.426, year: 2016

  4. Positivity bounds for Sivers functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Zhongbo; Soffer, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    We generalize a positivity constraint derived initially for parity-conserving processes to the parity-violating ones, and use it to derive non-trivial bounds on several Sivers functions, entering in the theoretical description of single spin asymmetry for various processes.

  5. Bound states of 'dressed' particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirokov, M.I.

    1994-01-01

    A new approach to the problem of bound states in relativistic quantum field theories is suggested. It uses the creation - destruction operators of 'dresses' particles which have been granted by Faddeev's (1963) 'dressing' formalism. Peculiarities of the proposed approach as compared to the known ones are discussed. 8 refs. (author)

  6. Quantum lower bound for sorting

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Yaoyun

    2000-01-01

    We prove that \\Omega(n log(n)) comparisons are necessary for any quantum algorithm that sorts n numbers with high success probability and uses only comparisons. If no error is allowed, at least 0.110nlog_2(n) - 0.067n + O(1) comparisons must be made. The previous known lower bound is \\Omega(n).

  7. Unconditional lower bounds against advice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buhrman, H.; Fortnow, L.; Santhanam, R.

    2009-01-01

    We show several unconditional lower bounds for exponential time classes against polynomial time classes with advice, including: (1) For any constant c, NEXP not in P^{NP[n^c]} (2) For any constant c, MAEXP not in MA/n^c (3) BPEXP not in BPP/n^{o(1)}. It was previously unknown even whether NEXP in

  8. Binding energies of two deltas bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Saito, Koichi.

    1982-06-01

    Bound states of the two-deltas system are investigated by employing the realistic one boson exchange potential. It is found that there exist many bound states in each isospin channel and also found that the tensor interaction plays important role in producing these bound states. Relationship between these bound states and dibaryon resonances is discussed. (J.P.N.)

  9. Universal quantum dot-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules using portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Liping; Zhu, Anna; Lou, Xuening; Song, Dan; Yang, Rong; Shi, Hanchang; Long, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A universal sandwich-like immunoassay strategy based on quantum-dots immunoprobe (QD-labeled anti-mouse IgG antibody) was developed for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules. A portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform was applied to investigate the sandwich-like immunoassay mechanism and format of small molecules, as well as the binding kinetics between QD immunoprobe and anti-small molecule antibody. A two-step immunoassay method that involves pre-incubation mixture of different concentration of small molecule and anti-small molecule antibody, and subsequent introduction of QD immunoprobe into the optofluidic cell was conducted for small molecule determination. Compared with the one-step immunoassay method, the two-step immunoassay method can obtain higher fluorescence signal and higher sensitivity index, thus improving the nano-biosensing performance. Based on the proposed strategy, two mode targets, namely, microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and Bisphenol A (BPA) were tested with high sensitivity, rapidity, and ease of use. A higher concentration of small molecules in the sample led to less anti-small molecule antibody bound with antigen-carrier protein conjugate immobilized onto the sensor surface, and less QD immunoprobes bound with anti-small molecule antibody. This phenomenon lowered the fluorescence signal detected by nano-biosensing platform. Under optimal operating conditions, MC-LR and BPA exhibited a limit of detection of 0.003 and 0.04 μg/L, respectively. The LODs were better than those of the indirect competitive immunoassay method for small molecules via Cy5.5-labeled anti-small molecule antibody. The proposed QD-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy was evaluated in spiked water samples, and showed good recovery, precision and accuracy without complicated sample pretreatments. All these results demonstrate that the new detection strategy could be readily applied to the other trace small molecules in real water samples

  10. Universal quantum dot-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules using portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Liping; Zhu, Anna; Lou, Xuening; Song, Dan; Yang, Rong [School of Environment and Natural Resources, Renmin University of China, Beijing (China); Shi, Hanchang [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Long, Feng, E-mail: longf04@ruc.edu.cn [School of Environment and Natural Resources, Renmin University of China, Beijing (China)

    2016-01-28

    A universal sandwich-like immunoassay strategy based on quantum-dots immunoprobe (QD-labeled anti-mouse IgG antibody) was developed for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of small molecules. A portable and reusable optofluidic nano-biosensing platform was applied to investigate the sandwich-like immunoassay mechanism and format of small molecules, as well as the binding kinetics between QD immunoprobe and anti-small molecule antibody. A two-step immunoassay method that involves pre-incubation mixture of different concentration of small molecule and anti-small molecule antibody, and subsequent introduction of QD immunoprobe into the optofluidic cell was conducted for small molecule determination. Compared with the one-step immunoassay method, the two-step immunoassay method can obtain higher fluorescence signal and higher sensitivity index, thus improving the nano-biosensing performance. Based on the proposed strategy, two mode targets, namely, microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and Bisphenol A (BPA) were tested with high sensitivity, rapidity, and ease of use. A higher concentration of small molecules in the sample led to less anti-small molecule antibody bound with antigen-carrier protein conjugate immobilized onto the sensor surface, and less QD immunoprobes bound with anti-small molecule antibody. This phenomenon lowered the fluorescence signal detected by nano-biosensing platform. Under optimal operating conditions, MC-LR and BPA exhibited a limit of detection of 0.003 and 0.04 μg/L, respectively. The LODs were better than those of the indirect competitive immunoassay method for small molecules via Cy5.5-labeled anti-small molecule antibody. The proposed QD-based sandwich-like immunoassay strategy was evaluated in spiked water samples, and showed good recovery, precision and accuracy without complicated sample pretreatments. All these results demonstrate that the new detection strategy could be readily applied to the other trace small molecules in real water samples

  11. A gadolinium(III) complex of a carboxylic-phosphorus acid derivative of diethylenetriamine covalently bound to inulin, a potential macromolecular MRI contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebdusková, Petra; Kotek, Jan; Hermann, Petr; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N; Lukes, Ivan; Peters, Joop A

    2004-01-01

    A novel conjugate of a polysaccharide and a Gd(III) chelate with potential as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was synthesized. The structure of the chelate was derived from H5DTPA by replacing the central pendant arm by a phosphinic acid functional group, which was covalently bound to the polysaccharide inulin. On the average, each monosaccharide unit of the inulin was attached to approximately one (0.9) chelate moiety. The average molecular weight is 23110 and the average number of Gd3+ ions per molecule is 24. The ligand binds the Gd3+ ion in an octadentate fashion via three nitrogen atoms, four carboxylate oxygen atoms, and one P-O oxygen atom, and its first coordination sphere is completed by a water molecule. This compound shows promising properties for application as a contrast agent for MRI thanks to a favorable residence lifetime of this water molecule (170 ns at 298 K), a relatively long rotational correlation time (866 ps at 298 K), and the presence of two water molecules in the second coordination sphere of the Gd3+ ion. Furthermore, its stability toward transmetalation with Zn(II) is as high as that of the clinically used [Gd(DTPA)(H2O)]2-.

  12. A symmetric Roos bound for linear codes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duursma, I.M.; Pellikaan, G.R.

    2006-01-01

    The van Lint–Wilson AB-method yields a short proof of the Roos bound for the minimum distance of a cyclic code. We use the AB-method to obtain a different bound for the weights of a linear code. In contrast to the Roos bound, the role of the codes A and B in our bound is symmetric. We use the bound

  13. Ligand Depot: a data warehouse for ligands bound to macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zukang; Chen, Li; Maddula, Himabindu; Akcan, Ozgur; Oughtred, Rose; Berman, Helen M; Westbrook, John

    2004-09-01

    Ligand Depot is an integrated data resource for finding information about small molecules bound to proteins and nucleic acids. The initial release (version 1.0, November, 2003) focuses on providing chemical and structural information for small molecules found as part of the structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. Ligand Depot accepts keyword-based queries and also provides a graphical interface for performing chemical substructure searches. A wide variety of web resources that contain information on small molecules may also be accessed through Ligand Depot. Ligand Depot is available at http://ligand-depot.rutgers.edu/. Version 1.0 supports multiple operating systems including Windows, Unix, Linux and the Macintosh operating system. The current drawing tool works in Internet Explorer, Netscape and Mozilla on Windows, Unix and Linux.

  14. An albumin-fixed membrane for the removal of protein-bound toxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Dongtao; Wu Dewang; Shi Wei; Ma Yuanyuan; Tian Xiangdong; Liang Pengfei; Zhang Qiqing

    2006-01-01

    Established methods for kidney dialysis do not work for liver failure because kidney dialysis removes only water-soluble toxins, while the liver normally removes albumin-bound toxins. In the present study, a polysulfone dialysis membrane with a -OH reactive group was prepared by hydrolyzing the chloromethylated polysulfone membrane, and the bovine serum albumin molecules were fixed into the membrane with 1,1'-carbonyldiimidazole activation. The content of albumin of the albumin-fixed membrane was 121.3 mg (g membrane) -1 . The albumin-fixed dialysis membranes were used to remove protein-bound toxins, bilirubin, from the bilirubin-albumin solution. The transfer rate of bilirubin of the albumin-fixed membrane was obviously higher compared to the normal dialysis membrane. The clearance of bilirubin with the albumin-fixed membrane was 49.8%. The albumin-fixed membrane can easily be regenerated by the bovine serum albumin and NaOH solution. Regeneration of the membrane suggested good mechanical and chemical stability, as well as good clearance of bilirubin. In addition, the effects of membrane thickness and bilirubin initial concentration on the removal of bilirubin were discussed

  15. Continuous adsorption and biotransformation of micropollutants by granular activated carbon-bound laccase in a packed-bed enzyme reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Luong N; Hai, Faisal I; Dosseto, Anthony; Richardson, Christopher; Price, William E; Nghiem, Long D

    2016-06-01

    Laccase was immobilized on granular activated carbon (GAC) and the resulting GAC-bound laccase was used to degrade four micropollutants in a packed-bed column. Compared to the free enzyme, the immobilized laccase showed high residual activities over a broad range of pH and temperature. The GAC-bound laccase efficiently removed four micropollutants, namely, sulfamethoxazole, carbamazepine, diclofenac and bisphenol A, commonly detected in raw wastewater and wastewater-impacted water sources. Mass balance analysis showed that these micropollutants were enzymatically degraded following adsorption onto GAC. Higher degradation efficiency of micropollutants by the immobilized compared to free laccase was possibly due to better electron transfer between laccase and substrate molecules once they have adsorbed onto the GAC surface. Results here highlight the complementary effects of adsorption and enzymatic degradation on micropollutant removal by GAC-bound laccase. Indeed laccase-immobilized GAC outperformed regular GAC during continuous operation of packed-bed columns over two months (a throughput of 12,000 bed volumes). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Computer simulation of bounded plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, W.S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems of simulating a one-dimensional bounded plasma system using particles in a gridded space are systematically explored and solutions to them are given. Such problems include the injection of particles at the boundaries, the solution of Poisson's equation, and the inclusion of an external circuit between the confining boundaries. A recently discovered artificial cooling effect is explained as being a side-effect of quiet injection, and its potential for causing serious but subtle errors in bounded simulation is noted. The methods described in the first part of the thesis are then applied to the simulation of an extension of the Pierce diode problem, specifically a Pierce diode modified by an external circuit between the electrodes. The results of these simulations agree to high accuracy with theory when a theory exists, and also show some interesting chaotic behavior in certain parameter regimes. The chaotic behavior is described in detail

  17. Bounded Rationality in Transposition Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollaard, Hans; Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg

    2014-01-01

    Studies explaining the timeliness and correctness of the transposition of EU directives into national legislation have provided rather inconclusive findings. They do not offer a clear-cut prediction concerning the transposition of the patients’ rights directive, which is one of the first that con......Studies explaining the timeliness and correctness of the transposition of EU directives into national legislation have provided rather inconclusive findings. They do not offer a clear-cut prediction concerning the transposition of the patients’ rights directive, which is one of the first...... that concerns the organisation and financing of national healthcare systems. This article applies the perspective of bounded rationality to explain (irregularities in) the timely and correct transposition of EU directives. The cognitive and organisational constraints long posited by the bounded rationality...

  18. 78 FR 18326 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ...; Comment Request; Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math Science Annual Performance Report AGENCY: The Office... considered public records. Title of Collection: Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math Science Annual Performance...) and Upward Bound Math and Science (UBMS) Programs. The Department is requesting a new APR because of...

  19. Spectrum of gluino bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, M.; Sharpe, S.; California Univ., Berkeley

    1983-01-01

    Using the bag model to first order in αsub(s) we find that if light gluinos exist they will appear as constituents of electrically charged bound states which are stable against strong interaction decay. We review the present experimental constraints and conclude that light, long-lived charged hadrons containing gluinos might exist with lifetimes between 2x10 - 8 and 10 - 14 s. (orig.)

  20. Theoretical study of the interaction of N2 with water molecules. (H2O)/sub n/:N2, n = 1--8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtiss, L.A.; Eisgruber, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Ab initio molecular orbital calculations including correlation energy have been carried out on the interaction of a single H 2 O molecule with N 2 . The potential energy surface for H 2 O:N 2 is found to have a minimum corresponding to a HOH xxx N 2 structure with a weak ( -1 ) hydrogen bond. A second, less stable, configuration corresponding to a H 2 O xxx N 2 structure with N 2 bonded side on to the oxygen of H 2 O was found to be either a minimum or a saddle point in the potential energy surface depending on the level of calculation. The minimal STO-3G basis set was used to investigate the interaction of up to eight H 2 O molecules with N 2 . Two types of clusters, one containing only HOH xxx N 2 interactions and the other containing both HOH xxxN 2 and H 2 O xxx N 2 interactions, were investigated for [N 2 :(H 2 O)/sub n/, n = 2--8

  1. Cyclotron transitions of bound ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezchastnov, Victor G.; Pavlov, George G.

    2017-06-01

    A charged particle in a magnetic field possesses discrete energy levels associated with particle rotation around the field lines. The radiative transitions between these levels are the well-known cyclotron transitions. We show that a bound complex of particles with a nonzero net charge displays analogous transitions between the states of confined motion of the entire complex in the field. The latter bound-ion cyclotron transitions are affected by a coupling between the collective and internal motions of the complex and, as a result, differ from the transitions of a "reference" bare ion with the same mass and charge. We analyze the cyclotron transitions for complex ions by including the coupling within a rigorous quantum approach. Particular attention is paid to comparison of the transition energies and oscillator strengths to those of the bare ion. Selection rules based on integrals of collective motion are derived for the bound-ion cyclotron transitions analytically, and the perturbation and coupled-channel approaches are developed to study the transitions quantitatively. Representative examples are considered and discussed for positive and negative atomic and cluster ions.

  2. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  3. Vibrational dynamics of thiocyanate and selenocyanate bound to horse heart myoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maj, Michał; Oh, Younjun; Park, Kwanghee; Lee, Jooyong; Cho, Minhaeng, E-mail: mcho@korea.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Kyung-Won [Department of Chemistry, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756, SouthKorea (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-21

    The structure and vibrational dynamics of SCN- and SeCN-bound myoglobin have been investigated using polarization-controlled IR pump-probe measurements and quantum chemistry calculations. The complexes are found to be in low and high spin states, with the dominant contribution from the latter. In addition, the Mb:SCN high spin complex exhibits a doublet feature in the thiocyanate stretch IR absorption spectra, indicating two distinct molecular conformations around the heme pocket. The binding mode of the high spin complexes was assigned to occur through the nitrogen atom, contrary to the binding through the sulfur atom that was observed in myoglobin derived from Aplysia Limacina. The vibrational energy relaxation process has been found to occur substantially faster than those of free SCN{sup −} and SeCN{sup −} ions and neutral SCN- and SeCN-derivatized molecules reported previously. This supports the N-bound configurations of MbNCS and MbNCSe, because S- and Se-bound configurations are expected to have significantly long lifetimes due to the insulation effect by heavy bridge atom like S and Se in such IR probes. Nonetheless, even though their lifetimes are much shorter than those of corresponding free ions in water, the vibrational lifetimes determined for MbNCS and MbNCSe are still fairly long compared to those of azide and cyanide myoglobin systems studied before. Thus, thiocyanate and selenocyanate can be good local probes of local electrostatic environment in the heme pocket. The globin dependence on binding mode and vibrational dynamics is also discussed.

  4. Extracellular KCl effect on organic bound tritium in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonen, Rafi; Uzi, German; Priel, Esther; Alfassi, Zeev B.

    2008-01-01

    Tritium atoms can replace hydrogen atoms in organic compounds, forming Organic Bound Tritium. Therefore, exposure of the body to tritium may lead to binding of tritium in tissue molecules, retaining it in the body longer than HTO, and causing higher doses. Ignoring this effect when evaluating inner exposures, may lead to under-estimation of tritium exposures. It was published, that tritium bound to some organic molecules has the potential to accumulate in organisms at higher levels as in the surrounding media. In order to investigate this effect and to identify physiological factors, OBT production in human malignant MG-63 osteoblast cells was studied. The purpose of the present work was to investigate the influence of the ionic extracellular potassium concentration on the amount of tritium in cells. Potassium is known as an ionic compound present in the body, which has the potential to cause cells swelling. Therefore, cells were exposed to isotonic and hypotonic media, supplemented with different concentrations of KCl, and the tritium accumulations were determined after incubation with HTO. An increase in the total Organic Bound Tritium production was observed, as well as an increase of the intracellular HTO content when increasing the KCl concentration. (author)

  5. Control of the selectivity of the aquaporin water channel family by global orientational tuning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Tajkhorshid, E.; Nollert, P.

    2002-01-01

    and orientation of a single file of seven to nine water molecules inside the channel. Two conserved asparagines force a central water molecule to serve strictly as a hydrogen bond donor to its neighboring water molecules. Assisted by the electrostatic potential generated by two half-membrane spanning loops......Aquaporins are transmembrane channels found in cell membranes of all life forms. We examine their apparently paradoxical property, facilitation of efficient permeation of water while excluding protons, which is of critical importance to preserving the electrochemical potential across the cell...... membrane. We have determined the structure of the Escherichia coli aquaglyceroporin GlpF with bound water, in native (2.7 angstroms) and in W48F/F200T mutant (2.1 angstroms) forms, and carried out 12-nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations that define the spatial and temporal probability distribution...

  6. Labeling schemes for bounded degree graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjiashvili, David; Rotbart, Noy Galil

    2014-01-01

    We investigate adjacency labeling schemes for graphs of bounded degree Δ = O(1). In particular, we present an optimal (up to an additive constant) log n + O(1) adjacency labeling scheme for bounded degree trees. The latter scheme is derived from a labeling scheme for bounded degree outerplanar...... graphs. Our results complement a similar bound recently obtained for bounded depth trees [Fraigniaud and Korman, SODA 2010], and may provide new insights for closing the long standing gap for adjacency in trees [Alstrup and Rauhe, FOCS 2002]. We also provide improved labeling schemes for bounded degree...

  7. Protection of a PWR nuclear power stations against corrosion using hydrogen molecules to capture oxygen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahili, M.

    2004-01-01

    A protection method for the primary loops metals of nuclear power plants from corrosion was investigated. Hydrogen molecules were added to the primary circuit to eliminate oxygen molecules produced by radiolysis of coolant at the reactor core. The hydrogen molecules were produced by electrolyses of water and then added when the coolant water was passing through the primary coolant circuit. Thermodynamical process and the protection methods from corrosion were discussed, the discussion emphasized on the removal of oxygen molecules as one of the protection methods, and compared with other methods. The amount of hydrogen molecules needed for complete removal of oxygen was estimated in two cases: in the case without passing the water through the oxygen removal system, and in the case of passing water through the system. A pressurized water reactor VVER was chosen to be investigated in this study. The amount of hydrogen molecules was estimated so as to eliminate completely the oxygen molecules from coolant water. The estimated value was found to be less than the permissible range for coolant water for such type of reactors. A simulation study for interaction mechanism between hydrogen and oxygen molecules as water flowing in a tube similar to that of coolant water was performed with different water flow velocities. The interaction between the molecules of hydrogen and oxygen was described. The gas diffusion at the surface of the tube was found to play a major role in the interaction. A mathematical model was found to give full description of the change of oxygen concentration through the tube, as well as, to calculate the length of the tube where the concentration of oxygen reduced to few order of magnitude. (Author)

  8. Tritiated Water Interaction with Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-01-01

    Experiments conducted to study tritium permeation of stainless steel at ambient and elevated temperatures revealed that HT converts relatively quickly to HTO. Further, the HTO partial pressure contributes essentially equally with elemental tritium gas in driving permeation through the stainless steel. Such permeation appears to be due to dissociation of the water molecule on the hot stainless steel surface. There is an equilibrium concentration of HTO vapor above adsorbed gas on the walls of the experimental apparatus evident from freezing transients. The uptake process of tritium from the carrier gas involves both surface adsorption and isotopic exchange with surface bound water

  9. Occurrence of organically bound tritium in the Mohelno lake system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kořínková, Tereza; Světlík, Ivo; Fejgl, Michal; Povinec, P. P.; Šimek, Pavel; Tomášková, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 307, č. 3 (2016), s. 2295-2299 ISSN 0236-5731. [10th International Conference on Methods and Applications of Radioanalytical Chemistry (MARC). Kailua Kona, 12.04.2015-17.04.2015] Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Mohelno reservoir * Dukovany nuclear power plant * Tissue free water tritium * Non-exchangeable organically bound tritium Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 1.282, year: 2016

  10. The algebras of bounded and essentially bounded Lebesgue measurable functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortini Raymond

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Let X be a set in ℝn with positive Lebesgue measure. It is well known that the spectrum of the algebra L∞(X of (equivalence classes of essentially bounded, complex-valued, measurable functions on X is an extremely disconnected compact Hausdorff space.We show, by elementary methods, that the spectrum M of the algebra ℒb(X, ℂ of all bounded measurable functions on X is not extremely disconnected, though totally disconnected. Let ∆ = { δx : x ∈ X} be the set of point evaluations and let g be the Gelfand topology on M. Then (∆, g is homeomorphic to (X, Τdis,where Tdis is the discrete topology. Moreover, ∆ is a dense subset of the spectrum M of ℒb(X, ℂ. Finally, the hull h(I, (which is homeomorphic to M(L∞(X, of the ideal of all functions in ℒb(X, ℂ vanishing almost everywhere on X is a nowhere dense and extremely disconnected subset of the Corona M \\ ∆ of ℒb(X, ℂ.

  11. Volume Stability of Bitumen Bound Building Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanaya I.N.A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper covers results of laboratory investigations on the volume stability of masonry units incorporating waste materials bound with bitumen (Bitublocks, due to moisture adsorption, thermal exposure and vacuum saturation. The materials used were steel slag, crushed glass, coal fly ash, and 50 pen bitumen. The samples were produced in hot mix method, compacted, then exposed to moist and temperature. It was found that moisture adsorption from the environment caused the Bitublock to expand. The samples with less intense curing regime experienced lower expansion and became stable faster, and vice versa. Under thermal condition (at 70°C, the samples with less intense curing regime underwent higher expansion, and vice versa. They were also highly reversible. Their volume stability was found unique under water exposure. The expansion on first vacuum saturation cycle was irreversible, then largely reversible on the following cycles.

  12. Stabilizing photoassociated Cs2 molecules by optimal control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Xie Ting; Huang Yin; Wang Gao-Ren; Cong Shu-Lin

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photoassociated molecules can be stabilized to deeply bound states. This process is achieved by transferring the population from the outer well to the inner well using the optimal control theory, the Cs 2 molecule is taken as an example. Numerical calculations show that weakly bound molecules formed in the outer well by a pump pulse can be compressed to the inner well via a vibrational level of the ground electronic state as an intermediary by an additionally optimized laser pulse. The positively chirped pulse can enhance the population of the target state. With a transform-limited dump pulse, nearly all the photoassociated molecules in the inner well of the excited electronic state can be transferred to the deeply vibrational level of the ground electronic state. (atomic and molecular physics)

  13. Stabilizing photoassociated Cs2 molecules by optimal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Xie, Ting; Huang, Yin; Wang, Gao-Ren; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photoassociated molecules can be stabilized to deeply bound states. This process is achieved by transferring the population from the outer well to the inner well using the optimal control theory, the Cs2 molecule is taken as an example. Numerical calculations show that weakly bound molecules formed in the outer well by a pump pulse can be compressed to the inner well via a vibrational level of the ground electronic state as an intermediary by an additionally optimized laser pulse. The positively chirped pulse can enhance the population of the target state. With a transform-limited dump pulse, nearly all the photoassociated molecules in the inner well of the excited electronic state can be transferred to the deeply vibrational level of the ground electronic state.

  14. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) properties of albumin-binding and gold nanoparticle-bound Eu (III) chelates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, Milleo Dalmacio

    CEST agents derived from paramagnetic complexes, commonly referred to as PARACEST agents represent a new class of MRI contrast agents that respond to biological information such as pH, temperature, redox, and metabolite levels. In this work, CEST properties of two novel PARACEST agents were investigated upon binding to human serum albumin (HSA) and conjugation to gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). CEST properties of [EuDOTA(O-Et-Tyr)4] -when bound to HSA was studied to address the effect of proteins on CEST. The interaction of this Eu3+ complex to HSA was investigated by performing fluorescent probe displacement studies and it was found to bind HSA at two different binding pockets, the normal warfarin and dansyl glycine binding sites. The lipophilic pendant arms and the negative charge of this complex contribute to the favorable protein binding. However, the CEST signal was reduced 2-fold upon binding to HSA. The exchangeable protons on HSA provide a large proton pool that can exchange with the bound H 2O, competing for the exchange between bulk and bound water. Au NPs coated with [EuDOTA(CAM)4]3+ were prepared using the Brust method and characterized by measuring the CEST properties. The water residence lifetime for the Au-Eu NP conjugates increased 2-fold compared to the free Eu3+ complex presumably, as a result of the formation of hindered structure between the particle and the Eu3+ complex. Sensitivity enhancement in CEST was achieved by slowing down water exchange and increasing the number of exchangeable groups on the agent using Au-Eu NP conjugates. The CEST properties of small molecule PARACEST agents were shown to vary depending on the platform used in assembling larger adducts.

  15. Voronoi Diagrams Without Bounding Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, E. T. K.

    2015-10-01

    We present a technique for presenting geographic data in Voronoi diagrams without having to specify a bounding box. The method restricts Voronoi cells to points within a user-defined distance of the data points. The mathematical foundation of the approach is presented as well. The cell clipping method is particularly useful for presenting geographic data that is spread in an irregular way over a map, as for example the Dutch dialect data displayed in Figure 2. The automatic generation of reasonable cell boundaries also makes redundant a frequently used solution to this problem that requires data owners to specify region boundaries, as in Goebl (2010) and Nerbonne et al (2011).

  16. Sensitivity analysis using probability bounding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferson, Scott; Troy Tucker, W.

    2006-01-01

    Probability bounds analysis (PBA) provides analysts a convenient means to characterize the neighborhood of possible results that would be obtained from plausible alternative inputs in probabilistic calculations. We show the relationship between PBA and the methods of interval analysis and probabilistic uncertainty analysis from which it is jointly derived, and indicate how the method can be used to assess the quality of probabilistic models such as those developed in Monte Carlo simulations for risk analyses. We also illustrate how a sensitivity analysis can be conducted within a PBA by pinching inputs to precise distributions or real values

  17. Bounded Densities and Their Derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozine, Igor; Krymsky, V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes how one can compute interval-valued statistical measures given limited information about the underlying distribution. The particular focus is on a bounded derivative of a probability density function and its combination with other available statistical evidence for computing ...... quantities of interest. To be able to utilise the evidence about the derivative it is suggested to adapt the ‘conventional’ problem statement to variational calculus and the way to do so is demonstrated. A number of examples are given throughout the paper....

  18. Removal of bound metal fasteners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, R. F.

    1981-04-01

    This project explored the removal of bound metal fasteners through the use of ultrasonically assisted wrenches. Two wrenches were designed, fabricated and tested. Previous studies had indicated an increase in thread tension for a given torque application under the influence of ultrasonics. Based on this, the loosening of seized and corroded fasteners with the aid of ultrasonics was explored. Experimental data confirmed our prior analysis of the torque-tension relationship under the influence of ultrasonics; however, our progress did not satisfy the requirements necessary to loosen seized studs in a shipyard environment.

  19. Space mappings with bounded distortion

    CERN Document Server

    Reshetnyak, Yu G

    1989-01-01

    This book is intended for researchers and students concerned with questions in analysis and function theory. The author provides an exposition of the main results obtained in recent years by Soviet and other mathematicians in the theory of mappings with bounded distortion, an active direction in contemporary mathematics. The mathematical tools presented can be applied to a broad spectrum of problems that go beyond the context of the main topic of investigation. For a number of questions in the theory of partial differential equations and the theory of functions with generalized derivatives, this is the first time they have appeared in an internationally distributed monograph.

  20. IM-CRDS for the analysis of matrix-bound water isotopes: a streamlined (and updated) tool for ecohydrologists to probe small-scale variability in plants Yasuhara, S. (syasuhara@picarro.com)1,Carter, J.A. (jcarter@picarro.com)1, Dennis, K.J. (kdennis@picarro.com)1 1Picarro Inc., 3105 Patrick Henry Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, S.

    2013-12-01

    The ability to measure the isotopic composition of matrix-bound water is valuable to many facets of earth and environmental sciences. For example, ecohydrologists use stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in plant and soil water, in combination with measurements of atmospheric water vapor, surface water and precipitation, to estimate budgets of evapotranspiration. Likewise, water isotopes of oceanic water, brines and other waters with high total dissolved solids (TDS, e.g., juices) are relevant to studying large-scale oceanic circulation, small-scale mixing, groundwater contamination, the balance of evaporation to precipitation, and the provenance of food. Conventionally matrix-bound water has been extracted using cryogenic distillation, whereby water is distilled from the material in question (e.g., a leaf sample) by heating under vacuum and collecting the resultant water vapor using liquid nitrogen. The water can then be analyzed for its stable isotopic composition by a variety of methods, including isotope ratio mass spectrometry and laser techniques, such as Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). Here we present recent improvements in an alternative, and stream-lined, solution for integrated sample extraction and isotopic measurement using a Picarro Induction Module (IM) coupled to commercially-available CRDS analyzer from Picarro. This technique is also valuable for waters with high TDS, which can have detrimental effects on flash vaporization process, typically used for the introduction of water to Picarro CRDS water isotope analyzers. The IM works by inductively heating a sample held within a metal sample holder in a glass vial flushed with dry air. Tested samples include leaves, stems, twigs, calibration water, juices, and salt water. The heating process evolves water vapor which is then swept through the system at approximately 150 standard cubic centimeters per minute. The evolved water vapor passes through an activated charcoal cartridge for removal of

  1. 2H Solid-State NMR Analysis of the Dynamics and Organization of Water in Hydrated Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenfen Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding water–biopolymer interactions, which strongly affect the function and properties of biopolymer-based tissue engineering and drug delivery materials, remains a challenge. Chitosan, which is an important biopolymer for the construction of artificial tissue grafts and for drug delivery, has attracted extensive attention in recent decades, where neutralization with an alkali solution can substantially enhance the final properties of chitosan films cast from an acidic solution. In this work, to elucidate the effect of water on the properties of chitosan films, we investigated the dynamics and different states of water in non-neutralized (CTS-A and neutralized (CTS-N hydrated chitosan by mobility selective variable-temperature (VT 2H solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Four distinct types of water exist in all of the samples with regards to dynamic behavior. First, non-freezable, rigid and strongly bound water was found in the crystalline domain at low temperatures. The second component consists of weakly bound water, which is highly mobile and exhibits isotropic motion, even below 260 K. Another type of water undergoes well-defined 180° flips around their bisector axis. Moreover, free water is also present in the films. For the CTS-A sample in particular, another special water species were bounded to acetic acid molecules via strong hydrogen bonding. In the case of CTS-N, the onset of motions of the weakly bound water molecules at 260 K was revealed by 2H-NMR spectroscopy. This water is not crystalline, even below 260 K, which is also the major contribution to the flexibility of chitosan chains and thus toughness of materials. By contrast, such motion was not observed in CTS-A. On the basis of the 2H solid-state NMR results, it is concluded that the unique toughness of CTS-N mainly originates from the weakly bound water as well as the interactions between water and the chitosan chains.

  2. Dipole Correlation of the Electronic Structures of theConformations of Water Molecule Evolving Through theNormal Modes of Vibrations Between Angular (C2v to Linear(D∝h Shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Chakraborty

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to settle the issue of equivalence or non-equivalence of the two lone pairsof electrons on oxygen atom in water molecule, a quantum chemical study of the dipolecorrelation of the electronic structure of the molecule as a function of conformationsgenerated following the normal modes of vibrations between the two extremeconformations, C2v (∠HOH at 90o and D∝h (∠HOH at 180o, including the equilibrium one,has been performed. The study invokes quantum mechanical partitioning of moleculardipoles into bond moment and lone pair moment and localization of delocalized canonicalmolecular orbitals, CMO’s into localized molecular orbitals, LMO’s. An earlier suggestion,on the basis of photoelectron spectroscopy, that one lone pair is in p-type and the other is ins-type orbital of O atom of water molecule at its equilibrium shape, and also the qualitative“Squirrel Ears” structure are brought under serious scrutiny. A large number ofconformations are generated and the charge density matrix, dipole moment of eachconformation is computed in terms of the generated canonical molecular orbitals, CMO’sand then Sinanoğlu’s localization method is invoked to localize the CMO’s of eachconformation and the quantum mechanical hybridizations of all the bonds and lone pairs onO center are evaluated in terms of the localized molecular orbitals. Computed datademonstrate that the electronic structures i.e. two bond pairs and two lone pairs and itshybridization status of all conformations of water molecule are straightforward in terms ofthe LMO’s. It is further revealed that the pattern of orbital hybridization changescontinuously as a function of evolution of molecular shape. The close analysis of thegenerated LMO’s reveals that one lone pair is accommodated in a pure p orbital and anotherlone pair is in a hybrid

  3. Determining Normal-Distribution Tolerance Bounds Graphically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Graphical method requires calculations and table lookup. Distribution established from only three points: mean upper and lower confidence bounds and lower confidence bound of standard deviation. Method requires only few calculations with simple equations. Graphical procedure establishes best-fit line for measured data and bounds for selected confidence level and any distribution percentile.

  4. On semidefinite programming bounds for graph bandwidth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klerk, E.; Nagy, M.; Sotirov, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose two new lower bounds on graph bandwidth and cyclic bandwidth based on semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations of the quadratic assignment problem. We compare the new bounds with two other SDP bounds reported in [A. Blum, G. Konjevod, R. Ravi, and S. Vempala,

  5. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  6. Effects of Magnetized Water with Small Molecules Mass on Albumin Extraction from Kidney Bean%小分子团磁化水对芸豆清蛋白浸出效果的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包国凤; 刁静静; 井雪莲; 张丽萍

    2015-01-01

    以垦芸2号芸豆品种为原料,以自来水和纯净水作对比试验,研究小分子团磁化水促进芸豆清蛋白的浸出作用,并优化了提取技术参数。通过对提取温度、提取时间、液料比和粉碎粒度四个因素的单因素试验和响应面分析,结果表明:提取温度31℃,提取时间2 h,液料比22∶1,粉碎粒度60目时芸豆清蛋白的提取率均最高,其中小分子团磁化水组提取率为48.96%,高于自来水组(42.79%)和纯净水组(40.87%);并对小分子团磁化水提取的芸豆清蛋白进行SDS-PAGE电泳测试,得出分子量排布主要集中在42.01 kDa左右,说明所得蛋白为清蛋白。%Using Kenyun 2 kidney beans as raw material and tap water and pure water as comparison tests,the infusion effects of magnetized water with small molecules mass to kidney bean were studied,and the extraction parameters of albumin from kidney bean were optimized. Through single factor and response surface analysis of four factors such as extraction temperature,extraction time, ratio of liquid to material and particle size,the results showed that the optimum extraction conditions was as follows:extraction temperature 31 ℃,extraction time 2 h,ratio of liquid to material 22∶1,particle size 60 mesh. Under such conditions,the extraction yield of magnetized water with small molecules group was 48.96% and higher than that of tap water group (42.79%)and purified water group (40.87%).SDS-PAGE result showed that the molecular weight of the extracted protein was about 42.01 kDa,and the protein was albumin.

  7. Observational Bounds on Cosmic Doomsday

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmakova, Marina

    2003-07-11

    Recently it was found, in a broad class of models, that the dark energy density may change its sign during the evolution of the universe. This may lead to a global collapse of the universe within the time t{sub c} {approx} 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} years. Our goal is to find what bounds on the future lifetime of the universe can be placed by the next generation of cosmological observations. As an example, we investigate the simplest model of dark energy with a linear potential V({phi}) = V{sub 0}(1 + {alpha}{phi}). This model can describe the present stage of acceleration of the universe if {alpha} is small enough. However, eventually the field {phi} rolls down, V({phi}) becomes negative, and the universe collapses. The existing observational data indicate that the universe described by this model will collapse not earlier than t{sub c} {approx_equal} 10 billion years from the present moment. We show that the data from SNAP and Planck satellites may extend the bound on the ''doomsday'' time to tc 40 billion years at the 95% confidence level.

  8. Quantum bounds on Bell inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pál, Károly F.; Vértesi, Tamás

    2009-02-01

    We have determined the maximum quantum violation of 241 tight bipartite Bell inequalities with up to five two-outcome measurement settings per party by constructing the appropriate measurement operators in up to six-dimensional complex and eight-dimensional real-component Hilbert spaces using numerical optimization. Out of these inequalities 129 have been introduced here. In 43 cases higher-dimensional component spaces gave larger violation than qubits, and in three occasions the maximum was achieved with six-dimensional spaces. We have also calculated upper bounds on these Bell inequalities using a method proposed recently. For all but 20 inequalities the best solution found matched the upper bound. Surprisingly, the simplest inequality of the set examined, with only three measurement settings per party, was not among them, despite the high dimensionality of the Hilbert space considered. We also computed detection threshold efficiencies for the maximally entangled qubit pair. These could be lowered in several instances if degenerate measurements were also allowed.

  9. Relevance of the ICRP biokinetic model for dietary organically bound tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.

    1999-10-01

    Ingested dietary tritium can participate in metabolic processes, and become synthesized into organically bound tritium in the tissues and organs. The distribution and retention of the organically bound tritium throughout the body are much different than tritium in the body water. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 56 (1989) has a biokinetic model to calculate dose from the ingestion of organically bound dietary tritium. The model predicts that the dose from the ingestion of organically bound dietary tritium is about 2.3 times higher than from the ingestion of the same activity of tritiated water. Under steady-state conditions, the calculated dose rate (using the first principle approach) from the ingestion of dietary organically bound tritium can be twice that from the ingestion of tritiated water. For an adult, the upper-bound dose estimate for the ingestion of dietary organically bound tritium is estimated to be close to 2.3 times higher than that of tritiated water. Therefore, given the uncertainty in the dose calculation with respect to the actual relevant dose, the ICRP biokinetic model for organically bound tritium is sufficient for dosimetry for adults. (author)

  10. Cold Rydberg molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming

    2017-04-01

    Cold atomic systems have opened new frontiers at the interface of atomic and molecular physics. These include research on novel types of Rydberg molecules. Three types of molecules will be reviewed. Long-range, homonuclear Rydberg molecules, first predicted in [1] and observed in [2], are formed via low-energy electron scattering of the Rydberg electron from a ground-state atom within the Rydberg atom's volume. The binding mostly arises from S- and P-wave triplet scattering. We use a Fermi model that includes S-wave and P-wave singlet and triplet scattering, the fine structure coupling of the Rydberg atom and the hyperfine structure coupling of the 5S1/2 atom (in rubidium [3]). The hyperfine structure gives rise to mixed singlet-triplet potentials for both low-L and high-L Rydberg molecules [3]. A classification into Hund's cases [3, 4, 5] will be discussed. The talk further includes results on adiabatic potentials and adiabatic states of Rydberg-Rydberg molecules in Rb and Cs. These molecules, which have even larger bonding length than Rydberg-ground molecules, are formed via electrostatic multipole interactions. The leading interaction term of neutral Rydberg-Rydberg molecules is between two dipoles, while for ionic Rydberg molecules it is between a dipole and a monopole. NSF (PHY-1506093), NNSF of China (61475123).

  11. Capacity Bounds for Parallel Optical Wireless Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas; Rezki, Zouheir; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    A system consisting of parallel optical wireless channels with a total average intensity constraint is studied. Capacity upper and lower bounds for this system are derived. Under perfect channel-state information at the transmitter (CSIT), the bounds have to be optimized with respect to the power allocation over the parallel channels. The optimization of the lower bound is non-convex, however, the KKT conditions can be used to find a list of possible solutions one of which is optimal. The optimal solution can then be found by an exhaustive search algorithm, which is computationally expensive. To overcome this, we propose low-complexity power allocation algorithms which are nearly optimal. The optimized capacity lower bound nearly coincides with the capacity at high SNR. Without CSIT, our capacity bounds lead to upper and lower bounds on the outage probability. The outage probability bounds meet at high SNR. The system with average and peak intensity constraints is also discussed.

  12. Bound states of Dipolar Bosons in One-dimensional Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Volosniev, A.; R. Armstrong, J.; V. Fedorov, D.

    2013-01-01

    that in the weakly-coupled limit the inter-tube interaction is similar to a zero-range term with a suitable rescaled strength. This allows us to address the corresponding many-body physics of the system by constructing a model where bound chains with one molecule in each tube are the effective degrees of freedom......We consider one-dimensional tubes containing bosonic polar molecules. The long-range dipole-dipole interactions act both within a single tube and between different tubes. We consider arbitrary values of the externally aligned dipole moments with respect to the symmetry axis of the tubes. The few....... This model can be mapped onto one-dimensional Hamiltonians for which exact solutions are known....

  13. VORONOI DIAGRAMS WITHOUT BOUNDING BOXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. K. Sang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a technique for presenting geographic data in Voronoi diagrams without having to specify a bounding box. The method restricts Voronoi cells to points within a user-defined distance of the data points. The mathematical foundation of the approach is presented as well. The cell clipping method is particularly useful for presenting geographic data that is spread in an irregular way over a map, as for example the Dutch dialect data displayed in Figure 2. The automatic generation of reasonable cell boundaries also makes redundant a frequently used solution to this problem that requires data owners to specify region boundaries, as in Goebl (2010 and Nerbonne et al (2011.

  14. Spectral computations for bounded operators

    CERN Document Server

    Ahues, Mario; Limaye, Balmohan

    2001-01-01

    Exact eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and principal vectors of operators with infinite dimensional ranges can rarely be found. Therefore, one must approximate such operators by finite rank operators, then solve the original eigenvalue problem approximately. Serving as both an outstanding text for graduate students and as a source of current results for research scientists, Spectral Computations for Bounded Operators addresses the issue of solving eigenvalue problems for operators on infinite dimensional spaces. From a review of classical spectral theory through concrete approximation techniques to finite dimensional situations that can be implemented on a computer, this volume illustrates the marriage of pure and applied mathematics. It contains a variety of recent developments, including a new type of approximation that encompasses a variety of approximation methods but is simple to verify in practice. It also suggests a new stopping criterion for the QR Method and outlines advances in both the iterative refineme...

  15. Two applications of the thermogram of the alcohol/water binary system with compositions of cryobiological interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lindong; Li, Weizhong; Zuo, Jianguo

    2011-06-01

    Quantitative analyses of the bound water content in the alcohol aqueous solution and its osmotic behavior should be cryobiologically significant. This paper has presented two applications of the thermogram of the alcohol/water system recorded by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Both applications are: (1) generating the quantitative relationship between the bound water content and the solution composition; (2) calculating the osmotic virial coefficients for alcohols. Five alcohols including methanol, ethanol, ethylene glycol, propylene glycol and glycerol are investigated. In the present study, partial binary phase diagrams of these five alcohol solutions are determined in the first place. The bound water contents in these solutions are quantitatively evaluated by three criteria afterwards. In the end, the osmotic virial coefficients for these alcohols are calculated according to the osmotic virial equation. It is turned out that the bound water fraction out of the total water content increases with a rising molality. The ability of the solute to restrict water molecules can be weakened when the solution becomes more concentrated. The results also indicate that propylene glycol should be the strongest "water-blocker" while methanol the weakest one. These findings can deepen our understanding of the cryoprotective properties of the alcohols from the perspectives of their roles in binding free water and promoting the osmotic efflux of cell water. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. NITRO MUSK BOUND TO CARP HEMOGLOBIN ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitroaromatic compounds including synthetic nitro musks are important raw materials and intermediates in the synthesis of explosives, dyes, and pesticides, pharmaceutical and personal care-products (PPCPs). The nitro musks such as musk xylene (MX) and musk ketone (MK) are extensively used as fragrance ingredients in PPCPs and other commercial toiletries. Identification and quantification of a bound 4-amino-MX (4-AMX) metabolite as well as a 2- amino-MK (2-AMK) metabolite were carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry' (GC/MS), with selected ion monitoring (SIM) in both the electron ionization (ElMS) and electron capture (EC) negative ion chemical ionization (NICIMS) modes. Detection of 4-AMX and 2-AMK occurred after the cysteine adducts in carp hemoglobin, derived from the nitroso metabolites, were released by alkaline hydrolysis. The released metabolites were extracted into n-hexane. The extract was preconcentrated by evaporation, and analyzed by GC-SIM-MS. A comparison between the El and EC approaches was made. EC NICIMS detected both metabolites whereas only 4-AMX was detected by ElMS. The EC NICIMS approach exhibited fewer matrix responses and provided a lower detection limit. Quantitation in both approaches was based on internal standard and a calibration plot. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Q

  17. Application of MRIL-WD (Magnetic Resonance Imaging Logging While Drilling) for irreducible water saturation, total reservoir, free-fluid, bound-fluid porosity measurements and its value for the petrophysical analysis of RT/RM data from the Shah Deniz well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirov, Elnur

    2016-04-01

    Sperry-Sun (Sperry Drilling Services) is the leader in MWD/LWD reliability, has developed the industry's first LWD NMR/MRIL-WD (nuclear magnetic resonance) tool. The MRIL-WD (magnetic resonance imaging logging-while-drilling) service directly measures the T1 component of hydrogen in subsurface rock units while drilling to obtain total reservoir porosity and to dissect the observed total porosity into its respective components of free fluid and bound fluid porosity. These T1 data are used to secure accurate total, free-fluid, capillary-bound water, and clay-bound water porosity of the reservoir sections which can be drilled in the several Runs. Over the last decade, results from Magnetic Resonance Imaging logs (NMR) have added significant value to petrophysical analysis and understanding by providing total, free-fluid and bound-fluid porosities, combined with fluid typing capabilities. With MRIL-WD very valuable Real-Time or Recorded Memory data/information is now available during or shortly after the drilling operation (formation properties measurement can be taken right after a drill bit penetration), while trip in and trip out as well. A key point in utilizing MRIL in an LWD environment is motion-tolerant measurements. Recent MRIL-WD logging runs from the Shah Deniz wells located in the Khazarian-Caspian Sea of the Azerbaijan Republic helped to delineate and assess hydrocarbon bearing zones. Acquired results demonstrate how MRIL data can be acquired while-drilling and provide reliable/high quality measurements. Magnetic Resonance Imaging logs at some developments wells have become a cornerstone in formation evaluation and petrophysical understanding. By providing total, free-fluid, and bound-fluid porosities together with fluid typing, MRIL results have significantly added to the assessment of reservoirs. In order to reduce NPT (Non-Productive Time) and save the rig operations time, there is always the desire to obtain logging results as soon as possible

  18. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atoms in a molecule generally prefer, particularly among the neighbouring ones, certain optimmn geometrical relationships. These are manifested in specific ranges of bond lengths, bond angles, torsion angles etc. As it always happens, chemists are interested in making molecules where these 'standard relationships' are ...

  19. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclo bu tadiene (1) has been one of the most popular molecules for experimentalists and theoreticians. This molecule is unstable as . it is antiaromatic ( 4,n electrons in a cyclic array). Even though some highly substituted cyclobutadienes, for example, compound 2 and the Fe(CO)3 complex of cyclobutadiene (3) are ...

  20. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Single molecule conductance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, R.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis represents an excursion into the world of molecular electronics, i.e. the field of research trying to use individual (organic) molecules as electronic components; in this work various experimental methods have been explored to connect individual molecules to metallic contacts and

  2. Surface species formed by the adsorption and dissociation of water molecules on Ru(0001) surface containing a small coverage of carbon atoms studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dept of Materials Science and Engineering UCB; Dept of Applied Science and Technology, UCB; Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Madrid, Spain; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale University; Salmeron, Miquel; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge I.; Heyde, Markus; Qi, Yabing; Schwarz, Udo D.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-04-26

    The adsorption and dissociation of water on a Ru(0001) surface containing a small amount ({le} 3 %) of carbon impurities was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Various surface species are formed depending on the temperature. These include molecular H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O-C complexes, H, O, OH and CH. Clusters of either pure H{sub 2}O or mixed H{sub 2}O-OH species are also formed. Each of these species produces a characteristic contrast in the STM images and can be identified by experiment and by ab initio total energy calculations coupled with STM image simulations. Manipulation of individual species via excitation of vibrational modes with the tunneling electrons has been used as supporting evidence.

  3. Molecules in stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, T.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, research related to molecules in stars has rapidly expanded because of progress in related fields. For this reason, it is almost impossible to cover all the topics related to molecules in stars. Thus, here the authors focus their attention on molecules in the atmospheres of cool stars and do not cover in any detail topics related to circumstellar molecules originating from expanding envelopes located far from the stellar surface. However, the authors do discuss molecules in quasi-static circumstellar envelopes (a recently discovered new component of circumstellar envelopes) located near the stellar surface, since molecular lines originating from such envelopes show little velocity shift relative to photospheric lines, and hence they directly affect the interpretation and analysis of stellar spectra

  4. Spectroscopy of the hghest Rb2 bound states with 10 kHz precision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaar, B.J.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.; van Kempen, E.G.M.; Freeland, R.S.; Wynar, R.; Comparat, D.; Ryu, C.; Heinzen, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    We have measured the binding energy of four of the highest bound vibrational levels of the ground electronic states of the ^87Rb2 molecule with a precision better than 10 kHz. The measurements were carried out using stimulated Raman photoassociation in an ^87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate. We have

  5. Peptide specific expansion of CD8(+) T cells by recombinant plate bound MHC/peptide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Esben G W; Buus, Soren; Thorn, Mette

    2009-01-01

    to in vitro T cell stimulation was investigated. By use of an antigenic peptide derived from the cytomegalovirus (CMVp) we tested the stimulatory efficacy of recombinant plate bound MHC molecules (PB-MHC), being immobilized in culture plates. A single stimulation of non-adherent peripheral blood mononuclear...

  6. Comparison of arsenic acid with phosphoric acid in the interaction with a water molecule and an alkali/alkaline-earth metal cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Woo; Kim, Chang Woo; Lee, Ji Hyun; Shim, Giwoong; Kim, Kwang S

    2011-10-20

    Recently, Wolfe-Simon has discovered a bacterium which is able to survive using arsenic(V) rather than phosphorus(V) in its DNA. Thus it is important to investigate some important structural and chemical similarities and dissimilarities between phosphate and arsenate. We compared the monohydrated structures and the alkali/alkaline-earth metal (Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+)) complexes of the arsenic acid/anions with those of the phosphoric acid/anions [i.e., H(m)PO(4)(-(3-m)) vs H(m)AsO(4)(-(3-m)) (m = 1-3)]. We carried out geometry optimization along with harmonic frequency calculations using ab initio calculations. Despite the increased van der Waals radius of As, the hydrated structures of both P and As systems show very close similarity (within 0.25 Å in the P/As···O(water) distance and within a few kJ/mol in binding energy) because of the increased induction energies by more polar arsenic acid/anons and slightly increased dispersion energy by a larger size of the As atom. In the metal complexes, the arsenic acid has a slightly larger binding distance (by 0.07-1.0 Å) and weaker binding energy because the As(V) ion has a slightly larger radius than the P(V) ion, and the electrostatic interaction is the dominating feature in these systems.

  7. Instanton bound states in ABJM theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsuda, Yasuyuki [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Moriyama, Sanefumi [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Kobayashi Maskawa Inst. and Graduate School of Mathematics; Okuyama, Kazumi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2013-06-15

    The partition function of the ABJM theory receives non-perturbative corrections due to instanton effects. We study these non-perturbative corrections, including bound states of worldsheet instantons and membrane instantons, in the Fermi-gas approach. We require that the total non-perturbative correction should be always finite for arbitrary Chern-Simons level. This finiteness is realized quite non-trivially because each bound state contribution naively diverges at some levels. The poles of each contribution should be canceled out in total. We use this pole cancellation mechanism to find unknown bound state corrections from known ones. We conjecture a general expression of the bound state contribution. Summing up all the bound state contributions, we find that the effect of bound states is simply incorporated into the worldsheet instanton correction by a redefinition of the chemical potential in the Fermi-gas system. Analytic expressions of the 3- and 4-membrane instanton corrections are also proposed.

  8. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, Amy S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  9. The nature of water within bacterial spores: protecting life in extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Charles V.; Friedline, Anthony; Johnson, Karen; Zachariah, Malcolm M.; Thomas, Kieth J., III

    2011-10-01

    The bacterial spore is a formidable container of life, protecting the vital contents from chemical attack, antimicrobial agents, heat damage, UV light degradation, and water dehydration. The exact role of the spore components remains in dispute. Nevertheless, water molecules are important in each of these processes. The physical state of water within the bacterial spore has been investigated since the early 1930's. The water is found two states, free or bound, in two different areas, core and non-core. It is established that free water is accessible to diffuse and exchange with deuterated water and that the diffusible water can access all areas of the spore. The presence of bound water has come under recent scrutiny and has been suggested the water within the core is mobile, rather than bound, based on the analysis of deuterium relaxation rates. Using an alternate method, deuterium quadrupole-echo spectroscopy, we are able to distinguish between mobile and immobile water molecules. In the absence of rapid motion, the deuterium spectrum of D2O is dominated by a broad line, whose line shape is used as a characteristic descriptor of molecular motion. The deuterium spectrum of bacterial spores reveals three distinct features: the broad peak of immobilized water, a narrow line of water in rapid motion, and a signal of intermediate width. This third signal is assigned this peak from partially deuterated proteins with the spore in which N-H groups have undergone exchange with water deuterons to form N-D species. As a result of these observations, the nature of water within the spore requires additional explanation to understand how the spore and its water preserve life.

  10. Bounded elements in Locally C*-algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Harti, Rachid

    2001-09-01

    In order to get more useful information about Locally C*-algebras, we introduce in this paper the notion of bounded elements. First, we study the connection between bounded elements and spectrally bounded elements. Some structural results of Locally C*-algebras are established in Theorems 1 , 2 and 3. As an immediate consequence of Theorem 3, we give a characterization of the connected component of the identity in the group of unitary elements for a Locally C*-algebra. (author)

  11. Fuzzy upper bounds and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soleimani-damaneh, M. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Mathematical Science and Computer Engineering, Teacher Training University, 599 Taleghani Avenue, Tehran 15618 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: soleimani_d@yahoo.com

    2008-04-15

    This paper considers the concept of fuzzy upper bounds and provides some relevant applications. Considering a fuzzy DEA model, the existence of a fuzzy upper bound for the objective function of the model is shown and an effective approach to solve that model is introduced. Some dual interpretations are provided, which are useful for practical purposes. Applications of the concept of fuzzy upper bounds in two physical problems are pointed out.

  12. Bounded cohomology of discrete groups

    CERN Document Server

    Frigerio, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The author manages a near perfect equilibrium between necessary technicalities (always well motivated) and geometric intuition, leading the readers from the first simple definition to the most striking applications of the theory in 13 very pleasant chapters. This book can serve as an ideal textbook for a graduate topics course on the subject and become the much-needed standard reference on Gromov's beautiful theory. -Michelle Bucher The theory of bounded cohomology, introduced by Gromov in the late 1980s, has had powerful applications in geometric group theory and the geometry and topology of manifolds, and has been the topic of active research continuing to this day. This monograph provides a unified, self-contained introduction to the theory and its applications, making it accessible to a student who has completed a first course in algebraic topology and manifold theory. The book can be used as a source for research projects for master's students, as a thorough introduction to the field for graduate student...

  13. Picosecond orientational dynamics of water in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tros, Martijn; Zheng, Linli; Hunger, Johannes; Bonn, Mischa; Bonn, Daniel; Smits, Gertien J; Woutersen, Sander

    2017-10-12

    Cells are extremely crowded, and a central question in biology is how this affects the intracellular water. Here, we use ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy and dielectric-relaxation spectroscopy to observe the random orientational motion of water molecules inside living cells of three prototypical organisms: Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast), and spores of Bacillus subtilis. In all three organisms, most of the intracellular water exhibits the same random orientational motion as neat water (characteristic time constants ~9 and ~2 ps for the first-order and second-order orientational correlation functions), whereas a smaller fraction exhibits slower orientational dynamics. The fraction of slow intracellular water varies between organisms, ranging from ~20% in E. coli to ~45% in B. subtilis spores. Comparison with the water dynamics observed in solutions mimicking the chemical composition of (parts of) the cytosol shows that the slow water is bound mostly to proteins, and to a lesser extent to other biomolecules and ions.The cytoplasm's crowdedness leads one to expect that cell water is different from bulk water. By measuring the rotational motion of water molecules in living cells, Tros et al. find that apart from a small fraction of water solvating biomolecules, cell water has the same dynamics as bulk water.

  14. Nuclear Overhauser effect studies of the conformation of Co(NH3)4ATP bound to kidney Na,K-ATPase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.M.; Jorgensen, P.L.; Grisham, C.M.

    1989-01-01

    Transferred nuclear Overhauser effect measurements (in the two-dimensional mode) have been used to determine the three-dimensional conformation of an ATP analogue, Co(NH3)4ATP, at the active site of sheep kidney Na,K-ATPase. Previous studies have shown that Co(NH3)4ATP is a competitive inhibitor with respect to MnATP for the Na,K-ATPase. Nine unique proton-proton distances on ATPase-bound Co(NH3)4ATP were determined from the initial build-up rates of the cross-peaks of the 2D-TRNOE data sets. These distances, taken together with previous 31P and 1H relaxation measurements with paramagnetic probes, are consistent with a single nucleotide conformation at the active site. The bound (Co(NH3)4ATP) adopts an anti conformation, with a glycosidic torsion angle of 35 degrees, and the conformation of the ribose ring is slightly N-type (C2'-exo, C3'-endo). The delta and gamma torsional angles in this conformation are 100 degrees and 178 degrees, respectively. The nucleotide adopts a bent configuration, in which the triphosphate chain lies nearly parallel to the adenine moiety. Mn2+ bound to a single, high-affinity site on the ATPase lies above and in the plane of the adenine ring. The distances from enzyme-bound Mn2+ to N6 and N7 are too large for first coordination sphere complexes, but are appropriate for second-sphere complexes involving, for example, intervening hydrogen-bonded water molecules. The NMR data also indicate that the structure of the bound ATP analogue is independent of the conformational state of the enzyme

  15. Nuclear Overhauser effect studies of the conformation of Co(NH3)4ATP bound to kidney Na,K-ATPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, J.M.; Jorgensen, P.L.; Grisham, C.M. (Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville (USA))

    1989-05-30

    Transferred nuclear Overhauser effect measurements (in the two-dimensional mode) have been used to determine the three-dimensional conformation of an ATP analogue, Co(NH3)4ATP, at the active site of sheep kidney Na,K-ATPase. Previous studies have shown that Co(NH3)4ATP is a competitive inhibitor with respect to MnATP for the Na,K-ATPase. Nine unique proton-proton distances on ATPase-bound Co(NH3)4ATP were determined from the initial build-up rates of the cross-peaks of the 2D-TRNOE data sets. These distances, taken together with previous 31P and 1H relaxation measurements with paramagnetic probes, are consistent with a single nucleotide conformation at the active site. The bound (Co(NH3)4ATP) adopts an anti conformation, with a glycosidic torsion angle of 35{degrees}, and the conformation of the ribose ring is slightly N-type (C2'-exo, C3'-endo). The delta and gamma torsional angles in this conformation are 100 degrees and 178 degrees, respectively. The nucleotide adopts a bent configuration, in which the triphosphate chain lies nearly parallel to the adenine moiety. Mn2+ bound to a single, high-affinity site on the ATPase lies above and in the plane of the adenine ring. The distances from enzyme-bound Mn2+ to N6 and N7 are too large for first coordination sphere complexes, but are appropriate for second-sphere complexes involving, for example, intervening hydrogen-bonded water molecules. The NMR data also indicate that the structure of the bound ATP analogue is independent of the conformational state of the enzyme.

  16. Sugar Blowing-Induced Porous Cobalt Phosphide/Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanostructures with Enhanced Electrochemical Oxidation Performance toward Water and Other Small Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chengzhou [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Fu, Shaofang [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Xu, Bo Z. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Song, Junhua [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Shi, Qiurong [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Li, Xiaolin [Energy and Environmental Directory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Beckman, Scott P. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Sun, Junming [The Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Du, Dan [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Lin, Yuehe [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA

    2017-06-28

    Finely controlled synthesis of high active and robust nonprecious metal catalysts with excellent catalytic efficiency in oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is extremely vital for making the water splitting process more energy-efficient and economical. Among these noble metal-free catalysts, transition-metal-based nanomaterials are considered as one of the most promising OER catalysts due to their relatively low-cost intrinsic activities, high abundance and diversity in terms of structure and morphology. In this work, we reported a facile sugar-blowing technique and low-temperature phosphorization to generate 3D self-supported metal involved carbon nanostructures, which termed as Co2P@Co/nitrogen-doped carbon (Co2P@Co/N-C). By capitalizing on the 3D porous nanostructures with high surface area, generously dispersed active sites, the intimate interaction between active sites and 3D N-doped carbon, the resultant Co2P@Co/N-C exhibited satisfying OER performance superior to CoO@Co/N-C, delivering 10 mA cm-2 at overpotential of 0.32 V. It is noting that in contrast to the substantial current density loss of RuO2, Co2P@Co/N-C showed much enhanced catalytic activity during the stability test and the 1.8-fold increase in current density was observed after stability test. Furthermore, the obtained Co2P@Co/N-C can also be served as an excellent nonprecious metal catalyst for methanol and glucose electrooxidation in alkaline media, further extending their potential applications.

  17. Dissociation in small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    The study of molecular dissociation processes is one of the most interesting areas of modern spectroscopy owing to the challenges presented bt even the simplest of diatomic molecules. This paper reviews the commonly used descriptions of molecular dissociation processes for diatomic molecules, the selection rules for predissociation, and a few of the principles to be remembered when one is forced to speculate about dissociation mechanisms in a new molecule. Some of these points will be illustrated by the example of dissociative ionization in O 2

  18. Some Improved Nonperturbative Bounds for Fermionic Expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Martin, E-mail: marlohmann@gmail.com [Universita di Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Matematica (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    We reconsider the Gram-Hadamard bound as it is used in constructive quantum field theory and many body physics to prove convergence of Fermionic perturbative expansions. Our approach uses a recursion for the amplitudes of the expansion, discovered in a model problem by Djokic (2013). It explains the standard way to bound the expansion from a new point of view, and for some of the amplitudes provides new bounds, which avoid the use of Fourier transform, and are therefore superior to the standard bounds for models like the cold interacting Fermi gas.

  19. Functionalized molecules studied by STM: motion, switching and reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grill, Leonhard

    2008-01-01

    Functionalized molecules represent the central issue of molecular nanotechnology. Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) is a powerful method to investigate such molecules, because it allows us to image them with sub-molecular resolution when adsorbed on a surface and can be used at the same time as a tool to manipulate single molecules in a controlled way. Such studies permit deep insight into the conformational, mechanical and electronic structure and thus functionalities of the molecules. In this review, recent experiments on specially designed molecules, acting as model systems for molecular nanotechnology, are reviewed. The presented studies focus on key functionalities: lateral rolling and hopping motion on a supporting surface, the switching behaviour of azobenzene derivatives by using the STM tip and the controlled reactivity of molecular side groups, which enable the formation of covalently bound molecular nanoarchitectures. (topical review)

  20. A comparison of total bound nitrogen with the sum of inorganic nitrogen in the present partice in the German Water Regulation Act for monitoring of nitrogen compounds; Ein Vergleich des gesamten gebundenen Stickstoffs mit der Summe des anorganischen Stickstoffs in der derzeitigen Gesetzespraxis zur Ueberwachung auf Stickstoffverbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinne, D.; Seckert-Knopp, W. [Landesamt fuer Wasserwirtschaft Rheinland-Pfalz, Mainz (Germany)

    1997-11-01

    The results of the analysis of nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, and total bound nitrogen (TN{sub b}) from 331 samples of municipal and 322 samples of industrial waste water effluents were compiled in the years 1990 to 1994. These data were evaluated due to - the comparison of the sum of inorganic nitrogen ({Sigma} N{sub anorg.}) of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia to TN{sub b} in view of a planned exchange in the German Waste Water Regulation Act - the calculation of organic bound nitrogen (N{sub org.}) - the usefulness to generate sufficient data for balancing the `content of nitrogen` in water systems. The results of our investigations are: The analytical results from the sum of inorganic nitrogen and TN{sub b} are in very good agreement. In most cases the TN{sub b} values were higher than those of {Sigma} N{sub anorg.} This is plausible because most samples contain a certain amount of organic bound nitrogen. Therefore the differences between the results of this two analytical parameters should express the term `organic bound nitrogen` (N{sub org.}). This substraction is an excellent method to estimate this value without a further analytical procedure. The data from our investigation underline this quite clearly. In contrary to the determination of the single compounds ammonia, nitrate, and nitrite the TN{sub b} as a sum parameter is fast, instrument based, can be automated and shows a sufficient limit of determination. This method allows the evaluation of a high data density for water monitoring and balancing the `content of nitrogen` in water systems. A further advantage is the minimizing of errors when applying only one analytical method instead of three. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Analysenergebnisse der Parameter Nitrit, Nitrat, Ammonium sowie die davon abgeleiteten Parameter `Summe anorganischer Stickstoff` ({Sigma} N{sub anorg.}) und `gesamter gebundener Stickstoff` (TN{sub b}) wurden fuer 331 Proben kommunaler und 322 Proben industrieller Abwasseranlagen aus den Jahren

  1. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  2. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  3. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    evolved as a new line of thinking wherein a single molecule or perhaps a collection .... In photonic communication processes, laser light has to be modulated and .... The author wishes to thank G Rajaram for a critical reading of the manuscript.

  4. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    overall absorption spectrum of a molecule is a superposition of many such sharp lines .... dilute solution of the enzyme and the substrate over few drops of silicone oil placed ..... Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM): Development.

  5. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  6. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month - Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Keywords. Adamantane; diamondoid systems; plastic crystals. ... Resonance – Journal of Science Education | News. © 2017 Indian ...

  7. Variational lower bound on the scattering length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, L.; Spruch, L.

    1975-01-01

    The scattering length A characterizes the zero-energy scattering of one system by another. It was shown some time ago that a variational upper bound on A could be obtained using methods, of the Rayleigh-Ritz type, which are commonly employed to obtain upper bounds on energy eigenvalues. Here we formulate a method for obtaining a variational lower bound on A. Once again the essential idea is to express the scattering length as a variational estimate plus an error term and then to reduce the problem of bounding the error term to one involving bounds on energy eigenvalues. In particular, the variational lower bound on A is rigorously established provided a certin modified Hamiltonian can be shown to have no discrete states lying below the level of the continuum threshold. It is unfortunately true that necessary conditions for the existence of bound states are not available for multiparticle systems in general. However, in the case of positron-atom scattering the adiabatic approximation can be introduced as an (essentially) solvable comparison problem to rigorously establish the nonexistence of bound states of the modified Hamiltonian. It has recently been shown how the validity of the variational upper bound on A can be maintained when the target ground-state wave function is imprecisely known. Similar methods can be used to maintain the variational lower bound on A. Since the bound is variational, the error in the calculated scattering length will be of second order in the error in the wave function. The use of the adiabatic approximation in the present context places no limitation in principle on the accuracy achievable

  8. Role of Confined Water in Underwater Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    Surface bound water is a strong deterrent for forming strong bonds between two surfaces underwater and expelling that bound water is important for strong adhesion. I will discuss examples of different strategies used by geckos, spiders, and mussels to handle this last layer of bound water. Recent results using infrared-visible sum frequency generation spectroscopy to probe the structure of this bound water will be discussed. National Science Foundation.

  9. Stacked spheres and lower bound theorem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BASUDEB DATTA

    2011-11-20

    Nov 20, 2011 ... Preliminaries. Lower bound theorem. On going work. Definitions. An n-simplex is a convex hull of n + 1 affinely independent points. (called vertices) in some Euclidean space R. N . Stacked spheres and lower bound theorem. Basudeb Datta. Indian Institute of Science. 2 / 27 ...

  10. A strongly quasiconvex PAC-Bayesian bound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiemann, Niklas; Igel, Christian; Wintenberger, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    We propose a new PAC-Bayesian bound and a way of constructing a hypothesis space, so that the bound is convex in the posterior distribution and also convex in a trade-off parameter between empirical performance of the posterior distribution and its complexity. The complexity is measured by the Ku...

  11. On the range of completely bounded maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard I. Loebl

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that if every bounded linear map from a C*-algebra α to a von Neumann algebra β is completely bounded, then either α is finite-dimensional or β⫅⊗Mn, where is a commutative von Neumann algebra and Mn is the algebra of n×n complex matrices.

  12. Bounds in the location-allocation problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik

    1981-01-01

    Develops a family of stronger lower bounds on the objective function value of the location-allocation problem. Solution methods proposed to solve problems in location-allocation; Efforts to develop a more efficient bound solution procedure; Determination of the locations of the sources....

  13. Experimental evidence for bounds on quantum correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, F A; Castagnoli, G; Degiovanni, I P; Castelletto, S

    2004-02-13

    We implemented the experiment proposed by Cabello in the preceding Letter to test the bounds of quantum correlation. As expected from the theory we found that, for certain choices of local observables, Tsirelson's bound of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality (2 x square root of 2) is not reached by any quantum states.

  14. Exponential Lower Bounds For Policy Iteration

    OpenAIRE

    Fearnley, John

    2010-01-01

    We study policy iteration for infinite-horizon Markov decision processes. It has recently been shown policy iteration style algorithms have exponential lower bounds in a two player game setting. We extend these lower bounds to Markov decision processes with the total reward and average-reward optimality criteria.

  15. Conductivity bound from dirty black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitaghsir Fadafan, Kazem, E-mail: bitaghsir@shahroodut.ac.ir

    2016-11-10

    We propose a lower bound of the dc electrical conductivity in strongly disordered, strongly interacting quantum field theories using holography. We study linear response of black holes with broken translational symmetry in Einstein–Maxwell-dilaton theories of gravity. Using the generalized Stokes equations at the horizon, we derive the lower bound of the electrical conductivity for the dual two dimensional disordered field theory.

  16. No-arbitrage bounds for financial scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geyer, Alois; Hanke, Michael; Weissensteiner, Alex

    2014-01-01

    We derive no-arbitrage bounds for expected excess returns to generate scenarios used in financial applications. The bounds allow to distinguish three regions: one where arbitrage opportunities will never exist, a second where arbitrage may be present, and a third, where arbitrage opportunities...

  17. DETERMINATION OF A BOUND MUSK XYLENE ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musk xylene (MX) is widely used as a fragrance ingredient in commercial toiletries. Identification and quantification of a bound 4-amino-MX (AMX) metabolite was carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), with selected ion monitoring (SIM). Detection of AMX occurred after the cysteine adducts in carp hemoglobin, derived from the nitroso metabolite, were released by alkaline hydrolysis. The released AMX metabolite was extracted into n-hexane. The extract was preconcentrated by evaporation, and analyzed by GC-SIM-MS. The concentration of AMX metabolite was found to range from 6.0 to 30.6 ng/g in the carp Hb, collected from the Las Vegas Wash and Lake Mead, Nevada areas. The presence of an AMX metabolite in the carp Hb was confirmed when similar mass spectral features and the same retention time of the AMX metabolite were obtained for both standard AMX and carp Hb extract solutions. In the non-hydrolyzed and reagent blank extracts, the AMX metabolite was not detected. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Located In the subtasks are the various research projects being performed in support of this Task and more in-depth coverage of each project. Briefly, each project's objective is stated below.Subtask 1: To integrate state-of-the-art technologies (polar organic chemical integrative samplers,

  18. Strong Dependence of Hydration State of F-Actin on the Bound Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Makoto; Imao, Asato; Mogami, George; Chishima, Ryotaro; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Takaya; Morimoto, Nobuyuki; Wazawa, Tetsuichi

    2016-07-21

    Understanding of the hydration state is an important issue in the chemomechanical energetics of versatile biological functions of polymerized actin (F-actin). In this study, hydration-state differences of F-actin by the bound divalent cations are revealed through precision microwave dielectric relaxation (DR) spectroscopy. G- and F-actin in Ca- and Mg-containing buffer solutions exhibit dual hydration components comprising restrained water with DR frequency f2 (fw). The hydration state of F-actin is strongly dependent on the ionic composition. In every buffer tested, the HMW signal Dhyme (≡ (f1 - fw)δ1/(fwδw)) of F-actin is stronger than that of G-actin, where δw is DR-amplitude of bulk solvent and δ1 is that of HMW in a fixed-volume ellipsoid containing an F-actin and surrounding water in solution. Dhyme value of F-actin in Ca2.0-buffer (containing 2 mM Ca(2+)) is markedly higher than in Mg2.0-buffer (containing 2 mM Mg(2+)). Moreover, in the presence of 2 mM Mg(2+), the hydration state of F-actin is changed by adding a small fraction of Ca(2+) (∼0.1 mM) and becomes closer to that of the Ca-bound form in Ca2.0-buffer. This is consistent with the results of the partial specific volume and the Cotton effect around 290 nm in the CD spectra, indicating a change in the tertiary structure and less apparent change in the secondary structure of actin. The number of restrained water molecules per actin (N2) is estimated to be 1600-2100 for Ca2.0- and F-buffer and ∼2500 for Mg2.0-buffer at 10-15 °C. These numbers are comparable to those estimated from the available F-actin atomic structures as in the first water layer. The number of HMW molecules is roughly explained by the volume between the equipotential surface of -kT/2e and the first water layer of the actin surface by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation using UCSF Chimera.

  19. SHARP ENTRYWISE PERTURBATION BOUNDS FOR MARKOV CHAINS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiede, Erik; VAN Koten, Brian; Weare, Jonathan

    For many Markov chains of practical interest, the invariant distribution is extremely sensitive to perturbations of some entries of the transition matrix, but insensitive to others; we give an example of such a chain, motivated by a problem in computational statistical physics. We have derived perturbation bounds on the relative error of the invariant distribution that reveal these variations in sensitivity. Our bounds are sharp, we do not impose any structural assumptions on the transition matrix or on the perturbation, and computing the bounds has the same complexity as computing the invariant distribution or computing other bounds in the literature. Moreover, our bounds have a simple interpretation in terms of hitting times, which can be used to draw intuitive but rigorous conclusions about the sensitivity of a chain to various types of perturbations.

  20. New bounds on isotropic Lorentz violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carone, Christopher D.; Sher, Marc; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Violations of Lorentz invariance that appear via operators of dimension four or less are completely parametrized in the Standard Model Extension (SME). In the pure photonic sector of the SME, there are 19 dimensionless, Lorentz-violating parameters. Eighteen of these have experimental upper bounds ranging between 10 -11 and 10 -32 ; the remaining parameter, k-tilde tr , is isotropic and has a much weaker bound of order 10 -4 . In this Brief Report, we point out that k-tilde tr gives a significant contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron and find a new upper bound of order 10 -8 . With reasonable assumptions, we further show that this bound may be improved to 10 -14 by considering the renormalization of other Lorentz-violating parameters that are more tightly constrained. Using similar renormalization arguments, we also estimate bounds on Lorentz-violating parameters in the pure gluonic sector of QCD

  1. Covariant entropy bound and loop quantum cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2008-01-01

    We examine Bousso's covariant entropy bound conjecture in the context of radiation filled, spatially flat, Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models. The bound is violated near the big bang. However, the hope has been that quantum gravity effects would intervene and protect it. Loop quantum cosmology provides a near ideal setting for investigating this issue. For, on the one hand, quantum geometry effects resolve the singularity and, on the other hand, the wave function is sharply peaked at a quantum corrected but smooth geometry, which can supply the structure needed to test the bound. We find that the bound is respected. We suggest that the bound need not be an essential ingredient for a quantum gravity theory but may emerge from it under suitable circumstances.

  2. Free and binary rotation of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konyukhov, V K

    2003-01-01

    A modification of the quantum-mechanical theory of rotation of polyatomic molecules (binary rotation) is proposed, which is based on the algebra and representations of the SO(4) group and allows the introduction of the concept of parity, as in atomic spectroscopy. It is shown that, if an asymmetric top molecule performing binary rotation finds itself in a spatially inhomogeneous electric field, its rotational levels acquire the additional energy due to the quadrupole moment. The existence of the rotational states of polyatomic molecules that cannot transfer to the free rotation state is predicted. In particular, the spin isomers of a water molecule, which corresponds to such states, can have different absolute values of the adsorption energy due to the quadrupole interaction of the molecule with a surface. The difference in the adsorption energies allows one to explain qualitatively the behaviour of the ortho- and para-molecules of water upon their adsorption on the surface of solids in accordance with experimental data. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drink and water in food (like fruits and vegetables). 6. Of all the earth’s water, how much is ocean or seas? 97 percent of the earth’s water is ocean or seas. 7. How much of the world’s water is frozen? Of all the water on earth, about 2 percent is frozen. 8. How much ...

  4. Sequential water molecule binding enthalpies for aqueous nanodrops containing a mono-, di- or trivalent ion and between 20 and 500 water molecules† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed description of the experimental and computational modeling methods. Isolation, BIRD and UVPD sequence for [Ru(NH3)6]3+·(H2O)169–171, nanoESI spectra for 2+ and 3+ ions. Detailed description of the isotope distribution simulation program. Comparison between experimental and simulated 1+, 2+ and 3+ ion isotope distributions. Wavelength dependence of the deduced sequential binding enthalpies. Comparison of experimental UVPD binding enthalpies to the liquid drop model at different temperatures. Complete list of binding enthalpies and average number of water molecules lost upon UVPD. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc04957e Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiles, Sven; Cooper, Richard J.; DiTucci, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Sequential water molecule binding enthalpies, ΔH n,n–1, are important for a detailed understanding of competitive interactions between ions, water and solute molecules, and how these interactions affect physical properties of ion-containing nanodrops that are important in aerosol chemistry. Water molecule binding enthalpies have been measured for small clusters of many different ions, but these values for ion-containing nanodrops containing more than 20 water molecules are scarce. Here, ΔH n,n–1 values are deduced from high-precision ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) measurements as a function of ion identity, charge state and cluster size between 20–500 water molecules and for ions with +1, +2 and +3 charges. The ΔH n,n–1 values are obtained from the number of water molecules lost upon photoexcitation at a known wavelength, and modeling of the release of energy into the translational, rotational and vibrational motions of the products. The ΔH n,n–1 values range from 36.82 to 50.21 kJ mol–1. For clusters containing more than ∼250 water molecules, the binding enthalpies are between the bulk heat of vaporization (44.8 kJ mol–1) and the sublimation enthalpy of bulk ice (51.0 kJ mol–1). These values depend on ion charge state for clusters with fewer than 150 water molecules, but there is a negligible dependence at larger size. There is a minimum in the ΔH n,n–1 values that depends on the cluster size and ion charge state, which can be attributed to the competing effects of ion solvation and surface energy. The experimental ΔH n,n–1 values can be fit to the Thomson liquid drop model (TLDM) using bulk ice parameters. By optimizing the surface tension and temperature change of the logarithmic partial pressure for the TLDM, the experimental sequential water molecule binding enthalpies can be fit with an accuracy of ±3.3 kJ mol–1 over the entire range of cluster sizes. PMID:28451364

  5. Site-Specific Measurement of Water Dynamics in the Substrate Pocket of Ketosteroid Isomerase Using Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Santosh Kumar; Ji, Minbiao; Gaffney, Kelly J.; Boxer, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the reorganization capacity of water molecules at the active sites of enzymes and how this couples to the catalytic reaction. Here, we study the dynamics of water molecules at the active site of a highly proficient enzyme, Δ5-3-ketosteroid isomerase (KSI), during a light-activated mimic of its catalytic cycle. Photo-excitation of a nitrile containing photo-acid, coumarin183 (C183), mimics the change in charge density that occurs at the active site of KSI during the first step of the catalytic reaction. The nitrile of C183 is exposed to water when bound to the KSI active site, and we used time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy as a site-specific probe to study the solvation dynamics of water molecules in the vicinity of the nitrile. We observed that water molecules at the active site of KSI are highly rigid, during the light-activated catalytic cycle, compared to the solvation dynamics observed in bulk water. Based upon this result we hypothesize that rigid water dipoles at the active site might help in the maintenance of the pre-organized electrostatic environment required for efficient catalysis. The results also demonstrate the utility of nitrile probes in measuring the dynamics of local (H-bonded) water molecules in contrast to the commonly used fluorescence methods which measure the average behavior of primary and subsequent spheres of solvation. PMID:22931297

  6. Electron-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamura, I.; Takayanagi, K.

    1984-01-01

    The study of collision processes plays an important research role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made by means of collision experiments. Based on theoretical, experimental, and computational studies, this volume presents an overview detailing the basic processes of electron-molecule collisions. The editors have collected papers-written by a group of international experts-that consider a diverse range of phenomena occurring in electronmolecule collisions. The volume discusses first the basic formulation for scattering problems and then gives an outline of the physics of electron-molecule collisions. The main topics covered are rotational transitions, vibrational transitions, dissociation of molecules in slow collisions, the electron-molecule collision as a spectroscopic tool for studying molecular electronic structures, and experimental and computational techniques for determining the cross sections. These well-referenced chapters are self-contained and can be read independently or consecutively. Authoritative and up-to-date, Electron-Molecule Collisions is a useful addition to the libraries of students and researchers in the fields of atomic, molecular, and chemical physics, and physical chemistry

  7. Dynamics of hadronic molecule in one-boson exchange approach and possible heavy flavor molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Guijun; Liu Jiafeng; Yan Mulin

    2009-01-01

    We extend the one pion exchange model at quark level to include the short distance contributions coming from η, σ, ρ and ω exchange. This formalism is applied to discuss the possible molecular states of DD*/DD*, BB*/BB*, DD*, BB*, the pseudoscalar-vector systems with C=B=1 and C=-B=1 respectively. The ''δ function'' term contribution and the S-D mixing effects have been taken into account. We find the conclusions reached after including the heavier mesons exchange are qualitatively the same as those in the one pion exchange model. The previous suggestion that 1 ++ BB*/BB* molecule should exist, is confirmed in the one-boson exchange model, whereas DD* bound state should not exist. The DD*/DD* system can accommodate a 1 ++ molecule close to the threshold, the mixing between the molecule and the conventional charmonium has to be considered to identify this state with X(3872). For the BB* system, the pseudoscalar-vector systems with C=B=1 and C=-B=1, near threshold molecular states may exist. These bound states should be rather narrow, isospin is violated and the I=0 component is dominant. Experimental search channels for these states are suggested.

  8. The 2.1 Å resolution structure of cyanopindolol-bound β1-adrenoceptor identifies an intramembrane Na+ ion that stabilises the ligand-free receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Miller-Gallacher

    Full Text Available The β1-adrenoceptor (β1AR is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR that is activated by the endogenous agonists adrenaline and noradrenaline. We have determined the structure of an ultra-thermostable β1AR mutant bound to the weak partial agonist cyanopindolol to 2.1 Å resolution. High-quality crystals (100 μm plates were grown in lipidic cubic phase without the assistance of a T4 lysozyme or BRIL fusion in cytoplasmic loop 3, which is commonly employed for GPCR crystallisation. An intramembrane Na+ ion was identified co-ordinated to Asp872.50, Ser1283.39 and 3 water molecules, which is part of a more extensive network of water molecules in a cavity formed between transmembrane helices 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7. Remarkably, this water network and Na+ ion is highly conserved between β1AR and the adenosine A2A receptor (rmsd of 0.3 Å, despite an overall rmsd of 2.4 Å for all Cα atoms and only 23% amino acid identity in the transmembrane regions. The affinity of agonist binding and nanobody Nb80 binding to β1AR is unaffected by Na+ ions, but the stability of the receptor is decreased by 7.5°C in the absence of Na+. Mutation of amino acid side chains that are involved in the co-ordination of either Na+ or water molecules in the network decreases the stability of β1AR by 5-10°C. The data suggest that the intramembrane Na+ and associated water network stabilise the ligand-free state of β1AR, but still permits the receptor to form the activated state which involves the collapse of the Na+ binding pocket on agonist binding.

  9. Vortex molecule in a nanoscopic square superconducting plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suematsu, Hisataka; Kato, Masaru; Ishida, Takekazu; Koyama, Tomio; Machida, Masahiko

    2010-01-01

    Using the finite element method and solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation, we have investigated magnetic field dependence of the stable vortex structures in a mesoscopic superconducting plate at low temperature (T = 0.1T c ). Because of the compactness of vortex configuration, there is interference between bound states around vortices and such quasi-particle structure affects the vortex configuration. Especially in two-vortices state, vortices form a molecule-like state, where bound states of each vortex form molecular orbital like bonding and anti-bonding states. The vortex configuration is different from that, which is expected from the repulsive interaction between vortices. (author)

  10. MOLECULES IN η CARINAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection toward η Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO + , HCN, HNC, and N 2 H + , and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13 CO and H 13 CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (∼100 km s –1 ), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO + do not appear to be underabundant in η Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13 C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of η Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  11. Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chovanec, A.; Grath, J.; Kralik, M.; Vogel, W.

    2002-01-01

    An up-date overview of the situation of the Austrian waters is given by analyzing the status of the water quality (groundwater, surface waters) and water protection measures. Maps containing information of nitrate and atrazine in groundwaters (analyses at monitoring stations), nitrate contents and biological water quality of running waters are included. Finally, pollutants (nitrate, orthophosphate, ammonium, nitrite, atrazine etc.) trends in annual mean values and median values for the whole country for the years 1992-1999 are presented in tables. Figs. 5. (nevyjel)

  12. Electron Accumulative Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buades, Ana B; Sanchez Arderiu, Víctor; Olid-Britos, David; Viñas, Clara; Sillanpää, Reijo; Haukka, Matti; Fontrodona, Xavier; Paradinas, Markos; Ocal, Carmen; Teixidor, Francesc

    2018-02-28

    With the goal to produce molecules with high electron accepting capacity and low reorganization energy upon gaining one or more electrons, a synthesis procedure leading to the formation of a B-N(aromatic) bond in a cluster has been developed. The research was focused on the development of a molecular structure able to accept and release a specific number of electrons without decomposing or change in its structural arrangement. The synthetic procedure consists of a parallel decomposition reaction to generate a reactive electrophile and a synthesis reaction to generate the B-N(aromatic) bond. This procedure has paved the way to produce the metallacarboranylviologen [M(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )-NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-M'(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )] (M = M' = Co, Fe and M = Co and M' = Fe) and semi(metallacarboranyl)viologen [3,3'-M(8-(NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-1,2-C 2 B 9 H 10 )(1',2'-C 2 B 9 H 11 )] (M = Co, Fe) electron cumulative molecules. These molecules are able to accept up to five electrons and to donate one in single electron steps at accessible potentials and in a reversible way. By targeted synthesis and corresponding electrochemical tests each electron transfer (ET) step has been assigned to specific fragments of the molecules. The molecules have been carefully characterized, and the electronic communication between both metal centers (when this situation applies) has been definitely observed through the coplanarity of both pyridine fragments. The structural characteristics of these molecules imply a low reorganization energy that is a necessary requirement for low energy ET processes. This makes them electronically comparable to fullerenes, but on their side, they have a wide range of possible solvents. The ET from one molecule to another has been clearly demonstrated as well as their self-organizing capacity. We consider that these molecules, thanks to their easy synthesis, ET, self-organizing capacity, wide range of solubility, and easy processability, can

  13. Attosecond electron dynamics in molecules and liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    WöRner, Hans Jakob

    The ultrafast motion of electrons and holes following light-matter interaction is fundamental to a broad range of chemical and biophysical processes. In this lecture, I will discuss some of our recent experiments that measure the atomic-scale motion of charge with attosecond temporal resolution (1 as = 10-18s). The first experiment is carried out on isolated, spatially oriented molecules in the gas phase. Using high-harmonic spectroscopy, we resolve the migration of an electron hole across the molecule with a resolution of 100 as and simultaneously demonstrate extensive control over charge migration. In the second class of experiments, we use an attosecond pulse train synchronized with a near-infrared laser pulse to temporally resolve the process of photoemission from molecules in the gas phase and from a liquid-water microjet, resolving electron transport through liquid water on the attosecond time scale.

  14. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be found in some metal water taps, interior water pipes, or pipes connecting a house to ... reduce or eliminate lead. See resources below. 5. Children and pregnant women are especially vulnerable to the ...

  15. Continuous bounded cohomology of locally compact groups

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    Recent research has repeatedly led to connections between important rigidity questions and bounded cohomology. However, the latter has remained by and large intractable. This monograph introduces the functorial study of the continuous bounded cohomology for topological groups, with coefficients in Banach modules. The powerful techniques of this more general theory have successfully solved a number of the original problems in bounded cohomology. As applications, one obtains, in particular, rigidity results for actions on the circle, for representations on complex hyperbolic spaces and on Teichmüller spaces. A special effort has been made to provide detailed proofs or references in quite some generality.

  16. Positivity bounds on double parton distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, Markus; Kasemets, Tomas

    2013-03-01

    Double hard scattering in proton-proton collisions is described in terms of double parton distributions. We derive bounds on these distributions that follow from their interpretation as probability densities, taking into account all possible spin correlations between two partons in an unpolarized proton. These bounds constrain the size of the polarized distributions and can for instance be used to set upper limits on the effects of spin correlations in double hard scattering. We show that the bounds are stable under leading-order DGLAP evolution to higher scales.

  17. Remarks on Bousso's covariant entropy bound

    CERN Document Server

    Mayo, A E

    2002-01-01

    Bousso's covariant entropy bound is put to the test in the context of a non-singular cosmological solution of general relativity found by Bekenstein. Although the model complies with every assumption made in Bousso's original conjecture, the entropy bound is violated due to the occurrence of negative energy density associated with the interaction of some the matter components in the model. We demonstrate how this property allows for the test model to 'elude' a proof of Bousso's conjecture which was given recently by Flanagan, Marolf and Wald. This corroborates the view that the covariant entropy bound should be applied only to stable systems for which every matter component carries positive energy density.

  18. The bound state problem and quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaichian, M.; Demichev, A.P.; Nelipa, N.F.

    1980-01-01

    A quantum field-theoretic model in which quark is confined is considered. System of equations for the Green functions of colour singlet and octet bound states is obtained. The method is based on the nonperturbative Schwinger-Dyson equations with the use of Slavnov-Taylor identities. It is shown that in the framework of the model if there exist singlet, then also exist octet bound states of the quark-antiquark system. Thus in general, confinement of free quarks does not mean absence of their coloured bound states. (author)

  19. Quasi-bound states in continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroaki; Hatano, Naomichi; Garmon, Sterling; Petrosky, Tomio

    2007-08-01

    We report the prediction of quasi-bound states (resonant states with very long lifetimes) that occur in the eigenvalue continuum of propagating states for a wide region of parameter space. These quasi-bound states are generated in a quantum wire with two channels and an adatom, when the energy bands of the two channels overlap. A would-be bound state that lays just below the upper energy band is slightly destabilized by the lower energy band and thereby becomes a resonant state with a very long lifetime (a second QBIC lays above the lower energy band). (author)

  20. Computational experience with a parallel algorithm for tetrangle inequality bound smoothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, K; Deo, N

    1999-09-01

    Determining molecular structure from interatomic distances is an important and challenging problem. Given a molecule with n atoms, lower and upper bounds on interatomic distances can usually be obtained only for a small subset of the 2(n(n-1)) atom pairs, using NMR. Given the bounds so obtained on the distances between some of the atom pairs, it is often useful to compute tighter bounds on all the 2(n(n-1)) pairwise distances. This process is referred to as bound smoothing. The initial lower and upper bounds for the pairwise distances not measured are usually assumed to be 0 and infinity. One method for bound smoothing is to use the limits imposed by the triangle inequality. The distance bounds so obtained can often be tightened further by applying the tetrangle inequality--the limits imposed on the six pairwise distances among a set of four atoms (instead of three for the triangle inequalities). The tetrangle inequality is expressed by the Cayley-Menger determinants. For every quadruple of atoms, each pass of the tetrangle inequality bound smoothing procedure finds upper and lower limits on each of the six distances in the quadruple. Applying the tetrangle inequalities to each of the (4n) quadruples requires O(n4) time. Here, we propose a parallel algorithm for bound smoothing employing the tetrangle inequality. Each pass of our algorithm requires O(n3 log n) time on a REW PRAM (Concurrent Read Exclusive Write Parallel Random Access Machine) with O(log(n)n) processors. An implementation of this parallel algorithm on the Intel Paragon XP/S and its performance are also discussed.

  1. Single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy: concluding remarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hulst, Niek F

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is all about molecules: control, synthesis, interaction and reaction of molecules. All too easily on a blackboard, one draws molecules, their structures and dynamics, to create an insightful picture. The dream is to see these molecules in reality. This is exactly what "Single Molecule Detection" provides: a look at molecules in action at ambient conditions; a breakthrough technology in chemistry, physics and biology. Within the realms of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Faraday Discussion on "Single Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy" was a very appropriate topic for presentation, deliberation and debate. Undoubtedly, the Faraday Discussions have a splendid reputation in stimulating scientific debates along the traditions set by Michael Faraday. Interestingly, back in the 1830's, Faraday himself pursued an experiment that led to the idea that atoms in a compound were joined by an electrical component. He placed two opposite electrodes in a solution of water containing a dissolved compound, and observed that one of the elements of the compound accumulated on one electrode, while the other was deposited on the opposite electrode. Although Faraday was deeply opposed to atomism, he had to recognize that electrical forces were responsible for the joining of atoms. Probably a direct view on the atoms or molecules in his experiment would have convinced him. As such, Michael Faraday might have liked the gathering at Burlington House in September 2015 (). Surely, with the questioning eyes of his bust on the 1st floor corridor, the non-believer Michael Faraday has incited each passer-by to enter into discussion and search for deeper answers at the level of single molecules. In these concluding remarks, highlights of the presented papers and discussions are summarized, complemented by a conclusion on future perspectives.

  2. Incoherent neutron scattering functions for random jump diffusion in bounded and infinite media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, P.L.; Ross, D.K.

    1981-01-01

    The incoherent neutron scattering function for unbounded jump diffusion is calculated from random walk theory assuming a gaussian distribution of jump lengths. The method is then applied to calculate the scattering function for spatially bounded random jumps in one dimension. The dependence on momentum transfer of the quasi-elastic energy broadenings predicted by this model and a previous model for bounded one-dimensional continuous diffusion are calculated and compared with the predictions of models for diffusion in unbounded media. The one-dimensional solutions can readily be generalized to three dimensions to provide a description of quasi-elastic scattering of neutrons by molecules undergoing localized random motions. (author)

  3. Cytoskeleton and Cytoskeleton-Bound RNA Visualization in Frog and Insect Oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloc, Malgorzata; Bilinski, Szczepan; Kubiak, Jacek Z

    2016-01-01

    The majority of oocyte functions involves and depends on the cytoskeletal elements, which include microtubules and actin and cytokeratin filaments. Various structures and molecules are temporarily or permanently bound to the cytoskeletal elements and their functions rely on cytoskeleton integrity and its timely assembly. Thus the accurate visualization of cytoskeleton is often crucial for studies and analyses of oocyte structure and functions. Here we describe several reliable methods for microtubule and/or microfilaments preservation and visualization in Xenopus oocyte extracts, and in situ in live and fixed insect and frog (Xenopus) oocytes. In addition, we describe visualization of cytoskeleton-bound RNAs using molecular beacons in live Xenopus oocytes.

  4. Determination of surface concentrations of individual molecule-layers used in nanoscale biosensors by in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Punzet, Manuel; Baurecht, Dieter; Varga, Franz; Karlic, Heidrun; Heitzinger, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    formation of typical functionalization protocols and to determine the respective molecule surface concentrations. BSA, anti-TNF-α and anti-PSA antibodies were bound via 3-(trimethoxy)butylsilyl aldehyde linkers to silicon-oxide surfaces in order

  5. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Molecule of the Month Isomers of Benzene - Still Pursuing Dreams. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 80-83. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  6. Electrons in Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    structure and properties (includingreactivt'ty) - both static (independent of time) and ... Furthermore, since the energy of H2 + in the ground state must be lower than that of .... (Figure 2b); note also that dp is positive in parts of the antibinding regions behind the two ... But, now both the sizes and shapes of molecules enter into.

  7. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - A Stable Dibismuthene - A Compound with a Bi-Bi Double Bond. V Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 ... Author Affiliations. V Chandrasekhar1. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, India.

  8. OMG: Open molecule generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peironcely, J.E.; Rojas-Chertó, M.; Fichera, D.; Reijmers, T.; Coulier, L.; Faulon, J.-L.; Hankemeier, T.

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical

  9. Molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Employing self-assembly methods, it is possible to engineer a bulk molecular material ... synthesis of molecular magnets in 1986, a large variety of them have been synthesized, which can be catego- ... maintained stably per organic molecule, stabilization of a ..... rotating freely under an applied field because it is a magne-.

  10. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 5. Molecule of the Month Molecular–Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best! Photon Rao. Feature Article Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 69-72. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  11. Efficient production of long-lived ultracold Sr2 molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciamei, Alessio; Bayerle, Alex; Chen, Chun-Chia; Pasquiou, Benjamin; Schreck, Florian

    2017-07-01

    We associate Sr atom pairs on sites of a Mott insulator optically and coherently into weakly bound ground-state molecules, achieving an efficiency above 80%. This efficiency is 2.5 times higher than in our previous work [S. Stellmer, B. Pasquiou, R. Grimm, and F. Schreck, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 115302 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.115302] and obtained through two improvements. First, the lifetime of the molecules is increased beyond one minute by using an optical lattice wavelength that is further detuned from molecular transitions. Second, we compensate undesired dynamic light shifts that occur during the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) used for molecule association. We also characterize and model STIRAP, providing insights into its limitations. Our work shows that significant molecule association efficiencies can be achieved even for atomic species or mixtures that lack Feshbach resonances suitable for magnetoassociation.

  12. Layers of Cold Dipolar Molecules in the Harmonic Approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    R. Armstrong, J.; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas; V. Fedorov, D.

    2012-01-01

    We consider the N-body problem in a layered geometry containing cold polar molecules with dipole moments that are polarized perpendicular to the layers. A harmonic approximation is used to simplify the hamiltonian and bound state properties of the two-body inter-layer dipolar potential are used...... to adjust this effective interaction. To model the intra-layer repulsion of the polar molecules, we introduce a repulsive inter-molecule potential that can be parametrically varied. Single chains containing one molecule in each layer, as well as multi-chain structures in many layers are discussed...... and their energies and radii determined. We extract the normal modes of the various systems as measures of their volatility and eventually of instability, and compare our findings to the excitations in crystals. We find modes that can be classified as either chains vibrating in phase or as layers vibrating against...

  13. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  14. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peironcely Julio E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG, which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  15. Tight Bounds for Distributed Functional Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodruff, David P.; Zhang, Qin

    2011-01-01

    $, our bound resolves their main open question. Our lower bounds are based on new direct sum theorems for approximate majority, and yield significant improvements to problems in the data stream model, improving the bound for estimating $F_p, p > 2,$ in $t$ passes from $\\tilde{\\Omega}(n^{1-2/p}/(\\eps^{2/p......} t))$ to $\\tilde{\\Omega}(n^{1-2/p}/(\\eps^{4/p} t))$, giving the first bound for estimating $F_0$ in $t$ passes of $\\Omega(1/(\\eps^2 t))$ bits of space that does not use the gap-hamming problem, and showing a distribution for the gap-hamming problem with high external information cost or super...

  16. Redshift-space limits of bound structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duenner, Rolando; Reisenegger, Andreas; Meza, Andres; Araya, Pablo A.; Quintana, Hernan

    2007-01-01

    An exponentially expanding Universe, possibly governed by a cosmological constant, forces gravitationally bound structures to become more and more isolated, eventually becoming causally disconnected from each other and forming so-called 'island universes'. This new scenario reformulates the question

  17. Density functional theory studies on the solvent effects in Al(H2O)63+ water-exchange reactions: the number and arrangement of outer-sphere water molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Jing; Dong, Shaonan; Zhang, Fuping; Wang, Ye; Bi, Shuping

    2018-03-07

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations combined with cluster models are performed at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level for investigating the solvent effects in Al(H 2 O) 6 3+ water-exchange reactions. A "One-by-one" method is proposed to obtain the most representative number and arrangement of explicit H 2 Os in the second hydration sphere. First, all the possible ways to locate one explicit H 2 O in second sphere (N m ' = 1) based on the gas phase structure (N m ' = 0) are examined, and the optimal pathway (with the lowest energy barrier) for N m ' = 1 is determined. Next, more explicit H 2 Os are added one by one until the inner-sphere is fully hydrogen bonded. Finally, the optimal pathways with N m ' = 0-7 are obtained. The structural and energetic parameters as well as the lifetimes of the transition states are compared with the results obtained with the "Independent-minimum" method and the "Independent-average" method, and all three methods show that the pathway with N m ' = 6 may be representative. Our results give a new idea for finding the representative pathway for water-exchange reactions in other hydrated metal ion systems.

  18. Error Bounds: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Outrata, Jiří; Kruger, A.Y.; Fabian, Marián; Henrion, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2010), s. 121-149 ISSN 1877-0533 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506; CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Error bounds * Calmness * Subdifferential * Slope Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.333, year: 2010 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/MTR/outrata-error bounds necessary and sufficient conditions.pdf

  19. Malabsorption of protein bound vitamin B12.

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, D W; Sawers, A H; Sharma, R K

    1984-01-01

    Patients with subnormal serum vitamin B12 concentrations were tested for absorption of protein bound vitamin B12 and compared with controls. Absorption of the protein bound vitamin appeared to decrease with increasing age in healthy subjects. Differences between the result of this test and the result of the Schilling test in patients who had undergone gastric surgery were confirmed; such differences were also seen in some patients who had iron deficiency anaemia, an excessive alcohol intake, ...

  20. New Spectral Features from Bound Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catena, Riccardo; Kouvaris, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that dark matter particles gravitationally bound to the Earth can induce a characteristic nuclear recoil signal at low energies in direct detection experiments. The new spectral feature we predict can provide the ultimate smoking gun for dark matter discovery for experiments...... with positive signal but unclear background. The new feature is universal, in that the ratio of bound over halo dark matter event rates at detectors is independent of the dark matter-nucleon cross section....