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Sample records for botulism immune globulin

  1. Trial of Immune Globulin in Infant Botulism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A 5-year, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the orphan drug Human Botulism Immune Globulin Intravenous (BIG-IV in 122 infants in California with confirmed infant botulism (75 caused by type A Clostridium botulinum toxin, and 47 by type B toxin was conducted at the California Department of Health Services, Richmond, CA; National Botulism Surveillance and Reference Laboratory, CDC and P, Atlanta; and Division of Biostatistics, University of California, Berkeley.

  2. 21 CFR 640.100 - Immune Globulin (Human).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immune Globulin (Human). 640.100 Section 640.100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Immune Globulin (Human) § 640.100 Immune...

  3. BOTULISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anica Berginc Dolenšek

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human botulism is a serious, relatively rare and potencial lethal disease, caused by Clostridium botulinum, a gram positive obligat anaerobic spore forming bacili which strain produced seven potent nevrotoksins (type A-G. It can be found in soil and marine sediment troughout the world and also colonizes the gastrointestinal tract of fishes, birds and mammals.Human botulism is usually caused by neurotoxin type A, B, E and rerely F. Type C, D and E cause illness in mammals, birds and fish. Botulism is not transmitted by human to human contact. More types of botulism are recognised: foodborne botulism, infant botulism, wound botulism, adult infection botulism, inadvertent botulism. Botulism is characterised by simmetrical, descendenting paralisys of motor and autonomic nerves usually beginning with cranial nerves. The pacient alert, afebril and without sensory disturbance. Botulinum toxin is an agent of biological warfare.Conclusions. From 1985 to 2003 are identified 44 cases of foodborn botulism in Slovenia. We described the outbreak of foodborn botulism in family epidemic, which source is domestic raw smoke ham.

  4. 21 CFR 640.102 - Manufacture of Immune Globulin (Human).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manufacture of Immune Globulin (Human). 640.102 Section 640.102 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....102 Manufacture of Immune Globulin (Human). (a) Processing method. The processing method shall be one...

  5. Anti-tetanus toxoid antibodies in intravenous gamma globulin: an alternative to tetanus immune globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D C; Lederman, H M

    1992-09-01

    The levels of anti-tetanus toxoid IgG antibodies were measured in 29 lots of intravenous gamma globulin (IVIG). The antibody levels varied from 4 to 90 IU/mL (geometric mean, 18.6; 90% confidence interval, 9.7-35.7). The variation from manufacturer to manufacturer accounted for most of the observed differences among lots; there was relatively little variability among multiple lots from a single manufacturer. IVIG may be an acceptable alternative to horse or human tetanus immune globulin.

  6. Treatment of neonatal sepsis with intravenous immune globulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brocklehurst, Peter; Farrell, Barbara; King, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a major cause of death and complications despite antibiotic treatment. Effective adjunctive treatments are needed. Newborn infants are relatively deficient in endogenous immunoglobulin. Meta-analyses of trials of intravenous immune globulin for suspected or proven neonatal sepsis...

  7. Dynamic changes of horse serum T-globulin immunization with snake venoms, tetanus and diphtheria toxoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H F; Lee, J D; Lee, Y C

    1979-12-01

    In course of immunizing horses with snake venoms, tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, a new serum component, T-globulin, was formed and migrated between the beta- and gamma-globulins. The T-globulin content was parallel with the antibody titre after the middle course of immunization. There were many components in snake antivenin and T-globulin was composed of most of those components. The components of diphtheria T-globulin were the same as those of crude antitoxin and tetanus T-globulin except one precipitin.

  8. Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

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  9. Labeling of human immune gamma globulin with sup(99m)Tc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, D.W.; Huang, J.T.

    1977-01-01

    Human immune serum gamma globulin and rabbit anti-Stap. aureus antibody have been successfully labeled with sup(99m)Tc at pH 7.4 with an average binding efficiency of 86 and 82%, respectively. The labeled proteins behave similarly to unlabeled gamma-globulin fraction in the normal human serum as demonstrated by protein electrophoresis. The biological half-time of sup(99m)Tc-gamma-globulin in dog has been determined to be 54 min for the fast component and 14.7 hr for a slower component. Immunological assays demonstrate no significant change in antibody activity after labeling process. (author)

  10. Brief Report: Dysregulated Immune System in Children with Autism: Beneficial Effects of Intravenous Immune Globulin on Autistic Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sudhir; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Children (ages 3-12) with autism (n=25) were given intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) treatments at 4-week intervals for at least 6 months. Marked abnormality of immune parameters was observed in subjects, compared to age-matched controls. IVIG treatment resulted in improved eye contact, speech, behavior, echolalia, and other autistic features.…

  11. Immune globulins are effective in severe pediatric Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, E; Shorer, Z; Roifman, C M; Levi, Y; Brand, N; Ravid, S; Murphy, E G

    1997-01-01

    The effect of high-dose intravenous immune globulins was evaluated in an open prospective multicenter study of 26 children with severe Guillain-Barré syndrome. They presented with mild to moderate flaccid weakness of extremities, with cranial nerve involvement (20) and sensory impairment (22). All children rapidly deteriorated in 2-16 days (mean 6) to become bedridden, and 2 children also developed respiratory failure requiring artificial ventilation (Disability Grading Scale 4-5). Immune globulins were then administered at a total dose of 2 gm/kg, on 2 consecutive days, without adverse effects requiring discontinuation of therapy. Marked and rapid improvement was noted in 25 children, who improved by 1 to 2 Disability Grade Scales ventilator. Eighteen children recovered by 2 weeks. The rest recuperated in a period of four months, including a child who was artificially ventilated for 4 weeks. The uniform rapid improvement and recovery associated with immune globulins contrasts with the slow recovery course in severe natural cases. We conclude that immune globulins are effective and safe in severe childhood-onset Guillain-Barré syndrome and therefore may serve as the initial treatment of choice.

  12. Comparison between IV immune globulin (IVIG) and anti-D globulin for treatment of immune thrombocytopenia: a randomized open-label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghbali, Aziz; Azadmanesh, Peyman; Bagheri, Bahador; Taherahmadi, Hasan; Sadeghi Sedeh, Bahman

    2016-08-01

    To compare the effect of IV immune globulin (IVIG) and anti-D globulin (anti-D) for treatment of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children. A randomized, open-label, single-center clinical trial was carried out in Amir-Kabir Hospital (Arak, Iran). The study was performed on 60 children with acute and chronic ITP, aged from 1 to 15 years. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to 50 μg/kg anti-D or 1 g/kg IVIG. Platelet counting was performed at baseline and at 3, 7, and 14 days after treatment termination. Safety assessment was performed in all patients. Anti-D caused a quicker response on the 3rd day of treatment (P anti-D had lower rate of side effects including fever (P anti-D was associated with rapid rise of platelets compared to IVIG. In addition, anti-D treatment had acceptable safety profile. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  13. U.S. vaccine and immune globulin product shortages, 2001-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziesenitz, Victoria C; Mazer-Amirshahi, Maryann; Zocchi, Mark S; Fox, Erin R; May, Larissa S

    2017-11-15

    Trends in shortages of vaccines and immune globulin products from 2001 through 2015 in the United States are described. Drug shortage data from January 2001 through December 2015 were obtained from the University of Utah Drug Information Service. Shortage data for vaccines and immune globulins were analyzed, focusing on the type of product, reason for shortage, shortage duration, shortages requiring vaccine deferral, and whether the drug was a single-source product. Inclusion of the product into the pediatric vaccination schedule was also noted. Of the 2,080 reported drug shortages, 59 (2.8%) were for vaccines and immune globulin products. Of those, 2 shortages (3%) remained active at the end of the study period. The median shortage duration was 16.8 months. The most common products on shortage were viral vaccines (58%), especially hepatitis A, hepatitis B, rabies, and varicella vaccines (4 shortages each). A vaccine deferral was required for 21 shortages (36%), and single-source products were on shortage 30 times (51%). The most common reason for shortage was manufacturing problems (51%), followed by supply-and-demand issues (7%). Thirty shortages (51%) were for products on the pediatric schedule, with a median duration of 21.7 months. Drug shortages of vaccines and immune globulin products accounted for only 2.8% of reported drug shortages within a 15-year period, but about half of these shortages involved products on the pediatric vaccination schedule, which may have significant public health implications. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of immunization on serum γ-globulin levels of calves following whole-body X irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, F.; Mehlhorn, G.; Neumeister, K.; Johannsen, U.; Panndorf, H.

    1980-01-01

    Calves aged 2.5 to 4 months were whole-body X irradiated with mean lethal doses between 1.2 and 1.7 Gy. The effect of different immunization procedures on the irradiation-induced reaction of the serum gamma globulin levels was studied. Immunization 14 and 21 days before irradiation resulted in obvious stimulation gamma globulin production. After parenteral antigen administration the nearly 2 weeks lasting increase of the gamma globulin level rose in the irradiated animals but declined in the sham-irradiated calves. After a lethal dosis of 1.7 Gy there was a decrease of the gamma globulins 3 weeks post irradiation, at the climax of the radiation syndrome. When 1.5 Gy were used the increase of the gamma globulin concentration was observed also after oral administration of the antigen. The response of the irradiated animals in the secondary reaction of the antibody production was most lear after boosting with homologous bacteria. The stimulating effect of the irradiation on the serum globulin levels after immunization prior to irradiation has been attributed to the reaction of the immunoglobulin-producing system to the release of tissue proteins and antigens, respectively

  15. PROPHYLACTIC ADMINISTRATION OF RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS IMMUNE GLOBULIN TO HIGH-RISK INFANTS AND YOUNG-CHILDREN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GROOTHUIS, [No Value; SIMOES, EAF; LEVIN, MJ; HALL, CB; LONG, CE; RODRIGUEZ, WJ; ARROBIO, J; MEISSNER, HC; FULTON, DR; WELLIVER, RC; TRISTRAM, DA; SIBER, GR; PRINCE, GA; VANRADEN, M; HEMMING, VG

    1993-01-01

    Background. Infants with cardiac disease or prematurity are at risk for severe illness caused by respiratory syncytial virus. Immune globulin with a high titer of antibodies against respiratory syncytial virus may offer infants and young children at risk protection from this serious, common

  16. Immune reconstitution with two different rabbit polyclonal anti-thymocytes globulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamoulid, Jamal; Crepin, Thomas; Gaiffe, Emilie; Laheurte, Caroline; Moulin, Bruno; Frimat, Luc; Rieu, Philippe; Mousson, Christiane; Durrbach, Antoine; Heng, Anne-Elisabeth; Rebibou, Jean-Michel; Saas, Philippe; Courivaud, Cécile; Ducloux, Didier

    2017-12-01

    Broad T cell depletion by polyclonal anti-thymocyte globulins (ATG) has been used for many years as a part of immunosuppressive treatment in transplantation. Currently, two different ATG are used in clinical practice, Thymoglobulin and Grafalon. Due to differences in the immunization source, these products contain different specificities and quantity of antibodies. These differences may have clinical consequences. We conducted a nested study in a large prospective multicentric cohort of kidney transplant to determine whether Grafalon-treated and Thymoglobulin-treated patients experience different lymphocyte reconstitution and clinical outcomes. 182 patients matched for age, gender, CMV status, CMV prophylaxis, number of previous transplantation, and maintenance immunosuppressive treatment were included (Thymoglobulin, [n=91]; Grafalon®, [n=91]). One-year post-transplant, recent thymic emigrants were significantly decreased (12±10% vs 21±12%; p<0.001) in Grafalon-treated patients. By contrast, T cell activation (CD38+DR+Ki67+) and senescence (CD8+CD57+CD28-) was increased in Thymoglobulin-treated patients. Compared to Grafalon, Thymoglobulin was not associated with a significantly different rate of acute rejection. CMV disease (p=0.013) was more frequent in Thymoglobulin-treated patients. Grafalon and Thymoglobulin seem to be equivalent to prevent acute rejection. CMV disease is more frequent in Thymoglobulin-treated patients. One year post-transplant immune profile profoundly differs according to the type of ATG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Proposal of abolition of the skin sensitivity test before equine rabies immune globulin application

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    CUPO Palmira

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An epizootic outbreak of rabies occurred in 1995 in Ribeirão Preto, SP, with 58 cases of animal rabies (54 dogs, 3 cats and 1 bat confirmed by the Pasteur Institute of São Paulo, and one human death. The need to provide care to a large number of people for the application of equine rabies immune globulin (ERIG prevented the execution of the skin sensitivity test (SST and often also the execution of desensitization, procedures routinely used up to that time at the Emergency Unit of the University Hospital of the Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo (EU-UHFMRP-USP, a reference hospital for the application of heterologous sera. In view of our positive experience of several years with the abolition of SST and of the use of premedication before the application of antivenom sera, we used a similar schedule for ERIG application. Of the 1489 victims of animal bites, 1054 (71% received ERIG; no patient was submitted to SST and all received intravenously anti-histamines (anti-H1 + anti-H2 and corticosteroids before the procedure. The patients were kept under observation for 60 to 180 minutes and no adverse reaction was observed. On the basis of these results, since December 1995 ERIG application has been decentralized in Ribeirão Preto and has become the responsibility of the Emergency Unit of the University Hospital and the Central Basic Health Unit, where the same routine is used. Since then, 4216 patients have received ERIG (1818 at the Basic Health Unit and 2398 at the EU-UHFMRP, with no problems. The ideal would be the routine use of human rabies immune globulin (HRIG in public health programs, but this is problematic, because of their high cost. However, while this does not occur, the use of SST is no longer justified at the time of application of ERIG, in view of the clinical evidence of low predictive value and low sensitivity of SST involving the application of heterologous sera. It is very important to point out

  18. Potential Confounding of Diagnosis of Rabies in Patients with Recent Receipt of Intravenous Immune Globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Neil M; Orciari, Lillian A; Bertumen, J Bradford; Damon, Inger; Ellison, James A; Fowler, Vance G; Franka, Richard; Petersen, Brett W; Satheshkumar, P S; Schexnayder, Stephen M; Smith, Todd G; Wallace, Ryan M; Weinstein, Susan; Williams, Carl; Yager, Pamela; Niezgoda, Michael

    2018-02-09

    Rabies is an acute encephalitis that is nearly always fatal. It is caused by infection with viruses of the genus Lyssavirus, the most common of which is Rabies lyssavirus. The Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) defines a confirmed human rabies case as an illness compatible with rabies that meets at least one of five different laboratory criteria.* Four of these criteria do not depend on the patient's rabies vaccination status; however, the remaining criterion, "identification of Lyssavirus-specific antibody (i.e. by indirect fluorescent antibody…test or complete [Rabies lyssavirus] neutralization at 1:5 dilution) in the serum," is only considered diagnostic in unvaccinated patients. Lyssavirus-specific antibodies include Rabies lyssavirus-specific binding immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies and Rabies lyssavirus neutralizing antibodies (RLNAs). This report describes six patients who were tested for rabies by CDC and who met CSTE criteria for confirmed human rabies because they had illnesses compatible with rabies, had not been vaccinated for rabies, and were found to have serum RLNAs (with complete Rabies lyssavirus neutralization at a serum dilution of 1:5). An additional four patients are described who were tested for rabies by CDC who were found to have serum RLNAs (with incomplete Rabies lyssavirus neutralization at a serum dilution of 1:5) despite having not been vaccinated for rabies. None of these 10 patients received a rabies diagnosis; rather, they were considered to have been passively immunized against rabies through recent receipt of intravenous immune globulin (IVIG). Serum RLNA test results should be interpreted with caution in patients who have not been vaccinated against rabies but who have recently received IVIG.

  19. Yeast-recombinant hepatitis B vaccine: efficacy with hepatitis B immune globulin in prevention of perinatal hepatitis B virus transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, C.E.; Taylor, P.E.; Tong, M.J.; Toy, P.T.; Vyas, G.N.; Nair, P.V.; Weissman, J.Y.; Krugman, S.

    1987-01-01

    A yeast-recombinant hepatitis B vaccine was licensed recently by the Food and Drug administration and is now available. To assess the efficacy of the yeast-recombinant vaccine, the authors administered the vaccine in combination with hepatitis B immune globulin to high-risk newborns. If infants whose mothers were positive for both hepatitis B surface antigen and the e antigen receive no immunoprophylaxis, 70% to 90% become infected with the virus, and almost all become chronic carriers. Among infants in this study who received hepatitis B immune globulin at birth and three 5- + g doses of yeast-recombinant hepatitis B vaccine, only 4.8% became chronic carriers, a better than 90% level of protection and a rate that is comparable with that seen with immune globulin and plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine. Hepatitis surface antigen and antibodies were detected by radioimmunoassay. These data suggest that, in this high-risk setting, the yeast-recombinant vaccine is as effective as the plasma-derived vaccine in preventing hepatitis B virus infection and the chronic carrier state

  20. Intravenous immune globulin in hereditary inclusion body myopathy: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorward Heidi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary Inclusion Body Myopathy (HIBM is an autosomal recessive, adult onset, non-inflammatory neuromuscular disorder with no effective treatment. The causative gene, GNE, codes for UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase, which catalyzes the first two reactions in the synthesis of sialic acid. Reduced sialylation of muscle glycoproteins, such as α-dystroglycan and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM, has been reported in HIBM. Methods We treated 4 HIBM patients with intravenous immune globulin (IVIG, in order to provide sialic acid, because IgG contains 8 μmol of sialic acid/g. IVIG was infused as a loading dose of 1 g/kg on two consecutive days followed by 3 doses of 400 mg/kg at weekly intervals. Results For all four patients, mean quadriceps strength improved from 19.0 kg at baseline to 23.2 kg (+22% directly after IVIG loading to 25.6 kg (+35% at the end of the study. Mean shoulder strength improved from 4.1 kg at baseline to 5.9 kg (+44% directly after IVIG loading to 6.0 kg (+46% at the end of the study. The composite improvement for 8 other muscle groups was 5% after the initial loading and 19% by the end of the study. Esophageal motility and lingual strength improved in the patients with abnormal barium swallows. Objective measures of functional improvement gave variable results, but the patients experienced improvements in daily activities that they considered clinically significant. Immunohistochemical staining and immunoblotting of muscle biopsies for α-dystroglycan and NCAM did not provide consistent evidence for increased sialylation after IVIG treatment. Side effects were limited to transient headaches and vomiting. Conclusion The mild benefits in muscle strength experienced by HIBM patients after IVIG treatment may be related to the provision of sialic acid supplied by IVIG. Other sources of sialic acid are being explored as treatment options for HIBM.

  1. Clinical outcomes after hepatitis C infection from contaminated anti-D immune globulin. Irish Hepatology Research Group.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kenny-Walsh, E

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: In February 1994, batches of anti-D immune globulin used in Ireland during 1977 and 1978 to prevent Rh isoimmunization were found to be contaminated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) from a single infected donor. In March 1994, a national screening program was initiated for all women who had received anti-D immune globulin between 1970 and 1994. Of the 62,667 women who had been screened when this study began, 704 (1.1 percent) had evidence of past or current HCV infection, and 390 of those 704 (55 percent) had positive tests for serum HCV RNA on reverse-transcription-polymerase-chain-reaction analysis. All 390 were offered a referral for clinical assessment and therapy. We evaluated 376 of these 390 women (96 percent); the other 14 were not seen at one of the designated treatment centers. RESULTS: The mean (+\\/-SD) age of the 376 women was 45+\\/-6 years at the time of screening. They had been infected with hepatitis C for about 17 years. A total of 304 women (81 percent) reported symptoms, most commonly fatigue (248 [66 percent]). Serum alanine aminotransferase concentrations were slightly elevated (40 to 99 U per liter) in 176 of 371 women (47 percent), and the concentrations were 100 U per liter or higher in 31 (8 percent). Liver biopsies showed inflammation in 356 of 363 women (98 percent); in most cases the inflammation was slight (41 percent) or moderate (52 percent). Although the biopsy samples from 186 of the 363 women (51 percent) showed evidence of fibrosis, only 7 women (2 percent) had probable or definite cirrhosis. Two of the seven reported excessive alcohol consumption. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the women with HCV infection 17 years after receiving HCV-contaminated anti-D immune globulin had evidence of slight or moderate hepatic inflammation on liver biopsy, about half had fibrosis, and 2 percent had probable or definite cirrhosis.

  2. Infant botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your infant has symptoms of botulism. Prevention In theory, the disease might be avoided by preventing exposure ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  3. High dose Intravenous Anti-D Immune Globulin is More Effective and Safe in Indian Paediatric Patients of Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Trupti Rekha; Jena, Rabindra Kumar; Swain, Kali Prasanna

    2016-12-01

    Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) is characterised by an autoimmune antibody-mediated destruction of platelets and impaired platelet production. Few controlled trials exist to guide management of patients with ITP in Indian scenario for which patients require an individualized approach. Anti-D (Rho (D) immune globulin) at a higher dose can prove to be a cost effective and safe alternative for Indian patients with ITP. To compare the safety and efficacy of higher dose (75μg/kg) intravenous Anti-D immune globulin against the standard dose of 50μg/kg for the management of ITP in Indian patients. One hundred and sixty four children with newly diagnosed ITP between 4-14 years were randomly selected for inclusion and were treated with 50μg/kg (standard dose) or 75μg /kg (higher dose) of Anti-D to compare the efficacy and safety of higher dose intravenous anti-D immune globulin. Efficacy of Anti-D was measured in terms of rate of response and median time to response for increase in platelet counts. Any adverse event was noted. A decrease in haemoglobin concentration suggested accompanying haemolysis. Seventy one out of 84 patients treated with Anti-D at 75μg/kg produced complete response (85%) with median time of response being 2.5 days. On the contrary, 45 patients (70%) patients treated with 50μg/kg had complete response. However, there was no significant increase in haemolysis with higher dose. A significant correlation was found between dose and peak increase in platelet count measured at 7 th day following administration. However, there was no relationship between the decrease in haemoglobin and the dose given, or between the increase in platelet count and fall in haemoglobin. A 75μg/kg dose of Anti-D is more effective with acceptable side effect in comparison to 50μg dose for treatment of newly diagnosed Indian patients of ITP.

  4. Study of in vivo movement of globulin-S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Junji; Kiyoki, Mamoru; Miura, Shuji; Fukushima, Hisashi; Naruchi, Tatsuyuki

    1978-01-01

    A quantity of human immune globulin in blood after globulin-S (S-sulfonated globulin ( GGS] for intravenous injection) was given to rat intravenously was 80% of administration dosage one hour the administration, 37% 24 hours, and 7% 29 days. The half life for 24 hours after the administration was about 17 hours. The half life after the distribution of globulin-S in blood and tissues had reached equilibrium was 13 days. The pool of human immune globulin in blood at this time was 54%. The peak of distribution amount of globulin-S in tissues appeared 6 hours after the administration in each tissues. The distribution amount in each tissues after that time changed in parallel with the concentration of globulin-S in blood. The pool of human immune globulin in tissues was 10% in the liver, 3% in the lung, and 2% in the kidney, 99% of sulfo was separated for 24 hours after the administration. The amount of ( 25 S] in blood decreased rapidly during a short time after the administration, and it decreased to 9% of ( 35 S] administered as 35 SGGS 2 hours after the administration. The amount of 35 SGGS distributed in each tissues reached its peak 2 hours after the administration, and hereafter it decreased rapidly in parallel with the amount of 35 SGGS distributed in blood. 85% and 11% of administered radioactivity were excreted in urine and stool, respectively, for 5 days after the intravenous administration of 35 SGGS. 7.7% of the administration dosage of 35 SGGS was excreted in bile for 24 hours after the administration. (Tsunoda, M.)

  5. Simultaneous passive and active immunization against hepatitis B: noninterference of hepatitis B immune globulin with the anti-HBs response to reduced doses of heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelie, P. N.; Reesink, H. W.; Grijm, R.; de Jong-van Manen, S. T.; Reerink-Brongers, E. E.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of simultaneous administration of hepatitis B immune globulin on the antibody response to a low dose of heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine was investigated in 175 health care workers. Subjects were divided into four groups: Groups I and II received 3 monthly injections of a reduced dose

  6. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Compartir This video describes the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, plague, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic fevers. ... Specific Segments of the Program Overview Anthrax Plague Smallpox Botulism Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers Tularemia Note: Parts of ...

  7. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... describes the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, plague, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic fevers. If these germs ... Watch Specific Segments of the Program Overview Anthrax Plague Smallpox Botulism Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers Tularemia Note: Parts ...

  8. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, plague, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic fevers. If these germs were ... Overview Anthrax Plague Smallpox Botulism Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers Tularemia Note: Parts of this video were adapted from " ...

  9. Home Canning and Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Home Canning and Botulism Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... myself and others safe when it comes to home-canned foods? Many cases of foodborne botulism have ...

  10. Synthesis and preliminary study of 99mTc-mercaptoacetyl-triglycine (99mTc-MAG3) for radiolabeling of immune globulins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, L.; Navarrete, M.

    2001-01-01

    The synthesis of a complex molecule with its coordination center composed by a triamide monomercaptide tetradentate set of donor groups plus a phenyl-acetyl group as protector group of a sulphur atom is reported. This compound has been mixed with immune globulin G, labeled with 99m Tc and purified by high resolution liquid chromatography (HRLC). The biological behavior of this labeled compound was evaluated with mice of Balb-C origin, showing the biological properties of a protein. This molecule might be another option for radio-immuno-scintigraphic analysis when using proteins of antigenic nature. (author)

  11. Purification of equine Gc-globulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houen, Gunnar; Pihl, Tina Holberg; Andersen, Pia Haubro

    Objectives With the aim of producing antibodies for an equine Group specific component (Gc)-globulin assay, the protein was purified from normal equine plasma. Methods Equine Gc-globulin was purified from healthy horse plasma using ion exchange chromatography (Q-Sepharose, CM......-Sepharose) and preparative PAGE. Results Equine Gc-globulin has successfully been purified from healthy horse plasma and rabbits and mice are being immunized to produce specific antibodies. Conclusions Purification of equine Gc-globulin and the production of specific antibodies will make it possible to develop an assay...... to be a sensitive marker of acute tissue injury and fatal outcome in humans. Patients with a low plasma concentration of Gc-globulin due to severe tissue injury might potentially benefit from infusions with purified Gc-globulin [1]. With an equine Gc-globulin assay, future studies will investigate the concentration...

  12. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... Response Worker Health and Safety Reaching At-Risk Populations Health Alert Network (HAN) Laboratory Information Social Media ... Share Compartir This video describes the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, plague, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic ...

  13. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... botulism, plague, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic fevers. If these germs were used to intentionally infect people, they ... Watch this video to learn how some of these agents have been or can be used as ...

  14. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This video describes the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, plague, tularemia, and ... Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Centers for ...

  15. A simple and rapid Hepatitis A Virus (HAV titration assay based on antibiotic resistance of infected cells: evaluation of the HAV neutralization potency of human immune globulin preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan Gerardo G

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis A virus (HAV, the causative agent of acute hepatitis in humans, is an atypical Picornaviridae that grows poorly in cell culture. HAV titrations are laborious and time-consuming because the virus in general does not cause cytopathic effect and is detected by immunochemical or molecular probes. Simple HAV titration assays could be developed using currently available viral construct containing selectable markers. Results We developed an antibiotic resistance titration assay (ARTA based on the infection of human hepatoma cells with a wild type HAV construct containing a blasticidin (Bsd resistance gene. Human hepatoma cells infected with the HAV-Bsd construct survived selection with 2 μg/ml of blasticidin whereas uninfected cells died within a few days. At 8 days postinfection, the color of the pH indicator phenol red in cell culture media correlated with the presence of HAV-Bsd-infected blasticidin-resistant cells: an orange-to-yellow color indicated the presence of growing cells whereas a pink-to-purple color indicated that the cells were dead. HAV-Bsd titers were determined by an endpoint dilution assay based on the color of the cell culture medium scoring orange-to-yellow wells as positive and pink-to-purple wells as negative for HAV. As a proof-of-concept, we used the ARTA to evaluate the HAV neutralization potency of two commercially available human immune globulin (IG preparations and a WHO International Standard for anti-HAV. The three IG preparations contained comparable levels of anti-HAV antibodies that neutralized approximately 1.5 log of HAV-Bsd. Similar neutralization results were obtained in the absence of blasticidin by an endpoint dilution ELISA at 2 weeks postinfection. Conclusion The ARTA is a simple and rapid method to determine HAV titers without using HAV-specific probes. We determined the HAV neutralization potency of human IG preparations in 8 days by ARTA compared to the 14 days required by the

  16. Estimated protective effectiveness of intramuscular immune serum globulin post-exposure prophylaxis during a measles outbreak in British Columbia, Canada, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, Mark; Murti, Michelle; Fung, Christina; Hemming, Felicity; Loadman, Susan; Stam, Robert; Van Buynder, Paul; Lem, Marcus

    2017-05-09

    Intramuscular Immune Serum Globulin (IM ISG) is recommended as post-measles exposure prophylaxis (PEP) when administered within 6days of initial exposure, with variable effectiveness in preventing measles disease. Effectiveness of IM ISG PEP in preventing clinical measles was assessed during a 2014 measles outbreak among a religious-affiliated community in British Columbia, Canada. Fifty-five self-reporting measles susceptible contacts were offered exclusively IM ISG PEP within an eligibility period best surmised to be within 6days of initial measles case exposure. Clinical outcome of IM ISG PEP recipients was determined by selective active surveillance and case self-reporting. IM ISG PEP failure was defined as onset of a measles-like rash 8-21days post-IM ISG PEP. Post-IM ISG PEP measles IgG antibody level was tested in 8 recipients. Factors associated with measles disease were analyzed. Seventeen of 55 IM ISG PEP recipients developed clinically consistent measles in the following 8-21days, corresponding to an estimated crude protective effectiveness of 69%. In school aged children 5-18years, among whom potential exposure intensity and immune status confounders were considered less likely, estimated IM ISG PEP protective effectiveness was 50%. Age effectiveness against measles disease within 8-21days post-ISG administration was 69%. Accuracy of this estimated protective effectiveness is vulnerable to assumptions and uncertainties in ascertaining exposure details and pre-exposure immune status. Increasing the Canadian recommended measles IM ISG PEP dose from 0.25 to 0.5ml/kg (up to 15ml maximum volume) may increase protective effectiveness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Age and Early Graft Function Relate With Risk-Benefit Ratio of Allogenic Islet Transplantation Under Antithymocyte Globulin-Mycophenolate Mofetil-Tacrolimus Immune Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, DaHae; Keymeulen, Bart; Hilbrands, Robert; Ling, Zhidong; Van de Velde, Ursule; Jacobs-Tulleneers-Thevissen, Daniel; Maleux, Geert; Lapauw, Bruno; Crenier, Laurent; De Block, Christophe; Mathieu, Chantal; Pipeleers, Daniel; Gillard, Pieter

    2017-09-01

    Induction therapy with a T cell-depleting agent followed by mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus is presently the most frequently used immune suppression (IS) regimen in islet transplantation. This study assesses its safety and tolerability in nonuremic type 1 diabetic recipients. Fifty-one patients (age, between 29 and 63 years) with high glycemic variability and problematic hypoglycemia received intraportal islet grafts under anti-thymocyte globulin-mycophenolate mofetil-tacrolimus protocol. They were followed up for over 48 months for function of the implant and adverse events. Severe hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis were absent in patients with functioning graft. Immune suppressive therapy was maintained for 48 months in 29 recipients with sustained function (group A), whereas 16 patients stopped earlier due to graft failure (group B) and in 6 for other reasons. Group A was significantly older at the time of implantation and achieved higher graft function at posttransplantation month 6 under similar dose of IS. Prevalence of IS-related side effects was similar in groups A and B, occurring predominantly during the first year posttransplantation. IS-related serious adverse events (SAE) were reported in 47% of patients, with 4 presenting with cytomegalovirus infection and 4 (age, 42-59 years) diagnosed with cancer. Except in 1 patient with cancer, all SAEs resolved after appropriate treatment. These risk/benefit data serve as a basis for clinical decision-making before entering an intraportal islet transplantation protocol. A longer benefit is observed in recipients of higher age (≥40 years), but it is not associated with more side effects and SAE.

  18. Unexpected suppression of anti-Fya and prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn after administration of Rh immune globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Donald R; Scofield, Terry L; Moulds, John J; Swanson, Jane L

    2011-04-01

    Rh immune globulin (RhIG) has been used successfully for many years for the antenatal suppression of anti-D in D- mothers carrying D+ babies to prevent hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Although the mechanism of RhIG-induced immunosuppression remains unknown, a recent report (TRANSFUSION 2006;46:1316-22) has shown that women receiving RhIG produce elevated levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)β-1, a powerful immunosuppressant cytokine. It was suggested that induction of TGFβ-1 and immunosuppression may be independent of cognate antigen recognition by RhIG. Herein, we present a description of a mother and baby that supports this hypothesis. Red blood cells and serum were analyzed using saline-tube indirect antiglobulin test methods. RhIG (RhoGAM) was administered after each amniocentesis performed at 28, 31, and 36 weeks' gestation. A group A, D-(cde), K+, Fy(a-b+), MNs, Jk(a+b+) mother with no detectable anti-D had an anti-Fy(a) titer of 4096 before RhIG but only 256 after RhIG. Mother gave birth to a group O, D-(cde), Fy(a+b+) healthy baby boy having a weak-positive direct antiglobulin test with anti-Fy(a) eluted from his cells and the titer in the cord serum was 4. This case demonstrates the potential immunosuppressive properties of RhIG for down regulation of a possible clinically significant alloantibody, not anti-D, where no D+ antigen is in the circulation of the mother. The case illustrates the potential utility for using RhIG to modulate antibody levels in situations other than for classical suppression of anti-D production. Although the mechanism in this case is unknown, TGFβ-1-mediated or antibody-mediated immunosuppression to soluble nonparticulate antigens are possible mechanisms. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  19. SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Send Us Your Feedback ... As Testosterone-estrogen Binding Globulin TeBG Formal Name Sex Hormone Binding Globulin This article was last reviewed ...

  20. An Outbreak of Foodborne Botulism in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona R Loutfy

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a rare paralytic illness resulting from a potent neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum. Botulism in Canada is predominately due to C botulinum type E and affects mainly the First Nations and Inuit populations. The most recent outbreak of botulism in Ontario was in Ottawa in 1991 and was caused by C botulinum type A. We report an outbreak of foodborne type B botulism in Ontario, which implicated home-canned tomatoes. The outbreak was characterized by mild symptoms in two cases and moderately severe illness in one case. The investigation shows the importance of considering the diagnosis of botulism in patients presenting with cranial nerve and autonomic dysfunction, especially when combined with gastrointestinal complaints; it also highlights the importance of proper home canning technique.

  1. Botulism: A Frequently Forgotten Old Malady

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teguh Thajeb

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A frequently forgotten old malady called botulism has been recognized for more than a century. This ailment occurs worldwide, afflicts human of all age groups from infants to elderly and affects Oriental people more often in several regions of China. Occurrence in Taiwan is uncommon, and therefore, it is often overlooked. The outbreaks of human botulism in various regions of the world, the clinical types, the molecular mechanisms, and the electrophysiologic findings will be highlighted.

  2. Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... seafood. However, the disease has also occurred from chili peppers, foil-wrapped baked potatoes and oil infused ... people who inject black tar heroin. Are there benefits to botulinum toxin? You might wonder how something ...

  3. Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vegetables, cured pork and ham, smoked or raw fish, and honey or corn syrup, baked potatoes cooked ... infection. In adults, symptoms may include: Abdominal cramps Breathing difficulty that may lead to respiratory failure Difficulty ...

  4. The Workshop on Animal Botulism in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarin, Hanna; Tevell Åberg, Annica; Woudstra, Cédric

    2013-01-01

    . Animal botulism is underreported and underdiagnosed, but an increasing number of reports, as well as the information gathered from this workshop, show that it is an emerging problem in Europe. The workshop was divided into 4 sessions: animal botulism in Europe, the bacteria behind the disease, detection...... and diagnostics, and European collaboration and surveillance. An electronic survey was conducted before the workshop to identify the 3 most needed discussion points, which were: prevention, preparedness and outbreak response; detection and diagnostics; and European collaboration and surveillance. The main...

  5. Admission levels of serum Gc-globulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiødt, F V; Bondesen, S; Petersen, I

    1996-01-01

    Gc-globulin scavenges actin released from necrotic hepatocytes to the extracellular space. In 77 patients with fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) (excluding patients treated with liver transplantation), admission levels of serum Gc-globulin and degree of complexing with monomeric actin (complex ratio...... in the same range as the KCH criteria. An advantage of Gc-globulin is that it gives an estimate of the outcome already on admission. Acute liver transplantation should be considered in FHF patients with Gc-globulin less than 100 mg/L....

  6. Fatal outbreak of botulism in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Tóra Hedinsdottir; Jespersen, Sanne; Kanstrup, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    respiratory muscle paralysis. We present five cases of foodborne botulism occurring in Greenland, two with fatal outcome, caused by ingestion of tradionally preserved eider fowl. In the cases of the survivors, antitoxin and supportive care, including mechanical ventilation, were administered. In these cases...

  7. Botulismo de origem alimentar Foodbourne botulism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Deboni Cereser

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O botulismo alimentar ocorre pela ingestão de toxinas pré-formadas pelo Clostridium botulinum, consideradas as mais potentes dentre as toxinas conhecidas. Caracteriza-se como uma doença de extrema gravidade, de evolução aguda, provoca distúrbios digestivos e neurológicos, em conseqüência à ingestão de diversos tipos de alimentos. As conservas caseiras estão entre os alimentos que oferecem maior risco à população consumidora. Os produtos de origem animal são frequentemente associados aos surtos da doença, destacando-se os embutidos, tais como salsichas, salames, presuntos e patês. Derivados do leite e enlatados, bem como produtos fermentados, são passíveis de provocar a intoxicação. As outras formas naturais da doença são botulismo por feridas e botulismo infantil, normalmente associado ao consumo de mel contendo esporos do Clostridium botulinum.Foodbourne botulism occurs after ingestion of preformed toxins produced by the Clostridium botulinum, which has been considered one of the most potent known one. The disease, acquired after ingestion of various kinds of foods, has acute character, and provokes gastrointestinal and neurologic symptoms. Homemade canned foods are those that represent higher risk to human health. Processed meat products are frequently associated with botulism outbreaks, mainly sausages, ham and pates. Dairy and canned food, as well as fermented foods, also may be related with this disease. Still, botulism may be caused by toxin production in deep wound, named wound botulism; and after ingestion of honey contaminated with spores by infants, named infant botulism.

  8. Sex hormone binding globulin phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelisse, M M; Bennett, Patrick; Christiansen, M

    1994-01-01

    Human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is encoded by a normal and a variant allele. The resulting SHBG phenotypes (the homozygous normal SHBG, the heterozygous SHBG and the homozygous variant SHBG phenotype) can be distinguished by their electrophoretic patterns. We developed a novel detection....... This method of detection was used to determine the distribution of SHBG phenotypes in healthy controls of both sexes and in five different pathological conditions characterized by changes in the SHBG level or endocrine disturbances (malignant and benign ovarian neoplasms, hirsutism, liver cirrhosis...... on the experimental values. Differences in SHBG phenotypes do not appear to have any clinical significance and no sex difference was found in the SHBG phenotype distribution....

  9. Botulism mortality in the USA, 1975-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kelly A; Mahon, Barbara E; Copeland, John; Fagan, Ryan P

    2015-01-01

    Botulism had mortality rates >60% before the 1950s. We reviewed confirmed botulism cases in the USA during 1975-2009 including infant, foodborne, wound, and other/unknown acquisition categories, and calculated mortality ratios. We created a multivariate logistic regression model for non-infant cases (foodborne, wound, and other/unknown). Overall mortality was 3.0% with 109 botulism-related deaths among 3,618 botulism cases [18 (<1%) deaths among 2,352 infant botulism cases, 61 (7.1%) deaths among 854 foodborne botulism cases, 18 (5.0%) deaths among 359 wound botulism cases, and 12 (22.6%) deaths among 53 other/unknown botulism cases]. Mortality among all cases increased with age; it was lowest among infants (0.8%) and highest among persons ≥80 years old (34.4%). Toxin type F had higher mortality (13.8%) than types A, B, or E (range, 1.4% to 4.1%). Efforts to reduce botulism mortality should target non-infant transmission categories and older adults.

  10. Botulism mortality in the USA, 1975–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kelly A.; Mahon, Barbara E.; Copeland, John; Fagan, Ryan P.

    2017-01-01

    Botulism had mortality rates >60% before the 1950s. We reviewed confirmed botulism cases in the USA during 1975–2009 including infant, foodborne, wound, and other/unknown acquisition categories, and calculated mortality ratios. We created a multivariate logistic regression model for non-infant cases (foodborne, wound, and other/unknown). Overall mortality was 3.0% with 109 botulism-related deaths among 3,618 botulism cases [18 (<1%) deaths among 2,352 infant botulism cases, 61 (7.1%) deaths among 854 foodborne botulism cases, 18 (5.0%) deaths among 359 wound botulism cases, and 12 (22.6%) deaths among 53 other/unknown botulism cases]. Mortality among all cases increased with age; it was lowest among infants (0.8%) and highest among persons ≥80 years old (34.4%). Toxin type F had higher mortality (13.8%) than types A, B, or E (range, 1.4% to 4.1%). Efforts to reduce botulism mortality should target non-infant transmission categories and older adults. PMID:28603554

  11. Botulinum Neurotoxins and Botulism: A Novel Therapeutic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanpen Chaicumpa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Specific treatment is not available for human botulism. Current remedial mainstay is the passive administration of polyclonal antibody to botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT derived from heterologous species (immunized animal or mouse hybridoma together with supportive and symptomatic management. The antibody works extracellularly, probably by blocking the binding of receptor binding (R domain to the neuronal receptors; thus inhibiting cellular entry of the holo-BoNT. The antibody cannot neutralize the intracellular toxin. Moreover, a conventional antibody with relatively large molecular size (150 kDa is not accessible to the enzymatic groove and, thus, cannot directly inhibit the BoNT zinc metalloprotease activity. Recently, a 15–20 kDa single domain antibody (VHH that binds specifically to light chain of BoNT serotype A was produced from a humanized-camel VH/VHH phage display library. The VHH has high sequence homology (>80% to the human VH and could block the enzymatic activity of the BoNT. Molecular docking revealed not only the interface binding between the VHH and the toxin but also an insertion of the VHH CDR3 into the toxin enzymatic pocket. It is envisaged that, by molecular linking the VHH to a cell penetrating peptide (CPP, the CPP-VHH fusion protein would be able to traverse the hydrophobic cell membrane into the cytoplasm and inhibit the intracellular BoNT. This presents a novel and safe immunotherapeutic strategy for botulism by using a cell penetrating, humanized-single domain antibody that inhibits the BoNT by means of a direct blockade of the groove of the menace enzyme.

  12. Neuronal Functions Associated with Endo- and Exocytotic Events-cum-Molecular Trafficking May Be Cell Maturation-Dependent: Lessons Learned from Studies on Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum type A progenitor toxins . Infect Immun 64:1589–1594 Li L, Singh BR (1999) Structure -function relationship of clostridial...experimental design and demonstration of the validity of the targeted neurologic therapeutic delivery approach based on recombinant botulinum toxin ...Endocytosis Exocytosis Molecular trafficking Cell maturation Botulism Targeted therapeutic Background Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced by

  13. [Botulism. Therapeutic management. Apropos of 36 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudre, Y; Becq-Giraudon, B; Boutaud, P h

    1975-03-08

    Botulism is relatively common in the Vienne department as we have observed 36 cases over a peroid of 7 years. Other French cases, published over the last 10 years, included 10 to 19 cases in the largest series. In a total of 10 series, there were 105 cases. Botulism is caused, in most cases, by eating ham prepared on the farm. It gives rise to the usual clinical picture including paralysis of accommodation, dysphagia, digestive symptoms with abdominal pain and constipation and finally, bladder paralysis. The mild forms are fairly common. We did not observe any severe cases. Our patients were treated in two homogeneous series of 17 cases each ; two patients were given no treatment. Patients treated by sero-anatoxin therapy according to classical methods, evolved towards a cure within 21 days on average. Patients treated by sulfguanidin were cured within 24 days. This study permitted us to confirm that sero-anatoxin therapy is not essential. The disadvantages are the number of injections, the possibility of sometimes fatal hyper-sensitive reactions which, in the opinion of many authors, justifies routine cover with cortisone. This attitude does not seem to us justified owing to the usually benign nature of the botulism. The treatment with sulfaguanidin is well tolerated and is not of any risk to the patient.

  14. Gc globulin as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Tina Holberg

    can prevent development of shock and thereby increase survival chances. The in vivo toxicity of Gc-globulin infusion is currently being investigated in horses and other species. Gc-globulin has been demonstrated in horse plasma and its structure closely resembles that of human Gc-globulin. Gc......-globulin concentrations in horses under clinical conditions have never previously been investigated. The Ph.D. project focuses on Gc-globulin as a prognostic marker in horses with acute abdominal pain....

  15. Profile of total protein, albumin, globulin and albumin globulin ratio in bulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Zahidah Irfan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Determination of serum total protein concentration and main fractions (albumin and globulin can be used as an important diagnostic tool in clinical biochemistry. Several factors can affect the concentration of total protein, albumin, globulin and albumin globulin ratio (A/G. The aim of this study is to obtain serum protein profiles, albumin, globulin and A/G ratio based on breed, age and BCS (body condition score. Blood samples from 160 bulls were collected. Blood chemistry were analyzed by photometer principle using a commercial kit. There were significant (P<0.001 breed variation on total protein, albumin, globulin and albumin globulin ratio. Significant age differences were observed on total protein and albumin concentration (P<0.001, while globulin concentration and A/G ratio were also significant (P<0.05. Amongs groups of BCS, significant difference was verified only in the albumin concentration (P<0.05. The concentration of total proteins, albumins and globulins in the serum of the bulls are higher than standard values for cattle, while A/G ratio is lower.

  16. Effect of Co-60 irradiation on hyperimmune antimeningococcus globulins-gamma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galguera, M.; Le Riverand, E.; Padron, S.

    1990-01-01

    Globulins-gamma from voluntary blood donors immunized with the Cuban BC antimeningococcus vaccine is now being used in our country for the treatment of the meningococcus disease. This study of the effect of Co-60 irradiation on antimeningococcus globulins-gamma was carried out to try to eliminate the inconvenience shown by the traditionally used sterilization procedures (losses in the filter and persistence of viral contamination). globulins-gamma was obtained by ethanol fractionation and was irradiated at a different dose in solution with different stabilizers and it was also lyophilized. Results of the chemical controls carried out lead to the conclusion that it is possible to use radiosterilization on this product in a lyophilized form. The preservation of bactericidal activity, even after the highest irradiation doses, confirms the above mentioned. 13 refs

  17. THE COLLOIDAL BEHAVIOR OF SERUM GLOBULIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, David I.

    1922-01-01

    1. The globulin prepared from ox serum by dilution and precipitation with carbon dioxide has been found, by electrometric titration experiments, to behave like an amphoteric electrolyte, reacting stoichiometrically with acids and bases. 2. The potential difference developed between a solution of globulin chloride, phosphate, or acetate and a solution of the corresponding acid, free from protein, separated from the globulin by a collodion membrane, was found to be influenced by hydrogen ion concentration and salt concentration in the way predicted by Donnan's theory of membrane equilibrium. In experiments with sodium globulinate and sodium hydroxide it was found that the potential difference could be similarly explained. 3. The osmotic pressure of such solutions could be qualitatively accounted for by the Donnan theory, but exhibited a discrepancy which is explicable by analogy with certain experiments of Loeb on gelatin. 4. The application of Loeb's theory of colloidal behavior, which had previously been found to hold in the case of gelatin, casein, egg albumin, and edestin, has thus been extended to another protein, serum globulin. PMID:19871977

  18. Nanotechnology Laboratory Collaborates with Army to Develop Botulism Vaccine | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL) is collaborating with the Army to develop a candidate vaccine against botulism. Under a collaboration agreement between the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of

  19. Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  20. [A case of foodborne botulism in the province of Viterbo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Verginelli

    2016-06-01

    The present article follows the diagnostic therapeutic pathway of the patient, highlighting the critical points not only related to the clinic but also to the ministerial procedures for reporting a case of botulism. This case provides an opportunity to emphasize the need for greater awareness about how to prevent and correctly manage the cases of botulism, both by the general population and by physicians who faced a patient with suspected poisoning by Botulinum toxin. [Article in Italian

  1. [Two horses with neurological symptoms: could this be equine botulism?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roest, H I J; de Bruijn, C M; Picavet, M T J E; Prins, B; Parmentier, D; de Zwart, G M A M; Dijkstra, Y E; van Zijderveld, F G

    2009-10-01

    Symptoms, diagnosis and therapy of equine botulism are discussed by the presentation of two detailed reports of horses with neurological symptoms and the results of laboratory investigations over the period 2003-2008 in the Netherlands. In addition a brief summary of the available literature is presented. Prevailing symptoms of botulism in horses include paralysis of the tongue, salvation, dysphagia and paresis and paralysis of the skeletal muscles, as well as signs of colic. Symptoms and prognosis vary with the amount of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) involved. For early clinical diagnosis of botulism thorough investigation of the facial nerves is important, for instance by the use of the 'Tongue Stress Test'. Laboratory results often remain negative, probably due to the sampling time, the high sensitivity of horses for botulinum neurotoxin or treatment with antitoxins. Most clinical cases in horses are caused by botulinum neurotoxin B (BoNT/B). For therapy to be successful antiserum needs to be administered in the earliest possible stage of the disease and this should be supported by symptomatic therapy. Botulism is a feed-related intoxication caused by either carcasses in the roughage or BoNT/B production after poor conservation of grass silage. This is the main source of botulism in horses due to the popularity of individually packed grass silage as feed for horses. As long as no vaccine is available in the Netherlands quality control of silage and haylage is strictly recommended in order to reduce the risk of botulism in horses.

  2. Hematologic and biochemistry values for black-faced spoonbills (Platalea minor) with and recovering from botulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shih-Jen; Shieh, Yao-Ching; Yu, Chang-You

    2008-07-01

    Type C1 botulism outbreaks in Black-faced Spoonbills (Platalea minor) occurred in Taiwan from 2002 to 2003, and hematologic and biochemistry parameters from botulism-paralyzed birds and recovered birds were compared. Values for creatinine and uric acid were higher (Pbirds with botulism than in recovered birds. Lower white blood cell counts (Pbirds. Based on these observations, we suggest that hematologic and biochemistry analyses should be performed to assess the health condition of birds recovering from botulism.

  3. A bibliography of references to avian botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jack E.; Wilson, Sonoma S.

    1977-01-01

    This bibliography, first compiled in 1970 in response to many requests for information on avian botulism, has been updated to include the literature published through 1975.In general, only articles dealing primarily with the avian disease are included, as opposed to those concerned with various aspects of the biology of Clostridium botulinum, either type C or type E. A few exceptions, such as Bengton’s report of the first isolation and description of the type C organism, are included for their historical interest. Progress reports and other administrative documents not available for distribution or request are excluded, as are textbook accounts, which are generally summaries of work published elsewhere.Although Mr. Allen and Mrs. Wilson have attempted to list every important reference, they make no claim to complete coverage of the published literature. The authors will be grateful to users of the bibliography who call attention to errors or omissions.

  4. Preparation of anti-CEA and anti-goat γ-globulin sera for radioimmunologic assay of carcinoembryonic antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusnierczyk-Glazman, H.; Breborowicz, J.

    1977-01-01

    Goats were immunized with purified carcinoembryonic antigen, and the suitability of the antisera for clinical assays of carcinoembryonic antigen was characterized. Reactivity of equine sera to goat γ-globulin as a precipitating factor in the radioimmunologic double antibody technique was also evaluated. (author)

  5. Extraction and characterization of chickpea (Cicer arietinum) albumin and globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L H; Hung, T V; Bennett, L

    2008-06-01

    Albumin and globulin fractions of 1 Desi and 2 Kabuli varieties of chickpeas (Cicer arietinum) were extracted with water and salt solutions (K(2)SO(4) and NaCl). The extractable yields and particularly the albumin-globulin ratio varied greatly with the extraction medium and chickpea variety. Depending on the procedure employed, albumin could be extracted as a major fraction of chickpea proteins. Higher levels of essential amino acids and sulfur containing amino acids were found in albumins than in globulins of all chickpeas investigated. The common structural characteristics of both Kabuli and Desi chickpea albumins and globulins were clearly identified by densitometric profiles of their sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel patterns. Albumins contained subunits with higher molecular weights than those of globulins. The in vitro digestibility of the chickpea proteins by papain, pepsin, chymotrypsin, and trypsin indicated that globulins were more susceptible to proteolytic hydrolysis.

  6. What not to say: risk communication for botulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glik, Deborah C; Drury, Allison; Cavanaugh, Clint; Shoaf, Kimberley

    2008-03-01

    This formative research study used qualitative methods to test the suitability of messages about botulism for the general public. Nine focus group interviews and 27 cognitive interviews were conducted with diverse audiences to pretest radio, television, and fact sheet messages predicated on a hypothetical terrorist attack using botulinum toxin. Narrative data were collected, transcribed, coded, and analyzed using content domains based on risk and health communication theories. While participants accepted the need for materials, the messages produced contained images and references describing botulism as a toxin-caused illness spread both by food and water contamination as well as by airborne means. The audience's lack of understanding of the term toxin and an imperfect understanding of airborne transmission of a toxic substance meant that some people interpreted botulism as being an infectious disease rather than a type of poisoning. The communication materials did not clearly show how the set of botulism symptoms are unique and described the anti-toxin as "not a cure," thus compounding the audience's misunderstanding. Using models from cognitive and developmental psychology, our findings were interpreted to show that certain terms evoke or elicit long-held conceptual frameworks that lay audiences use to explain medical phenomena. Relevant to botulism, poisoning events are distinct from infectious diseases, but prepared messages did not reinforce these distinctions. Ignoring how people organize preexisting health information when trying to communicate new information is a prescription for failure, especially in a crisis risk communication scenario. Findings from this study have been used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to reformulate pre-event crisis risk communication materials for botulism.

  7. The interaction of radiographic contrast media with immune globulins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, K.

    1983-01-01

    As a special form of contrast medium incidents, various reaction modes between iodinated contrast media and immunoglobulins are described. Theoretical explanations and typical examples are given for each of the four different possible action mechanisms. Diagnostic precautions are proposed in order to avoid unfavourable reactions especially with paraproteins. Special attention is drawn to the antigen-antibody like reaction between iodinated contrast media and IgM paraproteins. Some immunological criteria are recalled to attention, this type of reaction has to meet stringently. Only by this, misinterpretations of inevident conclusions from analogy can be prevented in future similar cases. (orig.) [de

  8. How to Keep an Infusion Log: Intravenous Immune Globulin (IVIG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... molecules that are folded and shaped in three dimensions to fit over foreign materials or antigens such ... to see if they have any evidence of hidden liver infection that might be caused by hepatitis. ...

  9. Preparation of a Homologous (Human) Intravenous Botulinal Immune Globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    ptoceýř lie des chilled % here %011t holec t idt e brand tnoii Aerosil 3X0 by Dcgussa. Inc.. plasma could be- treated et irniniicaully and Ailh casw...Ness% York. N Y .atid umiinr the brand name Cab-O-Sil and in a mnannecr that lllasmM#c iiiiel.nd h’lasitiiil c ould IV Is ( .,l ot (’or V Bostoin...and trade name and the other instructions, when indicated by the background. Typography , layout, con- ch -ctrof the product; tra-st, and other rintlnz

  10. Toxicoinfectious botulism in commercial caponized chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trampel, D.W.; Smith, Susan; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2005-01-01

    During the summer of 2003, two flocks of commercial broiler chickens experienced unusually high death losses following caponizing at 3 wk of age and again between 8 and 14 wk of age. In September, fifteen 11-wk-old live capons were submitted to the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for assistance. In both flocks, the second episode of elevated mortality was associated with incoordination, flaccid paralysis of leg, wing, and neck muscles, a recumbent body posture characterized by neck extension, and diarrhea. No macroscopic or microscopic lesions were detected in affected chickens. Hearts containing clotted blood and ceca were submitted to the National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, WI. Type C botulinum toxin was identified in heart blood and ceca by mouse bioassay tests. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay tests on heart blood samples were also positive for type C botulinum toxin. Clostridium botulinum was isolated from the ceca and genes encoding type C botulinum toxin were detected in cecal contents by a polymerase chain reaction test. Chickens are less susceptible to botulism as they age, and this disease has not previously been documented in broilers as old as 14 wk of age. Wound contamination by spores of C. botulinum may have contributed to the unusually high death losses following caponizing.

  11. Bibliography of references to avian botulism: Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sonoma S.; Locke, Louis N.

    1982-01-01

    This bibliography, first compiled in 1970 (Allen and Wilson 1977) and published in 1977 in response to many requests for information on avian botulism, has been updated to include the literature published through 1980.In general, only articles dealing primarily with the avian disease are included, as opposed to those concerned with the various aspects of the biology of Clostridium botulinum, either type C or E. A few exceptions, such as Bengtson's report of the first isolation and description of the type C organism, are included for their historical interest. Progress reports and other administrative documents not available for distribution on request are excluded, as are most textbook accounts, which are generally summaries of work published elsewhere.This bibliography was a cooperative effort by the National Wildlife Health Laboratory, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. National Park Service. The National Park Service provided partial funding for the work through Contract No. 89100-0491.Although the authors attempted to list every important reference, they make no claim to complete coverage of the published literature. The authors will be grateful to users of the bibliography who call attention to errors or omissions.Wayne I. Jensen (Retired)Milton Friend, Director, National Wildlife Health Laboratory

  12. Botulism in the ICU: Nursing care plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zariquiey-Esteva, G; Galeote-Cózar, D; Santa-Candela, P; Castanera-Duro, A

    Botulism is a rare disease in Europe, caused by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum, notifiable, non-transmissible person-to-person and potentially fatal (between 5 and 10%) if not treated quickly. The favourable opinion of the Clinical Research Ethics Committee was obtained. We present the nursing care plan of a 49-year-old man with a diagnosis of bacterial intoxication caused by Clostridium botulinum, secondary to ingestion of beans in poor condition, who was admitted to the ICU for a total of 35 days. Holistic nursing evaluation during the first 24hours, with prioritisation of the systems that were deteriorating fastest: neurological and respiratory. Nine diagnoses were prioritised according to the NANDA taxonomy: Risk for allergy response, Ineffective breathing pattern, impaired oral mucous membrane, Impaired physical mobility, Risk for disuse syndrome, Risk for dysfunctional gastrointestinal motility, Impaired urinary elimination, Risk for acute confusion and Risk for caregiver role strain. The nursing care plan, standardised and organised with the NANDA taxonomy and prioritised with the outcome-present state-test (OPT) model, guaranteed the best care based on evidence, as the NOC scores improvement demonstrated. It was impossible to compare the nursing intervention with other case reports. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Cluster of Botulism among dutch tourists in Turkey, june 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaan, C.M.; Ouwerkerk, van M.; Roest, H.I.J.

    2010-01-01

    In June 2008, three Dutch tourists participating in a mini-cruise in Turkey needed urgent repatriation for antitoxin treatment because of symptoms of botulism. Because there was a shortage of antitoxin in the Netherlands, an emergency delivery was requested from the manufacturer in Germany. An

  14. Effect of antithymocyte globulin source on outcomes of bone marrow transplantation for severe aplastic anemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kekre, Natasha; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Mei Jie; Carreras, Jeanette; Ahmed, Parvez; Anderlini, Paolo; Atta, Elias Hallack; Ayas, Mouhab; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Bonfim, Carmem M.; Joachim Deeg, H.; Kapoor, Neena; Lee, Jong Wook; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Eapen, Mary; Antin, Joseph H

    2017-01-01

    For treatment of severe aplastic anemia, immunosuppressive therapy with horse antithymocyte globulin results in superior response and survival compared with rabbit antithymocyte globulin. This relative benefit may be different in the setting of transplantation as rabbit antithymocyte globulin

  15. Cluster of botulism among Dutch tourists in Turkey, June 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaan, C M; van Ouwerkerk, I M; Roest, H J

    2010-04-08

    In June 2008, three Dutch tourists participating in a mini-cruise in Turkey needed urgent repatriation for antitoxin treatment because of symptoms of botulism. Because there was a shortage of antitoxin in the Netherlands, an emergency delivery was requested from the manufacturer in Germany. An outbreak investigation was initiated into all nine cruise members, eight of whom developed symptoms. C. botulinum type B was isolated in stool culture from four of them. No other patients were notified locally. Food histories revealed locally purchased unprocessed black olives, consumed on board of the ship, as most likely source, but no left-overs were available for investigation. C. botulinum type D was detected in locally purchased canned peas, and whilst type D is not known to be a cause of human intoxication, its presence in a canned food product indicates an inadequate preserving process. With increasing tourism to areas where food-borne botulism is reported regularly special requests for botulism antitoxin may become necessary. Preparing an inventory of available reserve stock in Europe would appear to be a necessary and valuable undertaking.

  16. Botulism (type A in a horse - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevim Kasap

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the case of a six year-old, male, thoroughbred horse with clinical signs of inappetence, weakness, and incoordination when walking. Clinical examination showed that the horse staggered and leaned to the left side. Feedstuff was present inside and around its mouth. Salivation was increased and there was no reflex at the palpebrae and tongue. The horse had difficulty swallowing and the tone of its tail was reduced. Botulism was diagnosed based on the clinical signs. Antibiotic (ceftiofur and fluid-electrolyte treatment was commenced. Next day, neostigmin was added to the horse’s treatment, and it became recumbent. The horse’s palpebral, tongue and tail reflexes returned partially after neostigmine methylsulphate treatment on the same day and it stood up on day four. However, it could not swallow anything during the whole week, so after getting permission from the owner, the horse was euthanized on day 10. Samples of the colonic content and blood serum were sent by courier to the laboratory for toxin neutralization, however, botulinum neurotoxins could not be detected. After that, serum samples from days 6 and 10 were sent to another laboratory for testing for botulinum neurotoxin antibodies by ELISA. Specific antibodies against botulinum neurotoxin type A were measured, indicating a previous, immuno-relevant contact with the toxin. This seroconversion for type A supports the clinical botulism diagnosis. Type A botulism is rarely seen in Europe and has been detected in a horse in Turkey for the first time.

  17. Management of animal botulism outbreaks: from clinical suspicion to practical countermeasures to prevent or minimize outbreaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anniballi, F.; Fiore, A.; Löfström, Ch.; Skarin, H.; Auricchio, B.; Woudstra, C.; Bano, L.; Segerman, B.; Koene, M.G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Botulism is a severe neuroparalytic disease that affects humans, all warm-blooded animals, and some fishes. The disease is caused by exposure to toxins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other botulinum toxin–producing clostridia. Botulism in animals represents a severe environmental and economic

  18. Physicochemical, functional and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory properties of amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) 7S globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Alejandra V; Aphalo, Paula; Ventureira, Jorge L; Martínez, E Nora; Añón, María C

    2012-01-30

    Amaranth 7S globulin is a minor globulin component and its impact on the properties of an amaranth protein ingredient depends on its proportion in the variety of amaranth being considered. Some physicochemical, functional and angiotesin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties of amaranth vicilin were studied in this work and compared with the 11S globulin. Fluorescence spectroscopy results indicated that 7S globulin tryptophans were more exposed to the solvent and, by calorimetry, the 7S globulin denaturation temperature (T(d) ) was found lower than the 11S globulin T(d) , suggesting a more flexible structure. The 7S globulin surface hydrophobicity was higher than that of the 11S globulin, which is in agreement with the better emulsifying properties of the 7S globulin. The solubility in neutral buffer of the 7S globulin (851 ± 25 g kg(-1) ) was also higher than that of the 11S globulin (195 ± 6 g kg(-1) ). Bioinformatic analyses showed the presence of ACE inhibitory peptides encrypted in 7S tryptic sequences and peptides released after in vitro gastrointestinal digestion showed a high ACE-inhibitory capacity (IC(50) = 0.17 g L(-1) ), similar to that of 11S globulin peptides. Compared with the 11S globulin, the 7S globulin presents similar ACE inhibitory activity and some functional advantages, better solubility and emulsifying activity, which suits some food requirements. The functional behavior has been related with the structural properties. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Outbreak of Type C Botulism in Commercial Layer Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuko; Wigle, William L; Gallagher, Susan; Johnson, Amy L; Sweeney, Raymond W; Wakenell, Patricia S

    2016-03-01

    This report describes an outbreak of type C botulism in two organic, free-range commercial layer farms in the Midwest. Hens affected were 64-wk-old Hy-Line brown hens and 34-wk-old Hy-Line brown hens owned by the same company, but housed on different premises, with approximately 20,000 birds per house. Mortality over the 2 wk of investigation was estimated to be up to 8% and 2.8%, respectively, with birds acting listless, lethargic, and depressed. Clinical signs consisted of progressive paralysis, and severely affected birds were moribund and laterally recumbent. Hens had ruffled feathers that easily epilated, with loss of muscular tone in the neck, tail, and wings. Hens had closed eyes and were reluctant to move. There were no significant gross or histopathologic lesions. Intestinal samples were submitted to the University of Pennsylvania Botulism Diagnostic Laboratory for real-time PCR and were positive for Clostridium botulinum organisms containing the Type C neurotoxin gene. Speculations on the source of the botulinum toxins include poor mortality removal leading to cannibalism of decomposing carcasses, as well as birds on the farm having access to putrid carcasses in the compost pile from a hole in their outdoor access fence.

  20. Estrabismo após toxina botulínica para fins estéticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Halfeld Ferrari Alves Lacordia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO Nas últimas décadas, a toxina botulínica tem sido aplicada para fins terapêuticos em inúmeras afecções. A toxina do tipo A foi aprovada primeiramente em 1989 para o uso em estrabismo, blefaroespasmo e espasmo hemifacial de pacientes maiores que 12 anos de idade. A observação de que pacientes tratados de blefaroespasmo com toxina botulínica apresentavam um efeito adicional de diminuição das rugas de expressão inspirou estudos sobre a aplicação cosmética da toxina. Recentemente, a toxina botulínica do tipo A foi aprovada para fins estéticos. Este trabalho relata um caso de ocorrência de estrabismo após aplicação de toxina botulínica na face para fins estéticos.

  1. BOTULISM E IN LAKE ERIE: ECOLOGY AND LOWER FOOD WEB TRANSFER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project will determine the environmental conditions that favor botulism Type E bacteria in Lake Erie and explore whether quagga mussels are altering bottom sediment conditions to favor C. botulinum growth. Analysis of environmental parameters, including water chemistry, alg...

  2. The proteomic analysis of barley albumins and globulins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laštovičková, Markéta; Bobálová, Janette

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 15 (2008), s709-s711 ISSN 1803-2389. [Meeting on Chemistry and Life /4./. Brno, 09.09.2008-11.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0570 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : barley * albumins * globulins Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  3. Genetics Home Reference: corticosteroid-binding globulin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... There may also be other genetic or environmental factors that influence whether an affected individual is more likely to develop pain or fatigue. Learn more about the gene associated with corticosteroid-binding globulin deficiency SERPINA6 Related Information What is a gene? What is a ...

  4. Heterogeneity in the seed globulin and albumin fractions from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Successful fractionation of albumin, globulin and vicilin fractions from dry seeds of African yam bean (Sphenostylis stenocarpa) was achieved using established procedures for preparation of legume seed proteins. The resulting polypeptides were separated by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under both reducing ...

  5. Serum total protein, albumin and globulin levels in Trypanosoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of orally administered Scoparia dulcis on Trypanosoma brucei-induced changes in serum total protein, albumin and globulin were investigated in rabbits over a period of twenty eight days. Results obtained show that infection resulted in hyperproteinaemia, hyperglobulinaemia and hypoalbuminaemia. However ...

  6. Isolation, characterization and radioimmunoassay of corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) in human serum - clinical significance and comparison to thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernutz, C.; Haensle, W.O.; Horn, K.; Pickardt, C.R.; Scriba, P.C.; Fink, E.; Kolb, H.; Tschesche, H.

    1979-01-01

    Isolation of the corticosteroid-binding globulin CBG was achieved by 5 chromatographical steps on cortisol Sepharose, QAE-Sephadex A-50, Con A-Sepharose and hydroxylapatite. The purity of the isolated CBG was demonstrated in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, SDS electrophoresis, immunodiffusion and ultracentrifugation. Microheterogeneity was shown in isoeletric focusing by 5 bands in the pH range of 3.7-4.2, which could be reduced to one major band after neuraminidase treatment. The equimolar binding of cortisol to CBG was demonstrated by binding studies. The association constant for cortisol was 2.8 x 10 8 M -1 , for progesterone 1.7 x 10 6 M -1 . From analytical ultracentrifugation, the molecular weight was calculated on 50 700; the sedimentation coefficient was 3.6 S, the partial specific volume 0.690 ml/g, the Stokes radius 38 A and the frictional coefficient ratio 1.5. A specific radioimmunoassay for CBG was established using the purified CBG for immunization, radioiodination and for calibration standards. The normal range of CBG levels in human serum was 2.4-4.4 mg/100 ml (mean +- 2SD). Studies were performed to compare the levels of CBG and thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG). No sex differences but a significant biphasic age dependence were observed for both proteins. In pregnancy and under oestrogen treatment of women and men, CBG was demonstrated to be the more distinct indicator of oestrogenic activity as compared with TBG, whereas the sensitivity of TBG was more pronounced to supposedly antioestrogenic substances like Danazol, and in severe disease. No coincidence of genetic CBG and TBG deficiencies have been found so far. (author)

  7. Botulism in injecting drug users, Dublin, Ireland, November-December 2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ward, M

    2009-01-08

    In November and December 2008, six cases of suspect wound botulism were reported in heroin injecting drug users, all residents in Dublin, Ireland. Patients were aged between 23-42 years of age; four cases were male; one patient died shortly after admission. The patients presented to four different hospitals across the city. Botulism in injecting drug users in Ireland was last reported in 2002.

  8. PROFIL PROTEIN TOTAL, ALBUMIN DAN GLOBULIN PADA AYAM BROILER YANG DIBERI KUNGIY, BAWANG PUTIH DAN ZINC (ZN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sus Derthi Widhyari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to study the effectiveness of turmeric, garlic and zinc supplementation on protein, albumin and globulin concentration of broiler. One hundred DOC were divided into five treatments, four replications, consist of five chicks in each replicate. The treatments were R0 (basal diet as a control, R1 (R0 + 1,5% turmeric powder +2,5 % garlic powder, R2 (R0 + 2,5% garlic powder + 120 ppm zinc, R3 (R0 +1,5% turmeric powder + 120ppm zinc and R4 (R0 +1,5 turmeric powder + 2,5% garlic powder + 120 ppm zinc. The diet contain 23,5% crude protein and 3215 kcal metabolizable energy. Blood samples were taken from axillary veins at the three and six weeks of age. The results showed that total protein and globulin concentration at 6 weeks slightly higher than 3 weeks old chicks but not significantly different (P>0.05. Albumin concentration were highest on R3 treatment. Total protein and globulin concentration was highest on the R2 treatment. In conclusion, the supplementation of garlic (2.5% and ZnO (120 ppm showed the best combination to improve immune response in broiler

  9. Effect of Increasing Toxin Levels on Guineau Pigs Passively Immunized With Human Botulinum Immune Globulin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olson, Carl

    2000-01-01

    .... As efficacy for this vaccine cannot be directly demonstrated in traditional clinical trials, the measurement of neutralizing antibodies has been proposed as a serological correlate for protection...

  10. Lobotomies and Botulism Bombs: Beckett's Trilogy and the Cold War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, Adam

    2016-06-01

    The article argues that Beckett's Trilogy stages the effects of a lobotomy operation on a potentially politically subversive writer, and that the consequences of the operation can be traced in both the retreat of the narrator(s) of the Trilogy into the mind and into comatose mental states and in the detail of the operation itself, based on the 'icepick' lobotomies performed by neurologist Walter Freeman in the late 1940s and early 1950s. To write about extreme psychiatric situations in the post-war period is necessarily to invoke the political uses of psychosurgery with which this article engages. The article goes on to consider the figure of the brain-damaged mind as a Cold War trope in the references to botulism and the motif of the penetrated skull in The Unnamable.

  11. Type C botulism in swine fed on restaurant waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djeison L. Raymundo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the epidemiologic data of the death of pigs during the period of 2002 to 2009 following the ingestion of botulinum neurotoxin type C. This neurotoxin was present in food residues originating from restaurant and hotel kitchens, stored in barrels without shelter from the sun and administered in a collective trough without prior thermal treatment. Animals which died at different ages showed clinical signs of botulism characterized by flaccid paralysis, weight loss, anorexia, weakness, lack of coordination, locomotion difficulties with the evolution of lateral recumbency with involuntary urination and defecation. No alterations were observed at postmortem and histological examination. The bioassay with serum neutralization in mice was carried out on samples of intestinal contents from pigs affected and revealed the presence of large quantities of botulinum toxin type C.

  12. Cortical recovery of swallowing function in wound botulism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ringelstein Erich B

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Botulism is a rare disease caused by intoxication leading to muscle weakness and rapidly progressive dysphagia. With adequate therapy signs of recovery can be observed within several days. In the last few years, brain imaging studies carried out in healthy subjects showed activation of the sensorimotor cortex and the insula during volitional swallowing. However, little is known about cortical changes and compensation mechanisms accompanying swallowing pathology. Methods In this study, we applied whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG in order to study changes in cortical activation in a 27-year-old patient suffering from wound botulism during recovery from dysphagia. An age-matched group of healthy subjects served as control group. A self-paced swallowing paradigm was performed and data were analyzed using synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM. Results The first MEG measurement, carried out when the patient still demonstrated severe dysphagia, revealed strongly decreased activation of the somatosensory cortex but a strong activation of the right insula and marked recruitment of the left posterior parietal cortex (PPC. In the second measurement performed five days later after clinical recovery from dysphagia we found a decreased activation in these two areas and a bilateral cortical activation of the primary and secondary sensorimotor cortex comparable to the results seen in a healthy control group. Conclusion These findings indicate parallel development to normalization of swallowing related cortical activation and clinical recovery from dysphagia and highlight the importance of the insula and the PPC for the central coordination of swallowing. The results suggest that MEG examination of swallowing can reflect short-term changes in patients suffering from neurogenic dysphagia.

  13. Ultrastructural studies of human and rabbit alpha-M-globulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloth, B; Chesebro, B; Svehag, S E

    1968-04-01

    Electron micrographs of isolated human alpha(2)M-molecules, obtained by the negative contrast technique, revealed morphologically homogenous structures resembling a graceful monogram of the two letters H and I. The modal values for the length and width of the alpha(2)M particles were 170 A and 100 A, respectively. Purified rabbit alphamacroglobulins contained about 80% alpha(1)M- and 20% alpha(2)M-globulins. The isolated rabbit alpha(1)M- and alpha(2)M-molecules were morphologically indistinguishable from one another and from human alpha(2)M-molecules. Preliminary immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that the two rabbit alphaM-globulins were antigenically different. Sedimentation constant determinations gave s(20, w) values of 18.8 and 18.2 for rabbit alpha(1)M and alpha(2)M, respectively.

  14. Anti-thymocyte globulins in kidney transplantation: focus on current indications and long-term immunological side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamoulid, Jamal; Staeck, Oliver; Crépin, Thomas; Halleck, Fabian; Saas, Philippe; Brakemeier, Susanne; Ducloux, Didier; Budde, Klemens

    2017-10-01

    Antithymocyte globulins (ATGs) are part of the immunosuppression arsenal currently used by clinicians to prevent or treat acute rejection in solid organ transplantation. ATG is a mixture of non-specific anti-lymphocyte immunoglobulins targeting not only T cell subsets but also several other immune and non-immune cells, rendering its precise immunoglobulin composition difficult to appreciate or to compare from one preparation to another. Furthermore, several mechanisms of action have been described. Taken together, this probably explains the efficacy and the side effects associated with this drug. Recent data suggest a long-term negative impact on allograft and patient outcomes, pointing out the need to better characterize the potential toxicity and the benefit-risk balance associated to this immunosuppressive therapy within large clinical trials. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  15. Botulism associated with commercially canned chili sauce--Texas and Indiana, July 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-03

    On July 7 and July 11, 2007, public health officials in Texas and Indiana, respectively, reported to CDC four suspected cases of foodborne botulism, two in each state. Investigations conducted by state and local health departments revealed that all four patients had eaten brands of Castleberry's hot dog chili sauce before illness began. Botulinum toxin type A was detected in the serum of one Indiana patient and in a leftover chili mixture obtained from his home. CDC informed the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the apparent link between illness and consumption of the chili sauce. On July 18, FDA issued a consumer advisory, and the manufacturer, Castleberry's Food Company (Augusta, Georgia), subsequently recalled the implicated brand and several other products produced in the same set of retorts (commercial-scale pressure cookers for processing canned foods) at the same canning facility. Examination of the canning facility in Georgia during the outbreak investigation had identified deficiencies in the canning process. On July 19, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) issued a press release that announced a recall of chili and certain meat products from the Castleberry canning facility and provided recommendations to consumers. That recall was expanded on July 21 to include additional canned products. A fifth case of botulism potentially linked to one of the recalled products is under investigation in California. This report describes the ongoing investigation by members of OutbreakNet and others and the measures undertaken to control the outbreak, which is the first outbreak of foodborne botulism in the United States associated with a commercial canning facility in approximately 30 years. Clinicians should be vigilant for symptoms of botulism, including symmetric cranial nerve palsies, especially if accompanied by descending flaccid paralysis. Consumers should not eat any of the recalled chili sauce or other recalled

  16. Some biochemical studies on thyroid immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoush, M.A.M.

    1980-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of induced immunological environment on: a - Carbohydrate metabolism as reflected by immunoreactive insulin and blood sugar levels. b - Biochemical parameters, namely total protein, albumin, globulin, alkaline phosphatase and transaminases, reflecting liver function. c - Radioimmunological tests reflecting thyroid function. The study comprised 36 male rabbits, boscate strain of six months age assigned randomly to : control, albumin immunized and thyroglobulin immunized groups

  17. Type C botulism in pelicans and other fish-eating birds at the Salton Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, T.E.; Nol, P.; Pelizza, C.; Sturm, K.K.

    2004-01-01

    In 1996, type C avian botulism killed over 10,000 pelicans and nearly 10,000 other fish-eating birds at the Salton Sea in southern California. Although botulism had been previously documented in waterbirds at the Sea, this die-off was unusual in that it involved primarily fish-eating birds. The American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorynchos) was the species with the greatest mortality in 1996. Since 1996, mortality has recurred every year but losses have declined (Salton Sea, but the source of toxin for fish is unknown.

  18. Interference of tolerance to human gamma globulin by synthetic polynucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, O.A.; Azar, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    A complex of polyadenylic-polyuridylic acids effectively inhibits the in vivo production of immunologic tolerance to human gamma globulin in mice. Moreover, this effect can be obtained only when the polynucleotide complex is given within 4 hr after antigen administration. Reconstitution of irradiated mice with combinations of T and B cells originating from tolerant or previously untreated mice demonstrates that poly A:U is responsible for the adjuvant effect observed. Poly A:U exerts its adjuvant effect primarily upon T cells, while B cells remain essentially uninfluenced by the polynucleotides

  19. Botulism outbreaks in natural environments — an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari eEspelund

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum comprises a diverse group of botulinum toxin-producing anaerobic rod-shaped spore-forming bacteria that are ubiquitously distributed in soils and aquatic sediments. Decomposition of plants, algae and animals creates anaerobic environments that facilitate growth of C. botulinum, which may then enter into food webs leading to intoxication of animals. Via saprophytic utilization of nutrients, the bacteria rapidly sporulate, creating a reservoir of highly robust spores. In the present review, we focus on the occurrence of C. botulinum in non-clinical environments, and examine factors influencing growth and environmental factors associated with botulism outbreaks. We also outline cases involving specific environments and their biota. In wetlands, it has been found that some C. botulinum strains can associate with toxin-unaffected organisms—including algae, plants, and invertebrates—in which the bacteria appear to germinate and stay in the vegetative form for longer periods of time. We suggest the need for future investigations to resolve issues related to the environments in which C. botulinum spores may accumulate and germinate, and where the vegetative forms may multiply.

  20. Evaluation of coproexamination as a diagnostic test for avian botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Wayne I.

    1981-01-01

    Fecal extracts and blood sera from 113 ducks showing clinical signs of botulism were examined for Clostridium botulinum type C toxin by means of the mouse toxicity test to evaluate coproexamination as a diagnostic procedure, as compared with demonstration of toxin in serum. When death of test mice unprotected with type specific antitoxin (while protected controls survived) was the criterion, 78.8% of the sera and 5.3% of the fecal extracts were positive. When characteristic signs of intoxication in the unprotected mice was included as evidence of toxin in the specimens, these percentages increased to 86.7 and 6.2, respectively.Fecal specimens were collected hourly for the first 6 h after peroral dosing of eight mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) with 1.0 LD50, of type C toxin and at 24, 48, and 72 h from birds surviving that long. From 2 to 4 toxin-positive specimens were passed by all eight ducks during the first 6 h, five specimens were positive at 24 h, and three were positive at 48 h. Only three specimens were collected at 72 h, all of which were negative. These findings suggest that attempts to detect toxin in the feces of wild ducks might have been more successful had the birds been captured earlier in the course of the disease.

  1. Sensitization with 7S Globulins from Peanut, Hazelnut, Soy or Pea Induces IgE with Different Biological Activities Which Are Modified by Soy Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroghsbo, Stine; Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; Rigby, Neil M.

    2011-01-01

    , such as stability to digestion, have also been suggested. 7S globulins from peanut, hazelnut, soy, and pea were studied to determine whether related proteins would induce a similar sensitization when removed from their ‘normal’ matrix. Methods: Brown Norway rats (soy tolerant or nontolerant) were immunized i.p. 3......Background: It is not known why some foods sensitizing via the gastrointestinal tract are prevalent allergenic foods and others are not. Eating habits, processing, and the food matrix have been suggested to influence the allergenicity of a given food. Factors related to protein structure...... times with 100 μg purified peanut, hazelnut, soy, or pea 7S without adjuvant. Sera were analyzed for specific antibodies by different ELISAs (IgG1, IgG2a, and IgE), inhibition ELISA, and rat basophilic leukemia cell assay. Results: The 4 related 7S globulins induced a response with an almost identical...

  2. Effect of ionizing whole-body irradiation on the primary and secondary antibody reaction of cows to injection of human gamma globulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, F.; Buchholz, I.; Mehlhorn, G.

    1989-01-01

    In 3 experiments 29 cows were exposed to whole-body irradiation, using 9 MeV X-rays of a linear accelerator, with doses of 1.50 and 2.00 Gy or 60 Co gamma rays with a dose of 2.75 Gy, as a midline dose. 2 weeks prior to irradiation the first immunization was applied using human gamma globulin. 4 or 5 weeks after irradiation a second immunization was carried out. The antibody titres were investigated. The irradiation failed to affect the antibody titres after the first immunization. After the second immunization the antibody titres of the irradiated animals remained diminished significantly (α = 0.05). This has been attributed to a damage of the memory cell pool. (author)

  3. Outcome of children with severe acquired aplastic anemia treated with rabbit antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Pereira Garanito

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: The present results confirm the poor response rate with rabbit antithymocyte globulin as first therapy in pediatrics patients, similar to what has been reported for patients of all ages. This confirmation is problematic in Brazil, given the lack of horse antithymocyte globulin in many markets outside the United States.

  4. Effect of anticonvulsants on plasma testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragry, J M; Makin, H L; Trafford, D J; Scott, D F

    1978-01-01

    Plasma sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and testosterone levels were measured in 29 patients with epilepsy (16 men and 13 women), most of them on chronic therapy with anticonvulsant drugs. Sex hormone binding globulin concentrations were increased in both sexes and testosterone levels in male patients. It is postulated that anticonvulsants may induce hepatic synthesis of SHBG. PMID:569688

  5. Safety Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmacokinetic Assessment of Human Gc Globulin (Vitamin D Binding Protein)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Tina Holberg; Jørgensen, Charlotte Svaerke; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Gc globulin is an important protein of the plasma actin-scavenger system. As such, it has been shown to bind free actin and prevent hypercoagulation and shock in patients with massive actin release resulting from severe tissue injuries. Treatment of such patients with Gc globulin could therefore...

  6. Safety pharmacology, toxicology and pharmacokinetic assesment of human Gc globulin (vitamin d binding protein)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Tina Holberg; Jørgensen, Charlotte Sværke; Santoni Rugiu, Eric

    2010-01-01

      Gc globulin is an important protein of the plasma actin-scavenger system. As such, it has been shown to bind free actin and prevent hypercoagulation and shock in patients with massive actin release resulting from severe tissue injuries. Treatment of such patients with Gc globulin could therefore...

  7. The effect of yeast β-glucan on the amount of albumin, globulin, urea and total protein of broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ali kargarirezapour

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glucans derived from yeast cell wall are promising alternatives to antibiotics, as they have been shown to improve growth performance and stimulate the immune system of immature broilers. In this study we evaluated the effect of different levels of yeast beta-glucan (YBG on some blood parametrs of broiler chickens. In a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design (the first factor: YBG levels: 0, 0.04 and 0.08% of basal diet and sex as a second factor 144 day old chicks (72 male and 72 female were selected and allocated to different treatments (three replicates of each treatment. The overall experimental period was 34 days. At the end of study, two birds from each pen were randomly selected as a sample. The level of albumin, globulin, urea and total protein was measured on blood samples. Statistical analysis of the results showed that the YBG had no significant effect on albumin, globulin, urea and total protein level. But the amount of plasma albumin and total protein in female chicks was significantly higher than male chicks (p

  8. Effect of antithymocyte globulin source on outcomes of bone marrow transplantation for severe aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekre, Natasha; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Carreras, Jeanette; Ahmed, Parvez; Anderlini, Paolo; Atta, Elias Hallack; Ayas, Mouhab; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Bonfim, Carmem; Deeg, H Joachim; Kapoor, Neena; Lee, Jong-Wook; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Pulsipher, Michael A; Eapen, Mary; Antin, Joseph H

    2017-07-01

    For treatment of severe aplastic anemia, immunosuppressive therapy with horse antithymocyte globulin results in superior response and survival compared with rabbit antithymocyte globulin. This relative benefit may be different in the setting of transplantation as rabbit antithymocyte globulin results in more profound immunosuppression. We analyzed 833 severe aplastic anemia transplants between 2008 and 2013 using human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched siblings (n=546) or unrelated donors (n=287) who received antithymocyte globulin as part of their conditioning regimen and bone marrow graft. There were no differences in hematopoietic recovery by type of antithymocyte globulin. Among recipients of HLA-matched sibling transplants, day 100 incidence of acute (17% versus 6%, P aplastic anemia. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  9. The molecular biology and biochemistry of rice endosperm α-globulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shorrosh, B.S.

    1989-01-01

    The author's first objective was to isolate a cDNA clone that encodes the rice endosperm α-globulin. Purified antibodies against a rice storage protein, α-globulin, were used to screen a λgt11 cDNA expression library constructed from immature rice seed endosperm. The cDNA insert of clone 4A1 (identified by antibody screening) was used as a probe to identify long cDNA inserts in the library. The deduced amino acid sequence of clone A3-12 cDNA insert (identified by cDNA screening) contained the amino acid sequences of three cyanogen bromide peptides fragment of α-globulin. The calculated molecular weight and amino acid composition of the deduced amino acid sequence were similar to the α-globulin protein. Northern blot analysis indicated that mRNA of one size, approximately 1.0 kb, is expressed. Southern genomic blot analysis revealed one band with EcoRI or Hind III digestion. Cell-free translation and immunoprecipitation showed that the initial translation product is approximately 2,000 daltons larger than the mature protein. The amino acid sequence of α-globulin revealed limited regions of similarities with wheat storage proteins. The author concludes that the cDNA insert in clone A3-12 contained the entire coding region of α-globulin protein and that α-globulin is encoded by a single gene. My second objective was to inhibit the degradation of α-globulin in the salt extract of rice flour. The salt extract of rice flour contained an acid protease whose optimal pH was 3 for 3 H-casein hydrolysis. A polypeptide with molecular weight of 20,000 was immunologically reactive with α-globulin antibodies and is produced by limited proteolysis in the extract. Pepstatin inhibited the proteolysis of 3H-casein and slowed the proteolysis of α-globulin

  10. [Influence of water fluoride exposure on sex hormone binding globulin and testosterone in adult male].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tong; Yang, Rupu; Li, Shihong; Zheng, Guoqing; Xi, Yu; Cheng, Xuemin; Hou, Jiaxiang; Cui, Liuxin; Ba, Yue

    2013-03-01

    To explore the influence of water fluoride exposure on sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and testosterone in adult male. Cross-sectional study was conducted in three villages of Tongxu county including high fluoride group (HFG), defluoridation project group (DFPG) and control group (CG) based on the fluoride concentration in drinking water. Adult male who were born and raised in the village and aged 18 - 50 years old were recruited using cluster sampling. Fasting blood and morning urine samples were collected. The fluoride levels in drinking water and urine were detected by fluoride-ion selective electrode method. Serum SHBG level was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The chemical luminescence immune analysis method was used to detect serum testosterone content. Serum SHBG level was 47.85 nmol/L in CG, 31.37 nmol/L in DFPG and 24.52 nmol/L in HFG respectively. There were significant difference among of three groups (P < 0.05). Serum testosterone level was 3.69 ng/ml in CG, 4.61 ng/ml in DFPG and 4.83 ng/ml in HFG respectively. Serum testosterone level in HFG was significantly higher than that in CG (P < 0.05). Serum SHBG level in HFG has positive correlation with serum testosterone (r = 0.230, P = 0.049), which has not been observed in DFPG and CG. Long-time fluorine exposure may affect serum SHBG and testosterone level in adult male.

  11. Acute Lung Injury during Antithymocyte Globulin Therapy for Aplastic Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan Christopher Goligher

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of a 33-year-old man with aplastic anemia who experienced recurrent episodes of hypoxemia and pulmonary infiltrates during infusions of antithymocyte globulin (ATG is described. With the use of high-dose corticosteroids, the patient’s original episodes resolved, and were subsequently prevented before additional administrations of ATG. Rare reports of an association between ATG and acute lung injury are found in the literature, but this is the first report of successful steroid-supported re-exposure. Although the mechanism of ATG-related acute lung injury remains uncertain, it may be parallel to the mechanism of transfusion-related acute lung injury because the pathogenesis of the latter relies, in part, on antileukocyte antibodies. ATG-related toxicity should be included in the differential diagnosis of new, infusion-associated pulmonary infiltrates, and corticosteroids may be a useful therapeutic consideration in the management.

  12. Three outbreaks of foodborne botulism caused by unsafe home canning of vegetables--Ohio and Washington, 2008 and 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Kashmira; Fagan, Ryan; Crossland, Sandra; Maceachern, Dorothy; Pyper, Brian; Bokanyi, Rick; Houze, Yolanda; Andress, Elizabeth; Tauxe, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Foodborne botulism is a potentially fatal paralytic illness caused by ingestion of neurotoxin produced by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Historically, home-canned vegetables have been the most common cause of botulism outbreaks in the United States. During 2008 and 2009, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state and local health departments in Ohio and Washington State investigated three outbreaks caused by unsafe home canning of vegetables. We analyzed CDC surveillance data for background on food vehicles that caused botulism outbreaks from 1999 to 2008. For the three outbreaks described, patients and their family members were interviewed and foods were collected. Laboratory testing of clinical and food samples was done at the respective state public health laboratories. From 1999 to 2008, 116 outbreaks of foodborne botulism were reported. Of the 48 outbreaks caused by home-prepared foods from the contiguous United States, 38% (18) were from home-canned vegetables. Three outbreaks of Type A botulism occurred in Ohio and Washington in September 2008, January 2009, and June 2009. Home-canned vegetables (green beans, green bean and carrot blend, and asparagus) served at family meals were confirmed as the source of each outbreak. In each instance, home canners did not follow canning instructions, did not use pressure cookers, ignored signs of food spoilage, and were unaware of the risk of botulism from consuming improperly preserved vegetables. Home-canned vegetables remain a leading cause of foodborne botulism. These outbreaks illustrate critical areas of concern in current home canning and food preparation knowledge and practices. Similar gaps were identified in a 2005 national survey of U.S. adults. Botulism prevention efforts should include targeted educational outreach to home canners.

  13. An Alternative Approach to Combination Vaccines: Intradermal Administration of Isolated Components for Control of Anthrax, Botulism, Plague and Staphylococcal Toxic Shock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morefield, Garry L; Tammariello, Ralph F; Purcell, Bret K; Worsham, Patricia L; Chapman, Jennifer; Smith, Leonard A; Alarcon, Jason B; Mikszta, John A; Ulrich, Robert G

    2008-01-01

    ... incompatible vaccine mixtures. Intradermally administered arrays of vaccines for protection from anthrax, botulism, plague, and staphylococcal toxic shock were biocompatible in vivo, retained potent antibody responses...

  14. Meta-analysis of treatment with rabbit and horse antithymocyte globulin for aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Jin; Kanda, Junya; Akahoshi, Yu; Harada, Naonori; Kameda, Kazuaki; Ugai, Tomotaka; Wada, Hidenori; Ishihara, Yuko; Kawamura, Koji; Sakamoto, Kana; Ashizawa, Masahiro; Sato, Miki; Terasako-Saito, Kiriko; Kimura, Shun-Ichi; Kikuchi, Misato; Yamazaki, Rie; Kako, Shinichi; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2017-05-01

    Aplastic anemia patients who received rabbit antithymocyte globulin exhibited response and survival rates inferior to those who received horse antithymocyte globulin in several studies. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to compare rabbit and horse antithymocyte globulin as immunosuppressive therapy for aplastic anemia. We searched online databases for studies that compared antithymocyte globulin regimens as first-line treatment for aplastic anemia, including both randomized and non-randomized controlled trials. The early mortality rate at 3 months and overall response rate at 6 months were evaluated. Thirteen studies were included in the analysis. The risk ratio (RR) of early mortality for rabbit vs. horse antithymocyte globulin was 1.33 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69-2.57; P = 0.39], with significant heterogeneity. A sensitivity analysis suggested higher early mortality rate in patients who received rabbit antithymocyte globulin. The overall response rate was significantly higher in patients who received horse antithymocyte globulin (RR 1.27; 95% CI 1.05-1.54; P = 0.015). In conclusion, in aplastic anemia patients treated with ATG, early mortality rate was not significantly different in patients receiving horse or rabbit ATG, although a sensitivity analysis showed higher early mortality in the rabbit ATG group. Horse ATG was associated with significantly higher response rate than rabbit ATG.

  15. Atypical tetanus in a completely immunized 14-year-old boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Kai; Ringe, Hannelore; Dorner, Brigitte G; Diers, Alexander; Uhlenberg, Birgit; Müller, Dominik; Varnholt, Verena; Gaedicke, Gerhard

    2007-11-01

    We report the uncommon clinical course of tetanus in a completely immunized 14-year-old boy. His initial symptoms, which included a flaccid paralysis, supported a diagnosis of botulism. Preliminary mouse-test results with combined botulinum antitoxins A, B, and E, obtained from tetanus-immunized horses, backed this diagnosis. The change in his clinical course from paralysis to rigor and the negative, more specific, botulinum mouse test with isolated botulinum antitoxins A, B, and E, obtained from nonvaccinated rabbits, disproved the diagnosis of botulism. Tetanus was suspected despite complete vaccination. The final results of a positive mouse test performed with isolated tetanus antitoxin confirmed the diagnosis. Adequate treatment was begun, and the boy recovered completely.

  16. Autocrine and Paracrine Control of Breast Cancer Growth by Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosner, Wiliam

    2003-01-01

    We propose that the expression of Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin (SHBG) by breast cancer cells is biologically regulated and that this SHBG functions to alter the effects of estrogens within the breast cancer cell...

  17. Autocine and Paracrine Control of Breast Cancer Growth by Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosner, William

    2004-01-01

    We propose that the expression of Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin (SHBG) by breast cancer cells is biologically regulated and this SHBG functions to alter the effects of estrogens within the breast cancer cell...

  18. Early, Real-Time Medical Diagnosis of Botulism by Endopeptidase-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Osnat; Feldberg, Liron; Gura, Sigalit; Brosh-Nissimov, Tal; Guri, Alex; Zimhony, Oren; Shapiro, Eli; Beth-Din, Adi; Stein, Dana; Ozeri, Eyal; Barnea, Ada; Turgeman, Amram; Ben David, Alon; Schwartz, Arieh; Elhanany, Eytan; Diamant, Eran; Yitzhaki, Shmuel; Zichel, Ran

    2015-12-15

    Botulinum toxin was detected in patient serum using Endopeptidase-mass-spectrometry assay, although all conventional tests provided negative results. Antitoxin was administered, resulting in patient improvement. Implementing this highly sensitive and rapid assay will improve preparedness for foodborne botulism and deliberate exposure. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Management of Animal Botulism Outbreaks: From Clinical Suspicion to Practical Countermeasures to Prevent or Minimize Outbreaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anniballi, Fabrizio; Fiore, Alfonsina; Löfström, Charlotta

    2013-01-01

    and economic concern because of its high mortality rate. Moreover, meat or other products from affected animals entering the food chain may result in a public health problem. To this end, early diagnosis is crucial to define and apply appropriate veterinary public health measures. Clinical diagnosis is based...... outbreaks. In this article we outline all phases of management of animal botulism outbreaks occurring in wet wild birds, poultry, cattle, horses, and fur farm animals....

  20. Foodborne botulism in southwest Romania during the post-communism period 1990-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neghina, Adriana Maria; Marincu, Iosif; Moldovan, Roxana; Iacobiciu, Ioan; Neghina, Raul

    2010-02-01

    This study was a retrospective investigation of botulism cases over a period of 18 years following major political and economic changes, addressing the question of whether this disease is still an important health concern in southwest Romania. The medical records of botulism cases were used as the source of data. Patients from five southwest Romanian counties were hospitalized at Victor Babes Hospital of Infectious Diseases in Timisoara during the period 1990-2007. The median annual incidence of botulism cases in southwest Romania decreased from 0.1 per 100 000 persons during 1990-1998, to 0.05 per 100 000 persons during 1999-2007. Most of the cases (18.6%) were diagnosed in 1990, immediately following the communism period. The median age of the patients was 38 years (range 16-73 years); 24 (55.8%) were male; the case fatality rate was 2.3%. A significantly higher incidence rate of 2.7 cases per 100 000 persons occurred in rural areas, even though most of the cases (53.5%) were inhabitants of urban areas. The clinical pattern included: difficulty swallowing (79.1%), double and/or blurred vision (69.8%), dry mouth (60.5%), drooping eyelids (51.2%), vomiting (39.5%), mydriasis (37.2%), constipation (27.9%), abdominal pain (23.3%), and slurred speech (18.6%). All cases were attributed to contaminated food sources, mainly home-prepared traditional pork products. Although the botulism cases decreased over the study period in southwest Romania, this life-threatening disease continues to be an important concern. A strategy addressing individual behaviors in the home is needed to improve food safety. Copyright 2009 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Grizzly bear corticosteroid binding globulin: Cloning and serum protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Brian A; Hamilton, Jason; Alsop, Derek; Cattet, Marc R L; Stenhouse, Gordon; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2010-06-01

    Serum corticosteroid levels are routinely measured as markers of stress in wild animals. However, corticosteroid levels rise rapidly in response to the acute stress of capture and restraint for sampling, limiting its use as an indicator of chronic stress. We hypothesized that serum corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the primary transport protein for corticosteroids in circulation, may be a better marker of the stress status prior to capture in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos). To test this, a full-length CBG cDNA was cloned and sequenced from grizzly bear testis and polyclonal antibodies were generated for detection of this protein in bear sera. The deduced nucleotide and protein sequences were 1218 bp and 405 amino acids, respectively. Multiple sequence alignments showed that grizzly bear CBG (gbCBG) was 90% and 83% identical to the dog CBG nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. The affinity purified rabbit gbCBG antiserum detected grizzly bear but not human CBG. There were no sex differences in serum total cortisol concentration, while CBG expression was significantly higher in adult females compared to males. Serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in bears captured by leg-hold snare compared to those captured by remote drug delivery from helicopter. However, serum CBG expression between these two groups did not differ significantly. Overall, serum CBG levels may be a better marker of chronic stress, especially because this protein is not modulated by the stress of capture and restraint in grizzly bears. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Antithymocyte Globulin Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Human Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Roider

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Antithymocyte globulin (ATG is used in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally accepted that ATG mediates its immunosuppressive effect primarily via depletion of T cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of ATG-Fresenius (now Grafalon® on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC. ATG induced a semi-mature phenotype in DC with significantly reduced expression of CD14, increased expression of HLA-DR, and intermediate expression of CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86. ATG-DC showed an increase in IL-10 secretion but no IL-12 production. In line with this tolerogenic phenotype, ATG caused a significant induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and a concomitant increase in levels of tryptophan metabolites in the supernatants of DC. Further, ATG-DC did not induce the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction but actively suppressed the T cell proliferation induced by mature DC. These data suggest that besides its well-known effect on T cells, ATG modulates the phenotype of DC in a tolerogenic way, which might constitute an essential part of its immunosuppressive action in vivo.

  3. Thermal denaturation of sunflower globulins in low moisture conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouilly, A.; Orliac, O.; Silvestre, F.; Rigal, L.

    2003-01-01

    DSC analysis in pressure resisting pans of sunflower oil cake makes appear the endothermic peak of sunflower globulins denaturation. Its temperature decreases from 189.5 to 119.9 deg. C while the corresponding enthalpy increases from 2.6 to 3.3 J/g of sample, or from 6.7 to 12.2 J/g of dry protein, when the samples moisture content varies from 0 to 30.0% of the total weight. The plot of the denaturation temperature versus the moisture content is not linear but has a rounded global shape and seems to follow the hydration behavior of the proteins, modeled with the sorption isotherm. As it can be seen on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs, protein corpuscles 'melt' after such a thermal treatment and large aggregates form by coagulation. Moisture dependence of the 'fusion' temperature of native proteic organization, in low moisture conditions, offers so a new characterization method for the use of vegetable proteins in agro-materials

  4. Thermal denaturation of sunflower globulins in low moisture conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouilly, A.; Orliac, O.; Silvestre, F.; Rigal, L

    2003-03-05

    DSC analysis in pressure resisting pans of sunflower oil cake makes appear the endothermic peak of sunflower globulins denaturation. Its temperature decreases from 189.5 to 119.9 deg. C while the corresponding enthalpy increases from 2.6 to 3.3 J/g of sample, or from 6.7 to 12.2 J/g of dry protein, when the samples moisture content varies from 0 to 30.0% of the total weight. The plot of the denaturation temperature versus the moisture content is not linear but has a rounded global shape and seems to follow the hydration behavior of the proteins, modeled with the sorption isotherm. As it can be seen on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs, protein corpuscles 'melt' after such a thermal treatment and large aggregates form by coagulation. Moisture dependence of the 'fusion' temperature of native proteic organization, in low moisture conditions, offers so a new characterization method for the use of vegetable proteins in agro-materials.

  5. Genomic organization of the rat alpha 2u-globulin gene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadyen, D A; Addison, W; Locke, J

    1999-05-01

    The alpha 2u-globulin are a group of similar proteins, belonging to the lipocalin superfamily of proteins, that are synthesized in a subset of secretory tissues in rats. The many alpha 2u-globulin isoforms are encoded by a multigene family that exhibits extensive homology. Despite a high degree of sequence identity, individual family members show diverse expression patterns involving complex hormonal, tissue-specific, and developmental regulation. Analysis suggests that there are approximately 20 alpha 2u-globulin genes in the rat genome. We have used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to show that the alpha 2u-globulin genes are clustered at a single site on rat Chromosome (Chr) 5 (5q22-24). Southern blots of rat genomic DNA separated by pulsed field gel electrophoresis indicated that the alpha 2u-globulin genes are contained on two NruI fragments with a total size of 880 kbp. Analysis of three P1 clones containing alpha 2u-globulin genes indicated that the alpha 2u-globulin genes are tandemly arranged in a head-to-tail fashion. The organization of the alpha 2u-globulin genes in the rat as a tandem array of single genes differs from the homologous major urinary protein genes in the mouse, which are organized as tandem arrays of divergently oriented gene pairs. The structure of these gene clusters may have consequences for the proposed function, as a pheromone transporter, for the protein products encoded by these genes.

  6. SIFAT FUNGSIONAL PRODUK INTERAKSI FRAKSI GLOBULIN 7S KOMAK (Dolichos lablab DAN GUM XANTAN [Functional Properties of the Interaction Product Between Globulin of 7S Fraction of Lablab Bean (Dolichos lablab with Xantan Gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukamto1*

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Lablab bean (Dolichos lablab seeds is a potential source of protein globulin.The bean’s protein content is 20.86 %, and the amount of globulin was more than 60% from the total protein, having major fractions of 7S and 11S. The objectives of this research were to explore the 7S globulin fractions, to study interaction between 7S globulin fractions with xanthan gum, and to observe the functional properties of the product of the interaction. The research was conducted in 2 steps. The first step was to fractionate the 7S fractions from globulin. The second steps was to interact 7S globulin fraction with xanthan gum. The yield of these interaction were examined for its physicochemical and functional properties. The results showed that the 7S globulin fractions could be interacted by xanthan gum at pH 7. The interacted product of globulin 7S fraction 10 % with xanthan gum 0,75 % had good functional properties than globulin 7S fraction, such as oil holding capacity, foaming capacity, and emulsion activity. Water holding capacity could not be detected because the yield became soluble. However,the foaming and emulsifying stability were still lower than those of soybean protein isolates. The research concluded that xanthan gum could be used to improve the physicochemical and functional properties of globulin 7S fraction.

  7. Study of the influence of homologous serum globulin preparations on the intestinal automicroflora in irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinegin, B.V.; Klemparskaya, N.N.; Mal' tsev, V.N.; Korshunov, G.A.; Shal' nova, G.A.; Kuz' mina, T.D.

    1984-09-01

    In spite of considerable experience of practical use of serum globulin preparations, their effect on automicroflora wasn't studied. The favorable effect of therapeutic injection of homologous serum globulin preparations on automicroflora of small and large intestine of mices was established for the model of acute radiation sickness caused by /sup 60/Co irradiation with 700 R dose. The effect of injecting two types of globulin preparations was studied: ones prepared of blood of intact and hemostimulated mices (to increase the content of normal antitissue antibodies in the serum). Besides the general globulin fraction isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation a study was made on the effect of purified IgG and IgM preparations. Threefold subcutaneous or intraperitoneal globulin in ection of 1 ..mu..g dose in a mice prevented after 2, 24, 48 h after irradiation the development of bacteriosis, typical for radiation injury - decreased accumulation of putrefactive bacteria and reduced the suppression of lactobacilli content. Globulin preparations and fractions of hemostimulated mice serum, enriched by normal antitissue antibodies are the most effective ones.

  8. 76 FR 14413 - Risk Mitigation Strategies To Address Potential Procoagulant Activity in Immune Globulin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    .../visit for directions, visitor parking, and public transportation information. Contact Person: Rhonda.... A transcript of the public workshop will be available on the Internet at http://www.fda.gov...

  9. 78 FR 79469 - Strategies To Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ... questions related to patient risk and product characteristics. The workshop has been planned in partnership... questions related to patient risk and product characteristics. The first day of this workshop will include...-associated hemolysis; (2) patient risk factors; and (3) possible product risk factors, including the presence...

  10. A Family Outbreak of Foodborne Botulism Following Consumption of Home-Canned Doogh in Hamadan, West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Food-borne botulism is one of the potentially fatal forms of food poisoning, usually caused by ingestion of home-canned vegetables, fruits and fish products. Objectives The aim of this study was to report an outbreak of botulism due to homemade doogh in Hamadan, Iran. Patients and Methods During an outbreak, 10 members of a family referred to the hospital because of food poisoning. All patients had a history of consumption of doogh, a traditional drink. After careful physical examination, all of them were hospitalized. Botulism was suspected in all patients except for the first patient. Results The first patient was a 76-year-old man who died after 12 hours of admission due to respiratory distress. Nine subsequent patients were diagnosed as botulism with the following symptoms: diplopia (90%, dizziness (70%, nausea and vomiting (80%, ptosis (60%, symmetric weakness of extremities (60%, dysarthria (30%, chest discomfort (30%, mydriasis (20%, dysphasia (20% and dry mouth (20%. All of the nine patients received botulinum antitoxin and improved during 5-15 days of hospitalization. Conclusions Immediate diagnosis based on careful history and physical examination are essential for management of botulism. People should be notified about proper food handling and preparation of traditional homemade foods.

  11. The Short-Lived Epidemic of Botulism From Commercially Canned Foods in the United States, 1919 to 1925.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanjian, Powel

    2018-04-17

    In 1919, three deadly outbreaks of botulism caused by consumption of canned olives packed in California captured national headlines. In all of the outbreaks, which occurred in separate locales, unsuspecting people died after consuming tainted food during a banquet or family meal. The press's sensational portrayal of canned food as hazardous aroused alarm among consumers at a time when commercial canning was becoming more common. Intent on restoring the image of their product as safe and wholesome, canning industry leaders funded a "botulism commission" of scientific experts in 1919 to investigate how to systematically eliminate the threat of botulism that had imperiled their business. The commissioners identified the scientific reasons for the outbreaks, and on the basis of their findings, the California Department of Public Health issued explicit recommendations for sterilization procedures intended to ensure safety. However, the department did not mandate inspections for all canneries. When commercially packed fruits and vegetables continued to cause botulism, industry leaders voluntarily backed a cannery inspection act to legally require all California canners to possess appropriate equipment and follow scientifically validated sterilization procedures. After the California legislature approved the act in 1925, canneries were inspected, regulations were enforced, and no further outbreaks occurred. This botulism epidemic is an example of a disease outbreak that was controlled when business interests became aligned with public health goals. The press's portrayal of afflicted persons as innocent victims and worthy citizens galvanized businessmen to implement safeguards to protect consumers from botulism intoxication. To preserve their customer base and salvage their corporations, leaders of the canning industry acknowledged the public health threat of their unregulated procedures and acted on the recommendations of scientists.

  12. Radioresistance of immunized animals in internal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal'nitskij, S.A.; Ponomareva, T.V.; Shubik, V.M.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of an immunization with bacterial vaccines and antimeasles-gamma-globulin on the radioresistance of raceless white mice was studied. In the vaccinated animals a higher survival rate and duration of life, a better general condition and a better curve of weight and stronger physical stamina were stated compared to the merely irradiated mice. The higher radioresistance is ascribed to the stimulation of cellular and humoral factors of the unspecific protection against infection, to the repair of the lymphoid tissue of the immunized animals and to the decrease in autosensibilization. (author)

  13. Lack of Globulin Synthesis during Seed Development Alters Accumulation of Seed Storage Proteins in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jung Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The major seed storage proteins (SSPs in rice seeds have been classified into three types, glutelins, prolamins, and globulin, and the proportion of each SSP varies. It has been shown in rice mutants that when either glutelins or prolamins are defective, the expression of another type of SSP is promoted to counterbalance the deficit. However, we observed reduced abundances of glutelins and prolamins in dry seeds of a globulin-deficient rice mutant (Glb-RNAi, which was generated with RNA interference (RNAi-induced suppression of globulin expression. The expression of the prolamin and glutelin subfamily genes was reduced in the immature seeds of Glb-RNAi lines compared with those in wild type. A proteomic analysis of Glb-RNAi seeds showed that the reductions in glutelin and prolamin were conserved at the protein level. The decreased pattern in glutelin was also significant in the presence of a reductant, suggesting that the polymerization of the glutelin proteins via intramolecular disulfide bonds could be interrupted in Glb-RNAi seeds. We also observed aberrant and loosely packed structures in the storage organelles of Glb-RNAi seeds, which may be attributable to the reductions in SSPs. In this study, we evaluated the role of rice globulin in seed development, showing that a deficiency in globulin could comprehensively reduce the expression of other SSPs.

  14. CONFORMATION CHANGES OF HUMAN SERUM γ–GLOBULIN IN THE PRESENCE OF ZINC IONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Cheknev

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Conformational changes of human serum γ–globulin during interaction with the zinc ions were studied in a solution. It has been shown that the presence of zinc in over its physiological concentrations led to increase in optical density across the whole spectrum of γ–globulin ultraviolet absorption. On the contrary, hypochromia in the spectrum was registered after interaction of the protein with zinc used in subphisiological concentrations. Possible role of divalent metal cations in changes in conformation of the blood serum γ–globulins, and thereby in regulation of their effector functions was discussed. (Med. Immunol., 2005, vol.7, № 4, pp. 375–380

  15. Toxina botulínica como tratamento para fobia social generalizada com hiperidrose

    OpenAIRE

    Lessa,Larissa da Rocha; Fontenelle,Leonardo F.

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXTO: Enrubescimento, tremores e transpiração excessiva são fenômenos frequentemente observados na fobia social. OBJETIVOS: Descrever a resposta de um paciente com o tipo generalizado de fobia social e hiperidrose à terapia cognitivo-comportamental aliada à toxina botulínica. MÉTODO: Relato de caso único. RESULTADOS: O Sr. A, 20 anos, estudante universitário, procurou tratamento por apresentar sintomas compatíveis com os diagnósticos de fobia social e depressão. O Sr. A também apresentava...

  16. Toxina botulínica para além da cosmética

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Maria José da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado, Ciências Farmacêuticas, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade do Algarve, 2015 As neurotoxinas produzidas a partir da bactéria Clostridium botulinum são potentes inibidores dos neurotransmissores que se encontram entre os neurónios e o músculo, inibindo também a sinalização entre os neurónios. Dos sete serótipos pertencentes à neurotoxina botulínic...

  17. Proteomic analysis of albumin and globulin fractions of pea (Pisum sativum L.) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziuba, Jerzy; Szerszunowicz, Iwona; Nałęcz, Dorota; Dziuba, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic analysis is emerging as a highly useful tool in food research, including studies of food allergies. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis involving isoelectric focusing and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is the most effective method of separating hundreds or even thousands of proteins. In this study, albumin and globulin tractions of pea seeds cv. Ramrod were subjected to proteomic analysis. Selected potentially alergenic proteins were identified based on their molecular weights and isoelectric points. Pea seeds (Pisum sativum L.) cv. Ramrod harvested over a period of two years (Plant Breeding Station in Piaski-Szelejewo) were used in the experiment. The isolated albumins, globulins and legumin and vicilin fractions of globulins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Proteomic images were analysed in the ImageMaster 2D Platinum program with the use of algorithms from the Melanie application. The relative content, isoelectric points and molecular weights were computed for all identified proteins. Electrophoregrams were analysed by matching spot positions from three independent replications. The proteomes of albumins, globulins and legumin and vicilin fractions of globulins produced up to several hundred spots (proteins). Spots most characteristic of a given fraction were identified by computer analysis and spot matching. The albumin proteome accumulated spots of relatively high intensity over a broad range of pi values of ~4.2-8.1 in 3 molecular weight (MW) ranges: I - high molecular-weight albumins with MW of ~50-110 kDa, II - average molecular-weight albumins with MW of ~20-35 kDa, and III - low molecular-weight albumins with MW of ~13-17 kDa. 2D gel electrophoregrams revealed the presence of 81 characteristic spots, including 24 characteristic of legumin and 14 - of vicilin. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis proved to be a useful tool for identifying pea proteins. Patterns of spots with similar isoelectric

  18. Studies on a possible using of penicillin and specific globulin for treatment of Siberia ulcer infection in irradiated animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strel'nikov, V.A.; Mal'tsev, V.N.

    1975-01-01

    The efficiency of anti-anthracic globulin and penicillin for treating infectious anthrax was compared in experiments on 160 guinea pigs and 400 white mice irradiated with sub-lethal doses of cobalt-60 gamma rays. It was found that penicillin retained its effectiveness in the irradiated animals whereas anti-anthracic globulin lost much of its therapeutic efficiency. (auth.)

  19. A Qualitative Inquiry About Pruno, an Illicit Alcoholic Beverage Linked to Botulism Outbreaks in United States Prisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, Nandini; Person, Bobbie; Shew, Mark; Wheeler, Daniel; Hall, Julia; Bogdanow, Linda; Leniek, Karyn; Rao, Agam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Since 2011, 3 outbreaks of botulism in US prisons have been attributed to pruno, which is an alcoholic beverage made by inmates. Following 1 outbreak, we conducted a qualitative inquiry to understand pruno brewing and its social context to inform outbreak prevention measures. Methods. We interviewed staff, inmates, and parolees from 1 prison about pruno production methods, the social aspects of pruno, and strategies for communicating the association between botulism and pruno. Results. Twenty-seven inmates and parolees and 13 staff completed interviews. Pruno is fermented from water, fruit, sugar, and miscellaneous ingredients. Knowledge of pruno making was widespread among inmates; staff were familiar with only the most common ingredients and supplies inmates described. Staff and inmates described inconsistent consequences for pruno possession and suggested using graphic health messages from organizations external to the prison to communicate the risk of botulism from pruno. Conclusions. Pruno making was frequent in this prison. Improved staff recognition of pruno ingredients and supplies might improve detection of brewing activities in this and other prisons. Consistent consequences and clear messages about the association between pruno and botulism might prevent outbreaks. PMID:26378846

  20. National outbreak of type a foodborne botulism associated with a widely distributed commercially canned hot dog chili sauce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliao, Patricia C; Maslanka, Susan; Dykes, Janet; Gaul, Linda; Bagdure, Satish; Granzow-Kibiger, Lynae; Salehi, Ellen; Zink, Donald; Neligan, Robert P; Barton-Behravesh, Casey; Lúquez, Carolina; Biggerstaff, Matthew; Lynch, Michael; Olson, Christine; Williams, Ian; Barzilay, Ezra J

    2013-02-01

    On 7 and 11 July 2007, health officials in Texas and Indiana, respectively, reported 4 possible cases of type A foodborne botulism to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Foodborne botulism is a rare and sometimes fatal illness caused by consuming foods containing botulinum neurotoxin. Investigators reviewed patients' medical charts and food histories. Clinical specimens and food samples were tested for botulinum toxin and neurotoxin-producing Clostridium species. Investigators conducted inspections of the cannery that produced the implicated product. Eight confirmed outbreak associated cases were identified from Indiana (n = 2), Texas (n = 3), and Ohio (n = 3). Botulinum toxin type A was identified in leftover chili sauce consumed by the Indiana patients and 1 of the Ohio patients. Cannery inspectors found violations of federal canned-food regulations that could have led to survival of Clostridium botulinum spores during sterilization. The company recalled 39 million cans of chili. Following the outbreak, the US Food and Drug Administration inspected other canneries with similar canning systems and issued warnings to the industry about the danger of C. botulinum and the importance of compliance with canned food manufacturing regulations. Commercially produced hot dog chili sauce caused these cases of type A botulism. This is the first US foodborne botulism outbreak involving a commercial cannery in >30 years. Sharing of epidemiologic and laboratory findings allowed for the rapid identification of implicated food items and swift removal of potentially deadly products from the market by US food regulatory authorities.

  1. [Acute laryngeal dyspnea in the patient with botulism cured in 2001 year in ENT Department Hospital in Kalisz].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnik, Władysław; Szewczyk, M; Bartnik-Krystalska, A

    2004-01-01

    The authors presented symptoms of botulism, diagnostics and treatment. In this case there was a necessity of urgent tracheotomy. The authors had good results because of early treatment with serum antibotulism A+B+C and symptomatic treatment. Decannulation was only after 45 days because the paralytic symptoms declined very slowly.

  2. Fatal course of foodborne botulism in an eigth-month old Infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Lonati

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available An 8-month old girl, weighing 9 kg, was brought by her parents at 8.15 am to the Emergency Department (ED for a progressive worsening of weakness and acute respiratory failure. On admission, the baby presented with poor oral intake, a weak cry and extremely weak muscular body control. Poor gag and suck, unreactive mydriasis, hypotonia, lethargy and absence of peristalsis were noted. Laboratory data showed severe respiratory acidosis. Chest X-ray, electroencephalography, encephalic CT scan and MRI were all normal, as were cerebrospinal fluid analysis and viral tests. Orotracheal intubation and continuous mechanical ventilation were applied. The patient received fluids, corticosteroids, aerosol therapy, large-spectrum antibiotics and enteral- nutrition. Further investigation revealed ingestion of an improperly prepared homecanned homogenized turkey meal. Type A botulinum neurotoxin was identified. Trivalent botulinum antitoxin, prostigmine and oral activated charcoal were administered. Generalized flaccid paralysis, areflexic bilateral mydriasis, gastric stasis and deep coma persisted for the duration of the hospital stay, and the patient died of severe respiratory failure and cardiac arrest 12 days after ED admission. Botulism poisoning should be suspected in any infant presenting with feeding difficulties, constipation, descendent paralysis or acute respiratory failure. Supportive treatment and antidotal therapy should be performed as soon as a clinical diagnosis is made. We describe a case of foodborne botulism in an 8-month old infant caused by ingestion of an improperly prepared home-canned homogenized turkey meal, representing the youngest fatal case reported in medical literature.

  3. Sex hormone-binding globulin levels predict insulin sensitivity, disposition index, and cardiovascular risk during puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kaspar; Aksglaede, Lise; Munch-Andersen, Thor

    2009-01-01

    Early puberty is associated with increased risk of subsequent cardiovascular disease. Low sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels are a feature of early puberty and of conditions associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The aim of the present study was to evaluate SHBG as a predictor...... of glucose metabolism and metabolic risk during puberty....

  4. Cortisol-binding globulin and meat quality in five European lines of pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geverink, N.A.; Foury, A.; Plastow, G.S.; Gil, L.; Gispert, M.; Hortós, M.; Font I Furnols, M.; Gort, G.; Moisan, M.P.; Mormède, P.

    2006-01-01

    The gene (Cbg) encoding cortisol-binding globulin (CBG) has been proposed as a candidate gene to explain genetic variation in cortisol secretion and carcass composition in pigs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between CBG and pork quality in 5 European breeding lines,

  5. Increased sex hormone-binding globulin levels in children and adolescents with thyrotoxicosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J; Jensen, Rikke Bodin Beck; Juul, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Thyrotoxicosis is a rare condition in pediatric patients, and optimal treatment can be difficult to achieve in some children. To our knowledge, no studies have evaluated sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels in hyperthyroid children and adolescents in relation to age- and gender...

  6. Competitive adsorption of albumin and monoclonal immuno upsilon globulin molecules on polystyrene surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elgersma, F.

    1990-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is proteins at interfaces. The main purpose of the work was to acquire more insight into the mechanism of adsorption of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and monoclonal Immuno gamma Globulins (IgG's). both individually and in competition. Another aim was to achieve

  7. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirick, G R; Bradt, B M; Denardo, S J; Denardo, G L

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ((90)yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ((131)I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) anti-CD20 MAbs for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, assays were developed to determine HAGA (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to ''humanize'' MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  8. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirick, G. R.; Bradt, B. M.; Denardo, S. J.; Denardo, G. L.

    2004-01-01

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ( 9 0yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ( 1 31I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades

  9. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirick, G. R.; Bradt, B. M.; Denardo, S. J.; Denardo, G. L. [Calfornia Univ., Sacramento (United States). Davis Medical Center

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ({sup 9}0yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ({sup 1}31I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  10. Is the sex hormone binding globulin related to preeclampsia independent of insulin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmanian, M.; Salari, Z.; Mirmohammadkhani, M.; Ghorbani, R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the association between Sex Hormone Binding Globulin and preeclampsia in Iranian women considering the probable confounding effect of insulin resistance. Methods: The case-control study was conducted at the Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, and comprised pregnant women who received prenatal care at Amiralmomenin Hospital in 2011. Cases represented patients admitted because of preeclampsia, while controls were randomly selected eligible pregnant women without hypertension and/or proteinuria. Fasting blood sugar and insulin were assessed for all participants as well as their blood concentration of Sex Hormone Binding Globulin. The Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance Score was used. The correlation between dependant and independent variables was reported by crude and adjusted odds ratio applying logistic regression models. SPSS 16.0 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 100 pregnant women in the study, 45(45%) were cases. Insulin resistance was found to be significantly more frequent in the cases compared to the controls (adjusted odds ratio=2.78; 95% Confidence Interval: 1.11, 6.90; p<0.01). There was a significant reverse correlation between level of Sex Hormone Binding Globulin in blood and being a case of preeclampsia (adjusted odds ratio=0.99; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.98, 1.00; p=0.04). Conclusion: Independent of insulin resistance, every 1nmol/l increase in Sex Hormone Binding Globulin, decreases the odds of preeclampsia by 1%, notifying Sex Hormone Binding Globulin as an important biomarker about its etiology and prediction. (author)

  11. Sex Hormone–Binding Globulin and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Women and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Eric L.; Song, Yiqing; Manson, JoAnn E.; Hunter, David J.; Lee, Cathy C.; Rifai, Nader; Buring, Julie E.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Liu, Simin

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Circulating sex hormone–binding globulin levels are inversely associated with insulin resistance, but whether these levels can predict the risk of developing type 2 diabetes is uncertain. METHODS We performed a nested case–control study of postmenopausal women in the Women’s Health Study who were not using hormone therapy (359 with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and 359 controls). Plasma levels of sex hormone–binding globulin were measured; two polymorphisms of the gene encoding sex hormone–binding globulin, SHBG, that were robustly associated with the protein levels were genotyped and applied in mendelian randomization analyses. We then conducted a replication study in an independent cohort of men from the Physicians’ Health Study II (170 with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and 170 controls). RESULTS Among women, higher plasma levels of sex hormone–binding globulin were prospectively associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes: multivariable odds ratios were 1.00 for the first (lowest) quartile of plasma levels, 0.16 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.08 to 0.33) for the second quartile, 0.04 (95% CI, 0.01 to 0.12) for the third quartile, and 0.09 (95% CI, 0.03 to 0.21) for the fourth (highest) quartile (P<0.001 for trend). These prospective associations were replicated among men (odds ratio for the highest quartile of plasma levels vs. the lowest quartile, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.36; P<0.001 for trend). As compared with homozygotes of the respective wild-type allele, carriers of a variant allele of the SHBG single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs6259 had 10% higher sex hormone–binding globulin levels (P = 0.005), and carriers of an rs6257 variant had 10% lower plasma levels (P = 0.004); variants of both SNPs were also associated with a risk of type 2 diabetes in directions corresponding to their associated sex hormone–binding globulin levels. In mendelian randomization analyses, the predicted odds ratio of type 2 diabetes per

  12. Electrophoretic Profile of Albumin, α1, α2, β and γ Globulin in Sera of Opioid Dependants and Non-dependants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    koros Div-salaar

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Div-salaar K1, Saravani R2, Shamsi-e-meimandi M3, Taei M4, Sheikholeslami A5 1. MSc. Staff member of Neurology Sciences Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences 2. Instructor, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences 3. Instructor, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Neurology Sciences Research Center, Karman University of Medical Sciences 4. Researcher, Neurology Sciences Research Center, Karman University of Medical Sciences 5. B.Sc in Environmental Hygiene, Kerman University of Medical Sciences Abstract Background: The prevalence rate of opioids consumption is high in Iran. The latest research approach related to substance abuse considers the role of plasma proteins in novel treatments of addiction. Since long-term consumption of opioids has some effects on liver function and plasma transfer systems, the present study was designed to determine the electrophoretic profile of plasma proteins in opiates-addict subjects. Materials and methods: In this cross-control study, the sample groups consisted of 42 opium consumers and 35 heroine dependents as case group and 35 non-addict volunteers as control group. The control group was matched with addicts for age and sex. Opioid consumption was confirmed by laboratory diagnostic tests on urine samples such as immunochromatography (RSA, rapidosis and complementary tests including liquid-solid column chromatography and thin layer chromatography (TLC. After blood collection and serum preparation, serum electrophoresis was performed. Data were presented as mean±SEM and analyzed by SPSS ver.11.5. The comparison of groups was done by using parametric tests and p<0.01 was considered as statistically significant. Results: There was no significant difference in the amounts of albumin, alpha-1-globulin, alpha-2-globulin and beta-globulin between groups. Gamma-globulin concentration was not significantly different between

  13. Avian botulism type E in waterbirds of Lake Michigan, 2010–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipault, Jennifer G.; White, C. LeAnn; Blehert, David S.; Jennings, Susan K.; Strom, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    During 2010 to 2013, waterbird mortality surveillance programs used a shared protocol for shoreline walking surveys performed June to November at three areas in northern Lake Michigan. In 2010 and 2012, 1244 total carcasses (0.8 dead bird/km walked) and 2399 total carcasses (1.2 dead birds/km walked), respectively, were detected. Fewer carcasses were detected in 2011 (353 total carcasses, 0.2 dead bird/km walked) and 2013 (451 total carcasses, 0.3 dead bird/km walked). During 3 years, peak detection of carcasses occurred in October and involved primarily migratory diving and fish-eating birds, including long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis; 2010), common loons (Gavia immer; 2012), and red-breasted mergansers (Mergus serrator; 2013). In 2011, peak detection of carcasses occurred in August and consisted primarily of summer residents such as gulls (Larus spp.) and double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus). A subset of fresh carcasses was collected throughout each year of the study and tested for botulinum neurotoxin type E (BoNT/E). Sixty-one percent of carcasses (57/94) and 10 of 11 species collected throughout the sampling season tested positive for BoNT/E, suggesting avian botulism type E was a major cause of death for both resident and migratory birds in Lake Michigan. The variety of avian species affected by botulism type E throughout the summer and fall during all 4 years of coordinated surveillance also suggests multiple routes for bird exposure to BoNT/E in Lake Michigan.

  14. A simple ligand-binding assay for thyroxine-binding globulin on reusable Sephadex columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastomsky, C.H.; Kalloo, H.; Frenkel-Leith, D.B.; McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec

    1977-01-01

    A method for the assay of thyroxine-binding globulin on reusable Sephadex G-25 columns is described. It depends upon elution by diluted iodothyronine-free serum of protein-bound [ 125 I]thyroxine from the columns under conditions where binding to thyroxine-binding prealbumin and albumin are abolished. It is simple, rapid and precise, and permits determinations inlarge numbers of samples. Values (mg/l; mean +- S.D.) were: normals 31.6+-5.4, hyperthyroid 28.3+-4.8, hypothyroid 40.6+-7.5, oral contraceptives 40.1+-6.8, pregnant 50.3+-5.4, cirrhotics 20.7+-4.3. Concentrations were reduced in serum heated at 56degC, while the uptake of [ 125 I]triiodothyronine was increased. There was a significant negative correlation between thyroxine-binding globulin concentration and triiodothyronine uptake in the heated serum samples and in euthyroid subjects

  15. Relationship between Post-kidney Transplantation Antithymocyte Globulin Therapy and Wound Healing Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Pourmand, G. R.; Dehghani, S.; Saraji, A.; Khaki, S.; Mortazavi, S. H.; Mehrsai, A.; Sajadi, H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Wound healing disorders are probably the most common post-transplantation surgical complications. It is thought that wound healing disturbance occurs due to antiproliferative effects of immunosuppressive drugs. On the other hand, success of transplantation is dependent on immunosuppressive therapies. Antihuman thymocyte globulin (ATG) has been widely used as induction therapy but the impact of this treatment on wound healing is not fully understood. Objective: To investigate wound...

  16. Investigation of a type C/D botulism outbreak in free-range laying hens in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souillard, R; Le Maréchal, C; Ballan, V; Rouxel, S; Léon, D; Balaine, L; Poëzevara, T; Houard, E; Robineau, B; Robinault, C; Chemaly, M; Le Bouquin, S

    2017-04-01

    In 2014, a botulism outbreak in a flock of laying hens was investigated in France. In the flock of 5020 hens, clinical signs of botulism occurred at 46 weeks of age. A type C/D botulism outbreak was confirmed using the mouse lethality assay for detection of botulinum toxin in serum and a real-time PCR test to detect Clostridium botulinum in intestinal contents. The disease lasted one week with a mortality rate of 2.6% without recurrence. Botulism in laying hens has rarely been reported. Five monthly visits were made to the farm between December 2014 and May 2015 for a longitudinal study of the persistence of C. botulinum in the poultry house after the outbreak, and to assess egg contamination by C. botulinum. Several samples were collected on each visit: in the house (from the ventilation circuit, the egg circuit, water and feed, droppings) and the surrounding area. Thirty clean and 30 dirty eggs were also swabbed at each visit. In addition, 12 dirty and 12 clean eggs were collected to analyse eggshell and egg content. The samples were analysed using real-time PCR to detect type C/D C. botulinum. The bacterium was still detected in the house more than 5 months after the outbreak, mostly on the walls and in the egg circuit. Regarding egg contamination, the bacteria were detected only on the shell but not in the content of the eggs. Control measures should therefore be implemented throughout the egg production period to avoid dissemination of the bacteria, particularly during egg collection.

  17. THE EFFECTS OF COPPER AND ZINC IONS DURING THEIR BINDING WITH HUMAN SERUM γ-GLOBULIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Cheknev

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Conformational changes of human serum γ-globulin were studied during and after its binding with copper and zinc ions, using molecular ultrafiltration and differential spectrophotometry. The contents of nonbound metals in the filtrate were evaluated, resp., with sodium diethyl thyocarbamate and o-phenanthroline. It has been shown that copper and zinc exhibited common biological properties during their interactions with protein, but the binding differed sufficiently under similar experimental conditions. E.g., it was confirmed that copper was more active at the external sites of γ-globulin molecule, whereas zinc demonstrated tropicity for the areas of protein intraglobular compartments. The metal-binding sites have been described that differ in their parameters of interactions with cations and their spatial location within globular domains. Approaches are suggested for dynamic analysis of saturation for these differently located sites by the metal ions. We discuss the issues of altered conformational state of the γ-globulin molecule during the binding of cations, as well as potential usage of these data in clinical immunology.

  18. Long-term outcome of 25 children and adolescents with severe aplastic anemia treated with antithymocyte globulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de-Medeiros C.R.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe aplastic anemia (SAA is probably an immune-mediated disorder, and immunosuppressive therapy is recommended for patients with no available donor for bone marrow transplant. Between October 1984 and November 1987, 25 consecutive children and adolescents with SAA with no HLA-compatible marrow donor received equine antithymocyte globulin (ATG (15 mg kg-1 day-1 for 10 days. The patients were evaluated 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after starting ATG treatment. Thereafter, patients were evaluated yearly until July 1998. Median age was 10 years (range, 1.5-20 years, granulocyte counts on referral ranged from 0.032 to 1.4 x 10(9/l (median 0.256 x 10(9/l, and 12 patients had granulocyte counts <0.2 x 10(9/l. At a median follow-up of 9.6 years (range, 8.6-11.8 years, 10 patients (40% remained alive with good marrow function. No morphologic evidence of hematological clonal disorders has been observed, although two patients probably have acquired clonal chromosomal abnormalities (trisomy 8 and del(6q21, respectively. Responses to ATG were observed between 6 weeks and 6 months from the start of treatment in 60% of evaluable patients. The response rate was not different in patients whose granulocyte count at diagnosis was <0.2 x 10(9/l, or in those who were <10 years of age. This study supports the view that, when compared with supportive measures, ATG is an effective treatment for children or adolescents with SAA. Although these results are inferior to those reported for marrow transplantation or more intensive immunosuppressive regimens, these patients who responded to ATG are long-term survivors with stable peripheral blood counts and a low rate of relapse.

  19. Apoptotic effects of antilymphocyte globulins on human pro-inflammatory CD4+CD28- T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Duftner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pro-inflammatory, cytotoxic CD4(+CD28(- T-cells with known defects in apoptosis have been investigated as markers of premature immuno-senescence in various immune-mediated diseases. In this study we evaluated the influence of polyclonal antilymphocyte globulins (ATG-Fresenius, ATG-F on CD4(+CD28(- T-cells in vivo and in vitro. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Surface and intracellular three colour fluorescence activated cell sorting analyses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 16 consecutive transplant recipients and short-term cell lines were performed. In vivo, peripheral levels of CD3(+CD4(+CD28(- T-cells decreased from 3.7 ± 7.1% before to 0 ± 0% six hours after ATG-F application (P = 0.043 in 5 ATG-F treated but not in 11 control patients (2.9 ± 2.9% vs. 3.9 ± 3.0%. In vitro, ATG-F induced apoptosis even in CD4(+CD28(- T-cells, which was 4.3-times higher than in CD4(+CD28(+ T-cells. ATG-F evoked apoptosis was partially reversed by the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl (Cbz-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe-fluoromethylketone (zVAD-fmk and prednisolon-21-hydrogensuccinate. ATG-F triggered CD25 expression and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and induced down-regulation of the type 1 chemokine receptors CXCR-3, CCR-5, CX3CR-1 and the central memory adhesion molecule CD62L predominately in CD4(+CD28(- T-cells. CONCLUSION: In summary, in vivo depletion of peripheral CD3(+CD4(+CD28(- T-cells by ATG-F in transplant recipients was paralleled in vitro by ATG-F induced apoptosis. CD25 expression and chemokine receptor down-regulation in CD4(+CD28(- T-cells only partly explain the underlying mechanism.

  20. [Partial thyroxine binding globulin deficiency in test tube infants: report of cases and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Y L; Wang, C L; Liang, L

    2016-06-02

    To investigate the clinical characteristics of twins with thyroxine binding globulin (TBG) deficiency and to find SERPINA7 gene mutations. Data(2015) related to clinical characteristics, serum biochemistry, gene mutations and pedigree of two children with TBG deficiency were collected in the First Affiliated Hospital of College of Medicine, Zhejiang University. The related literature was searched form China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, National Center for Biotechnology Information and PubMed (up to December 2015) by using search terms "Thyroxine binding globulin deficiency, gene, mutation" . Both patients were diagnosed as central hypothyroidism at the beginning and treated with L-thyroxine. Both of the identical twins of the triplet were observed for mutation in exon3, c. 631G﹥A(p.A211T), a new mutation had not been reported, but their parents and another non-identical triplet brother were normal. Literature review showed that 23 foreign cases with SERPINA7 gene mutation had been reported, however, no Chinese with SERPINA7 gene mutation had been reported. Among reported cases it was shown that SERPINA7 gene mutations located in exon, intron, promoter and enhancer. Up to now, 49 variants had been identified, 41 of them located in the mutated genes. Including these two cases, patients with thyroxine binding globulin deficiency were characterized by reduced serum TH levels, but normal free TH and TSH and absence of clinical manifestations. The new mutation of SERPINA7 gene c. 631G﹥A(p.A211T)is not transmitted via the known X chromosome linked heredity, and as the cases were test tube triplet infants, it is a de novo mutation. The serum thyroid function tests of TBG deficiency showed decreased TT4, TT3 and normal TSH and TBG deficiency is often misdiagnosed as central hypothyroidism.

  1. Comparative characterization of molecular varieties of thyroxine-binding human globulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermolenko, M.N.; Sviridov, O.V.; Strel'chenok, O.A.

    1986-01-01

    Two molecular varieties of thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) of human retroplacental blood, obtained as a result of fractionation of pure TBG on concanavalin A-Sepharose, were studied. It was shown that these varieties (TBG-1 and TBG-2) are immunologically identical; they have the same molecular weight and amino acid composition, exhibit the same affinity for thyroid hormones, and are indistinguishable in spectral characteristics. And yet, TBG-1 and TBG-2 have differences in charge, detectable in isoelectrofocusing, and a different monosaccharide composition. The existence of molecular varieties of TBG during pregnancy is apparently due to the peculiarities of the glycosylation of the polypeptide chain during TBG biosynthesis

  2. 11S Storage globulin from pumpkin seeds: regularities of proteolysis by papain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudakova, A S; Rudakov, S V; Kakhovskaya, I A; Shutov, A D

    2014-08-01

    Limited proteolysis of the α- and β-chains and deep cleavage of the αβ-subunits by the cooperative (one-by-one) mechanism was observed in the course of papain hydrolysis of cucurbitin, an 11S storage globulin from seeds of the pumpkin Cucurbita maxima. An independent analysis of the kinetics of the limited and cooperative proteolyses revealed that the reaction occurs in two successive steps. In the first step, limited proteolysis consisting of detachments of short terminal peptides from the α- and β-chains was observed. The cooperative proteolysis, which occurs as a pseudo-first order reaction, started at the second step. Therefore, the limited proteolysis at the first step plays a regulatory role, impacting the rate of deep degradation of cucurbitin molecules by the cooperative mechanism. Structural alterations of cucurbitin induced by limited proteolysis are suggested to generate its susceptibility to cooperative proteolysis. These alterations are tentatively discussed on the basis of the tertiary structure of the cucurbitin subunit pdb|2EVX in comparison with previously obtained data on features of degradation of soybean 11S globulin hydrolyzed by papain.

  3. Radioimmunoassay of testosterone and of sexual hormone-binding globulin in plasma of women with hirsutism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warenik-Szymankiewicz, A.; Baron, J.; Chawlisz, K.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma-borne testosterone was determined in 176 women with hirsutism, and in 47 patients sexual hormone-binding globulin was determined as well. The highest average testosterone values were recorded from cases with congenital adrenogenital syndrome (AGS). In cases of postnatal AGS values were much lower, but they were clearly in excess of those recordable from Stein-Leventhal syndrome. Plasma borne testosterone in cases of hirsutism came very close to testosterone levels established in the context of Stein-Leventhal syndrome. Testosterone levels dropped with significance, following AGS treatment, using cortisol derivatives, and following wedge-shaped ovariectomy. Sexual hormone binding-globulin was found to be strongly reduced in almost all women with hirsutism. Such reduction seemed to suggest the presence of increased amounts of free active testosterone in the blood of those patients. Determination of plasma-borne testosterone in cases of hirsutism is considered to be essential to both diagnosis of the endocrinological syndromes and monitoring of therapy. (author)

  4. Antitumor effect of degalactosylated gc-globulin on orthotopic grafted lung cancer in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Keiji; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Takeuchi, Ryota; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi; Onizuka, Shinya; Terada, Hiroshi

    2013-07-01

    Group-specific component (Gc)-globulin-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) generated by a cascade of catalytic reactions with deglycosidase enzymes exerts antitumor activity. We hypothesized that degalactosyl Gc-globulin (DG3), a precursor of GcMAF, also plays a role in recovery from cancer as well as GcMAF due to progression of deglycosylation by generally resident sialidases and mannosidases. We prepared the subtypes of DG3, such as 1f1f and 1s1s and its 22 homodimers, by using vitamin D3-binding Sepharose CL-6B and examined their antitumor activity in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma cells, by counting the number of nodules formed in their lungs. Antitumor activity of DG3 was observed regardless of its subtype, being equivalent to that of GcMAF. The injection route of DG3 affected its antitumor activity, with subcutaneous and intramuscular administration being more favorable than the intraperitoneal or intravenous route. In order to obtain significant antitumor activity, more than 160 ng/kg of DG3 were required. DG3 proved to be promising as an antitumor agent, similarly to GcMAF.

  5. Barbiturate ingestion in three adult captive tigers (Panthera tigris and concomitant fatal botulism of one : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Williams

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Zoo animals, including tigers, have been reported to suffer from barbiturate intoxication, with pentabarbitone being most commonly recorded. Clinical signs range from mild ataxia to general anaesthesia with recovery over hours to days with several factors affecting hepatic barbiturate metabolism and tissue partitioning. Botulism is an often fatal intoxication in man, animals, birds and certain fish. The occurrence in carnivores is uncommon to rare, with only 2 reports found of botulism in felids. This report relates to 3 adult captive cohabiting tigers that simultaneously developed signs of abdominal discomfort, progressive ataxia, recumbency and comatose sleep resembling stage 2 anaesthesia, alternating with periods of distracted wakefulness and ataxic movements. These signs occurred 4 days after being fed the carcass of a horse that had ostensibly died of colic and not been euthanased. The male tiger that was the dominant animal in the feeding hierarchy was worst affected and had to be given intravenous fluids. The female that was lowest in hierarchy was unaffected. After 48-72 hours of treatment at the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital the females could eat and made an uneventful recovery. The male tiger showed partial recovery but died during the night a few hours after drinking water on his return to the owner. Necropsy revealed severe oesophageal dilation and impaction with decaying grass; some of this material and water were present in the pharynx and trachea, and had been aspirated causing acute widespread bronchopneumonia. Colon content tested negative for common pesticides but, together with liver, tested positive for barbiturate. Serum taken on the day of admission had tested negative for barbiturate and the residual serum from the 3 animals later tested negative for botulinum toxin. Colon and oesophageal content from the male at necropsy were positive for Clostridium botulinum toxin type C by the mouse bioassay

  6. Outcome of children with severe acquired aplastic anemia treated with rabbit antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Pereira Garanito

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the outcome of children with severe acquired aplastic anemia treated with rabbit antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine as first-line treatment at this institution. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 26 pediatric patients with aplastic anemia, treated between 1996 and 2011 with rabbit antithymocyte globulin plus cyclosporine. Results: The overall response rate at six months was 34.6% (9/26, and the cumulative incidence of relapse was 26.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4%-66% at 5 years. The cumulative incidence of clonal evolution after immunosuppressive therapy was 8.3% (95% CI: 0.001%-53.7% at five years with both clonal evolutions in non -responders who acquired monosomy 7 karyotype. The overall survival at five years was 73.6% (95% CI: 49.2%-87.5%. Conclusions: The present results confirm the poor response rate with rabbit antithymocyte globulin as first therapy in pediatrics patients, similar to what has been reported for patients of all ages. This confirmation is problematic in Brazil, given the lack of horse antithymocyte globulin in many markets outside the United States. Resumo: Objetivo: Avaliar o resultado de crianças com anemia aplástica grave adquirida tratadas com globulina antitimocítica de coelho e ciclosporina como tratamento inicial em nosso instituto. Métodos: Análise retrospectiva de 26 pacientes pediátricos com anemia aplástica tratados entre 1996 e 2011 com globulina antitimocítica de coelho e ciclosporina. Resultados: A taxa de resposta geral em seis meses foi de 34,6% (9/26, e a incidência acumulada de recorrência foi de 26,5% (intervalo de confiança [IC] de 95%,1,4%-66% em cinco anos. A incidência acumulada de evolução clonal após a terapia imunossupressora foi de 8,3% (IC 95%, 0,001%-53,7% em cinco anos, com ambas as evoluções clonais em pacientes sem resposta que adquiriram o cariótipo com monossomia 7. A sobrevida geral em cinco anos foi de 73,6% (IC 95%, 49

  7. Childhood Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lowest levels in history, thanks to years of immunization. Children must get at least some vaccines before ... child provide protection for many years, adults need immunizations too. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  8. Immunizations - diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000331.htm Immunizations - diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Immunizations (vaccines or vaccinations) help protect you from some ...

  9. Regional variations in home canning practices and the risk of foodborne botulism in the Republic of Georgia, 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkhashvili, N; Chokheli, M; Chubinidze, M; Abazashvili, N; Chakvetadze, N; Imnadze, P; Kretsinger, K; Varma, J; Sobel, J

    2015-04-01

    Foodborne botulism is a severe, paralytic illness caused by ingestion of preformed neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum. In 2003, we conducted a population-based household survey of home canning practices to explore marked regional variations in botulism incidence in the Republic of Georgia (ROG). We designed a cluster sampling scheme and subdivided each of the 10 regions of the ROG into a variable number of strata. Households were selected from each stratum using a two-step cluster sampling methodology. We administered a questionnaire about home canning practices to household members responsible for food preparation. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, we modeled high (eastern ROG) against low (western ROG) incidence areas. Overall, we surveyed 2,742 households nationwide. Home canning with a capping device hermetically sealing the lid covering the jar was practiced by 1,909 households (65.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 59.8 to 72.1%). Canning was more prevalent in regions of low botulism incidence (34 versus 32%; P canning vegetables and consuming them (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.3 to 3.5) and adding any of the following ingredients to the jar at time of preparation: >1 tablespoon of salt per liter (aOR = 5.1; 95% CI: 1.2 to 22.6); vinegar (aOR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3 to 3.7), and greens (aOR = 5.6; 95% CI: 1.7 to 18.2). The following practices were associated with a decreased risk in high-botulism areas: >57 jars canned per household annually (aOR = 0.5; 95% CI: 0.3 to 0.9), covering or immersing vegetables in boiling water before placing them into the jar (aOR = 0.3 95% CI: 0.2 to 0.6), covering or immersing vegetables in boiling water after placing them into the jar (aOR = 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2 to 0.9), or adding garlic (aOR = 0.2; 95% CI: 0.1 to 0.5) or aspirin (aOR = 0.1; 95% CI: 0.1 to 0.2) to the jar at the time of preparation.

  10. Intraindividual variation of triiodothyronine, thyroxine, thyrotropin and thyroxine-binding globulin in fasting serum from healthy men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liappis, N.; Hoffmann, U.; Rao, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    The concentrations of triiodothyronine, thyroxine, thyrotropin and thyroxine-binding globulin were determined in fasting serum from 11 healthy men (age 18-25 years) by radioimmunoassays conducted over a period of 4 weeks on 5 consecutive days per week. The concentrations of thyroxine and thyroxine-binding globulin were very consistent intraindividually, with coefficients of variation of 7.84% and 9.37%, respectively. The triiodothyronine and thyrotropin levels showed significant intraindividual variability with coefficients of variation of 18.38% and 51.85%, respectively. These results point to the type of difficulties encountered in judging serum values, namely intraindividual variations over a given period of time. (orig.) [de

  11. Comparison of an anti-rabies human monoclonal antibody combination with human polyclonal anti-rabies immune globulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, Jaap; Marissen, Wilfred E.; Weldon, William C.; Niezgoda, Michael; Hanlon, Cathleen A.; Rice, Amy B.; Kruif, John de; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Bakker, Alexander B. H.; Rupprecht, Charles E.

    2006-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates human mortality from endemic canine rabies to be 55,000 deaths/year. Limited supply hampers the accessibility of appropriate lifesaving treatment, particularly in areas where rabies is endemic. Anti-rabies antibodies are key to protection against lethal

  12. Immunization Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... room/fact-sheets/detail/immunization-coverage","@context":"http://schema.org","@type":"Article"}; العربية 中文 français русский español ... Plan Global Health Observatory (GHO) data - Immunization More information on vaccines and immunization News 1 in 10 ...

  13. Protein chemical characterization of Gc globulin (vitamin D-binding protein) isoforms; Gc-1f, Gc-1s and Gc-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Maja; Jørgensen, Charlotte S; Laursen, Inga

    2007-01-01

    -survival of patients with fulminant hepatic failure and trauma. Here, we characterize the dominant isoforms of plasma-derived Gc globulin from Cohn fraction IV paste with respect to amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications. Gc globulin was purified in large scale and the isoforms separated by ion...

  14. Toxina botulínica no tratamento da dor Toxina botulínica en el tratamiento del dolor Botulinum toxin in pain treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Carlos Gomes Colhado

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A toxina botulínica (TxB, uma das mais potentes toxinas bacterianas conhecidas, tem reconhecidamente ação terapêutica eficaz no tratamento de algumas síndromes dolorosas. Entretanto, algumas de suas indicações ainda estão em fase de comprovação com relação a sua eficácia. O objetivo deste estudo foi revisar o histórico, propriedades farmacológicas e aplicações clinicas da TxB, quando empregada no tratamento de dores de diferentes origens. CONTEÚDO: A TxB é o produto da fermentação do Clostridium Botulinum, uma bactéria anaeróbia Gram-positiva. Comercialmente, as TxB existem nas formas A e B, agentes biológicos obtidos laboratorialmente. A TxB, uma neurotoxina que possui alta afinidade pelas sinapses colinérgicas, ocasiona bloqueio na liberação de acetilcolina pelo terminal nervoso, sem alterar a condução neural de sinais elétricos ou síntese e armazenamento de acetilcolina. Comprovadamente, a TxB pode enfraquecer seletivamente a musculatura dolorosa, interrompendo o ciclo espasmo-dor. Com relação à dor, varias publicações têm demonstrado a eficácia e segurança da TxB-A no tratamento da cefaleia tipo tensão, migrânea, dor lombar crônica e dor miofascial. CONCLUSÕES: A TxB-A é segura e bem tolerada em desordens dolorosas crônicas, onde regimes de farmacoterapia podem sabidamente provocar efeitos colaterais. Outra vantagem é a redução do uso de analgésicos e o tempo de ação de 3 a 4 meses por dose. Entretanto pesquisas futuras serão necessárias para se estabelecer a eficácia da TxB-A em desordens dolorosas crônicas e seu exato mecanismo no alivio da dor, bem como seu potencial em tratamentos multifatoriais.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: La toxina botulínica (TxB, una de las más potentes toxinas bacterianas de que se tiene conocimiento, posee una reconocida acción terapéutica eficaz en el tratamiento de algunos síndromes dolorosos. Sin embargo, algunas de sus

  15. Emergence of suspected type D botulism in ruminants in England and Wales (2001-2009), associated with exposure to broiler litter.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Payne, J.H.; Hogg, R.A.; Otter, A.; Roest, H.I.J.; Livesey, C.T.

    2011-01-01

    Scanning surveillance by the Veterinary Laboratories Agency revealed the emergence of suspected botulism in ruminants in 2003, presented as flaccid paralysis. From 2003 to 2009, 168 cattle and 19 sheep incidents were recorded, with mortality between 5 and 80 per cent. All sheep incidents and 95 per

  16. Toxina botulínica y su empleo en la patología oral y maxilofacial Botulinum toxin and its use in oral and maxillofacial pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Martínez-Pérez

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Las toxinas botulínicas son exotoxinas de la bacteria formadora de esporas Clostridim botulinum y los agentes causantes del botulismo. Cuando se inyecta en el músculo produce una parálisis flácida. El efecto clínico está directamente relacionado con la dosis y debe ajustarse para cada caso concreto. La Toxina botulínica ha demostrado en los más de veinte años en que se está utilizando que es un fármaco seguro. Las indicaciones de la toxina botulínica en la actualidad incluyen todas aquellas patologías que resultan de la hiperfunción muscular y la disfunción autonómica.Abstract: Botilinum toxins are exotoxins of the bacteria that form the Clostridium botulinum spores and the causative agents of botulism. When injected into the muscle flaccid paralysis is produced. The clinical effect is directly related with the dose and is should be adjusted for each particular case. over the last twenty years that it has been in use, the botulinum toxin has shown itself to be a reliable drug. Current indications for the use of botulinum toxin include all those pathologies which are the results of muscle hyperfunction and autonomic dysfunction.

  17. Immunizing Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Jody Macdonald

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the complex contexts within which Canadian health professionals engage in immunizing children and focuses on the Canadian practice guidelines and current scientific evidence that direct Canadian health professional competencies. The article begins by presenting two current global vaccine initiatives and links these to immunization in Canada. A selected literature review identifies current best immunization practices. With the purpose of promoting quality improvement, three key Canadian immunization competencies for health professional are highlighted: communication with parents, including those who are experiencing vaccine hesitancy; administration of immunizing agents; and documentation of immunizations. Health professionals are encouraged to reflect on immunization competencies and ensure evidence-based practices underpin vaccine delivery in their primary care settings.

  18. Botulismo tipo C em ganso ocorrido em Minas Gerais, Brasil Type C botulism in a goose at Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carlos Faria Lobato

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Botulismo é uma intoxicação causada pela ingestão das toxinas produzidas pelo Clostridium botulinum, que acomete mamíferos e aves, caracterizando-se por um quadro de paralisia flácida. Neste trabalho, é descrito um caso de botulismo em ganso, ocorrido no município de Santa Luzia, região metropolitana de Belo Horizonte, no Estado de Minas Gerais. Ao exame clínico, o animal apresentava-se com um quadro de paralisia flácida dos músculos do pescoço, das pernas e asas, além de apresentar ainda desprendimento de penas. A necropsia não revelou lesões significativas. Foi colhido o soro do animal e submetido ao teste de soroneutralização em camundongo, que identificou a toxina de C. botulinum tipo C.Botulism is an intoxication caused by the ingestion of toxins produced by Clostridium botulinum, that affects mammals and birds, characterized by a flaceid paralysis. This report describes a case of botulism in a goose in Santa Luzia, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Clinical examinations showed dropping feathers and flaccid paralysis involving the muscles of the wings, legs and neck. post-mortem examination showed no significant gross or macroscopic lesions C. botulinum type C toxin was demonstrated in the serum of the affected animal through serum neutralization test in mice.

  19. Konsentrasi Protein Total, Albumin, dan Globulin Anak Kambing Peranakan Etawah Setelah Pemberian Berbagai Sediaan Kolostrum* (TOTAL PROTEIN, ALBUMIN, AND GLOBULIN CONCENTRATIONS ON ETTAWAH CROSSBREED NEONATES FOLLOWING THE ADMINISTRATION OF VARIOUS FORM O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Esfandiari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to study the profile of total protein, albumin, and globulin concentrationson Ettawah crossbreed neonates after consuming various colostrums. Twenty four healthy neonatal kidswere used in this study. The neonates were divided into four groups. Each group received fresh maternal(goat colostrum, frozen-thawed bovine colostrum, bovine spray dried colostrum, and bovine powdercommercial colostrum, respectively. Colostrums were given at 10% of body weight directly after birth andfollowed by the same amount every 12 hours, for three days. The blood was taken from jugular vein at 0, 12,24, 48, 72, and 168 hours after birth to determine total protein, albumin, and globulin concentrations.Results of this study indicated that the serum total protein and globulin concentration increased andreached the peak at 24 hours after birth. Compared to the concentration at birth, the increase of totalprotein concentration were 62.77%, 59.26%, 48.05%, and 66.67% in fresh maternal (goat, frozen-thawedbovine, bovine spray dried, and commercial bovine colostrum, respectively. Serum globulin concentrationincreased 4.9, 4.4, 4.8, and 14.6 times in fresh matermnal goat, frozen-thawed bovine, spray dried, andcommercial bovine colostrums respectively, compared to the concentration at birth. In conclusion, theconsumption of various colostrums i.e. fresh maternal goat colostrums, bovine colostrums (frozen-thawed,spray dried and commercial colostrums would increase the concentration of blood total protein and globulin,which both reached the highest concentration at 24 h after birth.

  20. Rapid changes in the serum total protein and globulin levels in complications caused by facultatively pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrás, G; Kiss, S; Juraszek, J; Merétey, K

    1978-01-01

    The changes in the levels of total protein and four globulin fractions were followed up throughout the entire course of complications caused by Gram-negative facultative pathogens in 37 acute cases of respiratory insufficiency accompanying different underlying illnesses and in 9 chronic, bedridden patients given artificial ventilation. At the onset of the infectious complications, in the first place in septic shock, the levels of various globulin fractions showed a decrease corresponding to a half-life of 2 to 4 days. Neither the increased catabolism, nor the protein losses by the urine and tracheal secretions offer a sufficient explanation for the escape of globulins of this extent from the plasma. It seems that this is a consequence of the increase in capillary permeability due to the effect of antigen-antibody reactions and that of endotoxin. As a result, in the critical phase of the infectious complications, at the point of culmination, e.g. in septic shock, diminished amount of different globulins is transported to the site of utilization, that is, to the inflammatory area.

  1. 6-methylprednisolone does not impair anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) immunosuppressive activity in non-human primates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preville, [No Value; Sick, E; Beauchard, S; Ossevoort, M; Tiollier, J; Revillard, JP; Jonker, Margreet

    2001-01-01

    Background: Induction treatments with anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) in solid organ transplantation may enhance the efficacy of maintenance immunosuppressive therapy. Since ATG can trigger Fas (CD95) mediated T cell apoptosis, a process antagonized in vitro by corticosteroids, an important issue is

  2. Prognostic value of pretreatment albumin/globulin ratio in digestive system cancers: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hui-Wen; Yuan, Tang-Zhan; Chen, Jia-Xi; Zheng, Yang

    2018-01-01

    The albumin/globulin ratio (AGR) has been widely reported to be a potential predictor of prognosis in digestive system cancers (DSCs), but convincing conclusions have not been made. Therefore, herein, we performed a meta-analysis of relevant studies regarding this topic to evaluate the prognostic value of AGR in patients with DSCs. Three databases, including PubMed, EMBase, and Web of science, were searched comprehensively for eligible studies through September 8, 2017. The outcomes of interest included overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS). In our meta-analysis, pooled analysis of 13 studies with 9269 patients showed that a low AGR was significantly correlated with poor OS (HR = 1.94; 95% CI: 1.57-2.38; P digestive system cancers. A low pretreatment AGR may be a useful predictive prognostic biomarker in human digestive system cancers.

  3. Control survey of normal reference ranges adopted for serum thyroxine binding globulin, thyroxine, triiodothyronine in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugisaki, Hajime; Kameyama, Mayumi; Shibata, Kyoko

    1985-01-01

    A survey using questionnaires was made on 152 facilities from July through September 1984 to examine normal reference ranges of serum thyroxine binding globulin (TBG), thyroxine (TT 4 ), and triiodothyronine (TT 3 ). Normal reference ranges of TBG were in good agreement with each other, with the exception of four facilities showing high upper limits. An average value of the upper and lower limits in 83 facilities was 13.7 +- 1.9 μg/ml; and the standard deviation was 28.6 +- 2.8 μg/ml. Differences (approximately 10 %) in coefficient of variation were comparable to those (5.7-9.6 %) obtained from the previous survey. There were approximately 10 % differences in coefficient of variation for both TT 4 and TT 3 . (Namekawa, K.)

  4. In vitro thyroid testing in populations with low thyroxine binding globulin capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuaron, A

    1993-12-31

    Total thyroxine (T{sub 4}) concentration in serum is a reliable indicator of thyroid function in most individuals, but it is affected by altered concentrations of thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) in serum. Within certain limits, the variations in total TBG binding capacity (TBG{sub TOTAL}) caused by the fluctuations in the concentration of this binding globulin in serum can be modulated by calculating the free thyroxine index (FT{sub 4}I) as the product of T{sub 4} and the in vitro uptake of triiodothyronine by a secondary binder (T{sub 3}U). This calculation is empirically based on the facts that free TBG binding capacity (TBG{sub FREE}) is inversely related to T{sub 3}U and that T{sub 4} and T{sub 3}U show opposite behaviour when measured in sera with altered TBG: a low T{sub 4} in serum with reduced TBG{sub TOTAL} is compensated by a high value for T{sub 3}U, while an elevated T{sub 4} in serum with increased TBG{sub TOTAL} is compensated by a low value for T{sub 3}U. In both cases the product of T{sub 4} and T{sub 3} renders a normal FT{sub 4}I value, showing a certain association with the concentration of free T{sub 4} in serum (FT{sub 4}). In fact, this index has been shown to be superior than several FT{sub 4} assay systems in the assessment of thyroid status in clinical euthyroid subjects with relatively high or low T{sub 3}U 3 figs, 4 tabs

  5. Fasting induces the generation of serum thyronine-binding globulin in Zucker rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.A.; Rajatanavin, R.; Moring, A.F.; Braverman, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    Five-month-old lean and obese Zucker rats were fasted for up to 7 days (lean rats) or 28 days (obese rats), and serum total and free T4 and T3 concentrations, percent free T4 and T3 by equilibrium dialysis, and the binding of [ 125 I] T4 to serum proteins by gel electrophoresis were measured. In the lean rats, a 4- or 7-day fast resulted in significant decreases in serum total and free T4 and T3 concentrations. There was a decrease in the percent free T3 after 7 days of starvation. In contrast, a 4- or 7-day fast did not alter any of these variables in the obese rats. However, after 14 or more days of starvation, serum total T4 and T3 concentrations increased, and the percent free T4 and T3 decreased, resulting in no change in the serum free T4 or T3 concentrations in the obese rats. The percent of [ 125 I]T4 bound to serum thyronine-binding globulin increased and the percent bound to thyronine-binding prealbumin decreased with the duration of the fast in both the lean and obese rats. The increase in serum thyronine-binding globulin binding of T4 can explain the increase in serum total T4 and T3 concentrations, the decrease in percent free T4 and T3, and the normal free hormone concentration in the long term fasted obese rats. The findings in the lean rats appear to be due to a combination of the known central hypothyroidism that occurs during 4-7 days of fasting and the fasting-induced changes in T4 binding in serum. Changes in T4 and T3 binding in serum during fasting in the rat must be considered when the effects of fasting on serum concentrations of the thyroid hormones, thyroid hormone kinetics, and the peripheral action of the thyroid hormones are evaluated

  6. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  7. Involvement of reversible binding to alpha 2u-globulin in 1,4-dichlorobenzene-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonneau, M; Strasser, J; Lock, E A; Turner, M J; Swenberg, J A

    1989-06-01

    Similarly to unleaded gasoline, 1,4-dichlorobenzene (1,4-DCB) administered for 2 years caused a dose-related increase in the incidence of renal tumors in male but not in female rats or in either sex of mice. Unleaded gasoline and 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP), a component of unleaded gasoline, increased protein droplet formation and cell proliferation in male but not in female rat kidneys. These protein droplets contained, alpha 2u-globulin, a male rat-specific low-molecular-weight protein and 2,4,4-trimethyl-2-pentanol, a metabolite of TMP that was reversibly bound to this protein. Studies were undertaken to determine if 1,4-DCB produced similar effects; 1,2-DCB was used for comparison since it did not produce renal carcinogenesis in male rats. Gel filtration chromatography of a 116,000g supernatant prepared from kidneys of 1,4-[14C]DCB-treated rats showed that radiolabel coeluted with alpha 2u-globulin as one sharp peak as opposed to a multipeak pattern observed for 1,2-[14C]DCB; the maximal quantity of radiolabel for 1,4-DCB was twice that for 1,2-DCB. Equilibrium dialysis of kidney cytosol in the presence or absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate demonstrated that the radiolabel was reversibly bound to alpha 2u-globulin; the amount for 1,4-[14C]DCB-treated rats was almost twice as much as that for 1,2-[14C]DCB-treated rats. 1,2-DCB was also shown to be covalently bound to renal alpha 2u-globulin, and covalently bound to liver and plasma high-molecular-weight proteins. 1,4-DCB and, to a minor extent, 2,5-dichlorophenol, the major metabolite of 1,4-DCB, were reversibly bound to renal alpha 2u-globulin from 1,4-DCB-treated rats. 1,4-DCB increased protein droplet formation in male but not in female rat kidneys, whereas equimolar doses of 1,2-DCB showed no effect in either sex. Renal cell proliferation, measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation into renal DNA, was increased after 1,4-DCB but not after 1,2-DCB treatment. Nephrotoxicity and biochemical alterations induced by

  8. Immunity booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, Ioan; Titescu, Gheorghe; Tamaian, Radu; Haulica, Ion; Bild, Walther

    2002-01-01

    The immunity booster is, according to its patent description, microbiologically pure water with an D/(D+H) isotopic concentration of 100 ppm, with physical-chemical characteristics similar to those of distilled water. It is obtained by sterilization of a mixture of deuterium depleted water, with a 25 ppm isotopic concentration, with distilled water in a volume ratio of 4:6. Unlike natural immunity boosters (bacterial agents as Bacillus Chalmette-Guerin, Corynebacterium parvum; lipopolysaccharides; human immunoglobulin) or synthetical products (levamysol; isoprinosyne with immunostimulating action), which cause hypersensitivity and shocks, thrill, fever, sickness and the immunity complex disease, the water of 100 ppm D/(D + H) isotopic concentration is a toxicity free product. The testing for immune reaction of the immunity booster led to the following results: - an increase of cell action capacity in the first immunity shielding stage (macrophages), as evidenced by stimulation of a number of essential characterizing parameters, as well as of the phagocytosis capacity, bactericide capacity, and opsonic capacity of serum; - an increase of the number of leucocyte particularly of the granulocyte in peripheral blood, produced especially when medullar toxic agents like caryolysine are used; - it hinders the effect of lowering the number of erythrocytes in peripheral blood produced by experimentally induced chronic inflammation; - an increase of nonspecific immunity defence capacity against specific bacterial aggression of both Gram-positive bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae 558 ) and of the Gram-negative ones (Klebsiella pneumoniae 507 ); - an increase of immunity - stimulating activity (proinflamatory), like that of levamisole as evidenced by the test of stimulation of experimentally induced inflammation by means of carrageenan. The following advantages of the immunity booster are stressed: - it is toxicity free and side effect free; - can be orally administrated as

  9. Characterization of Clostridium Baratii Type F Strains Responsible for an Outbreak of Botulism Linked to Beef Meat Consumption in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuet, Christelle; Legeay, Christine; Sautereau, Jean; Bouchier, Christiane; Criscuolo, Alexis; Bouvet, Philippe; Trehard, Hélène; Jourdan Da Silva, Nathalie; Popoff, Michel

    2017-02-01

    A second botulism outbreak due to Clostridium baratii occurred in France in August 2015 and included three patients who had their meal in a restaurant the same day. We report the characterization of C. baratii isolates including whole genome sequencing (WGS). Four C. baratii isolates collected in August 2015 from the outbreak 2 were analysed for toxin production and typing as well as for genetic characterization. WGS was done using using the NEBNext Ultra DNA Library Prep kit for Illumina (New England Biolabs) and sequenced on MiSeq machine (Illumina) in paired-end reads of 250 bases. The phylogenetic tree was generated based on the UPGMA method with genetic distances computed by using the Kimura two-parameter model. Evolutionary analyses were conducted in Bionumerics (V.6.6 Applied Maths). Three C. baratii isolates for patient's stools and one isolate from meat produced botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type F and retained a bont/F7 gene in OrfX cluster. All isolates were identical according to the WGS. However, phylogeny of the core genome showed that the four C. baratii strains were distantly related to that of the previous C. baratii outbreak in France in 2014 and from the other C. baratii strains reported in databanks. The fact that the strains isolated from the patients and meat samples were genetically identical supports that the meat used for the Bolognese sauce was responsible for this second botulism outbreak in France. These isolates were unrelated to that from the first C. baratii outbreak in France in 2014 indicating a distinct source of contamination. WGS provided robust determination of genetic relatedness and information regarding BoNT typing and toxin gene locus genomic localization.

  10. Interactions of protein content and globulin subunit composition of soybean proteins in relation to tofu gel properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Andrew T; Yang, Aijun

    2016-03-01

    The content and globulin subunit composition of soybean proteins are known to affect tofu quality and food-grade soybeans usually have higher levels of proteins. We studied the tofu quality of soybeans with high (44.8%) or low (39.1%) protein content and with or without the 11S globulin polypeptide, 11SA4. Both protein content and 11SA4 significantly affected tofu gel properties. Soybeans containing more protein had smaller seeds which produced significantly firmer (0.663 vs.0.557 N, pseed size, tofu hardness and water holding capacity and led to significant changes to the profile of storage protein subunits, which may have contributed to the improvement in tofu gel properties. These results suggest that, in combination with higher protein content, certain protein subunits or their polypeptides can also be targeted in selecting soybeans to further improve soy food quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Positive predictive value of albumin: globulin ratio for feline infectious peritonitis in a mid-western referral hospital population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Unity; Deitz, Krysta; Hostetter, Shannon

    2012-12-01

    Low albumin to globulin ratio has been found previously to have a high positive predictive value for feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) in cats with clinical signs highly suggestive of the disease. However, FIP can have a more vague clinical presentation. This retrospective study found that the positive predictive value of an albumin:globulin (A:G) ratio of <0.8 and <0.6 was only 12.5% and 25%, respectively, in a group of 100 cats with one or more clinical signs consistent with FIP. The negative predictive value was 100% and 99% for an A:G ratio of <0.8 and A:G<0.6%, respectively. Therefore, when the prevalence of FIP is low, the A:G ratio is useful to rule out FIP but is not helpful in making a positive diagnosis of FIP.

  12. Innate immunity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ronnie Anderson is Director of the Medical Research Council Unit for Inflammation and Immunity. ... field have included macrophage, T cell, cytokine and cytokine activated killer cell interactions .... monocytes, mast cells, lymphocytes, eccrine.

  13. Sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels during pregnancy as predictors for pre-eclampsia and fetal growth restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Valdés R, Enrique; Lattes A, Karina; Muñoz S, Hernán; Ángel Cumsille, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sex-Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) may be associated to Pre-eclampsia (PE) and Fetal Growth Restriction (RCIU). Aim: To determine if maternal serum SHBG concentrations during the first and second trimesters are predictive biomarkers of Pre-eclampsia and RCIU. Patients and Methods: Prospective cohort study carried out in the Fetal Medicine Unit, Universidad de Chile Clinical Hospital between January, 2005 and December, 2006. Blood samples were obtained from unselectedpregnant wome...

  14. Retrospective diagnosis of Q fever in a country abattoir by the use of specific IgM globulin estimations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, A.M.; Hunt, J.G.

    1981-10-03

    Twenty-two cases of pyrexial illness which occurred amongst workers in a country abattoir were investigated retrospectively for Q fever, brucellosis, and leptospirosis. In 18, the illness was shown to be Q fever. No diagnoses were established for the other four. The demonstration of circulating Q-fever-specific IgM globulin was instrumental in establishing the diagnosis in many of the cases.

  15. In silico identification of anthropogenic chemicals as ligands of zebrafish sex hormone binding globulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorsteinson, Nels; Ban, Fuqiang; Santos-Filho, Osvaldo; Tabaei, Seyed M.H.; Miguel-Queralt, Solange; Underhill, Caroline; Cherkasov, Artem; Hammond, Geoffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Anthropogenic compounds with the capacity to interact with the steroid-binding site of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) pose health risks to humans and other vertebrates including fish. Building on studies of human SHBG, we have applied in silico drug discovery methods to identify potential binders for SHBG in zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model aquatic organism. Computational methods, including; homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, virtual screening, and 3D QSAR analysis, successfully identified 6 non-steroidal substances from the ZINC chemical database that bind to zebrafish SHBG (zfSHBG) with low-micromolar to nanomolar affinities, as determined by a competitive ligand-binding assay. We also screened 80,000 commercial substances listed by the European Chemicals Bureau and Environment Canada, and 6 non-steroidal hits from this in silico screen were tested experimentally for zfSHBG binding. All 6 of these compounds displaced the [ 3 H]5α-dihydrotestosterone used as labeled ligand in the zfSHBG screening assay when tested at a 33 μM concentration, and 3 of them (hexestrol, 4-tert-octylcatechol, and dihydrobenzo(a)pyren-7(8H)-one) bind to zfSHBG in the micromolar range. The study demonstrates the feasibility of large-scale in silico screening of anthropogenic compounds that may disrupt or highjack functionally important protein:ligand interactions. Such studies could increase the awareness of hazards posed by existing commercial chemicals at relatively low cost

  16. Clinical evaluation of thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) as a marker of liver tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terui, S

    1984-03-01

    This investigation was undertaken to evaluate thyroxine-binding globulin (TGB) as a marker of liver tumors, in conjection with the liver scintigram. Of 30 patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC), 22 (73.3%) showed significantly higher TBG concentrations. Eight patients (26.7%) showed normal TBG concentrations. In the case of 27 our of 30 patients with definite liver tumors, defects were apparent on the scintigrams. But seven of them had normal TBG concentrations in spite of the defects on the scintigrams. Out of 33 postoperative patients with liver metastasis, 28 (84%) had a raised TBG concentration. Only five (15.2%) had a normal TBG level. In 31 patients (93.9%) out of 33 with liver metastasis, a definite diagnosis was made on the basis of the liver scintigram. In 28 (90.3%) of these 31 people, the TBG concentration was higher than normal. Among 63 patients with liver tumors, both primary and metastatic, the test sensitivity for liver tumors was 92.1% (58/63) based on the accuracy of the liver scintigram. It was 79.4% (50/63) based on the TBG measurement. Why TBG increases to such an extent in spite of the euthyroid state remains unexplained. But it may be concluded that elevated TBG with positive liver scintigram furnishes a sensitive, fairly reliable, nonspecific tumor marker to determine liver tumors, especially in the case of liver metastasis.

  17. Self-Assembly of Rice Bran Globulin Fibrils in Electrostatic Screening: Nanostructure and Gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of various ionic strengths and protein concentrations on the fibrils structure and gel properties of rice bran globulin (RBG at pH 2.0 were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM, rheometer, and scanning electron microscope (SEM. AFM images showed the morphology of assembling RBG fibrils from strand beads to becoming branch clustered, when electrostatic repulsive forces attenuated gradually with increasing ionic strength. NaCl seems to accelerate the kinetics of fibrils formation, resulting in a significant increase in Th T fluorescence intensity. The increased ionic strengths promote particle size increasing and zeta potential decreasing synchronously. The percolation model G'~C-Cpn be used to calculate theoretical RBG gels concentration at various ionic strengths (0–500 mM, which decreased from 15.17 ± 0.63 to 2.26 ± 0.27 wt%. SEM images exhibited a granular mesh-like gel structure. A more homogenous structure occurred in low ionic strength. This study elucidates properties of RBG fibrils and gels as a bioactive material.

  18. Heat-Induced Soluble Protein Aggregates from Mixed Pea Globulins and β-Lactoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihi, Mohamed-Lazhar; Mession, Jean-luc; Sok, Nicolas; Saurel, Rémi

    2016-04-06

    The present work investigates the formation of protein aggregates (85 °C, 60 min incubation) upon heat treatment of β-lactoglobulin (βlg)-pea globulins (Glob) mixtures at pH 7.2 and 5 mM NaCl from laboratory-prepared protein isolates. Various βlg/Glob weight ratios were applied, for a total protein concentration of 2 wt % in admixture. Different analytical methods were used to determine the aggregation behavior of "mixed" aggregates, that is, surface hydrophobicity and also sulfhydryl content, protein interactions by means of SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, and molecule size distribution by DLS and gel filtration. The production of "mixed" thermal aggregates would involve both the formation of new disulfide bonds and noncovalent interactions between the denatured βlg and Glob subunits. The majority of "mixed" soluble aggregates displayed higher molecular weight and smaller diameter than those for Glob heated in isolation. The development of pea-whey protein "mixed" aggregates may help to design new ingredients for the control of innovative food textures.

  19. Serum Thyroxine to Thyroxine-Binding Globulin Ratio in Pregnancy and Newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Yeul

    1982-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of the ratio of serum thyroxine(T 4 ) /thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) for the thyroid status in pregnancy and newborn serum thyroxine, TBG, triiodothyronine, and free thyroxine levels were radioimmunoassayed in normal pregnant women at each of the trimesters, and the calculated serum T 4 /TBG ratios were compared with other parameters such as T 3 /TBG ratio and free T 4 /TBG ratio and free T 4 /TBG ratio. Serum T 4 levels were elevated with the proportionate increase in TBG levels during pregnancy, leading to the nearly constant value of serum T 4 /TBG ratios as in normal non-pregnant controls. In contrast, serum T 3 /TBG and free T 4 /TBG ratios varied considerably during pregnancy. In newborn, T 4 levels were nearly not changed with compared non-pregnant control value and TBG levels were elevated. The results indicate that serum T 4 /TBG ratio is a better parameter than others in evaluating the thyroid status during pregnancy and but newborn is a no better.

  20. Clinical Significance of Preoperative Albumin and Globulin Ratio in Patients with Gastric Cancer Undergoing Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-jie Mao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The pretreatment albumin and globulin ratio (AGR was an inflammation-associated factor which was related to the overall survival in various malignancies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of AGR in patients with gastric cancer. Method. This retrospective study included 862 cases pathologically diagnosed with gastric cancer. All patients were randomly divided into the testing group (431 cases and validation group (431 cases. The relationships of AGR with clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. Results. In the testing group, the median overall survival was 26.90 months and the cutoff value of AGR was 1.50 based on R language. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that lower AGR was correlated with poorer overall survival. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that AGR was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (HR: 0.584, 95% CI = 0.351–0.973, and p = 0.039. In the validation group, the median overall survival was 24.10 months. Lower AGR (≤1.50 also had a significantly poorer overall survival by Kaplan-Meier analysis. According to multivariate analysis, the AGR was also confirmed to be an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (HR: 0.578, 95% CI = 0.373–0.897, and p = 0.015. Conclusions. Our study suggested that the pretreatment AGR could be a prognostic biomarker for overall survival in patients with gastric cancer.

  1. Spatial and temporal dynamics of corticosterone and corticosterone binding globulin are driven by environmental heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Michael Todd; Kitaysky, Alexander Stanislav

    2008-02-01

    The question of whether changes in glucocorticoid concentrations reflect consistent changes in physiology associated with transitions between different stages of reproduction, or whether they reflect responses to environmental conditions, is one the central issues in field endocrinology studies. We examined the temporal and spatial dynamics of corticosterone (CORT, baseline, and acute stress-induced) and corticosterone binding globulin (CBG) concentrations in blood of Black-legged Kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) breeding at four major colonies in the Bering Sea, Alaska, during 1999-2005. We found that total CORT, free CORT, and CBG capacity varied inconsistently among reproductive stages, colonies, and years. Total CORT levels were positively correlated with CBG capacity. Variation in free CORT was largely driven by variation in total CORT. Results suggest that the adrenocortical function and CBG in breeding kittiwakes do not vary as a consequence of stage-specific modulation associated with a particular reproductive stage as in some short-lived passerine birds. Rather, in accord with predictions for a long-lived species, the lack of consistent colony, year, and reproductive stage patterns in baseline and maximum CORT, and CBG indicates that environmental factors, probably local dynamics of food availability, drive variation in these factors.

  2. Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG expression in ovarian carcinomas and its clinicopathological associations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixia Huang

    Full Text Available Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG is known as a carrier protein. It is classically thought to be mainly synthesized in the liver and then secreted into the circulating system, where it binds to sex steroids with a high affinity and modulates the bio-availability of the hormones. Other organs known to produce SHBG include brain, uterus, testis, prostate, breast and ovary, and the local expressed SHBG may play an important role in tumor development. However, SHBG expression status and its clinicopathological significance in ovarian cancer cells are not reported yet. In our present study, we examined and found the variable SHBG expression in four ovarian cancer cell lines (OV-90, OVCAR-3, SKOV-3 and ES-2 by immunocytochemistry and Western blotting. We then extended our study to 248 ovarian carcinoma samples, which were collected at The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital with complete clinical information, and discovered that SHBG was variably expressed in these ovarian carcinomas. Higher level of SHBG expression was significantly associated with more aggressive histological subtype (p = 0.022, higher FIGO stage (p = 0.018 and higher histological grade (grade of differentiation, p = 0.020, although association between SHBG expression and OS/PFS was not observed. Our results demonstrate that ovarian cancer cells produce SHBG and higher SHBG expression in ovarian carcinoma is associated with unfavorable clinicopathological features.

  3. Rabbit antithymocyte globulin is more beneficial in standard kidney than in extended donor recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardinger, Karen L; Brennan, Daniel C; Schnitzler, Mark A

    2009-05-15

    In a randomized, international study comparing rabbit antithymocyte globulin (TMG) and basiliximab (BAS) induction in renal transplant recipients at risk for delayed graft function or acute rejection (n=278), TMG was associated with less acute rejection at 1 year. This study analyzed outcomes stratified by standard criteria donor (SCD), extended criteria donor (ECD), and hypertensive donor. Data-capture limitations necessitated defining ECD as donor age more than 60 years or 50 to 60 years with hypertension and renal insufficiency. Seventy-five recipients received ECD-kidneys (28.4% TMG vs. 25.6% BAS, P=NS) and 203 recipients received SCD-kidneys (72.6% TMG vs. 74.4% BAS, P=NS). Recipients of an ECD or hypertensive donor-kidney had similar outcomes between treatment groups. Recipients of an SCD-kidney treated with TMG had less rejection (odds ratio [OR] 0.48). Recipients of a normotensive donor-kidney treated with TMG had less rejection (OR 0.56). Recipients of a normotensive, SCD-kidney treated with TMG had less rejection (OR 0.47) and death (OR 0.17) than their counterparts treated with BAS. Contrary to its perceived niche in recipients of ECD-kidneys, TMG was most beneficial in patients who received a normotensive, deceased SCD kidney.

  4. Relation of cigarette smoking in males of different ages to sex hormone binding globulin and testosterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Nabarawy, F.S.

    2002-01-01

    The relationship of cigarette smoking, age, total testosterone free testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were examined by solid phase radioimmunoassay in 90 randomly chosen healthy males of different ages. The serum levels of these hormones were investigated for smokers compared with non-smokers, of the same ages in 3 groups (adolescent males, middle aged males, and old aged males). Results indicated that cigarette smokers showed increased serum levels of testosterone (60.0% higher, P> 0.05), free testosterone (51.0 higher, P > 0.005) in young adolescent males group, testosterone (27.8% higher, P > 0.001), free testosterone (21.3% higher, P > 0.001) in middle aged males group, and testosterone (21.0% higher, P > 0.001), free testosterone (16.8% higher, P > 0.4) in old ages males group. SHBG was calculated as a mean of free and total testosterone in each group. smokers showed higher mean values of SHBG than non-smokers. Age was positively associated with serum SHBG, it was found that SHBG increased by 17.2% from the youngest (> 18 years) to the oldest age (> 65 years)

  5. [Value of the albumin to globulin ratio in predicting severity and prognosis in myasthenia gravis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D H; Su, Z Q; Chen, Y; Chen, Z B; Ding, Z N; Weng, Y Y; Li, J; Li, X; Tong, Q L; Han, Y X; Zhang, X

    2016-03-08

    To assess the predictive value of the albumin to globulin ratio (AGR) in evaluation of disease severity and prognosis in myasthenia gravis patients. A total of 135 myasthenia gravis (MG) patients were enrolled between February 2009 and March 2015. The AGR was detected on the first day of hospitalization and ranked from lowest to highest, and the patients were divided into three equal tertiles according to the AGR values, which were T1 (AGR 1.53). The Kaplan-Meier curve was used to evaluate the prognostic value of AGR. Cox model analysis was used to evaluate the relevant factors. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis was used to find the predictors of myasthenia crisis during hospitalization. The median length of hospital stay for each tertile was: for the T1 21 days (15-35.5), T2 18 days (14-27.5), and T3 16 days (12-22.5) (Pmyasthenia gravis. At the multivariate Cox regression analysis, the AGR (Pmyasthenia gravis patients. Respectively, the hazard ratio (HR) were 4.655 (95% CI: 2.355-9.202) and 0.596 (95% CI: 0.492-0.723). Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed the AGR (Pmyasthenia crisis. The AGR may represent a simple, potentially useful predictive biomarker for evaluating the disease severity and prognosis of patients with myasthenia gravis.

  6. Clinical evaluation of thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) as a marker of liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terui, S.

    1984-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to evaluate thyroxine-binding globulin (TGB) as a marker of liver tumors, in conjection with the liver scintigram. Of 30 patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC), 22 (73.3%) showed significantly higher TBG concentrations. Eight patients (26.7%) showed normal TBG concentrations. In the case of 27 our of 30 patients with definite liver tumors, defects were apparent on the scintigrams. But seven of them had normal TBG concentrations in spite of the defects on the scintigrams. Out of 33 postoperative patients with liver metastasis, 28 (84%) had a raised TBG concentration. Only five (15.2%) had a normal TBG level. In 31 patients (93.9%) out of 33 with liver metastasis, a definite diagnosis was made on the basis of the liver scintigram. In 28 (90.3%) of these 31 people, the TBG concentration was higher than normal. Among 63 patients with liver tumors, both primary and metastatic, the test sensitivity for liver tumors was 92.1% (58/63) based on the accuracy of the liver scintigram. It was 79.4% (50/63) based on the TBG measurement. Why TBG increases to such an extent in spite of the euthyroid state remains unexplained. But it may be concluded that elevated TBG with positive liver scintigram furnishes a sensitive, fairly reliable, nonspecific tumor marker to determine liver tumors, especially in the case of liver metastasis. (orig.)

  7. Serum corticosteroid binding globulin expression is modulated by fasting in polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Brian A; Hamilton, Jason; Cattet, Marc R L; Stenhouse, Gordon; Obbard, Martyn E; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2011-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from several subpopulations undergo extended fasting during the ice-free season. However, the animals appear to conserve protein despite the prolonged fasting, though the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. We hypothesized that elevated concentrations of corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the primary cortisol binding protein in circulation, lead to cortisol resistance and provide a mechanism for protein conservation during extended fasting. The metabolic state (feeding vs. fasting) of 16 field sampled male polar bears was determined based on their serum urea to creatinine ratio (>25 for feeding vs. polar bears sampled. Serum CBG expression was greater in lactating females relative to non-lactating females and males. CBG expression was significantly higher in fasting males when compared to non-fasting males. This leads us to suggest that CBG expression may serve as a mechanism to conserve protein during extended fasting in polar bears by reducing systemic free cortisol concentrations. This was further supported by a lower serum glucose concentration in the fasting bears. As well, a lack of an enhanced adrenocortical response to acute capture stress supports our hypothesis that chronic hunger is not a stressor in this species. Overall, our results suggest that elevated serum CBG expression may be an important adaptation to spare proteins by limiting cortisol bioavailability during extended fasting in polar bears. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sex hormone binding globulin, free estradiol index, and lipid profiles in girls with precocious puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Wook Chae

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available PurposeSex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG modulates the availability of biologically active free sex hormones. The regulatory role of SHBG might be important in the relationship between hormone levels and the modification of lipid profiles in girls with precocious puberty. However, few studies have evaluated the relationship of SHBG, free estradiol index (FEI, and lipid levels in these girls.MethodsOne hundred and nine girls less than 8 years of age with pubertal development were enrolled. FEI was calculated with SHBG and estradiol (E2. We analyzed SHBG between peak luteinizing hormone (LH≥5 (IU/L (group 1 and LH<5 (IU/L (group 2 through a gonadotropin releasing hormone stimulation test.ResultsBody mass index (BMI standard deviation score (SDS was higher in group 2 than in group 1 (P=0.004. Serum SHBG levels did not differ and FEI was not higher in group 1 (P=0.122. Serum cholesterol, HDL, and LDL did not differ; however, triglyceride levels were higher in group 2 (P=0.023. SHBG was negatively correlated with bone age advancement, BMI, BMI SDS, and FEI, and was positively correlated with HDL. However, SHBG was not correlated with E2 or peak LH.ConclusionSerum SHBG itself might not be associated with precocious puberty in girls, but it might be related to BMI and lipid profiles. Further studies are needed to reveal the relationship between sex hormone and obesity in girls with precocious puberty.

  9. Childhood immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romain, Sandra; Schillaci, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To examine childhood immunization levels relative to the number of family physicians, pediatricians, and public health nurses in Ontario. DESIGN Retrospective comparative analysis of publicly available data on immunization coverage levels and the relative number of family physicians, pediatricians, and public health nurses. SETTING Ontario. PARTICIPANTS Seven-year-old children, family physicians, pediatricians, and public health nurses in Ontario. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The association between immunization coverage levels and the relative number of family physicians, pediatricians, and public health nurses. RESULTS We found correlations between immunization coverage levels and the relative number (ie, per 1000 Ontario residents) of family physicians (ρ = 0.60) and pediatricians (ρ = 0.70) and a lower correlation with the relative number of public health nurses (ρ = 0.40), although none of these correlations was significant. A comparison of temporal trends illustrated that variation in the relative number of family physicians and pediatricians in Ontario was associated with similar variation in immunization coverage levels. CONCLUSION Increasing the number of family physicians and pediatricians might help to boost access to immunizations and perhaps other components of cost-saving childhood preventive care. PMID:19910599

  10. Clinical experience with thymoglobulin and antithymocyte globulin-Fresenius as induction therapy in renal transplant patients: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicora, Federico; Mos, Fernando; Paz, Marta; Roberti, Javier

    2013-10-01

    We describe our experiences with, and compare the outcomes of, 2 groups of renal transplant patients treated with thymoglobulin or antithymocyte globulin-Fresenius as induction therapy at transplant to reduce the incidence of acute rejection and prevent delayed allograft function. Twenty-four recipients of deceased-donor or living-donor kidney transplants received thymoglobulin, and 23 patients received antithymocyte globulin-Fresenius. Patient and graft survival and efficacy and safety were assessed at 3 months. The demographic characteristics of both groups were comparable, but the predominant donor type was significantly different. Incidence of complications, delayed graft function, and creatinine concentrations were comparable in both groups. At 3 months after the transplant, patient survival rate was 92% in the thymoglobulin group and 96% in the antithymocyte globulin-Fresenius group (P > .05), and death-censored graft survival rate for both groups was not significantly different. Average hematocrit and lymphocyte, neutrophil, and platelet counts were comparable in both groups at 3 months' follow-up. Average white blood count at 1 month was significantly different between the groups: at 5.62 ± 2.45 × 103 cells/mm³ in the thymoglobulin group and 7.85 ± 4.10 × 103 cells/mm³ in the ATG-F group (P Fresenius were generally comparable.

  11. Qualidade de vida e custos diretos em pacientes com blefaroespasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial, tratados com toxina botulínica-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osaki Midori Hentona

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os custos e a qualidade de vida dos pacientes com blefaroespasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial, submetidos à terapia com a toxina botulínica-A. MÉTODOS: Vinte e oito pacientes, sendo 16 com blefaroespasmo essencial e 12 com espasmo hemifacial, tratados com toxina botulínica-A, foram avaliados por meio de dois instrumentos: o SF-36 e a Escala de Disfunção de Blefaroespasmo. Os custos foram calculados segundo o número de unidades da toxina utilizadas por cada paciente no período de um ano. RESULTADOS: O custo total direto foi estimado em 1081,62 reais por ano (±89,39 para blefaroespasmo essencial e 618,06 reais por ano (±60,06 para espasmo hemifacial, para tratamento ambulatorial (p<0,001. Antes do tratamento, todos os domínios do SF-36 foram significantemente piores em ambas as doenças. Sob tratamento efetivo com toxina botulínica-A, os aumentos nos índices do SF-36 evidenciaram mudanças nas taxas de saúde geral da população em estudo, com diferença estatisticamente significante entre as respostas pré e pós-tratamento (p<0,05. Relacionando-se o SF-36 com Escala de Disfunção de Blefaroespasmo, foram observadas nos casos de blefaroespasmo essencial, relações significantes positivas (capacidade funcional, estado geral, aspecto emocional e aspectos sociais, ao passo que nos pacientes com espasmo hemifacial não foi encontrada nenhuma correlação. CONCLUSÃO: Este estudo demonstra notável impacto negativo das doenças na qualidade de vida desses pacientes, e uma significante melhora em ambas as doenças após tratamento com toxina botulínica-A. Além disso, os dados fornecem subsídios para justificar o alto custo da aquisição da toxina botulínica-A, devido a seus consideráveis benefícios para a qualidade de vida.

  12. The association between sex hormone-binding globulin and type 2 diabetes in Nigerian men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayefori M. Abbiyesuku

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidemiological studies have shown that sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG has a role in glucose homeostasis in both men and women. However, a prospective study on Japanese-American subjects concluded that SHBG was not a significant risk factor in either men or women, suggesting ethnic differences. We were not aware of any evaluation of SHBG in subjects of African ancestry. Objectives: We investigated the association between SHBG and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic diabetic men in a hospital in Nigeria. Method: Forty-eight male subjects with type 2 diabetes and 20 non-diabetic male subjects were recruited in this cross-sectional hospital-based study by the convenient sampling method.Height and circumferences around the waist and hip were measured to the nearest 0.5 cm and the waist–hip ratio was calculated from this measurement. Weight was measured and body mass index was calculated. Fasting plasma glucose concentration was measured by the glucose oxidase method with a between-run coefficient of variation of 3%. Insulin and SHBG were measured by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results: There was a statistically-significant difference between test results for the diabetic and non-diabetic patients. The mean SHBG concentration was higher in the non-diabetic group (42.2 nmol/L than the diabetic group (30.5 nmol/L. A significant inverse association between insulin resistance and SHBG was observed (r = 0.353, p < 0.015. Conclusion: This study supported earlier observations that a significant inverse correlation exists between SHBG and insulin resistance and provides evidence that the relationship may extend to type 2 diabetic men of African ancestry in Nigeria.

  13. Association between sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG and metabolic syndrome among men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuela Quental Callou de Sá

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Metabolic syndrome consists of a set of factors that imply increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. The objective here was to evaluate the association between sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG, sex hormones and metabolic syndrome among men. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective analysis on data from the study "Endogenous oestradiol but not testosterone is related to coronary artery disease in men", conducted in a hospital in São Paulo. METHODS: Men (aged 40-70 who underwent coronary angiography were selected. The age, weight, height, waist circumference, body mass index and prevalence of dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes of each patient were registered. Metabolic syndrome was defined in accordance with the criteria of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (NCEP-ATPIII. Serum samples were collected to assess the levels of glucose, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol (high density lipoprotein, triglycerides, albumin, SHBG, estradiol and total testosterone (TT. The levels of LDL-cholesterol (low density lipoprotein were calculated using Friedewald's formula and free testosterone (FT and bioavailable testosterone (BT using Vermeulen's formula. RESULTS: 141 patients were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was significantly higher in the first SHBG tercile than in the second and third terciles. A statistically significant positive association between the SHBG and TT values was observed, but no such association was seen between SHBG, BT and FT. CONCLUSION: Low serum levels of SHBG are associated with higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome among male patients, but further studies are required to confirm this association.

  14. Thyroxine binding to serum thyronine-binding globulin in thyroidectomized adult and normal neonatal rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.A.; Meyers, B.; Alex, S.; Fang, S.L.; Braverman, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    The amount of tracer [125I]T4 bound to serum thyronine-binding globulin (TBG) was measured by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in adult thyroidectomized (TX) rats and normal 1-day to 4-week-old rat puts. Thyroidectomy was associated with the appearance of significant amounts of [125I]T4 binding to serum TBG in lean rats, but not in obese Zucker rats. Treatment of the TX rats in vivo with replacement doses of T4 prevented this increase in TBG binding, but enrichment of serum from TX rats with T4 did not. Significant amounts of tracer [125I]T4 binding to TBG was present in serum from 1- to 3-week-old normal rat pups, but not in 1-day- or 4-week-old pups. There were significantly higher levels of TBG binding of [125I]T4 in serum from 2-week-old rat pups raised in litters of 16 pups compared to those raised in litters of 4 pups. All manipulations that result in the appearance of TBG in rat serum also result in either weight loss or a slowing in the rate of growth, suggesting that the appearance of TBG in rat serum has a nutritional component. This possibility is further supported by the observations that increases in TBG binding of [125I]T4 are not found in obese Zucker rats fed a low protein-high carbohydrate diet for 14 days or fasted for 7 days, or after thyroidectomy, perhaps owing to the large stores of fuel in the obese rat

  15. Emerging Role of Corticosteroid Binding Globulin in Glucocorticoid-driven Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pierre Moisan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid hormones (GCs are critical for survival since they ensure energy supply necessary to the body in an ever challenging environment. GCs are known to act on appetite, glucose metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and storage. However, in order to be beneficial to the body, GC levels should be maintained in an optimal window of concentrations. Not surprisingly, conditions of GC excess or deficiency, e.g. Cushing’s syndrome or Addison’s disease are associated with severe alterations of energy metabolism. Corticosteroid Binding Globulin (CBG, through its high specific affinity for GCs, plays a critical role in regulating plasma GC levels. Genetic studies in various species including humans have revealed that CBG is the major factor influencing inter-individual genetic variability of plasma GC levels, both in basal and stress conditions. Some, but not all of these genetic studies have also provided data linking CBG levels to body composition. The examination of CBG-deficient mice submitted to hyperlipidic diets unveiled specific roles for CBG in lipid storage and metabolism. The importance of CBG is even more striking when animals are submitted to high-fat diet combined to chronic stress, mimicking our occidental lifestyle. An influence of CBG on appetite has not been reported but remains to be more finely analyzed. Overall, a role of CBG in GC-driven metabolic disorders is emerging in recent studies. Although subtle, the influence of CBG in these diseases could open the way to new therapeutic interventions since CBG is easily accessible in the blood.

  16. Endocrine disruption: In silico interactions between phthalate plasticizers and corticosteroid binding globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Ishfaq A; Beg, Mohd A

    2017-12-01

    Endocrine disruption is a phenomenon when a man-made or natural compound interferes with normal hormone function in human or animal body systems. Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) have assumed considerable importance as a result of industrial activity, mass production of synthetic chemicals and environmental pollution. Phthalate plasticizers are a group of chemicals used widely and diversely in industry especially in the plastic industry, and many of the phthalate compounds have endocrine-disrupting properties. Increasing evidence indicates that steroid nuclear receptors and steroid binding proteins are the main targets of endocrine disruption. Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is a steroid binding protein that binds and transports cortisol in the blood circulation and is a potential target for endocrine disruption. An imbalance of cortisol in the body leads to many health problems. Induced fit docking of nine important and environmentally relevant phthalate plasticizers (DMP, BBP, DBP, DIBP, DnHP, DEHP, DINP, DnOP, DIDP) showed interactions with 10-19 amino acid residues of CBG. Comparison of the interacting residues of CBG with phthalate ligands and cortisol showed an overlapping of the majority (53-82%) of residues for each phthalate. Five of nine phthalate compounds and cortisol shared a hydrogen bonding interaction with the Arg-252 residue of CBG. Long-chain phthalates, such as DEHP, DINP, DnOP and DIDP displayed a higher binding affinity and formed a number of interactions with CBG in comparison to short-chain phthalates. The similarity in structural binding characteristics of phthalate compounds and native ligand cortisol suggested potential competitive conflicts in CBG-cortisol binding function and possible disruption of cortisol and progesterone homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Gene amplification as a cause of inherited thyroxine-binding globulin excess in two Japanese families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Yuichi; Miura, Yoshitaka; Saito, Hidehiko [Toyota Memorial Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    T{sub 4}-binding globulin (TBG) is the major thyroid hormone transport protein in man. Inherited abnormalities in the level of serum TBG have been classified as partial deficiency, complete deficiency, and excess. Sequencing analysis of the TBG gene, located on Xq21-22, has uncovered the molecular defects causing partial and complete deficiency. However, the mechanism leading to inherited TBG excess remains unknown. In this study, two Japanese families, F-A and F-T, with inherited TBG excess were analyzed. Serum TBG levels in hemizygous males were 58 and 44 {mu}g/mL, 3- and 2-fold the normal value, respectively. The molecule had normal properties in terms of heat stability and isoelectric focussing pattern. The sequence of the coding region and the promoter activity of the TBG gene were also indistinguishable between hemizygotes and normal subjects. The gene dosage of TBG relative to that of {beta}-globin, which is located on chromosome 11, and Duchenne muscular dystropy, which is located on Xp, was evaluated by coamplification of these target genes using polymerase chain reaction and subsequent quantitation by HPLC. The TBG/{beta}-globin ratios of the affected male and female of F-A were 3.13 and 4.13 times, respectively, that in the normal males. The TBG/Duchenne muscular dystrophy ratios were 2.92 and 2.09 times the normal value, respectively. These results are compatible with three copies of TBG gene on the affected X-chromosome. Similarly, a 2-fold increase in gene dosage was demonstrated in the affected hemizygote of F-T. A 3-fold tandem amplification of the TBG gene was shown by in situ hybridization of prometaphase and interphase chromosomes from the affected male with a biotinylated genomic TBG probe, confirming the gene dosage results. Gene amplification of TBG is the cause of inherited TBG excess in these two families. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Human sex hormone-binding globulin gene expression- multiple promoters and complex alternative splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosner William

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG regulates free sex steroid concentrations in plasma and modulates rapid, membrane based steroid signaling. SHBG is encoded by an eight exon-long transcript whose expression is regulated by a downstream promoter (PL. The SHBG gene was previously shown to express a second major transcript of unknown function, derived from an upstream promoter (PT, and two minor transcripts. Results We report that transcriptional expression of the human SHBG gene is far more complex than previously described. PL and PT direct the expression of at least six independent transcripts each, resulting from alternative splicing of exons 4, 5, 6, and/or 7. We mapped two transcriptional start sites downstream of PL and PT, and present evidence for a third SHBG gene promoter (PN within the neighboring FXR2 gene; PN regulates the expression of at least seven independent SHBG gene transcripts, each possessing a novel, 164-nt first exon (1N. Transcriptional expression patterns were generated for human prostate, breast, testis, liver, and brain, and the LNCaP, MCF-7, and HepG2 cell lines. Each expresses the SHBG transcript, albeit in varying abundance. Alternative splicing was more pronounced in the cancer cell lines. PL- PT- and PN-derived transcripts were most abundant in liver, testis, and prostate, respectively. Initial findings reveal the existence of a smaller immunoreactive SHBG species in LNCaP, MCF-7, and HepG2 cells. Conclusion These results extend our understanding of human SHBG gene transcription, and raise new and important questions regarding the role of novel alternatively spliced transcripts, their function in hormonally responsive tissues including the breast and prostate, and the role that aberrant SHBG gene expression may play in cancer.

  19. A successful desensitization protocol for horse-derived antithymocyte globulin in severe aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Esen; Cigerci Günaydın, Nurşen; Karadaş, Nihal; Gülen, Figen; Tanac, Remziye; Yılmaz, Deniz

    2015-03-01

    Horse antithymocyte globulin (h-ATG) (ATGAM(®) ) is the first choice of treatment in very severe patients with aplastic anemia who do not have any HLA matched sibling donor. h-ATG is a heterologous serum that may cause anaphylaxis. Alternative treatment strategies must be planned in case of hypersensitivity. Desensitization must be considered in patients without an alternative treatment of choice. We aimed to present the h-ATG desensitization protocol and consider its effectiveness in patients with aplastic anemia who are hypersensitized with h-ATG and do not have an alternative treatment of choice. Skin prick tests were performed with non-diluted solution in eight very severe patients with aplastic anemia who are followed up in Ege University Children's Hospital. Although skin prick test was found negative in these eight patients, different dilution h-ATG intradermal tests were performed and found positive in all patients. h-ATG desensitization program was started to these hypersensitized patients. Desensitization program was started to six male and two female very severe patients with aplastic anemia whose ages were between seven and 19 yr (median: 12.9 yr). All of the patients completed the desensitization program. While local reaction was seen in two patients, systemic reaction was seen in one patient and late reaction was seen in one patient during and after desensitization program. A successful desensitization program with h-ATG in children with aplastic anemia is presented. Even though there is not an exposure before to such high allergy potential heterologous serum, skin tests should be performed and desensitization must be started to patients who are hypersensitized to h-ATG. As the expected effectiveness of the treatment is so much, the desensitization protocol can be carried out safely and effectively with trained stuff although allergic reactions can be seen. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the Immune System Print en español El sistema inmunitario Whether you're stomping through the showers ... of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on TeensHealth® is for ...

  1. Immunizing Adults

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Vaccines aren’t just for kids; adults also need to get immunized. Overall, far too many people 19 years and older aren’t getting the vaccines they need and remain unprotected. In this podcast, Dr. Walter Williams discuss the importance of adults being fully vaccinated.

  2. Vaccines (immunizations) - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations; Immunizations; Immunize; Vaccine shots; Prevention - vaccine ... of the vaccine. VACCINE SCHEDULE The recommended vaccination (immunization) schedule is updated every 12 months by the ...

  3. A large outbreak of bovine botulism possibly linked to a massive contamination of grass silage by type D/C Clostridium botulinum spores on a farm with dairy and poultry operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relun, A; Dorso, L; Douart, A; Chartier, C; Guatteo, R; Mazuet, C; Popoff, M R; Assié, S

    2017-12-01

    Type D bovine botulism outbreaks associated with poultry litter are increasingly reported in European countries, but the circumstances of exposure to Clostridium botulinum toxins remain unclear. In spring 2015, a large type D/C bovine botulism outbreak affected a farm with dairy and poultry operations. Epidemiological and laboratory investigations strongly suggest that the outbreak was caused by feeding cattle with insufficiently acidified grass silage that was contaminated by type D/C C. botulinum spores. The source of the spores remains unclear, but could have been a stack of poultry litter stored in the grass silage pasture before harvesting. The presence of putrefied poultry carcasses mixed in with the litter is relatively unlikely considering the careful daily removal of poultry carcasses. These findings reinforce the importance of proper ensiling of feed materials and highlight the need for safe disposal of poultry litter, even in the case of good management of poultry deadstock, in order to prevent bovine botulism.

  4. Use of the Vettest 8008 and refractometry for determination of total protein, albumin, and globulin concentrations in feline effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasouliotis, Kostas; Murphy, Kate; Dodkin, Steve; Torrance, Andy G

    2002-01-01

    Pleural and peritoneal effusion is a common clinical finding in feline practice. Determination of fluid albumin (ALB) and globulin (GLOB) concentrations in addition to total protein (TP) concentration can be helpful in diagnosing or ruling out certain diseases in cats, especially feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). The objective of this study was to compare effusion TP, ALB, and GLOB results obtained by a refractometer and a bench-top dry chemistry analyzer with those results obtained by a reference method. Twenty-six pleural and 14 peritoneal effusion samples were analyzed from 40 cats with various diseases. TP and ALB concentrations were determined by a reference automated wet chemistry analyzer (Kone Specific, Kone Instruments, Espoo, Finland), a bench-top dry chemistry analyzer (Vettest 8008, IDEXX Laboratories Ltd, Chalfont St Peter, UK), and a refractometer (Atago SPR-T2, Atago Co, Tokyo, Japan). GLOB, albumin to globulin (A/G) ratio, and globulins as a percentage of total proteins (GLOB%) were calculated. Results were analyzed by paired t tests, difference plots, and Deming s regression analysis. Correlation coefficients (r) for TP with Vettest versus Kone and refractometer versus Kone methods were.97 and.94, respectively. GLOB and GLOB% values were significantly higher and A/G ratios were significantly lower with Vettest versus Kone methods. Correlation coefficients for ALB, GLOB, GLOB% and A/G ratio with Vettest versus Kone methods were.86,.93,.82, and.73, respectively. Although correlation with other methods was good, the refractometer underestimated TP concentrations in 3 samples. The refractometer is an acceptable method for determination of TP concentration in feline effusions. The Vettest 8008 also is an acceptable method for the determination of TP and ALB concentrations, however, calculated A/G ratios obtained with the Vettest are unacceptable.

  5. [Comparison of two types of antithymocyte globulin in the treatment of children with aplastic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X T; He, W; Shi, W; Zhou, X X; Qiao, X H

    2016-04-01

    This study was designed to compare the effects of the anti-human T lymphocyte globulin (Fresenius, ATG-F)and rabbit anti-human thymocyte immunoglobulin (Genzyme, R-ATG)in the treatment of childhood aplastic anemia (AA) and their effects. A total of 59 children with aplastic anemia were analyzed in the present study, including 34 cases of severe aplastic anemia (SAA), 12 cases of very severe aplastic anemia (VSAA) and 13 cases of transfusion-dependent non-severe aplastic anemia (NSAA). While receiving immunosuppressive therapy (IST), 30 and 29 patients, with long-term oral supplement with cyclosporin A (CSA), androgen and Chinese traditional medicines, were treated with ATG-F and R-ATG, respectively. When it was necessary, some supportive cares such as component transfusion and infection control were also employed. Absolute counts of peripheral blood lymphocyte (ALC) at various time points were dynamically detected after ATG therapy. According to the International Aplastic Anemia Treatment and Effect standards. There were no statistically significant differences in the overall response rate (67%(20/30)vs. 69%(20/29), χ(2)=0.036, P=0.676) and the survival rate (87%(26/30)vs. 83%(24/29), χ(2)=0.173, P=0.676) between the ATG-F and R-ATG groups. There were significant and long-term ALC decrease after ATG therapy, the rate of ALC decrease in ATG-F and R-ATG group, the ALC only recovered to 47.8% (ATG-F group) and 47.4% (R-ATG group) of the pre-treatment level respectively. ATG-F 5 mg/(kg·d) and R-ATG 3.75 mg/(kg·d)could achieve similar effects in the treatment of childhood AA, through similar significant clearance of T cells. Therefore, all of these suggest that ATG-F and R-ATG might serve as the drugs of front-line choice for IST in childhood AA patients who do not have an available human leukocyte antigen identical related donor.

  6. Adult Immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Coskun

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the many advances in modern medicine, each year thousands of people in the world die from diseases that are easily prevented by safe and effective vaccines. Few measures in preventive medicine are of such proven value and as easy to implement as routine immunization against infectious diseases. Prevention of infection by immunization is a lifelong process. There are a number of vaccines that all adults (¡I18 years require. There are also other vaccines that need to be tailored to meet individual variations in risk resulting from occupation, foreign travel, underlying illness, lifestyle and age. In this study, we tried to review this important subject. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(2.000: 159-166

  7. Botulism in Brazil, 2000-2008: epidemiology, clinical findings and laboratorial diagnosis Botulismo no Brasil, 2000-2008: epidemiologia, achados clínicos e diagnóstico laboratorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Estela Gravato Rowlands

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a rare and potentially lethal illness caused by Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin. We describe the findings of a laboratorial investigation of 117 suspected cases of botulism reported to the surveillance system in Brazil from January 2000 to October 2008. Data on the number and type of samples analyzed, type of toxins identified, reporting of the number of botulism cases and transmission sources are discussed. A total of 193 clinical samples and 81 food samples were analyzed for detection and identification of the botulism neurotoxin. Among the clinical samples, 22 (11.4% presented the toxin (nine type A, five type AB and eight with an unidentified type; in food samples, eight (9.9% were positive for the toxin (five type A, one type AB and two with an unidentified type. Of the 38 cases of suspected botulism in Brazil, 27 were confirmed by a mouse bioassay. Laboratorial botulism diagnosis is an important procedure to elucidate cases, especially food-borne botulism, to confirm clinical diagnosis and to identify toxins in food, helping sanitary control measures.Botulismo é uma doença rara e potencialmente letal, resultante da ação de uma neurotoxina produzida pelo Clostridium botulinum. No presente estudo, estão descritos os resultados da investigação laboratorial de 117 casos suspeitos de botulismo notificados ao sistema de vigilância, ocorridos no Brasil no período de janeiro de 2000 a outubro de 2008. Os dados obtidos sobre as fontes de transmissão, os tipos de toxina identificados e de amostras analisadas serão discutidos. Foram analisadas 193 amostras clínicas e 81 amostras de alimentos para detecção e identificação de neurotoxina botulínica. Entre as amostras clínicas, 22 (11,4% amostras apresentaram resultado positivo para toxina (nove do tipo A, cinco do tipo AB e em oito o tipo não foi identificado e entre as amostras de alimentos, oito (9,9% foram positivas (cinco do tipo A, uma do tipo AB e em duas o tipo n

  8. Immunizations for Preterm Babies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Health Issues Health Issues Conditions Injuries & Emergencies Vaccine Preventable Diseases ... Children > Safety & Prevention > Immunizations > Immunizations For Preterm Babies Safety & ...

  9. Weakened Immune Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Health Issues Health Issues Conditions Injuries & Emergencies Vaccine Preventable Diseases ... Children > Safety & Prevention > Immunizations > Weakened Immune Systems Safety & Prevention ...

  10. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Health Issues Health Issues Conditions Injuries & Emergencies Vaccine Preventable Diseases ... Children > Safety & Prevention > Immunizations > Immunizations: Active vs. Passive Safety & ...

  11. Rebalance between 7S and 11S globulins in soybean seeds of differing protein content and 11SA4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, A; Yu, X; Zheng, A; James, A T

    2016-11-01

    Protein content and globulin subunit composition of soybean seeds affect the quality of soy foods. In this proteomic study, the protein profile of soybean seeds with high (∼45.5%) or low (∼38.6%) protein content and with or without the glycinin (11S) subunit 11SA4 was examined. 44 unique proteins and their homologues were identified and showed that both protein content and 11SA4 influenced the abundance of a number of proteins. The absence of 11SA4 exerted a greater impact than the protein content, and led to a decreased abundance of glycinin G2/A2B1 and G5/A5A4B3 subunits, which resulted in lower total 11S with a concomitant higher total β-conglycinin (7S). Low protein content was associated with higher glycinin G3/A1aB1b and lower glycinin G4/A5A4B3. Using the proteomic approach, it was demonstrated that 11SA4 deficiency induced compensatory accumulation of 7S globulins and led to a similar total abundance for 7S+11S irrespective of protein content or 11SA4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Modified immunosuppressive therapy with porcine antilymphocyte globulin plus delayed cyclosporine A in children with severe aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Qingya; Sha, Pingping; Chen, Haifei; Shen, Hongshi; Qin, Longmei; Li, Zhengyang; Wu, Tianqin; Wang, Zhaoyue

    2018-01-01

    Immunosuppressive therapy (IST) with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) and cyclosporine (CsA) is the standard treatment for children with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) with no human leukocyte antigen-matched siblings. Due to the unavailability of horse ATG in China, porcine antilymphocyte globulin (p-ALG), which is less expensive and more effective than rabbit ATG, is widely used. We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of modified IST with p-ALG plus delayed CsA at day 21 in 50 SAA children. Eighteen SAA patients who progressed from nonsevere aplastic anemia (NSAA) were classified as SAA-II; the other 32 patients were classified as SAA-I. Overall response (OR) rates at 3, 6 and 12 months were 56, 64 and 62%, respectively. The 10-year overall survival (OS) rate and disease-free survival (DFS) rate were 80 and 56%. The OR, OS and DFS rates in the SAA-I group were clearly better than those in the SAA-II group. Death rate from infection within 30 days was 4%. Modified IST with p-ALG plus delayed CsA is a reliable and well-tolerated treatment for children with SAA, and reduces early death due to infection. Modified IST is more suitable for children with SAA-I.

  13. Physicochemical changes taking place in bovine globulins under the influence of gamma irradiation studied by thermal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciesla, K.; Vansant, E.F.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation modification of protein based polymers as well as the development of gamma irradiation techniques as a method of food sterilisation and preservation induces necessity of better recognition of the physicochemical changes occurring in proteins after gamma irradiation. Recently differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was applied widely in structural studies of proteins. Also thermoanalytical methods (TG, DTG) applied for proteins pyrolysis were also found to be useful in characterisation of proteins structure and the properties of proteins containing tissues. In presented paper, the aforementioned methods were applied for investigation of the gamma irradiation influence on thermal decomposition of gamma and alpha globulins and the results were related to their structural modifications. It has been found, that irradiation influences the course of decomposition of gamma and alpha globulins. Irradiation of solid native proteins result in decreased temperature of decomposition, especially decreased temperature of the last stage. The effects of irradiation performed for water suspensions were clearly more significant. The relatively large differences between decomposition of the irradiated and non-irradiated samples were detected by DSC and thermogravimetry already after irradiation of water suspensions

  14. Association of Serum Testosterone and Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Levels in Females with Acne Based on its Severity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiayani, A. J.; Rehman, R. U.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Androgens are involved in the development of acne. The aim of this study was to find out if there was an association of serum testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in females with acne based on its severity. Methods: It was a cross sectional study, conducted in Dermatology unit of Fauji Foundation Hospital (FFH), Rawalpindi. Duration of study was eight months. Adult females with acne were enrolled in the study. Patients were categorized into minor, mild, moderate groups. Blood samples were taken for serum testosterone and SHBG. Results: Five hundred and thirty-one adult female were enrolled into the study. The mean age was 21.49±4.73 years. Acne was graded as minor in 78 (14.7 percent) cases, mild in 248 (46.7 percent) and moderate in 205 (38.6 percent). There was no statistically significant relationship between the levels of serum testosterone (p=0.776) and SHBG (p=0.711) with acne severity. Conclusion: There was no association of serum testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin levels in females with acne based on its severity. (author)

  15. Resolution of Mild Ganciclovir-Resistant Cytomegalovirus Disease with Reduced-Dose Cidofovir and CMV-Hyperimmune Globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Samir J; Kuten, Samantha A; Knight, Richard J; Hong, Dana M; Gaber, A Osama

    2014-01-01

    Ganciclovir-resistant cytomegalovirus (CMV) is associated with significant morbidity in solid organ transplant recipients. Management of ganciclovir-resistant CMV may be complicated by nephrotoxicity which is commonly observed with recommended therapies and/or rejection induced by "indirect" viral effects or reduction of immunosuppression. Herein, we report a series of four high serologic risk (donor CMV positive/recipient CMV negative) kidney transplant patients diagnosed with ganciclovir-resistant CMV disease. All patients initially developed "breakthrough" viremia while still receiving valganciclovir prophylaxis after transplant and were later confirmed to exhibit UL97 mutations after failing to eradicate virus on adequate dosages of valganciclovir. The patients were subsequently and successfully treated with reduced-dose (1-2 mg/kg) cidofovir and CMV-hyperimmune globulin, given in 2-week intervals. In addition, all patients exhibited stable renal function after completion of therapy, and none experienced acute rejection. The combination of reduced-dose cidofovir and CMV-hyperimmune globulin appeared to be a safe and effective regimen in patients with mild disease due to ganciclovir-resistant CMV.

  16. Circadian variation in serum cortisol during hydrocortisone replacement is not attributable to changes in cortisol-binding globulin concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, T T; Gunganah, K; Monson, J P; Drake, W M

    2016-04-01

    Patients taking hydrocortisone (HC) replacement for primary or secondary adrenal failure require individual adjustment of their dose. In addition to modifying the administered doses of HC for each patient, physicians are increasingly interested in variations in the bioavailability of glucocorticoid replacement. One potential determinant of the bioavailability of replaced HC is a variation in serum cortisol-binding globulin (CBG) concentration, which may, in turn, affect interpretation of cortisol profiles and individual dose selection for patients on hydrocortisone replacement therapy. To investigate the hypothesis that there is a circadian variation in CBG levels. A total of 34 male patients divided into 3 groups (10 patients with non-somatotroph structural pituitary disease on HC replacement, 11 patients with treated acromegaly on HC replacement and 13 patients with treated acromegaly not on HC replacement) and 10 healthy volunteers were included. Cortisol and CBG levels were measured at 6 time points (0800, 1100, 1300, 1500, 1700 and 1900). No significant circadian variation in CBG concentration was found in any of the 4 groups. Circadian variation in serum cortisol during hydrocortisone replacement is not attributable to changes in cortisol-binding globulin concentration. Changes in serum cortisol levels may thus be explained by other factors including 11 β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity or circadian changes in the binding properties of CBG. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Molecular characterization of a genetic variant of the steroid hormone-binding globulin gene in heterozygous subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, D.O.; Catterall, J.F. [Population Council, New York, NY (United States); Carino, C. [Instituto National de la Nutricion, Mexico City, MX (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    Steroid hormone-binding globulin in human serum displays different isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns among individuals, suggesting genetic variation in the gene for this extracellular steroid carrier protein. Analysis of allele frequencies and family studies suggested the existence of two codominant alleles of the gene. Subsequent determination of the molecular basis of a variant of the gene was carried out using DNA from homozygous individuals from a single Belgian family. It was of interest to characterize other variant individuals to determine whether all variants identified by IEF phenotyping were caused by the same mutation or whether other mutations occurred in the gene in different populations. Previous studies identified Mexican subjects who were heterozygous for the variant IEF phenotype. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to localize the mutation in these subjects and to purify the variant allele for DNA sequence analysis. The results show that the mutation in this population is identical to that identified in the Belgian family, and no other mutations were detected in the gene. These data represent the first analysis of steroid hormone-binding globulin gene variation in heterozygous subjects and further support the conclusion of biallelism of the gene worldwide. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Emergence of suspected type D botulism in ruminants in England and Wales (2001 to 2009), associated with exposure to broiler litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, J H; Hogg, R A; Otter, A; Roest, H I J; Livesey, C T

    2011-06-18

    Scanning surveillance by the Veterinary Laboratories Agency revealed the emergence of suspected botulism in ruminants in 2003, presented as flaccid paralysis. From 2003 to 2009, 168 cattle and 19 sheep incidents were recorded, with mortality between 5 and 80 per cent. All sheep incidents and 95 per cent of cattle incidents had proximity to broiler litter. From July 2006, the gut contents collected from 74 affected cattle and 10 affected sheep were tested for Clostridium botulinum toxins using mice bioassays and for organisms by culture. Type D toxin was identified in 32 per cent of cattle and 18 per cent of sheep samples. C botulinum type D organisms were identified in 40 per cent of cattle and 30 per cent of sheep samples, but broth from one sample reacted with C and D antisera. Type C botulism has previously been reported more commonly than type D in the UK and has been associated with the use of poultry litter as fertiliser, bedding or feed. The almost exclusive association with C botulinum type D toxins or organisms in the gut contents in this survey suggests a change in the source or epidemiology of botulism in the UK. The source of C botulinum type D was uncertain. Broilers may carry C botulinum type D in their gut flora subclinically. The emergence of a new type D strain, or changes in broiler husbandry and nutrition, medication and other enteric infections may have affected colonisation with C botulinum. Further investigation of poultry and farm environments for sources of type D awaits the development of tests for C botulinum toxins that do not require the use of mice.

  19. Passive immunity transfer and serum constituents of crossbred calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís G. Rocha

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Passive immunity transfer (PIT evaluation is an essential tool for the maintenance of healthy calves during the first months of life. Since lactation number and breed have been proven to influence immunoglobulin levels in colostrum, the aim of this study was to evaluate PIT from primiparous and multiparous Canchim cows to their calves. Blood samples were collected from the calves before colostrum intake and 1, 2, 7, 15 and 30 days thereafter, while colostrum samples from the cows were taken immediately after parturition. Activities of gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, and concentrations of total protein, albumin, globulins, immunoglobulin A (IgA, immunoglobulin G (IgG, total and ionized calcium, inorganic phosphorus, magnesium, sodium and potassium were evaluated in calves' serum and activities of GGT and ALP and concentrations of total protein, IgA and IgG were assessed in cow's colostrum whey. Immunoglobulins concentrations were evaluated by electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels. Serum biochemistry evaluations revealed an increase in gamma-glutamyl transferase and alkaline phosphatase activities and in total protein, globulins, immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin G levels in calves' serum after colostrum intake. Only total protein and light chain immunoglobulin G levels in colostrum whey were affected by the cows' lactation number. Phosphorus and magnesium levels in blood serum increased after colostrum intake, while sodium and potassium levels oscillated in the experimental period. PIT was influenced by the cows' lactation number but was efficient in both groups.

  20. Hemimasticatory spasm treated with botulinum toxin: case report Espasmo hemimastigatório tratado com toxina botulínica: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A.G. Teive

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a female patient with hemimasticatory spasm, a rare movement disorder due to dysfunction of the motor trigeminal nerve of unknown origin. This patient had an excellent response to botulinum toxin therapy.Relatamos o caso de paciente feminina com espasmo hemimastigatório, distúrbio do movimento raro decorrente de disfunção da porção motora do nervo trigeminal, de etiologia desconhecida. A paciente teve excelente resposta clínica ao tratamento com toxina botulínica.

  1. Toxina botulínica en parálisis cerebral infantil: resultados en 27 sujetos a lo largo de un año

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez-Carpintero, R. (Rocío); Narbona, J. (Juan)

    1997-01-01

    Introducción y objetivos. Resultados positivos en el tratamiento de la parálisis cerebral infantil espástica con toxina botulínica, en estudios anglosajones de los últimos años, nos han llevado a iniciar este trabajo, cuyo objetivo es mostrar nuestra experiencia con la toxina en el tratamiento de esta enfermedad, establecer sus indicaciones, analizar los resultados obtenidos y plantear posibles aplicaciones futuras. Material y métodos. Incluimos 10 pacientes hemipléficos y 17 dipl...

  2. International reference reagents: antihuman globulin. An ISBT/ICSH joint working party report. International Society of Blood Transfusion. International Committee for Standardization in Haematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, J; Ford, D S; Chung, A; Collins, R; Kochman, S; Mazda, T; Overbeeke, M; Perera, R; Sakuldamrongpanich, T; Scott, M; Voak, D; Zupańska, B

    1999-01-01

    An international working party has conducted a study designed to select a suitable reference reagent for antihuman globulin, to replace those first made available in 1987. The chosen preparation contains levels of anti-IgG and anti-C3 (anti-C3c and anti-C3d) potency that are considered suitable to serve for reference when evaluating either polyspecific antihuman globulin reagents or those containing their separate monospecific components. The reference material is available in 2-ml freeze-dried aliquots from seven assigned distribution centres.

  3. Isoforms of thyroxine-binding globulin as a model for molecular epidemiology of human cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovaty, A.S.; Lapko, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    -binding globulin (TBG) by 50-60%, but no elevation in free T4, as compared with similar control groups of from Minsk. One of the reasons for the euthyroid syndrome in teenagers from the contaminated region was shown to be the blood isoforms in TBG. These isoforms differed in the structure of the carbohydrate components and as a rule are characterized by a prolonged circulation time. Using specific affinity chromatography, with subsequent immunological assay we shown that a certain amount of serum TBG-molecules in persons from Khojniki contains a high level of TBG (about 30% higher than the control group) containing fucosyalated biantennary sugar chains with more prolonged survival time. Previous findings showed that increased levels of fucosylation are observed for some serum glycoproteins in the blood of tumour patients. We provide evidence for variations in the TBGfuc which are contained in the serum TBG pool of patients suffering from cancer with various localisation. Thus, analysis of TBGfuc may be regarded as a prognostic marker in the determination of risk groups. The molecular mechanism of increased activity of fucosyl transferases will be discussed. We propose to measure the level of TBG fucosylated to assess the human cancer risk and habitants of contaminated region of Belarus. (authors)

  4. Effects of medicinal herbs "Plantago asiatica", "Houttuynia cordata" and "Mentha haplocalyx" on non-specific immune responses of cobia (Rachycentron canadum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Sheng; Chen, Yin-Yu; Ueng, Pien-Sheng; Nan, Fan-Hua

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of orally administered Plantago asiatica, Houttuynia cordata, and Mentha haplocalyx on the growth and nonspecific immune responses of cobia (Rachycentron canadum). The nonspecific immune parameters assessed were weight gain, feed conversion ratio, superoxide anion (O 2 - ) production, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, phagocytic rate, phagocytic index, lysozyme activity, serum albumin and globulin, and albumin:globulin (A/G) ratio. The growth experiment indicated that 6-week dietary treatments did not significantly affect on the growth of cobia. Nonspecific immune responses showed that O 2 - production, SOD and lysozyme activity, and phagocytosis were significantly increased after the oral administration of P. asiatica and H. cordata, and the serum albumin:globulin ratio (A/G) gradually decreased. In this study, treatment of the Mentha haplocalyx on the cobia didn't present with the inducing of the phagocytosis ability compared with the treatment of P. asiatica and H. cordata. We suggest that oral administration of the 10 g/kg or 20 g/kg of the P. asiatica and H. cordata is exactly inducing the phagocytosis, ROS production, lysozyme activity and SOD production in the cobia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Integrated Circuit Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sketoe, J. G.; Clark, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a DOD E3 program overview on integrated circuit immunity. The topics include: 1) EMI Immunity Testing; 2) Threshold Definition; 3) Bias Tee Function; 4) Bias Tee Calibration Set-Up; 5) EDM Test Figure; 6) EMI Immunity Levels; 7) NAND vs. and Gate Immunity; 8) TTL vs. LS Immunity Levels; 9) TP vs. OC Immunity Levels; 10) 7805 Volt Reg Immunity; and 11) Seventies Chip Set. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  6. Investigating the effect of ionizing radiations on humoral immune system in industrial radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakeri, Fariedeh.

    1993-01-01

    A general review of radiobiology, immunology system,mechanism of biological effect of radiation and their biological damaging on cells and organs and specifically radiation effects on humoral immune system are given. The purpose is investigating the side effects of occupational exposures caused by ionizing radiation, and reviewing the decreasing probability of humoral immune responses in industrial radiographers. Generally, it measures the following humoral factors of industrial radiographers by value of different exposures: 1-Measuring immunoglobulins serum which consist of IgM, IgG, IgA, IgE. 2-Electrophoresis of serum proteins to investigate gamma globulins changes and also the changes occur in serum globulins after exposure. 3-Investigating the titration of isohem glutins serum (or natural immunoglobulins) that is mostly from IgM. 4-Measuring the above experiments on health control personnel who have not exposed to occupational or biological radiation effects. 5-Comparing the results of the two groups by statistical analysis. 6-Trying to relate the exposure to the information obtained from the above experiments. 7-Finally, to obtain this response whether mutation as low dose of radiation as investigated in this project is a threatening factor to the health and immunity of industrial radiographers

  7. Suppression of the immune response to ovalbumin in vivo by anti-idiotypic antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinevich, A.S.; Pinegin, B.V.

    1986-01-01

    Conditions of suppression of the immune response to a food allergin (ovalbumin) were studied with the aid of anti-idiotypic (AID) antibodies. Hen ovalbumin was used and the experiments were performed on mice. Antibodies were isolated from the resulting protein fractions and tested for inhibitor activity by the method of direct radioimmunologic analysis. The test system consisted of the reaction of binding the globulin fraction to the total preparation of antibodies to ovalbumin from mice and a 125 I-labeled total preparation of antibodies to ovalbumin of the same animals

  8. Avaliação da fenda palpebral após aplicação de toxina botulínica tipo A em pacientes com distonias faciais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Eleonora Pereira Cunial

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a medida da fenda palpebral em pacientes com blefaroespasmo essencial benigno (BEB e espasmo hemifacial (EHF após a aplicação periocular de toxina botulínica tipo A. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados pacientes portadores de BEB e EHF submetidos à injeção periocular de toxina botulínica tipo A pela técnica inner orbital de aplicação. Os pacientes foram fotografados em PPO antes da aplicação e catorze dias depois dela. A fenda palpebral foi mensurada nestas imagens por meio de processamento computadorizado de imagens, utilizando o programa ImageJ. As alterações da fenda palpebral foram observadas comparando-se as medidas obtidas no pré e pós-aplicação. RESULTADOS: Comparando-se as imagens obtidas com o programa ImageJ, houve aumento estatisticamente significante (p<0,001 da fenda palpebral em 14 olhos (51,8% após a aplicação de injeção periocular da toxina botulínica e nenhuma das imagens analisadas apresentou diminuição da fenda palpebral. CONCLUSÃO: No presente estudo, os pacientes portadores de distonias faciais apresentaram aumento de fenda palpebral estatisticamente significante após aplicação periocular de toxina botulínica tipo A.

  9. Wound Botulism in Injection Drug Users: Time to Antitoxin Correlates with Intensive Care Unit Length of Stay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Offerman, Steven R

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We sought to identify factors associated with need for mechanical ventilation (MV, length of intensive care unit (ICU stay, length of hospital stay, and poor outcome in injection drug users (IDUs with wound botulism (WB.Methods: This is a retrospective review of WB patients admitted between 1991-2005. IDUs were included if they had symptoms of WB and diagnostic confirmation. Primary outcome variables were the need for MV, length of ICU stay, length of hospital stay, hospital-related complications, and death.Results: Twenty-nine patients met inclusion criteria. Twenty-two (76% admitted to heroin use only and seven (24% admitted to heroin and methamphetamine use. Chief complaints on initial presentation included visual changes, 13 (45%; weakness, nine (31%; and difficulty swallowing, seven (24%. Skin wounds were documented in 22 (76%. Twenty-one (72% patients underwent mechanical ventilation (MV. Antitoxin (AT was administered to 26 (90% patients but only two received antitoxin in the emergency department (ED. The time from ED presentation to AT administration was associated with increased length of ICU stay (Regression coefficient = 2.5; 95% CI 0.45, 4.5. The time from ED presentation to wound drainage was also associated with increased length of ICU stay (Regression coefficient = 13.7; 95% CI = 2.3, 25.2. There was no relationship between time to antibiotic administration and length of ICU stay.Conclusion: MV and prolonged ICU stays are common in patients identified with WB. Early AT administration and wound drainage are recommended as these measures may decrease ICU length of stay.[West J Emerg Med. 2009;10(4:251-256.

  10. Distonia laríngea: relato de caso e tratamento com toxina botulínica Laryngeal dystonia: case report and treatment with botulinum toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor José Barbosa Santos

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Distonia laríngea, ou disfonia espasmódica, é caracterizada por contrações involuntárias e inapropriadas da musculatura responsável pela fonação, sendo a do tipo adutora a mais comum. Caracteriza-se por quebras fonatórias, sendo seu diagnóstico confirmado por videolaringoestroboscopia. O tratamento de escolha é feito com a aplicação direta de toxina botulínica nos músculos responsáveis pelo movimento incoordenado. O objetivo desse trabalho é relatar o caso de uma paciente com diagnóstico de distonia laríngea do tipo adutora, tratada com toxina botulínica e discutir as vantagens e observações descritas na literatura a respeito desse tratamento.Laryngeal dystonia or spasmodic dysphonia is characterized by involuntary and innapropiate spasms of vocal muscles, having the adductor type as the most common one. It is chacterized by strain-strangled voice with pitch breaks. Diagnosis is made by means of videolaryngostroboscopic exam. The treatment of choice is done with botulinum toxin directly injected in the muscles responsible for the mismatched movement. The aim of this study is to report on an adductor- type dysphonia patient and to discuss the advantages and observations about this treatment reported in the literature.

  11. Characterization of mini-protein S, a recombinant variant of protein S that lacks the sex hormone binding globulin-like domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijnen, M.; Stam, J. G.; Chang, G. T.; Meijers, J. C.; Reitsma, P. H.; Bertina, R. M.; Bouma, B. N.

    1998-01-01

    Protein S is a vitamin K-dependent glycoprotein involved in the regulation of the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C (APC). Also, an anticoagulant role for protein S, independent of APC, has been described. Protein S has a unique C-terminal sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG)-like domain

  12. A portion of heifers attaining “early puberty” do not display estrus, are anovulatory and have altered sex hormone binding globulin concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cows with excess androstenedione (High A4) in the follicular fluid of dominant follicles attain puberty earlier than their low androstenedione counterparts. Furthermore, High A4 cows are anovulatory (chronic or sporadic) and have lower Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) compared to Low A4 ovulator...

  13. Reduction of the non-specific binding of DNA to gamma-globulin in Farr radioimmunoassay by addition of dextran sulfate and calcium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakizaka, A; Okuhara, E [Akita Univ. (Japan)

    1979-01-23

    The effect of non-specific binding caused by the interaction between gamma-globulin and denatured DNA was markedly reduced by addition of dextran sulfate or CaCl/sub 2/ at alkaline pH. This method was shown to be applicable in the detection of anti-DNA antibodies in sera from cases of human systemic lupus erythematosus.

  14. Lignans from the roots of Urtica dioica and their metabolites bind to human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöttner, M; Gansser, D; Spiteller, G

    1997-12-01

    Polar extracts of the stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L.) roots contain the ligans (+)-neoolivil, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol, isolariciresinol, pinoresinol, and 3,4-divanillyltetrahydrofuran. These compounds were either isolated from Urtica roots, or obtained semisynthetically. Their affinity to human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) was tested in an in vitro assay. In addition, the main intestinal transformation products of plant lignans in humans, enterodiol and enterolactone, together with enterofuran were checked for their activity. All lignans except (-)-pinoresinol developed a binding affinity to SHBG in the in vitro assay. The affinity of (-)-3,4-divanillyltetrahydrofuran was outstandingly high. These findings are discussed with respect to potential beneficial effects of plant lignans on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

  15. Genetic evidence that raised sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, John R B; Weedon, Michael N; Langenberg, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological studies consistently show that circulating sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels are lower in type 2 diabetes patients than non-diabetic individuals, but the causal nature of this association is controversial. Genetic studies can help dissect causal directions...... used data from this SNP, or closely correlated SNPs, in 27 657 type 2 diabetes patients and 58 481 controls from 15 studies. We then used data from additional studies to estimate the difference in SHBG levels between type 2 diabetes patients and controls. The SHBG SNP rs1799941 was associated with type...... 2 diabetes [odds ratio (OR) 0.94, 95% CI: 0.91, 0.97; P = 2 x 10(-5)], with the SHBG raising allele associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. This effect was very similar to that expected (OR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88, 0.96), given the SHBG-SNP versus SHBG levels association (SHBG levels are 0.2...

  16. Effect of weight reduction on insulin sensitivity, sex hormone-binding globulin, sex hormones and gonadotrophins in obese children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkebaek, N H; Lange, Aksel; Holland-Fischer, P

    2010-01-01

    Obesity in men is associated with reduced insulin sensitivity and hypoandrogenism, while obesity in women is associated with reduced insulin sensitivity and hyperandrogenism. In children, the effect of obesity and weight reduction on the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis is rarely investigated. ....... The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of weight reduction in obese Caucasian children on insulin sensitivity, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), DHEAS and the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis.......Obesity in men is associated with reduced insulin sensitivity and hypoandrogenism, while obesity in women is associated with reduced insulin sensitivity and hyperandrogenism. In children, the effect of obesity and weight reduction on the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis is rarely investigated...

  17. Differential representation of albumins and globulins during grain development in durum wheat and its possible functional consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Simona; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Vitale, Monica; Mazzeo, Fiorella; Mamone, Gianfranco; Di Stasio, Luigia; Maccaferri, Marco; Curci, Pasquale Luca; Sonnante, Gabriella; Zambrano, Nicola; Scaloni, Andrea

    2017-06-06

    Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum (Desf.) Husn.) is an economically important crop used for the production of semolina, which is the basis of pasta and other food products. Its grains provide proteins and starch for human consumption. Grain development is a key process in wheat physiology; it is highly affected by a number of enzymes that control the metabolic processes governing accumulation of starch and storage proteins and ultimately grain weight. Most of these enzymes are present in the albumin/globulin grain fraction, which represents about a quarter of total seed proteins. With the aim to describe the dynamic profile of the albumin/globulin fraction during durum wheat grain development, we performed a proteomic analysis of this subproteome using a two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE)-based approach and compared six developmental stages. A total of 285 differentially (237 over- and 48 under-) represented spots was identified by nanoLC-ESI-LIT-MS/MS, which were associated with 217 non-redundant Triticum sequence entries. Quantitative protein dynamics demonstrated that carbon metabolism, energy, protein destination/storage, disease/defense and cell growth/division functional categories were highly affected during grain development, concomitantly with progressive grain size increase and starch/protein reserve accumulation. Bioinformatic interaction prediction revealed a complex network of differentially represented proteins mainly centered at enzymes involved in carbon and protein metabolism. A description of 18 proteins associated with wheat flour human allergies was also obtained; these components showed augmented levels at the last developmental stages. By providing a comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of durum wheat grain development, yield and quality formation, this study provides the foundation and reveals potential biomarkers for further investigations of durum wheat breeding and semolina quality. A 2D

  18. Botulismo em bovinos de corte e leite alimentados com cama de frango Botulism in beef and dairy cattle fed with poultry litter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveraldo S. Dutra

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Surtos de botulismo causados pelos tipos C e D da toxina botulínica são freqüentes no país, estando originalmente associados à osteofagia e à ingestão de alimentos e água contaminados. No presente trabalho são descritos os aspectos epidemiológicos, clínico-patológicos e laboratoriais de sete surtos da intoxicação em bovinos de corte e leite alimentados com cama de frango, ocorridos nos estados de São Paulo e Minas Gerais entre 1989 e 2000. Cinco surtos ocorreram em rebanhos de corte confinados ou criados extensivamente e suplementados com o subproduto, e dois em propriedades leiteiras. De um total de 1.535 animais alimentados regularmente com a cama de frango, 455 (29,64% morreram em um período que variou de 2 a 4 semanas. A morbidade nos sete surtos estudados variou de 3,47 a 100%, da mesma forma que a mortalidade. Em uma das propriedades a letalidade foi de 60,52%, e em todos os outros surtos ela foi acima de 88,43%; em três propriedades o coeficiente foi de 100%. Os sinais clínicos de paralisia progressiva, dificuldade na locomoção, decúbito e estado mental aparentemente normal, diminuição do tônus da musculatura da língua e cauda, sialorréia e dificuldade respiratória caracterizaram o quadro clínico. À necropsia de 30 animais não foi observada qualquer alteração macroscópica digna de nota. A presença de esporos de Clostridium botulinum foi detectada em amostras de cama de frango colhidas nas sete propriedades. Nas amostras de fígado, líquido ruminal e intestinal, provenientes dos 30 animais necropsiados, foi possível detectar toxinas botulínicas tipos C (5 ou D (9, ou classificada como pertencente ao complexo CD (1, em pelos menos um dos materiais provenientes de 15 animais, confirmando assim o diagnóstico clínico-patológico e epidemiológico de botulismo.Outbreaks of botulism caused by type C and D of the botulinum toxin are frequent in Brazil, and are associated with bone chewing and ingestion of

  19. Sex hormone binding globulin - an important biomarker for predicting PCOS risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deswal, Ritu; Yadav, Arun; Dang, Amita Suneja

    2018-02-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a glycoprotein which regulates bioavailability of sex steroid hormones. Interest in SHBG has escalated in recent years because of its inverse association with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), obesity, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes type II. This meta-analysis was performed to examine the associations of SHBG with PCOS and to correlate serum SHBG levels with various PCOS associated endocrine and metabolic dysregulation as well as to determine the effects of various therapeutic agents on serum SHBG levels in PCOS patients in order to assess the true accuracy of SHBG in the prediction of PCOS. A literature search was performed using Pub-Med, Science direct, google scholar, EMBASE, and Cochrane library. A total of 675 relevant records were identified, of which 62 articles were included. Meta-analysis using a random-effects model was performed using STATA version 13 to calculate standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (95 % CIs). SHBG levels in controls were significantly higher than that of PCOS patients (SMD= -0.83, 95%CI = -1.01, -0.64), with significant heterogeneity across studies (I 2 = 93.9% and p=0.000). Our results suggest that the lower serum SHBG levels are associated with the risk of PCOS. SHBG may also play an important role in various metabolic disturbances in PCOS patients. Therapeutic interventions improved SHBG levels in PCOS women which further reduced PCOS associated complications. Therefore, SHBG levels may prove to be a useful biomarker for the diagnosis and treatment of PCOS. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42017057972 Abbreviations: PCOS: polycystic ovary syndrome; SHBG: sex hormone-binding globulin.

  20. Immune System Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth / For Kids / Quiz: Immune System Print How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About Us ...

  1. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedule for Adults (19 Years of Age and ... diseases that can be prevented by vaccines . 2018 Immunization Schedule Recommended Vaccinations for Adults by Age and ...

  2. Immunizations and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Immunizations Immunizations and African Americans African American adults are less ... 19 to 35 months had comparable rates of immunization. African American women are as likely to have ...

  3. Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Get ... date. See Disclaimer for additional details. Based on Immunization Schedule for Children 0 through 6 Years of ...

  4. Questioning the role of actinfree Gc-Globulin as actin scavenger in neurodegenerative central nervous system disease: relationship to S-100B levels and blood-brain barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressner, Olav A; Schifflers, Marie-Claire; Kim, Philipp; Heuts, Leo; Lahme, Birgit; Gressner, Axel M

    2009-02-01

    Preliminary studies report on significantly higher levels of the major cytoskeleton protein actin in CSF of patients with neurodegenerative conditions and that the dynamics of these levels obviously correlates with disease progression and clinical disability. One of the primary functions of actinfree Gc-Globulin is to bind and neutralize extracellular monomeric actin, released into the circulation by necrotic or ruptured cells, and thus ameliorating the clinical outcome in situations of severe organ damage. This is the first study to investigate actinfree Gc-Globulin and S100-B levels (as reliable marker of neurodegeneration) in paired CSF and serum samples of patients with multietiological CNS diseases. 42% of all patients with CNS disease displayed serum concentrations of actinfree Gc-Globulin above the established reference range. CSF concentrations of actinfree Gc-Globulin and S100-B were positively correlated with the severity of blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. Furthermore, patients with severe BBB dysfunction presented a higher percentage of intrathecal synthesis of actinfree Gc-Globulin compared to patients with mild to moderate dysfunction and to patients with normal BBB function. Representative longitudinal data from selected patients demonstrated an inverse behaviour of actinfree Gc-Globulin and S100-B CSF concentrations, suggesting a consumption of the actin scavenger capacity of Gc-Globulin in times of increased neuronal damage. This presumption was supported by the fact that those conditions associated with a severe neuronal damage, in particular CNS trauma, and highest S100-B concentrations simultaneously displayed lowest actinfree Gc-Globulin levels, and thus residual actin binding capacity of Gc-Globulin. In summary, our data propose a function of actinfree Gc-Globulin also in the clearance of actin filaments from CSF of patients with neuronal damage. However, active recruitment of hepatic derived actinfree Gc-Globulin to the site of CNS

  5. d-Limonene-induced male rat-specific nephrotoxicity: Evaluation of the association between d-limonene and alpha 2u-globulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehman-McKeeman, L.D.; Rodriguez, P.A.; Takigiku, R.; Caudill, D.; Fey, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    d-Limonene is a naturally occurring monoterpene, which when dosed orally, causes a male rat-specific nephrotoxicity manifested acutely as the exacerbation of protein droplets in proximal tubule cells. Experiments were conducted to examine the retention of [ 14 C]d-limonene in male and female rat kidney, to determine whether d-limonene or one or more of its metabolites associates with the male rat-specific protein, alpha 2u-globulin, and if so, to identify the bound material. The results indicated that, 24 hr after oral administration of 3 mmol d-limonene/kg, the renal concentration of d-limonene equivalents was approximately 2.5 times higher in male rats than in female rats. Equilibrium dialysis in the presence or absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate indicated that approximately 40% of the d-limonene equivalents in male rat kidney associated with proteins in a reversible manner, whereas no significant association was observed between d-limonene equivalents and female rat kidney proteins. Association between d-limonene and male rat kidney proteins was characterized by high-performance gel filtration and reverse-phase chromatography. Gel filtration HPLC indicated that d-limonene in male rat kidney is associated with a protein fraction having a molecular weight of approximately 20,000. Separation of alpha 2u-globulin from other kidney proteins by reverse-phase HPLC indicated that d-limonene associated with a protein present only in male rat kidney which was definitively identified as alpha 2u-globulin by amino acid sequencing. The major metabolite associated with alpha 2u-globulin was d-limonene-1,2-oxide. Parent d-limonene was also identified as a minor component in the alpha 2u-globulin fraction

  6. T cell immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Emel Bülbül Başkan

    2013-01-01

    Since birth, our immune system is constantly bombarded with self-antigens and foreign pathogens. To stay healthy, complex immune strategies have evolved in our immune system to maintain self-tolerance and to defend against foreign pathogens. Effector T cells are the key players in steering the immune responses to execute immune functions. While effector T cells were initially identified to be immune promoting, recent studies unraveled negative regulatory functions of effector T cells...

  7. Immunization Action Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IAC | Contact | A-Z Index | Donate | Shop | SUBSCRIBE Immunization Action Coalition Favorites ACIP Recommendations Package Inserts Additional Immunization Resources Photos Adult Vaccination Screening Checklists Ask the ...

  8. Toxina botulínica e fisioterapia em crianças com paralisia cerebral espástica: revisão bibliográfica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Silva Teles

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A paralisia cerebral (PC é definida como uma condição neurológica não progressiva originada em razão de uma lesão no encéfalo imaturo que compromete os movimentos e a postura. A espasticidade está presente em 75% dos casos. Essa patologia tem incidência na população de aproximadamente 2 em cada 1.000 nascidos vivos e pode chegar a até 7 por 1.000 em países em desenvolvimento. O objetivo do estudo foi realizar uma revisão bibliográfica por meio da seleção e análise criteriosa de artigos científicos que relatem os efeitos da aplicação da toxina botulínica tipo A associada à fisioterapia em crianças com paralisia cerebral espástica. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foi realizada uma revisão bibliográfica nas bases de dados eletrônicas MEDLINE, LILACS e SciELO, no período de 1997 a 2009. Os descritores utilizados foram: "paralisia cerebral" e "espasticidade muscular", combinados com "toxina botulínica tipo A" e "fisioterapia". RESULTADOS: Somando-se todos os bancos de dados, um total de 50 artigos que continham os desfechos de interesse dessa revisão foram encontrados, no entanto, alguns artigos aparecem em mais de uma busca e em duplicidade de idioma. Então, 23 artigos foram utilizados neste estudo. DISCUSSÃO: Vários estudos demonstram que, para maior efetividade da toxina botulínica tipo A, esta deve ser associada a um programa fisioterapêutico que sempre deve considerar as etapas do desenvolvimento motor da criança. CONSIDERAÇÕES FINAIS: De acordo com a revisão bibliográfica apresentada, a TBA associada à fisioterapia para o controle da espasticidade se mostra bastante eficaz. Contudo, novas pesquisas acerca deste assunto são necessárias.

  9. Uso de toxina botulínica paravertebral para detener la progresión de escoliosis en pollos pinealectomizados: la columna vertebral como sistema de tensegridad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro González-Miranda

    Full Text Available Antecedentes y Objetivos. La escoliosis idiopática infantil no tiene un tratamiento satisfactorio que permita reducir la importante morbilidad y mortalidad asociada a los casos más severos y progresivos de la enfermedad. El desarrollo de procedimientos que puedan ralentizar la progresión de la enfermedad durante el desarrollo del niño puede influir favorablemente en el crecimiento y retrasar el tratamiento definitivo de la deformidad al momento de la madurez músculoesquelética. Presentamos un estudio sobre la influencia de la toxina botulínica en el desarrollo de deformidad en un modelo animal de escoliosis progresiva. Material y método. Utilizamos 52 pollos Broiler hembra, en los que se practicó pinealectomía para producir escoliosis. Comparamos la evolución de la deformidad entre un grupo control y un grupo intervención asignado a recibir toxina botulínica paravertebral en la concavidad de la curva, bajo control electromiográfico. Realizamos estudios radiográficos y anatomopatológicos de los animales para evaluar los resultados. El grado de escoliosis se midió utilizando el método del ángulo de Cobb. Resultados. Cinco animales no sobrevivieron al estudio (1 en el grupo control y 4 en el de intervención. En el grupo control observamos una deformidad media de 32.9º (n= 25 y en el grupo intervención de 18.8º (n=22, encontrando diferencias estadísticamente significativas (p < 0.05. Por tanto, la aplicación de toxina botulínica en la concavidad de la deformidad de pollos pinealectomizados frena la progresión de escoliosis. Conclusiones. La consideración de la columna vertebral y sus tejidos blandos asociados como una estructura de tensegridad puede explicar el fenómeno mediante el desequilibrio generado entre los componentes de tensión (músculos y ligamentos y compresión (vértebras que conforman el sistema. Estos resultados justifican nuevos estudios en investigación clínica para explorar una nueva alternativa

  10. Our Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our Immune System A story for children with primary immunodeficiency diseases Written by Sara LeBien IMMUNE DEFICIENCY FOUNDATION A note ... who are immune deficient to better understand their immune system. What is a “ B-cell, ” a “ T-cell, ” ...

  11. Immune and hormonal activity in adults suffering from depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.O.V. Nunes

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available An association between depression and altered immune and hormonal systems has been suggested by the results of many studies. In the present study we carried out immune and hormonal measurements in 40 non-medicated, ambulatory adult patients with depression determined by CID-10 criteria and compared with 34 healthy nondepressed subjects. The severity of the condition was determined with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Of 40 depressed patients, 31 had very severe and 9 severe or moderate depression, 29 (72.5% were females and 11 (27.5% were males (2.6:1 ratio. The results revealed a significant reduction of albumin and elevation of alpha-1, alpha-2 and ß-globulins, and soluble IL-2 receptor in patients with depression compared to the values obtained for nondepressed subjects (P<0.05. The decrease lymphocyte proliferation in response to a mitogen was significantly lower in severely or moderately depressed patients when compared to control (P<0.05. These data confirm the immunological disturbance of acute phase proteins and cellular immune response in patients with depression. Other results may be explained by a variety of interacting factors such as number of patients, age, sex, and the nature, severity and/or duration of depression. Thus, the data obtained should be interpreted with caution and the precise clinical relevance of these findings requires further investigation.

  12. The 11S globulin Sin a 2 from yellow mustard seeds shows IgE cross-reactivity with homologous counterparts from tree nuts and peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirvent Sofía

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 11S globulin Sin a 2 is a marker to predict severity of symptoms in mustard allergic patients. The potential implication of Sin a 2 in cross-reactivity with tree nuts and peanut has not been investigated so far. In this work, we studied at the IgG and IgE level the involvement of the 11S globulin Sin a 2 in cross-reactivity among mustard, tree nuts and peanut. Methods Eleven well-characterized mustard-allergic patients sensitized to Sin a 2 were included in the study. A specific anti-Sin a 2 serum was obtained in rabbit. Skin prick tests (SPT, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, immunoblotting and IgG or IgE-inhibition immunoblotting experiments using purified Sin a 2, Sin a 1, Sin a 3, mustard, almond, hazelnut, pistachio, walnut or peanut extracts were performed. Results The rabbit anti-Sin a 2 serum showed high affinity and specificity to Sin a 2, which allowed us to demonstrate that Sin a 2 shares IgG epitopes with allergenic 11S globulins from tree nuts (almond, hazelnut, pistachio and walnut but not from peanut. All the patients included in the study had positive skin prick test to tree nuts and/or peanut and we subdivided them into two different groups according to their clinical symptoms after ingestion of such allergenic sources. We showed that 11S globulins contain conserved IgE epitopes involved in cross-reactivity among mustard, tree nuts and peanut as well as species-specific IgE epitopes. Conclusions The allergenic 11S globulin Sin a 2 from mustard is involved in cross-reactivity at the IgE level with tree nuts and peanut. Although the clinical relevance of the cross-reactive IgE epitopes present in 11S globulins needs to be investigated in further detail, our results contribute to improve the diagnosis and management of mustard allergic patients sensitized to Sin a 2.

  13. Serum protein changes in immune and nonimmune pigeons infected with various strains of Trichomonas gallinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocan, R.M.; Herman, C.M.

    1970-01-01

    Serum protein changes were studied in immune and nonimmune pigeons infected with three different strains of Trichomonas gallinae. Strain I (nonvirulent) produced no change in the relative concentration of serum components. Strains II (oral canker) and III (Jones' Barn) produced decreases in albumin and alpha globulins, and increases in beta and gamma globulins between the 7th and 20th days post infection. Birds infected with strain II began to return to normal by the 20th day, while all those infected with strain III were dead between 10 and 14 days post infection. Two serum protein patterns resulted from infection of immune birds with the Jones' Barn strain. One showed no change in relative protein concentrations and no tissue invasion by the parasite while the other was similar to that seen in nonimmune birds infected with a strain producing oral canker. These also showed evidence of tissue invasion by the parasite. It was concluded that tissue invasion was necessary to evoke a quantitative change in serum protein concentrations.

  14. Diplopia após injeção de toxina botulínica tipo A para rejuvenescimento facial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Melo de Oliveira Rassi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Relato de 4 casos de pacientes encaminhadas ao serviço de Ortóptica deste Hospital, que apresentaram diplopia após a injeção de toxina botulínica tipo A para rejuvenescimento facial. Nas medidas de ângulo do estrabismo em posições diagnósticas todas apresentaram microestrabismo paralítico, sendo duas por déficit da função do músculo oblíquo inferior e duas por déficit de função de músculo reto lateral. Baseados nos casos descritos, aconselha-se aos profissionais que fazem uso desta toxina para fins de rejuvenescimento facial que estejam atentos para a diplopia como efeito colateral.

  15. Low Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin Levels Associate with Prediabetes in Chinese Men Independent of Total Testosterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Li, Qin; Chen, Yi; Zhu, Chunfang; Chen, Yingchao; Xia, Fangzhen; Cang, Zhen; Lu, Meng; Chen, Chi; Lin, Dongping; Lu, Yingli

    2016-01-01

    Objective The association ns between prediabetes and androgens have been rarely reported, especially in Chinese men. We aimed to investigate whether androgens were associated with the prevalence of prediabetes diagnosed with new American Diabetes Association criteria in Chinese men and then to assess which androgen value was the most relevant factor. Methods A total of 2654 men (52.6±13.4 years old) were selected. Serum total testosterone (TT), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and free testosterone (FT) were measured. Covariance analysis of different androgen values were performed in age subgroups. Multinomial logistic regression was used for the association of TT, SHBG and FT with prediabetes and diabetes, as well as prediabetes in age subgroups. Results According to ADA new criteria, normoglycemia, prediabetes, and diabetes were diagnosed in 1405, 907 and 342 men, respectively. In covariance analysis, SHBG of prediabetes were found lower than that of normoglycemia but higher than that of diabetes (P prediabetes and diabetes. While, after full adjustment for age, residence area, economic status, waist circumference, metabolic factors, other two androgen values and HOMA-IR, only the associations of SHBG with prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes persisted statistically significant, especially in the elderly with prediabetes (all P for trend prediabetes and diabetes in Chinese men. Low serum SHBG was the most relevant factor for prediabetes and diabetes. Whether it is an independent predictor for incident prediabetes in Chinese men needs further explorations. PMID:27583401

  16. Characterization and quantification of corticosteroid-binding globulin in a southern toad, Bufo terrestris, exposed to coal-combustion-waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, C.K.; Fontes, C.; Breuner, C.W.; Mendonca, M.T. [Auburn University, Auburn, AL (USA). Dept. of Biological Science

    2007-05-15

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is a plasma protein that binds corticosterone and may regulate access of hormone to tissues. The role of CBG during a stress response is not clear. In this study, southern toads, Bufo terrestris, were exposed to a chronic pollutant (coal-combustion-waste), to determine changes in CBG and free corticosterone levels. Since toads exposed to chronic pollutants in previous studies did not exhibit the predicted changes in metabolic rate and mass, but did experience a significant elevation in total corticosterone, we hypothesized that CBG would likewise increase and thus, mitigate the effects of a chronic (i.e. 2 months) pollutant stressor. To conduct this study, we first characterized the properties of CBG in southern toads. After characterization, we monitored the changes in CBG, total corticosterone, and free corticosterone in male toads that were exposed to either coal-combustion-waste or control conditions. CBG increased in all groups throughout the experiment. Total corticosterone, on the other hand, was only significantly elevated at four weeks of exposure to coal-combustion-waste. The increase in CBG did not parallel the increase in total corticosterone; as a result, free corticosterone levels were not buffered by CBG, but showed a peak at four weeks similar to total corticosterone. This finding indicates that, in this species, CBG may not provide a protective mechanism during long-term pollution exposure.

  17. Biological half-life and transfer of maternal corticosteroid-binding globulin to amniotic fluid in the rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seralini, G.E.; Underhill, C.M.; Smith, C.L.; Nguyen, V.T.; Hammond, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    Rabbit corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) from the serum of pregnant and nonpregnant females differs in terms of charge microheterogeneity, and both forms were, therefore, radiolabeled and injected iv into 23- to 27-day pregnant rabbits (n = 6) to assess their biological half-lives and possible transfer to the fetal compartment. After an initially rapid distribution phase, the serum half-lives of both forms of [ 125 I]CBG were essentially identical (approximately 13 h) and did not vary at different gestational ages. There was also no difference in the transfer of either form of [ 125 I]CBG from maternal to fetal compartments in any of the animals studied. Moreover, [ 125 I]CBG showed no sign of degradation and retained its steroid-binding activity in fetal urine and amniotic fluid. Twenty-two hours after administration of [ 125 I]CBG to rabbits (n = 2) at 23 days gestation, its mean level in fetal urine (7 cpm/microliter) and amniotic fluid (2.5 cpm/microliter) was much higher than that in fetal blood (0.6 cpm/microliter). More importantly, the specific activities of [ 125 I]CBG in fetal urine and amniotic fluid were comparable to that in maternal serum, and approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than that in fetal serum. Taken together, these results suggest that CBG in fetal urine and amniotic fluid is largely of maternal origin, and that maternal CBG crosses the fetal kidney preferentially

  18. Repair of UV-induced DNA damage in aplastic anaemia: Changes after treatment with antilymphocyte globulin (ALG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, E.; Nissen, C.; Speck, B.; Signer, E.

    1988-01-01

    The extent of DNA-repair induced by UV-C irradiation was measured in peripheral unstimulated lymphocytes of 24 patients with aplastic anaemia at different stages of disease and compared with the results obtained in 92 controls. As parameter of the DNA-repair synthesis, the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine in the presence of 2 mmol/l hydroxyurea (HU) was taken. Of 19 patients tested after treatment with antilymphocyte globulin (ALG), 5 were in complete autologous haemopoietic remission, defined as > 1000 granulocytes/mm/sup 3/, > 100 000 platelets/mm/sup 3/ and a nontransfused haemoglobin value > 10 g%. 14 patients were in partial remission, defined as improvement of haemopoietic function, not meeting the criteria for complete remission. 4/5 patients in complete remission had normal DNA-repair synthesis, compared to 4/14 patients in partial remission. In 92 controls, a normal level was found in 70 cases. In 4/5 patients examined at diagnosis and at various intervals after ALG-treatment, DNA-repair synthesis was low at diagnosis. It increased after therapy and paralleled improvement of haemopoietic function to some extent. It is suggested that in aplastic anaemia there are different populations of lymphocytes with differing DNA-repair capacity; ALG treatment seems to favour expansion of the normal population, which is associated with improvement of haemopoietic function.

  19. Prospective study of rabbit antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine for aplastic anemia from the EBMT Severe Aplastic Anaemia Working Party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Judith C; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Tichelli, Andre; Risitano, Antonio M; Passweg, Jakob R; Killick, Sally B; Warren, Alan J; Foukaneli, Theodora; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Al-Zahrani, H A; Höchsmann, Britta; Schafhausen, Philip; Roth, Alexander; Franzke, Anke; Brummendorf, Tim H; Dufour, Carlo; Oneto, Rosi; Sedgwick, Philip; Barrois, Alain; Kordasti, Shahram; Elebute, Modupe O; Mufti, Ghulam J; Socie, Gerard

    2012-06-07

    Rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG; thymoglobulin, Genzyme) in combination with cyclosporine, as first-line immunosuppressive therapy, was evaluated prospectively in a multicenter, European, phase 2 pilot study, in 35 patients with aplastic anemia. Results were compared with 105 age- and disease severity-matched patients from the European Blood and Marrow Transplant registry, treated with horse ATG (hATG; lymphoglobulin) and cyclosporine. The primary end point was response at 6 months. At 3 months, no patients had achieved a complete response to rATG. Partial response occurred in 11 (34%). At 6 months, complete response rate was 3% and partial response rate 37%. There were 10 deaths after rATG (28.5%) and 1 after subsequent HSCT. Infections were the main cause of death in 9 of 10 patients. The best response rate was 60% for rATG and 67% for hATG. For rATG, overall survival at 2 years was 68%, compared with 86% for hATG (P = .009). Transplant-free survival was 52% for rATG and 76% for hATG (P = .002). On multivariate analysis, rATG (hazard ratio = 3.9, P = .003) and age more than 37 years (hazard ratio = 4.7, P = .0008) were independent adverse risk factors for survival. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00471848.

  20. Massive weight loss decreases corticosteroid-binding globulin levels and increases free cortisol in healthy obese patients: an adaptive phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manco, Melania; Fernández-Real, José M; Valera-Mora, Maria E; Déchaud, Henri; Nanni, Giuseppe; Tondolo, Vincenzo; Calvani, Menotti; Castagneto, Marco; Pugeat, Michel; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2007-06-01

    Obesity, insulin resistance, and weight loss have been associated with changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. So far, no conclusive data relating to this association are available. In this study, we aim to investigate the effects of massive weight loss on cortisol suppressibility, cortisol-binding globulin (CBG), and free cortisol index (FCI) in formerly obese women. Ten glucose-normotolerant, fertile, obese women (BMI >40 kg/m2, aged 38.66 +/- 13.35 years) were studied before and 2 years after biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) when stable weight was achieved and were compared with age-matched healthy volunteers. Cortisol suppression was evaluated by a 4-mg intravenous dexamethasone suppression test (DEX-ST). FCI was calculated as the cortisol-to-CBG ratio. Insulin sensitivity was measured by an euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, and insulin secretion was measured by a C-peptide deconvolution method. No difference was found in cortisol suppression after DEX-ST before or after weight loss. A decrease in ACTH was significantly greater in control subjects than in obese (P = 0.05) and postobese women (P obese subjects, an increase of free cortisol was associated with a simultaneous decrease in CBG levels, which might be an adaptive phenomenon relating to environmental changes. This topic, not addressed before, adds new insight into the complex mechanisms linking HPA activity to obesity.

  1. Measurement for serum thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) and its clinical assessment in diagnosis of thyroid states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Rikiyo; Yoshimasa, Yasunao; Hamada, Satoshi

    1979-01-01

    Serum levels of thyroxine (T 4 )-binding globulin (TBG) were determined by a radioimmunoassay using cellulose-linked antibody to TBG. Values obtained in healthy young adults averaged 1.62 +- 0.25 (SD) mg/100 ml, and no significant difference was detected between males and females. The TBG levels remained within the normal limit in hyperthyroidism while they were significantly increased in hypothyroidism. Interestingly enough, TBG levels were significantly elevated in chronic thyroidities with no overt hypothyroidism. In normal pregnancy, TBG was increased slightly in the first trimester, and markedly in the second and third trimesters. In one case of congenital TBG deficiency, no immunoreactive TBG was detected. It was demonstrated, further, that an inverse relationship (r = -0.7593) existed between the TBG level and serum triiodothyronine uptake index, and that a direct relation (r = +0.6557) was present between the TBG level and T 4 in sera from normal subjects and pregnancy. Ratios of T 4 /TBG were markedly increased in hyperthyroidism, and decreased in hypothyroidism, showing no overlap with the normal subjects, whereas they were below the normal limit in half the cases in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. The radioimmunoassay for TBG was useful in evaluating hypothyroid states, because it could differentiate the increase in T 4 associated with elevated TBG from hyperthyroidism. (author)

  2. [Sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels during pregnancy as predictors for pre-eclampsia and fetal growth restriction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés R, Enrique; Lattes A, Karina; Muñoz S, Hernán; Cumsille, Miguel Angel

    2012-05-01

    Sex-Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) may be associated to Pre-eclampsia (PE) and Fetal Growth Restriction (RCIU). To determine if maternal serum SHBG concentrations during the first and second trimesters are predictive biomarkers of Pre-eclampsia and RCIU. Prospective cohort study carried out in the Fetal Medicine Unit, Universidad de Chile Clinical Hospital between January, 2005 and December, 2006. Blood samples were obtained from unselected pregnant women during routine 11-14 week and 22-25 week ultrasound examinations, conforming two different study groups. Posteriorly, serum SHBG concentrations were determined in women who developed Pre-eclampsia, RCIU and their respective controls. Fifty five patients were included in the 11-14 weeks group. Nine women that developed PE, 10 that developed RCIU and 36 controls were selected from this group. There were no significant differences in SHBG levels between patients with PE, RCIU or controls (324.7 (26.6), 336.8 (33.9) and 377.5 (24.3) nmol/L, respectively). Fifty four women were included in the 22-25 weeks group. Eight women who developed Pre-eclampsia, 15 who developed RCIU and 31 controls were selected. Again, there were no significant differences in SHBG levels between patients with PE, RCIU or controls (345.5 (151.1), 383.8 (143.4) and 345.5 nmol/l (151.1), respectively). Maternal SHBG serum levels did not predict subsequent development of Pre-eclampsia and RCIU.

  3. Analysis of infusion-site reactions in renal transplant recipients receiving peripherally administered rabbit antithymocyte globulin as compared with basiliximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Abbie L; Roberts, Keri; Malek, Sayeed K; Chandraker, Anil K; Tullius, Stefan G; Gabardi, Steven

    2010-06-01

    Antithymocyte globulin rabbit (r-ATG) has been used for the treatment and prevention of acute rejection in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Current manufacturer recommendations for r-ATG dictate the need for administration through a high-flow vein (central line). Previous studies have shown peripheral administration of r-ATG to be safe; however, these studies suggest the co-administration of heparin and hydrocortisone and did not compare the infusion-site reaction rates to a control group. A retrospective analysis was conducted of adult RTR receiving r-ATG or basiliximab between January 2004 and October 2006. Each agent was administered through a dedicated peripheral line. The primary endpoint was the incidence of infusion-site reactions. Other endpoints included the need to replace the intravenous catheter and the incidence of systemic thrombosis within 1 month of transplantation. During the study period, 152 peripheral infusions of r-ATG and 92 peripheral infusions of basiliximab were administered. No difference in infusion-site reactions was noted between the groups. There was also no difference either in the need for peripheral line replacement or the rates of systemic thrombosis. Peripheral administration of r-ATG is safe and can be infused without concomitant heparin and hydrocortisone. This method of r-ATG infusion was shown to be as safe as peripherally administered basiliximab.

  4. Methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) induction of α2u-globulin nephropathy in male, but not female rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghoff, S.J.; Hard, G.C.; Berdasco, N.M.; Gingell, R.; Green, S.M.; Gulledge, W.

    2009-01-01

    Male F-344 rats were administered corn oil (vehicle control), d-limonene (positive control, 300 mg/kg), or MIBK (1000 mg/kg) and female F-344 rats corn oil (vehicle control) or MIBK for 10 consecutive days by oral gavage. Approximately 24 h after the final dose the kidneys were excised and the left kidney prepared and evaluated for histological changes including protein (hyaline) droplet accumulation, immunohistochemical staining for α2u-globulin (α2u), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) to quantitate renal cell proliferation. The right kidney was prepared for quantitation of total protein and α2u using an ELISA. MIBK elicited an increase in protein droplets, accumulation of α2u, and renal cell proliferation in male, but not female rats, responses characteristic of α2u-mediated nephropathy. MIBK produced identical histopathological changes in the male rat kidney when compared to d-limonene, an acknowledged inducer of α2u-nephropathy except that the grade of severity tended to be slightly lower with MIBK. MIBK did not induce any effects in female rats. Therefore, renal histopathology, along with the other measures of α2u accumulation, provides additional weight of evidence to support the inclusion of MIBK in the category of chemicals exerting renal effects through a α2u-nephropathy-mediated mode-of-action

  5. Induction of specific unresponsiveness to heart allografts in mongrel dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation and antithymocyte globulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strober, S.; Modry, D.L.; Hoppe, R.T.

    1984-01-01

    The survival of heterotopic heart allografts was determined in mongrel dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) alone or in combination with other immunosuppressive agents. TLI alone (total dose, 1800 rad) minimally prolonged graft survival as compared with untreated controls. However, marked synergy was observed when TLI was combined with a 10-day post-transplant course of rabbit anti-dog thymocyte globulin (ATG). Approximately 40% of recipients given TLI and ATG showed specific unresponsiveness, as judged by the lack of rejection on serial biopsies for more than 1 year and the prompt rejection of third party hearts. The addition of post-transplant azathioprine (90 to 180 days) to the TLI and ATG regimen increased the mortality of recipients and reduced the fraction of dogs showing specific unresponsiveness. Infusion of donor bone marrow cells at the time of heart transplantation failed to induced specific unresponsiveness in recipients given TLI alone or TLI in combination with post-transplant methotrexate, cyclosporine A, or ATG. The results indicate that the combination of TLI and a brief course of ATG without marrow transplantation was the most effective regimen for the induction of specific unresponsiveness in mongrel dogs

  6. Overestimation of Albumin Measured by Bromocresol Green vs Bromocresol Purple Method: Influence of Acute-Phase Globulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Moreira, Vanessa; Beridze Vaktangova, Nana; Martinez Gago, Maria Dolores; Laborda Gonzalez, Belen; Garcia Alonso, Sara; Fernandez Rodriguez, Eloy

    2018-05-22

    Usually serum albumin is measured with dye-binding assay as bromocresol green (BCG) and bromocresol purple (BCP) methods. The aim of this paper was to examine the differences in albumin measurements between the Advia2400 BCG method (AlbBCG), Dimension RxL BCP (AlbBCP) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). Albumin concentrations from 165 serum samples were analysed using AlbBCG, AlbBCP and CZE. CZE was employed to estimate different serum protein fractions. Influence of globulins on albumin concentration discrepancies between methods was estimated as well as the impact of the albumin method on aCa concentrations. Medcalc was employed for statistical analysis, setting a value of P albumin concentrations. AlbBCG were positively biased versus CZE (3.54 g/L). There was good agreement between CZE and ALbBCP (Albumin results from the BCP and BCG methods may result in unacceptable differences and clinical confusion, especially at lower albumin concentrations. Serum acute phase proteins contribute to overestimating the albumin concentration using AlbBCG.

  7. Heat-denaturation and aggregation of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) globulins as affected by the pH value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Outi E; Zannini, Emanuele; Koehler, Peter; Arendt, Elke K

    2016-04-01

    The influence of heating (100 °C; 0-15 min) on the relative molecular mass, protein unfolding and secondary structure of quinoa globulins was studied at pH 6.5 (low solubility), 8.5 and 10.5 (high solubility). The patterns of denaturation and aggregation varied with pH. Heating triggered the disruption of the disulfide bonds connecting the acidic and basic chains of the chenopodin subunits at pH 8.5 and 10.5, but not at pH 6.5. Large aggregates unable to enter a 4% SDS-PAGE gel were formed at pH 6.5 and 8.5, which became soluble under reducing conditions. Heating at pH 10.5 lead to a rapid dissociation of the native chenopodin and to the disruption of the subunits, but no SDS-insoluble aggregates were formed. No major changes in secondary structure occurred during a 15 min heating, but an increase in hydrophobicity indicated unfolding of the tertiary structure in all samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Low Levels of Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin Constitute an Independent Risk Factor for Arterial Stiffness in Korean Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunhee Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG and arterial stiffness in women is not conclusive. In addition, obesity might also be involved in the relationship between SHBG and atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between SHBG and arterial stiffness in association with central obesity in women. This cross-sectional study included 381 women who participated in the health checkup programs in one hospital. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV was measured as a marker for arterial stiffness. A negative correlation was observed between SHBG levels and baPWV (rho = −0.281. The relationship was significant even after adjusting for potential confounders (beta = −0.087 in fully adjusted model. After considering the interaction between central obesity and SHBG levels, the significant association was evident only in obese women (P for interaction = 0.025. Adjustment for a 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD risk scores, instead of each cardiovascular risk factor individually, did not affect the significance of the relationship between SHBG levels and baPWV. Serum levels of SHBG were negatively associated with arterial stiffness independent of cardiovascular risk factors or 10-year ASCVD risk scores in Korean women. The relationship may be potentiated by central obesity.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to the reactive centre loop (RCL) of human corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) can protect against proteolytic cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John G; Elder, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) binds most of the cortisol in circulation and is a non-functional member of the family of serine protease inhibitors (serpins) with an exposed elastase sensitive reactive centre loop (RCL). The RCL can be cleaved by human neutrophil elastase, released from activated neutrophils, and can also be cleaved at nearby site(s) by elastase released by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and at two further sites, also within the RCL, by bovine chymotrypsin. Cleavage of the RCL results in a conformational change accompanied by a marked decrease in affinity for cortisol and hence its release at the site of proteolysis. These cleavages are irreversible and the similar half-lives of cleaved and intact CBG could mean that there may be some advantage in slowing the rate of CBG cleavage in acute inflammation thereby increasing the proportion of intact CBG in circulation. Here we show, for the first time, that pre-incubation of tethered human CBG with two monoclonal antibodies to the RCL of CBG protects against cleavage by all three enzymes. Furthermore, in plasma, pre-incubation with both RCL monoclonal antibodies delays neutrophil elastase cleavage of the RCL and one of these RCL monoclonal antibodies also delays bovine chymotrypsin cleavage of the RCL. These findings may provide a basis and rationale for the concept of the use of RCL antibodies as therapeutic agents to effectively increase the proportion of intact CBG in circulation which may be of benefit in acute inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Análise retrospectiva das alterações da dinâmica facial após aplicações seriadas de toxina botulínica tipo A

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Pinto Gimenez

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUÇÃO: A presença de rugas na face devido à hipercinese muscular é comum nas regiões frontal, glabelar e peri-orbitárias. São descritos diversos métodos para o tratamento das rugas de expressão, como a dermoabrasão, a ablação a laser, o laser não ablativo, preenchimentos, cirurgia e aplicações de toxina botulínica. O tratamento das rugas da face com toxina botulínica tipo A é método consagrado, porém são pouco definidos os efeitos a longo prazo. Este estudo retrospectivo teve como objeti...

  11. Treatment of cervical dystonia with botulinum toxin in a patient with myasthenia gravis Tratamento de distonia cervical com toxina botulínica em uma paciente com miastenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCIA RUBIA R. GONÇALVES

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 49-year-old woman who has the rare combination of myasthenia gravis and cervical dystonia. She was treated with botulinum toxin type A with good response and no evidence of deterioration of the myasthenic symptoms. We therefore conclude that it is possible to use botulinum toxin in the presence of defective neuromuscular transmission.Relatamos o caso de uma mulher de 49 anos com rara combinação de miastenia gravis e distonia cervical tratada com toxina botulínica tipo A, apresentando boa resposta e nenhuma evidência de piora do quadro miastênico. A partir dessas observações concluimos que é possível o uso de toxina botulínica na presença de doença da transmissão neuromuscular.

  12. Skin innate immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Aksoy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available All multicellular organisms protect themselves from external universe and microorganisms by innate immune sytem that is constitutively present. Skin innate immune system has several different components composed of epithelial barriers, humoral factors and cellular part. In this review information about skin innate immune system and its components are presented to the reader. Innate immunity, which wasn’t adequately interested in previously, is proven to provide a powerfull early protection system, control many infections before the acquired immunity starts and directs acquired immunity to develop optimally

  13. Trial of using antibodies as carriers of alkylating agents. Pt. 2. Evaluation of ability to form /sup 32/P-cyclophosphamide + immune antibody complexes with homologous antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trzeciak, J; Felus, E; Nolewajka, E; Szaflarski, J; Dudziak, Z [Slaska Akademia Medyczna, Katowice (Poland)

    1976-01-01

    /sup 32/P-cyclophosphamide was found to combine with ..gamma..-globulin fractions of immune sera. Immune sera incubated with /sup 32/P-cyclophosphamide retained ability to react specifically with homologou antigen in vitro in the system: MN antigens of human erythrocytes + rabbit anti-MN antibody, and probably reacted selectively with target antigens in vivo in the system: antigens of guinea pig kidney tissue + rabbit antibodies against these antigens. Hemagglutination, passive hemagglutination and precipitation in agar gel tests were used in the experiments. Ability to combine of the immune antibody + /sup 32/P-cyclophosphamide complex with homologous antigens was evaluated by measurements of radioactivity of studied materials (erythrocyte agglutinates and organ homogenates). The results indicate feasibility of using immune antibodies as carriers of cytostatic agents.

  14. Imbalanced immune homeostasis in immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-04-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder resulting from low platelet counts caused by inadequate production as well as increased destruction by autoimmune mechanisms. As with other autoimmune disorders, chronic ITP is characterized by perturbations of immune homeostasis with hyperactivated effector cells as well as defective regulatory arm of the adaptive immune system, which will be reviewed here. Interestingly, some ITP treatments are associated with restoring the regulatory imbalance, although it remains unclear whether the immune system is redirected to a state of tolerance once treatment is discontinued. Understanding the mechanisms that result in breakdown of immune homeostasis in ITP will help to identify novel pathways for restoring tolerance and inhibiting effector cell responses. This information can then be translated into developing therapies for averting autoimmunity not only in ITP but also many autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Immune System (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the Immune System Print en español El sistema inmunitario The immune system, which is made up ... of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for ...

  16. Immunity by equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Gérard

    2016-08-01

    The classical model of immunity posits that the immune system reacts to pathogens and injury and restores homeostasis. Indeed, a century of research has uncovered the means and mechanisms by which the immune system recognizes danger and regulates its own activity. However, this classical model does not fully explain complex phenomena, such as tolerance, allergy, the increased prevalence of inflammatory pathologies in industrialized nations and immunity to multiple infections. In this Essay, I propose a model of immunity that is based on equilibrium, in which the healthy immune system is always active and in a state of dynamic equilibrium between antagonistic types of response. This equilibrium is regulated both by the internal milieu and by the microbial environment. As a result, alteration of the internal milieu or microbial environment leads to immune disequilibrium, which determines tolerance, protective immunity and inflammatory pathology.

  17. Immunity's ancient arms

    OpenAIRE

    Litman, Gary W.; Cannon, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse receptors on two types of cell mediate adaptive immunity in jawed vertebrates. In the lamprey, a jawless vertebrate, immunity is likewise compartmentalized but the molecular mechanics are very different.

  18. [Immune system and tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terme, Magali; Tanchot, Corinne

    2017-02-01

    Despite having been much debated, it is now well established that the immune system plays an essential role in the fight against cancer. In this article, we will highlight the implication of the immune system in the control of tumor growth and describe the major components of the immune system involved in the antitumoral immune response. The immune system, while exerting pressure on tumor cells, also will play a pro-tumoral role by sculpting the immunogenicity of tumors cells as they develop. Finally, we will illustrate the numerous mechanisms of immune suppression that take place within the tumoral microenvironment which allow tumor cells to escape control from the immune system. The increasingly precise knowledge of the brakes to an effective antitumor immune response allows the development of immunotherapy strategies more and more innovating and promising of hope. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Immune System and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It ... t, to find and destroy them. If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be ...

  20. Aging changes in immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004008.htm Aging changes in immunity To use the sharing features ... cells and antibodies that destroy these harmful substances. AGING CHANGES AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE IMMUNE SYSTEM ...

  1. Immunizations for adult women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faubion, Stephanie S; Larkin, Lisa C

    2016-12-01

    Immunizations protect individual persons and contribute to public health by reducing morbidity and mortality associated with common infectious diseases. In this Practice Pearl, we review guidelines for adult immunizations and recent and potential changes in vaccines.

  2. Antibodies to the A27 protein of vaccinia virus neutralize and protect against infection but represent a minor component of Dryvax vaccine--induced immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Manischewitz, Jody; Meseda, Clement A; Merchlinsky, Michael; Vassell, Russell A; Sirota, Lev; Berkower, Ira; Golding, Hana; Weiss, Carol D

    2007-10-01

    The smallpox vaccine Dryvax, which consists of replication-competent vaccinia virus, elicits antibodies that play a major role in protection. Several vaccinia proteins generate neutralizing antibodies, but their importance for protection is unknown. We investigated the potency of antibodies to the A27 protein of the mature virion in neutralization and protection experiments and the contributions of A27 antibodies to Dryvax-induced immunity. Using a recombinant A27 protein (rA27), we confirmed that A27 contains neutralizing determinants and that vaccinia immune globulin (VIG) derived from Dryvax recipients contains reactivity to A27. However, VIG neutralization was not significantly reduced when A27 antibodies were removed, and antibodies elicited by an rA27 enhanced the protection conferred by VIG in passive transfer experiments. These findings demonstrate that A27 antibodies do not represent the major fraction of neutralizing activity in VIG and suggest that immunity may be augmented by vaccines and immune globulins that include strong antibody responses to A27.

  3. Immune system simulation online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Lund, Ole; Castiglione, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The recognition of antigenic peptides is a major event of an immune response. In current mesoscopic-scale simulators of the immune system, this crucial step has been modeled in a very approximated way. RESULTS: We have equipped an agent-based model of the immune system with immuno...

  4. The Immune System Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Kirsten A.; Gibbs, Melissa A.; Friedman, Erich J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a card game that helps introductory biology students understand the basics of the immune response to pathogens. Students simulate the steps of the immune response with cards that represent the pathogens and the cells and molecules mobilized by the immune system. In the process, they learn the similarities and differences between the…

  5. Plant innate immunity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plants are invaded by an array of pathogens of which only a few succeed in causing disease. The attack by others is countered by a sophisticated immune system possessed by the plants. The plant immune system is broadly divided into two, viz. microbial-associated molecular-patterns-triggered immunity (MTI) and ...

  6. Induction of antitumor immunity through xenoplacental immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agadjanyan Michael G

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Historically cancer vaccines have yielded suboptimal clinical results. We have developed a novel strategy for eliciting antitumor immunity based upon homology between neoplastic tissue and the developing placenta. Placenta formation shares several key processes with neoplasia, namely: angiogenesis, activation of matrix metalloproteases, and active suppression of immune function. Immune responses against xenoantigens are well known to break self-tolerance. Utilizing xenogeneic placental protein extracts as a vaccine, we have successfully induced anti-tumor immunity against B16 melanoma in C57/BL6 mice, whereas control xenogeneic extracts and B16 tumor extracts where ineffective, or actually promoted tumor growth, respectively. Furthermore, dendritic cells were able to prime tumor immunity when pulsed with the placental xenoantigens. While vaccination-induced tumor regression was abolished in mice depleted of CD4 T cells, both CD4 and CD8 cells were needed to adoptively transfer immunity to naïve mice. Supporting the role of CD8 cells in controlling tumor growth are findings that only freshly isolated CD8 cells from immunized mice were capable of inducing tumor cell caspases-3 activation ex vivo. These data suggest feasibility of using xenogeneic placental preparations as a multivalent vaccine potently targeting not just tumor antigens, but processes that are essential for tumor maintenance of malignant potential.

  7. Predictors of early mortality after rabbit antithymocyte globulin as first-line treatment in severe aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta, Elias H; Lima, Carlos B L; Dias, Danielle S P; Clé, Diego V; Bonduel, Mariana M; Sciuccati, Gabriela B; Medeiros, Larissa A; Oliveira, Michel M; Salvino, Marco A; Garanito, Marlene P; Blum Fonseca, Patricia B; Saad, Sara Teresinha O; Calado, Rodrigo T; Scheinberg, Phillip

    2017-11-01

    Despite being recommended as first-line immunosuppressive therapy in severe aplastic anemia (SAA), horse antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is still unavailable in many countries outside the USA. Rabbit ATG is more lymphocytoxic than horse ATG, and this might result in a higher incidence of severe infections and early mortality. This study was designed to identify the risk factors for early mortality and overall survival (OS) after rabbit ATG in patients with SAA. We retrospectively reviewed 185 patients with SAA who underwent rabbit ATG and cyclosporine. The incidence of death in 3 months following rabbit ATG therapy was 15.1% (28/185). Early mortality was mainly related to infectious complications, despite adequate antibiotic and/or antifungal treatment. Age > 35 years (odds ratio [OR] 5.06, P = 0.001) and baseline absolute neutrophil count (ANC) ≤ 0.1 × 10 9 /L (OR 7.64, P  35 years (OR 1.88, P = 0.03), baseline ANC ≤ 0.1 × 10 9 /L (OR 2.65, P < 0.001), and lack of response to rabbit ATG (OR 11.40, P < 0.001) were independently associated with mortality. Alternative strategies are needed for the treatment of SAA patients in countries were horse ATG is unavailable, particularly for those at high risk for early mortality after rabbit ATG due to a higher age and very low pre-treatment neutrophil count.

  8. A retrospective comparison of cyclophosphamide plus antithymocyte globulin with cyclophosphamide plus busulfan as the conditioning regimen for severe aplastic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V.M. Ommati

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT is the treatment of choice for young patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA. The association of antithymocyte globulin (ATG and cyclophosphamide (CY is the most frequently used conditioning regimen for this disease. We performed this retrospective study in order to compare the outcomes of HLA-matched sibling donor AHSCT in 41 patients with SAA receiving cyclophosphamide plus ATG (ATG-CY, N = 17 or cyclophosphamide plus busulfan (BU-CY, N = 24. The substitution of BU for ATG was motivated by the high cost of ATG. There were no differences in the clinical features between the two groups, including age, gender, cytomegalovirus status, ABO match, interval between diagnosis and transplant, and number of total nucleated cells infused. No differences were observed in the time to neutrophil and platelet engraftment, or in the risk of veno-occlusive disease and hemorrhage. However, there was a higher risk of mucositis in the BU-CY group (71 vs 24%, P = 0.004. There were no differences in the incidence of neutrophil and platelet engraftment, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease, and transplant-related mortality. There was a higher incidence of late rejection in the ATG-CY group (41 vs 4%, P = 0.009. Although the ATG-CY group had a longer follow-up (101 months than the BU-CY group (67 months, P = 0.04, overall survival was similar between the groups (69 vs 58%, respectively, P = 0.32. We conclude that the association BU-CY is a feasible option to the conventional ATG-CY regimen in this population.

  9. Outcomes of Optimized over Standard Protocol of Rabbit Antithymocyte Globulin for Severe Aplastic Anemia: A Single-Center Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Meili; Shao, Yingqi; Huang, Jinbo; Huang, Zhendong; Zhang, Jing; Nie, Neng; Zheng, Yizhou

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous reports showed that outcome of rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) was not satisfactory as the first-line therapy for severe aplastic anemia (SAA). We explored a modifying schedule of administration of rATG. Design and Methods Outcomes of a cohort of 175 SAA patients, including 51 patients administered with standard protocol (3.55 mg/kg/d for 5 days) and 124 cases with optimized protocol (1.97 mg/kg/d for 9 days) of rATG plus cyclosporine (CSA), were analyzed retrospectively. Results Of all 175 patients, response rates at 3 and 6 months were 36.6% and 56.0%, respectively. 51 cases received standard protocol had poor responses at 3 (25.5%) and 6 months (41.2%). However, 124 patients received optimized protocol had better responses at 3 (41.1%, P = 0.14) and 6 (62.1%, P = 0.01). Higher incidences of infection (57.1% versus 37.9%, P = 0.02) and early mortality (17.9% versus 0.8%, P<0.001) occurred in patients received standard protocol compared with optimized protocol. The 5-year overall survival in favor of the optimized over standard rATG protocol (76.0% versus. 50.3%, P<0.001) was observed. By multivariate analysis, optimized protocol (RR = 2.21, P = 0.04), response at 3 months (RR = 10.31, P = 0.03) and shorter interval (<23 days) between diagnosis and initial dose of rATG (RR = 5.35, P = 0.002) were independent favorable predictors of overall survival. Conclusions Optimized instead of standard rATG protocol in combination with CSA remained efficacious as a first-line immunosuppressive regimen for SAA. PMID:23554855

  10. Induction by anti-thymocyte globulins in kidney transplantation: a review of the literature and current usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvezzi, Paolo; Jouve, Thomas; Rostaing, Lionel

    2015-10-01

    Preventing acute rejection (AR) after kidney transplantation is of utmost importance because an AR can have a negative impact on long-term allograft survival. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO, and Web of Science have been searched. At the moment this can be done by using rabbit anti-thymocyte globulins (rATGs) as an induction therapy. However, because rATGs are associated with some deleterious side-effects, such as the opportunistic infections cytomegalovirus (CMV) and de novo post-transplant cancer, it is very important they are used optimally, i.e., at minimal doses that avoid many side-effects but still retain optimal treatment efficacy. Recent data show that the risk of CMV infection can be minimized using tacrolimus plus everolimus, and not tacrolimus plus mycophenolic acid, as the maintenance immunosuppression. The use of rATG is particularly valuable in; (a) sensitized patients; (b) in recipients from an expanded-criteria donor, thus enabling the introduction of calcineurin inhibitors at reduced doses; and (c) for patients where steroid avoidance is contemplated. However, we also need to consider that rATG may increase the risk of de novo cancer, even though recent data indicate this is unlikely and that any risk can be reduced by using mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors instead of mycophenolic acid combined with low-dose calcineurin inhibitors. Even though rATGs do not improve long-term kidney-allograft survival, they may help reduce calcineurin-inhibitor dosage during the early post-transplant period and minimize the risk of AR.

  11. Single-shot antithymocyte globulin (ATG) induction for pancreas/kidney transplantation: ATG-Fresenius versus Thymoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, T; Papapostolou, G; Schenker, P; Kapischke, M

    2005-03-01

    Single-shot antithymocyte globulin (ATG) prior to reperfusion followed by tacrolimus (TAC), mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and prednisolone (PRD) is an established induction therapy in simultaneous pancreas kidney transplant (SPK) recipients. We retrospectively analyzed 6-month data from 105 patients who received their first SPK. From January 1996 to December 2000, ATG-Fresenius was used. Since January 2001, Thymoglobulin has been administered. In the first group, 58 patients were treated with ATG-Fresenius (4-6 mg/kg body weight). In the second group, 47 patients received Thymoglobulin (1.5-2.5 mg/kg body weight). HLA-mismatch was comparable. After an observation period of 6 months, patients, kidney, and pancreas graft survival is 98.3%, 96.6%, and 93.1% in group I and 97.9%, 97.9%, and 85.1% in group II, respectively. In each group, one death with functioning graft (DWFG) was observed. Twenty (34.5%) acute rejection episodes (AR) were observed (18 patients) in group I. They were treated with steroids (n = 16) or steroids/OKT3 (n = 4). One kidney graft failure was observed due to rejection and one due to DWFG. Four pancreas grafts were lost (thrombosis, n = 2; AR, n = 1; DWFG, n = 1). In group II, 15 AR (31.9%) were seen in 12 patients and were treated with steroids (n = 12), steroids/ATG (n = 1), or steroids/OKT3 (n = 2). Seven pancreas (thrombosis, n = 5; rejection, n = 1; DWFG, n = 1) and one kidney (DWFG, n = 1) graft losses occurred. These data clearly establish that single-shot ATG prior to reperfusion, followed by TAC, MMF, and PRD results in a low incidence of AR (34.5% in group I and 31.9% in group II) after SPK. Only 6.9% (group I) and 6.4% (group II) of the patients received antibodies for rejection treatment.

  12. Comparison of daclizumab, an interleukin 2 receptor antibody, to anti-thymocyte globulin-Fresenius induction therapy in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Jaoude, Maroun M; Ghantous, Imad; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2003-07-01

    The efficacy and safety of daclizumab and anti-thymocyte globulin-Fresenius (ATG-F) as induction therapy in kidney transplantation (KT) were investigated in 45 KT performed in our center between March and May 2002. Group II (n=10) received daclizumab as induction therapy, and Group I (n=35) were induced with a single intraoperative bolus therapy of ATG-F. All patients were at low-risk, and the recipient and donor demographics, as well the immunosuppression regimen employed were comparable in both groups. Drug safety, assessed by the occurrence of side effects, was almost comparable in the two groups, except for more thrombocytopenia in Group II (P<0.0004). Acute rejection (AR) occurred in 10% in Group I and 11.4% in Group II (P=NS). There were more infections in Group II (42.8%) than in Group I (10%) (P<0.009). Bacterial and viral infections were more common in Group II (69 and 23%) than in Group I (10 and 0%) (P<0.05). The hospital stay was similar in both groups. Mean serum creatinine levels upon discharge, at 1, 3 and 6 months were: 1.23+/-0.11, 1.21+/-0.06, 1.25+/-0.11 and 1.35+/-0.08 in Group I and 2.18+/-0.43, 1.49+/-0.16, 1.49+/-0.16 and 1.35+/-0.08 in Group II, respectively. While better serum creatinine levels were observed in Group I upon discharge (P<0.048), this was due to the presence of more sensitized patients in Group II. The 6 months actuarial patient and graft survival were identical in both groups (100 and 100%, respectively). Although both daclizumab and ATG-F were effective and safe as induction therapy in KT, less bacterial and viral infections and lower early serum creatinine levels were noted in daclizumab-treated patients.

  13. Measurement of free glucocorticoids: quantifying corticosteroid-binding globulin binding affinity and its variation within and among mammalian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delehanty, Brendan; Hossain, Sabrina; Jen, Chao Ching; Crawshaw, Graham J; Boonstra, Rudy

    2015-01-01

    Plasma glucocorticoids (GCs) are commonly used as measures of stress in wildlife. A great deal of evidence indicates that only free GC (GC not bound by the specific binding protein, corticosteroid-binding globulin, CBG) leaves the circulation and exerts biological effects on GC-sensitive tissues. Free hormone concentrations are difficult to measure directly, so researchers estimate free GC using two measures: the binding affinity and the binding capacity in plasma. We provide an inexpensive saturation binding method for calculating the binding affinity (equilibrium dissociation constant, K d) of CBG that can be run without specialized laboratory equipment. Given that other plasma proteins, such as albumin, also bind GCs, the method compensates for this non-specific binding. Separation of bound GC from free GC was achieved with dextran-coated charcoal. The method provides repeatable estimates (12% coefficient of variation in the red squirrel, Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), and there is little evidence of inter-individual variation in K d (range 2.0-7.3 nM for 16 Richardson's ground squirrels, Urocitellus richardsonii). The K d values of 28 mammalian species we assessed were mostly clustered around a median of 4 nM, but five species had values between 13 and 61 nM. This pattern may be distinct from birds, for which published values are more tightly distributed (1.5-5.1 nM). The charcoal separation method provides a reliable and robust method for measuring the K d in a wide range of species. It uses basic laboratory equipment to provide rapid results at very low cost. Given the importance of CBG in regulating the biological activity of GCs, this method is a useful tool for physiological ecologists.

  14. Endogenous Androgens and Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin in Women and Risk of Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Benjamin; Kische, Hanna; Gross, Stefan; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Dörr, Marcus; Nauck, Matthias; Keevil, Brian G; Brabant, Georg; Haring, Robin

    2015-12-01

    The association of endogenous androgens and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) mostly 23562 refers to small and selected study samples with immunoassay-based measurements. Thus, we investigated the association of hormone levels with MetS and T2DM in women from a large population-based sample. A total of 2077 women from the Study of Health in Pomerania were assessed at baseline (N = 3160, 1997-2001) and 5-year follow-up (N = 1711, 2002-2006). We investigated associations of total testosterone (T) and androstenedione measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, SHBG by immunoassay, and free T and free androgen index with MetS and T2DM. Baseline prevalence of MetS and T2DM was 23.1% (N = 365) and 9.5% (N = 196), with an incidence of 17.7 and 7.0 per 1.000 person-years, respectively. Cross-sectional analyses yielded inverse associations of SHBG with MetS (relative risk [RR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60-0.74) and T2DM (RR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.50-0.74) after multivariable adjustment. In longitudinal analyses, only age-adjusted models showed an inverse association of baseline SHBG with incident MetS (RR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.51-0.73) and T2DM (RR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.43-0.78). Multivariable-adjusted models stratified by menopausal status revealed an inverse association between SHBG and incident MetS risk in postmenopausal women (RR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.51-0.81). This longitudinal population-based study revealed independent inverse associations of SHBG with MetS and T2DM, suggesting low SHBG as a potential risk marker for cardiometabolic morbidity, especially among postmenopausal women.

  15. Low Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin Levels Associate with Prediabetes in Chinese Men Independent of Total Testosterone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhu

    Full Text Available The association ns between prediabetes and androgens have been rarely reported, especially in Chinese men. We aimed to investigate whether androgens were associated with the prevalence of prediabetes diagnosed with new American Diabetes Association criteria in Chinese men and then to assess which androgen value was the most relevant factor.A total of 2654 men (52.6±13.4 years old were selected. Serum total testosterone (TT, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG and free testosterone (FT were measured. Covariance analysis of different androgen values were performed in age subgroups. Multinomial logistic regression was used for the association of TT, SHBG and FT with prediabetes and diabetes, as well as prediabetes in age subgroups.According to ADA new criteria, normoglycemia, prediabetes, and diabetes were diagnosed in 1405, 907 and 342 men, respectively. In covariance analysis, SHBG of prediabetes were found lower than that of normoglycemia but higher than that of diabetes (P <0.05. In multinomial logistic regression, serum TT and SHBG were inversely associated with prediabetes and diabetes. While, after full adjustment for age, residence area, economic status, waist circumference, metabolic factors, other two androgen values and HOMA-IR, only the associations of SHBG with prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes persisted statistically significant, especially in the elderly with prediabetes (all P for trend <0.05.Serum androgen was inversely associated with prediabetes and diabetes in Chinese men. Low serum SHBG was the most relevant factor for prediabetes and diabetes. Whether it is an independent predictor for incident prediabetes in Chinese men needs further explorations.

  16. Genome wide association identifies common variants at the SERPINA6/SERPINA1 locus influencing plasma cortisol and corticosteroid binding globulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Bolton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Variation in plasma levels of cortisol, an essential hormone in the stress response, is associated in population-based studies with cardio-metabolic, inflammatory and neuro-cognitive traits and diseases. Heritability of plasma cortisol is estimated at 30-60% but no common genetic contribution has been identified. The CORtisol NETwork (CORNET consortium undertook genome wide association meta-analysis for plasma cortisol in 12,597 Caucasian participants, replicated in 2,795 participants. The results indicate that <1% of variance in plasma cortisol is accounted for by genetic variation in a single region of chromosome 14. This locus spans SERPINA6, encoding corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG, the major cortisol-binding protein in plasma, and SERPINA1, encoding α1-antitrypsin (which inhibits cleavage of the reactive centre loop that releases cortisol from CBG. Three partially independent signals were identified within the region, represented by common SNPs; detailed biochemical investigation in a nested sub-cohort showed all these SNPs were associated with variation in total cortisol binding activity in plasma, but some variants influenced total CBG concentrations while the top hit (rs12589136 influenced the immunoreactivity of the reactive centre loop of CBG. Exome chip and 1000 Genomes imputation analysis of this locus in the CROATIA-Korcula cohort identified missense mutations in SERPINA6 and SERPINA1 that did not account for the effects of common variants. These findings reveal a novel common genetic source of variation in binding of cortisol by CBG, and reinforce the key role of CBG in determining plasma cortisol levels. In turn this genetic variation may contribute to cortisol-associated degenerative diseases.

  17. Detection of a novel specificity (CTLA-4) in ATG/TMG globulins and sera from ATG-treated leukemic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistillo, Maria Pia; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Bonifazi, Francesca; Bandini, Giuseppe; Kato, Tomohiro; Matsui, Toshihiro; Nishioka, Kusuki; Conte, Roberto; Ferrara, Giovanni Battista

    2002-04-27

    T-cell costimulation has been shown to provide positive signals for T-cell activation and generation of effector activity. In this study, we analyzed the presence of antibodies (Abs) against the T-lymphocyte costimulatory molecules CD28, CTLA-4, CD80, and CD86 in anti-T-lymphocyte (ATG) and antithymocyte (TMG) globulin preparations to address their mechanism of action. We focused our attention on the role of CTLA-4-specific Abs in the immunosuppressive effect of ATG/TMG, because anti-CTLA-4 agonistic Abs may suppress T-cell proliferation and nonagonistic Abs may lead to T-cell depletion through an Ab-dependent cell cytotoxicity mechanism. ATG/TMG and patients' sera were tested for binding to recombinant human costimulatory molecules by ELISA techniques. CTLA-4 specificity was also analyzed by cytoplasmic immunofluorescence staining of a CTLA-4 transfectant by competitive inhibition immunofluorescence and by cell proliferation assay in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Either ATG or TMG predominantly contained anti-CTLA-4 Abs, with higher reactivity in ATG followed by anti-CD86 and -CD28 Abs, whereas anti-CD80 Abs were found only in ATG. Anti-CTLA-4 Abs present in ATG/TMG recognized the native form of CTLA-4 molecule, and their removal reduced the effect of ATG in an allogeneic MLR. Kinetic studies indicated that such Abs were present in the sera of 12 ATG-treated leukemic patients up to 21 days after ATG administration. These data suggest that the novel anti-CTLA-4 Abs found in ATG may greatly contribute to its immunosuppressive effect, thus accounting for the absence of rejection and exceptionally low incidence of graft-versus-host disease in the group of patients analyzed.

  18. Induction treatment with rabbit antithymocyte globulin versus basiliximab in renal transplant recipients with planned early steroid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Spencer T; Roberts, Keri L; Malek, Sayeed K; Tullius, Stefan G; Vadivel, Nidyanandh; De Serres, Sacha; Grafals, Monica; Elsanjak, Abdelaziz; Filkins, Beth Anne; Chandraker, Anil; Gabardi, Steven

    2011-06-01

    To compare the safety and efficacy of rabbit antithymocyte globulin (r-ATG) with basiliximab in renal transplant recipients for whom an early steroid withdrawal (ESW) regimen was planned. Single-center, retrospective, cohort study. Tertiary care medical center, including inpatient hospital stays and outpatient nephrology clinics. Ninety-nine consecutive adult recipients of living- or deceased-donor renal transplants between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2007, in whom ESW was planned and who received either r-ATG or basiliximab; patients receiving an extended-criteria kidney donation or a donation after cardiac death were excluded. All patients received mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus as maintenance therapy with planned ESW. Induction therapy was either r-ATG 1.5 mg/kg/day for 4 days (68 patients) or basiliximab 20 mg on postoperative days 0 and 4 (31 patients). The primary composite end point of biopsy-proven acute rejection (BPAR), graft loss, and death occurred in 6 patients (9%) and 9 patients (29%) in the r-ATG and basiliximab groups at 1 year after transplantation, respectively (p=0.01), with rates of 7% (5/68 patients) and 26% (8/31 patients) for BPAR (p=0.02), 0% and 3% (1/31 patients) for graft loss (p=0.31), and 2% (1/68 patients) and 0% for patient death (p>0.99). Average time to first BPAR was significantly longer in the r-ATG group (mean ± SD 151.4 ± 82.9 vs 53.6 ± 68.4 days, p<0.01). Kidney function at 12 months was similar between the two groups. Rabbit-ATG was associated with a lower frequency and delayed onset of BPAR compared with basiliximab in renal transplant recipients who received an ESW regimen.

  19. Characteristics of chemical binding to alpha 2u-globulin in vitro--evaluating structure-activity relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghoff, S.J.; Miller, A.B.; Bowen, J.P.; Swenberg, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    alpha 2u-Globulin (alpha 2u) has been shown to accumulate in the kidneys of male rats treated with 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP). 2,4,4-Trimethyl-2-pentanol (TMP-2-OH), a metabolite of TMP, is found reversibly bound to alpha 2u isolated from the kidneys of these treated rats. The objectives of the following study were to characterize the ability of [3H]TMP-2-OH to bind to alpha 2u in vitro and to determine whether other compounds that cause this protein to accumulate have the same binding characteristics. Although compounds that have been shown to cause the accumulation of alpha 2u in male rat kidneys compete in vitro with [3H]TMP-2-OH for binding to alpha 2u, they do so to varying degrees. The binding affinity (Kd) of the [3H]TMP-2-OH-alpha 2u complex was calculated to be on the order of 10(-7) M. The inhibition constant values (Ki) determined for d-limonene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, and 2,5-dichlorophenol were all in the range 10(-4) M, whereas the Ki values for isophorone, 2,4,4- or 2,2,4-trimethyl-1-pentanol, and d-limonene oxide were determined to be in the range 10(-6) and 10(-7) M, respectively. TMP and 2,4,4- and 2,2,4-trimethylpentanoic acid did not compete for binding. This suggests that other factors, besides binding, are involved in the accumulation of alpha 2u. In this study the ability of a chemical to bind to alpha 2u was used as a measure of biological activity to assess structure-activity relationships among the chemicals tested and known to cause the accumulation of alpha 2u. The results so far suggest that binding is dependent on both hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding

  20. Genome-wide association study of circulating estradiol, testosterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin in postmenopausal women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Prescott

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have successfully identified common genetic variants that contribute to breast cancer risk. Discovering additional variants has become difficult, as power to detect variants of weaker effect with present sample sizes is limited. An alternative approach is to look for variants associated with quantitative traits that in turn affect disease risk. As exposure to high circulating estradiol and testosterone, and low sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG levels is implicated in breast cancer etiology, we conducted GWAS analyses of plasma estradiol, testosterone, and SHBG to identify new susceptibility alleles. Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS data from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS, and Sisters in Breast Cancer Screening data were used to carry out primary meta-analyses among ~1600 postmenopausal women who were not taking postmenopausal hormones at blood draw. We observed a genome-wide significant association between SHBG levels and rs727428 (joint β = -0.126; joint P = 2.09 × 10(-16, downstream of the SHBG gene. No genome-wide significant associations were observed with estradiol or testosterone levels. Among variants that were suggestively associated with estradiol (P<10(-5, several were located at the CYP19A1 gene locus. Overall results were similar in secondary meta-analyses that included ~900 NHS current postmenopausal hormone users. No variant associated with estradiol, testosterone, or SHBG at P<10(-5 was associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk among CGEMS participants. Our results suggest that the small magnitude of difference in hormone levels associated with common genetic variants is likely insufficient to detectably contribute to breast cancer risk.

  1. Posttransplant Immune Activation: Innocent Bystander or Insidious Culprit of Posttransplant Accelerated Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducloux, Didier; Bamoulid, Jamal; Crepin, Thomas; Rebibou, Jean-Michel; Courivaud, Cecile; Saas, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of morbidity, disability, and mortality in kidney transplant patients. Cumulative reports indicate that the excessive risk of cardiovascular events is not entirely explained by the increased prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, and it has been postulated that posttransplant immune disturbances may explain the gap between the predicted and observed risks of cardiovascular events. Although concordant data suggest that innate immunity contributes to the posttransplant accelerated atherosclerosis, only few arguments plead for a role of adaptive immunity. We report and discuss here consistent data demonstrating that CD8 + T cell activation is a frequent posttransplant immune feature that may have pro-atherogenic effects. Expansion of exhausted/activated CD8 + T cells in kidney transplant recipients is stimulated by several factors including cytomegalovirus infections, lymphodepletive therapy (e.g., antithymocyte globulins), chronic allogeneic stimulation, and a past history of renal insufficiency. This is observed in the setting of decreased thymic activity, a process also found in elderly individuals and reflecting accelerated immune senescence.

  2. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  15. Cytokine regulation of immune tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jie; Xie, Aini; Chen, Wenhao

    2014-01-01

    The immune system provides defenses against invading pathogens while maintaining immune tolerance to self-antigens. This immune homeostasis is harmonized by the direct interactions between immune cells and the cytokine environment in which immune cells develop and function. Herein, we discuss three non-redundant paradigms by which cytokines maintain or break immune tolerance. We firstly describe how anti-inflammatory cytokines exert direct inhibitory effects on immune cells to enforce immune ...

  16. Kidney and innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Gen

    2017-03-01

    Innate immune system is an important modulator of the inflammatory response during infection and tissue injury/repair. The kidney as a vital organ with high energy demand plays a key role in regulating the disease related metabolic process. Increasing research interest has focused on the immune pathogenesis of many kidney diseases. However, innate immune cells such as dendritic cells, macrophages, NK cells and a few innate lymphocytes, as well as the complement system are essential for renal immune homeostasis and ensure a coordinated balance between tissue injury and regeneration. The innate immune response provides the first line of host defense initiated by several classes of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as membrane-bound Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs), together with inflammasomes responsible for early innate immune response. Although the innate immune system is well studied, the research on the detailed relationship between innate immunity and kidney is still very limited. In this review, we will focus on the innate immune sensing system in renal immune homeostasis, as well as the corresponding pathogenesis of many kidney diseases. The pivotal roles of innate immunity in renal injury and regeneration with special emphasis on kidney disease related immunoregulatory mechanism are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Alternative Immune Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Cadavid Gutierrez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The immune system in animals is a complex network of molecules, cells and tissues that coordinately maintain the physiological and genetic integrity of the organism. Traditionally, two classes of immunity have been considered, the innate immunity and the adaptive immunity. The former is ancestral, with limited variability and low discrimination. The latter is highly variable, specific and limited to jawed vertebrates. Adaptive immunity is based on antigen receptors that rearrange somatically to generate a nearly unlimited diversity of molecules. Likely, this mechanism of somatic recombination arose as a consequence of a horizontal transfer of transposons and transposases from bacterial genomes in the ancestor of jawed vertebrates. The recent discovery in jawless vertebrates and invertebrates of alternative adaptive immune mechanisms, suggests during evolution different animal groups have found alternative solutions to the problem of immune recognition.

  18. Measuring polio immunity to plan immunization activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorman, Arend; Lyons, Hil M

    2016-11-21

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative is closer than ever to achieving a polio-free world. Immunization activities must still be carried out in non-endemic countries to maintain population immunity at levels which will stop poliovirus from spreading if it is re-introduced from still-infected areas. In areas where there is no active transmission of poliovirus, programs must rely on surrogate indicators of population immunity to determine the appropriate immunization activities, typically caregiver-reported vaccination history obtained from non-polio acute flaccid paralysis patients identified through polio surveillance. We used regression models to examine the relationship between polio vaccination campaigns and caregiver-reported polio vaccination history. We find that in many countries, vaccination campaigns have a surprisingly weak impact on these commonly used indicators. We conclude that alternative criteria and data, such as routine immunization indicators from vaccination records or household surveys, should be considered for planning polio vaccination campaigns, and that validation of such surrogate indicators is necessary if they are to be used as the basis for program planning and risk assessment. We recommend that the GPEI and similar organizations consider or continue devoting additional resources to rigorously study population immunity and campaign effectiveness in at-risk countries. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection of immune complexes in sera of dogs with rheumatic and neoplastic diseases by 125I-Clq binding test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terman, D.S.; Moore, D.; Collins, J.; Johnston, B.; Person, D.; Templeton, J.; Poser, R.; Quinby, F.

    1979-01-01

    Some canine rheumatic and neoplastic diseases bear a striking clinical and serological resemblance to their counterparts in man. In the present study, human 125 I-Clq was employed in a radioimmunoassay for detection of immune complexes in sera of normal dogs and those with rheumatic and neoplastic diseases. Human 125 I-Clq showed binding of 16.7 +- 5.73% in a group of normal dog sera with binding of 32.5 +- 17.3% and 43.0 +- 16.0% in sera of dogs with rheumatic and neoplastic diseases. respectively. Human 125 I-Clq bound similar quantities of heat-aggregated canine and human gamma-globulin over a broad range of concentrations and human 125 I-Clq binding in canine sera was effectively inhibited by similar quantities of heat aggregated canine and human gamma-globulin. Seven of 12 dogs with elevated levels of Clq binding had active clinical and serological rheumatic disease (SLE or rheumatoid arthritis), while none of 7 dogs with values within the normal range had active clinical disease. All 5 dogs with widespread osteogenic sarcoma and all 4 dogs with high grade adenocarcinoma of the mammary gland had elevated Clq binding values while 2 animals with low grade malignancies without evident metastases did not. Thus, it appears that human 125 I-Clq may be employed to assay immune complexes in canine sera and may be a valuable technique for the study of dogs with various rheumatic and neoplastic diseases. (author)

  20. Serum albumin and globulin analysis for hepatocellular carcinoma detection avoiding false-negative results from alpha-fetoprotein test negative subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Feng, Shangyuan; Lin, Juqiang; Zeng, Yongyi; Li, Ling; Huang, Zufang; Li, Buhong; Zeng, Haishan; Chen, Rong

    2013-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of serum albumin and globulin were employed to detect hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Tentative assignments of SERS bands show specific biomolecular changes associated with cancer development. These changes include a decrease in relative amounts of tryptophan, glutamine, glycine, and serine, indicating excessive consumption of amino acids for protein duplication. Principal component analysis was also introduced to analyze the obtained spectra, resulting in both diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 100%. More importantly, it reveals that this method can detect HCC patients with alpha-fetoprotein negative test results, suggesting its great potential as a new alternative to detect HCC.

  1. Fibroblast receptor for cell-substratum adhesion: studies on the interaction of baby hamster kidney cells with latex beads coated by cold insoluble globulin (plasma fibronectin)

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Studies were carried out on the interactions of uncharged latex beads (0.76 micrometer) with baby hamster kidney cells. Binding of beads to the cells occurred if the beads were coated by cold insoluble globulin (CIG) (plasma fibronectin) but not if the beads were coated by bovine albumin. Bovine albumin-coated beads did not bind to the cells even in the presence of excess CIG in the incubation medium. Binding of beads occurred randomly over the entire surfaces of cells in suspension. However,...

  2. Use of sodium salicylate as a blocking agent for cortisol-binding-globulin in a radioimmunoassay for cortisol on unextracted plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, J W [Withington Hospital, Manchester (UK)

    1979-07-01

    This report describes investigations into the use of sodium salicylate as a cortisol-binding-globulin blocking agent and the subsequent development of a radioimmunoassay for cortisol on unextracted plasma. Cortisol antiserum was raised against a cortisol 3-0-(carboxy-methyl) oxime-bovine serum albumin conjugate. A /sup 125/I-labelled cortisol-tyrosine methyl ester conjugate was also prepared for use in the assay. The radioimmunoassay developed involved no pre-treatment or extraction of the samples before analysis and was extremely simple to perform. Comparison with another radioimmunoassay for cortisol and with the Mattingly fluorimetric assay gave good correlation.

  3. Combined N-glycome and N-glycoproteome analysis of the Lotus japonicus seed globulin fraction shows conservation of protein structure and glycosylation in legumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Svend Secher; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Stenkjær, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Legume food allergy, such as allergy toward peanuts and soybeans, is a health issue predicted to worsen as dietary advice recommends higher intake of legume-based foods. Lotus japonicus (Lotus) is an established legume plant model system for studies of symbiotic and pathogenic microbial...... interactions and, due to its well characterized genotype/phenotype and easily manipulated genome, may also be suitable for studies of legume food allergy. Here we present a comprehensive study of the Lotus N-glycoproteome. The global and site-specific N-glycan structures of Lotus seed globulins were analyzed...

  4. Use of sodium salicylate as a blocking agent for cortisol-binding-globulin in a radioimmunoassay for cortisol on unextracted plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    This report describes investigations into the use of sodium salicylate as a cortisol-binding-globulin blocking agent and the subsequent development of a radioimmunoassay for cortisol on unextracted plasma. Cortisol antiserum was raised against a cortisol 3-0-(carboxy-methyl) oxime-bovine serum albumin conjugate. A 125 I-labelled cortisol-tyrosine methyl ester conjugate was also prepared for use in the assay. The radioimmunoassay developed involved no pre-treatment or extraction of the samples before analysis and was extremely simple to perform. Comparison with another radioimmunoassay for cortisol and with the Mattingly fluorimetric assay gave good correlation. (author)

  5. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity.

  6. Serum globulin electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... plasma proteins. In: Baynes JW, Dominiczak MH, eds. Medical Biochemistry . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 4. Rajkumar SV. Plasma cell disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, ... . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 187.

  7. [FAB immunoglobulin fragments. I. The comparative characteristics of the serological and virus-neutralizing properties of a gamma globulin against tick-borne encephalitis and of the FAB fragments isolated from it].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barban, P S; Minaeva, V M; Pantiukhina, A N; Startseva, M G

    1976-06-01

    A comparative study was made of the serological properties and virus-neutralizing activity of antiencephalitis gamma-globulin and Fab-fragments isolated from it by gel-filtration. Horse immunoglobulins against the autumno-summer tick-borne encephalitis virus could be disintegrated with the aid of papaine to monovalent Fab-fragments which (according to the complement fixation reaction, the test of suppression of the complement fixation, and the HAIT) retained the serological activity whose level was compared with that of the serological activity of gamma-globulin. Fab-fragments possessed a marked virus-neutralizing activity. The mean value of a logarithm of the neutralization index was 2.65 +/- 0.2 for Fab-fragments and 3.74 +/- 0.38 for gamma-globulin (P less than 0.01).

  8. Reinfection immunity in schistosomiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Haruo

    1987-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is one of the most important parasitic diseases in the world, especially in endemic areas of developing countries. This situation has prompted parasitologist to attempt intensive researches on immune mechanisms, especially those of reinfection immunity associated with eliminating challenge infection. The current knowledge of reinfection immunity against Schistosoma spp. infection was therefore reviewed briefly and discussed with special reference to our data on protective immune responses induced by radiation-attenuated cercarial infection. A recently developed technique of compressed organ autoradiography (COA) has contributed to assessing parasite attrition in immune animals following challenge infection. Our study using COA has demonstrated that major attrition of schistosomula from challenge infection occurs in the skin of CBA/Ca mice vaccinated with 20 Krad gamma radiation-attenuated cercariae of S. mansoni, while in both lungs and liver of similarly vaccinated guinea pig model. Furthermore, gamma-irradiation to cercariae affected their migration potential and surface-antigen profiles. The immunizing stimuli of gamma radiation-attenuated cercariae profoundly affected the expression of responsiveness in vaccinated animals. The change in antigenic profiles and migration potential of those vaccinating population was discussed in relation to the kinetics of reinfection immunity induced in vaccinated amimal models. These works might provide a base line data to develop a practical vaccine for schistosomiasis using defined antigens. It must be emphasized that these vaccines could serve as a practical prophylactic measure for schistosomiasis in the endemic areas, even if the vaccines fail to induce sterilizing immunity. (author). 141 refs

  9. Ethics of Immunization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, M.F.; Quah, S.R.; Cockerham, W.C.

    2017-01-01

    Collective immunization can be highly effective in protecting societies against infectious diseases, but policy decisions about both the character and the content of immunization policies require ethical justification. This article offers an overview of ethical aspects that should be taken into

  10. Immunity and skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.B.; Brysk, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    Observations in humans and animal studies support the theory that immunologic surveillance plays an important role in limiting the development of skin malignancies. These immune responses undergo progressive diminution with age. In addition, other factors, such as bereavement, poor nutrition, and acute and chronic exposure to ultraviolet light, can further diminish immune mechanisms

  11. Immunizations. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, Nichole; Garrett, Jennifer; Teskey, Carmen; Duncan, Kay; Strasser, Kathy; Burrows-Mezu, Alicia L.

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that immunizations are essential to primary prevention of disease from infancy through adulthood. Promotion of immunizations by the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is central to the public health focus of school nursing practice…

  12. Disparity in childhood immunizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemstra, Mark; Neudorf, Cory; Opondo, Johnmark; Toye, Jennifer; Kurji, Ayisha; Kunst, Anton; Tournier, Ceal

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Incomplete immunization coverage is common in low-income families and Aboriginal children in Canada. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether child immunization coverage rates at two years of age were lower in low-income neighbourhoods of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. METHODS: Parents who were and

  13. Neural circuitry and immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Valentin A.; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Research during the last decade has significantly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms at the interface between the nervous system and the immune system. Insight into bidirectional neuroimmune communication has characterized the nervous system as an important partner of the immune system in the regulation of inflammation. Neuronal pathways, including the vagus nerve-based inflammatory reflex are physiological regulators of immune function and inflammation. In parallel, neuronal function is altered in conditions characterized by immune dysregulation and inflammation. Here, we review these regulatory mechanisms and describe the neural circuitry modulating immunity. Understanding these mechanisms reveals possibilities to use targeted neuromodulation as a therapeutic approach for inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. These findings and current clinical exploration of neuromodulation in the treatment of inflammatory diseases defines the emerging field of Bioelectronic Medicine. PMID:26512000

  14. Immune-directed therapy for type 1 diabetes at the clinical level: the Immune Tolerance Network (ITN) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Mario R; Nepom, Gerald T

    2012-01-01

    Reestablishing immune tolerance in type 1 diabetes (T1D), a chronic autoimmune disease, is a major goal. The Immune Tolerance Network (ITN) has initiated eight clinical trials of immunomodulatory therapies in recent-onset T1D over the past decade. Results have been mixed in terms of clinical efficacy, but the studies have provided valuable mechanistic insight that are enhancing our understanding of the disease and guiding the design of future trials. Trials of non-Fc-binding anti-CD3 mAbs have revealed that modulation of this target leads to partial responses, and ITN's AbATE trial led to identification of a robust responder group that could be distinguished from non-responders by baseline metabolic and immunologic features. A pilot study of the combination of IL-2 and rapamycin gave the first demonstration that frequency and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs) can be enhanced in T1D subjects, although the therapy triggered the activation of effectors with transient β-cell dysfunction. Similarly, therapy with anti-thymocyte globulin led to substantial lymphocyte depletion, but also to the activation of the acute-phase response with no clinical benefit during preliminary analyses. These and other results provide mechanistic tools that can be used as biomarkers for safety and efficacy in future trials. Furthermore, our results, together with those of other organizations, notably TrialNet, delineate the roles of the major components of the immune response in T1D. This information is setting the stage for future combination therapy trials. The development of disease-relevant biomarkers will also enable the implementation of innovative trial designs, notably adaptive trials, which will increase efficiencies in terms of study duration and sample size, and which will expedite the conduct of trials in which there are uncertainties about dose response and effect size.

  15. Detection of circulating immune complexes by Raji cell assay: comparison of flow cytometric and radiometric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingsmore, S.F.; Crockard, A.D.; Fay, A.C.; McNeill, T.A.; Roberts, S.D.; Thompson, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Several flow cytometric methods for the measurement of circulating immune complexes (CIC) have recently become available. We report a Raji cell flow cytometric assay (FCMA) that uses aggregated human globulin (AHG) as primary calibrator. Technical advantages of the Raji cell flow cytometric assay are discussed, and its clinical usefulness is evaluated in a method comparison study with the widely used Raji cell immunoradiometric assay. FCMA is more precise and has greater analytic sensitivity for AHG. Diagnostic sensitivity by the flow cytometric method is superior in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients: however, diagnostic specificity is similar for both assays, but the reference interval of FCMA is narrower. Significant correlations were found between CIC levels obtained with both methods in SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients and in longitudinal studies of two patients with cerebral SLE. The Raji cell FCMA is recommended for measurement of CIC levels to clinical laboratories with access to a flow cytometer

  16. Benefícios da aplicação de toxina botulínica associada à fonoterapia em pacientes disfágicos graves Benefits of botulinum toxin associated to swallowing therapy in patients with severe dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Teixeira Menezes; Katia Alonso Rodrigues; Isabella Christina de Oliveira Neto; Brasília Maria Chiari; Dayse Manrique; Maria Inês Rebelo Gonçalves

    2012-01-01

    Estudo de casos para caracterizar os benefícios da aplicação de toxina botulínica em glândulas salivares, associada à fonoterapia em pacientes disfágicos graves. Foram analisados cinco prontuários de pacientes neurológicos, em uso exclusivo de via alternativa de alimentação, com idades entre 17 e 70 anos, sendo quatro do gênero masculino e um do gênero feminino. Do total, quatro pacientes eram traqueostomizados. Foi considerado como critério de inclusão apresentar disfagia grave, com manifest...

  17. Efectividad del tratamiento conservador y/o toxina botulínica en la displasia de cadera en parálisis cerebral infantil espástica. Revisión sistemática

    OpenAIRE

    Busto Ruiz, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Objetivo: Estudiar la efectividad del tratamiento conservador y/o toxina botulínica tipo A en la prevención o tratamiento de la displasia o dislocación de la cadera en PCI espástica. Material y métodos: Se realizó una búsqueda bibliográfica en las bases de datos de Pubmed, Web of Science (WOS), PEDro y Cochrane Library. Las palabras clave utilizadas fueron hip dysplasia, hip dislocation, hip subluxation, cerebral palsy, treatment, management, child. Se incluyeron todo tipo d...

  18. On Modelling an Immune System

    OpenAIRE

    Monroy, Raúl; Saab, Rosa; Godínez, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    Immune systems of live forms have been an abundant source of inspiration to contemporary computer scientists. Problem solving strategies, stemming from known immune system phenomena, have been successfully applied to challenging problems of modern computing. However, research in artificial immune systems has overlooked establishing a coherent model of known immune system behaviour. This paper aims reports on an preliminary computer model of an immune system, where each immune system component...

  19. Rebuilding immunity with Remune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, L

    1998-01-01

    Remune, an immune response therapy composed of inactivated HIV, is designed to enhance the immune system's ability to recognize and kill HIV proteins. Developed by Dr. Jonas Salk, researchers hope Remune's actions can alter the course of HIV infection and slow disease progression. Remune has gained Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval to enter the critical Phase III trial stage. Two clinical trials are tracking Remune's immunogenicity (ability to provoke an immune response), its immunogenicity relative to dose level, and its effect on viral load. An ongoing trial, approved in February of 1996, enrolled 2,500 patients at 74 sites. The manufacturer, Immune Response Corporation (IRC), announced earlier this year that treatment with Remune induces an immune response to HIV that cross-reacts with different strains of the virus. This immune response is crucial for developing an effective worldwide treatment. Remune decreases levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a). IRC recently began a Phase I clinical trial in Great Britain that combines Remune with a protease inhibitor, two antiviral nucleoside analogues, and Interleukin-2. The trial is designed to determine the role that the drug may play in restoring immune response.

  20. National Network for Immunization Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists . © Copyright National Network for Immunization Information. The information contained in the National Network for Immunization Information Web site should not be ...

  1. Hericium caput-medusae (Bull.:Fr.) Pers. polysaccharide enhance innate immune response, immune-related genes expression and disease resistance against Aeromonas hydrophila in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Changlong; Wang, Jiazhen; Wang, Yuqiong; Dong, Wenlong; Shan, Xiaofeng; Lou, Yujie; Gao, Yunhang

    2018-01-01

    The objective was to add 0, 400, 800 or 1200 mg/kg of Hericium caput-medusae polysaccharide (HCMP) to the basal diet of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) and determine effects on humoral innate immunity, expression of immune-related genes and disease resistance. Adding HCMP enhanced (P < 0.05) bactericidal activity at 1, 2 and 3 weeks and also lysozyme activity, complement C3, and SOD activity at 2 and 3 weeks. Supplementing 800 or 1200 mg/kg of HCMP for 2 or 3 weeks increased (P < 0.05) serum concentrations of total protein, albumin and globulin. Two immune-related genes (IL-1β and TNF-α) were up-regulated (P < 0.05) in HCMP supplemented groups given 800 or 1200 mg/kg HCMP after 2 and 3 weeks of feeding. Expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was down-regulated (P < 0.05) after receiving 800 or 1200 mg/kg HCMP for 2 or 3 weeks. Fish fed 800 mg/kg HCMP had maximal disease resistance against Aeromonas hydrophila (65.4%). In conclusion, HCMP enhanced immune response and expression of immune-related genes and increased disease resistance against Aeromonas hydrophila in grass carp, with greatest effects in fish given 800 mg/kg HCMP for 3 weeks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Immunity: Insect Immune Memory Goes Viral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligoxygakis, Petros

    2017-11-20

    Adaptive memory in insect immunity has been controversial. In this issue, Andino and co-workers propose that acquisition of viral sequences in the host genome gives rise to anti-sense, anti-viral piRNAs. Such sequences can be regarded as both a genomic archive of past infections and as an armour of potential heritable memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cytomegalovirus-associated Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura After Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Hao Wei

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP is a rare complication after liver transplantation. Infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV is a frequent complication of organ transplantation and may induce autoimmune diseases, such as ITP. We report a case of ITP after primary CMV infection in a 3-year-old boy recipient of living-related orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT. The ITP developed 2 years after OLT in this patient who had received tacrolimus as an immunosuppressive agent, with nadir platelet counts of 5000/mm3 in 2 weeks. The patient was treated with two courses of intravenous gamma globulin (1 g/kg/day for 2 days and subsequent oral prednisolone (1.3 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks. He recovered from thrombocytopenia 4 weeks later. An inadequate immunosuppression, as evident by the low serum tacrolimus level (5.8 ng/mL before the episode of ITP in this patient, may allow the development of ITP after CMV infection. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(4:327-329

  4. HIV and Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV and Immunizations Last Reviewed: February 6, 2018 Key ...

  5. Immunity to parasitic infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lamb, Tracey J

    2012-01-01

    .... Often endemic in developing countries many parasitic diseases are neglected in terms of research funding and much remains to be understood about parasites and the interactions they have with the immune system...

  6. Exercise and immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007165.htm Exercise and immunity To use the sharing features on ... take a daily walk or follow a simple exercise routine a few times a week. Exercise helps ...

  7. Adults Need Immunizations, Too!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, Dr. Andrew Kroger from CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases discusses simple, safe, and effective ways adults can help protect themselves, their family, and their community from serious and deadly diseases.

  8. [Exosomes and Immune Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Naohiro

    2017-05-01

    In addition to the cytokines and cytotoxic granules, exosomes have been known as the intercellular communicator and cytotoxic missile of immune cells for the past decade. It has been well known that mature dendritic cell(DC)-derived exosomes participate in the T cell and natural killer(NK)cell activation, while immature DCs secrete tolerogenic exosomes for regulatory T(Treg)cell generation. Treg cell-derived EVs act as a suppressor against pathogenic type-1 T helper(Th1)cell responses. CD8+ T cells produce tumoricidal exosomes for preventing tumor invasion and metastasis transiently after T cell receptor(TCR)-mediated stimulation. Thus, immune cells produce functional exosomes in the activation state- and/or differentiation stage-dependent manner. In this review, the role of immune cell-derived exosomes will be introduced, focusing mainly on immune reaction against tumor.

  9. Immune responses to metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herberman, R.B.; Wiltrout, R.H.; Gorelik, E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present the changes in the immune system in tumor-bearing hosts that may influence the development of progression of metastases. Included are mononuclear cell infiltration of metastases; alterations in natural resistance mediated by natural killer cells and macrophages; development of specific immunity mediated by T-lymphocytes or antibodies; modulation of tumor-associated antigen expression; and the down-regulation of the immune response to the tumor by several suppressor mechanisms; the augmentation of the immune response and its potential for therapeutic application; includes the prophylaxis of metastases formation by NK cells; the therapy of metastases by augmentation NK-, macrophage-, or T-lymphocyte-mediated responses by biological response modifiers; and the transfer of anticancer activity by cytoxic T-lymphocytes or immunoconjugates of monoclonal antibodies with specificity for tumors

  10. Immunity of international organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijver, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Immunity rules are part and parcel of the law of international organizations. It has long been accepted that international organizations and their staff need to enjoy immunity from the jurisdiction of national courts. However, it is the application of these rules in practice that increasingly causes controversy. Claims against international organizations are brought before national courts by those who allegedly suffer from their activities. These can be both natural and legal persons such as companies. National courts, in particular lower courts, have often been less willing to recognize the immunity of the organization concerned than the organization s founding fathers. Likewise, public opinion and legal writings frequently criticize international organizations for invoking their immunity and for the lack of adequate means of redress for claimants. It is against this background that an international conference was organized at Leiden University in June 2013. A number of highly qualified academics and practit...

  11. Vaccines and immunization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    vaccines for malaria and HIV infection. Despite the ... decades, effective vaccines against the major causes of ... challenge antibodies, specific helper and effector T lymphocytes ... materials to produced immunity to a disease. It was originally ...

  12. Zinc Signals and Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maywald, Martina; Wessels, Inga; Rink, Lothar

    2017-10-24

    Zinc homeostasis is crucial for an adequate function of the immune system. Zinc deficiency as well as zinc excess result in severe disturbances in immune cell numbers and activities, which can result in increased susceptibility to infections and development of especially inflammatory diseases. This review focuses on the role of zinc in regulating intracellular signaling pathways in innate as well as adaptive immune cells. Main underlying molecular mechanisms and targets affected by altered zinc homeostasis, including kinases, caspases, phosphatases, and phosphodiesterases, will be highlighted in this article. In addition, the interplay of zinc homeostasis and the redox metabolism in affecting intracellular signaling will be emphasized. Key signaling pathways will be described in detail for the different cell types of the immune system. In this, effects of fast zinc flux, taking place within a few seconds to minutes will be distinguish from slower types of zinc signals, also designated as "zinc waves", and late homeostatic zinc signals regarding prolonged changes in intracellular zinc.

  13. Immunization in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruslin, Andrée; Steben, Marc; Halperin, Scott; Money, Deborah M; Yudin, Mark H

    2009-11-01

    To review the evidence and provide recommendations on immunization in pregnancy. Outcomes evaluated include effectiveness of immunization, risks and benefits for mother and fetus. The Medline and Cochrane databases were searched for articles published up to June 2008 on the topic of immunization in pregnancy. The evidence obtained was reviewed and evaluated by the Infectious Diseases Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) under the leadership of the principal authors, and recommendations were made according to guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Implementation of the recommendations in this guideline should result in more appropriate immunization of pregnant and breastfeeding women, decreased risk of contraindicated immunization, and better disease prevention. The quality of evidence reported in this document has been assessed using the evaluation of evidence criteria in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). (1) All women of childbearing age should be evaluated for the possibility of pregnancy before immunization. (III-A). (2) Health care providers should obtain a relevant immunization history from all women accessing prenatal care. (III-A). (3) In general, live and/or live-attenuated virus vaccines should not be administered during pregnancy, as there is a, largely theoretical, risk to the fetus. (II-3B). (4) Women who have inadvertently received immunization with live or live-attenuated vaccines during pregnancy should not be counselled to terminate the pregnancy because of a teratogenic risk. (II-2A). (5) Non-pregnant women immunized with a live or live-attenuated vaccine should be counselled to delay pregnancy for at least four weeks. (III-B). (6) Inactivated viral vaccines, bacterial vaccines, and toxoids can be used safely in pregnancy. (II-1A). (7) Women who are breastfeeding can still be immunized (passive-active immunization, live or killed

  14. Immunization alters body odor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Bruce A; Opiekun, Maryanne; Yamazaki, Kunio; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2014-04-10

    Infections have been shown to alter body odor. Because immune activation accompanies both infection and immunization, we tested the hypothesis that classical immunization might similarly result in the alteration of body odors detectable by trained biosensor mice. Using a Y-maze, we trained biosensor mice to distinguish between urine odors from rabies-vaccinated (RV) and unvaccinated control mice. RV-trained mice generalized this training to mice immunized with the equine West Nile virus (WNV) vaccine compared with urine of corresponding controls. These results suggest that there are similarities between body odors of mice immunized with these two vaccines. This conclusion was reinforced when mice could not be trained to directly discriminate between urine odors of RV- versus WNV-treated mice. Next, we trained biosensor mice to discriminate the urine odors of mice treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; a general elicitor of innate immunological responses) from the urine of control mice. These LPS-trained biosensors could distinguish between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and RV-treated mouse urine. Finally, biosensor mice trained to distinguish between the odors of RV-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine did not generalize this training to discriminate between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine. From these experiments, we conclude that: (1) immunization alters urine odor in similar ways for RV and WNV immunizations; and (2) immune activation with LPS also alters urine odor but in ways different from those of RV and WNV. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Adults Need Immunizations, Too!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-19

    In this podcast, Dr. Andrew Kroger from CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases discusses simple, safe, and effective ways adults can help protect themselves, their family, and their community from serious and deadly diseases.  Created: 3/19/2012 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 3/19/2012.

  16. Immune dysfunction in cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipeki, Nora; Antal-Szalmas, Peter; Lakatos, Peter L; Papp, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune dysfunction, also referred to as cirrhosis-associated immune dysfunction syndrome, is a major component of cirrhosis, and plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of both the acute and chronic worsening of liver function. During the evolution of the disease, acute decompensation events associated with organ failure(s), so-called acute-on chronic liver failure, and chronic decompensation with progression of liver fibrosis and also development of disease specific complications, comprise distinct clinical entities with different immunopathology mechanisms. Enhanced bacterial translocation associated with systemic endotoxemia and increased occurrence of systemic bacterial infections have substantial impacts on both clinical situations. Acute and chronic exposure to bacteria and/or their products, however, can result in variable clinical consequences. The immune status of patients is not constant during the illness; consequently, alterations of the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory processes result in very different dynamic courses. In this review we give a detailed overview of acquired immune dysfunction and its consequences for cirrhosis. We demonstrate the substantial influence of inherited innate immune dysfunction on acute and chronic inflammatory processes in cirrhosis caused by the pre-existing acquired immune dysfunction with limited compensatory mechanisms. Moreover, we highlight the current facts and future perspectives of how the assessment of immune dysfunction can assist clinicians in everyday practical decision-making when establishing treatment and care strategies for the patients with end-stage liver disease. Early and efficient recognition of inappropriate performance of the immune system is essential for overcoming complications, delaying progression and reducing mortality. PMID:24627592

  17. Immunity to Fish Rhabdoviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabd...

  18. Immune mediated liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojing; Ning, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Liver failure is a clinical syndrome of various etiologies, manifesting as jaundice, encephalopathy, coagulopathy and circulatory dysfunction, which result in subsequent multiorgan failure. Clinically, liver failure is classified into four categories: acute, subacute, acute-on-chronic and chronic liver failure. Massive hepatocyte death is considered to be the core event in the development of liver failure, which occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death is beyond the liver regenerative capacity. Direct damage and immune-mediated liver injury are two major factors involved in this process. Increasing evidence has suggested the essential role of immune-mediated liver injury in the pathogenesis of liver failure. Here, we review the evolved concepts concerning the mechanisms of immune-mediated liver injury in liver failure from human and animal studies. Both innate and adaptive immunity, especially the interaction of various immune cells and molecules as well as death receptor signaling system are discussed. In addition, we highlight the concept of "immune coagulation", which has been shown to be related to the disease progression and liver injury exacerbation in HBV related acute-on-chronic liver failure.

  19. Mammalian Gut Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassaing, Benoit; Kumar, Manish; Baker, Mark T.; Singh, Vishal; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian intestinal tract is the largest immune organ in the body and comprises cells from non-hemopoietic (epithelia, Paneth cells, goblet cells) and hemopoietic (macrophages, dendritic cells, T-cells) origin, and is also a dwelling for trillions of microbes collectively known as the microbiota. The homeostasis of this large microbial biomass is prerequisite to maintain host health by maximizing beneficial symbiotic relationships and minimizing the risks of living in such close proximity. Both microbiota and host immune system communicate with each other to mutually maintain homeostasis in what could be called a “love–hate relationship.” Further, the host innate and adaptive immune arms of the immune system cooperate and compensate each other to maintain the equilibrium of a highly complex gut ecosystem in a stable and stringent fashion. Any imbalance due to innate or adaptive immune deficiency or aberrant immune response may lead to dysbiosis and low-grade to robust gut inflammation, finally resulting in metabolic diseases. PMID:25163502

  20. Presence of. gamma. G and. beta. 1C globulins in renal glomeruli of aging and neonatally x-irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guttman, P H; Wuepper, K D; Fudenberg, H H

    1967-01-01

    A renal lesion in rodents, termed progressive intercapillary glomerulosclerosis (IGS), is characterized by gradual increase in the thickness of the mesangium due to cell proliferation, clustering, and pleomorphism of the mesangial cells, accumulation of PAS-positive mesangial matrix and progressive increase in the thickness of capillary basement membranes. Electron microscopy reveals deposits of electron-dense material in kidneys with IGS suggestive of plasma proteins in the mesangial matrix and in the basement membranes. IGS appears early in life and progresses with age. Whole body irradiation or direct irradiation of the kidneys causes acceleration of the glomerular lesion. A latent period precedes the onset of demonstrable histologic changes following x-ray; this latent period is of shorter duration in animals irradiated late in life. In previous studies, the possible role of an immune mechanism in the pathogenesis of IGS was suggested by the following observations: (1) the progressive course of the disease after a latent period following a single exposure to x-ray; (2) the similarity of the lesions to those seen in experimental immune disease of the kidney in rodents; (3) the presence of electron-dense material suggesting plasma protein deposits in the basement membranes and matrix; and (4) the potentiating effect of neonatal thymectomy on the course of radiation-induced IGS.

  1. Effect of triiodothyronine (L-T/sub 3/) and weight loss on sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in hirsute obese women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavaliere, H.; Medeiros Neto, G.A. (Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina)

    1984-06-01

    The effect of a 60-day period of treatment with L-T/sub 3/ (200 ..mu..g/day) was evaluated in hirsute obese women and normal controls. The obese patients were also submitted to a low calorie high protein diet. Mean initial weight significantly declined with a significant lowering of the mean DHEA-S level. There were changes in serum T/sub 3/ which rose in both obese and normal patients. Serum sex-hormone binding globulin levels at baseline studies were significantly higher in normal controls than in obese patients. At the end of the 60-day period of L-T/sub 3/ administration it was observed in both groups a 2-4 fold increase in serum SHBG levels but normal controls had significantly higher mean values than obese individuals.

  2. Association of the pituitary-testicular axis function and sex hormone-binding globulin with melatonin secretion in morbidly obese men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrowska, Z.; Buntner, B.; Marek, B.; Zwirska-Korczala, K.

    1995-01-01

    A possible relationship between melatonin (MEL) secretion and pituitary-testicular function as well as the circadian rhythmicity of serum MEL, lutropin (LH), folitropin (FSH), estradiol (E 2 ), total testosterone (T) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were evaluated in 16 men with the primary obesity (body mass index - BMI > 43 kg/m 2 ; waist-to-hip circumference ratio - WHR > 1.0) and in 17 healthy volunteers with normal body weight. The mean 24-h MEL level was significantly higher in obese patients than in healthy control individuals. Moreover, all obese men showed some abnormalities of MEL circadian pattern such as decreased ratio between day and night MEL levels, abnormal secretory peaks during the light hours and lower interindividual variability for timing amplitude. Abnormal circadian variations of MEL were associated with reduced 24-h mean values of LH, FSH, T and SHBG, whereas E 2 levels were elevated. (author). 49 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  3. The effect of triiodothyronine (L-T3) and weight loss on sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in hirsute obese women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavaliere, H.; Medeiros Neto, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a 60-day period of treatment with L-T 3 (200 μg/day) was evaluated in hirsute obese women and normal controls. The obese patients were also submitted to a low calorie high protein. Mean initial weight significantly declined with a significant lowering of the mean DHEA-S leves. There was changes in serum T 3 rose in both obese and normal patients. Serum sex-hormone binding globulin levels at baseline studies were significantly higher in normal controls than in obese patients. At the end of de 60-day period of L-T 3 administration it was observed in both groups a 2-4 fold increase in serum SHBG levels but normal controls had significantly higher mean values than obese individuals. (M.A.C.) [pt

  4. U.S. Immunization program adult immunization activities and resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, LaDora O.; Bridges, Carolyn B.; Graitcer, Samuel B.; Lamont, Brock

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adults are recommended to receive vaccines based on their age, medical conditions, prior vaccinations, occupation and lifestyle. However, adult immunization coverage is low in the United States and lags substantially below Healthy People 2020 goals. To assess activities and resources designated for adult immunization programs by state and local health department immunization programs in the United States, we analyzed 2012 and 2013 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Program Annual Reports and Progress Assessments (PAPA) survey of CDC-funded immunization programs. Fifty-six of 64 funded US immunization programs' responses were included in the analysis. Eighty-two percent of (n = 46) programs reported having a designated adult immunization coordinator in 2012 and 73% (n = 41) in 2013. Of the 46 coordinators reported in 2012, 30% (n = 14) spent more than 50% of their time on adult immunization activities, and only 24% (n = 10) of the 41 adult coordinators in 2013 spent more than 50% of their time on adult immunization activities. In 2012, 23% (n = 13) of the 56 programs had a separate immunization coalition for adults and 68% (n = 38) included adult issues in their overall immunization program coalition. In 2013, 25% (n = 14) had a separate adult immunization coalition while 57% (n = 32) incorporated adult immunizations into their overall immunization program coalition. The results indicate substantial variation across the US in public health infrastructure to support adult immunizations. Continued assessment of adult immunization resources and activities will be important in improving adult immunization coverage levels though program support. With many programs having limited resources dedicated to improving adult immunization rates in the in US, efforts by the health departments to collaborate with providers and other partners in their jurisdictions to increase awareness, increase the use of proven strategies to improve

  5. Filoviral Immune Evasion Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F. Basler

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Filoviridae family of viruses, which includes the genera Ebolavirus (EBOV and Marburgvirus (MARV, causes severe and often times lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans. Filoviral infections are associated with ineffective innate antiviral responses as a result of virally encoded immune antagonists, which render the host incapable of mounting effective innate or adaptive immune responses. The Type I interferon (IFN response is critical for establishing an antiviral state in the host cell and subsequent activation of the adaptive immune responses. Several filoviral encoded components target Type I IFN responses, and this innate immune suppression is important for viral replication and pathogenesis. For example, EBOV VP35 inhibits the phosphorylation of IRF-3/7 by the TBK-1/IKKε kinases in addition to sequestering viral RNA from detection by RIG-I like receptors. MARV VP40 inhibits STAT1/2 phosphorylation by inhibiting the JAK family kinases. EBOV VP24 inhibits nuclear translocation of activated STAT1 by karyopherin-α. The examples also represent distinct mechanisms utilized by filoviral proteins in order to counter immune responses, which results in limited IFN-α/β production and downstream signaling.

  6. Immune memory in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Barbara; Kurtz, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Evidence for innate immune memory (or 'priming') in invertebrates has been accumulating over the last years. We here provide an in-depth review of the current state of evidence for immune memory in invertebrates, and in particular take a phylogenetic viewpoint. Invertebrates are a very heterogeneous group of animals and accordingly, evidence for the phenomenon of immune memory as well as the hypothesized molecular underpinnings differ largely for the diverse invertebrate taxa. The majority of research currently focuses on Arthropods, while evidence from many other groups of invertebrates is fragmentary or even lacking. We here concentrate on immune memory that is induced by pathogenic challenges, but also extent our view to a non-pathogenic context, i.e. allograft rejection, which can also show forms of memory and can inform us about general principles of specific self-nonself recognition. We discuss definitions of immune memory and a number of relevant aspects such as the type of antigens used, the route of exposure, and the kinetics of reactions following priming. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non-virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  8. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K; Laing, Kerry J; Winton, James R

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  9. Immunity to Fish Rhabdoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen K. Purcell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  10. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity.

  11. Pentraxins and immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Nagar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pentraxin-3 (PTX3 is a multifactorial protein involved in immunity and inflammation, which is rapidly produced and released by several cell types in response to inflammatory signals. It may be suggested that PTX3 is related to periodontal tissue inflammation. Its salivary concentrations may have a diagnostic potential. Pentraxin-3 (PTX3 is an ancient family of multifactorial proteins involved in immunity and inflammation. They are rapidly produced and released by various types of cells when there are indications of inflammation. PTX3 is related to inflammation in the periodontal tissue and it can be suggested that salivary concentrations may be used for diagnosing the same.

  12. Mucosal immunity to poliovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogra, Pearay L; Okayasu, Hiromasa; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Sutter, Roland W

    2011-10-01

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) currently based on use of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) has identified suboptimal immunogenicity of this vaccine as a major impediment to eradication, with a failure to induce protection against paralytic poliomyelitis in certain population segments in some parts of the world. The Mucosal Immunity and Poliovirus Vaccines: Impact on Wild Poliovirus Infection, Transmission and Vaccine Failure conference was organized to obtain a better understanding of the current status of global control of poliomyelitis and identify approaches to improve the immune responsiveness and effectiveness of the orally administered poliovirus vaccines in order to accelerate the global eradication of paralytic poliomyelitis.

  13. Training and natural immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Helge, Jørn Wulff; Richter, Erik

    2000-01-01

    these subjects were used to eliminate day-to-day variation in the immunological tests. Independently of diet, training increased the percentage of CD3-CD16+ CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells from [mean (SEM)] 14 (1) % to 20 (3) % (P = 0.05), whereas the NK-cell activity, either unstimulated or stimulated...... influence natural immunity, and suggest that ingestion of a fat-rich diet during training is detrimental to the immune system compared to the effect of a carbohydrate-rich diet....

  14. Vaccines and Immunization Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Michael D; Meador, Anna E

    2016-03-01

    Vaccines are among most cost-effective public health strategies. Despite effective vaccines for many bacterial and viral illnesses, tens of thousands of adults and hundreds of children die each year in the United States from vaccine-preventable diseases. Underutilization of vaccines requires rethinking the approach to incorporating vaccines into practice. Arguably, immunizations could be a part all health care encounters. Shared responsibility is paramount if deaths are to be reduced. This article reviews the available vaccines in the US market, as well as practice recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Standardization and application of the solid phase C1q radioimmunoassay using soluble tetanus toxoid-antitetanus immune complexes in sera of patients with chronic polyarthritis and Lupus erythematodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, E.J.; Steffen, C.; Smolen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Soluble tetanus-antitetanus immune complexes were prepared with affinity-chromatography and gel chromatography. Serial dilutions of these immune complex preparations were tested in a solid phase C1q radioimmunoassay. Soluble immune complexes as well as aggregated human gamma globulin of identical protein concentrations were comparatively investigated. Soluble immune complexes rendered a more sensitive standardization of RIA. According to these observations a relation between μg/ml equivalents of defined tetanus-antitetanus complexes and ng second antibody obtained in C1q-RIA was calculated. Upper limit of mean values and two standard deviations of ng second antibody obtained in investigations of 55 normal sera was designated as 1 unit immune complexes and regarded as border line of negative results. Multiplication of μg/ml immune complex equivalents of 1 unit led to a scale of 1 to 15 units, showing the area of positive results. According to these values a standardization curve was constructed allowing a conversion of ng-second antibody obtained in serum investigations into immune complex units equivalent to defined standard immune complexes. With this curve investigation results of 56 RA sera and 21 SLE sera were expressed in the range of units, making a distinct gradation of positive results and a clear cut separation of positive and negative results possible. SLE sera of patients in acute stage showed highly positive results. (orig.) [de

  16. Standardization and application of the solid phase C1q radioimmunoassay using soluble tetanus toxoid-antitetanus immune complexes in sera of patients with chronic polyarthritis and Lupus erythematodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, E J; Steffen, C; Smolen, J

    1982-11-22

    Soluble tetanus-antitetanus immune complexes were prepared with affinity-chromatography and gel chromatography. Serial dilutions of these immune complex preparations were tested in a solid phase C1q radioimmunoassay. Soluble immune complexes as well as aggregated human gamma globulin of identical protein concentrations were comparatively investigated. Soluble immune complexes rendered a more sensitive standardization of RIA. According to these observations a relation between ..mu..g/ml equivalents of defined tetanus-antitetanus complexes and ng second antibody obtained in C1q-RIA was calculated. Upper limit of mean values and two standard deviations of ng second antibody obtained in investigations of 55 normal sera was designated as 1 unit immune complexes and regarded as border line of negative results. Multiplication of ..mu..g/ml immune complex equivalents of 1 unit led to a scale of 1 to 15 units, showing the area of positive results. According to these values a standardization curve was constructed allowing a conversion of ng-second antibody obtained in serum investigations into immune complex units equivalent to defined standard immune complexes. With this curve investigation results of 56 RA sera and 21 SLE sera were expressed in the range of units, making a distinct gradation of positive results and a clear cut separation of positive and negative results possible. SLE sera of patients in acute stage showed highly positive results.

  17. Immune-Mediated Neutropenia and Thrombocytopenia in a Patient with Ulcerative Colitis: An Unusual Hematological Association with IBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-In Kim

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematological manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD are well described in the literature. However, the combination of immune-mediated neutropenia and thrombocytopenia has only been reported once in association with IBD. A case is reported of immune-mediated neutropenia and thrombocytopenia in a patient with ulcerative colitis during a relapse. No obvious causes of these hematological abnormalities were found in the patient despite an exhaustive search. An immune-mediated process was confirmed by positive antineutrophil antibody and platelet-associated antibody in the patient’s serum, and the demonstration of binding of the patient’s immunoglobulin G to autologous neutrophils. The patient was treated with high-dose steroid, intravenous gamma-globulin and eventually splenectomy. The platelet count subsequently normalized; although the severe neutropenia recurred, it has subsequently improved without further treatment. Although a definitive cause-effect relationship cannot be established, the immune-mediated neutropenia and thrombocytopenia may be an unusual hematological manifestation associated with ulcerative colitis.

  18. Immune System and Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Badri Man

    2017-01-01

    The immune system recognises a transplanted kidney as foreign body and mounts immune response through cellular and humoral mechanisms leading to acute or chronic rejection, which ultimately results in graft loss. Over the last five decades, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the immune responses to transplanted organs in both experimental and clinical transplant settings. Modulation of the immune response by using immunosuppressive agents has led to successful outcomes after kidney transplantation. The paper provides an overview of the general organisation and function of human immune system, immune response to kidney transplantation, and the current practice of immunosuppressive therapy in kidney transplantation in the United Kingdom.

  19. Neuroendocrine-immune interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemenade, van Lidy; Cohen, Nicholas; Chadzinska, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    It has now become accepted that the immune system and neuroendocrine system form an integrated part of our physiology. Immunological defense mechanisms act in concert with physiological processes like growth and reproduction, energy intake and metabolism, as well as neuronal development. Not only

  20. Amyloid and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Gen

    2018-03-01

    Extracellular amyloid deposition defines a range of amyloidosis and amyloid-related disease. Addition to primary and secondary amyloidosis, amyloid-related disease can be observed in different tissue/organ that sharing the common pathogenesis based on the formation of amyloid deposition. Currently, both Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes can be diagnosed with certainly only based on the autopsy results, by which amyloidosis of the associative tissue/organ is observed. Intriguingly, since it demonstrated that amyloid deposits trigger inflammatory reaction through the activation of cascaded immune response, wherein several lines of evidence implies a protective role of amyloid in preventing autoimmunity. Furthermore, attempts for preventing amyloid formation and/or removing amyloid deposits from the brain have caused meningoencephalitis and consequent deaths among the subjects. Hence, it is important to note that amyloid positively participates in maintaining immune homeostasis and contributes to irreversible inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the interactive relationship between amyloid and the immune system, discussing the potential functional roles of amyloid in immune tolerance and homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Lymphoma: Immune Evasion Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, Ranjan; Hammerich, Linda; Peng, Paul; Brown, Brian; Merad, Miriam; Brody, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    While the cellular origin of lymphoma is often characterized by chromosomal translocations and other genetic aberrations, its growth and development into a malignant neoplasm is highly dependent upon its ability to escape natural host defenses. Neoplastic cells interact with a variety of non-malignant cells in the tumor milieu to create an immunosuppressive microenvironment. The resulting functional impairment and dysregulation of tumor-associated immune cells not only allows for passive growth of the malignancy but may even provide active growth signals upon which the tumor subsequently becomes dependent. In the past decade, the success of immune checkpoint blockade and adoptive cell transfer for relapsed or refractory lymphomas has validated immunotherapy as a possible treatment cornerstone. Here, we review the mechanisms by which lymphomas have been found to evade and even reprogram the immune system, including alterations in surface molecules, recruitment of immunosuppressive subpopulations, and secretion of anti-inflammatory factors. A fundamental understanding of the immune evasion strategies utilized by lymphomas may lead to better prognostic markers and guide the development of targeted interventions that are both safer and more effective than current standards of care

  2. Lymphoma: Immune Evasion Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Ranjan; Hammerich, Linda; Peng, Paul [Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Brown, Brian [Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Merad, Miriam [Department of Oncological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Brody, Joshua D., E-mail: joshua.brody@mssm.edu [Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2015-04-30

    While the cellular origin of lymphoma is often characterized by chromosomal translocations and other genetic aberrations, its growth and development into a malignant neoplasm is highly dependent upon its ability to escape natural host defenses. Neoplastic cells interact with a variety of non-malignant cells in the tumor milieu to create an immunosuppressive microenvironment. The resulting functional impairment and dysregulation of tumor-associated immune cells not only allows for passive growth of the malignancy but may even provide active growth signals upon which the tumor subsequently becomes dependent. In the past decade, the success of immune checkpoint blockade and adoptive cell transfer for relapsed or refractory lymphomas has validated immunotherapy as a possible treatment cornerstone. Here, we review the mechanisms by which lymphomas have been found to evade and even reprogram the immune system, including alterations in surface molecules, recruitment of immunosuppressive subpopulations, and secretion of anti-inflammatory factors. A fundamental understanding of the immune evasion strategies utilized by lymphomas may lead to better prognostic markers and guide the development of targeted interventions that are both safer and more effective than current standards of care.

  3. Fully immunized child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutua, Martin Kavao; Kimani-Murage, Elizabeth; Ngomi, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Background: More efforts have been put in place to increase full immunization coverage rates in the last decade. Little is known about the levels and consequences of delaying or vaccinating children in different schedules. Vaccine effectiveness depends on the timing of its administration, and it ...

  4. Tick Innate Immunity.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopáček, Petr; Hajdušek, Ondřej; Burešová, Veronika; Daffre, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 708, - (2010), 137-162 ISSN 0065-2598 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/10/2136; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : tick * pathogen transmission * innate immunity Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.379, year: 2010

  5. Avaliação do filme lacrimal de pacientes com distonia facial durante tratamento com toxina botulínica tipo A Lacrimal film evaluation of patients with facial dystonia during botulinum toxin type A treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Grativol Costa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar o efeito da toxina botulínica no filme lacrimal em pacientes com distonia facial. MÉTODOS: Foram incluídos 24 pacientes portadores de blefaroespasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial que receberam aplicação de toxina botulínica tipo A que foram submetidos à propedêutica do filme lacrimal previamente à aplicação e após, com 7 e 30 dias. RESULTADOS: Houve diminuição das queixas de olho seco trinta dias após a aplicação, entretanto, o tempo de ruptura do filme lacrimal e o teste de Schirmer não demonstraram variação significativa entre os períodos pré-tratamento e 1 mês da aplicação. Em relação ao teste de coloração com rosa bengala, todos os olhos que coraram no pré-tratamento, melhoraram na última avaliação. CONCLUSÃO: A injeção de toxina botulínica pode aliviar as queixas de olho seco nos pacientes com distonia facial pela provável ação de inibição do orbicular na sua função de bomba lacrimal.PURPOSE: To determine the effect of botulinum toxin injection in the eyelid on lacrimal film in patients with facial dystonia. METHODS: Twenty-four patients with essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm were submitted to botulinum toxin injection and lacrimal film tests were performed before the application and after seven and thirty days. RESULTS: There was improvement in symptoms of dry eye and rose bengal test, however, the breakup time and Schirmer's test did not show significant variation between pretreatment and after 1 month of follow-up. CONCLUSION: The dry eye symptoms in patients with facial dystonia may be attenuated by botulinum toxin due to its possible inhibitory effect on the orbicular muscle leading to a decrease in lacrimal pump.

  6. Botulinum toxin for treatment of cocontractions related to obstetrical brachial plexopathy Toxina botulínica para tratamento das co-contrações relacionadas à plexopatia braquial obstétrica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos O. Heise

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin type A was recently introduced for treatment of biceps - triceps muscle cocontraction, which compromises elbow function in children with obstetrical brachial plexopathy. This is our preliminary experience with this new approach. Eight children were treated with 2 - 3 U/kg of botulinum toxin injected in the triceps (4 patients and biceps (4 patients muscle, divided in 2 or 3 sites. All patients submitted to triceps injections showed a long-lasting improvement of active elbow flexion and none required new injections, after a follow-up of 3 to 18 months. Three of the patients submitted to biceps injections showed some improvement of elbow extension, but none developed anti-gravitational strength for elbow extension and the effect lasted only three to five months. One patient showed no response to triceps injections. Our data suggest that botulinum toxin can be useful in some children that have persistent disability secondary to obstetrical brachial plexopathy.A toxina botulínica do tipo A foi introduzida recentemente para o tratamento das co-contrações entre os músculos biceps e triceps, que comprometem a função do cotovelo nas crianças com plexopatia braquial obstétrica. Apresentamos nossa experiência preliminar com esta abordagem. Oito crianças foram tratadas com 2 - 3 U/kg de toxina botulínica injetada nos músculos triceps (4 pacientes e biceps (4 pacientes, divididas em 2 ou 3 sítios. Todos os pacientes submetidos a injeções no triceps apresentaram melhora persistente da flexão do cotovelo e nenhum precisou de novas aplicações após seguimento de 3 a 18 meses. Três pacientes submetidos a aplicações no biceps apresentaram melhora na extensão do cotovelo, mas nenhum adquiriu força antigravitacional e o efeito durou apenas 3 a 5 meses. Um paciente não respondeu às injeções. Nossos dados sugerem que a toxina botulínica pode ser útil no tratamento de algumas crianças com seqüelas de plexopatia braquial

  7. Frequently Asked Questions about Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will be too late for the vaccine to work. The best time to immunize kids is when they're healthy. Can immunizations cause a bad reaction in my child? The most common reactions to vaccines are minor ...

  8. Technique Selectively Represses Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters December 3, 2012 Technique Selectively Represses Immune System Myelin (green) encases and protects nerve fibers (brown). A new technique prevents the immune system from attacking myelin in a mouse model of ...

  9. Prognostic value of pretreatment albumin–globulin ratio in predicting long-term mortality in gastric cancer patients who underwent D2 resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu J

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Jianjun Liu,1,2,* Shangxiang Chen,1,2,* Qirong Geng,1,3 Xuechao Liu,1,2 Pengfei Kong,1,2 Youqing Zhan,1,2 Dazhi Xu1,2 1State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, 2Department of Gastric and Pancreatic Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, 3Department of Hematology Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Several studies have highlighted the prognostic value of the albumin–globulin ratio (AGR in various kinds of cancers. Our study was designed to assess whether AGR is associated with the prognosis of gastric cancer patients. Patients and methods: A total of 507 gastric cancer patients between 2005 and 2012 were included. The AGR was defined as the ratio of serum albumin to nonalbumin and calculated by the equation: albumin/(total protein - albumin. Furthermore, AGR was divided into two groups (low and high using the X-tile software. Survival analysis stratified by AGR groups was performed. Results: The mean survival time for each group was 36.62 months (95% CI: 33.92–39.32 for the low AGR group and 48.95 months (95% CI: 41.93–55.96, P=0.003 for the high AGR group. Patients in the high group (AGR ≥1.93 had a significantly lower 5-year mortality in comparison with the low group (AGR <1.93 (52.4% vs 78.5%, P=0.003. The high AGR group showed obviously better overall survival than the low AGR group according to Kaplan–Meier curves (P=0.003. Multivariate analysis showed that AGR was an independent predictive factor of prognosis in gastric patients. Conclusion: Pretreatment AGR is a significant and independent predictive factor of prognosis. Keywords: gastric cancer, survival, inflammation, albumin–globulin ratio

  10. Maternal immunity enhances systemic recall immune responses upon oral immunization of piglets with F4 fimbriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ut V; Melkebeek, Vesna; Devriendt, Bert; Goetstouwers, Tiphanie; Van Poucke, Mario; Peelman, Luc; Goddeeris, Bruno M; Cox, Eric

    2015-06-23

    F4 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) cause diarrhoea and mortality in piglets leading to severe economic losses. Oral immunization of piglets with F4 fimbriae induces a protective intestinal immune response evidenced by an F4-specific serum and intestinal IgA response. However, successful oral immunization of pigs with F4 fimbriae in the presence of maternal immunity has not been demonstrated yet. In the present study we aimed to evaluate the effect of maternal immunity on the induction of a systemic immune response upon oral immunization of piglets. Whereas F4-specific IgG and IgA could be induced by oral immunization of pigs without maternal antibodies and by intramuscular immunization of pigs with maternal antibodies, no such response was seen in the orally immunized animals with maternal antibodies. Since maternal antibodies can mask an antibody response, we also looked by ELIspot assays for circulating F4-specific antibody secreting cells (ASCs). Enumerating the F4-specific ASCs within the circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and the number of F4-specific IgA ASCs within the circulating IgA(+) B-cells revealed an F4-specific immune response in the orally immunized animals with maternal antibodies. Interestingly, results suggest a more robust IgA booster response by oral immunization of pigs with than without maternal antibodies. These results demonstrate that oral immunization of piglets with F4-specific maternal antibodies is feasible and that these maternal antibodies seem to enhance the secondary systemic immune response. Furthermore, our ELIspot assay on enriched IgA(+) B-cells could be used as a screening procedure to optimize mucosal immunization protocols in pigs with maternal immunity.

  11. Vitamin E, immunity, and infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    A normally functioning immune system is critical for the body to fight and eliminate invading pathogens from the environment. On the other hand, the immune system also protects the body from internal risks such as neoplasia growing within and autoimmune responses that attack self. The immune system ...

  12. Correção de estrabismo paralítico por injeção de toxina botulínica Management of paralytic strabismus by injection of botulinum toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Wattiez

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Avaliar a ação da toxina botulínica em paralisias adquiridas de VI e III nervos. Pacientes e métodos: Foram tratados com toxina botulínica 15 pacientes, com diagnóstico de paralisia de VI e III nervos, aguda ou crônica. Foram estudados de forma prospectiva, durante os meses de agosto de 1998 a maio de 1999. O estudo incluiu, além da avaliação do estrabismo, avaliação oftalmológica completa. Os pacientes foram acompanhados por um período de 2 a 7 meses após a última aplicação. Resultados: Onze pacientes (73% apresentaram paralisias do VI nervo e 4 pacientes (27%, paralisias de III nervo. Seis casos foram agudos (40% e 9 casos (60%, crônicos. Cinco dos 6 casos agudos (83% conseguiram controlar o desvio com a toxina botulínica como único tratamento e obter fusão. Dos 9 casos crônicos, 2 casos (22% corrigiram o desvio só com a toxina, os outros 7, além da aplicação, foram submetidos à cirurgia, dos quais 4 casos (46% foram corrigidos e os outros 3 casos (32% não. Conclusão: Concluímos que nos casos em que houve força muscular residual, após a paralisia, e bom potencial de fusão, a toxina botulínica foi o melhor tratamento, pois foi possível controlar o desvio e obter fusão, sem cirurgia.Purpose: To evaluate the treatment by injection of botulinum toxin in acquired sixth and third nerve palsies. Methods: Fifteen patients were treated with botulinum toxin. They were studied prospectively during nine months, between August, 1998 and May, 1999. In addition to the strabismus examination, a complete ophthalmological evaluation was performed. The patients were followed for 2 to 7 months after the last injection or surgical procedure. Results: Eleven patients (73% presented with sixth nerve palsy and four (27% with third nerve palsy. Six cases were acute (40% and 9 cases (60% were chronic. Five acute cases (83% obtained ocular alignment and controlled the deviation with toxin. Two of nine chronic cases (22

  13. Specific labeling of the thyroxine binding site in thyroxine-binding globulin: determination of the amino acid composition of a labeled peptide fragment isolated from a proteolytic digest of the derivatized protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnick, M; Perret, V

    1987-08-01

    [125I] Thyroxine has been covalently bound to the thyroxine binding site in thyroxine-binding globulin by reaction with the bifunctional reagent, 1,5-difluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. An average of 0.47 mol of [125I] thyroxine was incorporated per mol protein; nonspecific binding amounted to 8%. A labeled peptide fragment was isolated from a proteolytic digest of the derivatized protein by HPLC and its amino acid composition was determined. Comparison with the amino acid sequence of thyroxine-binding globulin indicated partial correspondence of the labeled peptide with two possible regions in the protein. These regions also coincide with part of the barrel structure present in the closely homologous protein, alpha 1-antitrypsin.

  14. Immunity to tumour antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Geng; Ali, Selman A; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Mian, Shahid; Ahmad, Murrium; Miles, Amanda; Rees, Robert C

    2005-01-01

    During the last decade, a large number of human tumour antigens have been identified. These antigens are classified as tumour-specific shared antigens, tissue-specific differentiation antigens, overexpressed antigens, tumour antigens resulting from mutations, viral antigens and fusion proteins. Antigens recognised by effectors of immune system are potential targets for antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy. However, most tumour antigens are self-proteins and are generally of low immunogenicity and the immune response elicited towards these tumour antigens is not always effective. Strategies to induce and enhance the tumour antigen-specific response are needed. This review will summarise the approaches to discovery of tumour antigens, the current status of tumour antigens, and their potential application to cancer treatment.

  15. Agency privileges and immunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    Switzerland has become the thirty-fifth Member State to be a party to the Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Its Resident Representative, Ambassador Alfred Eschler, deposited his Government's instrument of acceptance on 16 September. This is the fourth such instrument to be deposited with the Agency since the beginning of this year, the others being Ecuador on 16 April, Niger on 17 June and Vietnam on 31 July. (author)

  16. Immune disorders in anorexia

    OpenAIRE

    SŁOTWIŃSKA, SYLWIA MAŁGORZATA; SŁOTWIŃSKI, ROBERT

    2017-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a disease involving eating disorders. It mainly affects young people, especially teenage women. The disease is often latent and occurs in many sub-clinical and partial forms. Approximately from 0.3% to 1% of the population suffers from anorexia. It has been shown that patients with anorexia develop neurotransmitter-related disorders, leading to uncontrolled changes in the immune and endocrine systems. Interactions between cytokines, neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters pla...

  17. Ebola and Immune System

    OpenAIRE

    KOMENAN, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is a formidable disease whose surges always result in a high number of victims in sub-Saharan Africa. There is no official treatment against the virus, which makes the task of containment extremely delicate. However, the existence of survivors to the virus demonstrates curable nature of the disease and suggests the existence of favorable factors of immunity. The author examines these factors and their challenges and perspectives in the cure of the disease.

  18. Efficacy of two different doses of rabbit anti-T-lymphocyte globulin to prevent graft-versus-host disease in children with haematological malignancies transplanted from an unrelated donor: a multicentre, randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial

    OpenAIRE

    Locatelli, Franco; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Bertaina, Alice; Rognoni, Carla; Comoli, Patrizia; Rovelli, Attilio; Pession, Andrea; Fagioli, Franca; Favre, Claudio; Lanino, Edoardo; Giorgiani, Giovanna; Merli, Pietro; Pagliara, Daria; Prete, Arcangelo; Zecca, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background Although rabbit anti-T-lymphocyte globulin (ATLG) is largely used for the prevention of immunemediated complications in patients given allogeneic haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) from an unrelated donor, the optimum dose of this drug in children is still undefined. We aimed to test whether a higher dose of ATLG was superior to a lower dose for prevention of grade II–IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Methods We conducted a multicentre, randomised, open-label, p...

  19. Immune disorders in anorexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Małgorzata Słotwińska

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa is a disease involving eating disorders. It mainly affects young people, especially teenage women. The disease is often latent and occurs in many sub-clinical and partial forms. Approximately from 0.3% to 1% of the population suffers from anorexia. It has been shown that patients with anorexia develop neurotransmitter-related disorders, leading to uncontrolled changes in the immune and endocrine systems. Interactions between cytokines, neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters play an important role in disease development. Significant malnutrition induces disorders and alterations in T-cell populations. The cellular response in patients with anorexia nervosa has been shown to be normal, although opinions on this issue are controversial. Laboratory studies on neutrophils in anorexia patients showed decreased adhesion and reduced bactericidal and cell activities. Despite such unfavourable results, patients with anorexia are resistant to infections, which are very rare in this group. Glutamine improves the performance of the human immune system. The administration of glutamine to anorexia patients, as a supplement to parenteral nutrition, has resulted in significant improvements in immune system parameters. The results of previous studies on the causes and risk factors in the development of anorexia nervosa are still ambiguous. One can hope that the differences and similarities between patients with anorexia nervosa and those with other forms of protein-calorie malnutrition may be helpful in determining the relationship between nutritional status and body defences and susceptibility to infection, and can help to broaden the knowledge about the aetiopathogenesis of anorexia nervosa.

  20. Immune disorders in anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słotwińska, Sylwia Małgorzata; Słotwiński, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a disease involving eating disorders. It mainly affects young people, especially teenage women. The disease is often latent and occurs in many sub-clinical and partial forms. Approximately from 0.3% to 1% of the population suffers from anorexia. It has been shown that patients with anorexia develop neurotransmitter-related disorders, leading to uncontrolled changes in the immune and endocrine systems. Interactions between cytokines, neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters play an important role in disease development. Significant malnutrition induces disorders and alterations in T-cell populations. The cellular response in patients with anorexia nervosa has been shown to be normal, although opinions on this issue are controversial. Laboratory studies on neutrophils in anorexia patients showed decreased adhesion and reduced bactericidal and cell activities. Despite such unfavourable results, patients with anorexia are resistant to infections, which are very rare in this group. Glutamine improves the performance of the human immune system. The administration of glutamine to anorexia patients, as a supplement to parenteral nutrition, has resulted in significant improvements in immune system parameters. The results of previous studies on the causes and risk factors in the development of anorexia nervosa are still ambiguous. One can hope that the differences and similarities between patients with anorexia nervosa and those with other forms of protein-calorie malnutrition may be helpful in determining the relationship between nutritional status and body defences and susceptibility to infection, and can help to broaden the knowledge about the aetiopathogenesis of anorexia nervosa.

  1. Hyperthermia, immunity and metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopatin, V.F.

    1983-01-01

    The analysis of literature data concerning local hyperthermia effects shows that temperatures over 41-42 deg C (in the whole tumor volume), causing tumor growth inhibition and cell injury, can change antigenic nature of a malignant tissue. The tumor injured by thermal effect is able probably the full length of time of injured tissue resorption to maintain at a sufficiently high level antitumoral immunity and lay obstacles to emergence of metastases or even cause regression of those tumoral foci which have not been exposed to direct effect of the injuring agent. The facts of tumoral foci regression take place also upon radiation effect which is associated as well with participation of immune mechanisms. In.experiments with animals an essential increase of immunogenic character of malignant cells exposed to ionizing radiation effect has been observed. It follows that radiation injury of tumoral tissue as well as thermal one is able to stimulate antitumoral immunity and reduce the probability of emergence of metastases. But in case of radiotherapy immunosuppression effect of ionizing radiation (at the expense of inhibition of proliferation and death of immunocompetent cells) can essentially overlap immunostimulating effect related to the changes in antigenic character of tumoral cells

  2. Linear ubiquitination in immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yutaka; Taraborrelli, Lucia; Walczak, Henning

    2015-07-01

    Linear ubiquitination is a post-translational protein modification recently discovered to be crucial for innate and adaptive immune signaling. The function of linear ubiquitin chains is regulated at multiple levels: generation, recognition, and removal. These chains are generated by the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC), the only known ubiquitin E3 capable of forming the linear ubiquitin linkage de novo. LUBAC is not only relevant for activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in various signaling pathways, but importantly, it also regulates cell death downstream of immune receptors capable of inducing this response. Recognition of the linear ubiquitin linkage is specifically mediated by certain ubiquitin receptors, which is crucial for translation into the intended signaling outputs. LUBAC deficiency results in attenuated gene activation and increased cell death, causing pathologic conditions in both, mice, and humans. Removal of ubiquitin chains is mediated by deubiquitinases (DUBs). Two of them, OTULIN and CYLD, are constitutively associated with LUBAC. Here, we review the current knowledge on linear ubiquitination in immune signaling pathways and the biochemical mechanisms as to how linear polyubiquitin exerts its functions distinctly from those of other ubiquitin linkage types. © 2015 The Authors. Immunological Reviews Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Comparison of long-term outcomes between children with aplastic anemia and refractory cytopenia of childhood who received immunosuppressive therapy with antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Asahito; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Muramatsu, Hideki; Ito, Masafumi; Narita, Atsushi; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Tsuchida, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Ito, Etsuro; Yabe, Hiromasa; Ohga, Shouichi; Ohara, Akira; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-11-01

    The 2008 World Health Organization classification proposed a new entity in childhood myelodysplastic syndrome, refractory cytopenia of childhood. However, it is unclear whether this morphological classification reflects clinical outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed bone marrow morphology in 186 children (median age 8 years; range 1-16 years) who were enrolled in the prospective study and received horse antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine between July 1999 and November 2008. The median follow-up period was 87 months (range 1-146 months). Out of 186 patients, 62 (33%) were classified with aplastic anemia, 94 (49%) with refractory cytopenia of childhood, and 34 (18%) with refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia. Aplastic anemia patients received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor more frequently and for longer durations than other patients (Paplastic anemia, 4 patients with refractory cytopenia of childhood, and 3 patients with refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia. Although the cumulative incidence of total clonal evolution at ten years was not significantly different among the 3 groups, the cumulative incidence of monosomy 7 development was significantly higher in aplastic anemia than in the other groups (P=0.02). Multivariate analysis revealed that only granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration duration of 40 days or more was a significant risk factor for monosomy 7 development (P=0.02). These findings suggest that even the introduction of a strict morphological distinction from hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndrome cannot eradicate clonal evolution in children with aplastic anemia. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  4. Meta-analysis on the Safety and Efficacy of the Reperfusion Use of a Single High Dose of Anti-T-Lymphocyte Globulin Fresenius in Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X; Wang, W; Sun, Z-J; Su, L L; Zhang, X-D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a single high dose of the anti-T-lymphocyte globulin Fresenius (ATG-F), given before kidney transplantation, on the prevention of acute rejection response and infections and on the survival rate of the renal graft and patient. Databases including PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify randomized controlled trials relevant to studying the presurgical use of a single high dose of ATG-F. Five RCTs that included 346 patients were selected. The meta-analysis suggested that the application of ATG-F reduced the postsurgical acute rejection reaction incidence compared to that of the control group (relative risk = 0.50, 95% confidence interval = 0.35-0.71, P = .0001). However, the application of ATG-F exhibited no significant effect on the incidence of urinary tract infection, cytomegalovirus infection, and delayed graft function. Furthermore, the one-year patient survival rate and kidney graft survival rate were not affected. The meta-analysis suggested that the reperfusion use of a single high dose (9 mg/kg) of ATG-F could effectively reduce the incidence of postsurgical acute rejection response without affecting the occurrence of infections, the survival rates of kidney grafts and patients, or the incidence of delayed graft function. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Anti-thymocyte globulin could improve the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with highly aggressive T-cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J; Cai, Y; Jiang, J L; Wan, L P; Yan, S K; Wang, C

    2015-01-01

    The early experiment result in our hospital showed that anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) inhibited the proliferation of lymphoid tumor cells in the T-cell tumors. We used the ATG as the part of the conditioning regimen and to evaluate the long-term anti-leukemia effect, the safety and complication in the patients with highly aggressive T-cell lymphomas. Twenty-three patients were enrolled into this study. At the time of transplant, six patients reached first or subsequent complete response, three patients had a partial remission and 14 patients had relapsed or primary refractory disease. The conditioning regimen consisted of ATG, total body irradiation, toposide and cyclophosphamide. The complete remission rate after transplant was 95.7%. At a median follow-up time of 25 months, 16 (69.6%) patients are alive and free from diseases, including nine patients in refractory and progressive disease. Seven patients died after transplant, five from relapse and two from treatment-related complications. The incidence of grades II–IV acute graft-vs-host disease (GvHD) was 39.1%. The maximum cumulative incidence of chronic GvHD was 30%. The most frequent and severe conditioning-related toxicities observed in 8 out of 23 patients were grades III/IV infections during cytopenia. Thus, ATG-based conditioning is a feasible and effective alternative for patients with highly aggressive T-cell tumors

  6. Disparate rates of acute rejection and donor-specific antibodies among high-immunologic risk renal transplant subgroups receiving antithymocyte globulin induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Samir J; Suki, Wadi N; Loucks-DeVos, Jennifer; Graviss, Edward A; Nguyen, Duc T; Knight, Richard J; Kuten, Samantha A; Moore, Linda W; Teeter, Larry D; Gaber, Lillian W; Gaber, A Osama

    2016-08-01

    Lymphocyte-depleting induction lowers acute rejection (AR) rates among high-immunologic risk (HIR) renal transplant recipients, including African Americans (AAs), retransplants, and the sensitized. It is unclear whether different HIR subgroups experience similarly low rates of AR. We aimed to describe the incidence of AR and de novo donor-specific antibody (dnDSA) among HIR recipients categorized by age, race, or donor type. All received antithymocyte globulin (ATG) induction and triple maintenance immunosuppression. A total of 464 HIR recipients from 2007 to 2014 were reviewed. AR and dnDSA rates at 1 year for the entire population were 14% and 27%, respectively. AR ranged from 6.7% among living donor (LD) recipients to 30% in younger AA deceased donor (DD) recipients. De novo donor-specific antibody at 1 year ranged from 7% in older non-AA LD recipients to 32% in AAs. AA race remained as an independent risk factor for AR among DD recipients and for dnDSA among all HIR recipients. Development of both AR and dnDSA within the first year was associated with a 54% graft survival at 5 years and was an independent risk factor for graft loss. Despite utilization of recommended immunosuppression for HIR recipients, substantial disparities exist among subgroups, warranting further consideration of individualized immunosuppression in certain HIR subgroups. © 2016 Steunstichting ESOT.

  7. Incidence and Pattern of Graft-versus-Host Disease in Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Transplantation after Nonmyeloablative Conditioning with Total Lymphoid Irradiation and Antithymocyte Globulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Veltri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonmyeloablative (NMA conditioning with total lymphoid irradiation and antithymocyte globulin (TLI/ATG has been shown to protect against acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. We report here our institutional experience with allogeneic transplantation following NMA conditioning with TLI/ATG (. GVHD prophylaxis consisted of a combination of a calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate mofetil. Median patient age was 59 years. The median followup of surviving patients is 545 days. One patient experienced primary graft rejection. The median time to neutrophil engraftment was 18 days and platelet engraftment was 9.5 days. The cumulative incidence (CI of grade II–IV acute GVHD at day +100 was 28.6% and 38.1% at day +180. The CI for grade III-IV acute GVHD was 28.6% at day +180. CI of chronic GVHD was 45.2% at 1 year. The CI of disease relapse was 9.5% at 1 year. The rate of nonrelapse mortality (NRM was 0% at day +100 and only 9.5% at 1 year. The overall and progression free survival at 1 year was 81% and 80.4%, respectively. Our limited, retrospective data show encouraging relapse and NRM rates with TLI/ATG-based NMA conditioning, but with higher than previously reported rates of acute and chronic GVHD, underscoring the need for novel strategies designed to effectively prevent GVHD.

  8. Stable long-term pulmonary function after fludarabine, antithymocyte globulin and i.v. BU for reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirou, S; Malard, F; Chambellan, A; Chevallier, P; Germaud, P; Guillaume, T; Delaunay, J; Moreau, P; Delasalle, B; Lemarchand, P; Mohty, M

    2014-05-01

    Lung function decline is a well-recognized complication following allogeneic SCT (allo-SCT). Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and in vivo T-cell depletion by administration of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) may have a protective role in the occurrence of late pulmonary complications. This retrospective study reported the evolution of lung function parameters within the first 2 years after allo-SCT in a population receiving the same RIC regimen that included fludarabine and i.v. BU in combination with low-dose ATG. The median follow-up was 35.2 months. With a median age of 59 years at the time of transplant, at 2 years, the cumulative incidences of non-relapse mortality was as low as 9.7%. The cumulative incidence of relapse was 33%. At 2 years, the cumulative incidences of extensive chronic GVHD (cGVHD) and of pulmonary cGVHD were 23.1% and 1.9%, respectively. The cumulative incidences of airflow obstruction and restrictive pattern were 3.8% and 9.6%, respectively. Moreover, forced expiratory volume (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV1/FVC ratio remained stable from baseline up to 2 years post transplantation (P=0.26, P=0.27 and P=0.07, respectively). These results correspond favorably with the results obtained with other RIC regimens not incorporating ATG, and suggest that ATG may have a protective pulmonary role after allo-SCT.

  9. Effects of aerobic exercise training on serum sex hormone binding globulin, body fat index, and metabolic syndrome factors in obese postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Won; Kim, Do-Yeon

    2012-12-01

    The percentage of obese postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome is rising, and physical factors associated with the metabolic syndrome prevalence or incidence are also rising, including high body mass index (BMI), visceral fat area (VFA), low plasma sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels, and low cardiorespiratory fitness. Therefore, we investigated the influence of aerobic exercise on SHBG, body fat index (BFI), and metabolic syndrome factors in obese postmenopausal Korean women. Thirty healthy postmenopausal, women aged 53.46 ± 2.4 years and with over 32% body fat, were randomly assigned to an aerobic exercise group (EX; n=15) or to a "nonexercise" control (Con; n=15) group. The primary outcome measurements were serum SHBG, lipid profiles, insulin levels, and metabolic syndrome factors. Secondary outcome measurements were body composition, VFA, blood pressure (BP), and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Posttraining body weight and BFI (Pmetabolic syndrome factors (Pexercise group but not in the control group. SHBG levels also showed a significant positive correlation with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and significant negative correlations withglucose, diastolic blood pressure, fat mass, BMI, and percent body fat (Pexercise improves body composition, SHBG, insulin levels, and metabolic syndrome factors. These findings suggest that in obesepostmenopausal Korean women, 16 weeks of aerobic exercise is effective for preventing the metabolic syndrome caused by obesity.

  10. Elevation of corticosteroid-binding globulin in Obese strain (OS) chickens: possible implications for the disturbed immunoregulation and the development of spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faessler, R.; Schauenstein, K.; Kroemer, G.; Schwarz, S.; Wick, G.

    1986-01-01

    Basal plasma levels of corticosterone and corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) have been investigated in Obese strain (OS) chickens afflicted with spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (SAT). Corticosterone was determined radioimmunologically, and CBG by using a highly sensitive radioligand saturation assay. OS chickens displayed total corticosterone levels not different from healthy normal White Leghorn (NWL) chickens. CBG, however, was found to be twice as high in OS chickens as compared with their healthy counterparts, irrespective of sex or age. This quantitative difference in the CBG level is not compensated for by either altered affinity or specificity of the molecule. Furthermore, no differences were found in the response of OS and NWL lymphocytes to the suppressive effect of glucocorticoids in vitro. It was therefore assumed that OS animals are deficient in free, hormonally active corticosterone. An additional indication for such a diminished glucocorticoid tonus was that in vivo treatment of OS chickens with glucocorticoid hormones, thus increasing the free and active hormone fraction, normalizes the T cell hyperreactivity and significantly reduces thyroid infiltration. Possible pathophysiological implications of a diminished glucocorticoid tonus for spontaneous autoimmunity, as well as possible explanations for the beneficial effects of glucocorticoid treatment on the development of SAT, are discussed

  11. Interaction of Soybean 7S Globulin Peptide with Cell Membrane Model via Isothermal Titration Calorimetry, Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation, and Langmuir Monolayer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuan; Pan, Runting; Ruan, Qijun; Wan, Zhili; Guo, Jian; Yang, Xiaoquan

    2018-05-16

    To understand the underlying molecular mechanism of the cholesterol-lowering effect of soybean 7S globulins, the interactions of their pepsin-released peptides (7S-peptides) with cell membrane models consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and cholesterol (CHOL) were systematically studied. The results showed that 7S-peptides were bound to DPPC/DOPC/CHOL liposomes mainly through van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds, and the presence of higher CHOL concentrations enhanced the binding affinity (e.g., DPPC/DOPC/CHOL = 1:1:0, binding ratio = 0.114; DPPC/DOPC/CHOL = 1:1:1, binding ratio = 2.02). Compression isotherms indicated that the incorporation of 7S-peptides increased the DPPC/DOPC/CHOL monolayer fluidity and the lipid raft size. The presence of CHOL accelerated the 7S-peptide accumulation on lipid rafts, which could serve as platforms for peptides to develop into β-sheet rich structures. These results allow us to hypothesize that 7S-peptides may indirectly influence membrane protein functions via altering the membrane organization in the enterocytes.

  12. Possible cleavage sites of glutelin partial degradation confirmed by immunological analysis in globulin-less mutants of rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nadar; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Katsube-Tanaka, Tomoyuki

    2017-10-01

    Proteolytic cleavage or partial degradation of proteins is one of the important post-translational modifications for various biological processes, but it is difficult to analyze. Previously, we demonstrated that some subunits of the major rice (Oryza sativa L.) seed storage protein glutelin are partially degraded to produce newly identified polypeptides X1-X5 in mutants in which another major seed storage protein globulin is absent. In this study, the new polypeptides X3 and X4/X5 were immunologically confirmed to be derived from GluA3 and GluA1/GluA2 subunits, respectively. Additionally, the new polypeptides X1 and X2 were at least in part the α polypeptides of the GluB4 subunit partially degraded at the C-terminus. Simulated 2D-PAGE migration patterns of intact and partially degraded α polypeptides based on the calculation of their MWs and pIs enabled us to narrow or predict the possible locations of cleavage sites. The predicted cleavage sites were also verified by the comparison of 2D-PAGE patterns between seed-extracted and E. coli-expressed proteins of the intact and truncated α polypeptides. The results and methodologies demonstrated here would be useful for analyses of partial degradation of proteins and the structure-function relationships of rice seed protein bodies. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Impact of irradiation and immunosuppressive agents on immune system homeostasis in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C; Walker, J; Dewane, J; Engelmann, F; Laub, W; Pillai, S; Thomas, Charles R; Messaoudi, I

    2015-09-01

    In this study we examined the effects of non-myeloablative total body irradiation (TBI) in combination with immunosuppressive chemotherapy on immune homeostasis in rhesus macaques. Our results show that the administration of cyclosporin A or tacrolimus without radiotherapy did not result in lymphopenia. The addition of TBI to the regimen resulted in lymphopenia as well as alterations in the memory/naive ratio following reconstitution of lymphocyte populations. Dendritic cell (DC) numbers in whole blood were largely unaffected, while the monocyte population was altered by immunosuppressive treatment. Irradiation also resulted in increased levels of circulating cytokines and chemokines that correlated with T cell proliferative bursts and with the shift towards memory T cells. We also report that anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) treatment and CD3 immunotoxin administration resulted in a selective and rapid depletion of naive CD4 and CD8 T cells and increased frequency of memory T cells. We also examined the impact of these treatments on reactivation of latent simian varicella virus (SVV) infection as a model of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection of humans. None of the treatments resulted in overt SVV reactivation; however, select animals had transient increases in SVV-specific T cell responses following immunosuppression, suggestive of subclinical reactivation. Overall, we provide detailed observations into immune modulation by TBI and chemotherapeutic agents in rhesus macaques, an important research model of human disease. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  14. Shared decision making in the management of children with newly diagnosed immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Carolyn E; Boydell, Katherine M; Stasiulis, Elaine; Blanchette, Victor S; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary; Birken, Catherine S; Breakey, Vicky R; Parkin, Patricia C

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the treatment decision-making process for children hospitalized with newly diagnosed immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Using focus groups, we studied children with ITP, parents of children with ITP, and health care professionals, inquiring about participants' experience with decision support and decision making in newly diagnosed ITP. Data were examined using thematic analysis. Themes that emerged from children were feelings of "anxiety, fear, and confusion"; the need to "understand information"; and "treatment choice," the experience of which was age dependent. For parents, "anxiety, fear, and confusion" was a dominant theme; "treatment choice" revealed that participants felt directed toward intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) for initial treatment. For health care professionals, "comfort level" highlighted factors contributing to professionals' comfort with offering options; "assumptions" were made about parental desire for participation in shared decision making (SDM) and parental acceptance of treatment options; "providing information" was informative regarding modes of facilitating SDM; and "treatment choice" revealed a discrepancy between current practice (directed toward IVIG) and the ideal of SDM. At our center, families of children with newly diagnosed ITP are not experiencing SDM. Our findings support the implementation of SDM to facilitate patient-centered care for the management of pediatric ITP.

  15. Adaptation in the innate immune system and heterologous innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stefan F

    2014-11-01

    The innate immune system recognizes deviation from homeostasis caused by infectious or non-infectious assaults. The threshold for its activation seems to be established by a calibration process that includes sensing of microbial molecular patterns from commensal bacteria and of endogenous signals. It is becoming increasingly clear that adaptive features, a hallmark of the adaptive immune system, can also be identified in the innate immune system. Such adaptations can result in the manifestation of a primed state of immune and tissue cells with a decreased activation threshold. This keeps the system poised to react quickly. Moreover, the fact that the innate immune system recognizes a wide variety of danger signals via pattern recognition receptors that often activate the same signaling pathways allows for heterologous innate immune stimulation. This implies that, for example, the innate immune response to an infection can be modified by co-infections or other innate stimuli. This "design feature" of the innate immune system has many implications for our understanding of individual susceptibility to diseases or responsiveness to therapies and vaccinations. In this article, adaptive features of the innate immune system as well as heterologous innate immunity and their implications are discussed.

  16. Impact of pharmacists providing immunizations on adolescent influenza immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Steve G

    2016-01-01

    To determine if the Oregon law change in 2011 to allow pharmacists to immunize adolescents 11 to 17 years of age increased influenza immunizations or changed existing immunization venues. With the use of Oregon's ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS), 2 measures of impact were developed. First, the change in adolescent age 11-17 influenza immunizations before (2007-2010) and after (2011-2014) the pharmacy law change was evaluated against a reference cohort (aged 7-10) not affected by the law. Community pharmacies were also compared with other types of influenza immunization sites within one of the study influenza seasons (2013-2014). From 2007 to 2014, adolescent influenza immunizations at community pharmacies increased from 36 to 6372 per year. After the 2011 pharmacy law change, adolescents aged 11 to 17 were more likely to receive an influenza immunization compared with the reference population (odds ratio, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.19-1.22). Analysis of the 2013-2014 influenza season suggests that community pharmacies immunized a different population of adolescents than other providers. The 2011 change in Oregon law allowed pharmacists to increase the total of influenza immunizations given to adolescents. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ejercicio y sistema inmune Exercise and the immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Javier Patiño Grajales

    2006-01-01

    , infections, immunodeficiencies and cancer. This article presents a review of current information concerning this area, with the purpose of providing concepts to help readers understand this biological phenomena and their implications in human health. Several immune response parameters have been studied during physical exercise, including their relationship with the stress-induced hormonal response and the profile of different hormones according to the intensity of physical activity. Also, changes in blood cell populations (lymphocytes, monocytes and neutrophils and the behavior of cytokines and the synthesis of specific immune globulins have been assessed. This knowledge has allowed to establish a relationship between the immune and neuroendocrine systems, which might explain the various changes in the immune response and the adaptation seen in physical activity, as well as the differences found at diverse exercise intensity and frequency levels.

  18. Pseudoachondroplasia with immune deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kultursay, N.; Taneli, B.; Cavusoglu, A.

    1988-01-01

    A 5-year old boy was admitted to the hospital with failure to thrive since he was 2 years old, with weakness in his legs and a waddling gait. He has normal mental development. His parents are normal phenotypically and are unrelated. In analysing his pedigree only a grandfather is described to have waddling gait. He has a normal craniofacial appearance but a disproportionate body with normal trunk and short extremities with height below the 3rd percentile. The diagnosis of pseudoachondroplasia was made on clinical, radiological and laboratory findings. He also had immune deficiency characterised by low T-lymphocyte populations and a low level of serum immunoglobulin A. (orig.)

  19. FOXP3-specific immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2013-01-01

    Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3)-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells are present among human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), especially in cancer patients. Such T lymphocytes are able not only to specifically recognize dendritic cells (DCs) that have been exposed to recombinant FOXP3 and regulat...... and regulatory T cells, but also to kill FOXP3(+) malignant T cells. The natural occurrence of FOXP3-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes among human PBMCs suggests a general role for these cells in the complex network of immune regulation....

  20. Immune Aspects of Female Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brazdova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Immune infertility, in terms of reproductive failure, has become a serious health issue involving approximately 1 out of 5 couples at reproductive age. Semen that is defined as a complex fluid containing sperm, cellular vesicles and other cells and components, could sensitize the female genital tract. The immune rejection of male semen in the female reproductive tract is explained as the failure of natural tolerance leading to local and/or systemic immune response. Present active immune mechanism may induce high levels of anti-seminal/sperm antibodies. It has already been proven that iso-immunization is associated with infertility. Comprehensive studies with regards to the identification of antibody-targets and the determination of specific antibody class contribute to the development of effective immuno-therapy and, on the other hand, potential immuno-contraception, and then of course to complex patient diagnosis. This review summarizes the aspects of female immune infertility.