WorldWideScience

Sample records for bound qq systems

  1. Bounding approaches to system identification

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, John; Piet-Lahanier, Hélène; Walter, Éric

    1996-01-01

    In response to the growing interest in bounding error approaches, the editors of this volume offer the first collection of papers to describe advances in techniques and applications of bounding of the parameters, or state variables, of uncertain dynamical systems. Contributors explore the application of the bounding approach as an alternative to the probabilistic analysis of such systems, relating its importance to robust control-system design.

  2. Performance and LHC beam stability issue related to Q/Q' diagnostics and feedback systems

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhagen, Ralph J

    2010-01-01

    The baseline tune (Q) and chromaticity (Q’) diagnostics and associated feedback systems played a crucial role during the LHC commissioning, in establishing circulating beam, the first ramps and their fill-to-fill feed-forward correction. Early on, they also allowed to identify issues such as the residual tune stability, beam spectrum interferences and beam-beam effects – all of which may impact beam lifetimes and thus need to be addressed in view of nominal LHC operation.

  3. Match-bounded String Rewriting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geser, Alfons; Hofbauer, Dieter; Waldmann, Johannes

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a new class of automated proof methods for the termination of rewriting systems on strings. The basis of all these methods is to show that rewriting preserves regular languages. To this end, letters are annotated with natural numbers, called match heights. If the minimal height of all positions in a redex is h+1 then every position in the reduct will get height h+1. In a match-bounded system, match heights are globally bounded. Using recent results on deleting systems, we prove that rewriting by a match-bounded system preserves regular languages. Hence it is decidable whether a given rewriting system has a given match bound. We also provide a sufficient criterion for the abence of a match-bound. The problem of existence of a match-bound is still open. Match-boundedness for all strings can be used as an automated criterion for termination, for match-bounded systems are terminating. This criterion can be strengthened by requiring match-boundedness only for a restricted set of strings, for instance the set of right hand sides of forward closures.

  4. Interplays among the masses, mixing parameters, and couplings of the 1++ and 1+- qq¯-meson system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneda, Sadao; Miyazaki, Akihito

    1989-11-01

    Despite the old prediction mA1= √2 mρ from the spectral function sum rules, the mass of the isovector 1++ meson A1 [now a1(1270)] is indicated to be close to that of the isovector 1+- meson b1(1235). In this paper, we address the question ``Is there any dynamical reason to expect the approximate degeneracy of the masses of a1(1270) and b1(1235)\\?'' From the theoretical framework of ``asymptotic flavor symmetry plus hadron constraining algebras involving the generators of underlying symmetry groups of QCD,'' we present an argument which shows that the answer is yes. Interesting intimate interplays among the masses, mixing parameters, and the coupling constants of the 1++ and 1+- nonet systems are demonstrated. The mass degeneracy is closely related to the presence of dynamical selection rules observed.

  5. Landauer Bound for Analog Computing Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Diamantini, M. Cristina; Trugenberger, Carlo A.

    2016-01-01

    By establishing a relation between information erasure and continuous phase transitions we generalise the Landauer bound to analog computing systems. The entropy production per degree of freedom during erasure of an analog variable (reset to standard value) is given by the logarithm of the configurational volume measured in units of its minimal quantum. As a consequence every computation has to be carried on with a finite number of bits and infinite precision is forbidden by the fundamental laws of physics, since it would require an infinite amount of energy.

  6. A lower bound of concurrence for multipartite quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xue-Na; Li, Ming; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2018-02-01

    We present a lower bound of concurrence for four-partite systems in terms of the concurrence for M (2≤ M≤ 3) part quantum systems and give an analytical lower bound for 2⊗ 2⊗ 2⊗ 2 mixed quantum sates. It is shown that these lower bounds are able to improve the existing bounds and detect entanglement better. Furthermore, our approach can be generalized to multipartite quantum systems.

  7. The S-matrix for systems with bound states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijgrok, Th.W.

    A unitary S-matrix is defined for a system of three particles, two of which can form a bound state. It is shown how for elastic scattering the polarization of the bound state must be taken into account.

  8. Semirelativistic N-boson systems bound by attractive pair potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Richard L [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Boulevard West, Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1M8 (Canada); Lucha, Wolfgang [Institute for High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: rhall@mathstat.concordia.ca, E-mail: wolfgang.lucha@oeaw.ac.at

    2009-10-02

    We establish bounds on the energy of a system of N identical bosons bound by attractive pair potentials and obeying the semirelativistic Salpeter equation. The lower bound is provided by a 'reduction', with the aid of Jacobi relative coordinates, to a suitably scaled one-body Klein-Gordon problem. Complementary upper energy bounds are provided by means of a Gaussian trial function. Detailed results are presented for the exponential pair potential V(r) = -vexp(-r/a)

  9. Search for a bound K− pp system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camerini P.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Data from the K− absorption reaction on 6,7Li, 9Be, 13C and 16O have recently been collected by FINUDA at the DAΦNE φ-factory (Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati-INFN, following an earlier lower statitics run on 12C and some other targets. FINUDA is a high acceptance magnetic spectrometer which performed a wide range of studies by detecting the charged particles and neutrons exiting the targets after the absorption event. In this paper it is discussed about the study of the A(K− , Λp reaction in the context of the search for deeply bound $ar{K}$ - nuclear states. The observation of a bump in the Λp invariant mass distribution is discussed in terms of a possible signature of a deeply bound K− pp kaonic cluster as well as of more conventional physics. An overview of the experimental situation in this field will be given.

  10. Breaking of PT Symmetry in Bounded and Unbounded Scattering Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Ambichl

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available PT-symmetric scattering systems with balanced gain and loss can undergo a symmetry-breaking transition in which the eigenvalues of the nonunitary scattering matrix change their phase shifts from real to complex values. We relate the PT-symmetry-breaking points of such an unbounded scattering system to those of the underlying bounded systems. In particular, we show how the PT thresholds in the scattering matrix of the unbounded system translate into analogous transitions in the Robin boundary conditions of the corresponding bounded systems. Based on this relation, we argue and then confirm that the PT transitions in the scattering matrix are, under very general conditions, entirely insensitive to a variable coupling strength between the bounded region and the unbounded asymptotic region, a result that can be tested experimentally and visualized using the concept of Smith charts.

  11. Breaking of PT Symmetry in Bounded and Unbounded Scattering Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambichl, Philipp; Makris, Konstantinos G.; Ge, Li; Chong, Yidong; Stone, A. Douglas; Rotter, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    PT-symmetric scattering systems with balanced gain and loss can undergo a symmetry-breaking transition in which the eigenvalues of the non-unitary scattering matrix change their phase shifts from real to complex values. We relate the PT-symmetry breaking points of such an unbounded scattering system to those of underlying bounded systems. In particular, we show how the PT-thresholds in the scattering matrix of the unbounded system translate into analogous transitions in the Robin boundary conditions of the corresponding bounded systems. Based on this relation, we argue and then confirm that the PT-transitions in the scattering matrix are, under very general conditions, entirely insensitive to a variable coupling strength between the bounded region and the unbounded asymptotic region, a result that can be tested experimentally and visualized using the concept of Smith charts.

  12. Regularity bounds on Zakharov system evolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Colliander

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Spatial regularity properties of certain global-in-time solutions of the Zakharov system are established. In particular, the evolving solution $u(t$ is shown to satisfy an estimate $|u(t|_{H^s} leq C |t|^{(s-1+}$, where $H^s$ is the standard spatial Sobolev norm. The proof is an adaptation of earlier work on the nonlinear Schrodinger equation which reduces matters to bilinear estimates.

  13. String percolation threshold for elliptically bounded systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, J. E.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Bautista, I.

    2017-12-01

    It has been shown that a hot and dense deconfined nuclear matter state produced in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, can be quantitatively described by the String Percolation phenomenological model. The model address the phase transition in terms of the two-dimensional continuum percolation theory over strings, which are schematic representations of the fundamental interactions among the partons of the colliding nuclei in the initial state. In this work, we present an extension of the critical string density results including the eccentricity dependence on the initial state geometry focus on small string number with different density profile, small deviations from the different profile densities are found. The percolation threshold shows consistency with the thermodynamic limit for the uniform density profile with a large number of strings in the case of circular boundary system. A significant dependence on the eccentricity for a small number of strings compared to high occupancy systems is exhibited, the implications may become relevant in hadron-hadron or hadron-nucleus collision systems.

  14. Computation in Dynamically Bounded Asymmetric Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, Ueli; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Douglas, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Previous explanations of computations performed by recurrent networks have focused on symmetrically connected saturating neurons and their convergence toward attractors. Here we analyze the behavior of asymmetrical connected networks of linear threshold neurons, whose positive response is unbounded. We show that, for a wide range of parameters, this asymmetry brings interesting and computationally useful dynamical properties. When driven by input, the network explores potential solutions through highly unstable ‘expansion’ dynamics. This expansion is steered and constrained by negative divergence of the dynamics, which ensures that the dimensionality of the solution space continues to reduce until an acceptable solution manifold is reached. Then the system contracts stably on this manifold towards its final solution trajectory. The unstable positive feedback and cross inhibition that underlie expansion and divergence are common motifs in molecular and neuronal networks. Therefore we propose that very simple organizational constraints that combine these motifs can lead to spontaneous computation and so to the spontaneous modification of entropy that is characteristic of living systems. PMID:25617645

  15. Stability and response bounds of non-conservative linear systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kliem, Wolfhard; Pommer, Christian

    2004-01-01

    This paper develops a stability theorem and response bounds for non-conservative systems of the form MX + (D + G)x + (K + N)x = f(t), with hermitian positive-definite matrices M, D and K, and skew-hermitian matrices G and N. To this end, we first find a Lyapunov function by solving the Lyapunov...... matrix equation. Then, if a system satisfies the condition of the stability theorem, the associated Lyapunov function can be used to obtain response bounds for the norms as well as for the individual coordinates of the solution. Examples from rotor dynamics illustrate the results....

  16. Linear lower bounds and simulations in Frege systems with substitutions

    OpenAIRE

    Bonet Carbonell, M. Luisa; Galesi, Nicola

    1996-01-01

    Our work concerns Frege systems, substitution Frege systems (sF), renaming Frege systems, top/bottom-Frege systems and extended Frege systems (eF). Urquhart shows that tautologies associated to a binary strings require Omega(n/log n) lines to be proved in sF. Here we prove, by giving a sF proof of O(n/log n) lines in substitution Frege, that his lower bound is optimal and we show that in the tree-like case Omega(n) lines are required for a p...

  17. Applied Bounded Model Checking for Interlocking System Designs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxthausen, Anne Elisabeth; Peleska, Jan; Pinger, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    In this article the verification and validation of interlocking systems is investigated. Reviewing both geographical and route-related interlocking, the verification objectives can be structured from a perspective of computer science into (1) verification of static semantics, and (2) verification...... of behavioural (operational) semantics. The former checks that the plant model – that is, the software components reflecting the physical components of the interlocking system – has been set up in an adequate way. The latter investigates trains moving through the network, with the objective to uncover potential...... safety violations. From a formal methods perspective, these verification objectives can be approached by theorem proving, global, or bounded model checking. This article explains the techniques for application of bounded model checking techniques, and discusses their advantages in comparison...

  18. bounding the error of a continuous approximation for linear systems

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR S.E UWAMUSI

    The error analysis in LU factorization can be seen as follows: Assuming that d* is an approximate solution to the system of equations (1.1). We consider the problem of calculating the bounds of. ∞. -. - *. 1 d b. A where. ∞ d is the infinity norm in n. IR . We suppose that there is an approximate inverse matrix B to the interval ...

  19. Control of Rate-Bounded Hybrid Systems with Liveness Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, Michael; Lin, Feng; Meyer, George

    1998-01-01

    In the present paper we examine the control problem for a class of composite hybrid machines (CHMs) that consist of concurrent operation (employing synchronous composition) of elementary hybrid machines (EHMs), that allows both signal sharing and event synchronization. A controller can then be coupled with the plant by means of synchronous composition. We confine our attention to controllers that interact with the system only through event synchronization. We present an initial investigation of synthesis of liveness controllers for hybrid machines. To this end we define open hybrid machines as systems that can interact with the environment through event synchronization and can be therefor be "driven" to their marked configuration by user (controller). Liveness specifications must be associated with timing constraints. We may require that for a specified time limit, every run reach a marked configuration within that time limit. Alternatively, a more relaxed specification may be that, for some (unspecified) global time bound, every run of the system reach a marked configuration within that time bound. Finally, the least restrictive liveness requirement is that every run reach a marked configuration within a finite time limit (but we do not insist on the existence of a global time bound for all runs).

  20. Probing infinity in bounded two-dimensional electrostatic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abutalib, M; Batle, J; Ooi, C H Raymond

    2016-07-01

    The total electrostatic energy of systems of identical particles of equal charge is studied in configurations bounded in space, but divergent in the number of charges. This approach shall guide us to unveil a non-linear, functional form specifying the divergent nature of system energy. We consider fractals to be physical entities, with charges located in their vertices or nodes. This description is interesting since features, such as the corresponding fractal dimension, can characterize the total energy EN. Finally, at local length scales, we describe how energy diverges at charge accumulation points in the fractal, that is, almost everywhere by definition.

  1. A narrow quasi-bound state of the DNN system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doté, A., E-mail: dote@post.kek.jp [KEK Theory Center, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies (IPNS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan); J-PARC Branch, KEK Theory Center, IPNS, KEK, 203-1, Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki, 319-1106 (Japan); Bayar, M. [Departamento de Física Teórica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigación de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Department of Physics, Kocaeli University, 41380 Izmit (Turkey); Xiao, C.W. [Departamento de Física Teórica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigación de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Hyodo, T. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, 152-8551 (Japan); Oka, M. [J-PARC Branch, KEK Theory Center, IPNS, KEK, 203-1, Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki, 319-1106 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, 152-8551 (Japan); Oset, E. [Departamento de Física Teórica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigación de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2013-09-20

    We have investigated a charmed system of DNN (composed of two nucleons and a D meson) by a complementary study with a variational calculation and a Faddeev calculation with fixed-center approximation (Faddeev-FCA). In the present study, we employ a DN potential based on a vector–meson exchange picture in which a resonant Λ{sub c}(2595) is dynamically generated as a DN quasi-bound state, similarly to the Λ(1405) as a K{sup ¯}N one in the strange sector. As a result of the study of variational calculation with an effective DN potential and three kinds of NN potentials, the DNN(J{sup π}=0{sup −},I=1/2) is found to be a narrow quasi-bound state below Λ{sub c}(2595)N threshold: total binding energy ∼225 MeV and mesonic decay width ∼25 MeV. On the other hand, the J{sup π}=1{sup −} state is considered to be a scattering state of Λ{sub c}(2595) and a nucleon. These results are essentially supported by the Faddeev-FCA calculation. By the analysis of the variational wave function, we have found a unique structure in the DNN(J{sup π}=0{sup −},I=1/2) such that the D meson stays around the center of the total system due to the heaviness of the D meson.

  2. Deciding Termination for Ancestor Match- Bounded String Rewriting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geser, Alfons; Hofbauer, Dieter; Waldmann, Johannes

    2005-01-01

    Termination of a string rewriting system can be characterized by termination on suitable recursively defined languages. This kind of termination criteria has been criticized for its lack of automation. In an earlier paper we have shown how to construct an automated termination criterion if the recursion is aligned with the rewrite relation. We have demonstrated the technique with Dershowitz's forward closure criterion. In this paper we show that a different approach is suitable when the recursion is aligned with the inverse of the rewrite relation. We apply this idea to Kurth's ancestor graphs and obtain ancestor match-bounded string rewriting systems. Termination is shown to be decidable for this class. The resulting method improves upon those based on match-boundedness or inverse match-boundedness.

  3. Lower bound of multipartite concurrence based on sub-partite quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhu, Xue-Na; Fei, Shao-Ming; Zheng, Zhu-Jun

    2017-12-01

    We study the concurrence of arbitrary dimensional multipartite quantum systems. An explicit analytical lower bound of concurrence for four-partite mixed states is obtained in terms of the concurrences of tripartite mixed states. Detailed examples are given to show that our lower bounds improve the existing lower bounds of concurrence. The approach is generalized to five-partite quantum systems.

  4. Positive blowup solutions for some fractional systems in bounded domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramzi Alsaedi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using some potential theory tools and the Schauder fixed point theorem, we prove the existence of a positive continuous weak solution for the fractional system $$ ( -Delta ^{alpha/2}u+ p(xu^{sigma }v^{r}=0,quad (-Delta^{alpha/2}v+q(xu^{s}v^{eta }=0 $$ in a bounded $ C^{1,1}$-domain D in $mathbb{R}^{n}$ $(ngeq 3$, subject to Dirichlet conditions, where $0

  5. Mass spectrum bound state systems with relativistic corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dineykhan, M; Zhaugasheva, S A [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Toinbaeva, N Sh; Jakhanshir, A [al-Farabi Kazak National University, 480012 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2009-07-28

    Based on the investigation of the asymptotic behaviour of the polarization loop function for charged n scalar particles in an external gauge field, we determine the interaction Hamiltonian including relativistic corrections. The mass spectrum of the bound state is analytically derived. The mechanism for arising of the constituent mass of the relativistic bound-state forming particles is explained. The mass and the constituent mass of the two-, three- and n-body relativistic bound states are calculated taking into account relativistic corrections. The corrections arising due to the one- and two-loop electron polarization to the energy spectrum of muonic hydrogen with orbital and radial excitations are calculated.

  6. qq-production at NLO merged with parton-shower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hangst, Christian; Muehlleitner, Margarete [KIT - Institut fuer Theoretische Physik (Germany); Kraemer, Michael [RWTH Aachen University, Institut fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie (Germany); Popenda, Eva; Spira, Michael [Paul Scherrer Institut - Theory Group LTP (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01

    Precise predictions for the production of SUSY-particles at the LHC require the combination of fixed-order NLO-calculations and parton-showers. This so-called merging can be achieved via the POWHEG-method. I present some results obtained with this method for qq-production, based on the implementation of this process in the program-package POWHEG-BOX.

  7. Exotic tetraquark states with the qq anti Q anti Q configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Si-Qiang; Chen, Kan; Liu, Xiang [Lanzhou University, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou (China); Lanzhou University and Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Research Center for Hadron and CSR Physics, Lanzhou (China); Liu, Yan-Rui [Shandong University, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Particle Physics and Particle Irradiation (MOE), Jinan (China); Zhu, Shi-Lin [Peking University, School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Peking University, Center for High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-10-15

    In this work, we study systematically the mass splittings of the qq anti Q anti Q (q = u, d, s and Q = c, b) tetraquark states with the color-magnetic interaction by considering color mixing effects and estimate roughly their masses. We find that the color mixing effect is relatively important for the J{sup P} = 0{sup +} states and possible stable tetraquarks exist in the nn anti Q anti Q (n = u, d) and ns anti Q anti Q systems either with J = 0 or with J = 1. Possible decay patterns of the tetraquarks are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  8. Triply heavy tetraquark states with the QQ anti Q anti q configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kan; Liu, Xiang [Lanzhou University, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou (China); Lanzhou University and Institute of Modern Physics of CAS, Research Center for Hadron and CSR Physics, Lanzhou (China); Liu, Yan-Rui; Wu, Jing [Shandong University, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Particle Physics and Particle Irradiation (MOE), Jinan (China); Zhu, Shi-Lin [Peking University, School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Peking University, Center of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-01-15

    In the framework of the color-magnetic interaction, we systematically investigate the mass splittings of the QQ anti Q anti q tetraquark states and estimate their rough masses in this work. These systems include the explicitly exotic states cc anti b anti q and bb anti c anti q and the hidden exotic states cc anti c anti q, cb anti b anti q, bc anti c anti q, and bb anti b anti q. If a state around the estimated mass region can be observed, its nature as a genuine tetraquark is favored. The strong decay patterns shown here will be helpful to the experimental search for these exotic states. (orig.)

  9. Efficient Proof Engines for Bounded Model Checking of Hybrid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fränzle, Martin; Herde, Christian

    2005-01-01

    of the various optimizations that arise naturally in the bounded model checking context, e.g. isomorphic replication of learned conflict clauses or tailored decision strategies, and extends them to the hybrid domain. We demonstrate that those optimizations are crucial to the performance of the tool....

  10. Effects of Permanent Bounded Cyber-Attacks on Networked Control Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gerard, Benjamin; Voos, Holger; Li, Yumei; Darouach, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of permanent bounded cyber-attacks on networked control systems is treated. After a characterisation of malicious cyber attacks, the danger of permanent bounded cyber-attacks of two types is proved, the step attacks on system with invariant zero with zero real part and the free attacks. Simulation examples demonstrate the obtained results.

  11. Implementation of qq-production in the POWHEG-BOX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hangst, Christian; Muehlleitner, Margarete; Popenda, Eva [KIT - Institut fuer Theoretische Physik (Germany); Kraemer, Michael [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie; Spira, Michael [Paul Scherrer Institut - Theory Group LTP (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    Precise predictions for the production of SUSY-particles at the LHC in the framework of the MSSM make the combination of fixed-order NLO-calculations and parton-showers indispensable. The POWHEG-method is one of several existing possibilities to avoid in this step of the simulation the occurrence of the so called double-counting problem. I present the implementation of qq-production into the existing program POWHEG-BOX, which provides the process-independent steps of this method automatically.

  12. Majorana bound states in a coupled quantum-dot hybrid-nanowire system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, M. T.; Vaitiekenas, S.; Hansen, E. B.

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid nanowires combining semiconductor and superconductor materials appear well suited for the creation, detection, and control of Majorana bound states (MBSs). We demonstrate the emergence of MBSs from coalescing Andreev bound states (ABSs) in a hybrid InAs nanowire with epitaxial Al, using...... with the end-dot bound state, which is in agreement with a numerical model. The ABS/MBS spectra provide parameters that are useful for understanding topological superconductivity in this system....

  13. Termination Proofs for String Rewriting Systems via Inverse Match-Bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ricky (Technical Monitor); Geser, Alfons; Hofbauer, Dieter; Waldmann, Johannes

    2004-01-01

    Annotating a letter by a number, one can record information about its history during a reduction. A string rewriting system is called match-bounded if there is a global upper bound to these numbers. In earlier papers we established match-boundedness as a strong sufficient criterion for both termination and preservation of regular languages. We show now that the string rewriting system whose inverse (left and right hand sides exchanged) is match-bounded, also have exceptional properties, but slightly different ones. Inverse match-bounded systems effectively preserve context-free languages; their sets of normalized strings and their sets of immortal strings are effectively regular. These sets of strings can be used to decide the normalization, the termination and the uniform termination problems of inverse match-bounded systems. We also show that the termination problem is decidable in linear time, and that a certain strong reachability problem is deciable, thus solving two open problems of McNaughton's.

  14. Upper and Lower Bounds of Frequency Interval Gramians for a Class of Perturbed Linear Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2012-01-01

    if the system is controllable or observable, but also it is required to know the degree of controllability or observability of the system. Gramian matrices were introduced to address this issue by providing a quantitative measure for controllability and observability. In many applications, the information...... of uncertain systems. In this paper, we derive upper and lower bounds of frequency interval gramians under perturbations of an A-matrix in the state-space form. These bounds are obtained by solving algebraic Riccati equations. The results are further used to obtain upper and lower bounds of the frequency...

  15. An error bound for a discrete reduced order model of a linear multivariable system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saggaf, Ubaid M.; Franklin, Gene F.

    1987-01-01

    The design of feasible controllers for high dimension multivariable systems can be greatly aided by a method of model reduction. In order for the design based on the order reduction to include a guarantee of stability, it is sufficient to have a bound on the model error. Previous work has provided such a bound for continuous-time systems for algorithms based on balancing. In this note an L-infinity bound is derived for model error for a method of order reduction of discrete linear multivariable systems based on balancing.

  16. Estimation variance bounds of importance sampling simulations in digital communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, D.; Yao, K.

    1991-01-01

    In practical applications of importance sampling (IS) simulation, two basic problems are encountered, that of determining the estimation variance and that of evaluating the proper IS parameters needed in the simulations. The authors derive new upper and lower bounds on the estimation variance which are applicable to IS techniques. The upper bound is simple to evaluate and may be minimized by the proper selection of the IS parameter. Thus, lower and upper bounds on the improvement ratio of various IS techniques relative to the direct Monte Carlo simulation are also available. These bounds are shown to be useful and computationally simple to obtain. Based on the proposed technique, one can readily find practical suboptimum IS parameters. Numerical results indicate that these bounding techniques are useful for IS simulations of linear and nonlinear communication systems with intersymbol interference in which bit error rate and IS estimation variances cannot be obtained readily using prior techniques.

  17. Bound Chains of Tilted Dipoles in Layered Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Volosniev, A.; R. Armstrong, J.; V. Fedorov, D.

    2012-01-01

    Ultracold polar molecules in multilayered systems have been experimentally realized very recently. While experiments study these systems almost exclusively through their chemical reactivity, the outlook for creating and manipulating exotic few- and many-body physics in dipolar systems is fascinat...

  18. Stability and response bounds of non-conservative linear systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommer, Christian

    2003-01-01

    For a linear system of second order differential equations the stability is studied by Lyapunov's direct method. The Lyapunov matrix equation is solved and a sufficient condition for stability is expressed by the system matrices. For a system which satisfies the condition for stability the Lyapunov...

  19. Thermodynamics of small systems two volumes bound as one

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Terrel L

    1994-01-01

    This authoritative summary of the basics of small system, or nonmacroscopic, thermodynamics was written by the field's founder. Originally published in two volumes, the text remains essential reading in an area in which the practical aim is to derive equations that provide interconnections among various thermodynamic functions. Part I introduces the basics of small system thermodynamics, exploring environmental variables, noting throughout the ways in which small thermodynamic systems differ operationally from macroscopic systems. Part II explores binding on macromolecules and aggregation, completes the discussion of environmental variables, and includes brief summaries of certain special topics, including electric and magnetic fields, spherical drops and bubbles, and polydisperse systems.

  20. Information bounds and quickest change detection in decentralized decision systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mei, Yajun

    2005-01-01

    The quickest change detection problem is studied in decentralized decision systems, where a set of sensors receive independent observations and send summary messages to the fusion center, which makes a final decision. In the system where the sensors do not have access to their past observations, the previously conjectured asymptotic optimality of a procedure with a monotone likelihood ratio quantizer (MLRQ) is proved. In the case of additive Gaussian sensor noise, if the signal-to-noise ratio...

  1. Bound Motion of Bodies and Paticles in the Rotating Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardy, Miroslav

    2007-04-01

    The Lagrange theory of particle motion in the noninertial systems is applied to the Foucault pendulum, isosceles triangle pendulum and the general triangle pendulum swinging on the rotating Earth. As an analogue, planet orbiting in the rotating galaxy is considered as the giant galactic gyroscope. The Lorentz equation and the Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi equations are generalized for the rotation system. The knowledge of these equations is inevitable for the construction of LHC where each orbital proton “feels” the Coriolis force caused by the rotation of the Earth.

  2. Applied Bounded Model Checking for Interlocking System Designs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxthausen, Anne Elisabeth; Peleska, Jan; Pinger, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    of behavioural (operational) semantics. The former checks that the plant model – that is, the software components reflecting the physical components of the interlocking system – has been set up in an adequate way. The latter investigates trains moving through the network, with the objective to uncover potential...

  3. Existence of bounded positive solutions of a nonlinear differential system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrine Gontara

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we study the existence and nonexistence of solutions for the system $$displaylines{ frac{1}{A}(Au''=pu^{alpha }v^{s}quad hbox{on }(0,infty , cr frac{1}{B}(Bu''=qu^{r}v^{eta }quad hbox{on }(0,infty , cr Au'(0=0,quad u(infty =a>0, cr Bv'(0=0,quad v(infty =b>0, }$$ where $alpha ,eta geq 1$, $s,rgeq 0$, p,q are two nonnegative functions on $(0,infty $ and A, B satisfy appropriate conditions. Using potential theory tools, we show the existence of a positive continuous solution. This allows us to prove the existence of entire positive radial solutions for some elliptic systems.

  4. Disorder-induced bound states within an adatom-quantum wire system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetta, Bradley; Ordonez, Gonzalo

    2014-03-01

    Bound states induced by disorder are theoretically observed within a quantum wire and adatom system. The quantum wire is modeled as an array of quantum wells with random energies and exhibits Anderson Localization. By varying the energy of our adatom and adjusting the tunneling strength between the adatom and the quantum wire we observe disorder-induced bound states between the the adatom and its attached point. The characteristics of these disorder-induced bound states are greatly influenced by the site of interest on the quantum wire. Utilizing random quantum wires and disordered superlattices to produce bound states may offer flexibility in fabrication as well as provide grounds for energy transmission in photovoltaics.

  5. Delta-Complete Analysis for Bounded Reachability of Hybrid Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-16

    system models that arise in biomedical and robotics applications. This research was sponsored by the National Science Foundation grants no. CNS1330014...biomedical and robotics applications. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report (SAR) 18. NUMBER OF...ODEs #Vars Delta Result Time(s) Trace AF-GOOD 4 3 20 53 0.001 SAT 0.425 793K AF-BAD 4 3 20 53 0.001 UNSAT 0.074 — AF-TO1-GOOD 4 3 24 62 0.001 SAT 2.750

  6. Bounding Averages Rigorously Using Semidefinite Programming: Mean Moments of the Lorenz System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goluskin, David

    2017-11-01

    We describe methods for proving bounds on infinite-time averages in differential dynamical systems. The methods rely on the construction of nonnegative polynomials with certain properties, similarly to the way nonlinear stability can be proved using Lyapunov functions. Nonnegativity is enforced by requiring the polynomials to be sums of squares, a condition which is then formulated as a semidefinite program (SDP) that can be solved computationally. Although such computations are subject to numerical error, we demonstrate two ways to obtain rigorous results: using interval arithmetic to control the error of an approximate SDP solution, and finding exact analytical solutions to relatively small SDPs. Previous formulations are extended to allow for bounds depending analytically on parametric variables. These methods are illustrated using the Lorenz equations, a system with three state variables (x, y, z) and three parameters (β ,σ ,r) . Bounds are reported for infinite-time averages of all eighteen moments x^ly^mz^n up to quartic degree that are symmetric under (x,y)\\mapsto (-x,-y) . These bounds apply to all solutions regardless of stability, including chaotic trajectories, periodic orbits, and equilibrium points. The analytical approach yields two novel bounds that are sharp: the mean of z^3 can be no larger than its value of (r-1)^3 at the nonzero equilibria, and the mean of xy^3 must be nonnegative. The interval arithmetic approach is applied at the standard chaotic parameters to bound eleven average moments that all appear to be maximized on the shortest periodic orbit. Our best upper bound on each such average exceeds its value on the maximizing orbit by less than 1%. Many bounds reported here are much tighter than would be possible without computer assistance.

  7. Bounded Model Checking and Inductive Verification of Hybrid Discrete-Continuous Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Bernd; Behle, Markus; Eisenbrand, Fritz

    2004-01-01

    We present a concept to signicantly advance the state of the art for bounded model checking (BMC) and inductive verication (IV) of hybrid discrete-continuous systems. Our approach combines the expertise of partners coming from dierent domains, like hybrid systems modeling and digital circuit...

  8. Computing variable bounds in the conceptual design phase of guided weapon systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, M.; Buco, D.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of guided weapon systems is primarily expressed by the end-of-flight effect, routinely approximated by the miss distance. It is however equally important that certain system variables of interest are kept within given bounds all along the duration of the flight. In this paper, we

  9. Space-Bounded Church-Turing Thesis and Computational Tractability of Closed Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Mark; Schneider, Jonathan; Rojas, Cristóbal

    2015-08-28

    We report a new limitation on the ability of physical systems to perform computation-one that is based on generalizing the notion of memory, or storage space, available to the system to perform the computation. Roughly, we define memory as the maximal amount of information that the evolving system can carry from one instant to the next. We show that memory is a limiting factor in computation even in lieu of any time limitations on the evolving system-such as when considering its equilibrium regime. We call this limitation the space-bounded Church-Turing thesis (SBCT). The SBCT is supported by a simulation assertion (SA), which states that predicting the long-term behavior of bounded-memory systems is computationally tractable. In particular, one corollary of SA is an explicit bound on the computational hardness of the long-term behavior of a discrete-time finite-dimensional dynamical system that is affected by noise. We prove such a bound explicitly.

  10. 21 CFR 862.1640 - Protein-bound iodine test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Protein-bound iodine test system. 862.1640 Section 862.1640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... iodine obtained by this device are used in the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disorders. (b...

  11. Bounded and large radially symmetric solutions for some (p,q-Laplacian stationary systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Ben Dkhil

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns radially symmetric positive solutions of second-order quasilinear elliptic systems. In terms of the growth of the variable potential functions, we establish conditions such that the solutions are either bounded or blow up at infinity.

  12. On Global Existence of Classical Solutions for the Vlasov-Poisson System in Convex Bounded Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Hyung Ju; Jung, Jaewoo; Velazquez, Juan J. L.

    2011-01-01

    We prove global existence of strong solutions for the Vlasov-Poisson system in a convex bounded domain in the plasma physics case assuming homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions for the electric potential and the specular reflection boundary conditions for the distribution density.

  13. Exact lower and upper bounds on stationary moments in stochastic biochemical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A.; Lamperski, Andrew; Singh, Abhyudai

    2017-08-01

    In the stochastic description of biochemical reaction systems, the time evolution of statistical moments for species population counts is described by a linear dynamical system. However, except for some ideal cases (such as zero- and first-order reaction kinetics), the moment dynamics is underdetermined as lower-order moments depend upon higher-order moments. Here, we propose a novel method to find exact lower and upper bounds on stationary moments for a given arbitrary system of biochemical reactions. The method exploits the fact that statistical moments of any positive-valued random variable must satisfy some constraints that are compactly represented through the positive semidefiniteness of moment matrices. Our analysis shows that solving moment equations at steady state in conjunction with constraints on moment matrices provides exact lower and upper bounds on the moments. These results are illustrated by three different examples—the commonly used logistic growth model, stochastic gene expression with auto-regulation and an activator-repressor gene network motif. Interestingly, in all cases the accuracy of the bounds is shown to improve as moment equations are expanded to include higher-order moments. Our results provide avenues for development of approximation methods that provide explicit bounds on moments for nonlinear stochastic systems that are otherwise analytically intractable.

  14. Bounding the Failure Probability Range of Polynomial Systems Subject to P-box Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a reliability analysis framework for systems subject to multiple design requirements that depend polynomially on the uncertainty. Uncertainty is prescribed by probability boxes, also known as p-boxes, whose distribution functions have free or fixed functional forms. An approach based on the Bernstein expansion of polynomials and optimization is proposed. In particular, we search for the elements of a multi-dimensional p-box that minimize (i.e., the best-case) and maximize (i.e., the worst-case) the probability of inner and outer bounding sets of the failure domain. This technique yields intervals that bound the range of failure probabilities. The offset between this bounding interval and the actual failure probability range can be made arbitrarily tight with additional computational effort.

  15. Bethe-Salpeter equation for a four fermion system I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.K.; Muller, B.; Greiner, W.

    1988-08-01

    The authors derive the Bethe-Salpeter equation for bound states of a four-body system. They treat only two-body interaction kernels in the ladder approximation. The equations should be applicable for the description of exotic meson states (q qq-barq-bar states) and the ''poly-positronium'' states discussed in connection with the interpretation of the narrow coincidence peaks in the spectra of electrons and positrons observed in heavy ion collisions.

  16. Bound states and perfect transmission scattering states in P T -symmetric open quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmon, Savannah; Gianfreda, Mariagiovanna; Hatano, Naomichi

    2014-03-01

    We study the point spectrum and transmission scattering spectrum in P T -symmetric open quantum systems containing balanced regions of energy amplification and attenuation, using tight-binding chains with matching sink and source sites as prototype models. For a given system geometry, we write the boundary conditions that permit scattering state and bound state solutions with wave functions that likewise satisfy P T symmetry; we further demonstrate the P T -symmetric scattering states give rise to perfect transmission through the scattering region. We also discuss bound states in continuum and other spectral effects that may be discovered in P T -symmetric open quantum systems. Finally we discuss the potential for experimental realization of our models in systems containing whispering gallery mode resonators with balanced loss and gain. S. G. acknowledges support from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  17. Possible evidence for narrow bound states related to the $p\\overline{p}$ system

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlopoulos, P; Blüm, P; Fransson, K; Guigas, R; Hassler, N; Izycki, M; Koch, H; Nilsson, A; Poth, H; Suffert, Martin; Towscher, L; Zioutas, Konstantin

    1978-01-01

    A search for mesonic structure in the pp system below threshold is reported. Bound states are observed for the first time by observing gamma -rays accompanying the annihilation of stopped p in liquid hydrogen. A novel NaI handling technique is reported. Three narrow structures are observed related to the pp system at 183, 216 and 420 MeV, with confidence levels of 1%, 2.5% and 1.8% respectively. (47 refs).

  18. Semirelativistic stability of N-boson systems bound by 1/r{sub ij} pair potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Richard L [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Boulevard West, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1M8 (Canada); Lucha, Wolfgang [Institute for High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: rhall@mathstat.concordia.ca, E-mail: wolfgang.lucha@oeaw.ac.at

    2008-09-05

    We analyse a system of self-gravitating identical bosons by means of a semirelativistic Hamiltonian comprising the relativistic kinetic energies of the involved particles and added (instantaneous) Newtonian gravitational pair potentials. With the help of an improved lower bound to the bottom of the spectrum of this Hamiltonian, we are able to enlarge the known region for relativistic stability for such boson systems against gravitational collapse and to sharpen the predictions for their maximum stable mass.

  19. H∞ Loop Shaping Control of Input Saturated Systems with Norm-Bounded Parametric Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Lima Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a gain-scheduling control design strategy for a class of linear systems with the presence of both input saturation constraints and norm-bounded parametric uncertainty. LMI conditions are derived in order to obtain a gain-scheduled controller that ensures the robust stability and performance of the closed loop system. The main steps to obtain such a controller are given. Differently from other gain-scheduled approaches in the literature, this one focuses on the problem of H∞ loop shaping control design with input saturation nonlinearity and norm-bounded uncertainty to reduce the effect of the disturbance input on the controlled outputs. Here, the design problem has been formulated in the four-block H∞ synthesis framework, in which it is possible to describe the parametric uncertainty and the input saturation nonlinearity as perturbations to normalized coprime factors of the shaped plant. As a result, the shaped plant is represented as a linear parameter-varying (LPV system while the norm-bounded uncertainty and input saturation are incorporated. This procedure yields a linear parameter-varying structure for the controller that ensures the stability of the polytopic LPV shaped plant from the vertex property. Finally, the effectiveness of the method is illustrated through application to a physical system: a VTOL “vertical taking-off landing” helicopter.

  20. Behavior of QQ-plots and genomic control in studies of gene-environment interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arend Voorman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies of gene-environment interaction (GxE GWAS are becoming popular. As with main effects GWAS, quantile-quantile plots (QQ-plots and Genomic Control are being used to assess and correct for population substructure. However, in G x E work these approaches can be seriously misleading, as we illustrate; QQ-plots may give strong indications of substructure when absolutely none is present. Using simulation and theory, we show how and why spurious QQ-plot inflation occurs in G x E GWAS, and how this differs from main-effects analyses. We also explain how simple adjustments to standard regression-based methods used in G x E GWAS can alleviate this problem.

  1. Ranking of Business Process Simulation Software Tools with DEX/QQ Hierarchical Decision Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damij, Nadja; Boškoski, Pavle; Bohanec, Marko; Mileva Boshkoska, Biljana

    2016-01-01

    The omnipresent need for optimisation requires constant improvements of companies' business processes (BPs). Minimising the risk of inappropriate BP being implemented is usually performed by simulating the newly developed BP under various initial conditions and "what-if" scenarios. An effectual business process simulations software (BPSS) is a prerequisite for accurate analysis of an BP. Characterisation of an BPSS tool is a challenging task due to the complex selection criteria that includes quality of visual aspects, simulation capabilities, statistical facilities, quality reporting etc. Under such circumstances, making an optimal decision is challenging. Therefore, various decision support models are employed aiding the BPSS tool selection. The currently established decision support models are either proprietary or comprise only a limited subset of criteria, which affects their accuracy. Addressing this issue, this paper proposes a new hierarchical decision support model for ranking of BPSS based on their technical characteristics by employing DEX and qualitative to quantitative (QQ) methodology. Consequently, the decision expert feeds the required information in a systematic and user friendly manner. There are three significant contributions of the proposed approach. Firstly, the proposed hierarchical model is easily extendible for adding new criteria in the hierarchical structure. Secondly, a fully operational decision support system (DSS) tool that implements the proposed hierarchical model is presented. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed hierarchical model is assessed by comparing the resulting rankings of BPSS with respect to currently available results.

  2. Frequency Weighted Model Order Reduction Technique and Error Bounds for Discrete Time Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Imran

    2014-01-01

    for whole frequency range. However, certain applications (like controller reduction require frequency weighted approximation, which introduce the concept of using frequency weights in model reduction techniques. Limitations of some existing frequency weighted model reduction techniques include lack of stability of reduced order models (for two sided weighting case and frequency response error bounds. A new frequency weighted technique for balanced model reduction for discrete time systems is proposed. The proposed technique guarantees stable reduced order models even for the case when two sided weightings are present. Efficient technique for frequency weighted Gramians is also proposed. Results are compared with other existing frequency weighted model reduction techniques for discrete time systems. Moreover, the proposed technique yields frequency response error bounds.

  3. Optimal bounds and extremal trajectories for time averages in nonlinear dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobasco, Ian; Goluskin, David; Doering, Charles R.

    2018-02-01

    For any quantity of interest in a system governed by ordinary differential equations, it is natural to seek the largest (or smallest) long-time average among solution trajectories, as well as the extremal trajectories themselves. Upper bounds on time averages can be proved a priori using auxiliary functions, the optimal choice of which is a convex optimization problem. We prove that the problems of finding maximal trajectories and minimal auxiliary functions are strongly dual. Thus, auxiliary functions provide arbitrarily sharp upper bounds on time averages. Moreover, any nearly minimal auxiliary function provides phase space volumes in which all nearly maximal trajectories are guaranteed to lie. For polynomial equations, auxiliary functions can be constructed by semidefinite programming, which we illustrate using the Lorenz system.

  4. Cramer-Rao Bound for Blind Channel Estimators in Redundant Block Transmission Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yen-Huan; Yeh, Ping-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we derive the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB) for blind channel estimation in redundant block transmission systems, a lower bound for the mean squared error of any blind channel estimators. The derived CRB is valid for any full-rank linear redundant precoder, including both zero-padded (ZP) and cyclic-prefixed (CP) precoders. A simple form of CRBs for multiple complex parameters is also derived and presented which facilitates the CRB derivation of the problem of interest. A comparison is made between the derived CRBs and performances of existing subspace-based blind channel estimators for both CP and ZP systems. Numerical results show that there is still some room for performance improvement of blind channel estimators.

  5. Open Systems with Error Bounds: Spin-Boson Model with Spectral Density Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascherpa, F; Smirne, A; Huelga, S F; Plenio, M B

    2017-03-10

    In the study of open quantum systems, one of the most common ways to describe environmental effects on the reduced dynamics is through the spectral density. However, in many models this object cannot be computed from first principles and needs to be inferred on phenomenological grounds or fitted to experimental data. Consequently, some uncertainty regarding its form and parameters is unavoidable; this in turn calls into question the accuracy of any theoretical predictions based on a given spectral density. Here, we focus on the spin-boson model as a prototypical open quantum system, find two error bounds on predicted expectation values in terms of the spectral density variation considered, and state a sufficient condition for the strongest one to apply. We further demonstrate an application of our result, by bounding the error brought about by the approximations involved in the hierarchical equations of motion resolution method for spin-boson dynamics.

  6. Control of systems with asymmetric bounds using linear programming: application to a hydrogen reformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies controller design for feedback systems in the presence of asymmetrically bounded signals, using a case study. An asymmetric objective functional is used to consider the asymmetrically bounded signals, which makes possible to derive a linear programming problem. Solving this LP makes possible to design controllers that minimize certain outputs, fulfilling at the same time hard constraints on certain signals. The method is presented by application to a hydrogen reformer, a system in petrochemical plants that produces hydrogen from hydrocarbons: a mixed sensitivity problem is stated and solved, with an additional constraint given by the asymmetric limitations on the magnitude and rate of the control signal, and the asymmetricity in the disturbances.

  7. Pre-impact fall detection system using dynamic threshold and 3D bounding box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otanasap, Nuth; Boonbrahm, Poonpong

    2017-02-01

    Fall prevention and detection system have to subjugate many challenges in order to develop an efficient those system. Some of the difficult problems are obtrusion, occlusion and overlay in vision based system. Other associated issues are privacy, cost, noise, computation complexity and definition of threshold values. Estimating human motion using vision based usually involves with partial overlay, caused either by direction of view point between objects or body parts and camera, and these issues have to be taken into consideration. This paper proposes the use of dynamic threshold based and bounding box posture analysis method with multiple Kinect cameras setting for human posture analysis and fall detection. The proposed work only uses two Kinect cameras for acquiring distributed values and differentiating activities between normal and falls. If the peak value of head velocity is greater than the dynamic threshold value, bounding box posture analysis will be used to confirm fall occurrence. Furthermore, information captured by multiple Kinect placed in right angle will address the skeleton overlay problem due to single Kinect. This work contributes on the fusion of multiple Kinect based skeletons, based on dynamic threshold and bounding box posture analysis which is the only research work reported so far.

  8. Improved upper bounds on Kaluza-Klein gravity with current Solar System experiments and observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Xue-Mei [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Purple Mountain Observatory, Nanjing (China); Xie, Yi [Nanjing University, School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Space Navigation and Position Techniques, Shanghai (China); Nanjing University, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics, Nanjing (China)

    2015-11-15

    As an extension of previous works on classical tests of Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravity and as an attempt to find more stringent constraints on this theory, its effects on physical experiments and astronomical observations conducted in the Solar System are studied. We investigate the gravitational time delay at inferior conjunction caused by KK gravity, and use new Solar System ephemerides and the observation of Cassini to strengthen constraints on KK gravity by up to two orders of magnitude. These improved upper bounds mean that the fifth-dimensional space in the soliton case is a very flat extra dimension in the Solar System, even in the vicinity of the Sun. (orig.)

  9. Finite Energy and Bounded Actuator Attacks on Cyber-Physical Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL; Melin, Alexander M [ORNL; Ferragut, Erik M [ORNL; Laska, Jason A [ORNL; Dong, Jin [ORNL; Drira, Anis [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    As control system networks are being connected to enterprise level networks for remote monitoring, operation, and system-wide performance optimization, these same connections are providing vulnerabilities that can be exploited by malicious actors for attack, financial gain, and theft of intellectual property. Much effort in cyber-physical system (CPS) protection has focused on protecting the borders of the system through traditional information security techniques. Less effort has been applied to the protection of cyber-physical systems from intelligent attacks launched after an attacker has defeated the information security protections to gain access to the control system. In this paper, attacks on actuator signals are analyzed from a system theoretic context. The threat surface is classified into finite energy and bounded attacks. These two broad classes encompass a large range of potential attacks. The effect of theses attacks on a linear quadratic (LQ) control are analyzed, and the optimal actuator attacks for both finite and infinite horizon LQ control are derived, therefore the worst case attack signals are obtained. The closed-loop system under the optimal attack signals is given and a numerical example illustrating the effect of an optimal bounded attack is provided.

  10. Bounding box framework for efficient phase field simulation of grain growth in anisotropic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vanherpe, L; Blanpain, B; Vandewalle, S

    2011-01-01

    A sparse bounding box algorithm is extended to perform efficient phase field simulations of grain growth in anisotropic systems. The extended bounding box framework allows to attribute different properties to different grain boundary types of a polycrystalline microstructure and can be combined with explicit, implicit or semi-implicit time stepping strategies. To illustrate the applicability of the software, the simulation results of a case study are analysed. They indicate the impact of a misorientation dependent boundary energy formulation on the evolution of the misorientation distribution of the grain boundary types and on the individual growth rates of the grains as a function of the number of grain faces. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A k-Bounded Symbolic Execution for Checking Strong Heap Properties of Open Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jooyong; Deng, Xianghua; Bogor, Robby

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents Kiasan, a bounded technique to reason about open systems based on a path sensitive, relatively sound and complete symbolic execution instead of the usual compositional reasoning through weakest precondition calculation that summarizes all execution paths. Kiasan is able to check...... strong heap properties, and it is fully automatic and flexible in terms of its cost and the guarantees it provides. It allows a user-adjustable mixed compositional/non-compositional reasoning and naturally produces error traces as fault evidence. We implemented Kiasan using the Bogor model checking...

  12. Determining the bounds of skilful forecast range for probabilistic prediction of system-wide wind power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Dirk; Brayshaw, David; Methven, John; Drew, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    State-of-the-art wind power forecasts beyond a few hours ahead rely on global numerical weather prediction models to forecast the future large-scale atmospheric state. Often they provide initial and boundary conditions for nested high resolution simulations. In this work, both upper and lower bounds on forecast range are identified within which global ensemble forecasts provide skilful information for system-wide wind power applications. An upper bound on forecast range is associated with the limit of predictability, beyond which forecasts have no more skill than predictions based on climatological statistics. A lower bound is defined at the lead time beyond which the resolved uncertainty associated with estimating the future large-scale atmospheric state is larger than the unresolved uncertainty associated with estimating the system-wide wind power response to a given large-scale state. The bounds of skillful ensemble forecast range are quantified for three leading global forecast systems. The power system of Great Britain (GB) is used as an example because independent verifying data is available from National Grid. The upper bound defined by forecasts of GB-total wind power generation at a specific point in time is found to be 6-8 days. The lower bound is found to be 1.4-2.4 days. Both bounds depend on the global forecast system and vary seasonally. In addition, forecasts of the probability of an extreme power ramp event were found to possess a shorter limit of predictability (4.5-5.5 days). The upper bound on this forecast range can only be extended by improving the global forecast system (outside the control of most users) or by changing the metric used in the probability forecast. Improved downscaling and microscale modelling of the wind farm response may act to decrease the lower bound. The potential gain from such improvements have diminishing returns beyond the short-range (out to around 2 days).

  13. Towards an integrated forecasting system for fisheries on habitat-bound stocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn; Butenschön, M.; Gürkan, Z.

    2013-01-01

    First results of a coupled modelling and forecasting system for fisheries on habitat-bound stocks are being presented. The system consists currently of three mathematically, fundamentally different model subsystems coupled offline: POLCOMS providing the physical environment implemented...... and to quantify the impacts on the higher trophic level, in this case the sandeel population, demonstrated here on the basis of hindcast data. The coupled forecasting system is tested for some typical scientific questions appearing in spatial fish stock management and marine spatial planning, including...... in the domain of the north-west European shelf, the SPAM model which describes sandeel stocks in the North Sea, and the third component, the SLAM model, which connects POLCOMS and SPAM by computing the physical– biological interaction. Our major experience by the coupling model subsystems is that well...

  14. Upper bounds for the number of limit cycles of polynomial differential systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Ellaggoune

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For $\\varepsilon$ small we consider the number of limit cycles of the polynomial differential system $$ \\dot{x}=y-f_1(x,yy, \\quad \\dot{y}=-x-g_2(x,y-f_2(x,yy, $$ where $f_1(x,y=\\varepsilon f_{11}(x,y+\\varepsilon^2f_{12}(x,y$, $g_2(x,y=\\varepsilon g_{21}(x,y+\\varepsilon^2 g_{22}(x,y$ and $f_2(x,y=\\varepsilon f_{21}(x,y+\\varepsilon^2 f_{22}(x,y$ where $f_{1i}, f_{2i}, g_{2i}$ have degree $l, n,m$ respectively for each $i=1,2$. We provide an accurate upper bound of the maximum number of limit cycles that this class of systems can have bifurcating from the periodic orbits of the linear center $\\dot{x}=y, \\dot{y}=-x$ using the averaging theory of first and second order. We give an example for which this bound is reached.

  15. Very stable silica-gel-bound laccase biocatalysts for the selective oxidation in continuous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekuć, Adriana; Bryjak, Jolanta; Szymańska, Katarzyna; Jarzebski, Andrzej B

    2010-04-01

    Cerrena unicolor laccase was immobilized by adsorption and covalent bonds formation on silica-gel carriers, functionalized with different organosilanes and surface densities. The effects of protein concentration, pH value of the coupling mixture and the enzyme purity on immobilization efficiency of the best carrier, moderately modified (0.75 mmol/g carrier) with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane were investigated. Activity of the best biocatalysts, expressed in ABTS oxidation, was 4028 U/mL of the carrier or 3530 U/mg of bound protein. Properties of immobilized laccase were determined to find excellent thermal stability improvement; t(1/2) for freely suspended enzyme was 2-3 min at 80 degrees C, whereas after immobilization over 100 min. Kinetic experiments in both batch and packed-bed reactors gave only four times lower k(cat)/K(m) value than for the native enzyme. A packed-bed reactor with silica-gel-bound laccase beads appeared to be very efficient in ABTS oxidation and its exceptional potentials were shown in the continuous decolorization of indigo carmine for 18 days without loss in activity. This system offers perfect ability to degrade recalcitrant dyes, but we can also envisage its use, with ABTS acting as a mediator, in regeneration of nicotinamide cofactors. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Stochastic resonance in a tumor-immune system subject to bounded noises and time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most recent approaches in cancer therapy. A mathematical model of tumor-immune interaction, subject to a periodic immunotherapy treatment (imitated by a periodic signal), correlative and bounded stochastic fluctuations and time delays, is investigated by numerical simulations for its signal power amplification (SPA). Within the tailored parameter regime, the synchronous response of tumor growth to the immunotherapy, stochastic resonance (SR), versus both the noises and delays is obtained. The details are as follows (i) the peak values of SPA versus the noise intensity (A) in the proliferation term of tumor cells decrease as the frequency of periodic signal increases, i.e. an increase of the frequency restrains the SR; (ii) an increase of the amplitude of periodic signal restrains the SR versus A, but boosts up the SR versus the noise intensity B in the immune term; (iii) there is an optimum cross-correlated degree between the two bounded noises, at which the system exhibits the strongest SR versus the delay time τα(the reaction time of tumor cell population to their surrounding environment constraints); (iv) upon increasing the delay time τα, double SR versus the delay time τβ (the time taken by both the tumor antigen identification and tumor-stimulated proliferation of effectors) emerges. These results may be helpful for an immunotherapy treatment for the sufferer.

  17. The energy of a system of relativistic massless bosons bound by oscillator pair potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Richard L.; Lucha, Wolfgang; Schoeberl, Franz F

    2003-12-29

    We study the lowest energy E of a semirelativistic system of N identical massless bosons with Hamiltonian H=-bar i=1Np{sub i}{sup 2}+-bar j>i=1N{gamma}-bar r{sub i}-r{sub j}-bar {sup 2},{gamma}>0. We prove A{gamma}N{sup 2}(N-1){sup 21/3}=bounds determines E with an error less than 0.15% for all N>=2.

  18. $f(T)$ gravity: effects on astronomical observation and Solar System experiments and upper-bounds

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Yi

    2013-01-01

    As an extension of a previous work in which perihelion advances are considered only and as an attempt to find more stringent constraints on its parameters, we investigate effects on astronomical observation and experiments conducted in the Solar System due to the $f(T)$ gravity which contains a quadratic correction of $\\alpha T^2$ ($\\alpha$ is a model parameter) and the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. Using a spherical solution describing the Sun's gravitational field, the resulting secular evolution of planetary orbital motions, light deflection, gravitational time delay and frequency shift are calculated up to the leading contribution. Among them, we find qualitatively that the light deflection holds a unique bound on $\\alpha$, without dependence on $\\Lambda$, and the time delay experiments during inferior conjunction impose a clean constraint on $\\Lambda$, regardless of $\\alpha$. Based on observation and experiments, especially the supplementary advances in the perihelia provided by the INPOP10a ephemeris...

  19. Mixing among light scalar mesons and L=1 qq-bar scalar mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshima, T. [Department of Applied Physics, Chubu University, Kasugai (Japan)]. E-mail: teshima@isc.chubu.ac.jp; Kitamura, I.; Morisita, N. [Department of Applied Physics, Chubu University, Kasugai (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Following the re-establishment of the {sigma}(500) and the {kappa}(900), the light scalar mesons a{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 0}(980) together with the {sigma}(500) and the {kappa}(900) are considered as the chiral scalar partner of pseudoscalar nonet in SU(3) chiral symmetry, and the high mass scalar mesons a{sub 0}(1450), K*{sub 0}(1430), f{sub 0}(1370) and f{sub 0}(1710) turned out to be considered as the L=1 qq-bar scalar mesons. We assume that the high mass of the L=1 qq-bar scalar mesons is caused by the mixing with the light scalar mesons. For the structure of the light scalar mesons, we adopted the qqq-barq-bar model in order to explain the 'scalar meson puzzle'. The inter-mixing between the light scalar nonet and the high mass L=1 qq-bar nonet and the intra-mixing among each nonet are analysed by including the glueball into the high mass scalar nonet. (author)

  20. Body posture recognition and turning recording system for the care of bed bound patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Rong-Shue; Mi, Zhenqiang; Yang, Bo-Ru; Kau, Lih-Jen; Bitew, Mekuanint Agegnehu; Li, Tzu-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes body posture recognition and turning recording system for assisting the care of bed bound patients in nursing homes. The system continuously detects the patient's body posture and records the length of time for each body posture. If the patient remains in the same body posture long enough to develop pressure ulcers, the system notifies caregivers to change the patient's body posture. The objective of recording is to provide the log of body turning for querying of patients' family members. In order to accurately detect patient's body posture, we developed a novel pressure sensing pad which contains force sensing resistor sensors. Based on the proposed pressure sensing pad, we developed a bed posture recognition module which includes a bed posture recognition algorithm. The algorithm is based on fuzzy theory. The body posture recognition algorithm can detect the patient's bed posture whether it is right lateral decubitus, left lateral decubitus, or supine. The detected information of patient's body posture can be then transmitted to the server of healthcare center by the communication module to perform the functions of recording and notification. Experimental results showed that the average posture recognition accuracy for our proposed module is 92%.

  1. A QQ→QQ planar double box in canonical form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco S. Bianchi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider a planar double box with four massive external momenta and two massive internal propagators. We derive the system of differential equations for the relevant master integrals, cast it in canonical form, write it as a dlog form and solve it in terms of iterated integrals up to depth four.

  2. A comparison of error bounds for a nonlinear tracking system with detection probability Pd < 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Huisi; Zhang, Hao; Meng, Huadong; Wang, Xiqin

    2012-12-14

    Error bounds for nonlinear filtering are very important for performance evaluation and sensor management. This paper presents a comparative study of three error bounds for tracking filtering, when the detection probability is less than unity. One of these bounds is the random finite set (RFS) bound, which is deduced within the framework of finite set statistics. The others, which are the information reduction factor (IRF) posterior Cramer-Rao lower bound (PCRLB) and enumeration method (ENUM) PCRLB are introduced within the framework of finite vector statistics. In this paper, we deduce two propositions and prove that the RFS bound is equal to the ENUM PCRLB, while it is tighter than the IRF PCRLB, when the target exists from the beginning to the end. Considering the disappearance of existing targets and the appearance of new targets, the RFS bound is tighter than both IRF PCRLB and ENUM PCRLB with time, by introducing the uncertainty of target existence. The theory is illustrated by two nonlinear tracking applications: ballistic object tracking and bearings-only tracking. The simulation studies confirm the theory and reveal the relationship among the three bounds.

  3. A Comparison of Error Bounds for a Nonlinear Tracking System with Detection Probability Pd < 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiqin Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Error bounds for nonlinear filtering are very important for performance evaluation and sensor management. This paper presents a comparative study of three error bounds for tracking filtering, when the detection probability is less than unity. One of these bounds is the random finite set (RFS bound, which is deduced within the framework of finite set statistics. The others, which are the information reduction factor (IRF posterior Cramer-Rao lower bound (PCRLB and enumeration method (ENUM PCRLB are introduced within the framework of finite vector statistics. In this paper, we deduce two propositions and prove that the RFS bound is equal to the ENUM PCRLB, while it is tighter than the IRF PCRLB, when the target exists from the beginning to the end. Considering the disappearance of existing targets and the appearance of new targets, the RFS bound is tighter than both IRF PCRLB and ENUM PCRLB with time, by introducing the uncertainty of target existence. The theory is illustrated by two nonlinear tracking applications: ballistic object tracking and bearings-only tracking. The simulation studies confirm the theory and reveal the relationship among the three bounds.

  4. A Comparison of Error Bounds for a Nonlinear Tracking System with Detection Probability Pd < 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Huisi; Zhang, Hao; Meng, Huadong; Wang, Xiqin

    2012-01-01

    Error bounds for nonlinear filtering are very important for performance evaluation and sensor management. This paper presents a comparative study of three error bounds for tracking filtering, when the detection probability is less than unity. One of these bounds is the random finite set (RFS) bound, which is deduced within the framework of finite set statistics. The others, which are the information reduction factor (IRF) posterior Cramer-Rao lower bound (PCRLB) and enumeration method (ENUM) PCRLB are introduced within the framework of finite vector statistics. In this paper, we deduce two propositions and prove that the RFS bound is equal to the ENUM PCRLB, while it is tighter than the IRF PCRLB, when the target exists from the beginning to the end. Considering the disappearance of existing targets and the appearance of new targets, the RFS bound is tighter than both IRF PCRLB and ENUM PCRLB with time, by introducing the uncertainty of target existence. The theory is illustrated by two nonlinear tracking applications: ballistic object tracking and bearings-only tracking. The simulation studies confirm the theory and reveal the relationship among the three bounds. PMID:23242274

  5. Determining the bounds of skilful forecast range for probabilistic prediction of system-wide wind power generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Cannon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available State-of-the-art wind power forecasts beyond a few hours ahead rely on global numerical weather prediction models to forecast the future large-scale atmospheric state. Often they provide initial and boundary conditions for nested high resolution simulations. In this paper, both upper and lower bounds on forecast range are identified within which global ensemble forecasts provide skilful information for system-wide wind power applications. An upper bound on forecast range is associated with the limit of predictability, beyond which forecasts have no more skill than predictions based on climatological statistics. A lower bound is defined at the lead time beyond which the resolved uncertainty associated with estimating the future large-scale atmospheric state is larger than the unresolved uncertainty associated with estimating the system-wide wind power response to a given large-scale state.The bounds of skilful ensemble forecast range are quantified for three leading global forecast systems. The power system of Great Britain (GB is used as an example because independent verifying data is available from National Grid. The upper bound defined by forecasts of GB-total wind power generation at a specific point in time is found to be 6–8 days. The lower bound is found to be 1.4–2.4 days. Both bounds depend on the global forecast system and vary seasonally. In addition, forecasts of the probability of an extreme power ramp event were found to possess a shorter limit of predictability (4.5–5.5 days. The upper bound on this forecast range can only be extended by improving the global forecast system (outside the control of most users or by changing the metric used in the probability forecast. Improved downscaling and microscale modelling of the wind farm response may act to decrease the lower bound. The potential gain from such improvements have diminishing returns beyond the short-range (out to around 2 days.

  6. The DMM Bound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emiris, Ioannis Z.; Mourrain, Bernard; Tsigaridas, Elias

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we derive aggregate separation bounds, named after Davenport-Mahler-Mignotte (DMM), on the isolated roots of polynomial systems, specifically on the minimum distance between any two such roots. The bounds exploit the structure of the system and the height of the sparse (or toric) re...... bound on the number of steps that subdivision-based algorithms perform in order to isolate all real roots of a polynomial system. This leads to the first complexity bound of Milne's algorithm [22] in 2D....

  7. Physical Uncertainty Bounds (PUB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, Diane Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Dean L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-19

    This paper introduces and motivates the need for a new methodology for determining upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulations of engineered systems due to limited fidelity in the composite continuum-level physics models needed to simulate the systems. We show that traditional uncertainty quantification methods provide, at best, a lower bound on this uncertainty. We propose to obtain bounds on the simulation uncertainties by first determining bounds on the physical quantities or processes relevant to system performance. By bounding these physics processes, as opposed to carrying out statistical analyses of the parameter sets of specific physics models or simply switching out the available physics models, one can obtain upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest.

  8. Towards an integrated forecasting system for fisheries on habitat-bound stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, A.; Butenschön, M.; Gürkan, Z.; Allen, I. J.

    2013-03-01

    First results of a coupled modelling and forecasting system for fisheries on habitat-bound stocks are being presented. The system consists currently of three mathematically, fundamentally different model subsystems coupled offline: POLCOMS providing the physical environment implemented in the domain of the north-west European shelf, the SPAM model which describes sandeel stocks in the North Sea, and the third component, the SLAM model, which connects POLCOMS and SPAM by computing the physical-biological interaction. Our major experience by the coupling model subsystems is that well-defined and generic model interfaces are very important for a successful and extendable coupled model framework. The integrated approach, simulating ecosystem dynamics from physics to fish, allows for analysis of the pathways in the ecosystem to investigate the propagation of changes in the ocean climate and to quantify the impacts on the higher trophic level, in this case the sandeel population, demonstrated here on the basis of hindcast data. The coupled forecasting system is tested for some typical scientific questions appearing in spatial fish stock management and marine spatial planning, including determination of local and basin-scale maximum sustainable yield, stock connectivity and source/sink structure. Our presented simulations indicate that sandeel stocks are currently exploited close to the maximum sustainable yield, even though periodic overfishing seems to have occurred, but large uncertainty is associated with determining stock maximum sustainable yield due to stock inherent dynamics and climatic variability. Our statistical ensemble simulations indicates that the predictive horizon set by climate interannual variability is 2-6 yr, after which only an asymptotic probability distribution of stock properties, like biomass, are predictable.

  9. Towards an integrated forecasting system for fisheries on habitat-bound stocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Christensen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available First results of a coupled modelling and forecasting system for fisheries on habitat-bound stocks are being presented. The system consists currently of three mathematically, fundamentally different model subsystems coupled offline: POLCOMS providing the physical environment implemented in the domain of the north-west European shelf, the SPAM model which describes sandeel stocks in the North Sea, and the third component, the SLAM model, which connects POLCOMS and SPAM by computing the physical–biological interaction. Our major experience by the coupling model subsystems is that well-defined and generic model interfaces are very important for a successful and extendable coupled model framework. The integrated approach, simulating ecosystem dynamics from physics to fish, allows for analysis of the pathways in the ecosystem to investigate the propagation of changes in the ocean climate and to quantify the impacts on the higher trophic level, in this case the sandeel population, demonstrated here on the basis of hindcast data. The coupled forecasting system is tested for some typical scientific questions appearing in spatial fish stock management and marine spatial planning, including determination of local and basin-scale maximum sustainable yield, stock connectivity and source/sink structure. Our presented simulations indicate that sandeel stocks are currently exploited close to the maximum sustainable yield, even though periodic overfishing seems to have occurred, but large uncertainty is associated with determining stock maximum sustainable yield due to stock inherent dynamics and climatic variability. Our statistical ensemble simulations indicates that the predictive horizon set by climate interannual variability is 2–6 yr, after which only an asymptotic probability distribution of stock properties, like biomass, are predictable.

  10. From kaonic atoms to kaonic nuclei: A search for antikaon-mediated bound nuclear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmeskal, Johann

    2008-10-01

    Strong interaction processes were intensively studied at low energy with exotic atoms, touching one of the fundamental problems in hadron physic today - the still unsolved question of how hadron masses are generated. The question of the origin of the large hadron masses made up of light quarks, the current mass of the up ( u) and down ( d) quarks ( m≈5 MeV) is two orders of magnitude smaller than a typical hadron mass of about 1 GeV, will be discussed in the context with the experimental work done in the field of exotic atoms expanded to exotic nuclei. An overview of the properties of exotic hydrogen atoms made of pions and kaons are presented, using high precision experiments unrevealing the nature of strong interaction physics at low energy. A new field which contributes to the understanding of the origin of the large hadron mass is the study of the mass modification in a nuclear medium. Antikaon mediated bound nuclear systems would be an ideal tool, if they exist, to look for chiral restoration at high density and zero temperature or even more exotic to look for phase transitions.

  11. Major bioactive phenolics in Bergenia species from the Indian Himalayan region: Method development, validation and quantitative estimation using UHPLC-QqQLIT-MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Renu; Kumar, Brijesh; Meena, Baleshwar; Srivastava, Mukesh; Mishra, Tripti; Tiwari, Vandana; Pal, Mahesh; Nair, Narayanan K.; Upreti, Dalip K.

    2017-01-01

    Bergenia species are important medicinal plants used in indigenous systems of medicine for their antilithiatic and diuretic properties. An ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to hybrid linear ion trap triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqQLIT-MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for the estimation of quantitative variation of eight major bioactive phenolics in the rhizomes (150 samples) of four species of this herb, Bergenia (B. ciliata, B. ligulata, B. purpurascens and B. stracheyi). Chromatographic separation was obtained on a Waters ACQUITY UPLCTM BEH (ethylene bridged hybrid) C18 column with a mobile phase consisting of 0.1% (v/v) formic acid aqueous solution and acetonitrile under a gradient elution manner. A hybrid linear ion trap triple quadrupole mass spectrometer was operated in negative electrospray ionization mode with multiple reactions monitoring for detection and quantification of the eight compounds. The validated method demonstrated good linearity (r2 ≥ 0.9991), precision (RSD ≤ 1.87%) and accuracy (95.16–102.11%, RSD ≤ 1.83%) for all reference analytes. The quantitative results revealed that B. ligulata contains the highest amount of the major active marker-bergenin. The results also suggest that sensitive UHPLC-QqQLIT-MS/MS method, a sensitive, accurate and convenient one, could be helpful in identification of potential accession(s), rapid quality control and establishing authenticity of Bergenia species as raw material for pharmaceutical industries. PMID:28749965

  12. Studies of identified hadrons in qq-bar events at LEPI, in W sup + W sup - and qq-bar events at LEPII and search for stable and long-lived heavy charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, N

    1999-01-01

    The use of RICH detectors allows the identification of charged pions, kaons and protons, covering the full momentum range 0.7qq-bar, Z sup 0->bb-bar and Z sup 0->uu-bar, dd-bar, ss-bar, selected from approx 1,400,000 Z sup 0 decays collected by DELPHI in 1994. This study has been extended to high-energy qq-bar events at LEPII. New heavy particles from 2 GeV/c sup 2 to the kinematic limit at LEPII have been searched using the RICH detectors.

  13. Diffusion induced by bounded noise in a two-dimensional coupled memory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The diffusion behavior driven by bounded noise under the influence of a coupled harmonic potential is investigated in a two-dimensional coupled-damped model. With the help of the Laplace analysis we obtain exact descriptions for a particle's two-time dynamics which is subjected to a coupled harmonic potential and a coupled damping. The time lag is used to describe the velocity autocorrelation function and mean square displacement of the diffusing particle. The diffusion behavior for the time lag is also discussed with respect to the coupled items and the amplitude of bounded noise.

  14. Bound states and the Bekenstein bound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousso, Raphael

    2003-10-16

    We explore the validity of the generalized Bekenstein bound, S<= pi M a. We define the entropy S as the logarithm of the number of states which have energy eigenvalue below M and are localized to a flat space region of width alpha. If boundary conditions that localize field modes are imposed by fiat, then the bound encounters well-known difficulties with negative Casimir energy and large species number, as well as novel problems arising only in the generalized form. In realistic systems, however, finite-size effects contribute additional energy. We study two different models for estimating such contributions. Our analysis suggests that the bound is both valid and nontrivial if interactions are properly included, so that the entropy S counts the bound states of interacting fields.

  15. Bounding the Role of Black Carbon in the Climate System: a Scientific Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, T. C.; Doherty, S. J.; Fahey, D. W.; Forster, P. M.; Bernsten, T.; DeAngelo, B. J.; Flanner, M. G.; Ghan, S.; Karcher, B.; Koch, D.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Black carbon aerosol plays a unique and important role in Earth's climate system. Black carbon is a type of carbonaceous material with a unique combination of physical properties. This assessment provides an evaluation of black-carbon climate forcing that is comprehensive in its inclusion of all known and relevant processes and that is quantitative in providing best estimates and uncertainties of the main forcing terms: direct solar absorption; influence on liquid, mixed phase, and ice clouds; and deposition on snow and ice. These effects are calculated with climate models, but when possible, they are evaluated with both microphysical measurements and field observations. Predominant sources are combustion related, namely, fossil fuels for transportation, solid fuels for industrial and residential uses, and open burning of biomass. Total global emissions of black carbon using bottom-up inventory methods are 7500 Gg/yr in the year 2000 with an uncertainty range of 2000 to 29000. However, global atmospheric absorption attributable to black carbon is too low in many models and should be increased by a factor of almost 3. After this scaling, the best estimate for the industrial-era (1750 to 2005) direct radiative forcing of atmospheric black carbon is +0.71 W/sq m with 90% uncertainty bounds of (+0.08, +1.27)W/sq m. Total direct forcing by all black carbon sources, without subtracting the preindustrial background, is estimated as +0.88 (+0.17, +1.48) W/sq m. Direct radiative forcing alone does not capture important rapid adjustment mechanisms. A framework is described and used for quantifying climate forcings, including rapid adjustments. The best estimate of industrial-era climate forcing of black carbon through all forcing mechanisms, including clouds and cryosphere forcing, is +1.1 W/sq m with 90% uncertainty bounds of +0.17 to +2.1 W/sq m. Thus, there is a very high probability that black carbon emissions, independent of co-emitted species, have a positive forcing

  16. Bounded Rationality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ballester Pla, Coralio; Hernández, Penélope

    2012-01-01

    The observation of the actual behavior by economic decision makers in the lab and in the field justifies that bounded rationality has been a generally accepted assumption in many socio-economic models...

  17. Bounding the $\

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, A

    2003-01-01

    A bound on the nu /sup tau / magnetic moment is calculated through the reaction e/sup +/e/sup -/ to nu nu gamma at the Z/sub 1/-pole, and in the framework of a left-right symmetric model at LEP energies. We find that the bound is almost independent of the mixing angle phi of the model in the allowed experimental range for this parameter. (31 refs).

  18. The ρ(ω/B*(B system and bound states in the unitary local Hidden Gauge approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez-Soler P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we study systems composed of a ρ/ω and B* meson pair. We find three bound states in isospin, spin-parity channels (1/2, 0+, (1/2, 1+ and (1/2, 2+. The state with J = 2 can be a good candidate for the B*2(5747. We also study the ρB system, and a bound state with mass 5728 MeV and width around 20 MeV is obtained, which can be identified with the B1(5721 resonance. In the case of I = 3/2, one obtains repulsion and thus, no exotic (molecular mesons in this sector are generated in the approach.

  19. Differential Privacy for Relational Algebra: Improving the Sensitivity Bounds via Constraint Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catuscia Palamidessi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Differential privacy is a modern approach in privacy-preserving data analysis to control the amount of information that can be inferred about an individual by querying a database. The most common techniques are based on the introduction of probabilistic noise, often defined as a Laplacian parametric on the sensitivity of the query. In order to maximize the utility of the query, it is crucial to estimate the sensitivity as precisely as possible. In this paper we consider relational algebra, the classical language for queries in relational databases, and we propose a method for computing a bound on the sensitivity of queries in an intuitive and compositional way. We use constraint-based techniques to accumulate the information on the possible values for attributes provided by the various components of the query, thus making it possible to compute tight bounds on the sensitivity.

  20. [Reduction of nitrobenzene by iron oxides bound Fe(II) system at different pH values].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Fu-Bo; Xie, Li; Li, Jun; Zhou, Qi

    2009-07-15

    Batch tests were conducted to investigate the reductive transformation of nitrobenzene by goethite, hematite, magnetite and steel converter slag bound Fe(II) system. And the reduction mechanism was explored at different pH values. Experimental results showed that hematite, magnetite and steel converter slag could adsorb Fe(II) on surfaces and form iron oxides bound Fe(II) system at pH from 6.5 to 7.0. The systems had strong reductive capacity and could reduce nitrobenzene to aniline. The reduction efficiency of nitrobenzene in surface bound Fe(II) system followed the sequence of magnetite, hematite and steel converter slag from high to low. The reduction efficiency of hematite and magnetite system increased with pH increasing. While it was almost pH independent in steel converter slag system. Although goethite adsorbed most of Fe(II) in solution, the adsorbed Fe(II) had no reductive activity for nitrobenzene. At pH 6.0, small amount of Fe(II) was adsorbed on magnetite and hematite and the systems did not show reductive activity for nitrobenzene. However, steel converter slag could adsorb Fe(II) at pH 6.0 and reduction efficiency almost equaled to the value at pH 7.0. When pH was above 7.5, dissolved Fe(II) could be converted to Fe(OH)2 and the newly formed Fe(OH)2 became the main redactor in the system. Under alkali condition, the presence of iron oxides inhibited the reduction capacity of system.

  1. Robust cooperation of connected vehicle systems with eigenvalue-bounded interaction topologies in the presence of uncertain dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Keqiang; Gao, Feng; Li, Shengbo Eben; Zheng, Yang; Gao, Hongbo

    2017-12-01

    This study presents a distributed H-infinity control method for uncertain platoons with dimensionally and structurally unknown interaction topologies provided that the associated topological eigenvalues are bounded by a predesigned range.With an inverse model to compensate for nonlinear powertrain dynamics, vehicles in a platoon are modeled by third-order uncertain systems with bounded disturbances. On the basis of the eigenvalue decomposition of topological matrices, we convert the platoon system to a norm-bounded uncertain part and a diagonally structured certain part by applying linear transformation. We then use a common Lyapunov method to design a distributed H-infinity controller. Numerically, two linear matrix inequalities corresponding to the minimum and maximum eigenvalues should be solved. The resulting controller can tolerate interaction topologies with eigenvalues located in a certain range. The proposed method can also ensure robustness performance and disturbance attenuation ability for the closed-loop platoon system. Hardware-in-the-loop tests are performed to validate the effectiveness of our method.

  2. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  3. Empirical Studies on the Network of Social Groups: The Case of Tencent QQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhi-Qiang; Han, Xiao-Pu; Lü, Linyuan; Yeung, Chi Ho

    2015-01-01

    Participation in social groups are important but the collective behaviors of human as a group are difficult to analyze due to the difficulties to quantify ordinary social relation, group membership, and to collect a comprehensive dataset. Such difficulties can be circumvented by analyzing online social networks. In this paper, we analyze a comprehensive dataset released from Tencent QQ, an instant messenger with the highest market share in China. Specifically, we analyze three derivative networks involving groups and their members-the hypergraph of groups, the network of groups and the user network-to reveal social interactions at microscopic and mesoscopic level. Our results uncover interesting behaviors on the growth of user groups, the interactions between groups, and their relationship with member age and gender. These findings lead to insights which are difficult to obtain in social networks based on personal contacts.

  4. A Study on College EFL Learning Community Based on QQ International

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI Li

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An EFL Learning Community has been set up online via a free messaging tool QQ International to consolidate and apply the knowledge learnt in class. One sub-community aims at developing multicultural awareness while the other focuses on expertise training in English for the undergraduates in several universities. Our innovative approach is that the trainees interact with other participants with virtual icons, virtual roles and specific achievement goals according to curriculum-related scenarios. The project team utilized surveys and observations to analyze the advantages and disadvantages from different perspectives and gain further insight into the nature of member participation, knowledge application and learning interests. Results revealed that EFL Learning Community promoted learning interests and training efficiency, contributed to interprofessional collaboration and interpersonal cooperation, with the implication that levels of moderate anonymity are the most optimal for role-plays in a learning community both online and in real life.

  5. Queue Content Analysis in a 2-Class Discrete-Time Queueing System under the Slot-Bound Priority Service Rule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofian De Clercq

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper we present here introduces a new priority mechanism in discrete-time queueing systems. It is a milder form of priority when compared to HoL priority, but it favors customers of one type over the other when compared to regular FCFS. It also provides an answer to the starvation problem that occurs in HoL priority systems. In this new priority mechanism, customers of different priority classes entering the system during the same time slot are served in order of their respective priority class—hence the name slot-bound priority. Customers entering during different slots are served on an FCFS basis. We consider two customer classes (pertaining to two levels of priority such that type-1 customers are served before type-2 customers that enter the system during the same slot. A general independent arrival process and generally distributed service times are assumed. Expressions for the probability generating function (PGF of the system content (number of type- customers, in regime are obtained using a slot-to-slot analysis. The first moments are calculated, as well as an approximation for the probability mass functions associated with the found PGFs. Lastly, some examples allow us some deeper insight into the inner workings of the slot-bound priority mechanism.

  6. Closed-system 'economic' models for psychiatric disorders: Western atomism and its culture-bound syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Rodrick

    2015-08-01

    The stabilization of human cognition via feedback from embedding social and cultural contexts is a dynamic process deeply intertwined with it, constituting, in a sense, the riverbanks directing the flow of a stream of generalized consciousness at different scales: Cultural norms and social interaction are synergistic with individual and group cognition and their disorders. A canonical failure mode in atomistic cultures is found to be a 'ground state' collapse well represented by atomistic models of economic interaction that are increasingly characterized as divorced from reality by heterodox economists. That is, high rates of psychopathic and antisocial personality disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder emerge as culture-bound syndromes particular to Western or Westernizing societies, or to those undergoing social disintegration.

  7. Studying repair of a single protein-bound nick in vivo using the Flp-nick system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ida; Andersen, Anni Hangaard; Bjergbæk, Lotte

    2012-01-01

    The Flp-nick system is a simple in vivo system developed for studying the cellular responses to a protein-bound nick at a single genomic site in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Flp-nick system takes advantage of a mutant Flp recombinase that can introduce a nick at a specific Flp...... recombinase recognition target (FRT) site, which has been integrated into the yeast genome. Upon cleavage at the FRT site, the Flp mutant becomes covalently linked to the 3′ DNA end at the nick in an irreversible manner, as the mutant fails to accomplish the required religation process. Thus, the established...... damage mimics a stabilized topoisomerase I-DNA cleavage complex. DNA topoisomerases are ubiquitous enzymes that relieve topological stress in the DNA arising during DNA replication or transcription. During this process, they make transient enzyme-DNA cleavage complexes, which normally are reversed...

  8. Extension of the lower bound of monitor solutions of maximally permissive supervisors to non-α net systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, W. H.; Chao, D. Y.

    2016-07-01

    Traditional region-based liveness-enforcing supervisors focus on (1) maximal permissiveness of not losing legal states, (2) structural simplicity of minimal number of monitors, and (3) fast computation. Lately, a number of similar approaches can achieve minimal configuration using efficient linear programming. However, it is unclear as to the relationship between the minimal configuration and the net structure. It is important to explore the structures involved for the fewest monitors required. Once the lower bound is achieved, further iteration to merge (or reduce the number of) monitors is not necessary. The minimal strongly connected resource subnet (i.e., all places are resources) that contains the set of resource places in a basic siphon is an elementary circuit. Earlier, we showed that the number of monitors required for liveness-enforcing and maximal permissiveness equals that of basic siphons for a subclass of Petri nets modelling manufacturing, called α systems. This paper extends this to systems more powerful than the α one so that the number of monitors in a minimal configuration remains to be lower bounded by that of basic siphons. This paper develops the theory behind and shows examples.

  9. Parabolic systems of Shilov-type with coefficients of bounded smoothness and nonnegative genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Litovchenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Shilov-type parabolic systems are parabolically stable systems for changing its coefficients unlike of parabolic systems by Petrovskii. That's why the modern theory of the Cauchy problem for class by Shilov-type systems is developing abreast how the theory of the systems with constant or time-dependent coefficients alone. Building the theory of the Cauchy problem for systems with variable coefficients is actually today. A new class of linear parabolic systems with partial derivatives to the first order by the time $t$ with variable coefficients that includes a class of the Shilov-type systems with time-dependent coefficients and non-negative genus is considered in this work. A main part of differential expression concerning space variable $x$ of each such system is parabolic (by Shilov expression. Coefficients of this expression are time-dependent, but coefficients of a group of younger members may depend also a space variable. We built the fundamental solution of the Cauchy problem for systems from this class by the method of sequential approximations. Conditions of  minimal smoothness on  coefficients of the systems by  variable $x$ are founded, the smoothness of solution is investigated and estimates of derivatives of this solution are obtained.  These results are important for  investigating  of the correct solution of the Cauchy problem for this systems in different functional spaces, obtaining forms of description of the solution of this problem and its properties.

  10. RyR2 QQ2958 Genotype and Risk of Malignant Ventricular Arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Galati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular arrhythmias are one of the most common causes of death in developed countries. The use of implantable cardiac defibrillators is the most effective treatment to prevent sudden cardiac death. To date, the ejection fraction is the only approved clinical variable used to determine suitability for defibrillator placement in subjects with heart failure. The purpose of this study was to assess whether genetic polymorphisms found in the ryanodine receptor type 2 (Q2958R and histidine-rich calcium-binding protein (S96A might serve as markers for arrhythmias. Genotyping was performed in 235 patients treated with defibrillator for primary and secondary prevention of arrhythmias. No significant association was found between the S96A polymorphism and arrhythmia onset, whereas the QQ2958 genotype in the ryanodine receptor gene was correlated with an increased risk of life-threatening arrhythmias. Concurrent stressor conditions, such as hypertension, seem to increase this effect. Our findings might help to better identify patients who could benefit from defibrillator implantation.

  11. Relativistic coupling of internal and centre of mass dynamics in classical and simple bound quantum mechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Krause, Dennis; Lee, Inbum

    2017-07-01

    Although special relativity and quantum mechanics revolutionised physics in the early 20th century, the consequences of combining these two theories are still being explored a hundred years later, usually using the formidable theoretical machinery of quantum field theory. However, a formalism accessible to undergraduates has been recently developed which shows how the centre of mass and internal dynamics of classical and quantum systems is relativistically coupled with interesting consequences. Here we explore some of the implications of this coupling, first classically, where we find that the dynamics of the system is time dilated when moving relative to another inertial frame. We then apply the dynamics to a quantum 2-level atom bound in a one-dimensional infinite potential well, and show that the coupling produces collapses and revivals in quantum interference. This example provides an illustration of how the combination of special relativity and quantum mechanics can be studied in situations familiar to most undergraduates.

  12. Stochastic Stability for Time-Delay Markovian Jump Systems with Sector-Bounded Nonlinearities and More General Transition Probabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with delay-dependent stochastic stability for time-delay Markovian jump systems (MJSs with sector-bounded nonlinearities and more general transition probabilities. Different from the previous results where the transition probability matrix is completely known, a more general transition probability matrix is considered which includes completely known elements, boundary known elements, and completely unknown ones. In order to get less conservative criterion, the state and transition probability information is used as much as possible to construct the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and deal with stability analysis. The delay-dependent sufficient conditions are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities to guarantee the stability of systems. Finally, numerical examples are exploited to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. The Role of Dysfunctional Myths in a Decision-Making Process under Bounded Rationality: A Complex Dynamical Systems Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamovlasis, Dimitrios; Vaiopoulou, Julie

    2017-07-01

    The present study examines the factors influencing a decision-making process, with specific focus on the role of dysfunctional myths (DM). DM are thoughts or beliefs that are rather irrational, however influential to people's decisions. In this paper a decision-making process regarding the career choice of university students majoring in natural sciences and education (N=496) is examined by analyzing survey data taken via Career Decision Making Difficulties Questionnaire (CDDQ). The difficulty of making the choice and the certainty about one's decision were the state variables, while the independent variables were factors related to the lack of information or knowledge needed, which actually reflect a bounded rationality. Cusp catastrophe analysis, based on both least squares and maximum likelihood procedures, showed that the nonlinear models predicting the two state variables were superior to linear alternatives. Factors related to lack of knowledge about the steps involved in the process of career decision-making, lack of information about the various occupations, lack of information about self and lack of motivation acted as asymmetry, while dysfunctional myths acted as bifurcation factor for both state variables. The catastrophe model, grounded in empirical data, revealed a unique role for DM and a better interpretation within the context of complexity and the notion of bounded rationality. The analysis opens the nonlinear dynamical systems (NDS) perspective in studying decision-making processes. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  14. Frequency Weighted Model Order Reduction Technique and Error Bounds for Discrete Time Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Imran; Abdul Ghafoor; Victor Sreeram

    2014-01-01

    Model reduction is a process of approximating higher order original models by comparatively lower order models with reasonable accuracy in order to provide ease in design, modeling and simulation for large complex systems. Generally, model reduction techniques approximate the higher order systems for whole frequency range. However, certain applications (like controller reduction) require frequency weighted approximation, which introduce the concept of using frequency weights in model reductio...

  15. Bounded Rationality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballester Pla, Coralio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The observation of the actual behavior by economic decision makers in the lab and in the field justifies that bounded rationality has been a generally accepted assumption in many socio-economic models. The goal of this paper is to illustrate the difficulties involved in providing a correct definition of what a rational (or irrational agent is. In this paper we describe two frameworks that employ different approaches for analyzing bounded rationality. The first is a spatial segregation set-up that encompasses two optimization methodologies: backward induction and forward induction. The main result is that, even under the same state of knowledge, rational and non-rational agents may match their actions. The second framework elaborates on the relationship between irrationality and informational restrictions. We use the beauty contest (Nagel, 1995 as a device to explain this relationship.

    La observación del comportamiento de los agentes económicos tanto en el laboratorio como en la vida real justifica que la racionalidad acotada sea un supuesto aceptado en numerosos modelos socio-económicos. El objetivo de este artículo es ilustrar las dificultades que conlleva una correcta definición de qué es un agente racional (irracional. En este artículo se describen dos marcos que emplean diferentes metodologías para analizar la racionalidad acotada. El primero es un modelo de segregación espacial donde se contrastan dos metodologías de optimización: inducción hacia atrás y hacia adelante. El resultado principal es que, incluso con el mismo nivel de conocimiento, tanto agentes racionales como irracionales podrían coincidir en sus acciones. El segundo marco trabaja sobre la relación entre irracionalidad y restricción de información. Se utiliza el juego llamado “beauty contest” (Nagel 1995 como mecanismo para explicar dicha relación.

  16. Modelling of the batch biosorption system: study on exchange of protons with cell wall-bound mineral ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    The interchange of the protons with the cell wall-bound calcium and magnesium ions at the interface of solution/bacterial cell surface in the biosorption system at various concentrations of protons has been studied in the present work. A mathematical model for establishing the correlation between concentration of protons and active sites was developed and optimized. The sporadic limited residence time reactor was used to titrate the calcium and magnesium ions at the individual data point. The accuracy of the proposed mathematical model was estimated using error functions such as nonlinear regression, adjusted nonlinear regression coefficient, the chi-square test, P-test and F-test. The values of the chi-square test (0.042-0.017), P-test (proton concentrations. The zeta potential of the bacterium surface at various concentrations of protons was observed to validate the denaturation of active sites.

  17. Loop Shaping Control Design for a Supersonic Propulsion System Model Using Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT) Specifications and Bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Kopasakis, George

    2010-01-01

    This paper covers the propulsion system component modeling and controls development of an integrated mixed compression inlet and turbojet engine that will be used for an overall vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) model. Using previously created nonlinear component-level propulsion system models, a linear integrated propulsion system model and loop shaping control design have been developed. The design includes both inlet normal shock position control and jet engine rotor speed control for a potential supersonic commercial transport. A preliminary investigation of the impacts of the aero-elastic effects on the incoming flow field to the propulsion system are discussed, however, the focus here is on developing a methodology for the propulsion controls design that prevents unstart in the inlet and minimizes the thrust oscillation experienced by the vehicle. Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT) specifications and bounds, and aspects of classical loop shaping are used in the control design process. Model uncertainty is incorporated in the design to address possible error in the system identification mapping of the nonlinear component models into the integrated linear model.

  18. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF ARSENIC-BOUND SOLIDS IN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorption, co-precipitation, and oxidation-reduction reactions of arsenic at the sorbent-water interface are importent factors affecting the fate and transport of arsenic in aqueous systems. Numerous studies have concluded that arsenite (As(III) is more soluble and mobile than ar...

  19. "Bound" globulin in the skin of patients with chronic discoid lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cormane, R.H.

    1964-01-01

    In what respect chronic discoid lupus erythematosus is related to systemic lupus erythematosus is still uncertain. In discoid lupus the lupus-erythematosus (L.E.) phenomenon is negative, and the history does not suggest vascular lesions or involvement of serous membranes. In both diseases the

  20. State-Bound Estimation for Nonlinear Systems Using Randomized Mu-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Hans Lehrach, and Albert Poustka. Monte Carlo analysis of an ODE Model of the Sea Urchin Endomesoderm Network. BMC Systems Biology, 3(1):83+, 2009. [14...compensation using sea current data” 1 Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Contents 1 Introduction 4 2 Methods...226 kinetic parameters. The uncertainty ranges are set to ±10% from the nominal values. Among the several input conditions, the robustness is tested

  1. Bounding the Set of Classical Correlations of a Many-Body System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, Matteo; Tura, Jordi

    2017-12-01

    We present a method to certify the presence of Bell correlations in experimentally observed statistics, and to obtain new Bell inequalities. Our approach is based on relaxing the conditions defining the set of correlations obeying a local hidden variable model, yielding a convergent hierarchy of semidefinite programs (SDP's). Because the size of these SDP's is independent of the number of parties involved, this technique allows us to characterize correlations in many-body systems. As an example, we illustrate our method with the experimental data presented in Science 352, 441 (2016), 10.1126/science.aad8665.

  2. A real-time control system of gene expression using ligand-bound nucleic acid aptamer for metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Cui, Xun; Yang, Le; Zhang, Zhe; Lv, Liping; Wang, Haoyuan; Zhao, Zhenmin; Guan, Ningzi; Dong, Lichun; Chen, Rachel

    2017-07-01

    Artificial control of bio-functions through regulating gene expression is one of the most important and attractive technologies to build novel living systems that are useful in the areas of chemical synthesis, nanotechnology, pharmacology, cell biology. Here, we present a novel real-time control system of gene regulation that includes an enhancement element by introducing duplex DNA aptamers upstream promoter and a repression element by introducing a RNA aptamer upstream ribosome binding site. With the presence of ligands corresponding to the DNA aptamers, the expression of the target gene can be potentially enhanced at the transcriptional level by strengthening the recognition capability of RNAP to the recognition region and speeding up the separation efficiency of the unwinding region due to the induced DNA bubble around the thrombin-bound aptamers; while with the presence of RNA aptamer ligand, the gene expression can be repressed at the translational level by weakening the recognition capability of ribosome to RBS due to the shielding of RBS by the formed aptamer-ligand complex upstream RBS. The effectiveness and potential utility of the developed gene regulation system were demonstrated by regulating the expression of ecaA gene in the cell-free systems. The realistic metabolic engineering application of the system has also tested by regulating the expression of mgtC gene and thrombin cDNA in Escherichia coli JD1021 for controlling metabolic flux and improving thrombin production, verifying that the real-time control system of gene regulation is able to realize the dynamic regulation of gene expression with potential applications in bacterial physiology studies and metabolic engineering. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. A Novel Frequency Synchronization Algorithm and its Cramer Rao Bound in Practical UWB Environment for MB-OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chakrabarti

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an efficient time-domain coarse frequency offset (FO synchronizer (TCFS for multi-band orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MB-OFDM systems effective for practical ultra-wideband (UWB environment. The proposed algorithm derives its estimates based on phase differences in the received subcarrier signals of several successive OFDM symbols in the preamble. We consider different carrier FOs and different channel responses in different bands to keep the analysis and simulation compatible for practical multiband UWB scenario. Performance of the algorithm is studied by means of bit error rate (BER analysis of MBOFDM system. We derive the Cramer Rao lower bound (CRLB of the estimation error variance and compare it with the simulated error variance both in additive white Gaussian noise and UWB channel model (CM environments, CM1-CM4. Both analysis and simulation show that TCFS can estimate coarse carrier FO more efficiently in UWB fading channels for MB-OFDM applications compared to the other reported results in literature. Also, computational complexity of the proposed algorithm is analyzed for its usability evaluation.

  4. Biodegradation of sulfamethazine by Trametes versicolor: Removal from sewage sludge and identification of intermediate products by UPLC-QqTOF-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Galan, Ma. Jesus, E-mail: mggqam@cid.csic.es [Departament de Quimica Ambiental, IDAEA-CSIC, C/Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Carlos E., E-mail: CarlosEsteban.Rodriguez@uab.cat [Unitat asociada de Biocatalisi Aplicada IQAC-CSIC, Escola d' Enginyeria, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion en Contaminacion Ambiental, Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 San Jose (Costa Rica); Vicent, Teresa, E-mail: Teresa.Vicent@uab.cat [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Escola d' Enginyeria, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Caminal, Gloria, E-mail: Gloria.Caminal@uab.cat [Unitat asociada de Biocatalisi Aplicada IQAC-CSIC, Escola d' Enginyeria, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Diaz-Cruz, M. Silvia, E-mail: sdcqam@cid.csic.es [Departament de Quimica Ambiental, IDAEA-CSIC, C/Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Barcelo, Damia, E-mail: dbcqam@cid.csic.es [Departament de Quimica Ambiental, IDAEA-CSIC, C/Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), Parc Cientific i Tecnologic de la Universitat de Girona. C/Emili Grahit, 101 Edifici H2O, E-17003 Girona (Spain); King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-11-15

    Degradation of the sulfonamide sulfamethazine (SMZ) by the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor was assessed. Elimination was achieved to nearly undetectable levels after 20 h in liquid medium when SMZ was added at 9 mg L{sup -1}. Experiments with purified laccase and laccase-mediators resulted in almost complete removal. On the other hand, inhibition of SMZ degradation was observed when piperonilbutoxide, a cytochrome P450-inhibitor, was added to the fungal cultures. UPLC-QqTOF-MS analysis allowed the identification and confirmation of 4 different SMZ degradation intermediates produced by fungal cultures or purified laccase: desulfo-SMZ, N{sup 4}-formyl-SMZ, N{sup 4}-hydroxy-SMZ and desamino-SMZ; nonetheless SMZ mineralization was not demonstrated with the isotopically labeled sulfamethazine-phenyl-{sup 13}C{sub 6} after 7 days. Inoculation of T. versicolor to sterilized sewage sludge in solid-phase systems showed complete elimination of SMZ and also of other sulfonamides (sulfapyridine, sulfathiazole) at real environmental concentrations, making this fungus an interesting candidate for further remediation research. - Highlights: {yields}Degradation of sulfamethazine by Trametes versicolor was evaluated. {yields}The laccase enzymatic system and cytochrome P-450 were involved in the degradation. {yields}Four different degradation products of sulfamethazine were identified and confirmed. {yields}The molecular structures and masses of the metabolites were accurately calculated. {yields}Full elimination of sulfamethazine was observed in regular sewage sludge.

  5. Outward bound

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schefter, Jim

    1996-01-01

    ... series of unmanned missions to explore the solar system. Called Discovery, the program is NASA's answer to political and scientific criticism of billion-dollar space extravaganzas that can take a decade or more to get results. Discovery's goal is to design smaller spacecraft with narrowly focused scientific goals, and to build them quickly enough ...

  6. Quasi-bounded sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kucera

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available It is proved in [1] & [2] that a set bounded in an inductive limit E=indlim En of Fréchet spaces is also bounded in some En iff E is fast complete. In the case of arbitrary locally convex spaces En every bounded set in a fast complete indlim En is quasi-bounded in some En, though it may not be bounded or even contained in any En. Every bounded set is quasi-bounded. In a Fréchet space every quasi-bounded set is also bounded.

  7. The structure of Serratia marcescens Lip, a membrane-bound component of the type VI secretion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Vincenzo A.; Shepherd, Sharon M.; English, Grant; Coulthurst, Sarah J.; Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of S. marcescens Lip reveals a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Lip, a core component of the type VI secretion apparatus, is localized to the outer membrane and is positioned to interact with other proteins forming this complex system. Lip is a membrane-bound lipoprotein and a core component of the type VI secretion system found in Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of a Lip construct (residues 29–176) from Serratia marcescens (SmLip) has been determined at 1.92 Å resolution. Experimental phases were derived using a single-wavelength anomalous dispersion approach on a sample cocrystallized with iodide. The membrane localization of the native protein was confirmed. The structure is that of the globular domain lacking only the lipoprotein signal peptide and the lipidated N-terminus of the mature protein. The protein fold is dominated by an eight-stranded β-sandwich and identifies SmLip as a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Transthyretin and the only other member of the family fold, 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase, form homotetramers important for their function. The asymmetric unit of SmLip is a tetramer with 222 symmetry, but the assembly is distinct from that previously noted for the transthyretin protein family. However, structural comparisons and bacterial two-hybrid data suggest that the SmLip tetramer is not relevant to its role as a core component of the type VI secretion system, but rather reflects a propensity for SmLip to participate in protein–protein interactions. A relatively low level of sequence conservation amongst Lip homologues is noted and is restricted to parts of the structure that might be involved in interactions with physiological partners.

  8. ( p, q)-webs of DIM representations, 5d N=1 instanton partition functions and qq-characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgine, J.-E.; Fukuda, M.; Harada, K.; Matsuo, Y.; Zhu, R.-D.

    2017-11-01

    Instanton partition functions of N=1 5d Super Yang-Mills reduced on S 1 can be engineered in type IIB string theory from the ( p, q)-branes web diagram. To this diagram is superimposed a web of representations of the Ding-Iohara-Miki (DIM) algebra that acts on the partition function. In this correspondence, each segment is associated to a representation, and the (topological string) vertex is identified with the intertwiner operator constructed by Awata, Feigin and Shiraishi. We define a new intertwiner acting on the representation spaces of levels (1, n) ⊗ (0, m) → (1, n + m), thereby generalizing to higher rank m the original construction. It allows us to use a folded version of the usual ( p, q)-web diagram, bringing great simplifications to actual computations. As a result, the characterization of Gaiotto states and vertical intertwiners, previously obtained by some of the authors, is uplifted to operator relations acting in the Fock space of horizontal representations. We further develop a method to build qq-characters of linear quivers based on the horizontal action of DIM elements. While fundamental qq-characters can be built using the coproduct, higher ones require the introduction of a (quantum) Weyl reflection acting on tensor products of DIM generators.

  9. Study of the response of the electromagnetic calorimeter and research of a Higgs boson of 300 GeV/c{sup 2} in the channel qqH {yields} qqWW {yields} qql{nu}jj of the ATLAS experiment at LHC; Etude de la reponse du calorimetre electromagnetique et recherche d'un boson de Higgs de 300 GeV/c{sup 2} dans le canal qqH {yields} qqWW {yields} qql{nu}jj dans l'experience ATLAS au LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Maner, Ch

    2003-06-01

    The research of the Higgs boson implies a good uniformity of the response of the electromagnetic calorimeter of ATLAS for the study of its leptonic and photonic channels. In the first part of this thesis, I have developed a reliable monitoring tool for checking the quality of the data taking during these tests, shown that the procedure of production of the coefficients of optimal filtering comprises an artifact which influences the uniformity of the response in energy of a module and contributed to the installation of an algorithm of replacement of the missing coefficients. The second part relates to the study of the channel qqH {yields} qqyWW {yields} qqlvj j for a Higgs of 300 GeV/c32. The result reported in the technical design report did not allow to exploit this channel for a discovery because the distributions of the signal and backgrounds merged. Thanks to a new more global approach associated with a new cut on the mass of the Wj system and a relaxation of certain cuts, I have shown that this channel allows the discovery of the Higgs boson as well as the measurement of coupling H {yields} WW. (author)

  10. sup 2 D NMR study of the dynamics of bound water molecules in dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine-D sub 2 O system at a low water content

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, A; Takizawa, T

    2003-01-01

    We found two doublet signals A and B in sup 2 D-NMR of dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine-D sub 2 O system at a low water content below the temperature of the onset of the main phase transition, i.e. in the beta'-crystalline (L subbeta sub ') phase. The splitting of each doublet becomes minimum at the onset of the transition. The signal A decreases in intensity with a slight increase of its splitting as the temperature increases further, accompanying the marked growth of the signal B in its intensity and splitting. These features of two doublets in the L subbeta sub ' phase and at higher temperatures have never been noticed. The signals A and B were ascribed to the tightly bound water and the loosely bound water, respectively. These assignments were confirmed by the theoretical calculations of the splitting of the doublet A for all possible number of the tightly bound water molecules. (author)

  11. Towards Automatic Resource Bound Analysis for OCaml

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Jan; Das, Ankush; Weng, Shu-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a resource analysis system for OCaml programs. This system automatically derives worst-case resource bounds for higher-order polymorphic programs with user-defined inductive types. The technique is parametric in the resource and can derive bounds for time, memory allocations and energy usage. The derived bounds are multivariate resource polynomials which are functions of different size parameters that depend on the standard OCaml types. Bound inference is fully automatic...

  12. Weakly bound states of two- and three-boson systems in the crossover from two to three dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamashita, Marcelo; Bellotti, Filipe Furlan; Frederico, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum and properties of quantum bound states is strongly dependent on the dimensionality of space. How this comes about and how one may theoretically and experimentally study the interpolation between different dimensions is a topic of great interest in different fields of physics. In this...

  13. A High-Throughput UHPLC-QqQ-MS Method for Polyphenol Profiling in Rosé Wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Lambert

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A rapid, sensitive and selective analysis method using Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to triple-quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (UHPLC-QqQ-MS has been developed for the quantification of polyphenols in rosé wines. The compound detection being based on specific MS transitions in Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM mode, the present method allows the selective quantification of up to 152 phenolic and two additional non-phenolic wine compounds in 30 min without sample purification or pre-concentration, even at low concentration levels. This method was repeatably applied to a set of 12 rosé wines and thus proved to be suitable for high-throughput and large-scale metabolomics studies.

  14. Upper bound on quantum stabilizer codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo; Xing, Li-Juan

    2009-03-01

    By studying sets of operators having constant weight, we present an analytical upper bound on the pure quantum stabilizer codes whose underlying quantum system can be of arbitrary dimension, which outperforms the well-known quantum Hamming bound, the optimal analytical upper bound so far for small code length.

  15. Urinary bladder extracellular matrix hydrogels and matrix-bound vesicles differentially regulate central nervous system neuron viability and axon growth and branching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Anne; Kandakatla, Apoorva; van der Merwe, Yolandi; Ren, Tanchen; Huleihel, Luai; Hussey, George; Naranjo, Juan Diego; Johnson, Scott; Badylak, Stephen; Steketee, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Central nervous system neurons often degenerate after trauma due to the inflammatory innate immune response to injury, which can lead to neuronal cell death, scarring, and permanently lost neurologic function. Extracellular matrix bioscaffolds, derived by decellularizing healthy tissues, have been widely used in both preclinical and clinical studies to promote positive tissue remodeling, including neurogenesis, in numerous tissues, with extracellular matrix from homologous tissues often inducing more positive responses. Extracellular matrix hydrogels are liquid at room temperature and enable minimally invasive extracellular matrix injections into central nervous system tissues, before gelation at 37℃. However, few studies have analyzed how extracellular matrix hydrogels influence primary central nervous system neuron survival and growth, and whether central nervous system and non-central nervous system extracellular matrix specificity is critical to neuronal responses. Urinary bladder extracellular matrix hydrogels increase both primary hippocampal neuron survival and neurite growth to similar or even greater extents, suggesting extracellular matrix from non-homologous tissue sources, such as urinary bladder matrix-extracellular matrix, may be a more economical and safer alternative to developing central nervous system extracellular matrices for central nervous system applications. Additionally, we show matrix-bound vesicles derived from urinary bladder extracellular matrix are endocytosed by hippocampal neurons and positively regulate primary hippocampal neuron neurite growth. Matrix-bound vesicles carry protein and RNA cargos, including noncoding RNAs and miRNAs that map to the human genome and are known to regulate cellular processes. Thus, urinary bladder matrix-bound vesicles provide natural and transfectable cargoes which offer new experimental tools and therapeutic applications to study and treat central nervous system neuron injury.

  16. Capacity Bounds for Parallel Optical Wireless Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2016-01-01

    A system consisting of parallel optical wireless channels with a total average intensity constraint is studied. Capacity upper and lower bounds for this system are derived. Under perfect channel-state information at the transmitter (CSIT), the bounds have to be optimized with respect to the power allocation over the parallel channels. The optimization of the lower bound is non-convex, however, the KKT conditions can be used to find a list of possible solutions one of which is optimal. The optimal solution can then be found by an exhaustive search algorithm, which is computationally expensive. To overcome this, we propose low-complexity power allocation algorithms which are nearly optimal. The optimized capacity lower bound nearly coincides with the capacity at high SNR. Without CSIT, our capacity bounds lead to upper and lower bounds on the outage probability. The outage probability bounds meet at high SNR. The system with average and peak intensity constraints is also discussed.

  17. The Derivation of the Stability Bound of the Feedback ANC System That Has an Error in the Estimated Secondary Path Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Pil Moon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the stability problem of the feedback active noise control (ANC system, which can be caused by the modeling error of the electro-acoustic path estimation in its feedback mechanism. A stability analysis method is proposed to obtain the stability bound as a form of a closed-form equation in terms of the delay error length of the secondary path, the ANC filter length, and the primary noise frequency. In the proposed method, the system’s open loop magnitude and phase response equations are separately exploited and approximated within the Nyquist stability criterion. The stability bound of the proposed method is verified by comparing both the original Nyquist stability condition and the simulation results.

  18. Analysis of 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and its brominated analogues in chlorine-treated water by gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, Carles; Ventura, Francesc; Caixach, Josep; Martín, Jordi; Boleda, M Rosa; Paraira, Miquel

    2015-11-01

    A simple, selective and sensitive method for the analysis of the strong mutagen 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and its brominated analogues (BMXs) in chlorine-treated water has been developed. The method is based on gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS), previous liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of a smaller sample volume compared to other methods and on-line derivatization with a silylation reactive. GC-QqQ-MS/MS has been raised as an alternative easier to perform than gas chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) for the analysis of MX and BMXs, and it allows to achieve low LODs (0.3 ng/L for MX and 0.4-0.9 ng/L for BMXs). This technique had not been previously described for the analysis of MX and BMXs. Quality parameters were calculated and real samples related to 3 drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs), tap water and both untreated and chlorinated groundwater were analyzed. Concentrations of 0.3-6.6 ng/L for MX and 1.0-7.3 ng/L for BMXs were detected. Results were discussed according to five of the main factors affecting MX and BMXs formation in chlorine-treated water (organic precursors, influence of bromide ions, evolution of MX and BMXs in the drinking water distribution system, groundwater chlorination and infiltration of water coming from chlorination processes in groundwater). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Soluble and cell wall-bound phenolic acids and ferulic acid dehydrodimers in rye flour and five bread model systems: insight into mechanisms of improved availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynkowska, Wioletta M; Cyran, Malgorzata R; Ceglińska, Alicja

    2015-03-30

    The bread-making process influences bread components, including phenolics that significantly contribute to its antioxidant properties. Five bread model systems made from different rye cultivars were investigated to compare their impact on concentration of ethanol-soluble (free and ester-bound) and insoluble phenolics. Breads produced by a straight dough method without acid addition (A) and three-stage sourdough method with 12 h native starter preparation (C) exhibited the highest, genotype-dependent concentrations of free phenolic acids. Dough acidification by direct acid addition (method B) or by gradual production during prolonged starter fermentation (24 and 48 h, for methods D and E) considerably decreased their level. However, breads B were enriched in soluble ester-bound fraction. Both direct methods, despite substantial differences in dough pH, caused a similar increase in the amount of insoluble ester-bound fraction. The contents of phenolic fractions in rye bread were positively related to activity level of feruloyl esterase and negatively to those of arabinoxylan-hydrolysing enzymes in wholemeal flour. The solubility of rye bread phenolics may be enhanced by application of a suitable bread-making procedure with respect to rye cultivar, as the mechanisms of this process are also governed by a response of an individual genotype with specific biochemical profile. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Searches for heavy $ZZ$ and $ZW$ resonances in the $\\ell\\ell qq$ and $\

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; ATLAS Collaboration; Abbott, Brad; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Abidi, Syed Haider; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adachi, Shunsuke; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adelman, Jahred; Adersberger, Michael; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Afik, Yoav; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agheorghiesei, Catalin; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akatsuka, Shunichi; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akilli, Ece; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albicocco, Pietro; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Alderweireldt, Sara; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alshehri, Azzah Aziz; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Angerami, Aaron; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antrim, Daniel Joseph; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Araujo Ferraz, Victor; Arce, Ayana; Ardell, Rose Elisabeth; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; 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Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Beck, Helge Christoph; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beermann, Thomas; Begalli, Marcia; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; 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Callea, Giuseppe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvente Lopez, Sergio; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Camplani, Alessandra; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Ina; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carlson, Benjamin Taylor; Carminati, Leonardo; Carney, Rebecca; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrá, Sonia; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castelijn, Remco; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; 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Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cueto, Ana; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Czekierda, Sabina; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'amen, Gabriele; D'Auria, Saverio; D'eramo, Louis; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey; Daneri, Maria Florencia; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Daubney, Thomas; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davis, Douglas; Davison, Peter; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Maria, Antonio; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vasconcelos Corga, Kevin; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Dehghanian, Nooshin; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Gaudio, Michela; Del Peso, Jose; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delporte, Charles; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Devesa, Maria Roberta; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Bello, Francesco Armando; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; 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Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farina, Edoardo Maria; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenton, Michael James; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Flierl, Bernhard Matthias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Förster, Fabian Alexander; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Freund, Benjamin; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Ganguly, Sanmay; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; García Pascual, Juan Antonio; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gasnikova, Ksenia; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gee, Norman; Geisen, Jannik; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Geß{}ner, Gregor; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiacomi, Nico; Giannetti, Paola; Giannini, Antonio; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugliarelli, Gilberto; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gkountoumis, Panagiotis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Gama, Rafael; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gottardo, Carlo Alberto; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Chloe; Gray, Heather; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Grummer, Aidan; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Gui, Bin; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Wen; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Ruchi; Gupta, Shaun; Gurbuz, Saime; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutelman, Benjamin Jacque; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Guzik, Marcin Pawel; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Hageböck, Stephan; Hagihara, Mutsuto; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Han, Shuo; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; 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Herr, Holger; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Herwig, Theodor Christian; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Higashino, Satoshi; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hildebrand, Kevin; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hils, Maximilian; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hiti, Bojan; Hladik, Ondrej; Hoad, Xanthe; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Honda, Shunsuke; Honda, Takuya; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hostiuc, Alexandru; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hoya, Joaquin; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hrdinka, Julia; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Shuyang; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Huhtinen, Mika; Hunter, Robert Francis Holub; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Hyneman, Rachel; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Iltzsche, Franziska; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Isacson, Max Fredrik; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Paul; Jacobs, Ruth Magdalena; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Janus, Piotr Andrzej; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Javurkova, Martina; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jelinskas, Adomas; Jenni, Peter; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Zihao; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Jivan, Harshna; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, Christian; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Roger; Jones, Samuel David; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kaji, Toshiaki; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentaro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kay, Ellis; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kellermann, Edgar; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Kendrick, James; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Kharlamova, Tatyana; Khodinov, Alexander; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kilby, Callum; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; Kirchmeier, David; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitali, Vincent; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, Thorwald; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klingl, Tobias; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Köhler, Nicolas Maximilian; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Koulouris, Aimilianos; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kourlitis, Evangelos; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitrii; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Krauss, Dominik; Kremer, Jakub Andrzej; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Jiri; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Mark; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kulinich, Yakov Petrovich; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kupfer, Tobias; Kuprash, Oleg; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurchaninov, Leonid; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurth, Matthew Glenn; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; La Ruffa, Francesco; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lack, David Philip John; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lanfermann, Marie Christine; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Langenberg, Robert Johannes; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Lapertosa, Alessandro; Laplace, Sandrine; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Lau, Tak Shun; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Benoit; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Les, Robert; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Li, Bing; Li, Changqiao; Li, Haifeng; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Quanyin; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Kuan-yu; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linck, Rebecca Anne; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jesse; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo, Cheuk Yee; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina Maria; Loch, Peter; Loebinger, Fred; Loesle, Alena; Loew, Kevin Michael; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopez, Jorge; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lu, Yun-Ju; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lutz, Margaret Susan; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyu, Feng; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Madysa, Nico; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magerl, Veronika; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majersky, Oliver; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Claire; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mankinen, Katja Hannele; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchese, Luigi; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin Tobon, Cesar Augusto; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Martensson, Mikael; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Christopher Blake; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Mason, Lara Hannan; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Maznas, Ioannis; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McNamara, Peter Charles; McNicol, Christopher John; McPherson, Robert; Meehan, Samuel; Megy, Theo Jean; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meideck, Thomas; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mellenthin, Johannes Donatus; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Melzer, Alexander; Menary, Stephen Burns; Meng, Lingxin; Meng, Xiangting; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Merlassino, Claudia; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Millar, Declan Andrew; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Minegishi, Yuji; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirto, Alessandro; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mizukami, Atsushi; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Mkrtchyan, Tigran; Mlynarikova, Michaela; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mogg, Philipp; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Stefanie; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moschovakos, Paris; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Harry James; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Michael Edward; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Newman, Paul; Ng, Tsz Yu; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishu, Nishu; Nisius, Richard; Nitsche, Isabel; Nitta, Tatsumi; Nobe, Takuya; Noguchi, Yohei; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nomura, Marcelo Ayumu; Nooney, Tamsin; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'connor, Kelsey; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oppen, Henrik; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; 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Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian Ralf; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schott, Matthias; Schouwenberg, Jeroen; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schuh, Natascha; Schulte, Alexandra; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Sciandra, Andrea; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scornajenghi, Matteo; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Senkin, Sergey; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; 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St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapf, Birgit Sylvia; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Stark, Simon Holm; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stärz, Steffen; Staszewski, Rafal; Stegler, Martin; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultan, D M S; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Suruliz, Kerim; Suster, Carl; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Swift, Stewart Patrick; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Tahirovic, Elvedin; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takasugi, Eric Hayato; Takeda, Kosuke; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanioka, Ryo; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Alan James; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Thais, Savannah Jennifer; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thiele, Fabian; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Tian, Yun; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Todt, Stefanie; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Tornambe, Peter; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Treado, Colleen Jennifer; Trefzger, Thomas; Tresoldi, Fabio; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsang, Ka Wa; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tu, Yanjun; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tulbure, Traian Tiberiu; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Turchikhin, Semen; Turgeman, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Uno, Kenta; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usui, Junya; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vadla, Knut Oddvar Hoie; Vaidya, Amal; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valente, Marco; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valéry, Lo\\"ic; Valkar, Stefan; Vallier, Alexis; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; van der Graaf, Harry; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varni, Carlo; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vasquez, Gerardo; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Furelos, David; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Ambrosius Thomas; Vermeulen, Jos; Vetterli, Michel; Viaux Maira, Nicolas; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vishwakarma, Akanksha; Vittori, Camilla; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vogel, Marcelo; 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Weirich, Marcel; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Michael David; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Weston, Thomas; Whalen, Kathleen; Whallon, Nikola Lazar; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Aaron; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; Whiteson, Daniel; Whitmore, Ben William; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilk, Fabian; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkels, Emma; Winklmeier, Frank; Winston, Oliver James; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wobisch, Markus; Wolf, Tim Michael Heinz; Wolff, Robert; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Vincent Wai Sum; Woods, Natasha Lee; Worm, Steven; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xi, Zhaoxu; Xia, Ligang; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Xu, Tairan; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamane, Fumiya; Yamatani, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yigitbasi, Efe; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zacharis, Georgios; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zemaityte, Gabija; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dengfeng; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Liqing; Zhang, Matt; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Maosen; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zou, Rui; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports searches for heavy resonances decaying into $ZZ$ or $ZW$ using data from proton--proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36.1 fb$^{-1}$, were recorded with the ATLAS detector in 2015 and 2016 at the Large Hadron Collider. The searches are performed in final states in which one $Z$ boson decays into either a pair of light charged leptons (electrons and muons) or a pair of neutrinos, and the associated $W$ boson or the other $Z$ boson decays hadronically. No evidence of the production of heavy resonances is observed. Upper bounds on the production cross sections of heavy resonances times their decay branching ratios to $ZZ$ or $ZW$ are derived in the mass range 300--5000 GeV within the context of Standard Model extensions with additional Higgs bosons, a heavy vector triplet or warped extra dimensions. Production through gluon--gluon fusion, Drell--Yan or vector-boson fusion are considered, depending on the assum...

  1. Aspects of Majorana Bound States in One-Dimensional Systems with and without Time-Reversal Symmetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wölms, Konrad Udo Hannes

    . In particular they are very important for the closely related phase of one-dimensional topological superconductors with time-reversal symmetry. This phase also exhibits Majorana bound states, and we will study some of its aspects in this thesis. We will discuss some issues related to obtaining this topological......In recent years there has been a lot of interest in topological phases of matter. Unlike conventional phases of matter, topological phases are not distinguished by symmetries, but by so-called topological invariants which have more subtle physical implications. It comes therefore as no surprise...... that for a long time only a few topological phases were studied and those that were, were not studied in the full topological context, which is only known now. One of the topological phases that has been know for a very long time is the quantum Hall eect. The quantum Hall eect is a topological phase in two...

  2. On the one loop γ{sup (∗)}→qq̄ impact factor and the exclusive diffractive cross sections for the production of two or three jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussarie, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, UMR 8627, CNRS, University Paris-Sud, CNRS,Université Paris-Saclay,91405, Orsay (France); Grabovsky, A.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics,11, Lavrenteva avenue, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University,630090, 2, Pirogova street, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, University of Minnesota,Duluth, Minnesota, 55812 (United States); Szymanowski, L. [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ),Warsaw (Poland); Wallon, S. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, UMR 8627, CNRS, University Paris-Sud, CNRS,Université Paris-Saclay,91405, Orsay (France); UPMC University Paris 06, faculté de physique,4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2016-11-24

    We present the calculation of the impact factor for the γ{sup (∗)}→qq̄ transition with one loop accuracy in arbitrary kinematics. The calculation was done within Balitsky’s high energy operator expansion. Together with our previous result for the γ{sup (∗)}→qq̄g Born impact factor it allows one to derive cross sections for 2- (one loop) and 3-jet (Born) difractive electroproduction. We write such cross sections for the 2 and 3 jet exclusive diffractive electroproduction off a proton in terms of hadronic matrix elements of Wilson lines. For the 2-jet cross section we demonstrate the cancellation of infrared, collinear and rapidity singularities. Our result can be directly exploited to describe the recently analyzed data on exclusive dijet production at HERA and used for the study of jet photoproduction in ultraperipheral proton or nuclear scattering.

  3. Quantification of amygdalin in nonbitter, semibitter, and bitter almonds (Prunus dulcis) by UHPLC-(ESI)QqQ MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihyun; Zhang, Gong; Wood, Elizabeth; Rogel Castillo, Cristian; Mitchell, Alyson E

    2013-08-14

    Amygdalin is a cynaogenic diglucoside responsible for the bitterness of almonds. Almonds display three flavor phenotypes, nonbitter, semibitter, and bitter. Herein, the amygdalin content of 20 varieties of nonbitter, semibitter, and bitter almonds from four primary growing regions of California was determined using solid-phase extraction and ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography electrospray triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-(ESI)QqQ MS/MS). The detection limit for this method is ≤ 0.1 ng/mL (3 times the signal-to-noise ratio) and the LOQ is 0.33 ng/mL (10 times the signal-to-noise ratio), allowing for the reliable quantitation of trace levels of amygdalin in nonbitter almonds (0.13 mg/kg almond). Results indicate that amygdalin concentrations for the three flavor phenotypes were significantly different (p amygdalin in nonbitter, semibitter, and bitter almonds are 63.13 ± 57.54, 992.24 ± 513.04, and 40060.34 ± 7855.26 mg/kg, respectively. Levels of amygdalin ranged from 2.16 to 157.44 mg/kg in nonbitter, from 523.50 to 1772.75 mg/kg in semibitter, and from 33006.60 to 53998.30 mg/kg in bitter almonds. These results suggest that phenotype classification may be achieved on the basis of amygdalin levels. Growing region had a statistically significant effect on the amygdalin concentration in commercial varieties (p < 0.05).

  4. with Bounded Failure Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Wanti Srivastava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the Bayes prediction of the future failures of a deteriorating repairable mechanical system subject to minimal repairs and periodic overhauls. To model the effect of overhauls on the reliability of the system a proportional age reduction model is assumed and the 2-parameter Engelhardt-Bain process (2-EBP is used to model the failure process between two successive overhauls. 2-EBP has an advantage over Power Law Process (PLP models. It is found that the failure intensity of deteriorating repairable systems attains a finite bound when repeated minimal repair actions are combined with some overhauls. If such a data is analyzed through models with unbounded increasing failure intensity, such as the PLP, then pessimistic estimates of the system reliability will arise and incorrect preventive maintenance policy may be defined. On the basis of the observed data and of a number of suitable prior densities reflecting varied degrees of belief on the failure/repair process and effectiveness of overhauls, the prediction of the future failure times and the number of failures in a future time interval is found. Finally, a numerical application is used to illustrate the advantages from overhauls and sensitivity analysis of the improvement parameter carried out.

  5. Distance bounds on quantum dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidar, Daniel A.; Zanardi, Paolo; Khodjasteh, Kaveh

    2008-07-01

    We derive rigorous upper bounds on the distance between quantum states in an open-system setting in terms of the operator norm between Hamiltonians describing their evolution. We illustrate our results with an example taken from protection against decoherence using dynamical decoupling.

  6. Bounded Parikh Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Cadilhac

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Parikh finite word automaton model (PA was introduced and studied by Klaedtke and Ruess in 2003. Here, by means of related models, it is shown that the bounded languages recognized by PA are the same as those recognized by deterministic PA. Moreover, this class of languages is the class of bounded languages whose set of iterations is semilinear.

  7. Bounded Gaussian process regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjørn Sand; Nielsen, Jens Brehm; Larsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We extend the Gaussian process (GP) framework for bounded regression by introducing two bounded likelihood functions that model the noise on the dependent variable explicitly. This is fundamentally different from the implicit noise assumption in the previously suggested warped GP framework. We...

  8. Effect of Inhomogeneity of the Universe on a Gravitationally Bound Local System: A No-Go Result for Explaining the Secular Increase in the Astronomical Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakida, Hideyoshi

    2012-06-01

    We will investigate the influence of the inhomogeneity of the Universe, especially that of the Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) model, on a gravitationally bound local system such as the solar system. We concentrate on the dynamical perturbation to the planetary motion and derive the leading order effect generated from the LTB model. It will be shown that there appear not only a well-known cosmological effect arisen from the homogeneous and isotropic model, such as the Robertson-Walker (RW) model, but also the additional terms due to the radial inhomogeneity of the LTB model. We will also apply the obtained results to the problem of secular increase in the astronomical unit, reported by Krasinsky and Brumberg (2004), and imply that the inhomogeneity of the Universe cannot have a significant effect for explaining the observed dAU/d t = 15 ±4 [m/century].

  9. Computation Results from a Parametric Study to Determine Bounding Critical Systems of Homogeneously Water-Moderated Mixed Plutonium--Uranium Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Y.

    2001-01-11

    This report provides computational results of an extensive study to examine the following: (1) infinite media neutron-multiplication factors; (2) material bucklings; (3) bounding infinite media critical concentrations; (4) bounding finite critical dimensions of water-reflected and homogeneously water-moderated one-dimensional systems (i.e., spheres, cylinders of infinite length, and slabs that are infinite in two dimensions) that were comprised of various proportions and densities of plutonium oxides and uranium oxides, each having various isotopic compositions; and (5) sensitivity coefficients of delta k-eff with respect to critical geometry delta dimensions were determined for each of the three geometries that were studied. The study was undertaken to support the development of a standard that is sponsored by the International Standards Organization (ISO) under Technical Committee 85, Nuclear Energy (TC 85)--Subcommittee 5, Nuclear Fuel Technology (SC 5)--Working Group 8, Standardization of Calculations, Procedures and Practices Related to Criticality Safety (WG 8). The designation and title of the ISO TC 85/SC 5/WG 8 standard working draft is WD 14941, ''Nuclear energy--Fissile materials--Nuclear criticality control and safety of plutonium-uranium oxide fuel mixtures outside of reactors.'' Various ISO member participants performed similar computational studies using their indigenous computational codes to provide comparative results for analysis in the development of the standard.

  10. Instanton bound states in ABJM theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsuda, Yasuyuki [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Moriyama, Sanefumi [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Kobayashi Maskawa Inst. and Graduate School of Mathematics; Okuyama, Kazumi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2013-06-15

    The partition function of the ABJM theory receives non-perturbative corrections due to instanton effects. We study these non-perturbative corrections, including bound states of worldsheet instantons and membrane instantons, in the Fermi-gas approach. We require that the total non-perturbative correction should be always finite for arbitrary Chern-Simons level. This finiteness is realized quite non-trivially because each bound state contribution naively diverges at some levels. The poles of each contribution should be canceled out in total. We use this pole cancellation mechanism to find unknown bound state corrections from known ones. We conjecture a general expression of the bound state contribution. Summing up all the bound state contributions, we find that the effect of bound states is simply incorporated into the worldsheet instanton correction by a redefinition of the chemical potential in the Fermi-gas system. Analytic expressions of the 3- and 4-membrane instanton corrections are also proposed.

  11. Application of a nanoEA-IRMS system for δ13C measurement of biomineral-bound organics in samples of diatom opal with nanomolar quantities of C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Vicente, Ana; María Mejía-Ramírez, Luz; Stoll, Heather

    2013-04-01

    We describe the isotopic measurement of δ13C in very small samples of diatom opal (nanomolar quantities of C) both from fossil sediments and cultures. We use a nano-EA system composed of a combustion elemental analyzer (EA3000 series, Eurovector), with standard 18 mm diameter quartz oxidation-reduction reactors and an ash removal device that aids in removal of uncombusted opal and ensures a long reactor lifetime. This is coupled to a custom designed trapping and cromatography system (Nano-CF, Nu Instruments Ltd.) which cryogenically removes CO2 generated by sample combustion and introduces the gas into a low-flow helium carrier stream to the mass spectrometer (Nu Perspective IRMS instrument, Nu Instruments Ltd.). This technique allows for an important reduction in the minimum sample requirements for analysis compared to a typical EA, however the need to reduce the contribution of the blank to the measured values becomes all the more critical. Blank from the capsules can be minimized through specific protocols including cleaning with solvents and reducing the size of the capsule by cutting it to a smaller size, attaining blanks as low as 13.75±2.15 nmol C. Under these conditions we can accurately measure both standards and diatom reference materials in the range of 100 to 330 nmol C, with a precision of 2σ 10 ‰ analysed in sequence. Applied to measure biomineral-bound organics in cleaned diatom samples from sediments, the low sample size requirements of this technique allows us to analyse multiple size fractions within one sample, and explore isotopic fractionation patterns between them. We have analysed samples from sediments of both centric and pennate diatoms typically in the range of 200 to 1300 µg of cleaned opal. Analysis of culture samples of Thalassiosira pseudonana of 20 to 150 µg of cleaned opal, allows us to evaluate if there is covariation of the whole cell particulate organic carbon (POC) and diatom-bound δ13C values. Initial results suggest

  12. A Flp-nick system to study repair of a single protein-bound nick in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ida; Bentsen, Iben Bach; Lisby, Michael

    2009-01-01

    cells if functional repair pathways are lacking. The Flp-nick system can be used to dissect repair, checkpoint and replication fork management pathways activated by a single genomic insult, and it allows the study of events at the damage site, which so far has been impossible to address....

  13. Virial Expansion Bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Stephen James

    2013-10-01

    In the 1960s, the technique of using cluster expansion bounds in order to achieve bounds on the virial expansion was developed by Lebowitz and Penrose (J. Math. Phys. 5:841, 1964) and Ruelle (Statistical Mechanics: Rigorous Results. Benjamin, Elmsford, 1969). This technique is generalised to more recent cluster expansion bounds by Poghosyan and Ueltschi (J. Math. Phys. 50:053509, 2009), which are related to the work of Procacci (J. Stat. Phys. 129:171, 2007) and the tree-graph identity, detailed by Brydges (Phénomènes Critiques, Systèmes Aléatoires, Théories de Jauge. Les Houches 1984, pp. 129-183, 1986). The bounds achieved by Lebowitz and Penrose can also be sharpened by doing the actual optimisation and achieving expressions in terms of the Lambert W-function. The different bound from the cluster expansion shows some improvements for bounds on the convergence of the virial expansion in the case of positive potentials, which are allowed to have a hard core.

  14. [Qualitative and quantitative analysis of major constituents in Tetrastigma hemsleyanum by HPLC-Q-TOF-MS and UPLC-QqQ-MS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen; Fu, Zhi-qin; Lin, Jing; Huang, Xue-cheng; Chen, Dan; Yu, Hong-min; Huang, Ze-hao; Fan, Shi-ming

    2014-11-01

    A qualitative analytical method of liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-Q-TOF-MS) was developed for identification of multi-constituents and an analytical method was developed for simultaneously determining 4 major compounds (rutin, isoquercitrin, kaempferol-3-0-rutinoside, and astragalin) in Tetrastigma hemsleyanum Diels et Gilg. The HPLC-Q-TOF-MS assay was performed on a Welch Ultimate XB-C18 column (4.6 mm x 150 mm, 5 microm) with the mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile (A) and water containing 0.1% Formic acid (B) in gradient mode at a flow rate of 0.8 mL x min(-1). The column temperature was at 30 degrees C, and negative ion mode was used for TOF-MS. The UPLC-QqQ-MS assay was performed on a Waters CORTECS C18 (2.1 mm x 100 mm, 1.6 microm) with the mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile (A) and water containing 0.1% formic acid (B) in gradient mode at a flow rate of 0.25 mL x min(-1). The column temperature was at 45 degrees C, and MRM mode was used for QqQ-MS. Based on the retention time and MS spectra, 24 compounds were identified or tentatively characterized by comparing with reference substances or literatures. For quantitative the linear range of 4 detected compounds were good (r > 0.9966), and the overall recoveries ranged from 98.27% to 101.58%, with the RSD ranging from 3.15% to 5.88%. The results indicated that new approach conbined HPLC-Q-TOF-MS and UPLC-QqQ-MS was applicable in qualitative and quantitative quality control of Tetrastigma hemsleyanum.

  15. Neuronal Correlation Parameter and the Idea of Thermodynamic Entropy of an N-Body Gravitationally Bounded System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haranas, Ioannis; Gkigkitzis, Ioannis; Kotsireas, Ilias; Austerlitz, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how the brain encodes information and performs computation requires statistical and functional analysis. Given the complexity of the human brain, simple methods that facilitate the interpretation of statistical correlations among different brain regions can be very useful. In this report we introduce a numerical correlation measure that may serve the interpretation of correlational neuronal data, and may assist in the evaluation of different brain states. The description of the dynamical brain system, through a global numerical measure may indicate the presence of an action principle which may facilitate a application of physics principles in the study of the human brain and cognition.

  16. Carrier and Clock Recovery in (Turbo-Coded Systems: Cramér-Rao Bound and Synchronizer Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Moeneclaey

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we derive the Cramér-Rao bound (CRB for joint carrier phase, carrier frequency, and timing estimation from a noisy linearly modulated signal with encoded data symbols. We obtain a closed-form expression for the CRB in terms of the marginal a posteriori probabilities of the coded symbols, allowing efficient numerical evaluation of the CRB for a wide range of coded systems by means of the BCJR algorithm. Simulation results are presented for a rate 1/2 turbo code combined with QPSK mapping. We point out that the synchronization parameters for the coded system are essentially decoupled. We find that, at the normal (i.e., low operating SNR of the turbo-coded system, the true CRB for coded transmission is (i essentially the same as the modified CRB and (ii considerably smaller than the true CRB for uncoded transmission. Comparison of actual synchronizer performance with the CRB for turbo-coded QPSK reveals that a “code-aware” soft-decision-directed synchronizer can perform very closely to this CRB, whereas “code-unaware” estimators such as the conventional non-data-aided algorithm are substantially worse; when operating on coded signals, the performance of the latter synchronizers is still limited by the CRB for uncoded transmission.

  17. Validation of EMP bounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, L.K.; Merewether, K.O.; Chen, K.C.; Jorgenson, R.E.; Morris, M.E.; Solberg, J.E.; Lewis, J.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Derr, W. [Derr Enterprises, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Test data on canonical weapon-like fixtures are used to validate previously developed analytical bounding results. The test fixtures were constructed to simulate (but be slightly worse than) weapon ports of entry but have known geometries (and electrical points of contact). The exterior of the test fixtures exhibited exterior resonant enhancement of the incident fields at the ports of entry with magnitudes equal to those of weapon geometries. The interior consisted of loaded transmission lines adjusted to maximize received energy or voltage but incorporating practical weapon geometrical constraints. New analytical results are also presented for bounding the energies associated with multiple bolt joints and for bounding the exterior resonant enhancement of the exciting fields.

  18. Bounded Tamper Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Faust, Sebastian; Mukherjee, Pratyay

    2013-01-01

    a bounded tamper and leakage resilient CCA secure public key cryptosystem based on the DDH assumption. We first define a weaker CPA-like security notion that we can instantiate based on DDH, and then we give a general compiler that yields CCA-security with tamper and leakage resilience. This requires...... a public tamper-proof common reference string. Finally, we explain how to boost bounded tampering and leakage resilience (as in 1. and 2. above) to continuous tampering and leakage resilience, in the so-called floppy model where each user has a personal hardware token (containing leak- and tamper...

  19. Determination and characterization of site-specific N-glycosylation using MALDI-Qq-TOF tandem mass spectrometry: case study with a plant protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykova, Natalia V; Rampitsch, Christof; Krokhin, Oleg; Standing, Kenneth G; Ens, Werner

    2006-02-15

    MALDI tandem mass spectrometry analysis on a hybrid quadrupole-quadrupole time-of-flight (Qq-TOF) instrument was used in combination with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, proteolytic digestion, and liquid chromatography for identification and structural characterization of glycosylation in a novel glycoprotein, pathogenesis-related subtilisin-like proteinase P69B from tomato. Glycopeptide fractions from microcolumn reversed-phase HPLC deposited on MALDI targets were identified from MS by their specific m/z spacing patterns (203, 162, 146 u) between glycoforms. In most cases, MS/MS spectra of [M + H]+ ions of glycopeptides featured peaks useful for determining sugar compositions, peptide sequences, and thus probable glycosylation sites. Furthermore, peptide-related product ions could readily be used in database search procedures to identify the glycoprotein. Four out of five predicted glycosylation sites were biologically relevant and occupied by five N-linked glycan side chains each. In addition, the fragmentation efficiency allowed detection of further modification of methionine-containing glycoforms with either oxidized or iodoacetamide alkylated methionine. The high resolution furnished by MALDI-Qq-TOF allowed rapid and sensitive structural characterization of site-specific N-glycosylation from a limited quantity of material and revealed heterogeneity at different levels, including different glycan side-chain modifications, and heterogeneity of oligosaccharide structures on the same glycosylation site.

  20. Search for heavy Higgs-like resonances in the Higgs to ZZ to l+l- q+q- final state in pp collisions in the CMS Experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; González López, Óscar

    2014-07-25

    Even after the discovery of a Higgs boson with mass around 125 GeV, there are several pending questions in the Standard Model that allow many models which predict additional resonances, very similar to those expected from the Higgs boson, and at a higher mass. This thesis presents the analysis performed looking for heavy Higgs-like signatures in the H to ZZ to l+l-qq final state in the range 230-600 GeV, with the data recorded by CMS from 2010 to 2013. The data correspond to two different running periods: during 2010 and 2011 protons collided at an energy of $\\sqrt{s}$ =7 TeV in the center of mass, while during 2012 and 2013 they collided at $\\sqrt{s}$ =8 TeV. On the other hand, the performance of the drift tube chambers in the barrel muon system is vital in the muon detection and reconstruction of CMS. The present work also presents the studies done in the determination of the efficiency, resolution and noise contamination of the drift tube chambers, with the first data of collisions recorded.

  1. Bounded variation and around

    CERN Document Server

    Appell, Jürgen; Merentes Díaz, Nelson José

    2013-01-01

    This monographis a self-contained exposition of the definition and properties of functionsof bounded variation and their various generalizations; the analytical properties of nonlinear composition operators in spaces of such functions; applications to Fourier analysis, nonlinear integral equations, and boundary value problems. The book is written for non-specialists. Every chapter closes with a list of exercises and open problems.

  2. Born Level Bound States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Paul

    2017-05-01

    Bound state poles in the S-matrix of perturbative QED are generated by the divergence of the expansion in α . The perturbative corrections are necessarily singular when expanding around free, {O}( α ^0 ) in and out states that have no overlap with finite-sized atomic wave functions. Nevertheless, measurables such as binding energies do have well-behaved expansions in powers of α (and log α ). It is desirable to formulate the concept of "lowest order" for gauge theory bound states such that higher order corrections vanish in the α → 0 limit. This may allow to determine a lowest order term for QCD hadrons which incorporates essential features such as confinement and chiral symmetry breaking, and thus can serve as the starting point of a useful perturbative expansion. I discuss a "Born" (no loop, lowest order in \\hbar ) approximation. Born level states are bound by gauge fields which satisfy the classical field equations. Gauss' law determines a distinct field A^0({\\varvec{x}}) for each instantaneous position of the charges. A Poincaré covariant boundary condition for the gluon field leads to a confining potential for q\\bar{q} and qqq states. In frames where the bound state is in motion the classical gauge field is obtained by a Lorentz boost of the rest frame field.

  3. Lower bound for the nuclear kinetic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehesa, J.S. (Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear); Galvez, F.J. (Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica)

    1985-06-27

    We argue that the kinetic energy of a many-fermion system is bounded from below by Kqsup(-2/3)A sup(5/3) / , with K = 0.565 where q is the number of spin states available to each particle and sup(1/2) is the root mean square radius of the single-particle density. A simple lower bound for the nuclear kinetic energy is found. Numerical values of the bound for several nuclei are shown, and a comparison with some self-consistent calculations and some pseudo-empirical values is made.

  4. Characteristics of depositional sequences, systems tracts and bounding surfaces in Early Ordovician greenhouse passive margin carbonates to Late Ordovician glacio-eustatic influenced foreland basin facies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, M.C.; Read, J.F. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1994-03-01

    Passive margin, cyclic carbonates of the Early Ordovician Knox Group, Appalachians are dominated by meter scale dolomitized carbonate cycles. These are stacked into 1 to 5 m.y. depositional sequences that appear to be relatively conformable. The sequences are defined by stacking patterns on Fischer plots that graph long term changes in accommodation with thick less dolomitized cycles in the TST, and thin, highly dolomitized cycles in the HST, becoming quartzose in the late HST and LST. Sequence and systems tract boundaries are subtle and typically marked by zones of cycles rather than single discrete surfaces. In contrast, sequences in the later Ordovician foreland basin fill locally show: (1) sequence bounding unconformities on the Knox, the Camp Nelson and on top of the Ordovician, (2) well defined low stand deposits as in the subaerial breccias and detrital dolomite muds veneering the Knox unconformity; redbeds and associated quartz sands and conglomerates with intercalated peritidal carbonate layers and their distal equivalent peritidal laminites; (3) TST's in the lower part of the Middle Ordovician limestones include regionally traceable cyclic peritidal carbonates or in the lower Lexington Limestone, transgressive high energy grainstones; (4) HST's consist of poorly cyclic deeper water up into shallow water grainstone bank and northward prograding peritidal carbonate facies; The ongoing study of detailed logs of outcrop and core should help refine the understanding of the fine scale makeup of sequences developed in these contrasting tectonic and global climatic settings.

  5. Bound Exciton Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, B. K.

    In the preceding chapter, we concentrated on the properties of free excitons. These free excitons may move through the sample and hit a trap, a nonradiative or a radiative recombination center. At low temperatures, the latter case gives rise to either deep center luminescence, mentioned in Sect. 7.1 and discussed in detail in Chap. 9, or to the luminescence of bound exciton complexes (BE or BEC). The chapter continues with the most prominent of these BECs, namely A-excitons bound to neutral donors. The next aspects are the more weakly BEs at ionized donors. The Sect. 7.4 treats the binding or localization energies of BEC from a theoretical point of view, while Sect. 7.5 is dedicated to excited states of BECs, which contain either holes from deeper valence bands or an envelope function with higher quantum numbers. The last section is devoted to donor-acceptor pair transitions. There is no section devoted specifically to excitons bound to neutral acceptors, because this topic is still partly controversially discussed. Instead, information on these A0X complexes is scattered over the whole chapter, however, with some special emphasis seen in Sects. 7.1, 7.4, and 7.5.

  6. Characterization of Ni(II) complexes of Schiff bases of amino acids and (S)-N-(2-benzoylphenyl)-1-benzylpyrrolidine-2-carboxamide using ion trap and QqTOF electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jirasko, Robert; Holcapek, Michal; Kolarova, Lenka; Nadvornik, Milan; Popkov, Alexander

    This work demonstrates the application of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) using two different mass analyzers, ion trap and hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (QqTOF) mass analyzer, for the structural characterization of Ni(II) complexes of Schiff bases of

  7. Rapid discovery of cyclopamine analogs from Fritillaria and Veratrum plants using LC-Q-TOF-MS and LC-QqQ-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuan; Zheng, Zu-Guo; Yu, Yue; Wu, Zi-Tian; Liang, Dan; Li, Ping; Jiang, Yan; Li, Hui-Jun

    2017-08-05

    Cyclopamine, an inhibitor of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway, has been paid much attention in treating a wide variety of tumors. However, isolation and purification of cyclopamine analogs from medicinal plants remain challengeable. We herein proposed an efficient strategy using liquid chromatography quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS) and liquid chromatography triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-QqQ-MS) for rapid screening and targeted isolation of cyclopamine analogs in Fritillaria and Veratrum plants. Firstly, fifteen reference compounds were characterized by LC-Q-TOF-MS and their characteristic fragment ions were summarized. Secondly, according to the characteristic fragment ions at m/z 67.1, 84.1, 109.1 and 114.1, rapid chemical screening of plant extracts was carried out by LC-QqQ-MS using precursor ion scan mode and 69 pre-target compounds were screened out. Thirdly, 24 real target compounds were verified by LC-Q-TOF-MS based on relative abundances (over 20%) of characteristic fragment ions. Fourthly, the targeted isolation of Fritillaria ussuriensis bulb and Veratrum dahuricum rhizome afforded a novel cyclopamine analog namely 15β-hydroxy-23-isopengbeisine B as well as four known ones, whose structures were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Additionally, these five analogs were evaluated for the inhibitory activity of Hh signaling pathway in NIH/3T3 cell and cytotoxicity in PANC-1 and HepG2 cells. These results indicated that the proposed strategy was reliable for rapid discovery and targeted isolation of important natural products from chemically complex plant matrices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dromions bound states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maccari, Attilio

    2003-03-01

    The asymptotic perturbation (AP) method is applied to the study of the nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation in 3+1 dimensions with harmonic potential and external periodic excitation supposed to be in primary resonance with the frequency of a generic mode. The AP method uses two different procedures for the solutions: introducing an asymptotic temporal rescaling and balancing of the harmonic terms with a simple iteration. Standard quantum mechanics can be used to derive the lowest order approximate solution and amplitude and phase modulation equations are obtained. External force-response and frequency-response curves are found and the existence of dromions trapped in bound states is demonstrated.

  9. Orbital effects of a monochromatic plane gravitational wave with ultra-low frequency incident on a gravitationally bound two-body system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We analytically compute the long-term orbital variations of a test particle orbiting a central body acted upon by an incident monochromatic plane gravitational wave. We assume that the characteristic size of the perturbed two-body system is much smaller than the wavelength of the wave. Moreover, we also suppose that the wave's frequency νg is much smaller than the particle's orbital one nb. We make neither a priori assumptions about the direction of the wavevector kˆ nor on the orbital configuration of the particle. While the semi-major axis a is left unaffected, the eccentricity e, the inclination I, the longitude of the ascending node Ω, the longitude of pericenter ϖ and the mean anomaly ℳ undergo non-vanishing long-term changes of the form dΨ/dt=F(Kij;e,I,Ω,ω,Ψ=e,I,Ω,ϖ,M, where Kij, i,j=1,2,3 are the coefficients of the tidal matrix K. Thus, in addition to the variations of its orientation in space, the shape of the orbit would be altered as well. Strictly speaking, such effects are not secular trends because of the slow modulation introduced by K and by the orbital elements themselves: they exhibit peculiar long-term temporal patterns which would be potentially of help for their detection in multidecadal analyses of extended data records of planetary observations of various kinds. In particular, they could be useful in performing independent tests of the inflation-driven ultra-low gravitational waves whose imprint may have been indirectly detected in the Cosmic Microwave Background by the Earth-based experiment BICEP2. Our calculation holds, in general, for any gravitationally bound two-body system whose orbital frequency nb is much larger than the frequency νg of the external wave, like, e.g., extrasolar planets and the stars orbiting the Galactic black hole. It is also valid for a generic perturbation of tidal type with constant coefficients over timescales of the order of the orbital period of the perturbed particle.

  10. Profiles of free and bound phenolics extracted from Citrus fruits and their roles in biological systems: content, and antioxidant, anti-diabetic and anti-hypertensive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alu'datt, Muhammad H; Rababah, Taha; Alhamad, Mohammad N; Al-Mahasneh, Majdi A; Ereifej, Khalil; Al-Karaki, Ghazi; Al-Duais, Mohammed; Andrade, Juan E; Tranchant, Carole C; Kubow, Stan; Ghozlan, Kawther A

    2017-09-20

    This study of selected plants of the Rutaceae family was carried out to investigate their phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and the in vitro inhibitory potential of extracted phenolics towards enzymes relevant for hyperglycemia and hypertension. The phenolic content, antioxidant activity and phenolic extract-mediated inhibitory activities for α-glucosidase and α-amylase were evaluated by spectrophotometry. The content of individual phenolics and the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of the phenolic extracts were evaluated by LC/MS-MS and RP-HPLC methods, respectively. A higher percentage of free phenolic content was seen for all the selected plants of the Rutaceae family (85.43-92.82% of the total phenolic content) than of the bound form (7.18-14.57% of total phenolic content). The major predominant bound phenolic in lemon and red blood orange was hesperidin. The major predominant bound phenolic in pummelo, shamouti and clementine was ferulic acid. The highest ACE and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the extracted phenolics from lemon was associated with free phenolic extracts obtained at 30 °C with values of 100% inhibition. Red blood orange free phenolic extract (30 °C) elicited the highest α-amylase inhibition activity (32.3%). In contrast, extracted bound phenolics after acid and base hydrolysis from all selected plants from the Citrus species were shown to induce activation of the ACE and α-amylase enzymes.

  11. Refining Multivariate Value Set Bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Luke Alexander

    Over finite fields, if the image of a polynomial map is not the entire field, then its cardinality can be bounded above by a significantly smaller value. Earlier results bound the cardinality of the value set using the degree of the polynomial, but more recent results make use of the powers of all monomials. In this paper, we explore the geometric properties of the Newton polytope and show how they allow for tighter upper bounds on the cardinality of the multivariate value set. We then explore a method which allows for even stronger upper bounds, regardless of whether one uses the multivariate degree or the Newton polytope to bound the value set. Effectively, this provides an alternate proof of Kosters' degree bound, an improved Newton polytope-based bound, and an improvement of a degree matrix-based result given by Zan and Cao.

  12. Upper bounds on quantum uncertainty products and complexity measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, Angel; Sanchez-Moreno, Pablo; Dehesa, Jesus S. [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Granada, Granada (Spain) and Institute Carlos I for Computational and Theoretical Physics, University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Institute Carlos I for Computational and Theoretical Physics, University of Granada, Granada (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    The position-momentum Shannon and Renyi uncertainty products of general quantum systems are shown to be bounded not only from below (through the known uncertainty relations), but also from above in terms of the Heisenberg-Kennard product . Moreover, the Cramer-Rao, Fisher-Shannon, and Lopez-Ruiz, Mancini, and Calbet shape measures of complexity (whose lower bounds have been recently found) are also bounded from above. The improvement of these bounds for systems subject to spherically symmetric potentials is also explicitly given. Finally, applications to hydrogenic and oscillator-like systems are done.

  13. Equivalence principle and bound kinetic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohensee, Michael A; Müller, Holger; Wiringa, R B

    2013-10-11

    We consider the role of the internal kinetic energy of bound systems of matter in tests of the Einstein equivalence principle. Using the gravitational sector of the standard model extension, we show that stringent limits on equivalence principle violations in antimatter can be indirectly obtained from tests using bound systems of normal matter. We estimate the bound kinetic energy of nucleons in a range of light atomic species using Green's function Monte Carlo calculations, and for heavier species using a Woods-Saxon model. We survey the sensitivities of existing and planned experimental tests of the equivalence principle, and report new constraints at the level of between a few parts in 10(6) and parts in 10(8) on violations of the equivalence principle for matter and antimatter.

  14. Entropy Bounds, Holographic Principle and Uncertainty Relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Volovich

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A simple derivation of the bound on entropy is given and the holographic principle is discussed. We estimate the number of quantum states inside space region on the base of uncertainty relation. The result is compared with the Bekenstein formula for entropy bound, which was initially derived from the generalized second law of thermodynamics for black holes. The holographic principle states that the entropy inside a region is bounded by the area of the boundary of that region. This principle can be called the kinematical holographic principle. We argue that it can be derived from the dynamical holographic principle which states that the dynamics of a system in a region should be described by a system which lives on the boundary of the region. This last principle can be valid in general relativity because the ADM hamiltonian reduces to the surface term.

  15. Performance Bounds of Quaternion Estimators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yili; Jahanchahi, Cyrus; Nitta, Tohru; Mandic, Danilo P

    2015-12-01

    The quaternion widely linear (WL) estimator has been recently introduced for optimal second-order modeling of the generality of quaternion data, both second-order circular (proper) and second-order noncircular (improper). Experimental evidence exists of its performance advantage over the conventional strictly linear (SL) as well as the semi-WL (SWL) estimators for improper data. However, rigorous theoretical and practical performance bounds are still missing in the literature, yet this is crucial for the development of quaternion valued learning systems for 3-D and 4-D data. To this end, based on the orthogonality principle, we introduce a rigorous closed-form solution to quantify the degree of performance benefits, in terms of the mean square error, obtained when using the WL models. The cases when the optimal WL estimation can simplify into the SWL or the SL estimation are also discussed.

  16. Pharmacological potential of Bidens pilosa L. and determination of bioactive compounds using UHPLC-QqQLIT-MS/MS and GC/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Garima; Passsari, Ajit Kumar; Singh, Pratibha; Leo, Vincent Vineeth; Subbarayan, Sarathbabu; Kumar, Brijesh; Singh, Bhim Pratap; Lalhlenmawia, Hauzel; Kumar, Nachimuthu Senthil

    2017-11-16

    Research of natural products from traditionally used medicinal plants to fight against the human ailments is fetching attention of researchers worldwide. Bidens pilosa Linn. var. Radiata (Asteraceae) is well known for its folkloric medicinal use against various diseases from many decades. Mizoram, North East India, has high plant diversity and the use of this plant as herbal medicine is deep rooted in the local tribes. The present study was executed to understand the pharmacological potential of B. pilosa leaves extract. The antimicrobial potential was determined using agar well diffusion and broth microdilution method against bacterial and yeast pathogens. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using MTT and apoptotic DNA fragmentation assays. Further, the antioxidant ability of the extract was analysed using DPPH and ABTS free radical scavenging assay. Mosquitocidal activity was evaluated against third in-star larvae of C. quinquefasciatus using dose response and time response larvicidal bioassay. Additionally, the major phenolic and volatile compounds were determined using UHPLC-QqQLIT-MS/MS and GC/MS respectively. We found that the extract showed highest antimicrobial activity against E. coli (MIC 80 μg/mL and IC50 110.04 μg/mL) and showed significant cytotoxicity against human epidermoid carcinoma (KB-3-1) cells with IC50 values of 99.56 μg/mL among the tested cancer cell lines. The IC50 values for scavenging DPPH and ABTS was 80.45 μg/mL and 171.6 μg/mL respectively. The extract also showed the high phenolics (72 μg GAE/mg extract) and flavonoids (123.3 μg Quercetin /mg extract). Lastly, five bioactive and six volatile compounds were detected using UHPLC-QqQLIT-MS/MS and GC-MS respectively which may be responsible for the plant's bioactivities. An anticancerous compound, Paclitaxel was detected and quantified for the first time from B. pilosa leaves extract, which further showed the anticancerous potential of the tested extract. On the basis of the present

  17. Asymptotic-bound-state model for Feshbach resonances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiecke, T.G.; Goosen, M.R.; Walraven, J.T.M.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.

    2010-01-01

    We present an asymptotic-bound-state model which can be used to accurately describe all Feshbach resonance positions and widths in a two-body system. With this model we determine the coupled bound states of a particular two-body system. The model is based on analytic properties of the two-body

  18. ExtremeBounds: Extreme Bounds Analysis in R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Hlavac

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the R package ExtremeBounds to perform extreme bounds analysis (EBA, a sensitivity test that examines how robustly the dependent variable of a regression model is related to a variety of possible determinants. ExtremeBounds supports Leamer's EBA that focuses on the upper and lower extreme bounds of regression coefficients, as well as Sala-i-Martin's EBA which considers their entire distribution. In contrast to existing alternatives, it can estimate models of a variety of user-defined sizes, use regression models other than ordinary least squares, incorporate non-linearities in the model specification, and apply custom weights and standard errors. To alleviate concerns about the multicollinearity and conceptual overlap of examined variables, ExtremeBounds allows users to specify sets of mutually exclusive variables, and can restrict the analysis to coefficients from regression models that yield a variance inflation factor within a prespecified limit.

  19. Correlation Distance and Bounds for Mutual Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. W. Hall

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The correlation distance quantifies the statistical independence of two classical or quantum systems, via the distance from their joint state to the product of the marginal states. Tight lower bounds are given for the mutual information between pairs of two-valued classical variables and quantum qubits, in terms of the corresponding classical and quantum correlation distances. These bounds are stronger than the Pinsker inequality (and refinements thereof for relative entropy. The classical lower bound may be used to quantify properties of statistical models that violate Bell inequalities. Partially entangled qubits can have lower mutual information than can any two-valued classical variables having the same correlation distance. The qubit correlation distance also provides a direct entanglement criterion, related to the spin covariance matrix. Connections of results with classically-correlated quantum states are briefly discussed.

  20. The ground state of long-range Schrödinger equations and static qq̄ potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beccaria, Matteo [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica Ennio De Giorgi,Università del Salento, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); INFN, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Metafune, Giorgio [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica Ennio De Giorgi,Università del Salento, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Pallara, Diego [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica Ennio De Giorgi,Università del Salento, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); INFN, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2016-05-06

    Motivated by the recent results in http://arxiv.org/abs/1601.05679 about the quark-antiquark potential in N=4 SYM, we reconsider the problem of computing the asymptotic weak-coupling expansion of the ground state energy of a certain class of 1d Schrödinger operators −((d{sup 2})/(dx{sup 2}))+λ V(x) with long-range potential V(x). In particular, we consider even potentials obeying ∫{sub ℝ}dx V(x)<0 with large x asymptotics V∼−a/x{sup 2}−b/x{sup 3}+⋯. The associated Schrödinger operator is known to admit a bound state for λ→0{sup +}, but the binding energy is rigorously non-analytic at λ=0. Its asymptotic expansion starts at order O(λ), but contains higher corrections λ{sup n} log{sup m} λ with all 0≤m≤n−1 and standard Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory fails order by order in λ. We discuss various analytical tools to tame this problem and provide the general expansion of the binding energy at O(λ{sup 3}) in terms of quadratures. The method is tested on a soluble potential that is fully under control, and on various non-soluble cases as well. A supersymmetric case, arising in the study of the quark-antiquark potential in N=6 ABJ(M) theory, is also exploited to provide a further non-trivial consistency check. Our analytical results confirm at third order a remarkable exponentiation of the leading infrared logarithms, first noticed in N=4 SYM where it may be proved by Renormalization Group arguments. We prove this interesting feature at all orders at the level of the Schrödinger equation for general potentials in the considered class.

  1. Bounds for Asian basket options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deelstra, Griselda; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vanmaele, Michèle

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we propose pricing bounds for European-style discrete arithmetic Asian basket options in a Black and Scholes framework. We start from methods used for basket options and Asian options. First, we use the general approach for deriving upper and lower bounds for stop-loss premia of sums of non-independent random variables as in Kaas et al. [Upper and lower bounds for sums of random variables, Insurance Math. Econom. 27 (2000) 151-168] or Dhaene et al. [The concept of comonotonicity in actuarial science and finance: theory, Insurance Math. Econom. 31(1) (2002) 3-33]. We generalize the methods in Deelstra et al. [Pricing of arithmetic basket options by conditioning, Insurance Math. Econom. 34 (2004) 55-57] and Vanmaele et al. [Bounds for the price of discrete sampled arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 185(1) (2006) 51-90]. Afterwards we show how to derive an analytical closed-form expression for a lower bound in the non-comonotonic case. Finally, we derive upper bounds for Asian basket options by applying techniques as in Thompson [Fast narrow bounds on the value of Asian options, Working Paper, University of Cambridge, 1999] and Lord [Partially exact and bounded approximations for arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Finance 10 (2) (2006) 1-52]. Numerical results are included and on the basis of our numerical tests, we explain which method we recommend depending on moneyness and time-to-maturity.

  2. Bounded relative motion under zonal harmonics perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baresi, Nicola; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2017-04-01

    The problem of finding natural bounded relative trajectories between the different units of a distributed space system is of great interest to the astrodynamics community. This is because most popular initialization methods still fail to establish long-term bounded relative motion when gravitational perturbations are involved. Recent numerical searches based on dynamical systems theory and ergodic maps have demonstrated that bounded relative trajectories not only exist but may extend up to hundreds of kilometers, i.e., well beyond the reach of currently available techniques. To remedy this, we introduce a novel approach that relies on neither linearized equations nor mean-to-osculating orbit element mappings. The proposed algorithm applies to rotationally symmetric bodies and is based on a numerical method for computing quasi-periodic invariant tori via stroboscopic maps, including extra constraints to fix the average of the nodal period and RAAN drift between two consecutive equatorial plane crossings of the quasi-periodic solutions. In this way, bounded relative trajectories of arbitrary size can be found with great accuracy as long as these are allowed by the natural dynamics and the physical constraints of the system (e.g., the surface of the gravitational attractor). This holds under any number of zonal harmonics perturbations and for arbitrary time intervals as demonstrated by numerical simulations about an Earth-like planet and the highly oblate primary of the binary asteroid (66391) 1999 KW4.

  3. Permeability Study of Polyphenols Derived from a Phenolic-Enriched Hibiscus sabdariffa Extract by UHPLC-ESI-UHR-Qq-TOF-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Borrás-Linares

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous findings on the capacity of Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS polyphenols to ameliorate metabolic disturbances justify the necessity of studies oriented to find the potential metabolites responsible for such an effect. The present study examined the intestinal epithelial membrane permeability of polyphenols present in a phenolic-enriched Hibiscus sabdariffa extract (PEHS, free and encapsulated, using the Caco-2 cell line. Additionally, selected polyphenols (quercetin, quercetin-3-glucoside, quercetin-3-glucuronide, and N-feruloyltyramine were also studied in the same absorption model. The powerful analytical platform used ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with ultra-high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-UHR-Qq-TOF-MS, and enabled the characterization of seven new compounds in PEHS. In the permeation study, only a few compounds were able to cross the cell monolayer and the permeability was lower when the extract was in an encapsulated form. Pure compounds showed a moderate absorption in all cases. Nevertheless, these preliminary results may need further research to understand the complete absorption mechanism of Hibiscus polyphenols.

  4. Metabolite Profiling of 14 Wuyi Rock Tea Cultivars Using UPLC-QTOF MS and UPLC-QqQ MS Combined with Chemometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wuyi Rock tea, well-recognized for rich flavor and long-lasting fragrance, is a premium subcategory of oolong tea mainly produced in Wuyi Mountain and nearby regions of China. The quality of tea is mainly determined by the chemical constituents in the tea leaves. However, this remains underexplored for Wuyi Rock tea cultivars. In this study, we investigated the leaf metabolite profiles of 14 major Wuyi Rock tea cultivars grown in the same producing region using UPLC-QTOF MS and UPLC-QqQ MS with data processing via principal component analysis and cluster analysis. Relative quantitation of 49 major metabolites including flavan-3-ols, proanthocyanidins, flavonol glycosides, flavone glycosides, flavonone glycosides, phenolic acid derivatives, hydrolysable tannins, alkaloids and amino acids revealed clear variations between tea cultivars. In particular, catechins, kaempferol and quercetin derivatives were key metabolites responsible for cultivar discrimination. Information on the varietal differences in the levels of bioactive/functional metabolites, such as methylated catechins, flavonol glycosides and theanine, offers valuable insights to further explore the nutritional values and sensory qualities of Wuyi Rock tea. It also provides potential markers for tea plant fingerprinting and cultivar identification.

  5. Setup of a UHPLC-QqQ-MS method for the analysis of phenolic compounds in cherry tomatoes, tomato sauce, and tomato juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lecce, Giuseppe; Martínez-Huélamo, Miriam; Tulipani, Sara; Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M

    2013-09-04

    The setup of a novel, rapid, and sensitive UHPLC-QqQ-MS method was described for the determination of phenolic compounds in tomatoes and tomato-based products (tomato sauce and juice). Phenolic compounds including hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives, flavonols, and flavanones were detected, separated, and quantified in a 3 min chromatographic run. The main advantages of the method include high analyte recovery (90.1-115%), low limit of detection (0.008-0.167 mg L(-1)) and quantification (0.01-0.83 mg L(-1)), good accuracy (85.6-115%), and precision (<15%). The detection of the phenolic compounds varied according to the physicochemical nature of the extracts, but generally low matrix-dependent suppression/enhancement effects were observed in all three matrices. The possibility to transfer easily the existing HPLC to the fast UHPLC methods is very attractive, and with minor modifications, the methodology described may be applied to the phenolic characterization of a broad range of plant and food matrices.

  6. Analysis of phytochemical variations in dioecious Tinospora cordifolia stems using HPLC/QTOF MS/MS and UPLC/QqQLIT -MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Vikas; Singh, Awantika; Chandra, Preeti; Negi, M P S; Kumar, Nikhil; Kumar, Brijesh

    2016-01-01

    The stem of dioecious Tinospora cordifolia (Menispermaceae) is a commonly used traditional Ayurvedic medicine in India having several therapeutic properties. To develop and validate LC-MS methods for the identification and simultaneous quantitation of various secondary metabolites and to study metabolomic variations in the stem of male and female plants. Ethanolic extract of stems were analysed by HPLC/ESI-QTOF-MS/MS for rapid screening of bioactive phytochemicals. High resolution MS and MS/MS in positive ESI mode were used for structural investigation of secondary metabolites. An UPLC/ESI-QqQ(LIT) -MS/MS method in MRM mode was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantitation of five bioactive alkaloids. Identification and characterisation of 36 metabolites including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes and phytoecdysteroids were performed using LC-MS and MS/MS techniques. The bioactive alkaloids such as jatrorrhizine, magnoflorine, isocorydine, palmatine and tetrahydropalmatine were successfully quantified in male and female plants. The mean abundances of magnoflorine jatrorrhizine, and oblongine were significantly (P Phytochemicals in the stem of male and female Tinospora cordifolia showed significant qualitative and quantitative variations. LC-MS and MS/MS methods can be used to differentiate between male and female plants based on their chemical profiles and quantities of the marker bioactive alkaloids. This chemical composition difference was also evident during vegetative stage when there were no male and female flowers. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Chemical profiling analysis of Maca using UHPLC-ESI-Orbitrap MS coupled with UHPLC-ESI-QqQ MS and the neuroprotective study on its active ingredients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanyan; Li, Peng; Brantner, Adelheid; Wang, Hongjie; Shu, Xinbin; Yang, Jian; Si, Nan; Han, Lingyu; Zhao, Haiyu; Bian, Baolin

    2017-03-01

    Lepidium meyenii (Maca), originated from Peru, has been cultivated widely in China as a popular health care food. However, the chemical and effective studies of Maca were less in-depth, which restricted its application seriously. To ensure the quality of Maca, a feasible and accurate strategy was established. One hundred and sixty compounds including 30 reference standards were identified in 6 fractions of methanol extract of Maca by UHPLC-ESI-Orbitrap MS. Among them, 15 representative active compounds were simultaneously determined in 17 samples by UHPLC-ESI-QqQ MS. The results suggested that Maca from Yunnan province was the potential substitute for the one from Peru. Meanwhile, the neuroprotective effects of Maca were investigated. Three fractions and two pure compounds showed strong activities in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced zebrafish model. Among them, 80% methanol elution fraction (Fr5) showed significant neuroprotective activity, followed by 100% part (Fr6). The inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) was a possible mechanism of its neuroprotective effect.

  8. Permeability Study of Polyphenols Derived from a Phenolic-Enriched Hibiscus sabdariffa Extract by UHPLC-ESI-UHR-Qq-TOF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás-Linares, Isabel; Herranz-López, María; Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Arráez-Román, David; González-Álvarez, Isabel; Bermejo, Marival; Fernández Gutiérrez, Alberto; Micol, Vicente; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2015-08-07

    Previous findings on the capacity of Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS) polyphenols to ameliorate metabolic disturbances justify the necessity of studies oriented to find the potential metabolites responsible for such an effect. The present study examined the intestinal epithelial membrane permeability of polyphenols present in a phenolic-enriched Hibiscus sabdariffa extract (PEHS), free and encapsulated, using the Caco-2 cell line. Additionally, selected polyphenols (quercetin, quercetin-3-glucoside, quercetin-3-glucuronide, and N-feruloyltyramine) were also studied in the same absorption model. The powerful analytical platform used ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with ultra-high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-UHR-Qq-TOF-MS), and enabled the characterization of seven new compounds in PEHS. In the permeation study, only a few compounds were able to cross the cell monolayer and the permeability was lower when the extract was in an encapsulated form. Pure compounds showed a moderate absorption in all cases. Nevertheless, these preliminary results may need further research to understand the complete absorption mechanism of Hibiscus polyphenols.

  9. Hadron-nucleus bound states

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, T

    2000-01-01

    A new type of nuclear spectroscopy to study hadron-nucleus bound states is described. The first successful experiment was to search for deeply bound pi sup - states in heavy nuclei using the sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Pb(d, sup 3 He) reaction at GSI, in which a narrow peak arising from the 2p pi sup - orbital coupled with the neutron-hole states was observed at 135 MeV excitation energy. An improved experiment has just been carried out to separately identify the 1s and 2p pi sup - states. These experiments provide important information on the local potential strength, from which the effective mass of pi sup - is deduced to be 20 MeV. This method will be extended to search for eta and omega bound states as well as for K sup - bound states. The advantage of the bound-state spectroscopy versus invariant mass spectroscopy is emphasized.

  10. Market Access through Bound Tariffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sala, Davide; Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Yalcin, Erdal

    on the risk that exporters face in destination markets. The present paper formalizes the underlying interaction of risk, fixed export costs and firms' market entry decisions based on techniques known from the real options literature; doing so we highlight the important role of bound tariffs at the extensive......WTO negotiations deal predominantly with bound - besides applied - tariff rates. But, how can reductions in tariffs ceilings, i.e. tariff rates that no exporter may ever actually be confronted with, generate market access? The answer to this question relates to the effects of tariff bindings...... margin of trade. We find that bound tariffs are more effective with higher risk destination markets, that a large binding overhang may still command substantial market access, and that reductions in bound tariffs generate effective market access even when bound rates are above current and long...

  11. Market access through bound tariffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sala, Davide; Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Yalcin, Erdal

    2010-01-01

    on the risk that exporters face in destination markets. The present paper formalizes the underlying interaction of risk, fixed export costs and firms' market entry decisions based on techniques known from the real options literature; doing so we highlight the important role of bound tariffs at the extensive......WTO negotiations deal predominantly with bound - besides applied - tariff rates. But, how can reductions in tariffs ceilings, i.e. tariff rates that no exporter may ever actually be confronted with, generate market access? The answer to this question relates to the effects of tariff bindings...... margin of trade. We find that bound tariffs are more effective with higher risk destination markets, that a large binding overhang may still command substantial market access, and that reductions in bound tariffs generate effective market access even when bound rates are above current and longterm...

  12. Synergism between soluble and dietary fiber bound antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Ecem Evrim; Gökmen, Vural; Skibsted, Leif H

    2015-03-04

    This study investigates the synergism between antioxidants bound to dietary fibers (DF) of grains and soluble antioxidants of highly consumed beverages or their pure antioxidants. The interaction between insoluble fractions of grains containing bound antioxidants and soluble antioxidants was investigated using (i) a liposome-based system by measuring the lag phase before the onset of oxidation and (ii) an ESR-based system by measuring the reduction percentage of Fremy's salt radical. In both procedures, antioxidant capacities of DF-bound and soluble antioxidants were measured as well as their combinations, which were prepared at different ratios. The simple addition effects of DF-bound and soluble antioxidants were compared with measured values. The results revealed a clear synergism for almost all combinations in both liposome- and ESR-based systems. The synergism observed in DF-bound-soluble antioxidant system paints a promising picture considering the role of fiber in human gastrointestinal (GI) tract health.

  13. Nonequilibrium quantum bounds to Landauer's principle: Tightness and effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Steve; Guarnieri, Giacomo; Paternostro, Mauro; Vacchini, Bassano

    2017-10-01

    We assess two different nonequilibrium quantum Landauer bounds: the traditional approach based on the change in entropy, referred to as the "entropic bound," and one based on the details of the dynamical map, referred to as the "thermodynamic bound." By first restricting to a simple exactly solvable model of a single two-level system coupled to a finite-dimensional thermal environment and by exploiting an excitation-preserving interaction, we establish the dominant role played by the population terms in dictating the tightness of these bounds with respect to the dissipated heat and clearly establish that coherences only affect the entropic bound. Furthermore, we show that sharp boundaries between the relative performance of the two quantities emerge and find that there are clear instances where both approaches return a bound weaker than Clausius' statement of the second law, rendering them ineffective. Finally, we show that our results extend to generic interaction terms.

  14. Tight lower bound for percolation threshold on an infinite graph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kathleen E; Pryadko, Leonid P

    2014-11-14

    We construct a tight lower bound for the site percolation threshold on an infinite graph, which becomes exact for an infinite tree. The bound is given by the inverse of the maximal eigenvalue of the Hashimoto matrix used to count nonbacktracking walks on the original graph. Our bound always exceeds the inverse spectral radius of the graph's adjacency matrix, and it is also generally tighter than the existing bound in terms of the maximum degree. We give a constructive proof for existence of such an eigenvalue in the case of a connected infinite quasitransitive graph, a graph-theoretic analog of a translationally invariant system.

  15. Characterization and reactivity of the weakly bound complexes of the [H, N, S]{sup −} anionic system with astrophysical and biological implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabelsi, T.; Ajili, Y.; Ben Yaghlane, S.; Jaidane, N.-E. [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moléculaire et Applications–LSAMA, Université de Tunis El Manar, Tunis (Tunisia); Mogren Al-Mogren, M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Francisco, J. S. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States); Hochlaf, M., E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr [Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, Université Paris-Est, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 Blvd. Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France)

    2015-07-21

    We investigate the lowest electronic states of doublet and quartet spin multiplicity states of HNS{sup −} and HSN{sup −} together with their parent neutral triatomic molecules. Computations were performed using highly accurate ab initio methods with a large basis set. One-dimensional cuts of the full-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) along the interatomic distances and bending angle are presented for each isomer. Results show that the ground anionic states are stable with respect to the electron detachment process and that the long range parts of the PESs correlating to the SH{sup −} + N, SN{sup −} + H, SN + H{sup −}, NH + S{sup −}, and NH{sup −} + S are bound. In addition, we predict the existence of long-lived weakly bound anionic complexes that can be formed after cold collisions between SN{sup −} and H or SH{sup −} and N. The implications for the reactivity of these species are discussed; specifically, it is shown that the reactions involving SH{sup −}, SN{sup −}, and NH{sup −} lead either to the formation of HNS{sup −} or HSN{sup −} in their electronic ground states or to autodetachment processes. Thus, providing an explanation for why the anions, SH{sup −}, SN{sup −}, and NH{sup −}, have limiting detectability in astrophysical media despite the observation of their corresponding neutral species. In a biological context, we suggest that HSN{sup −} and HNS{sup −} should be incorporated into H{sub 2}S-assisted heme-catalyzed reduction mechanism of nitrites in vivo.

  16. Combining Alphas via Bounded Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zura Kakushadze

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We give an explicit algorithm and source code for combining alpha streams via bounded regression. In practical applications, typically, there is insufficient history to compute a sample covariance matrix (SCM for a large number of alphas. To compute alpha allocation weights, one then resorts to (weighted regression over SCM principal components. Regression often produces alpha weights with insufficient diversification and/or skewed distribution against, e.g., turnover. This can be rectified by imposing bounds on alpha weights within the regression procedure. Bounded regression can also be applied to stock and other asset portfolio construction. We discuss illustrative examples.

  17. Sum rule expressions for bounds on Van der Waals coefficients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luyckx, R.; Coulon, P.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.

    1979-01-01

    We present a simple matrix solution for the moment equations that occur in recently discovered bounds on van der Waals coefficients. Using this matrix solution it is possible to express these new bounds directly in terms of the oscillator strength sum rules of the interacting systems.

  18. Computational Lower Bounds Using Diagonalization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 7. Computational Lower Bounds Using Diagonalization - Languages, Turing Machines and Complexity Classes. M V Panduranga Rao. General Article Volume 14 Issue 7 July 2009 pp 682-690 ...

  19. Bounded Rationality in Transposition Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollaard, Hans; Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg

    2014-01-01

    perspective may affect the commonly employed explanatory factors of administrative capacities, misfit and the heterogeneity of preferences among veto players. To prevent retrospective rationalisation of the transposition process, this paper traces this process as it unfolded in Denmark and the Netherlands....... As bounded rationality is apparent in the transposition processes in these relatively well-organised countries, future transposition studies should devote greater consideration to the bounded rationality perspective....

  20. Oil Body-Bound Oleosin-rhFGF-10: A Novel Drug Delivery System that Improves Skin Penetration to Accelerate Wound Healing and Hair Growth in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenqing; Yang, Jing; Cai, Jingbo; Wang, Hongyu; Tian, Haishan; Huang, Jian; Qiang, Weidong; Zhang, Linbo; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiaokun; Jiang, Chao

    2017-10-18

    Recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 10 (rhFGF-10) is frequently used to treat patients with skin injuries. It can also promote hair growth. However, the effective application of rhFGF-10 is limited because of its poor stability and transdermal absorption. In this study, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blotting were used to identify transgenic safflowers carrying a gene encoding an oleosin-rhFGF-10 fusion protein. The size and structural integrity of oleosin-rhFGF-10 in oil bodies extracted from transgenic safflower seeds was characterized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blotting. Oil body extracts containing oleosin-rhFGF-10 were topically applied to mouse skin. The absorption of oleosin-rhFGF-10 was studied by immunohistochemistry. Its efficiency in promoting wound healing and hair regeneration were evaluated in full thickness wounds and hair growth assays. We identified a safflower line that carried the transgene and expressed a 45 kDa oleosin-rhFGF-10 protein. Oil body-bound oleosin-rhFGF-10 was absorbed by the skin with higher efficiency and speed compared with prokaryotically-expressed rhFGF-10. Oleosin-rhFGF-10 also enhanced wound closure and promoted hair growth better than rhFGF-10. The application of oleosin-rhFGF-10 in oil bodies promoted its delivery through the skin, providing a basis for improved therapeutic effects in enhancing wound healing and hair growth.

  1. Bounds of memory strength for power-law series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fangjian; Yang, Dan; Yang, Zimo; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Zhou, Tao

    2017-05-01

    Many time series produced by complex systems are empirically found to follow power-law distributions with different exponents α . By permuting the independently drawn samples from a power-law distribution, we present nontrivial bounds on the memory strength (first-order autocorrelation) as a function of α , which are markedly different from the ordinary ±1 bounds for Gaussian or uniform distributions. When 1 3 , the upper bound remains +1 while the lower bound descends below 0. Theoretical bounds agree well with numerical simulations. Based on the posts on Twitter, ratings of MovieLens, calling records of the mobile operator Orange, and the browsing behavior of Taobao, we find that empirical power-law-distributed data produced by human activities obey such constraints. The present findings explain some observed constraints in bursty time series and scale-free networks and challenge the validity of measures such as autocorrelation and assortativity coefficient in heterogeneous systems.

  2. Insoluble-Bound Phenolics in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi, Fereidoon; Yeo, Ju-Dong

    2016-09-11

    This contribution provides a review of the topic of insoluble-bound phenolics, especially their localization, synthesis, transfer and formation in plant cells, as well as their metabolism in the human digestive system and corresponding bioactivities. In addition, their release from the food matrix during food processing and extraction methods are discussed. The synthesis of phenolics takes place mainly at the endoplasmic reticulum and they are then transferred to each organ through transport proteins such as the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporter at the organ's compartment membrane or via transport vesicles such as cytoplasmic and Golgi vesicles, leading to the formation of soluble and insoluble-bound phenolics at the vacuole and cell wall matrix, respectively. This part has not been adequately discussed in the food science literature, especially regarding the synthesis site and their transfer at the cellular level, thus this contribution provides valuable information to the involved scientists. The bound phenolics cannot be absorbed at the small intestine as the soluble phenolics do (5%-10%), thus passing into the large intestine and undergoing fermentation by a number of microorganisms, partially released from cell wall matrix of foods. Bound phenolics such as phenolic acids and flavonoids display strong bioactivities such as anticancer, anti-inflammation and cardiovascular disease ameliorating effects. They can be extracted by several methods such as acid, alkali and enzymatic hydrolysis to quantify their contents in foods. In addition, they can also be released from the cell wall matrix during food processing procedures such as fermentation, germination, roasting, extrusion cooking and boiling. This review provides critical information for better understanding the insoluble-bound phenolics in food and fills an existing gap in the literature.

  3. Immunofluorescent visualization of mouse interneuron subtypes [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4qq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Molgaard

    2014-11-01

    studying the GABAergic system.

  4. Space-bounded communication complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brody, Joshua Eric; Chen, Shiteng; Papakonstantinou, Periklis A.

    2013-01-01

    -obliviousness shows up. For this model we also introduce new techniques through which certain limitations of space-bounded computation are revealed. One of the main motivations of this work is in understanding the difference in the use of space when computing the following functions: Equality (EQ), Inner Product (IP......In the past thirty years, Communication Complexity has emerged as a foundational tool to proving lower bounds in many areas of computer science. Its power comes from its generality, but this generality comes at a price---no superlinear communication lower bound is possible, since a player may...... communicate his entire input. However, what if the players are limited in their ability to recall parts of their interaction? We introduce memory models for 2-party communication complexity. Our general model is as follows: two computationally unrestricted players, Alice and Bob, each have s(n) bits of memory...

  5. Viscosity bound violation in holographic solids and the viscoelastic response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberte, Lasma [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP),Strada Costiera 11, 34151, Trieste (Italy); Baggioli, Matteo [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE),The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST),Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Physics, Institute for Condensed Matter Theory, University of Illinois,1110 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Pujolàs, Oriol [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE),The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST),Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-07-14

    We argue that the Kovtun-Son-Starinets (KSS) lower bound on the viscosity to entropy density ratio holds in fluid systems but is violated in solid materials with a non-zero shear elastic modulus. We construct explicit examples of this by applying the standard gauge/gravity duality methods to massive gravity and show that the KSS bound is clearly violated in black brane solutions whenever the massive gravity theories are of solid type. We argue that the physical reason for the bound violation relies on the viscoelastic nature of the mechanical response in these materials. We speculate on whether any real-world materials can violate the bound and discuss a possible generalization of the bound that involves the ratio of the shear elastic modulus to the pressure.

  6. Analysis of Price Stackelberg Duopoly Game with Bounded Rationality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The classical Stackelberg game is extended to boundedly rational price Stackelberg game, and the dynamic duopoly game model is described in detail. By using the theory of bifurcation of dynamical systems, the existence and stability of the equilibrium points of this model are studied. And some comparisons with Bertrand game with bounded rationality are also performed. Stable region, bifurcation diagram, The Largest Lyapunov exponent, strange attractor, and sensitive dependence on initial conditions are used to show complex dynamic behavior. The results of theoretical and numerical analysis show that the stability of the price Stackelberg duopoly game with boundedly rational players is only relevant to the speed of price adjustment of the leader and not relevant to the follower’s. This is different from the classical Cournot and Bertrand duopoly game with bounded rationality. And the speed of price adjustment of the boundedly rational leader has a destabilizing effect on this model.

  7. Quantum engine efficiency bound beyond the second law of thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedenzu, Wolfgang; Mukherjee, Victor; Ghosh, Arnab; Kofman, Abraham G; Kurizki, Gershon

    2018-01-11

    According to the second law, the efficiency of cyclic heat engines is limited by the Carnot bound that is attained by engines that operate between two thermal baths under the reversibility condition whereby the total entropy does not increase. Quantum engines operating between a thermal and a squeezed-thermal bath have been shown to surpass this bound. Yet, their maximum efficiency cannot be determined by the reversibility condition, which may yield an unachievable efficiency bound above unity. Here we identify the fraction of the exchanged energy between a quantum system and a bath that necessarily causes an entropy change and derive an inequality for this change. This inequality reveals an efficiency bound for quantum engines energised by a non-thermal bath. This bound does not imply reversibility, unless the two baths are thermal. It cannot be solely deduced from the laws of thermodynamics.

  8. Viscosity bound violation in holographic solids and the viscoelastic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberte, Lasma; Baggioli, Matteo; Pujolàs, Oriol

    2016-07-01

    We argue that the Kovtun-Son-Starinets (KSS) lower bound on the viscosity to entropy density ratio holds in fluid systems but is violated in solid materials with a nonzero shear elastic modulus. We construct explicit examples of this by applying the standard gauge/gravity duality methods to massive gravity and show that the KSS bound is clearly violated in black brane solutions whenever the massive gravity theories are of solid type. We argue that the physical reason for the bound violation relies on the viscoelastic nature of the mechanical response in these materials. We speculate on whether any real-world materials can violate the bound and discuss a possible generalization of the bound that involves the ratio of the shear elastic modulus to the pressure.

  9. A holographic bound for D3-brane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momeni, Davood; Myrzakul, Aizhan; Myrzakulov, Ratbay [Eurasian National University, Eurasian International Center for Theoretical Physics, Astana (Kazakhstan); Eurasian National University, Department of General Theoretical Physics, Astana (Kazakhstan); Faizal, Mir [University of British Columbia-Okanagan, Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, Kelowna, BC (Canada); University of Lethbridge, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lethbridge, AB (Canada); Bahamonde, Sebastian [University College London, Department of Mathematics, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    In this paper, we will regularize the holographic entanglement entropy, holographic complexity and fidelity susceptibility for a configuration of D3-branes. We will also study the regularization of the holographic complexity from the action for a configuration of D3-branes. It will be demonstrated that for a spherical shell of D3-branes the regularized holographic complexity is always greater than or equal to the regularized fidelity susceptibility. Furthermore, we will also demonstrate that the regularized holographic complexity is related to the regularized holographic entanglement entropy for this system. Thus, we will obtain a holographic bound involving regularized holographic complexity, regularized holographic entanglement entropy and regularized fidelity susceptibility of a configuration of D3-brane. We will also discuss a bound for regularized holographic complexity from action, for a D3-brane configuration. (orig.)

  10. A Lower Bound for Chaos on the Elliptical Stadium

    CERN Document Server

    Canale, E; Oliffson-Kamphorst, S; De Pinto-Carvalho, S; Canale, Eduardo; Markarian, Roberto; Kamphorst, Sylvie Oliffson; Carvalho, Sonia Pinto de

    1997-01-01

    The elliptical stadium is a plane region bounded by a curve constructed by joining two half-ellipses by two parallel segments of equal length. The billiard inside it, as a map, generates a two parameters family of dynamical systems. It is known that the system is ergodic for a certain region of the parameter space. In this work we study the stability of a particular family of periodic orbits obtaining good bounds for the chaotic zone.

  11. Bounded Densities and Their Derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozine, Igor; Krymsky, V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes how one can compute interval-valued statistical measures given limited information about the underlying distribution. The particular focus is on a bounded derivative of a probability density function and its combination with other available statistical evidence for computing ...

  12. Physics with loosely bound nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nuclear physics changed drastically as the new generation of accelerators started providing more and more rare isotopes, which are away from the line of stability. These weakly bound nuclei are found to exhibit new forms of nuclear matter and unprecedented exotic behaviour. The low breakup thresholds of these rare ...

  13. Moderate deviations for bounded subsequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Stoica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study Davis' series of moderate deviations probabilities for Lp-bounded sequences of random variables (p>2. A certain subseries therein is convergent for the same range of parameters as in the case of martingale difference or i.i.d. sequences.

  14. Breakup of loosely bound nuclei at intermediate energies for nuclear astrophysics and the development of a position sensitive microstrip detector system and its readout electronics using ASICs technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertulani, Carlos A. [Texas A & M Univ., Commerce, TX (United States)

    2016-01-12

    The work performed under this grant has led to the development of a detection system that will be used to measure reaction rates for proton or neutron capture reactions at stellar energies on radioactive ions far from stability. The reaction rates are needed to better understand the physics of nucleosynthesis in explosive stellar processes such as supernovae and x-ray burst events. The radioactive ions will be produced at the Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (RIBF) at RIKEN near Tokyo, Japan. During the course of this work, the group involved in this project has expanded by several institutions in Europe and Japan and now involves collaborators from the U.S., Japan, Hungary, Romania, Germany, Spain, Italy, China, and South Korea. As part of the project, a novel design based on large-area silicon detectors has been built and tested. The work has involved mechanical construction of a special purpose vacuum chamber, with a precision mounting system for the silicon detectors, development of a new ASICs readout system that has applications with a wide variety of silicon detector systems, and the development of a data acquisition system that is integrated into the computer system being used at RIBF. The parts noted above that are needed to carry out the research program are completed and ready for installation. Several approved experiments that will use this system will be carried out in the near future. The experimental work has been delayed due to a large increase in the cost and availability of electrical power for RIBF that occurred following the massive earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan in the spring of 2011. Another component of the research carried out with this grant involved developing the theoretical tools that are required to extract the information from the experiments that is needed to determine the stellar reaction rates. The tools developed through this part of the work will be made freely available for general use.

  15. Analytic continuation of bound states to solve resonance states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Norimichi; Arai, Koji [Niigata Univ. (Japan); Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Varga, K.

    1997-05-01

    As a method to determine the parameters of the resonance state, a method is proposed using analytic continuation on bound constants of correlation. The characteristics of this method consists in probability of prediction of the parameters of the resonance state only by calculation of the bound state. Owing to conducting the analytic continuation on square root of energy in the bound state as a function relating to the bound constant, energy and width in the bound state was determined. Here was reported on a result of application of this method to three systems. Some partial wave on two systems showing correlation at a simple potential and a resonance state of zero of all orbital angular motion quality in three boson system were determined using the analytic continuation method. These results agreed well with one used a method of integrating Schroedinger equation directly and one used the complex scaling method, and this method was found to be much efficient for the study of the resonance state. Under a background of becoming applicable to the method of analytic continuation, there was development of calculating method for the recent small number multi system. As the characteristics of the analytic continuation method is used for only calculation of the bound state, it is convenient at a point applicable to the method to obtain conventional bound state and then is much efficient in a point of applicability of calculus of variations. However, in order to obtain coefficient of Pade approximation correctly, the bound state must be solved correctly, which is difficult for more complex system and is not always applicable to every systems. (G.K.)

  16. On the lower bound of monitor solutions of maximally permissive supervisors for a subclass α-S3PR of flexible manufacturing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Daniel Yuh

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a novel and computationally efficient method - based on a vector covering approach - to design optimal control places and an iteration approach that computes the reachability graph to obtain a maximally permissive liveness enforcing supervisor for FMS (flexible manufacturing systems) have been reported. However, it is unclear as to the relationship between the structure of the net and the minimal number of monitors required. This paper develops a theory to show that the minimal number of monitors required cannot be less than that of basic siphons in α-S3PR (systems of simple sequential processes with resources). This confirms that two of the three controlled systems by Chen et al. are of a minimal monitor configuration since they belong to α-S3PR and their number in each example equals that of basic siphons.

  17. A non-regenerative model of a redundant repairable system: bounds for the unavailability and asymptotical insensitivity to the lifetime distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor N. Kovalenko

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate steady state reliability parameters of an F:r-out-of-N redundant repairable system with m(1≤m≤r−1 repair channels in light traffic conditions. Such a system can also be treated as a closed queueing network of a simple kind. It includes two nodes, with infinite number of channels and m channels, respectively. Each of the N customers pass cyclically from one node to the other; the service time distributions are of a general form for both the nodes.

  18. Breakup of loosely bound nuclei at intermediate energies for nuclear astrophysics and the development of a position sensitive microstrip detector system and its readout electronics using ASICs technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tribble, Robert E. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Sobotka, Lee G. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Blackmon, Jeff C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Bertulani, Carlos A. [Texas A & M Univ., Commerce, TX (United States)

    2015-12-29

    The work performed under this grant has led to the development of a detection system that will be used to measure reaction rates for proton or neutron capture reactions at stellar energies on radioactive ions far from stability. The reaction rates are needed to better understand the physics of nucleosynthesis in explosive stellar processes such as supernovae and x-ray burst events. The radioactive ions will be produced at the Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (RIBF) at RIKEN near Tokyo, Japan. During the course of this work, the group involved in this project has expanded by several institutions in Europe and Japan and now involves collaborators from the U.S., Japan, Hungary, Romania, Germany, Spain, Italy, China, and South Korea. As part of the project, a novel design based on large-area silicon detectors has been built and tested and the performance characterized in a series of tests using particle beams with a variety of atomic numbers at the Cyclotron Institute of Texas A&M University and the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba facility (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan. The work has involved mechanical construction of a special purpose vacuum chamber, with a precision mounting system for the silicon detectors, development of a new ASICs readout system that has applications with a wide variety of silicon detector systems, and the development of a data acquisition system that is integrated into the computer system being used at RIBF. The parts noted above that are needed to carry out the research program are completed and ready for installation. Several approved experiments that will use this system will be carried out in the near future. The experimental work has been delayed due to a large increase in the cost and availability of electrical power for RIBF that occurred following the massive earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan in the spring of 2011. Another component of the research carried out with this grant involved developing the theoretical tools that are required

  19. National Energy with Weather System Simultator (NEWS) Sets Bounds on Cost Effective Wind and Solar PV Deployment in the USA without the Use of Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clack, C.; MacDonald, A. E.; Alexander, A.; Dunbar, A. D.; Xie, Y.; Wilczak, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of weather-driven renewable energies for the United States energy portfolio is growing. The main perceived problems with weather-driven renewable energies are their intermittent nature, low power density, and high costs. In 2009, we began a large-scale investigation into the characteristics of weather-driven renewables. The project utilized the best available weather data assimilation model to compute high spatial and temporal resolution power datasets for the renewable resources of wind and solar PV. The weather model used is the Rapid Update Cycle for the years of 2006-2008. The team also collated a detailed electrical load dataset for the contiguous USA from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for the same three-year period. The coincident time series of electrical load and weather data allows the possibility of temporally correlated computations for optimal design over large geographic areas. The past two years have seen the development of a cost optimization mathematic model that designs electric power systems. The model plans the system and dispatches it on an hourly timescale. The system is designed to be reliable, reduce carbon, reduce variability of renewable resources and move the electricity about the whole domain. The system built would create the infrastructure needed to reduce carbon emissions to 0 by 2050. The advantages of the system is reduced water demain, dual incomes for farmers, jobs for construction of the infrastructure, and price stability for energy. One important simplified test that was run included existing US carbon free power sources, natural gas power when needed, and a High Voltage Direct Current power transmission network. This study shows that the costs and carbon emissions from an optimally designed national system decrease with geographic size. It shows that with achievable estimates of wind and solar generation costs, that the US could decrease its carbon emissions by up to 80% by the early 2030s, without an

  20. Bounds on charge and heat diffusivities in momentum dissipating holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoretti, Andrea [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Genova,via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146, Genova (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Genova,via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146, Genova (Italy); Lorentz Institute for Theoretical Physics,Niels Bohrweg 2, Leiden NL-2333 CA (Netherlands); Braggio, Alessandro [INFN - Sezione di Genova,via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146, Genova (Italy); CNR-SPIN,Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146, Genova (Italy); Magnoli, Nicodemo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Genova,via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146, Genova (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Genova,via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146, Genova (Italy); Musso, Daniele [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP),Strada Costiera 11, I-34151 Trieste (Italy)

    2015-07-20

    Inspired by a recently conjectured universal bound for thermo-electric diffusion constants in quantum critical, strongly coupled systems and relying on holographic analytical computations, we investigate the possibility of formulating Planckian bounds in different holographic models featuring momentum dissipation. For a certain family of solutions to a simple massive gravity dilaton model at zero charge density we find linear in temperature resistivity and entropy density alongside a constant electric susceptibility. In addition we explicitly find that the sum of the thermo-electric diffusion constants is bounded.

  1. Capacity bounds for parallel IM-DD optical wireless channels

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2016-07-26

    A system consisting of parallel intensity-modulation direct-detection optical wireless channels with a total average intensity constraint is studied. Capacity upper and lower bounds for this system are derived. If channel-state information is available at the transmitter, the bounds have to be optimized with respect to intensity allocation over the parallel channels. The optimization of the lower bound is non-convex, however, the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions can be used to find a list of possible solutions one of which is optimal. The optimal solution can then be found by an exhaustive search algorithm, which is computationally expensive. To overcome this, we propose a low-complexity intensity allocation algorithm which is nearly optimal. The optimized capacity lower bound coincides with the capacity at high signal-to-noise ratio. © 2016 IEEE.

  2. Infinite Horizon Discrete Time Control Problems for Bounded Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We establish Pontryagin Maximum Principles in the strong form for infinite horizon optimal control problems for bounded processes, for systems governed by difference equations. Results due to Ioffe and Tihomirov are among the tools used to prove our theorems. We write necessary conditions with weakened hypotheses of concavity and without invertibility, and we provide new results on the adjoint variable. We show links between bounded problems and nonbounded ones. We also give sufficient conditions of optimality.

  3. Lower bounds in differential privacy

    OpenAIRE

    De, Anindya

    2011-01-01

    This is a paper about private data analysis, in which a trusted curator holding a confidential database responds to real vector-valued queries. A common approach to ensuring privacy for the database elements is to add appropriately generated random noise to the answers, releasing only these {\\em noisy} responses. In this paper, we investigate various lower bounds on the noise required to maintain different kind of privacy guarantees.

  4. Geometry of Homogeneous Bounded Domains

    CERN Document Server

    Vesentini, E

    2011-01-01

    This title includes: S.G. Gindikin, I.I. Pjateckii-Sapiro, E.B. Vinberg: Homogeneous Kahler manifolds; S.G. Greenfield: Extendibility properties of real submanifolds of Cn; W. Kaup: Holomorphische Abbildungen in Hyperbolische Raume; A. Koranyi: Holomorphic and harmonic functions on bounded symmetric domains; J.L. Koszul: Formes harmoniques vectorielles sur les espaces localement symetriques; S. Murakami: Plongements holomorphes de domaines symetriques; and E.M. Stein: The analogues of Fatous' theorem and estimates for maximal functions.

  5. Wronskian method for bound states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Francisco M, E-mail: fernande@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [INIFTA (UNLP, CONICET), Division Quimica Teorica, Boulevard 113 S/N, Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2011-05-15

    We propose a simple and straightforward method based on Wronskians for the calculation of bound-state energies and wavefunctions of one-dimensional quantum-mechanical problems. We explicitly discuss the asymptotic behaviour of the wavefunction and show that the allowed energies make the divergent part vanish. As illustrative examples we consider an exactly solvable model, the Gaussian potential well, and a two-well potential proposed earlier for the interpretation of the infrared spectrum of ammonia.

  6. Cyclotron transitions of bound ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezchastnov, Victor G.; Pavlov, George G.

    2017-06-01

    A charged particle in a magnetic field possesses discrete energy levels associated with particle rotation around the field lines. The radiative transitions between these levels are the well-known cyclotron transitions. We show that a bound complex of particles with a nonzero net charge displays analogous transitions between the states of confined motion of the entire complex in the field. The latter bound-ion cyclotron transitions are affected by a coupling between the collective and internal motions of the complex and, as a result, differ from the transitions of a "reference" bare ion with the same mass and charge. We analyze the cyclotron transitions for complex ions by including the coupling within a rigorous quantum approach. Particular attention is paid to comparison of the transition energies and oscillator strengths to those of the bare ion. Selection rules based on integrals of collective motion are derived for the bound-ion cyclotron transitions analytically, and the perturbation and coupled-channel approaches are developed to study the transitions quantitatively. Representative examples are considered and discussed for positive and negative atomic and cluster ions.

  7. P2-16: Dual-Bound Model and the Role of Time Bound in Perceptual Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daeseob Lim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The diffusion model (DM encapsulates the dynamics of perceptual decision within a ‘diffusion field’ that is defined by a basis with sensory-evidence (SE and time vectors. At the core of the DM, it assumes that a decision is not made until an evidence particle drifts in the diffusion field and eventually hits one of the two pre-fixed bounds defined in the SE axis. This assumption dictates when and which choice is made by referring to when and which bound will be hit by the evidence particle. What if urgency pressures the decision system to make a choice even when the evidence particle has yet hit the SE bound? Previous modeling attempts at coping with time pressure, despite differences in detail, all manipulated the coordinate of SE bounds. Here, we offer a novel solution by adopting another bound on the time axis. This ‘dual-bound’ model (DBM posits that decisions can also be made when the evidence particle hits a time bound, which is determined on a trial-by-trial basis by a ‘perceived time interval’ – how long the system can stay in the ‘diffusion’ field. The classic single-bound model (SBM exhibited systematic errors in predicting both the reaction time distributions and the time-varying bias in choice. Those errors were not corrected by previously proposed variants of the SBM until the time bound was introduced. The validity of the DBM was further supported by the strong across-individual correlation between observed precision of interval timing and the predicted trial-by-trial variability of the time bound.

  8. Two homologous intermetallic phases in the Na-Au-Zn system with sodium bound in unusual paired sites within 1D tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Saroj L; Lin, Qisheng; Corbett, John D

    2012-09-03

    The Na-Au-Zn system contains the two intermetallic phases Na(0.97(4))Au(2)Zn(4) (I) and Na(0.72(4))Au(2)Zn(2) (II) that are commensurately and incommensurately modulated derivatives of K(0.37)Cd(2), respectively. Compound I crystallizes in tetragonal space group P4/mbm (No. 127), a = 7.986(1) Å, c = 7.971(1) Å, Z = 4, as a 1 × 1 × 3 superstructure derivative of K(0.37)Cd(2) (I4/mcm). Compound II is a weakly incommensurate derivative of K(0.37)Cd(2) with a modulation vector q = 0.189(1) along c. Its structure was solved in superspace group P4/mbm(00g)00ss, a = 7.8799(6) Å, c = 2.7326(4) Å, Z = 2, as well as its average structure in P4/mbm with the same lattice parameters.. The Au-Zn networks in both consist of layers of gold or zinc squares that are condensed antiprismatically along c ([Au(4/2)Zn(4)Zn(4)Au(4/2)] for I and [Au(4/2)Zn(4)Au(4/2)] for II) to define fairly uniform tunnels. The long-range cation dispositions in the tunnels are all clearly and rationally defined by electron density (Fourier) mapping. These show only close, somewhat diffuse, pairs of opposed, ≤50% occupied Na sites that are centered on (I) (shown) or between (II) the gold squares. Tight-binding electronic structure calculations via linear muffin-tin-orbital (LMTO) methods, assuming random occupancy of ≤ ∼100% of nonpaired Na sites, again show that the major Hamilton bonding populations in both compounds arise from the polar heteroatomic Au-Zn interactions. Clear Na-Au (and lesser Na-Zn) bonding is also evident in the COHP functions. These two compounds are the only stable ternary phases in the (Cs,Rb,K,Na)-Au-Zn systems, emphasizing the special bonding and packing requirements in these sodium structures.

  9. Generalized mutual information and Tsirelson's bound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakakuwa, Eyuri [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Murao, Mio [Institute for Nano Quantum Information Electronics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2014-12-04

    We introduce a generalization of the quantum mutual information between a classical system and a quantum system into the mutual information between a classical system and a system described by general probabilistic theories. We apply this generalized mutual information (GMI) to a derivation of Tsirelson's bound from information causality, and prove that Tsirelson's bound can be derived from the chain rule of the GMI. By using the GMI, we formulate the 'no-supersignalling condition' (NSS), that the assistance of correlations does not enhance the capability of classical communication. We prove that NSS is never violated in any no-signalling theory.

  10. Strata-bound Fe-Co-Cu-Au-Bi-Y-REE deposits of the Idaho Cobalt Belt: Multistage hydrothermal mineralization in a magmatic-related iron oxide copper-gold system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Mineralogical and geochemical studies of strata-bound Fe-Co-Cu-Au-Bi-Y-rare-earth element (REE) deposits of the Idaho cobalt belt in east-central Idaho provide evidence of multistage epigenetic mineralization by magmatic-hydrothermal processes in an iron oxide copper-gold (IOCG) system. Deposits of the Idaho cobalt belt comprise three types: (1) strata-bound sulfide lenses in the Blackbird district, which are cobaltite and, less commonly, chalcopyrite rich with locally abundant gold, native bismuth, bismuthinite, xenotime, allanite, monazite, and the Be-rich silicate gadolinite-(Y), with sparse uraninite, stannite, and Bi tellurides, in a gangue of quartz, chlorite, biotite, muscovite, garnet, tourmaline, chloritoid, and/or siderite, with locally abundant fluorapatite or magnetite; (2) discordant tourmalinized breccias in the Blackbird district that in places have concentrations of cobaltite, chalcopyrite, gold, and xenotime; and (3) strata-bound magnetite-rich lenses in the Iron Creek area, which contain cobaltiferous pyrite and locally sparse chalcopyrite or xenotime. Most sulfide-rich deposits in the Blackbird district are enclosed by strata-bound lenses composed mainly of Cl-rich Fe biotite; some deposits have quartz-rich envelopes.Whole-rock analyses of 48 Co- and/or Cu-rich samples show high concentrations of Au (up to 26.8 ppm), Bi (up to 9.16 wt %), Y (up to 0.83 wt %), ∑REEs (up to 2.56 wt %), Ni (up to 6,780 ppm), and Be (up to 1,180 ppm), with locally elevated U (up to 124 ppm) and Sn (up to 133 ppm); Zn and Pb contents are uniformly low (≤821 and ≤61 ppm, respectively). Varimax factor analysis of bulk compositions of these samples reveals geochemically distinct element groupings that reflect statistical associations of monazite, allanite, and xenotime; biotite and gold; detrital minerals; chalcopyrite and sparse stannite; quartz; and cobaltite with sparse selenides and tellurides. Significantly, Cu is statistically separate from Co and As

  11. Lower bounds for randomized Exclusive Write PRAMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKenzie, P.D.

    1995-05-02

    In this paper we study the question: How useful is randomization in speeding up Exclusive Write PRAM computations? Our results give further evidence that randomization is of limited use in these types of computations. First we examine a compaction problem on both the CREW and EREW PRAM models, and we present randomized lower bounds which match the best deterministic lower bounds known. (For the CREW PRAM model, the lower bound is asymptotically optimal.) These are the first non-trivial randomized lower bounds known for the compaction problem on these models. We show that our lower bounds also apply to the problem of approximate compaction. Next we examine the problem of computing boolean functions on the CREW PRAM model, and we present a randomized lower bound, which improves on the previous best randomized lower bound for many boolean functions, including the OR function. (The previous lower bounds for these functions were asymptotically optimal, but we improve the constant multiplicative factor.) We also give an alternate proof for the randomized lower bound on PARITY, which was already optimal to within a constant additive factor. Lastly, we give a randomized lower bound for integer merging on an EREW PRAM which matches the best deterministic lower bound known. In all our proofs, we use the Random Adversary method, which has previously only been used for proving lower bounds on models with Concurrent Write capabilities. Thus this paper also serves to illustrate the power and generality of this method for proving parallel randomized lower bounds.

  12. Tight bounds on accessible information and informational power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Arno, Michele; Buscemi, Francesco; Ozawa, Masanao

    2014-06-01

    The accessible information quantifies the amount of classical information that can be extracted from an ensemble of quantum states. Analogously, the informational power quantifies the amount of classical information that can be extracted by a quantum measurement. For both quantities, we provide upper and lower bounds that depend only on the dimension of the system, and we prove their tightness. In the case of symmetric informationally complete (SIC) ensembles and measurements, stronger bounds are provided and their tightness proved for qubits and qutrits. From our upper bounds, we notice, perhaps surprisingly, that the statistics generated by SIC ensembles or measurements in arbitrary dimension, though optimal for tomographic purposes, in fact never contain more than just one bit of information, the rest being constituted by completely random bits. On the other hand, from our lower bounds, we obtain an explicit strategy beating the so-called pretty-good one for the extraction of mutual information in the case of SIC ensembles and measurements.

  13. Frenetic Bounds on the Entropy Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Christian

    2017-10-01

    We give a systematic derivation of positive lower bounds for the expected entropy production (EP) rate in classical statistical mechanical systems obeying a dynamical large deviation principle. The logic is the same for the return to thermodynamic equilibrium as it is for steady nonequilibria working under the condition of local detailed balance. We recover there recently studied "uncertainty" relations for the EP, appearing in studies about the effectiveness of mesoscopic machines. In general our refinement of the positivity of the expected EP rate is obtained in terms of a positive and even function of the expected current(s) which measures the dynamical activity in the system, a time-symmetric estimate of the changes in the system's configuration. Also underdamped diffusions can be included in the analysis.

  14. Counting Majorana bound states using complex momenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mandal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the connection between Majorana fermions bound to the defects in arbitrary dimensions, and complex momentum roots of the vanishing determinant of the corresponding bulk Bogoliubov–de Gennes (BdG Hamiltonian, has been established (EPL, 2015, 110, 67005. Based on this understanding, a formula has been proposed to count the number (n of the zero energy Majorana bound states, which is related to the topological phase of the system. In this paper, we provide a proof of the counting formula and we apply this formula to a variety of 1d and 2d models belonging to the classes BDI, DIII and D. We show that we can successfully chart out the topological phase diagrams. Studying these examples also enables us to explicitly observe the correspondence between these complex momentum solutions in the Fourier space, and the localized Majorana fermion wavefunctions in the position space. Finally, we corroborate the fact that for systems with a chiral symmetry, these solutions are the so-called "exceptional points", where two or more eigenvalues of the complexified Hamiltonian coalesce.

  15. Distance hijacking attacks on distance bounding protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Cremers, Cas; Rasmussen, Kasper Bonne; Čapkun, Srdjan

    2011-01-01

    Distance bounding protocols are typically analyzed with respect to three types of attacks: Distance Fraud, Mafia Fraud, and Terrorist Fraud. We define and analyze a fourth main type of attack on distance bounding protocols, called Distance Hijacking. We show that many proposed distance bounding protocols are vulnerable to this type of attack, and we propose solutions to make these protocols resilient to Distance Hijacking. We further show that verifying distance bounding protocols using exist...

  16. Purity- and Gaussianity-bounded uncertainty relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandilara, A.; Karpov, E.; Cerf, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    Bounded uncertainty relations provide the minimum value of the uncertainty assuming some additional information on the state. We derive analytically an uncertainty relation bounded by a pair of constraints, those of purity and Gaussianity. In a limiting case this uncertainty relation reproduces the purity-bounded derived by Man’ko and Dodonov and the Gaussianity-bounded one (Mandilara and Cerf 2012 Phys. Rev. A 86 030102R).

  17. Bounded rationality and heterogeneous expectations in macroeconomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massaro, D.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis studies the effect of individual bounded rationality on aggregate macroeconomic dynamics. Boundedly rational agents are specified as using simple heuristics in their decision making. An important aspect of the type of bounded rationality described in this thesis is that the population of

  18. Labeling schemes for bounded degree graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjiashvili, David; Rotbart, Noy Galil

    2014-01-01

    graphs. Our results complement a similar bound recently obtained for bounded depth trees [Fraigniaud and Korman, SODA 2010], and may provide new insights for closing the long standing gap for adjacency in trees [Alstrup and Rauhe, FOCS 2002]. We also provide improved labeling schemes for bounded degree...

  19. Exotic and qq-bar resonances in the pi+pi-pi- system produced in pi-p collisions at 18 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. U. Chung; K. Danyo; R. W. Hackenburg; C. Olchanski; J. S. Suh; H. J. Willutzki; S. P. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; V. V. Lipaev; A. V. Popov; D. I. Ryabchikov; Z. Bar-Yam; J. P. Dowd; P. Eugenio; M. Hayek; W. Kern; E. King; N. Shenhav; V. A. Bodyagin; O. L. Kodolova; V. L. Korotkikh; M. A. Kostin; A. I. Ostrovidov; L. I. Sarycheva; I. N. Vardanyan; A. A. Yershov; D. S. Brown; X. L. Fan; D. Joffe; T. K. Pedlar; K. K. Seth; A. Tomaradze; T. Adams; J. M. Bishop; N. M. Cason; E. I. Ivanov; J. M. LoSecco; J. J. Manak; W. D. Shephard; D. L. Stienike; S. A. Taegar; G. S. Adams; J. P. Cummings; J. Hu; J. Kuhn; M. Lu; J. Napolitano; D. B. White; M. Witkowski; M. Nozar; X. Shen; D. P. Weygand

    2002-03-01

    A partial-wave analysis of the reaction pi{sup -}p-->pi{sup +}pi{sup -}pi{sup -}p at 18 GeV/c has been performed on a data sample of 250 000 events obtained in the Brookhaven experiment E852. The well-known a{sub 1}(1260), a{sub 2}(1320) and pi{sub 2}(1670) resonant states are observed. The existence of the pi(1800), a{sub 1}(1700) and a{sub 4}(2040) states is confirmed. The a{sub 3}(1874) state is also observed. The exotic 1{sup -+} pi{sub 1}(1600) state produced in the natural parity exchange process is found to decay in the rho(770)pi{sup -} channel. A mass-dependent fit results in a resonance mass of 1593{+-}8{sub -47}{sup +29} MeV/c{sup 2} and a width of 168{+-}20{sub -12}{sup +150} MeV/c{sup 2}.

  20. Performance Bounds on Two Concatenated, Interleaved Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moision, Bruce; Dolinar, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    A method has been developed of computing bounds on the performance of a code comprised of two linear binary codes generated by two encoders serially concatenated through an interleaver. Originally intended for use in evaluating the performances of some codes proposed for deep-space communication links, the method can also be used in evaluating the performances of short-block-length codes in other applications. The method applies, more specifically, to a communication system in which following processes take place: At the transmitter, the original binary information that one seeks to transmit is first processed by an encoder into an outer code (Co) characterized by, among other things, a pair of numbers (n,k), where n (n > k)is the total number of code bits associated with k information bits and n k bits are used for correcting or at least detecting errors. Next, the outer code is processed through either a block or a convolutional interleaver. In the block interleaver, the words of the outer code are processed in blocks of I words. In the convolutional interleaver, the interleaving operation is performed bit-wise in N rows with delays that are multiples of B bits. The output of the interleaver is processed through a second encoder to obtain an inner code (Ci) characterized by (ni,ki). The output of the inner code is transmitted over an additive-white-Gaussian- noise channel characterized by a symbol signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) Es/No and a bit SNR Eb/No. At the receiver, an inner decoder generates estimates of bits. Depending on whether a block or a convolutional interleaver is used at the transmitter, the sequence of estimated bits is processed through a block or a convolutional de-interleaver, respectively, to obtain estimates of code words. Then the estimates of the code words are processed through an outer decoder, which generates estimates of the original information along with flags indicating which estimates are presumed to be correct and which are found to

  1. Complementarity reveals bound entanglement of two twisted photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.; Löffler, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate the detection of bipartite bound entanglement as predicted by the Horodecki's in 1998. Bound entangled states, being heavily mixed entangled quantum states, can be produced by incoherent addition of pure entangled states. Until 1998 it was thought that such mixing could always be reversed by entanglement distillation; however, this turned out to be impossible for bound entangled states. The purest form of bound entanglement is that of only two particles, which requires higher-dimensional (d > 2) quantum systems. We realize this using photon qutrit (d = 3) pairs produced by spontaneous parametric downconversion, that are entangled in the orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom, which is scalable to high dimensions. Entanglement of the photons is confirmed via a ‘maximum complementarity protocol’. This conceptually simple protocol requires only maximized complementary of measurement bases; we show that it can also detect bound entanglement. We explore the bipartite qutrit space and find that, also experimentally, a significant portion of the entangled states are actually bound entangled.

  2. More loosely bound hadron molecules at CDF?

    CERN Document Server

    Bignamini, C; Piccinini, F; Polosa, A D; Riquer, V; Sabelli, C

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper we have proposed a method to estimate the prompt production cross section of X(3872) at the Tevatron assuming that this particle is a loosely bound molecule of a D and a D*bar meson. Under this hypothesis we find that it is impossible to explain the high prompt production cross section found by CDF at sigma(X(3872)) \\sim 30-70 nb as our theoretical prediction is about 300 times smaller than the measured one. Following our work, Artoisenet and Braaten, have suggested that final state interactions in the DD*bar system might be so strong to push the result we obtained for the cross section up to the experimental value. Relying on their conclusions we show that the production of another very narrow loosely bound molecule, the X_s=D_s D_s*bar, could be similarly enhanced. X_s should then be detectable at CDF with a mass of 4080 MeV and a prompt production cross section of sigma(X_s) \\sim 1-3 nb.

  3. Spectral computations for bounded operators

    CERN Document Server

    Ahues, Mario; Limaye, Balmohan

    2001-01-01

    Exact eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and principal vectors of operators with infinite dimensional ranges can rarely be found. Therefore, one must approximate such operators by finite rank operators, then solve the original eigenvalue problem approximately. Serving as both an outstanding text for graduate students and as a source of current results for research scientists, Spectral Computations for Bounded Operators addresses the issue of solving eigenvalue problems for operators on infinite dimensional spaces. From a review of classical spectral theory through concrete approximation techniques to finite dimensional situations that can be implemented on a computer, this volume illustrates the marriage of pure and applied mathematics. It contains a variety of recent developments, including a new type of approximation that encompasses a variety of approximation methods but is simple to verify in practice. It also suggests a new stopping criterion for the QR Method and outlines advances in both the iterative refineme...

  4. On order bounded subsets of locally solid Riesz spaces | Hong ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a topological Riesz space there are two types of bounded subsets: order bounded subsets and topologically bounded subsets. It is natural to ask (1) whether an order bounded subset is topologically bounded and (2) whether a topologically bounded subset is order bounded. A classical result gives a partial answer to (1) ...

  5. Right-Hand Side Dependent Bounds for GMRES Applied to Ill-Posed Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Pestana, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    © IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2014. In this paper we apply simple GMRES bounds to the nearly singular systems that arise in ill-posed problems. Our bounds depend on the eigenvalues of the coefficient matrix, the right-hand side vector and the nonnormality of the system. The bounds show that GMRES residuals initially decrease, as residual components associated with large eigenvalues are reduced, after which semi-convergence can be expected because of the effects of small eigenvalues.

  6. Using tolerance bounds in scientific investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, J.R.

    1996-07-01

    Assessment of the variability in population values plays an important role in the analysis of scientific data. Analysis of scientific data often involves developing a bound on a proportion of a population. Sometimes simple probability bounds are obtained using formulas involving known mean and variance parameters and replacing the parameters by sample estimates. The resulting bounds are only approximate and fail to account for the variability in the estimated parameters. Tolerance bounds provide bounds on population proportions which account for the variation resulting from the estimated mean and variance parameters. A beta content, gamma confidence tolerance interval is constructed so that a proportion beta of the population lies within the region bounded by the interval with confidence gamma. An application involving corrosion measurements is used to illustrate the use of tolerance bounds for different situations. Extensions of standard tolerance intervals are applied to generate regression tolerance bounds, tolerance bounds for more general models of measurements collected over time, and tolerance intervals for varying precision data. Tolerance bounds also provide useful information for designing the collection of future data.

  7. Bound anionic states of adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  8. Distance hijacking attacks on distance bounding protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Cremers, Cas; Rasmussen, Kasper Bonne; Čapkun, Srdjan

    2011-01-01

    Distance bounding protocols are typically analyzed with respect to three types of attacks: Distance Fraud, Mafia Fraud, and Terrorist Fraud. We define a fourth main type of attacks on distance bounding protocols, called Distance Hijacking attacks. We show that many proposed distance bounding protocols are vulnerable to these attacks, and we propose solutions to make these protocols resilient to Distance Hijacking. Additionally, we generalize Distance Hijacking to Location Hijacking, to which ...

  9. Boundedly UC spaces: characterisations and preservation | Jain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A metric space (X, d) is called a boundedly UC space if every closed and bounded subset of X is a UC space. A metric space (X, d) is called a UC space if each real-valued continuous function on (X, d) is uniformly continuous. In this paper, we study twenty-two equivalent conditions for a metric space to be a boundedly UC ...

  10. Bounded cohomology of discrete groups

    CERN Document Server

    Frigerio, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The author manages a near perfect equilibrium between necessary technicalities (always well motivated) and geometric intuition, leading the readers from the first simple definition to the most striking applications of the theory in 13 very pleasant chapters. This book can serve as an ideal textbook for a graduate topics course on the subject and become the much-needed standard reference on Gromov's beautiful theory. -Michelle Bucher The theory of bounded cohomology, introduced by Gromov in the late 1980s, has had powerful applications in geometric group theory and the geometry and topology of manifolds, and has been the topic of active research continuing to this day. This monograph provides a unified, self-contained introduction to the theory and its applications, making it accessible to a student who has completed a first course in algebraic topology and manifold theory. The book can be used as a source for research projects for master's students, as a thorough introduction to the field for graduate student...

  11. Bounded sets in fast complete inductive limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kucera

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Let E1⊂E2⊂… be a sequence of locally convex spaces with all identity maps: En→En+1 continuous and E=indlim En fast complete. Then each set bounded in E is also bounded in some En iff for any Banach disk B bounded in E and n∈N, the closure of B⋂En in B is bounded in some Em. This holds, in particular, if all spaces En are webbed.

  12. Valuation models and Simon's bounded rationality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alexandra Strommer de Farias Godoi

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims at reconciling the evidence that sophisticated valuation models are increasingly used by companies in their investment appraisal with the literature of bounded rationality, according...

  13. Some Improved Nonperturbative Bounds for Fermionic Expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Martin, E-mail: marlohmann@gmail.com [Universita di Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Matematica (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    We reconsider the Gram-Hadamard bound as it is used in constructive quantum field theory and many body physics to prove convergence of Fermionic perturbative expansions. Our approach uses a recursion for the amplitudes of the expansion, discovered in a model problem by Djokic (2013). It explains the standard way to bound the expansion from a new point of view, and for some of the amplitudes provides new bounds, which avoid the use of Fourier transform, and are therefore superior to the standard bounds for models like the cold interacting Fermi gas.

  14. A strongly quasiconvex PAC-Bayesian bound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiemann, Niklas; Igel, Christian; Wintenberger, Olivier

    We propose a new PAC-Bayesian bound and a way of constructing a hypothesis space, so that the bound is convex in the posterior distribution and also convex in a trade-off parameter between empirical performance of the posterior distribution and its complexity. The complexity is measured by the Ku......We propose a new PAC-Bayesian bound and a way of constructing a hypothesis space, so that the bound is convex in the posterior distribution and also convex in a trade-off parameter between empirical performance of the posterior distribution and its complexity. The complexity is measured...

  15. Weak Solution and Weakly Uniformly Bounded Solution of Impulsive Heat Equations Containing “Maximum” Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Oyelami, Benjamin Oyediran

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, criteria for the existence of weak solutions and uniformly weak bounded solution of impulsive heat equation containing maximum temperature are investigated and results obtained. An example is given for heat flow system with impulsive temperature using maximum temperature simulator and criteria for the uniformly weak bounded of solutions of the system are obtained.

  16. Weak Solution and Weakly Uniformly Bounded Solution of Impulsive Heat Equations Containing “Maximum” Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyelami, Benjamin Oyediran

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, criteria for the existence of weak solutions and uniformly weak bounded solution of impulsive heat equation containing maximum temperature are investigated and results obtained. An example is given for heat flow system with impulsive temperature using maximum temperature simulator and criteria for the uniformly weak bounded of solutions of the system are obtained.

  17. Effect of substrate on optical bound states in the continuum in 1D photonic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadrieva, Z. F.; Sinev, I. S.; Samusev, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    Optical bound states in the continuum (BIC) are localized states with energy lying above the light line and having infinite lifetime. Any losses taking place in real systems result in transformation of the bound states into resonant states with finite lifetime. In this work, we analyze properties...... into resonant states due to leakage into the diffraction channels opening in the substrate.......Optical bound states in the continuum (BIC) are localized states with energy lying above the light line and having infinite lifetime. Any losses taking place in real systems result in transformation of the bound states into resonant states with finite lifetime. In this work, we analyze properties...

  18. Finite element method for neutron transport - VI. Upper and lower bounds for local characteristics of solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackroyd, R.T. (UKAEA Risley Nuclear Power Development Establishment. Technical Services and Planning Directorate); Splawski, B.A. (Queen Mary Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that the finite element method also shares with Monte Carlo the capability to bracket local characteristics of a solution, such as the reaction rate for a small locality. The bracketing bounds for the Monte Carlo method have a statistical error, whereas these bounds are rigorous for the finite element method. The latter bounds for a locality of a system are obtained by a bi-variational method with the aid of an associated system. For cell problems very tight bounds can be computed, but in deep-penetration problems for shields there are some difficulties to be overcome. Reasons are advanced for the difficulties.

  19. Search for heavy resonances in the ℓℓqq final state in pp collisions at p √s = 13 TeV with ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachas Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A search for heavy resonances decaying to a pair of Z bosons is performed using proton–proton collision data produced at √s = 13 TeV and recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb−1. Diboson resonant production is expected in several Standard Model extension scenarios. The ZZ decay mode considered corresponds to one Z boson decaying to a pair of charged leptons and the other decaying to a pair of quarks. No evidence for the production of resonances decaying to a ZZ pair is observed. Upper bounds on the production cross sections at √s = 13 TeV times their decay branching ratios to ZZ pairs are derived for a heavy Higgs boson and a spin–2 Randall-Sundrum graviton scenario.

  20. Search for heavy resonances in the $\\ell\\ell qq$ final state in pp collisions at $\\sqrt s =13$ TeV with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Bachas, Konstantinos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A search for heavy resonances decaying to a pair of $Z$ bosons is performed using proton-proton collision data produced at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV and recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb$^{-1}$. Diboson resonant production is expected in several Standard Model extension scenarios. The $ZZ$ decay mode considered corresponds to one $Z$ boson decaying to a pair of charged leptons and the other decaying to a pair of quarks. No evidence for the production of resonances decaying to a $ZZ$ pair is observed. Upper bounds on the production cross sections at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV times their decay branching ratios to $ZZ$ pairs are derived for a heavy Higgs boson and a spin-2 Randall-Sundrum graviton scenario.

  1. Effect of Inhomogeneity of the Universe on a Gravitationally Bound ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 33; Issue 2. Effect of Inhomogeneity of the Universe on a Gravitationally Bound Local System: A No-Go Result for Explaining the Secular Increase in the Astronomical Unit. Hideyoshi Arakida. Volume 33 Issue 2 June 2012 pp 201-211 ...

  2. Resistance of Soil-Bound Prions to Rumen Digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Samuel E.; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L.; Bartz, Jason C.

    2012-01-01

    Before prion uptake and infection can occur in the lower gastrointestinal system, ingested prions are subjected to anaerobic digestion in the rumen of cervids and bovids. The susceptibility of soil-bound prions to rumen digestion has not been evaluated previously. In this study, prions from infectious brain homogenates as well as prions bound to a range of soils and soil minerals were subjected to in vitro rumen digestion, and changes in PrP levels were measured via western blot. Binding to clay appeared to protect noninfectious hamster PrPc from complete digestion, while both unbound and soil-bound infectious PrPSc proved highly resistant to rumen digestion. In addition, no change in intracerebral incubation period was observed following active rumen digestion of unbound hamster HY TME prions and HY TME prions bound to a silty clay loam soil. These results demonstrate that both unbound and soil-bound prions readily survive rumen digestion without a reduction in infectivity, further supporting the potential for soil-mediated transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD) and scrapie in the environment. PMID:22937149

  3. Resistance of soil-bound prions to rumen digestion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E Saunders

    Full Text Available Before prion uptake and infection can occur in the lower gastrointestinal system, ingested prions are subjected to anaerobic digestion in the rumen of cervids and bovids. The susceptibility of soil-bound prions to rumen digestion has not been evaluated previously. In this study, prions from infectious brain homogenates as well as prions bound to a range of soils and soil minerals were subjected to in vitro rumen digestion, and changes in PrP levels were measured via western blot. Binding to clay appeared to protect noninfectious hamster PrP(c from complete digestion, while both unbound and soil-bound infectious PrP(Sc proved highly resistant to rumen digestion. In addition, no change in intracerebral incubation period was observed following active rumen digestion of unbound hamster HY TME prions and HY TME prions bound to a silty clay loam soil. These results demonstrate that both unbound and soil-bound prions readily survive rumen digestion without a reduction in infectivity, further supporting the potential for soil-mediated transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD and scrapie in the environment.

  4. Bionic Control of Cheetah Bounding with a Segmented Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A cheetah model is built to mimic real cheetah and its mechanical and dimensional parameters are derived from the real cheetah. In particular, two joints in spine and four joints in a leg are used to realize the motion of segmented spine and segmented legs which are the key properties of the cheetah bounding. For actuating and stabilizing the bounding gait of cheetah, we present a bioinspired controller based on the state-machine. The controller mainly mimics the function of the cerebellum to plan the locomotion and keep the body balance. The haptic sensor and proprioception system are used to detect the trigger of the phase transition. Besides, the vestibular modulation could perceive the pitching angle of the trunk. At last, the cerebellum acts as the CPU to operate the information from the biological sensors. In addition, the calculated results are transmitted to the low-level controller to actuate and stabilize the cheetah bounding. Moreover, the delay feedback control method is employed to plan the motion of the leg joints to stabilize the pitching motion of trunk with the stability criterion. Finally, the cyclic cheetah bounding with biological properties is realized. Meanwhile, the stability and dynamic properties of the cheetah bounding gait are analyzed elaborately.

  5. Bounding the space of holographic CFTs with chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlmutter, Eric [Department of Physics, Princeton University,Jadwin Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2016-10-13

    Thermal states of quantum systems with many degrees of freedom are subject to a bound on the rate of onset of chaos, including a bound on the Lyapunov exponent, λ{sub L}≤2π/β. We harness this bound to constrain the space of putative holographic CFTs and their would-be dual theories of AdS gravity. First, by studying out-of-time-order four-point functions, we discuss how λ{sub L}=2π/β in ordinary two-dimensional holographic CFTs is related to properties of the OPE at strong coupling. We then rule out the existence of unitary, sparse two-dimensional CFTs with large central charge and a set of higher spin currents of bounded spin; this implies the inconsistency of weakly coupled AdS{sub 3} higher spin gravities without infinite towers of gauge fields, such as the SL(N) theories. This fits naturally with the structure of higher-dimensional gravity, where finite towers of higher spin fields lead to acausality. On the other hand, unitary CFTs with classical W{sub ∞}[λ] symmetry, dual to 3D Vasiliev or hs[λ] higher spin gravities, do not violate the chaos bound, instead exhibiting no chaos: λ{sub L}=0. Independently, we show that such theories violate unitarity for |λ|>2. These results encourage a tensionless string theory interpretation of the 3D Vasiliev theory.

  6. New lower bound for the Capacitated Arc Routing Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wøhlk, Sanne

    2006-01-01

    We present a new lower bound, the Multiple Cuts Node Duplication Lower Bound, for the undirected Capacitated Arc Routing Problem.We prove that this new bound dominates the existing bounds for the problem. Computational results are also provided.......We present a new lower bound, the Multiple Cuts Node Duplication Lower Bound, for the undirected Capacitated Arc Routing Problem.We prove that this new bound dominates the existing bounds for the problem. Computational results are also provided....

  7. Anisotropy-induced photonic bound states in the continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomis-Bresco, Jordi; Artigas, David; Torner, Lluis

    2017-03-01

    Bound states in the continuum (BICs) are radiationless localized states embedded in the part of the parameter space that otherwise corresponds to radiative modes. Many decades after their original prediction and early observations in acoustic systems, such states have been demonstrated recently in photonic structures with engineered geometries. Here, we put forward a mechanism, based on waveguiding structures that contain anisotropic birefringent materials, that affords the existence of BICs with fundamentally new properties. In particular, anisotropy-induced BICs may exist in symmetric as well as in asymmetric geometries; they may form in tunable angular propagation directions; their polarization may be pure transverse electric, pure transverse magnetic or full vector with tunable polarization hybridity; and they may be the only possible bound states of properly designed structures, and thus appear as a discrete, isolated bound state embedded in a whole sea of radiative states.

  8. Soft-bound synaptic plasticity increases storage capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C W van Rossum

    Full Text Available Accurate models of synaptic plasticity are essential to understand the adaptive properties of the nervous system and for realistic models of learning and memory. Experiments have shown that synaptic plasticity depends not only on pre- and post-synaptic activity patterns, but also on the strength of the connection itself. Namely, weaker synapses are more easily strengthened than already strong ones. This so called soft-bound plasticity automatically constrains the synaptic strengths. It is known that this has important consequences for the dynamics of plasticity and the synaptic weight distribution, but its impact on information storage is unknown. In this modeling study we introduce an information theoretic framework to analyse memory storage in an online learning setting. We show that soft-bound plasticity increases a variety of performance criteria by about 18% over hard-bound plasticity, and likely maximizes the storage capacity of synapses.

  9. Relativistic bound state approach to fundamental forces including gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morsch H.P.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To describe the structure of particle bound states of nature, a relativistic bound state formalism is presented, which requires a Lagrangian including scalar coupling of two boson fields. The underlying mechanisms are quite complex and require an interplay of overlapping boson fields and fermion-antifermion production. This gives rise to two potentials, a boson-exchange potential and one identified with the long sought confinement potential in hadrons. With minimal requirements, two elementary massless fermions (quantons - with and without charge - and one gauge boson, hadrons and leptons but also atoms and gravitational systems are described by bound states with electric and magnetic coupling between the charges and spins of quantons. No need is found for colour, Higgs-coupling and supersymmetry.

  10. Resignation Syndrome: Catatonia? Culture-Bound?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallin, Karl; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Evers, Kathinka; Engström, Ingemar; Hjern, Anders; Petrovic, Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Resignation syndrome (RS) designates a long-standing disorder predominately affecting psychologically traumatized children and adolescents in the midst of a strenuous and lengthy migration process. Typically a depressive onset is followed by gradual withdrawal progressing via stupor into a state that prompts tube feeding and is characterized by failure to respond even to painful stimuli. The patient is seemingly unconscious. Recovery ensues within months to years and is claimed to be dependent on the restoration of hope to the family. Descriptions of disorders resembling RS can be found in the literature and the condition is unlikely novel. Nevertheless, the magnitude and geographical distribution stand out. Several hundred cases have been reported exclusively in Sweden in the past decade prompting the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare to recognize RS as a separate diagnostic entity. The currently prevailing stress hypothesis fails to account for the regional distribution and contributes little to treatment. Consequently, a re-evaluation of diagnostics and treatment is required. Psychogenic catatonia is proposed to supply the best fit with the clinical presentation. Treatment response, altered brain metabolism or preserved awareness would support this hypothesis. Epidemiological data suggests culture-bound beliefs and expectations to generate and direct symptom expression and we argue that culture-bound psychogenesis can accommodate the endemic distribution. Last, we review recent models of predictive coding indicating how expectation processes are crucially involved in the placebo and nocebo effect, delusions and conversion disorders. Building on this theoretical framework we propose a neurobiological model of RS in which the impact of overwhelming negative expectations are directly causative of the down-regulation of higher order and lower order behavioral systems in particularly vulnerable individuals. PMID:26858615

  11. Resignation syndrome: Catatonia? Culture-bound?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl eSallin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Resignation syndrome (RS designates a long-standing disorder predominately affecting psychologically traumatised children and adolescents in the midst of a strenuous and lengthy migration process. Typically a depressive onset is followed by gradual withdrawal progressing via stupor into a state that prompts tube feeding and is characterised by failure to respond even to painful stimuli. The patient is seemingly unconscious. Recovery ensues within months to years and is claimed to be dependent on the restoration of hope to the family.Descriptions of disorders resembling RS can be found in the literature and the condition is unlikely novel. Nevertheless, the magnitude and geographical distribution stand out. Several hundred cases have been reported exclusively in Sweden in the past decade prompting the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare to recognise RS as a separate diagnostic entity. The currently prevailing stress hypothesis fails to account for the regional distribution and contributes little to treatment. Consequently, a re-evaluation of diagnostics and treatment is required. Psychogenic catatonia is proposed to supply the best fit with the clinical presentation. Treatment response, altered brain metabolism or preserved awareness would support this hypothesis.Epidemiological data suggests culture-bound beliefs and expectations to generate and direct symptom expression and we argue that culture-bound psychogenesis can accommodate the endemic distribution.Last, we review recent models of predictive coding indicating how expectation processes are crucially involved in the placebo and nocebo effect, delusions and conversion disorders. Building on this theoretical framework we propose a neurobiological model of RS in which the impact of overwhelming negative expectations are directly causative of the down-regulation of higher order and lower order behavioural systems in particularly vulnerable individuals.

  12. Resignation Syndrome: Catatonia? Culture-Bound?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallin, Karl; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Evers, Kathinka; Engström, Ingemar; Hjern, Anders; Petrovic, Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Resignation syndrome (RS) designates a long-standing disorder predominately affecting psychologically traumatized children and adolescents in the midst of a strenuous and lengthy migration process. Typically a depressive onset is followed by gradual withdrawal progressing via stupor into a state that prompts tube feeding and is characterized by failure to respond even to painful stimuli. The patient is seemingly unconscious. Recovery ensues within months to years and is claimed to be dependent on the restoration of hope to the family. Descriptions of disorders resembling RS can be found in the literature and the condition is unlikely novel. Nevertheless, the magnitude and geographical distribution stand out. Several hundred cases have been reported exclusively in Sweden in the past decade prompting the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare to recognize RS as a separate diagnostic entity. The currently prevailing stress hypothesis fails to account for the regional distribution and contributes little to treatment. Consequently, a re-evaluation of diagnostics and treatment is required. Psychogenic catatonia is proposed to supply the best fit with the clinical presentation. Treatment response, altered brain metabolism or preserved awareness would support this hypothesis. Epidemiological data suggests culture-bound beliefs and expectations to generate and direct symptom expression and we argue that culture-bound psychogenesis can accommodate the endemic distribution. Last, we review recent models of predictive coding indicating how expectation processes are crucially involved in the placebo and nocebo effect, delusions and conversion disorders. Building on this theoretical framework we propose a neurobiological model of RS in which the impact of overwhelming negative expectations are directly causative of the down-regulation of higher order and lower order behavioral systems in particularly vulnerable individuals.

  13. Capacity bounds for kth best path selection over generalized fading channels

    KAUST Repository

    Hanif, Muhammad Fainan

    2014-02-01

    Exact ergodic capacity calculation for fading wireless channels typically involves time-consuming numerical evaluation of infinite integrals. In this paper, lower and upper bounds on ergodic capacity for kth best path are presented. These bounds have simple analytic expressions which allow their fast evaluation. Numerical results show that the newly proposed bounds closely approximate the exact ergodic capacity for a large variety of system configurations. © 1997-2012 IEEE.

  14. Bounded rationality and learning in complex markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, C.H.; Barkely Rosser Jr, J.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter reviews some work on bounded rationality, expectation formation and learning in complex markets, using the familiar demand-supply cobweb model. We emphasize two stories of bounded rationality, one story of adaptive learning and another story of evolutionary selection. According to the

  15. Bounded rationality and learning in complex markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, C.H.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter reviews some work on bounded rationality, expectation formation and learning in complex markets, using the familiar demand-supply cobweb model. We emphasize two stories of bounded rationality, one story of adaptive learning and another story of evolutionary selection. According to the

  16. Spatial coagulation with bounded coagulation rate

    OpenAIRE

    Bailleul, Ismael

    2010-01-01

    We prove that the spatial coagulation equation with bounded coagulation rate is well-posed for all times in a given class of kernels if the convection term of the underlying particle dynamics has divergence bounded below by a positive constant. Multiple coagulations, fragmentation and scattering are also considered.

  17. Schroedinger upper bounds to semirelativistic eigenvalues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Richard L [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Boulevard West, Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1M8 (Canada); Lucha, Wolfgang [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik, Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria)

    2005-09-16

    Problems posed by semirelativistic Hamiltonians of the form H = {radical}(m{sup 2} + p{sup 2}) + V(r) are studied. It is shown that energy upper bounds can be constructed in terms of certain related Schroedinger operators; these bounds include free parameters which can be chosen optimally.

  18. No-arbitrage bounds for financial scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geyer, Alois; Hanke, Michael; Weissensteiner, Alex

    2014-01-01

    We derive no-arbitrage bounds for expected excess returns to generate scenarios used in financial applications. The bounds allow to distinguish three regions: one where arbitrage opportunities will never exist, a second where arbitrage may be present, and a third, where arbitrage opportunities...

  19. Nonatomic dual bakery algorithm with bounded tokens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aravind, Alex A.; Hesselink, Wim H.

    A simple mutual exclusion algorithm is presented that only uses nonatomic shared variables of bounded size, and that satisfies bounded overtaking. When the shared variables behave atomically, it has the first-come-first-served property (FCFS). Nonatomic access makes information vulnerable. The

  20. Polynomially Bounded Sequences and Polynomial Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okazaki Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we formalize polynomially bounded sequences that plays an important role in computational complexity theory. Class P is a fundamental computational complexity class that contains all polynomial-time decision problems [11], [12]. It takes polynomially bounded amount of computation time to solve polynomial-time decision problems by the deterministic Turing machine. Moreover we formalize polynomial sequences [5].

  1. Upper Bounds on Numerical Approximation Errors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raahauge, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This paper suggests a method for determining rigorous upper bounds on approximationerrors of numerical solutions to infinite horizon dynamic programming models.Bounds are provided for approximations of the value function and the policyfunction as well as the derivatives of the value function...

  2. On the range of completely bounded maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard I. Loebl

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that if every bounded linear map from a C*-algebra α to a von Neumann algebra β is completely bounded, then either α is finite-dimensional or β⫅⊗Mn, where is a commutative von Neumann algebra and Mn is the algebra of n×n complex matrices.

  3. A polynomial lower bound for testing monotonicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Belovs (Aleksandr); Blais, E. (Eric)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe show that every algorithm for testing n-variate Boolean functions for monotonicity has query complexity Ω(n1/4). All previous lower bounds for this problem were designed for nonadaptive algorithms and, as a result, the best previous lower bound for general (possibly adaptive)

  4. Viewing Majorana Bound States by Rabi Oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Liang, Qi-Feng; Yao, Dao-Xin; Hu, Xiao

    2015-07-08

    We propose to use Rabi oscillation as a probe to view the fractional Josepshon relation (FJR) associated with Majorana bound states (MBSs) expected in one-dimensional topological superconductors. The system consists of a quantum dot (QD) and an rf-SQUID with MBSs at the Josephson junction. Rabi oscillations between energy levels formed by MBSs are induced by ac gate voltage controlling the coupling between QD and MBS when the photon energy proportional to the ac frequency matches gap between quantum levels formed by MBSs and QD. As a manifestation of the Rabi oscillation in the whole system involving MBSs, the electron occupation on QD oscillates with time, which can be measured by charge sensing techniques. With Floquet theorem and numerical analysis we reveal that from the resonant driving frequency for coherent Rabi oscillation one can directly map out the FJR cos(πΦ/Φ0) as a signature of MBSs, with Φ the magnetic flux through SQUID and Φ0 = hc/2e the flux quantum. The present scheme is expected to provide a clear evidence for MBSs under intensive searching.

  5. Foot loading characteristics of Chinese bound feet women: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yaodong; Mei, Qichang; Fernandez, Justin; Li, Jianshe; Ren, Xuejun; Feng, Neng

    2015-01-01

    The custom of bound feet among Chinese women has existed for almost a century. This practice has influenced the daily life of Chinese women, especially during everyday locomotion. The primary aim of this study is to analyze the loading patterns of bound feet. Specifically, the plantar pressure and center of pressure were analyzed for peak pressure, contact area, force time integral, center of pressure displacement velocity and trajectory in the anterior-posterior direction via a comparison with normal feet. The key outcomes from this work were that the forefoot and rearfoot of bound feet bear the whole loading during stance phase. The center of pressure displacement velocity of bound feet was also greatly reduced with the shortening of trajectories. This suggests that the proprioceptive system adjusts motor function to adapt to new loading patterns while maintaining locomotive stability. A biomechanical understanding of bound feet may assist with prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of bound feet disorders.

  6. R-matrix calculations for few-quark bound states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalchi, M.A. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, UNESP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hadizadeh, M.R. [Ohio University, Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Athens, OH (United States); Central State University, College of Science and Engineering, Wilberforce, OH (United States)

    2016-10-15

    The R-matrix method is implemented to study the heavy charm and bottom diquark, triquark, tetraquark, and pentaquarks in configuration space, as the bound states of quark-antiquark, diquark-quark, diquark-antidiquark, and diquark-antitriquark systems, respectively. The mass spectrum and the size of these systems are calculated for different partial wave channels. The calculated masses are compared with recent theoretical results obtained by other methods in momentum and configuration spaces and also by available experimental data. (orig.)

  7. Bounds on collapse models from cold-atom experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilardello, Marco; Donadi, Sandro; Vinante, Andrea; Bassi, Angelo

    2016-11-01

    The spontaneous localization mechanism of collapse models induces a Brownian motion in all physical systems. This effect is very weak, but experimental progress in creating ultracold atomic systems can be used to detect it. In this paper, we considered a recent experiment (Kovachy et al., 2015), where an atomic ensemble was cooled down to picokelvins. Any Brownian motion induces an extra increase of the position variance of the gas. We study this effect by solving the dynamical equations for the Continuous Spontaneous Localizations (CSL) model, as well as for its non-Markovian and dissipative extensions. The resulting bounds, with a 95 % of confidence level, are beaten only by measurements of spontaneous X-ray emission and by experiments with cantilever (in the latter case, only for rC ≥ 10-7 m, where rC is one of the two collapse parameters of the CSL model). We show that, contrary to the bounds given by X-ray measurements, non-Markovian effects do not change the bounds, for any reasonable choice of a frequency cutoff in the spectrum of the collapse noise. Therefore the bounds here considered are more robust. We also show that dissipative effects are unimportant for a large spectrum of temperatures of the noise, while for low temperatures the excluded region in the parameter space is the more reduced, the lower the temperature.

  8. Sound velocity bound and neutron stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedaque, Paulo; Steiner, Andrew W

    2015-01-23

    It has been conjectured that the velocity of sound in any medium is smaller than the velocity of light in vacuum divided by sqrt[3]. Simple arguments support this bound in nonrelativistic and/or weakly coupled theories. The bound has been demonstrated in several classes of strongly coupled theories with gravity duals and is saturated only in conformal theories. We point out that the existence of neutron stars with masses around two solar masses combined with the knowledge of the equation of state of hadronic matter at "low" densities is in strong tension with this bound.

  9. Lability of copper bound to humic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Lingchen; Young, Scott D.; Bailey, Liz

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical speciation models generally include the assumption that all metal bound to humic acid and fulvic acid (HA, FA) is labile. However, in the current study, we determined the presence of a soluble ‘non-labile’ Cu fraction bound to HA extracted from grassland and peat soils. This was quantified by determining isotopically-exchangeable Cu (E-value) and EDTA-extraction of HA-bound Cu, separated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and assayed by coupled ICP-MS. Evidence of time-depend...

  10. Positivity bounds on double parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, Markus; Kasemets, Tomas

    2013-03-15

    Double hard scattering in proton-proton collisions is described in terms of double parton distributions. We derive bounds on these distributions that follow from their interpretation as probability densities, taking into account all possible spin correlations between two partons in an unpolarized proton. These bounds constrain the size of the polarized distributions and can for instance be used to set upper limits on the effects of spin correlations in double hard scattering. We show that the bounds are stable under leading-order DGLAP evolution to higher scales.

  11. Continuous bounded cohomology of locally compact groups

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    Recent research has repeatedly led to connections between important rigidity questions and bounded cohomology. However, the latter has remained by and large intractable. This monograph introduces the functorial study of the continuous bounded cohomology for topological groups, with coefficients in Banach modules. The powerful techniques of this more general theory have successfully solved a number of the original problems in bounded cohomology. As applications, one obtains, in particular, rigidity results for actions on the circle, for representations on complex hyperbolic spaces and on Teichmüller spaces. A special effort has been made to provide detailed proofs or references in quite some generality.

  12. Asymptotic Performance Bound on Estimation and Prediction of Mobile MIMO-OFDM Wireless Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adeogun, Ramoni

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we derive an asymptotic closed--form expression for the error bound on extrapolation of doubly selective mobile MIMO wireless channels. The bound shows the relationship between the prediction error and system design parameters such as bandwidth, number of antenna elements, and number...... on channel parameters such as angles of arrival and departure, delays and Doppler shifts....

  13. A Focused Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM Quantitative Method for Bioactive Grapevine Stilbenes by Ultra-High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Triple-Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (UHPLC-QqQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Hurtado-Gaitán

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Grapevine stilbenes are a family of polyphenols which derive from trans-resveratrol having antifungal and antimicrobial properties, thus being considered as phytoalexins. In addition to their diverse bioactive properties in animal models, they highlight a strong potential in human health maintenance and promotion. Due to this relevance, highly-specific qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis are necessary to accurately analyze stilbenes in different matrices derived from grapevine. Here, we developed a rapid, sensitive, and specific analysis method using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqQ in MRM mode to detect and quantify five grapevine stilbenes, trans-resveratrol, trans-piceid, trans-piceatannol, trans-pterostilbene, and trans-ε-viniferin, whose interest in relation to human health is continuously growing. The method was optimized to minimize in-source fragmentation of piceid and to avoid co-elution of cis-piceid and trans-resveratrol, as both are detected with resveratrol transitions. The applicability of the developed method of stilbene analysis was tested successfully in different complex matrices including cellular extracts of Vitis vinifera cell cultures, reaction media of biotransformation assays, and red wine.

  14. Search for heavy resonances decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the qq bar (‧) b b bar final state in pp collisions at √{ s } = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Abidi, S. H.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adelman, J.; Adersberger, M.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agheorghiesei, C.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akatsuka, S.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akilli, E.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albicocco, P.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Alderweireldt, S. C.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M. I.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antrim, D. J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Araujo Ferraz, V.; Arce, A. T. H.; Ardell, R. E.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahmani, M.; Bahrasemani, H.; Baines, J. T.; Bajic, M.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. 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I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Ezzi, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Fabiani, V.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenton, M. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Flierl, B. M.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Förster, F. A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Freund, B.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Ganguly, S.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; García Pascual, J. A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gasnikova, K.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geisen, J.; Geisen, M.; Geisler, M. P.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. 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G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gravila, P. M.; Gray, C.; Gray, H. M.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grevtsov, K.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groh, S.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Grummer, A.; Guan, L.; Guan, W.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Gui, B.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, W.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Guzik, M. P.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Hadef, A.; Hageböck, S.; Hagihara, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. 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W.; Higashino, S.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hildebrand, K.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hils, M.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hiti, B.; Hladik, O.; Hoad, X.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Honda, S.; Honda, T.; Hong, T. M.; Hooberman, B. H.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howarth, J.; Hoya, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hrdinka, J.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, Q.; Hu, S.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. 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B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Shen, Y.; Sherafati, N.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Shirabe, S.; Shiyakova, M.; Shlomi, J.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shope, D. R.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sideras Haddad, E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Siral, I.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, J. W.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, I. M.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Søgaard, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Sopczak, A.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spieker, T. M.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapf, B. S.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Stark, S. H.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultan, D. M. S.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Suruliz, K.; Suster, C. J. E.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Swift, S. P.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takasugi, E. H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanioka, R.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thiele, F.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Todt, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Tornambe, P.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Treado, C. J.; Trefzger, T.; Tresoldi, F.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsang, K. W.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tulbure, T. T.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turgeman, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usui, J.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vadla, K. O. H.; Vaidya, A.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valéry, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallier, A.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Graaf, H.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varni, C.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viaux Maira, N.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vishwakarma, A.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, Q.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, W.; Wang, Z.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, A. F.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weirich, M.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A. S.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Whitmore, B. W.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkels, E.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wobisch, M.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolff, R.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, V. W. S.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xi, Z.; Xia, L.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Xu, T.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamatani, M.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yigitbasi, E.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zacharis, G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zemaityte, G.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zou, R.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    A search for heavy resonances decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the qq bar (‧) b b bar final state is described. The search uses 36.1 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √{ s } = 13 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2015 and 2016. The data are in agreement with the Standard Model expectations, with the largest excess found at a resonance mass of 3.0 TeV with a local (global) significance of 3.3 (2.1) σ. The results are presented in terms of constraints on a simplified model with a heavy vector triplet. Upper limits are set on the production cross-section times branching ratio for resonances decaying to a W (Z) boson and a Higgs boson, itself decaying to b b bar , in the mass range between 1.1 and 3.8 TeV at 95% confidence level; the limits range between 83 and 1.6 fb (77 and 1.1 fb) at 95% confidence level.

  15. Search for heavy resonances decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the qq¯(′bb¯ final state in pp collisions at s=13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aaboud

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A search for heavy resonances decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the qq¯(′bb¯ final state is described. The search uses 36.1 fb−1 of proton–proton collision data at s=13 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2015 and 2016. The data are in agreement with the Standard Model expectations, with the largest excess found at a resonance mass of 3.0 TeV with a local (global significance of 3.3 (2.1 σ. The results are presented in terms of constraints on a simplified model with a heavy vector triplet. Upper limits are set on the production cross-section times branching ratio for resonances decaying to a W (Z boson and a Higgs boson, itself decaying to bb¯, in the mass range between 1.1 and 3.8 TeV at 95% confidence level; the limits range between 83 and 1.6 fb (77 and 1.1 fb at 95% confidence level.

  16. Redshift-space limits of bound structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duenner, Rolando; Reisenegger, Andreas; Meza, Andres; Araya, Pablo A.; Quintana, Hernan

    2007-01-01

    An exponentially expanding Universe, possibly governed by a cosmological constant, forces gravitationally bound structures to become more and more isolated, eventually becoming causally disconnected from each other and forming so-called 'island universes'. This new scenario reformulates the question

  17. New Spectral Features from Bound Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catena, Riccardo; Kouvaris, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that dark matter particles gravitationally bound to the Earth can induce a characteristic nuclear recoil signal at low energies in direct detection experiments. The new spectral feature we predict can provide the ultimate smoking gun for dark matter discovery for experiments...... with positive signal but unclear background. The new feature is universal, in that the ratio of bound over halo dark matter event rates at detectors is independent of the dark matter-nucleon cross section....

  18. On bounds for symmetric divergence measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuichi, S.; Yanagi, K.; Kuriyama, K.

    2017-06-01

    In the paper [1], tight bounds for symmetric divergence measures applying the results established by G.L.Gilardoni. In this article, we report on two kinds of extensions for the Sason's results, namely a classical q-extension and a non-commutative(quantum) extension. Especially, we improve Sason's bound of the summation of the absolute value for the difference between two probability distributions, applying the parameter q of Tsallis entropy, under a certain assumption.

  19. Stable Bound States of Asymmetric Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Mark B.; Zhang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    The simplest renormalizable effective field theories with asymmetric dark matter bound states contain two additional gauge singlet fields one being the dark matter and the other a mediator particle that the dark matter annihilates into. We examine the physics of one such model with a Dirac fermion as the dark matter and a real scalar mediator. For a range of parameters the Yukawa coupling of the dark matter to the mediator gives rise to stable asymmetric dark matter bound states. We derive pr...

  20. Malabsorption of protein bound vitamin B12.

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, D W; Sawers, A H; Sharma, R K

    1984-01-01

    Patients with subnormal serum vitamin B12 concentrations were tested for absorption of protein bound vitamin B12 and compared with controls. Absorption of the protein bound vitamin appeared to decrease with increasing age in healthy subjects. Differences between the result of this test and the result of the Schilling test in patients who had undergone gastric surgery were confirmed; such differences were also seen in some patients who had iron deficiency anaemia, an excessive alcohol intake, ...

  1. Dynamic optimization problems with bounded terminal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Bounded terminal conditions of nonlinear optimization problems are converted to equality terminal conditions via Valentine's device. In so doing, additional unknown parameters are introduced into the problem. The transformed problems can still be easily solved using the sequential gradient-restoration algorithm (SGRA) via a simple augmentation of the unknown parameter vector pi. Three example problems with bounded terminal conditions are solved to verify this technique.

  2. Decomposition Bounds for Marginal MAP

    OpenAIRE

    PING, WEI; Liu,Qiang; Ihler, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Marginal MAP inference involves making MAP predictions in systems defined with latent variables or missing information. It is significantly more difficult than pure marginalization and MAP tasks, for which a large class of efficient and convergent variational algorithms, such as dual decomposition, exist. In this work, we generalize dual decomposition to a generic power sum inference task, which includes marginal MAP, along with pure marginalization and MAP, as special cases. Our method is ba...

  3. Accidental bound states in the continuum in an open Sinai billiard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilipchuk, A.S. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Federal Research Center KSC SB RAS, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Siberian Federal University, 660080 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Sadreev, A.F., E-mail: almas@tnp.krasn.ru [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Federal Research Center KSC SB RAS, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-19

    The fundamental mechanism of the bound states in the continuum is the full destructive interference of two resonances when two eigenlevels of the closed system are crossing. There is, however, a wide class of quantum chaotic systems which display only avoided crossings of eigenlevels. As an example of such a system we consider the Sinai billiard coupled with two semi-infinite waveguides. We show that notwithstanding the absence of degeneracy bound states in the continuum occur due to accidental decoupling of the eigenstates of the billiard from the waveguides. - Highlights: • Bound states in the continuum in open chaotic billiards occur to accidental vanishing of coupling of eigenstate of billiard with waveguides.

  4. Determination of Free and Bound Phenolic Acids, and Evaluation of Antioxidant Activities and Total Polyphenolic Contents in Selected Pearled Barley

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    YOSHIDA, Atsuko; SONODA, Keisuke; NOGATA, Yoichi; NAGAMINE, Takashi; SATO, Maki; OKI, Tomoyuki; HASHIMOTO, Shunjiro; OHTA, Hideaki

    2010-01-01

    The content of insoluble bound phenolic acids in pearled barley was determined by an analytical system consisting of alkaline hydrolysis extraction, high-performance liquid chromatographic separation...

  5. Robust Adaptive PID Control of Robot Manipulator with Bounded Disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To solve the strong nonlinearity and coupling problems in robot manipulator control, two novel robust adaptive PID control schemes are proposed in this paper with known or unknown upper bound of the external disturbances. Invoking the two proposed controllers, the unknown bounded external disturbances can be compensated and the global asymptotical stability with respect to the manipulator positions and velocities is able to be guaranteed. As compared with the existing adaptive PD control methods, the designed control laws can enlarge the tolerable external disturbances, enhance the accuracy in finite-time trajectory tracking control, and improve the dynamic performance of the manipulator systems. The stability and convergence properties of the closed-loop system are analytically proved using Lyapunov stability theory and Barbalat’s lemma. Simulations are performed for a planner manipulator with two rotary degrees of freedom to illustrate the viability and the advantages of the proposed controllers.

  6. Bounding the Set of Finite Dimensional Quantum Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navascués, Miguel; Vértesi, Tamás

    2015-07-01

    We describe a simple method to derive high performance semidefinite programing relaxations for optimizations over complex and real operator algebras in finite dimensional Hilbert spaces. The method is very flexible, easy to program, and allows the user to assess the behavior of finite dimensional quantum systems in a number of interesting setups. We use this method to bound the strength of quantum nonlocality in Bell scenarios where the dimension of the parties is bounded from above. We derive new results in quantum communication complexity and prove the soundness of the prepare-and-measure dimension witnesses introduced in Gallego et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 230501 (2010). Finally, we propose a new dimension witness that can distinguish between classical, real, and complex two-level systems.

  7. Tight bounds on computing error-correcting codes by bounded-depth circuits with arbitrary gates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gal, A.; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Koucky, Michal

    2013-01-01

    We bound the minimum number w of wires needed to compute any (asymptotically good) error-correcting code C:{0,1}Ω(n)→{0,1}n with minimum distance Ω(n), using unbounded fan-in circuits of depth d with arbitrary gates. Our main results are: 1) if d=2, then w=Θ(n (lgn/lglgn)2); 2) if d=3, then w...... bound gives the largest known lower bound for computing any linear map. The upper bounds imply that a (necessarily dense) generator matrix for our code can be written as the product of two sparse matrices. Using known techniques, we also obtain similar (but not tight) bounds for computing pairwise......-independent hash functions. Our lower bounds are based on a superconcentrator-like condition that the graphs of circuits computing good codes must satisfy. This condition is provably intermediate between superconcentrators and their weakenings considered before...

  8. Bound Electron States in Skew-symmetric Quantum Wire Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    for electronic transport studies was to confine resonant- tunneling heterostructures laterally with a fabrication-imposed po- tential. This approach...Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Quantum Wires, Crossed Nanowires , Trapped Electron States, Quantum Dots REPORT...realistic systems such as semiconductor nanowire films and carbon nanotube bundles. Bound electron states in skew-symmetric quantum wire intersections by

  9. Bound States in the Continuum in Nuclear and Hadron Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lenske, H; Cao, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The population of bound states in the continuum and their spectral properties are studied on the nuclear and hadronic scale. The theoretical approach is presented and realizations in nuclear and charmonium spectroscopy are dis- cussed. The universality of the underlying dynamical principles is pointed out. Applications to nuclear systems at the neutron dripline and for charmonium spectroscopy by $e^- e^+ \\to D\\bar{D}$ production are discussed.

  10. Recurrent neural networks training with stable bounding ellipsoid algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen; de Jesús Rubio, José

    2009-06-01

    Bounding ellipsoid (BE) algorithms offer an attractive alternative to traditional training algorithms for neural networks, for example, backpropagation and least squares methods. The benefits include high computational efficiency and fast convergence speed. In this paper, we propose an ellipsoid propagation algorithm to train the weights of recurrent neural networks for nonlinear systems identification. Both hidden layers and output layers can be updated. The stability of the BE algorithm is proven.

  11. Dynamics of quadratic polynomials: Complex bounds for real maps

    OpenAIRE

    Lyubich, Mikhail; Yampolsky, Michael

    1995-01-01

    We extend Sullivan's complex a priori bounds to real quadratic polynomials with essentially bounded combinatorics. Combined with the previous results of the first author, this yields complex bounds for all real quadratics. Local connectivity of the corresponding Julia sets follows.

  12. Bounds Estimation Via Regression with Asymmetric Cost Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoste, D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper addresses a significant but mostly-neglected class of problems that we call bounds estimation. This includes learning empirical best-case and worst-case algorithmic complexity bounds and red-line bounds on sensor data.

  13. Universal bounds in even-spin CFTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, Joshua D. [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University,Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-01

    We prove using invariance under the modular S− and ST−transformations that every unitary two-dimensional conformal field theory (CFT) having only even-spin primary operators (with no extended chiral algebra and with right- and left-central charges c,c̃>1) contains a primary operator with dimension Δ{sub 1} satisfying 0<Δ{sub 1}<((c+c̃)/24)+0.09280…. After deriving both analytical and numerical bounds, we discuss how to extend our methods to bound higher conformal dimensions before deriving lower and upper bounds on the number of primary operators in a given energy range. Using the AdS{sub 3}/CFT{sub 2} dictionary, the bound on Δ{sub 1} proves the lightest massive excitation in appropriate theories of 3D matter and gravity with cosmological constant Λ<0 can be no heavier than 1/8G{sub N}+O(√(−Λ)); the bounds on the number of operators are related via AdS/CFT to the entropy of states in the dual gravitational theory. In the flat-space approximation, the limiting mass is exactly that of the lightest BTZ black hole.

  14. Quasi-One-Dimensional Electron Gas Bound to a Helium-Coated Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebrecht, Michael; Del Maestro, Adrian; Cole, Milton W.

    2016-05-01

    A much-studied system is the quasi-2D electron gas in image-potential bound states at the surface of helium and hydrogen. In this paper, we report on an analogous quasi-1D system: electrons bound by image-like polarization forces to the surface of a helium-coated carbon nanotube. The potential is computed from an electron-helium pseudopotential, plus a dynamic image term evaluated from a semi-classical model of the nanotube's response function. Predictions are made for the bound states and potential many-body properties of this novel electron gas for a specific choice of tube radius and film thickness.

  15. Multipole-bound molecular negative ions

    CERN Document Server

    Abdul-Karim, H; Desfrançois, C

    2002-01-01

    Within the framework of a simple electrostatic model, as compared to recent experimental results, we here discuss the stability of very weakly bound molecular negative ions. In contrast with the case of conventional valence anions, the excess electron is then located in a very diffuse orbital and is mainly bound by electrostatic dipolar, quadrupolar, and polarization forces, at large distances from the neutral molecular core. By fitting a single repulsion parameter of the model to the available experimental data, it is possible to make quantitative predictions of the excess-electron binding energies in these species. Critical values of the dipole moment, quadrupole moment or polarizability required for the observation of stable multipole-bound negative ions are predicted and compared to available experimental data and ab initio calculations. Refs. 26 (author)

  16. Resistivity bound for hydrodynamic bad metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Andrew; Hartnoll, Sean A.

    2017-10-01

    We obtain a rigorous upper bound on the resistivity ρ of an electron fluid whose electronic mean free path is short compared with the scale of spatial inhomogeneities. When such a hydrodynamic electron fluid supports a nonthermal diffusion process—such as an imbalance mode between different bands—we show that the resistivity bound becomes ρ≲AΓ. The coefficient A is independent of temperature and inhomogeneity lengthscale, and Γ is a microscopic momentum-preserving scattering rate. In this way, we obtain a unified mechanism—without umklapp—for ρ˜T2 in a Fermi liquid and the crossover to ρ˜T in quantum critical regimes. This behavior is widely observed in transition metal oxides, organic metals, pnictides, and heavy fermion compounds and has presented a long-standing challenge to transport theory. Our hydrodynamic bound allows phonon contributions to diffusion constants, including thermal diffusion, to directly affect the electrical resistivity.

  17. Properties of Water Bound in Hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir M. Gun’ko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the importance of water in hydrogel (HG properties and structure is analyzed. A variety of methods such as 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance, DSC (differential scanning calorimetry, XRD (X-ray powder diffraction, dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, thermally stimulated depolarization current, quasi-elastic neutron scattering, rheometry, diffusion, adsorption, infrared spectroscopy are used to study water in HG. The state of HG water is rather non-uniform. According to thermodynamic features of water in HG, some of it is non-freezing and strongly bound, another fraction is freezing and weakly bound, and the third fraction is non-bound, free water freezing at 0 °C. According to structural features of water in HG, it can be divided into two fractions with strongly associated and weakly associated waters. The properties of the water in HG depend also on the amounts and types of solutes, pH, salinity, structural features of HG functionalities.

  18. Yukawa Bound States and Their LHC Phenomenology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enkhbat Tsedenbaljir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the current status on the possible bound states of extra generation quarks. These include phenomenology and search strategy at the LHC. If chiral fourth-generation quarks do exist their strong Yukawa couplings, implied by current experimental lower bound on their masses, may lead to formation of bound states. Due to nearly degenerate 4G masses suggested by Precision Electroweak Test one can employ “heavy isospin” symmetry to classify possible spectrum. Among these states, the color-octet isosinglet vector ω 8 is the easiest to be produced at the LHC. The discovery potential and corresponding decay channels are covered in this paper. With possible light Higgs at ~125 GeV two-Higgs doublet version is briefly discussed.

  19. Braneworld black holes and entropy bounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Heydarzade

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Bousso's D-bound entropy for the various possible black hole solutions on a 4-dimensional brane is checked. It is found that the D-bound entropy here is apparently different from that of obtained for the 4-dimensional black hole solutions. This difference is interpreted as the extra loss of information, associated to the extra dimension, when an extra-dimensional black hole is moved outward the observer's cosmological horizon. Also, it is discussed that N-bound entropy is hold for the possible solutions here. Finally, by adopting the recent Bohr-like approach to black hole quantum physics for the excited black holes, the obtained results are written also in terms of the black hole excited states.

  20. Braneworld black holes and entropy bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydarzade, Y.; Hadi, H.; Corda, C.; Darabi, F.

    2018-01-01

    The Bousso's D-bound entropy for the various possible black hole solutions on a 4-dimensional brane is checked. It is found that the D-bound entropy here is apparently different from that of obtained for the 4-dimensional black hole solutions. This difference is interpreted as the extra loss of information, associated to the extra dimension, when an extra-dimensional black hole is moved outward the observer's cosmological horizon. Also, it is discussed that N-bound entropy is hold for the possible solutions here. Finally, by adopting the recent Bohr-like approach to black hole quantum physics for the excited black holes, the obtained results are written also in terms of the black hole excited states.

  1. On the ergodicity bounds for a constant retrial rate queueing model

    OpenAIRE

    Zeifman, Alexander; Satin, Yacov; Morozov, Evsey; Nekrasova, Ruslana; Gorshenin, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    We consider a Markovian single-server retrial queueing system with a constant retrial rate. Conditions of null ergodicity and exponential ergodicity for the correspondent process, as well as bounds on the rate of convergence are obtained.

  2. Bounds for the Hilbert function of polynomial ideals and for the degrees in the Nullstellensatz

    CERN Document Server

    Sombra, M

    1996-01-01

    We present a new effective Nullstellensatz with bounds for the degrees which depend not only on the number of variables and on the degrees of the input polynomials but also on an additional parameter called the {\\it geometric degree of the system of equations}. The obtained bound is polynomial in these parameters. It is essentially optimal in the general case, and it substantially improves the existent bounds in some special cases. The proof of this result is combinatorial, and it relies on global estimations for the Hilbert function of homogeneous polynomial ideals. In this direction, we obtain a lower bound for the Hilbert function of an arbitrary homogeneous polynomial ideal, and an upper bound for the Hilbert function of a generic hypersurface section of an unmixed radical polynomial ideal.

  3. Free-Space Optical Communications: Capacity Bounds, Approximations, and a New Sphere-Packing Perspective

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2016-02-03

    The capacity of the free-space optical channel is studied. A new recursive approach for bounding the capacity of the channel based on sphere-packing is proposed. This approach leads to new capacity upper bounds for a channel with a peak intensity constraint or an average intensity constraint. Under an average constraint only, the derived bound is tighter than an existing sphere-packing bound derived earlier by Farid and Hranilovic. The achievable rate of a truncated-Gaussian input distribution is also derived. It is shown that under both average and peak constraints, this achievable rate and the sphere-packing bounds are within a small gap at high SNR, leading to a simple high-SNR capacity approximation. Simple fitting functions that capture the best known achievable rate for the channel are provided. These functions can be of practical importance especially for the study of systems operating under atmospheric turbulence and misalignment conditions.

  4. Career Development and Personal Functioning Differences between Work-Bound and Non-Work Bound Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, Peter A.; Patton, Wendy; Hood, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    We surveyed 506 Australian high school students on career development (exploration, planning, job-knowledge, decision-making, indecision), personal functioning (well-being, self-esteem, life satisfaction, school satisfaction) and control variables (parent education, school achievement), and tested differences among work-bound, college-bound and…

  5. 78 FR 18326 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math Science... hand delivery. Please note that comments submitted by fax or email and those submitted after the... 1995 (PRA) (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)), provides the general public and Federal agencies with an...

  6. Tight bounds on computing error-correcting codes by bounded-depth circuits with arbitrary gates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gál, Anna; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Koucký, Michal

    2011-01-01

    We bound the minimum number w of wires needed to compute any (asymptotically good) error-correcting code C:01(n)01n with minimum distance (n), using unbounded fan-in circuits of depth d with arbitrary gates. Our main results are: (1) If d=2 then w=(n(lognloglogn)2) . (2) If d=3 then w=(nlglgn). (3......, our (n(lognloglogn)2) lower bound gives the largest known lower bound for computing any linear map, improving on the (nlg32n) bound of Pudlak and Rodl (Discrete Mathematics '94). We find the upper bounds surprising. They imply that a (necessarily dense) generator matrix for the code can be written...... as the product of two sparse matrices. The upper bounds are non-explicit: we show the existence of circuits (consisting of only XOR gates) computing good codes within the stated bounds. Using a result by Ishai, Kushilevitz, Ostrovsky, and Sahai (STOC '08), we also obtain similar bounds for computing pairwise...

  7. Violation of Energy Bounds in Designer Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Hertog, T

    2007-01-01

    We continue our study of the stability of designer gravity theories, where one considers anti-de Sitter gravity coupled to certain tachyonic scalars with boundary conditions defined by a smooth function W. It has recently been argued there is a lower bound on the conserved energy in terms of the global minimum of W, if the scalar potential arises from a superpotential P and the scalar reaches an extremum of P at infinity. We show, however, there are superpotentials for which these bounds do not hold.

  8. G-frames with bounded linear operators

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Xiang-chun; Zhu, Yu-can; Shu, Zhi-biao; Ding, Ming-ling

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the more general g-frame which is called a $K$-g-frame by combining a g-frame with a bounded linear operator $K$ in a Hilbert space. We give several equivalent characterizations for $K$-g-frames and discuss the stability of perturbation for $K$-g-frames. We also investigate the relationship between a $K$-g-frame and the range of the bounded linear operator $K$. In the end, we give two sufficient conditions for the remainder of a $K$-g-frame after an erasure to stil...

  9. Bounds on fake weighted projective space

    OpenAIRE

    Kasprzyk, Alexander M.

    2009-01-01

    A fake weighted projective space X is a Q-factorial toric variety with Picard number one. As with weighted projective space, X comes equipped with a set of weights (λ0, ..., λn). We see how the singularities of P (λ0, ..., λn) influence the singularities of X, and how the weights bound the number of possible fake weighted projective spaces for a fixed dimension. Finally, we present an upper bound on the ratios λj/Σλi if we wish X to have only terminal (or canonical) singularities.

  10. Fibered Transverse Knots and the Bennequin Bound

    OpenAIRE

    Etnyre, John B.; Van Horn-Morris, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    We prove that a nicely fibered link (by which we mean the binding of an open book) in a tight contact manifold $(M,\\xi)$ with zero Giroux torsion has a transverse representative realizing the Bennequin bound if and only if the contact structure it supports (since it is also the binding of an open book) is $\\xi.$ This gives a geometric reason for the non-sharpness of the Bennequin bound for fibered links. We also note that this allows the classification, up to contactomorphism, of maximal self...

  11. Verifying bound entanglement of dephased Werner states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P.; Bohmann, M.; Vogel, W.

    2017-10-01

    The verification of quantum entanglement under the influence of realistic noise and decoherence is crucial for the development of quantum technologies. Unfortunately, a full entanglement characterization is generally not possible with most entanglement criteria such as entanglement witnesses or the partial transposition criterion. In particular, so-called bound entanglement cannot be certified via the partial transposition criterion. Here we present the full entanglement verification of dephased qubit and qutrit Werner states via entanglement quasiprobabilities. Remarkably, we are able to reveal bound entanglement for noisy mixed states in the qutrit case. This example demonstrates the strength of the entanglement quasiprobabilities for verifying the full entanglement of quantum states suffering from noise.

  12. A note on BPS vortex bound states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alonso-Izquierdo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this note we investigate bound states, where scalar and vector bosons are trapped by BPS vortices in the Abelian Higgs model with a critical ratio of the couplings. A class of internal modes of fluctuation around cylindrically symmetric BPS vortices is characterized mathematically, analyzing the spectrum of the second-order fluctuation operator when the Higgs and vector boson masses are equal. A few of these bound states with low values of quantized magnetic flux are described fully, and their main properties are discussed.

  13. A note on BPS vortex bound states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso-Izquierdo, A., E-mail: alonsoiz@usal.es [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca (Spain); Garcia Fuertes, W., E-mail: wifredo@uniovi.es [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo (Spain); Mateos Guilarte, J., E-mail: guilarte@usal.es [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad de Salamanca (Spain)

    2016-02-10

    In this note we investigate bound states, where scalar and vector bosons are trapped by BPS vortices in the Abelian Higgs model with a critical ratio of the couplings. A class of internal modes of fluctuation around cylindrically symmetric BPS vortices is characterized mathematically, analyzing the spectrum of the second-order fluctuation operator when the Higgs and vector boson masses are equal. A few of these bound states with low values of quantized magnetic flux are described fully, and their main properties are discussed.

  14. Bound on local unambiguous discrimination between multipartite quantum states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying-Hui; Gao, Fei; Tian, Guo-Jing; Cao, Tian-Qing; Zuo, Hui-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the upper bound on unambiguous discrimination by local operations and classical communication. We demonstrate that any set of linearly independent multipartite pure quantum states can be locally unambiguously discriminated if the number of states in the set is no more than , where the space spanned by the set can be expressed in the irreducible form and is the optimal local dimension of the party. That is, is an upper bound. We also show that it is tight, namely there exists a set of states, in which at least one of the states cannot be locally unambiguously discriminated. Our result gives the reason why the multiqubit system is the only exception when any three quantum states are locally unambiguously distinguished.

  15. Culture-bound Syndrome: Has it Found its Right Niche?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh

    2011-07-01

    Culture-bound syndrome is a broad rubric that encompasses certain behavioral, affective and cognitive manifestations seen in specific cultures. These manifestations are deviant from the usual behavior of the individuals of that culture and are a reason for distress/discomfort. This entitles these manifestations for a proper labeling and subsequent management. However, the available information and literature on these conditions suggest that at least some of them are/have been more widely prevalent than being considered. This article presents a case for possible relabeling and inclusion of these conditions in the mainstream diagnostic systems based on the example of the dhat syndrome- a culture-bound syndrome from India. These conditions could be relabeled as functional somatic syndromes.

  16. Quarkonium-nucleus bound states from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beane, S.  R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chang, E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Cohen, S.  D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Detmold, W. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lin, H. -W. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Orginos, K. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Parreño, A. [Univ., de Barcelona, Marti Franques (Spain); Savage, M.  J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-11

    Quarkonium-nucleus systems are composed of two interacting hadronic states without common valence quarks, which interact primarily through multi-gluon exchanges, realizing a color van der Waals force. We present lattice QCD calculations of the interactions of strange and charm quarkonia with light nuclei. Both the strangeonium-nucleus and charmonium-nucleus systems are found to be relatively deeply bound when the masses of the three light quarks are set equal to that of the physical strange quark. Extrapolation of these results to the physical light-quark masses suggests that the binding energy of charmonium to nuclear matter is B < 40 MeV.

  17. Fundamental Bounds on First Passage Time Fluctuations for Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingrich, Todd R.; Horowitz, Jordan M.

    2017-10-01

    Current is a characteristic feature of nonequilibrium systems. In stochastic systems, these currents exhibit fluctuations constrained by the rate of dissipation in accordance with the recently discovered thermodynamic uncertainty relation. Here, we derive a conjugate uncertainty relationship for the first passage time to accumulate a fixed net current. More generally, we use the tools of large-deviation theory to simply connect current fluctuations and first passage time fluctuations in the limit of long times and large currents. With this connection, previously discovered symmetries and bounds on the large-deviation function for currents are readily transferred to first passage times.

  18. Characterization of plasma membrane bound inorganic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Currently, a major problem in the management of visceral leishmaniasis or kala-azar, especially in the Indian subcontinent, is the growing unresponsiveness to conventional antimonial therapy. Membrane bound pyrophophatase (PPases) do not exist in plasma membrane from mammals. Thus, H+-PPases ...

  19. Stacked spheres and lower bound theorem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BASUDEB DATTA

    2011-11-20

    Nov 20, 2011 ... Using Kalai's result, Tay (1995) proved LBT for a bigger class of simplicial complexes (namely, normal pseudomanifolds). In 2008, we (Bagchi & Datta) have presented a self-contained combinatorial proof of LBT for normal pseudomanifolds. Stacked spheres and lower bound theorem. Basudeb Datta.

  20. Computational Lower Bounds Using Diagonalization-II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 4. Computational Lower Bounds Using Diagonalization - II. M V Panduranga Rao. General Article Volume 15 Issue 4 April 2010 pp 337-346 ... Keywords. Diagonalization; time–hierarchy theorem; relativization; Baker–Gill–Solovay theorem.

  1. Vulnerable Derivatives and Good Deal Bounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murgoci, Agatha

    2013-01-01

    We price vulnerable derivatives – i.e. derivatives where the counterparty may default. These are basically the derivatives traded on the over-the-counter (OTC) markets. Default is modelled in a structural framework. The technique employed for pricing is good deal bounds (GDBs). The method imposes...

  2. ASSESSMENT OF REAP-UPWARD BOUND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LANG, MELVIN; HOPP, LAURENCE

    THE IMPACT OF AN UPWARD BOUND (UB) PROGRAM ON THE ATTITUDES, MOTIVATION, AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS WITH COLLEGE POTENTIAL IS EVALUATED. THE PROGRAM IS ONE OF THE 21 UB PROGRAMS RANDOMLY SELECTED FOR INTENSIVE STUDY. AT RUTGERS UB STUDENTS' ATTITUDES AND MOTIVATION TOWARD COLLEGE GOALS, SELF-EVALUATION AND SELF-ESTEEM,…

  3. Lower Bounds for External Memory Dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Fagerberg, Rolf

    2003-01-01

    We study trade-offs between the update time and the query time for comparison based external memory dictionaries. The main contributions of this paper are two lower bound trade offs between the I/O complexity of member queries and insertions: If N

  4. Book Selection, Collection Development, and Bounded Rationality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews previously proposed schemes of classical rationality in book selection, describes new approaches to rational choice behavior, and presents a model of book selection based on bounded rationality in a garbage can decision process. The role of tacit knowledge and symbolic content in the selection process are also discussed. (102 references)…

  5. The metamorphosis of 'culture-bound' syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilek, W G; Jilek-Aall, L

    1985-01-01

    Starting from a critical review of the concept of 'culture-bound' disorders and its development in comparative psychiatry, the authors present the changing aspects of two so-called culture-bound syndromes as paradigms of transcultural metamorphosis (koro) and intra-cultural metamorphosis (Salish Indian spirit sickness), respectively. The authors present recent data on epidemics of koro, which is supposedly bound to Chinese culture, in Thailand and India among non-Chinese populations. Neither the model of Oedipal castration anxiety nor the model of culture-specific pathogenicity, commonly adduced in psychiatric and ethnological literature, explain these phenomena. The authors' data on Salish Indian spirit sickness describes the contemporary condition as anomic depression, which is significantly different from its traditional namesake. The traditional concept was redefined by Salish ritual specialists in response to current needs imposed by social changes. The stresses involved in creating the contemporary phenomena of koro and spirit sickness are neither culture-specific nor culture-inherent, as postulated for 'culture-bound' syndromes, rather they are generated by a feeling of powerlessness caused by perceived threats to ethnic survival.

  6. Upper Bounds for Mutations of Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Alexander Cruz Morales

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this note we provide a new, algebraic proof of the excessive Laurent phenomenon for mutations of potentials (in the sense of [Galkin S., Usnich A., Preprint IPMU 10-0100, 2010] by introducing to this theory the analogue of the upper bounds from [Berenstein A., Fomin S., Zelevinsky A., Duke Math. J. 126 (2005, 1-52].

  7. Bound states of the Dirac equation on Kerr spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Sam R

    2015-01-01

    We formulate the Dirac equation for a massive neutral spin-half particle on a rotating black hole spacetime, and we consider its (quasi)bound states: gravitationally-trapped modes which are regular across the future event horizon. These bound states decay with time, due to the absence of superradiance in the (single-particle) Dirac field. We introduce a practical method for computing the spectrum of energy levels and decay rates, and we compare our numerical results with known asymptotic results in the small-$M \\mu$ and large-$M \\mu$ regimes. By applying perturbation theory in a horizon-penetrating coordinate system, we compute the `fine structure' of the energy spectrum, and show good agreement with numerical results. We obtain data for a hyperfine splitting due to black hole rotation. We evolve generic initial data in the time domain, and show how Dirac bound states appear as spectral lines in the power spectra. In the rapidly-rotating regime, we find that the decay of low-frequency co-rotating modes is sup...

  8. Bounds on Average Time Complexity of Decision Trees

    KAUST Repository

    Chikalov, Igor

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, bounds on the average depth and the average weighted depth of decision trees are considered. Similar problems are studied in search theory [1], coding theory [77], design and analysis of algorithms (e.g., sorting) [38]. For any diagnostic problem, the minimum average depth of decision tree is bounded from below by the entropy of probability distribution (with a multiplier 1/log2 k for a problem over a k-valued information system). Among diagnostic problems, the problems with a complete set of attributes have the lowest minimum average depth of decision trees (e.g, the problem of building optimal prefix code [1] and a blood test study in assumption that exactly one patient is ill [23]). For such problems, the minimum average depth of decision tree exceeds the lower bound by at most one. The minimum average depth reaches the maximum on the problems in which each attribute is "indispensable" [44] (e.g., a diagnostic problem with n attributes and kn pairwise different rows in the decision table and the problem of implementing the modulo 2 summation function). These problems have the minimum average depth of decision tree equal to the number of attributes in the problem description. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011.

  9. HDL-bound sphingosine-1-phosphate restrains lymphopoiesis and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaho, Victoria A; Galvani, Sylvain; Engelbrecht, Eric; Liu, Catherine; Swendeman, Steven L; Kono, Mari; Proia, Richard L; Steinman, Lawrence; Han, May H; Hla, Timothy

    2015-07-16

    Lipid mediators influence immunity in myriad ways. For example, circulating sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a key regulator of lymphocyte egress. Although the majority of plasma S1P is bound to apolipoprotein M (ApoM) in the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particle, the immunological functions of the ApoM-S1P complex are unknown. Here we show that ApoM-S1P is dispensable for lymphocyte trafficking yet restrains lymphopoiesis by activating the S1P1 receptor on bone marrow lymphocyte progenitors. Mice that lacked ApoM (Apom(-/-)) had increased proliferation of Lin(-) Sca-1(+) cKit(+) haematopoietic progenitor cells (LSKs) and common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs) in bone marrow. Pharmacological activation or genetic overexpression of S1P1 suppressed LSK and CLP cell proliferation in vivo. ApoM was stably associated with bone marrow CLPs, which showed active S1P1 signalling in vivo. Moreover, ApoM-bound S1P, but not albumin-bound S1P, inhibited lymphopoiesis in vitro. Upon immune stimulation, Apom(-/-) mice developed more severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, characterized by increased lymphocytes in the central nervous system and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. Thus, the ApoM-S1P-S1P1 signalling axis restrains the lymphocyte compartment and, subsequently, adaptive immune responses. Unique biological functions imparted by specific S1P chaperones could be exploited for novel therapeutic opportunities.

  10. Bound-state formation in falling liquid films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuc-Khanh; Pradas, Marc; Kalliadasis, Serafim; Bontozoglou, Vasilis

    2012-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation shows that the interaction between solitary pulses may give rise to the formation of bound states consisting of two or more pulses separated by well-defined distances and traveling at the same velocity. Stationary pulse couples are studied first. The resulting equilibrium pulse distances compare favorably to theoretical predictions at large and intermediate pulse separations. When the two pulses are closely spaced, the theory becomes increasingly less accurate. Their time-dependent simulations indicate that all initial conditions of large separations lead to a monotonic attraction or repulsion to the stable bound states. However, intermediate range leads to a self-sustained oscillatory variation of the pulse separation distance, with well-defined amplitude and period, and a mean separation coinciding with the stationary distance. Eventually a very close separation causes an explosive repulsion of two pulses toward much larger stable separation. Bound states consisting of three pulses are computed next. The equilibrium separation distances in a symmetric system are similar to predictions based on simple couples. However, in an asymmetric one, they deviate significantly from simple predictions. Partially supported by FP7-Marie Curie ITN-``MULTIFLOW''-GA-214919-2.

  11. Transfer Function Bounds for Partial-unit-memory Convolutional Codes Based on Reduced State Diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of a coding system consisting of a convolutional encoder and a Viterbi decoder is analytically found by the well-known transfer function bounding technique. For the partial-unit-memory byte-oriented convolutional encoder with m sub 0 binary memory cells and (k sub 0 m sub 0) inputs, a state diagram of 2(K) (sub 0) was for the transfer function bound. A reduced state diagram of (2 (m sub 0) +1) is used for easy evaluation of transfer function bounds for partial-unit-memory codes.

  12. Improved lower bounds for the atomic charge density at the nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvez, F.J.; Porras, I.; Angulo, J.C.; Dehesa, J.S.

    1988-06-14

    Lower bounds F(..cap alpha.., ..beta..) for the electronic charge density of atomic systems with N electrons at the nucleus, p (O), are given by means of any two radial expectation values and , for real ..cap alpha.. not ..beta.., in a rigorous and simple way. In particular, p (O) greater than or equal to (N/8 ..pi..)/sup 2// which improves bounds found previously. An interesting property of these bounds is that they are equal to the exact value p(O) in the limit ..beta.. -> -3 for any fixed ..cap alpha.. value.

  13. Controlling multipolar radiation with symmetries for electromagnetic bound states in the continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, Thomas; Kanté, Boubacar

    2014-12-01

    Interferences in open systems embedded in a continuum can lead to states that are bound within the continuum itself. An electromagnetic state that naturally decays becomes bound at a unique point in phase space. We demonstrate the striking occurrence of multiple such peculiar states in coupled deep subwavelength resonators. The bound states in the continuum originate from the control of multipolar radiation and their symmetries. The architectures investigated here, using all-dielectric resonators, constitute a flexible and readily achievable platform for applications requiring strong light-matter interaction and light localization.

  14. Aerodynamics of intermittent bounds in flying birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobalske, Bret W.; Hearn, Jason W. D.; Warrick, Douglas R.

    Flap-bounding is a common flight style in small birds in which flapping phases alternate with flexed-wing bounds. Body lift is predicted to be essential to making this flight style an aerodynamically attractive flight strategy. To elucidate the contributions of the body and tail to lift and drag during the flexed-wing bound phase, we used particle image velocimetry (PIV) and measured properties of the wake of zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata, N = 5), flying at 6-10 m s- 1 in a variable speed wind tunnel as well as flow around taxidermically prepared specimens (N = 4) mounted on a sting instrumented with force transducers. For the specimens, we varied air velocity from 2 to 12 m s- 1 and body angle from -15∘ to 50∘. The wake of bounding birds and mounted specimens consisted of a pair of counterrotating vortices shed into the wake from the tail, with induced downwash in the sagittal plane and upwash in parasagittal planes lateral to the bird. This wake structure was present even when the tail was entirely removed. We observed good agreement between force measures derived from PIV and force transducers over the range of body angles typically used by zebra finch during forward flight. Body lift:drag (L:D) ratios averaged 1.4 in live birds and varied between 1 and 1.5 in specimens at body angles from 10∘ to 30∘. Peak (L:D) ratio was the same in live birds and specimens (1.5) and was exhibited in specimens at body angles of 15∘ or 20∘, consistent with the lower end of body angles utilized during bounds. Increasing flight velocity in live birds caused a decrease in CL and CD from maximum values of 1.19 and 0.95 during flight at 6 m s- 1 to minimum values of 0.70 and 0.54 during flight at 10 m s- 1. Consistent with delta-wing theory as applied to birds with a graduated-tail shape, trimming the tail to 0 and 50% of normal length reduced L:D ratios and extending tail length to 150% of normal increased L:D ratio. As downward induced velocity is present in the

  15. Upper Bounds on Performance Measures of Heterogeneous // Queues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Q. Alves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In many real-life queueing systems, the servers are often heterogeneous, namely they work at different rates. This paper provides a simple method to compute tight upper bounds on two important performance measures of single-class heterogeneous multi-server Markovian queueing systems, namely the average number in queue and the average waiting time in queue. This method is based on an expansion of the state space that is followed by an approximate reduction of the state space, only considering the most probable states. In most cases tested, we were able to approximate the actual behavior of the system with smaller errors than those obtained from traditional homogeneous multiserver Markovian queues, as shown by GPSS simulations. In addition, we have correlated the quality of the approximation with the degree of heterogeneity of the system, which was evaluated using its Gini index. Finally, we have shown that the bounds are robust and still useful, even considering quite different allocation strategies. A large number of simulation results show the accuracy of the proposed method that is better than that of classical homogeneous multiserver Markovian formulae in many situations.

  16. Optimal Bounds in Parametric LTL Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Zimmermann

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider graph games of infinite duration with winning conditions in parameterized linear temporal logic, where the temporal operators are equipped with variables for time bounds. In model checking such specifications were introduced as "PLTL" by Alur et al. and (in a different version called "PROMPT-LTL" by Kupferman et al.. We present an algorithm to determine optimal variable valuations that allow a player to win a game. Furthermore, we show how to determine whether a player wins a game with respect to some, infinitely many, or all valuations. All our algorithms run in doubly-exponential time; so, adding bounded temporal operators does not increase the complexity compared to solving plain LTL games.

  17. Bounded rational choice behaviour: applications in transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Fjendbo

    2016-01-01

    Even though the theory of rational behaviour has been challenged for almost 100 years, the dominant approach within the field of transport has been based upon the assumptions of neoclassical economics that we live in a world of rational decision makers who always have perfect knowledge and aim to...... and limited processing may occur due to time constraints, low involvement in the decision at hand, relying on habits or the task requiring too high a mental effort....... to maximise some subjective measure. Where other fields, for example within the social sciences and psychology, have made serious efforts to explore alternative models derived from principles of bounded rationality, this direction has begun to take speed within transport applications only recently. Bounded...

  18. Tight Bounds for Distributed Functional Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodruff, David P.; Zhang, Qin

    2011-01-01

    output to a function $f$ computed over the union of the inputs. The goal is to minimize the communication. We show the randomized communication complexity of estimating the number of distinct elements up to a $1+\\eps$ factor is $\\Omega(k/\\eps^2)$, improving the previous $\\Omega(k + 1/\\eps^2)$ bound......} t))$ to $\\tilde{\\Omega}(n^{1-2/p}/(\\eps^{4/p} t))$, giving the first bound for estimating $F_0$ in $t$ passes of $\\Omega(1/(\\eps^2 t))$ bits of space that does not use the gap-hamming problem, and showing a distribution for the gap-hamming problem with high external information cost or super...

  19. Novel black hole bound states and entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Govindarajan, T R

    2011-01-01

    We solve for the spectrum of the Laplacian as Hamiltonian on $\\mathbb{R}^{2}-\\mathbb{D}$ and in $\\mathbb{R}^{3}-\\mathbb{B}$. A self-adjointness analysis with $\\partial\\mathbb{D}$ and $\\partial\\mathbb{B}$ as the boundary for the two cases shows that a general class of boundary conditions for which the Hamiltonian operator is essentially self-adjoint are of the mixed (Robin) type. With this class of boundary conditions we obtain 'bound state' solutions for the Schroedinger equation. Interestingly, these solutions are all localized near the boundary. We further show that the number of bound states is finite and is infact proportional to the perimeter or area of the removed \\emph{disc} or \\emph{ball}. We then argue that similar considerations should hold for static black hole backgrounds with the horizon treated as the boundary.

  20. Spectral singularities and zero energy bound states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, W.D. [National Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study, and Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Stellenbosch, 7602 Matieland (South Africa); Nazmitdinov, R.G. [Department de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-15

    Single particle scattering around zero energy is re-analysed in view of recent experiments with ultra-cold atoms, nano-structures and nuclei far from the stability valley. For non-zero orbital angular momentum the low energy scattering cross section exhibits dramatic changes depending on the occurrence of either a near resonance or a bound state or the situation in between, that is a bound state at zero energy. Such state is singular in that it has an infinite scattering length, behaves for the eigenvalues but not for the eigenfunctions as an exceptional point and has no pole in the scattering function. These results should be observable whenever the interaction or scattering length can be controlled. (authors)

  1. A linear programming approach to characterizing norm bounded uncertainty from experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheid, R. E.; Bayard, D. S.; Yam, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The linear programming spectral overbounding and factorization (LPSOF) algorithm, an algorithm for finding a minimum phase transfer function of specified order whose magnitude tightly overbounds a specified nonparametric function of frequency, is introduced. This method has direct application to transforming nonparametric uncertainty bounds (available from system identification experiments) into parametric representations required for modern robust control design software (i.e., a minimum-phase transfer function multiplied by a norm-bounded perturbation).

  2. Efficient Implementation Of Branch-And-Bound Method On Desktop Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Tian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC is an opensource middleware system for volunteer and desktop grid computing. In this paper we propose BNBTEST, a BOINC version of distributed branch and bound method. The crucial issues of distributed branch-and-bound method are traversing the search tree and loading balance. We developed subtaskspackaging method and three dierent subtasks' distribution strategies to solve these.

  3. Spectroscopy of η′-nucleus bound states at GSI-SIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Outa Haruhiko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The η′ meson mass may be reduced due to partial restoration of chiral symmetry. If this is the case, an η′-nucleus system may form a nuclear bound state.We plan to carry out a missing-mass spectroscopy experiment with the 12C(p,d reaction at GSI-SIS. Peak structures corresponding to such a bound state may be observed even in an inclusive measurement, if the decay width is narrow enough.

  4. Mass media and heterogeneous bounds of confidence in continuous opinion dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Pineda, M.; Buendia, G. M.

    2014-01-01

    This work focus on the effects of an external mass media on continuous opinion dynamics with heterogeneous bounds of confidence. We modified the original Deffuant et al. and Hegselmann and Krause models to incorporate both, an external mass media and a heterogeneous distribution of confidence levels. We analysed two cases, one where only two bounds of confidence are taken into account, and other were each individual of the system has her/his own characteristic level of confidence. We found th...

  5. Volume Stability of Bitumen Bound Building Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Thanaya I.N.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper covers results of laboratory investigations on the volume stability of masonry units incorporating waste materials bound with bitumen (Bitublocks), due to moisture adsorption, thermal exposure and vacuum saturation. The materials used were steel slag, crushed glass, coal fly ash, and 50 pen bitumen. The samples were produced in hot mix method, compacted, then exposed to moist and temperature. It was found that moisture adsorption from the environment caused the Bitublock to expand....

  6. Closed form bound-state perturbation theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollie J. Rose

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available The perturbed Schrödinger eigenvalue problem for bound states is cast into integral form using Green's Functions. A systematic algorithm is developed and applied to the resulting equation giving rise to approximate solutions expressed as functions of the given perturbation parameter. As a by-product, convergence radii for the traditional Rayleigh-Schrödinger and Brillouin-Wigner perturbation theories emerge in a natural way.

  7. EXPLICIT LOWER BOUNDS FOR LINEAR FORMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leppälä, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    Let I be the field of rational numbers or an imaginary quadratic field and Z(I) its ring of integers. We study some general lemmas that produce lower bounds vertical bar B-0 + B-1 theta(1) +... + B-r theta(r)vertical bar >= 1/max{vertical bar B-1 vertical bar,...,vertical bar B-r vertical bar}(mu...

  8. Exact BPS bound for noncommutative baby Skyrmions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domrin, Andrei, E-mail: domrin@mi.ras.ru [Department of Mathematics and Mechanics, Moscow State University, Leninskie gory, 119992, GSP-2, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lechtenfeld, Olaf, E-mail: lechtenf@itp.uni-hannover.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik and Riemann Center for Geometry and Physics, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Appelstraße 2, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Linares, Román, E-mail: lirr@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, C.P. 09340, México D.F. (Mexico); Maceda, Marco, E-mail: mmac@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, C.P. 09340, México D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-11-25

    The noncommutative baby Skyrme model is a Moyal deformation of the two-dimensional sigma model plus a Skyrme term, with a group-valued or Grassmannian target. Exact abelian solitonic solutions have been identified analytically in this model, with a singular commutative limit. Inside any given Grassmannian, we establish a BPS bound for the energy functional, which is saturated by these baby Skyrmions. This asserts their stability for unit charge, as we also test in second-order perturbation theory.

  9. Bounding symbolic powers via asymptotic multiplier ideals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Teitler

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We revisit a bound on symbolic powers found by Ein-Lazarsfeld-Smith and subsequently improved by Takagi-Yoshida. We show that the original argument of [6] actually gives the same improvement. On the other hand, we show by examples that any further improvement based on the same technique appears unlikely. This is primarily an exposition; only some examples and remarks might be new.

  10. Herbert Simon: bounded rationality and organizations theory

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    This article evaluates Herbert A. Simon’s contribution to organization theory, placing special emphasis on the criterion of bounded rationality. Simon’s criticism of the orthodox version of organizational bureaucracy is interpreted and his analysis is extended to institutional economics. One of Simon’s main achievements in organizational theory consisted of analytically evaluating the psychology of individual and collective behaviour, thereby opening up the way for future investigation by D. ...

  11. Safe, Multiphase Bounds Check Elimination in Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-28

    National Science Foundation under grants CCF-0846010, EIA-0117255, CCF-0702527, and CNS-0855247. References [1] Elvira Albert, Germán Puebla, and Manuel ...David Grove, Michael Hind, Vivek Sarkar, Mauricio J. Serrano , V. C. Sreedhar, Harini Srinivasan, and John Whaley. The jalapeño dynamic optimizing...Computer Science, pages 137–153, August 2009. 40 Gampe, et al. Multiphase Bounds Check Elimination CS-TR-2010-001 [44] Martin Odersky and Philip Wadler

  12. On Lower Bounds for Statistical Learning Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Ling Loh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, tools from information theory have played an increasingly prevalent role in statistical machine learning. In addition to developing efficient, computationally feasible algorithms for analyzing complex datasets, it is of theoretical importance to determine whether such algorithms are “optimal” in the sense that no other algorithm can lead to smaller statistical error. This paper provides a survey of various techniques used to derive information-theoretic lower bounds for estimation and learning. We focus on the settings of parameter and function estimation, community recovery, and online learning for multi-armed bandits. A common theme is that lower bounds are established by relating the statistical learning problem to a channel decoding problem, for which lower bounds may be derived involving information-theoretic quantities such as the mutual information, total variation distance, and Kullback–Leibler divergence. We close by discussing the use of information-theoretic quantities to measure independence in machine learning applications ranging from causality to medical imaging, and mention techniques for estimating these quantities efficiently in a data-driven manner.

  13. Bounds on the complex permittivity of polycrystalline materials by analytic continuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gully, A.; Lin, J.; Cherkaev, E.; Golden, K. M.

    2015-01-01

    An analytic continuation method for obtaining rigorous bounds on the effective complex permittivity ε* of polycrystalline composite materials is developed. It is assumed that the composite consists of many identical anisotropic crystals, each with a unique orientation. The key step in obtaining the bounds involves deriving an integral representation for ε*, which separates parameter information from geometrical information. Forward bounds are then found using knowledge of the single crystal permittivity tensor and mean crystal orientation. Inverse bounds are also developed, which recover information about the mean crystal orientation from ε*. We apply the polycrystalline bounds to sea ice, a critical component of the climate system. Different ice types, which result from different growth conditions, have different crystal orientation and size statistics. These characteristics significantly influence the fluid transport properties of sea ice, which control many geophysical and biogeochemical processes important to the climate and polar ecosystems. Using a two-scale homogenization scheme, where the single crystal tensor is numerically computed, forward bounds for sea ice are obtained and are in excellent agreement with columnar sea ice data. Furthermore, the inverse bounds are also applied to sea ice, helping to lay the groundwork for determining ice type using remote sensing techniques. PMID:25663811

  14. Culture bound anxiety disorder in adolescence: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Joshua M

    2008-08-01

    There are a number of culture-bound syndromes in the literature that may directly impact on clients' systems of meaning and, thus, the clinician's ability to effectively intervene. This applies to Hispanic/Latino children, particularly those who present with anxiety and somatic symptoms. This case study deals with a 14-year-old Hispanic girl who presented at a behavioral health clinic with anxiety behaviors. Review of the literature and case example from practice. Since culture can have a profound influence on a child's thoughts, emotions, and behaviors, nurses' cultural understanding is critical in psychiatric diagnostic evaluation and treatment.

  15. Scaling and universality in two dimensions: three-body bound states with short-ranged interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellotti, F F; Frederico, T [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, DCTA, 12.228-900 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Yamashita, M T [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, UNESP-Univ Estadual Paulista, CP 70532-2, CEP 01156-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fedorov, D V; Jensen, A S; Zinner, N T, E-mail: zinner@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy-Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade, bygn. 1520, DK-8000 Arhus C (Denmark)

    2011-10-28

    The momentum space zero-range model is used to investigate universal properties of three interacting particles confined to two dimensions. The pertinent equations are first formulated for a system of two identical and one distinct particle and the two different two-body subsystems are characterized by two-body energies and masses. The three-body energy in units of one of the two-body energies is a universal function of the other two-body energy and the mass ratio. We derive convenient analytical formulae for calculations of the three-body energy as a function of these two independent parameters and exhibit the results as universal curves. In particular, we show that the three-body system can have any number of stable bound states. When the mass ratio of the distinct to identical particles is greater than 0.22, we find that at most two stable bound states exist, while for two heavy and one light mass an increasing number of bound states is possible. The specific number of stable bound states depends on the ratio of two-body bound state energies and on the mass ratio, and we map out an energy-mass phase diagram of the number of stable bound states. Realizable systems of both fermions and bosons are discussed in this framework.

  16. Quantum information processing in the radical-pair mechanism: Haberkorn's theory violates the Ozawa entropy bound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouloudakis, K; Kominis, I K

    2017-02-01

    Radical-ion-pair reactions, central for understanding the avian magnetic compass and spin transport in photosynthetic reaction centers, were recently shown to be a fruitful paradigm of the new synthesis of quantum information science with biological processes. We show here that the master equation so far constituting the theoretical foundation of spin chemistry violates fundamental bounds for the entropy of quantum systems, in particular the Ozawa bound. In contrast, a recently developed theory based on quantum measurements, quantum coherence measures, and quantum retrodiction, thus exemplifying the paradigm of quantum biology, satisfies the Ozawa bound as well as the Lanford-Robinson bound on information extraction. By considering Groenewold's information, the quantum information extracted during the reaction, we reproduce the known and unravel other magnetic-field effects not conveyed by reaction yields.

  17. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction as an agent to free the bound entangled states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kapil K.; Pandey, S. N.

    2016-04-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the efficacy of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction to convert the bound entangled states into free entangled states. We consider the tripartite hybrid system as a pair of non interacting two qutrits initially prepared in bound entangled states and one auxiliary qubit. Here, we consider two types of bound entangled states investigated by Horodecki. The auxiliary qubit interacts with any one of the qutrit of the pair through DM interaction. We show that by tuning the probability amplitude of auxiliary qubit and DM interaction strength, one can free the bound entangled states, which can be further distilled. We use the reduction criterion to find the range of the parameters of probability amplitude of auxiliary qubit and DM interaction strength, for which the states are distillable. The realignment criterion and negativity have been used for detection and quantification of entanglement.

  18. Precision Measurement of the Position-Space Wave Functions of Gravitationally Bound Ultracold Neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kamiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravity is the most familiar force at our natural length scale. However, it is still exotic from the view point of particle physics. The first experimental study of quantum effects under gravity was performed using a cold neutron beam in 1975. Following this, an investigation of gravitationally bound quantum states using ultracold neutrons was started in 2002. This quantum bound system is now well understood, and one can use it as a tunable tool to probe gravity. In this paper, we review a recent measurement of position-space wave functions of such gravitationally bound states and discuss issues related to this analysis, such as neutron loss models in a thin neutron guide, the formulation of phase space quantum mechanics, and UCN position sensitive detectors. The quantum modulation of neutron bound states measured in this experiment shows good agreement with the prediction from quantum mechanics.

  19. Sulfur Atom in its Bound State Is a Unique Element Involved in Physiological Functions in Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Koike

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It was in the 1950s that the term polysulfide or persulfide was introduced in biological studies. The unfamiliar term “sulfane sulfur” sometimes appeared in papers published in the 1970s, and was defined in the review article by Westley in 1983. In the article, sulfane sulfur is described as sulfur atoms that are covalently bound only with sulfur atoms, and as this explanation was somewhat difficult to comprehend, it was not generally accepted. Thus, in the early 1990s, we redefined these sulfur species as “bound sulfur”, which easily converts to hydrogen sulfide on reduction with a thiol reducing agent. In other words, bound sulfur refers to a sulfur atom that exists in a zero to divalent form (0 to −2. The first part of this review focuses on the fluorescent derivatization HPLC method—which we developed for measurement of bound sulfur—and explains the distribution of bound sulfur and the hydrogen sulfide-producing ability of various tissues, as clarified by this method. Next, we discuss diverse physiological functions and involvement of polysulfide, a typical type of bound sulfur, in the redox regulation system. Additionally, we also address its possible physiological role in the central nervous system, based on its action of scavenging reactive carbonyl compounds.

  20. Ionically Bound Peroxidase from Peach Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves Valdir Augusto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble, ionically bound peroxidase (POD and polyphenoloxidase (PPO were extracted from the pulp of peach fruit during ripening at 20°C. Ionically bound form was purified 6.1-fold by DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex G-100 chromatography. The purified enzyme showed only one peak of activity on Sephadex G-100 and PAGE revealed that the enzyme was purified by the procedures adopted. The purified enzyme showed a molecular weight of 29000 Da, maximum activity at pH 5.0 and at 40ºC. The calculated apparent activation energy (Ea for the reaction was10.04 kcal/mol. The enzyme was heat-labile in the temperature range of 60 to 75ºC with a fast inactivation at 75ºC. Measurement of residual activity showed a stabilizing effect of sucrose at various temperature/sugar concentrations (0, 10, 20 %, w/w, with an activation energy (Ea for inactivation increasing with sucrose concentration from 0 to 20% (w/w. The Km and Vmax values were 9.35 and 15.38 mM for 0-dianisidine and H2O2, respectively. The bound enzyme was inhibited competitively by ferulic, caffeic and protocatechuic acids with different values of Ki,. L-cysteine, p-coumaric and indolacetic acid and Fe++ also inhibited the enzyme but at a lower grade. N-ethylmaleimide and p-CMB were not effective to inhibit the enzyme demonstrating the non-essentiality of SH groups.

  1. Bound values for Hall conductivity of heterogeneous medium under ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    - ditions in inhomogeneous medium has been studied. It is shown that bound values for. Hall conductivity differ from bound values for metallic conductivity. This is due to the unusual character of current percolation under quantum Hall effect ...

  2. Linear Plotkin bound for entanglement-assisted quantum codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Luobin; Li, Ruihu

    2013-03-01

    The entanglement-assisted (EA) formalism is a generalization of the standard stabilizer formalism, and it can transform arbitrary quaternary classical linear codes into entanglement-assisted quantum error correcting codes (EAQECCs) by using of shared entanglement between the sender and the receiver. Using the special structure of linear EAQECCs, we derive an EA-Plotkin bound for linear EAQECCs, which strengthens the previous known EA-Plotkin bound. This linear EA-Plotkin bound is tighter then the EA-Singleton bound, and matches the EA-Hamming bound and the EA-linear programming bound in some cases. We also construct three families of EAQECCs with good parameters. Some of these EAQECCs saturate this linear EA-Plotkin bound and the others are near optimal according to this bound; almost all of these linear EAQECCs are degenerate codes.

  3. Bound states in the strong coupling limit

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A

    1972-01-01

    The author shows that the number of bound states of a particle in a short-range potential in n dimensions is given asymptotically by N=g /sup n/2/S/sub n//(2 pi )/sup n/ integral mod 2MV/sup -//h(cross)/sup 2/ mod /sup n/2/d/sup n/x+0(g/sup n/2-g/) for g to infinity , where gV /sup -/ is the attractive part of the potential, and S/sub /n is the volume of the n dimensional sphere with unit radius. (10 refs).

  4. Topological edge states of bound photon pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlach, Maxim A.; Poddubny, Alexander N.

    2017-05-01

    We predict the existence of interaction-driven edge states of bound two-photon quasiparticles in a dimer periodic array of nonlinear optical cavities. The energy spectrum of photon pairs is dramatically richer than in the noninteracting case or in a simple lattice, featuring collapse and revival of multiple edge and bulk modes as well as edge states in continuum. We link the edge-state existence to the two-photon quantum walk graph connectivity. Our results offer a route to control quantum entanglement and provide insights into the physics of many-body topological states.

  5. Properties of Excitons Bound to Ionized Donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben; Suffczynski, M.; Gorzkowski, W.

    1971-01-01

    Binding energies, interparticle distances, oscillator strengths, and exchange corrections are calculated for the three-particle complex corresponding to an exciton bound to an ionized donor. The results are given as functions of the mass ratio of the electron and hole. Binding of the complex...... is obtained for mass ratios up to 0.426. The interparticle distances are up to 50 times larger than the corresponding exciton radius. The oscillator strengths are about 104 times greater than those of free excitons, while the exchange corrections for the complex are comparable to those of free excitions...

  6. Model Independent Bounds on Kinetic Mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, Anson; Izaguirre, Eder; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-22

    New Abelian vector bosons can kinetically mix with the hypercharge gauge boson of the Standard Model. This letter computes the model independent limits on vector bosons with masses from 1 GeV to 1 TeV. The limits arise from the numerous e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments that have been performed in this energy range and bound the kinetic mixing by {epsilon} {approx}< 0.03 for most of the mass range studied, regardless of any additional interactions that the new vector boson may have.

  7. Engineering the coupling between Majorana bound states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z. C.; Shao, X. Q.; Xia, Y.; Yi, X. X.

    2017-09-01

    We study the coupling between Majorana bound states (CMBS), which is mediated by a topologically trivial chain in the presence of pairing coupling and long-range coupling. The results show that CMBS can be enhanced by the pairing coupling and long-range coupling of the trivial chain. When driving the trivial chain by periodic driving field, we deduce the analytical expressions of CMBS in the high-frequency limit, and demonstrate that CMBS can be modulated by the frequency and amplitude of driving field. Finally we exhibit the application of tunable CMBS in realizing quantum logic gates.

  8. Valuation models and Simon's bounded rationality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Strommer de Farias Godoi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at reconciling the evidence that sophisticated valuation models are increasingly used by companies in their investment appraisal with the literature of bounded rationality, according to which objective optimization is impracticable in the real world because it would demand an immense level of sophistication of the analytical and computational processes of human beings. We show how normative valuation models should rather be viewed as forms of reality representation, frameworks according to which the real world is perceived, fragmented for a better understanding, and recomposed, providing an orderly method for undertaking a task as complex as the investment decision.

  9. Andreev bound states. Some quasiclassical reflections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Y., E-mail: yiriolin@illinois.edu; Leggett, A. J. [University of Illinois at Urhana-Champaign, Dept. of Physics (United States)

    2014-12-15

    We discuss a very simple and essentially exactly solvable model problem which illustrates some nice features of Andreev bound states, namely, the trapping of a single Bogoliubov quasiparticle in a neutral s-wave BCS superfluid by a wide and shallow Zeeman trap. In the quasiclassical limit, the ground state is a doublet with a splitting which is proportional to the exponentially small amplitude for “normal” reflection by the edges of the trap. We comment briefly on a prima facie paradox concerning the continuity equation and conjecture a resolution to it.

  10. Score Bounded Monte-Carlo Tree Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazenave, Tristan; Saffidine, Abdallah

    Monte-Carlo Tree Search (MCTS) is a successful algorithm used in many state of the art game engines. We propose to improve a MCTS solver when a game has more than two outcomes. It is for example the case in games that can end in draw positions. In this case it improves significantly a MCTS solver to take into account bounds on the possible scores of a node in order to select the nodes to explore. We apply our algorithm to solving Seki in the game of Go and to Connect Four.

  11. Infrared spectroscopy of weakly bound molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Lisa I-Ching

    1988-11-01

    The infrared spectra of a series of hydrated hydronium cluster ions and of protonated ethane ion are presented. A tandem mass spectrometer is ideally suited to obtaining the spectra of such weakly bound molecular ions. Traditional absorption spectroscopy is not feasible in these situations, so the techniques described in this thesis make use of some consequence of photon absorption with higher sensitivity than simply attenuation of laser power. That consequence is dissociation. By first mass selecting the parent ion under study and then mass selecting the fragment ion formed from dissociation, the near unit detection efficiency of ion counting methods has been used to full advantage.

  12. BOUND PERIODICAL HOLDINGS BATTELLE - NORTHWEST LIBRARY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1967-05-01

    This report lists the bound periodicals in the Technical Library at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. It was prepared from a computer program and is arranged in two parts. Part one is an alphabetical list of journals by title; part two is an arrangement of the journals by subject. The list headings are self-explanatory, with the exception of the title code, which is necessary in the machine processing. The listing is complete through June, 1966 and updates an earlier publication issued in March, 1965.

  13. Left Behind: A Bound Remnant from a White Dwarf Supernova?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Saurabh

    2017-08-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) have enormous importance to cosmology and astrophysics, but their progenitors and explosion mechanisms are not understood in detail. Recently, observations and theoretical models have suggested that not all thermonuclear white-dwarf supernova explosions are normal SN Ia. In particular, type Iax supernovae (peculiar cousins to SN Ia), are thought to be exploding white dwarfs that are not completely disrupted, leaving behind a bound remnant. In deep and serendipitous HST pre-explosion data, we have discovered a luminous, blue progenitor system for the type Iax SN 2012Z in NGC 1309, which we interpret as a helium-star donor to the exploding white dwarf. HST observations of SN 2012Z in 2016, when the supernova light was expected to have faded away, still show a source at the location, as expected in our model where the pre-explosion flux was coming from the companion. However, the 2016 data also show a surprise: an excess flux compared to the progenitor system. Our proposed observations here will help unravel the mystery of that excess flux: is it from the bound ex-white dwarf remnant? Or is it from the shocked companion star that has been bombarded by supernova ejecta? Either of these possibilities would provide key new evidence as to the nature of these white dwarf supernovae.

  14. Determining the limit of detection of surface bound antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiona, Robert M T; Welch, Nicholas G; Scoble, Judith A; Muir, Benjamin W; Pigram, Paul J

    2017-08-11

    Determination of a limit of detection (LoD) for surface bound antibodies is crucial for the development and deployment of sensitive bioassays. The measurement of very low concentrations of surface bound antibodies is also important in the manufacturing of pharmaceutical products such as antibody-conjugated pharmaceuticals. Low concentrations are required to avoid an immune response from the target host. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used to determine the LoD for the surface bound antibody (antiepidermal growth factor receptor antibody) on silicon substrates. Antibody solution concentrations between 10 μg/ml and 1 ng/ml and a control (antibody-free buffer solution) were employed, and the detection performance of each technique was compared. For this system, the ELISA LoD was 100 ng/ml and the XPS LoD was 1 μg/ml, corresponding to an estimated surface concentration of 49  ± 7 ng/cm2 using a 1 μg/ml solution. Due to the multivariate complexity of ToF-SIMS data, analysis was carried out using three different methods, peak ratio calculations, principal component analysis, and artificial neural network analysis. The use of multivariate analysis with this dataset offers an unbiased analytical approach based on the peaks selected from ToF-SIMS data. The results estimate a ToF-SIMS LoD between applied antibody concentrations of 10 and 100 ng/mL. For surface bound antibodies on a silicon substrate, the LoD is below an estimated surface concentration of 49 ng/cm2. The authors have determined the LoD for this system using ELISA, XPS, and ToF-SIMS with multivariate analyses, with ToF-SIMS offering an order of magnitude better detection over ELISA and 2 orders of magnitude better detection over XPS.

  15. Accidental bound states in the continuum in an open Sinai billiard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilipchuk, A. S.; Sadreev, A. F.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental mechanism of the bound states in the continuum is the full destructive interference of two resonances when two eigenlevels of the closed system are crossing. There is, however, a wide class of quantum chaotic systems which display only avoided crossings of eigenlevels. As an example of such a system we consider the Sinai billiard coupled with two semi-infinite waveguides. We show that notwithstanding the absence of degeneracy bound states in the continuum occur due to accidental decoupling of the eigenstates of the billiard from the waveguides.

  16. Bounding the number of remarkable values via Jouanolou's theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Chèze, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    In this article we bound the number of remarkable values of a polynomial vector field. The proof is short and based on Jouanolou's theorem about rational first integrals of planar polynomial derivations. Our bound is given in term of the size of a Newton polygon associated to the vector field. We prove that this bound is almost reached.

  17. Bounding the number of remarkable values via Jouanolou's theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chèze, Guillaume

    2015-05-01

    In this article we bound the number of remarkable values of a polynomial vector field. The proof is short and based on Jouanolou's theorem about rational first integrals of planar polynomial derivations. Our bound is given in term of the size of a Newton polygon associated to the vector field. We prove that this bound is almost reached.

  18. Bound values for Hall conductivity of heterogeneous medium under ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bound values for Hall conductivity under quantum Hall effect (QHE) conditions in inhomogeneous medium has been studied. It is shown that bound values for Hall conductivity differ from bound values for metallic conductivity. This is due to the unusual character of current percolation under quantum Hall effect conditions.

  19. Bounds in the generalized Weber problem under locational uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Henrik

    1981-01-01

    An existing analysis of the bounds on the Weber problem solution under uncertainty is incorrect. For the generalized problem with arbitrary measures of distance, we give easily computable ranges on the bounds and state the conditions under which the exact values of the bounds can be found...

  20. Bounded scalar perturbations in bouncing brane world cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Rodrigo; Pace, Francesco; Soares, Ivano Damião

    2013-11-01

    We examine the dynamics of scalar perturbations in closed Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universes in the framework of brane world theory with a timelike extra dimension. In this scenario, the unperturbed Friedmann equations contain additional terms arising from the bulk-brane interaction that implement nonsingular bounces in the models with a cosmological constant and noninteracting perfect fluids. The structure of the phase space of the models allows for two basic configurations, namely, one bounce solutions and eternal universes. Assuming that the matter content of the model is given by dust and radiation, we derive the dynamical field equations for scalar hydrodynamical perturbations considering either a conformally flat (de Sitter) bulk or a perturbed bulk. The dynamical system built with these equations is extremely involved. Nevertheless, in this paper we perform a numerical analysis which can shed some light on the study of cosmological scalar perturbations in bouncing brane world models. From a mathematical point of view we show that although the bounce enhances the amplitudes of scalar perturbations for one bounce models in the case of a de Sitter bulk, the amplitudes of the perturbations remain sufficiently small and bounded relative to the background values up to a certain scale. For one bounce models in the case of a perturbed bulk the amplitudes of all perturbations (apart from the Weyl fluid energy density) remain sufficiently small and bounded relative to the background values for any scale of the perturbations. We also discuss and compare the stability and bounded behavior of the perturbations in the late accelerated phase of one bounce solutions. For eternal universes we argue that some of these features are maintained only for early times (typically of the order of the first bounce). In this sense we show that eternal solutions are highly unstable configurations considering the background model of this paper.

  1. Stability of bound species during alkene reactions on solid acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazen, Michele L.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2017-05-01

    This study reports the thermodynamics of bound species derived from ethene, propene, n-butene, and isobutene on solid acids with diverse strength and confining voids. Density functional theory (DFT) and kinetic data indicate that covalently bound alkoxides form C-C bonds in the kinetically relevant step for dimerization turnovers on protons within TON (0.57 nm) and MOR (0.67 nm) zeolitic channels and on stronger acids HPW (polyoxometalate clusters on silica). Turnover rates for mixed alkenes give relative alkoxide stabilities; the respective adsorption constants are obtained from in situ infrared spectra. Tertiary alkoxides (from isobutene) within larger voids (MOR, HPW) are more stable than less substituted isomers but are destabilized within smaller concave environments (TON) because framework distortions are required to avoid steric repulsion. Adsorption constants are similar on MOR and HPW for each alkoxide, indicating that binding is insensitive to acid strength for covalently bound species. DFT-derived formation free energies for alkoxides with different framework attachments and backbone length/structure agree with measurements when dispersion forces, which mediate stabilization by confinement in host-guest systems, are considered. Theory reveals previously unrecognized framework distortions that balance the C-O bond lengths required for covalency with host-guest distances that maximize van der Waals contacts. These distortions, reported here as changes in O-atom locations and dihedral angles, become stronger for larger, more substituted alkoxides. The thermodynamic properties reported here for alkoxides and acid hosts differing in size and conjugate-anion stability are benchmarked against DFT-derived free energies; their details are essential to design host-guest pairs that direct alkoxide species toward specific products.

  2. Generalized bounds for convex multistage stochastic programs

    CERN Document Server

    Künzi, H; Fandel, G; Trockel, W; Basile, A; Drexl, A; Dawid, H; Inderfurth, K; Kürsten, W; Schittko, U

    2005-01-01

    This work was completed during my tenure as a scientific assistant and d- toral student at the Institute for Operations Research at the University of St. Gallen. During that time, I was involved in several industry projects in the field of power management, on the occasion of which I was repeatedly c- fronted with complex decision problems under uncertainty. Although usually hard to solve, I quickly learned to appreciate the benefit of stochastic progr- ming models and developed a strong interest in their theoretical properties. Motivated both by practical questions and theoretical concerns, I became p- ticularly interested in the art of finding tight bounds on the optimal value of a given model. The present work attempts to make a contribution to this important branch of stochastic optimization theory. In particular, it aims at extending some classical bounding methods to broader problem classes of practical relevance. This book was accepted as a doctoral thesis by the University of St. Gallen in June 2004.1...

  3. Bounds of parameter estimation for interference signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2017-08-20

    Parameter estimation, especially frequency estimation, from noisy observations of interference is essential in optical interferometric sensing and metrology. The Cramer-Rao bound (CRB) of such estimation determines measurement sensitivity limit. Unlike the well-studied complex sinusoids in communication theory, an optical interference signal is distinctly different in its model parameters and noise statistics. The connection between these parameters and their estimation bounds has not been well understood. Here we propose a complete, realistic multiparameter interference model corrupted by a combination of shot noise, dark noise, and readout noise. We derive the Fisher information matrix and the CRBs for all model parameters, including intensity, visibility, optical path length (frequency), and initial phase. We show that the CRBs of frequency and phase are coupled but not affected by the knowledge of intensity and visibility. Knowing the initial phase offers significant sensitivity advantage, which is verified by both theoretical derivations and numerical simulations. In addition to the complete model, a shot noise-limited case is studied, permitting the calculation of the CRBs directly from measured data.

  4. A Conjectured Bound on Accidental Symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Buican, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    In this note, we study a large class of four-dimensional R-symmetric theories, and we describe a new quantity, \\tau_U, which is well-defined in these theories. Furthermore, we conjecture that this quantity is larger in the ultraviolet (UV) than in the infrared (IR), i.e. that \\tau_U^{UV}>\\tau_U^{IR}. While we do not prove this inequality in full generality, it is straightforward to show that our conjecture holds in the subset of theories that do not have accidental symmetries. In addition, we subject our inequality to an array of non-trivial tests in theories with accidental symmetries and dramatically different dynamics both in N=1 and N=2 supersymmetry and find that our inequality is obeyed. One interesting consequence of this conjecture is that the mixing of accidental symmetries with the IR superconformal R current is bounded by the UV quantity, \\tau_U^{UV}. To demonstrate the potential utility of this bound, we apply it to the somewhat mysterious SU(2) gauge theory of Intriligator, Seiberg, and Shenker a...

  5. Bounds for phylogenetic network space metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Andrew; Huber, Katharina T; Moulton, Vincent; Wu, Taoyang

    2018-04-01

    Phylogenetic networks are a generalization of phylogenetic trees that allow for representation of reticulate evolution. Recently, a space of unrooted phylogenetic networks was introduced, where such a network is a connected graph in which every vertex has degree 1 or 3 and whose leaf-set is a fixed set X of taxa. This space, denoted [Formula: see text], is defined in terms of two operations on networks-the nearest neighbor interchange and triangle operations-which can be used to transform any network with leaf set X into any other network with that leaf set. In particular, it gives rise to a metric d on [Formula: see text] which is given by the smallest number of operations required to transform one network in [Formula: see text] into another in [Formula: see text]. The metric generalizes the well-known NNI-metric on phylogenetic trees which has been intensively studied in the literature. In this paper, we derive a bound for the metric d as well as a related metric [Formula: see text] which arises when restricting d to the subset of [Formula: see text] consisting of all networks with [Formula: see text] vertices, [Formula: see text]. We also introduce two new metrics on networks-the SPR and TBR metrics-which generalize the metrics on phylogenetic trees with the same name and give bounds for these new metrics. We expect our results to eventually have applications to the development and understanding of network search algorithms.

  6. Dilation volumes of sets of bounded perimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiderlen, Markus; Rataj, Jan

    This paper analyzes the first order behavior (that is, the right sided derivative) of the volume of the dilation A ⊕ tQ as t converges to zero. Here A and Q are subsets of n-dimensional Euclidean space, A has bounded perimeter and Q is compact. If Q consists of two points only, x and x+u, say......, this derivative coincides up to sign with the directional derivative of the covariogram of A in direction u. By known results for the covariogram, this derivative can therefore be expressed by the cosine transform of the surface area measure of A. We extend this result to sets Q that are at most countable and use...... it to determine the derivative of the contact distribution function of a stationary random closed set at zero. A variant for uncountable Q is given, too. The proofs are based on approximation of the characteristic function of A by smooth functions of bounded variation and showing corresponding formulas for them....

  7. Magnetic resonance elastography: Inversions in bounded media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolipaka, Arunark; McGee, Kiaran P; Manduca, Armando; Romano, Anthony J; Glaser, Kevin J; Araoz, Philip A; Ehman, Richard L

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography is a noninvasive imaging technique capable of quantifying and spatially resolving the shear stiffness of soft tissues by visualization of synchronized mechanical wave displacement fields. However, magnetic resonance elastography inversions generally assume that the measured tissue motion consists primarily of shear waves propagating in a uniform, infinite medium. This assumption is not valid in organs such as the heart, eye, bladder, skin, fascia, bone and spinal cord, in which the shear wavelength approaches the geometric dimensions of the object. The aim of this study was to develop and test mathematical inversion algorithms capable of resolving shear stiffness from displacement maps of flexural waves propagating in bounded media such as beams, plates, and spherical shells, using geometry-specific equations of motion. Magnetic resonance elastography and finite element modeling of beam, plate, and spherical shell phantoms of various geometries were performed. Mechanical testing of the phantoms agreed with the stiffness values obtained from finite element modeling and magnetic resonance elastography data, and a linear correlation of r(2) >or= 0.99 was observed between the stiffness values obtained using magnetic resonance elastography and finite element modeling data. In conclusion, we have demonstrated new inversion methods for calculating shear stiffness that may be more appropriate for waves propagating in bounded media. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. A balance for dark matter bound states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozzoli, F.

    2017-05-01

    Massive particles with self interactions of the order of 0.2 barn/GeV are intriguing Dark Matter candidates from an astrophysical point of view. Current and past experiments for direct detection of massive Dark Matter particles are focusing to relatively low cross sections with ordinary matter, however they cannot rule out very large cross sections, σ/M > 0.01 barn/GeV, due to atmosphere and material shielding. Cosmology places a strong indirect limit for the presence of large interactions among Dark Matter and baryons in the Universe, however such a limit cannot rule out the existence of a small sub-dominant component of Dark Matter with non negligible interactions with ordinary matter in our galactic halo. Here, the possibility of the existence of bound states with ordinary matter, for a similar Dark Matter candidate with not negligible interactions, is considered. The existence of bound states, with binding energy larger than ∼ 1 meV, would offer the possibility to test in laboratory capture cross sections of the order of a barn (or larger). The signature of the detection for a mass increasing of cryogenic samples, due to the possible particle accumulation, would allow the investigation of these Dark Matter candidates with mass up to the GUT scale. A proof of concept for a possible detection set-up and the evaluation of some noise sources are described.

  9. Achieving Agreement in Three Rounds with Bounded-Byzantine Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahyar, R.

    2017-01-01

    A three-round algorithm is presented that guarantees agreement in a system of K greater than or equal to 3F+1 nodes provided each faulty node induces no more than F faults and each good node experiences no more than F faults, where, F is the maximum number of simultaneous faults in the network. The algorithm is based on the Oral Message algorithm of Lamport, Shostak, and Pease and is scalable with respect to the number of nodes in the system and applies equally to traditional node-fault model as well as the link-fault model. We also present a mechanical verification of the algorithm focusing on verifying the correctness of a bounded model of the algorithm as well as confirming claims of determinism.

  10. Reactivity of Metal Ions Bound to Water-Soluble Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauer, N.N.; Watkins, J.G.; Lin, M.; Birnbaum, E.R.; Robison, T.W.; Smith, B.F.; Gohdes, J.W.; McDonald, J.G.

    1999-06-29

    The intent of this work is to determine the effectiveness of catalysts covalently bound to polymers and to understand the consequences of supporting the catalysts on catalyst efficiency and selectivity. Rhodium phosphine complexes with functional groups for coupling to polymers were prepared. These catalyst precursors were characterized using standard techniques including IR, NMR, and elemental analysis. Studies on the modified catalysts showed that they were still active hydrogenation catalysts. However, tethering of the catalysts to polyamines gave systems with low hydrogenation activity. Analogous biphasic systems were also explored. Phosphine ligands with a surfactant-like structure have been synthesized and used to prepare catalytically active complexes of palladium. The palladium complexes were utilized in Heck-type coupling reactions (e.g. coupling of iodobenzene and ethyl acrylate to produce ethyl cinnamate) under vigorously stirred biphasic reaction conditions, and were found to offer superior performance over a standard water-soluble palladium catalyst under analogous conditions.

  11. On the Applicability of Lower Bounds for Solving Rectilinear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jens; Karisch, Stefan E.; Perregaard, M.

    1998-01-01

    The quadratic assignment problem (QAP) belongs to the hard core of NP-hard optimization problems. After almost forty years of research only relatively small instances can be solved to optimality. The reason is that the quality of the lower bounds available for exact methods is not sufficient....... Recently, lower bounds based on decomposition were proposed for the so called rectilinear QAP that proved to be the strongest for a large class of problem instances. We investigate the strength of these bounds when applied not only at the root node of a search tree but as the bound function used...... in a Branch-and-Bound code solving large scale QAPs....

  12. Degenerate quantum codes and the quantum Hamming bound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvepalli, Pradeep; Klappenecker, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    The parameters of a nondegenerate quantum code must obey the Hamming bound. An important open problem in quantum coding theory is whether the parameters of a degenerate quantum code can violate this bound for nondegenerate quantum codes. In this article we show that Calderbank-Shor-Steane (CSS) codes, over a prime power alphabet q⩾5, cannot beat the quantum Hamming bound. We prove a quantum version of the Griesmer bound for the CSS codes, which allows us to strengthen the Rains’ bound that an [[n,k,d

  13. Self-bound droplets of a dilute magnetic quantum liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt, Matthias; Böttcher, Fabian; Ferrier-Barbut, Igor; Pfau, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    Self-bound many-body systems occur in different scenarios all across the fields of physics. For example in the astrophysical context the stellar classification is based on a detailed balance of attractive self-gravitating forces and repulsive terms e.g. due to Fermi pressure. Also liquid droplets are formed by mutual attractive forces due to covalent or van der Waals attraction and repulsive parts of the inter-particle potential due to the electronic Pauli exclusion principle. Self-bound ensembles of ultracold atoms at densities 100 million times lower than in a helium droplet, the only other quantum liquid known so far, have been suggested. However, they have been elusive up to now as they require more than the usual contact interaction, which is either attractive or repulsive but never both. Based on the recent finding that an unstable bosonic dipolar gas can be stabilized by a repulsive many-body term, which is due to quantum depletion and a corresponding exclusion volume at small distances, it was predict...

  14. Probability bounds analysis for nonlinear population ecology models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enszer, Joshua A; Andrei Măceș, D; Stadtherr, Mark A

    2015-09-01

    Mathematical models in population ecology often involve parameters that are empirically determined and inherently uncertain, with probability distributions for the uncertainties not known precisely. Propagating such imprecise uncertainties rigorously through a model to determine their effect on model outputs can be a challenging problem. We illustrate here a method for the direct propagation of uncertainties represented by probability bounds though nonlinear, continuous-time, dynamic models in population ecology. This makes it possible to determine rigorous bounds on the probability that some specified outcome for a population is achieved, which can be a core problem in ecosystem modeling for risk assessment and management. Results can be obtained at a computational cost that is considerably less than that required by statistical sampling methods such as Monte Carlo analysis. The method is demonstrated using three example systems, with focus on a model of an experimental aquatic food web subject to the effects of contamination by ionic liquids, a new class of potentially important industrial chemicals. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. A sharp upper bound for departure from normality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.L.

    1993-08-01

    The departure from normality of a matrix is a real scalar that is impractical to compute if a matrix is large and its eigenvalues are unknown. A simple formula is presented for computing an upper bound for departure from normality in the Frobenius norm. This new upper bound is cheaper to compute than the upper bound derived by Henrici. Moreover, the new bound is sharp for Hermitian matrices, skew-Hermitian matrices and, in general, any matrix with eigenvalues that are horizontally or vertically aligned in the complex plane. In terms of applications, the new bound can be used in computing bounds for the spectral norm of matrix functions or bounds for the sensitivity of eigenvalues to matrix perturbations.

  16. On the distinguishability and observer design for single-input single-output continuous-time switched affine systems under bounded disturbances with application to chaos-based modulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gómez-Gutiérrez, D.; Renato Vázquez, C.; Čelikovský, Sergej; Ramírez-Trevino, A.; Castillo-Toledo, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2017), s. 49-58 ISSN 0947-3580 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-20433S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Unknown input observers * Chaos-based modulation * Chaotic synchronization * Message-embedding Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 1.944, year: 2016 http:// library .utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/TR/celikovsky-0471410.pdf

  17. Butterfly velocity bound and reverse isoperimetric inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xing-Hui; Lü, H.

    2017-03-01

    We study the butterfly effect of the AdS planar black holes in the framework of Einstein's general relativity. We find that the butterfly velocities can be expressed by a universal formula vB2=T S /(2 VthP ). In doing so, we come upon a near-horizon geometrical formula for the thermodynamical volume Vth . We verify the volume formula by examining a variety of AdS black holes. We also show that the volume formula implies that the conjectured reverse isoperimetric inequality follows straightforwardly from the null-energy condition, for static AdS black holes. The inequality is thus related to an upper bound of the butterfly velocities.

  18. Congeniality bounds on quark masses from nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M. Hossain; Hossain, M. Jakir; Tariq, Abdullah Shams Bin

    2013-08-01

    The work of Jaffe, Jenkins and Kimchi [Phys. Rev. D 79, 065014 (2009)] is revisited to see if indeed the region of congeniality found in their analysis survives further restrictions from nucleosynthesis. It is observed that much of their congenial region disappears when imposing conditions required to produce the correct and required abundances of the primordial elements as well as ensure that stars can continue to burn hydrogen nuclei to form helium as the first step in forming heavier elements in stellar nucleosynthesis. The remaining region is a very narrow slit reduced in width from around 29 MeV found by Jaffe et al. to only about 2.2 MeV in the difference of the nucleon/quark masses. Further bounds on δmq/mq seem to reduce even this narrow slit to the physical point itself.

  19. CBC bound proteins and RNA fate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacometti, Simone

    The cap-binding complex (CBC) plays a pivotal role in post-transcriptional processing events and orchestrates a variety of metabolic pathways, through association with different interaction partners. Two CBC sub-complexes, the CBC-ARS2-PHAX (CBCAP) and the CBC-nuclear exosome targeting (NEXT......) binding varies with the RNA maturation stage, with the CBC being highly enriched on mature mRNA, ARS2/PHAX/ZC3H18/MTR4 less so, and RMB7 preferentially bound to pre-mRNAs; (iv) MTR4 and RBM7 show different specificities, with RBM7 being highly enriched on introns and promoter upstream transcripts (PROMPTs......) complex (CBCN), were recently shown to target capped RNA either toward export or degradation, but the mechanisms by which they can discriminate between different RNA families and route them toward different metabolic pathways still remain unclear. A major question to be answered is how and when...

  20. Helioscope bounds on hidden sector photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, J.

    2007-12-15

    The flux of hypothetical ''hidden photons'' from the Sun is computed under the assumption that they interact with normal matter only through kinetic mixing with the ordinary standard model photon. Requiring that the exotic luminosity is smaller than the standard photon luminosity provides limits for the mixing parameter down to {chi}

  1. Surface-bound states in nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peng; Antonov, Denis; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Bester, Gabriel

    2017-05-01

    We show via ab initio calculations and an electrostatic model that the notoriously low, but positive, electron affinity of bulk diamond becomes negative for hydrogen passivated nanodiamonds and argue that this peculiar situation (type-II offset with a vacuum level at nearly midgap) and the three further conditions: (i) a surface dipole with positive charge on the outside layer, (ii) a spherical symmetry, and (iii) a dielectric mismatch at the surface, results in the emergence of a peculiar type of surface state localized just outside the nanodiamond. These states are referred to as "surface-bound states" and have consequently a strong environmental sensitivity. These type of states should exist in any nanostructure with negative electron affinity. We further quantify the band offsets of different type of nanostructures as well as the exciton binding energy and contrast the results with results for "conventional" silicon quantum dots.

  2. Volume Stability of Bitumen Bound Building Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanaya I.N.A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper covers results of laboratory investigations on the volume stability of masonry units incorporating waste materials bound with bitumen (Bitublocks, due to moisture adsorption, thermal exposure and vacuum saturation. The materials used were steel slag, crushed glass, coal fly ash, and 50 pen bitumen. The samples were produced in hot mix method, compacted, then exposed to moist and temperature. It was found that moisture adsorption from the environment caused the Bitublock to expand. The samples with less intense curing regime experienced lower expansion and became stable faster, and vice versa. Under thermal condition (at 70°C, the samples with less intense curing regime underwent higher expansion, and vice versa. They were also highly reversible. Their volume stability was found unique under water exposure. The expansion on first vacuum saturation cycle was irreversible, then largely reversible on the following cycles.

  3. General bounds in Hybrid Natural Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germán, Gabriel; Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo; Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Sussman, Roberto A.; Tapia, José

    2017-12-01

    Recently we have studied in great detail a model of Hybrid Natural Inflation (HNI) by constructing two simple effective field theories. These two versions of the model allow inflationary energy scales as small as the electroweak scale in one of them or as large as the Grand Unification scale in the other, therefore covering the whole range of possible energy scales. In any case the inflationary sector of the model is of the form V(phi)=V0 (1+a cos(phi/f)) where 0<= a<1 and the end of inflation is triggered by an independent waterfall field. One interesting characteristic of this model is that the slow-roll parameter epsilon(phi) is a non-monotonic function of phi presenting a maximum close to the inflection point of the potential. Because the scalar spectrum Script Ps(k) of density fluctuations when written in terms of the potential is inversely proportional to epsilon(phi) we find that Script Ps(k) presents a minimum at phimin. The origin of the HNI potential can be traced to a symmetry breaking phenomenon occurring at some energy scale f which gives rise to a (massless) Goldstone boson. Non-perturbative physics at some temperature Tbounded by the symmetry breaking scale, Δ≡ VH1/4 bounds for the inflationary energy scale Δ and for the tensor-to-scalar ratio r.

  4. Coherent structures in wall-bounded turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, David J C

    2015-01-01

    The inherent difficulty of understanding turbulence has led to researchers attacking the topic in many different ways over the years of turbulence research. Some approaches have been more successful than others, but most only deal with part of the problem. One approach that has seen reasonable success (or at least popularity) is that of attempting to deconstruct the complex and disorganised turbulent flow field into to a set of motions that are in some way organised. These motions are generally called "coherent structures". There are several strands to this approach, from identifying the coherent structures within the flow, defining their characteristics, explaining how they are created, sustained and destroyed, to utilising their features to model the turbulent flow. This review considers research on coherent structures in wall-bounded turbulent flows: a class of flow which is extremely interesting to many scientists (mainly, but not exclusively, physicists and engineers) due to their prevalence in nature, industry and everyday life. This area has seen a lot of activity, particularly in recent years, much of which has been driven by advances in experimental and computational techniques. However, several ideas, developed many years ago based on flow visualisation and intuition, are still both informative and relevant. Indeed, much of the more recent research is firmly indebted to some of the early pioneers of the coherent structures approach. Therefore, in this review, selected historical research is discussed along with the more contemporary advances in an attempt to provide the reader with a good overview of how the field has developed and to highlight the perspicacity of some of the early researchers, as well as providing an overview of our current understanding of the role of coherent structures in wall-bounded turbulent flows.

  5. Coherent structures in wall-bounded turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J.C. Dennis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The inherent difficulty of understanding turbulence has led to researchers attacking the topic in many different ways over the years of turbulence research. Some approaches have been more successful than others, but most only deal with part of the problem. One approach that has seen reasonable success (or at least popularity is that of attempting to deconstruct the complex and disorganised turbulent flow field into to a set of motions that are in some way organised. These motions are generally called "coherent structures". There are several strands to this approach, from identifying the coherent structures within the flow, defining their characteristics, explaining how they are created, sustained and destroyed, to utilising their features to model the turbulent flow. This review considers research on coherent structures in wall-bounded turbulent flows: a class of flow which is extremely interesting to many scientists (mainly, but not exclusively, physicists and engineers due to their prevalence in nature, industry and everyday life. This area has seen a lot of activity, particularly in recent years, much of which has been driven by advances in experimental and computational techniques. However, several ideas, developed many years ago based on flow visualisation and intuition, are still both informative and relevant. Indeed, much of the more recent research is firmly indebted to some of the early pioneers of the coherent structures approach. Therefore, in this review, selected historical research is discussed along with the more contemporary advances in an attempt to provide the reader with a good overview of how the field has developed and to highlight the perspicacity of some of the early researchers, as well as providing an overview of our current understanding of the role of coherent structures in wall-bounded turbulent flows.

  6. Towards an Inclusive Virtual Dressing Room for Wheelchair-Bound Customers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis; Petersson, Eva

    2014-01-01

    , at a reported approximately 40%, is crippling the clothing industry. Results from public response surveys (including at The Scandinavian Health & Rehab Messe) to a VDR simulation system clearly indicated how the wheelchair-bound community perceived benefits from the system. This was unexpected and aside from...... product. This resulted in additional surveys and the evolution of this additional work-in-progress. Following introducing the VDR, key issues such as interface design, body measurement, and cloth representation in the VDR is discussed. The finding of wheelchair-bound-need is envisioned as a next...

  7. Lieb-Robinson bounds for multi-commutators and applications to response theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bru, J -B

    2017-01-01

    Lieb-Robinson bounds for multi-commutators are effective mathematical tools to handle analytic aspects of infinite volume dynamics of non-relativistic quantum particles with short-range, possibly time-dependent interactions. In particular, the existence of fundamental solutions is shown for those (non-autonomous) C*-dynamical systems for which the usual conditions found in standard theories of (parabolic or hyperbolic) non-autonomous evolution equations are not given. In mathematical physics, bounds on multi-commutators of an order higher than two can be used to study linear and non-linear responses of interacting particles to external perturbations. These bounds are derived for lattice fermions, in view of applications to microscopic quantum theory of electrical conduction discussed in this book. All results also apply to quantum spin systems, with obvious modifications. In order to make the results accessible to a wide audience, in particular to students in mathematics with little Physics background, basics...

  8. Full counting statistics approach to the quantum non-equilibrium Landauer bound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Giacomo; Campbell, Steve; Goold, John; Pigeon, Simon; Vacchini, Bassano; Paternostro, Mauro

    2017-10-01

    We develop the full counting statistics of dissipated heat to explore the relation with Landauer’s principle. Combining the two-time measurement protocol for the reconstruction of the statistics of heat with the minimal set of assumptions for Landauer’s principle to hold, we derive a general one-parameter family of upper and lower bounds on the mean dissipated heat from a system to its environment. Furthermore, we establish a connection with the degree of non-unitality of the system’s dynamics and show that, if a large deviation function exists as stationary limit of the above cumulant generating function, then our family of lower and upper bounds can be used to witness and understand first-order dynamical phase transitions. For the purpose of demonstration, we apply these bounds to an externally pumped three level system coupled to a finite sized thermal environment.

  9. Bounded Semantics of CTL and SAT-Based Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenhui

    Bounded model checking has been proposed as a complementary approach to BDD based symbolic model checking for combating the state explosion problem, esp. for efficient error detection. This has led to a lot of successful work with respect to error detection in the checking of LTL, ACTL (the universal fragment of CTL) and ACTL* properties by satisfiability testing. The use of bounded model checking for verification (in contrast to error detection) of LTL and ACTL properties has later also been studied. This paper studies the potentials and limitations of bounded model checking for the verification of CTL and CTL* formulas. On the theoretical side, we first provide a framework for discussion of bounded semantics, which serves as the basis for bounded model checking, then extend the bounded semantics of ACTL to a bounded semantics of CTL, and discuss the limitation of developing such a bounded semantics for CTL*. On the practical side, a deduction of a SAT-based bounded model checking approach for ACTL properties from the bounded semantics of CTL is demonstrated, and a comparison of such an approach with BDD-based model checking is presented based on experimental results.

  10. Free-Space Optical Communications: Capacity Bounds, Approximations, and a New Sphere-Packing Perspective

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2015-04-01

    The capacity of the intensity-modulation direct-detection (IM-DD) free-space optical channel is studied. It is shown that for an IM-DD channel with generally input-dependent noise, the worst noise at high SNR is input-independent Gaussian with variance dependent on the input cost. Based on this result, a Gaussian IM-DD channel model is proposed where the noise variance depends on the optical intensity constraints only. A new recursive approach for bounding the capacity of the channel based on sphere-packing is proposed, which leads to a tighter bound than an existing sphere-packing bound for the channel with only an average intensity constraint. Under both average and peak constraints, it yields bounds that characterize the high SNR capacity within a negligible gap, where the achievability is proved by using a truncated Gaussian input distribution. This completes the high SNR capacity characterization of the channel, by closing the gap in the existing characterization for a small average-to-peak ratio. Simple fitting functions that capture the best known achievable rate for the channel are provided. These functions can be of significant practical importance especially for the study of systems operating under atmospheric turbulence and misalignment conditions. Finally, the capacity/SNR loss between heterodyne detection (HD) systems and IM-DD systems is bounded at high SNR, where it is shown that the loss grows as SNR increases for a complex-valued HD system, while it is bounded by 1.245 bits or 3.76 dB at most for a real-valued one.

  11. Formation Control of Robotic Swarm Using Bounded Artificial Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Qin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Formation control of multirobot systems has drawn significant attention in the recent years. This paper presents a potential field control algorithm, navigating a swarm of robots into a predefined 2D shape while avoiding intermember collisions. The algorithm applies in both stationary and moving targets formation. We define the bounded artificial forces in the form of exponential functions, so that the behavior of the swarm drove by the forces can be adjusted via selecting proper control parameters. The theoretical analysis of the swarm behavior proves the stability and convergence properties of the algorithm. We further make certain modifications upon the forces to improve the robustness of the swarm behavior in the presence of realistic implementation considerations. The considerations include obstacle avoidance, local minima, and deformation of the shape. Finally, detailed simulation results validate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm, and the direction of possible futrue work is discussed in the conclusions.

  12. Helical liquids and Majorana bound states in quantum wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreg, Yuval; Refael, Gil; von Oppen, Felix

    2010-10-22

    We show that the combination of spin-orbit coupling with a Zeeman field or strong interactions may lead to the formation of a helical electron liquid in single-channel quantum wires, with spin and velocity perfectly correlated. We argue that zero-energy Majorana bound states are formed in various situations when such wires are situated in proximity to a conventional s-wave superconductor. This occurs when the external magnetic field, the superconducting gap, or, most simply, the chemical potential vary along the wire. These Majorana states do not require the presence of a vortex in the system. Experimental consequences of the helical liquid and the Majorana states are also discussed.

  13. Nonvalence Correlation-Bound Anion States of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voora, Vamsee K; Jordan, Kenneth D

    2015-10-15

    In this work, we characterize the nonvalence correlation-bound anion states of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. Unlike the analogous image potential states of graphene that localize the charge density of the excess electron above and below the plane of the sheet, we find that for PAHs, much of the charge distribution of the excess electron is localized around the periphery of the molecule. This is a consequence of the electrostatic interaction of the electron with the polar CH groups. By replacing the H atoms by F atoms or the CH groups by N atoms, the charge density of the excess electron shifts from the periphery to above and below the plane of the ring systems.

  14. Scalability under a Power Bound using the GREMLINs Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiterth, Matthias [Ludwig Maximilian Univ., Munich (Germany)

    2015-02-16

    With the move towards exascale, system and software developers will have to deal with issues of extreme parallelism. The system properties affected most by the increase in node and core count are the shared resources on node and across the system. The increase in parallelism leads to reduced memory and bandwidth when regarding individual cores. Since power is a limiting factor for supercomputers, and power is not fully utilized in current systems, overprovisioning compute resources is a viable approach to maximized power utilization. To maximize system performance in regard to these changing conditions, it is necessary to understand how resource restrictions impact performance and system behavior. For the purpose of understanding anticipated system properties the GREMLINs Framework was developed. The framework gives the opportunity to add power restrictions, hinder memory properties and introduce faults to study resilience, among others. These features give the opportunity to use current petascale technology to study problems system designers and software developers will have to face when moving towards exascale and beyond. This work describes the initial release of the GREMLINs Framework, developed for this work, and shows how it can be used to study the scaling behavior of proxy applications. These proxy applications represent a selection of HPC workloads important to the scientific community. The proxy applications studied are AMG2013, an algebraic multi-grid linear system solver, CoMD, a classical molecular dynamics proxy application and NEKBONE, an application that uses a high order spectral element method to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. The main interest of these studies lies in analysis regarding their power behavior at scale under a power bound. These findings show how the GREMLINs Framework can help systems and software designers to attain better application performance and can also be used as basis for CPU power balancing tools to use power more

  15. The neural basis of bounded rational behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coricelli, Giorgio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bounded rational behaviour is commonly observed in experimental games and in real life situations. Neuroeconomics can help to understand the mental processing underlying bounded rationality and out-of-equilibrium behaviour. Here we report results from recent studies on the neural basis of limited steps of reasoning in a competitive setting —the beauty contest game. We use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to study the neural correlates of human mental processes in strategic games. We apply a cognitive hierarchy model to classify subject’s choices in the experimental game according to the degree of strategic reasoning so that we can identify the neural substrates of different levels of strategizing. We found a correlation between levels of strategic reasoning and activity in a neural network related to mentalizing, i.e. the ability to think about other’s thoughts and mental states. Moreover, brain data showed how complex cognitive processes subserve the higher level of reasoning about others. We describe how a cognitive hierarchy model fits both behavioural and brain data.

    La racionalidad limitada es un fenómeno observado de manera frecuente tanto en juegos experimentales como en situaciones cotidianas. La Neuroeconomía puede mejorar la comprensión de los procesos mentales que caracterizan la racionalidad limitada; en paralelo nos puede ayudar a comprender comportamientos que violan el equilibrio. Nuestro trabajo presenta resultados recientes sobre la bases neuronales del razonamiento estratégico (y sus límite en juegos competitivos —como el juego del “beauty contest”. Estudiamos las bases neuronales del comportamiento estratégico en juegos con interacción entre sujetos usando resonancia magnética funcional (fMRI. Las decisiones de los participantes se clasifican acorde al grado de razonamiento estratégico: el llamado modelo de Jerarquías Cognitivas. Los resultados muestran una correlación entre niveles de

  16. Bounds on Threshold of Regular Random $k$-SAT

    CERN Document Server

    Rathi, Vishwambhar; Rasmussen, Lars; Skoglund, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    We consider the regular model of formula generation in conjunctive normal form (CNF) introduced by Boufkhad et. al. We derive an upper bound on the satisfiability threshold and NAE-satisfiability threshold for regular random $k$-SAT for any $k \\geq 3$. We show that these bounds matches with the corresponding bound for the uniform model of formula generation. We derive lower bound on the threshold by applying the second moment method to the number of satisfying assignments. For large $k$, we note that the obtained lower bounds on the threshold of a regular random formula converges to the lower bound obtained for the uniform model. Thus, we answer the question posed in \\cite{AcM06} regarding the performance of the second moment method for regular random formulas.

  17. Persistence-Based Branch Misprediction Bounds for WCET Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puffitsch, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Branch prediction is an important feature of pipelined processors to achieve high performance. However, it can lead to overly pessimistic worst-case execution time (WCET) bounds when being modeled too conservatively. This paper presents bounds on the number of branch mispredictions for local...... linear programming formulations of the WCET problem. An evaluation on a number of benchmarks shows that with these bounds, dynamic branch prediction does not necessarily lead to higher WCET bounds than static prediction schemes....... dynamic branch predictors. To handle interferences between branch instructions we use the notion of persistence, a concept that is also found in cache analyses. The bounds apply to branches in general, not only to branches that close a loop. Furthermore, the bounds can be easily integrated into integer...

  18. Prospects and risks of future network-bound supply systems. A multi-criteria procedure for the assessment of future scenarios; Chancen und Risiken zukuenftiger netzgebundener Versorgung. Ein multi-kriterielles Verfahren zur Bewertung von Zukunftsszenarien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karger, C.R.; Hennings, W.; Jaeger, T.

    2006-07-01

    Shaping the developments of network-based supply systems is a difficult challenge in the context of preparing for the future. The structures for supplying the public with the basic goods electricity, gas and water, and also telecommunication services, have become the subject of public debates. A sustainable future for the supplies is being sought: measures for protecting the climate have been requested; citizens have committed themselves to opposing not only planned power stations, and coal mining, but also wind power plants; energy resources like coal, oil and natural gas are becoming scarce and expensive. At the same time, the supply utilities must meet the challenges of privatization, market openings and globalization. The pressure of high costs necessitates savings. The question is which choices are open within the framework of these determining factors. Setting the course for a sustainable future supply means that a method is needed for diagnosing the opportunities and risks of future developments as early as possible and for leveling out promising paths. The bases upon which decisions are made should be as transparent as possible and hence be easy to understand and put into action. lt is against this background that this study looks at specific options for the future and uses this as a basis for developing a method which tries to answer the question ''What is it that we want?''. It is not about an abstract discussion of the sustainability of future supplies or the contribution of specific technologies to sustainability, but about views of the future of supplies with respect to all societal aspects, with reference to which specific objectives are discussed, the pros and cons of which are weighed up, and regarding which the expected conflicts and potentials for reaching a consensus are leveled out. The essential features of this method are the multiple stages involved and the inclusion of science and society. Scientific and societal actors

  19. Upper bounds on minimum cardinality of exact and approximate reducts

    KAUST Repository

    Chikalov, Igor

    2010-01-01

    In the paper, we consider the notions of exact and approximate decision reducts for binary decision tables. We present upper bounds on minimum cardinality of exact and approximate reducts depending on the number of rows (objects) in the decision table. We show that the bound for exact reducts is unimprovable in the general case, and the bound for approximate reducts is almost unimprovable in the general case. © 2010 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  20. NITRO MUSK BOUND TO CARP HEMOGLOBIN ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitroaromatic compounds including synthetic nitro musks are important raw materials and intermediates in the synthesis of explosives, dyes, and pesticides, pharmaceutical and personal care-products (PPCPs). The nitro musks such as musk xylene (MX) and musk ketone (MK) are extensively used as fragrance ingredients in PPCPs and other commercial toiletries. Identification and quantification of a bound 4-amino-MX (4-AMX) metabolite as well as a 2- amino-MK (2-AMK) metabolite were carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry' (GC/MS), with selected ion monitoring (SIM) in both the electron ionization (ElMS) and electron capture (EC) negative ion chemical ionization (NICIMS) modes. Detection of 4-AMX and 2-AMK occurred after the cysteine adducts in carp hemoglobin, derived from the nitroso metabolites, were released by alkaline hydrolysis. The released metabolites were extracted into n-hexane. The extract was preconcentrated by evaporation, and analyzed by GC-SIM-MS. A comparison between the El and EC approaches was made. EC NICIMS detected both metabolites whereas only 4-AMX was detected by ElMS. The EC NICIMS approach exhibited fewer matrix responses and provided a lower detection limit. Quantitation in both approaches was based on internal standard and a calibration plot. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Q

  1. Organically bound tritium analysis in environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baglan, N. [CEA/DAM/DIF, Arpajon (France); Kim, S.B. [AECL, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Cossonnet, C. [IRSN/PRP-ENV/STEME/LMRE, Orsay (France); Croudace, I.W.; Warwick, P.E. [GAU-Radioanalytical, University of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom); Fournier, M. [IRSN/DG/DMQ, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Galeriu, D. [IFIN-HH, Horia-Hulubei, Inst. Phys. and Nucl. Eng., Bucharest (Romania); Momoshima, N. [Kyushu University, Radioisotope Ctr., Fukuoka (Japan); Ansoborlo, E. [CEA/DEN/DRCP/CETAMA, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2015-03-15

    Organically bound tritium (OBT) has become of increased interest within the last decade, with a focus on its behaviour and also its analysis, which are important to assess tritium distribution in the environment. In contrast, there are no certified reference materials and no standard analytical method through the international organization related to OBT. In order to resolve this issue, an OBT international working group was created in May 2012. Over 20 labs from around the world participated and submitted their results for the first intercomparison exercise results on potato (Sep 2013). The samples, specially-prepared potatoes, were provided in March 2013 to each participant. Technical information and results from this first exercise are discussed here for all the labs which have realised the five replicates necessary to allow a reliable statistical treatment. The results are encouraging as the increased number of participating labs did not degrade the observed dispersion of the results for a similar activity level. Therefore, the results do not seem to depend on the analytical procedure used. From this work an optimised procedure can start to be developed to deal with OBT analysis and will guide subsequent planned OBT trials by the international group.

  2. Dynamics of water bound to crystalline cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Neill, Hugh; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Petridis, Loukas; He, Junhong; Mamontov, Eugene; Hong, Liang; Urban, Volker; Evans, Barbara; Langan, Paul; Smith, Jeremy C.; Davison, Brian H.

    2017-09-19

    Interactions of water with cellulose are of both fundamental and technological importance. Here, we characterize the properties of water associated with cellulose using deuterium labeling, neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering provided quantitative details about the dynamical relaxation processes that occur and was supported by structural characterization using small-angle neutron scattering and X-ray diffraction. We can unambiguously detect two populations of water associated with cellulose. The first is “non-freezing bound” water that gradually becomes mobile with increasing temperature and can be related to surface water. The second population is consistent with confined water that abruptly becomes mobile at ~260 K, and can be attributed to water that accumulates in the narrow spaces between the microfibrils. Quantitative analysis of the QENS data showed that, at 250 K, the water diffusion coefficient was 0.85 ± 0.04 × 10-10 m2sec-1 and increased to 1.77 ± 0.09 × 10-10 m2sec-1 at 265 K. MD simulations are in excellent agreement with the experiments and support the interpretation that water associated with cellulose exists in two dynamical populations. Our results provide clarity to previous work investigating the states of bound water and provide a new approach for probing water interactions with lignocellulose materials.

  3. Decision theory with resource-bounded agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Joseph Y; Pass, Rafael; Seeman, Lior

    2014-04-01

    There have been two major lines of research aimed at capturing resource-bounded players in game theory. The first, initiated by Rubinstein (), charges an agent for doing costly computation; the second, initiated by Neyman (), does not charge for computation, but limits the computation that agents can do, typically by modeling agents as finite automata. We review recent work on applying both approaches in the context of decision theory. For the first approach, we take the objects of choice in a decision problem to be Turing machines, and charge players for the "complexity" of the Turing machine chosen (e.g., its running time). This approach can be used to explain well-known phenomena like first-impression-matters biases (i.e., people tend to put more weight on evidence they hear early on) and belief polarization (two people with different prior beliefs, hearing the same evidence, can end up with diametrically opposed conclusions) as the outcomes of quite rational decisions. For the second approach, we model people as finite automata, and provide a simple algorithm that, on a problem that captures a number of settings of interest, provably performs optimally as the number of states in the automaton increases. Copyright © 2014 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  4. Neutron bound beta-decay: BOB

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrew, Josephine; Paul, Stephan; Emmerich, Ralf; Engels, Ralf; Fierlinger, Peter; Gabriel, Mirko; Gutsmiedl, Erwin; Mellenthin, Johannes; Schön, Johannes; Schott, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Andreas; Grüenauer, Florian; Röhrmoser, Anton

    2012-05-01

    An experiment to observe the bound beta-decay (BOB) of the free neutron into a hydrogen atom and an electron anti-neutrino is described. The hyperfine spin state population of the monoenergetic hydrogen atom yields the neutrino left-handedness or possible right-handed admixture as well as possible small scalar and tensor contributions to the weak force. The BOB H(2s) hyperfine states can be separated with a Lamb-Shift Spin Filter. These monoenergetic H(2s) atoms are ionised into H- by charge exchanging within an argon cell. These ions are then separated using an adaptation of a MAC-E Filter. A first experiment is proposed at the FRMII high thermal-neutron flux beam reactor SR6 through-going beam tube, where we will seek to observe this rare neutron decay-mode for the first time and determine the branching ratio. After successful completion, the hyperfine spin state population will be determined, possibly at the ILL high-flux beam reactor through-going beam tube H6-H7, where the thermal neutron flux is a factor of four larger.

  5. Bound state in positron scattering by allene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Sanchez, Sergio d'Almeida; Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2017-12-01

    We report integral and differential cross sections for positron collisions with allene, calculated with the Schwinger multichannel method. The cross sections were computed in the static-polarization approximation for energies up to 7 eV. We have tested a series of single-particle basis sets and different polarization schemes to improve the description of low-energy positron scattering by the allene molecule. We have found that the use of extra centers with no net charge with additional single-particle s - and p -type functions centered at them are essential in order to accurately reproduce the polarization potential and, hence, obtain proper scattering cross sections. The choice of the allene molecule was due to the fact that it is a highly symmetric molecule with no permanent dipole moment and would allow several different calculations. Our cross sections are compared to the available experimental data for the total cross section with a reasonable agreement after correcting their results due to the low angular discrimination of their apparatus. Also, a virtual state was observed in the integral cross section that became a bound state when the description of the polarization potential is improved. We also observed a Ramsauer-Townsend minimum in the cross section whose location varies from 2.7 to 3.4 eV, depending on the polarization scheme used in the calculations.

  6. Search for a SM Higgs boson in the H → Z*Z → ℓ+ℓ−qq̅ channel in the mass range 120 - 180 GeV with the ATLAS Detector at √s = 7 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zurzolo Giovanni

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A summary of the first study is given for the decay channel H → Z*Z → ℓ+ℓ−qq̅ (ℓ = e, μ in the Higgs boson mass range 120 - 180 GeV, using the pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at √s = 7 TeV at the LHC. Data driven methods to estimate the background and new techniques to improve the mass resolution of the hadronic Z boson decay are used. Events with 0 or 1 b-jets and events with 2 b-jets are treated as separated channels. No significant excess of events above the estimated background is observed; upper limits at 95% C.L. on the Higgs production cross section are derived.

  7. Classical Physics and the Bounds of Quantum Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frustaglia, Diego; Baltanás, José P; Velázquez-Ahumada, María C; Fernández-Prieto, Armando; Lujambio, Aintzane; Losada, Vicente; Freire, Manuel J; Cabello, Adán

    2016-06-24

    A unifying principle explaining the numerical bounds of quantum correlations remains elusive, despite the efforts devoted to identifying it. Here, we show that these bounds are indeed not exclusive to quantum theory: for any abstract correlation scenario with compatible measurements, models based on classical waves produce probability distributions indistinguishable from those of quantum theory and, therefore, share the same bounds. We demonstrate this finding by implementing classical microwaves that propagate along meter-size transmission-line circuits and reproduce the probabilities of three emblematic quantum experiments. Our results show that the "quantum" bounds would also occur in a classical universe without quanta. The implications of this observation are discussed.

  8. What Information Theory Says about Bounded Rational Best Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2005-01-01

    Probability Collectives (PC) provides the information-theoretic extension of conventional full-rationality game theory to bounded rational games. Here an explicit solution to the equations giving the bounded rationality equilibrium of a game is presented. Then PC is used to investigate games in which the players use bounded rational best-response strategies. Next it is shown that in the continuum-time limit, bounded rational best response games result in a variant of the replicator dynamics of evolutionary game theory. It is then shown that for team (shared-payoff) games, this variant of replicator dynamics is identical to Newton-Raphson iterative optimization of the shared utility function.

  9. A root-bound index for evaluating planting stock quality of container ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pot-binding can adversely affect the performance of container-grown stock. One factor that affects potbinding is the size of the root system in relation to the size of the container. The aim of this study was to determine if an objective root-bound index (RBI) would be useful when evaluating the quality of pines grown in various ...

  10. A discrete spherical X-ray transform of orientation distribution functions using bounding cubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazantsev, Ivan G; Schmidt, Søren; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2009-01-01

    is proposed. The circle's parts in each frustum are gnomonically mapped into line segments inside the bounding cubes. The line segments constitute a convex polygon with vertexes indicating frustum exit–entry points. Thus the problem of system matrix calculation is reduced to the tracing of line segments...

  11. 41 CFR 102-118.30 - Are Government corporations bound by this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Are Government corporations bound by this part? 102-118.30 Section 102-118.30 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION TRANSPORTATION 118...

  12. S-matrix method for the numerical determination of bound states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Madan, R. N.

    1973-01-01

    A rapid numerical technique for the determination of bound states of a partial-wave-projected Schroedinger equation is presented. First, one needs to integrate the equation only outwards as in the scattering case, and second, the number of trials necessary to determine the eigenenergy and the corresponding eigenfunction is considerably less than in the usual method. As a nontrivial example of the technique, bound states are calculated in the exchange approximation for the e-/He+ system and l equals 1 partial wave.

  13. Study of BB ¯*/DD ¯* bound states in a Bethe-Salpeter approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun

    2014-10-01

    In this work the BB ¯*/DD ¯* system is studied in the Bethe-Salpeter approach with quasipotential approximation. In our calculation both direct and cross diagrams are included in the one-boson-exchange potential. The numerical results indicate the existence of an isoscalar bound state DD ¯* with JPC=1++, which may be related to the X(3872). In the isovector sector, no bound state is produced from the interactions of DD ¯* and BB ¯*, which suggests the molecular state explanations for Zb(10610) and Zc(3900) are excluded.

  14. Are culture-bound syndromes as real as universally-occurring disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Rachel

    2010-12-01

    This paper asks what it means to say that a disorder is a "real" disorder and then considers whether culture-bound syndromes are real disorders. Following J.L. Austin I note that when we ask whether some supposed culture-bound syndrome is a real disorder we should start by specifying what possible alternatives we have in mind. We might be asking whether the reported behaviours genuinely occur, that is, whether the culture-bound syndrome is a genuine phenomenon as opposed to a myth. We might be wondering whether the condition should rightly be considered a disorder, as opposed to some sort of non-disorder condition (for example, a non-disorder form of deviance, or a potentially valuable condition). We might want to know whether the culture-bound syndrome is really a distinct disorder, in the sense that scientific classification systems should include it as a separate category, or whether it is just a variant of a universally occurring disorder. I argue that some specific difficulties can arise with determining whether a culture-bound syndrome is a real disorder in each of these three senses. However, the frequent assumption that real disorders will necessarily occur universally, and that those that occur only in certain environments are suspicious is not generally justified. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Heavy quark bound states in a quark–gluon plasma: Dissociation and recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul, E-mail: jean-paul.blaizot@cea.fr [Institut de Physique Théorique (IPhT), CNRS/UMR 3681, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); De Boni, Davide [Department of Physics, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP, Wales (United Kingdom); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, Povo (Trento) 38123 (Italy); Faccioli, Pietro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, Povo (Trento) 38123 (Italy); INFN-TIFPA, Via Sommarive 14, Povo (Trento) 38123 (Italy); Garberoglio, Giovanni [ECT*-FBK, Via Sommarive 18, Povo (Trento) 38123 (Italy); INFN-TIFPA, Via Sommarive 14, Povo (Trento) 38123 (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    We present a comprehensive approach to the dynamics of heavy quarks in a quark–gluon plasma, including the possibility of bound state formation and dissociation. In this exploratory paper, we restrict ourselves to the case of an Abelian plasma, but the extension of the techniques used to the non-Abelian case is doable. A chain of well defined approximations leads eventually to a generalized Langevin equation, where the force and the noise terms are determined from a correlation function of the equilibrium plasma, and depend explicitly on the configuration of the heavy quarks. We solve the Langevin equation for various initial conditions, numbers of heavy quark–antiquark pairs and temperatures of the plasma. Results of simulations illustrate several expected phenomena: dissociation of bound states as a result of combined effects of screening of the potential and collisions with the plasma constituent, formation of bound pairs (recombination) that occurs when enough heavy quarks are present in the system.

  16. Shell-model description of weakly bound and unbound nuclear states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, N. [University of Tennessee, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Physics Division, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nazarewicz, W. [University of Tennessee, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Physics Division, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Warsaw University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Ploszajczak, M.; Rotureau, J. [CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), Caen (France)

    2005-09-01

    A consistent description of weakly bound and unbound nuclei requires an accurate description of the particle continuum properties when carrying out multiconfiguration mixing. This is the domain of the Gamow Shell Model (GSM) which is the multiconfigurational shell model in the complex k-plane formulated using a complete Berggren ensemble representing bound single-particle (s.p.) states, s.p. resonances, and non-resonant complex energy continuum states. We discuss the salient features of effective interactions in weakly bound systems and show selected applications of the GSM formalism to p-shell nuclei. Finally, a development of the new non-perturbative scheme based on Density Matrix Renormalization Group methods to select the most significant continuum configurations in GSM calculations is discussed shortly. (orig.)

  17. Transition from Optical Bound States in the Continuum to Leaky Resonances: Role of Substrate and Roughness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadrieva, Zarina F.; Sinev, Ivan S.; Koshelev, Kirill L.

    2017-01-01

    into resonant states due to leakage into the diffraction channels opening in the substrate. We show how two concurrent loss mechanisms, scattering due to surface roughness and leakage into substrate, contribute to the suppression of the resonance lifetime and specify the condition when one of the mechanisms......Optical bound states in the continuum (BIC) are localized states with energy lying above the light line and having infinite lifetime. Any losses taking place in real systems result in transformation of the bound states into resonant states with finite lifetime. In this Letter, we analyze properties...... becomes dominant. The obtained results provide useful guidelines for practical implementations of structures supporting optical bound states in the continuum....

  18. Lasing action from photonic bound states in continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodigala, Ashok; Lepetit, Thomas; Gu, Qing; Bahari, Babak; Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Kanté, Boubacar

    2017-01-01

    In 1929, only three years after the advent of quantum mechanics, von Neumann and Wigner showed that Schrödinger’s equation can have bound states above the continuum threshold. These peculiar states, called bound states in the continuum (BICs), manifest themselves as resonances that do not decay. For several decades afterwards the idea lay dormant, regarded primarily as a mathematical curiosity. In 1977, Herrick and Stillinger revived interest in BICs when they suggested that BICs could be observed in semiconductor superlattices. BICs arise naturally from Feshbach’s quantum mechanical theory of resonances, as explained by Friedrich and Wintgen, and are thus more physical than initially realized. Recently, it was realized that BICs are intrinsically a wave phenomenon and are thus not restricted to the realm of quantum mechanics. They have since been shown to occur in many different fields of wave physics including acoustics, microwaves and nanophotonics. However, experimental observations of BICs have been limited to passive systems and the realization of BIC lasers has remained elusive. Here we report, at room temperature, lasing action from an optically pumped BIC cavity. Our results show that the lasing wavelength of the fabricated BIC cavities, each made of an array of cylindrical nanoresonators suspended in air, scales with the radii of the nanoresonators according to the theoretical prediction for the BIC mode. Moreover, lasing action from the designed BIC cavity persists even after scaling down the array to as few as 8-by-8 nanoresonators. BIC lasers open up new avenues in the study of light-matter interaction because they are intrinsically connected to topological charges and represent natural vector beam sources (that is, there are several possible beam shapes), which are highly sought after in the fields of optical trapping, biological sensing and quantum information.

  19. Is regional species diversity bounded or unbounded?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Howard V

    2013-02-01

    Two conflicting hypotheses have been proposed to explain large-scale species diversity patterns and dynamics. The unbounded hypothesis proposes that regional diversity depends only on time and diversification rate and increases without limit. The bounded hypothesis proposes that ecological constraints place upper limits on regional diversity and that diversity is usually close to its limit. Recent evidence from the fossil record, phylogenetic analysis, biogeography, and phenotypic disparity during lineage diversification suggests that diversity is constrained by ecological processes but that it is rarely asymptotic. Niche space is often unfilled or can be more finely subdivided and still permit coexistence, and new niche space is often created before ecological limits are reached. Damped increases in diversity over time are the prevalent pattern, suggesting the need for a new 'damped increase hypothesis'. The damped increase hypothesis predicts that diversity generally increases through time but that its rate of increase is often slowed by ecological constraints. However, slowing due to niche limitation must be distinguished from other possible mechanisms creating similar patterns. These include sampling artifacts, the inability to detect extinctions or declines in clade diversity with some methods, the distorting effects of correlated speciation-extinction dynamics, the likelihood that opportunities for allopatric speciation will vary in space and time, and the role of undetected natural enemies in reducing host ranges and thus slowing speciation rates. The taxonomic scope of regional diversity studies must be broadened to include all ecologically similar species so that ecological constraints may be accurately inferred. The damped increase hypothesis suggests that information on evolutionary processes such as time-for-speciation and intrinsic diversification rates as well as ecological factors will be required to explain why regional diversity varies among times

  20. Structure Biology of Membrane Bound Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Dax [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). School of Medicine. Dept. of Physiology

    2016-11-30

    The overall goal of the proposed research is to understand the membrane-associated active processes catalyzed by an alkane $\\square$-hydroxylase (AlkB) from eubacterium Pseudomonase oleovorans. AlkB performs oxygenation of unactivated hydrocarbons found in crude oils. The enzymatic reaction involves energy-demanding steps in the membrane with the uses of structurally unknown metal active sites featuring a diiron [FeFe] center. At present, a critical barrier to understanding the membrane-associated reaction mechanism is the lack of structural information. The structural biology efforts have been challenged by technical difficulties commonly encountered in crystallization and structural determination of membrane proteins. The specific aims of the current budget cycle are to crystalize AlkB and initiate X-ray analysis to set the stage for structural determination. The long-term goals of our structural biology efforts are to provide an atomic description of AlkB structure, and to uncover the mechanisms of selective modification of hydrocarbons. The structural information will help elucidating how the unactivated C-H bonds of saturated hydrocarbons are oxidized to initiate biodegradation and biotransformation processes. The knowledge gained will be fundamental to biotechnological applications to biofuel transformation of non-edible oil feedstock. Renewable biodiesel is a promising energy carry that can be used to reduce fossil fuel dependency. The proposed research capitalizes on prior BES-supported efforts on over-expression and purification of AlkB to explore the inner workings of a bioenergy-relevant membrane-bound enzyme.

  1. Electron transfer between the heme bound oxygen and the tetrahydrobiopterin cofactor of nitric oxide synthase: a DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menyhárd, Dóra K.

    2004-07-01

    Nitric oxide is synthesized from L-Arg by nitric oxide synthases (NOSs). DFT calculations carried out in the present study demonstrate that there is direct coupling between the heme bound oxygen and the tetrahydrobiopterin (H 4B) cofactor in the activated state of NOS. Results indicate that radicalization of H 4B causes the coupled reduction of heme bound oxygen. In our model system H 3B rad radical formation is prompted by proton dissociation from the N5 site of the cofactor; spin density is transferred to the heme bound oxygen, which we found in an orientation preconditioned for H abstraction from the substrate.

  2. Bound states of Dipolar Bosons in One-dimensional Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Volosniev, A.; R. Armstrong, J.; V. Fedorov, D.

    2013-01-01

    We consider one-dimensional tubes containing bosonic polar molecules. The long-range dipole-dipole interactions act both within a single tube and between different tubes. We consider arbitrary values of the externally aligned dipole moments with respect to the symmetry axis of the tubes. The few-...

  3. Erlang loss bounds for OT-ICU systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, N.M.; Kortbeek, Nikky

    2009-01-01

    In hospitals, patients can be rejected at both the operating theater (OT) and the intensive care unit (ICU) due to limited ICU capacity. The corresponding ICU rejection probability is an important service factor for hospitals. Rejection of an ICU request may lead to health deterioration for

  4. Hierarchical bounds on entropy production inferred from partial information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisker, Gili; Polettini, Matteo; Gingrich, Todd R.; Horowitz, Jordan M.

    2017-09-01

    Systems driven away from thermal equilibrium constantly deliver entropy to their environment. Determining this entropy production requires detailed information about the system’s internal states and dynamics. However, in most practical scenarios, only a part of a complex experimental system is accessible to an external observer. In order to address this challenge, two notions of partial entropy production have been introduced in the literature as a way to assign an entropy production to an observed subsystem: one due to Shiraishi and Sagawa (2015 Phys. Rev. E 91 012130) and another due to Polettini and Esposito (2017 arXiv:1703.05715). We show that although both of these schemes provide a lower bound on the total entropy production, the latter—which utilizes an effective thermodynamics description—gives a better estimate of the total dissipation. Using this effective thermodynamic framework, we establish a partitioning of the total entropy production into two contributions that individually verify integral fluctuation theorems: an observable partial entropy production and a hidden entropy production assigned to the unobserved subsystem. Our results offer broad implications for both theoretical and empirical systems when only partial information is available.

  5. Tight bounds on computing error-correcting codes by bounded-depth circuits with arbitrary gates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gál, Anna; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Koucký, Michal

    2012-01-01

    We bound the minimum number w of wires needed to compute any (asymptotically good) error-correcting code C:{0,1}Ω(n) -> {0,1}n with minimum distance Ω(n), using unbounded fan-in circuits of depth d with arbitrary gates. Our main results are: (1) If d=2 then w = Θ(n ({log n/ log log n})2). (2) If d...... on a superconcentrator-like condition that the graphs of circuits computing good codes must satisfy. This condition is provably intermediate between superconcentrators and their weakenings considered before....

  6. Bounds of Certain Dynamic Inequalities on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak B. Pachpatte

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study explicit bounds of certain dynamic integral inequalities on time scales. These estimates give the bounds on unknown functions which can be used in studying the qualitative aspects of certain dynamic equations. Using these inequalities we prove the uniqueness of some partial integro-differential equations on time scales.

  7. Optimal Two Parameter Bounds for the Seiffert Mean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We obtain sharp bounds for the Seiffert mean in terms of a two parameter family of means. Our results generalize and extend the recent bounds presented in the Journal of Inequalities and Applications (2012 and Abstract and Applied Analysis (2012.

  8. Bounded Baire functions and the Henstock-Stieltjes integral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantrawan, Made; Indrati, Ch. Rini

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we give a sufficient condition for bounded Baire functions to be integrable in the sense of the Henstock-Stieltjes integral. By considering the space of all bounded Baire class α functions (α theorem for two-norm continuous linear functionals defined on bℬα [a, b] in terms of the Henstock-Stieltjes integral.

  9. On parallel Branch and Bound frameworks for Global Optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrera, Juan F.R.; Salmerón, José M.G.; Hendrix, Eligius M.T.; Asenjo, Rafael; Casado, Leocadio G.

    2017-01-01

    Branch and Bound (B&B) algorithms are known to exhibit an irregularity of the search tree. Therefore, developing a parallel approach for this kind of algorithms is a challenge. The efficiency of a B&B algorithm depends on the chosen Branching, Bounding, Selection, Rejection, and Termination

  10. Entropy Bounds for Constrained Two-Dimensional Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren Otto; Justesen, Jørn

    1999-01-01

    The maximum entropy and thereby the capacity of 2-D fields given by certain constraints on configurations are considered. Upper and lower bounds are derived.......The maximum entropy and thereby the capacity of 2-D fields given by certain constraints on configurations are considered. Upper and lower bounds are derived....

  11. Improved Space Bounds for Cache-Oblivious Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshani, Peyman; Zeh, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    second main result shows that any cache-oblivious 2-d three-sided range reporting data structure with the optimal query bound has to use Ω(N logε N) space, thereby improving on a recent lower bound for the same problem. Using known transformations, the lower bound extends to 3-d dominance reporting and 3......We provide improved bounds on the size of cacheoblivious range reporting data structures that achieve the optimal query bound of O(logB N + K/B) block transfers. Our first main result is an O(N √ logN log logN)-space data structure that achieves this query bound for 3-d dominance reporting and 2-d...... three-sided range reporting. No cache-oblivious o(N log N/ log logN)-space data structure for these problems was known before, even when allowing a query bound of O(logO(1) 2 N + K/B) block transfers.1 Our result also implies improved space bounds for general 2-d and 3-d orthogonal range reporting. Our...

  12. Higgs interchange and bound states of superheavy fermions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hypothetical superheavy fourth-generation fermions with a very small coupling with the rest of the Standard Model can give rise to long enough lived bound states. The production and the detection of these bound states would be experimentally feasible at the LHC. Extending, in the present study, the analysis of other ...

  13. A Partitioning and Bounded Variable Algorithm for Linear Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheskin, Theodore J.

    2006-01-01

    An interesting new partitioning and bounded variable algorithm (PBVA) is proposed for solving linear programming problems. The PBVA is a variant of the simplex algorithm which uses a modified form of the simplex method followed by the dual simplex method for bounded variables. In contrast to the two-phase method and the big M method, the PBVA does…

  14. Holographic bounds on the UV cutoff scale in inflationary cosmology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keski-Vakkuri, Esko; Sloth, Martin Snoager

    2003-01-01

    We discuss how holographic bounds can be applied to the quantum fluctuations of the inflaton. In general the holographic principle will lead to a bound on the UV cutoff scale of the effective theory of inflation, but it will depend on the coarse-graining prescription involved in calculating the e...

  15. A bounds on the resonant frequency of rectangular microstrip antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, M. C.

    1980-01-01

    The calculation of currents induced by a transverse electric plane wave normally incident upon an infinite strip embedded in a grounded dielectric slab is used to infer a lower bound on the resonant frequency (or resonant-E-plane dimension) for rectangular microstrip antennas. An upper bound is provided by the frequency for which the E-plane dimension is a half-wavelength.

  16. Quasi-bound states, resonance tunnelling, and tunnelling times ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In analogy with the definition of resonant or quasi-bound states used in three-dimensional quantal scattering, we define the quasi-bound states that occur in one- dimensional transmission generated by twin symmetric potential barriers and evaluate their energies and widths using two typical examples: (i) twin ...

  17. Bound states in a hyperbolic asymmetric double-well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, R. R., E-mail: richard.hartmann@dlsu.edu.ph [Physics Department, De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Avenue, Manila (Philippines)

    2014-01-15

    We report a new class of hyperbolic asymmetric double-well whose bound state wavefunctions can be expressed in terms of confluent Heun functions. An analytic procedure is used to obtain the energy eigenvalues and the criterion for the potential to support bound states is discussed.

  18. Monetary and fiscal policy under bounded rationality and heterogeneous expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lustenhouwer, J.E.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to use plausible and intuitive models of bounded rationality to give new insights in monetary and fiscal policy. Particular focus is put on the zero lower bound on the nominal interest rate, forward guidance, and fiscal consolidations. The thesis considers different forms

  19. Bounding W-W ' Mixing with Spin Asymmetries at RHIC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Daniel; den Dunnen, Wilco J.

    2010-01-01

    The W boson can obtain a small right-handed coupling to quarks and leptons through mixing with a hypothetical W' boson that appears in many extensions of the standard model. Measuring or even bounding this coupling to the light quarks is very challenging. Only one model independent bound on the

  20. On the Feng-Rao bound for generalized hamming weights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geil, Hans Olav; Thommesen, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The Feng-Rao bound gives good estimates of the minimum distance of a large class of codes. In this work we are concerned with the problem of how to extend the Feng-Rao bound so that it deals with all the generalized Hamming weights. The problem was solved by Heijnen and Pellikaan in [7] for a lar...

  1. Parity lifetime of bound states in a proximitized semiconductor nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Higginbotham, Andrew Patrick; Albrecht, Sven Marian; Kirsanskas, Gediminas

    2015-01-01

    superconductor layer, yielding an isolated, proximitized nanowire segment. We identify Andreev-like bound states in the semiconductor via bias spectroscopy, determine the characteristic temperatures and magnetic fields for quasiparticle excitations, and extract a parity lifetime (poisoning time) of the bound...... state in the semiconductor exceeding 10 ms....

  2. Bounds on the Effect of Progressive Structural Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achtziger, Wolfgang; Bendsøe, Martin P; Taylor, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Problem formulations are presented for the evaluation of upper and lower bounds on the effect of progressive structural degradation. For the purposes of this study, degradation effect is measured by an increase in global structural compliance (flexibility). Thus the stated bounds are given simply...

  3. Detecting Majorana nonlocality using strongly coupled Majorana bound states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubbert, S.H.P.; Akhmerov, A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Majorana bound states (MBS) differ from the regular zero energy Andreev bound states in their nonlocal properties, since two MBS form a single fermion. We design strategies for detection of this nonlocality by using the phenomenon of Coulomb-mediated Majorana coupling in a setting which still

  4. Fibronectin-synthesizing activity of free and membrane-bound polyribosomes from human embryonic fibroblasts and chick embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkin, V.M.; Volodarskaya, S.M.

    1986-06-20

    The fibronectin-synthesizing activity of membrane-bound and free polyribosomes in a cell-free system was studied using immunochemical methods. It was found that fibronectin biosynthesis on membrane-bound polyribosomes from human embryonic fibroblasts accounts for 4.9% and those from 10-day-old chick embryos for 1.1% of the total amount of newly synthesized proteins, whereas on free polyribosomes it is 1.0 and 0.3%, respectively. Fibronectin monomers with a molecular weight of 220,000 were found only in the material of the cell-free system containing heavy fractions of membrane-bound polyribosomes newly synthesized in the presence of spermidine. Thus, it was shown that fibronectin is synthesized primarily on membrane-bound polyribosomes.

  5. The interplay of intrinsic and extrinsic bounded noises in biomolecular networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Caravagna

    Full Text Available After being considered as a nuisance to be filtered out, it became recently clear that biochemical noise plays a complex role, often fully functional, for a biomolecular network. The influence of intrinsic and extrinsic noises on biomolecular networks has intensively been investigated in last ten years, though contributions on the co-presence of both are sparse. Extrinsic noise is usually modeled as an unbounded white or colored gaussian stochastic process, even though realistic stochastic perturbations are clearly bounded. In this paper we consider Gillespie-like stochastic models of nonlinear networks, i.e. the intrinsic noise, where the model jump rates are affected by colored bounded extrinsic noises synthesized by a suitable biochemical state-dependent Langevin system. These systems are described by a master equation, and a simulation algorithm to analyze them is derived. This new modeling paradigm should enlarge the class of systems amenable at modeling. We investigated the influence of both amplitude and autocorrelation time of a extrinsic Sine-Wiener noise on: (i the Michaelis-Menten approximation of noisy enzymatic reactions, which we show to be applicable also in co-presence of both intrinsic and extrinsic noise, (ii a model of enzymatic futile cycle and (iii a genetic toggle switch. In (ii and (iii we show that the presence of a bounded extrinsic noise induces qualitative modifications in the probability densities of the involved chemicals, where new modes emerge, thus suggesting the possible functional role of bounded noises.

  6. Spin Labeling ESR Investigation of Covalently Bound Residues in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, Olga; Steinhoff, Heinz-Juergen; Klasmeier, Joerg; Schulz, Marcus; Matthies, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Organic xenobiotic chemicals, such as pesticides, biocides and veterinary pharmaceuticals, interact with soil, which results in the simultaneous formations of metabolites, mineralization products, and bound or non-extractable residues (NER). Substances or metabolites with reactive functional groups, such as aniline or phenol, have a tendency to give a larger proportion of NER. Despite numerous studies on NER, the majority of their chemical structures is still unknown. Reversible sequestration and irreversible formation of NER were also observed for veterinary antibiotic pharmaceuticals, after their application to soil with and without manure. For this purpose, we hypothesized a key role of specific functional groups of soil contaminants, via which contaminants are covalently bound to soil constituents, and advance a method of spin labeling ESR investigation of reaction products using a membrane method. Spin labels (SL) represent chemically stable paramagnetic molecules used as molecular labels and molecular probes for testing the covalent binding, structural properties, and molecular mobility of different physical, chemical, and biological systems. In the case of covalent binding of SL, their ESR spectra become broadened. We used stable nitroxide radicals (NR) as SL. These radicals modeled organic chemical contaminants and differed only in one functional group. The paramagnetic SL 4-Amino Tempo (4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinylox) differed from Tempo (2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidinooxy) in a substituent at the para-position of the piperidine ring, whereas Aniline Tempo (1-Piperidinyloxy, 2,2,6,-tetramethyl, 6-Aniline) differed from Tempo in an Aniline substituting one CH3 functional group. Before experimental analysis, we tested temporal changes in the concentration of both NR incubated with soil and found that the life-times of them in soil exceeded 3 days. We contaminated and labeled soil samples with NR, adding to soil the aqueous solution, which already

  7. Bounds on the number of bound states in the transfer matrix spectrum for some weakly correlated lattice models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Carroll, Michael [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada e Estatistica, ICMC-USP, C.P. 668,13560-970 Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    We consider the interaction of particles in weakly correlated lattice quantum field theories. In the imaginary time functional integral formulation of these theories there is a relative coordinate lattice Schroedinger operator H which approximately describes the interaction of these particles. Scalar and vector spin, QCD and Gross-Neveu models are included in these theories. In the weakly correlated regime H=H{sub o}+W where H{sub o}=-{gamma}{Delta}{sub l}, 0 < {gamma} Much-Less-Than 1 and {Delta}{sub l} is the d-dimensional lattice Laplacian: {gamma}={beta}, the inverse temperature for spin systems and {gamma}={kappa}{sup 3} where {kappa} is the hopping parameter for QCD. W is a self-adjoint potential operator which may have non-local contributions but obeys the bound Double-Vertical-Line W(x, y) Double-Vertical-Line Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To cexp ( -a( Double-Vertical-Line x Double-Vertical-Line + Double-Vertical-Line y Double-Vertical-Line )), a large: exp-a={beta}/{beta}{sub o}{sup (1/2)}({kappa}/{kappa}{sub o}) for spin (QCD) models. H{sub o}, W, and H act in l{sub 2}(Z{sup d}), d Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 1. The spectrum of H below zero is known to be discrete and we obtain bounds on the number of states below zero. This number depends on the short range properties of W, i.e., the long range tail does not increase the number of states.

  8. Bounded rationality, abstraction and hierarchical decision-making: an information-theoretic optimality principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eGenewein

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstraction and hierarchical information-processing are hallmarks of human and animal intelligence underlying the unrivaled flexibility of behavior in biological systems. Achieving such a flexibility in artificial systems is challenging, even with more and more computational power. Here we investigate the hypothesis that abstraction and hierarchical information-processing might in fact be the consequence of limitations in information-processing power. In particular, we study an information-theoretic framework of bounded rational decision-making that trades off utility maximization against information-processing costs. We apply the basic principle of this framework to perception-action systems with multiple information-processing nodes and derive bounded optimal solutions. We show how the formation of abstractions and decision-making hierarchies depends on information-processing costs. We illustrate the theoretical ideas with example simulations and conclude by formalizing a mathematically unifying optimization principle that could potentially be extended to more complex systems.

  9. A Precise Bound for Gyroscopic Stabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hryniv, Rostyslav; Kliem, Wolfhard; Lancaster, Peter

    1998-01-01

    ABSTRACT: We consider gyroscopic systems $M\\ddot x(t) + hG\\dot x(t) + Kx(t) = 0$ where $M>0,\\;G^T=-G$, and $K......ABSTRACT: We consider gyroscopic systems $M\\ddot x(t) + hG\\dot x(t) + Kx(t) = 0$ where $M>0,\\;G^T=-G$, and $K...

  10. Interaction of solitons and the formation of bound states in the generalized Lugiato-Lefever equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Rivas, Pedro; Gomila, Damia; Colet, Pere; Gelens, Lendert

    2017-07-01

    Bound states, also called soliton molecules, can form as a result of the interaction between individual solitons. This interaction is mediated through the tails of each soliton that overlap with one another. When such soliton tails have spatial oscillations, locking or pinning between two solitons can occur at fixed distances related with the wavelength of these oscillations, thus forming a bound state. In this work, we study the formation and stability of various types of bound states in the Lugiato-Lefever equation by computing their interaction potential and by analyzing the properties of the oscillatory tails. Moreover, we study the effect of higher order dispersion and noise in the pump intensity on the dynamics of bound states. In doing so, we reveal that perturbations to the Lugiato-Lefever equation that maintain reversibility, such as fourth order dispersion, lead to bound states that tend to separate from one another in time when noise is added. This separation force is determined by the shape of the envelope of the interaction potential, as well as an additional Brownian ratchet effect. In systems with broken reversibility, such as third order dispersion, this ratchet effect continues to push solitons within a bound state apart. However, the force generated by the envelope of the potential is now such that it pushes the solitons towards each other, leading to a null net drift of the solitons. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Theory and Applications of the Lugiato-Lefever Equation", edited by Yanne K. Chembo, Damia Gomila, Mustapha Tlidi, Curtis R. Menyuk.

  11. Bound on dissipative effects from semileptonic neutral B-meson decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benatti, F.; Marcantoni, S.; Pinotti, P.; Zimmermann, K. [Universita di Trieste, Dipartimento di Fisica, Trieste (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Trieste (Italy); Floreanini, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Trieste (Italy)

    2017-09-15

    The semileptonic decay asymmetry A{sub Δm} is studied within the open quantum systems approach to the physics of the neutral meson B{sup 0}-B{sup 0} system: this extended treatment takes into account possible non-standard, dissipative effects induced by the presence of an external environment. A bound on these effects is provided through the analysis of available experimental data from the Belle Collaboration. (orig.)

  12. Summary of Bounding Requirements for the NGNP Demonstration Plant F&ORs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Not Listed

    2008-06-01

    This report documents bounding functional and operating requirements (F&ORs)for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support selection of the nuclear system design and specification of the operating conditions and configuration of NGNP once the nuclear system design is selected. These requirements supplement the detailed F&ORs for NGNP developed in the FY07 NGNP Pre-conceptual design work.

  13. Improved bounds on the epidemic threshold of exact SIS models on complex networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ruhi, Navid Azizan

    2017-01-05

    The SIS (susceptible-infected-susceptible) epidemic model on an arbitrary network, without making approximations, is a 2n-state Markov chain with a unique absorbing state (the all-healthy state). This makes analysis of the SIS model and, in particular, determining the threshold of epidemic spread quite challenging. It has been shown that the exact marginal probabilities of infection can be upper bounded by an n-dimensional linear time-invariant system, a consequence of which is that the Markov chain is “fast-mixing” when the LTI system is stable, i.e. when equation (where β is the infection rate per link, δ is the recovery rate, and λmax(A) is the largest eigenvalue of the network\\'s adjacency matrix). This well-known threshold has been recently shown not to be tight in several cases, such as in a star network. In this paper, we provide tighter upper bounds on the exact marginal probabilities of infection, by also taking pairwise infection probabilities into account. Based on this improved bound, we derive tighter eigenvalue conditions that guarantee fast mixing (i.e., logarithmic mixing time) of the chain. We demonstrate the improvement of the threshold condition by comparing the new bound with the known one on various networks with various epidemic parameters.

  14. Culture-bound syndrome and a culturally sensitive approach: from a viewpoint of medical anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoji, A; Miyakawa, T

    2000-08-01

    Some aspects of the culture-bound syndrome are presented for discussion. From the psychiatric and medical anthropological viewpoints, kamidaari is described as an initiatory illness for seeing a shaman, and focus on clinical realities developing between different therapeutic subcultures in the same culture and the complementary practices of two epistemological ones, namely, the shamanistic and modern psychiatric system in the shamanistic climate. It is suggested that the culture-bound syndrome that reflects cultural influences on disease patterns and renders them difficult to place in a universal classificatory system should be seen as a vernacular bricolage or as tactics used by people within the web of their own local culture of origin. Therapists who treat patients in a cross-epistemological milieu should be aware of the subcultural-epistemological issues that may affect the clinical process. It should be recognized that, depending on the nature of a particular psychiatric crisis, the clinical encounter is straddling the boundaries of multiple clinical realities. At every stage in the clinical field, there is an intersection, consonance, or interruption of rejoinders in the open dialog by all those engaged in the clinical time. Aspects of climatic, culturally sensitive psychotherapy will be described, and the concept of the culture-bound syndrome will be reconsidered. Our approach could be seen as 'situation- and fudo-bound'.

  15. Lying for the Greater Good: Bounded Rationality in a Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktay Sürücü

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the interaction between fully and boundedly rational agents in situations where their interests are perfectly aligned. The cognitive limitations of the boundedly rational agent do not allow him to fully understand the market conditions and lead him to take non-optimal decisions in some situations. Using categorization to model bounded rationality, we show that the fully rational agent can nudge, i.e., he can manipulate the information he sends and decrease the expected loss caused by the boundedly rational agent. Assuming different types for the boundedly rational agent, who differ only in the categories used, we show that the fully rational agent may learn the type of the boundedly rational agent along their interaction. Using this additional information, the outcome can be improved and the amount of manipulated information can be decreased. Furthermore, as the length of the interaction increases the probability that the fully rational agent learns the type of the boundedly rational agent grows

  16. On the Feng-Rao bound for generalized Hamming weights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geil, Olav; Thommesen, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The Feng-Rao bound gives good estimates of the minimum distance of a large class of codes. In this work we are concerned with the problem of how to extend the Feng-Rao bound so that it deals with all the generalized Hamming weights. The problem was solved by Heijnen and Pellikaan in [7] for a large...... family of codes that includes the duals of one-point geometric Goppa codes and the q-ary Reed-Muller codes, but not the Feng-Rao improved such ones. We show that Heijnen and Pellikaan’s results holds for the more general class of codes for which the traditional Feng-Rao bound can be applied. We also...... establish the connection to the Shibuya-Sakaniwa bound for generalized Hamming weights ([15], [16], [17], [18], [19] and [20]). More precisely we show that the Shibuya-Sakaniwa bound is a consequence of the extended Feng-Rao bound. In particular the extended Feng-Rao bound gives always at least as good...

  17. Finite energy bounds for $\\piN$ scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Grassberger, P; Schwela, D

    1974-01-01

    Upper bounds on energy averaged pi N cross sections are given. Using low energy data and data from pi N backward scattering and NN to pi pi annihilation, it is found that sigma /sub tot/bounds are based on assumptions similar to those underlying Froissart's bound and are equal to it asymptotically. However, at finite but large energies, they increase much slower than what might have been anticipated on purely numerological grounds. Related problems in pp and Kp scattering are also discussed. (25 refs) .

  18. Upper Bounds on Stream I/O Using Semantic Interpretations

    OpenAIRE

    Gaboardi, Marco; Péchoux, Romain

    2009-01-01

    The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com; International audience; This paper extends for the first time semantics interpretation tools to infinite data in order to ensure Input/Output upper bounds on first order Haskell like programs on streams. By I/O upper bounds, we mean temporal relations between the number of reads performed on the input stream elements and the number of output elements produced. We study several I/O upper bounds properties that are of both theoretic...

  19. Bounded-Angle Iterative Decoding of LDPC Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinar, Samuel; Andrews, Kenneth; Pollara, Fabrizio; Divsalar, Dariush

    2009-01-01

    Bounded-angle iterative decoding is a modified version of conventional iterative decoding, conceived as a means of reducing undetected-error rates for short low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes. For a given code, bounded-angle iterative decoding can be implemented by means of a simple modification of the decoder algorithm, without redesigning the code. Bounded-angle iterative decoding is based on a representation of received words and code words as vectors in an n-dimensional Euclidean space (where n is an integer).

  20. Universal Bound on the Fano Factor in Enzyme Kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Barato, Andre C

    2015-01-01

    The Fano factor, an observable quantifying fluctuations of product generation by a single enzyme, can reveal information about the underlying reaction scheme. A lower bound on this Fano factor that depends on the thermodynamic affinity driving the transformation from substrate to product constrains the number of intermediate states of an enzymatic cycle. So far, this bound has been proven only for a unicyclic network of states. We show that the bound can be extended to arbitrary multicyclic networks, with the Fano factor constraining the largest value of the effective length, which is the ratio between the number of states and the number of products, among all cycles.