WorldWideScience

Sample records for boulder removal project

  1. Arroyo Mocho Boulder Removal Project: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hetch Hetchy Pump Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, L; Kato, T; Van Hattem, M

    2007-06-28

    The purpose of this biological assessment is to review the proposed Arroyo Mocho Boulder Removal Project in sufficient detail to determine to what extent the proposed action may affect any of the threatened, endangered, proposed, or sensitive species and designated or proposed critical habitats listed below. In addition, the following information is provided to comply with statutory requirements to use the best scientific and commercial information available when assessing the risks posed to listed and/or proposed species and designated and/or proposed critical habitat by proposed federal actions. This biological assessment is prepared in accordance with legal requirements set forth under regulations implementing Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act (50 CFR 402; 16 U.S.C 1536 (c)). It is our desire for the Arroyo Mocho Boulder Removal Project to receive incidental take coverage for listed species and critical habitat within the greater project area by means of amending the previous formal Section 7 consultation (1-1-04-F-0086) conducted a few hundred meters downstream by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in 2002. All conservation measures, terms and conditions, and reporting requirements from the previous Biological Opinion (1-1-04-F-0086) have been adopted for this Biological Assessment and/or amendment.

  2. 76 FR 8359 - Boulder Canyon Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... Area Power Administration Boulder Canyon Project AGENCY: Western Area Power Administration, DOE...) is proposing an adjustment to the Boulder Canyon Project (BCP) electric service base charge and rates... section 9(c) of the Reclamation Project Act of 1939 (43 U.S.C. 485h(c)), and other acts that specifically...

  3. 76 FR 56430 - Boulder Canyon Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ..., e-mail [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Hoover Dam, authorized by the Boulder Canyon... continually reviews its security costs and seeks ways to reduce its overall costs. Hoover Dam security costs... border. Hoover Power Plant has nineteen (19) generating units (two for plant use) and an installed...

  4. 78 FR 48670 - Boulder Canyon Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    ..., (602) 605-2442, email [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Hoover Dam, authorized by the... Arizona and Nevada border. The Hoover Dam powerplant has 19 generating units (two for plant use) and an... carryover from FY 2011 into FY 2012 and higher than projected FY 2012 Other Revenues from the Hoover Dam...

  5. Final Technical Report - Modernization of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taddeucci, Joe [Dept. of Public Works, Boulder, CO (United States). Utilities Division

    2013-03-29

    The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Project (BCH) was purchased by the City of Boulder, CO (the city) in 2001. Project facilities were originally constructed in 1910 and upgraded in the 1930s and 1940s. By 2009, the two 10 MW turbine/generators had reached or were nearing the end of their useful lives. One generator had grounded out and was beyond repair, reducing plant capacity to 10 MW. The remaining 10 MW unit was expected to fail at any time. When the BCH power plant was originally constructed, a sizeable water supply was available for the sole purpose of hydroelectric power generation. Between 1950 and 2001, that water supply had gradually been converted to municipal water supply by the city. By 2001, the water available for hydroelectric power generation at BCH could not support even one 10 MW unit. Boulder lacked the financial resources to modernize the facilities, and Boulder anticipated that when the single, operational historical unit failed, the project would cease operation. In 2009, the City of Boulder applied for and received a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant for $1.18 million toward a total estimated project cost of $5.155 million to modernize BCH. The federal funding allowed Boulder to move forward with plant modifications that would ensure BCH would continue operation. Federal funding was made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. Boulder determined that a single 5 MW turbine/generator would be the most appropriate capacity, given the reduced water supply to the plant. Average annual BCH generation with the old 10 MW unit had been about 8,500 MW-hr, whereas annual generation with a new, efficient turbine could average 11,000 to 12,000 MW-hr. The incremental change in annual generation represents a 30% increase in generation over pre-project conditions. The old turbine/generator was a single nozzle Pelton turbine with a 5-to-1 flow turndown and a maximum turbine/generator efficiency of 82%. The new unit is a

  6. 77 FR 64333 - Relocation of Transmission Lines for the U.S. 93 Boulder City Bypass Project, Boulder County, NV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... Area Power Administration Relocation of Transmission Lines for the U.S. 93 Boulder City Bypass Project... and rebuilding approximately one mile of the Henderson-Mead 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines... installing new structures, conductors, overhead ground wire, insulators, and transmission line hardware. The...

  7. 77 FR 65681 - Boulder Canyon Project-Post-2017 Resource Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    ... Administration, DOE. ACTION: Notice of proposed marketing criteria. SUMMARY: The Western Area Power Administration (Western), a Federal power marketing agency of the Department of Energy (DOE), is seeking comments on proposed marketing criteria for allocating the Federal power from the Boulder Canyon Project (BCP...

  8. 77 FR 35671 - Conformed Power Marketing Criteria or Regulations for the Boulder Canyon Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    ... Area Power Administration Conformed Power Marketing Criteria or Regulations for the Boulder Canyon Project AGENCY: Western Area Power Administration, DOE. ACTION: Conformance of power marketing criteria in... (Western), a Federal power marketing agency of the Department of Energy (DOE), is modifying Part C of its...

  9. 75 FR 57912 - Boulder Canyon Project-Rate Order No. WAPA-150

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ...). This Act transferred to and vested in the Secretary of Energy the power marketing functions of the... using sound business principles. Both agencies continue to provide transparency in development of their... September 30, 2015, or until superseded. Available In the marketing area serviced by the Boulder Canyon...

  10. Integrating Infrastructure-Relevant Climate Projections into City Planning: Learning from Boulder CO, Austin TX and Washington DC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, A. M. K.; Hayhoe, K.

    2015-12-01

    Over the coming century, climate change has the potential to impact infrastructure in many different ways, particularly in population-dense areas that depend on transportation and built environments. Many of these impacts may occur via changes in the frequency and magnitude of extremes: high and low temperature, heat waves, precipitation, coastal flooding, and storm events. Having a better idea of how the climate might change locally, both within the near future as well as toward the end of the century, can give city planners and engineers guidance when designing new structures and when repairing and fortifying existing components of buildings, bridges, highways, sewers, ports, etc. However, the type of event and the amount of damages that may be incurred are often highly specific to a given location. Over the last 10 years, we have worked with a broad range of cities, states, non-profit organizations, and federal agencies to integrate climate projections into ongoing resiliency, sustainability, and management processes. Drawing on that experience, we describe the broad steps in assimilating climate information into existing decision-making frameworks relevant to most applications, as well as highlighting many of the unique aspects of these analyses using examples from our most recent work with three very different cities - Austin TX, Boulder CO and Washington DC. From initial conversations with local experts to identify relevant thresholds to final integration of projected changes into the planning processes of these cities, these case studies highlight the utility of including future climate projections into infrastructure planning, the challenges to doing so, and the over-arching importance of communication and interaction between infrastructure experts, engineers, and scientists.

  11. Regenerable Contaminant Removal System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Regenerable Contaminant Removal System (RCRS) is an innovative method to remove sulfur and halide compounds from contaminated gas streams to part-per-billion...

  12. EXPLOITATION OF GRANITE BOULDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Cotman

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The processes of forming, petrography, features, properties and exploitation of granite boulders are described. The directional drilling and black powder blasting is the succesful method in exploitation of granite boulders (boulder technology (the paper is published in Croatian.

  13. Boulder Magnetic Observatory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are vector and scalar component values of the Earth's magnetic field for 2004 recorded at the Boulder Magnetic Observatory in Colorado. Vector values are...

  14. Probability of Boulders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    1997-01-01

    To collect background information for formulating a description of the expected soil properties along the tunnel line, in 1987 Storebælt initiated a statistical investigation of the occurrence and size of boulders in the Great Belt area. The data for the boulder size distribution were obtained...... by use of aerial photographing of cliff beaches with subsequent stereo metric measurement on the photographs. To get information about the density of occurrence, a series of continuous seismic scannings were also made along parallel lines in a corridor with the tunnel line as about the central line....... The data collection part of the investigation was made on the basis of geological expert advice (Gunnar Larsen, Århus) by the Danish Geotechnical Institute (DGI).The statistical data analysis combined with stochastic modeling based on geometry and sound wave diffraction theory gave a point estimate...

  15. Functions & Requirements for Debris Removal System Project A-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PRECECHTEL, D.R.

    1999-12-29

    This revision of the Functions and Requirements Document updates the approved Functions and Requirements for Debris Removal Subproject WHC-SD-SNF-FRD-009, Rev. 0. It has been revised in its entirety to reflect the current scope of work for Debris Removal as canisters and lids under the K Basin Projects work breakdown structure (WBS). In this revision the canisters and lids will be consider debris and a new set of Functions and Requirements have been developed to remove the canisters and lids from the basin.

  16. Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-01-29

    This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

  17. 75 FR 69433 - City of Boulder, CO; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission City of Boulder, CO; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment November 5, 2010. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Federal Energy... Energy Projects has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for an application filed by City of Boulder...

  18. Boulder Dislodgement by Tsunamis and Storms: Version 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Robert

    2016-04-01

    In the past, boulder dislodgement by tsunami and storm waves has been approached with a simple threshold approach in which a boulder was moved if the sum of the acting forces on the boulder is larger than zero. The impulse theory taught us, however, that this criterion is not enough to explain particle dislodgement. We employ an adapted version of the Newton's Second Law of Motion (NSLM) in order to consider the essence of the impulse theory which is that the sum of the forces has to exceed a certain threshold for a certain period of time. Furthermore, a classical assumption is to consider linear waves. However, when waves travel toward the shore, they alter due to non-linear processes. We employ the TRIADS model to quantify that change and how it impacts boulder dislodgement. We present our results of the coupled model (adapted NSLM and TRIADS model). The results project a more complex picture of boulder transport by storms and tsunami. The following question arises: What information do we actually invert, and what does it tell us about the causative event?

  19. Boulder emplacement and remobilisation by cyclone and submarine landslide tsunami waves near Suva City, Fiji

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, A. Y. Annie; Terry, James P.; Ziegler, Alan; Pratap, Arti; Harris, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    The characteristics of a reef-top boulder field created by a local submarine landslide tsunami are presented for the first time. Our examination of large reef-derived boulders deposited by the 1953 tsunami near Suva City, Fiji, revealed that shorter-than-normal-period tsunami waves generated by submarine landslides can create a boulder field resembling a storm boulder field due to relatively short boulder transport distances. The boulder-inferred 1953 tsunami flow velocity is estimated at over 9 m s- 1 at the reef edge. Subsequent events, for example Cyclone Kina (1993), appear to have remobilised some large boulders. While prior research has demonstrated headward retreat of Suva Canyon in response to the repeated occurrence of earthquakes over the past few millennia, our results highlight the lingering vulnerability of the Fijian coastlines to high-energy waves generated both in the presence (tsunami) and absence (storm) of submarine failures and/or earthquakes. To explain the age discrepancies of U-Th dated coral comprising the deposited boulders, we introduce a conceptual model showing the role of repeated episodes of tsunamigenic submarine landslides in removing reef front sections through collapse. Subsequent high-energy wave events transport boulders from exposed older sections of the reef front onto the reef where they are deposited as 'new' boulders, alongside freshly detached sections of the living reef. In similar situations where anachronistic deposits complicate the deposition signal, age-dating of the coral boulders should not be used as a proxy for determining the timing of the submarine landslides or the tsunamis that generated them.

  20. Revisiting boulder fields on Bonaire (Leeward Antilles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, M.; May, S. M.; Brückner, H.

    2012-04-01

    Blocks and boulders are typical sedimentary features of rocky shorelines worldwide. In many cases, their deposition is related to tsunamis or severe storms, though inferences of certain extreme wave events from the boulder record, and in particular the differentiation between storms and tsunamis, remain difficult. At the eastern coast of Bonaire (Leeward Antilles), numerous limestone boulders and blocks (up to approx. 130 t) are distributed on top of a 3 to 6 m a.s.l. (above mean sea level) palaeo-reef terrace. Disagreement exists among a number of scholars concerning the transport processes involved in the formation of these boulder fields. In this paper, numerical approaches of coastal boulder entrainment and transport were applied in order to provide new and more reliable data on their origin. To improve the reliability of the boulder transport model, more realistic input parameters were provided by DGPS measurements of the boulder dimensions (3D models by triangulation of point clouds using a GIS) and the calculation of bulk densities by taking into account the different coralline lithofacies of the reef-rock clasts. Boulder transport equations from literature were modified and now consider the irregular shape and real dimensions of the boulders and blocks. The results indicate that boulder weight and dimension, and thus calculated wave energy and wave heights were overestimated in most of the previous studies, where calculations of boulder volume were based on multiplication of the main axes. The results of this study and wave heights observed during recent high-magnitude hurricanes seem to rule out storm-generated waves for the dislocation of the largest boulders and blocks, and point to the occurrence of palaeo-tsunamis on Bonaire. However, the majority of coarse-clast deposits may have been generated by hurricane swells. The results underline the significance of more realistic field data in modelling boulder transport by waves.

  1. Preliminary study of uranium favorability of the Boulder batholith, Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castor, S.B.; Robins, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The Boulder batholith of southwestern Montana is a composite Late Cretaceous intrusive mass, mostly composed of quartz monzonite and granodiorite. This study was not restricted to the plutonic rocks; it also includes younger rocks that overlie the batholith, and older rocks that it intrudes. The Boulder batholith area has good overall potential for economic uranium deposits, because its geology is similar to that of areas that contain economic deposits elsewhere in the world, and because at least 35 uranium occurrences of several different types are present. Potential is greatest for the occurrence of small uranium deposits in chalcedony veins and base-metal sulfide veins. Three areas may be favorable for large, low-grade deposits consisting of a number of closely spaced chalcedony veins and enriched wall rock; the Mooney claims, the Boulder area, and the Clancy area. In addition, there is a good possibility of by-product uranium production from phosphatic black shales in the project area. The potential for uranium deposits in breccia masses that cut prebatholith rocks, in manganese-quartz veins near Butte, and in a shear zone that cuts Tertiary rhyolite near Helena cannot be determined on the basis of available information. Low-grade, disseminated, primary uranium concentrations similar to porphyry deposits proposed by Armstrong (1974) may exist in the Boulder batholith, but the primary uranium content of most batholith rocks is low. The geologic environment adjacent to the Boulder batholith is similar in places to that at the Midnite mine in Washington. Some igneous rocks in the project area contain more than 10 ppM U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, and some metasedimentary rocks near the batholith contain reductants such as sulfides and carbonaceous material.

  2. The Geographic Distribution of Boulder Halo Craters at Mid-to-High Latitudes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, L. X.; Fassett, C. I.; Levy, J. S.; King, I. R.; Chaffey, P. M.; Wagoner, C. M.; Hanlon, A. E.; Watters, J. L.; Kreslavsky, M. A.; Holt, J. W.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Extensive evidence exists for ground ice at mid-to-high latitudes on Mars, including results from neutron spectroscopy [1-3], thermal properties [4-5], geomorphology [e.g., 6-9], and the in situ observations of Mars Phoenix [10]. This ground ice has been hypothesized to be emplaced diffusively and fill pores [11], or to have accumulated by ice and dust deposition that draped or mantled the terrain [7, 12]. These two processes are not mutually exclusive; both potentially have occurred on Mars [5]. One of the landforms found in areas where ground ice is common on Mars are boulder halo craters [e.g., 13-15] (Figure 1), which are topographically muted impact craters that are filled by ice-rich regolith. They are outlined by boulders that trace a circular outline of the original crater rim. Boulder halos generally have distinctly higher boulder densities than the surrounding background plains and have few boulders in their interiors. The mechanism of boulder halo crater formation is somewhat uncertain. Our working model is that an impact event occurs with sufficient size to excavate to a depth greater than the boulder-poor, ice-rich soils. Excavated boulders are deposited around the crater's rim and in its proximal ejecta. Quite rapidly [14], the crater becomes infilled by icy soil. Rather than being buried, boulders in the halo remain at the surface, perhaps be-cause they 'float' relative to finer-grained materials [14, 16]. Regardless of the details of this process, the life-time of boulders at the surface is much greater than the timescale needed to remove most of the craters' topography. Physical weathering of rocks must be greatly out-paced by crater infilling (the opposite of what is typical, e.g., on the Moon [17]). The rapidity of this infilling is easiest to understand if icy mantling material is deposited and accumulates, rather than simply being added by pore filling of soils. If this model is correct, boulder halos only form when they excavate rock

  3. 324 Building liquid waste handling and removal system project plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, J.E.

    1998-07-29

    This report evaluates the modification options for handling radiological liquid waste generated during decontamination and cleanout of the 324 Building. Recent discussions indicate that the Hanford site railroad system will be closed by the end of FY 1998 necessitating the need for an alternate transfer method. The issue of handling of Radioactive Liquid Waste (RLW) from the 324 Building (assuming the 340 Facility is not available to accept the RLW) has been examined in at least two earlier engineering studies (Parsons 1997a and Hobart 1997). Each study identified a similar preferred alternative that included modifying the 324 Building RLWS to allow load-out of wastewater to a truck tanker, while making maximum use of existing piping, tanks, instrumentation, controls and other features to minimize costs and physical changes to the building. This alternative is accepted as the basis for further discussion presented in this study. The goal of this engineering study is to verify the path forward presented in the previous studies and assure that the selected alternative satisfies the 324 Building deactivation goals and objectives as currently described in the project management plan. This study will also evaluate options available to implement the preferred alternative and select the preferred option for implementation of the entire system. Items requiring further examination will also be identified. Finally, the study will provide a conceptual design, schedule and cost estimate for the required modifications to the 324 Building to allow removal of RLW. Attachment 5 is an excerpt from the project baseline schedule found in the Project Management Plan.

  4. 77 FR 48151 - Boulder Canyon Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ..., (602) 605-2442, email [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Hoover Dam, authorized by the... Arizona and Nevada border. Hoover Dam power plant has nineteen (19) generating units (two for plant use... Charge is allocated to each BCP Contractor in proportion to their allocation of Hoover power. A BCP...

  5. 78 FR 7775 - Boulder Canyon Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... Darrick Moe, Regional Manager, Desert Southwest Customer Service Region, Western Area Power Administration... CONTACT: Jack Murray, Rates Manager, Desert Southwest Customer Service Region, Western Area Power... Desert Southwest Customer Service Regional Office, Western Area Power Administration, 615 South 43rd...

  6. 77 FR 2533 - Boulder Canyon Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    ... Darrick Moe, Regional Manager, Desert Southwest Customer Service Region, Western Area Power Administration... inspection and copying at the Desert Southwest Customer Service Regional Office, Western Area Power... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Western...

  7. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL. USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT CLIMAX, MN SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Climax, MN site. The objectives of the project are to evaluate (1) the effectiveness of Kinetico’s Macrolite®...

  8. Do Cement Boulders Mimic Natural Boulders for Macro-Invertebrates in the Southern Caspian Sea?

    OpenAIRE

    Pourjomeh, Fatemeh; Shokri, Mohammad Reza; Kiabi, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    The macro-invertebrates on natural (rock) and artificial (cement) boulders were compared along the southern Caspian Sea and the effect of structural features of boulders (i.e. orientation, facing, surface complexity, the degree of exposure to the wave action) on macro-invertebrate communities were investigated. Ten locations with rock walls in the southern Caspian Sea were investigated in which the isolated boulders of natural and artificial types with similar dimensions were haphazardly ...

  9. Novel Long-Term CO2 Removal System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current Technology for CO2 removal from enclosed air of spacecraft utilizes LiOH canisters for CO2 absorption. This absorption is irreversible so longer flights...

  10. Removing Mid-Spatial Frequency Errors with VIBE Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Optimax VIBE process is a full-aperture, conformal polishing process incorporating high frequency motion that rapidly removes sub-surface damage in a VIBE...

  11. The Boulder Creek Batholith, Front Range, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gable, Dolores J.

    1980-01-01

    The Boulder Creek batholith is the best known of several large Precambrian batholiths of similar rock composition that crop out across central Colorado. The rocks in the batholith belong to the calc-alkaline series and range in composition from granodiorite through quartz diorite (tonalite) to gneissic aplite. Two rock types dominate': the Boulder Creek Granodiorite, the major rock unit, and a more leucocratic and slightly younger unit herein named Twin Spruce Quartz Monzonite. Besides mafic inclusions, which occur mainly in hornblende-bearing phases of the Boulder Creek Granodiorite, there are cogenetic older and younger lenses, dikes, and small plutons of hornblende diorite, hornblendite, gabbro, and pyroxenite. Pyroxenite is not found in the batholith. The Boulder Creek Granodiorite in the batholith represents essentially two contemporaneous magmas, a northern body occurring in the Gold Hill and Boulder quadrangles and a larger southern body exposed in the Blackhawk and the greater parts of the Tungsten and Eldorado Springs quadrangles. The two bodies are chemically and mineralogically distinct. The northern body is richer in CaO and poorer in K2O, is more mafic, and has a larger percentage of plagioclase than the southern body. A crude sequence of rock types occurs from west to east in the batholith accompanied by a change in plagioclase composition from calcic plagioclase on the west to sodic on the east. Ore minerals tend to decrease, and the ratio potassium feldspar:plagioclase increases inward from the western contact of the batholith, indicating that the Boulder Creek batholith is similar to granodiorite batholiths the world over. Emplacement of the Boulder Creek batholith was contemporaneous with plastic deformation and high-grade regional metamorphism that folded the country rock and the batholith contact along west-northwest and north-northwest axes. Also, smaller satellitic granodiorite bodies tend to conform to the trends of foliation and fold axes in

  12. African penguins Spheniscus demersus colonized Boulders, near ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    2000-03-01

    Mar 1, 2000 ... African penguins Spheniscus demersus colonized. Boulders, near Simonstown, in 1985 (Cooper 1985). It was one of three colonies of African penguins formed in South Africa's Western Cape between 1982 and. 1985. The others were Stony Point at Betty's Bay in. 1982 (Broni 1982) and Robben Island in ...

  13. Evaluation of an Unsuccessful Brook Trout Electrofishing Removal Project in a Small Rocky Mountain Stream.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A.; Schill, Daniel J.

    2006-01-26

    In the western United States, exotic brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis frequently have a deleterious effect on native salmonids, and biologists often attempt to remove brook trout from streams by means of electrofishing. Although the success of such projects typically is low, few studies have assessed the underlying mechanisms of failure, especially in terms of compensatory responses. A multiagency watershed advisory group (WAG) conducted a 3-year removal project to reduce brook trout and enhance native salmonids in 7.8 km of a southwestern Idaho stream. We evaluated the costs and success of their project in suppressing brook trout and looked for brook trout compensatory responses, such as decreased natural mortality, increased growth, increased fecundity at length, and earlier maturation. The total number of brook trout removed was 1,401 in 1998, 1,241 in 1999, and 890 in 2000; removal constituted an estimated 88% of the total number of brook trout in the stream in 1999 and 79% in 2000. Although abundance of age-1 and older brook trout declined slightly during and after the removals, abundance of age-0 brook trout increased 789% in the entire stream 2 years after the removals ceased. Total annual survival rate for age-2 and older brook trout did not decrease during the removals, and the removals failed to produce an increase in the abundance of native redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri. Lack of a meaningful decline and unchanged total mortality for older brook trout during the removals suggest that a compensatory response occurred in the brook trout population via reduced natural mortality, which offset the removal of large numbers of brook trout. Although we applaud WAG personnel for their goal of enhancing native salmonids by suppressing brook trout via electrofishing removal, we conclude that their efforts were unsuccessful and suggest that similar future projects elsewhere over such large stream lengths would be costly, quixotic enterprises.

  14. Analysis of registered CDM projects: potential removal of evidenced bottlenecks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agosto, D.; Bombard, P.; Gostinelli, F.

    2007-07-01

    The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) has developed during its first period of implementation, a distinctive set of patterns. The authors thought of concentrating on the CDM analysis in order to highlight potential remedies or reasons for given bottlenecks. In order to establish a sort of extensive SWOT analysis for CDMs, all the 356 projects actually (November 2006) registered at UNFCCC were examined, together with all the about 1000 PDDs presented to the UNFCCC but not registered yet. The CDM projects have been studied trying to cluster projects according to relevant characteristics, both from a technical and an economic point of view. Chosen indicators are meant to identify: more convenient/more diffused energy system for a CDM; reasons for a geographical distribution of different types of projects; potentials for a future exploitation of lower used technologies in CDM. Conclusions are drawn and appropriate tables and graphs presented. (1) the Baseline Emission Factor, combined to economic patterns, is the pivotal factor that characterizes both choices of host country and technology; (2) some technologies can exploit appropriately CDM scheme, whilst other technologies, are constrained by it. (3) there are still some important weak points: grouping of non Annex I countries; crediting period; criteria for the evaluation of sustainable development. (auth)

  15. Quantitative Morphologic Analysis of Boulder Shape and Surface Texture to Infer Environmental History: A Case Study of Rock Breakdown at the Ephrata Fan, Channeled Scabland, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Viles, Heather A.; Bourke, Mary C.

    2008-01-01

    Boulder morphology reflects both lithology and climate and is dictated by the combined effects of erosion, transport, and weathering. At present, morphologic information at the boulder scale is underutilized as a recorder of environmental processes, partly because of the lack of a systematic quantitative parameter set for reporting and comparing data sets. We develop such a parameter set, incorporating a range of measures of boulder form and surface texture. We use standard shape metrics measured in the field and fractal and morphometric classification methods borrowed from landscape analysis and applied to laser-scanned molds. The parameter set was pilot tested on three populations of basalt boulders with distinct breakdown histories in the Channeled Scabland, Washington: (1) basalt outcrop talus; (2) flood-transported boulders recently excavated from a quarry; and (3) flood-transported boulders, extensively weathered in situ on the Ephrata Fan surface. Size and shape data were found to distinguish between flood-transported and untransported boulders. Size and edge angles (approximately 120 degrees) of flood-transported boulders suggest removal by preferential fracturing along preexisting columnar joints, and curvature data indicate rounding relative to outcrop boulders. Surface textural data show that boulders which have been exposed at the surface are significantly rougher than those buried by fan sediments. Past signatures diagnostic of flood transport still persist on surface boulders, despite ongoing overprinting by processes in the present breakdown environment through roughening and fracturing in situ. Further use of this quantitative boulder parameter set at other terrestrial and planetary sites will aid in cataloging and understanding morphologic signatures of environmental processes.

  16. Removal Action Plan for the Accelerated Retrieval Project for a Described Area within Pit 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. M. Tyson

    2006-08-01

    This Removal Action Plan documents the plan for implementation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compenstion, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action to be performed by the Accelerated Retrieval Project. The focus of the action is the limited excavation and retrieval of selected waste streams from a designated portion of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Subsurface Disposal Area that are contaminated with volatile organic compounds, isotopes of uranium, or transuranic radionuclides. The selected retrieval area is approximately 0.2 ha (1/2 acre) and is located in the eastern portion of Pit 4. The proposed project is referred to as the Accelerated Retrieval Project. This Removal Action Plan details the major work elements, operations approach, and schedule, and summarizes the environmental, safety and health, and waste management considerations associated with the project.

  17. Collaboration Between Environmental Water Chemistry Students and Hazardous Waste Treatment Specialists on the University of Colorado-Boulder Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    The University of Colorado-Boulder is one of a few universities in the country that has a licensed Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility (TSDF) for hazardous waste on campus. This facility, located on the bottom floor of the Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) building, allows CU to more economically treat hazardous waste by enabling treatment specialists on staff to safely collect and organize the hazardous waste generated on campus. Hazardous waste is anything that contains a regulated chemical or compound and most chemicals used in engineering labs (e.g., acids, solvents, metal solutions) fall into this category. The EH&S staff is able to treat close almost 33% of the waste from campus and the rest is packed for off-site treatment at various places all over the country for disposal (e.g., Sauget, IL, Port Aurthor, TX). The CU-Boulder campus produced over 50 tons of hazardous waste in 2010 costing over $300,000 in off-campus expenses. The EH&S staff assigns one of over 50 codes to the waste which will determine if the waste can be treated on campus of must be shipped off campus to be disposed of. If the waste can be treated on campus, it will undergo one of three processes: 1) neutralization, 2) UV-ozone oxidation, or 3) ion exchange. If the waste is acidic but contains no heavy metals, the acid is neutralized with sodium hydroxide (a base) and can be disposed "down the drain" to the Boulder Wastewater Treatment Plant. If the waste contains organic compounds and no metals, a UV-ozone oxidation system is used to break down the organic compounds. Silver from photography wastewater can be removed using ion exchange columns. Undergraduate and graduate students worked with the hazardous waste treatment facility at the Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) building on the CU-Boulder campus during the fall of 2011 and fall of 2012. Early in the semester, students receive a tour of the three batch treatment processes the facility is equipped with. Later in the

  18. Subtidal Bathymetric Changes by Shoreline Armoring Removal and Restoration Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Salish Sea, a region with a diverse coastline, is altered by anthropogenic shoreline modifications such as seawalls. In recent years, local organizations have moved to restore these shorelines. Current research monitors the changes restoration projects have on the upper beach, lower beach, and intertidal, however little research exists to record possible negative effects on the subtidal. The purpose of this research is to utilize multibeam sonar bathymetric data to analyze possible changes to the seafloor structure of the subtidal in response to shoreline modification and to investigate potential ecosystem consequences of shoreline alteration. The subtidal is home to several species including eelgrass (Zostera marina). Eelgrass is an important species in Puget Sound as it provides many key ecosystem functions including providing habitat for a wide variety of organisms, affecting the physics of waves, and sediment transport in the subtidal. Thus bathymetric changes could impact eelgrass growth and reduce its ability to provide crucial ecosystem services. Three Washington state study sites of completed shoreline restoration projects were used to generate data from areas of varied topographic classification, Seahurst Park in Burien, the Snohomish County Nearshore Restoration Project in Everett, and Cornet Bay State Park on Whidbey Island. Multibeam sonar data was acquired using a Konsberg EM 2040 system and post-processed in Caris HIPS to generate a base surface of one-meter resolution. It was then imported into the ArcGIS software suite for the generation of spatial metrics. Measurements of change were calculated through a comparison of historical and generated data. Descriptive metrics generated included, total elevation change, percent area changed, and a transition matrix of positive and negative change. Additionally, pattern metrics such as, surface roughness, and Bathymetric Position Index (BPI), were calculated. The comparison of historical data to new data

  19. Tsunami-induced boulder transport - combining physical experiments and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetjen, Jan; Engel, Max; May, Simon Matthias; Schüttrumpf, Holger; Brueckner, Helmut; Prasad Pudasaini, Shiva

    2016-04-01

    Coasts are crucial areas for living, economy, recreation, transportation, and various sectors of industry. Many of them are exposed to high-energy wave events. With regard to the ongoing population growth in low-elevation coastal areas, the urgent need for developing suitable management measures, especially for hazards like tsunamis, becomes obvious. These measures require supporting tools which allow an exact estimation of impact parameters like inundation height, inundation area, and wave energy. Focussing on tsunamis, geological archives can provide essential information on frequency and magnitude on a longer time scale in order to support coastal hazard management. While fine-grained deposits may quickly be altered after deposition, multi-ton coarse clasts (boulders) may represent an information source on past tsunami events with a much higher preservation potential. Applying numerical hydrodynamic coupled boulder transport models (BTM) is a commonly used approach to analyse characteristics (e.g. wave height, flow velocity) of the corresponding tsunami. Correct computations of tsunamis and the induced boulder transport can provide essential event-specific information, including wave heights, runup and direction. Although several valuable numerical models for tsunami-induced boulder transport exist (e. g. Goto et al., 2007; Imamura et al., 2008), some important basic aspects of both tsunami hydrodynamics and corresponding boulder transport have not yet been entirely understood. Therefore, our project aims at these questions in four crucial aspects of boulder transport by a tsunami: (i) influence of sediment load, (ii) influence of complex boulder shapes other than idealized rectangular shapes, (iii) momentum transfers between multiple boulders, and (iv) influence of non-uniform bathymetries and topographies both on tsunami and boulder. The investigation of these aspects in physical experiments and the correct implementation of an advanced model is an urgent need

  20. Treatment techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. Final report of the TENAWA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annanmaeki, M.; Turtiainen, T. [eds.

    2000-01-01

    TENAWA project (Treatment Techniques for Removing Natural Radionuclides from Drinking Water) was carried out on a cost-shared basic with the European Commission (CEC) under the supervision of Directorate-General XII, Radiation Protection Unit. TENAWA project was started because in several European countries ground water supplies may contain high amounts of natural radionuclides. During the project both laboratory and field research was performed in order to test the applicability of different equipment and techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. The measurable objectives of the project were: to give recommendations on the most suitable methods for removing radon ({sup 222}Rn), uranium ({sup 238,234}U), radium ({sup 226}, {sup 228}Ra), lead ({sup 210}Pb) and polonium ({sup 210}Po) from drinking water of different qualities (i.e. soft, hard, iron-, manganese- and humus-rich, acidic) to test commercially available equipment for its ability to remove radionuclides; to find new materials, absorbents and membranes effective in the removal of radionuclides and to issue guidelines for the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes produced in water treatment. Radon could be removed efficiently (>95%) from domestic water supplies by both aeration and granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Defects in technical reliability or radon removal efficiency were observed in some aerators. The significant drawback of GAC filtration was the elevated gamma dose rates (up to 120 {mu}Sv/h) near the filter and the radioactivity of spent GAC. Aeration was found to be a suitable method for removing radon at waterworks, too. The removal efficiencies at waterworks where the aeration process was designed to remove radon or carbon dioxide were 67-99%. If the aeration process was properly designed, removal efficiencies higher than 95% could be attained. Uranium could best be removed (>95%) with strong basic anion exchange resins and radium by applying strong

  1. Geoelectric monitoring at the Boulder magnetic observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Blum

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite its importance to a range of applied and fundamental studies, and obvious parallels to a robust network of magnetic-field observatories, long-term geoelectric field monitoring is rarely performed. The installation of a new geoelectric monitoring system at the Boulder magnetic observatory of the US Geological Survey is summarized. Data from the system are expected, among other things, to be used for testing and validating algorithms for mapping North American geoelectric fields. An example time series of recorded electric and magnetic fields during a modest magnetic storm is presented. Based on our experience, we additionally present operational aspects of a successful geoelectric field monitoring system.

  2. Geoelectric monitoring at the Boulder magnetic observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Cletus; White, Tim; Sauter, Edward A.; Stewart, Duff; Bedrosian, Paul A.; Love, Jeffrey J.

    2017-01-01

    Despite its importance to a range of applied and fundamental studies, and obvious parallels to a robust network of magnetic-field observatories, long-term geoelectric field monitoring is rarely performed. The installation of a new geoelectric monitoring system at the Boulder magnetic observatory of the US Geological Survey is summarized. Data from the system are expected, among other things, to be used for testing and validating algorithms for mapping North American geoelectric fields. An example time series of recorded electric and magnetic fields during a modest magnetic storm is presented. Based on our experience, we additionally present operational aspects of a successful geoelectric field monitoring system.

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Boulder ZED Design Build - Boulder, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This case study describes a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Boulder, Colorado, that scored HERS 38 without PV and 0 with PV. This 2,504 ft2 custom home has advanced framed walls, superior insulation a ground-source heat pump, ERV, and triple-pane windows.

  4. University of Colorado at Boulder: Energy and Climate Revolving Fund. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The University of Colorado at Boulder's student run Environmental Center leads the campus' sustainability efforts. The Center created the Energy and Climate Revolving Fund (ECRF) in 2007 to finance energy-efficiency upgrades. The ECRF functions as a source of funding for project loans and provides a method of financing projects that seeks to save…

  5. An overview of ALARA considerations during Yankee Atomic`s Component Removal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados, B.; Babineau, G.; Colby, B.; Cox, B. [Yankee Nuclear Power Station, Rowe, MA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In Februrary 1992, Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) permanently shutdown Yankee Nuclear Power Station in Rowe, Massachusetts, after thirty-two years of efficient operation. Yankee`s plan decommissioning is to defer dismantlement until a low level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal facility is available. The plant will be maintained in a safe storage condition until a firm contract for the disposal of LLRW generated during decommissioning can be secured. Limited access to a LLRW disposal facility may occur during the safe storage period. Yankee intends to use these opportunities to remove components and structures. A Component Removal Project (CRP) was initiated in 1993 to take advantage of one of these opportunities. A Componenet Removal Project (CRP) was initiated in 1993 to take advantage of one of these opportunities. The CRP includes removal of four steam generators, the pressurizer, and segmentation of reactor vessel internals and preparation of LLRW for shipment and disposal at Chem-Nuclear`s Barnwell, South Carolina facility. The CRP is projected to be completed by June 1994 at an estimated total worker exposure of less than 160 person-rem.

  6. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Vintage on the Ponds in Delavan, WI Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained for the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Vintage on the Ponds in Delavan, WI. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of a Kinetico Macrolite® press...

  7. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL. U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT CLIMAX, MN. FINAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained for the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project following one year of operation at the Climax, Minnesota, site. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of Kin...

  8. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Northeastern Elementary School in Fountain City, IN - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Northeastern Elementary School in Fountain City, IN. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effectiveness of US Water Sys...

  9. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL AND ADSORPTIVE MEDIA USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT STEWART, MN. SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the EPA arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Stewart, MN facility. The main objective of the project is to evaluate the effectiveness of Siemens¿ Type II AERALA...

  10. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT BIG SAUK LAKE MOBILE HOME PARK IN SAUK CENTRE, MN. SIX MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Big Sauk Lake Mobile Home Park (BSLMHP) in Sauk Centre, MN. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the...

  11. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL. U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT VILLAGE ON THE PONDS IN DELAVAN, WI. SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Vintage on the Ponds at Delavan, WI. The objectives of the project are to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of Kine...

  12. Geological Investigations on Boulder-Clay of E. Groningen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijzel, van P.; Overweel, C.J.; Veenstra, H.J.

    1959-01-01

    In this article the results of a study on boulder-clay in the neighbourhood of Winschoten (N.E. Netherlands) are communicated (Chapter I). The underlying sediments of the boulder-clay in this area consist of fine preglacial sands and black clay. In the nuclei of the many drumlins a strongly

  13. Local late Amazonian boulder breakdown and denudation rate on Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, T.; Hauber, E.; Kleinhans, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Inactive fan surfaces become smoother and develop desert pavement over time by weathering and erosion. We use this mechanism to estimate late Amazonian boulder breakdown and surface denudation rates on a young (∼1.25 Ma) (Schon et al., 2009) fan on Mars. This is done by comparing boulder size and

  14. Managing environmental impact of bouldering as a niche outdoor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper proposes a normative management instrument to help environmental managers in the field of outdoor recreation and conservation limit the impact of sport climbing, bouldering in particular, as an action-sport activity. Evidence of the rising popularity of the bouldering sport and its associated impacts on ...

  15. Boulders and ponds on the Asteroid 433 Eros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombard, Andrew J.; Barnouin, Olivier S.; Prockter, Louise M.; Thomas, Peter C.

    2010-12-01

    There are ˜300 features on the Asteroid 433 Eros that morphologically resemble ponds (flat-floored and sharply embaying the bounding depression in which they sit). Because boulders on Eros are apparently eroding in place and because ponds with associated boulders tend to be larger than ponds without blocks, we propose that ponds form from thermally disaggregated and seismically flattened boulder material, under the assumption that repeated day/night cycling causes material fatigue that leads to erosion of the boulders. Results from a simple boulder emplacement/thermal erosion model with boulders emplaced in a few discrete events (i.e., large impacts) match well the observed size distribution. Under this scenario, the subtle color differences of ponds (somewhat bluer than the rest of the surface) might be due to some combination of less space-weathered material and density stratification of silicate-rich chondrules and more metal-rich matrix from a disaggregated boulder. Volume estimates of ponds derived from NEAR Laser Rangefinder profiles are consistent with what can be supplied by boulders. Ponds are also observed to be concentrated in regions of low slope and high elevation, which suggests the presence of a less mobile regolith and thus a contrast in the resistance to seismic shaking between the pond material and the material that makes up the bounding depression. Future tests include shake-table experiments and temperature cycling (fatigue) of ordinary chondrites to test the thermal erosion mechanism.

  16. A novel background field removal method for MRI using projection onto dipole fields (PDF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian; Khalidov, Ildar; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Spincemaille, Pascal; Liu, Jing; Tsiouris, A John; Wang, Yi

    2011-11-01

    For optimal image quality in susceptibility-weighted imaging and accurate quantification of susceptibility, it is necessary to isolate the local field generated by local magnetic sources (such as iron) from the background field that arises from imperfect shimming and variations in magnetic susceptibility of surrounding tissues (including air). Previous background removal techniques have limited effectiveness depending on the accuracy of model assumptions or information input. In this article, we report an observation that the magnetic field for a dipole outside a given region of interest (ROI) is approximately orthogonal to the magnetic field of a dipole inside the ROI. Accordingly, we propose a nonparametric background field removal technique based on projection onto dipole fields (PDF). In this PDF technique, the background field inside an ROI is decomposed into a field originating from dipoles outside the ROI using the projection theorem in Hilbert space. This novel PDF background removal technique was validated on a numerical simulation and a phantom experiment and was applied in human brain imaging, demonstrating substantial improvement in background field removal compared with the commonly used high-pass filtering method. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. The Carbon Dioxide Removal Model Intercomparison Project (CDR-MIP) Initial Results and Future Experiment Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, D. P.; Scott, V.; Lenton, A.; Vaughan, N.

    2016-12-01

    Continued anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are changing the climate threatening "severe, pervasive and irreversible" impacts. Inadequate emissions reduction is resulting in increased attention on Climate Intervention (CI) - deliberate interventions to counter climate change that seek to either modify the Earth's radiation budget, or remove the primary greenhouse gas from the atmosphere - Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR). The majority of future scenarios that do not exceed 2°C warming by 2100 include CDR methods. At present, there is little consensus on the efficacy and impacts of CDR and proposed CDR methods. In response, the Carbon Dioxide Removal Model Intercomparison Project (or CDR-MIP) has been initiated. This project brings together a suite of Earth System Models (ESMs) and Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICS) in a common framework to explore the potential, risks, and challenges of CDR and different proposed CDR methods. The first set of CDR-MIP experiments investigate climate "reversibility" and the response of the Earth system to idealized engineered permanent CO2 removal. Here we present early results of these experiments and also discuss the design and implementation of the next experiments that explore CDR via land use change and ocean alkalinization. In particular we will highlight which components of the simulated climate system exhibit "reversibility", when CO2 increases and then decreases, and the time scales over which this occurs. Many of the trends are similar in different models; however, there is some disagreement in the response of the simulated carbon cycle.

  18. Removing Dams: Project-Level Policy and Scientific Research Needs (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, B.

    2010-12-01

    More than 800 dams have been removed around the country, mostly “small” dams, under 25 feet in height. The total number of removals, however, is small relative to the number of deteriorating dams and the ecological impacts those structures continue to have on native riverine species and natural river function. The number of dam removal projects is increasing as aging dams continue to deteriorate and riverine species continue to decline. Practitioners and regulators need to find cost-effective project approaches that minimize short-term environmental impacts and maximize long-term benefits while keeping project costs manageable. Dam removals can be a regulatory challenge because they inherently have short-term impacts in order to achieve larger, self-sustaining, long-term benefits. These short-term impacts include sediment movement, construction access roads, and habitat conversion from lacustrine to riverine. Environmental regulations are designed to prevent degradation and have presented challenges for projects designed to benefit the environment. For example, a short-term release of sediment may exceed water quality standards for some period of time, but lead to a long-term beneficial project. Other regulatory challenges include permitting the loss of wetland area for increased native river function, or allowing the release of some level of contaminated sediment when the downstream sediment is similarly contaminated. Dam removal projects raise a range of engineering and scientific questions on effective implementation techniques such as appropriate sediment management approaches, construction equipment access approaches, invasive species management, channel/floodplain reconstruction, and active versus passive habitat rehabilitation. While practitioners have learned and refined implementation approaches over the last decade, more input is needed from researchers to help assess the effectiveness of those techniques, and to provide more effective techniques

  19. Cervical Spine Collar Removal by Emergency Room Nurses: A Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Guillaume; Forgione, Massimo; Lusignan, Francis; Lanoue, Marc-André; Drouin, Simon

    2017-08-22

    The Canadian C-Spine Rule (CCR) is a clinical decision aid to facilitate the safe removal of cervical collars in the alert, orientated, low-risk adult trauma patient. Few health care settings have assessed initiatives to train charge nurses to use the CCR. This practice improvement project conducted in a secondary trauma center in Canada aimed to (1) train charge nurses of the emergency room to use the CCR, (2) monitor its use throughout the project period, and (3) compare the assessments of the charge nurses with those of emergency physicians. The project began with the creation of an interdisciplinary team. Clinical guidelines were established by the interdisciplinary project team. Nine charge nurses of the emergency room were then trained to use the CCR (3 on each 8-hour shift). The use of the CCR was monitored throughout the project period, from June 1 to October 5, 2016. The 3 aims of this practice improvement project were attained successfully. Over a 5-month period, 114 patients were assessed with the CCR. Charge nurses removed the cervical collars for 54 of 114 patients (47%). A perfect agreement rate (114 of 114 patients, 100%) was attained between the assessments of the nurses and those of physicians. This project shows that the charge nurses of a secondary trauma center can use the CCR safely on alert, orientated, and low-risk adult trauma patients as demonstrated by the agreement in the assessments of emergency room nurses and physicians. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A story about distributions of dimensions and locations of boulders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2006-01-01

    distributions are well modeled by a Markov chain type of model. Different details of the data and their statistical analysis support several modeling conjectures concerning the glacial history of boulder deposition. In a companion paper it is described how the results of this beach boulder investigation...... for making a bored tunnel through the till deposit. Geographical universality was discovered through the statistical analysis of observations of boulder coordinates and dimension measures from wide spread cliff beach locations. One conclusion is that the joint size distribution up to some degree of modeling...

  1. Cosmogenic Ne-21 exposure ages of glacial boulders constrained by local bedrock erosion rates in Ong Valley, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, D. J.; Balco, G.; Putkonen, J.; Bibby, T.; Giusti, C.; Ball, A. E.; Hedberg, C. P.; Diamond, M. S.; Ringger, K. C.

    2013-12-01

    In order to accurately determine the exposure age of glacial boulders with cosmogenic nuclides, we need to know something about the erosion rate of the rock and any previous exposure the boulder may have had. Commonly, the erosion rate is simply assumed, and inheritance is dealt with by both sampling strategy and removing outliers from the data. In this study, we determine the rock erosion rate by measuring the concentration of cosmogenic Ne-21 in granite bedrock samples. This is used to constrain the exposure age of glacial boulders of the same lithology from the same locale. Ong Valley, Antarctica, (157.5 East, 83.25 South) is an ice-free valley in the Miller Range of the Central Transantarctic Mountains. The valley contains three distinct glacial drifts, and the oldest of these is well defined by an end moraine. We collected samples from six boulders on this end moraine, and six additional samples from the surrounding bedrock that is composed of the same lithology, the Hope Granite. The bedrock samples were collected from the ridge bordering the valley, well above the glacial limit. Because the bedrock samples have not been shielded by ice and have been exposed for millions of years, the concentration of cosmogenic Ne-21 in these samples reflects only the erosion rate of the granite. We separated quartz from the granite samples following standard laboratory methods and measured the concentration of cosmogenic Ne-21 in the quartz at the BGC Noble Gas Thermochronometry Lab. The concentration of cosmogenic Ne-21 in the bedrock samples is interpreted as reflecting only the erosion rate. We can then assume that the erosion rate of the bedrock is equal to the erosion rate of the glacial boulders on the end moraine because they have the same lithology and have been subjected to the same climate conditions during their exposure. With this information, we can better constrain the exposure age of the glacial boulders in Ong Valley.

  2. Space debris removal by ground-based lasers: main conclusions of the European project CLEANSPACE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmiller, Bruno; Jacquelard, Christophe; Eckel, Hans-Albert; Wnuk, Edwin

    2014-11-01

    Studies show that the number of debris in low Earth orbit is exponentially growing despite future debris release mitigation measures considered. Specifically, the already existing population of small and medium debris (between 1 cm and several dozens of cm) is today a concrete threat to operational satellites. A ground-based laser solution which can remove, at low expense and in a nondestructive way, hazardous debris around selected space assets appears as a highly promising answer. This solution is studied within the framework of the CLEANSPACE project which is part of the FP7 space program. The overall CLEANSPACE objective is: to propose an efficient and affordable global system architecture, to tackle safety regulation aspects, political implications and future collaborations, to develop affordable technological bricks, and to establish a roadmap for the development and the future implantation of a fully functional laser protection system. This paper will present the main conclusions of the CLEANSPACE project.

  3. DEMETERRES project: development of innovative technologies for removing radionuclides from contaminated solid and liquid matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagvardieff, Pierre; Barré, Yves; Blin, Virginie; Faure, Sylvain; Fornier, Anne; Grange, Didier; Grandjean, Agnès; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Henner, Pascale; Siroux, Brice; Leybros, Antoine; Messalier, Marc; Paillard, Hervé; Prévost, Thierry; Rennesson, Malvina; Sarrobert, Catherine; Vavasseur, Alain; Véry, Anne-Aliénor

    2017-09-01

    As part of the « post-accidental » management, the DEMETERRES project (RSNR PIA) proposes to develop innovative and environmentally friendly methods for removal of cesium and strontium from soils and liquid matrices in order to rehabilitate them for an agricultural use while minimizing the volume of generated wastes in accordance with the nuclear waste existing processes. Complementary approaches are used: they are based on physico-chemical technologies (such as foams flotation, supercritical CO2 extraction, extractants in fluidized bed reactor …) and biological ones (bioextractants, phytoextraction) which concepts are described. These researches aim to design innovative and performing extractants in term of selectivity and to achieve the pilot reactor phase for each of them. These pilots will group in a network to provide a technological platform lasting the project, to which will be attached an available network of experts. The respective advances of these researches are presented, completed of tests initiated in Japan on contaminated soils through partnerships.

  4. Boulder-based wave hindcasting underestimates storm size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David; Woods, Joesphine; Rosser, Nick; Hansom, James; Naylor, Larissa

    2017-04-01

    Large boulder-size clasts represent an important archive of erosion and wave activity on the coast. From tropical coral reefs to eroding cliffs in the high-latitudes, boulders have been used to hindcast the frequency and magnitude of cyclones and tsunami. Such reconstructions are based on the balance between the hydrodynamic forces acting on individual clasts and the counteracting resistive forces of friction and gravity. Here we test the three principle hindcasting relationships on nearly 1000 intertidal boulders in North Yorkshire, U.K using a combination of field and airborne terrestrial LiDAR data. We quantify the predicted versus actual rates of movement and the degree to which local geomorphology can retard or accelerate transport. Actual clast movement is significantly less than predicted values, regardless of boulder volume, shape or location. In situ cementation of clasts to the substrate by marine organisms and clustering of clasts increases friction thereby preventing transport. The implication is that boulders do not always provide a reliable estimation of wave height on the coast and reliance solely on hindcasting relationships leads to an under prediction of the frequency and magnitude of past storm wave activity. The crucial need for process field studies to refine boulder transport models is thus demonstrated.

  5. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA -- USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT ROLLINSFORD, NH, SIX MONTH EVALUTION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Rollinsford Water and Sewer District facility in Rollinsford, NH. The objectives of the project are to...

  6. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA. USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT VALLEY VISTA, AZ FINAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at an Arizona Water Company (AWC) facility in Sedona, AZ, commonly referred to as Valley Vista. The objectives of the project were t...

  7. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media USEPA Demonstration Project at Rimrock AZ Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Arizona Water Company (AWC) facility in Rimrock, AZ. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: 1) the effectiveness of ...

  8. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA, USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT RIMROCK, AZ, SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Rimrock, AZ. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the effectiveness of AdEdge Arsenic Package Uni...

  9. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTION MEDIA USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT BROWN CITY, MI SIX MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project in Brown City, MI. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the effectiveness of Severn Trent Services (...

  10. Boulder Ozone Sonde Data Analyses for Multiple Tropopause Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Manney, G. L.; Johnson, B.; Minschwaner, K.; Torres, L.; Lawrence, Z. D.

    2014-12-01

    Boulder ozone profile measurements tend to feature structures with multiple layers in the troposphere, so called laminae. These have been shown to be related to several phenomena, including stratospheric air intrusions that are transported to the location of measurements and local gravity wave perturbations (Boulder is located near the Rocky Mountain range where gravity waves are prevalent). In addition, observations indicate that air from the tropical tropopause layer can be transported into regions with multiple tropopauses over the middle latitudes in the vicinity of the subtropical jets. We use GMAO's GEOS-5 data assimilation system products, including Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), interpolated to Boulder, Colorado, USA (40N, 105W) to assess incidence of upper tropospheric jets that influence UTLS ozone distribution. The proximity of the subtropical jet to Boulder results in frequent observations of multiple tropopauses. We analyze ozonesonde data launched in June-July 2014 to determine the origins of laminae observed in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS). Our tools include back trajectory analysis coupled with 4D satellite ozone profile data, including those from NASA's Aura Microwave Limb Sounder instrument. Filaments causing laminae in ozone profiles observed at Boulder will be tracked to origins in either stratospheric or tropospheric intrusions using reverse domain-filling (RDF) trajectory methods. Detailed studies of several ozone profiles collected over Boulder in June/July 2014 will help determine techniques for future analysis of a larger dataset that goes back to 1978. Ozone variability in the UTLS over Boulder is of importance for studies of local climatological ozone conditions, their causes/attribution, and with regard to EPA ozone regulations at the mountain sites across the USA.

  11. Mechanics of boulder creation on stepped platforms during storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herterich, James; Dias, Frederic

    2017-04-01

    Overtopping waves can cause cliff erosion in the form of very large boulders. Impacts may induce microcracks in rock and hydraulic compression may detach a boulder along pre-existing bedrock joints. The coastal geological structure (rock type, fault orientation, joint alignment, etc.) is important in determining weaknesses in the rock that may lead to erosion. On the Aran Islands (Ireland), the cliff-tops are stepped platforms. Between winter storm periods, it is observed that boulders are created from the faces of the steps. This suggests that not only are the waves powerful enough to overtop the cliff, but the overtopping flow is still energetic enough to erode and transport large boulders. In this talk, we consider the wave-induced stress in a crack that extends into the cliff. The bending stress on the undersurface of the rock above the crack may induce microcracks. During high-pressure wave events, these microcracks can grow to complete fracture, creating new boulders. In this sense, the stepped platforms are "peeled" back over time. We model and analyze structural and wave conditions that affect this process.

  12. DEMETERRES project: development of innovative technologies for removing radionuclides from contaminated solid and liquid matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chagvardieff Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the « post-accidental » management, the DEMETERRES project (RSNR PIA proposes to develop innovative and environmentally friendly methods for removal of cesium and strontium from soils and liquid matrices in order to rehabilitate them for an agricultural use while minimizing the volume of generated wastes in accordance with the nuclear waste existing processes. Complementary approaches are used: they are based on physico-chemical technologies (such as foams flotation, supercritical CO2 extraction, extractants in fluidized bed reactor … and biological ones (bioextractants, phytoextraction which concepts are described. These researches aim to design innovative and performing extractants in term of selectivity and to achieve the pilot reactor phase for each of them. These pilots will group in a network to provide a technological platform lasting the project, to which will be attached an available network of experts. The respective advances of these researches are presented, completed of tests initiated in Japan on contaminated soils through partnerships.

  13. Somatic Profile of the Elite Boulderers in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozimek, Mariusz; Krawczyk, Marcin; Zadarko, Emilian; Barabasz, Zbigniew; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Stanula, Arkadiusz; Mucha, Dawid K; Jurczak, Adam; Mucha, Dariusz

    2017-04-01

    Ozimek, M, Krawczyk, M, Zadarko, E, Barabasz, Z, Ambroży, T, Stanula, A, Mucha, DK, Jurczak, A, and Mucha, D. Somatic profile of the elite boulderers in Poland. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 963-970, 2017-The study was designed to determine the values of selected somatic characteristics, body proportions, and the somatotype of elite bouldering climbers in Poland and to establish the relationships between the values of the somatic characteristics and climber's performance in bouldering. The study was conducted in a group of elite sport climbers (n = 10) who were ranked by the Polish Mountaineering Association in 2011, 2012, and 2013. The anthropometric measurements were made according to the relevant rules and standards. The results were used to calculate the values of somatic variables and body proportion indices for the climbers and to establish their somatotype. The results were compared with the data on untrained students (n = 165). The boulderers were found to differ significantly from the controls regarding body height (p somatotypes of the analyzed groups, the biggest differences were observed for the levels of mesomorphy (NS) and endomorphy, the latter being statistically significant (p somatotype) and a low body fat percentage (low endomorphy). Regarding body proportions, greater than average arm length to body height ratio and well-developed musculature of the limbs are required for a boulderer to perform on a competitive level. High arm length index and low body fat percentage represent the strongest determinants of performance in bouldering. It can be assumed that arm length index has a high diagnostic value for recruitment and selection of climbers.

  14. Boulder Dislodgment Reloaded: New insights from boulder transport and dislodgement by tsunamis and storms from three-dimensional numerical simulations with GPUSPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R.; Zainali, A.

    2014-12-01

    Boulders can be found on many coastlines around the globe. They are generally thought to be moved either during coastal storms or tsunamis because they are too heavy to be moved by more common marine or coastal processes. To understand storm and tsunami risk at given coastline, the event histories of both events need to be separated to produce a robust event statistics for quantitative risk analyses. Because boulders are most likely only moved by coastal storms or tsunamis, they are very suitable to produce the data basis for such event statistics. Boulder transport problem has been approached by comparing the driving with resisting forces acting on a boulder. However, we argue that this approach is not sufficient because the comparison of resisting and driving forces only constitutes boulder motion, but not for boulder dislodgment. Boulder motion means that the boulder starts to move out of its pocket. However, this motion does not guarantee that the boulder will reach the critical dislodgment position. Boulder dislodgment is a necessary condition to identify whether or not a boulder has moved. For boulder dislodgement, an equation of motion is needed, and that equation is Newtons Second Law of Motion (NSL). We perform fully coupled three-dimensional numerical simulation of boulders moved by waves where the boulders move according to NSL. Our numerical simulations are the first of their kind applied to tsunami and storm boulder motion. They show how storm and tsunami waves interact with boulders in a more realistic physical setting, and highlight the importance of submergence. Based on our simulations we perform a dimensional analysis that identifies the Froude number as important parameter, which can be considered large only in the front of tsunami waves, but small in the rest of tsunami wave and also generally small in storm waves. From a general point of view, our results indicate that the boulder transport problem is more complex than recently considered, and

  15. Factors influencing growth of the African penguin colony at Boulders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on growth of the Boulders colony of African penguins Spheniscus demersus from inception in 1985 to the present. More than 900 pairs now breed there. Growth of the colony slowed in 1995 and 1996 and reversed in 1998, coinciding with periods of low abundance of Cape anchovy Engraulis capensis off ...

  16. City of Boulder, Colorado Municipal Tree Resource Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.G. McPherson; J.R. Simpson; P.J. Peper; S.L. Gardner; K.E. Vargas; Q. Xiao

    2005-01-01

    Boulder is a vibrant city, renowned for its livability and cultural wealth and well known for its Smart Growth policies that protect and restore environmental quality while enhancing economic opportunity. The city maintains trees as an integral component of the urban infrastructure. Research indicates that healthy trees can mitigate impacts associated with the built...

  17. Testing Wetland Delineation Indicators in New England Boulder Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    NRCS 2009). The Sad - dleback boulder field is located at an elevation of 1830 ft (Fig. 2) and was deposited on the toe of a glacial slope (Fig. 3...August and Sep- tember are in large part attributable to two large storms that were rem- nants of tropical storms. ERDC/CRREL TR-12-4 10 Figure 6

  18. Erratic boulders in Switzerland, a geological and cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynard, Emmanuel

    2015-04-01

    Erratic boulders are stones transported over quite long distances by glaciers and that differ from the type of rock upon which they rely. They range from the size of pebbles to large boulders weighing several thousand tons. Erratic boulders are significant geosites (Reynard, 2004) for several reasons. (1) First, they are indicators of former glacier extensions by marking glaciers' path, size and volume. In Switzerland, they allowed mapping the extension of large Alpine glaciers (the Rhine and Rhone glaciers, in particular) and their retreat stages (e.g. the Monthey erratic boulders that mark an important lateglacial stage of the Rhone glacier). Crystalline erratic boulders along the Jura range (limestone mountains) were used to map the altitude reached by the Rhone glacier during the two last glaciations. Precise mapping of crystalline and limestone boulders distribution also enabled mapping local Jura glaciers' recurrences after the Rhone glacier retreat. (2) During the last decades, several erratic boulders were used for cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating, which allowed impressive advances in palaeoclimatic research. (3) Erratic blocks have also an ecological interest by the fact that they "have transported" specific habitats in areas far away from their origin (e.g. acid crystalline rocks and soils in limestone areas such as in the Jura). For all these reasons, several erratic boulders were classified in the inventory of Swiss geosites. Erratic boulders also have a significant cultural value (Lugon et al., 2006). (1) The Glacier Garden in Lucerne was discovered in 1872. It comprises various surfaces of "roches moutonnées", potholes and large erratic blocks that document the presence of the Reuss glacier. Considered as a natural monument it is now one of the most famous touristic attraction of Lucerne and Central Switzerland. (2) The Pierre Bergère stone, situated in Salvan (Mont-Blanc massif, South-western Switzerland), is the place where future Nobel Prize

  19. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media USEPA Demonstration Project at Bow, NH Final performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the White Rock Water Company (WRWC) public water system, a small residential drinking w...

  20. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT VALLEY VISTA, AZ SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the EPA arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Arizona Water Company (AWC) facility in Sedona, AZ, commonly referred to as Valley Vista. The main objective of the...

  1. A time motion analysis of bouldering style competitive rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Dominic J; Olsen, Peter D

    2010-05-01

    Limited research has been performed on competitive bouldering. The aim of this study was to quantify the movement dynamics of elite boulder climbers. Six climbers were filmed during a national competition consisting of 5 novel climbing problems or routes. Two problems were randomly selected and film footage was analyzed using Kandle Swinger Pro software to determine type and duration (seconds) of bouldering movements. All subjects provided consent, and the study had ethical approval. The mean +/- SD were determined for number of attempts per problem, duration of attempt, time on hold, and time to reach between holds. Exercise:recovery ratios were also calculated. On average, climbers attempted a problem 3.0 +/- 0.5 times, with an attempt lasting 28.9 +/- 10.8 seconds and rest periods of 114 +/- 31 seconds between attempts. Average time gripping holds was 7.9 +/- 1.3 seconds, with approximately 0.5 +/- 0.1 seconds recovery between reaching for holds. The exercise-to-recovery ratio was approximately 1:4 for attempting a problem and approximately 13:1 for forearm muscles during climbing. The exercise-to-recovery ratios allow sufficient time for recovery during and after a problem. However, the prolonged contraction of forearm muscles indicates the importance of strength and endurance in these muscles. Video analysis was found to be a useful tool for the quantification of movement characteristics of competitive elite boulders. Data collected could be utilized in the design of sport-specific tests and training programs. Future research could examine a larger number of athletes and problems and help develop performance tests and training interventions for bouldering.

  2. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media, U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at LEADS Head Start Building in Buckeye Lake, OH - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained for the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Licking Economic Action Development Study (LEADS) Head Start School in Buckeye Lake, Ohio. The objectives of the project were to evaluate...

  3. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Richmond Elementary School in Susanville, CA Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained for the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Richmond Elementary School in Susanville, CA. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of an Aquatic Treatme...

  4. 49 CFR 393.136 - What are the rules for securing large boulders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., so that the boulder may roll, it must be placed in a crib made of hardwood timber fixed to the deck...-separated points of contact that prevent its tendency to roll in any direction. (5) If a boulder is tapered... satisfied: (1) The boulder must be secured individually with at least two chain tiedowns forming an “X...

  5. Boulder shores in South Africa – a distinct but poorly documented ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Boulder shores in South Africa – a distinct but poorly documented coastal habitat type. ... We propose that boulder shores merit separate management and conservation targets as compared to rock-platforms, though the ecology of boulder shores in the region remains very poorly known and requires further study. Keywords: ...

  6. NASA’s Asteroid Redirect Mission: The Boulder Capture Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Paul; Nuth, Joseph A.; Mazanek, Dan D.; Merrill, Raymond G.; Reeves, David M.; Naasz, Bo J.

    2014-11-01

    NASA is examining two options for the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM), which will return asteroid material to a Lunar Distant Retrograde Orbit (LDRO) using a robotic solar-electric-propulsion spacecraft, called the Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV). Once the ARV places the asteroid material into the LDRO, a piloted mission will rendezvous and dock with the ARV. After docking, astronauts will conduct two extravehicular activities (EVAs) to inspect and sample the asteroid material before returning to Earth. One option involves capturing an entire small (˜4-10 m diameter) near-Earth asteroid (NEA) inside a large inflatable bag. However, NASA is examining another option that entails retrieving a boulder (˜1-5 m) via robotic manipulators from the surface of a larger (˜100+ m) pre-characterized NEA. This option can leverage robotic mission data to help ensure success by targeting previously (or soon to be) well-characterized NEAs. For example, the data from the Hayabusa mission has been utilized to develop detailed mission designs that assess options and risks associated with proximity and surface operations. Hayabusa’s target NEA, Itokawa, has been identified as a valid target and is known to possess hundreds of appropriately sized boulders on its surface. Further robotic characterization of additional NEAs (e.g., Bennu and 1999 JU3) by NASA’s OSIRIS REx and JAXA’s Hayabusa 2 missions is planned to begin in 2018. The boulder option is an extremely large sample-return mission with the prospect of bringing back many tons of well-characterized asteroid material to the Earth-Moon system. The candidate boulder from the target NEA can be selected based on inputs from the world-wide science community, ensuring that the most scientifically interesting boulder be returned for subsequent sampling. This boulder option for NASA’s ARM can leverage knowledge of previously characterized NEAs from prior robotic missions, which provides more certainty of the target NEA

  7. Lung tumor tracking, trajectory reconstruction, and motion artifact removal using rotational cone-beam projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John Henry

    Management of lung tumor motion is a challenging and important problem for modern, highly conformal radiotherapy. Poorly managed tumor motion can lead to imaging artifacts, poor target coverage, and unnecessarily high dose to normal tissues. The goals of this dissertation are to develop a real-time localization algorithm that is applicable to rotational cone-beam projections acquired during regular (˜60 seconds) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans, and to use these tracking results to reconstruct a tumor's trajectory, shape and size immediately prior to treatment. Direct tumor tracking is performed via a multiple template matching algorithm where templates are derived from digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) generated from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Three-dimensional (3D) tumor trajectories are reconstructed by binning twodimensional (2D) tracking results according to their corresponding respiratory phases. Within each phase bin a point is calculated approximating the 3D tumor position, resulting in a 3D phase-binned trajectory. These 3D trajectories are used to construct motion blurring functions which are in turn used to remove motion blurring artifacts from reconstructed CBCT volumes with a deconvolution algorithm. Finally, the initial direct tracking algorithm is combined with diaphragm-based tracking to develop a more robust "combined" tracking algorithm. Respiratory motion phantoms (digital and physical), and example patient cases were used to test each technique. Direct tumor tracking performed well for both phantom cases, with sub-millimeter root mean square error (e rms) in the axial and tangential imager dimensions. In patient studies the algorithm performed well for many angles, but exhibited large errors for some projections. Accurate 3D trajectories were successfully reconstructed for patients and phantoms. Errors in reconstructed trajectories were smaller than the errors in the direct tracking results in all cases. The

  8. Frequency-Range Distribution of Boulders Around Cone Crater: Relevance to Landing Site Hazard Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg-Watkins, R. N.; Jolliff, B. L.; Lawrence, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Boulders represent a landing hazard that must be addressed in the planning of future landings on the Moon. A boulder under a landing leg can contribute to deck tilt and boulders can damage spacecraft during landing. Using orbital data to characterize boulder populations at locations where landers have safely touched down (Apollo, Luna, Surveyor, and Chang'e-3 sites) is important for determining landing hazard criteria for future missions. Additionally, assessing the distribution of boulders can address broader science issues, e.g., how far craters distribute boulders and how this distribution varies as a function of crater size and age. The availability of new Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) images [1] enables the use of boulder size- and range frequency distributions for a variety of purposes [2-6]. Boulders degrade over time and primarily occur around young or fresh craters that are large enough to excavate bedrock. Here we use NAC images to analyze boulder distributions around Cone crater (340 m diameter) at the Apollo 14 site. Cone crater (CC) was selected because it is the largest crater where astronaut surface photography is available for a radial traverse to the rim. Cone crater is young (approximately 29 Ma [7]) relative to the time required to break down boulders [3,8], giving us a data point for boulder range-frequency distributions (BRFDs) as a function of crater age.

  9. Astronaut Harrison Schmitt standing next to boulder during third EVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt is photographed standing next to a huge, split boulder during the third Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA-3) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site on the Moon. The lunar rover, which transported Schmitt and Eugene A. Cernan, mission commander, to this extravehicular station from their Lunar Module, is seen in the background. Schmitt is the Apollo 17 lunar module pilot. The mosaic is made from two frames from Apollo 17 Hasselblad magaine 140.

  10. Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission: Robotic Boulder Capture Option Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Merrill, Raymond G.; Belbin, Scott P.; Reeves, David M.; Earle, Kevin D.; Naasz, Bo J.; Abell, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently studying an option for the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission (ARRM) that would capture a multi-ton boulder (typically 2-4 meters in size) from the surface of a large (is approximately 100+ meter) Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) and return it to cislunar space for subsequent human and robotic exploration. This alternative mission approach, designated the Robotic Boulder Capture Option (Option B), has been investigated to determine the mission feasibility and identify potential differences from the initial ARRM concept of capturing an entire small NEA (4-10 meters in size), which has been designated the Small Asteroid Capture Option (Option A). Compared to the initial ARRM concept, Option B allows for centimeter-level characterization over an entire large NEA, the certainty of target NEA composition type, the ability to select the boulder that is captured, numerous opportunities for mission enhancements to support science objectives, additional experience operating at a low-gravity planetary body including extended surface contact, and the ability to demonstrate future planetary defense strategies on a hazardous-size NEA. Option B can leverage precursor missions and existing Agency capabilities to help ensure mission success by targeting wellcharacterized asteroids and can accommodate uncertain programmatic schedules by tailoring the return mass.

  11. Removing Mid-Spatial Frequency (MSF) Errors Using Stress-Polishing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This IRAD proposes to evaluate how stress polishing can be used to extend the application of super-polishing to fast aspheres and freeforms, removing sub-aperture...

  12. Novel Conductive Water Removal Membrane (CWRM) for PEM Passive Fuel Cell Operation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ElectroChem proposes a Phase II program to advance its Phase I effort, to develop a conductive water removal membrane to enable passive, high current density PEMFC...

  13. Removing Mid-Spatial Frequency Errors on Curved Surfaces with VIBE Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Optimax VIBE process is a full-aperture, conformal polishing process incorporating high frequency motion that rapidly removes sub-surface damage in a VIBE...

  14. Advanced Product Water Removal and Management (APWR) Fuel Cell System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a passive, self-regulating, gravity-independent Advanced Product Water Removal and management (APWR) system for incorporation into Polymer...

  15. Bio-Electrochemical Carbon Dioxide Removal for Air Revitalization in Exploration Life Support Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An important aspect of the ISS air revitalization system for life support is the removal of carbon dioxide from cabin air and retrieves oxygen from CO2. The current...

  16. Advanced Product Water Removal and Management (APWR) Fuel Cell System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a passive, self-regulating, gravity-independent Advanced Product Water Removal (APWR) system for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM)...

  17. Boulder Distributions at Legacy Landing Sites: Assessing Regolith Production Rates and Landing Site Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, R. N.; Jolliff, B. L.; Lawrence, S. J.; Hayne, P. O.; Ghent, R. R.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how the distribution of boulders on the lunar surface changes over time is key to understanding small-scale erosion processes and the rate at which rocks become regolith. Boulders degrade over time, primarily as a result of micrometeorite bombardment so their residence time at the surface can inform the rate at which rocks become regolith or become buried within regolith. Because of the gradual degradation of exposed boulders, we expect that the boulder population around an impact crater will decrease as crater age increases. Boulder distributions around craters of varying ages are needed to understand regolith production rates, and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) images provide one of the best tools for conducting these studies. Using NAC images to assess how the distribution of boulders varies as a function of crater age provides key constraints for boulder erosion processes. Boulders also represent a potential hazard that must be addressed in the planning of future lunar landings. A boulder under a landing leg can contribute to deck tilt, and boulders can damage spacecraft during landing. Using orbital data to characterize boulder populations at locations where landers have safely touched down (Apollo, Luna, Surveyor, Chang'e-3) provides validation for landed mission hazard avoidance planning. Additionally, counting boulders at legacy landing sites is useful because: 1) LROC has extensive coverage of these sites at high resolutions (approximately 0.5 meters per pixel). 2) Returned samples from craters at these sites have been radiometrically dated, allowing assessment of how boulder distributions vary as a function of crater age. 3) Surface photos at these sites can be used to correlate with remote sensing measurements.

  18. Large-scale dam removal in the northeast United States: documenting ecological responses to the Penobscot River Restoration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, M. J.; Aponte Clarke, G.; Baeder, C.; McCaw, D.; Royte, J.; Saunders, R.; Sheehan, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Penobscot River Restoration Project aims to improve aquatic connectivity in New England's second largest watershed ( 22,000 km2) by removing the two lowermost, mainstem dams and bypassing a third dam on a principal tributary upstream. Project objectives include: restoring unobstructed access to the entire historic riverine range for five lower river diadromous species including Atlantic and shortnose sturgeon; significantly improving access to upstream habitat for six upper river diadromous species including Atlantic salmon; reconnecting trophic linkages between headwater areas and the Gulf of Maine; restoring fluvial processes to the former impoundments; improving recreational and Penobscot Nation cultural opportunities; and maintaining basin-wide hydropower output. The project is expected to have landscape-scale benefits and the need for a significant investment in long-term monitoring and evaluation to formally quantify ecosystem response has been recognized. A diverse group of federal, state, tribal, NGO, and academic partners has developed a long-term monitoring and evaluation program composed of nine studies that began in 2009. Including American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding that leveraged partner contributions, we have invested nearly $2M to date in pre- and post-removal investigations that evaluate geomorphology/bed sediment, water quality, wetlands, and fisheries. Given the number of affected diadromous species and the diversity of their life histories, we have initiated six distinct, but related, fisheries investigations to document these expected changes: Atlantic salmon upstream and downstream passage efficiency using passive integrated transponder (PIT) and acoustic telemetry; fish community structure via an index of biotic integrity (IBI); total diadromous fish biomass through hydroacoustics; shortnose sturgeon spawning and habitat use via active and passive acoustic telemetry; and freshwater-marine food web interactions by

  19. NASA's asteroid redirect mission: Robotic boulder capture option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, P.; Nuth, J.; Mazanek, D.; Merrill, R.; Reeves, D.; Naasz, B.

    2014-07-01

    NASA is examining two options for the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM), which will return asteroid material to a Lunar Distant Retrograde Orbit (LDRO) using a robotic solar-electric-propulsion spacecraft, called the Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV). Once the ARV places the asteroid material into the LDRO, a piloted mission will rendezvous and dock with the ARV. After docking, astronauts will conduct two extravehicular activities (EVAs) to inspect and sample the asteroid material before returning to Earth. One option involves capturing an entire small (˜4--10 m diameter) near-Earth asteroid (NEA) inside a large inflatable bag. However, NASA is also examining another option that entails retrieving a boulder (˜1--5 m) via robotic manipulators from the surface of a larger (˜100+ m) pre-characterized NEA. The Robotic Boulder Capture (RBC) option can leverage robotic mission data to help ensure success by targeting previously (or soon to be) well-characterized NEAs. For example, the data from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) Hayabusa mission has been utilized to develop detailed mission designs that assess options and risks associated with proximity and surface operations. Hayabusa's target NEA, Itokawa, has been identified as a valid target and is known to possess hundreds of appropriately sized boulders on its surface. Further robotic characterization of additional NEAs (e.g., Bennu and 1999 JU_3) by NASA's OSIRIS REx and JAXA's Hayabusa 2 missions is planned to begin in 2018. This ARM option reduces mission risk and provides increased benefits for science, human exploration, resource utilization, and planetary defense.

  20. Rounded boulders on Itokawa as clues to geological processes in the early solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J.; Rizk, B.

    2015-12-01

    Large rounded boulders on Itokawa are a surprising find and may be evidence of forceful inter-boulder collisions occurring over protracted periods of time. Surface textures of some boulders are reminiscent of those on terrestrial aeolian sand grains despite five orders of magnitude difference in scale. Using Hertzian analysis and fracture strength data, we calculate that the maximum collisional velocities involved in the comminution process are ~6-7 m/s. We hypothesise that boulder rounding could be a product of collisions in a gravitationally stable orbiting debris field in which boulders acquire collisional energy from YORP spin. Collisional paths may be instigated by Yarkovsky drift and gyroscopic effects of rotation. Collisional energy is dissipated by elastic damping, but rapidly renewed by YORP spinup that takes only hundreds to thousands of years to regenerate comminution-strength collisions. The rounded boulders on Itokawa are found amongst angular, unworn material which suggests a mixed origin for Itokawa's regolith.

  1. Clast mobility within boulder beaches over two winters in Galicia, northwestern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Alberti, Augusto; Trenhaile, Alan S.

    2015-11-01

    A micro-drone was used to make low altitude flights over boulder beaches at Laxe Brava and Oia in Galicia, northwestern Spain. Flights were made in July 2012, May 2013, and spring 2014. High resolution digital terrain models and orthophotographs, combined with GIS mapping, were used to monitor changes in the position of thousands of boulders. Maximum storm wave height was higher in the winter of 2013-2014 than in winter 2012-2013, and this was reflected in an increase in the proportion of the boulders that moved in the two winters, from 17% to almost 48% at Laxe Brava, and from 53% to almost 88% at Oia. The greater mobility of the boulders at Oia can be attributed in part to their generally smaller size, although there was considerable overlap between the size of boulders that moved and those that did not move within and between the two beaches. There were mobile boulders in areas up to several metres above the high tidal level on both beaches, and boulder transport in the shore-normal and alongshore directions triggered some changes in the beach profiles, particularly in the middle to upper parts of the beaches. Estimates of threshold transport conditions, scaled to boulder mass, breaker height, and other variables, suggested that all but the very largest boulders on the two beaches should have been mobile, even during the summer months when the waves were much lower than in winter. Model over-prediction can be attributed to a number of factors, including: constraints on movement imposed by surrounding boulders; differences in boulder size and their effect on pivoting angles and on the degree to which boulders are exposed or sheltered from wave impact; and difficulties in assigning appropriate values to model coefficients.

  2. NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission: A Robotic Boulder Capture Option for Science, Human Exploration, Resource Utilization, and Planetary Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, P.; Nuth, J.; Mazanek, D.; Merrill, R.; Reeves, D.; Naasz, B.

    2014-01-01

    boulder be returned for subsequent sampling. In addition, the material surrounding the boulder can be collected from the surface, thus providing geological contextual information and additional samples of NEA regolith. The robotic manipulators used for capturing the boulder will ensure some of the surface remains undisturbed and that the boulder will retain its structural integrity, which will preserve the context of any samples collected by the astronauts and ensure a high level of science return. Human Exploration: Due to the coherent nature of the boulder that will be collected, entire encapsulation of the asteroid material is not required. This facilitates exploration and sample collection of the boulder by astronauts in a variety of ways. The total time for EVA during the crew portion of the mission is very limited. Current estimates are that each of the two EVAs will only last four hours. The RBC option will allow crew members to have good situational awareness of the work site and quickly identify sample sites of interest. In addition, the samples to be collected can be readily accessed without having to deal with removal of an encapsulation system, which adds extra complexity and risk for the astronauts during EVA. Resource Utilization: One of the most crucial aspects for resource utilization is the identification and collection of appropriate materials (e.g., volatiles, organics, metals, etc.) that contain components of interest. Prior characterization of NEAs is required in order to increase the likelihood that appropriate materials will be returned. Ground-based observations of small (resources, and both are already targets of currently planned robotic missions that will characterize their physical properties in great detail. Planetary Defense: The RBC option involves interaction with a well- characterized potentially hazardoussized NEA that would enable NASA to conduct one or more planetary defense demonstrations. The primary method would use the collected

  3. Bear Creek Valley Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Action Project Plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The Bear Creek Valley Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Action Project Plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Y/ER-301) was prepared (1) to safely, cost-effectively, and efficiently evaluate the environmental impact of solid material in the two debris areas in the context of industrial land uses (as defined in the Bear Creek Valley Feasibility Study) to support the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Assessment and (2) to evaluate, define, and implement the actions to mitigate these impacts. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.x.01.20.01.08.

  4. Compliance Monitoring of Underwater Blasting for Rock Removal at Warrior Point, Columbia River Channel Improvement Project, 2009/2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Skalski, J. R.; Seaburg, Adam

    2011-05-10

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) conducted the 20-year Columbia River Channel Improvement Project (CRCIP) to deepen the navigation channel between Portland, Oregon, and the Pacific Ocean to allow transit of fully loaded Panamax ships (100 ft wide, 600 to 700 ft long, and draft 45 to 50 ft). In the vicinity of Warrior Point, between river miles (RM) 87 and 88 near St. Helens, Oregon, the USACE conducted underwater blasting and dredging to remove 300,000 yd3 of a basalt rock formation to reach a depth of 44 ft in the Columbia River navigation channel. The purpose of this report is to document methods and results of the compliance monitoring study for the blasting project at Warrior Point in the Columbia River.

  5. An advanced three-phase physical, experimental and numerical method for tsunami induced boulder transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetjen, Jan; Engel, Max; Prasad Pudasaini, Shiva; Schüttrumpf, Holger; Brückner, Helmut

    2017-04-01

    Coasts around the world are affected by high-energy wave events like storm surges or tsunamis depending on their regional climatological and geological settings. By focusing on tsunami impacts, we combine the abilities and experiences of different scientific fields aiming at improved insights of near- and onshore tsunami hydrodynamics. We investigate the transport of coarse clasts - so called boulders - due to tsunami impacts by a multi-methodology approach of numerical modelling, laboratory experiments, and sedimentary field records. Coupled numerical hydrodynamic and boulder transport models (BTM) are widely applied for analysing the impact characteristics of the transport by tsunami, such as wave height and flow velocity. Numerical models able to simulate past tsunami events and the corresponding boulder transport patterns with high accuracy and acceptable computational effort can be utilized as powerful forecasting models predicting the impact of a coast approaching tsunami. We have conducted small-scale physical experiments in the tilting flume with real shaped boulder models. Utilizing the structure from motion technique (Westoby et al., 2012) we reconstructed real boulders from a field study on the Island of Bonaire (Lesser Antilles, Caribbean Sea, Engel & May, 2012). The obtained three-dimensional boulder meshes are utilized for creating downscaled replica of the real boulder for physical experiments. The results of the irregular shaped boulder are compared to experiments with regular shaped boulder models to achieve a better insight about the shape related influence on transport patterns. The numerical model is based on the general two-phase mass flow model by Pudasaini (2012) enhanced for boulder transport simulations. The boulder is implemented using the immersed boundary technique (Peskin, 2002) and the direct forcing approach. In this method Cartesian grids (fluid and particle phase) and Lagrangian meshes (boulder) are combined. By applying the

  6. Comparison of ozone retrievals from the Pandora spectrometer system and Dobson spectrophotometer in Boulder, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, J.; Evans, R.; Cede, A.; Abuhassan, N.; Petropavlovskikh, I.; McConville, G.

    2015-08-01

    A comparison of retrieved total column ozone (TCO) amounts between the Pandora #34 spectrometer system and the Dobson #061 spectrophotometer from direct-sun observations was performed on the roof of the Boulder, Colorado, NOAA building. This paper, part of an ongoing study, covers a 1-year period starting on 17 December 2013. Both the standard Dobson and Pandora TCO retrievals required a correction, TCOcorr = TCO (1 + C(T)), using a monthly varying effective ozone temperature, TE, derived from a temperature and ozone profile climatology. The correction is used to remove a seasonal difference caused by using a fixed temperature in each retrieval algorithm. The respective corrections C(TE) are CPandora = 0.00333(TE-225) and CDobson = -0.0013(TE-226.7) per degree K. After the applied corrections removed most of the seasonal retrieval dependence on ozone temperature, TCO agreement between the instruments was within 1 % for clear-sky conditions. For clear-sky observations, both co-located instruments tracked the day-to-day variation in total column ozone amounts with a correlation of r2 = 0.97 and an average offset of 1.1 ± 5.8 DU. In addition, the Pandora TCO data showed 0.3 % annual average agreement with satellite overpass data from AURA/OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) and 1 % annual average offset with Suomi-NPP/OMPS (Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership, the nadir viewing portion of the Ozone Mapper Profiler Suite).

  7. CT truncation artifact removal using water-equivalent thicknesses derived from truncated projection data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Bose, Supratik; Shukla, Himanshu P; Bani-Hashemi, Ali R

    2007-01-01

    Large patient anatomies and limited imaging field-of-view (FOV) lead to truncation of CT projections. Truncation introduces serious artifacts into reconstructed images, including central cupping and bright external rings. FOV may be increased using laterally offset detectors, but this requires sophisticated imaging hardware and full angular scanning. We propose a novel method to complete truncated projections based on the observation that the thickness of the patient may be estimated along the projection rays by calculating water-equivalent thicknesses (WET). These values are not at all affected by truncation and thus constitute valuable auxiliary information. We parameterize pairs of points along each ray that intersects the unknown object boundary. These points are separated by the measured WET value (obtained from projections that have been corrected for scatter and beam-hardening). We assume, for all large body parts, that the patient outline may be roughly approximated as an ellipse. Using a deterministic optimization algorithm, we simultaneously estimate the point positions and ellipse parameters by minimizing the distance between point sets and the ellipse boundary. The optimal ellipse is used to complete the truncated projections. Reconstruction then ensues. We apply the algorithm to a severely truncated CT dataset of a typical abdomen. The RMS error between complete data and truncated reconstructions (corrected using an empirical extrapolation approach) is 20.4% for an abdominal dataset. The new algorithm reduces this error to 1.0%. Even thought the algorithm assumes an elliptical patient cross-section, truly impressive increases in quantitative image quality are observed. The presence of pelvic bone in the image does not appreciably bias the ellipse position even though it does bias the thickness estimates for some rays. The algorithm incurs low computational cost and is suitable for on-line clinical workflows.

  8. Predicted Versus Actual Savings for a Low-Rise Multifamily Retrofit in Boulder, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L.; Williamson, J.

    2013-11-01

    To determine the most cost-effective methods of improving buildings, accurate analysis and prediction of the energy use of existing buildings is essential. However, multiple studies confirm that analysis methods tend to over-predict energy use in poorly insulated, leaky homes and thus, the savings associated with improving those homes. In NREL's report titled 'Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis of Residential Buildings,' researchers propose a method for improving the accuracy of residential energy analysis methods. A key step in this process involves the comparisons of predicted versus metered energy use and savings. In support of this research need, CARB evaluated the retrofit of a multifamily building in Boulder, CO. The updated property is a 37 unit, 2 story apartment complex built in 1950, which underwent renovations in early 2009 to bring it into compliance with Boulder, CO's SmartRegs ordinance. Goals of the study were to: 1) evaluate predicted versus actual savings due to the improvements, 2) identify areas where the modeling assumptions may need to be changed, and 3) determine common changes made by renters that would negatively impact energy savings. In this study, CARB seeks to improve the accuracy of modeling software while assessing retrofit measures to specifically determine which are most effective for large multifamily complexes in the cold climate region. Other issues that were investigated include the effects of improving building efficiency on tenant comfort, the impact on tenant turnover rates, and the potential market barriers for this type of community scale project.

  9. Removal of radon by aeration testing of various aeration techniques for small water works. For European Commission under Contract No FI4PCT960054 TENAWA project

    CERN Document Server

    Salonen, L; Mehtonen, J; Mjoenes, L; Raff, O; Turunen, H

    2002-01-01

    Capability of various aeration techniques to remove radon from water in small waterworks was studied as a part of project (Treatment Techniques for Removing Natural Radionuclides from Drinking Water), which was carried out during 1997-1999 on a cost-shared basis (contract No. F14PCT960054) with The European Commission (CEC) under the supervision of the Directorate-General XII Radiation Protection Research Unit. In TENAWA project both laboratory and field experiments were performed in order to find reliable methods and equipment for removing natural radionuclides from ground water originating either from private wells or small waterworks. Because such techniques are more often needed in private households than at waterworks, the main emphasis of the research was aimed to solve the water treatment problems related to the private water supplies, especially bedrock wells. Radon was the most important radionuclide to be removed from water at waterworks whereas the removal of other radionuclides ( sup 2 sup 3 sup 4...

  10. Environmental Assessment, Geiger Spur Track Removal Spokane County Road Project #3091, Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    in an unimproved area well away from the proposed project area and within a designated conservation area. The community type, pinus ponderosa...conventions between the United States, Canada, Japan, Mexico , and the former Soviet Union for the protection of migratory birds. Unless otherwise... Mexico , Russia, and Japan. EO 13186 provides broad guidelines on conservation responsibilities and requires the development of more detailed guidance in

  11. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY PROCESS MODIFICATION TO COAGULATION/FILTRATION. USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT LIDGERWOOD, ND. FINAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained for the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Lidgerwood, North Dakota site. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of process modifications to an e...

  12. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Seely-Brown Village in Pomfret, CT - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed for and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Seely-Brown Village in Pomfret, CT. The objectives of the project were to evaluate the effectiveness of ArsenXnp adsorption media in...

  13. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Taos, NM, Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained for the EPA arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Town of Taos in New Mexico. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effectiveness of Severn Trent Services’ (STS) SORB 33™ ad...

  14. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Rollinsford, NH, Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Rollinsford, New Hampshire. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: 1) the effectiveness of AdEdge Technologies’ AD -33TM media ...

  15. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Hot Springs Mobile Home Park in Willard, Utah - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents activities performed for and results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Hot Springs Mobile Home Park (HSMHP) in Willard, UT. The objectives of the project were to evaluate the effectiveness of Adsorbsia™ GTO™...

  16. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Geneseo Hills Subdivision, in Geneseo, IL Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Geneseo Hills Subdivision in Geneseo, IL. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effectiveness of AdEdge Technologies...

  17. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Covered Wells in Tohono O’odham Nation, AZ - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Covered Wells in Tohono O’odham Nation, AZ. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effectiveness of AdEdge Technologies’ ...

  18. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY POINT OF USE REVERSE OSMOSIS. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT SUNSET RANCH DEVELOPMENT IN HOMEDALE, ID. SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the point of use arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Sunset Ranch Development in Homedale, ID. The objectives of the project are to evaluate t...

  19. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT SPRING BROOK MOBILE HOME PARK IN WALES, ME SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Spring Brook Mobile Home Park in Wales, ME. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the effectiv...

  20. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Spring Brook Mobile Home Park in Wales, ME Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained for the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Spring Brook Mobile Home Park (SBMHP) in Wales, Maine. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: 1) the effectiveness of an arsenic...

  1. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Coagulation/Filtration U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Sandusky, MI. Six-Month Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the EPA arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the City of Sandusky, MI facility. The objectives of the project are to evaluate 1) the effectiveness of Siemen...

  2. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Coagulation/Filtration - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Village of Waynesville, IL - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal drinking water treatment technology demonstration project at the Village of Waynesville, IL. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Peerless coagu...

  3. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Coagulation/Filtration, U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at the City of Okanogan, WA - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the City of Okanogan, WA facility. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of Filtronics’ FH-13 Ele...

  4. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Coagulation/Filtration - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Town of Arnaudville, LA - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the United Water Systems’ facility in Arnaudville, LA. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of K...

  5. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Webb Consolidated Independent School District in Bruni, TX - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Webb Consolidated Independent School District (Webb CISD) in Bruni, TX. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effect...

  6. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Woodstock Middle School in Woodstock, CT - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed for and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Woodstock Middle School in Woodstock, CT. The objectives of the project were to evaluate the effectiveness of Adsorbsia™ GTO™ me...

  7. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT CHATEAU ESTATES MOBILE HOME PARK IN SPRINGFIELD, OH. SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed for and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Chateau Estates Mobile Home Park at Springfield, OH. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the ef...

  8. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT CHATEAU ESTATES MOBILE HOME PARK IN SPRINGFIELD, OH. FINAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed for and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Chateau Estates Mobile Home Park at Springfield, OH. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the ef...

  9. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT QUEEN ANNES COUNTY, MARYLAND SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the community of Prospect Bay at Grasonville in Queen Anne’s County, MD. The objectives of the project were to ev...

  10. 75 FR 26988 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO AGENCY... of human remains in the possession of the University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO. The human... notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the...

  11. 75 FR 45655 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO AGENCY... of human remains in the control of the University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO. The human remains... sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native...

  12. 75 FR 28647 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO AGENCY... of human remains in the possession of the University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO. The human... notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the...

  13. 75 FR 77898 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO AGENCY... of human remains in the possession of the ] University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO. The human... CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution...

  14. 75 FR 45657 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO AGENCY... of human remains in the control of the University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO. The human remains... notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the...

  15. Environmental projects. Volume 13: Underground storage tanks, removal and replacement. Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengelsdorf, Irv

    1991-01-01

    The Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (GDSCC), located in the Mojave Desert about 40 miles north of Barstow, California, and about 160 miles northeast of Pasadena, is part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Deep Space Network, one of the world's largest and most sensitive scientific telecommunications and radio navigation networks. Activities at the GDSCC are carried out in support of six large parabolic dish antennas. As a large-scale facility located in a remote, isolated desert region, the GDSCC operations require numerous on-site storage facilities for gasoline, diesel oil, hydraulic oil, and waste oil. These fluids are stored in underground storage tanks (USTs). This present volume describes what happened to the 26 USTs that remained at the GDSCC. Twenty-four of these USTs were constructed of carbon steel without any coating for corrosion protection, and without secondary containment or leak detection. Two remaining USTs were constructed of fiberglass-coated carbon steel but without secondary containment or leak protection. Of the 26 USTs that remained at the GDSCC, 23 were cleaned, removed from the ground, cut up, and hauled away from the GDSCC for environmentally acceptable disposal. Three USTs were permanently closed (abandoned in place).

  16. Boulder coastal deposits at Favignana Island rocky coast (Sicily, Italy): Litho-structural and hydrodynamic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Fabrizio; Corradino, Marta; Parrino, Nicolò; Besio, Giovanni; Presti, Valeria Lo; Renda, Pietro; Calcagnile, Lucio; Quarta, Gianluca; Sulli, Attilio; Antonioli, Fabrizio

    2018-02-01

    Boulders are frequently dislodged from rock platforms, transported and deposited along coastal zones by high-magnitude storm waves or tsunamis. Their size and shape are often controlled by the thickness of bedding planes as well as by high-angle to bedding fracture network. We investigate these processes along two coastal areas of Favignana Island by integrating geological data for 81 boulders, 49 rupture surfaces (called sockets) and fracture orientation and spacing with four radiocarbon dates, numerical hydrodynamic analysis, and hindcast numerical simulation data. Boulders are scattered along the carbonate platform as isolated blocks or in small groups, which form, as a whole, a discontinuous berm. Underwater surveys also highlight free boulders with sharp edges and sockets carved out in the rock platform. Boulders are composed of ruditic- to arenitic-size clastic carbonates. Their size ranges from 0.6 to 3.7 m, 0.55 to 2.4 m, and 0.2 to 1 m on the major (A), medium (B), and minor (C) axes, respectively. The highest value of mass estimation is 12.5 t. Almost all of boulders and sockets are characterized by a tabular or bladed shape. The comparisons between a) the fractures spacing and the length of A- and B-axes, and b) the frequency peaks of C-axis with the recurrent thickness of beds measured along the coastal zone demonstrate the litho-structural control in the size and shape of joint-bounded boulders. These comparisons, together with the similarity between the shapes of the boulders and those of the sockets as well as between the lithology of boulders and the areas surrounding the sockets, suggest that blocks originate by detachment from the platform edge. Thus, the most common pre-transport setting is the joint-bounded scenario. Hydrodynamic equations estimate that the storm wave heights necessary to initiate the transport of blocks diverge from 2 m to 8 m for joint-bounded boulders and from few tens of centimeters up to 11 m for submerged boulders. The

  17. Projects To Probe Titan's Surface Composition and Development of Atmospheric Removal Models for Cassini VIMS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, K. M.; Buratti, B. J.; Baines, K. H.; West, R. A.; Wolff, M. J.; Brown, R. H.

    2007-05-01

    In this work, we will describe recent projects performed by our group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology involving I/F data of Titan's surface acquired by Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), including the next stage of development of methods to de-gas and de-fog VIMS images. VIMS I/F spectra include contributions from both surface and atmospheric signal; therefore, current spectral data analysis necessarily focuses on portions of VIMS I/F spectra where atmospheric methane and scattering by haze is at a minimum. However, atmospheric opacity clears enough between wavelengths of 1 and 2 microns to provide strong potential to view complex landforms if a proper atmospheric correction can be applied. Plane- parallel radiative transfer (RT) correction methods have been used successfully in surface-atmospheric separation retrievals for Mars and offer some utility for VIMS observations of Titan that are away from the limb. In a previous work (Pitman et al. 2007, LPSC XXXVIII, p. 1164), we determined which inputs to radiative transfer models must be updated, given results from recent meetings and literature, and evaluated two plane-parallel RT models (adding-doubling, discrete ordinates) to determine which is more easily customized for surface- atmospheric separation of Titan. In this work, we report our progress on replacing Voyager with Cassini-Huygens inputs and how these models currently compare. Work performed under contract to NASA and by appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program (ORAU).

  18. A story about estimation of a random field of boulders from incomplete seismic measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on the statistical interpretation of seismic diffraction measurements of boulder locations. The measurements are made in a corridor along the planned tunnel line for the later realized bored tunnel through the till deposits under the East Channel of the Great Belt in Denmark...... graphical registrations on seismograms do not make a proper interpretation possible without detailed knowledge about the joint distribution of the primary dimensions of the boulders. Therefore separate measurements were made of the dimensions of boulders deposited visibly on the cliff beaches of the Great...... and measured. These direct observations on site confirmed that the prediction was quite good....

  19. Differences in climbing-specific strength between boulder and lead rock climbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchini, Maurizio; Violette, Frédéric; Impellizzeri, Franco M; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare maximal muscle strength and rapid force capacity of finger flexors between boulder and lead climbers of national-international level. Ten boulder (mean ± SD, age 27 ± 8 years) and 10 lead climbers (age 27 ± 6 years) volunteered for the study. Ten nonclimbers (age 25 ± 4 years) were also tested. Isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force and rate of force development (RFD) produced in "crimp" and "open-crimp" hand positions were evaluated on an instrumented hold. Climbers were stronger than nonclimbers. More interestingly, MVC force and RFD were significantly greater in boulder compared with lead climbers (p rock climbers.

  20. Bonaire's boulder fields revisited: evidence for Holocene tsunami impact on the Leeward Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Max; May, Simon Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Supralittoral boulders and blocks are prominent sedimentary features along rocky shorelines worldwide. In most cases, their deposition is attributed to high-energy wave events (tsunamis, severe storms). Even though tsunami waves are expected to have higher transport capacities compared to storm waves, megaclasts of up to 100 t were observed to have been moved laterally by the latter waveform. The deduction of certain extreme wave events (tsunamis, severe storms) from the boulder record thus remains a major challenge in palaeo-event research; the debate on their differentiation is ongoing. At the eastern coast of Bonaire (Leeward Antilles) in the southern Caribbean, numerous limestone blocks and boulders (up to c. 130 t) are distributed on top of a 3-6 m a.s.l. (above mean sea level) palaeo-reef platform. Disagreement exists among a number of authors concerning the transport processes involved in the formation of the boulder fields. In this paper, state-of-the-art modelling approaches of coastal boulder entrainment and transport were applied in order to provide new and more reliable data to support/challenge the working hypothesis of tsunami deposition. To improve the reliability of the boulder transport model, more realistic input parameters were provided by new DGPS measurements of the boulder dimensions and the calculation of bulk densities by taking into account the heterogeneity of the reef-rock boulders. Existing hydrodynamic equations were modified to allow for the irregular shape and real dimensions of the boulders. The results indicate that (i) boulder weight and dimension, and thus (ii) calculated wave energy and wave heights were overestimated in most of the previous studies, where calculations of boulder volume were based on multiplication of the main axes. The results of this study and wave heights observed during recent severe tropical cyclones seem to rule out storm-generated waves for the dislocation of the largest blocks. However, the majority of

  1. Comparison of Ozone Retrievals from the Pandora Spectrometer System and Dobson Spectrophotometer in Boulder, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, J.; Evans, R.; Cede, A.; Abuhassan, N.; Petropavlovskikh, I.; McConville, G.

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of retrieved total column ozone (TCO) amounts between the Pandora #34 spectrometer system and the Dobson #061 spectrophotometer from direct-sun observations was performed on the roof of the Boulder, Colorado, NOAA building. This paper, part of an ongoing study, covers a 1-year period starting on 17 December 2013. Both the standard Dobson and Pandora TCO retrievals required a correction, TCO(sub corr) = TCO (1 + C(T)), using a monthly varying effective ozone temperature, T(sub E), derived from a temperature and ozone profile climatology. The correction is used to remove a seasonal difference caused by using a fixed temperature in each retrieval algorithm. The respective corrections C(T(sub E)) are C(sub Pandora) = 0.00333(T(sub E) - 225) and C(sub Dobson) = -0.0013(T(sub E) - 226.7) per degree K. After the applied corrections removed most of the seasonal retrieval dependence on ozone temperature, TCO agreement between the instruments was within 1% for clear-sky conditions. For clear-sky observations, both co-located instruments tracked the day-to-day variation in total column ozone amounts with a correlation of r(exp 2) = 0.97 and an average offset of 1.1 +/- 5.8 DU. In addition, the Pandora TCO data showed 0.3% annual average agreement with satellite overpass data from AURA/OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) and 1% annual average offset with Suomi-NPP/OMPS (Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership, the nadir viewing portion of the Ozone Mapper Profiler Suite).

  2. Chemical data and lead isotopic compositions in stream-sediment samples from the Boulder River watershed, Jefferson County, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, David L.; Unruh, Dan M.; Church, Stan E.

    1999-01-01

    Metal-mining related wastes in the Boulder River basin study area in northern Jefferson County, Montana, have been evaluated for their environmental effects as a part of the U.S. Geological Survey Abandoned Mine Lands Project. Many mine and prospect waste dumps, and mill wastes are located in the drainage basins of Basin Creek, Cataract Creek, and High Ore Creek, the three major tributaries to the Boulder River in the study area. Throughout the study area, mine-waste material has been transported into and down streams, where it mixes with and becomes incorporated into the bed sediments. In some locations, waste material was placed by mine operators directly in stream channels, and has been transported downstream forming fluvial tailings deposits along the stream banks. Water quality and aquatic habitat have been affected by acid generation and toxic-metal mobility during snowmelt and storm water runoff events. Colloids formed by the raising of pH downstream from these mine sites sorb metals contributing to the high concentrations observed in both bed and suspended sediments within the watershed. This report presents geochemical data for bed sediments from 67 sites and lead isotope data for 59 sites. Also included are geochemical data for seven suspended-sediment samples, and one smelter slag sample. 

  3. Measured and Inferred Bedrock Faults in the Boulder-Weld Coal Field (frifaultu)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This file is a digital line representation of measured and inferred bedrock faults in the Boulder-Weld coal field, Denver Basin, Colorado. This file was created as...

  4. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Upper Bodfish in Lake Isabella, CA Interim Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first 10 months of system operation of an arsenic (As) and uranium (U) removal technology being demonstrated at Upper Bodfish in Lake Isabella, CA. The objectives of the project are to evalua...

  5. Arsenic and Uranium Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Upper Bodfish in Lake Isabella, CA -Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the performance evaluation of an arsenic (As) and uranium (U) removal technology demonstrated at Upper Bodfish in Lake Isabella, CA. The objectives of the project are to evaluate: (1) the effecti...

  6. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA. U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT BOW, NH , SIX MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the White Rock Water Company (WRWC) public water system, a small residential drinking water facility in Bo...

  7. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT BRUNI, TX, SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Webb Consolidated Independent School District (Webb CISD) site at Bruni, TX. The main objective of the projec...

  8. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT DUMMERSTON, VT SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months (from June 22, 2005 through December 22, 2005) of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Charette Mobile Home Park (CMHP) in Dummerston, Vermont. T...

  9. Fifty Years of Space Weather Forecasting from Boulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    The first official space weather forecast was issued by the Space Disturbances Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, in 1965, ushering in an era of operational prediction that continues to this day. Today, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) charters the Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) as one of the nine National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) to provide the nation's official watches, warnings, and alerts of space weather phenomena. SWPC is now integral to national and international efforts to predict space weather events, from the common and mild, to the rare and extreme, that can impact critical technological infrastructure. In 2012, the Strategic National Risk Assessment included extreme space weather events as low-to-medium probability phenomena that could, unlike any other meteorogical phenomena, have an impact on the government's ability to function. Recognizing this, the White House chartered the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) to produce the first comprehensive national strategy for the prediction, mitigation, and response to an extreme space weather event. The implementation of the National Strategy is ongoing with NOAA, its partners, and stakeholders concentrating on the goal of improving our ability to observe, model, and predict the onset and severity of space weather events. In addition, work continues with the research community to improve our understanding of the physical mechanisms - on the Sun, in the heliosphere, and in the Earth's magnetic field and upper atmosphere - of space weather as well as the effects on critical infrastructure such as electrical power transmission systems. In fifty years, people will hopefully look back at the history of operational space weather prediction and credit our efforts today with solidifying the necessary developments in observational systems, full-physics models of the entire Sun-Earth system, and tools for predicting the impacts to infrastructure to protect

  10. Indoor air quality in Latino homes in Boulder, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, Luis E.; Champion, Wyatt M.; Li, Ning; Montoya, Lupita D.

    2014-08-01

    Indoor concentrations of airborne pollutants can be several times higher than those found outdoors, often due to poor ventilation, overcrowding, and the contribution of indoor sources within a home. Americans spend most of their time indoors where exposure to poor indoor air quality (IAQ) can result in diminished respiratory and cardiovascular health. This study measured the indoor air quality in 30 homes of a low-income Latino community in Boulder, Colorado during the summer of 2012. Participants were administered a survey, which included questions on their health conditions and indoor air pollution sources like cigarette smoke, heating fuel, and building materials. Twenty-four hour samples of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) from the indoor air were collected in each home; ambient PM2.5 samples were collected each day as well. Concurrent air samples were collected onto 47 mm Teflo and Tissuquartz filter at each location. Teflo filters were analyzed gravimetrically to measure PM2.5 and their extracts were used to determine levels of proteins and endotoxins in the fine fraction. The Tissuquartz filters were analyzed for elemental and organic carbon content (EC/OC). Results indicated that the indoor air contained higher concentrations of PM2.5 than the ambient air, and that the levels of OC were much higher than EC in both indoor and outdoor samples. This community showed no smoking in their homes and kept furry pets indoors at very low rates; therefore, cooking is likely the primary source of indoor PM. For responders with significant exposure to PM, it appeared to be primarily from occupational environments or childhood exposure abroad. Our findings indicate that for immigrant communities such as this, it is important to consider not only their housing conditions but also the relevant prior exposures when conducting health assessments.

  11. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Point of Entry/Point of Use Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Oregon Institute of Technology at Klamath Falls, OR - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) at Klamath Falls, OR. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness...

  12. Ethical considerations related to participation and partnership: an investigation of stakeholders’ perceptions of an action-research project on user fee removal for the poorest in Burkina Faso

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare user fees present an important barrier for accessing services for the poorest (indigents) in Burkina Faso and selective removal of fees has been incorporated in national healthcare planning. However, establishing fair, effective and sustainable mechanisms for the removal of user fees presents important challenges. A participatory action-research project was conducted in Ouargaye, Burkina Faso, to test mechanisms for identifying those who are indigents, and funding and implementing user fee removal. In this paper, we explore stakeholder perceptions of ethical considerations relating to participation and partnership arising in the action-research. Methods We conducted 39 in-depth interviews to examine ethical issues associated with the action-research. Respondents included 14 individuals identified as indigent through the community selection process, seven members of village selection committees, six local healthcare professionals, five members of the management committees of local health clinics, five members of the research team, and four regional or national policy-makers. Using constant comparative techniques, we carried out an inductive thematic analysis of the collected data. Results The Ouargaye project involved a participatory model, included both implementation and research components, and focused on a vulnerable group within small, rural communities. Stakeholder perceptions and experiences relating to the participatory approach and reliance on multiple partnerships in the project were associated with a range of ethical considerations related to 1) seeking common ground through communication and collaboration, 2) community participation and risk of stigmatization, 3) impacts of local funding of the user fee removal, 4) efforts to promote fairness in the selection of the indigents, and 5) power relations and the development of partnerships. Conclusions This investigation of the Ouargaye project serves to illuminate the distinctive

  13. Ethical considerations related to participation and partnership: an investigation of stakeholders' perceptions of an action-research project on user fee removal for the poorest in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Matthew R; Gogognon, Patrick; Ridde, Valéry

    2014-02-20

    Healthcare user fees present an important barrier for accessing services for the poorest (indigents) in Burkina Faso and selective removal of fees has been incorporated in national healthcare planning. However, establishing fair, effective and sustainable mechanisms for the removal of user fees presents important challenges. A participatory action-research project was conducted in Ouargaye, Burkina Faso, to test mechanisms for identifying those who are indigents, and funding and implementing user fee removal. In this paper, we explore stakeholder perceptions of ethical considerations relating to participation and partnership arising in the action-research. We conducted 39 in-depth interviews to examine ethical issues associated with the action-research. Respondents included 14 individuals identified as indigent through the community selection process, seven members of village selection committees, six local healthcare professionals, five members of the management committees of local health clinics, five members of the research team, and four regional or national policy-makers. Using constant comparative techniques, we carried out an inductive thematic analysis of the collected data. The Ouargaye project involved a participatory model, included both implementation and research components, and focused on a vulnerable group within small, rural communities. Stakeholder perceptions and experiences relating to the participatory approach and reliance on multiple partnerships in the project were associated with a range of ethical considerations related to 1) seeking common ground through communication and collaboration, 2) community participation and risk of stigmatization, 3) impacts of local funding of the user fee removal, 4) efforts to promote fairness in the selection of the indigents, and 5) power relations and the development of partnerships. This investigation of the Ouargaye project serves to illuminate the distinctive ethical terrain of a participatory public

  14. Influence of large woody debris on channel morphology and dynamics in steep, boulder-rich mountain streams, western Cascades, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustini, John M.; Jones, Julia A.

    2003-03-01

    This study used 20-year records of stream channel change and wood to test hypotheses about the long-term influence of large woody debris (LWD) on channel morphology, channel stability, and sediment dynamics in a steep, boulder-rich mountain stream. We compared two nearly adjacent reaches of third-order Mack Creek over the period 1978-1997 after virtually all wood was removed from the channel of the lower reach in 1964. We assessed the long-term legacy of wood removal using repeated cross-section surveys, streamflow data, LWD inventory data, and detailed mapping and longitudinal profile surveys. At each of 11 cross sections in the upper reach and 19 in the lower reach, we calculated areas of scour and fill in response to the two largest floods in the record. We used quasi-likelihood logistic regression models to test the proportion of each reach that experienced change between consecutive surveys over the entire record (1978-1997) as a function of flood return periods. The longitudinal profile of the site without LWD was more variable than the reach with LWD at the finest scale (˜1 m) due to a greater frequency of boulder steps, but the reach with LWD was more variable at the channel unit scale. LWD-created steps 1 to 2.5 m high in the wood-rich reach accounted for nearly 30% of the total channel fall and created low-gradient upstream channel segments one to three channel widths long. As a result, both reaches have the same average slope (about 9%), but nearly three times as much of the channel in the wood-rich reach had a slope of ≤5% as in the reach without wood (20.4% of total channel length vs. 7.5% of channel length). The reach with abundant LWD was less responsive to moderate streamflow events (return period <˜5 years), but it responded similarly to peak flows with a return period of about 10 to 25 years. Although the average magnitude of cross-section changes was the same during the largest flood in the record (25-year return period), the reach without

  15. Boulders on asteroid Toutatis as observed by Chang’e-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yun; Ji, Jianghui; Huang, Jiangchuan; Marchi, Simone; Li, Yuan; Ip, Wing-Huen

    2015-01-01

    Boulders are ubiquitously found on the surfaces of small rocky bodies in the inner solar system and their spatial and size distributions give insight into the geological evolution and collisional history of the parent bodies. Using images acquired by the Chang’e-2 spacecraft, more than 200 boulders have been identified over the imaged area of the near-Earth asteroid Toutatis. The cumulative boulder size frequency distribution (SFD) shows a steep slope of −4.4 ± 0.1, which is indicative of a high degree of fragmentation. Similar to Itokawa, Toutatis probably has a rubble-pile structure, as most boulders on its surface cannot solely be explained by impact cratering. The significantly steeper slope for Toutatis’ boulder SFD compared to Itokawa may imply a different preservation state or diverse formation scenarios. In addition, the cumulative crater SFD has been used to estimate a surface crater retention age of approximately 1.6 ± 0.3 Gyr. PMID:26522880

  16. On the representativity of water vapour measurements at Boulder for global stratospheric trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lossow, S.

    2016-12-01

    Long-term changes of water vapour in the lower stratosphere inevitably affect the surface climate. Thus understanding such changes is of primary importance. The longest continuous data set is based on balloon-borne frost point hygrometer observations at Boulder. Overall this data set shows an increase in water vapour since the 1980s accompanied by large variability on short time scales (Hurst et al., 2011). Recently a merged satellite data set, covering the time period between 1988 and 2010, has been analysed showing a decrease of water vapour in the lower stratosphere (Hegglin et al., 2014). This discrepancy is difficult to reconcile. There might be problems with one data set or even with both. Also the local behaviour at Boulder might not be representative for the zonal mean behaviour, which is represented by the satellite observations. So far this has been assumed and the Boulder changes have even been considered to be globally representative. Here I present investigations of this aspect using both model simulations and observations. References: Hegglin et al. (2014), "Vertical structure of stratospheric water vapour trends derived from merged satellite data", Nature Geoscience, 7, 768 - 776, doi:10.1038/ngeo2236. Hurst et al. (2011), "Stratospheric water vapor trends over Boulder, Colorado: Analysis of the 30 year Boulder record", Journal of Geophysical Research, 116, D02,306, doi:10.1029/2010JD015065.

  17. Boulders on asteroid Toutatis as observed by Chang'e-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yun; Ji, Jianghui; Huang, Jiangchuan; Marchi, Simone; Li, Yuan; Ip, Wing-Huen

    2015-11-02

    Boulders are ubiquitously found on the surfaces of small rocky bodies in the inner solar system and their spatial and size distributions give insight into the geological evolution and collisional history of the parent bodies. Using images acquired by the Chang'e-2 spacecraft, more than 200 boulders have been identified over the imaged area of the near-Earth asteroid Toutatis. The cumulative boulder size frequency distribution (SFD) shows a steep slope of -4.4 ± 0.1, which is indicative of a high degree of fragmentation. Similar to Itokawa, Toutatis probably has a rubble-pile structure, as most boulders on its surface cannot solely be explained by impact cratering. The significantly steeper slope for Toutatis' boulder SFD compared to Itokawa may imply a different preservation state or diverse formation scenarios. In addition, the cumulative crater SFD has been used to estimate a surface crater retention age of approximately 1.6 ± 0.3 Gyr.

  18. Something more than boulders: A geological comment on the nomenclature of megaclasts on extraterrestrial bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Delia E.; Ruban, Dmitry A.

    2017-01-01

    Large clasts are common on extraterrestrial bodies, and these are traditionally termed "blocks" and "boulders". These two terms can easily raise confusion, however, because they are used in a sense that differs from geological definitions. Several classifications of large clasts are currently in use in the Earth sciences, and they differ only in detail. They restrict the size of boulders to 1-4 m; larger particles are called "megaclasts". The analysis of the published information on large clasts on planet satellites, asteroids, and comets imply that the particles often described as "boulders" actually are megaclasts; boulders, as the term is used in the Earth sciences, are too small to be detected given the limited resolution of most images obtained. It were therefore scientifically preferable if the established geological literature were applied in the modern planetary and space research. It appears sensible to distinguish boulders from megaclasts; the latter comprise bodies that might be subdivided granulometrically into blocks, megablocks, and superblocks. It is also shown that the abundance of megaclasts on extraterrestrial bodies may itself be beneficial for our understanding of such particles, which are rare on Earth.

  19. Abundance and distribution of sessile invertebrates under intertidal boulders (São Paulo, Brazil)

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, Rosana Moreira da

    1995-01-01

    The encrusting communities under two boulder fields (Praia Grande and Ponta do Baleeiro) were monitored monthly during 1990 and 1991, in São Sebastião, on the northern coast of São Paulo State, Brazil. Two sizes of boulders were chosen: small (20-30 cm² underside area) and larger ones (160-220 cm²) located on the middle and lower levels of the intertidal. The community's components were mainly sessile animals either compound ones such as Bryozoa, Ascidiacea, Porifera and Cnidaria, in this ord...

  20. Evaluation of Boulder, CO,SmartRegs Ordinance and Better Buildings Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Vijayakumar, G. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Under the SmartRegs ordinance in the city of Boulder, Colorado, all rental properties in the city must achieve an energy efficiency level comparable to a HERS Index of approximately 120 points or lower by the year 2019. The City of Boulder received a $12 million grant from the DOE’s Better Buildings initiative to create and incentivize their EnergySmart Program. In this report, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) describes its work with the program, including energy audits of rental properties, developing training programs for insulators and inspectors, and conducting interviews with property owners.

  1. Evaluation of Boulder, CO, SmartRegs Ordinance and Better Buildings Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L.; Vijayakumar, G.

    2012-04-01

    Under the SmartRegs ordinance in the city of Boulder, Colorado, all rental properties in the city must achieve an energy efficiency level comparable to a HERS Index of approximately 120 points or lower by the year 2019. The City of Boulder received a $12 million grant from the DOE's Better Buildings initiative to create and incentivize their EnergySmart Program. In this report, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) describes its work with the program, including energy audits of rental properties, developing training programs for insulators and inspectors, and conducting interviews with property owners.

  2. 33 CFR 165.T11-281 - Safety Zone; Lake Mead Intake Construction; Lake Mead, Boulder City, NV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone; Lake Mead Intake Construction; Lake Mead, Boulder City, NV. 165.T11-281 Section 165.T11-281 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Coast Guard District § 165.T11-281 Safety Zone; Lake Mead Intake Construction; Lake Mead, Boulder City...

  3. 78 FR 20168 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Boulder Municipal Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Boulder Municipal Airport, Boulder, CO AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of request to release airport property. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to rule and invite public comment...

  4. Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC) for the Solid Waste Treatment Facility (T Plant) Fuel Removal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHNSON, R.E.

    2000-11-16

    This NOC describes the activities to remove all spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies from the spent fuel pool in the T Plant Complex 221-T canyon for interim storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The unabated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) estimated for the public hypothetical maximally exposed individual (MEI) is 5.7 E-6 millirem (mrem) per year for this fuel removal NOC. The abated TEDE conservatively is estimated to account for 2.9 E-9 mrem per year to the MEI.

  5. 75 FR 52015 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO AGENCY... of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of the University of Colorado Museum... determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has...

  6. 75 FR 52019 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO AGENCY... of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of the University of Colorado Museum... determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has...

  7. 75 FR 42771 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO AGENCY... of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of the University of Colorado Museum.... 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution...

  8. 76 FR 62833 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Colorado Museum has completed... contact the University of Colorado Museum. Disposition of the human remains and associated funerary object...

  9. 76 FR 43719 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Colorado Museum has completed... contact the University of Colorado Museum. Disposition of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated...

  10. 76 FR 43715 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Colorado Museum has completed... University of Colorado Museum. ] Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the...

  11. 76 FR 62839 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Colorado Museum has completed... contact the University of Colorado Museum. Disposition of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated...

  12. 75 FR 57290 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO AGENCY... of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of the University of Colorado Museum..., 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum...

  13. 76 FR 43713 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Colorado Museum has completed... contact the University of Colorado Museum. Disposition of the human remains and associated funerary object...

  14. Arsenic/Radium Removal from Drinking Water by the HMO Process, U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Greenville, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2003, the Town of Greenville, Wisconsin was selected for the Round 2 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Arsenic Demonstration Program and a Kinetico Macrolite® pressure filtration system was selected for its ability to remove arsenic. Well reconstruction prior to the ...

  15. Idaho Completion Project’s Accelerated Retrieval Project Overview of the Pit 4 Non-Time Critical Removal Action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. L. Clements; R. E. Arbon; B. D. Preussner

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Accelerated Retrieval Project performed by the Idaho Completion Project at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Topics include an overall description of the process and methods that will retrieve, characterize, and certify newly generated transuranic (TRU) waste for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The retrieval and characterization of buried TRU waste presents unique challenges. Innovative approaches developed and discussed are: excavation, RCRA waste sampling, visual examination, and deployment of the WIPP Central Characterization Project mobile systems to the INL.

  16. Cephalopholis argus fish census and assemblage data from the West Hawaii Roi Removal Project 2010-2012 (NODC Accession 0099263)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project examined the results of the field manipulative experiment that has been set up to test the ecological effects of introduced roi on reef fish...

  17. Project management plan for Waste Area Grouping 5 Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks contents removal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    On January 1, 1992, the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) signed a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) concerning the Oak Ridge Reservation. The FFA requires that inactive liquid low-level (radioactive) waste (LLLW) tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) be remediated in accordance with requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This revision is to update the schedule and designation of responsibilities for the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) tanks contents removal project. The scope of this project is to transfer inventory from the five inactive LLLW tanks at the OHF into the active LLLW system.

  18. Tone-matched enhanced TIFF sidescan-sonar image from Boulder Basin, Lake Mead - UTM projection

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Lake Mead is a large interstate reservoir located in the Mojave Desert of southeastern Nevada and northwestern Arizona. It was impounded in 1935 by the construction...

  19. 78 FR 79436 - Boulder Canyon Project-Post-2017 Resource Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ... Area Power Administration (Western), a Federal power marketing agency of the Department of Energy (DOE... May 31, 1987. In 1977, the power marketing functions of the Secretary of Interior were transferred to... Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984 (43 U.S.C. 619) for the marketing of BCP power through September 30, 2017...

  20. Restoration of a boulder reef in temperate waters: Strategy, methodology and lessons learnt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støttrup, Josianne Gatt; Dahl, Karsten; Niemann, Sanne

    2017-01-01

    and geotechnical surveys confirmed that the sea bed could support added boulders, and high resolution bathymetric surveys provided input for the design of the reef, particularly for numerical modelling of the hydrographic and sediment transport conditions. Numerical modelling was used to derive hydrographic design......Anthropogenic impacts on marine habitats are a global problem, particularly in coastal areas. While boulder reefs in temperate waters hold high biomass and biodiversity, and may be unable to recover from anthropogenic stressors without restoration efforts, little is known about how to restore......, collected in 2009, demonstrated that cavernous structures and shallow reef areas were restored. Moreover, data collected in 2012 confirmed the stability of the restored reef. Finally, results highlighted the importance of stakeholder mapping at the outset, appropriate timing of stakeholder involvement...

  1. Is There Evidence of Convectively Injected Water Vapor in the Lowermost Stratosphere Over Boulder, Colorado?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, D. F.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Davis, S. M.; Hall, E. G.; Jordan, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Anderson et al. (2012) reported the frequent presence of convectively injected water vapor in the lowermost stratosphere over North America during summertime, based on aircraft measurements. They asserted that enhanced catalytic ozone destruction within these wet stratospheric air parcels presents a concern for UV dosages in populated areas, especially if the frequency of deep convective events increases. Schwartz et al.(2013) analyzed 8 years of more widespread Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements of lower stratospheric water vapor over North America and concluded that anomalously wet (>8 ppm) air parcels were present only 2.5% of the time during July and August. However, given the 3-km vertical resolution of MLS water vapor retrievals in the lowermost stratosphere, thin wet layers deposited by overshooting convection may be present but not readily detectable by MLS. Since 1980 the balloon-borne NOAA frost point hygrometer (FPH) has produced nearly 400 high quality water vapor profiles over Boulder, Colorado, at 5-m vertical resolution from the surface to the middle stratosphere. The 34-year record of high-resolution FPH profiles obtained over Boulder during summer months is evaluated for evidence of convectively injected water vapor in the lowermost stratosphere. A number of approaches are used to assess the contributions of deep convection to the Boulder stratospheric water vapor record. The results are compared to those based on MLS profiles over Boulder and the differences are discussed. Anderson, J. G., D. M. Wilmouth, J. B. Smith, and D. S. Sayres (2012), UV dosage levels in summer: Increased risk of ozone loss from convectively injected water vapor, Science, 337(6096), 835-839, doi:10.1126/science.1222978. Schwartz, M. J., W. G. Read, M. L. Santee, N. J. Livesey, L. Froidevaux, A. Lambert, and G. L. Manney (2013), Convectively injected water vapor in the North American summer lowermost stratosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 2316-2321, doi:10

  2. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY POINT-OF-USE (POU) REVERSE OSMOSIS. U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT SUNSET RANCH DEVELOPMENT IN HOMEDALE, ID. FINAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Sunset Ranch Development in Homedale, ID. The objectives of the project are to evaluate: 1) the effectiveness of a point of use (POU) re...

  3. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Oxidation/Filtration and Adsorptive Media, U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Clinton Christian School in Goshen, IN - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed for and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Clinton Christian School in Goshen, IN. The objectives of the project were to evaluate the effectiveness of AdEdge Technologies’...

  4. Extent of Abandoned Underground Coal Mines and Surface Mines in the Boulder-Weld Coal Field (friminedu)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This file is a digital polygon representation of the areal extent of abandoned underground coal mines and surface mines in the Boulder-Weld coal field, Denver Basin,...

  5. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Evaluation of a Multifamily Retrofit in Climate Zone 5, Boulder, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-11-01

    In 2009, a 37-unit apartment complex located in Boulder, Colorado, underwent an energy retrofit to comply with Boulder SmartRegs Ordinance, a mandate that requires all rental properties to meet certain energy efficiency standards by 2018. The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), a U.S. Department of Energy Building America team, worked with city planners and building owners to evaluate this program and recently completed a case study evaluating the effectiveness of a collection of retrofit measures.

  6. Multi-hole seismic modeling in 3-D space and cross-hole seismic tomography analysis for boulder detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fei; Liu, Jiangping; Wang, Jing; Zong, Yuquan; Yu, Mingyu

    2016-11-01

    A boulder stone, a common geological feature in south China, is referred to the remnant of a granite body which has been unevenly weathered. Undetected boulders could adversely impact the schedule and safety of subway construction when using tunnel boring machine (TBM) method. Therefore, boulder detection has always been a key issue demanded to be solved before the construction. Nowadays, cross-hole seismic tomography is a high resolution technique capable of boulder detection, however, the method can only solve for velocity in a 2-D slice between two wells, and the size and central position of the boulder are generally difficult to be accurately obtained. In this paper, the authors conduct a multi-hole wave field simulation and characteristic analysis of a boulder model based on the 3-D elastic wave staggered-grid finite difference theory, and also a 2-D imaging analysis based on first arrival travel time. The results indicate that (1) full wave field records could be obtained from multi-hole seismic wave simulations. Simulation results describe that the seismic wave propagation pattern in cross-hole high-velocity spherical geological bodies is more detailed and can serve as a basis for the wave field analysis. (2) When a cross-hole seismic section cuts through the boulder, the proposed method provides satisfactory cross-hole tomography results; however, when the section is closely positioned to the boulder, such high-velocity object in the 3-D space would impact on the surrounding wave field. The received diffracted wave interferes with the primary wave and in consequence the picked first arrival travel time is not derived from the profile, which results in a false appearance of high-velocity geology features. Finally, the results of 2-D analysis in 3-D modeling space are comparatively analyzed with the physical model test vis-a-vis the effect of high velocity body on the seismic tomographic measurements.

  7. Field grouting summary report on the WAG seeps 4 and 6 removal action project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    During the summer of 1996, a unique multi-phase, multi-stage, low-pressure permeation grouting pilot program was performed inside portions of four unlined waste disposal trenches at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The project was deemed a non-time-critical removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); however, due to a history of heavy precipitation in the fall, the schedule was fast-tracked to meet an October 31, 1996 grouting completion date. The technical objective of the removal action was to reduce the off-site transport of Strontium 90 ({sup 90}Sr) by grouting portions of four waste disposal trenches believed to be responsible for over 70% of the {sup 90}Sr leaving the site. A goal of the grouting operation was to reduce the average in situ hydraulic conductivity of the grouted waste materials to a value equal to or less than 1 x 10{sup {minus}6} cm/sec. This target hydraulic conductivity value was established to be at least two orders of magnitude lower than that of the surrounding natural ground.

  8. Field grouting summary report on the WAG 4 seeps 4 and 6 removal action project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3. Appendixes E and F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    During the summer of 1996, a unique multi-phase, multi-stage, low-pressure permeation grouting pilot program was performed inside portions of four unlined waste disposal trenches at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The project was deemed a non-time-critical removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); however, due to a history of heavy precipitation in the fall, the schedule was fast-tracked to meet an October 31, 1996 grouting completion date. The technical objective of the removal action was to reduce the off-site transport of j Strontium 90 ({sup 90}Sr) by grouting portions of four waste disposal trenches believed to be responsible for over 70 percent of the {sup 90}Sr leaving the site. A goal of the grouting operation was to reduce the average in situ hydraulic conductivity of the grouted waste materials to a value equal to or less than 1 x 10{sup -6} cm/sec. This target hydraulic conductivity value was established to be at least two orders of magnitude lower than that of the surrounding natural ground.

  9. Removal of High -Concentration and Refractory Organic Matter from Diosgenin Manufacture Wastewater : a case study of a demonstration project in Hubei Province, P R China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, J.; Wang, L.

    2009-12-01

    Wastewater from diosgenin manufacture is dark brown (3,500 ~4,000 times of the chroma) and acidic(pH=0.8~1.5)with high concentration of organic matter(COD=25,000~38,000 mg/L)and poor biodegradability(BOD5/COD= 0.25~0.30). It is highly toxic to biota due to the water-soluble saponin, tannins and pectin. Therefore removal of the organic matter is of great importance before the discharge of the wastewater into the environment. Here we presented a set of data from a demonstration project in Hubei province, P R China with an improved technics. This technics, focusing on the treatment of diosgenin wastewater, included hydrolytic acidification, internal electrolysis, neutralization, aerating-improved Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) and bio-contact oxidation treatment in sequence to remove the organic matter. After 60 days of starting-up, the water quality from hydrolytic acidification reactor was greatly improved. The effluent became clear, indicating the obvious removal of suspended solids in the water; the ratio of BOD/COD increased to 0.44, suggesting an significant increase of biodegradability; the content of volatile fatty acid (VFA) increased from 22.6 mmol/L to 86.8 mmol/L and the volume loading of COD reached 9.48 kg COD/(m3d). Basically at this stage the removal efficiency of COD was stabilized at 25%. Further treatment was conducted on the effluent from hydrolytic acidification reactor through the Improved UASB Reactor after the internal electrolysis and neutralization. The Improved UASB Reactor can start up at room temperature with an influent of 1,500 mg/L COD and inflow rate of 50(m3/d). Then, temperature was increased gradually to 38 oC (± 2 oC) to optimize the growth of the mesophilic anaerobes in the reactor. The content of VFA of the effluent was controlled below 8 mmol/L to guarantee the pH in the range of 6.8~7.2. After 150 days of debugging, the COD of the influent to UASB increased to 9,600 mg/L, hydraulic retaining time (HRT) was around 70 hrs

  10. Rock climbing rescues: causes, injuries, and trends in Boulder County, Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lack, Daniel A; Sheets, Alison L; Entin, Jacob M; Christenson, David C

    2012-09-01

    To describe rates and patterns of rock climbing rescue incidents, morbidity and mortality in Boulder County, CO. Rocky Mountain Rescue Group incident reports from 1998 to 2011 were reviewed to provide a 14-year statistical account of rock climbing incidents. Rock climbing rescues in Boulder accounted for 428 of a total of 2198 (19.5%) mountain and wilderness rescue victims. Most rock climbing victims were male (78%), and 46% of victims were between the ages of 20 and 29 years; most rock climbing incidents occurred on weekend days (median time of 3:30 pm) during the spring, summer, and autumn. Technical roped climbers accounted for 58% of climbing victims, whereas unroped climbers accounted for 34%. Belay incidents accounted for 12% of climbing victims, whereas rock fall incidents accounted for 4.5% of victims. Most victims were uninjured (43% stranded or lost), whereas lower extremity injuries were the most common injury (29.5% of injured victims). A total of 5.5% of climbing victims were fatally injured (23 victims: 5 from lead falls and 9 from unroped falls). The occurrence of rock climbing-related rescue victims comprised one fifth of all rescue victims in Boulder County. A large fraction of incidents and fatalities resulted from unroped climbing. Incidents of lost or uninjured stranded climbers and belay incidents account for more than half of victims, which can likely be prevented by gaining appropriate experience, seeking local information, and applying some simple safety measures for control of rope belays. Copyright © 2012 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Abundance and distribution of sessile invertebrates under intertidal boulders (São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Moreira da Rocha

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The encrusting communities under two boulder fields (Praia Grande and Ponta do Baleeiro were monitored monthly during 1990 and 1991, in São Sebastião, on the northern coast of São Paulo State, Brazil. Two sizes of boulders were chosen: small (20-30 cm² underside area and larger ones (160-220 cm² located on the middle and lower levels of the intertidal. The community's components were mainly sessile animals either compound ones such as Bryozoa, Ascidiacea, Porifera and Cnidaria, in this order of abundance, or simple ones such as Polychaeta and Bivalvia, also in this order of abundance. All groups, except by serpulids (Polychaeta, had higher percent cover in the low intertidal region and under large boulders. Diversity was higher at Ponta do Baleeiro, and in the low intertidal region and on large boulders for both shores.Em São Sebastião, litoral norte do Estado de São Paulo, Brasil, foram monitorados mensalmente dois ambientes de matacões em costões rochosos. Praia Grande e Ponta do Baleeiro, ao longo de 1990 e 1991. As condições ambientais avaliadas foram: temperatura e salinidade da água, hidrodinâmica, capacidade de abrasão da areia acumulada, heterogeneidade ambiental e porosidade das pedras. Foi estudada a comunidade incrustante na superfície inferior de pedras pequenas (20-30 cm² de área na face inferior e maiores (160-220 cm² dispostas nos estratos médio e inferior da zona entremarés. Esta comunidade era constituída principalmente por organismos sésseis coloniais (Bryozoa, Ascidiacea, Porifera e Cnidaria, nesta ordem de abundância ou solitários (Polychaeta e Bivalvia, nesta ordem de abundância. Todos os grupos, com exceção dos ser pulid cos (Polychaeta, apresentaram maior porcentagem de cobertura nos estratos inferiores e nas pedras grandes. A composição específica foi similar nos dois costões estudados, mas várias espécies ocorreram exclusivamente em um determinado nível de maré, ou tamanho de pedra

  12. Geology and uranium deposits of the Caribou area, Boulder County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, F.B.; Cavender, W.S.; Kaiser, E.P.

    1954-01-01

    Pitchblende was discovered in the Caribou mine, Boulder County. Colo., in 1948 by Consolidated Caribou Silver Mines, incorporated during the reopening of the 1040-level.  Since 1948, a small quantity of pitchblende has been produced from the Radium vein during exploratory work that was done under contract with the Atomic Energy Commission. The Caribou mine, primarily a silver mine, develops five veins (Caribou. No Name, Poorman, Sherman and Silver Dollar) that were formerly worked as separate mines. Three other veins, the Radium, Elmer, and Nelson, are exposed in the Caribou mine only at and below the 920-level.  

  13. OSL surface exposure dating of wave-emplaced coastal boulders - Research concept and first results from the Rabat coast, Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Dominik; May, Simon Matthias; Mhammdi, Nadia; King, Georgina; Brückner, Helmut

    2017-04-01

    Fields of wave-emplaced blocks and boulders represent impressive evidence of cyclone and tsunami flooding over Holocene time scales. Unfortunately, their use for coastal hazard assessment is in many cases impeded by the absence of appropriate dating approaches, which are needed to generate robust chronologies. The commonly applied AMS-14C, U/Th or ESR dating of coral-reef rocks and marine organisms attached to the clasts depends on a - mostly hypothetical - coincidence between the organisms' death and boulder displacement, and inferred event chronologies may be biased by the marine 14C-reservoir effect and reworked organisms. Here we discuss the potential of the recently developed optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) surface exposure dating technique to directly date the relocation process of wave-emplaced boulders. By measuring the depth-dependent resetting of luminescence signals in exposed rock surfaces and comparing it to the signal-depth profiles of known-age samples, OSL surface exposure dating may be capable to model direct depositional ages for boulder transport. Thereby, it promises to overcome the limitations of existing dating techniques, and to decipher complex transport histories of clasts that underwent multiple phases of exposure and burial. The concept and some first results of OSL surface exposure dating shall be presented for coastal boulders from the Rabat coast, Morocco, where the preconditions for successful dating are promising: (i) Several coastal boulders show clear indication of overturning during wave transport in the form of downward-facing bio-eroded surfaces; (ii) the boulders are composed of different types of sandstone that contain quartz and feldspar, the required dosimeters for OSL dating; (iii) all boulders are of Holocene age and, therefore, in the dating range of OSL surface exposure dating. The main challenges for a successful application are the intensive bio-erosion and weathering of some surfaces exposed after transport

  14. Persistence of 10-year old Exxon Valdez oil on Gulf of Alaska beaches: The importance of boulder-armoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irvine, G.V. [United States Geological Survey , Anchorage, AK (United States); Mann, D.H. [University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Institute of Arctic Biology; Short, J.W. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Juneau, AK (United States). Auke Bay Fisheries Laboratory

    2006-09-15

    Oil stranded as a result of the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill has persisted for >10 years at study sites on Gulf of Alaska shores distant from the spill's origin. These sites were contaminated by 'oil mousse', which persists in these settings due to armoring of underlying sediments and their included oil beneath boulder. The boulder-armored beaches that we resampled in 1999 showed continued contamination by subsurface oil, despite their exposure to moderate to high wave energies. Significant declines in surface oil cover occurred at all study sites. In contrast, mousse has persisted under boulders in amounts similar to what was present in 1994 and probably in 1989. Especially striking is the general lack of weathering of this subsurface oil over the last decade. Oil at five of the six armored-beach sites 10 years after the spill is compositionally similar to 11-day old Exxon Valdez oil. Analysis of movements in the boulder-armor that covers the study beaches reveals that only minor shifts have occurred since 1994, suggesting that over the last five, and probably over the last 10 years, boulder-armors have remained largely unmoved at the study sites. These findings emphasize the importance of particular geomorphic parameters in determining stranded oil persistence. Surface armoring, combined with stranding of oil mousse, results in the unexpectedly lengthy persistence of only lightly to moderately weathered oil within otherwise high-energy wave environments. (author)

  15. Persistence of 10-year old Exxon Valdez oil on Gulf of Alaska beaches: the importance of boulder-armoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Gail V; Mann, Daniel H; Short, Jeffrey W

    2006-09-01

    Oil stranded as a result of the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill has persisted for >10 years at study sites on Gulf of Alaska shores distant from the spill's origin. These sites were contaminated by "oil mousse", which persists in these settings due to armoring of underlying sediments and their included oil beneath boulders. The boulder-armored beaches that we resampled in 1999 showed continued contamination by subsurface oil, despite their exposure to moderate to high wave energies. Significant declines in surface oil cover occurred at all study sites. In contrast, mousse has persisted under boulders in amounts similar to what was present in 1994 and probably in 1989. Especially striking is the general lack of weathering of this subsurface oil over the last decade. Oil at five of the six armored-beach sites 10 years after the spill is compositionally similar to 11-day old Exxon Valdez oil. Analysis of movements in the boulder-armor that covers the study beaches reveals that only minor shifts have occurred since 1994, suggesting that over the last five, and probably over the last 10 years, boulder-armors have remained largely unmoved at the study sites. These findings emphasize the importance of particular geomorphic parameters in determining stranded oil persistence. Surface armoring, combined with stranding of oil mousse, results in the unexpectedly lengthy persistence of only lightly to moderately weathered oil within otherwise high-energy wave environments.

  16. Survival Times of Meter-Sized Rock Boulders on the Surface of Airless Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevsky, A. T.; Head, J. W.; Horz, F.; Ramsley, K.

    2015-01-01

    This study considers the survival times of meter-sized rock boulders on the surfaces of several airless bodies. As the starting point, we employ estimates of the survival times of such boulders on the surface of the Moon by[1], then discuss the role of destruction due to day-night temperature cycling, consider the meteorite bombardment environment on the considered bodies in terms of projectile flux and velocities and finally estimate the survival times. Survival times of meter-sized rocks on lunar surface: The survival times of hand specimen-sized rocks exposed to the lunar surface environment were estimated based on experiments modeling the destruction of rocks by meteorite impacts, combined with measurements of the lunar surface meteorite flux, (e.g.,[2]). For estimations of the survival times of meter-sized lunar boulders, [1] suggested a different approach based on analysis of the spatial density of boulders on the rims of small lunar craters of known absolute age. It was found that for a few million years, only a small fraction of the boulders ejected by cratering process are destroyed, for several tens of million years approx.50% are destroyed, and for 200-300 Ma, 90 to 99% are destroyed. Following [2] and other works, [1] considered that the rocks are mostly destroyed by meteorite impacts. Destruction of rocks by thermal-stress. However, high diurnal temperature variations on the surface of the Moon and other airless bodies imply that thermal stresses may also be a cause of surface rock destruction. Delbo et al. [3] interpreted the observed presence of fine debris on the surface of small asteroids as due to thermal surface cycling. They stated that because of the very low gravity on the surface of these bodies, ejecta from meteorite impacts should leave the body, so formation there of fine debris has to be due to thermal cycling. Based on experiments on heating-cooling of cm-scale pieces of ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites and theoretical modeling of

  17. Geochemical studies of the White Breccia Boulders at North Ray Crater, Descartes region of the lunar highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, M. M.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Lum, R. K. L.; Schuhmann, P. J.; Nava, D. F.; Schuhmann, S.; Philpotts, J. A.; Winzer, S. R.

    1977-01-01

    The samples of the White Breccia Boulders obtained during the Apollo 16 mission and investigated in the reported study include an anorthositic breccia (67415), a dark matrix breccia (67435), a light matrix breccia (67455), and a large clast of dark matrix breccia (67475) taken from the 67455 boulder. The chemical analyses of bulk samples of the samples are listed in a table. A graph shows the lithophile trace element abundances. Another graph indicates the variation of Sm with Al2O3 content for samples from the White Breccia Boulders. The North Ray Crater breccias are found to be in general slightly more aluminous than breccias from the other stations at the Apollo 16 site. Analyses of eight Apollo 16 breccias cited in the literature range from 25% to 35% Al2O3. However, the North Ray Crater breccias are more clearly distinct from the other Apollo 16 breccias in their contents of lithophile trace elements.

  18. Arsenic and Antimony Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at South Truckee Meadows General Improvement District (STMGID), NV, Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the operation of an arsenic and antimony removal technology demonstrated at the South Truckee Meadows General Improvement District (STMGID) in Washoe County, NV. The objectives of the project wer...

  19. Arsenic and Antimony Removal from Drinking Water by Point-of-Entry Reverse Osmosis Coupled with Dual Plumbing Distribution - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Carmel Elementary School in Carmel, ME -Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed for and the results obtained from the arsenic and antimony removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Carmel Elementary School (CES) in Carmel, ME. An innovative approach of employing point of entry (POE) reverse osmo...

  20. Assessing enigmatic boulder deposits in NE Aegean Sea: importance of historical sources as tool to support hydrodynamic equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vacchi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to their importance in the assessment of coastal hazards, several studies have focused on geomorphological and sedimentological field evidence of catastrophic wave impacts related to historical tsunami events. Among them, many authors used boulder fields as important indicators of past tsunamis, especially in the Mediterranean Sea. The aim of this study was to understand the mechanism of deposition of clusters of large boulders, consisting of beachrock slabs, which were found on the southern coasts of Lesvos Island (NE Aegean Sea. Methods to infer the origin of boulder deposits (tsunami vs. storm wave are often based on hydrodynamic models even if different environmental complexities are difficult to be incorporated into numerical models. In this study, hydrodynamic equations did not provide unequivocal indication of the mechanism responsible for boulder deposition in the study area. Further analyses, ranging from geomorphologic to seismotectonic data, indicated a tsunami as the most likely cause of displacement of the boulders but still do not allow to totally exclude the extreme storm origin. Additional historical investigations (based on tsunami catalogues, historical photos and aged inhabitants interviews indicated that the boulders are likely to have been deposited by the tsunami triggered by the 6.7 Ms Chios-Karaburum earthquake of 1949 or, alternatively, by minor effects of the destructive tsunami produced by 1956's Amorgos Island earthquake. Results of this study point out that, at Mediterranean scale, to flank numerical models with the huge amount of the available historical data become a crucial tool in terms of prevention policies related to catastrophic coastal events.

  1. Thermal stress and topography control on the exfoliation of spheroidal granite boulders in Pricopan Ridge, Macin Mountains, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, Mirela; Vespremeanu-Stroe, Alfred

    2017-04-01

    Exfoliation is one of the most frequent processes of granite landforms shaping, its intensity being usually associated with the cumulated action of thermal stresses. Although exfoliation microforms are present on granite landforms in most of the warm-climates, the controlling factors of this process are not yet well defined. Within this study, we investigated the distribution pattern of the exfoliation microforms identified on the surface of 40 rounded granite boulders mapped on the western slope of Pricopan Ridge (Macin Mountains), in a semi-arid temperate environment (Northern Dobrogea, Romania). Continuous rock near-surface temperature measurement on a reference boulder over a four years period allowed us to evaluate the frequency and intensity of the rock thermal oscillations, taking into account (as control factors) (i) the fast temperature changes generated by convective summer rain events, (ii) the day-night temperature variations and (iii) the occurrence of freeze-thaw oscillations during winter. The relative rock strength at the rock surface was determined by Schmidt Hammer tests, which highlighted a reduced resistance of the boulder areas oriented towards South (mean rebound values of 27-33) compared to the North-exposed ones (mean rebound values of 43-50). Over a North-South profile of the boulders, the lowest resistance of the rock surface corresponds to their gently sloping southern faces (at slope values of 0-45 degrees (°)), which indicates a higher susceptibility of these sectors to be affected by weathering processes. These specific areas (gently-sloping faces of the rounded granite boulders) overlap the sector of high frequency and intensity of the investigated thermal-stress inducing processes, all three of them reaching the highest peak on the South-face of the boulders at slopes of 20°-30°. Correspondently, the exfoliation microforms mapped and morphometrically described in this study are developed most frequently in the area delimited by

  2. A re-evaluation of the relativistic redshift on frequency standards at NIST, Boulder, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlis, Nikolaos K.; Weiss, Marc A.

    2017-08-01

    We re-evaluated the relativistic redshift correction applicable to the frequency standards at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Boulder, Colorado, USA, based on a precise GPS survey of three benchmarks on the roof of the building where these standards had been previously housed, and on global and regional geoid models supported by data from the GRACE and GOCE missions, including EGM2008, USGG2009, and USGG2012. We also evaluated the redshift offset based on the published NAVD88 geopotential number of the leveling benchmark Q407 located on the side of Building 1 at NIST, Boulder, Colorado, USA, after estimating the bias of the NAVD88 datum at our specific location. Based on these results, our current best estimate of the relativistic redshift correction, if frequency standards were located at the height of the leveling benchmark Q407 outside the second floor of Building 1, with respect to the EGM2008 geoid whose potential has been estimated to be {{W}0}=62 636 855.69 {{m}2} {{s}-2} , is equal to (-1798.50  ±  0.06)  ×  10-16. The corresponding value, with respect to an equipotential surface defined by the International Astronomical Union’s (IAU) adopted value of {{W}0}=62 636 856.0 {{m}2} {{s}-2} , is (-1798.53  ±  0.06)  ×  10-16. These values are comparable to the value of (-1798.70  ±  0.30)  ×  10-16, estimated by Pavlis and Weiss in 2003, with respect to an equipotential surface defined by {{W}0}=62 636 856.88 {{m}2} {{s}-2} . The minus sign implies that clocks run faster in the laboratory in Boulder than a corresponding clock located on the geoid. Contribution of US government, not subject to Copyright.

  3. Cataract removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eye diseases and eye surgery. Adults are usually awake for the procedure. Numbing medicine (local anesthesia) is ... removed. Tips for recovering after cataract surgery: Wear dark sunglasses outside after you remove the patch. Wash ...

  4. Nevus Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find the answers you seek. What are the Negative Effects of Nevus Removal? Removal procedures are major ... Reunited Donor Challenge Met! Find Nevus Outreach on Facebook To New Parents of a Child With a ...

  5. Boulder Deposits on the Southern Spanish Atlantic Coast: Possible Evidence for the 1755 AD Lisbon Tsunami?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Kelletat

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Field evidence of visible tsunami impacts in Europe is scarce. This research focused on an analysis of large littoral debris and accompanying geomorphic features and their rela- tionship to a tsunami event at Cabo de Trafalgar, located on the southern Spanish Atlantic coast. Relative dating of weathering features as well as minor bioconstructive forms in the littoral zone suggest the Lisbon tsunami of 1755 AD as the event responsible for the large deposits described. This tsunami had run up heights of more than 19 m and was generated at the Gorringe Bank, located 500 km west off the Cape. Tsunami deposits at Cabo de Tra- falgar are the first boulder deposits identified on the southern Spanish Atlantic coast and are located approximately 250 km southeast of the Algarve coast (Portugal, where other geo- morphic evidence for the Lisbon tsunami has been reported.

  6. Long-term variability of supratidal coastal boulder activation in Brittany (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autret, Ronan; Dodet, Guillaume; Suanez, Serge; Roudaut, Gildas; Fichaut, Bernard

    2018-03-01

    High-energy supratidal coastal boulder deposit (SCBD) dynamics were investigated on Vierge Island and Pors Carn Point, north and south of western Brittany, France, respectively. Morphological changes induced by boulder transport and quarrying were quantified using high-resolution topographic survey data taken between 2012 and 2017. Additional in-situ wave parameters and water levels were also recorded over this period (2014-2017) in order to compute the maximum water levels and assess the relationship between SCBD morphological changes and specific hydrodynamic conditions. During extreme water levels (for maximum water levels exceeding a one in ten year event), SCBDs were broadly reworked (up to 40% of the total volume). During lower intensity events, for which maximum water levels were still very high, morphological changes represented 1% to 5% of the total volume. These morphological and hydrodynamic observations were then used to calibrate a chronology of SCBD activation events based on 70 years of hindcast winter maximum water levels. These long-term time-series showed great interannual variability in SCBD activation but no significant long-term trend. Winter-frequency SCBD activation was better correlated to the WEPA index (r = 0.46) than the NAO index (r = 0.1). Therefore, the WEPA index can be considered to be a more significant climate proxy for assessing storm-related geomorphic changes in the temperate latitudes of the N-E Atlantic basin (36°-52° N), including the Brittany coast. The potential of SCBDs as a morphological storm proxy for macrotidal high-energy rocky coasts is addressed.

  7. Risk factors for injury in sport climbing and bouldering: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollings, Kaikanani Y; McKay, Carly D; Emery, Carolyn A

    2015-09-01

    Rock climbing is an increasingly popular sport worldwide, as a recreational activity and a competitive sport. Several disciplines including sport climbing and bouldering have developed, each employing specific movements and techniques, leading to specific injuries. To examine risk factors and prevention measures for injury in sport climbing and bouldering, and to assess the methodological quality of existing studies. 12 electronic databases and several other sources were searched systematically using predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Eligible articles were peer-reviewed, based on primary research using original data; outcome measures included injury, morbidity or mortality in rock climbing, and included one or more potential risk factor or injury prevention strategy. Two independent reviewers assessed the methodology of research in each study using the Downs and Black Quality Index. The data extracted is summarised, and appraisals of the articles are presented with respect to the quality of evidence presented. 19 studies met the inclusion criteria, and introduced 35 possible risk factors or injury prevention measures in climbing. Age, increasing years of climbing experience, highest climbing grade achieved (skill level), high climbing intensity score (CIS) and participating in lead climbing are potential risk factors. Results regarding injury prevention measures remain inconclusive. This field is relatively new and, as such, the data are not as robust as for more established sports with a larger research foundation. The key need is establishing modifiable risk factors using prospective studies and high quality methodology, such that injury prevention strategies can be developed. The CIS may be a useful measure in this field of research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Bouldering: an alternative strategy to long-vertical climbing in root-climbing hortensias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados Mendoza, Carolina; Isnard, Sandrine; Charles-Dominique, Tristan; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Rowe, Nick P; Van Acker, Joris; Goetghebeur, Paul; Samain, Marie-Stéphanie

    2014-10-06

    In the Neotropics, the genus Hydrangea of the popular ornamental hortensia family is represented by climbing species that strongly cling to their support surface by means of adhesive roots closely positioned along specialized anchoring stems. These root-climbing hortensia species belong to the nearly exclusive American Hydrangea section Cornidia and generally are long lianescent climbers that mostly flower and fructify high in the host tree canopy. The Mexican species Hydrangea seemannii, however, encompasses not only long lianescent climbers of large vertical rock walls and coniferous trees, but also short 'shrub-like' climbers on small rounded boulders. To investigate growth form plasticity in root-climbing hortensia species, we tested the hypothesis that support variability (e.g. differences in size and shape) promotes plastic responses observable at the mechanical, structural and anatomical level. Stem bending properties, architectural axis categorization, tissue organization and wood density were compared between boulder and long-vertical tree-climbers of H. seemannii. For comparison, the mechanical patterns of a closely related, strictly long-vertical tree-climbing species were investigated. Hydrangea seemannii has fine-tuned morphological, mechanical and anatomical responses to support variability suggesting the presence of two alternative root-climbing strategies that are optimized for their particular environmental conditions. Our results suggest that variation of some stem anatomical traits provides a buffering effect that regulates the mechanical and hydraulic demands of two distinct plant architectures. The adaptive value of observed plastic responses and the importance of considering growth form plasticity in evolutionary and conservation studies are discussed. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Metal Removal in Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez Roldan, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study Copper removal capacity of different algae species and their mixtures from the municipal wastewater. This project was implemented in the greenhouse in the laboratories of Tampere University of Applied Sciences and the wastewater used was the one from the Tampere municipal wastewater treatment plant. Five algae species and three mixtures of them were tested for their Copper removal potential in wastewater in one batch test run. The most efficient algae mixture...

  10. Wildfire impacts on stream sedimentation: re-visiting the Boulder Creek Burn in Little Granite Creek, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandra Ryan; Kathleen Dwire

    2012-01-01

    In this study of a burned watershed in northwestern Wyoming, USA, sedimentation impacts following a moderately-sized fire (Boulder Creek burn, 2000) were evaluated against sediment loads estimated for the period prior to burning. Early observations of suspended sediment yield showed substantially elevated loads (5x) the first year post-fire (2001), followed by less...

  11. A Case Study on Environmental Perspectives of Boulderers and Access Issues at the Niagara Glen Nature Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jeremy; Davidson, Justin; Hutson, Garrett

    2008-01-01

    Currently, there are concerns about access restrictions to bouldering, a form of rock climbing, and other outdoor activities practiced at the Niagara Glen Nature Reserve located near Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada. The Niagara Parks Commission is currently in the process of exploring ways to balance protection of the natural area with sustainable…

  12. Collection Assessment in Response to Changing Curricula: An Analysis of the Biotechnology Resources at the University of Colorado at Boulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Gabrielle

    2010-01-01

    Increasing demand for biotechnology and biomedical resources prompted the Engineering Library at the University of Colorado at Boulder (UCB) to complete a collection assessment of the journals, books, and other resources provided by the University Libraries. This paper presents a variety of methods for evaluating library collections and describes…

  13. Arsenic and Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water by Ion Exchange U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Vale, OR - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the EPA Arsenic Removal Technology Demonstration Program, a 540-gal/min (gpm) ion exchange (IX) system proposed by Kinetico was selected for demonstration at Vale, OR to remove arsenic and nitrate from a groundwater supply to meet their respective maximum contaminant l...

  14. Seismic-sequence stratigraphy and geologic structure of the Floridan aquifer system near "Boulder Zone" deep wells in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, acquired, processed, and interpreted seismic-reflection data near the North and South District “Boulder Zone” Well Fields to determine if geologic factors may contribute to the upward migration of injected effluent into that upper part of the Floridan aquifer system designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as an underground source of drinking water. The depth of the Boulder Zone at the North and South District “Boulder Zone” Well Fields ranges from about 2,750 to 3,300 feet below land surface (ft bls), whereas overlying permeable zones used as alternative drinking water supply range in depth from about 825 to 1,580 ft bls at the North and South District “Boulder Zone” Well Fields. Seismic-sequence stratigraphy and geologic structures imaged on seismic-reflection profiles created for the study describe the part of the Floridan aquifer system overlying and within the Boulder Zone. Features of the Floridan aquifer system underlying the Boulder Zone were not studied because seismic-reflection profiles acquired near the North and South District “Boulder Zone” Well Fields lacked adequate resolution at such depths.

  15. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT RICHMOND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL IN SUSANVILLE, CA SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the performance evaluation study of the Aquatic Treatment Systems, Inc. (ATS) adsorptive media arsenic removal system at Richmond Elementary School in Susanville, Californi...

  16. TEMPORARY REMOVAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calkins, Hugh; Hindricks, Gerhard; Cappato, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    The publisher regrets that this article has been temporarily removed. A replacement will appear as soon as possible in which the reason for the removal of the article will be specified, or the article will be reinstated. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at https://www.e...

  17. Community structure of intertidal boulder-cobble fields in the Straits of Magellan, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ríos

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on quantitative samples taken along 4 transects in mobile hard-bottom intertidal areas of the Canal Whiteside, Magellan region, biotic composition, abundance and distribution patterns are described. The intertidal substrates, mainly formed by boulders and cobbles, represent highly heterogenous habitats from the structural point of view, and demonstrated a species richness higher than previously mentioned in some preliminary reports. Community structure parameters (abundance, species richness, diversity, and evenness were not homogenous in the study areas, suggesting local dynamics. Differences in the vertical distribution of organisms were also found, suggesting changes of the zonation pattern along the beach profile. The macrofaunal assemblages were dominated by few species, with different specific compositions between transects. In general, representatives of Mollusca (Mytilus chilensis, Perumytilus purpuratus, Polychaeta (Hemipodus simplex, and Amphipoda (Paramoera fissicauda, P. brachyura, Transorchestia chilensis were the numerically dominant groups. In terms of biomass, molluscs were highly dominant, mainly M. chilensis and P. purpuratus. Among the macroalgae, rhodophytes were the group with the highest presence, but Ulva lactuca (Chlorophyta was the dominant species. In the upper sandy terrace, no macroorganisms were found. Several species found at Canal Whiteside have a wide circumpolar distribution in Sub-Antarctic regions.

  18. Fast Lemons and Sour Boulders: Testing Crossmodal Correspondences Using an Internet-Based Testing Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy T. Woods

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available According to a popular family of hypotheses, crossmodal matches between distinct features hold because they correspond to the same polarity on several conceptual dimensions (such as active–passive, good–bad, etc. that can be identified using the semantic differential technique. The main problem here resides in turning this hypothesis into testable empirical predictions. In the present study, we outline a series of plausible consequences of the hypothesis and test a variety of well-established and previously untested crossmodal correspondences by means of a novel internet-based testing methodology. The results highlight that the semantic hypothesis cannot easily explain differences in the prevalence of crossmodal associations built on the same semantic pattern (fast lemons, slow prunes, sour boulders, heavy red; furthermore, the semantic hypothesis only minimally predicts what happens when the semantic dimensions and polarities that are supposed to drive such crossmodal associations are made more salient (e.g., by adding emotional cues that ought to make the good/bad dimension more salient; finally, the semantic hypothesis does not explain why reliable matches are no longer observed once intramodal dimensions with congruent connotations are presented (e.g., visually presented shapes and colour do not appear to correspond.

  19. Inland fields of dispersed cobbles and boulders as evidence for a tsunami on Anegada, British Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Bruce E.; Watt, Steve; Buckley, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Marine overwash from the north a few centuries ago transported hundreds of angular cobbles and boulders tens to hundreds of meters southward from limestone outcrops in the interior of Anegada, 140 km east–northeast of Puerto Rico. We examined two of several cobble and boulder fields as part of an effort to interpret whether the overwash resulted from a tsunami or a storm in a location where both events are known to occur. One of the cobble and boulder field extends 200 m southward from limestone outcrops that are 300 m inland from the island’s north shore. The other field extends 100 m southward from a limestone knoll located 800 m from the nearest shore. In the two fields, we measured the size, orientation, and spatial distribution of a total of 161 clasts and determined their stratigraphic positions with respect to an overwash sand and shell sheet deposit. In both fields, we found the spacing between clasts increased southward and that clast long-axis orientations are consistent with a transport trending north–south. Almost half the clasts are partially buried in a landward thinning and fining overwash sand and none were found embedded in the shelly mud of a pre-overwash marine pond. The two cobble and boulder fields resemble modern tsunami deposits in which dispersed clasts extend inland as a single layer. The fields contrast with coarse clast storm deposits that often form wedge-shaped shore-parallel ridges. These comparisons suggest that the overwash resulted from a tsunami and not from a storm.

  20. Potential for timing high-energy marine inundation events in the recent geological past through age-dating of reef boulders in Fiji

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, James P.; Etienne, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    Transported coastal boulders have increasingly come to represent a valuable element of investigations within the broader framework of multi-proxy approaches applied to coastal hazard studies. Through a case study on Taveuni Island in Fiji, this paper outlines some approaches and hindrances to effective timing of prehistorical high-energy marine inundation events (storms and tsunamis) on tropical coastlines from the evidence of reef-platform carbonate boulders. Various sources of errors are outlined that investigators must consider when attempting to use carbonate boulder ages as a surrogate for timing past events. On Taveuni, uranium : thorium dates with a high level of precision (1-7 years) suggest that major inundation events have a return period of approximately 40-45 years since 1650 AD. Of particular importance, considerably different age dates are provided by coral samples sourced from the top and bottom (i.e. opposite faces) of individual boulders, so highlighting interpretation biases that must be avoided.

  1. Tattoo removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adatto, Maurice A; Halachmi, Shlomit; Lapidoth, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Over 50,000 new tattoos are placed each year in the United States. Studies estimate that 24% of American college students have tattoos and 10% of male American adults have a tattoo. The rising popularity of tattoos has spurred a corresponding increase in tattoo removal. Not all tattoos are placed intentionally or for aesthetic reasons though. Traumatic tattoos due to unintentional penetration of exogenous pigments can also occur, as well as the placement of medical tattoos to mark treatment boundaries, for example in radiation therapy. Protocols for tattoo removal have evolved over history. The first evidence of tattoo removal attempts was found in Egyptian mummies, dated to have lived 4,000 years BC. Ancient Greek writings describe tattoo removal with salt abrasion or with a paste containing cloves of white garlic mixed with Alexandrian cantharidin. With the advent of Q-switched lasers in the late 1960s, the outcomes of tattoo removal changed radically. In addition to their selective absorption by the pigment, the extremely short pulse duration of Q-switched lasers has made them the gold standard for tattoo removal. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. The role of landslides in downslope transport of caprock-derived boulders in sedimentary tablelands, Stołowe Mts, SW Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszyński, Filip; Jancewicz, Kacper; Kasprzak, Marek; Migoń, Piotr

    2017-10-01

    Escarpment slopes in sedimentary tablelands are often mantled by extensive boulder blankets. While lithology shows beyond doubt that caprock is the source of boulders, the processes involved in boulder movement and their distribution patterns are rarely examined. In this paper we investigate the role of landslides initiated within middle and lower escarpment slopes in redistributing boulder covers, on the example of the Stołowe Mountains in SW Poland. Quartz sandstones form caprock and give rise to precipitous, albeit rather low (30 m high at most, typically 10-15 m) uppermost slope sections, and are the source of boulders which occur at distances even 1 km away from the caprock, on the nearly flat footslope. Sedimentary series beneath caprock include fine-grained rocks such as mudstones, claystone and calcareous sandstones. Geomorphological mapping and geomorphometric analysis of a high-resolution DEM allowed us to identify landform patterns interpreted as resulting from landslides, both rotational and translational. The latter produced distinctive tread-and-riser topography, with risers up to 10 m high. Results of geophysical prospecting using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) confirm the presence of allochthonous, sandstone-derived upper layer that wedges out downslope and indicate resistivity contrasts at depth of 5-15 m, interpreted as basal boundaries of landslide material. Sandstone boulders rafted on top of slid masses and reached very distant footslope settings. The primary role of landsliding consists of transporting allochthonous boulders further than would be possible otherwise and accumulating boulders in clusters and linear belts across the slope, notably on risers.

  3. Technical bases for the use of CIF{sub 3} in the MSRE reactive gas removal project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    1997-06-01

    Nearly impermeable, non-volatile deposits in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) off-gas piping are impeding the removal of reactive gases from that system. The deposits almost certainly consist of reduced uranium fluorides or of uranium oxyfluorides. Treatment with ClF{sub 3} is a non-intrusive method capable of chemically converting these compounds back to UF{sub 6}, which can then be removed as a gas. This report discusses the technical bases for the use of ClF{sub 3} treatments in this system. A variety of issues are examined, and where the necessary information exists or has been developed, the resolution discussed. The more important of these issues include the efficacy of ClF{sub 3} at deposit removal under the conditions imposed by the MSRE system, materials compatibility of ClF{sub 3} and its reaction products, and operational differences in the Reactive Gas Removal System imposed by the presence of ClF{sub 3} and its products.

  4. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA. U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT SOUTH TRUCKEE MEADOWS GENERAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT (STMIG), NV. INTERIM EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first 32 weeks of operation of an arsenic and antimony removal technology currently being demonstrated at the South Truckee Meadows General Improvement District (STMGID) in Washoe County, NV. ...

  5. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ION EXCHANGE. U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT FRUITLAND, ID SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the performance evaluation of a Kinetico ion exchange (IX) system to remove arsenic (As) and nitrate from source water at the City of Fruitland in Idaho. The 250-gal/min (g...

  6. Acute injuries and overuse syndromes in sport climbing and bouldering in Austria: a descriptive epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieber, Karin; Angelmaier, Lukas; Csapo, Robert; Herceg, Malvina

    2012-06-01

    The increasing popularity of climbing activities is associated with a rise in the number of respective injuries and overuse syndromes. However, a comprehensive scrutiny of the incidence, kind and severity of climbing-related ailments in Austria is so far outstanding. We aimed to evaluate injuries and overuse syndromes in sport climbing and bouldering in Austria and to investigate whether the injury incidence differs between specific groups of climbers. Retrospective cross-sectional self-report study. A self-report questionnaire to assess (a) demographic and anthropometric characteristics, (b) climbing experience and skill level, and (c) detailed information on climbing-related injuries was made available in climbing halls and on the Internet. Data from 193 climbers (133 males and 60 females; age 30.4 ± 8.1 years; average climbing experience 9.3 ± 7.7 years) were acquired. A total of 374 injuries were reported by 130 participants (67.4 %). The single most common differential diagnoses, accounting for 56.7 % of all injuries, were strains and ruptures of annular ligaments of the fingers, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow, and sprains or fractures of the ankle joint. The odds for strains of the annular ligaments and lateral epicondylitis were greater in men and increased with older age and higher exposure to climbing stress. This is the first comprehensive study investigating climbing-related injuries in Austria. The incidence and kind of the ailments reported confirm results of previous studies. Moreover, our results suggest that the risk to suffer climbing-related overuse syndromes, but not acute injuries, is dependent on sex, age, and exposure to climbing stress.

  7. Cobble cam: Grain-size measurements of sand to boulder from digital photographs and autocorrelation analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, J.A.; Rubin, D.M.; Ruggiero, P.; Harney, J.N.; Draut, A.E.; Buscombe, D.

    2009-01-01

    A new application of the autocorrelation grain size analysis technique for mixed to coarse sediment settings has been investigated. Photographs of sand- to boulder-sized sediment along the Elwha River delta beach were taken from approximately 1??2 m above the ground surface, and detailed grain size measurements were made from 32 of these sites for calibration and validation. Digital photographs were found to provide accurate estimates of the long and intermediate axes of the surface sediment (r2 > 0??98), but poor estimates of the short axes (r2 = 0??68), suggesting that these short axes were naturally oriented in the vertical dimension. The autocorrelation method was successfully applied resulting in total irreducible error of 14% over a range of mean grain sizes of 1 to 200 mm. Compared with reported edge and object-detection results, it is noted that the autocorrelation method presented here has lower error and can be applied to a much broader range of mean grain sizes without altering the physical set-up of the camera (~200-fold versus ~6-fold). The approach is considerably less sensitive to lighting conditions than object-detection methods, although autocorrelation estimates do improve when measures are taken to shade sediments from direct sunlight. The effects of wet and dry conditions are also evaluated and discussed. The technique provides an estimate of grain size sorting from the easily calculated autocorrelation standard error, which is correlated with the graphical standard deviation at an r2 of 0??69. The technique is transferable to other sites when calibrated with linear corrections based on photo-based measurements, as shown by excellent grain-size analysis results (r2 = 0??97, irreducible error = 16%) from samples from the mixed grain size beaches of Kachemak Bay, Alaska. Thus, a method has been developed to measure mean grain size and sorting properties of coarse sediments. ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. BWR Vessel and Internals Project Removal and Analysis of Material Samples from Core Shroud and Top Guide at Susquehanna Unit 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, D; Haertel, T; Lindberg, J; Oliver, B; Greenwood, L

    2005-04-15

    Fast and thermal fluence were determined by a laboratory analysis of the samples. Fluence in the upper regions of the shroud (between the H1 and H2 welds) was substantially lower than that in the belt line region (near the H4 weld). Fluence in the top guide was significantly higher than fluence on the core shroud. As expected, helium concentrations were highest in regions where fluence was highest. Estimates of the initial boron concentration were similar to measurements made on materials removed from other reactors. A technical justification evaluated the acceptability of the sampling process with respect to structural consequences of material removal and to increased cracking susceptibility due to the as-left condition. It was determined that the sampling process was acceptable on both counts.

  9. Work plan, health and safety plan, and quality assurance project plan for hazardous waste removal at the CTF K-1654B underground collection tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panter, M.S.; Burman, S.N.; Landguth, D.C.; Uziel, M.S.

    1991-10-01

    The Central Training Facility (CTF), located on Bear Creek Road approximately two miles south of the K-25 Site, is utilized for training security personnel at Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, Tennessee. At the request of the CTF staff, this plan has been developed for the removal of the waste contents in the facility's 500-gal septic tank and associated distribution box. The septic tank and distribution box were historically located beneath the K-1654B trailer and adjacent to the K-1654A Indoor Firing Range. Recently, however, the K-1654B trailer was removed to accommodate the objectives of this work plan as well as future construction activities planned at CTF. The purpose of this plan is to develop and assign responsibilities, establish personnel protection requirements and mandatory safety procedures, and provide for contingencies that may arise while operations are being conducted by ORNL/MAD at the CTF K-1654B underground collection tank site. This document addresses requirements of 29 CFR 1910.120, Final Rule, with respect to aspects of health and safety applicable to an underground collection tank waste removal.

  10. Work plan, health and safety plan, and quality assurance project plan for hazardous waste removal at the CTF K-1654B underground collection tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panter, M.S.; Burman, S.N.; Landguth, D.C.; Uziel, M.S.

    1991-10-01

    The Central Training Facility (CTF), located on Bear Creek Road approximately two miles south of the K-25 Site, is utilized for training security personnel at Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, Tennessee. At the request of the CTF staff, this plan has been developed for the removal of the waste contents in the facility`s 500-gal septic tank and associated distribution box. The septic tank and distribution box were historically located beneath the K-1654B trailer and adjacent to the K-1654A Indoor Firing Range. Recently, however, the K-1654B trailer was removed to accommodate the objectives of this work plan as well as future construction activities planned at CTF. The purpose of this plan is to develop and assign responsibilities, establish personnel protection requirements and mandatory safety procedures, and provide for contingencies that may arise while operations are being conducted by ORNL/MAD at the CTF K-1654B underground collection tank site. This document addresses requirements of 29 CFR 1910.120, Final Rule, with respect to aspects of health and safety applicable to an underground collection tank waste removal.

  11. Skin lesion removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shave excision - skin; Excision of skin lesions - benign; Skin lesion removal - benign; Cryosurgery - skin, benign; BCC - removal; Basal cell cancer - removal; Actinic keratosis - removal; Wart - removal; Squamous cell - removal; ...

  12. 75 FR 19966 - Boulder Canyon Project-Post-2017 Application of the Energy Planning and Management Program Power...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... Management Program Power Marketing Initiative AGENCY: Western Area Power Administration, DOE. ACTION: Notice... Southwest Region, a Federal power marketing agency of the Department of Energy (DOE), is extending the comment period regarding the application of the Energy Planning and Management Program (Program) Power...

  13. Hair Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in girls who need it. Deciding to remove body hair is a personal choice. Getting rid of body hair doesn't make a person healthier, and you ... you don't want to. Some cultures view body hair as beautiful and natural, so do what feels ...

  14. Hair removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haedersdal, Merete; Haak, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    Hair removal with optical devices has become a popular mainstream treatment that today is considered the most efficient method for the reduction of unwanted hair. Photothermal destruction of hair follicles constitutes the fundamental concept of hair removal with red and near-infrared wavelengths suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair, white skin, and a normal hormonal status. Currently, no method of lifelong permanent hair eradication is available, and it is important that patients have realistic expectations. Substantial evidence has been found for short-term hair removal efficacy of up to 6 months after treatment with the available systems. Evidence has been found for long-term hair removal efficacy beyond 6 months after repetitive treatments with alexandrite, diode, and long-pulse Nd:YAG lasers, whereas the current long-term evidence is sparse for IPL devices. Treatment parameters must be adjusted to patient skin type and chromophore. Longer wavelengths and cooling are safer for patients with darker skin types. Hair removal with lasers and IPL sources are generally safe treatment procedures when performed by properly educated operators. However, safety issues must be addressed since burns and adverse events do occur. New treatment procedures are evolving. Consumer-based treatments with portable home devices are rapidly evolving, and presently include low-level diode lasers and IPL devices. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Developing Capacity for Cities to Adapt to a Changing Climate-a Case Study in Boulder, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, R.; Groves, D. G.; Nason, M.; Pandya, R.

    2016-12-01

    The City of Boulder in Colorado has undertaken many progressive climate-related initiatives, from signing the Kyoto protocol to passing a Climate Action Tax. But as the city prepared to launch its Climate Commitment document and lead a community process, it realized that one critical group that had not been fully engaged in the process was its own staff. It became clear that for organizational change to occur and for the city to meet its goals, city staff needed to develop a deeper understanding of the importance of the climate goals while also learning better how to use these goals to guide their long-term planning. In early 2016, the city launched a year-long "Climate Leaders" initiative which comprised of a series of workshops that brought together over 70 staff members with climate scientists and experts in climate adaptation planning. The first two workshops, billed as Climate 101 and 201, reviewed the best available scientific information about climate threats and potential impacts, and worked with participants to understand how climate changes could affect diverse city functions. These interactive workshops also explored ways to help city staff feel comfortable preparing for a significantly different climate and discussed ways to communicate this information to the public. From there the group split into two tracks. A "mitigation" track focused on the ways in which Boulder could meet its aggressive emissions reduction targets. The "adaptation" track developed integrated scenarios for citywide planning to highlight Boulder's vulnerability to climate change and guide adaptation planning. Bringing these two conversations together is helping city staff to explore critical linkages between mitigation and adaptation, develop common messages to build community support for climate action, and inform comprehensive climate resiliency planning. We will describe how Boulder successfully partnered with scientists and planning experts to program a year of interactive

  16. Economic Impacts from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program: Using Property-Assessed Clean Energy Financing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, M.; Cliburn, J. K.; Coughlin, J.

    2011-04-01

    This report examines the economic impacts (including job creation) from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program (CSLP), an example of Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing. The CSLP was the first test of PACE financing on a multi-jurisdictional level (involving individual cities as well as the county government). It was also the first PACE program to comprehensively address energy efficiency measures and renewable energy, and it was the first funded by a public offering of both taxable and tax-exempt bonds.

  17. 77 FR 39987 - Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests and Pawnee National Grassland; Boulder and Gilpin County...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ...; (4) provide new and upgraded lift infrastructure to improve the quality of the alpine ski experience... County, CO; Eldora Mountain Resort Ski Area Projects AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of... the ski area, the proposed projects are designed to allow Eldora to meet guest expectations for a safe...

  18. 76 FR 14063 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... archeological Native American diet. The remains may have been removed from the Gila National Forest or the Gila... evidence, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, deferred NAGPRA compliance responsibility to... funerary objects are a ceramic bowl, a ceramic jar, and one lot of stone flakes. The ceramic jar contains...

  19. Ozone comparison between Pandora #34, Dobson #061, OMI, and OMPS in Boulder, Colorado, for the period December 2013-December 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Jay; Evans, Robert; Cede, Alexander; Abuhassan, Nader; Petropavlovskikh, Irina; McConville, Glenn; Miyagawa, Koji; Noirot, Brandon

    2017-09-01

    A one-time-calibrated (in December 2013) Pandora spectrometer instrument (Pan #034) has been compared to a periodically calibrated Dobson spectroradiometer (Dobson #061) co-located in Boulder, Colorado, and compared with two satellite instruments over a 3-year period (December 2013-December 2016). The results show good agreement between Pan #034 and Dobson #061 within their statistical uncertainties. Both records are corrected for ozone retrieval sensitivity to stratospheric temperature variability obtained from the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) and Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA-2) model calculations. Pandora #034 and Dobson #061 differ by an average of 2.1 ± 3.2 % when both instruments use their standard ozone absorption cross sections in the retrieval algorithms. The results show a relative drift (0.2 ± 0.08 % yr-1) between Pandora observations against NOAA Dobson in Boulder, CO, over a 3-year period of continuous operation. Pandora drifts relative to the satellite Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS) are +0.18 ± 0.2 % yr-1 and -0.18 ± 0.2 % yr-1, respectively, where the uncertainties are 2 standard deviations. The drift between Dobson #061 and OMPS for a 5.5-year period (January 2012-June 2017) is -0.07 ± 0.06 % yr-1.

  20. Increase in background stratospheric aerosol observed with lidar at Mauna Loa Observatory and Boulder, Colorado - article no. L15808

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, D.; Barnes, J.; O' Neill, M.; Trudeau, M.; Neely, R. [NOAA, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The stratospheric aerosol layer has been monitored with lidars at Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii and Boulder in Colorado since 1975 and 2000, respectively. Following the Pinatubo volcanic eruption in June 1991, the global stratosphere has not been perturbed by a major volcanic eruption providing an unprecedented opportunity to study the background aerosol. Since about 2000, an increase of 4-7% per year in the aerosol backscatter in the altitude range 20-30 km has been detected at both Mauna Loa and Boulder. This increase is superimposed on a seasonal cycle with a winter maximum that is modulated by the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in tropical winds. Of the three major causes for a stratospheric aerosol increase: volcanic emissions to the stratosphere, increased tropical upwelling, and an increase in anthropogenic sulfur gas emissions in the troposphere, it appears that a large increase in coal burning since 2002, mainly in China, is the likely source of sulfur dioxide that ultimately ends up as the sulfate aerosol responsible for the increased backscatter from the stratospheric aerosol layer. The results are consistent with 0.6-0.8% of tropospheric sulfur entering the stratosphere.

  1. Milk removal

    OpenAIRE

    Ferneborg, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Milk from dairy cows is a staple dietary component for humans all over the world. Regardless of whether milk is consumed in its purest, unaltered form or as high-end products such as fine cheese or ice cream, it needs to be of high quality when taken from the cow, produced at a low price and produced in a system that consider aspects such as animal health, animal welfare and sustainability. This thesis investigated the role of milk removal and the importance of residual milk on milk yield...

  2. Behavioural changes of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) after marine boulder reef restoration: Implications for coastal habitat management and Natura 2000 areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støttrup, Josianne Gatt; Svendsen, Jon Christian; Stenberg, Claus

    2017-01-01

    While marine reefs are degraded globally, the responses of fish to marine reef restoration remain uncertain, particularly in temperate waters. This study measured the effect of marine boulder reef restoration on the behaviour of Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L., in a Natura 2000 area using acoustic...... telemetry. Cod were tagged and released in the study area before and after the restoration and tracked continuously for six months. A larger fraction of the released fish remained in the study area after restoration (94%) than before (53%). Moreover, throughout the study period, cod spent significantly more...... hours per day and prolonged their residence time in the study area after the restoration. The study indicates that marine reefs subjected to boulder extraction can be restored and function as favourable cod habitats. Temperate marine boulder reef restoration represents a valuable management tool...

  3. Distribution of effluent injected into the Boulder Zone of the Floridan aquifer system at the North District Wastewater Treatment Plant, southeastern Florida, 1997–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jeffrey N.; Decker, Jeremy D.

    2018-02-09

    Nonhazardous, secondarily treated, domestic wastewater (effluent) has been injected about 1 kilometer below land surface into the Boulder Zone of the Floridan aquifer system at the North District Wastewater Treatment Plant in southeastern Florida. The Boulder Zone contains saline, nonpotable water. Effluent transport out of the injection zone is a risk of underground effluent injection. At the North District Wastewater Treatment Plant, injected effluent was detected outside the Boulder Zone. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, investigated effluent transport from the Boulder Zone to overlying permeable zones in the Floridan aquifer system.One conceptual model is presented to explain the presence of effluent outside of the injection zone in which effluent injected into the Boulder Zone was transported to the Avon Park permeable zone, forced by buoyancy and injection pressure. In this conceptual model, effluent injected primarily into the Boulder Zone reaches a naturally occurring feature (a karst-collapse structure) near an injection well, through which the effluent is transported vertically upward to the uppermost major permeable zone of the Lower Floridan aquifer. The effluent is then transported laterally through the uppermost major permeable zone of the Lower Floridan aquifer to another naturally occurring feature northwest of the North District Wastewater Treatment Plant, through which it is then transported vertically upward into the Avon Park permeable zone. In addition, a leak within a monitoring well, between monitoring zones, allowed interflow between the Avon Park permeable zone and the Upper Floridan aquifer. A groundwater flow and effluent transport simulation of the hydrogeologic system at the North District Wastewater Treatment Plant, based on the hypothesized and non-unique conceptualization of the subsurface hydrogeology and flow system, generally replicated measured effluent constituent

  4. Study of Catalysts and Electrocatalysts for NO{sub x} Removal in Combustion Gases ELECTRONOX Project Final Report; Estudio de Catalizadores y Electrocatalizadores para la Eliminacion de NO{sub x} en Gases de Combustion. Informe Final Proyecto ELECTRONOX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Martinez, E.; Marono Bujan, M.; Sanchez-Hervas, J. M.

    2009-12-11

    The final aim of the ELECTRONOX project was to develop new methodologies and technologies for NO{sub x} removal. To fulfil this objective, studies of selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with hydrocarbons, both conventional and with electrochemical promotion, have been undertaken at pilot plant level, using appropriate catalyst/electrocatalysts configurations and in conditions similar to those required in their possible practical application. None of the catalysts/electrocatalysts studied is active and stable enough, under realistic conditions, to consider its possible industrial application, because the value of NO{sub x} conversion achieved by selective catalytic reduction with hydrocarbons, both conventional and with electrochemical promotion, decreases in presence of the different inhibitors and poisons present in the combustion gas, while the promotional effect on the catalytic activity and selectivity is more pronounced. In addition, the catalysts/electrocatalysts suffer from different deactivation processes, such as: sulphur poisoning, carbon deposition and sintering. However, the developed electrochemical catalyst looks promising for NO{sub x} removal in combustion gases, because it can be promoted under realistic operating conditions. (Author) 23 refs.

  5. From Mountains to Plains: The Hydrogeochemistry of the Boulder Creek Watershed, Colorado during High- and Low-Flow Conditions 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplanck, P. L.; Murphy, S. F.; McCleskey, R. B.; Barber, L. B.; Roth, D. A.

    2002-05-01

    A hydrogeochemical study of the Boulder Creek watershed was undertaken to evaluate natural and anthropogenic sources of solutes and the geochemical processes that affect stream chemistry. The Boulder Creek watershed, 1160 km{2}, is in the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado and can be delineated into five physiographic/land use regions: the headwater region (elev. 4100 to 2600 m, tundra to pine/fir forest, Precambrian and Tertiary gneisses and plutons, sparse habitation), the mountain corridor (elev. 2600 to 1750 m, ponderosa pine, Precambrian and Tertiary gneisses and plutons, small mountain communities), the urban region (elev. 1750 to 1560 m, grassland, Mesozoic sedimentary units, City of Boulder), the wastewater-dominated reach (elev. 1560 to 1540 m, grassland, Mesozoic sedimentary units, sewage treatment plant effluent), and the agriculture region (elev. 1540 to 1480 m, grassland, Mesozoic sedimentary units, mixed urban and agricultural). Potential anthropogenic sources of solutes include: mining (hardrock and aggregate), septic systems, highway runoff, urban wastewater, and agricultural practices. A 70 km reach of Boulder Creek (16 sites) and its major inflows (13 sites) were sampled during high- and low-flow conditions in 2000. At all sites, discharge was measured or estimated, and water samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and organic carbon. At selected sites, analyses also included a suite of pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and wastewater-derived organic compounds and the strontium isotopic composition. Stream water in the headwater region is a dilute Ca-Mg-HCO3-SO4- water, and in the mountain corridor a slight increase in solutes was observed. Within the urban reach solute concentrations increased, with the most dramatic increase below the sewage treatment plant. Many constituents continue to increase in concentration through the urban/agriculture region. Similar trends were observed during high- and low-flow conditions with

  6. Exerting Power in a Landscape Management Controversy: A case study of the proposed Penguin Parade at Boulder Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Foster

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Managing the future of places that are esteemed for both their cultural and natural heritage values is becoming increasingly contentious. This paper examines the spatialised strategies of two groups attempting to influence planning decisions over the fate of ten vernacular buildings in Boulder Bay, Christchurch, and their possible replacement by an eco-tourism proposal. Both groups' strategies include deploying global policy initiatives such as the IUCN Red List and the ICOMOS Charter, however, they diverge significantly over how the local landscape is portrayed. Those looking to preserve the baches, unsurprisingly emphasise local memory and the historical character of the place, while those proposing tourism development downplay many of the impacts of the proposal.

  7. 76 FR 2579 - Safety Zone; Lake Mead Intake Construction, Lake Mead, Boulder City, NV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Lake Mead Intake Construction, Lake Mead... establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of Lake Mead in support of the construction project for Lake... blasting operations for the placement of a water intake pipe in Lake Mead during the first 6 months of 2011...

  8. 75 FR 13232 - Safety Zone; Lake Mead Intake Construction, Lake Mead, Boulder City, NV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Lake Mead Intake Construction, Lake Mead... establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of Lake Mead in support of the construction project for Lake... Pipe from Lake Mead throughout 2010. This safety zone is necessary to ensure non-authorized personnel...

  9. 75 FR 877 - Cancellation of the South Valley Facilities Expansion Project-Clark County, NV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-06

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Cancellation of the South Valley Facilities Expansion Project-- Clark County, NV... (NOI) to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the South Valley Facilities Expansion... Bureau of Reclamation, Lower Colorado Region, P.O. Box 61470, Boulder City, NV 89006-1470. SUPPLEMENTARY...

  10. Boulder abundances and size-frequency distributions on Oxia Planum-Mars: Scientific implications for the 2020 ESA ExoMars rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajola, Maurizio; Rossato, Sandro; Baratti, Emanuele; Pozzobon, Riccardo; Quantin, Cathy; Carter, John; Thollot, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the abundances and the size-frequency distributions (SFD) of boulders identified on a sector of the prime landing site for the ExoMars 2020 rover, in Oxia Planum region. By means of a HiRISE image, boulders ≥ 1.75 m across have been identified and subdivided according to the two main Oxia Planum geological units: the Noachian clay-rich formation (Nc), and the Amazonian volcanic deposit (Av). The spatial density of boulders ≥ 1.75 m over the entire study area is 6.75 × 10-4/m2, with a size-frequency that is best fit both with power-law and exponential-law curves with indices of -4.9 + 0.1/-0.2 and -1.29 + 0.04/-0.06 respectively. Significant differences were found by analysing separately the Av and Nc geological units. The data collected in the Av unit are well-fitted with a power-law curve with an index equal to -4.8 +/-0.2 and with an exponential-law curve with an index of -1.24 + 0.05,-0.06, whilst in the Nc unit such indices are -5.5 + 0.3/-0.4 and -1.70 + 0.09/-0.12 (power-law and exponential-law curve, respectively). The spatial density of boulders in the Av unit is 7.0 times larger than in the Nc one. This may be due primarily to the distinct mechanical properties of the two units that may result in a different production rate or preservation of the boulders. Secondly, the Av unit overlies the Nc unit, possibly resulting in more impacts and/or different weathering processes throughout the ages. This study provides a quantitative evaluation of the abundances of boulders ≥ 1.75 m across on Oxia Planum: it is therefore a reference for the ExoMars 2020 mission, both during the landing phase and the rover traverse to specific areas of interest. The landing ellipse presents much higher abundances of boulders ≥ 1.75 m than all previous Martian rover landing areas. This is particularly evident when the rougher Av unit is taken into account. Contrarily, the Nc unit shows a much more comparable value, but still slightly higher, to the Mars

  11. Indoor rock climbing (bouldering) as a new treatment for depression: study design of a waitlist-controlled randomized group pilot study and the first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttenberger, Katharina; Stelzer, Eva-Maria; Först, Stefan; Schopper, Matthias; Kornhuber, Johannes; Book, Stephanie

    2015-08-25

    Depression is one of the most common diseases in industrialised nations. Physical activity is regarded as an important part of therapeutic intervention. Rock climbing or bouldering (rock climbing to moderate heights without rope) comprises many aspects that are considered useful, but until now, there has been hardly any research on the effects of a bouldering group intervention on people with depression. The purpose of this controlled pilot study was twofold: first, to develop a manual for an eight-week interventional program that integrates psychotherapeutic interventions in a bouldering group setting and second, to assess the effects of a bouldering intervention on people with depression. The intervention took place once a week for three hours across a period of eight weeks. Participants were randomly assigned to the two groups (intervention vs. waitlist). The intervention group began the bouldering therapy immediately after a baseline measurement was taken; the waitlist participants began after an eight-week period of treatment as usual. On four measurement dates at eight-week intervals, participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II), the symptom checklist-90-R (SCL-90), the questionnaire on resources and self-management skills (FERUS), and the attention test d2-R. A total of 47 participants completed the study, and the data were analysed with descriptive statistics. Cohen's d was calculated as a measure of the effect size. For the primary hypothesis, a regression analysis and the Number Needed to Treat (NNT) (improvement of at least 6 points on the BDI-II) were calculated. After eight weeks of intervention, results indicated positive effects on the measures of depression (primary hypothesis: BDI-II: Cohen's d = 0.77), this was supported by the regression analysis with "group" as the only significant predictor of a change in depression (p = .007). The NNT was four. These findings provide the first evidence that therapeutic bouldering may

  12. CO2 Removal from Mars EMU Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CO2 control for during ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) on mars is challenging. Lithium hydroxide (LiOH) canisters have impractical logistics penalties, and regenerable...

  13. CO2 Removal from Mars EMU Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A practical CO2 control system for ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) on Mars have not yet been developed. TDA Research, Inc. proposes to develop a durable,...

  14. Terse messaging and public health in the midst of natural disasters: the case of the Boulder floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Jeannette; League, Cedar; Sellnow, Timothy L; Sellnow, Deanna D

    2015-01-01

    Social media are quickly becoming the channel of choice for disseminating emergency warning messages. However, relatively little data-driven research exists to inform effective message design when using these media. The present study addresses that void by examining terse health-related warning messages sent by public safety agencies over Twitter during the 2013 Boulder, CO, floods. An examination of 5,100 tweets from 52 Twitter accounts over the course of the 5-day flood period yielded several key conclusions and implications. First, public health messages posted by local emergency management leaders are most frequently retweeted by organizations in our study. Second, emergency public health messages focus primarily on drinking water in this event. Third, terse messages can be designed in ways that include imperative/instructional and declarative/explanatory styles of content, both of which are essential for promoting public health during crises. These findings demonstrate that even terse messages delivered via Twitter ought to provide information about the hazard event, its impact, and actionable instructions for self-protection.

  15. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 86-157-1678, Stag Dental Clinic, Boulder, Colorado. [Nitrous oxide exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunter, B.J.

    1986-03-01

    Employees of the Stag Dental Clinic, Boulder, Colorado requested an evaluation of nitrous oxide exposure during dental procedures. Direct reading measurements taken in the dental operatory immediately after nitrous oxide was administered showed levels exceeding 1000 parts per million (ppm) in the breathing zone of the dentist and his assistant. The levels remained high throughout the 1-hour procedure. The level of nitrous oxide in the hallway outside the operatory was 300 ppm and that in the adjacent operatory, 150 ppm (background). General-room air in the operatory in use was 800 ppm nitrous oxide. Levels of nitrous oxide decreased to 50 ppm 1.5 hours after the gas was turned off. The current NIOSH recommended time weighted average is 25 ppm. The author concludes that a health hazard existed at the dental office due to high exposures of nitrous oxide. It was recommended that a scavenging system should be installed. Recommendations also include routine maintenance on anesthetic and suction equipment, a follow-up evaluation after the exhaust systems have been in place, advising all dentists and other personnel in the clinic of the adverse health effects due to nitrous oxide, and use of more dilution ventilation.

  16. Experimental modelling of wave amplification over irregular bathymetry for investigations of boulder transport by extreme wave events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Boyle, Louise; Whittaker, Trevor; Cox, Ronadh; Elsäßer, Björn

    2017-04-01

    During the winter of 2013-2014 the west coast of Ireland was exposed to 6 storms over a period of 8 weeks with wind speeds equating to hurricane categories 3 and 4. During this period, the largest significant wave height recorded at the Marine Institute M6 wave buoy, approximately 300km from the site, was 13.6m (on 26th January 2014). However, this may not be the largest sea state of that winter, because the buoy stopped logging on 30th January and therefore failed to capture the full winter period. During the February 12th 2014 "Darwin" storm, the Kinsale Energy Gas Platform off Ireland's south coast measured a wave height of 25 m, which remains the highest wave measured off Ireland's coasts[1]. Following these storms, significant dislocation and transportation of boulders and megagravel was observed on the Aran Islands, Co. Galway at elevations of up to 25m above the high water mark and distances up to 220 m inland including numerous clasts with masses >50t, and at least one megagravel block weighing >500t [2]. Clast movements of this magnitude would not have been predicted from the measured wave heights. This highlights a significant gap in our understanding of the relationships between storms and the coastal environment: how are storm waves amplified and modified by interactions with bathymetry? To gain further understanding of wave amplification, especially over steep and irregular bathymetry, we have designed Froude-scaled wave tank experiments using the 3D coastal wave basin facility at Queen's University Belfast. The basin is 18m long by 16m wide with wave generation by means of a 12m wide bank of 24 top hinged, force feedback, sector carrier wave paddles at one end. The basin is equipped with gravel beaches to dissipate wave energy on the remaining three sides, capable of absorbing up to 99% of the incident wave energy, to prevent unwanted reflections. Representative bathymetry for the Aran Islands is modelled in the basin based on a high resolution

  17. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2010 Fourmile burn area, Boulder County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Barbara C.; Stevens, Michael R.; Verdin, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary emergency assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned by the Fourmile Creek fire in Boulder County, Colorado, in 2010. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and volumes of debris flows for selected drainage basins. Data for the models include burn severity, rainfall total and intensity for a 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainstorm, and topographic and soil property characteristics. Several of the selected drainage basins in Fourmile Creek and Gold Run were identified as having probabilities of debris-flow occurrence greater than 60 percent, and many more with probabilities greater than 45 percent, in response to the 25-year recurrence, 1-hour rainfall. None of the Fourmile Canyon Creek drainage basins selected had probabilities greater than 45 percent. Throughout the Gold Run area and the Fourmile Creek area upstream from Gold Run, the higher probabilities tend to be in the basins with southerly aspects (southeast, south, and southwest slopes). Many basins along the perimeter of the fire area were identified as having low probability of occurrence of debris flow. Volume of debris flows predicted from drainage basins with probabilities of occurrence greater than 60 percent ranged from 1,200 to 9,400 m3. The predicted moderately high probabilities and some of the larger volumes responses predicted for the modeled storm indicate a potential for substantial debris-flow effects to buildings, roads, bridges, culverts, and reservoirs located both within these drainages and immediately downstream from the burned area. However, even small debris flows that affect structures at the basin outlets could cause considerable damage.

  18. Trends and variability of midlatitude stratospheric water vapour deduced from the re-evaluated Boulder balloon series and HALOE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Scherer

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an updated trend analysis of water vapour in the lower midlatitude stratosphere from the Boulder balloon-borne NOAA frostpoint hygrometer measurements and from the Halogen Occulation Experiment (HALOE. Two corrections for instrumental bias are applied to homogenise the frostpoint data series, and a quality assessment of all soundings after 1991 is presented. Linear trend estimates based on the corrected data for the period 1980–2000 are up to 40% lower than previously reported. Vertically resolved trends and variability are calculated with a multi regression analysis including the quasi-biennal oscillation and equivalent latitude as explanatory variables. In the range of 380 to 640 K potential temperature (≈14 to 25 km, the frostpoint data from 1981 to 2006 show positive linear trends between 0.3±0.3 and 0.7±0.1%/yr. The same dataset shows trends between −0.2±0.3 and 1.0±0.3%/yr for the period 1992 to 2005. HALOE data over the same time period suggest negative trends ranging from −1.1±0.2 to −0.1±0.1%/yr. In the lower stratosphere, a rapid drop of water vapour is observed in 2000/2001 with little change since. At higher altitudes, the transition is more gradual, with slowly decreasing concentrations between 2001 and 2007. This pattern is consistent with a change induced by a drop of water concentrations at entry into the stratosphere. Previously noted differences in trends and variability between frostpoint and HALOE remain for the homogenised data. Due to uncertainties in reanalysis temperatures and stratospheric transport combined with uncertainties in observations, no quantitative inference about changes of water entering the stratosphere in the tropics could be made with the mid latitude measurements analysed here.

  19. ARSENIC REMOVAL BY IRON REMOVAL PROCESSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentation will discuss the removal of arsenic from drinking water using iron removal processes that include oxidation/filtration and the manganese greensand processes. Presentation includes results of U.S. EPA field studies conducted in Michigan and Ohio on existing iron remo...

  20. Diet After Gallbladder Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... keep having diarrhea. Is there a gallbladder removal diet I should follow? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R. ... months. There isn't a specific gallbladder removal diet that you should follow, but there are a ...

  1. PLANNING YOUR REMOVALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Service déménagement; ST Division

    1999-01-01

    To give you better service and avoid lengthy delays, the Removals Service advises you to refrain from programming moves between 26 July and 3 September, as large-scale removals are already planned during this summer period.Thanking you in advance for your co-operation and understanding.Removals Service STTel. 74185 / Mobile 164017

  2. Study of metal removal by square Wetland System with Eleocharis SP. using SR-XRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avelino Neto, Sebastiao; Moreira, Silvana [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mails: savneto@bol.com.br; silvana@fec.unicamp.br

    2007-07-01

    The pollution of the water resources for metals, results of different economic activities. The objective of the present study was to use the SR-TXRF technique to evaluate the performance of Wetland system cultivated with Eleocharis sp. installed at FEAGRI-UNICAMP, in the metal removal. The metals analyzed were Cr, Mn, Fe, Zn and Pb. Samples of the wastewater in the exit, Eleocharis sp. leaf and medium boulder were collected during 20 weeks consecutively. The system was operated with different outflows and hydraulic detention times (HDT) as: 600 L.day{sup -1} (HDT 2 days), 400 L.day-1 (HDT 3 days), 300 L.day{sup -1} (HDT 4 days) and 200 L.day{sup -1} (HDT 6 days). The main source of metal removal was medium boulder with efficiency varying 30.1% for Cr and 98.9% for Pb, independent of the hydraulic detention time (HDT) used. The efficiency of the wetland in the Cr removal varied between 39.6 and 98.7%, and for Mn was higher than 81.6%. For Fe the performance was higher than 70.6% and for Cu the efficiency varied between 88.4 and 99.7 %, while for Pb the variation was 67.5 to 98.4 %. The wetland system with Eleocharis sp were in agreement with CONAMA legislation concern to Fe, Cu and Zn removal and for HDT of 2, 3, 4 and 6 days (HDT), moreover for Mn was necessary 4 and 6 days (HDT) and for Cr and Pb 6 days (HDT). (author)

  3. Dam removal: Listening in

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Melissa M.; Bellmore, James; O'Connor, James E.; Duda, Jeff; East, Amy E.; Grant, Gordon G.; Anderson, Chauncey; Bountry, Jennifer A.; Collins, Mathias J.; Connolly, Patrick J.; Craig, Laura S.; Evans, James E.; Greene, Samantha; Magilligan, Francis J.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Major, Jon J.; Pess, George R.; Randle, Timothy J.; Shafroth, Patrick B.; Torgersen, Christian; Tullos, Desiree D.; Wilcox, Andrew C.

    2017-01-01

    Dam removal is widely used as an approach for river restoration in the United States. The increase in dam removals—particularly large dams—and associated dam-removal studies over the last few decades motivated a working group at the USGS John Wesley Powell Center for Analysis and Synthesis to review and synthesize available studies of dam removals and their findings. Based on dam removals thus far, some general conclusions have emerged: (1) physical responses are typically fast, with the rate of sediment erosion largely dependent on sediment characteristics and dam-removal strategy; (2) ecological responses to dam removal differ among the affected upstream, downstream, and reservoir reaches; (3) dam removal tends to quickly reestablish connectivity, restoring the movement of material and organisms between upstream and downstream river reaches; (4) geographic context, river history, and land use significantly influence river restoration trajectories and recovery potential because they control broader physical and ecological processes and conditions; and (5) quantitative modeling capability is improving, particularly for physical and broad-scale ecological effects, and gives managers information needed to understand and predict long-term effects of dam removal on riverine ecosystems. Although these studies collectively enhance our understanding of how riverine ecosystems respond to dam removal, knowledge gaps remain because most studies have been short (< 5 years) and do not adequately represent the diversity of dam types, watershed conditions, and dam-removal methods in the U.S.

  4. Quantifying the effects of wildfire on changes in soil properties by surface burning of soils from the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieting, Celeste; Ebel, Brian A.; Singha, Kamini

    2017-01-01

    Study regionThis study used intact soil cores collected at the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory near Boulder, Colorado, USA to explore fire impacts on soil properties.Study focusThree soil scenarios were considered: unburned control soils, and low- and high-temperature burned soils. We explored simulated fire impacts on field-saturated hydraulic conductivity, dry bulk density, total organic carbon, and infiltration processes during rainfall simulations.New hydrological insights for the regionSoils burned to high temperatures became more homogeneous with depth with respect to total organic carbon and bulk density, suggesting reductions in near-surface porosity. Organic matter decreased significantly with increasing soil temperature. Tension infiltration experiments suggested a decrease in infiltration rates from unburned to low-temperature burned soils, and an increase in infiltration rates in high-temperature burned soils. Non-parametric statistical tests showed that field-saturated hydraulic conductivity similarly decreased from unburned to low-temperature burned soils, and then increased with high-temperature burned soils. We interpret these changes result from the combustion of surface and near-surface organic materials, enabling water to infiltrate directly into soil instead of being stored in the litter and duff layer at the surface. Together, these results indicate that fire-induced changes in soil properties from low temperatures were not as drastic as high temperatures, but that reductions in surface soil water repellency in high temperatures may increase infiltration relative to low temperatures.

  5. Cosmogenic exposure dating of boulders and bedrock in Denmark: wide range in ages reflect strong dependence of post-depositional stability related to specific glacial landforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houmark-Nielsen, Michael; Linge, Henriette; Fabel, Derek; Xu, Sheng

    2010-05-01

    The timing of ice-sheet fluctuations, as indicated by glacier advances and retreats, is detected from a wide range of geochronological techniques, including varve counting, and radiocarbon and luminescence dating of proglacial and inter till sediments. A robust Late Weichselian chronology of deglacial ice sheet fluctuations in southwestern Scandinavia indicates that the decline of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet from the Last Glacial Maximum position at c. 23-21 kyr (thousands of years) ago in central Denmark occurred through recessional stages and readvances. Active glaciers withdrew from eastern Denmark 17-16 kyr ago and left the southwestern Baltic basin ice free at the beginning of the Bølling interstade c. 14.5 kyr ago. The withdrawal left behind belts of elongate end moraines and streamlined ground moraine as large ice masses were successively isolated causing massive down wasting until c. 12 - 11 kyr ago. In Eastern Denmark and southernmost Sweden this lead to formation of complex superimposed glacial landscapes originally covered with a wealth of erratic boulders. Hitherto untried cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating was applied to sites in Eastern Denmark to test the method against independent chronologies. Samples collected from erratics, moraines and ice-sculpted bedrock were prepared at the Cosmogenic Nuclide Laboratory at the University of Glasgow and AMS measurements were carried out at the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC) AMS facility. Procedural blank corrected 10Be concentrations were converted to in situ 10Be surface exposure ages using the online CRONUS-Earth 10Be-26Al exposure age calculator Version 2.2. Exposure ages from 35 samples range between 11.5 and 20 kyr, 18 of which lie within the expected age envelope. Two samples show overestimated ages apparently due to cosmogenic nuclide inheritance from previous exposure episodes. The remaining 17, two of which have suffered from exhumation, are younger than predicted

  6. Hair removal in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Pereira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Due to hormonal stimulation during puberty, changes occur in hair type and distribution. In both sexes, body and facial unwanted hair may have a negative psychological impact on the teenager. There are several available methods of hair removal, but the choice of the most suitable one for each individual can raise doubts. Objective: To review the main methods of hair removal and clarify their indications, advantages and disadvantages. Development: There are several removal methods currently available. Shaving and depilation with chemicals products are temporary methods, that need frequent repetition, because hair removal is next to the cutaneous surface. The epilating methods in which there is full hair extraction include: epilation with wax, thread, tweezers, epilating machines, laser, intense pulsed light, and electrolysis. Conclusions: The age of beginning hair removal and the method choice must be individualized and take into consideration the skin and hair type, location, dermatological and endocrine problems, removal frequency, cost and personal preferences.

  7. Particle adhesion and removal

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  8. Skin lesion removal-aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shave excision - skin aftercare; Excision of skin lesions - benign aftercare; Skin lesion removal - benign aftercare; Cryosurgery - skin aftercare; BCC - removal aftercare; Basal cell cancer - removal aftercare; Actinic keratosis - removal aftercare; Wart - ...

  9. Project 2010 Project Management

    CERN Document Server

    Happy, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The ideal on-the-job reference guide for project managers who use Microsoft Project 2010. This must-have guide to using Microsoft Project 2010 is written from a real project manager's perspective and is packed with information you can use on the job. The book explores using Project 2010 during phases of project management, reveals best practices, and walks you through project flow from planning through tracking to closure. This valuable book follows the processes defined in the PMBOK Guide, Fourth Edition , and also provides exam prep for Microsoft's MCTS: Project 2010 certification.: Explains

  10. Schools Remove Hazardous Chemicals from Labs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Describes safety committee (New York section, American Chemical Society) survey of college chemistry facilities to assess hazards and make recommendations, and a cooperative project in Iowa to identify and remove hazardous chemicals from college/secondary school classrooms. Includes a partial list of hazardous chemicals identified by the Iowa…

  11. Biochemical Removal of HAP Precursors From Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, G.; Tucker, L.; Richards, J.

    1997-07-01

    This project addresses DOE`s interest in advanced concepts for controlling emissions of air toxics from coal-fired utility boilers. We are determining the feasibility of developing a biochemical process for the precombustion removal of substantial percentages of 13 inorganic hazardous air pollutant (HAP) precursors from coal. These HAP precursors are Sb, As, Be, Cd, Cr, Cl, Co, F, Pb, Hg, Mn, Ni, and Se. Although rapid physical coal cleaning is done routinely in preparation plants, biochemical processes for removal of HAP precursors from coal potentially offer advantages of deeper cleaning, more specificity, and less coal loss. Compared to chemical processes for coal cleaning, biochemical processes potentially offer lower costs and milder process conditions. Pyrite oxidizing bacteria, most notably Thiobacillusferrooxidans, are being evaluated in this project for their ability to remove HAP precursors from U.S. coals.

  12. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... growths that can usually be removed with laparoscopic techniques. Removal of the adrenal gland may also be required for ... Views: 34,507 Share this: Tweet Related Keep reading... Brought to you by: SOCIETY OF AMERICAN GASTROINTESTINAL AND ENDOSCOPIC SURGEONS (SAGES) 11300 West ...

  13. 324 Building spent fuel segments pieces and fragments removal summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMITH, C L

    2003-01-09

    As part of the 324 Building Deactivation Project, all Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and Special Nuclear Material were removed. The removal entailed packaging the material into a GNS-12 cask and shipping it to the Central Waste Complex (CWC).

  14. An analytical method for determining heat transfer from power plant coolant in the Florida 'Boulder Zone'. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, M.; Van den Berg, A.J.

    1974-07-01

    An analytical solution to the heat transfer problem of dissipating the heat from 83F power plant coolant to 60F rock and sea water is presented. The problem considers the concept of injecting the coolant into the 'Boulder Zone,' the cavernous geological strata underlying all of South Florida, allowing a fresh water 'bubble' to form, and cool for 30 days, before being recirculated back to the plant. The solution revealed that the average temperature of the 'bubble' would be 68.3F with approximately 37% of the total water discharged at 61F and 17% at 83F. The remaining water, or approximately 46% would be a mixture at about 73.5F. (GRA)

  15. [Thoracoscopically removed thoracolithiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, K; Nishikawa, T; Fujiwara, T; Matsuura, M

    2010-11-01

    Thoracolithiasis is a rare condition with only 16 cases of surgically removed nodules reported in the literature in Japan. We report an additional thoracoscopically removed case. A 62-year-old man was pointed out an abnormal shadow behind the left diaphragmatic dome on a routine health examination. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a round mass lesion with calcification, about 11 mm in diameter, in the left thorax. Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) was performed and a white 11 mm completely free nodule in the left pleural cavity was removed. Pathological findings revealed necrotic fat tissue in the center surrounded by hyalinized fibrous tissue, being consistent with thoracolithiasis.

  16. Ozone comparison between Pandora #34, Dobson #061, OMI, and OMPS in Boulder, Colorado, for the period December 2013–December 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Herman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A one-time-calibrated (in December 2013 Pandora spectrometer instrument (Pan #034 has been compared to a periodically calibrated Dobson spectroradiometer (Dobson #061 co-located in Boulder, Colorado, and compared with two satellite instruments over a 3-year period (December 2013–December 2016. The results show good agreement between Pan #034 and Dobson #061 within their statistical uncertainties. Both records are corrected for ozone retrieval sensitivity to stratospheric temperature variability obtained from the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI and Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA-2 model calculations. Pandora #034 and Dobson #061 differ by an average of 2.1 ± 3.2 % when both instruments use their standard ozone absorption cross sections in the retrieval algorithms. The results show a relative drift (0.2 ± 0.08 % yr−1 between Pandora observations against NOAA Dobson in Boulder, CO, over a 3-year period of continuous operation. Pandora drifts relative to the satellite Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI and the Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS are +0.18 ± 0.2 % yr−1 and −0.18 ± 0.2 % yr−1, respectively, where the uncertainties are 2 standard deviations. The drift between Dobson #061 and OMPS for a 5.5-year period (January 2012–June 2017 is −0.07 ± 0.06 % yr−1.

  17. Transported beachrock slabs and coral boulders for interpreting high-energy waves: a case study from Ludao (Green Island) in south eastern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, A. Y. Annie; Terry, James P.; Switzer, Adam D.; Pile, Jeremy

    2014-05-01

    Eastern Taiwan is frequently impacted by powerful typhoons that track close by or make direct landfall. On a beach in the SW of Ludao Island, a small volcanic island lying 35 km SE off mainland Taiwan (22.67° N 121.48° E), the presence of abundant beachrock slabs provides evidence of the sediment transport capabilities of high-energy waves generated by these storms. Our field-based investigation at Ludao explores the potential value of such beachrock slabs for wave analysis. One feature of the work is our rearrangement of the hydrodynamic transport equations of Nandasena et al. (2011) so that they are appropriate for this particular geomorphic setting, where exposed in situ beachrock outcrops liberate clasts which may then be transported either by run-up or backwash flow onto adjacent reefs. Such settings are common on tropical coastlines with fringing coral reefs and beaches comprising mostly biogenic sediments. Results show that the lowest flow velocities required to transport all measured beachrock slabs from their known outcrop sources to current positions are 3.16 m/s for run-up and 3.24 m/s for backwash. Elsewhere, 60 further coral and limestone boulders were also mapped and measured along the eastern coastline of Ludao. While most do not exhibit signs of recent transportation, several boulders up to 6.9 m3 in size were evidently moved by Typhoon Tembin in August 2012. Taken in conjunction, these complementary datasets provide a means for interpreting the characteristics of storm waves on Ludao during both recent and older events.

  18. Coral boulders, gravel tongues and sand sheets: Features of coastal accretion and sediment nourishment by Cyclone Tomas (March 2010) on Taveuni Island, Fiji

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Samuel; Terry, James P.

    2012-11-01

    Tropical Cyclone (TC) Tomas in March 2010 was a category-4 storm that struck the northern and eastern islands of Fiji in the southwest Pacific, with the coast of Taveuni Island in particular experiencing a significant surge and high waves as the eye passed within 30 km. Post-storm field investigations of the coastal geomorphic impacts concentrated on an area in central Taveuni (S16°50' 179°52'W) where protected fringing reefs and coastlines form part of the Bouma National Heritage Park (BNHP). Here, a range of cyclone constructional imprints were found to have supplemented existing coastal sediments. Fresh coral boulders strewn across reef platforms indicate that TC Tomas had sufficient power to deliver new coral blocks, but that this material comprises a relatively minor component (20%) of pre-existing boulder fields. Comparison between the dimensions of fresh (max. 4.9 m3) and older blocks (max. > 40 m3) reveals that unknown earlier events (storms or tsunamis) produced much larger debris, and therefore presumably generated much stronger flow velocities across the fringing reefs than TC Tomas. Analysis of calcarenite slabs quarried from in situ beachrock exposures was particularly useful for calculating storm-surge flow velocities at the shoreline, giving mean values of 3.4 and 1.9 m/s for run-up and backwash, respectively. Several elongate tongues (max. length 75 m) of fresh coral gravel were also constructed perpendicular to the reef crest. A conceptual model of debris accretion based on wave refraction across a crescent-shaped reef front is developed to explain their formation, but which does not rely on the simultaneous existence of a reef-parallel rubble rampart. Overall, the patchy and discontinuous nature of cyclogenic accretionary features across reef, beach and back-beach locations indicates the potential challenges for identification and interpretation of palaeo-cyclone events within the sedimentary record on affected coastlines in the South Pacific

  19. US-Canada Monitoring Network Reveals Biodiversity Patterns in Data-poor Marine Cobble-Boulder Habitats of the Coastal Northwest Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, R.; Hunt, H.; Tremblay, J.; Comeau, M.; Silva, A.; Rochette, R.

    2016-02-01

    In the Northeast US and Atlantic Canada a regional collaborative of marine resource agencies, academics, and fishing industry participants monitor more than 100 coastal sites with subtidal cobble-boulder habitat, a prime nursery of commercially important lobsters and crabs. The survey's prime motivation is to quantify annual recruitment of early juvenile stages of these crustaceans. Quantifying faunal abundance in subtidal cobble-boulder habitats is logistically challenging, defying trawl, core and camera. Until recently surveys of cobble habitats were solely conducted by divers using airlift suction samplers in natural cobble beds. In 2005 we developed standardized cobble-filled collectors that considerably expand the survey's reach to greater depths and offshore areas. In addition to their value in monitoring commercial crustaceans, these vessel-deployed collectors have proven to be especially useful in biodiversity studies. Here we describe patterns of species richness and abundance of decapod crustaceans and small demersal fishes colonizing 800 cobble-filled collectors deployed yearly in 2008 and 2009 at near-shore sites across the steep thermal and biogeographic gradient from Rhode Island, USA to Newfoundland, Canada to 76 m depth. At least 17 decapod and 24 fish genera were represented, including cryptic fish taxa not readily detected with other sampling gear. Species richness at shallow sites (5-10 m) was greatest in the south, but did not follow a simple latitudinal cline; rather, it correlated strongly with the complex geography of summer bottom temperature, thereby setting a baseline for climate change studies. Given the world-wide prevalence of this coastal habitat, broader monitoring will reveal new insights on biodiversity patterns and ecosystem services it provides. We seek wider collaboration with the scientific community and stakeholders toward a broader understanding of this poorly studied marine habitat.

  20. Characterizing aquatic health using salmonid mortality, physiology, and biomass estimates in streams with elevated concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in the Boulder River Watershed, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Aïda M.; Skaar, Don; Nimick, David A.; MacConnell, Elizabeth; Hogstrand, Christer

    2003-01-01

    Abandoned tailings and mine adits are located throughout the Boulder River watershed in Montana. In this watershed, all species of fish are absent from some tributary reaches near mine sources; however, populations of brook trout Salvelinus fontitalis, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, and cut-throat trout O. clarki are found further downstream. Multiple methods must be used to investigate the effects of metals released by past mining activity because the effects on aquatic life may range in severity, depending on the proximity of mine sources. Therefore, we used three types of effects—those on fish population levels (as measured by survival), those on biomass and density, and those at the level of the individual (as measured by increases in metallothionein, products of lipid peroxidation, and increases in concentrations of tissue metals)—to assess the aquatic health of the Boulder River watershed. Elevated concentrations of Cd, Cu, and Zn in the water column were associated with increased mortality of trout at sites located near mine waste sources. The hypertrophy (swelling), degeneration (dying), and necrosis of epithelial cells observed in the gills support our conclusion that the cause of death was related to metals in the water column. At a site further downstream (lower Cataract Creek), we observed impaired health of resident trout, as well as effects on biomass and density (measured as decreases in the kilograms of trout per hectare and the number per 300 m) and effects at the individual level, including increases in metallothionein, products of lipid peroxidation, and tissue concentrations of metals.

  1. U-Th-Pb and Rb-Sr systematics of Apollo 17 boulder 7 from the North Massif of the Taurus-Littrow Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, P.D.; Tatsumoto, M.; Unruh, D.M.

    1974-01-01

    Portions of highland breccia boulder 7 collected during the Apollo 17 mission were studied using UThPb and RbSr systematics. A RbSr internal isochron age of 3.89 ?? 0.08 b.y. with an initial 87Sr/86Sr of 0.69926 ?? 0.00008 was obtained for clast 1 (77135,57) (a troctolitic microbreccia). A troctolitic portion of microbreccia clast 77215,37 yielded a UPb internal isochron of 3.8 ?? 0.2 b.y. and an initial 206Pb/207Pb of 0.69. These internal isochron age are interpreted as reflecting metamorphic events, probably related to impacts, which reset RbSr and UPb mineral systems of older rocks. Six portions of boulder 7 were analyzed for U, Th, and Pb as whole rocks. Two chemical groups appear to be defined by the U, Th, and Pb concentration data. Chemical group A is characterized by U, Th, and Pb concentrations and 238U/204Pb values which are higher than those of group B. Group A rocks have typical 232Th/238U ratios of ??? 3.85, whereas-group B rocks have unusually high Th/U values of ??? 4.1. Whole-rock UPb and PbPb ages are nearly concordant. Two events appear to be reflected in these data - one at ??? 4.4 b.y. and one at ??? 4.5 b.y. The chemical groupings show no correlation with documented ages. The old ages of ??? 4.4 b.y. and ??? 4.5 b.y. may, like the younger ??? 4.0 b.y. ages, be related to basin excavation events. ?? 1974.

  2. Digital Collections Are a Sprint, Not a Marathon: Adapting Scrum Project Management Techniques to Library Digital Initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Dulock

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a case study in which a small team from the digital initiatives group and metadata services department at the University of Colorado Boulder (CU-Boulder Libraries conducted a pilot of the Scrum project management framework. The pilot team organized digital initiatives work into short, fixed intervals called sprints—a key component of Scrum. Over a year of working in the modified framework yielded significant improvements to digital collection work, including increased production of digital objects and surrogate records, accelerated publication of digital collections, and an increase in the number of concurrent projects. Adoption of sprints has improved communication and cooperation among participants, reinforced teamwork, and enhanced their ability to adapt to shifting priorities.

  3. Thyroid gland removal - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000293.htm Thyroid gland removal - discharge To use the sharing features ... surgery. This will make your scar show less. Thyroid Hormone Replacement You may need to take thyroid ...

  4. Paint removal using lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K; Garmire, E

    1995-07-20

    Experiments to investigate the potential for practical laser graffiti-removal systems are reported. A universal engineering curve for the time needed for removal of paint from nonconductive substrates that was valid over a range of 10(7) in intensity was measured with a variety of lasers. Comparable times were measured for conductive substrates, when pulses shorter than the thermal conduction times were used. Analysis suggests that Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers may be the most efficient means for removing graffiti and other unwanted paint. An 1-m(2) area of paint 14 µm thick can be removed in approximately 10 min with a 50-Hz laser system of 15-W average power.

  5. Laparoscopic Spleen Removal (Splenectomy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Humanitarian Efforts Log In Laparoscopic Spleen Removal (Splenectomy) Patient Information from SAGES Download PDF Find a ... are suspected. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Splenectomy? Individual results may vary depending on your overall ...

  6. Advanced Coating Removal Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Jon

    2006-01-01

    An important step in the repair and protection against corrosion damage is the safe removal of the oxidation and protective coatings without further damaging the integrity of the substrate. Two such methods that are proving to be safe and effective in this task are liquid nitrogen and laser removal operations. Laser technology used for the removal of protective coatings is currently being researched and implemented in various areas of the aerospace industry. Delivering thousands of focused energy pulses, the laser ablates the coating surface by heating and dissolving the material applied to the substrate. The metal substrate will reflect the laser and redirect the energy to any remaining protective coating, thus preventing any collateral damage the substrate may suffer throughout the process. Liquid nitrogen jets are comparable to blasting with an ultra high-pressure water jet but without the residual liquid that requires collection and removal .As the liquid nitrogen reaches the surface it is transformed into gaseous nitrogen and reenters the atmosphere without any contamination to surrounding hardware. These innovative technologies simplify corrosion repair by eliminating hazardous chemicals and repetitive manual labor from the coating removal process. One very significant advantage is the reduction of particulate contamination exposure to personnel. With the removal of coatings adjacent to sensitive flight hardware, a benefit of each technique for the space program is that no contamination such as beads, water, or sanding residue is left behind when the job is finished. One primary concern is the safe removal of coatings from thin aluminum honeycomb face sheet. NASA recently conducted thermal testing on liquid nitrogen systems and found that no damage occurred on 1/6", aluminum substrates. Wright Patterson Air Force Base in conjunction with Boeing and NASA is currently testing the laser remOval technique for process qualification. Other applications of liquid

  7. Hair removal in adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Pereira; Susana Machado; Manuela Selores

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Due to hormonal stimulation during puberty, changes occur in hair type and distribution. In both sexes, body and facial unwanted hair may have a negative psychological impact on the teenager. There are several available methods of hair removal, but the choice of the most suitable one for each individual can raise doubts. Objective: To review the main methods of hair removal and clarify their indications, advantages and disadvantages. Development: There are several remova...

  8. Laser hair removal pearls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Emily P; Goldberg, David J

    2008-03-01

    A number of lasers and light devices are now available for the treatment of unwanted hair. The goal of laser hair removal is to damage stem cells in the bulge of the follicle through the targeting of melanin, the endogenous chromophore for laser and light devices utilized to remove hair. The competing chromophores in the skin and hair, oxyhemoglobin and water, have a decreased absorption between 690 nm and 1000 nm, thus making this an ideal range for laser and light sources. Pearls of laser hair removal are presented in this review, focusing on four areas of recent development: 1 treatment of blond, white and gray hair; 2 paradoxical hypertrichosis; 3 laser hair removal in children; and 4 comparison of lasers and IPL. Laser and light-based technologies to remove hair represents one of the most exciting areas where discoveries by dermatologists have led to novel treatment approaches. It is likely that in the next decade, continued advancements in this field will bring us closer to the development of a more permanent and painless form of hair removal.

  9. Tattoo Removal: Options and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Tattoo Removal: Options and Results Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... for tattoo lightening or removal. A Rise in Tattoo Removal According to a Harris Interactive poll conducted ...

  10. A close-up of the ALEPH Time Projection Chamber (TPC) after the detector was dismantled, with a slice removed for the exhibition at the Musée International d'Horlogerie.

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On the occasion of CERN's 50th anniversary, starting 2 December at the Musée International d'Horlogerie in La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland, a new exhibition will pay tribute to physics, from the cosmic to the subatomic scales. The exhibition, which run for several years, includes a slice of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) from ALEPH, one of the LEP detectors, which CERN donated to the museum when the detector was dismantled.

  11. Hemodialysis removal of norfloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, A H; Tang, I; Fitzloff, J; Jain, R

    1994-01-01

    The effect of hemodialysis on norfloxacin removal was evaluated in 7 patients. Single 800-mg doses of the drug were given to the subjects prior to dialysis using cuprophan hollow fiber dialyzers. Arterial and venous sample pairs were obtained at hourly intervals during treatment. Norfloxacin plasma concentrations were determined by HPLC. The mean hemodialysis clearance and extraction ratio were 38.84 +/- 10.92 ml/min and 0.19 +/- 0.06, respectively. Small differences in these parameters were observed between dialyzers with different surface areas (p > 0.05) and also between treatments using different blood flow rates (p > 0.05). Since a relatively small amount of norfloxacin is removed by hemodialysis, dosage adjustment is not necessary to compensate for the extracorporeal removal.

  12. Optimising laser tattoo removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabir Sardana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lasers are the standard modality for tattoo removal. Though there are various factors that determine the results, we have divided them into three logical headings, laser dependant factors such as type of laser and beam modifications, tattoo dependent factors like size and depth, colour of pigment and lastly host dependent factors, which includes primarily the presence of a robust immune response. Modifications in the existing techniques may help in better clinical outcome with minimal risk of complications. This article provides an insight into some of these techniques along with a detailed account of the factors involved in tattoo removal.

  13. Optimising Laser Tattoo Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardana, Kabir; Ranjan, Rashmi; Ghunawat, Sneha

    2015-01-01

    Lasers are the standard modality for tattoo removal. Though there are various factors that determine the results, we have divided them into three logical headings, laser dependant factors such as type of laser and beam modifications, tattoo dependent factors like size and depth, colour of pigment and lastly host dependent factors, which includes primarily the presence of a robust immune response. Modifications in the existing techniques may help in better clinical outcome with minimal risk of complications. This article provides an insight into some of these techniques along with a detailed account of the factors involved in tattoo removal. PMID:25949018

  14. Chemical data and lead isotopic compositions of geochemical baseline samples from streambed sediments and smelter slag, lead isotopic compositions in fluvial tailings, and dendrochronology results from the Boulder River watershed, Jefferson County, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unruh, Daniel M.; Fey, David L.; Church, Stan E.

    2000-01-01

    IntroductionAs a part of the U.S. Geological Survey Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative, metal-mining related wastes in the Boulder River study area in northern Jefferson County, Montana, have been evaluated for their environmental effects. The study area includes a 24-km segment of the Boulder River in and around Basin, Montana and three principal tributaries to the Boulder River: Basin Creek, Cataract Creek, and High Ore Creek. Mine and prospect waste dumps and mill wastes are located throughout the drainage basins of these tributaries and in the Boulder River. Mine-waste material has been transported into and down streams, where it has mixed with and become incorporated into the streambed sediments. In some localities, mine waste material was placed directly in stream channels and was transported downstream forming fluvial tailings deposits along the stream banks. Water quality and aquatic habitat have been affected by trace-element-contaminated sediment that moves from mine wastes into and down streams during snowmelt and storm runoff events within the Boulder River watershed.Present-day trace element concentrations in the streambed sediments and fluvial tailings have been extensively studied. However, in order to accurately evaluate the impact of mining on the stream environments, it is also necessary to evaluate the pre-mining trace-element concentrations in the streambed sediments. Three types of samples have been collected for estimation of pre-mining concentrations: 1) streambed sediment samples from the Boulder River and its tributaries located upstream from historical mining activity, 2) stream terrace deposits located both upstream and downstream of the major tributaries along the Boulder River, and 3) cores through sediment in overbank deposits, in abandoned stream channels, or beneath fluvial tailings deposits. In this report, we present geochemical data for six stream-terrace samples and twelve sediment-core samples and lead isotopic data for six terrace

  15. A Model for Sustainable Humanitarian Engineering Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The engineering profession should embrace a new mission statement—to contribute to the building of a more sustainable, stable, and equitable world. Recently, engineering students and professionals in the United States have shown strong interest in directly addressing the needs of developing communities worldwide. That interest has taken the form of short-and medium-term international trips through Engineers Without Borders—USA and similar organizations. There are also several instances where this kind of outreach work has been integrated into engineering education at various US institutions such as the University of Colorado at Boulder. This paper addresses the challenges and opportunities associated with balancing two goals in engineering for humanitarian development projects: (i effective sustainable community development, and (ii meaningful education of engineers. Guiding principles necessary to meet those two goals are proposed.

  16. Bunion removal - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Bunion removal - series—Normal anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/ ...

  17. Adenoid removal - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Adenoid removal - series—Normal anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/ ...

  18. Requirements, techniques, and costs for contaminant removal from landfill gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, John N; Elwell, Anthony C; Elsayed, Nada H; Joseph, Babu

    2017-05-01

    Waste-to-energy projects are an increasingly prominent component of future energy portfolios. Landfill gas (LFG)-to-energy (LFGTE) projects are particularly important as they address greenhouse gas emissions. Contaminants in LFG may hamper these projects both from environmental and economic standpoints. The purpose of this review is to highlight key aspects (LFG composition ranges, LFG flowrates, and allowable tolerances for LFGTE technologies, performance and costs for contaminant removal by adsorption). Removal of key contaminants, H2S and siloxanes, by adsorption are surveyed in terms of adsorption capacities and regeneration abilities. Based on the open literature, costing analyses are tabulated and discussed. The findings indicate economics of contaminant removal depend heavily on the feed concentrations of contaminants, allowable tolerances for the LFGTE technology, and the current market for the product. Key trends, identification of challenges, and general purification guidelines for purifying LFG for energy projects are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Colloidal transport in the Gordon Gulch catchment of the Boulder Creek CZO and its effect on C-Q relationships for silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Arnulfo A.; Derry, Louis A.; Mills, Taylor J.; Anderson, Suzanne P.

    2017-03-01

    The near-constant Si concentration under varying discharge observed in Gordon Gulch of the Boulder Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) indicates that the silica fluxes are strongly controlled by discharge. To identify the mechanisms supplying increased Si at high discharge (Q), we examine Si-Al-Fe-Ge in soils, streams, and groundwaters. We identify bedrock weathering in groundwater and colloidal transport as the two end-members that supply Si to the system. During base flow, streamflow is derived from groundwater, and weathering of feldspar is the main source of Si with a Ge/Si ratio 0.2-0.5 µmol/mol and low dissolved Al and Fe. The groundwater data are consistent with incongruent weathering of feldspar as the main source of dissolved Si. As discharge increases, Si-Al-Fe-bearing colloids are mobilized and the Ge/Si ratio of the stream rises to 3.0 µmol/mol. Mineralogical analysis using XRD identified Al-Si phases including kaolinite, illite, and quartz in the colloidal size fraction (plant operations.

  20. Changes in population structure and body dimensions of two xanthid crabs: A long-term study in a single boulder-shore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Warburg

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Two xanthid crab species were studied during 29 months over a period of 14 years between 1986 and 1999 all in exactly the same boulder shore. One of the crab species studied was the xanthid, Eriphia verrucosa (Forskall, 1775 with 60 specimens, the other species, Xantho poressa (Olivi, 1792, with 155 specimens. A significant change in numbers of both males and females of E. verrucosa was noticeable between 1986 and 1996 with a marked drop in numbers between these years. In 1997 male numbers increased again to almosttheir previous numbers in the population during 1986. The population of X. poressa declined significantly towards the end of the study period. Numbers of both genders peaked in spring and again, in summer. There was generally a decline in numbers of both crab species during autumn and winter. Thus, the average capture during the seasons was highest in spring for males of both E. verrucosa, and X. poressa. The body dimensions: mass, carapace length (CL and width (CW were measured in both xanthids. The aim of this long-term study was to determine whether temporal changes in the population structure and allometric changes in the dimensions of these crabs took place. Only such long-term observations could reveal these changes in population.

  1. Sedimentology of granite boulder conglomerates and associated clastics in the onshore section of the late Mesozoic Pletmos Basin (Western Cape, South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordy, Emese M.; America, Travis

    2016-07-01

    Along the southern margin of South Africa, intermountain rift successions, which comprise unusually large, rounded granite boulders and other coarse clastics, reveal an important geological history about the mid-Mesozoic extensional tectonics that lead to the break-up of Gondwana. These strata, mapped as part of the Mid to Upper Jurassic Enon Formation, allow the assessment of the nature, intensity and mode of sediment transport in onshore section of the Pletmos Basin, which is one of the late Mesozoic basins in southern Africa. Based on sedimentary facies analysis, palaeocurrent measurements and semi-quantitative palaeohydraulic calculations, the results suggest that the abundant coarse sediment was deposited by debris-flows and stream-flow floods on a proximal alluvial fan with high gradient alluvial channels. The floods were intense with mean flow velocity of ˜6 m3/s and peak discharge of ˜450 m3/s. While the role of climate in the sedimentation dynamics remains unknown, syn-sedimentary rift tectonics were likely significant and caused, north of the major boundary fault, the unroofing and denudation of the uplifted mountainous source areas, including the Late Ediacaran-Cambrian Maalgaten Granite Suite and the Siluro-Ordovician Table Mountain Group (Cape Supergroup).

  2. Current achievements and challenges of a multiple dating approach (14C, 230Th/U and 36Cl) to infer tsunami transport age(s) of reef-top boulders on Bonaire (Leeward Antilles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixhon, Gilles; May, Simon Matthias; Engel, Max; Mechernich, Silke; Schroeder-Ritzrau, Andrea; Frank, Norbert; Fohlmeister, Jens; Boulvain, Frédéric; Dunai, Tibor; Brückner, Helmut

    2017-04-01

    The deposition of supratidal coarse-clast deposits is difficult to date, limiting their value for inferring frequency-magnitude patterns of high-energy wave events. On Bonaire (Leeward Antilles, Caribbean), these deposits form prominent landforms, and transport by one or several Holocene tsunamis is assumed at least for the largest clasts. Although a large dataset of 14C and electron spin resonance (ESR) ages is available for major coral rubble ridges and ramparts, it is still debated whether these data reflect the timing of major events, and how these datasets are biased by the reworking of coral fragments. As an attempt to overcome the current challenges for dating the dislocation of singular boulders, three distinct dating methods are implemented and compared: (i) 14C dating of boring bivalves attached to the boulders; (ii) 230Th/U dating of post-depositional, secondary calcite flowstone and subaerial microbialites at the underside of the boulders; and (iii) surface exposure dating of overturned boulders via 36Cl concentration measurements in corals. Approaches (ii) and (iii) have never been applied to coastal boulder deposits so far. The three 14C age estimates are older than 37 ka, i.e. most probably beyond the applicability of the method, which is attributed to post-depositional diagenetic processes, shedding doubt on the usefulness of this method in the local context. The remarkably convergent 230Th/U ages, all pointing to the Late Holocene period (1.0-1.6 ka), are minimum ages for the transport event(s). The microbialite sample yields an age of 1.23±0.23 ka and both flowstone samples are in stratigraphic order: the older (onset of carbonate precipitation) and younger flowstone layers yield ages of 1.59±0.03 and 1.23±0.03 ka, respectively. Four coral samples collected from the topside of overturned boulders yielded similar 36Cl concentration measurements. However, the computed ages are affected by large uncertainties, mostly due to the high natural

  3. Pilot project in rural western Madhya Pradesh, India, to assess the feasibility of using LED and solar-powered lanterns to remove kerosene lamps and related hazards from homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamania, S; Chouhan, R; Awasthi, A; Bendell, R; Marsden, N; Gibson, J; Whitaker, I S; Potokar, T S

    2015-05-01

    Globally, 300,000 deaths are estimated to occur annually and the incidence is far greater as a large majority of burns are small and go unreported. Ninety-five percent of the global burden of burns is found in low- and middle-income countries; however, there is relatively little in the literature regarding effective primary prevention in these areas. Flame is the most common cause of burn in Madhya Pradesh, the central state of India. The most common demographic among the burn unit inpatient of Choithram hospital Indore, is young women from 21 to 40 years of age, whose burns are primarily caused by kerosene lamps. A non electrical source of illumination is essential for every household in rural areas due to the infrequent and poor power supply. At the baseline, 23 kerosene lamp burns were reported by villagers in the past 5 years among the study population of this pilot project. A pilot project to investigate the strategies for reducing the incidence of domestic burns in rural villages around the city of Indore was performed, by replacing kerosene lamps with safer and more sustainable alternatives, including solar-powered and light-emitting diode (LED) lamps. A total of 1042 households were randomly chosen from 18 villages within the Malwa region of Madhya Pradesh (population of 28,825) to receive the alternative light source (670 LED and 372 solar lamps). We investigated the efficacy of this strategy of reducing the incidence of burns, measured the social acceptance by villagers, and quantified the cost implications and availability of LED lamps in rural communities with a high incidence of burns. Replacing kerosene lamps with LED and solar alternatives was deemed socially acceptable by 99.34% of the participants and reduced the cost of lighting for impoverished rural villagers by 85% over 1 year. We successfully demonstrated a significant decrease in the use of kerosene lamps (plamps as an effective primary prevention strategy for reducing burns in rural areas

  4. Paint removal principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavallon, Olivier

    1995-04-01

    An attempt is made to group the various processes of paint removal into families. The classifications are distinguished by chemical, mechanical, and thermal phenomena. For each of these phenomena, it is possible to identify the main mechanisms brought into play in material removal leading to paint stripping. The chemical strippers used are methylene chloride, phenolic compounds, and activated acids or activated bases free from phenols, chromates or methylene chloride. However, the methylene chloride and phenolic compounds are being replaced by a new generation of chemical strippers which are less active and their solvent power is lower. To improve the chemical kinetics, 'active' elements are introduced into the composition of these products. Mechanical stripping includes technologies using mechanical phenomena based on erosion, achieved by friction or blasting particles. Thermal stripping, the last classification, makes use of electronics and automation.

  5. Investigations in gallium removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip, C.V.; Pitt, W.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Beard, C.A. [Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, TX (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Gallium present in weapons plutonium must be removed before it can be used for the production of mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear reactor fuel. The main goal of the preliminary studies conducted at Texas A and M University was to assist in the development of a thermal process to remove gallium from a gallium oxide/plutonium oxide matrix. This effort is being conducted in close consultation with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) personnel involved in the development of this process for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Simple experiments were performed on gallium oxide, and cerium-oxide/gallium-oxide mixtures, heated to temperatures ranging from 700--900 C in a reducing environment, and a method for collecting the gallium vapors under these conditions was demonstrated.

  6. Expeditionary Rubber Removal Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-31

    polishing of the aggregate and damage to the pavement surface, particularly on grooved pavements . Due to these concerns a detergent removal method was...The quantity required can range from 15,000 to 27,000 gallons depending on the slope of the runway and the pavement surface texture . A broom is needed...training required to safely operate. The equipment and technique had to minimize the risk of damaging the existing pavement . Maximum use of commercial

  7. Facilities removal working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  8. Laser removal of tattoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammaro, A; Fatuzzo, G; Narcisi, A; Abruzzese, C; Caperchi, C; Gamba, A; Parisella, F R; Persechino, S

    2012-01-01

    In Western countries the phenomenon of "tattooing" is expanding and tattoos are considered a new fashion among young people. In this paper we briefly trace the history of tattooing, the techniques used, the analysis of pigments used, and their possible adverse reactions. We also carried out a review of the international literature on the use of Q-switched laser in tattoo removal and its complications, and we describe our experience in the use of this technique.

  9. Melter Glass Removal and Dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, BS

    2000-10-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been using vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high-level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are used for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life (on the order of two to three years) at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods because of the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life spans have, to date, exceeded original life-span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing the assembly in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size-reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size-reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storing or disposing of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size-reduction and/or melter refurbishment in particular, removing the glass as a part of a refurbishment or to reduce contamination levels (thus allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste).

  10. Project management for engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Project Management for Engineers, as the title suggests, is a direct attempt at addressing the ever-increasing and specific needs for better project management of engineering students, practicing engineers and managers in the industry. It aims not only to present the principles and techniques of Project Management, but also to discuss project management standards, processes and requirements, such as PMBOK, IEEE and PRINCE. Each chapter begins with the basics of the theme being developed at a level understandable to an undergraduate, before more complex topics are introduced at the end of each section that are suitable for graduate students. For the practicing professionals or managers in the industry, the book also provides many real illustrations of practical application of the principles of Project Management. Through a realistic blend of theory and practical examples, as well as an integration of the engineering technical issues with business issues, this book seeks to remove the veil of mystery that has...

  11. Electrodialytic removal of cadmium from biomass combustion fly ashes in larger scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Simonsen, Peter

    The paper presents results from the project: "Electrochemical removal of cadmium from biomass combustion fly ashes in larger scale and evaluation of the possibilities of reusing the treated ashes in concrete".......The paper presents results from the project: "Electrochemical removal of cadmium from biomass combustion fly ashes in larger scale and evaluation of the possibilities of reusing the treated ashes in concrete"....

  12. Removal of chromium (VI) by acid-washed zero-valent iron under various groundwater geochemistry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Keith C K; Lo, Irene M C

    2008-02-15

    The hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) removal capacity of acid-washed zerovalent iron (AW-Fe0) was evaluated under different groundwater geochemistry conditions through column experiments. It was found that each gram of the AW-Fe0 could remove 0.65-1.76 mg of Cr(VI) from synthetic groundwater in the absence of bicarbonate (HCO3-), magnesium and/or calcium ions. Groundwater geochemistry was found to exert various degrees of impact on Cr(VI) removal by the AW-Fe0, in which HCO3- alone gave the mildest impact whereas the copresence of calcium and HCO3- exerted the greatest impact In comparison with the unwashed Fe0, the AW-Fe0 showed a poorer Cr(VI) removal capacity and was also more susceptible to the influence of the dissolved groundwater constituents on Cr(VI) removal,thereby indicating the unsuitability of using AW-Fe0 in permeable reactive barriers for remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater. On the AW-Fe0 surface, where the indigenous iron precipitates were almost erased, trivalent chromium including chromium (III) oxides, hydroxides, and oxyhydroxides in irregular strip, chick footmark-liked or boulder-liked forms as well as Cr(III)-Cr(VI) mixed oxides were detected.

  13. STEAM GENERATOR GROUP PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, R. A.; Lewis, M

    1985-09-01

    This report is a summary of progress in the Surry Steam Generator Group Project for 1984. Information is presented on the analysis of two baseline eddy current inspections of the generator. Round robin series of tests using standard in-service inspection techniques are described along with some preliminary results. Observations are reported of degradation found on tubing specimens removed from the generator, and on support plates characterized in-situ. Residual stresses measured on a tubing specimen are reported. Two steam generator repair demonstrations are described; one for antivibration bar replacement, and one on tube repair methods. Chemical analyses are shown for sludge samples removed from above the tube sheet.

  14. Removable molar power arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Attachment of force elements from the gingival hook of maxillary molar tubes during the retraction of the anterior teeth is very common in orthodontic practice. As the line of force passes below the center of resistance (CR of molar, it results its mesial tipping and also anchorage loss. To overcome this problem, the line of force should pass along the CR of molar. This article highlights a method to overcome this problem by attaching a removable power arm to the headgear tube of molar tube during the retraction of the anterior teeth.

  15. [Transient removable dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouadio, A A; Jordana, F; N'Goran, J K; Le Bars, P

    2015-09-01

    Removable dentures are always transient current. The epidemiology and causes of tooth gaps demonstrate the need to master the different prosthetic treatment. This made whether to propose treatment plans that take into account psychological, physiological and technical support for this patient. Different situations may arise. A gradual transition may be considered or immediate passage to the total edentulous according to general criteria, local and desiderata of patients. After tooth extraction, the transitional prosthesis can control bone lysis thereby it is part of a complete treatment before prosthesis. It also facilitates a good psychological and physiological integration before the prosthesis use.

  16. Further Investigations of Cosmogenic Ne-21 Exposure Ages of Glacial Boulders Constrained by Local Bedrock Erosion Rates in Ong Valley, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, C. P.; Morgan, D. J.; Cox, J.; Balco, G.; Putkonen, J.; Bibby, T.

    2014-12-01

    A history of glaciation can be tracked by determining the exposure age of boulders found in glacial drifts using the concentration of the cosmogenic nuclide Ne-21. In order to calculate exposure age, the erosion rate and previous exposure must be taken into consideration. In this study, we measured cosmogenic Ne-21 concentrations in quartz from samples of bedrock and samples taken from distinct glacial drifts in Antarctica. We determined the erosion rate using the concentrations of Ne-21 in the bedrock and then used this rate to calculate the exposure ages of the samples taken from the glacial drifts. The samples were collected from the Ong Valley, Antarctica (157.5 East, 83.25 South), an ice-free valley in the Miller Range of the Central Transantarctic Mountains that contains three distinct glacial drifts. We analyzed samples from the oldest and the youngest of these drifts, from moraines from a small alpine glacier to the east of the main valley, and from the surrounding bedrock of the valley walls above the glacial limit. The average erosion rate we calculated was 23 cm/Myrs. The six samples from the oldest glacial drift have an average exposure age of 2.1 Myrs, but have a range of 4.4 Myrs. The exposure age of samples from the middle of the youngest drift on the valley floor average 90.1 kyrs, with a range of 13.4 kyrs. Samples from a lateral moraine of this youngest drift have an average exposure age of 145 kyrs, with a range of 134 kyrs. The 7 samples taken from the alpine glacier east of Ong Valley have an average age of 1.10 Myrs, but a range of 3.87 Myrs. The high variability in ages among samples from the same glacial drift arises from prior exposure and postdepositional movement of the rocks.

  17. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  18. Statement of removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Article title: Phosphorylation of the p52 NF-kB subunit. Authors: Benjamin Barre and Neil D Perkins. Journal: Cell Cycle. Bibliometrics: Volume 9, Issue 24, 2010 pages 4774-4775. DOI: 10.4161/cc.9.24.14246.Publisher: Taylor & Francis. We, the Editor and Publisher of Cell Cycle, have removed the following accepted manuscript that was posted online 15 December 2010: Benjamin Barre and Neil D Perkins, "P Phosphorylation of the p52 NF-kB subunit" DOI: 10.4161/cc.9.24.14246. Cell Cycle. This article has been removed due to a number of issues with the original 2010 Cell Cycle article entitled "Regulation of activity and function of the p52 NF-kB subunit following DNA damage" (Barre B., et al. Cell Cycle 2010; 9:4795–804; PMID: 21131783; http://dx.doi.org/10.4161/cc.9.24.14245). This article is a commentary on the retracted paper detailed above. Consequently, in our opinion the integrity of the manuscript has been compromised, and there is no option but to retract the paper. We note we received, peer-reviewed, accepted, and published the article in good faith. The retracted article will remain online to maintain the scholarly record, but it will be digitally watermarked on each page as RETRACTED.

  19. Mercury removal sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2016-03-29

    Sorbents and methods of using them for removing mercury from flue gases over a wide range of temperatures are disclosed. Sorbent materials of this invention comprise oxy- or hydroxyl-halogen (chlorides and bromides) of manganese, copper and calcium as the active phase for Hg.sup.0 oxidation, and are dispersed on a high surface porous supports. In addition to the powder activated carbons (PACs), this support material can be comprised of commercial ceramic supports such as silica (SiO.sub.2), alumina (Al.sub.2O.sub.3), zeolites and clays. The support material may also comprise of oxides of various metals such as iron, manganese, and calcium. The non-carbon sorbents of the invention can be easily injected into the flue gas and recovered in the Particulate Control Device (PCD) along with the fly ash without altering the properties of the by-product fly ash enabling its use as a cement additive. Sorbent materials of this invention effectively remove both elemental and oxidized forms of mercury from flue gases and can be used at elevated temperatures. The sorbent combines an oxidation catalyst and a sorbent in the same particle to both oxidize the mercury and then immobilize it.

  20. Duct Remediation Program: Material characterization and removal/handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckman, T.d.; Davis, M.M.; Karas, T.M.

    1992-11-01

    Remediation efforts were successfully performed at Rocky Flats to locate, characterize, and remove plutonium holdup from process exhaust ducts. Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) techniques were used to determine holdup locations and quantities. Visual characterization using video probes helped determine the physical properties of the material, which were used for remediation planning. Assorted equipment types, such as vacuum systems, scoops, brushes, and a rotating removal system, were developed to remove specific material types. Personnel safety and material handling requirements were addressed throughout the project.

  1. Centre vortex removal restores chiral symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trewartha, Daniel; Kamleh, Waseem; Leinweber, Derek B.

    2017-12-01

    The influence of centre vortices on dynamical chiral symmetry breaking is investigated through the light hadron spectrum on the lattice. Recent studies of the quark propagator and other quantities have provided evidence that centre vortices are the fundamental objects underpinning dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in {SU}(3) gauge theory. For the first time, we use the chiral overlap fermion action to study the low-lying hadron spectrum on lattice ensembles consisting of Monte Carlo, vortex-removed, and vortex-projected gauge fields. We find that gauge field configurations consisting solely of smoothed centre vortices are capable of reproducing all the salient features of the hadron spectrum, including dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. The hadron spectrum on vortex-removed fields shows clear signals of chiral symmetry restoration at light values of the bare quark mass, while at heavy masses the spectrum is consistent with a theory of weakly interacting constituent quarks.

  2. IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang, William A. Goddard, Yongchun Tang

    2005-05-05

    In the second year of this project, we continued our effort to develop low temperature decarboxylation catalysts and investigate the behavior of these catalysts at different reaction conditions. We conducted a large number of dynamic measurements with crude oil and model compounds to obtain the information at different reaction stages, which was scheduled as the Task2 in our work plan. We developed a novel adsorption method to remove naphthenic acid from crude oil using naturally occurring materials such as clays. Our results show promise as an industrial application. The theoretical modeling proposed several possible reaction pathways and predicted the reactivity depending on the catalysts employed. From all of these studies, we obtained more comprehensive understanding about catalytic decarboxylation and oil upgrading based on the naphthenic acid removal concept.

  3. Projects Work!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Textor, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    The great educational value of projects is emphasized by contrasting negative aspects of the life of today's children with the goals of project work. This is illustrated by a project "Shopping." It is shown what children are learning in such projects and what the advantages of project work are. Relevant topic areas, criteria for selecting a…

  4. Save the Boulders Beach Penguins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheerer, Katherine; Schnittka, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Maybe it's the peculiar way they walk or their cute little suits, but students of all ages are drawn to penguins. To meet younger students' curiosity, the authors adapted a middle-school level, penguin-themed curriculum unit called Save the Penguins (Schnittka, Bell, and Richards 2010) for third-grade students. The students loved learning about…

  5. FLOODPLAIN, BOULDER COUNTY, COLORADO, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  6. Laser tattoo removal: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Kathryn M; Graber, Emmy M

    2012-01-01

    Tattoos have played an important role in human culture for thousands of years, and they remain popular today. The development of quality-switched (QS) lasers has revolutionized the removal of unwanted tattoos. To thoroughly review the literature on laser tattoo removal pertaining to its history, its theoretical basis, the various devices used, potential adverse effects, and future developments. An extensive literature review of publications related to tattoo removal was conducted. Reports exist demonstrating the efficacy of laser removal of different tattoo types, including professional, amateur, traumatic, cosmetic, and medical. The literature supports the use of different QS lasers for removal of tattoos. Some colors have a more-complete response using particular wavelengths. QS lasers can effectively and safely remove different types of unwanted tattoos. © 2011 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Mechanochemical removal of carbamazepine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Mohamed; Nasser, Ahmed; Mingelgrin, Uri

    2016-10-01

    Carbamazepine (CBZ) is a drug used for treating epilepsy, neuropathic pain, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Its widespread use is indicated by its listing in the WHO's Model List of Essential Medicines. The accumulation of CBZ in various environmental compartments, specifically in crops irrigated with treated effluent or grown on soils containing biosolids, is often reported. Being a persistent PPCP (a pharmaceutical and personal care product), developing procedures to remove CBZ is of great importance. In the present study, the breakdown of CBZ by surface reactions in contact with various minerals was attempted. While Al-montmorillonite enhanced CBZ disappearance without the need to apply mechanical force, the efficiency of magnetite in enhancing the disappearance increased considerably upon applying such force. Ball milling with magnetite generated a virtually complete disappearance of CBZ (∼94% of the applied CBZ disappeared after milling for 30 min). HPLC, LC/MS and FTIR were employed in an attempt to elucidate the rate of disappearance and degradation mechanisms of CBZ. A small amount of the hydrolysis product iminostilbene was identified by LC/MS and the breaking off of carbamic acid from the fused rings skeleton of CBZ was indicated by FTIR spectroscopy, confirming the formation of iminostilbene. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Methods to Remove Coke from Endothermic Heat Exchangers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Currently the United States space program is recognized as the world leader in providing access to space. However, in order to maintain this position, it will be...

  9. Transparent and Flexible Electrodynamic Coating for Particulate Removal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has an unmet need for clean, dust-free surfaces critical for many mission applications: solar panels and collectors, aircraft components, optical windows,...

  10. Removing Mid-Spatial Frequency Errors with VIBE Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Optimax VIBE finishing process is a fast (<60 second), full-aperture, conformal polishing process incorporating high frequency motion that rapidly eliminates...

  11. Enabling Large-body Active Debris Removal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Research suggests that: (1) orbital debris has reached an unstable point whereby, even with no future launches, the amount of debris will continue to grow through...

  12. Enabling Large-body Active Debris Removal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Research suggests that: (1) orbital debris has reached the point that, even with no future launches, collisions among large-body debris will lead to unstable growth...

  13. Congressionally Directed Project for Passive NOx Removal Catalysts Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, William [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2014-12-29

    The Recipient proposes to produce new scientific and technical knowledge and tools to enable the discovery and deployment of highly effective materials for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from lean combustion exhaust. A second goal is to demonstrate a closely coupled experimental and computational approach to heterogeneous catalysis research. These goals will be met through the completion of four primary technical objectives: First, an in-depth kinetic analysis will be performed on two prominent classes of NOx SCR catalysts, Fe- and Cu-exchanged beta and ZSM-5 zeolites, over a wide range of catalyst formulation and under identical, high conversion conditions as a function of gas phase composition. Second, the nanoscale structure and adsorption chemistry of these high temperature (HT) and low temperature (LT) catalysts will be determined using in situ and operando spectroscopy under the same reaction conditions. Third, first-principles molecular simulations will be used to model the metal-zeolite active sites, their adsorption chemistry, and key steps in catalytic function. Fourth, this information will be integrated into chemically detailed mechanistic and kinetic descriptions and models of the operation of these well- defined NOx SCR catalysts under practically relevant reaction conditions. The new knowledge and models that derive from this work will be published in the scientific literature.

  14. Reflections on a Pilot Project: Removing the "Dis" from Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Michelle J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores preliminary results of a pilot study whose purpose was to document, through an oral history narrative, the personal and work experiences of a female artist and social entrepreneur who is legally blind. These experiences included the challenges that the research participant has experienced in the U.S. as a woman with an…

  15. Methods to Remove Coke from Endothermic Heat Exchangers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In February 2004 NASA released "The Vision for Space Exploration", which describes a strategy for exploring our solar system that builds upon the policy announced by...

  16. Concentration-discharge relationships during an extreme event: Contrasting behavior of solutes and changes to chemical quality of dissolved organic material in the Boulder Creek Watershed during the September 2013 flood: SOLUTE FLUX IN A FLOOD EVENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rue, Garrett P. [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder Colorado USA; Rock, Nathan D. [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder Colorado USA; Gabor, Rachel S. [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder Colorado USA; Pitlick, John [Department of Geography, University of Colorado, Boulder Colorado USA; Tfaily, Malak [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; McKnight, Diane M. [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder Colorado USA

    2017-07-01

    During the week of September 10-17, 2013, close to 20 inches of rain fell across Boulder County, Colorado, USA. This rainfall represented a 1000-year event that caused massive hillslope erosion, landslides, and mobilization of sediments. The resultant stream flows corresponded to a 100-year flood. For the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory (BC-CZO), this event provided an opportunity to study the effect of extreme rainfall on solute concentration-discharge relationships and biogeochemical catchment processes. We observed base cation and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations at two sites on Boulder Creek following the recession of peak flow. We also isolated three distinct fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) for chemical characterization. At the upper site, which represented the forested mountain catchment, the concentrations of the base cations Ca, Mg and Na were greatest at the peak flood and decreased only slightly, in contrast with DOC and K concentrations, which decreased substantially. At the lower site within urban corridor, all solutes decreased abruptly after the first week of flow recession, with base cation concentrations stabilizing while DOC and K continued to decrease. Additionally, we found significant spatiotemporal trends in the chemical quality of organic matter exported during the flood recession, as measured by fluorescence, 13C-NMR spectroscopy, and FTICR-MS. Similar to the effect of extreme rainfall events in driving landslides and mobilizing sediments, our findings suggest that such events mobilize solutes by the flushing of the deeper layers of the critical zone, and that this flushing regulates terrestrial-aquatic biogeochemical linkages during the flow recession.

  17. Region 9 Removal Sites 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point geospatial dataset representing locations of CERCLA (Superfund) Removal sites. CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act)...

  18. Human-Systems Integration Processes (HSIP) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In FY12, this project removed the commercial-specific content from the Commercial Human-Systems Integration Design Processes (CHSIP), identified gaps in the...

  19. Define Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Madsen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    "Project" is a key concept in IS management. The word is frequently used in textbooks and standards. Yet we seldom find a precise definition of the concept. This paper discusses how to define the concept of a project. The proposed definition covers both heavily formalized projects and informally...... organized, agile projects. Based on the proposed definition popular existing definitions are discussed....

  20. Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Project Management Theory Meets Practice contains the proceedings from the 1st Danish Project Management Research Conference (DAPMARC 2015), held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on May 21st, 2015.......Project Management Theory Meets Practice contains the proceedings from the 1st Danish Project Management Research Conference (DAPMARC 2015), held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on May 21st, 2015....

  1. Simulated bat populations erode when exposed to climate change projections for western North America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Hayes

    Full Text Available Recent research has demonstrated that temperature and precipitation conditions correlate with successful reproduction in some insectivorous bat species that live in arid and semiarid regions, and that hot and dry conditions correlate with reduced lactation and reproductive output by females of some species. However, the potential long-term impacts of climate-induced reproductive declines on bat populations in western North America are not well understood. We combined results from long-term field monitoring and experiments in our study area with information on vital rates to develop stochastic age-structured population dynamics models and analyzed how simulated fringed myotis (Myotis thysanodes populations changed under projected future climate conditions in our study area near Boulder, Colorado (Boulder Models and throughout western North America (General Models. Each simulation consisted of an initial population of 2,000 females and an approximately stable age distribution at the beginning of the simulation. We allowed each population to be influenced by the mean annual temperature and annual precipitation for our study area and a generalized range-wide model projected through year 2086, for each of four carbon emission scenarios (representative concentration pathways RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6.0, RCP8.5. Each population simulation was repeated 10,000 times. Of the 8 Boulder Model simulations, 1 increased (+29.10%, 3 stayed approximately stable (+2.45%, +0.05%, -0.03%, and 4 simulations decreased substantially (-44.10%, -44.70%, -44.95%, -78.85%. All General Model simulations for western North America decreased by >90% (-93.75%, -96.70%, -96.70%, -98.75%. These results suggest that a changing climate in western North America has the potential to quickly erode some forest bat populations including species of conservation concern, such as fringed myotis.

  2. Removal of stormwater particulates by disc filter technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Katrine; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Eriksson, Eva

    and in the size-range of 100 nm. The physical treatment of particle filtration at 10 µm was inadequate to remove the small particles identified in this project. Coagulation with a cationic coagulant and subsequently flocculation is suggested as process improvements technologies....

  3. Mixing and In situ product removal in micro-bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Of the thesis :’ Mixing and In-situ product removal in micro bioreactors’ by Xiaonan Li The work presented in this thesis is a part of a large cluster project, which was formed between DSM, Organon, Applikon and two university groups (TU Delft and University of Twente), under the ACTS and

  4. Body Parts Removed during Surgery: A Useful Training Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Stecco, Carla; Tiengo, Cesare; Parenti, Anna; Cestrone, Adriano; De Caro, Raffaele

    2011-01-01

    Current undergraduate medical curricula provides relatively little time for cadaver dissection. The Department of Human Anatomy and Physiology at the University of Padova has organized a pilot project with the University Hospital for the donation of body parts that are surgically removed for therapeutic purposes and destined under Italian law for…

  5. Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilkington, Alan; Chai, Kah-Hin; Le, Yang

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies the true coverage of PM theory through a bibliometric analysis of the International Journal of Project Management from 1996-2012. We identify six persistent research themes: project time management, project risk management, programme management, large-scale project management......, project success/failure and practitioner development. These differ from those presented in review and editorial articles in the literature. In addition, topics missing from the PM BOK: knowledge management project-based organization and project portfolio management have become more popular topics...

  6. Effects of glow discharge cleanings on hydrogen isotope removal for plasma facing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi, Y., E-mail: yamauchi@qe.eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Matsumoto, A.; Kosaka, Y.; Kimura, Y.; Takeda, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Hino, T.; Nobuta, Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Nishimura, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    The effect of the discharge cleanings on hydrogen isotope removal have been evaluated for graphite, stainless steel, tungsten, boron and titanium. For all materials, the helium glow discharge cleaning was the most effective on the hydrogen isotope removal among the inert gas discharges. High efficiency of energy transfer to target atom and deep projected range for helium ion might be responsible for the high removal fraction. The effect of argon glow discharge cleaning was small. The small removal fraction for the argon might be owing to re-deposition layer, which acted as a screening to the removal. The hydrogen isotope in the tungsten was hardly removed by the inert gas discharge cleanings. The small removal fraction for the tungsten might be owing to hydrogen isotope retention in deeper regions resulting from diffusion along with the grain boundary or the porous structure. Surface impurity and morphologies significantly influenced the deuterium removal effects.

  7. Can Acne Scars Be Removed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arrhythmias Abuse Love and Romance Understanding Other People Can Acne Scars Be Removed? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can Acne Scars Be Removed? Print A A A ... acné? Different Types of Acne Scars from acne can seem like double punishment — first you had to ...

  8. Laser assisted graffiti paints removing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, B. Y.; Chikalev, Y. V.; Shakhno, E. A.

    2011-02-01

    It's hard to imagine a modern city view without some drawings and inscriptions, usually called "graffiti". Traditional cleaning methods do not suit modern requirements. Investigation of possibilities of laser assisted paints removing is described in this article. The conditions for removing different paints from different surfaces were defined.

  9. North Korea: Terrorism List Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-06

    he was officially notifying Congress of his intent to remove North Korea from the list of state sponsors of terrorism after the 45 calender -day...of his intent to remove North Korea from the list of state sponsors of terrorism after 45 calender days. Under U.S. law, the President is required to

  10. North Korea: Terrorism List Removal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-10

    calender -day notification period to Congress as required by U.S. law. The White House stated that North Korea would thus be removed on August 11, 2008...Congress notification of his intent to remove North Korea from the list of state sponsors of terrorism after 45 calender days. Under U.S. law, the

  11. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of

  12. Ticagrelor Removal From Human Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George O. Angheloiu, MD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The authors devised an efficient method for ticagrelor removal from blood using sorbent hemadsorption. Ticagrelor removal was measured in 2 sets of in vitro experiments. The first set was a first-pass experiment using bovine serum albumin (BSA solution pre-incubated with ticagrelor, whereas the second set, performed in a recirculating manner, used human blood mixed with ticagrelor. Removal of ticagrelor from BSA solution reached values >99%. The peak removal rate was 99% and 94% from whole blood and 99.99% and 90% from plasma during 10 h and 3 to 4 h of recirculating experiments, respectively. In conclusion, hemadsorption robustly removes ticagrelor from BSA solution and human blood samples.

  13. Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambal

    2013-01-01

    A durable, high-capacity regenerable sorbent can remove CO2 from the breathing loop under a Martian atmosphere. The system design allows near-ambient temperature operation, needs only a small temperature swing, and sorbent regeneration takes place at or above 8 torr, eliminating the potential for Martian atmosphere to leak into the regeneration bed and into the breathing loop. The physical adsorbent can be used in a metabolic, heat-driven TSA system to remove CO2 from the breathing loop of the astronaut and reject it to the Martian atmosphere. Two (or more) alternating sorbent beds continuously scrub and reject CO2 from the spacesuit ventilation loop. The sorbent beds are cycled, alternately absorbing CO2 from the vent loop and rejecting the adsorbed material into the environment at a high CO2 partial pressure (above 8 torr). The system does not need to run the adsorber at cryogenic temperatures, and uses a much smaller temperature swing. The sorbent removes CO2 via a weak chemical interaction. The interaction is strong enough to enable CO2 adsorption even at 3 to 7.6 torr. However, because the interaction between the surface adsorption sites and the CO2 is relatively weak, the heat input needed to regenerate the sorbent is much lower than that for chemical absorbents. The sorbent developed in this project could potentially find use in a large commercial market in the removal of CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants, if regulations are put in place to curb carbon emissions from power plants.

  14. PRECOMBUSTION REMOVAL OF HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANT PRECURSORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2000-10-09

    In response to growing environmental concerns reflected in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored several research and development projects in late 1995 as part of an initiative entitled Advanced Environmental Control Technologies for Coal-Based Power Systems. The program provided cost-shared support for research and development projects that could accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. Clean coal technologies developed under this program would serve as prototypes for later generations of technologies to be implemented in the industrial sector. In order to identify technologies with the greatest potential for commercial implementation, projects funded under Phase I of this program were subject to competitive review by DOE before being considered for continuation funding under Phase II. One of the primary topical areas identified under the DOE initiative relates to the development of improved technologies for reducing the emissions of air toxics. Previous studies have suggested that many of the potentially hazardous air pollutant precursors (HAPPs) occur as trace elements in the mineral matter of run-of-mine coals. As a result, these elements have the potential to be removed prior to combustion at the mine site by physical coal cleaning processes (i.e., coal preparation). Unfortunately, existing coal preparation plants are generally limited in their ability to remove HAPPs due to incomplete liberation of the mineral matter and high organic associations of some trace elements. In addition, existing physical coal cleaning plants are not specifically designed or optimized to ensure that high trace element rejections may be achieved.

  15. Midway Atoll - Ironwood Removal for Dune Restoration and Sea Level Rise Resiliency

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The proposed project consists of removal of invasive, non-native ironwood trees (Casuarina equisetifolia) from approximately 40 acres of high priority coastal strand...

  16. Characterization and quantification of deposits build up and removal in straw suspension fired boilers

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Peter Arendt; Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Wedel, Stig; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Wadenbäck, Johan; Pedersen, Søren Thaaning; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    This project deals with ash deposit formation in suspension fired biomass power plant boilers. The project has been conducted in a tight collaboration between Vattenfall and the CHEC Research Centre at DTU Department of Chemical Engineering. A large part of the project has been performed by conductingadvanced probe measurements at the Amagerværkets Vattenfall owed boilers. It was the objective of the project to provide an improved understanding of ash deposit formation and removal in biomass ...

  17. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Momentum in Science, Part 2" (70 minutes) Be a part of something big. HBO's "THE ALZHEIMER'S PROJECT" ... vital research and services. "THE ALZHEIMER'S PROJECT" is a presentation of HBO Documentary Films and the National ...

  18. Project ethics

    CERN Document Server

    Jonasson, Haukur Ingi

    2013-01-01

    How relevant is ethics to project management? The book - which aims to demystify the field of ethics for project managers and managers in general - takes both a critical and a practical look at project management in terms of success criteria, and ethical opportunities and risks. The goal is to help the reader to use ethical theory to further identify opportunities and risks within their projects and thereby to advance more directly along the path of mature and sustainable managerial practice.

  19. Acute changes in clinical breast measurements following bra removal: Implications for surgical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Scurr

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Internipple distance and breast projection can be measured first following bra removal, followed by sternal notch to nipple distance, any measures associated with the vertical nipple position should be made more than 6 min after bra removal. These guidelines have implications for breast surgery, particularly for unilateral reconstruction based on the residual breast position.

  20. Tidd PFBC demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrocco, M. [American Electric Power, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Tidd project was one of the first joint government-industry ventures to be approved by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in its Clean Coal Technology Program. In March 1987, DOE signed an agreement with the Ohio Power Company, a subsidiary of American Electric Power, to refurbish the then-idle Tidd plant on the banks of the Ohio River with advanced pressurized fluidized bed technology. Testing ended after 49 months of operation, 100 individual tests, and the generation of more than 500,000 megawatt-hours of electricity. The demonstration plant has met its objectives. The project showed that more than 95 percent of sulfur dioxide pollutants could be removed inside the advanced boiler using the advanced combustion technology, giving future power plants an attractive alternative to expensive, add-on scrubber technology. In addition to its sulfur removal effectiveness, the plant`s sustained periods of steady-state operation boosted its availability significantly above design projections, heightening confidence that pressurized fluidized bed technology will be a reliable, baseload technology for future power plants. The technology also controlled the release of nitrogen oxides to levels well below the allowable limits set by federal air quality standards. It also produced a dry waste product that is much easier to handle than wastes from conventional power plants and will likely have commercial value when produced by future power plants.

  1. Tattoo removal with ingenol mebutate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Sarah-Jane; Le, Thuy T; Ogbourne, Steven M; James, Cini; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of people are getting tattoos; however, many regret the decision and seek their removal. Lasers are currently the most commonly used method for tattoo removal; however, treatment can be lengthy, costly, and sometimes ineffective, especially for certain colors. Ingenol mebutate is a licensed topical treatment for actinic keratoses. Here, we demonstrate that two applications of 0.1% ingenol mebutate can efficiently and consistently remove 2-week-old tattoos from SKH/hr hairless mice. Treatment was associated with relocation of tattoo microspheres from the dermis into the posttreatment eschar. The skin lesion resolved about 20 days after treatment initiation, with some cicatrix formation evident. The implications for using ingenol mebutate for tattoo removal in humans are discussed.

  2. Membrane adsorber for endotoxin removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Moita de Almeida

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The surface of flat-sheet nylon membranes was modified using bisoxirane as the spacer and polyvinyl alcohol as the coating polymer. The amino acid histidine was explored as a ligand for endotoxins, aiming at its application for endotoxin removal from aqueous solutions. Characterization of the membrane adsorber, analysis of the depyrogenation procedures and the evaluation of endotoxin removal efficiency in static mode are discussed. Ligand density of the membranes was around 7 mg/g dry membrane, allowing removal of up to 65% of the endotoxins. The performance of the membrane adsorber prepared using nylon coated with polyvinyl alcohol and containing histidine as the ligand proved superior to other membrane adsorbers reported in the literature. The lack of endotoxin adsorption on nylon membranes without histidine confirmed that endotoxin removal was due to the presence of the ligand at the membrane surface. Modified membranes were highly stable, exhibiting a lifespan of approximately thirty months.

  3. Removing Mold from Your Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Place to Stay Main Content Removing Mold From Your Home This page provides information about ... mold cleanup, health hazards and resources. Dealing With Mold and Mildew in Your Flood-Damaged Home After ...

  4. Paint removal activities in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Terry

    1993-03-01

    Paint removal activities currently under way in Canada include: research and development of laser paint stripping; development and commercialization of a new blasting medium based on wheat starch; commercialization of a new blasting medium and process using crystalline ice blasting for paint removal and surface cleaning; and the development of automated and robotic systems for paint stripping applications. A specification for plastic media blasting (PMB) of aircraft and aircraft components is currently being drafted by NDHQ for use by the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and contractors involved in coating removal for the CAF. Defense Research Establishment Pacific (DREP) is studying the effects of various blast media on coating removal rates, and minimizing the possibility of damage to substrates other than aluminum such as graphite epoxy composite and Kevlar. The effects of plastic media blasting on liquid penetrant detection of fatigue cracks is also under investigation.

  5. Removal of root filling materials.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duncan, H.F. Chong, B.S.

    2011-05-01

    Safe, successful and effective removal of root filling materials is an integral component of non-surgical root canal re-treatment. Access to the root canal system must be achieved in order to negotiate to the canal terminus so that deficiencies in the original treatment can be rectified. Since a range of materials have been advocated for filling root canals, different techniques are required for their removal. The management of commonly encountered root filling materials during non-surgical re-treatment, including the clinical procedures necessary for removal and the associated risks, are reviewed. As gutta-percha is the most widely used and accepted root filling material, there is a greater emphasis on its removal in this review.

  6. Mildew Remover for Aircraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    This patented mildew remover formula is an aqueous solution consisting of sodium perborate (an oxidizing agent) and a nonionic detergent (reference...1193), Synthetic Tap Water (MIL-C-85570, paragraph 4.6.6.2), a 1.5% sodium perborate solution, and a series of perborate and surfactant solutions...Mildew Remover Formulation: Sodium Perborate Monohydrate, 1.5% Triton X-100 surfactant, 0.39% (or equivalent) Reagent Water (ASTM D 1193) 2. Corrosion

  7. Paint Removal from Family Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    Both products were also tested for removing a baked finish from aluminum siding. In this test, the 700-W was more effective than 667-W, probably...Once Leeder 667-W has / -been allowed to penetrate and lift, simply remove it with damp rags. Caution: Leeder 667-W contains caustic soda . Avoid...and First Aid Procedures: Skin: Wash with water. Follow with ’oric acid or vinegar wash. Internal: Give vinegar , juice of lemor, -rapef-ruit or orange

  8. Electronic Commerce Removing Regulatory Impediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    AD-A252 691 ELECTRONIC COMMERCE Removing Regulatory Impediments ~DuiG A% ELECTE I JUL1 8 1992 0 C D Daniel J. Drake John A. Ciucci ... - ""N ST AT KE...Management Institute 6400 Goldsboro Road Bethesda, Maryland 20817-5886 92 LMI Executive Summary ELECTRONIC COMMERCE : REMOVING REGULATORY IMPEDIMENTS... Electronic Commerce techniques, such as electronic mail and electronic data interchange (EDI), enable Government agencies to conduct business without the

  9. Colorado Better Buildings Project. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strife, Susie [Boulder County, Boulder, CO (United States); Yancey, Lea [Boulder County, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2013-12-30

    The Colorado Better Buildings project intended to bring new and existing energy efficiency model programs to market with regional collaboration and funding partnerships. The goals for Boulder County and its program partners were to advance energy efficiency investments, stimulate economic growth in Colorado and advance the state’s energy independence. Collectively, three counties set out to complete 9,025 energy efficiency upgrades in 2.5 years and they succeeded in doing so. Energy efficiency upgrades have been completed in more than 11,000 homes and businesses in these communities. Boulder County and its partners received a $25 million BetterBuildings grant from the U.S. Department of Energy under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in the summer of 2010. This was also known as the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants program. With this funding, Boulder County, the City and County of Denver, and Garfield County set out to design programs for the residential and commercial sectors to overcome key barriers in the energy upgrade process. Since January 2011, these communities have paired homeowners and business owners with an Energy Advisor – an expert to help move from assessment to upgrade with minimal hassle. Pairing this step-by-step assistance with financing incentives has effectively addressed many key barriers, resulting in energy efficiency improvements and happy customers. An expert energy advisor guides the building owner through every step of the process, coordinating the energy assessment, interpreting results for a customized action plan, providing a list of contractors, and finding and applying for all available rebates and low-interest loans. In addition to the expert advising and financial incentives, the programs also included elements of social marketing, technical assistance, workforce development and contractor trainings, project monitoring and verification, and a cloud-based customer data system to coordinate among field

  10. Guidelines for removing permanent makeup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.Bettina Rümmelein

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Permanent makeup (PMU is a frequently implemented cosmetic procedure performed by beauticians. From a technical point, PMU is considered a facial tattoo. Failed procedures or a change of mind can lead to the desire for removal. The purpose of this retrospective evaluation of patients who came to the clinic with the desire to remove PMU between 2011 and 2015 was to explore the problems, side effects, and results in order to define treatment guidelines for other doctors. We evaluated 87 individual cases in total. In treatable cases, i.e. 52 out of the 87 cases, laser treatments were performed using a nanosecond Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG laser. It takes between 1-12 treatments to remove the PMU. In three cases, the colour of the PMU could not be removed by laser and remained after the treatment. In two cases, laser treatment had to be terminated due to colour changes towards the green-blue spectrum. Before PMU removal, laser test shots are urgently recommended as unforeseeable colour changes can cause severe aesthetically unpleasant results. Covered up PMU (skin colour is particularly susceptible to changes in colour. Heat-induced shrinking of the eye area can cause an ectropium. Surgical solutions also have to be taken into consideration. The use of proper eye protection with intraocular eye shields is mandatory. This article is an attempt to set up some guidelines for the treatment of PMU removal.

  11. Nitrobenzene removal in bioelectrochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yang; Rozendal, René A; Rabaey, Korneel; Keller, Jürg

    2009-11-15

    Nitrobenzene occurs as a pollutant in wastewaters originating from numerous industrial and agricultural activities. It needs to be removed prior to discharge to sewage treatment works because of its high toxicity and persistence. In this study, we investigated the use of a bioelectrochemical system (BES) to remove nitrobenzene at a cathode coupled to microbial oxidation of acetate at an anode. Effective removal of nitrobenzene at rates up to 1.29 +/- 0.04 mol m(-3) TCC d(-1) (total cathodic compartment, TCC) was achieved with concomitant energy recovery. Correspondingly, the formation rate for the reduction product aniline was 1.14 +/- 0.03 mol m(-3) TCC d(-1). Nitrobenzene removal and aniline formation rates were significantly enhanced when the BES was supplied with power, reaching 8.57 +/- 0.03 and 6.68 +/- 0.03 mol m(-3) TCC d(-1), respectively, at an energy consumption of 17.06 +/- 0.16 W m(-3) TCC (current density at 59.5 A m(-3) TCC). Compared to those of conventional anaerobic biological methods for nitrobenzene removal, the required dosage of organic cosubstrate was significantly reduced in this system. Although aniline was always identified as the major product of nitrobenzene reduction at the cathode of BES in this study, the Coulombic efficiencies of nitrobenzene removal and aniline formation were dependent on the current density of the BES.

  12. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Baat, C; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of removable partial dentures, the acrylic resin removable partial denture has 3 favourable aspects: the economic aspect, its aesthetic quality and the ease with which it can be extended and adjusted. Disadvantages are an increased risk of caries developing, gingivitis, periodontal disease, denture stomatitis, alveolar bone reduction, tooth migration, triggering of the gag reflex and damage to the acrylic resin base. Present-day indications are ofa temporary or palliative nature or are motivated by economic factors. Special varieties of the acrylic resin removable partial denture are the spoon denture, the flexible denture fabricated of non-rigid acrylic resin, and the two-piece sectional denture. Furthermore, acrylic resin removable partial dentures can be supplied with clasps or reinforced by fibers or metal wires.

  13. Water Recycling removal using temperature-sensitive hydronen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana B. Gupta

    2002-10-30

    The overall objective of this project was to study the proposed Water Recycling/Removal Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogels. The main element of this technology is the design of a suitable hydrogel that can perform needed water separation for pulp and paper industry. The specific topics studied are to answer following questions: (a) Can water be removed using hydrogel from large molecules such as lignin? (b) Can the rate of separation be made faster? (c) What are the molecular interactions with hydrogel surface? (d) Can a hydrogel be designed for a high ionic strength and high temperature? Summary of the specific results are given.

  14. Virtual projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per; Commisso, Trine Hald

    2012-01-01

    Virtual projects are common with global competition, market development, and not least the financial crisis forcing organizations to reduce their costs drastically. Organizations therefore have to place high importance on ways to carry out virtual projects and consider appropriate practices...... for performing these projects. This paper compares best practices with practiced practices for virtual projects and discusses ways to bridge the gap between them. We have studied eleven virtual projects in five Danish organizations and compared them with a predefined list of best practices compiled from...... that the best practice knowledge has not permeated sufficiently to the practice. Furthermore, the appropriate application of information and communication technology (ICT) remains a big challenge, and finally project managers are not sufficiently trained in organizing and conducting virtual projects...

  15. Project Temporalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tryggestad, Kjell; Justesen, Lise; Mouritsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how animals can become stakeholders in interaction with project management technologies and what happens with project temporalities when new and surprising stakeholders become part of a project and a recognized matter of concern to be taken...... into account. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a qualitative case study of a project in the building industry. The authors use actor-network theory (ANT) to analyze the emergence of animal stakeholders, stakes and temporalities. Findings – The study shows how project temporalities can...... multiply in interaction with project management technologies and how conventional linear conceptions of project time may be contested with the emergence of new non-human stakeholders and temporalities. Research limitations/implications – The study draws on ANT to show how animals can become stakeholders...

  16. The Yangtze-Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subklew, Günter; Ulrich, Julia; Fürst, Leander; Höltkemeier, Agnes

    2010-05-01

    then encounter considerably improved climatic conditions with higher temperatures during their physiologically active season in the summer months. This reversal of the flood pulse in the course of the year will exert an enormous influence on the fauna and flora and the associated processes. Other parameters resulting from the management of the reservoir are the sediment deposits and their varying extents in the different zones of the WFZ. For example, the different degrees of compaction of the sediment of the river bank will largely determine the exchange of oxygen, nutrients and metabolites between the plants and the water body and thus the major ecosystem functions. The locally different thicknesses of the sediment body will be decisive for the emergence of plant shoots through the sediment. In areas of high flow rates, in contrast, habitats will be established that are strongly characterized by the dynamics of the pebbles and boulders. The Three Gorges Project will thus bring about a significant change in habitat conditions for vegetation in the WFZ whose consequences cannot yet be predicted with any certainty. This also concerns the potential and long-term impacts of changed vegetation on the local population, who exploit the plant resources, and also on tourism and on the hydroregime and the sedimentation regime in the reservoir. Landslides and rock falls are the major geological events in the Three Gorges region. The mud and debris avalanches formed during such landslips represent a danger both for areas of settlement and also for land used industrially and agriculturally, as well as for infrastructure facilities, and may also considerably obstruct navigation. Furthermore, the analogous mass movements are one of the reasons for the silting up of the Yangtze and many of its tributaries. The region of the Three Gorges contains rapidly growing urban centres that will receive further impulses for growth from the dam project. The fact that the Chongqing conurbation

  17. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1998-10-14

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  18. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  19. K basins sludge removal sludge pretreatment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H.L.

    1997-06-12

    The Spent Nuclear Fuels Program is in the process of planning activities to remove spent nuclear fuel and other materials from the 100-K Basins as a remediation effort for clean closure. The 105 K- East and K-West Basins store spent fuel, sludge, and debris. Sludge has accumulated in the 1 00 K Basins as a result of fuel oxidation and a slight amount of general debris being deposited, by settling, in the basin water. The ultimate intent in removing the sludge and fuel is to eliminate the environmental risk posed by storing fuel at the K Basins. The task for this project is to disposition specific constituents of sludge (metallic fuel) to produce a product stream through a pretreatment process that will meet the requirements, including a final particle size acceptable to the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The purpose of this task is to develop a preconceptual design package for the K Basin sludge pretreatment system. The process equipment/system is at a preconceptual stage, as shown in sketch ES-SNF-01 , while a more refined process system and material/energy balances are ongoing (all sketches are shown in Appendix C). Thus, the overall process and 0535 associated equipment have been conservatively selected and sized, respectively, to establish the cost basis and equipment layout as shown in sketches ES- SNF-02 through 08.

  20. High removal rate laser-based coating removal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Dennis L.; Celliers, Peter M.; Hackel, Lloyd; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Dane, C. Brent; Mrowka, Stanley

    1999-11-16

    A compact laser system that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1000 ft.sup.2 /hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

  1. Overview of paint removal methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Terry

    1995-04-01

    With the introduction of strict environmental regulations governing the use and disposal of methylene chloride and phenols, major components of chemical paint strippers, there have been many new environmentally safe and effective methods of paint removal developed. The new methods developed for removing coatings from aircraft and aircraft components include: mechanical methods using abrasive media such as plastic, wheat starch, walnut shells, ice and dry ice, environmentally safe chemical strippers and paint softeners, and optical methods such as lasers and flash lamps. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages, and some have unique applications. For example, mechanical and abrasive methods can damage sensitive surfaces such as composite materials and strict control of blast parameters and conditions are required. Optical methods can be slow, leaving paint residues, and chemical methods may not remove all of the coating or require special coating formulations to be effective. As an introduction to environmentally safe and effective methods of paint removal, this paper is an overview of the various methods available. The purpose of this overview is to introduce the various paint removal methods available.

  2. Laser hair removal: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Stephanie D; Graber, Emmy M

    2013-06-01

    Unwanted hair growth is a common aesthetic problem. Laser hair removal has emerged as a leading treatment option for long-term depilation. To extensively review the literature on laser hair removal pertaining to its theoretical basis, current laser and light-based devices, and their complications. Special treatment recommendations for darker skin types were considered. A comprehensive literature search related to the long-pulse alexandrite (755 nm), long-pulse diode (810 nm), long-pulse neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG; 1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) system, as well as newer home-use devices, was conducted. The literature supports the use of the alexandrite, diode, Nd:YAG and IPL devices for long-term hair removal. Because of its longer wavelength, the Nd:YAG is the best laser system to use for pigmented skin. Further research is needed regarding the safety and efficacy of home-use devices. Current in-office laser hair removal devices effectively provide a durable solution for unwanted hair removal. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Project studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geraldi, Joana; Söderlund, Jonas

    2018-01-01

    Project organising is a growing field of scholarly inquiry and management practice. In recent years, two important developments have influenced this field: (1) the study and practice of projects have extended their level of analysis from mainly focussing on individual projects to focussing on micro......- as well as macro-level concerns around projects; and (2) there has been a greater interest in different kinds of scholarly inquiry. Taken together, these two developments call for closer scrutiny of how the levels of analysis and the types of inquiry are related and benefit each other...... project research: (1) levels of analysis; and (2) type of research. Analysing recent developments within project studies, we observe the emergence of what we refer to as type 3 research, which reconciles the need for theoretical development and engagement with practice. Type 3 research suggests pragmatic...

  4. Laser Tattoo Removal: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naga, Lina I; Alster, Tina S

    2017-02-01

    Tattoo art has been around for thousands of years in every culture and is currently flourishing in all age groups, social classes, and occupations. Despite the rising popularity of tattoos, demand for their removal has also increased. While various treatments, including surgical excision, dermabrasion, and chemical destruction have historically been applied, over the past 2 decades, lasers have revolutionized the way tattoos are treated and have become the gold standard of treatment. To achieve optimal cosmetic outcome of treatment, lasers emitting high energies and short pulses are required to adequately destroy tattoo ink. We review the history of laser tattoo removal, outlining the challenges inherent in developing lasers that can most effectively remove tattoo particles while safely protecting skin from unwanted injury.

  5. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research, the Alzheimer's Association has been an active partner in "THE ALZHEIMER'S PROJECT," ... (48 minutes) "Momentum ...

  6. Seamonster Education: A Sensor Network Project in Southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatland, D. R.; Nagorski, S.; Connor, C.; Heavner, M. J.; Hood, E.

    2006-12-01

    The NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Science (ROSES) program is supporting a wireless sensor network project as part of its Advanced Information Systems Technology "Smart Sensor Web" initiative. The project, entitled Seamonster (for SouthEast Alaska MONitoring Network for Science, Telecomm, and Education Research) is led by the University of Alaska Southeast (Juneau) in collaboration with Microsoft- Vexcel in Boulder Colorado. This paper describes the Education Research component of Seamonster with emphasis on live scientist connection to educators, field experience, and inquiry-based student learning opportunity. Part of the Seamonster science will focus on a succession of valleys near Juneau in various stages of deglaciation, in effect providing a synopsis of a millennium-timescale process in a single moment. The Seamonster sensor configuration is designed to initially focus on a single watershed--Lemon Creek--and to subsequently expand to this larger region of interest. The aim is to provide data that narrates the story of watershed processes in real time, for example connecting precipitation to outflow volume and turbidity throughout the course of the year. As the project grows in scope the educational component will expand to keep pace. Having educators and by extension their students connected to data-driven stories as they unfold is a major objective of the project and will represent a milestone in efforts to include more people in front-end science as it happens.

  7. Arsenic removal by electrocoagulation process: Recent trends and removal mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidheesh, P V; Singh, T S Anantha

    2017-08-01

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water is a major issue in the present world. Arsenicosis is the disease caused by the regular consumption of arsenic contaminated water, even at a lesser contaminated level. The number of arsenicosis patients is increasing day-by-day. Decontamination of arsenic from the water medium is the only one way to regulate this and the arsenic removal can be fulfilled by water treatment methods based on separation techniques. Electrocoagulation (EC) process is a promising technology for the effective removal of arsenic from aqueous solution. The present review article analyzes the performance of the EC process for arsenic removal. Electrocoagulation using various sacrificial metal anodes such as aluminium, iron, magnesium, etc. is found to be very effective for arsenic decontamination. The performances of each anode are described in detail. A special focus has been made on the mechanism behind the arsenite and arsenate removal by EC process. Main trends in the disposal methods of sludge containing arsenic are also included. Comparison of arsenic decontamination efficiencies of chemical coagulation and EC is also reported. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Removal (and attempted removal) of material from a Hooded Vulture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relatively little is documented about nest material theft in vultures. We used camera traps to monitor Hooded Vulture Necrosyrtes monachus nests for a year. We report camera trap photographs of a starling Lamprotornis sp. removing what appeared to be dung from an inactive Hooded Vulture nest on Cleveland Game ...

  9. Laser-based coatings removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.A. [F2 Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D&D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building. This report describes the use of pulse-repetetion laser systems for the removal of paints and coatings.

  10. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA AT GOFFSTOWN, NH SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Orchard Highlands Subdivision site at Goffstown, NH. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the effect...

  11. Capital and Operating Costs of Small Arsenic Removal Adsorptive Media Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted 50 full-scale demonstration projects on treatment systems removing arsenic from drinking water in 26 states throughout the U.S. The projects were conducted to evaluate the performance, reliability, and cost of arsenic remo...

  12. Mixing and In situ product removal in micro-bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Li, X.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Of the thesis :’ Mixing and In-situ product removal in micro bioreactors’ by Xiaonan Li The work presented in this thesis is a part of a large cluster project, which was formed between DSM, Organon, Applikon and two university groups (TU Delft and University of Twente), under the ACTS and IBOS program. The aim of this cluster project was to develop a system consisting of parallel bioreactors of 30 to 200 microliter working volume for the cultivation of micro-organisms under well contr...

  13. PROJECT REPORT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    medakubu

    We here present a very preliminary report on a field project entitled 'Vanishing. Voices from Ghana's Middle Belt', an Endangered Languages Documentation Project funded by the Endangered Languages Documentation Program based at the School of. Oriental and African Studies, University of London. It is being carried ...

  14. Project Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Estevez Fernandez, M.A.; Borm, P.E.M.; Hamers, H.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper studies situations in which a project consisting of several activities is not executed as planned.It is divided into three parts.The first part analyzes the case where the activities may be delayed; this possibly induces a delay on the project as a whole with additional costs.Associated

  15. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... state Home > News & Events > Upcoming Events > HBO Alzheimer’s Project In the News Walk to End Alzheimer's Upcoming ... Disease Awareness Month World Alzheimer's Month HBO Alzheimer’s Project MAKE A DONATION Your gift will help us ...

  16. LEX Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars; Larsen, Torben J.; Walbjørn, Jacob

    This document is aimed at helping all parties involved in the LEX project to get a common understanding of words, process, levels and the overall concept.......This document is aimed at helping all parties involved in the LEX project to get a common understanding of words, process, levels and the overall concept....

  17. HSAPS market analysis project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloeckner, Ronny; Aaberg, Rolf Jarle

    2006-12-15

    The H-SAPS (Hydrogen Stand-Alone Power System) project, an EU project within the ALTENER programme in the period 2002-2004, was initiated to determine the potential for the introduction of environmentally benign hydrogen technology in what is believed to be a near-term market, namely stand-alone power systems (SAPS). The objective of the project was to examine the technological, political, social and economical factors affecting the emergence of hydrogen technology in the stand-alone power system market today and in the future. The scope of the project was limited to small and medium sized stand-alone power systems, up to a few hundred kilowatts (kW) power rating and based on renewable energy as the primary energy source. The work was divided into five phases: (1) Inception, (2) Data collection and analysis, (3) Market analysis and barrier removal, (4) Dissemination, and (5) Final report. Separate reports were written on these topics, and later summarised this final report. The H-SAPS-project identified the following critical technical barriers (in prioritized order): (1) High costs of both electrolyser and fuel cell solutions, (2) Short lifetime warranties and little lifetime experience for PEM electrolysers and PEM fuel cells, (3) Low energy efficiency of the hydrogen energy system (critical for small systems), and (4) The need to develop easy-to-use and energy efficient gas and electricity control systems. One of the main conclusions from the project is that there is a need to focus on interim solutions, based on conventional energy technologies (e.g., internal combustion engines instead of fuel cells), in order for H-SAPS to compete in the near-term SAPS-market (author) (ml)

  18. Sequestering agents for the removal of actinides from waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, K.; White, D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Whisenhunt, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The ultimate goal of this project is to develop new separation technologies to remove radioactive metal ions from contaminated DOE sites. To this end we are studying both the fundamental chemistry and the extractant properties of some chelators that are either found in nature or are closely related to natural materials. The work is a collaboration betwen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory-University of California, Berkeley, and the Glenn T. Seaborg Institute for Transactinium Science at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  19. Potential Fallouts of Accidental Ingestion of Limescale Removers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátil, Tomáš; Říčařová, B.; Šenholdová, Z.; Rakovcová, H.; Pelclová, D.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 14 (2007), s. 138-140 ISSN 0009-2770. [Mezioborová česko-slovenská toxikologická konference /12./. Praha, 11.06.2007-13.06.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/07/1195 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Limescale remover * titratable acid reserve (TAR) * water acidity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.683, year: 2007

  20. Tattoo removal with ingenol mebutate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cozzi SJ

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Sarah-Jane Cozzi,1 Thuy T Le,1 Steven M Ogbourne,2 Cini James,1 Andreas Suhrbier1 1Inflammation Biology Laboratory, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, 2Genecology Research Center, Faculty of Science, Health, Engineering and Education, University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore DC, QLD, Australia Abstract: An increasing number of people are getting tattoos; however, many regret the decision and seek their removal. Lasers are currently the most commonly used method for tattoo removal; however, treatment can be lengthy, costly, and sometimes ineffective, especially for certain colors. Ingenol mebutate is a licensed topical treatment for actinic keratoses. Here, we demonstrate that two applications of 0.1% ingenol mebutate can efficiently and consistently remove 2-week-old tattoos from SKH/hr hairless mice. Treatment was associated with relocation of tattoo microspheres from the dermis into the posttreatment eschar. The skin lesion resolved about 20 days after treatment initiation, with some cicatrix formation evident. The implications for using ingenol mebutate for tattoo removal in humans are discussed. Keywords: tattoo, ingenol mebutate, mouse 

  1. Electrochemical Machining Removes Deep Obstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catania, Mark J.

    1987-01-01

    Electrochemical machining (ECM) is effective way of removing obstructing material between two deep holes supposed to intersect but do not because of misalignment of drilling tools. ECM makes it possible to rework costly castings otherwise scrapped. Method fast even for tough or hard alloys and complicated three-dimensional shapes.

  2. Removing Solids From Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Glenn T.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus removes precipitated inorganic salts and other solids in water-recycling process. Designed for use with oxidation in supercritical water which treats wastes and yields nearly pure water. Heating coils and insulation around vessel keep it hot. Locking bracket seals vessel but allows it to be easily opened for replacement of filled canisters.

  3. Arsenic Removal by Liquid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Marino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Water contamination with harmful arsenic compounds represents one of the most serious calamities of the last two centuries. Natural occurrence of the toxic metal has been revealed recently for 21 countries worldwide; the risk of arsenic intoxication is particularly high in Bangladesh and India but recently also Europe is facing similar problem. Liquid membranes (LMs look like a promising alternative to the existing removal processes, showing numerous advantages in terms of energy consumption, efficiency, selectivity, and operational costs. The development of different LM configurations has been a matter of investigation by several researching groups, especially for the removal of As(III and As(V from aqueous solutions. Most of these LM systems are based on the use of phosphine oxides as carriers, when the metal removal is from sulfuric acid media. Particularly promising for water treatment is the hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM configuration, which offers high selectivity, easy transport of the targeted metal ions, large surface area, and non-stop flow process. The choice of organic extractant(s plays an essential role in the efficiency of the arsenic removal. Emulsion liquid membrane (ELM systems have not been extensively investigated so far, although encouraging results have started to appear in the literature. For such LM configuration, the most relevant step toward efficiency is the choice of the surfactant type and its concentration.

  4. Paint removal activities in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbein, R.; Arnolds-Mayer, G.

    1993-03-01

    To replace paint removing chemicals containing chlorinated hydrocarbons several alternative paint stripping methods have been developed or are under study in Germany: high pressure water stripping; plastic media blasting; use of alcalic and acid activated softeners; CO2 pellet blasting; and laser application.

  5. Waterjet processes for coating removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Fletcher; Cosby, Steve; Hoppe, David

    1995-01-01

    USBI and NASA have been testing and investigating the use of high pressure water for coating removal for approximately the past 12 years at the Automated TPS (Thermal Protection System - ablative materials used for thermal protection during ascent and descent of the solid rocket boosters) Removal Facility located in the Productivity Enhancement Complex at Marshall Space Flight Center. Originally the task was to develop and automate the removal process and transfer the technology to a production facility at Kennedy Space Center. Since that time more and more applications and support roles for the waterjet technology have been realized. The facility has become a vital part of development activities ongoing at MSFC. It supports the development of environmentally compliant insulations, sealants, and coatings. It also supports bonding programs, test motors, and pressure vessels. The most recent role of the cell is supporting Thiokol Corporation's solid rocket motor program in the development of waterjet degreasing and paint stripping methods. Currently vapor degreasing methods use 500,000 lbs. of ozone depleting chemicals per year. This paper describes the major cell equipment, test methods practiced, and coatings that have been removed.

  6. Artificial wetlands performance: nitrogen removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-de-Bazúa, Carmen; Guido-Zárate, Alejandro; Huanosta, Thalía; Padrón-López, Rosa Martha; Rodríguez-Monroy, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Artificial wetlands (AW) are a promising option for wastewater treatment in small communities due to their high performance in nutrients removal and low operation and maintenance costs. Nitrogen can favour the growth of algae in water bodies causing eutrophication when present at high concentrations. Nitrogen can be removed through different mechanisms (e.g. nitrification-denitrification, adsorption and plant uptake). Environmental conditions such as temperature and relative humidity can play an important role in the performance of these systems by promoting the growth of macrophytes such as reeds and cattails (e.g. Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia respectively). In this paper, two AW systems were compared, one located in Mexico City, Mexico at an altitude higher than 2,000 m above the sea level, and the second one located in Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico at an a altitude near the sea level (27 m). Both systems comprised five reactors (147-L plastic boxes) filled with volcanic slag and gravel and intermittently fed with synthetic water. The removal nitrogen efficiency found for the system located in Mexico City was higher than that of the Tabasco system (90 and 80% as TKN respectively). The higher temperatures in the Tabasco system did not enhanced the nitrogen removal as expected. Copyright IWA Publishing 2008.

  7. GLYPHOSATE REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activated-carbon, oxidation, conventional-treatment, filtration, and membrane studies are conducted to determine which process is best suited to remove the herbicide glyphosate from potable water. Both bench-scale and pilot-scale studies are completed. Computer models are used ...

  8. Arsenic removal by lime softening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaosol, T.; Suksaroj, C.; Bregnhøj, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    This paper focuses on the study of arsenic removal for drinking water by lime softening. The initial arsenic (V) concentration was 500 and 1,000 ug/L in synthetic groundwater. The experiments were performed as batch tests with varying lime dosages and mixing time. For the synthetic groundwater......, arsenic (V) removal increased with increasing lime dosage and mixing time, as well as with the resulting pH. The residual arsenic (V) in all cases was lower than the WHO guideline of 10 ug/L at pH higher than 11.5. Kinetic of arsenic (V) removal can be described by a first-order equation as C1 = C0*e......^-k*t. The relation between the constant (k value) and increasing lime dosage was found to be linear, described by k = 0.0034 (Dlime). The results support a theory from the literature that the arsenic (V) was removed by precipitation af Ca3(AsO4)2. The results obtained in the present study suggest that lime...

  9. Biotechnological sulphide removal with oxygen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buisman, C.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development of a new process for biotechnological sulphide removal from wastewater, in which it is attempted to convert sulphide into elemental sulphur by colourless sulphur bacteria. The toxicity, corrosive properties, unpleasant odor and high oxygen demand of sulphide

  10. Support of US CLIVAR Project Office 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, Donna [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2013-08-31

    Director of JOSS, supervised the U.S. CLIVAR Project Office Director and helped direct the officer to enhance the goals and objectives of the U.S. CLIVAR Project and budget. Financial Manager of JOSS, worked to complete proposals and monitor compliance with award requirements and funding limitations and ensure the U.S. CLIVAR Project Office complied with UCAR policies and procedures. Project Coordinator administered the funding for the U.S. CLIVAR Project Office and was responsible for coordinating special projects that required additional support from JOSS technical staff. These projects included activities such as website updates, technology upgrades, production of printed reports, and development of graphic elements like logos. Web Developer worked both on web development and graphic work and the work consisted of the following: Maintaining the site ? installing updates to Drupal CMS (Content Management System). Creating new templates for webpages and styling them with CSS and JavaScript/jQuery code. Fixing the styling on webpages that the content contributor/manager (Jenn Mays) created and has had trouble with. Creating new web forms for abstract uploading, subscriptions, and meeting registrations. Created 4 webpages for the ?ASP: Key Uncertainties in the Global Carbon-Cycle? meeting. Developed a document review form, instruction webpages, login redirect, dynamic table with form submissions for the US CLIVAR SSC Science Plan Document Review. This was open to the public from June 12, 2013 until July 10, 2013. During this time the user accounts had to be checked (daily) that were created by the public, to delete any spam ones. Graphics work: preparing images for general use on webpages, webpage banners, and for meeting name badges, creating a US CLIVAR letterhead, redesigning the US AMOC logo. System Administrator spent time working on the migration of the US CLIVAR site from the USGCRP office to UCAR here Boulder. This was done to increase the general speed of

  11. Watchdog Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Rhett [Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories, Inc., Pullman, WA (United States); Campbell, Jack [CenterPoint Energy Houston Electric, TX (United States); Hadley, Mark [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-12-30

    The Watchdog Project completed 100% of the project Statement of Project Objective (SOPO). The Watchdog project was a very aggressive project looking to accomplish commercialization of technology that had never been commercialized, as a result it took six years to complete not the original three that were planned. No additional federal funds were requested from the original proposal and SEL contributed the additional cost share required to complete the project. The result of the Watchdog Project is the world’s first industrial rated Software Defined Network (SDN) switch commercially available. This technology achieved the SOPOO and DOE Roadmap goals to have strong network access control, improve reliability and network performance, and give the asset owner the ability to minimize attack surface before and during an attack. The Watchdog project is an alliance between CenterPoint Energy Houston Electric, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL), and Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories, Inc. (SEL). SEL is the world’s leader in microprocessor-based electronic equipment for protecting electric power systems. PNNL performs basic and applied research to deliver energy, environmental, and national security for our nation. CenterPoint Energy is the third largest publicly traded natural gas delivery company in the U.S and third largest combined electricity and natural gas delivery company. The Watchdog Project efforts were combined with the SDN Project efforts to produce the entire SDN system solution for the critical infrastructure. The Watchdog project addresses Topic Area of Interest 5: Secure Communications, for the DEFOA- 0000359 by protecting the control system local area network itself and the communications coming from and going to the electronic devices on the local network. Local area networks usually are not routed and have little or no filtering capabilities. Combine this with the fact control system protocols are designed with inherent trust the control

  12. Noise Reduction to Reduce Patient Anxiety During Cast Removal: Can We Decrease Patient Anxiety With Cast Removal by Wearing Noise Reduction Headphones During Cast Saw Use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Susan T; Harris, Marie S; Lierhaus, Anneliese M; Miller, Patricia E; DiFazio, Rachel L

    Noise reduction headphones decrease the sound during cast removal. Their effectiveness in decreasing anxiety has not been studied. Compare pediatric patients' anxiety levels during cast removal with and without utilization of noise reduction headphones combined with use of a personal electronic device. Quality improvement project. Patients randomly assigned to noise reduction headphone group or standard care group during cast removal. Faces, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability Scale and heart rate were evaluated prior to, during, and after cast removal. Data were compared across groups. Fifty patients were included; 25 per group. No difference detected between the 2 groups in Faces, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability Scale score prior to (p = .05) or after cast removal (p = .30). During cast removal, the headphone group had lower FLACC Scale scores (p = .03). Baseline heart rate was lower in the headphone group prior to (p = .02) and after (p = .005) cast removal with no difference during cast removal (p = .24). Utilizing noise reduction headphones and a personal electronic device during the cast removal process decreases patient anxiety.

  13. Freedom Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Suarez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Freedom Project trains prisoners in nonviolent communication and meditation. Two complementary studies of its effects are reported in this article. The first study is correlational; we found decreased recidivism rates among prisoners trained by Freedom Project compared with recidivism rates in Washington state. The second study compared trained prisoners with a matched-pair control group and found improvement in self-reported anger, self-compassion, and certain forms of mindfulness among the trained group. Ratings of role-plays simulating difficult interactions show increased social skills among the group trained by Freedom Project than in the matched controls.

  14. Projective geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Faulkner, T Ewan

    2006-01-01

    This text explores the methods of the projective geometry of the plane. Some knowledge of the elements of metrical and analytical geometry is assumed; a rigorous first chapter serves to prepare readers. Following an introduction to the methods of the symbolic notation, the text advances to a consideration of the theory of one-to-one correspondence. It derives the projective properties of the conic and discusses the representation of these properties by the general equation of the second degree. A study of the relationship between Euclidean and projective geometry concludes the presentation. Nu

  15. Technical Description Lillgrund Wind Power Plant. Lillgrund Pilot Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeppsson, Joakim; Larsen, Poul Erik; Larsson, Aake (Vattenfall Vindkraft AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-09-15

    Lillgrund offshore wind power plant comprises 48 wind turbines, each rated at 2.3 MW, bringing the total wind farm capacity to 110 MW. The Lillgrund offshore wind power plant is located in a shallow area of Oeresund, 7 km off the coast of Sweden and 7 km south from the Oeresund Bridge connecting Sweden and Denmark. An average wind speed of around 8,5 m/s at hub height, combined with a relatively low water depth of 4 to 8 meters makes it economically feasible to build here. Vattenfall Vindkraft AB is the owner and operator of Lillgrund offshore wind power plant. Lillgrund is a Swedish pilot project supported by the Swedish Energy Agency. The bidding process was completed during 2005 and the offshore power plant was constructed in the period 2006 to 2007. The wind farm was constructed on time and has now been successfully operational since December 2007. There is, however, always potential for improvement and the aim of this report has been to determine and highlight these areas. It is worth noting out that only the electrical system and the foundations are tailor made at offshore wind power plants. The wind turbines are more or less standard products with none or very limited possibilities for project specific design changes. Geotechnical investigations are expensive and it can be difficult to balance the risks as well as the benefits of this expense in the early phases of a large infrastructure project. As a whole, the geotechnical surveys at Lillgrund proved to be useful. They identified potential issues, such as the fact that extra excavation was required for two of the foundations. It also revealed the location of a small number of boulders that would have to be removed. Vattenfall requested a complete study of the electrical system for Lillgrund to be delivered with the bids. That request was not met. Instead Siemens Wind Power began a complete electrical system study after being awarded the Contract. The electrical system study was completed during the

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic projects at the CDIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents the tasks accomplished at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the second quarter of FY91. Areas of technical progress this quarter included: coal system development; seed system development; test bay modification; channel power dissipation and distribution system development; oxygen system storage upgrade; iron-core magnet thermal protection system checkout; TRW slag rejector/CDIF slag removal project; stack gas/environmental compliance upgrade; coal-fired combustor support; 1A channels fabrication and assembly; support of Mississippi State University diagnostic testing; test operations and results; data analysis and modeling; technical papers; and projected activities. 2 tabs.

  17. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... leading community engagement. Talk about the films on our message board . Watch films free online now "The ... ALZHEIMER'S PROJECT" will expose the Alzheimer's crisis facing our nation and drive concerned citizens to take action. ...

  18. Project LEAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project LEAF has a goal of educating farmworkers about how to reduce pesticide exposure to their families from pesticide residues they may be inadvertently taking home on their clothing, etc. Find outreach materials.

  19. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... National Alzheimer's Gala A Night at Sardi's Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month World Alzheimer's Month HBO Alzheimer’s Project ... takes a look at the faces behind the disease - and the forces leading us to find a ...

  20. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease has on those with Alzheimer's and their families. September 14, 2009 "The Alzheimer's Project" wins two ... way Americans thinks about Alzheimer's disease. Tell your family and friends. Post info on your Web site . ...

  1. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available | News | Events | Press | Contact 24/7 Helpline: 1.800.272.3900 Find your chapter: search by state Home > News & Events > Upcoming Events > HBO Alzheimer’s Project In the News Walk to End ...

  2. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Momentum in Science, Part 2" (70 minutes) Be a part of something big. HBO's "THE ALZHEIMER'S PROJECT" ... 800-272-3900 Find Your Local Chapter Get the facts 10 warning signs What is dementia What ...

  3. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your family and friends. Post info on your Web site . Become an Alzheimer's champion. Help support vital research and services. "THE ALZHEIMER'S PROJECT" is a presentation of HBO ...

  4. Alzheimer's Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alzheimer’s Project In the News Walk to End Alzheimer's Upcoming Events AAIC Advocacy Forum Rita Hayworth Gala - New York Rita Hayworth Gala - Chicago National Alzheimer's Gala A Night at Sardi's Alzheimer's Disease Awareness ...

  5. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research, the Alzheimer's Association has been an active partner in "THE ALZHEIMER'S PROJECT," providing expert insight and leading community engagement. Talk about the films on our message ...

  6. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 14, 2009 "The Alzheimer's Project" wins two Creative Arts Emmys Two installments of the multi-part HBO ... from the Alzheimer's Association and others, won Creative Arts Emmy awards. "The Memory Loss Tapes" was honored ...

  7. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Alzheimer's Project," produced with help from the Alzheimer's Association and others, won Creative Arts Emmy awards. "The ... in Alzheimer's care, support and research, the Alzheimer's Association has been an active partner in "THE ALZHEIMER'S ...

  8. Project Reptile!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffily, Deborah

    2001-01-01

    Integrating curriculum is important in helping children make connections within and among areas. Presents a class project for kindergarten children which came out of the students' interests and desire to build a reptile exhibit. (ASK)

  9. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Emmys Two installments of the multi-part HBO documentary "The Alzheimer's Project," produced with help from the Alzheimer's Association and others, won Creative Arts Emmy awards. "The Memory Loss Tapes" was honored ...

  10. Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    2009-01-01

    In this video Associate Professor Constance Kampf talks about the importance project management. Not only as a tool in implementation, but also as a way of thinking, and as something that needs to be considered from idea conception......In this video Associate Professor Constance Kampf talks about the importance project management. Not only as a tool in implementation, but also as a way of thinking, and as something that needs to be considered from idea conception...

  11. Microalgae removal with Moringa oleifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrado-Moreno, M M; Beltran-Heredia, J; Martín-Gallardo, J

    2016-02-01

    Moringa oleifera seed extract was tested for algae (Chlorella, Microcystis, Oocystis and Scenedesmus) removal by Jar-test technique. This coagulant can be used in drinking water treatment. Jar-test has been carried out in order to evaluate the efficiency of this natural coagulant agent inside real surface water matrix. The influence of variables has been studied in this process, including operating parameters such as coagulant dosage, initial algae concentration, pH, agitation time and water matrix. Removal capacity is verified for water with high contamination of algae while the process is not affected by the pH and water matrix. Coagulation process may be modelling through Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption hypothesis, so acceptable r2 coefficients are obtained. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Explosives Removal from Munitions Wastewaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Rohm and Haas Company, Philadelphia, Pa., 19105 2 Background Generally, pollation in munitions plant waste water stems from washing and steam cleaning...290131 EXPLOSIVES REMOVAL FROM MUNITIONS WST- WATERS B. W. STEVENS, R. P. MCDONNELL ROHM. AND HAAS CO?*ANY, PHILAD2ELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA R. K. PXDREN...operations. Waste water from a typical TNT manufacturing J21 plant may contain from 40 to 120 ppm of TNT and lesser aimounts of 2,4, DNT. K. Waste

  13. Contaminant Removal From Natural Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Christian A. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline W. (Inventor); Geiger, Cheri L. (Inventor); Reinhart, Debra (Inventor); Fillpek, Laura B. (Inventor); Coon, Christina (Inventor); Devor, Robert (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion containing zero-valent metal particles is used to remediate contaminated natural resources, such as groundwater and soil. In a preferred embodiment, the zero-valent metal emulsion removes heavy metals, such as lead (pb), from contaminated natural resources. In another preferred embodiment, the zero-valent metal emulsion is a bimetallic emulsion containing zero-valent metal particles doped with a catalytic metal to remediate halogenated aromatic compounds, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), from natural resources.

  14. Zeolites Remove Sulfur From Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolites remove substantial amounts of sulfur compounds from diesel fuel under relatively mild conditions - atmospheric pressure below 300 degrees C. Extracts up to 60 percent of sulfur content of high-sulfur fuel. Applicable to petroleum refineries, natural-gas processors, electric powerplants, and chemical-processing plants. Method simpler and uses considerably lower pressure than current industrial method, hydro-desulfurization. Yields cleaner emissions from combustion of petroleum fuels, and protects catalysts from poisoning by sulfur.

  15. Nutrient removal from farm effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolan, N S; Wong, L; Adriano, D C

    2004-09-01

    The objectives of the study were: (i) to examine the efficiency of nutrient removal during the treatment of dairy farm effluent in a two-pond system, and (ii) to produce an inexpensive but effective nutrient trap which could be recycled as a nutrient source or soil mulch. The concentration of chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) in a two-pond system used to treat dairy farm effluent was monitored over a period of 7 months. The retention of nutrients by two porous materials was examined both in the laboratory batch (zeolite and bark) and pilot-scale field (bark) experiments. The results indicated that biological treatment of farm effluents using the two-pond system was not effective in the removal of nutrients, which are likely to become pollutant when discharged to waterways. Both the bark and zeolite materials were effective in the removal of N, P and K from effluent. These materials can be placed in the second (i.e., aerobic) pond to treat effluents, which can then be discharged to streams with minimum impact on water quality. The nutrient-enriched porous materials can be recycled as a source of nutrients and soil conditioner.

  16. Coal ash removal in Schkopau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisler

    1945-05-22

    This short paper outlined an ash removal process as revealed by a conversation with a Mr. Boerner. Boerner worked with Dr. Strohfeldt in February and March of 1945 on an ash removal process performed at the Schkopau Works. A mill supplied 3 tons/hr of crushed coal, which was mixed with a dilute HCl solution. The acid suspension was immediately supplied to the first concentrator. The thickened paste was transferred by means of a diaphragm pump to the second concentator where a small amount of HCl solution was added. After concentrating in the second apparatus, the paste went to a tank car where the suspension was maintained by air bubbling. Difficulty in filtration was avoided by introduction of a rotating filter cake remover and equally-sized coal granules. The filter yield was estimated at 150 kg of wet cake per m/sup 2/ per hr. The water content of the cake was approximately 50% to 55%, and it was thought that a decrease in water content would result by slowing down the throughput rate. Ash and water analyses of the processed coal were set up, but were not run. No other specific values were given such as ash content, acid concentation, or amounts of reagents added.

  17. Elemental mercury removal using a wet scrubber.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, E.; Livengood, C. D.; Martin, K.; Mendelsohn, M. H.; Zhou, C. Q.

    1999-05-19

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal that is emitted into the environment by both natural and human activities. Acute and chronic exposure to mercury and methyl mercury in humans results in central nervous system damage, kidney damage, and even death. Although some Hg emission sources have been regulated, coal-fired utilities have not been. In anticipation of federal regulations on mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has designed a flue gas simulation system to study the removal of elemental mercury. The simulated flue gas enters the system and combines with the inlet mercury vapor (from a calibrated permeation tube), carried by nitrogen gas. This combined gas continues past the flow meter and the pressure gage to the reactor inlet. Inside the reactor chamber, the flue gas is sprayed with NOXSORB{reg_sign}, a chloric acid solution, which reacts with elemental mercury. The amount of reaction (oxidation) of elemental mercury is important since mercury in an oxidized form is highly soluble, In this form, the Hg can be picked up downstream by a wet scrubber from fossil-fuel burning utilities. Experiments on mercury removal from flue gases have been conducted at ANL, with the participation of a senior design team from Purdue University Calumet. Temperature variations ranging from room temperature to 350 F have been studied. Other parameters, such as the concentration of NOXSORB{reg_sign}, were also tested. Furthermore, pump speed and sprayer droplet sizes of the NOXSORB{reg_sign} solution were studied. A literature survey on the current and proposed mercury control legislation, along with the existing control technologies, has been performed as part of the senior design project. With guidance from ANL, an understanding of the simulation system has been developed. This information has been used to determine the mass transfer. Another literature survey was performed on the reaction kinetics of mercury. The information obtained was

  18. Predicting the type, location and magnitude of geomorphic responses to dam removal: Role of hydrologic and geomorphic constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, John D.; Magilligan, Francis J.; Renshaw, Carl E.

    2015-12-01

    Using a dam removal on the Ashuelot River in southern New Hampshire, we test how a sudden, spatially non-uniform increase in river slope alters sediment transport dynamics and riparian sediment connectivity. Site conditions were characterized by detailed pre- and post-removal field surveys and high-resolution aerial lidar data, and locations of erosion and deposition were predicted through one-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling. The Homestead Dam was a ~ 200 year old, 4 m high, 50 m wide crib dam that created a 9.5 km long, relatively narrow reservoir. Following removal, an exhumed resistant bed feature of glaciofluvial boulders located 400 m upstream and ~ 2.5 m lower than the crest of the dam imposed a new boundary condition in the drained reservoir, acting as a grade control that maintained a backwater effect upstream. During the 15 months following removal, non-uniform erosion in the former reservoir totaled ~ 60,000 m3 (equivalent to ~ 9.3 cm when averaged across the reservoir). Net deposition of ~ 10,700 m3 was measured downstream of the dam, indicating most sediment from the reservoir was carried more than 8 km downstream beyond the study area. The most pronounced bed erosion occurred where modeled sediment transport increased in the downstream direction, and deposition occurred both within and downstream of the former reservoir where modeled sediment transport decreased in the downstream direction. We thus demonstrate that spatial gradients in sediment transport can be used to predict locations of erosion and deposition on the stream bed. We further observed that bed incision was not a necessary condition for bank erosion in the former reservoir. In this characteristically narrow and shallow reservoir lacking abundant dam-induced sedimentation, the variable resistance of the bed and banks acted as geomorphic constraints. Overall, the response deviated from the common conceptual model of knickpoint erosion and channel widening due to dam removal. With

  19. Removal and Recovery of Organic Vapor Emissions by Fixed-Bed Activated Carbon Fiber Adsorber-Cryogenic Condenser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hay, K

    1998-01-01

    ... them. This project evaluated the ability of an activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) adsorption, electrothermal desorption, cryogenic-condensation system to remove 10 cu cm/min containing 1000 ppmv of methyl ethyl ketone (MEK...

  20. Characterization and quantification of deposits build up and removal in straw suspension fired boilers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arendt Jensen, Peter; Wedel, S.; Jappe Frandsen, F.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Shafique Bashir, M. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. CHEC Research Centre, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Wadenback, J.; Thaaning Pedersen, S. [Vattenfall A/S, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-07-15

    This project deals with ash deposit formation in suspension fired biomass power plant boilers. The project has been conducted in a tight collaboration between Vattenfall and the CHEC Research Centre at DTU Department of Chemical Engineering. A large part of the project has been performed by conducting advanced probe measurements at the Amagervaerkets Vattenfall owed boilers. It was the objective of the project to provide an improved understanding of ash deposit formation and removal in biomass suspension fired boilers. The project have provided a large amount of knowledge on the following issues: 1) The influence of local boiler conditions on deposit formation in suspension fired boilers using wood or co-firing straw and wood, 2) quantification of deposit removal in biomass suspension firing boilers with regards both to natural shedding and soot blower induced shedding, 3) established relations of the properties of fuel ash, fly ash and deposits, 4) use of coal ash to remedy biomass ash induced boiler deposit problems. (Author)

  1. Characterization and quantification of deposits build up and removal in straw suspension fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Arendt; Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Wedel, Stig

    This project deals with ash deposit formation in suspension fired biomass power plant boilers. The project has been conducted in a tight collaboration between Vattenfall and the CHEC Research Centre at DTU Department of Chemical Engineering. A large part of the project has been performed...... by conducting advanced probe measurements at the Amagerværkets Vattenfall owed boilers. It was the objective of the project to provide an improved understanding of ash deposit formation and removal in biomass suspension fired boilers. The project have provided a large amount of knowledge on the following issues......: 1) The influence of local boiler conditions on deposit formation in suspension fired boilers using wood or co-firing straw and wood, 2) quantification of deposit removal in biomass suspension firing boilers with regards both to natural shedding and soot blower induced shedding, 3) established...

  2. Spacecraft Water Regeneration by Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project is to develop advanced catalysts for a volatile removal assembly used to purify spacecraft water. The innovation of the proposed...

  3. Bed Sediment Monitoring of Multiple Contiguous Small Dam Removals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galster, J. C.; Wyrick, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Dam removal is crucial for reconnecting river habitats, restoring passage of fish and other aquatic organisms, and restoring the free flow of water and sediment. However, removal of obsolete dams is often resisted due to concerns of releasing sediment and initiating channel instability. Two dams on the Musconetcong River in northern New Jersey have been removed as part of a watershed-wide effort to remove or breach all major obstructions to restore the river to its original free-flowing state. The two dams were consecutively situated 1 kilometer apart and their removals provided an opportunity to study the geomorphic response in the form of bed elevation changes and sediment size through pre- and post-removal monitoring. Initial geomorphic surveys of the riverbed in the vicinity of and between the two dams have shown areas of erosion and deposition. These surveys have established a set of control points along the river channel between the two dams, and confirm the downstream movement of a sediment plume and localized areas of erosion. At the upstream dam, comparisons pre- and post-dam removal surveys show greater than 100 cubic meters of sediment being both eroded and deposited within the site. Most but not all of the erosion occurred around the newly exposed sediment bar upstream of the former dam, where the thalweg has reestablished itself following the dam’s removal. Areas that were excavated during removal have experienced deposition. Most of the deposition occurred downstream and on the left-hand bank. Due to the two low flow culverts in the former dam, a mid-channel sediment bar formed but has subsequently eroded. At the downstream dam site, erosion has removed up to 1.1 m of sediment from the bed in places while depositing up to 0.5 m sediment in others. As sediment from the former impoundment migrated through the project site, areas excavated during the removal became areas of deposition following the removal, and; alternately, areas in the channel

  4. Water Distribution and Removal Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Deng; N. Chipman; E.L. Hardin

    2005-08-26

    The design of the Yucca Mountain high level radioactive waste repository depends on the performance of the engineered barrier system (EBS). To support the total system performance assessment (TSPA), the Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is developed to describe the thermal, mechanical, chemical, hydrological, biological, and radionuclide transport processes within the emplacement drifts, which includes the following major analysis/model reports (AMRs): (1) EBS Water Distribution and Removal (WD&R) Model; (2) EBS Physical and Chemical Environment (P&CE) Model; (3) EBS Radionuclide Transport (EBS RNT) Model; and (4) EBS Multiscale Thermohydrologic (TH) Model. Technical information, including data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documents will be provided to defend the applicability of these models for their intended purpose of evaluating the postclosure performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system. The WD&R model ARM is important to the site recommendation. Water distribution and removal represents one component of the overall EBS. Under some conditions, liquid water will seep into emplacement drifts through fractures in the host rock and move generally downward, potentially contacting waste packages. After waste packages are breached by corrosion, some of this seepage water will contact the waste, dissolve or suspend radionuclides, and ultimately carry radionuclides through the EBS to the near-field host rock. Lateral diversion of liquid water within the drift will occur at the inner drift surface, and more significantly from the operation of engineered structures such as drip shields and the outer surface of waste packages. If most of the seepage flux can be diverted laterally and removed from the drifts before contacting the wastes, the release of radionuclides from the EBS can be controlled, resulting in a proportional reduction in dose release at the accessible environment. The purposes

  5. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal in the wastewater treatment plant of Bunnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, H.P. de; Rensink, J.H.

    1989-02-01

    At several sewage treatment plants in the Netherlands there has been continuously found a remarkable high phosphorus removal rate, without using chemical additions. In Bunnik this is up to 90%. In the effluent we will mostly find less than 1 mg P/l. At the Bunnik plant we deal with biological excess phosphorus removal. Biological phosphorus removal is based on the luxury uptake of phosphorus by some bacteria. On certain circumstances micro-organisms of the genius Acinetobacter stored excess amounts of phosphates in their cells. In 1984 a project started, financed by the institute for inland waters and wastewater treatment (DBW/RIZA). The purpose of this research project was to find factors which were, responsible for the remarkable enhanced phosphorus removal in the Bunnik plant.

  6. Echo project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gfader, Verina; Carson, Rebecca; Kraus, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Echo project (ed. by Verina Gfader and Ruth Höflich) is an online publication and community board that developed from a visit to the Los Angeles Art Book fair in January 2014. It was on the occasion of a prior book project, titled Prospectus, that the editorial team had been invited by the LAABF...... Intellect and Financialization sets a conceptual ground for rethinking subjective freedom; an encounter with Another LA opens out a multitude of cartographies - revealing more discreet and politically dynamic movements in the urban grid; there are glimpses of Machine Project’s events, a visual story around...

  7. THE REMOVAL OF GLYPHOSATE FROM DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effectiveness of granulated activated carbon (GAC), packed activated carbon (PAC), conventional treatment, membranes, and oxidation for removing glyphosate from natural waters is evaluated. Results indicate that GAC and PAC are not effective in removing glyphosate, while oxid...

  8. Chronic Diarrhea: A Concern After Gallbladder Removal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic diarrhea: A concern after gallbladder removal? I had my gallbladder removed six months ago, and I'm ... Barkun A, et al. Bile acid malabsorption in chronic diarrhea: Pathophysiology and treatment. Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology. 2013; ...

  9. Conflicts Associated with Dam Removal in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna G. C. Lejon

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of deteriorating old dams that need renovation or have lost their function make dam removal a viable management option. There are at least four major reasons for dam removal: safety, law and policy, economy, and ecology. Here we discuss 17 Swedish dams that were recently considered for removal. Because dam removal usually causes controversy, dam removal initiatives may succeed, fail, or result in a compromise such as a bypass channel for migrating fish. We identify and discuss three major obstructions to dam removal: funding, cultural-historical values, and threatened species. To facilitate dam removal, the reasons for, and the effects of, dam removal must be carefully explained, and the public and stakeholders must be kept informed. In complicated cases in which compromise solutions may be the most feasible outcome, the integration of the knowledge of different stakeholders is crucial. The involvement of diverse stakeholders increases their willingness to find compromises, thus avoiding conflicts and failures.

  10. Dam Removal Information Portal (DRIP)—A map-based resource linking scientific studies and associated geospatial information about dam removals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Jeffrey J.; Wieferich, Daniel J.; Bristol, R. Sky; Bellmore, J. Ryan; Hutchison, Vivian B.; Vittum, Katherine M.; Craig, Laura; Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2016-08-18

    The removal of dams has recently increased over historical levels due to aging infrastructure, changing societal needs, and modern safety standards rendering some dams obsolete. Where possibilities for river restoration, or improved safety, exceed the benefits of retaining a dam, removal is more often being considered as a viable option. Yet, as this is a relatively new development in the history of river management, science is just beginning to guide our understanding of the physical and ecological implications of dam removal. Ultimately, the “lessons learned” from previous scientific studies on the outcomes dam removal could inform future scientific understanding of ecosystem outcomes, as well as aid in decision-making by stakeholders. We created a database visualization tool, the Dam Removal Information Portal (DRIP), to display map-based, interactive information about the scientific studies associated with dam removals. Serving both as a bibliographic source as well as a link to other existing databases like the National Hydrography Dataset, the derived National Dam Removal Science Database serves as the foundation for a Web-based application that synthesizes the existing scientific studies associated with dam removals. Thus, using the DRIP application, users can explore information about completed dam removal projects (for example, their location, height, and date removed), as well as discover sources and details of associated of scientific studies. As such, DRIP is intended to be a dynamic collection of scientific information related to dams that have been removed in the United States and elsewhere. This report describes the architecture and concepts of this “metaknowledge” database and the DRIP visualization tool.

  11. Photodynamic therapy for hair removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H. M. Ali

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unwanted hair is one of the most common medical problems affecting women of reproductive age inducing a lot of psychological stress and threatening their femininity and self-esteem. Old methods of removing unwanted hair include shaving, waxing, chemical depilation, and electrolysis, all of which have temporary results. However laser-assisted hair removal is the most efficient method of long-term hair removal currently available. It is desirable to develop a reduced cost photodynamic therapy (PDT system whose properties should include high efficiency and low side-effects. Method: Mice skin tissues were used in this study and divided into six groups such as controls, free methylene blue (MB incubation, liposome methylene blue (MB incubation, laser without methylene blue (MB, free methylene blue (MB for 3 and 4 hrs and laser, liposome methylene blue (MB for 3 hrs and laser. Methylene blue (MBwas applied to wax epilated areas. The areas were irradiated with CW He-Ne laser system that emits orange-red light with wavelength 632.8 nm and 10 mW at energy density of 5 J/ cm2 for 10 minutes. The UV-visible absorption spectrum was collected by Cary spectrophotometer. Results: Methylene blue (MB is selectively absorbed by actively growing hair follicles due to its cationic property. Methylene blue (MBuntreated sections showed that hair follicle and sebaceous gland are intact and there is no change due to the laser exposure. Free methylene blue (MB sections incubated for 3 hrs showed that He:Ne laser induced destruction in hair follicles, leaving an intact epidermis. Treated section with free methylene blue (MB for 4 hrs showed degeneration and necrosis in hair follicle, leaving an intact epidermis. Liposomal methylene blue (MB sections incubated for 3 hrs showed He:Ne laser induced destruction in hair follicles with intradermal leucocytic infiltration. Conclusions: Low power CW He:Ne laser and methylene blue (MB offered a successful PDT system

  12. Heat removing under hypersonic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semenov Mikhail E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider the heat transfer properties of the axially symmetric body with parabolic shape at hypersonic speeds (with a Mach number M > 5. We use the numerical methods based on the implicit difference scheme (Fedorenko method with direct method based on LU-decomposition and iterative method based on the Gauss-Seigel method. Our numerical results show that the heat removing process should be performed in accordance with the nonlinear law of heat distribution over the surface taking into account the hypersonic conditions of motion.

  13. Ultrasound-guided removal of Implanon devices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Persaud, T

    2008-11-01

    Our study has shown that ultrasound-guided localisation and removal of Implanon rods is safe, practical and highly successful. Over a 4-year period, 119 patients had successful, uncomplicated removal of their subdermal devices.The technique is particularly useful for removal of the device when it is not palpable or when an attempt at removal of a palpable device has not been successful.

  14. Carisolv- An Innovative Method of Caries Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Kathuria, Vartika; Anil V. Ankola; Hebbal, Mamata; Mocherla, Monica

    2013-01-01

    The use of minimal invasive dentistry and attention to patient comfort is of utmost importance especially for the school children and anxious and uncooperative patients. This demanded the newer patient friendly technique in dentistry amongst which is the Chemo mechanical caries removal (CMCR). CMCR involves the selective caries removal of carious dentine. As only the carious dentine is removed the painful removal of sound dentine is avoided and the anxiety due to the vibration of the handpiec...

  15. The Effects of Removable Denture on Swallowing

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Dae-Sik; Seong, Jin Wan; Kim, Younghoon; Chee, Youngjoon; Hwang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between removable dentures and swallowing and describe risks. Methods Twenty-four patients with removable dentures who were referred for videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) were enrolled. We evaluated the change of swallowing function using VFSS before and after the removal of the removable denture. The masticatory performance by Kazunori's method, sensation of oral cavity by Christian's method, underlying disease, and National Institutes of Hea...

  16. Removal and recovery of toxic metal ions from aqueous waste sites using polymer pendant ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the use of polymer pendant ligand technology to remove and recover toxic metal ions from DOE aqueous waste sites. Polymer pendant lgiands are organic ligands, anchored to crosslinked, modified divinylbenzene-polystyrene beads, that can selectively complex metal ions. The metal ion removal step usually occurs through a complexation or ion exchange phenomena, thus recovery of the metal ions and reuse of the beads is readily accomplished.

  17. Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang; Yongchun Tang; William A. Goddard

    2005-12-09

    In the past three years, we followed the work plan as we suggested in the proposal and made every efforts to fulfill the project objectives. Based on our large amount of creative and productive work, including both of experimental and theoretic aspects, we received important technical breakthrough on naphthenic acid removal process and obtained deep insight on catalytic decarboxylation chemistry. In detail, we established an integrated methodology to serve for all of the experimental and theoretical work. Our experimental investigation results in discovery of four type effective catalysts to the reaction of decarboxylation of model carboxylic acid compounds. The adsorption experiment revealed the effectiveness of several solid materials to naphthenic acid adsorption and acidity reduction of crude oil, which can be either natural minerals or synthesized materials. The test with crude oil also received promising results, which can be potentially developed into a practical process for oil industry. The theoretical work predicted several possible catalytic decarboxylation mechanisms that would govern the decarboxylation pathways depending on the type of catalysts being used. The calculation for reaction activation energy was in good agreement with our experimental measurements.

  18. Short Communication Preliminary Studies on Nutrients Removal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Short Communication Preliminary Studies on Nutrients Removal Potential of Selected Aquatic Plants. ... Aquatic plants can remove nutrients (P&N) from sewage or industrial wastewater through accumulation. ... This study had identified some aquatic plants as good potential nutrient removers especially in wetlands.

  19. Ozone removal by diesel particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metts, T. A.; Batterman, S. A.; Fernandes, G. I.; Kalliokoski, P.

    The most significant removal mechanisms for tropospheric ozone (O 3) include dry deposition, photolysis, and photochemical reactions. This study examines another mechanism potentially important in urban areas: sorption and removal on diesel particulate matter (DPM). Tests were performed to determine O 3 breakthrough and the amount of O 3 removed by the DPM generated by a heavy-duty diesel engine. Teflon filters loaded with 0.7-1.8 mg of DPM were exposed to a test atmosphere of humidified and ozonated air designed to represent realistic ambient air conditions. In addition, soot samples with the organic fraction removed were tested to determine whether the organic or elemental fraction contributed to O 3 removal. For comparison, activated carbon (AC) samples were also tested. The DPM-loaded filters removed 5.6±1.8 wt% of O 3. Considerably more ozone, 31±4 wt %, was removed by the DPM after removal of its soluble organic fraction. Removal capacities of DPM were small relative to AC, which removed >38±3 wt% of O 3. Of the Lagergren pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and Ritchie chemisorption models tested, the Ritchie model provided the best fit to the breakthrough data. Preliminary estimates drawn from laboratory results suggest that diesel soot present at typical urban levels will remove only a small portion of O 3 from urban or tropospheric air. In air cleaning applications, DPM-loaded filters are also expected to remove only a small portion of indoor O 3.

  20. Hardware removal after osseous free flap reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Kristine E; Desmond, Renee; Magnuson, J Scott; Carroll, William R; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2014-01-01

    Identifying risk factors for hardware removal in patients undergoing mandibular reconstruction with vascularized osseous free flaps remains a challenge. The purpose of this study is to identify potential risk factors, including osteocutaneous radial forearm versus fibular flap, for need for removal and to describe the fate of implanted hardware. Case series with chart review Setting Academic tertiary care medical center. Two hundred thirteen patients undergoing 227 vascularized osseous mandibular reconstructions between the years 2004 and 2012. Data were compiled through a manual chart review, and patients incurring hardware removals were identified. Thirty-four of 213 evaluable vascularized osseous free flaps (16%) underwent surgical removal of hardware. The average length of time to removal was 16.2 months (median 10 months), with the majority of removals occurring within the first year. Osteocutaneous radial forearm free flaps (OCRFFF) incurred a slightly higher percentage of hardware removals (9.9%) compared to fibula flaps (6.1%). Partial removal was performed in 8 of 34 cases, and approximately 38% of these required additional surgery for removal. Hardware removal was associated with continued tobacco use after mandibular reconstruction (P = .03). Removal of the supporting hardware most commonly occurs from infection or exposure in the first year. In the majority of cases the bone is well healed and the problem resolves with removal.

  1. FLOAT Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.; Aarup, Bendt

    The objective of the FLOAT project is to study the reliability of high-performance fibre-reinforced concrete, also known as Compact Reinforced Composite (CRC), for the floats of wave energy converters. In order to reach a commercial breakthrough, wave energy converters need to achieve a lower price...

  2. THE PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M. Latyshev

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available "Urals Industrial - Urals Polar" is the unique project and thus it will provide the economic security not only of the local territory but of the whole Russia in terms of several courses. This article is devoted to the main courses of these ones and their influence on the economy of the country.

  3. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Chicago National Alzheimer's Gala A Night at Sardi's Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month World Alzheimer's Month HBO Alzheimer’s Project ... help us change the way Americans thinks about Alzheimer's disease. Tell your family and friends. Post info on ...

  4. PROJECT REPORT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    Description and Documentation of an Endangered Language of Ivory ... A language documentation project is summed up briefly in this work-in-progress ..... which captures the system of the language. Even now there are many uncertainties in the glossing of grammatical words, and some constructions are still opaque.

  5. Project Avatar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhlin, Jonas Alastair

    'Project Avatar' tager udgangspunkt i den efterretningsdisciplin, der kaldes Open Source Intelligence og indebærer al den information, som ligger frit tilgængeligt i åbne kilder. Med udbredelsen af sociale medier åbners der op for helt nye typer af informationskilder. Spørgsmålet er; hvor nyttig er...

  6. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Alzheimer’s Project In the News Walk to End Alzheimer's Upcoming Events AAIC Advocacy Forum Rita Hayworth Gala - New York Rita Hayworth Gala - Chicago National Alzheimer's Gala A Night at Sardi's Alzheimer's Disease Awareness ...

  7. Project Narrative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, Mary C. [St. Bonaventure University, St Bonaventure, NY(United States)

    2012-07-12

    The Project Narrative describes how the funds from the DOE grant were used to purchase equipment for the biology, chemistry, physics and mathematics departments. The Narrative also describes how the equipment is being used. There is also a list of the positive outcomes as a result of having the equipment that was purchased with the DOE grant.

  8. Project Baltia

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Uus arhitektuuriajakiri "Project Baltia" tutvustab Baltimaade, Soome ja Peterburi regiooni arhitektuuri, linnaehitust ja disaini. Ilmub neli korda aastas inglise- ja venekeelsena. Väljaandja: kirjastus Balticum Peterburis koostöös Amsterdami ja Moskva kirjastusega A-Fond. Peatoimetaja Vladimir Frolov

  9. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available | News | Events | Press | Contact 24/7 Helpline: 1.800.272.3900 Find your chapter: search by state Home > News & Events > Upcoming Events > HBO Alzheimer’s Project In the News Walk to End ...

  10. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  11. Active Space Debris Removal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele GUERRA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the start of the space era, more than 5000 launches have been carried out, each carrying satellites for many disparate uses, such as Earth observation or communication. Thus, the space environment has become congested and the problem of space debris is now generating some concerns in the space community due to our long-lived belief that “space is big”. In the last few years, solutions to this problem have been proposed, one of those is Active Space Debris Removal: this method will reduce the increasing debris growth and permit future sustainable space activities. The main idea of the method proposed below is a drag augmentation system: use a system capable of putting an expanded foam on a debris which will increase the area-to-mass ratio to increase the natural atmospheric drag and solar pressure. The drag augmentation system proposed here requires a docking system; the debris will be pushed to its release height and then, after un-docking, an uncontrolled re-entry takes place ending with a burn up of the object and the foam in the atmosphere within a given time frame. The method requires an efficient way to change the orbit between two debris. The present paper analyses such a system in combination with an Electric Propulsion system, and emphasizes the choice of using two satellites to remove five effective rockets bodies debris within a year.

  12. Endoscopically removed giant submucosal lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although uncommon, giant submucosal colon lipomas merit attention as they are often presented with dramatic clinical features such as bleeding, acute bowel obstruction, perforation and sometimes may be mistaken for malignancy. There is a great debate in the literature as to how to treat them. Case report. A patient, 67-year old, was admitted to the Clinic due to a constipation over the last several months, increasing abdominal pain mainly localized in the left lower quadrant accompanied by nausea, vomiting and abdominal distension. Physical examination was unremarkable and the results of the detailed laboratory tests and carcinoembryonic antigen remained within normal limits. Colonoscopy revealed a large 10 cm long, and 4 to 5 cm in diameter, mobile lesion in his sigmoid colon. Conventional endoscopic ultrasound revealed 5 cm hyperechoic lesion of the colonic wall. Twenty MHz mini-probe examination showed that lesion was limited to the submucosa. Since polyp appeared too large for a single transaction, it was removed piecemeal. Once the largest portion of the polyp has been resected, it was relatively easy to place the opened snare loop around portions of the residual polyp. Endoscopic resection was carried out safely without complications. Histological examination revealed the common typical histological features of lipoma elsewhere. The patient remained stable and eventually discharged home. Four weeks later he suffered no recurrent symptoms. Conclusion. Colonic lipomas can be endoscopically removed safely eliminating unnecessary surgery.

  13. SDN Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Rhett [Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc, Pullman, WA (United States)

    2016-12-23

    The SDN Project completed on time and on budget and successfully accomplished 100% of the scope of work outlined in the original Statement of Project Objective (SOPO). The SDN Project formed an alliance between Ameren Corporation, University of Illinois Urbana- Champaign (UIUC), Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL), and Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories, Inc. (SEL). The objective of the SDN Project is to address Topic Area of Interest 2: Sustain critical energy delivery functions while responding to a cyber-intrusion under Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0000797. The goal of the project is to design and commercially release technology that provides a method to sustain critical energy delivery functions during a cyber intrusion and to do this control system operators need the ability to quickly identify and isolate the affected network areas, and re-route critical information and control flows around. The objective of the SDN Project is to develop a Flow Controller that monitors, configures, and maintains the safe, reliable network traffic flows of all the local area networks (LANs) on a control system in the Energy sector. The SDN team identified the core attributes of a control system and produced an SDN flow controller that has the same core attributes enabling networks to be designed, configured and deployed that maximize the whitelisted, deny-bydefault and purpose built networks. This project researched, developed and commercially released technology that: Enables all field networks be to configured and monitored as if they are a single asset to be protected; Enables greatly improved and even precalculated response actions to reliability and cyber events; Supports pre-configured localized response actions tailored to provide resilience against failures and centralized response to cyber-attacks that improve network reliability and availability; Architecturally enables the right subject matter experts, who are usually the information

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic projects at the CDIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    This quarterly technical progress report presents the tasks accomplished at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the fourth quarter of FY92. Areas of technical progress this quarter included: coal system development; seed system development; test train/A-Bay modifications; channel power dissipation and distribution system development; integrated topping cycle current consolidators; solid suspension injection system upgrade; oxygen system storage upgrade; iron-core magnet repair/upgrade; TRW slag rejector/CDIF slag removal project; emission compliance project; air emissions monitoring support; coal-fired combustor support; 1A channels fabrication and assembly; support of Mississippi State University diagnostic testing; test operations and results; data analysis and modeling; technical papers; and projected activities.

  15. Projective geometry and projective metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Busemann, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    The basic results and methods of projective and non-Euclidean geometry are indispensable for the geometer, and this book--different in content, methods, and point of view from traditional texts--attempts to emphasize that fact. Results of special theorems are discussed in detail only when they are needed to develop a feeling for the subject or when they illustrate a general method. On the other hand, an unusual amount of space is devoted to the discussion of the fundamental concepts of distance, motion, area, and perpendicularity.Topics include the projective plane, polarities and conic sectio

  16. Influence of groundwater composition on subsurface iron and arsenic removal

    KAUST Repository

    Moed, David H.

    2012-06-01

    Subsurface arsenic and iron removal (SAR/SIR) is a novel technology to remove arsenic, iron and other groundwater components by using the subsoil. This research project investigated the influence of the groundwater composition on subsurface treatment. In anoxic sand column experiments, with synthetic groundwater and virgin sand, it was found that several dissolved substances in groundwater compete for adsorption sites with arsenic and iron. The presence of 0.01 mmol L -1phosphate, 0.2 mmol L -1 silicate, and 1 mmol L -1 nitrate greatly reduced the efficiency of SAR, illustrating the vulnerability of this technology in diverse geochemical settings. SIR was not as sensitive to other inorganic groundwater compounds, though iron retardation was limited by 1.2 mmol L -1 calcium and 0.06 mmol L -1 manganese. © IWA Publishing 2012.

  17. Removing Noise From Pyrosequenced Amplicons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davenport Russell J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many environmental genomics applications a homologous region of DNA from a diverse sample is first amplified by PCR and then sequenced. The next generation sequencing technology, 454 pyrosequencing, has allowed much larger read numbers from PCR amplicons than ever before. This has revolutionised the study of microbial diversity as it is now possible to sequence a substantial fraction of the 16S rRNA genes in a community. However, there is a growing realisation that because of the large read numbers and the lack of consensus sequences it is vital to distinguish noise from true sequence diversity in this data. Otherwise this leads to inflated estimates of the number of types or operational taxonomic units (OTUs present. Three sources of error are important: sequencing error, PCR single base substitutions and PCR chimeras. We present AmpliconNoise, a development of the PyroNoise algorithm that is capable of separately removing 454 sequencing errors and PCR single base errors. We also introduce a novel chimera removal program, Perseus, that exploits the sequence abundances associated with pyrosequencing data. We use data sets where samples of known diversity have been amplified and sequenced to quantify the effect of each of the sources of error on OTU inflation and to validate these algorithms. Results AmpliconNoise outperforms alternative algorithms substantially reducing per base error rates for both the GS FLX and latest Titanium protocol. All three sources of error lead to inflation of diversity estimates. In particular, chimera formation has a hitherto unrealised importance which varies according to amplification protocol. We show that AmpliconNoise allows accurate estimates of OTU number. Just as importantly AmpliconNoise generates the right OTUs even at low sequence differences. We demonstrate that Perseus has very high sensitivity, able to find 99% of chimeras, which is critical when these are present at high

  18. Experiments on aerosol removal by high-pressure water spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corno, Ada del, E-mail: delcorno@rse-web.it [RSE, Power Generation Technologies and Materials Dept, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy); Morandi, Sonia, E-mail: morandi@rse-web.it [RSE, Power Generation Technologies and Materials Dept, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy); Parozzi, Flavio, E-mail: parozzi@rse-web.it [RSE, Power Generation Technologies and Materials Dept, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy); Araneo, Lucio, E-mail: lucio.araneo@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, via Lambruschini 4A, I-20156 Milano (Italy); CNR-IENI, via Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Casella, Francesco, E-mail: francesco2.casella@mail.polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, via Lambruschini 4A, I-20156 Milano (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Experimental research to measure the efficiency of high-pressure sprays in capturing aerosols if applied to a filtered containment venting system in case of severe accident. • Cloud of monodispersed SiO{sub 2} particles with sizes 0.5 or 1.0 μm and initial concentration in the range 2–90 mg/m{sup 3}. • Carried out in a chamber 0.5 × 1.0 m and 1.5 m high, with transparent walls equipped with a high pressure water spray with single nozzle. • Respect to low-pressure sprays, removal efficiency turned out significant: the half-life for 1 μm particles with a removal high-pressure spray system is orders of magnitude shorter than that with a low-pressure sprays system. - Abstract: An experimental research was managed in the framework of the PASSAM European Project to measure the efficiency of high-pressure sprays in capturing aerosols when applied to a filtered containment venting system in case of severe accident. The campaign was carried out in a purposely built facility composed by a scrubbing chamber 0.5 × 1.0 m and 1.5 m high, with transparent walls to permit the complete view of the aerosol removal process, where the aerosol was injected to form a cloud of specific particle concentration. The chamber was equipped with a high pressure water spray system with a single nozzle placed on its top. The test matrix consisted in the combination of water pressure injections, in the range 50–130 bar, on a cloud of monodispersed SiO{sub 2} particles with sizes 0.5 or 1.0 μm and initial concentration ranging between 2 and 99 mg/m{sup 3}. The spray was kept running for 2 min and the efficiency of the removal was evaluated, along the test time, using an optical particle sizer. With respect to low-pressure sprays, the removal efficiency turned out much more significant: the half-life for 1 μm particles with a removal high-pressure spray system is orders of magnitude shorter than that with a low-pressure spray system. The highest removal rate was

  19. Hydropower Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-04-02

    The Water Power Program helps industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity. Through support for public, private, and nonprofit efforts, the Water Power Program promotes the development, demonstration, and deployment of advanced hydropower devices and pumped storage hydropower applications. These technologies help capture energy stored by diversionary structures, increase the efficiency of hydroelectric generation, and use excess grid energy to replenish storage reserves for use during periods of peak electricity demand. In addition, the Water Power Program works to assess the potential extractable energy from domestic water resources to assist industry and government in planning for our nation’s energy future. From FY 2008 to FY 2014, DOE’s Water Power Program announced awards totaling approximately $62.5 million to 33 projects focused on hydropower. Table 1 provides a brief description of these projects.

  20. PARTNER Project

    CERN Multimedia

    Ballantine, A; Dixon-Altaber, H; Dosanjh, M; Kuchina, L

    2011-01-01

    Hadrontherapy uses particle beams to treat tumours located near critical organs and tumours that respond poorly to conventional radiation therapy. It has become evident that there is an emerging need for reinforcing research in hadrontherapy and it is essential to train professionals in this rapidly developing field. PARTNER is a 4-year Marie Curie Training project funded by the European Commission with 5.6 million Euros aimed at the creation of the next generation of experts. Ten academic institutes and research centres and two leading companies are participating in PARTNER, that is coordinated by CERN, forming a unique multidisciplinary and multinational European network. The project offers research and training opportunities to 25 young biologists, engineers, physicians and physicists and is allowing them to actively develop modern techniques for treating cancer in close collaboration with leading European Institutions. For this purpose PARTNER relies on cutting edge research and technology development, ef...

  1. Removing Cycles in Esterel Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard von Hanxleden

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Esterel belongs to the family of synchronous programming languages, which are affected by cyclic signal dependencies. This prohibits a static scheduling, limiting the choice of available compilation techniques for programs with such cycles. This work proposes an algorithm that, given a constructive synchronous Esterel program, performs a semantics-preserving source code level transformation that removes cyclic signal dependencies. The transformation is divided into two parts: detection of cycles and iterative resolution of these cycles. It is based on the replacement of cycle signals by a signal expression involving no other cycle signals, thereby breaking the cycle. This transformation of cyclic Esterel programs enables the use of efficient compilation techniques, which are only available for acyclic programs. Furthermore, experiments indicate that the code transformation can even improve code quality produced by compilers that can already handle cyclic programs.

  2. Removable partial dentures: clinical concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenkamp, David M

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a review of the traditional clinical concepts for the design and fabrication of removable partial dentures (RPDs). Although classic theories and rules for RPD designs have been presented and should be followed, excellent clinical care for partially edentulous patients may also be achieved with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology and unique blended designs. These nontraditional RPD designs and fabrication methods provide for improved fit, function, and esthetics by using computer-aided design software, composite resin for contours and morphology of abutment teeth, metal support structures for long edentulous spans and collapsed occlusal vertical dimensions, and flexible, nylon thermoplastic material for metal-supported clasp assemblies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Projection Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Falko Jens; Poulsen, Mikael Zebbelin

    1999-01-01

    When trying to solve a DAE problem of high index with more traditional methods, it often causes instability in some of the variables, and finally leads to breakdown of convergence and integration of the solution. This is nicely shown in [ESF98, p. 152 ff.].This chapter will introduce projection...... methods as a way of handling these special problems. It is assumed that we have methods for solving normal ODE systems and index-1 systems....

  4. Improving Software Engineering on NASA Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumbley, Tim; Kelly, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Software Engineering Initiative: Reduces risk of software failure -Increases mission safety. More predictable software cost estimates and delivery schedules. Smarter buyer of contracted out software. More defects found and removed earlier. Reduces duplication of efforts between projects. Increases ability to meet the challenges of evolving software technology.

  5. Toothbrush efficacy for plaque removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, K J; Chinta, S K; Agarwal, P; Nemelivsky, M; Frisina, A C; Cao, Z; Norman, R G; Fisch, G S; Corby, P

    2014-11-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a novel sonic toothbrush in reducing plaque and in maintenance of gingival health when compared to a standard manual brush. This study was a block-randomized, examiner-blind, two-treatment, parallel group, single centre clinical investigation. A total of 84 subjects were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive either the Panasonic EW-DL90 or an American Dental Association-endorsed manual toothbrush. Subjects were instructed to follow a twice-daily brushing regimen without flossing. Plaque levels and gingival health were assessed at baseline and after 1 and 3 weeks of treatment using the Turesky Modification of the Quigley-Hein Plaque Index and the Papillary Bleeding Score. Subjects assigned to the EW-DL90 group had significantly lower plaque levels after 1 and 3 weeks of treatment than those in the manual group (P = 0.003 and 0.0035, respectively). Both groups showed a reduction in plaque levels at Week 3 relative to baseline. The EW-DL90 group had significantly lower gingival inflammation scores after 1 week of treatment (P = 0.0293), but there was no difference between groups after 3 weeks of treatment. The EW-DL90 toothbrush safely and effectively removes more plaque than a standard manual toothbrush. Improvement in gingival inflammation was observed after 1 week of treatment. There was no difference in Papillary Bleeding Score between the two groups after 3 weeks of treatment. The newly developed sonic brush (Panasonic EW-DL90) tested in this study was found to be more effective than a manual toothbrush at plaque removal. The papillary bleeding scores were significantly lower in the sonic brush group after 1 week of product use. After 3 weeks of product use, both treatment groups had similar papillary bleeding scores almost returning to baseline values. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Electrokinetic removal of heavy metals from soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puvvadi Venkata Sivapullaiah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Removal of heavy metal ions from soils by electrokinetic treatment has several advantages. The extent of removal, however, is both soil specific and ion specific. The conditions to be maintained have to be established based on laboratory studies. With a view to maximize the removal of metal ions the trends of removal of heavy metal ions such as iron, nickel and cadmium form a natural Indian kaolinitic red earth during different conditions maintained in the electrokinetic extraction process are studied. A laboratory electrokinetic extraction apparatus was assembled for this purpose. Attempts are also made to elucidate the mechanism of removal of the metal ions from soil. The composition of the flushing fluid, voltage and duration of extraction are varied. While dilute acetic acid has been used to neutralize the alkalinity that develops at the cathode, EDTA solution has been used to desorb heavy metals from clay surface. Generally the extent of removal was proportional to the osmotic flow. Nickel and Cadmium are more effectively removed than iron. The percentage removal of Ni is generally proportional to the osmotic flow but shows sensitivity to the pH of the system. There is an optimum voltage for removal of metal ions from soil. The removal of iron was negligible under different conditions studied.

  7. Hot Spot Removal System: System description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    Hazardous wastes contaminated with radionuclides, chemicals, and explosives exist across the Department of Energy complex and need to be remediated due to environmental concerns. Currently, an opportunity is being developed to dramatically reduce remediation costs and to assist in the acceleration of schedules associated with these wastes by deploying a Hot Spot Removal System. Removing the hot spot from the waste site will remove risk driver(s) and enable another, more cost effective process/option/remedial alternative (i.e., capping) to be applied to the remainder of the site. The Hot Spot Removal System consists of a suite of technologies that will be utilized to locate and remove source terms. Components of the system can also be used in a variety of other cleanup activities. This Hot Spot Removal System Description document presents technologies that were considered for possible inclusion in the Hot Spot Removal System, technologies made available to the Hot Spot Removal System, industrial interest in the Hot Spot Removal System`s subsystems, the schedule required for the Hot Spot Removal System, the evaluation of the relevant technologies, and the recommendations for equipment and technologies as stated in the Plan section.

  8. Development of Technology for Effective Removal of Arsenic and Cyanides from Drinking Water and Wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Jae

    2008-02-09

    The purpose of the project was to perform a joint research and development effort focused upon the development of methods and the prototype facility for effective removal of arsenic and cyanides from drinking water and wastewater, based on the UPEC patented technology. The goals of this project were to validate UPEC technology, to manufacture a prototype facility meeting the market requirements, and to introduce it to both industry and municipalities which deal with the water quality. The project involved design and fabrication of one experimental unit and one prototypical industrial unit, and tests at industrial and mining sites. The project used sodium ferrate (Na2FeO4) as the media to remove arsenic in drinking water and convert arsenic into non-hazardous form. The work consisted of distinct phases ending with specific deliverables in development, design, fabrication and testing of prototype systems and eventually producing validation data to support commercial introduction of technology and its successful implementation.

  9. Q-switched laser tattoo removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viljem H. topčič

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Decorative tattooing gained popularity in many western countries throughout the 1990s. Some estimates show that approximately 10 % of men in the United States already have tattoos. However, tattoos often become a personal regret. As recent surveys suggest, 17 % of people that have obtained a tattoo and more than 50 % of adults over the age of 40 in the United States of America consider having them removed. The same trend can be observed in our country as well. Laser therapy is the gold standard for tattoo removal. In Slovenia, laser tattoo removal therapy is available and widely accessible. There is a wide range of facilities offering laser tattoo removal, ranging from different private clinics to beauty salons. Different facilities use different lasers, but not all lasers, however, are optimal for successful and complete tattoo removal, as inappropriate use can cause many unwanted side effects.Methods: Eleven (11 patients (2 men and 9 women requesting tattoo removal were treated in our department. When treating our patients, we used Fotona’s QX MAX quality-switched Nd:YAG laser which offers four different wavelengths in a single system; 1064 nm Nd:YAG was used to treat and remove dark pigments, 532 nm KTP for red, tan-colored, purple and orange tattoo inks, 650 nm dye for green tattoo inks and 585 nm dye for sky-blue colored inks.Results: Satisfactory tattoo removal was achieved in all patients treated. Patients were very satisfied with the success and the number of treatments needed for tattoo removal. There were mild unwanted side effects and the pain was moderate. The average number of treatments required for complete tattoo removal was less than 7, ranging from 3 to 21 treatments. Patients’ satisfaction with tattoo removal was estimated at 5.2 (on a scale from 1 to 6.Conclusions: Our study showed that Q-switched lasers successfully remove tattoo ink, however several treatments are required for satisfactory tattoo removal

  10. PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND THE PROJECT MANAGER: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    importance of proper planning and monitoring of project activities in order to avoid building and infrastructural collapse, project failure, project abandonment, project cost and time overruns, etc. The paper examines the different component parts that constitute project management in the building construction industry.

  11. Hardware Removal in Craniomaxillofacial Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Thomas J.; Gandhi, Rikesh; Allori, Alexander C.; Marcus, Jeffrey R.; Powers, David; Erdmann, Detlev; Hollenbeck, Scott T.; Levinson, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Background Craniomaxillofacial (CMF) fractures are typically treated with open reduction and internal fixation. Open reduction and internal fixation can be complicated by hardware exposure or infection. The literature often does not differentiate between these 2 entities; so for this study, we have considered all hardware exposures as hardware infections. Approximately 5% of adults with CMF trauma are thought to develop hardware infections. Management consists of either removing the hardware versus leaving it in situ. The optimal approach has not been investigated. Thus, a systematic review of the literature was undertaken and a resultant evidence-based approach to the treatment and management of CMF hardware infections was devised. Materials and Methods A comprehensive search of journal articles was performed in parallel using MEDLINE, Web of Science, and ScienceDirect electronic databases. Keywords and phrases used were maxillofacial injuries; facial bones; wounds and injuries; fracture fixation, internal; wound infection; and infection. Our search yielded 529 articles. To focus on CMF fractures with hardware infections, the full text of English-language articles was reviewed to identify articles focusing on the evaluation and management of infected hardware in CMF trauma. Each article’s reference list was manually reviewed and citation analysis performed to identify articles missed by the search strategy. There were 259 articles that met the full inclusion criteria and form the basis of this systematic review. The articles were rated based on the level of evidence. There were 81 grade II articles included in the meta-analysis. Result Our meta-analysis revealed that 7503 patients were treated with hardware for CMF fractures in the 81 grade II articles. Hardware infection occurred in 510 (6.8%) of these patients. Of those infections, hardware removal occurred in 264 (51.8%) patients; hardware was left in place in 166 (32.6%) patients; and in 80 (15.6%) cases

  12. Projective mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlholm, Christian; Brockhoff, Per B.; Bredie, Wender Laurentius Petrus

    2012-01-01

    instructions and influence heavily the product placements and the descriptive vocabulary (Dehlholm et.al., 2012b). The type of assessors performing the method influences results with an extra aspect in Projective Mapping compared to more analytical tests, as the given spontaneous perceptions are much dependent...... the applied framework, semantic restrictions, the choice of type of assessors and the validation of product separations. The applied framework concerns the response surface as presented to the assessor in different shapes, e.g. rectangular, square or round. Semantic restrictions are a part of the assessor...

  13. Carbon dioxide removal with inorganic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, R.R.; Fain, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide, in the atmosphere has sparked a great deal of interest in the removal of CO{sub 2} from flue gases of fossil fueled plants. Presently, several techniques for the removal of CO{sub 2} are considered to have potential, but are lacking in practicality. For example, amine scrubbing of flue gas streams is potential, but are lacking in practically. For example, amine scrubbing of flue gas streams is effective in removing CO{sub 2}, but costs are high; efficiency suffers; and other acid gases must be removed prior to amine stripping. Membrane systems for CO{sub 2} removal are held in high regard, and inorganic, particularly ceramic, membranes offer the potential for high temperature, thus energy saving, removal.

  14. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

  15. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

  16. [Removable partial dentures. Oral functions and types].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creugers, N H J; de Baat, C

    2009-11-01

    A removable partial denture enables the restoration or improvement of 4 oral functions: aesthetics, mandibular stability, mastication, and speech. However, wearing a removable partial denture should not cause oral comfort to deteriorate. There are 3 types of removable partial dentures: acrylic tissue-supported dentures, dentures with cast metal frameworks en dentures with cast metal frameworks and (semi)precision attachments. Interrupted tooth arches,free-ending tooth arches, and a combination of interrupted as well as free-ending tooth arches can be restored using these dentures. Well-known disadvantages of removable partial dentures are problematic oral hygiene, negative influence on the remaining dentition and limited oral comfort. Due to the advanced possibilities of fixed tooth- or implant-supported partial dentures, whether or not free-ending, or tooth- as well as implant-supported partial dentures, the indication of removable partial dentures is restricted. Nevertheless, for the time being the demand for removable partial dentures is expected to continue.

  17. HAPs-Rx: Precombustion Removal of Hazardous Air Pollutant Precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David J. Akers; Clifford E. Raleigh

    1998-03-16

    CQ Inc. and its project team members--Howard University, PrepTech Inc., Fossil Fuel Sciences, the United States Geological Survey (USGS), and industry advisors--are applying mature coal cleaning and scientific principles to the new purpose of removing potentially hazardous air pollutants from coal. The team uniquely combines mineral processing, chemical engineering, and geochemical expertise. This project meets more than 11 goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Energy Strategy, and the 1993 Climate Change Action Plan. During this project: (1) Equations were developed to predict the concentration of trace elements in as-mined and cleaned coals. These equations, which address both conventional and advanced cleaning processes, can be used to increase the removal of hazardous air pollutant precursors (HAPs) by existing cleaning plants and to improve the design of new cleaning plants. (2) A promising chemical method of removing mercury and other HAPs was developed. At bench-scale, mercury reductions of over 50 percent were achieved on coal that had already been cleaned by froth flotation. The processing cost of this technology is projected to be less than $3.00 per ton ($3.30 per tonne). (3) Projections were made of the average trace element concentration in cleaning plant solid waste streams from individual states. Average concentrations were found to be highly variable. (4) A significantly improved understanding of how trace elements occur in coal was gained, primarily through work at the USGS during the first systematic development of semiquantitative data for mode of occurrence. In addition, significant improvement was made in the laboratory protocol for mode of occurrence determination. (5) Team members developed a high-quality trace element washability database. For example, the poorest mass balance closure for the uncrushed size and washability data for mercury on all four coals is 8.44 percent and the best is 0.46 percent. This indicates an

  18. Environmental Remediation: Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nkansah, Marian Asantewah

    2012-11-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous persistent semi-volatile organic compounds. They are contaminants that are resistant to degradation and can remain in the environment for long periods due to their high degree of conjugation, and aromaticity. PAHs are present in industrial effluents as products of incomplete combustion processes of organic compounds. Petroleum, coal and shale oil contain extremely complex mixtures of these PAHs, and their transport and refining process can also result in the release of PAHs. It is therefore prudent that such effluents are treated before discharge into the environment. In this project, different approaches to the treatment of PAHs have been investigated. Hydrous pyrolysis has been explored as a potential technique for degrading PAHs in water using anthracene as a model compound. The experiments were performed under different conditions of temperature, substrate, redox systems and durations. The conditions include oxidising systems comprising pure water, hydrogen peroxide and Nafion-SiO2 solid catalyst in water; and reducing systems of formic acid and formic acid / Nafion-SiO2 / Pd-C catalysts to assess a range of reactivities. Products observed in GCMS analysis of the extract from the water phase include anthrone, anthraquinone, xanthone and multiple hydro-anthracene derivatives (Paper I). In addition a modified version of the Nafion-SiO2 solid catalyst in water oxidising system was tested; and reducing systems of formic acid and formic acid / Nafion-SiO2 / Pd-C catalysts were adopted for the conversion of a mixture of anthracene, fluorene and fluoranthene. The rate of conversion in the mixture was high as compared to that of only anthracene (Paper II). Also the use of LECA (Lightweight expanded clay aggregates) as an adsorbent (Paper III) for PAHs (phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene) removal from water has been.(Author)

  19. Early precambrian asteroid impact-triggered tsunami: excavated seabed, debris flows, exotic boulders, and turbulence features associated with 3.47-2.47 Ga-old asteroid impact fallout units, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glikson, Andrew Y

    2004-01-01

    Pioneering studies of Precambrian impact fallout units and associated tsunami deposits in the Hamersley Basin, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia, by B.M. Simonson and S.W. Hassler, document a range of tsunami deposits associated with impact fallout units whose impact connection is identified by associated microtektites and microkrystites (condensation spherules). The impact connection of these particles is demonstrated by iridium anomalies, unique platinum group elements patterns, and Ni-rich mineral phases. Densely packed tsunami-transported fragments and boulders overlie microkrystite units of the >2629 +/- 5 Ma top Jeerinah Impact Layer (JIL). Tsunami events closely follow spherule settling associated with the 2561 +/- 8 Ma Spherule Marker Bed SMB-1 and SMB-2 impact events, Bee Gorge Member, Wittenoom Formation. The two impact cycles are separated by a stratigraphically consistent silicified black siltstone, representing a "Quiet Interval." The SMB turbidites display turbulence eddies, climbing ripples, conglomerate pockets, slumps, and waterlogged sediment deformation features. Consequences of tsunami in the probably contemporaneous Carawine Dolomite (Pb-Pb carbonate ages of approximately 2.56-2.54 Ga), eastern Hamersley Basin, include sub-autochthonous below-wave base excavation and megabrecciation of sea floor substrata, resulting in a unique 10-30-m-thick spherule-bearing megabreccia marker mapped over a nearly 100-km north-south strike distance in the east Hamersley Basin. The field relations suggest a pretsunami settling of the bulk of the spherules. Tsunami wave effects include: (1). dispersal of the spherule-rich soft upper sea floor sediments as a subaqueous mud cloud and (2). excavation of consolidated substrata below the soft sediment zone. Excavation and megabrecciation included injection of liquefied spherule-bearing microbreccia into dilated fractures in the disrupted underlying carbonates. Near-perfect preservation of the spherules within the

  20. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2008-12-09

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.