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Sample records for botulism immune globulin

  1. Creation and development of the public service orphan drug Human Botulism Immune Globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Stephen S

    2007-04-01

    The public service orphan drug Human Botulism Immune Globulin for the treatment of infant botulism would not have come into existence without the federal Orphan Drug Act and the funding mechanism that it provided to conduct pivotal clinical trials. Nonetheless, creating, developing, and achieving licensure of Human Botulism Immune Globulin took approximately 15 years and approximately $10.6 million (2005 dollars) to accomplish. Use of Human Botulism Immune Globulin to treat patients with infant botulism has resulted thus far in more than 30 years of avoided hospital stay and more than $50 million (2005 dollars) of avoided hospital costs. To provide a possible paradigm for others, the circumstances that enabled a state public health department to create, test, license, and distribute an orphan drug are described here.

  2. Experience with the use of an investigational F(ab')2 heptavalent botulism immune globulin of equine origin during an outbreak of type E botulism in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, R G; Weber, J T; Corwin, A; Allos, B M; Abd el Rehim, M S; Sharkawy, S E; Sarn, J E; McKee, K T

    1996-08-01

    During an outbreak of type E foodborne botulism in Cairo in 1991, an investigational equine F(ab')2 "despeciated" heptavalent botulism immune globulin (dBIG) was provided to the Egyptian Ministry of Health by the U.S. Army. Of 54 patients known to have been treated with antitoxins, 4 received commercially available trivalent antitoxins, 45 received dBIG, and 5 received both commercial antitoxin and dBIG. Physicians recorded side effects in 10 (22%) of 45 patients who received dBIG; in nine cases, reactions were considered "mild," and in one case they were believed to be serum sickness. In contrast, possible serum sickness during hospitalization was recorded for two of four patients who were receiving commercial antitoxins. No complications of therapy were noted for any patient who was receiving both antitoxin types. In a separate study, 31 patients were contacted about their reactions to the antitoxin by telephone after discharge from the hospital. Seven (54%) of 13 patients attributed symptoms that they experienced while they were hospitalized to receipt of dBIG, while four (44%) of nine patients who indicated that they had received commercial antitoxins and one (20%) of five who received both commercial antitoxin and dBIG reported side effects before discharge. Data on the efficacy of the antitoxins were not obtained. In our experience, equine dBIG was at least as safe as commercially available antitoxins in treating type E foodborne botulism.

  3. How to Keep an Infusion Log: Intravenous Immune Globulin (IVIG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Globulin include Pediatric AIDS and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. Therapy with Intravenous Immune Globulin Many of these immune deficiency diseases ... be treated very success- fully with IVIG replacement therapy. The intravenous Immune Globulin used to treat patients with immune ...

  4. BOTULISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anica Berginc Dolenšek

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human botulism is a serious, relatively rare and potencial lethal disease, caused by Clostridium botulinum, a gram positive obligat anaerobic spore forming bacili which strain produced seven potent nevrotoksins (type A-G. It can be found in soil and marine sediment troughout the world and also colonizes the gastrointestinal tract of fishes, birds and mammals.Human botulism is usually caused by neurotoxin type A, B, E and rerely F. Type C, D and E cause illness in mammals, birds and fish. Botulism is not transmitted by human to human contact. More types of botulism are recognised: foodborne botulism, infant botulism, wound botulism, adult infection botulism, inadvertent botulism. Botulism is characterised by simmetrical, descendenting paralisys of motor and autonomic nerves usually beginning with cranial nerves. The pacient alert, afebril and without sensory disturbance. Botulinum toxin is an agent of biological warfare.Conclusions. From 1985 to 2003 are identified 44 cases of foodborn botulism in Slovenia. We described the outbreak of foodborn botulism in family epidemic, which source is domestic raw smoke ham.

  5. Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 10 minutes before serving them. Prepare and store food safely Don't eat preserved food if its ... other serious bloodborne diseases, never inject or inhale street drugs. References Pegram PS, et al. Botulism. http:// ...

  6. Immune reconstitution following rabbit antithymocyte globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurkan, S; Luan, Y; Dhillon, N; Allam, S R; Montague, T; Bromberg, J S; Ames, S; Lerner, S; Ebcioglu, Z; Nair, V; Dinavahi, R; Sehgal, V; Heeger, P; Schroppel, B; Murphy, B

    2010-09-01

    Depletional induction therapies are routinely used to prevent acute rejection and improve transplant outcome. The effects of depleting agents on T-cell subsets and subsequent T-cell reconstitution are incompletely defined. We used flow cytometry to examine the effects of rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) on the peripheral T-cell repertoire of pediatric and adult renal transplant recipients. We found that while rATG effectively depleted CD45RA+CD27+ naïve and CD45RO+CD27+ central memory CD4+ T cells, it had little effect on CD45RO+CD27- CD4+ effector memory or CD45RA+CD31-, CD45RO+CD27+ and CD45RO+CD27- CD8+ T cell subsets. When we performed a kinetic analysis of CD31+ recent thymic emigrants and CD45RA+/RO+ T cells, we found evidence for both thymopoiesis and homeostatic proliferation contributing to immune reconstitution. We additionally examined the impact of rATG on peripheral CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. We found that in adults, administration of rATG-induced peripheral expansion and new thymic emigration of T cells with a Treg phenotype, while CD4+Foxp3+ T cells of thymic origin predominated in children, providing the first evidence that rATG induces Treg in vivo. Collectively our data indicate that rATG alters the balance of regulatory to memory effector T cells posttransplant, providing an explanation for how it positively impacts transplant outcome. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  7. Treatment of neonatal sepsis with intravenous immune globulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brocklehurst, Peter; Farrell, Barbara; King, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a major cause of death and complications despite antibiotic treatment. Effective adjunctive treatments are needed. Newborn infants are relatively deficient in endogenous immunoglobulin. Meta-analyses of trials of intravenous immune globulin for suspected or proven neonatal sepsis...

  8. Dynamic changes of horse serum T-globulin immunization with snake venoms, tetanus and diphtheria toxoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H F; Lee, J D; Lee, Y C

    1979-12-01

    In course of immunizing horses with snake venoms, tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, a new serum component, T-globulin, was formed and migrated between the beta- and gamma-globulins. The T-globulin content was parallel with the antibody titre after the middle course of immunization. There were many components in snake antivenin and T-globulin was composed of most of those components. The components of diphtheria T-globulin were the same as those of crude antitoxin and tetanus T-globulin except one precipitin.

  9. Identification and preliminary characterization of vaccinia virus (Dryvax) antigens recognized by vaccinia immune globulin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones-Trower, Agnes; Garcia, Alonzo; Meseda, Clement A; He, Yong; Weiss, Carol; Kumar, Arunima; Weir, Jerry P; Merchlinsky, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Using vaccinia immune globulin (VIG), a high-titer antibody preparation from immunized subjects, we demonstrate that the humoral immune response in humans is directed against numerous antigens in the Dryvax vaccine strain...

  10. Intravenous immune globulins (IVIg) treatment for organizing pneumonia in a selective IgG immune deficiency state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueta, Itai; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Orbach, Hedi

    2014-12-01

    We describe herein a 61-year-old woman who presented with fever, night sweats and cough. The diagnosis of pneumonia was established, but with symptom recurrence following antibiotic therapy, further diagnostics were performed. Biopsy via bronchoscopy revealed cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, and later on follow-up, a selective IgG immune deficiency was also diagnosed. Initial treatment of high-dose glucocorticoid therapy induced remission, but with dose reduction recurrence was observed. Intravenous immune globulin treatment was initiated and induced a successful clinical and radiological remission. Few cases of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia and hypogammaglobulinemia have been reported. To our knowledge, this is the fourth case described of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia with a hypogammaglobulinemia state and the first reported case of a selective immune deficiency state treated successfully with intravenous immune globulins.

  11. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medical Device Safety Immunizations Food & Water Safety and Hand Hygiene Clean Hands Save Lives Resources for Emergency Health Professionals Clinician ... Share Compartir This video describes the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, plague, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic ...

  12. Infant botulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenicia, Lucia; Anniballi, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    Infant botulism is a rare disease that affects infant less than 12 months of age. The illness results from absorption of botulinum toxin produced in situ by neurotoxigenic clostridia that can temporarily colonize the intestinal tract of infants. To date, all inhabited continents except Africa have reported cases of infant botulism. Recognition of cases seem directly related to physician awareness and clinical suspicion. This review summarizes microbiological, clinical and epidemiological features of infant botulism.

  13. Neutralizing antibodies to non-polio enteroviruses in human immune serum globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, R; Prather, S L; Powell, K R; Menegus, M A

    1983-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies to selected non-polio enteroviruses were found in three lots of human immune serum globulin (ISG) prepared from the sera of persons from different geographic regions. Reciprocal titers to coxsackieviruses B3 and B4 ranged from 400 to greater than or equal to 2000, whereas titers to coxsackievirus A9 and ECHO viruses 5 and 9 ranged from 100 to 400 in all three lots of ISG. The presence of neutralizing antibodies to commonly occurring (coxsackieviruses B1 to B5 and A9 and ECHO viruses 3, 4 and 9) and infrequently encountered (ECHO viruses 5 and 13) serotypes, coupled with the increasing evidence that antibodies are an important factor in preventing illness, support recommending the administration of ISG to those at high risk for serious disease.

  14. PROPHYLACTIC ADMINISTRATION OF RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS IMMUNE GLOBULIN TO HIGH-RISK INFANTS AND YOUNG-CHILDREN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GROOTHUIS, [No Value; SIMOES, EAF; LEVIN, MJ; HALL, CB; LONG, CE; RODRIGUEZ, WJ; ARROBIO, J; MEISSNER, HC; FULTON, DR; WELLIVER, RC; TRISTRAM, DA; SIBER, GR; PRINCE, GA; VANRADEN, M; HEMMING, VG

    1993-01-01

    Background. Infants with cardiac disease or prematurity are at risk for severe illness caused by respiratory syncytial virus. Immune globulin with a high titer of antibodies against respiratory syncytial virus may offer infants and young children at risk protection from this serious, common

  15. What the world's religions teach, applied to vaccines and immune globulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabenstein, John D

    2013-04-12

    For millennia, humans have sought and found purpose, solace, values, understanding, and fellowship in religious practices. Buddhist nuns performed variolation against smallpox over 1000 years ago. Since Jenner developed vaccination against smallpox in 1796, some people have objected to and declined vaccination, citing various religious reasons. This paper reviews the scriptural, canonical basis for such interpretations, as well as passages that support immunization. Populous faith traditions are considered, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Subjects of concern such as blood components, pharmaceutical excipients of porcine or bovine origin, rubella strain RA 27/3, and cell-culture media with remote fetal origins are evaluated against the religious concerns identified. The review identified more than 60 reports or evaluations of vaccine-preventable infectious-disease outbreaks that occurred within religious communities or that spread from them to broader communities. In multiple cases, ostensibly religious reasons to decline immunization actually reflected concerns about vaccine safety or personal beliefs among a social network of people organized around a faith community, rather than theologically based objections per se. Themes favoring vaccine acceptance included transformation of vaccine excipients from their starting material, extensive dilution of components of concern, the medicinal purpose of immunization (in contrast to diet), and lack of alternatives. Other important features included imperatives to preserve health and duty to community (e.g., parent to child, among neighbors). Concern that 'the body is a temple not to be defiled' is contrasted with other teaching and quality-control requirements in manufacturing vaccines and immune globulins. Health professionals who counsel hesitant patients or parents can ask about the basis for concern and how the individual applies religious understanding to decision-making about

  16. Proposal of abolition of the skin sensitivity test before equine rabies immune globulin application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CUPO Palmira

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An epizootic outbreak of rabies occurred in 1995 in Ribeirão Preto, SP, with 58 cases of animal rabies (54 dogs, 3 cats and 1 bat confirmed by the Pasteur Institute of São Paulo, and one human death. The need to provide care to a large number of people for the application of equine rabies immune globulin (ERIG prevented the execution of the skin sensitivity test (SST and often also the execution of desensitization, procedures routinely used up to that time at the Emergency Unit of the University Hospital of the Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo (EU-UHFMRP-USP, a reference hospital for the application of heterologous sera. In view of our positive experience of several years with the abolition of SST and of the use of premedication before the application of antivenom sera, we used a similar schedule for ERIG application. Of the 1489 victims of animal bites, 1054 (71% received ERIG; no patient was submitted to SST and all received intravenously anti-histamines (anti-H1 + anti-H2 and corticosteroids before the procedure. The patients were kept under observation for 60 to 180 minutes and no adverse reaction was observed. On the basis of these results, since December 1995 ERIG application has been decentralized in Ribeirão Preto and has become the responsibility of the Emergency Unit of the University Hospital and the Central Basic Health Unit, where the same routine is used. Since then, 4216 patients have received ERIG (1818 at the Basic Health Unit and 2398 at the EU-UHFMRP, with no problems. The ideal would be the routine use of human rabies immune globulin (HRIG in public health programs, but this is problematic, because of their high cost. However, while this does not occur, the use of SST is no longer justified at the time of application of ERIG, in view of the clinical evidence of low predictive value and low sensitivity of SST involving the application of heterologous sera. It is very important to point out

  17. High-dose intravenous immune globulin impairs antibacterial activity of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K S

    1989-10-01

    In an effort to examine further whether passive immunotherapy is a useful adjunct to antimicrobial therapy for neonatal group B streptococcal disease, we evaluated human intravenous immune globulin and penicillin G, alone and in combination, for their therapeutic efficacy against experimental severe group B streptococcal infection in newborn rats. Infected rats received either immunoglobulin (2 gm/kg) intraperitoneally, penicillin G (dosage varied), or a combination of the two. All animals that received immunoglobulin alone died. The mortality rate of animals treated with penicillin G alone was 51%. In contrast, therapy with combined penicillin G and immunoglobulin resulted in a significantly greater mortality rate (88%). Similar detrimental effects were also observed when human immunoglobulin (2 gm/kg) was given in conjunction with ceftriaxone (mortality rates of 95.7% for ceftriaxone and immunoglobulin versus 56.5% for ceftriaxone alone). However, a smaller dose of immunoglobulin (0.5 gm/kg) did not result in the greater mortality rate. Moreover, antibiotic-mediated bacterial killing was impaired in vitro and in vivo by a large dose of immunoglobulin but not by a smaller dose. These findings suggest that large doses of human immunoglobulin may be disadvantageous to the bacterial activity of penicillin G and ceftriaxone against group B streptococcal disease. Additional studies are needed to elucidate further the mechanisms responsible for this dose-dependent adverse effect of human immunoglobulins.

  18. Yeast-recombinant hepatitis B vaccine: efficacy with hepatitis B immune globulin in prevention of perinatal hepatitis B virus transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, C.E.; Taylor, P.E.; Tong, M.J.; Toy, P.T.; Vyas, G.N.; Nair, P.V.; Weissman, J.Y.; Krugman, S.

    1987-05-15

    A yeast-recombinant hepatitis B vaccine was licensed recently by the Food and Drug administration and is now available. To assess the efficacy of the yeast-recombinant vaccine, the authors administered the vaccine in combination with hepatitis B immune globulin to high-risk newborns. If infants whose mothers were positive for both hepatitis B surface antigen and the e antigen receive no immunoprophylaxis, 70% to 90% become infected with the virus, and almost all become chronic carriers. Among infants in this study who received hepatitis B immune globulin at birth and three 5-/sup +/g doses of yeast-recombinant hepatitis B vaccine, only 4.8% became chronic carriers, a better than 90% level of protection and a rate that is comparable with that seen with immune globulin and plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine. Hepatitis surface antigen and antibodies were detected by radioimmunoassay. These data suggest that, in this high-risk setting, the yeast-recombinant vaccine is as effective as the plasma-derived vaccine in preventing hepatitis B virus infection and the chronic carrier state.

  19. Progressive Vaccinia: Case Description and Laboratory-Guided Therapy With Vaccinia Immune Globulin, ST-246, and CMX001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Edith R.; Davidson, Whitni; Groff, Harold L.; Smith, Scott K.; Warkentien, Tyler; Li, Yu; Wilkins, Kimberly A.; Karem, Kevin L.; Akondy, Rama S.; Ahmed, Rafi; Frace, Michael; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Zaki, Sherif; Hruby, Dennis E.; Painter, Wendy P.; Bergman, Kimberly L.; Cohen, Jeffrey I.; Damon, Inger K.

    2012-01-01

    Progressive vaccinia (PV) is a rare but potentially lethal complication that develops in smallpox vaccine recipients with severely impaired cellular immunity. We describe a patient with PV who required treatment with vaccinia immune globulin and who received 2 investigational agents, ST-246 and CMX001. We describe the various molecular, pharmacokinetic, and immunologic studies that provided guidance to escalate and then successfully discontinue therapy. Despite development of resistance to ST-246 during treatment, the patient had resolution of PV. This case demonstrates the need for continued development of novel anti-orthopoxvirus pharmaceuticals and the importance of both intensive and timely clinical and laboratory support in management of PV. PMID:22904336

  20. Intravenous immune globulin in hereditary inclusion body myopathy: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorward Heidi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary Inclusion Body Myopathy (HIBM is an autosomal recessive, adult onset, non-inflammatory neuromuscular disorder with no effective treatment. The causative gene, GNE, codes for UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase, which catalyzes the first two reactions in the synthesis of sialic acid. Reduced sialylation of muscle glycoproteins, such as α-dystroglycan and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM, has been reported in HIBM. Methods We treated 4 HIBM patients with intravenous immune globulin (IVIG, in order to provide sialic acid, because IgG contains 8 μmol of sialic acid/g. IVIG was infused as a loading dose of 1 g/kg on two consecutive days followed by 3 doses of 400 mg/kg at weekly intervals. Results For all four patients, mean quadriceps strength improved from 19.0 kg at baseline to 23.2 kg (+22% directly after IVIG loading to 25.6 kg (+35% at the end of the study. Mean shoulder strength improved from 4.1 kg at baseline to 5.9 kg (+44% directly after IVIG loading to 6.0 kg (+46% at the end of the study. The composite improvement for 8 other muscle groups was 5% after the initial loading and 19% by the end of the study. Esophageal motility and lingual strength improved in the patients with abnormal barium swallows. Objective measures of functional improvement gave variable results, but the patients experienced improvements in daily activities that they considered clinically significant. Immunohistochemical staining and immunoblotting of muscle biopsies for α-dystroglycan and NCAM did not provide consistent evidence for increased sialylation after IVIG treatment. Side effects were limited to transient headaches and vomiting. Conclusion The mild benefits in muscle strength experienced by HIBM patients after IVIG treatment may be related to the provision of sialic acid supplied by IVIG. Other sources of sialic acid are being explored as treatment options for HIBM.

  1. Lack of association between Rh status, Rh immune globulin in pregnancy and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Judith H; Takahashi, T Nicole

    2007-07-01

    Though causes of autism are considered largely genetic, considerable concern remains that exposure to Rh immune globulin (RhIg), which until 2001 in the United States contained the preservative thimerosal, can cause autism. To determine whether mothers of children with autism are more likely to be Rh negative (Rh(-)) or to have received RhIg preserved with thimerosal, which is 49.6% ethyl mercury, we surveyed families of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) ascertained through a University-based autism clinic considered free of ascertainment biases related to type of autism or severity. Between 2004 and 2006, 305 mothers of 321 children with an ASD agreed to participate in a telephone interview. Analysis of complete records including the blood group status and RhIg exposure of 214 families showed that Rh(-) status is no higher in mothers of children with autism than in the general population, exposure to antepartum RhIg, preserved with thimerosal is no higher for children with autism and pregnancies are no more likely to be Rh incompatible. This was also true for autism subgroups defined by behavioral phenotype, gender, IQ, regressive onset, head circumference, dysmorphology, birth status, essential, or complex phenotype. These findings support the consensus that exposure to ethylmercury in thimerosal is not the cause of the increased prevalence of autism. These data are important not only for parents in this country but also for the international health community where thimerosal continues to be used to preserve multi-dose vials which in turn makes vaccines affordable. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Treatment with high-dose recombinant human hyaluronidase-facilitated subcutaneous immune globulins in patients with juvenile dermatomyositis who are intolerant to intravenous immune globulins: a report of 5 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Fabian; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Hinze, Claas H

    2016-09-13

    High-dose intravenous immune globulins (IVIg) are frequently used in refractory juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) but are often poorly tolerated. High-dose recombinant human hyaluronidase-facilitated subcutaneous immune globulins (fSCIg) allow the administration of much higher doses of immune globulins than conventional subcutaneous immune globulin therapy and may be an alternative to IVIg. The safety and efficacy of fSCIg therapy in JDM is unknown. In this retrospective case series, five patients with steroid-refractory severe JDM were treated with high-dose fSCIg due to IVIg adverse effects (severe headaches, nausea, vomiting, difficult venous access). Peak serum IgG levels, muscle enzymes, the childhood myositis assessment scale and adverse effects were retrieved for at least 6 months following intiation of fSCIg. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Patients initially received fSCIg 1 g/kg every 14 days, resulting in median IgG peak levels of 1901 mg/dl (1606-2719 mg/dl), compared to median IgG peak and trough levels while previously receiving IVIg of 2741 mg/dl (2429-2849 mg/dl) and 1351 mg/dl (1156-1710 mg/dl). Additional antirheumatic therapies consisted of low-dose glucocorticoid therapy, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil and/or rituximab. Two patients maintained clinically inactive disease and three patients had only a partial treatment response. In the three patients with partial treatment response, fSCIg 1 g/kg was then given on days 1 and 6 of every 28-day cycle resulting in IgG peak levels of between 2300-2846 mg/dl (previously 1606-1901 mg/dl on the biweekly regimen), resulting in clinically inactive disease in two of the three patients. There were no relevant adverse effects that limited continuation of fSCIg treatment. High-dose fSCIg is well-tolerated in patients with JDM and high peak serum IgG levels can be achieved which may be important for treatment success. High-dose fSCIg may therefore be an alternative to high-dose IVIg

  3. Clinical outcomes after hepatitis C infection from contaminated anti-D immune globulin. Irish Hepatology Research Group.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kenny-Walsh, E

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: In February 1994, batches of anti-D immune globulin used in Ireland during 1977 and 1978 to prevent Rh isoimmunization were found to be contaminated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) from a single infected donor. In March 1994, a national screening program was initiated for all women who had received anti-D immune globulin between 1970 and 1994. Of the 62,667 women who had been screened when this study began, 704 (1.1 percent) had evidence of past or current HCV infection, and 390 of those 704 (55 percent) had positive tests for serum HCV RNA on reverse-transcription-polymerase-chain-reaction analysis. All 390 were offered a referral for clinical assessment and therapy. We evaluated 376 of these 390 women (96 percent); the other 14 were not seen at one of the designated treatment centers. RESULTS: The mean (+\\/-SD) age of the 376 women was 45+\\/-6 years at the time of screening. They had been infected with hepatitis C for about 17 years. A total of 304 women (81 percent) reported symptoms, most commonly fatigue (248 [66 percent]). Serum alanine aminotransferase concentrations were slightly elevated (40 to 99 U per liter) in 176 of 371 women (47 percent), and the concentrations were 100 U per liter or higher in 31 (8 percent). Liver biopsies showed inflammation in 356 of 363 women (98 percent); in most cases the inflammation was slight (41 percent) or moderate (52 percent). Although the biopsy samples from 186 of the 363 women (51 percent) showed evidence of fibrosis, only 7 women (2 percent) had probable or definite cirrhosis. Two of the seven reported excessive alcohol consumption. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the women with HCV infection 17 years after receiving HCV-contaminated anti-D immune globulin had evidence of slight or moderate hepatic inflammation on liver biopsy, about half had fibrosis, and 2 percent had probable or definite cirrhosis.

  4. Updated Dosing Instructions for Immune Globulin (Human) GamaSTAN S/D for Hepatitis A Virus Prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Noele P

    2017-09-15

    GamaSTAN S/D (Grifols Therapeutics, Inc., Research Triangle Park, North Carolina) is a sterile, preservative-free solution of immune globulin (IG) for intramuscular administration and is used for prophylaxis against disease caused by infection with hepatitis A, measles, varicella, and rubella viruses (1). GamaSTAN S/D is the only IG product approved by the Food and Drug Administration for hepatitis A virus (HAV) prophylaxis. In July 2017, GamaSTAN S/D prescribing information was updated with changes to the dosing instructions for hepatitis A preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis indications. These changes were made because of concerns about decreased HAV immunoglobulin G antibody (anti-HAV IgG) potency, likely resulting from decreasing prevalence of previous HAV infection among plasma donors, leading to declining anti-HAV antibody levels in donor plasma (2). No changes in dosing instructions were made for measles, varicella, or rubella preexposure or postexposure prophylaxis.

  5. Association between anti-thymocyte globulin exposure and CD4+ immune reconstitution in paediatric haemopoietic cell transplantation : a multicentre, retrospective pharmacodynamic cohort analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, Rick; van Kesteren, Charlotte; Jol-van der Zijde, Cornelia M; Lankester, Arjan C; Bierings, Marc B; Egberts, Toine C G|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/162850050; van Tol, Maarten J D; Knibbe, Catherijne A J; Bredius, Robbert G M; Boelens, Jaap J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was introduced into the conditioning regimen in haemopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to prevent graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD) and graft failure. However, ATG can also cause delayed immune reconstitution of donor T cells. We studied the relation between

  6. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Compartir This video describes the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, plague, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic fevers. ... Specific Segments of the Program Overview Anthrax Plague Smallpox Botulism Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers Tularemia Note: Parts of ...

  7. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... describes the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, plague, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic fevers. If these germs ... Watch Specific Segments of the Program Overview Anthrax Plague Smallpox Botulism Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers Tularemia Note: Parts ...

  8. Home Canning and Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Home Canning and Botulism Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... myself and others safe when it comes to home-canned foods? Many cases of foodborne botulism have ...

  9. Infant Botulism (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other symptoms of botulism can include: flat facial expression poor feeding (weak sucking) weak cry decreased movement trouble swallowing with excessive drooling muscle weakness breathing problems Infant botulism can be treated, but it's important ...

  10. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... smallpox, anthrax, botulism, plague, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic fevers. If these germs were used to intentionally infect ... Program Overview Anthrax Plague Smallpox Botulism Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers Tularemia Note: Parts of this video were adapted ...

  11. Simultaneous passive and active immunization against hepatitis B: noninterference of hepatitis B immune globulin with the anti-HBs response to reduced doses of heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelie, P. N.; Reesink, H. W.; Grijm, R.; de Jong-van Manen, S. T.; Reerink-Brongers, E. E.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of simultaneous administration of hepatitis B immune globulin on the antibody response to a low dose of heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine was investigated in 175 health care workers. Subjects were divided into four groups: Groups I and II received 3 monthly injections of a reduced dose

  12. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This video describes the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, plague, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic ...

  13. Denmark: botulism in an infant or infant botulism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pærregaard, Anders; Angen, O.; Mølbak, Kare

    2008-01-01

    was noted. Botulism was suspected and confirmed by testing of patient serum in a bioassay. The condition of the patient improved following administration of botulism antiserum. The clinical picture was suggestive of intestinal (infant) botulism. However, botulism acquired from consumption of food...

  14. Type E botulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, B Zane

    2010-11-01

    There are seven known serotypes of botulism, designated A through G; almost all human cases of botulism are caused by types A, B, and E. Botulism type E is the predominant serotype causing disease associated with native Arctic foods. In the circumpolar regions of the world, the coastal soils are rich in botulism type E, and consumption of fish and marine animals in these areas are the sources of clusters of botulism. Unlike spores of type A and B, botulism type E can withstand freezing down to 3.5°C. Alaskan native fermentation of fish heads, fish eggs, and beaver tail allow proper anaerobic conditions for botulinum toxin to be elaborated from Clostridium botulinum. The consumption of whale meat, "muktuk" has also been associated with outbreaks of botulism in Alaska and the Canadian Arctic. Elsewhere in the Arctic regions, type E botulism has been associated with Norwegian "rakfisk" prepared by a process similar to fermented Alaskan foods. Outbreaks in Egypt with the salted gray mullet "faseikh", in Israel and New York linked to salted uneviscerated whitefish "kapchunka", in Iran from eating "ashbal" an uncooked salmon, and in Japan with "izushi" a traditional fermented fish preserved in rice have occurred. Importation of vacuum-packed whitefish from Alaska and Canada has also been associated with sporadic cases of botulism type E in Europe. In March 2010, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention released the heptavalent antitoxin (H-BAT) for use in the USA, under an Investigational New Drug program, as the preferred treatment for food-borne botulism, including type E, which had not been covered by the bivalent antitoxin, the prior approved antitoxin product in the USA.

  15. Purification of equine Gc-globulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houen, Gunnar; Pihl, Tina Holberg; Andersen, Pia Haubro

    Objectives With the aim of producing antibodies for an equine Group specific component (Gc)-globulin assay, the protein was purified from normal equine plasma. Methods Equine Gc-globulin was purified from healthy horse plasma using ion exchange chromatography (Q-Sepharose, CM......-Sepharose) and preparative PAGE. Results Equine Gc-globulin has successfully been purified from healthy horse plasma and rabbits and mice are being immunized to produce specific antibodies. Conclusions Purification of equine Gc-globulin and the production of specific antibodies will make it possible to develop an assay...... to be a sensitive marker of acute tissue injury and fatal outcome in humans. Patients with a low plasma concentration of Gc-globulin due to severe tissue injury might potentially benefit from infusions with purified Gc-globulin [1]. With an equine Gc-globulin assay, future studies will investigate the concentration...

  16. Denmark: Botulism in an infant or infant botulism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pærregaard, A; Angen, Øystein; Lisby, M

    2008-01-01

    A 4.5 months old, previously healthy Danish girl was admitted to a paediatric department after six days of passive behaviour and weak suck. Over the next days she became increasingly weak, developed bilateral ptosis, the muscle stretch reflexes were lost, and mydriasis with slow pupillary responses...... was noted. Botulism was suspected and confirmed by testing of patient serum in a bioassay. The condition of the patient improved following administration of botulism antiserum. The clinical picture was suggestive of intestinal (infant) botulism. However, botulism acquired from consumption of food...... suspected foodborne versus intestinal botulism. Taking the potentially very serious consequences of foodborne botulism into consideration, the measures taken were justified....

  17. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... Share Compartir This video describes the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, plague, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic ... United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and ...

  18. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... be used as bioterrorist weapons. Watch the Complete Program "The History of Bioterroism" (26 min 38 sec) Watch Specific Segments of the Program Overview Anthrax Plague Smallpox Botulism Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers ...

  19. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... and Their Caregivers People with Disabilities People with Chronic Illnesses Glucose Monitoring at Evacuation Centers Dialysis Care ... Share Compartir This video describes the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, plague, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic ...

  20. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  1. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... Laboratory Information Social Media Zombie Apocalypse What’s New Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This video describes the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, ...

  2. [Botulism: Diagnosis and Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Sebastian; Eder, Ines; Wölfel, Roman; Braun, Peggy; Lippmann, Norman; Rodloff, Arne

    2017-09-01

    Background Botulism is a rare, life-threatening, time-critical neuroparalytic disease that is frequently a subject of differential diagnostic considerations. But there is much uncertainty regarding diagnosis and therapy. Rapid diagnosis, early antitoxin dose, consistent food hygiene and the sensitization of the population can help to reduce incidence, morbidity and mortality. Methods This overview is based on an epidemiological data inquiry (RKI, ECDC, CDC, WHO) and a selective literature research (pubmed till March 2017). Additionally, the German botulism guideline (2012) and own diagnostical experiences were taken into account. Results The incidence of botulinum toxin intoxication induced by ubiquitous spore-forming Clostridium botulinum (main representative) is < 0.01/100 000 EU citizens. Foodborne botulism is a pure intoxication syndrome (most common form) due to improperly prepared or incorrectly stored food. Wound and infant botulism are kinds of "toxico-infections". A "bulbar" neuroparalysis is a main symptom progressing to a flaccid tetraparesis up to respiratory paralysis. Infant botulism is presented non-specific and is treated only symptomatically; but a special human-derived antitoxin is available at international pharmacies. In case of suspected foodborne or wound botulism antitoxin must be administered as soon as possible, which may also be effective 24 hours after symptoms onset. There is no evidence for adjuvant treatment except of intensive care unit (ICU) therapy. Conclusion Despite typical symptomatology botulism is often diagnosed too late. Early antitoxin administration and ICU therapy are crucial for survival. A consultant laboratory should be contacted for advice. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Adherence to Lamivudine after an early withdrawal of hepatitis B immune globulin plays an important role in the long-term prevention of hepatitis B virus recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buti, Maria; Mas, Antoni; Prieto, Martin; Casafont, Fernando; González, Antonio; Miras, Manuel; Herrero, Jose Ignacio; Jardi, Rosendo; Esteban, Rafael

    2007-09-15

    Lamivudine combined with hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIg) is the standard of care for preventing the recurrence hepatitis B virus after liver transplant. To determine the risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) recurrence after early withdrawal of HBIg in patients receiving lamivudine maintenance therapy, 20 patients receiving a course of HBIg and lamivudine after transplantation and long-term maintenance therapy with lamivudine and 9 patients receiving HBIg and lamivudine indefinitely were analyzed. The survival rate was 90% after a mean follow-up of 83 months. The HBV recurrence rate was 14% with a mean period of 91 months free from HBV recurrence. Both groups had similar HBV recurrence rates, 15% for the combination and 11% for lamivudine alone. Four patients, 3 of whom were noncompliant with therapy, experienced posttransplant HBV recurrence. Patients who adhere to long-term prophylaxis with lamivudine after early withdrawal of HBIg have a low risk of HBV recurrence, similar to those who receive combination prophylaxis.

  4. Chart validation of inpatient ICD-9-CM administrative diagnosis codes for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) among intravenous immune globulin (IGIV) users in the Sentinel Distributed Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Eric M; Schweizer, Marin L; Robinson, Jennifer G; Eschol, Jayasheel O; Kafa, Rami; Girotra, Saket; Winiecki, Scott K; Fuller, Candace C; Carnahan, Ryan M; Leonard, Charles E; Haskins, Cole; Garcia, Crystal; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A

    2018-02-15

    The Sentinel Distributed Database (SDD) is a large database of patient-level administrative health care records, primarily derived from insurance claims and electronic health records, and is sponsored by the US Food and Drug Administration for medical product safety evaluations. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a common study endpoint for drug safety studies that rely on health records from the SDD and other administrative databases. In this chart validation study, we report on the positive predictive value (PPV) of inpatient International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification AMI administrative diagnosis codes (410.x1 and 410.x0) in the SDD. As part of an assessment of thromboembolic adverse event risk following treatment with intravenous immune globulin, charts were obtained for 103 potential post-intravenous immune globulin AMI cases. Charts were abstracted by trained nurses and physician-adjudicated based on prespecified diagnostic criteria. Acute myocardial infarction status could be determined for 89 potential cases. The PPVs for the inpatient AMI diagnoses recorded in the SDD were 75% overall (95% CI, 65-84%), 93% (95% CI, 78-99%) for principal-position diagnoses, 88% (95% CI, 72-97%) for secondary diagnoses, and 38% (95% CI, 20-59%) for position-unspecified diagnoses (eg, diagnoses originating from separate physician claims associated with an inpatient stay). Of the confirmed AMI cases, demand ischemia was the suspected etiology more often for those coded in secondary or unspecified positions (72% and 40%, respectively) than for principal-position AMI diagnoses (21%). The PPVs for principal and secondary AMI diagnoses were high and similar to estimates from prior chart validation studies. Position-unspecified diagnosis codes were less likely to represent true AMI cases. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Immune reconstitution and outcomes after conditioning with anti-thymocyte-globulin in unrelated cord blood transplantation; the good, the bad, and the ugly

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, Coco; Admiraal, Rick; Nierkens, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Unrelated umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) exhibits a low risk of graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD) and has unique potent anti-virus and anti-leukemia effects. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) in the conditioning regimen for UCBT is successful in reducing graft rejection and GvHD. Nevertheless, this beneficial effect of ATG coincides with its detrimental effect on immune reconstitution. The latter directly relates to a high incidence of viral infections and leukemia relapses. ATG has been used in transplant patients for over 30 years. In recent years, the knowledge on the mechanisms of action of ATG and its implementation in the UCBT setting has increased dramatically. Important data became available showing the highly variable pharmacokinetics (PK) of ATG and its consequence on outcome measures. Here, we review the effects of ATG on immune reconstitution and subsequent outcomes after UCBT, and describe the mechanisms causing these effects. We highlight the importance of optimizing ATG exposure before and after UCBT and discuss strategies to maintain the ‘good’ and overcome the ‘bad and ugly’ effects of ATG on UCBT outcome. PMID:28607912

  6. Denmark: botulism in an infant or infant botulism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paerregaard, A; Angen, O; Lisby, M

    2008-01-01

    A 4.5 months old, previously healthy Danish girl was admitted to a paediatric department after six days of passive behaviour and weak suck. Over the next days she became increasingly weak, developed bilateral ptosis, the muscle stretch reflexes were lost, and mydriasis with slow pupillary responses...... was noted. Botulism was suspected and confirmed by testing of patient serum in a bioassay. The condition of the patient improved following administration of botulism antiserum. The clinical picture was suggestive of intestinal (infant) botulism. However, botulism acquired from consumption of food...

  7. A simple and rapid Hepatitis A Virus (HAV titration assay based on antibiotic resistance of infected cells: evaluation of the HAV neutralization potency of human immune globulin preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan Gerardo G

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis A virus (HAV, the causative agent of acute hepatitis in humans, is an atypical Picornaviridae that grows poorly in cell culture. HAV titrations are laborious and time-consuming because the virus in general does not cause cytopathic effect and is detected by immunochemical or molecular probes. Simple HAV titration assays could be developed using currently available viral construct containing selectable markers. Results We developed an antibiotic resistance titration assay (ARTA based on the infection of human hepatoma cells with a wild type HAV construct containing a blasticidin (Bsd resistance gene. Human hepatoma cells infected with the HAV-Bsd construct survived selection with 2 μg/ml of blasticidin whereas uninfected cells died within a few days. At 8 days postinfection, the color of the pH indicator phenol red in cell culture media correlated with the presence of HAV-Bsd-infected blasticidin-resistant cells: an orange-to-yellow color indicated the presence of growing cells whereas a pink-to-purple color indicated that the cells were dead. HAV-Bsd titers were determined by an endpoint dilution assay based on the color of the cell culture medium scoring orange-to-yellow wells as positive and pink-to-purple wells as negative for HAV. As a proof-of-concept, we used the ARTA to evaluate the HAV neutralization potency of two commercially available human immune globulin (IG preparations and a WHO International Standard for anti-HAV. The three IG preparations contained comparable levels of anti-HAV antibodies that neutralized approximately 1.5 log of HAV-Bsd. Similar neutralization results were obtained in the absence of blasticidin by an endpoint dilution ELISA at 2 weeks postinfection. Conclusion The ARTA is a simple and rapid method to determine HAV titers without using HAV-specific probes. We determined the HAV neutralization potency of human IG preparations in 8 days by ARTA compared to the 14 days required by the

  8. Combination therapy with antibiotics and anthrax immune globulin intravenous (AIGIV is potentially more effective than antibiotics alone in rabbit model of inhalational anthrax.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Kammanadiminti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of AIGIV when given in combination with levofloxacin and the effective window of treatment to assess the added benefit provided by AIGIV over standard antibiotic treatment alone in a New Zealand white rabbit model of inhalational anthrax. METHODS: Rabbits were exposed to lethal dose of aerosolized spores of Bacillus anthracis (Ames strain and treated intravenously with either placebo, (normal immune globulin intravenous, IGIV or 15 U/kg of AIGIV, along with oral levofloxacin treatment at various time points (30-96 hours after anthrax exposure. RESULTS: The majority of treated animals (>88% survived in both treatment groups when treatment was initiated within 60 hours of post-exposure. However, reduced survival of 55%, 33% and 25% was observed for placebo + levofloxacin group when the treatment was initiated at 72, 84 and 96 hours post-exposure, respectively. Conversely, a survival rate of 65%, 40% and 71% was observed in the AIGIV + levofloxacin treated groups at these time points. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of AIGIV with antibiotics provided an improvement in survival compared to levofloxacin treatment alone when treatment was delayed up to 96 hours post-anthrax exposure. Additionally, AIGIV treatment when given as an adjunct therapy at any of the time points tested did not interfere with the efficacy of levofloxacin.

  9. Effectiveness of low-dose intramuscular anti-VHB immune globulin in the prophylaxis of viral B hepatitis reinfection after liver transplantation: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, I; Herreros de Tejada, A; Moreno, J M; Rubio, E; Lucena, J L; De la Revilla, J; Sánchez Turrión, V; Gomez, A; Lopez, J; Cuervas-Mons, V

    2003-08-01

    Prophylaxis using high-dose intravenous anti-HBV immune globulin (HBIG) is effective to prevent reinfection due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). However, this treatment is expensive and intravenous administration is difficult during outpatient care. Our aim was to assess the effectiveness of low-dose intramuscular HBIG to prevent HBV reinfection after OLT. Six patients (all men, mean age 41 years, negative HBV DNA without hepatotropic virus coinfection) were transplanted in our institution due to HBV cirrhosis and included in a prospective noncomparative study. Intramuscular HBIG (2000 IU) was administered during the anhepatic phase of OLT, followed by daily 2000 IU doses for 7 days and then monthly. HBV antibody titers were measured every month. Reinfection was defined as the recurrence of surface HBV antigen in serum after transplantation. After 1 year follow-up, none of the six patients had detectable HBV surface antigen and the liver biopsies were normal in all cases. Using 2000 IU, anti-HBs levels were: 880+/-356 IU/L at 1 month, 191+/-123 at 6 months, and 225+/-49 after 1 year. In all cases anti-HBs titers were above 100 IU/L during the follow-up. Monthly administration of low-dose (2000 IU) intramuscular HBIG effectively prevents recurrence of HBV infection as well as attains a protective level of anti-HBs antibodies (over 100 IU/L) for at least the first year after transplantation.

  10. Impact of Pre-Transplant Anti-T Cell Globulin (ATG on Immune Recovery after Myeloablative Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Servais

    Full Text Available Pre-transplant infusion of rabbit anti-T cell globulin (ATG is increasingly used as prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT. However, the precise impact of pre-transplant ATG on immune recovery after PBSCT is still poorly documented.In the current study, we compared immune recovery after myeloablative PBSCT in 65 patients who either received (n = 37 or did not (n = 28 pre-transplant ATG-Fresenius (ATG-F. Detailed phenotypes of circulating T, B, natural killer (NK and invariant NKT (iNKT cells were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry at serial time-points from day 40 to day 365 after transplantation. Thymic function was also assessed by sjTREC quantification. Serious infectious events were collected up to 2 years post-transplantation.Pre-transplant ATG-F had a prolonged (for at least up to 1-year and selective negative impact on the T-cell pool, while it did not impair the recovery of B, NK nor iNKT cells. Among T cells, ATG-F selectively compromised the recovery of naïve CD4+, central memory CD4+ and naïve CD8+ cells, while it spared effector memory T and regulatory T cells. Levels of sjTRECs were similar in both cohorts at 1-year after PBSCT, suggesting that ATG-F unlikely impaired thymopoiesis at long-term after PBSCT. Finally, the incidence and rate of serious infections were similar in both groups, while ATG-F patients had a lower incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease.Pre-transplant ATG-F induces long-lasting modulation of the circulating T-cell pool after myeloablative PBSCT, that may participate in preventing graft-versus-host disease without deeply compromising anti-pathogen defenses.

  11. Hepatitis B virus quasispecies evolution after liver transplantation in patients under long-term lamivudine prophylaxis with or without hepatitis B immune globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buti, M; Tabernero, D; Mas, A; Homs, M; Prieto, M; Rodríguez-Frías, F; Casafont, F; Casillas, R; González, A; Miras, M; Herrero, J I; Castells, L; Esteban, R

    2015-04-01

    To investigate an optimal long-term prophylactic strategy for prevention of hepatitis B virus (HBV) recurrence after liver transplantation, we conducted a randomized study of 29 transplant recipients receiving a short course of hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIg) + lamivudine (LAM), followed by randomization to long-term prophylaxis with LAM with or without HBIg. The efficacy and safety, and impact on survival and HBV recurrence of these 2 prophylactic regimens were compared over a mean period of 10 years. In patients with viral recurrence, the HBV quasispecies in the surface/polymerase region were studied by ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS). The 10-year survival rate was 76% and was not affected by the type of prophylaxis. Four patients had hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) recurrence within the first 48 months after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). HBsAg-positive and -negative patients showed similar mean survival times, with no differences between the 2 regimens. Low HBV DNA levels were transiently detected in 32% of HBsAg-negative patients. UDPS showed major changes after OLT in the HBV quasispecies of patients with viral recurrence, which may be explained by a "bottleneck" effect of OLT together with prophylactic therapy. Long-term survival after OLT in end-stage chronic hepatitis B patients was good with both prophylactic strategies. However, low, transient HBV DNA levels were detected even in the absence of HBsAg, showing the importance of continuing HBV prophylaxis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Unexpected suppression of anti-Fya and prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn after administration of Rh immune globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Donald R; Scofield, Terry L; Moulds, John J; Swanson, Jane L

    2011-04-01

    Rh immune globulin (RhIG) has been used successfully for many years for the antenatal suppression of anti-D in D- mothers carrying D+ babies to prevent hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Although the mechanism of RhIG-induced immunosuppression remains unknown, a recent report (TRANSFUSION 2006;46:1316-22) has shown that women receiving RhIG produce elevated levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)β-1, a powerful immunosuppressant cytokine. It was suggested that induction of TGFβ-1 and immunosuppression may be independent of cognate antigen recognition by RhIG. Herein, we present a description of a mother and baby that supports this hypothesis. Red blood cells and serum were analyzed using saline-tube indirect antiglobulin test methods. RhIG (RhoGAM) was administered after each amniocentesis performed at 28, 31, and 36 weeks' gestation. A group A, D-(cde), K+, Fy(a-b+), MNs, Jk(a+b+) mother with no detectable anti-D had an anti-Fy(a) titer of 4096 before RhIG but only 256 after RhIG. Mother gave birth to a group O, D-(cde), Fy(a+b+) healthy baby boy having a weak-positive direct antiglobulin test with anti-Fy(a) eluted from his cells and the titer in the cord serum was 4. This case demonstrates the potential immunosuppressive properties of RhIG for down regulation of a possible clinically significant alloantibody, not anti-D, where no D+ antigen is in the circulation of the mother. The case illustrates the potential utility for using RhIG to modulate antibody levels in situations other than for classical suppression of anti-D production. Although the mechanism in this case is unknown, TGFβ-1-mediated or antibody-mediated immunosuppression to soluble nonparticulate antigens are possible mechanisms. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  13. [Botulism in infancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, E; Gallusser, A; Despland, P A

    1989-06-01

    The authors describe a case of botulism in a 3-month-old infant infected with Clostridium botulinum type A. Symptomatology developed within four days, persisted for two weeks, then regressed. Symptoms were paresis of face muscles, hyporeactive pupils, loss of succion and deglutition, axial hypotonia, weakness of peripheral muscles, lability of the autonomic nervous system with acute episodes of bradycardia and constipation. Anomalies of the electroen-cephalogram and of the auditory evoked responses suggest that the toxin penetrated the central nervous system. Treatment was symptomatic, without need for assisted ventilation. It was not possible to detect the source of infection.

  14. SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Send Us Your Feedback ... As Testosterone-estrogen Binding Globulin TeBG Formal Name Sex Hormone Binding Globulin This article was last reviewed ...

  15. Waterfowl botulism in California 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The San Joaquin Valley had the potential for a severe botulism outbreak, but intensive management efforts kept losses to 45,000 birds. Outbreaks in the Sacramento...

  16. Efficacy of a type C botulism vaccine in green-winged teal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, T.E.; Samuel, M.D.; Swift, P.K.; Yarris, G.S.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the efficacy of a single dose of Botumink toxoid for protecting wild green-winged teal (Anas crecca) during botulism epizootics caused by Clostridium botulinum type C. We challenged control and immunized ducks with four different doses of type C botulinum toxin to determine the LD50 for this species and to evaluate vaccine protection. Fewer immunized ducks were affected with botulism than control ducks, indicating that a single dose of Botumink toxoid could increase the survival of ducks during epizootics. However, the frequency of immunized ducks with signs of botulism increased with the challenge dose of botulinum toxin. Even at doses of botulinum toxin approximately 2 to 4 green-winged teal LD50, about 50% of the immunized ducks were affected. We believe an improved vaccine or a better delivery system is required to justify immunization of wild birds for experimental survival studies.

  17. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  18. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  19. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  20. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... Disaster Evacuees Keep It With You Drug and Medical Device Safety Immunizations Food & Water Safety and Hand ... Response," co-produced by the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), the Food ...

  1. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... You Drug and Medical Device Safety Immunizations Food & Water Safety and Hand Hygiene Clean Hands Save Lives ... 2007 Page last updated: October 7, 2014 Content source: Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR) ...

  2. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... With You Drug and Medical Device Safety Immunizations Food & Water Safety and Hand Hygiene Clean Hands Save ... Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Centers for ...

  3. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  4. Prevention and Treament of Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    botulinum (usually A or B) are in- gested, and vegetative cells temporarily colonize the large intestine. Under appropri- ate growth conditions, C...non-small cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma [17]. Distinct from its action on cell cycle regulation, ROS has also been found to prolong...paralysis following "a bad potato ": a case of botulism. Can J Anaesth 52:433-4336 35. Black RE, Gunn RA (1980) Hypersensitivity reactions associated with

  5. [Type-C botulism in dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, G H; Lambers, G M; Haagsma, J

    1986-11-15

    Twelve dogs died from an outbreak of type-C botulism. The origin of the outbreak was found to consist in feeding the dogs broiler carcasses contaminated with Clostridium botulinum type-C. High concentrations of toxin type-C could be detected in the stomach contents. Botulism in dogs was only fatal when large amounts of toxin had been produced.

  6. Botulism in Italy, 1986 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; Fiore, Alfonsina; Lonati, Davide; Locatelli, Carlo Alessandro; Lista, Florigio; Fillo, Silvia; Mandarino, Giuseppina; De Medici, Dario

    2017-06-15

    Botulism is a rare but severe neuroparalytic disease caused by botulinum toxins. Because of its high potential impact on public health, botulism is a closely monitored communicable disease in Europe. In Italy, which has one of the highest incidence rates in Europe (0.03 cases per 100,000 population), botulism is monitored through a case-based passive surveillance system: the front-line physician who diagnoses a suspected case must notify the Local Health Units immediately, and the Ministry of Health's office within 12 hours. From 1986 to 2015, 466 confirmed cases of botulism were recorded in Italy (of 1,257 suspected cases). Of these, 421 were food-borne (the most frequently seen form of botulism due to the consumption of improperly home-canned foods), 36 were infant botulism, which accounts for ca 50% of all these types of cases registered in Europe, six were wound-related and three were due to adult intestinal colonisation. This scenario suggests that stronger efforts should be made towards raising public awareness of the risk of food-borne botulism, especially with respect to home-preserved foods, as well as improving the training of front-line medical personnel, to ensure that a quick and accurate diagnosis of botulism can be made. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  7. An Outbreak of Foodborne Botulism in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona R Loutfy

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a rare paralytic illness resulting from a potent neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum. Botulism in Canada is predominately due to C botulinum type E and affects mainly the First Nations and Inuit populations. The most recent outbreak of botulism in Ontario was in Ottawa in 1991 and was caused by C botulinum type A. We report an outbreak of foodborne type B botulism in Ontario, which implicated home-canned tomatoes. The outbreak was characterized by mild symptoms in two cases and moderately severe illness in one case. The investigation shows the importance of considering the diagnosis of botulism in patients presenting with cranial nerve and autonomic dysfunction, especially when combined with gastrointestinal complaints; it also highlights the importance of proper home canning technique.

  8. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  9. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... Keep It With You Drug and Medical Device Safety Immunizations Food & Water Safety and Hand Hygiene Clean Hands Save Lives Resources ... Response Guide Planning Resources Response Worker Health and Safety Reaching At-Risk Populations Health Alert Network (HAN) ...

  10. A randomized study comparing lamivudine monotherapy after a short course of hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIg) and lamivudine with long-term lamivudine plus HBIg in the prevention of hepatitis B virus recurrence after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buti, María; Mas, Antoni; Prieto, Martín; Casafont, Fernando; González, Antonio; Miras, Manuel; Herrero, Jose Ignacio; Jardí, Rossendo; Cruz de Castro, Eva; García-Rey, César

    2003-06-01

    To compare the efficacy in preventing hepatitis B virus (HBV) recurrence of lamivudine vs. lamivudine plus hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIg) after a short course of HBIg and lamivudine in liver transplanted chronic hepatitis B patients. Forty-six patients with HBV cirrhosis received lamivudine before liver transplantation and were then randomized to receive lamivudine plus HBIg for 1 month followed by lamivudine or both drugs for 17 months. Thirty-two patients were transplanted and 29 were randomized to receive combination therapy (15 cases) or lamivudine monotherapy (14 cases). HBV DNA was undetectable in all cases (17 induced by lamivudine therapy) at the time of liver transplantation. After 18 months of follow-up, all patients survived without HBV recurrence: hepatitis Bs antigen and HBV DNA were negative; however, HBV DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in four cases (three with HBIg plus lamivudine and one with lamivudine). Alanine aminotransferase levels were normal except in six cases (one HCV and two HDV coinfections). There were no drug-related adverse events. Lamivudine monotherapy after a short course of lamivudine and HBIg is equally as efficacious in preventing HBV recurrence as HBIg plus lamivudine during the first 18 months after liver transplantation. This strategy is more economic and convenient to administer than long-term HBIg plus lamivudine.

  11. Chart validation of inpatient International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) administrative diagnosis codes for venous thromboembolism (VTE) among intravenous immune globulin (IGIV) users in the Sentinel Distributed Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Eric M; Cuker, Adam; Carnahan, Ryan M; Perepu, Usha S; Winiecki, Scott K; Schweizer, Marin L; Leonard, Charles E; Fuller, Candace C; Garcia, Crystal; Haskins, Cole; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A

    2018-02-01

    The Sentinel Distributed Database (SDD) is a database of patient administrative healthcare records, derived from insurance claims and electronic health records, sponsored by the US Food and Drug Administration for evaluation of medical product outcomes. There is limited information on the validity of diagnosis codes for acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) in the SDD and administrative healthcare data more generally.In this chart validation study, we report on the positive predictive value (PPV) of inpatient administrative diagnosis codes for acute VTE-pulmonary embolism (PE) or lower-extremity or site-unspecified deep vein thrombosis (DVT)-within the SDD. As part of an assessment of thromboembolic adverse event risk following treatment with intravenous immune globulin (IGIV), charts were obtained for 75 potential VTE cases, abstracted, and physician-adjudicated.VTE status was determined for 62 potential cases. PPVs for lower-extremity DVT and/or PE were 90% (95% CI: 73-98%) for principal-position diagnoses, 80% (95% CI: 28-99%) for secondary diagnoses, and 26% (95% CI: 11-46%) for position-unspecified diagnoses (originating from physician claims associated with an inpatient stay). Average symptom onset was 1.5 days prior to hospital admission (range: 19 days prior to 4 days after admission).PPVs for principal and secondary VTE discharge diagnoses were similar to prior study estimates. Position-unspecified diagnoses were less likely to represent true acute VTE cases.

  12. Disease investigations : Study of waterfowl botulism

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Studies were done to determine the ecology of the botulism organism Clostridium botulinum Type C and the manner of which toxin is ingested by the waterfowl so that...

  13. The Workshop on Animal Botulism in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarin, Hanna; Tevell Åberg, Annica; Woudstra, Cédric

    2013-01-01

    A workshop on animal botulism was held in Uppsala, Sweden, in June 2012. Its purpose was to explore the current status of the disease in Europe by gathering the European experts in animal botulism and to raise awareness of the disease among veterinarians and others involved in biopreparedness....... Animal botulism is underreported and underdiagnosed, but an increasing number of reports, as well as the information gathered from this workshop, show that it is an emerging problem in Europe. The workshop was divided into 4 sessions: animal botulism in Europe, the bacteria behind the disease, detection...... conclusions drawn from these discussions were that there is an urgent need to replace the mouse bioassay for botulinum toxin detection with an in vitro test and that there is a need for a European network to function as a reference laboratory, which could also organize a European supply of botulinum antitoxin...

  14. Botulism: A Frequently Forgotten Old Malady

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teguh Thajeb

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A frequently forgotten old malady called botulism has been recognized for more than a century. This ailment occurs worldwide, afflicts human of all age groups from infants to elderly and affects Oriental people more often in several regions of China. Occurrence in Taiwan is uncommon, and therefore, it is often overlooked. The outbreaks of human botulism in various regions of the world, the clinical types, the molecular mechanisms, and the electrophysiologic findings will be highlighted.

  15. Botulism on the Des Lacs Refuge and control measures

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report on botulism at Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge. Summaries of botulism outbreaks on the refuge for 1935-1937 are included, as well as information on...

  16. Intestinal toxemia botulism in Italy, 1984-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenicia, L; Anniballi, F; Aureli, P

    2007-06-01

    Botulism in humans is caused by botulinum neurotoxins, produced in most cases by Clostridium botulinum, although other Clostridia species are implicated as well. Of the five forms of botulism in humans, three are referred to as "infective": wound botulism, infant botulism, and adult intestinal botulism; the latter two forms are also referred to as "intestinal toxemia botulism" because the organism colonizes the lumen of the intestinal tract and produces botulinum neurotoxin in vivo. Twenty-three cases of infant botulism and three cases of adult intestinal botulism occurred in Italy between 1984 and 2005. Microbiological analyses of clinical, environmental, and food samples and analysis of clinical and epidemiological data revealed two main characteristics of intestinal toxemia botulism in Italy that are not common in cases in other countries: the isolation of a strain of C. butyricum that produced botulinum neurotoxin type E in 6 of 26 cases, including two cases of adult intestinal toxemia botulism, and the onset of botulism in these cases with concomitant severe gastrointestinal symptomatology. This report summarizes the microbiological, clinical, and epidemiological data of all cases of intestinal toxemia botulism that have occurred in Italy in the period 1984-2005.

  17. Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also restaurant-prepared foods such as patty melts, aluminum foil–wrapped baked potatoes, and bottled garlic. Infant ... that appear to be spoiled. Discard any food containers that are bulging. They may contain gas produced ...

  18. Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and moving down Paralyzed bowel Speech impairment Urine retention with inability to urinate Blurred vision No fever ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  19. Fatal outbreak of botulism in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Tóra Hedinsdottir; Jespersen, Sanne; Kanstrup, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    respiratory muscle paralysis. We present five cases of foodborne botulism occurring in Greenland, two with fatal outcome, caused by ingestion of tradionally preserved eider fowl. In the cases of the survivors, antitoxin and supportive care, including mechanical ventilation, were administered. In these cases...... recovery was complete. Microbiological assays, including toxin neutralization bioassay, demonstrated the presence of neurotoxin E in two survivors. The third survivor was shown by PCR to have the BoNT type E gene in faeces. This is the first report of cases of fatal botulism in Greenland. It underscores...

  20. prolamin, albumin, globulin and glutelin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... It is on the basis of the above attribute of lectin and phorbolester that Aregheore et al. (2003) employed heat treatment, alkaline hydrolysis and solvent extraction for the detoxification of the Jatropha curcas seed cake. Meanwhile some valuable protein fractions (prolamin, albumin, globulin and glutelin) are ...

  1. Botulismo de origem alimentar Foodbourne botulism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Deboni Cereser

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O botulismo alimentar ocorre pela ingestão de toxinas pré-formadas pelo Clostridium botulinum, consideradas as mais potentes dentre as toxinas conhecidas. Caracteriza-se como uma doença de extrema gravidade, de evolução aguda, provoca distúrbios digestivos e neurológicos, em conseqüência à ingestão de diversos tipos de alimentos. As conservas caseiras estão entre os alimentos que oferecem maior risco à população consumidora. Os produtos de origem animal são frequentemente associados aos surtos da doença, destacando-se os embutidos, tais como salsichas, salames, presuntos e patês. Derivados do leite e enlatados, bem como produtos fermentados, são passíveis de provocar a intoxicação. As outras formas naturais da doença são botulismo por feridas e botulismo infantil, normalmente associado ao consumo de mel contendo esporos do Clostridium botulinum.Foodbourne botulism occurs after ingestion of preformed toxins produced by the Clostridium botulinum, which has been considered one of the most potent known one. The disease, acquired after ingestion of various kinds of foods, has acute character, and provokes gastrointestinal and neurologic symptoms. Homemade canned foods are those that represent higher risk to human health. Processed meat products are frequently associated with botulism outbreaks, mainly sausages, ham and pates. Dairy and canned food, as well as fermented foods, also may be related with this disease. Still, botulism may be caused by toxin production in deep wound, named wound botulism; and after ingestion of honey contaminated with spores by infants, named infant botulism.

  2. Wound botulism: clinical and microbiological findings of an Italian case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureli, P; Fenicia, L; Ferrini, A M; Martini, M; Beccia, G

    1992-09-01

    A case of wound botulism in a 41-year old man is reported. The patient had accidently been wounded when he fell on an iron bar. Some days later he developed typical clinical manifestations of botulism. Wound botulism was confirmed by detection and quantification of type B botulinal toxin in the serum. Ventilatory supportive care was necessary and botulinal antitoxin was not given. The patient was hospitalized for 30 days and recovery was complete.

  3. Comparison of IgG concentrations by radial immunodiffusion, electrophoretic gamma globulin concentrations and total globulins in neonatal foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscheschlok, L; Venner, M; Howard, J

    2017-03-01

    Failure of transfer of passive immunity (FTPI) in foals is associated with a risk of infection and death. The current diagnostic gold standard is quantification of immunoglobulins using radial immunodiffusion (IgG-RID). Routine diagnosis is often performed using semi-quantitative tests. Concentrations of serum electrophoretic gamma globulins (EGG) and total globulins may be useful to assess FTPI, but few studies have investigated their use. To assess agreement between IgG-RID and EGG and evaluate the accuracy of total globulin concentration to diagnose FTPI based on both IgG-RID and EGG. Prospective study. A total of 360 serum samples were harvested at 6-24 h post natum from 60 German Warmblood foals. Concentrations of EGG, IgG-RID and total globulin (calculated from total proteins and albumin) were measured. Agreement between EGG and IgG-RID was assessed using Bland-Altman plots and Passing-Bablok regression. The accuracy of total globulin concentration was assessed using rank correlation and ROC curve analysis. Good agreement was found with slightly lower EGG than IgG-RID concentrations (Bland-Altman systemic bias -1.9 g/l) which was more pronounced at higher concentrations (regression equation: IgG-RID = -0.78 + 1.28 × EGG). Correlations between total globulin concentration and EGG and total globulin concentration and IgG-RID were 0.93 and 0.79, respectively. The area under the curve was 0.982 and 0.952 for EGG IgG-RID 95% with 71.2% (IgG-RID) and 90.5% (EGG) specificity for 90% with 66.0% (IgG-RID) and 87.9% (EGG) specificity for IgG-RID, with slightly more conservative estimates of immunoglobulins obtained using EGG. Total globulins may be a useful and economic quantitative screening test with cut-offs achieving high sensitivities, but analyser-specific cut-offs may be necessary. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  4. Wound botulism in drug users: a still underestimated diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodolico, C; Barca, E; Fenicia, L; Anniballi, F; Sinardi, A U; Girlanda, P

    2010-12-01

    Wound botulism is a rare infectious disease that is becoming a frequent complication of parental drug use. Diagnosis is often difficult and based on clinical suspicion. We report the first Italian case of wound botulism due to intramuscular heroin injection in a 48-year-old man with an acute onset of slurred speech and dysphagia. The most considerable finding of electrophysiological study was the reduction in amplitude of compound muscle action potential which should be considered a useful initial electrodiagnostic sign in the clinical context of botulism. Alerting clinicians to botulism is crucial for a rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment and thus decreasing mortality and complications.

  5. Transient tonic pupils in botulism type B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, S; Freddi, N; Francavilla, E; Meneghetti, F; Fenicia, L; Franciosa, G; Cadrobbi, P

    1998-01-01

    We report a 29-year-old woman who developed unilateral unreactive mydriasis and cycloplegia after 5 days of persistent constipation. During the next hours the patient complained of dry mouth and difficulties in swallowing food; iris and ciliary muscle palsies spread over the second eye. Ocular motility was normal and there were no clinical signs of neuromuscular involvement. Conventional electromyography and evoked muscle action potentials following repetitive nerve stimulation were normal; single-fiber electromyography showed normal jitter and absence of blocking. The diagnosis of botulism was considered as most likely, and the patient was given botulinum antitoxin. The post-treatment course was characterized by bilateral tonic pupillary reaction to near, sectoral iris contractions to light and pupillary constriction to 2 mm in 40 min following topical instillation of 0.1% pilocarpine. Ocular manifestations completely disappeared within 5 weeks. Botulism type B toxin was demonstrated in the pretreatment stool of the patient but not the serum.

  6. [Botulism: the first epidemic outbreak in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos, C; Romero, J; Solari, J; Garcia, D

    1990-01-01

    The first occurrence of Botulism described in Perú took place in Huancayo city, in November 1988. Twelve persons became ill, two of them died. All of them ate "salchipapas" a very popular meal in the country done with fried potatoes, hot dogs, eggs and dressed with mayonnaise) in a restaurant near their working place. Six of the twelve patients were immediately taken to Lima and admitted in Edgardo Rebagliati Martins National Hospital from the Social Security Peruvian Institute, and treated by the International Medicine Department. We studied five of the six patients; they all had similar symptoms and signs, specially neurological and gastrointestinal ones. Their serological specimens were positive for type B botulin toxin. Clinical, epidemiologic, electromyographic and laboratory findings supported the diagnosis of the first outbreak of Botulism in Perú.

  7. Globulin Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/globulintest.html Globulin Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a Globulin Test? Globulins are a group of proteins in your ...

  8. globulins and cholesterol levels in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rum total protein, globulin and cholesterol levels were sig- nificantly increased in oral contraceptive and their control counterparts. The albumin/globulin ratio in subjects on oral contraceptives users is significantly decreased compared with controls. In view of the findings of this study, it is suggested that the biochemical ...

  9. Admission levels of serum Gc-globulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiødt, F V; Bondesen, S; Petersen, I

    1996-01-01

    Gc-globulin scavenges actin released from necrotic hepatocytes to the extracellular space. In 77 patients with fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) (excluding patients treated with liver transplantation), admission levels of serum Gc-globulin and degree of complexing with monomeric actin (complex rati...

  10. Use of sentinel mallards for epizootiologic studies of avian botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, T.E.; Brand, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    Captive-reared mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were used as sentinels to study the epizootiology of avian botulism at the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge, Willows, California (USA) from 1986 to 1989. Sentinel mallards were wing-clipped, and 40 to 50 birds were confined in 1.6-ha enclosures in 11 selected wetlands (pools). Enclosures were searched intensively three to four times weekly from July through October. Sick and dead wild and sentinel birds were collected, necropsied, and tested for type C botulism toxin. Botulism epizootics occurred in sentinel mallards in 1986, 1987, and 1989, but only a few isolated cases of botulism were detected in 1988. In most epizootics, botulism also was detected simultaneously in wild birds using the same pool outside the enclosure. Epizootics in sentinels were initiated and perpetuated in the absence of vertebrate carcasses. A sex-specific trend in the probability of intoxication was detected, with males contracting botulism at a higher rate than females. Daily mortality rates of sentinels during botulism epizootics ranged from 0.0006 to 0.0600, with a mean of 0.0190. These rates would result in the daily loss of 0.6 to 60 birds per thousand at risk. The use of sentinel birds provided an effective means of gathering site-specific epizootiologic data.

  11. Avian botulism in the southern San Joaquin Valley 1973

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Dead and sick waterfowl found on the Kern National Wildlife Refuge in late June, 1973, were diagnosed as positive for botulism toxin. Despite immediate control...

  12. Avian botulism in the southern San Joaquin valley 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A joint effort of the Department of Fish and' Game and the U. S. Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife contained botulism losses in the southern San Joaquin Valley...

  13. Waterfowl botulism in the Tulare Lake Basin California 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The possibility of a major outbreak of waterfowl botulism in the Tulare Lake Basin of Kern and Kings County, California was anticipated during the summer and fall of...

  14. Nanotechnology Laboratory Collaborates with Army to Develop Botulism Vaccine | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL) is collaborating with the Army to develop a candidate vaccine against botulism. Under a collaboration agreement between the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of

  15. Rabbit Anti-T Cell Globulin in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storek, Jan; Mohty, Mohamad; Boelens, Jaap Jan

    2015-01-01

    Anti-T cell globulin (ATG) is polyclonal IgG from rabbits immunized with human thymocytes or a human T cell line. Prophylaxis using ATG infused with conditioning for adult marrow or blood stem cell transplantation reduces both acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). However, ATG is not

  16. Considering the antimicrobial sensitivity of the intestinal botulism agent Clostridium butyricum when treating concomitant infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenicia, Lucia; Ferrini, Anna Maria; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Mannoni, Veruscka; Aureli, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    In Italy, neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum has been reported as a new agent of intestinal toxemia botulism, and most of the cases have been associated with enterocolitis. Although infections concomitant with botulism must be treated with antibiotics, this can increase the severity of botulism. We discuss the sensitivity of this agent to certain antibiotics, compared to findings on the sensitivity of C. botulinum.

  17. Genetic variation in pea seed globulin composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzitzikas, E.; Vincken, J.P.; Groot, de J.; Gruppen, H.; Visser, R.G.F.

    2006-01-01

    A quantitative characterization of seeds from 59 pea (Pisum sativum L.) lines and relative taxa with various external characteristics and wide geographical origin was performed to explore the genetic variation of pea concerning its starch and protein contents and globulin composition. Pea lines,

  18. Type C botulism in American Foxhounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsanti, J A; Walser, M; Hatheway, C L; Bowen, J M; Crowell, W

    1978-04-01

    Diffuse lower motor neuron dysfunction developed in a group of American Foxhounds while they were hunting. Of 19 dogs, 10 became weak and 9 became quadriplegic. Three of the quadriplegic dogs died before treatment could be instituted. The remaining quadriplegic dogs recovered after being given supportive treatment, with (4 dogs) or without (2 dogs) trivalent (types A, B, E) botulinal antitoxin. The 10 dogs that were weak recovered without treatment. A markedly decreased amplitude of evoked potentials and increased chronaxy were found by electromyographic examination of 2 of the quadriplegic dogs. A toxic substance that was neutralized by type C botulinal antitoxin in mouse inoculation tests was in the serum and feces of the most severly affected dog presented alive and in a fecal extract of another affected dog. In the one dog necropsied, neither gross nor histologic lesions were found in the central or peripheral nervous systems or in the skeletal musculature. The history, clinical signs, electromyographic findings, toxin neutralization tests in mice, and absence of histologic abnormalities in the neuromuscular system provided evidence for the diagnosis of C botulism.

  19. Botulism and hot-smoked whitefish: a family cluster of type E botulism in France, September 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L A; Niskanen, T; Junnikkala, M; Moilanen, E; Lindstrom, M; Korkeala, H; Korhonen, T; Popoff, M; Mazuet, C; Callon, H; Pihier, N; Peloux, F; Ichai, C; Quintard, H; Dellamonica, P; Cua, E; Lasfargue, M; Pierre, F; de Valk, H

    2009-11-12

    A family cluster of three cases of type E botulism were identified in south-east France in September 2009. The suspected food source of infection was a vacuum packed hot-smoked whitefish of Canadian origin purchased by the family during a visit to Finland and consumed several weeks later in France on the day prior to symptom onset. No leftover fish was available to confirm this hypothesis. Vacuum packed hot-smoked whitefish has previously been associated with cases of type E botulism in multiple countries, including Finland, Germany, the United States and Israel.

  20. Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  1. Gc globulin as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Tina Holberg

    shown that very low concentration of plasma Gc-globulin are related to an increased risk of developing shock and lethal complications of trauma. Gc-globulin is thus a prognostic marker in intensive care medicine. It has been suggested that treatment with Gc-globulin to patients with severe tissue injury......-globulin concentrations in horses under clinical conditions have never previously been investigated. The Ph.D. project focuses on Gc-globulin as a prognostic marker in horses with acute abdominal pain....

  2. Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Why Exercise Is Wise Are Detox Diets Safe? Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A What's in this article? ... fault if you don't have all the immunizations (vaccinations) you need. Shots that doctors recommend today ...

  3. Cluster of Botulism among dutch tourists in Turkey, june 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaan, C.M.; Ouwerkerk, van M.; Roest, H.I.J.

    2010-01-01

    In June 2008, three Dutch tourists participating in a mini-cruise in Turkey needed urgent repatriation for antitoxin treatment because of symptoms of botulism. Because there was a shortage of antitoxin in the Netherlands, an emergency delivery was requested from the manufacturer in Germany. An

  4. The 1971 waterfowl botulism outbreak in the Tulare Lake basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The efforts of the Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife held botulism losses in the Tulare Lake region of the Southern San...

  5. Infant botulism in Andalusia (Southern Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Laso, Eduardo; Roncero-Sánchez-Cano, Inés; Arce-Portillo, Elena; Ley-Martos, Myriam; Aguirre-Rodríguez, Javier; García-Ron, Adrián; Mora-Navarro, David; Méndez-García, Mario; Camino-León, Rafael

    2014-05-01

    Infant botulism (IB) is caused by the intestinal colonization by Clostridium botulinum in the first year of life and its subsequent production of neurotoxins. Traditionally, IB has been associated to honey consumption. IB cases tend to cluster in geographic regions. In Europe, IB is a rare disorder. From 1976 through 2006, 65 cases were identified in 13 European countries. In Spain, in the last 15 years, most of the cases have been reported in one region, Andalusia (Southern Spain). A specific treatment for IB type A and type B (BabyBIG) is available outside of the United States since 2005. and aims: We performed a retrospective review of IB cases detected in Andalusia since 1997 and compare them with the cases of IB reported in Europe. We identified 11 confirmed cases of IB in Andalusia since 1997, and 14 cases in Spain. Nine out of 11 cases were detected since 2007; none of these infants had been exposed to honey consumption. One case in 1997 and another in 2000 were associated to honey. Two cases were treated with BabyBIG in 2007. In the period 2006-2012 the cases of IB reported in Europe were 54. We identified a considerable increase in the incidence of IB since 2006. A tendency to a reduction in the number of cases of IB linked to honey consumption has also been identified. An increase in the exposure to these bacteria from the environment could be presumed. Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for this treatable disorder. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sex hormone binding globulin and corticosteroid binding globulin as major effectors of steroid action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Jack D; Jirikowski, Gustav F

    2014-03-01

    Contrary to the long-held postulate of steroid-hormone binding globulin action, these protein carriers of steroids are major players in steroid actions in the body. This manuscript will focus on our work with sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) and demonstrate how they are actively involved in the uptake, intracellular transport, and possibly release of steroids from cells. This manuscript will also discuss our own findings that the steroid estradiol is taken up into the cell, as demonstrated by uptake of fluorescence labeled estradiol into Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and into the cytoplasm where it may have multiple actions that do not seem to involve the cell nucleus. This manuscript will focus mainly on events in two compartments of the cell, the plasma membrane and the cytoplasm. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy of 3,4-Diaminopyridine as a Therapy for Type C Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-09

    toxin type C., 3,4-disaanopyridine Botulism is Caused solely by the protein neurotoxins produced S.1 C’ostridiila botulitium. Thlese toxin * act by... botulism , mice were injected i.p. with 10, 20 or 40 LD50 of type C toxin . After 3 hr, when symptoms of botulism were apparent, therapy with 3,4-DAP was...and mink (SMITH, 1977). Other species reportedly affected by type C botulism include ferrets, pigs and dogs (HARIHARAN and MrTCHELL 1977), as well as

  8. Outbreak of type C botulism in captive wild birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymundo, Djeison L; Von Hohendorf, Raquel; Boabaid, Fabiana M; Both, Maria C; Sonne, Luciana; Assis, Ronnie A; Caldas, Rogerio P; Driemeier, David

    2012-06-01

    In late summer 2010, an outbreak of type C botulism affected the birds kept in a dam at a southern Brazilian zoo. A total of 14(10 black-necked swans, Cygnus melancoryphus; 3 Muscovy ducks, Cairina moschata; and 1 fulvous whistling-duck, Dendrocygna bicolor) out of 100 birds died after showing flaccid paralysis of the skeletal muscles characterized by general locomotion deficit, flight and swimming disorders, dropped neck, and severe dyspnea. Carcasses of dead birds (some infested by larvae of sarcophagus fly) scattered in the bird enclosure, and oxygen-free, organically rich mud and/or shallow standing waters present at the edges of the weir were identified as possible toxin sources. Postmortem examinations revealed no significant pathological changes. Epidemiologic and clinical findings indicated the diagnosis of type C botulism toxin, which was confirmed by mouse bioassay and seroneutralization.

  9. Soy 11S Globulin Acid Subunits as the Novel Food Polymer Carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins were conjugated with soy 11S globulins acid subunits and the hapten-specific monoclonal antibodies (McAbs cross-reactive with four major aflatoxins were achieved using indirect competitive ELISA screening procedure. The two antibodies (clones 1B2 and 2D3 had similar reaction efficiency with aflatoxins B1, B2, and G1 but showed a weak cross-reaction to G2. The clone 4C5 exhibited the highest sensitivity for all four aflatoxins. The concentrations of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 at 50% inhibition for 4C5 were 1.1, 1.2, 2.1, and 17.6 pg mL−1. The results indicated that soy 11S globulin acid subunits were suitable novel carriers for aflatoxin antigen in immunization experiments and clone 4C5 could be used for simultaneous analysis of total aflatoxins.

  10. 21 CFR 640.102 - Manufacture of Immune Globulin (Human).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... microorganisms. Preservatives to inhibit growth of microorganisms shall not be used during processing. (c) Bulk...) Sterilization and heating. The final product shall be sterilized promptly after solution. At no time during processing shall the product be exposed to temperatures above 45 °C, and after sterilization the product...

  11. Cluster of botulism among Dutch tourists in Turkey, June 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaan, C M; van Ouwerkerk, I M; Roest, H J

    2010-04-08

    In June 2008, three Dutch tourists participating in a mini-cruise in Turkey needed urgent repatriation for antitoxin treatment because of symptoms of botulism. Because there was a shortage of antitoxin in the Netherlands, an emergency delivery was requested from the manufacturer in Germany. An outbreak investigation was initiated into all nine cruise members, eight of whom developed symptoms. C. botulinum type B was isolated in stool culture from four of them. No other patients were notified locally. Food histories revealed locally purchased unprocessed black olives, consumed on board of the ship, as most likely source, but no left-overs were available for investigation. C. botulinum type D was detected in locally purchased canned peas, and whilst type D is not known to be a cause of human intoxication, its presence in a canned food product indicates an inadequate preserving process. With increasing tourism to areas where food-borne botulism is reported regularly special requests for botulism antitoxin may become necessary. Preparing an inventory of available reserve stock in Europe would appear to be a necessary and valuable undertaking.

  12. Effect of antithymocyte globulin source on outcomes of bone marrow transplantation for severe aplastic anemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kekre, Natasha; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Mei Jie; Carreras, Jeanette; Ahmed, Parvez; Anderlini, Paolo; Atta, Elias Hallack; Ayas, Mouhab; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Bonfim, Carmem M.; Joachim Deeg, H.; Kapoor, Neena; Lee, Jong Wook; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Eapen, Mary; Antin, Joseph H

    2017-01-01

    For treatment of severe aplastic anemia, immunosuppressive therapy with horse antithymocyte globulin results in superior response and survival compared with rabbit antithymocyte globulin. This relative benefit may be different in the setting of transplantation as rabbit antithymocyte globulin

  13. An outbreak of foodborne botulism associated with food sold at a salvage store in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Pavani; Crowe, Colleen; Reller, Megan; Gaul, Linda; Hayslett, James; Barth, Suzanne; Eliasberg, Stacey; Ferreira, J; Holt, Kristin; Bengston, Steve; Hendricks, Kate; Sobel, Jeremy

    2003-12-01

    Foodborne botulism is caused by potent neurotoxins of Clostridium botulinum. We investigated a large outbreak of foodborne botulism among church supper attendees in Texas. We conducted a cohort study of attendees and investigated the salvage store that sold the implicated foods. We identified 15 cases of botulism (40%) among 38 church supper attendees. Nine patients (60%) had botulinum toxin type A detected in stool specimens. The diagnosis was delayed in 3 cases. Fifteen (63%) of 24 attendees who ate a chili dish developed botulism (relative risk, undefined; Pdogs. An unopened container of brand X chili yielded type A toxin. Brand X chili was purchased at a salvage store where perishable foods were inadequately refrigerated. Our investigation highlights the need to improve clinicians' awareness of botulism. More rigorous and more unannounced inspections may be necessary to detect food mishandling at salvage stores.

  14. 21 CFR 862.1330 - Globulin test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Globulin test system. 862.1330 Section 862.1330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... other disorders of blood globulins. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt...

  15. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... immunizations for hepatitis A (gamma globulin) may be helpful for people traveling to a part of the world where hepatitis A is common. They are typically given before children or adults leave on their trip. These are used less now that there is a vaccine for hepatitis A. If there is enough time, ...

  16. Bioassessment of avian botulism at Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Current detection of a botulism outbreak is dependent on the occurrence of dead or sick birds during field surveys (Reed and Rocke 1992). A recently developed...

  17. Outbreak of type A foodborne botulism at a boarding school, Uganda, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viray, M A; Wamala, J; Fagan, R; Luquez, C; Maslanka, S; Downing, R; Biggerstaff, M; Malimbo, M; Kirenga, J B; Nakibuuka, J; Ddumba, E; Mbabazi, W; Swerdlow, D L

    2014-11-01

    Botulism has rarely been reported in Africa. In October 2008, botulism was reported in three Ugandan boarding-school students. All were hospitalized and one died. A cohort study was performed to assess food exposures among students, and clinical specimens and available food samples were tested for botulinum toxin. Three case-patients were identified; a homemade, oil-based condiment was eaten by all three. In the cohort study, no foods were significantly associated with illness. Botulinum toxin type A was confirmed in clinical samples. This is the first confirmed outbreak of foodborne botulism in Uganda. A homemade, oil-based condiment was the probable source. Consumption of homemade oil-based condiments is widespread in Ugandan schools, putting children at risk. Clinicians and public health authorities in Uganda should consider botulism when clusters of acute flaccid paralysis are seen. Additionally, schools should be warned of the hazard of homemade oil-based condiments, and take steps to prevent their use.

  18. Frozen, Fully-Cooked Products and Botulism--Food Safety Advisory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Standard Forms FSIS United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service About FSIS District Offices Careers ... Actions ${title} Loading... Frozen, Fully-Cooked Products & Botulism - Food Safety Advisory In August and September 2001, several cases ...

  19. A case of infant botulism associated with honey feeding in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenicia, L; Ferrini, A M; Aureli, P; Pocecco, M

    1993-11-01

    A case of infant botulism in a 9 week-old female is described. A strain of C. botulinum type B was isolated from the feces of the baby. The epidemiologic study detected in a sample of home canned honey Clostridium botulinum spores of the same serotype that was isolated from the patient. The honey had been used only to sweeten the pacifier of the baby. This is the first case of infant botulism in Europe linked conclusively to honey.

  20. Botulism in a dog--first confirmed case in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, V; McDowell, D M

    1986-09-01

    During an outbreak of suspected botulism in waterfowl on Hamilton Lake an eight year old entire male dog was admitted to a Hamilton veterinary clinic. The dog was unable to stand upon admission and showed a partial lower motor neuron dysfunction characteristic of botulism. Treatment consisted of antibiotics and intensive supportive therapy. Complications resulted in the dog being destroyed ten days after commencement of treatment. Analysis of a serum sample taken antemortem, confirmed the presence of Clostridium botulinum type C toxin.

  1. Clinical Features of Foodborne and Wound Botulism: A Systematic Review of the Literature, 1932-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatham-Stephens, Kevin; Fleck-Derderian, Shannon; Johnson, Shacara D; Sobel, Jeremy; Rao, Agam K; Meaney-Delman, Dana

    2017-12-27

    Botulism is a rare, potentially fatal paralytic illness caused by neurotoxins. To inform the evaluation of patients with suspected botulism, we conducted a systematic review to describe the clinical features of botulism. We searched Medline Ovid, Embase Dialog, Embase Ovid, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) EBSCO, Global Health Ovid, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and ClinicalTrials.gov for English language articles through May 2015. Information abstracted included demographics, signs and symptoms, laboratory results, and clinical outcome for foodborne and wound botulism patients confirmed by laboratory testing, epidemiologic link, or association with an outbreak. The review followed PRISMA guidelines and was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42015024784). We identified 402 patients from 233 articles published in English between 1932 and 2015. Most cases (n = 346 [86%]) were foodborne botulism and most (n = 263 [65%]) were associated with an outbreak. The median incubation period was 1 day, and the median time from illness onset to hospital admission was 2 days. Shortness of breath, dyspnea, or respiratory distress or failure at hospital admission was reported in 169 (42%) patients; 71 (42%) reported respiratory involvement without report of extremity weakness. Among 154 patients for whom the hospital day of intubation was reported, 134 (87%) were intubated on the first or second hospital day. Botulism patients can experience a range of signs and symptoms. Respiratory involvement may occur early in the illness and can occur without preceding extremity weakness. Clinicians and public health departments preparing for and responding to botulism events should use this information to guide the evaluation of suspected botulism patients.

  2. Botulism in injecting drug users, Dublin, Ireland, November-December 2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ward, M

    2009-01-08

    In November and December 2008, six cases of suspect wound botulism were reported in heroin injecting drug users, all residents in Dublin, Ireland. Patients were aged between 23-42 years of age; four cases were male; one patient died shortly after admission. The patients presented to four different hospitals across the city. Botulism in injecting drug users in Ireland was last reported in 2002.

  3. Wound botulism presenting as a deep neck space infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Christopher; Mookherjee, Somnath; Russell, Matthew S

    2012-12-01

    Otolaryngologists commonly evaluate patients with findings suspicious for deep space soft tissue infections of the neck. In this case, a woman with a history of injection drug use (IDU) presented with dysphagia, odynophagia, and neck pain. Multiple neck abscesses, too small to drain, were seen on imaging. Despite broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics, she unexpectedly and rapidly developed respiratory failure requiring intubation. Further work-up diagnosed wound botulism (WB). To our knowledge, this is the first report of WB presenting as a deep neck space infection, and illustrates the importance of considering this deadly diagnosis in patients with IDU history and bulbar symptoms. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Evaluation of potential risk of botulism from seafood cocktails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerke, P

    1973-05-01

    Clostridium botulinum E could not be detected in 35 samples of commercial seafood cocktails, ranging in pH from 4.10 to 4.85. At 30 C, toxinogenesis in homogenates acidified with a citric-acetic acid mixture was prevented at pH 4.86 or lower for crabmeat and at 5.03 or lower for shrimp. Measurements of the rate of acid penetration into the centers of large pieces of flesh indicated that the already small risk of botulism from seafood cocktails could be completely eliminated by using a cocktail sauce at a maximum pH of 3.70 and by cooling the final product to at least 10 C for 24 h.

  5. Lobotomies and Botulism Bombs: Beckett's Trilogy and the Cold War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, Adam

    2016-06-01

    The article argues that Beckett's Trilogy stages the effects of a lobotomy operation on a potentially politically subversive writer, and that the consequences of the operation can be traced in both the retreat of the narrator(s) of the Trilogy into the mind and into comatose mental states and in the detail of the operation itself, based on the 'icepick' lobotomies performed by neurologist Walter Freeman in the late 1940s and early 1950s. To write about extreme psychiatric situations in the post-war period is necessarily to invoke the political uses of psychosurgery with which this article engages. The article goes on to consider the figure of the brain-damaged mind as a Cold War trope in the references to botulism and the motif of the penetrated skull in The Unnamable.

  6. Animal Botulism Outcomes in the AniBioThreat Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woudstra, Cédric; Tevell Åberg, Annica; Skarin, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Botulism disease in both humans and animals is a worldwide concern. Botulinum neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other Clostridium species are the most potent biological substances known and are responsible for flaccid paralysis leading to a high mortality rate. Clostridium botulinum...... and botulinum neurotoxins are considered potential weapons for bioterrorism and have been included in the Australia Group List of Biological Agents. In 2010 the European Commission (DG Justice, Freedom and Security) funded a 3-year project named AniBioThreat to improve the EU's capacity to counter animal...... new genetic information to better understand the diversity of these Clostridia and develop detection methods targeting both highly specific genetic markers of these Clostridia and the neurotoxins they are able to produce. Several European institutes participating in the AniBioThreat project...

  7. Structural, Functional and Evolutionary Aspects of Seed Globulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesari, Pooja; Neetu; Sharma, Anchal; Katiki, Madhusudhanarao; Kumar, Pramod; Gurjar, Bhola R; Tomar, Shailly; Sharma, Ashwani K; Kumar, Pravindra

    2017-01-01

    Globulins are a major class of seed storage proteins which were thought to be enzymatically inactive. These proteins belong to the most ancient cupin superfamily. They can be graded into 11S legumin type and 7S vicilin type based on their sedimentation coefficients. Members from both classes share structural homology are thought to have evolved from either one-domain germin predecessor by duplication or by horizontal gene transfer of two-domain gene from bacteria to eukaryotes. Globulins are known to define the nutritional quality of the seeds, however, they are also involved in sucrose binding, desiccation, defense against microbes, hormone binding and oxidative stress etc. Major drawback with globulins is their tendency to bind to IgE. Studying structural-functional behavior of such protein can help in modifying proteins for enhanced functionality in food processing industries. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Infant Botulism: a network to improve the diagnosis and treatment of a rare and under-diagnosed disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Lonati

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Infant Botulism is a form of human botulism in which ingested spores of Clostridium botulinum germinate, colonize the infant’s colon, in which they produce botulinum neurotoxin. After the toxin is absorbed, binding to peripheral cholinergic synapses occurs, causing flaccid paralysis. The incidence of infant botulism is low, but some underestimation is likely to exist: the disease is difficult to diagnose because its wide spectrum of clinical manifestations which are not pathognomic. Moreover, failure to recognise the disease is probably related to the low index of suspicion: in fact, the experience of clinicians is fundamental in recognising infant botulism. A specific project has been promote to improve knowledge of the disease by training physicians (pediatricians, neurologists, clinical toxicologists to look out for the possible presence of Infant Botulism cases and improving public awareness through a prevention program. Standardization of therapeutic protocol also by treatment with specific therapeutic measures will be disseminated. A staff of physicians specialized in Clinical Toxicology will be available, 24 hours a day and seven days/week in the Pavia Poison Centre – National Toxicology Information Center. According to the project, this Centre acts as Reference Center for the clinical diagnosis and the treatment of infant botulism for the correct recognition of typical syndrome, the early diagnosis and the possible therapy with particular attention to antidotic treatment. The National Reference Centre for Botulism at the Istituto Superiore di Sanità will offer a 24-hours diagnostic laboratory service to support diagnose in suspected cases of botulism.

  9. Report of two unlinked cases of infant botulism in the UK in October 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Kathie A; Nwarfor, Ijeoma; Mpamugo, Obioma; Mithani, Vina; Lister, Paula; Dixon, Garth; Nixon, Grainne; Planche, Timothy; Courtney, Max; Morgan, Jaime; McLauchlin, Jim

    2009-12-01

    Infant botulism is a rare disease in the UK, with the first case being recognized in 1978 and only five subsequent cases being reported before 2007. This study reports two unlinked cases of infant botulism, caused by two distinct strains of Clostridium botulinum (toxin types A and B, respectively), that occurred within a single month in the south-east of England in October 2007. The use of real-time PCR to detect C. botulinum neurotoxin genes in clinical specimens to improve the diagnostic procedure and to follow carriage of the causative organism in the infant gut is described. The laboratory investigation of these two cases demonstrated that a combination of the mouse bioassay, real-time PCR assays and conventional microbiological culture can provide rapid confirmation of a clinical diagnosis and affect patient management. Both infants (aged 4 and 8 months) were previously healthy prior to the onset of symptoms, and in both cases, a diagnosis of infant botulism was delayed for at least 10 days after initial admission to hospital. Once diagnosed, one of the infants was the first in the UK to be treated with human-derived botulism immunoglobulin. Real-time PCR was used to demonstrate that C. botulinum was excreted in the infants' faeces for up to 68 and 81 days, respectively. Despite the infrequency of infant botulism in the UK, clinicians should be aware of this rare but serious condition and should seek microbiological advice when presented with young infants with compatible symptomologies.

  10. Serum total protein, albumin and globulin levels in Trypanosoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    2Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Avenue,. P.O. Box 951361, Los Angeles, ... total protein, albumin and globulin were investigated in rabbits over a period of twenty eight days. ..... dynamics of erythrocyte membrane sialic acid concentration during.

  11. Adiponectin And Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin In Preeclampsia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was designed to investigate the circulating levels of adiponectin, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), total and free testosterone in preeclamptic women in comparison with normotensive pregnant controls. The aim of this work was extended to study the correlations between these biochemical indices, ...

  12. Serum total protein, albumin and globulin levels in Trypanosoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of orally administered Scoparia dulcis on Trypanosoma brucei-induced changes in serum total protein, albumin and globulin were investigated in rabbits over a period of twenty eight days. Results obtained show that infection resulted in hyperproteinaemia, hyperglobulinaemia and hypoalbuminaemia. However ...

  13. Heterogeneity in the seed globulin and albumin fractions from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Successful fractionation of albumin, globulin and vicilin fractions from dry seeds of African yam bean (Sphenostylis stenocarpa) was achieved using established procedures for preparation of legume seed proteins. The resulting polypeptides were separated by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under both reducing ...

  14. Plasma Levels of Total Proteins, Albumin, Globulin and Plasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plasma levels of total protein, albumin and globulin were estimated in 25 HIV positive subjects and 25 age and sex-matched controls. Test subjects were recruited from the Haematology day Clinic and Medical wards of the. OAUTHC, lle-Ife. The controls were equally obtained from staff and students within the OAUTHC, ...

  15. heterogeneity in the seed globulin and albumin fractions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic Resources Unit. These and other collections which have not yet been multiplied but which were used in this study are listed in. JESSE MACHUKA. Table 1. For convenience, the word “accession” is used to refer to all the accessions and collections described above. Fractionation of albumin and globulin- fractions.

  16. PROFIL PROTEIN TOTAL, ALBUMIN DAN GLOBULIN PADA AYAM BROILER YANG DIBERI KUNGIY, BAWANG PUTIH DAN ZINC (ZN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sus Derthi Widhyari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to study the effectiveness of turmeric, garlic and zinc supplementation on protein, albumin and globulin concentration of broiler. One hundred DOC were divided into five treatments, four replications, consist of five chicks in each replicate. The treatments were R0 (basal diet as a control, R1 (R0 + 1,5% turmeric powder +2,5 % garlic powder, R2 (R0 + 2,5% garlic powder + 120 ppm zinc, R3 (R0 +1,5% turmeric powder + 120ppm zinc and R4 (R0 +1,5 turmeric powder + 2,5% garlic powder + 120 ppm zinc. The diet contain 23,5% crude protein and 3215 kcal metabolizable energy. Blood samples were taken from axillary veins at the three and six weeks of age. The results showed that total protein and globulin concentration at 6 weeks slightly higher than 3 weeks old chicks but not significantly different (P>0.05. Albumin concentration were highest on R3 treatment. Total protein and globulin concentration was highest on the R2 treatment. In conclusion, the supplementation of garlic (2.5% and ZnO (120 ppm showed the best combination to improve immune response in broiler

  17. Two cases of type E infant botulism caused by neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureli, P; Fenicia, L; Pasolini, B; Gianfranceschi, M; McCroskey, L M; Hatheway, C L

    1986-08-01

    The first two confirmed cases of type E infant botulism occurred in two 16-week-old girls in Rome, Italy. The original diagnosis for the first patient was intestinal blockage due to an ileocecal invagination, which was treated surgically. Postoperatively, the patient became unresponsive and required ventilatory assistance. A diagnosis of infant botulism was then made. The second infant presented to the same hospital 7 1/2 months later with profound weakness, hypotonicity, mydriasis, and areflexia. This case was recognized as possible botulism at admission. Both cases were confirmed by detection and identification of type E botulinal toxin in stool specimens and in enrichment cultures of those specimens. The toxigenic organisms isolated were quite different from Clostridium botulinum type E. The apparent causative organism in each case resembles Clostridium butyricum but produces a neurotoxin that is indistinguishable from type E botulinal toxin by its effects on mice and by its neutralization with type E botulinal antitoxin.

  18. Botulism associated with commercially canned chili sauce--Texas and Indiana, July 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-03

    On July 7 and July 11, 2007, public health officials in Texas and Indiana, respectively, reported to CDC four suspected cases of foodborne botulism, two in each state. Investigations conducted by state and local health departments revealed that all four patients had eaten brands of Castleberry's hot dog chili sauce before illness began. Botulinum toxin type A was detected in the serum of one Indiana patient and in a leftover chili mixture obtained from his home. CDC informed the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the apparent link between illness and consumption of the chili sauce. On July 18, FDA issued a consumer advisory, and the manufacturer, Castleberry's Food Company (Augusta, Georgia), subsequently recalled the implicated brand and several other products produced in the same set of retorts (commercial-scale pressure cookers for processing canned foods) at the same canning facility. Examination of the canning facility in Georgia during the outbreak investigation had identified deficiencies in the canning process. On July 19, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) issued a press release that announced a recall of chili and certain meat products from the Castleberry canning facility and provided recommendations to consumers. That recall was expanded on July 21 to include additional canned products. A fifth case of botulism potentially linked to one of the recalled products is under investigation in California. This report describes the ongoing investigation by members of OutbreakNet and others and the measures undertaken to control the outbreak, which is the first outbreak of foodborne botulism in the United States associated with a commercial canning facility in approximately 30 years. Clinicians should be vigilant for symptoms of botulism, including symmetric cranial nerve palsies, especially if accompanied by descending flaccid paralysis. Consumers should not eat any of the recalled chili sauce or other recalled

  19. Foodborne botulism associated with home-preserved turnip tops in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Anniballi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, foodborne botulism is a rare disease mainly due to home-preserved food. In the case reported here, clinical diagnosis was performed on the basis of clinical signs and referred consumption of home-preserved turnip tops in oil. Definitive diagnosis was performed by detection of botulinum toxin in sera and neuro-toxigenic organisms in stools and leftover food. This case report highlights the need of a high medical awareness, prompt clinical diagnosis, and synergic collaboration among the health authorities for a correct management of botulism as well as disease containment.

  20. False-Positive Serum Botulism Bioassay in Miller-Fisher Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeylikman, Yuriy; Shah, Vishal; Shah, Umang; Mirsen, Thomas R; Campellone, Joseph V

    2015-09-01

    We describe a patient with acute progressive weakness and areflexia. Both botulism and Miller-Fisher variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome were initial diagnostic considerations, and she was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and botulinum antitoxin. A mouse bioassay was positive for botulinum toxin A, although her clinical course, electrodiagnostic studies, and cerebrospinal fluid findings supported Miller-Fisher syndrome. This patient's atypical features offer points of discussion regarding the evaluation of patients with acute neuromuscular weakness and emphasize the limitations of the botulism bioassay.

  1. Polar poisons: did Botulism doom the Franklin expedition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, B Zane

    2003-01-01

    In 1845 the Franklin expedition left London with 2 ships and 134 men on board in an attempt to find the route through the Northwest Passage. The ships were built with state-of-the-art technology for their day, but provisioned with supplies from the lowest bidder. After taking on fresh provisions in the Whalefish Islands, off the coast of Greenland, the entire crew was never heard from again. Graves found on remote Beechey Island indicate that three able-bodied seamen died during the first winter. A note written on a ship's log, later found in a cairn, indicate that the expedition's leader, Sir John Franklin, died during the second winter entrapped on the ice, by which time 24 men had also perished. The remaining crew failed in their attempt to walk out of the Arctic by an overland route. In 1981 Owen Beattie, from the University of Alberta, exhumed the remains of the sailors from the three graves on Beechey Island. Elevated lead levels were found in all three sailors. While lead poisoning has been a leading theory of the cause of the crew's deaths, blamed on the crudely tinned provisions the ships carried with them from England, chronic lead exposure may only have weakened the crew, not necessarily killed them. One of three exhumed sailors also had in his intestine the spores of an unspecified Clostridium species. The theory put forth by this article is that Botulism, type E, which is endemic in the Arctic, may have been responsible for their deaths.

  2. Avian morbidity and mortality from botulism, aspergillosis, and salmonellosis at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, New York, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, C.J.; Windingstad, R.M.; Siegfried, L.M.; Duncan, R.M.; Cook, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    During the summers of 1981 and 1982, studies were conducted at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, Long Island, New York, to determine whether annual water-level drawdowns used to create shorebird habitat also led to the occurrence of avian botulism (Clostridium botulinum type C). Low levels of morbidity and mortality from avian botulism occurred on the two ponds throughout both summers, but there was no apparent relationship between the occurrence or rates of botulism losses and drawdowns of the ponds. Botulism also occurred throughout both summers on other areas of the refuge. Botulinal toxin was found in fly larvae associated with avian carcasses, including birds that did not die from botulism. Toxin was not found in other samples of aquatic biota in the ponds, although it was demonstrated in a single sample of decomposing sea lettuce (Ulva lactuca) in Jamaica Bay. Aspergillosis (Aspergillus fumigatus) and salmonellosis (Salmonella spp.) were also frequently-diagnosed causes of morbidity and mortality. We believe that botulinal toxin present in carcasses of birds dying from botulism, or produced postmortem in birds dying from other causes, on the two ponds and other areas in Jamaica Bay were a major source of botulinal toxin. Toxin could be ingested by birds through direct scavenging on carcasses, or by consumption of toxic fly larvae associated with carcasses. Diligent carcass pickup at the two ponds is recommended to reduce mortality from avian botulism.

  3. A case if infant botulism due to neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum type E associated with Clostridium difficile colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenicia, L; Da Dalt, L; Anniballi, F; Franciosa, G; Zanconato, S; Aureli, P

    2002-10-01

    Reported here is the sixth case of intestinal toxemia botulism caused by Clostridium butyricum type E in Italy since 1984. In this case, the patient was concomitantly affected with colitis due to Clostridium difficile toxin. A review of previously reported cases revealed that some of these patients may also have had intestinal toxemia botulism associated with Clostridium difficile colitis, based on the reported symptoms. Given that this association has been shown to exist not only in Italy but also in the USA, it is recommended that individuals with intestinal botulism and symptoms of colitis undergo testing for Clostridium difficile and its toxins in fecal samples.

  4. Globulin gene expression in embryos of maize viviparous mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, A.R.; Wallace, M.S.; Paiva, R. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Expression of genes encoding the major Zea mays embryo globulins was examined in the maize precocious germination viviparous (vp) mutants. Comparison of globulin protein profiles of precociously germinating mutant embryos with those of normally germinating mature embryos revealed substantial differences with respect to the proteins encoded by the Glb1 gene. Analysis of Glb1 transcript levels in vp/vp embryos suggests that these mutants do not fully switch from a program of embryo maturation to one of germination. These preliminary studies indicate that the vp mutants provide an excellent system for the study of embryo maturation in maize. We also provide evidence for the positive regulation of Glb1 expression by the plant growth regulator abscisic acid.

  5. Extraction, isolation, and characterization of globulin proteins from Lupinus albus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Pedro; Canela, Nuria; Katakis, Ioanis; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2011-03-23

    Lupin has recently been added to the list of allergens requiring mandatory advisory labeling on foodstuffs sold in the European Union, and since December 2008, all products containing even trace amounts of lupin must be labeled correctly. Lupin globulins consist of two major globulins called α-conglutin (11S and "legumin-like") and β-conglutin (7S and "vicilin-like") and another additional two globulins, γ-conglutin and δ-conglutin, which are present in lower amounts. We report on a methodology to facilitate the extraction of each of these proteins using centrifugation and isolation by anion-exchange chromatography followed by size-exclusion chromatography. The isolated subunits were characterized using reducing and non-reducing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, western blotting, and peptide mass fingerprinting, all of which revealed that the individual protein subunits are highly pure and can be used as immunogens for the production of antibodies specific for each of the conglutin fractions, as well as standards, and the extraction protocol can be used for the selective extraction of each of the subunits from foodstuffs, thus facilitating a highly accurate determination of the lupin concentration. Furthermore, the subunits can be used to elucidate information regarding the toxicity of each of the subunits, by looking at their interaction with the IgE antibodies found in the serum of individuals allergic to lupin, providing critical information for the definition of the requirements of analytical assays for the detection of lupin in foodstuffs.

  6. [Evolution of seed storage globulins and cupin superfamily].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutov, A D; Kakhovskaia, I A

    2011-01-01

    An extensive superfamily of cupins (clan cl09118) currently combines thousands of functionally and structurally diverse prokaryote and eukaryote proteins, which contain a beta-barrel of antiparallel beta-strands (cupin module). Possible ways of the formation of the cupin superfamily were suggested based on the comparison of primary and tertiary structures of proteins from several conserved families of cupins including seed storage globulins and plant oxalate oxydases (germins), and bacterial oxalate decarboxylases, gentisate dioxygenases and epimerases. The origin of two-domain structure of seed storage globulins from cyanobacterial two-domain oxalate decarboxylases has been deduced. The evolutionary pathway of single-domain germins previously suggested to be immediate progenitors of storage globulins was traced back. Common evolutionary roots of germins and oxalate decarboxylases descend from recent bacterial and archaebacterial proteins whose primitive structure is restricted to the cupin module. These root proteins reflect the hypothetical structure of a pro-cupin that probably gave rise to at least a part of the total diversity of members of the cupin superfamily (for instance, to the cupin module of gentisate dioxygenases). The major dilemma for the description of the cupin superfamily is distinguishing evolutionary divergence from convergence. The structural convergence can be exemplified by formation of a beta-barrel inside extremely conserved structures of the otherwise unrelated epimerases from Archaea and bacteria.

  7. A phase II multicenter rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin trial in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes identifying a novel model for response prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komrokji, Rami S; Mailloux, Adam W; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Paquette, Ronald; Fulp, William J; Sugimori, Chiharu; Paleveda-Pena, Jennifer; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; List, Alan F; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2014-07-01

    Immune dysregulation is a mechanism contributing to ineffective hematopoiesis in a subset of myelodysplastic syndrome patients. We report the first US multicenter non-randomized, phase II trial examining the efficacy of rabbit(r)-anti-thymocyte globulin using 2.5 mg/kg/day administered daily for 4 doses. The primary end point was hematologic response; secondary end points included duration of response, time to response, time to progression, and tolerance. Nine (33%;95% confidence interval=17%-54%) of the 27 patients treated experienced durable hematologic improvement in an intent-to-treat analysis with a median time to response and median response duration of 75 and 245 days, respectively. While younger age is the most significant factor favoring equine(e)-anti-thymocyte globulin response, treatment outcome on this study was independent of age (P=0.499). A shorter duration between diagnosis and treatment showed a positive trend (P=0.18), but International Prognostic Scoring System score (P=0.150), karyotype (P=0.319), and age-adjusted bone marrow cellularity (P=0.369) were not associated with response classification. Since activated T-lymphocytes are the primary cellular target of anti-thymocyte globulin, a T-cell expression profiling was conducted in a cohort of 38 patients consisting of rabbit and equine-antithymocyte globulin-treated patients. A model containing disease duration, CD8 terminal memory T cells and T-cell proliferation-associated-antigen expression predicted response with the greatest accuracy using a leave-one-out cross validation approach. This profile categorized patients independent of other covariates, including treatment type and age using a leave-one-out-cross-validation approach (75.7%). Therefore, rabbit-anti-thymocyte globulin has hematologic remitting activity in myelodysplastic syndrome and a T-cell activation profile has potential utility classifying those who are more likely to respond (NCT00466843 clinicaltrials.gov). Copyright

  8. Tuberculosis presenting as immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadir-Erdogan Beril

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although various hematologic abnormalities are seen in tuberculosis, immune thrombocytopenic purpura is a rare event. Case Presentation We report a case of a 29 year-old male who was presented with immune thrombocytopenia-induced hemoptysis, macroscopic hematuria and generalized petechiae. The patient was found to have clinical, microbiological and radiological evidence of active pulmonary tuberculosis. The immune thrombocytopenic purpura was successfully treated with anti-tuberculous drugs combined with corticosteroids and high dose immune globulin therapy. Conclusion Immune thrombocytopenic purpura can be one of the hematological manifestations of tuberculosis which has a global prevalence with increasing incidence secondary to HIV infection.

  9. [The macrophage disappearance reaction in guinea pigs sensitized with bovine gamma globulin or human scrum albumin (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimke, R; Bernstein, B; Ambrosius, H

    1977-01-01

    The macrophage disappearance reaction (MDR) is a suitable test for detection of cell mediated immunity against bovine gamma globulin (BGG) and human serum albumin (HSA) in guinea pigs. The MDR is a technical simple, good manipulable, and quantifiable test. The optimal test conditions for the antigens BGC and HSA are the following: Peritoneal exudat cells (PEC) were stimulated with paraffin oil. On the 5th day after receiving oil the animals were injected with 80 microgram BGG or 30 microgram HSA i.p. 5 hours later the PEC were harvested and counted. With the MDR it is possible to detect differences with respect to degree of cell-mediated immunity. Supernatants of sensitized lymphocytes produces the MDR too.

  10. Intestinal toxemia botulism in two young people, caused by Clostridium butyricum type E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenicia, L; Franciosa, G; Pourshaban, M; Aureli, P

    1999-12-01

    Two unconnected cases of type E botulism involving a 19-year-old woman and a 9-year-old child are described. The hospital courses of their illness were similar and included initial acute abdominal pain accompanied by progressive neurological impairment. Both patients were suspected of having appendicitis and underwent laparotomy, during which voluminous Meckel's diverticula were resected. Unusual neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum strains that produced botulinum-like toxin type E were isolated from the feces of the patients. These isolates were genotypically and phenotypically identical to other neurotoxigenic C. butyricum strains discovered in Italy in 1985-1986. No cytotoxic activity of the strains that might explain the associated gastrointestinal symptoms was demonstrated. The clinical picture of the illness and the persistence of neurotoxigenic clostridia in the feces of these patients suggested a colonization of the large intestine, with in vivo toxin production. The possibility that Meckel's diverticulum may predispose to intestinal toxemia botulism may warrant further investigation.

  11. Toxina botulínica y fisioterapia en la parálisis cerebral infantil

    OpenAIRE

    Camilieri Rumbau, María Mercé

    2006-01-01

    Introducción: La parálisis cerebral es la causa más común de espasticidad en niños y la toxina botulínica A es un opción para su el tratamiento, ya que produce una parálisis local al ser inyectada en un músculo. Objetivo: Comprobar la eficacia de la aplicación de toxina botulínica y fisioterapia en la parálisis cerebral infantil. Material y método: Se ha realizado una búsqueda en diversas bases de datos electrónicas como son Freejournals, Doyma, Medline, Google y revistas de neuro...

  12. Foodborne botulism in southwest Romania during the post-communism period 1990-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neghina, Adriana Maria; Marincu, Iosif; Moldovan, Roxana; Iacobiciu, Ioan; Neghina, Raul

    2010-02-01

    This study was a retrospective investigation of botulism cases over a period of 18 years following major political and economic changes, addressing the question of whether this disease is still an important health concern in southwest Romania. The medical records of botulism cases were used as the source of data. Patients from five southwest Romanian counties were hospitalized at Victor Babes Hospital of Infectious Diseases in Timisoara during the period 1990-2007. The median annual incidence of botulism cases in southwest Romania decreased from 0.1 per 100 000 persons during 1990-1998, to 0.05 per 100 000 persons during 1999-2007. Most of the cases (18.6%) were diagnosed in 1990, immediately following the communism period. The median age of the patients was 38 years (range 16-73 years); 24 (55.8%) were male; the case fatality rate was 2.3%. A significantly higher incidence rate of 2.7 cases per 100 000 persons occurred in rural areas, even though most of the cases (53.5%) were inhabitants of urban areas. The clinical pattern included: difficulty swallowing (79.1%), double and/or blurred vision (69.8%), dry mouth (60.5%), drooping eyelids (51.2%), vomiting (39.5%), mydriasis (37.2%), constipation (27.9%), abdominal pain (23.3%), and slurred speech (18.6%). All cases were attributed to contaminated food sources, mainly home-prepared traditional pork products. Although the botulism cases decreased over the study period in southwest Romania, this life-threatening disease continues to be an important concern. A strategy addressing individual behaviors in the home is needed to improve food safety. Copyright 2009 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A preclinical evaluation of aminopyridines as putative therapeutic agents in the treatment of botulism.

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, L.L.

    1986-01-01

    4-Aminopyridine and 3,4-diaminopyridine were evaluated for their abilities to delay the onset of paralysis due to botulinum neurotoxin types A, B, and E. Experiments were done on phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparations excised from mice. At a concentration that produced an enhancement in muscle twitch amplitude, 4-aminopyridine and 3,4-diaminopyridine delayed the onset of paralysis due to botulinum toxin type A. Under the same conditions, the drugs did little to protect tissues against botul...

  14. Strain-specific renal toxicity of heterologous antilymphocyte [gamma]-globulin in mice7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, B.J.; Vries, M.J. de; Noord, M.J. van; Lubbe, F.H.

    1970-01-01

    Severe glomerulonephritis followed one to five weekly i.p. injections in TLFM mice of rabbit antimouse lymphocyte [gamma]-globulin (ALG). Glomerulonephritis did not occur in C57BL mice subjected to the same regimen. Administration of normal rabbit [gamma]-globulin (NRG) to RFM mice also caused renal

  15. Comparison of horse and rabbit antithymocyte globulin in immunosuppressive therapy for refractory cytopenia of childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Yoshimi (Ayami); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); I. Baumann (Irith); S. Schwarz (Stephan); I. Simonitsch-Klupp (Ingrid); P. de Paepe (Pascale); V. Campr (Vit); G. Kerndrup (Gitte); M.J. O'Sullivan (Maureen); R. Devito (Rita); P. Leguit; M. Hernandez (Manuel); M.N. Dworzak (Michael); B. de Moerloose (Barbara); J. Stary (Jan); H. Hasle (Henrik); O.P. Smith (Owen Patrick); M. Zecca (Marco); F. Catala; M. Schmugge; F. Locatelli (Franco); M. Führer (Monika); A. Fischer (Alexandra); A. Guderle (Anne); P. Nöllke (Peter); B. Strahm (Brigitte); C.M. Niemeyer (Charlotte)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRefractory cytopenia of childhood is the most common subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome in children. In this study, we compared the outcome of immunosuppressive therapy using horse antithymocyte globulin (n=46) with that using rabbit antithymocyte globulin (n=49) in 95 patients with

  16. Botulism Outbreak in a Family after Ingestion of Locally Produced Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Rafie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is one of the most important foodborne diseases and is caused by Clostridium botulinum toxin. The main manifestations are flaccid muscle paralysis and cranial nerve palsies. Botulism is an essential health problem because of its high mortality. The diagnosis of botulism, especially in sporadic cases, is a medical challenge and a high clinical suspicion is necessary for early recognition. So, every physician should be familiar with its signs and symptoms for early detection and treatment. We describe a family with dysphasia and acute paralysis after the ingestion of locally made cheese. The clinical presentations of the 1st patient were similar to myasthenic crisis and she, therefore, received plasma exchange. After the appearance of similar symptoms in the other family members, they were treated with polyvalent botulinum antitoxin and diagnosis was confirmed by toxicology and detection of serotype A botulinum toxin in cheese and stool samples. Uncommon clinical presentations and unusual sources of botulinum toxin should be kept in mind because of the importance of early diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Hazard analysis and possibilities for preventing botulism originating from meat products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilev Dragan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the more important data on the bacteria Clostridium botulinum, the appearance of botulism, hazard analysis and the possibilities for preventing botulism. Proteolytic strains of C.botulinum Group I, whose spores are resistant to heat, create toxins predominantly in cans containing slightly sour food items, in the event that the spores are not inactivated in the course of sterilization. Non-proteolytic strains of Group II are more sensitive to high temperatures, but they have the ability to grow and create toxins at low temperatures. Type E most often creates a toxin in vacuum-packed smoked fish, and the non-proteolytic strain type B in dried hams and certain pasteurized meat products. The following plays an important role in the prevention of botulism: reducing to a minimum meat contamination with spores of clostridia, implementing good hygiene measures and production practice during the slaughter of animals, the inactivation of spores of C. botulinum during sterilization (F>3, and, in dried hams and pasteurized products, the prevention of bacterial growth and toxin forming by maintaining low temperatures in the course of production and storage, as well as the correct use of substances that inhibit the multiplication of bacteria and the production of toxins (nitrites, table salt, etc..

  18. The effect of yeast β-glucan on the amount of albumin, globulin, urea and total protein of broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ali kargarirezapour

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glucans derived from yeast cell wall are promising alternatives to antibiotics, as they have been shown to improve growth performance and stimulate the immune system of immature broilers. In this study we evaluated the effect of different levels of yeast beta-glucan (YBG on some blood parametrs of broiler chickens. In a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design (the first factor: YBG levels: 0, 0.04 and 0.08% of basal diet and sex as a second factor 144 day old chicks (72 male and 72 female were selected and allocated to different treatments (three replicates of each treatment. The overall experimental period was 34 days. At the end of study, two birds from each pen were randomly selected as a sample. The level of albumin, globulin, urea and total protein was measured on blood samples. Statistical analysis of the results showed that the YBG had no significant effect on albumin, globulin, urea and total protein level. But the amount of plasma albumin and total protein in female chicks was significantly higher than male chicks (p

  19. A Family Outbreak of Foodborne Botulism Following Consumption of Home-Canned Doogh in Hamadan, West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Food-borne botulism is one of the potentially fatal forms of food poisoning, usually caused by ingestion of home-canned vegetables, fruits and fish products. Objectives The aim of this study was to report an outbreak of botulism due to homemade doogh in Hamadan, Iran. Patients and Methods During an outbreak, 10 members of a family referred to the hospital because of food poisoning. All patients had a history of consumption of doogh, a traditional drink. After careful physical examination, all of them were hospitalized. Botulism was suspected in all patients except for the first patient. Results The first patient was a 76-year-old man who died after 12 hours of admission due to respiratory distress. Nine subsequent patients were diagnosed as botulism with the following symptoms: diplopia (90%, dizziness (70%, nausea and vomiting (80%, ptosis (60%, symmetric weakness of extremities (60%, dysarthria (30%, chest discomfort (30%, mydriasis (20%, dysphasia (20% and dry mouth (20%. All of the nine patients received botulinum antitoxin and improved during 5-15 days of hospitalization. Conclusions Immediate diagnosis based on careful history and physical examination are essential for management of botulism. People should be notified about proper food handling and preparation of traditional homemade foods.

  20. Effects of gamma-globulin therapy in severely epileptic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedini, R; de Feo, M R; Orano, A; Rocchi, L

    1985-01-01

    The effects of gamma-globulin therapy have been studied from clinical, immunological, and electrographic perspectives in 10 children affected by severe organic epilepsy. After the first or the second injection of large doses of IgG, an appreciable reduction in seizure frequency and an improvement in behavioral and psychological performance were observed in seven children. These clinical modifications were not correlated with an important decrease of the EEG epileptic elements, but in most cases they were associated to an increase in alpha activity and/or in power of the predominant EEG frequency. These changes were observed during the entire treatment period and tended to disappear when therapy was interrupted. No significant changes in both immunological data and plasma levels of antiepileptic drugs accompanied the clinical and EEG changes.

  1. Corticosteroid-binding globulin: the clinical significance of altered levels and heritable mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Lucia; Ho, Jui T; Torpy, David J

    2010-03-05

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is the specific high-affinity plasma transport glycoprotein for cortisol. Stress-induced falls in CBG levels may heighten hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responses and CBG:tissue interactions may allow targeted cortisol delivery. Three genetic variants of CBG have been identified that reduce cortisol binding affinity and/or CBG levels. These include the Leuven and Lyon mutations which reduce CBG:cortisol binding affinity 3- and 4-fold, respectively, and the null mutation resulting in a 50% (heterozygote) or 100% (homozygote) reduction in CBG levels. The three reported null homozygotes demonstrate that complete CBG deficiency is not lethal, although it may be associated with hypotension and fatigue. The phenotype of a CBG null murine model included fatigue and immune defects. One community-based study revealed that severe CBG mutations are rare in idiopathic fatigue disorders. The mechanisms by which CBG mutations may cause fatigue are unknown. There are preliminary data of altered CBG levels in hypertension and in the metabolic syndrome; however, the nature of these associations is uncertain. Further studies may clarify the functions of CBG, and clinical observations may validate and/or extend the phenotypic features of various CBG mutations. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pretransplant antithymocyte globulin has increased efficacy in controlling donor-reactive memory T cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayasoufi, K; Yu, H; Fan, R; Wang, X; Williams, J; Valujskikh, A

    2013-03-01

    Antibody-mediated lymphocyte depletion is frequently used as induction therapy in sensitized transplant patients. Although T cells with an effector/memory phenotype remain detectable after lymphoablative therapies in human transplant recipients, the role of preexisting donor-reactive memory in reconstitution of the T cell repertoire and induction of alloimmune responses following lymphoablation is poorly understood. We show in a mouse cardiac transplantation model that antidonor immune responses following treatment with rabbit antimouse thymocyte globulin (mATG) were dominated by T cells derived from the preexisting memory compartment. Administration of mATG 1 week prior to transplantation (pre-TP) was more efficient in targeting preexisting donor-reactive memory T cells, inhibiting overall antidonor T cell responses, and prolonging heart allograft survival than the commonly used treatment at the time of transplantation (peri-TP). The failure of peri-TP mATG to control antidonor memory responses was due to faster recovery of preexisting memory T cells rather than their inefficient depletion. This rapid recovery did not depend on T cell specificity for donor alloantigens suggesting an important role for posttransplant inflammation in this process. Our findings provide insights into the components of the alloimmune response remaining after lymphoablation and may help guide the future use of ATG in sensitized transplant recipients. © Copyright 2013 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  3. [Influence of water fluoride exposure on sex hormone binding globulin and testosterone in adult male].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tong; Yang, Rupu; Li, Shihong; Zheng, Guoqing; Xi, Yu; Cheng, Xuemin; Hou, Jiaxiang; Cui, Liuxin; Ba, Yue

    2013-03-01

    To explore the influence of water fluoride exposure on sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and testosterone in adult male. Cross-sectional study was conducted in three villages of Tongxu county including high fluoride group (HFG), defluoridation project group (DFPG) and control group (CG) based on the fluoride concentration in drinking water. Adult male who were born and raised in the village and aged 18 - 50 years old were recruited using cluster sampling. Fasting blood and morning urine samples were collected. The fluoride levels in drinking water and urine were detected by fluoride-ion selective electrode method. Serum SHBG level was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The chemical luminescence immune analysis method was used to detect serum testosterone content. Serum SHBG level was 47.85 nmol/L in CG, 31.37 nmol/L in DFPG and 24.52 nmol/L in HFG respectively. There were significant difference among of three groups (P < 0.05). Serum testosterone level was 3.69 ng/ml in CG, 4.61 ng/ml in DFPG and 4.83 ng/ml in HFG respectively. Serum testosterone level in HFG was significantly higher than that in CG (P < 0.05). Serum SHBG level in HFG has positive correlation with serum testosterone (r = 0.230, P = 0.049), which has not been observed in DFPG and CG. Long-time fluorine exposure may affect serum SHBG and testosterone level in adult male.

  4. Sensitization with 7S Globulins from Peanut, Hazelnut, Soy or Pea Induces IgE with Different Biological Activities Which Are Modified by Soy Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroghsbo, Stine; Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; Rigby, Neil M.

    2011-01-01

    , such as stability to digestion, have also been suggested. 7S globulins from peanut, hazelnut, soy, and pea were studied to determine whether related proteins would induce a similar sensitization when removed from their ‘normal’ matrix. Methods: Brown Norway rats (soy tolerant or nontolerant) were immunized i.p. 3...... times with 100 μg purified peanut, hazelnut, soy, or pea 7S without adjuvant. Sera were analyzed for specific antibodies by different ELISAs (IgG1, IgG2a, and IgE), inhibition ELISA, and rat basophilic leukemia cell assay. Results: The 4 related 7S globulins induced a response with an almost identical...... level of specific antibodies, but peanut 7S induced IgE of higher avidity than hazelnut and pea 7S which, again, had a higher avidity than IgE induced by soy 7S. Soy tolerance reduced the functionality of IgE without influencing antibody titers. Conclusions: Although the 4 7S globulins are structurally...

  5. Atypical tetanus in a completely immunized 14-year-old boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Kai; Ringe, Hannelore; Dorner, Brigitte G; Diers, Alexander; Uhlenberg, Birgit; Müller, Dominik; Varnholt, Verena; Gaedicke, Gerhard

    2007-11-01

    We report the uncommon clinical course of tetanus in a completely immunized 14-year-old boy. His initial symptoms, which included a flaccid paralysis, supported a diagnosis of botulism. Preliminary mouse-test results with combined botulinum antitoxins A, B, and E, obtained from tetanus-immunized horses, backed this diagnosis. The change in his clinical course from paralysis to rigor and the negative, more specific, botulinum mouse test with isolated botulinum antitoxins A, B, and E, obtained from nonvaccinated rabbits, disproved the diagnosis of botulism. Tetanus was suspected despite complete vaccination. The final results of a positive mouse test performed with isolated tetanus antitoxin confirmed the diagnosis. Adequate treatment was begun, and the boy recovered completely.

  6. STUDIES IN IMMUNITY AND ANAPHYLAXIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Richard M.; Karsner, Howard T.; Eisenbrey, Arthur B.

    1911-01-01

    1. The sera of rabbits injected repeatedly with the nucleoproteins, globulins, and albumins of the liver and kidney of the dog give no evidence in vitro or in vivo experiments of organ affinity. The precipitin test offers no proof of the specificity of these sera for the proteins employed as antigens. 2. The anaphylaxis reaction applied to the same proteins indicates a slight relative organ affinity but no specificity as far as the respective protein fractions are concerned. The relative organ affinity resides, rather, in the globulin and albumin fractions than in the nucleoprotein fraction. Dog serum used both as a sensitizing and an intoxicating agent gives rise to very active cross reactions with organ proteins, thus failing to support the theory of organ or of protein specificity. 3. These results do not support the view put forward that nucleoproteins play an important part in the course of production of cytotoxic immune sera. PMID:19867451

  7. Tratamiento de la sonrisa gingival con la toxina botulínica tipo A: caso clínico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy Nunes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available La toxina botulínica ha sido señalada recientemente en la literatura como una opción de tratamiento para la corrección de la sonrisa gingival. Este reporte de caso relata la experiencia de los autores en un caso de sonrisa gingival asociada a 4 mm de exposición gingival e hipermovilidad de la musculatura elevadora del labio superior, tratado con el uso de toxina botulínica. Controles periódicos y evaluaciones de la exposición gingival fueron realizados mensualmente tras la aplicación. El tratamiento con toxina botulínica de tipo A puede ser considerado como una posible alternativa de tratamiento en este tipo de casos.

  8. In vivo characterization of rabbit anti-mouse thymocyte globulin: a surrogate for rabbit anti-human thymocyte globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzek, Melanie C; Neff, Kathleen S; Luong, Michael; Smith, Karen A; Culm-Merdek, Kerry; Richards, Susan M; Williams, John M; Perricone, Michael; Garman, Richard D

    2009-07-27

    Polyclonal rabbit anti-human thymocyte globulin (Thymoglobulin) is used clinically for immunosuppression in solid organ transplantation; however, it is difficult to fully characterize the effects of this agent in humans. A surrogate rabbit anti-murine thymocyte globulin (mATG) was generated analogously to the commercial product Thymoglobulin and in vivo activities were evaluated, including pharmacokinetics, T-cell depletion, dose response and kinetics, depletion/sparing of T-cell subsets or other leukocyte populations, and depletion in different lymphoid organs. Within 1 day, T cells are depleted by mATG in the blood, spleen, lymph node, and bone marrow down to doses of 1 mg/kg. Although mATG binds and depletes thymocytes in vitro, there is no thymocyte depletion in vivo at any dose level, suggesting decreased antibody accessibility to the thymus. After two doses of mATG given 3 days apart, T-cell reconstitution begins as early as day 9 and returns to basal levels by day 21 and 29 for CD4 and CD8 T cells, respectively. There is also preferential depletion of naïve T cells that results in increased ratios of regulatory and memory T cells within 1 day after mATG administration. Depletion of natural killer-T cells, natural killer cells, plasma cells, and plasmablasts occurs, but is modest and more transient compared with T cells. B cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, hematopoetic stem cells, and bone marrow stromal cells seem resistant to mATG depletion. These studies characterize the depletive effects of mATG in normal mice and provide insight into mechanisms of action of Thymoglobulin.

  9. Evidencia y uso actual de toxina botulínica en patología otorrinolaringológica

    OpenAIRE

    Caro L,Jorge; Fuentes L,Nicolás; Iñiguez C,Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    A partir de los primeros usos terapéuticos de la toxina botulínica su utilización se ha extendido a variadas ramas de la medicina incluyendo la otorrinolaringología. Se considera un medicamento seguro en manos de profesionales capacitados y su utilización se realiza a través de un procedimiento mínimamente invasivo con efectos adversos leves y transitorios. Se usa en un amplio número de patologías otorrinolaringológicas y de cabeza y cuello. Actualmente la toxina botulínica A representa la pr...

  10. Barbiturate ingestion in three adult captive tigers (Panthera tigris) and concomitant fatal botulism of one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J H; Bester, L; Venter, L; Pretorius, D; Greyling, F

    2011-12-01

    Zoo animals, including tigers, have been reported to suffer from barbiturate intoxication, with pentabarbitone being most commonly recorded. Clinical signs range from mild ataxia to general anaesthesia with recovery over hours to days with several factors affecting hepatic barbiturate metabolism and tissue partitioning. Botulism is an often fatal intoxication in man, animals, birds and certain fish. The occurrence in carnivores is uncommon to rare, with only 2 reports found of botulism in felids. This report relates to 3 adult captive cohabiting tigers that simultaneously developed signs of abdominal discomfort, progressive ataxia, recumbency and comatose sleep resembling stage 2 anaesthesia, alternating with periods of distracted wakefulness and ataxic movements. These signs occurred 4 days after being fed the carcass of a horse that had ostensibly died of colic and not been euthanased. The male tiger that was the dominant animal in the feeding hierarchy was worst affected and had to be given intravenous fluids. The female that was lowest in hierarchy was unaffected. After 48-72 hours of treatment at the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital the females could eat and made an uneventful recovery. The male tiger showed partial recovery but died during the night a few hours after drinking water on his return to the owner. Necropsy revealed severe oesophageal dilation and impaction with decaying grass; some of this material and water were present in the pharynx and trachea, and had been aspirated causing acute widespread bronchopneumonia. Colon content tested negative for common pesticides but, together with liver, tested positive for barbiturate. Serum taken on the day of admission had tested negative for barbiturate and the residual serum from the 3 animals later tested negative for botulinum toxin. Colon and oesophageal content from the male at necropsy were positive for Clostridium botulinum toxin type C by the mouse bioassay neutralisation test, confirming

  11. Electrophysiological evidence of peripheral nerve dysfunction in six dogs with botulism type C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nes, J J; van der Most van Spijk, D

    1986-05-01

    In six dogs with botulism type C electrophysiological examinations showed: fibrillation potentials and prolonged insertional activity; low amplitude of the evoked muscle action potential; decrease in amplitude of the compound muscle action potential with slow repetitive stimulation; slowing of motor and sensory velocities in the peripheral nerve; and restoration of velocity and amplitude corresponding to clinical improvement. These findings indicate peripheral nerve dysfunction which cannot be explained adequately by current knowledge of the action of botulinum toxin on cholinergic nerve endings. It is therefore suggested that botulinum toxin also interferes with peripheral nerve conduction.

  12. SIFAT FUNGSIONAL PRODUK INTERAKSI FRAKSI GLOBULIN 7S KOMAK (Dolichos lablab DAN GUM XANTAN [Functional Properties of the Interaction Product Between Globulin of 7S Fraction of Lablab Bean (Dolichos lablab with Xantan Gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukamto1*

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Lablab bean (Dolichos lablab seeds is a potential source of protein globulin.The bean’s protein content is 20.86 %, and the amount of globulin was more than 60% from the total protein, having major fractions of 7S and 11S. The objectives of this research were to explore the 7S globulin fractions, to study interaction between 7S globulin fractions with xanthan gum, and to observe the functional properties of the product of the interaction. The research was conducted in 2 steps. The first step was to fractionate the 7S fractions from globulin. The second steps was to interact 7S globulin fraction with xanthan gum. The yield of these interaction were examined for its physicochemical and functional properties. The results showed that the 7S globulin fractions could be interacted by xanthan gum at pH 7. The interacted product of globulin 7S fraction 10 % with xanthan gum 0,75 % had good functional properties than globulin 7S fraction, such as oil holding capacity, foaming capacity, and emulsion activity. Water holding capacity could not be detected because the yield became soluble. However,the foaming and emulsifying stability were still lower than those of soybean protein isolates. The research concluded that xanthan gum could be used to improve the physicochemical and functional properties of globulin 7S fraction.

  13. Grizzly bear corticosteroid binding globulin: Cloning and serum protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Brian A; Hamilton, Jason; Alsop, Derek; Cattet, Marc R L; Stenhouse, Gordon; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2010-06-01

    Serum corticosteroid levels are routinely measured as markers of stress in wild animals. However, corticosteroid levels rise rapidly in response to the acute stress of capture and restraint for sampling, limiting its use as an indicator of chronic stress. We hypothesized that serum corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the primary transport protein for corticosteroids in circulation, may be a better marker of the stress status prior to capture in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos). To test this, a full-length CBG cDNA was cloned and sequenced from grizzly bear testis and polyclonal antibodies were generated for detection of this protein in bear sera. The deduced nucleotide and protein sequences were 1218 bp and 405 amino acids, respectively. Multiple sequence alignments showed that grizzly bear CBG (gbCBG) was 90% and 83% identical to the dog CBG nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. The affinity purified rabbit gbCBG antiserum detected grizzly bear but not human CBG. There were no sex differences in serum total cortisol concentration, while CBG expression was significantly higher in adult females compared to males. Serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in bears captured by leg-hold snare compared to those captured by remote drug delivery from helicopter. However, serum CBG expression between these two groups did not differ significantly. Overall, serum CBG levels may be a better marker of chronic stress, especially because this protein is not modulated by the stress of capture and restraint in grizzly bears. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antithymocyte Globulin Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Human Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Roider

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Antithymocyte globulin (ATG is used in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally accepted that ATG mediates its immunosuppressive effect primarily via depletion of T cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of ATG-Fresenius (now Grafalon® on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC. ATG induced a semi-mature phenotype in DC with significantly reduced expression of CD14, increased expression of HLA-DR, and intermediate expression of CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86. ATG-DC showed an increase in IL-10 secretion but no IL-12 production. In line with this tolerogenic phenotype, ATG caused a significant induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and a concomitant increase in levels of tryptophan metabolites in the supernatants of DC. Further, ATG-DC did not induce the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction but actively suppressed the T cell proliferation induced by mature DC. These data suggest that besides its well-known effect on T cells, ATG modulates the phenotype of DC in a tolerogenic way, which might constitute an essential part of its immunosuppressive action in vivo.

  15. Thermal denaturation of sunflower globulins in low moisture conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouilly, A.; Orliac, O.; Silvestre, F.; Rigal, L

    2003-03-05

    DSC analysis in pressure resisting pans of sunflower oil cake makes appear the endothermic peak of sunflower globulins denaturation. Its temperature decreases from 189.5 to 119.9 deg. C while the corresponding enthalpy increases from 2.6 to 3.3 J/g of sample, or from 6.7 to 12.2 J/g of dry protein, when the samples moisture content varies from 0 to 30.0% of the total weight. The plot of the denaturation temperature versus the moisture content is not linear but has a rounded global shape and seems to follow the hydration behavior of the proteins, modeled with the sorption isotherm. As it can be seen on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs, protein corpuscles 'melt' after such a thermal treatment and large aggregates form by coagulation. Moisture dependence of the 'fusion' temperature of native proteic organization, in low moisture conditions, offers so a new characterization method for the use of vegetable proteins in agro-materials.

  16. Fractionation of plasma globulin for prothrombin, thrombokinase, and accessory thromboplastin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MILSTONE, J H

    1951-09-01

    1. Crude globulin from more than 1,000 liters of citrated bovine plasma has been used in developing a procedure for moderately large scale separation of clotting factors. Fraction A, prothrombin, kinase, and thrombin fractions were prepared. Fraction A contained both kinase and accessory thromboplastin, the latter predominating when fraction A was diluted. 2. When prothrombin was activated by kinase, the rate of thrombin production was enhanced by the addition of platelets, or brain lipid, or dilute fraction A. These accessory thromboplastins caused this acceleration only when calcium chloride was added. Even with calcium, they were not effective unless kinase was present. 3. In contrast, the action of kinase was not entirely dependent on either ionic calcium or accessory thromboplastin. The concentrated kinase fraction activated prothrombin in the presence of excess oxalate. Although kinase often contaminates highly purified thrombins, it is probably distinct from thrombin. The ratio of kinase to thrombin was 100 times as great in the kinase fraction as in the thrombin fraction. 4. The kinase fraction, diluted 45,000-fold, to protein-nitrogen concentrations as low as 0.02 microgram per ml., accelerated the conversion of crude prokinase in three-stage tests. 5. The findings are consistent with the following concept of the basic enzymatic mechanism: See PDF for Structure It is now added that calcium and accessory thromboplastin exert their effects by impinging on the basic mechanism, in a chemically secondary or indirect manner.

  17. Antithymocyte Globulin Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Human Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roider, Tobias; Katzfuß, Michael; Matos, Carina; Singer, Katrin; Renner, Kathrin; Oefner, Peter J; Dettmer-Wilde, Katja; Herr, Wolfgang; Holler, Ernst; Kreutz, Marina; Peter, Katrin

    2016-12-11

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is used in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally accepted that ATG mediates its immunosuppressive effect primarily via depletion of T cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of ATG-Fresenius (now Grafalon(®)) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). ATG induced a semi-mature phenotype in DC with significantly reduced expression of CD14, increased expression of HLA-DR, and intermediate expression of CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86. ATG-DC showed an increase in IL-10 secretion but no IL-12 production. In line with this tolerogenic phenotype, ATG caused a significant induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and a concomitant increase in levels of tryptophan metabolites in the supernatants of DC. Further, ATG-DC did not induce the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction but actively suppressed the T cell proliferation induced by mature DC. These data suggest that besides its well-known effect on T cells, ATG modulates the phenotype of DC in a tolerogenic way, which might constitute an essential part of its immunosuppressive action in vivo.

  18. PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF 11S GLOBULIN FROM KUTAJ (HOLARRHENA ANTIDYSENTERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Globulins are major seed storage proteins which determine the nutritional quality of the seeds. They form the main source of essential amino acids in the human dietary. The seeds of the Kutaj plant are used in the treatment of various diseases and disorders. Transgenic approaches can be applied to rectify or enhance the content of essential amino acids in seed proteins. It necessitates the study and characterization of globulins from various plant families and sources. Herein, we report the Holarrhena antidysenterica globulin (11S globulin purified from seeds of Indian medicinal plant, Kutaj. Pure HAG protein was obtained by using DEAE anion-exchange followed by size-exclusion chromatography. The protein exists as a hexamer of ~350 kDa. The SDS-PAGE gel in reducing condition showed bands at ~36 kDa (alpha subunit and ~22 kDa (beta subunit; and non-reducing condition ~58 kDa which suggest the presence of disulphide bond between the alpha and beta subunit. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the larger subunit is LRQPQLNEAQ and shows high sequence homology with already known 11S seed storage globulin. Molisch’s test indicated that it is a glycoprotein. Glycosylation phenomenon in 11S globulin helps in protein transport from ER to the vacuolar bodies.

  19. Serum globulin predicts all-cause mortality for life insurance applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulks, Michael; Stout, Robert L; Dolan, Vera F

    2014-01-01

    Determine the relative mortality in apparently healthy adults with various levels of serum globulin. By use of the Social Security Death Master File, mortality in 2010 was determined for 7.7 million life insurance applicants age 20 to 89 providing blood samples with valid globulin results between 1992 and 2006. Relative mortality by Cox regression for bands of globulin values was determined by age-sex group, with age split into 20 to 59 and 60 to 89, with each grouping also including age as a covariate. Further analysis was conducted by excluding applicants with elevations of other test values associated with increased globulin levels and mortality risk. After accounting for the mortality impact of frequently associated laboratory test abnormalities including BMI, alkaline phosphatase and albumin, relative mortality was found to increase gradually for globulin values > 3.2 g/dL. Values > 4.0 were associated with a mortality risk that was approximately doubled. There is also a small increased risk for globulin values life insurance applicants. In many cases, other laboratory findings were not informative of the risk.

  20. National outbreak of type a foodborne botulism associated with a widely distributed commercially canned hot dog chili sauce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliao, Patricia C; Maslanka, Susan; Dykes, Janet; Gaul, Linda; Bagdure, Satish; Granzow-Kibiger, Lynae; Salehi, Ellen; Zink, Donald; Neligan, Robert P; Barton-Behravesh, Casey; Lúquez, Carolina; Biggerstaff, Matthew; Lynch, Michael; Olson, Christine; Williams, Ian; Barzilay, Ezra J

    2013-02-01

    On 7 and 11 July 2007, health officials in Texas and Indiana, respectively, reported 4 possible cases of type A foodborne botulism to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Foodborne botulism is a rare and sometimes fatal illness caused by consuming foods containing botulinum neurotoxin. Investigators reviewed patients' medical charts and food histories. Clinical specimens and food samples were tested for botulinum toxin and neurotoxin-producing Clostridium species. Investigators conducted inspections of the cannery that produced the implicated product. Eight confirmed outbreak associated cases were identified from Indiana (n = 2), Texas (n = 3), and Ohio (n = 3). Botulinum toxin type A was identified in leftover chili sauce consumed by the Indiana patients and 1 of the Ohio patients. Cannery inspectors found violations of federal canned-food regulations that could have led to survival of Clostridium botulinum spores during sterilization. The company recalled 39 million cans of chili. Following the outbreak, the US Food and Drug Administration inspected other canneries with similar canning systems and issued warnings to the industry about the danger of C. botulinum and the importance of compliance with canned food manufacturing regulations. Commercially produced hot dog chili sauce caused these cases of type A botulism. This is the first US foodborne botulism outbreak involving a commercial cannery in >30 years. Sharing of epidemiologic and laboratory findings allowed for the rapid identification of implicated food items and swift removal of potentially deadly products from the market by US food regulatory authorities.

  1. A Qualitative Inquiry About Pruno, an Illicit Alcoholic Beverage Linked to Botulism Outbreaks in United States Prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Maroya Spalding; Sreenivasan, Nandini; Person, Bobbie; Shew, Mark; Wheeler, Daniel; Hall, Julia; Bogdanow, Linda; Leniek, Karyn; Rao, Agam

    2015-11-01

    Since 2011, 3 outbreaks of botulism in US prisons have been attributed to pruno, which is an alcoholic beverage made by inmates. Following 1 outbreak, we conducted a qualitative inquiry to understand pruno brewing and its social context to inform outbreak prevention measures. We interviewed staff, inmates, and parolees from 1 prison about pruno production methods, the social aspects of pruno, and strategies for communicating the association between botulism and pruno. Twenty-seven inmates and parolees and 13 staff completed interviews. Pruno is fermented from water, fruit, sugar, and miscellaneous ingredients. Knowledge of pruno making was widespread among inmates; staff were familiar with only the most common ingredients and supplies inmates described. Staff and inmates described inconsistent consequences for pruno possession and suggested using graphic health messages from organizations external to the prison to communicate the risk of botulism from pruno. Pruno making was frequent in this prison. Improved staff recognition of pruno ingredients and supplies might improve detection of brewing activities in this and other prisons. Consistent consequences and clear messages about the association between pruno and botulism might prevent outbreaks.

  2. Fatal course of foodborne botulism in an eight-month old infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonati, Davide; Locatelli, Carlo Alessandro; Fenicia, Lucia; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Landri, Paolo; Giampreti, Andrea; Petrolini, Valeria Margherita; Vecchio, Sarah; Manzo, Luigi

    2011-09-30

    An 8-month old girl, weighing 9 kg, was brought by her parents at 8.15 am to the Emergency Department (ED) for a progressive worsening of weakness and acute respiratory failure. On admission, the baby presented with poor oral intake, a weak cry and extremely weak muscular body control. Poor gag and suck, unreactive mydriasis, hypotonia, lethargy and absence of peristalsis were noted. Laboratory data showed severe respiratory acidosis. Chest X-ray, electroencephalography, encephalic CT scan and MRI were all normal, as were cerebrospinal fluid analysis and viral tests. Orotracheal intubation and continuous mechanical ventilation were applied. The patient received fluids, corticosteroids, aerosol therapy, large-spectrum antibiotics and enteral-nutrition. Further investigation revealed ingestion of an improperly prepared home-canned homogenized turkey meal. Type A botulinum neurotoxin was identified. Trivalent botulinum antitoxin, prostigmine and oral activated charcoal were administered. Generalized flaccid paralysis, areflexic bilateral mydriasis, gastric stasis and deep coma persisted for the duration of the hospital stay, and the patient died of severe respiratory failure and cardiac arrest 12 days after ED admission. Botulism poisoning should be suspected in any infant presenting with feeding difficulties, constipation, descendent paralysis or acute respiratory failure. Supportive treatment and antidotal therapy should be performed as soon as a clinical diagnosis is made. We describe a case of foodborne botulism in an 8-month old infant caused by ingestion of an improperly prepared home-canned homogenized turkey meal, representing the youngest fatal case reported in medical literature.

  3. Fatal course of foodborne botulism in an eigth-month old Infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Manzo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available An 8-month old girl, weighing 9 kg, was brought by her parents at 8.15 am to the Emergency Department (ED for a progressive worsening of weakness and acute respiratory failure. On admission, the baby presented with poor oral intake, a weak cry and extremely weak muscular body control. Poor gag and suck, unreactive mydriasis, hypotonia, lethargy and absence of peristalsis were noted. Laboratory data showed severe respiratory acidosis. Chest X-ray, electroencephalography, encephalic CT scan and MRI were all normal, as were cerebrospinal fluid analysis and viral tests. Orotracheal intubation and continuous mechanical ventilation were applied. The patient received fluids, corticosteroids, aerosol therapy, large-spectrum antibiotics and enteral- nutrition. Further investigation revealed ingestion of an improperly prepared homecanned homogenized turkey meal. Type A botulinum neurotoxin was identified. Trivalent botulinum antitoxin, prostigmine and oral activated charcoal were administered. Generalized flaccid paralysis, areflexic bilateral mydriasis, gastric stasis and deep coma persisted for the duration of the hospital stay, and the patient died of severe respiratory failure and cardiac arrest 12 days after ED admission. Botulism poisoning should be suspected in any infant presenting with feeding difficulties, constipation, descendent paralysis or acute respiratory failure. Supportive treatment and antidotal therapy should be performed as soon as a clinical diagnosis is made. We describe a case of foodborne botulism in an 8-month old infant caused by ingestion of an improperly prepared home-canned homogenized turkey meal, representing the youngest fatal case reported in medical literature.

  4. Determination of the median toxic dose of type C botulism in lactating dairy cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, R.B.; Puschner, B.; Walker, R.L.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Galey, F.D.; Cullor, J.S.; Ardans, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Because of the difficulty in identifying botulinum toxin in cattle, it is hypothesized that cattle are sensitive to levels of toxin below the detection limits of current diagnostic techniques (the mouse protection bioassay and the immunostick enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] for type C botulinum toxin). Using an up-down method for toxicologic testing, the median toxic dose (MTD50) for cattle was determined. Four lactating Holstein cows were dosed at 0.125 or 0.25 ng/kg with Clostridium botulinum type C toxin and failed to develop clinical signs of botulism during the 7-day observation period. Three cows given 0.50 ng/kg of toxin developed clinical signs of botulism. From these results, the MTD50 was calculated at 0.388 ng/kg (3.88 mouse lethal doses/kg) using the trim-logit method. These results suggest that cattle are 12.88 times more sensitive to type C botulinum toxin than a mouse on a per kilogram weight basis. The mouse protection bioassay and the immunostick ELISA for type C botulinum toxin failed to identify the presence of the toxin in the serum, blood, and milk samples taken from all 7 animals.

  5. 76 FR 14413 - Risk Mitigation Strategies To Address Potential Procoagulant Activity in Immune Globulin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... proteins that can co-purify with IGIV; (4) partitioning of coagulation factors during IGIV purification; (5... National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and the Plasma Protein Therapeutics Association, are jointly... proteins may be causative, and to identify relevant, feasible tests that could be used to assess levels and...

  6. [Immune stimulative potency of milk proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambroziak, Adam; Cichosz, Grazyna

    2014-02-01

    Milk proteins are characterized by the highest immune stimulative potency from among all the proteins present in human diet. Whey proteins and numerous growth factors that regulate insulin secretion, differentiation of intestine epithelium cells, and also tissue restoration, are priceless in stimulation the immune system. Lactoferrin shows the most comprehensive pro-health properties: antioxidative, anticancer, immune stimulative and even chemopreventive. Also peptides and amino acids formed from casein and whey proteins possess immune stimulative activity. The most valuable proteins, i.e. lactoferrin, immune globulins, lactoperoxidase and lisozyme, together with bioactive peptides, are resistant to pepsin and trypsin activity. This is why they maintain their exceptional biological activity within human organism. Properly high consumption of milk proteins conditions correct function of immune system, especially at children and elderly persons.

  7. Characterization of an organism that produces type E botulinal toxin but which resembles Clostridium butyricum from the feces of an infant with type E botulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCroskey, L M; Hatheway, C L; Fenicia, L; Pasolini, B; Aureli, P

    1986-01-01

    The apparent causative organism from the only reported case of type E infant botulism was isolated and characterized. Except for its ability to produce type E botulinal toxin, this organism (strain 5262) would be unquestionably identified as Clostridium butyricum. This is the second time an organism resembling a defined Clostridium species other than a member of the C. botulinum group has been implicated in infant botulism.

  8. Lack of Globulin Synthesis during Seed Development Alters Accumulation of Seed Storage Proteins in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jung Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The major seed storage proteins (SSPs in rice seeds have been classified into three types, glutelins, prolamins, and globulin, and the proportion of each SSP varies. It has been shown in rice mutants that when either glutelins or prolamins are defective, the expression of another type of SSP is promoted to counterbalance the deficit. However, we observed reduced abundances of glutelins and prolamins in dry seeds of a globulin-deficient rice mutant (Glb-RNAi, which was generated with RNA interference (RNAi-induced suppression of globulin expression. The expression of the prolamin and glutelin subfamily genes was reduced in the immature seeds of Glb-RNAi lines compared with those in wild type. A proteomic analysis of Glb-RNAi seeds showed that the reductions in glutelin and prolamin were conserved at the protein level. The decreased pattern in glutelin was also significant in the presence of a reductant, suggesting that the polymerization of the glutelin proteins via intramolecular disulfide bonds could be interrupted in Glb-RNAi seeds. We also observed aberrant and loosely packed structures in the storage organelles of Glb-RNAi seeds, which may be attributable to the reductions in SSPs. In this study, we evaluated the role of rice globulin in seed development, showing that a deficiency in globulin could comprehensively reduce the expression of other SSPs.

  9. Sensitization with 7S globulins from peanut, hazelnut, soy or pea induces IgE with different biological activities which are modified by soy tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroghsbo, Stine; Bøgh, Katrine L; Rigby, Neil M; Mills, E N Clare; Rogers, Adrian; Madsen, Charlotte B

    2011-01-01

    It is not known why some foods sensitizing via the gastrointestinal tract are prevalent allergenic foods and others are not. Eating habits, processing, and the food matrix have been suggested to influence the allergenicity of a given food. Factors related to protein structure, such as stability to digestion, have also been suggested. 7S globulins from peanut, hazelnut, soy, and pea were studied to determine whether related proteins would induce a similar sensitization when removed from their 'normal' matrix. Brown Norway rats (soy tolerant or nontolerant) were immunized i.p. 3 times with 100 μg purified peanut, hazelnut, soy, or pea 7S without adjuvant. Sera were analyzed for specific antibodies by different ELISAs (IgG1, IgG2a, and IgE), inhibition ELISA, and rat basophilic leukemia cell assay. The 4 related 7S globulins induced a response with an almost identical level of specific antibodies, but peanut 7S induced IgE of higher avidity than hazelnut and pea 7S which, again, had a higher avidity than IgE induced by soy 7S. Soy tolerance reduced the functionality of IgE without influencing antibody titers. Although the 4 7S globulins are structurally related allergens, they induce antibodies with different antigen-binding characteristics. Peanut 7S induces IgE of a higher avidity than hazelnut and pea 7S which, again, has a higher avidity than IgE induced by soy 7S. We also show that soy tolerance influences the function of antibodies to peanut 7S. These findings may help explain how antibodies of different clinical significances can develop in different individuals sensitized to the same allergen. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Neurophysiological assessment in the diagnosis of botulism: usefulness of single-fiber EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padua, L; Aprile, I; Monaco, M L; Fenicia, L; Anniballi, F; Pauri, F; Tonali, P

    1999-10-01

    We report the clinical, serological, and neurophysiological findings in seven patients with foodborne botulism caused by ingestion of black olives in water. The clinical picture was characterized by mild symptoms with a long latency of onset and by involvement of cranial and upper limb muscles; only one patient, a child, developed respiratory failure. Spores of Clostridium botulinum were found in stools in some but not all cases. Conventional neurophysiological tests had low sensitivity; abnormal findings were present only in the patient with severe clinical involvement, in whom compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) appeared reduced. Repetitive nerve stimulation at a high rate showed pseudofacilitation and not true posttetanic facilitation, but single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG) showed abnormalities of neuromuscular transmission in every case. Neurophysiological evaluation, particularly SFEMG, is important because it allows rapid identification of abnormal neuromuscular transmission while bioassay studies are in progress. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Increased sex hormone-binding globulin levels in children and adolescents with thyrotoxicosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J; Jensen, Rikke Bodin Beck; Juul, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Thyrotoxicosis is a rare condition in pediatric patients, and optimal treatment can be difficult to achieve in some children. To our knowledge, no studies have evaluated sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels in hyperthyroid children and adolescents in relation to age- and gender-related norm......Thyrotoxicosis is a rare condition in pediatric patients, and optimal treatment can be difficult to achieve in some children. To our knowledge, no studies have evaluated sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels in hyperthyroid children and adolescents in relation to age- and gender...

  12. Safety Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmacokinetic Assessment of Human Gc Globulin (Vitamin D Binding Protein)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Tina Holberg; Jørgensen, Charlotte Svaerke; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric

    2010-01-01

    potentially be life-saving. This article presents pre-clinical toxicology experiments conducted on purified plasma-derived human Gc globulin. The Gc globulin formulation was shown to be stable for at least 4 years with full retention of actin-binding capacity. In vitro studies did not reveal activation...... toxicity studies in rats and horses did not show any unwanted reactions. In a 14-day toxicology study in beagle dogs, formation of antibodies was seen and in the end of the study period, three out of four dogs showed clinical immunological reactions, which could be ascribed to the formation of antibodies...

  13. Safety pharmacology, toxicology and pharmacokinetic assesment of human Gc globulin (vitamin d binding protein)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Tina Holberg; Jørgensen, Charlotte Sværke; Santoni Rugiu, Eric

    2010-01-01

    potentially be life-saving. This article presents pre-clinical toxicology experiments conducted on purified plasma-derived human Gc globulin. The Gc globulin formulation was shown to be stable for at least 4 years with full retention of actin-binding capacity. In vitro studies did not reveal activation...... toxicity studies in rats and horses did not show any unwanted reactions. In a 14-day toxicology study in beagle dogs, formation of antibodies was seen and in the end of the study period, three out of four dogs showed clinical immunological reactions, which could be ascribed to the formation of antibodies...

  14. Prevention of postherpetic neuralgia with varicella-zoster hyperimmune globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hügler, Peter; Siebrecht, Peter; Hoffmann, Klaus; Stücker, Markus; Windeler, Jürgen; Altmeyer, Peter; Laubenthal, Heinz

    2002-01-01

    Recovery after an acute attack of herpes zoster is followed by postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) in 9-14% of all patients. Depending on the patient's age, the severity of the acute attack of herpes zoster and the dermatome involved, the incidence of PHN may be as high as 65%. The purpose of our study was to ascertain the incidence of PHN after a prophylactic intravenous injection of varicella-zoster hyperimmune globulin (VZV-IG) (Varitect Biotest Pharma). For this double-blind placebo-controlled randomised investigation we defined PHN as pain confined to the dermatome previously affected by herpes zoster, and we required a pain intensity of at least 15% points on a visual analogue scale (VAS) for this dermatome. The inclusion criteria were the dermatological diagnosis of herpes zoster together with age over 50 years. On Day 1, 20 patients received a single intravenous infusion of VZV-IG in a dose of 2mL/kg body weight, 20 patients (control group) received a single infusion of human albumin 5% in a dose of 2mL/kg body weight. All patients received acyclovir intravenously in a dose of 15mg/kg body weight per 24h for 5 days. The patients were followed up for a total of 42 days. The incidence of PHN at Day 42 was selected as the main outcome criterion for assessing the efficacy of prophylaxis. On reaching a significant difference between the groups (t test; alphaVAS and a NAS. As auxiliary outcome criteria, we used the McGill Pain-Rating Questionnaire in its German version, the revised multidimensional pain scale (RMSS) and the Freiburg symptom list (FBL). All results were assessed by the t test (alpha<0.05). The frequency of PHN in the placebo group was 70% (14/20), in the active treatment group it was 35% (7/20) at Day 42. The results of the McGill test showed the variability of the perception of pain in the placebo group significantly greater. No significant group differences were found in the FBL. Being tested with the RMSS, the patients of the placebo group assessed

  15. A penicillin- and metronidazole-resistant Clostridium botulinum strain responsible for an infant botulism case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuet, C; Yoon, E-J; Boyer, S; Pignier, S; Blanc, T; Doehring, I; Meziane-Cherif, D; Dumant-Forest, C; Sautereau, J; Legeay, C; Bouvet, P; Bouchier, C; Quijano-Roy, S; Pestel-Caron, M; Courvalin, P; Popoff, M R

    2016-07-01

    The clinical course of a case of infant botulism was characterized by several relapses despite therapy with amoxicillin and metronidazole. Botulism was confirmed by identification of botulinum toxin and Clostridium botulinum in stools. A C. botulinum A2 strain resistant to penicillins and with heterogeneous resistance to metronidazole was isolated from stool samples up to 110 days after onset. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested by disc agar diffusion and MICs were determined by Etest. Whole genome sequencing allowed detection of a gene cluster composed of blaCBP for a novel penicillinase, blaI for a regulator, and blaR1 for a membrane-bound penicillin receptor in the chromosome of the C. botulinum isolate. The purified recombinant penicillinase was assayed. Resistance to β-lactams was in agreement with the kinetic parameters of the enzyme. In addition, the β-lactamase gene cluster was found in three C. botulinum genomes in databanks and in two of 62 genomes of our collection, all the strains belonging to group I C. botulinum. This is the first report of a C. botulinum isolate resistant to penicillins. This stresses the importance of antibiotic susceptibility testing for adequate therapy of botulism. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sex hormone-binding globulin levels predict insulin sensitivity, disposition index, and cardiovascular risk during puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kaspar; Aksglaede, Lise; Munch-Andersen, Thor

    2009-01-01

    Early puberty is associated with increased risk of subsequent cardiovascular disease. Low sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels are a feature of early puberty and of conditions associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The aim of the present study was to evaluate SHBG as a predictor...... of glucose metabolism and metabolic risk during puberty....

  17. Competitive adsorption of albumin and monoclonal immuno upsilon globulin molecules on polystyrene surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elgersma, F.

    1990-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is proteins at interfaces. The main purpose of the work was to acquire more insight into the mechanism of adsorption of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and monoclonal Immuno gamma Globulins (IgG's). both individually and in competition. Another aim was to achieve

  18. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirick, G. R.; Bradt, B. M.; Denardo, S. J.; Denardo, G. L. [Calfornia Univ., Sacramento (United States). Davis Medical Center

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ({sup 9}0yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ({sup 1}31I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  19. Anti-thymocyte globulin as graft-versus-host disease prevention in the setting of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: a review from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Frédéric; Mohty, Mohamad; Blaise, Didier; Socié, Gérard; Labopin, Myriam; Esteve, Jordi; Ciceri, Fabio; Giebel, Sebastian; Gorin, Norbert Claude; Savani, Bipin N; Schmid, Christoph; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-02-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is increasingly used as treatment for patients with life-threatening blood diseases. Its curative potential is largely based on immune-mediated graft-versus-leukemia effects caused by donor T cells contained in the graft. Unfortunately, donor T cells are also the cause of graft-versus-host disease. The vast majority of human leukocyte antigen-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants are nowadays carried out with peripheral blood stem cells as the stem cell source. In comparison with bone marrows, peripheral blood stem cells contain more hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells but also one log more T cells. Consequently, the use of peripheral blood stem cells instead of bone marrow has been associated with faster hematologic recovery and a lower risk of relapse in patients with advanced disease, but also with a higher incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease. These observations have been the basis for several studies aimed at assessing the impact of immunoregulation with anti-thymocyte globulin on transplantation outcomes in patients given human leukocyte antigen-matched peripheral blood stem cells from related or unrelated donors. After a brief introduction on anti-thymocyte globulin, this article reviews recent studies assessing the impact of anti-thymocyte globulin on transplantation outcomes in patients given peripheral blood stem cells from human leukocyte antigen-matched related or unrelated donors as well as in recipients of grafts from human leukocyte antigen haploidentical donors. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  20. Chronic botulism in a Saxony dairy farm: sources, predisposing factors, development of the disease and treatment possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Monika; Neuhaus, Jürgen; Herrenthey, Anke Große; Gökce, M Mourat; Schrödl, Wieland; Shehata, Awad A

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate Clostridium botulinum at a Saxony dairy farm with 159 cows and 18 heifers. The animals exhibited clinical symptoms of chronic botulism. To determine the source of the infection, feces, blood, organs, and gastrointestinal fluids of dead or euthanized cows; as well as soil, water, silage and manure were tested for C. botulinum spores and BoNTs using ELISA. BoNT/C and C. botulinum type C were detected in 53% and 3% of tested animals, respectively, while BoNT/D and C. botulinum type D were detected in 18% of the animals. C. botulinum also was detected in organs, gastrointestinal fluids, drinking water and manure. To evaluate possible treatments, animals were given Jerusalem artichoke syrup (JAS), Botulism vaccine (formalinised aluminum hydroxide gel adsorbed toxoid of C. botulinum types C and D) or a suspension of Enterococcus faecalis. After four weeks treatment with JAS, BoNT/C and C. botulinum type C were not detected in feces. In contrast, BoNT/D and C. botulinum type D were not significantly influenced by the JAS treatment. Vaccination with botulism vaccine and the E. faecalis suspension significantly decreased BoNT/D and C. botulinum type D. A significant increase of Enterococci was detected in animals treated with E. faecalis. Interestingly, there was a negative correlation between the detection of both BoNT and C. botulinum with the concentration of Enterococci in feces. Although C. botulinum C and D antibodies increased significantly (p < 0.0001) after vaccination with the botulism vaccine, the reduction of C. botulinum and BoNT in feces did not result in recovery of the animals because they were deficient of trace elements [manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu) and selenium (Se)]. Animals treated with trace elements recovered. It appears that intestinal microbiota dysbiosis and trace element deficiency could explain the extensive emergence of chronic Botulism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  1. Effect of sucrose on functional properties of soy globulins: adsorption and foam characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruíz-Henestrosa, Victor Pizones; Sánchez, Cecilio Carrera; Rodríguez Patino, Juan M

    2008-04-09

    In this contribution, we have analyzed the effect of sucrose on dynamic interfacial (dynamic surface pressure and surface dilatational properties) and foaming (foam capacity and foam stability) characteristics of soy globulins (7S and 11S). The protein (at 1 x 10(-3), 1 x 10(-2), 0.1, and 1 wt %) and sucrose (at 0, 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 M) concentrations in aqueous solution and the pH (at 5 and 7), and ionic strength (at 0.05 and 0.5 M) were analyzed as variables. The temperature was maintained constant at 20 degrees C. We have observed the following. (i) The dynamics of adsorption (presence of a lag period, diffusion, and penetration at the air-water interface) of soy globulins depend on the peculiar molecular features of proteins (7S or 11S soy globulin) and the level of association/dissociation of these proteins by varying the pH and ionic strength, as well as the effect of sucrose in the aqueous phase on the unfolding of the protein. The rate of adsorption increases with the protein concentration in solution, at pH 7 compared to pH 5, at high ionic strength, and in the absence of sucrose. (ii) The surface dilatational properties reflect the fact that soy globulin adsorbed films exhibit viscoelastic behavior. The surface dilatational modulus increases at pH 7 compared to pH 5, but decreases with the addition of sucrose into the aqueous phase. (iii) The rate of adsorption and surface dilatational properties (surface dilatational modulus and phase angle) during adsorption at the air-water interface play an important role in the formation of foams generated from aqueous solutions of soy globulins. (iv) The increased interfacial adsorption (at high surface pressures) and the combined effects of interfacial adsorption and interfacial interactions between adsorbed soy globulin molecules (at high surface dilatational modulus) can explain the higher stability of the foam, with few exceptions.

  2. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Counselors Kidney Stones Brain and Nervous System Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System Print A A ... put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  3. Electrophoretic Profile of Albumin, α1, α2, β and γ Globulin in Sera of Opioid Dependants and Non-dependants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    koros Div-salaar

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Div-salaar K1, Saravani R2, Shamsi-e-meimandi M3, Taei M4, Sheikholeslami A5 1. MSc. Staff member of Neurology Sciences Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences 2. Instructor, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences 3. Instructor, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Neurology Sciences Research Center, Karman University of Medical Sciences 4. Researcher, Neurology Sciences Research Center, Karman University of Medical Sciences 5. B.Sc in Environmental Hygiene, Kerman University of Medical Sciences Abstract Background: The prevalence rate of opioids consumption is high in Iran. The latest research approach related to substance abuse considers the role of plasma proteins in novel treatments of addiction. Since long-term consumption of opioids has some effects on liver function and plasma transfer systems, the present study was designed to determine the electrophoretic profile of plasma proteins in opiates-addict subjects. Materials and methods: In this cross-control study, the sample groups consisted of 42 opium consumers and 35 heroine dependents as case group and 35 non-addict volunteers as control group. The control group was matched with addicts for age and sex. Opioid consumption was confirmed by laboratory diagnostic tests on urine samples such as immunochromatography (RSA, rapidosis and complementary tests including liquid-solid column chromatography and thin layer chromatography (TLC. After blood collection and serum preparation, serum electrophoresis was performed. Data were presented as mean±SEM and analyzed by SPSS ver.11.5. The comparison of groups was done by using parametric tests and p<0.01 was considered as statistically significant. Results: There was no significant difference in the amounts of albumin, alpha-1-globulin, alpha-2-globulin and beta-globulin between groups. Gamma-globulin concentration was not significantly different between

  4. Blefarospasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial: características dos pacientes, tratamento com toxina botulínica A e revisão da literatura

    OpenAIRE

    Schellini Silvana Artioli; Matai Olívia; Igami Thais Zamudio; Padovani Carlos Roberto; Padovani Carlos Pereira

    2006-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Conhecer as características dos portadores de blefarospasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial, assim como a resposta ao tratamento utilizando toxina botulínica A. MÉTODOS: Trinta e quatro portadores de blefarospasmo essencial ou espasmo hemifacial foram avaliados quanto a idade, sexo, queixas oculares, tempo de existência da doença, tipo de comprometimento, complicações e resultado do tratamento com toxina botulínica A. RESULTADOS: A mediana da idade dos pacientes foi de 63 anos e a mé...

  5. BOTULISM. STUDIES ON THE MANNER IN WHICH THE TOXIN OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM ACTS UPON THE BODY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Ernest C.; Shevky, Richard

    1923-01-01

    A survey of the results of these experiments shows, we believe conclusively, that in botulinus intoxication in cats, dogs, and rabbits there is a specific effect upon the portions of the autonomic nervous system which Gaskell (14) described as the bulbosacral and prosomatic outflows of connector fibers respectively, which results in a blocking of the nerve impulses of these nerves. The experimental as well as the clinical evidence indicates that there is no damage to the nerves of the thoracicolumbar outflow. The exact location of the damage has not been ascertained nor has the mechanism by which the nerve impulse is blocked been determined. The experiments show, however, that the lesions in these portions of the nervous system are not of central distribution but are peripheral, and that the block cannot be due to an organic break in the conduction apparatus but must be due to some derangement which is relatively unstable. If it were otherwise it would not be possible to induce a physiological response even by massive stimulation, nor could the response be subsequently repeated by stimuli which lie within the limits of normal intensity. The application of the results of these experiments to the clinical manifestations of botulism will be discussed in a later report after the effect of the toxin upon the skeletal motor nerves has been described. PMID:19868755

  6. Massive weight loss decreases corticosteroid-binding globulin levels and increases free cortisol in healthy obese patients: an adaptive phenomenon?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manco, Melania; Fernández-Real, José M; Valera-Mora, Maria E; Déchaud, Henri; Nanni, Giuseppe; Tondolo, Vincenzo; Calvani, Menotti; Castagneto, Marco; Pugeat, Michel; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2007-01-01

    .... So far, no conclusive data relating to this association are available. In this study, we aim to investigate the effects of massive weight loss on cortisol suppressibility, cortisol-binding globulin (CBG...

  7. Evidence for T Cell-dependent Immunity to Bacteroides fragilis in an Intraabdominal Abscess Model

    OpenAIRE

    Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Markham, Richard B.; Zaleznik, Dori F.; Cisneros, Ronald L.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    1982-01-01

    It has been shown that active immunization of rats with the capsular polysaccharide of Bacteroides fragilis protects these animals against abscess development following intraperitoneal challenge with this species. Passive transfer of hyperimmune globulin from immunized animals to nonimmune recipients provided protection against B. fragilis bacteremia in challenged animals, but did not confer protection against abscess development. On the other hand, adoptive transfer of spleen cells from immu...

  8. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Modifies Testosterone Action and Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Huika; Pham, Thy; McWhinney, Brett C.; Ungerer, Jacobus P.; Pretorius, Carel J.; Richard, Derek J.; Mortimer, Robin H.; d'Emden, Michael C.; Richard, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) is the major serum carrier of sex hormones. However, growing evidence suggests that SHBG is internalised and plays a role in regulating intracellular hormone action. This study was to determine whether SHBG plays a role in testosterone uptake, metabolism, and action in the androgen sensitive LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. Internalisation of SHBG and testosterone, the effects of SHBG on testosterone uptake, metabolism, regulation of androgen responsive gen...

  9. Barbiturate ingestion in three adult captive tigers (Panthera tigris and concomitant fatal botulism of one : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Williams

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Zoo animals, including tigers, have been reported to suffer from barbiturate intoxication, with pentabarbitone being most commonly recorded. Clinical signs range from mild ataxia to general anaesthesia with recovery over hours to days with several factors affecting hepatic barbiturate metabolism and tissue partitioning. Botulism is an often fatal intoxication in man, animals, birds and certain fish. The occurrence in carnivores is uncommon to rare, with only 2 reports found of botulism in felids. This report relates to 3 adult captive cohabiting tigers that simultaneously developed signs of abdominal discomfort, progressive ataxia, recumbency and comatose sleep resembling stage 2 anaesthesia, alternating with periods of distracted wakefulness and ataxic movements. These signs occurred 4 days after being fed the carcass of a horse that had ostensibly died of colic and not been euthanased. The male tiger that was the dominant animal in the feeding hierarchy was worst affected and had to be given intravenous fluids. The female that was lowest in hierarchy was unaffected. After 48-72 hours of treatment at the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital the females could eat and made an uneventful recovery. The male tiger showed partial recovery but died during the night a few hours after drinking water on his return to the owner. Necropsy revealed severe oesophageal dilation and impaction with decaying grass; some of this material and water were present in the pharynx and trachea, and had been aspirated causing acute widespread bronchopneumonia. Colon content tested negative for common pesticides but, together with liver, tested positive for barbiturate. Serum taken on the day of admission had tested negative for barbiturate and the residual serum from the 3 animals later tested negative for botulinum toxin. Colon and oesophageal content from the male at necropsy were positive for Clostridium botulinum toxin type C by the mouse bioassay

  10. Botulismo tipo C em perus em Minas Gerais, Brasil Type C botulism in turkeys in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carlos Faria Lobato

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available O botulismo é uma intoxicação causada pela ingestão das toxinas produzidas pelo Clostridium botulinum, que acomete mamíferos e aves e é caracterizado por um quadro de paralisia flácida. Neste trabalho, é descrito um surto de botulismo em perus, ocorrido no município de Santa Luzia, região metropolitana de Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais. Os animais apresentavam incoordenação motora, paralisia flácida das patas, asas e pescoço. Em um intervalo de 24 horas, todos os 29 animais do plantel vieram a óbito. Na necropsia, observou-se a presença de larvas de mosca no inglúvio. Nos soros coletados, foi identificada a toxina botulínica tipo C pelo teste de soroneutraliza��ão em camundongos.Botulism is an intoxication caused by the ingestion of toxins produced by Clostridium botulinum. It affects mammals and birds, and is characterized by flaccid paralysis of the limbs. This report describes an outbreak of botulism in turkeys of various ages in the city of Santa Luzia, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The animals showed incoordination followed by flaccid paralysis involving the muscles of the legs, wings and neck. Within 24 hours, all 29 (100% turkeys died. The post-mortem examination revealed the presence of fly larvae in the crop and the C. botulinum type C toxin was demonstrated in the sera of two affected animals by serum neutralization test.

  11. Purification and biochemical characterization of 11S globulin from chan (Hyptis suaveolens L. Poit) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojórquez-Velázquez, Esaú; Lino-López, Gisela J; Huerta-Ocampo, José A; Barrera-Pacheco, Alberto; Barba de la Rosa, Ana P; Moreno, Abel; Mancilla-Margalli, N Alejandra; Osuna-Castro, Juan A

    2016-02-01

    Chan (Hyptis suaveolens) is a Mesoamerican crop highly appreciated since the pre-Hispanic cultures. Its proteins are a good source of essential amino acids; however, there are no reports on the properties of its individual proteins. In this study, the 11S globulin (Hs11S) was purified and biochemically characterized. The molecular weight of native Hs11S was about 150-300 kDa with isoelectric points of 5.0-5.3, composed by four monomers of 53.5, 52, 51.1 and 49.5 kDa, each formed by one acidic subunit and one basic subunit linked by a disulfide bond. Dynamic light scattering, size exclusion chromatography and native PAGE show that Hs11S is assembled in different oligomeric forms. LC-MS/MS analysis confirmed its identity. Hs11S presents antigenic determinants in common with lupin 11S globulin. Carbohydrate moieties or phosphate groups linked to Hs11S were not detected. This information is very useful in order to exploit and utilize rationally chan 11S globulin in food systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Effects of copper and zinc cations bound by gamma-globulin fraction in Staphylococcus aureus culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheknev, S B; Vostrova, E I; Piskovskaia, L S; Vostrov, A V

    2014-01-01

    AIM. Evaluation of Staphylococcus aureus culture growth dynamics in the presence of gamma-globulin: metal-complexes formed with copper and zinc cations as well as cations of metals used in isolation during the first 24 hours of exposition. . Samples of human gamma-globulin metal-complexes with copper or zinc cations at a final concentration of 0.5 microg/ml were introduced into S. aureus bacteria suspensions containing approximately 10(3) CFU/ml. Suspension at the volume of 5.0 ml was incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 hours with sampling and CFU calculation in the culture at various exposure periods. An accepted micromethod for determination of viability of bacteria was used. The protein transformed by copper cation binding realizes bacteriostatic activity in the logarithmic growth phase of S. aureus culture from 3.0 to 6.0 hours of incubation. Free copper cations inhibit bacterial reproduction at a higher degree than the metal-complex. The protein transformed by zinc cation binding realizes bacteriostatic activity at 1.5 hours of S. aureus incubation. Free zinc cations do not have bacteriostatic effect against S. aureus. Proteins of the gamma-globulin fraction in the range of physiological concentrations forming metal-complexes with copper and zinc cations may be factors that have cytostatic effect against S. aureus bacteria. Zinc cations realize bacteriostatic activity only in gamma-gloulin bound state whereas copper cations--also in the free state.

  13. Transgenic Rabbits That Overexpress the Neonatal Fc Receptor (FcRn) Generate Higher Quantities and Improved Qualities of Anti-Thymocyte Globulin (ATG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyi, Mária; Cervenak, Judit; Bender, Balázs; Kacskovics, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Immune suppression with rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (rATG) is a well-established therapeutic concept for preventing host rejection of transplanted organs and graft versus host disease. Increasing the efficiency of rATG production by reducing the number of animals would be highly beneficial to lower cost and to improve quality standards. We have developed transgenic (Tg) mice and rabbits that overexpress the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and have shown an augmented humoral immune response in these animals. To test whether our FcRn Tg rabbits produced rATG more efficiently, we immunized them and their New Zealand White controls with live Jurkat cells. By day 21 after immunization, Tg animals produced significantly, 1.5 times higher amount of total IgG compared to their wt littermates. Also, the binding efficiency of Tg sera to Jurkat cells and their complement-mediated cytotoxicity was significantly higher. The purified Tg IgG preparation contained 2.6 the amount of Jurkat specific IgG as the wt preparation analyzed by complement-mediated lysis, suggesting greater antigen-specific B cell activation in the Tg rabbits. To test this hypothesis, immunization with ovalbumin and human α1-antitrypsin was performed, resulting in significantly greater numbers of antigen-specific B-cells in the FcRn Tg rabbits as compared with wt controls. The shift towards significantly larger populations of antigen-specific B cells relative to the non-specific B cell pool is further corroborated by our previous findings in FcRn Tg mice. Consequently, our FcRn Tg rabbits have the potential to offer substantial qualitative and quantitative improvements for the production of rATG and other polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies. PMID:24194847

  14. Toxina botulínica no tratamento da dor Toxina botulínica en el tratamiento del dolor Botulinum toxin in pain treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Carlos Gomes Colhado

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A toxina botulínica (TxB, uma das mais potentes toxinas bacterianas conhecidas, tem reconhecidamente ação terapêutica eficaz no tratamento de algumas síndromes dolorosas. Entretanto, algumas de suas indicações ainda estão em fase de comprovação com relação a sua eficácia. O objetivo deste estudo foi revisar o histórico, propriedades farmacológicas e aplicações clinicas da TxB, quando empregada no tratamento de dores de diferentes origens. CONTEÚDO: A TxB é o produto da fermentação do Clostridium Botulinum, uma bactéria anaeróbia Gram-positiva. Comercialmente, as TxB existem nas formas A e B, agentes biológicos obtidos laboratorialmente. A TxB, uma neurotoxina que possui alta afinidade pelas sinapses colinérgicas, ocasiona bloqueio na liberação de acetilcolina pelo terminal nervoso, sem alterar a condução neural de sinais elétricos ou síntese e armazenamento de acetilcolina. Comprovadamente, a TxB pode enfraquecer seletivamente a musculatura dolorosa, interrompendo o ciclo espasmo-dor. Com relação à dor, varias publicações têm demonstrado a eficácia e segurança da TxB-A no tratamento da cefaleia tipo tensão, migrânea, dor lombar crônica e dor miofascial. CONCLUSÕES: A TxB-A é segura e bem tolerada em desordens dolorosas crônicas, onde regimes de farmacoterapia podem sabidamente provocar efeitos colaterais. Outra vantagem é a redução do uso de analgésicos e o tempo de ação de 3 a 4 meses por dose. Entretanto pesquisas futuras serão necessárias para se estabelecer a eficácia da TxB-A em desordens dolorosas crônicas e seu exato mecanismo no alivio da dor, bem como seu potencial em tratamentos multifatoriais.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: La toxina botulínica (TxB, una de las más potentes toxinas bacterianas de que se tiene conocimiento, posee una reconocida acción terapéutica eficaz en el tratamiento de algunos síndromes dolorosos. Sin embargo, algunas de sus

  15. Apoptotic effects of antilymphocyte globulins on human pro-inflammatory CD4+CD28- T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Duftner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pro-inflammatory, cytotoxic CD4(+CD28(- T-cells with known defects in apoptosis have been investigated as markers of premature immuno-senescence in various immune-mediated diseases. In this study we evaluated the influence of polyclonal antilymphocyte globulins (ATG-Fresenius, ATG-F on CD4(+CD28(- T-cells in vivo and in vitro. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Surface and intracellular three colour fluorescence activated cell sorting analyses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 16 consecutive transplant recipients and short-term cell lines were performed. In vivo, peripheral levels of CD3(+CD4(+CD28(- T-cells decreased from 3.7 ± 7.1% before to 0 ± 0% six hours after ATG-F application (P = 0.043 in 5 ATG-F treated but not in 11 control patients (2.9 ± 2.9% vs. 3.9 ± 3.0%. In vitro, ATG-F induced apoptosis even in CD4(+CD28(- T-cells, which was 4.3-times higher than in CD4(+CD28(+ T-cells. ATG-F evoked apoptosis was partially reversed by the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl (Cbz-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe-fluoromethylketone (zVAD-fmk and prednisolon-21-hydrogensuccinate. ATG-F triggered CD25 expression and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and induced down-regulation of the type 1 chemokine receptors CXCR-3, CCR-5, CX3CR-1 and the central memory adhesion molecule CD62L predominately in CD4(+CD28(- T-cells. CONCLUSION: In summary, in vivo depletion of peripheral CD3(+CD4(+CD28(- T-cells by ATG-F in transplant recipients was paralleled in vitro by ATG-F induced apoptosis. CD25 expression and chemokine receptor down-regulation in CD4(+CD28(- T-cells only partly explain the underlying mechanism.

  16. Long-term outcome of 25 children and adolescents with severe aplastic anemia treated with antithymocyte globulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de-Medeiros C.R.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe aplastic anemia (SAA is probably an immune-mediated disorder, and immunosuppressive therapy is recommended for patients with no available donor for bone marrow transplant. Between October 1984 and November 1987, 25 consecutive children and adolescents with SAA with no HLA-compatible marrow donor received equine antithymocyte globulin (ATG (15 mg kg-1 day-1 for 10 days. The patients were evaluated 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after starting ATG treatment. Thereafter, patients were evaluated yearly until July 1998. Median age was 10 years (range, 1.5-20 years, granulocyte counts on referral ranged from 0.032 to 1.4 x 10(9/l (median 0.256 x 10(9/l, and 12 patients had granulocyte counts <0.2 x 10(9/l. At a median follow-up of 9.6 years (range, 8.6-11.8 years, 10 patients (40% remained alive with good marrow function. No morphologic evidence of hematological clonal disorders has been observed, although two patients probably have acquired clonal chromosomal abnormalities (trisomy 8 and del(6q21, respectively. Responses to ATG were observed between 6 weeks and 6 months from the start of treatment in 60% of evaluable patients. The response rate was not different in patients whose granulocyte count at diagnosis was <0.2 x 10(9/l, or in those who were <10 years of age. This study supports the view that, when compared with supportive measures, ATG is an effective treatment for children or adolescents with SAA. Although these results are inferior to those reported for marrow transplantation or more intensive immunosuppressive regimens, these patients who responded to ATG are long-term survivors with stable peripheral blood counts and a low rate of relapse.

  17. Toxina botulínica y su empleo en la patología oral y maxilofacial Botulinum toxin and its use in oral and maxillofacial pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Martínez-Pérez

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Las toxinas botulínicas son exotoxinas de la bacteria formadora de esporas Clostridim botulinum y los agentes causantes del botulismo. Cuando se inyecta en el músculo produce una parálisis flácida. El efecto clínico está directamente relacionado con la dosis y debe ajustarse para cada caso concreto. La Toxina botulínica ha demostrado en los más de veinte años en que se está utilizando que es un fármaco seguro. Las indicaciones de la toxina botulínica en la actualidad incluyen todas aquellas patologías que resultan de la hiperfunción muscular y la disfunción autonómica.Abstract: Botilinum toxins are exotoxins of the bacteria that form the Clostridium botulinum spores and the causative agents of botulism. When injected into the muscle flaccid paralysis is produced. The clinical effect is directly related with the dose and is should be adjusted for each particular case. over the last twenty years that it has been in use, the botulinum toxin has shown itself to be a reliable drug. Current indications for the use of botulinum toxin include all those pathologies which are the results of muscle hyperfunction and autonomic dysfunction.

  18. Toxina botulínica tipo A para el manejo del dolor en pacientes con síndrome de dolor miofascial crónico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Torres Huerta, J.C; Hernández Santos, J.R; Ortiz Ramírez, E.M; Tenopala Villegas, S

    2010-01-01

    ... botulínica tipo A para el manejo del dolor en pacientes con síndrome de dolor miofascial crónico J.C. Torres Huerta, J.R. Hernández Santos, E.M. Ortiz Ramírez y S. Tenopala Villegas 22 Nota cl...

  19. Anti-HBs levels in infants of hepatitis B carrier mothers after delayed active immunization with recombinant vaccine concomitant with DTP-polio vaccine: Is there need for a second dose of HBIg?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Grosheide (Pia Maria); R. Del Canho (R.); M. Voogd (M.); R.A. Heijtink; S.W. Schalm (Solko)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe need for an additional dose of hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIg) was studied by comparing infants receiving 1 ml HBIg at birth followed by hepatitis B immunization, concomitant with DTP-polio vaccine, at 3, 4, 5 and 11 months (schedule E), with infants receiving the same schedule

  20. Eutrophication and Bacterial Pathogens as Risk Factors for Avian Botulism Outbreaks in Wetlands Receiving Effluents from Urban Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Dolors; Laguna, Celia; Díaz-Sánchez, Sandra; Sánchez, Sergio; Chicote, Álvaro; Florín, Máximo; Mateo, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Due to the scarcity of water resources in the “Mancha Húmeda” Biosphere Reserve, the use of treated wastewater has been proposed as a solution for the conservation of natural threatened floodplain wetlands. In addition, wastewater treatment plants of many villages pour their effluent into nearby natural lakes. We hypothesized that certain avian pathogens present in wastewater may cause avian mortalities which would trigger avian botulism outbreaks. With the aim of testing our hypothesis, 24 locations distributed in three wetlands, two that receive wastewater effluents and one serving as a control, were monitored during a year. Sediment, water, water bird feces, and invertebrates were collected for the detection of putative avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), Salmonella spp., Clostridium perfringens type A, and Clostridium botulinum type C/D. Also, water and sediment physicochemical properties were determined. Overall, APEC, C. perfringens, and C. botulinum were significantly more prevalent in samples belonging to the wetlands which receive wastewater. The occurrence of a botulism outbreak in one of the studied wetlands coincided with high water temperatures and sediment 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), a decrease in water redox potential, chlorophyll a, and sulfate levels, and an increase in water inorganic carbon levels. The presence of C. botulinum in bird feces before the onset of the outbreak indicates that carrier birds exist and highlights the risk of botulinum toxin production in their carcasses if they die by other causes such as bacterial diseases, which are more probable in wastewater wetlands. PMID:24795377

  1. Botulismo tipo C em ganso ocorrido em Minas Gerais, Brasil Type C botulism in a goose at Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carlos Faria Lobato

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Botulismo é uma intoxicação causada pela ingestão das toxinas produzidas pelo Clostridium botulinum, que acomete mamíferos e aves, caracterizando-se por um quadro de paralisia flácida. Neste trabalho, é descrito um caso de botulismo em ganso, ocorrido no município de Santa Luzia, região metropolitana de Belo Horizonte, no Estado de Minas Gerais. Ao exame clínico, o animal apresentava-se com um quadro de paralisia flácida dos músculos do pescoço, das pernas e asas, além de apresentar ainda desprendimento de penas. A necropsia não revelou lesões significativas. Foi colhido o soro do animal e submetido ao teste de soroneutralização em camundongo, que identificou a toxina de C. botulinum tipo C.Botulism is an intoxication caused by the ingestion of toxins produced by Clostridium botulinum, that affects mammals and birds, characterized by a flaceid paralysis. This report describes a case of botulism in a goose in Santa Luzia, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Clinical examinations showed dropping feathers and flaccid paralysis involving the muscles of the wings, legs and neck. post-mortem examination showed no significant gross or macroscopic lesions C. botulinum type C toxin was demonstrated in the serum of the affected animal through serum neutralization test in mice.

  2. Two-family outbreak of botulism associated with the consumption of smoked ribs in Sichuan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ling; Chen, Xueping; Liu, Shujie; Zhou, Zengrong; Yang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    On September 22, 2013, two patients from Sichuan Province, China presented with symptoms of food-borne botulism, a rare but fatal illness caused by the consumption of foods containing Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins. Investigators reviewed the medical charts and food consumption histories, and interviewed patients and family members. Food samples and clinical specimens were tested for botulinum toxin and neurotoxin-producing Clostridium species by standard methods. The first two index cases presented with cranial neuropathies and flaccid paralysis, and required mechanical ventilation. There were 12 confirmed outbreak-associated cases. Botulinum toxin type A was identified in the smoked ribs, and all of the patients had consumed the smoked ribs from the same local restaurant. The smoked ribs contained no added salt, sugar, or preservative. Botulinum toxin production likely resulted from the cold-smoking preparation method and inappropriate refrigeration. Smoked ribs produced by a local restaurant, contaminated with type A botulism, was the contributor to this outbreak. The supervision of food safety should be strengthened to prevent future outbreaks in China. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Rabbit antithymocyte globulin (Thymoglobulin®) impairs the thymic output of both conventional and regulatory CD4+ T cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult patients

    OpenAIRE

    Na, Il-Kang; Wittenbecher, Friedrich; Dziubianau, Mikalai; Herholz, Anne; Mensen, Angela; Kunkel, Désirée; Blau, Olga; Blau, Igor; Thiel, Eckhard; Uharek, Lutz; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Rieger, Kathrin; Thiel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™ is used to prevent graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Common disadvantages of treatment are infectious complications. The effects of rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™ on thymic function have not been well-studied. Multicolor flow cytometry was used to analyze the kinetics of conventional and regulatory T cells in adult patients treated (n=12) or not treated (n=8) with rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Gen...

  4. Gamma globulin fraction of the proteinogram and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boixeda, Ramon; Capdevila, Josep Antón; Vicente, Vanessa; Palomera, Elisabet; Juanola, Jordi; Albiach, Laia; Rex, Ainhoa; Almirall, Jordi

    2017-08-10

    To evaluate the levels of the serum gamma globulin fraction in proteinograms as a biomarker to assess the severity, and to predict the mortality and new exacerbations in patients admitted for an exacerbation of a COPD. The VIRAE study was carried out on a cohort of patients hospitalized for an exacerbation of probable infectious origin of COPD over a period of 2 years. The levels of the serum gamma globulin fraction were analyzed in the proteinogram of 120 patients. The main clinical indicators of severity were also evaluated. Key features were compared in 2 groups (gamma fraction in the proteinogram greater or less than 6.6g/dl). The levels of the serum gamma fraction in the proteinogram correlated with the FEV1 (P=.009), the CRP (P=.04), and the number of readmissions after 6 months of hospitalization (P=.04). We observed a good association with the GOLD scale, the BODE index and the mMRC dyspnea scale; and also with treatment with oral corticoids and home oxygen therapy. We did not find it to be a good predictor of mortality, despite observing increased mortality rates one year after hospital admission in patients with low levels of the factor. The levels of the gamma globulin fraction in proteinograms has a good correlation with the FEV1. In addition, they are associated with a greater severity of patients with COPD. This simple biomarker may be useful in identifying high-risk patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Ecogeographic variability and genetic diversity associated with seed albumins, globulins and prolamins patterns in Vicia taxa from Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechkri, Sakina; Medoukali, Imane; Khelifi, Douadi

    2017-12-01

    Genetic variability was studied in 78 populations of locally collected Vicia L. taxa for seed albumins, globulins and prolamins patterns by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) along with an ecogeographic characterization of sites investigated. 131, 119 and 98 bands were respectively used for albumin, globulin and prolamin cluster analysis. Dendrograms based on the Jaccard index and the UPGMA method were generated and the degree of genetic diversity between and within taxa was evaluated. Five clusters were generated from albumins, six from globulins and four from prolamins patterns. The results reflect the great diversity of storage proteins and a high correlation was obtained between the three studied fractions. Several accessions present specific bands which could be used as a discriminatory marker both on intra and interspecific levels. No clear relationships were seen between the groups according to their geographical origin. Data obtained from ecogeographic investigation can be used for future collecting missions.

  6. Integrated Immune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarnece

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to replace several recent studies about astronaut immune systems with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling. The study will address lack of in-flight data to determine the inflight status of immune systems, physiological stress, viral immunity, to determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight, and to determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  7. Gamma globulins-induced interaction between two red blood cells: forces measurement with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kisung; Muravyov, Alexei; Semenov, Alexei; Wagner, Christian; Priezzhev, Alexander; Lyubin, Eugeny; Fedyanin, Andrey

    2017-03-01

    The protein contribution to the red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is studied using the in-house made two-channeled optical tweezers. The cells interaction was characterized using two forces: the force required for separating two cells (FD - disaggregating force) and the force required for holding them from their spontaneous aggregation (FA - aggregating force). The gamma globulin solutions with/without albumin were used to induce the RBC aggregation. The strong interaction (3-10 pN) between the cells was measured within the contact formed using optical tweezers. We found that FD becomes stronger as the gamma globulin concentration increases, while the addition of albumin to the solution led to the significant (few fold) enhancement of the cells interaction forces. However, despite of the strong interaction between the cells their spontaneous overlapping was not observed, unlike the case in plasma, where the cells did increase their overlapping surface, when attached with small interacting surface and released from optical traps. This work in addition to our previous work with model solutions of fibrinogen allows us to conclude that the synergy of blood components is one of the most important features that contribute to the reversible RBC aggregation.

  8. Actualización sobre aplicaciones de la toxina botulínica en estética facial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Alcolea López

    Full Text Available En la actualidad, la toxina botulínica (TB es parte importante en los tratamientos médico-estéticos de la cara. Este trabajo hace una aproximación didáctica, con fines prácticos formativos, sobre el manejo de la TB para el rejuvenecimiento facial en el ejercicio de la Cirugía Plástica y Estética. Entender la anatomía del envejecimiento es clave para manejar de forma integral la TB junto con otras técnicas de la especialidad destinadas a combatir el envejecimiento, considerándolo en su conjunto. Resumimos los conocimientos actuales sobre el empleo de las inyecciones de TB en el tercio superior de la cara.

  9. Tratamento do blefaroespasmo e distonias faciais correlatas com toxina botulínica: estudo de 16 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Roberto Murillo Limongi de Souza

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a eficácia do tratamento com Botox® e estudar o comportamento destes pacientes após aplicações sucessivas, dando ênfase ao possível efeito de tolerância após o uso prolongado deste medicamento. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado estudo prospectivo em 16 pacientes com distonias faciais no ambulatório de Oftalmologia, no Setor de Plástica Ocular do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, entre abril de 1998 a março de 1999. Todos os pacientes foram submetidos ao exame oftalmológico completo, neurológico e tomografia computadorizada de crânio. Os pacientes com sintomas importantes de espasmo foram tratados com aplicação da toxina botulínica tipo A (Botox®. Dez pacientes eram do sexo feminino. A idade média foi 64,75 anos. RESULTADOS: Dentre as distonias faciais, o espasmo hemifacial foi o mais encontrado, num total de 8 pacientes.O índice de sucesso do Botox®foi de 87,5 %, com duração média do efeito de 30 a 90 dias, variando de acordo com o número de aplicações. CONCLUSÕES: O tratamento dos espasmos faciais com a toxina botulínica mostrou-se eficaz em 87,5 % de nossos pacientes.

  10. Eutrophication and bacterial pathogens as risk factors for avian botulism outbreaks in wetlands receiving effluents from urban wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anza, Ibone; Vidal, Dolors; Laguna, Celia; Díaz-Sánchez, Sandra; Sánchez, Sergio; Chicote, Alvaro; Florín, Máximo; Mateo, Rafael

    2014-07-01

    Due to the scarcity of water resources in the "Mancha Húmeda" Biosphere Reserve, the use of treated wastewater has been proposed as a solution for the conservation of natural threatened floodplain wetlands. In addition, wastewater treatment plants of many villages pour their effluent into nearby natural lakes. We hypothesized that certain avian pathogens present in wastewater may cause avian mortalities which would trigger avian botulism outbreaks. With the aim of testing our hypothesis, 24 locations distributed in three wetlands, two that receive wastewater effluents and one serving as a control, were monitored during a year. Sediment, water, water bird feces, and invertebrates were collected for the detection of putative avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), Salmonella spp., Clostridium perfringens type A, and Clostridium botulinum type C/D. Also, water and sediment physicochemical properties were determined. Overall, APEC, C. perfringens, and C. botulinum were significantly more prevalent in samples belonging to the wetlands which receive wastewater. The occurrence of a botulism outbreak in one of the studied wetlands coincided with high water temperatures and sediment 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), a decrease in water redox potential, chlorophyll a, and sulfate levels, and an increase in water inorganic carbon levels. The presence of C. botulinum in bird feces before the onset of the outbreak indicates that carrier birds exist and highlights the risk of botulinum toxin production in their carcasses if they die by other causes such as bacterial diseases, which are more probable in wastewater wetlands. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Most probable origin of coeliac disease is low immune globulin A in the intestine caused by malfunction of Peyer's patches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, S.J.; Mulder-Bos, G.C.

    2006-01-01

    Coeliac disease frequency increases by obscure reasons and affects in some Western countries as much as 1% of the populations. The second one of monozygotic twins does not develop the disease in 100% but only in 20-50%. To unravel these mysteries, literature was searched to determine the disease

  12. Comparison of an anti-rabies human monoclonal antibody combination with human polyclonal anti-rabies immune globulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, Jaap; Marissen, Wilfred E.; Weldon, William C.; Niezgoda, Michael; Hanlon, Cathleen A.; Rice, Amy B.; Kruif, John de; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Bakker, Alexander B. H.; Rupprecht, Charles E.

    2006-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates human mortality from endemic canine rabies to be 55,000 deaths/year. Limited supply hampers the accessibility of appropriate lifesaving treatment, particularly in areas where rabies is endemic. Anti-rabies antibodies are key to protection against lethal

  13. Protein chemical characterization of Gc globulin (vitamin D-binding protein) isoforms; Gc-1f, Gc-1s and Gc-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Maja; Jørgensen, Charlotte S; Laursen, Inga

    2007-01-01

    Gc globulin, also called vitamin D-binding protein, is a plasma protein involved in the extracellular actin-scavenger system, vitamin D transport and possibly also other biological activities. Low levels of Gc globulin have been found to correlate with multiple organ failure and non......-survival of patients with fulminant hepatic failure and trauma. Here, we characterize the dominant isoforms of plasma-derived Gc globulin from Cohn fraction IV paste with respect to amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications. Gc globulin was purified in large scale and the isoforms separated by ion...... (Gc-1s) and a Thr/Lys substitution (Gc-2) in agreement with DNA sequencing studies. The commercial preparations were found to represent mainly one or two isoforms. An O-linked glycan with a mass of 656 Da and terminating with a sialic acid residue was detected on a minor proportion of Gc globulin...

  14. Toxina botulínica aplicada bajo guía ecográfica en el tratamiento de la sialorrea: reporete de dos casos

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez García, Irene Camila; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.; Jiménez Fandiño, Luis Humberto; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.; Jiménez Fandiño, Luis Humberto; Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana- Hospital Universitario San Ignacio, Bogotá, Colombia.; Otalora, Andrés; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.

    2016-01-01

     Introducción: la sialorrea es una condición frecuente en pacientes con enfermedades neuromusculares que genera problemas sociales y médicos en los pacientes, y para la cual existen múltiples tratamientos. Métodos: se aplicó toxina botulínica bajo guía ultrasonográfica en dos pacientes y se midió la severidad de la sialorrea previa y posterior a la aplicación. Resultados: se evidenció mejoría de la salivación excesiva dada por la escala de medición. Conclusiones: la toxina botulínica podría s...

  15. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies of two different rabbit antithymocyte globulin dosing regimens: results of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchler, Matthias; Longuet, Hélène; Lemoine, Roxane; Herr, Florence; Gatault, Philippe; Thibault, Gilles; Ternant, David; Foulon, Christine; Pilorge, Bernadette; Lemay, Djamila; Sung, Crystal; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Baron, Christophe; Lebranchu, Yvon

    2013-03-01

    Rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG; Thymoglobulin(®)) is currently used to prevent acute rejection in kidney transplantation. The dose and regimen of rATG have not been optimized. Moreover, the impact of different treatment regimens on T-cell phenotype reconstitution remains unknown. We conducted a prospective randomized study of 17 renal transplant patients to determine the pharmacokinetics of total and active (bound to human cells) rATG and T-cell phenotype reconstitution after rATG administration. Patients received rATG at a total dose of 6mg/kg, administered either as 1.5mg/kg/day on days 0-3 (Group 1, n=8) or 3mg/kg on days 0 and 3 (Group 2, n=9). All patients received tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and steroids. Blood samples were assayed for total rATG by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and active rATG by flow cytometry. Maximum concentrations and terminal half-lives were similar between the two groups but at month 3 Group 1 had significantly lower values for total rATG (concentration was 6.2±1.1μg/mL versus 10.2±2.9μg/mL in Group 2, p=0.027) and total rATG dose-normalized AUC (374±83dayg/mL versus 508±149dayg/mL in Group 2, p=0.046). Time to sub-therapeutic levels (memory CD4(+) T-cells increased to a similar extent in both groups (Group 1: 38±18% at baseline, 74±23% at one year, p=0.009; Group 2: 32±14% at baseline, 65±14% at one year, p=0.001). In conclusion, our results suggest that the dosing regimen for rATG induction influences pharmacokinetic parameters without affecting the quality of immune reconstitution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Rabbit antithymocyte globulin (thymoglobulin) impairs the thymic output of both conventional and regulatory CD4+ T cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Il-Kang; Wittenbecher, Friedrich; Dziubianau, Mikalai; Herholz, Anne; Mensen, Angela; Kunkel, Désirée; Blau, Olga; Blau, Igor; Thiel, Eckhard; Uharek, Lutz; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Rieger, Kathrin; Thiel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™ is used to prevent graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Common disadvantages of treatment are infectious complications. The effects of rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™ on thymic function have not been well-studied. Multicolor flow cytometry was used to analyze the kinetics of conventional and regulatory T cells in adult patients treated (n=12) or not treated (n=8) with rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™ during the first 6 months after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Patients treated with rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™ had almost undetectable levels of recent thymic emigrants (CD45RA(+)CD31(+)) of both conventional and regulatory CD4T cells throughout the 6 months after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation whereas CD4(+)CD45RA-memory T cells were less affected, but their levels were also significantly lower than in patients not treated with rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™. In vitro, rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™ induced apoptosis and cytolysis of human thymocytes, and its cytotoxic effects were greater than those of rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Fresenius™. Rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™ in combination with a conditioning regimen strongly impairs thymic recovery of both conventional and regulatory CD4(+) T cells. The sustained depletion of conventional and regulatory CD4(+)T cells carries a high risk of both infections and graft-versus-host disease. Our data indicate that patients treated with rabbit antithymocyte globulin-Genzyme™ could benefit from thymus-protective therapies and that trials comparing this product with other rabbit antithymocyte globulin preparations or lymphocyte-depleting compounds would be informative.

  17. Immunizations - diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000331.htm Immunizations - diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Immunizations (vaccines or vaccinations) help protect you from some ...

  18. Childhood Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lowest levels in history, thanks to years of immunization. Children must get at least some vaccines before ... child provide protection for many years, adults need immunizations too. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  19. Neurotoxins from Clostridium botulinum (serotype A) isolated from the soil of Mendoza (Argentina) differ from the A-Hall archetype and from that causing infant botulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, P; Troncoso, M; Patterson, S I; López Gómez, C; Fernandez, R; Sosa, M A

    2016-10-01

    The type A of neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum is the prevalent serotype in strains of Mendoza. The soil is the main reservoir for C.botulinum and is possibly one of the infection sources in infant botulism. In this study, we characterized and compared autochthonous C. botulinum strains and their neurotoxins. Bacterial samples were obtained from the soil and from fecal samples collected from children with infant botulism. We first observed differences in the appearance of the colonies between strains from each source and with the A Hall control strain. In addition, purified neurotoxins of both strains were found to be enriched in a band of 300 kDa, whereas the A-Hall strain was mainly made up of a band of ∼600 kDa. This finding is in line with the lack of hemagglutinating activity of the neurotoxins under study. Moreover, the proteolytic activity of C. botulinum neurotoxins was evaluated against SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein receptor) proteins from rat brain. It was observed that both, SNAP 25 (synaptosomal-associated protein 25) and VAMP 2 (vesicle-associated membrane protein) were cleaved by the neurotoxins isolated from the soil strains, whereas the neurotoxins from infant botulism strains only induced a partial cleavage of VAMP 2. On the other hand, the neurotoxin from the A-Hall strain was able to cleave both proteins, though at a lesser extent. Our data indicate that the C.botulinum strain isolated from the soil, and its BoNT, exhibit different properties compared to the strain obtained from infant botulism patients, and from the A-Hall archetype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Konsentrasi Protein Total, Albumin, dan Globulin Anak Kambing Peranakan Etawah Setelah Pemberian Berbagai Sediaan Kolostrum* (TOTAL PROTEIN, ALBUMIN, AND GLOBULIN CONCENTRATIONS ON ETTAWAH CROSSBREED NEONATES FOLLOWING THE ADMINISTRATION OF VARIOUS FORM O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Esfandiari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to study the profile of total protein, albumin, and globulin concentrationson Ettawah crossbreed neonates after consuming various colostrums. Twenty four healthy neonatal kidswere used in this study. The neonates were divided into four groups. Each group received fresh maternal(goat colostrum, frozen-thawed bovine colostrum, bovine spray dried colostrum, and bovine powdercommercial colostrum, respectively. Colostrums were given at 10% of body weight directly after birth andfollowed by the same amount every 12 hours, for three days. The blood was taken from jugular vein at 0, 12,24, 48, 72, and 168 hours after birth to determine total protein, albumin, and globulin concentrations.Results of this study indicated that the serum total protein and globulin concentration increased andreached the peak at 24 hours after birth. Compared to the concentration at birth, the increase of totalprotein concentration were 62.77%, 59.26%, 48.05%, and 66.67% in fresh maternal (goat, frozen-thawedbovine, bovine spray dried, and commercial bovine colostrum, respectively. Serum globulin concentrationincreased 4.9, 4.4, 4.8, and 14.6 times in fresh matermnal goat, frozen-thawed bovine, spray dried, andcommercial bovine colostrums respectively, compared to the concentration at birth. In conclusion, theconsumption of various colostrums i.e. fresh maternal goat colostrums, bovine colostrums (frozen-thawed,spray dried and commercial colostrums would increase the concentration of blood total protein and globulin,which both reached the highest concentration at 24 h after birth.

  1. Genetic evidence that raised sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, John R B; Weedon, Michael N; Langenberg, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies consistently show that circulating sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels are lower in type 2 diabetes patients than non-diabetic individuals, but the causal nature of this association is controversial. Genetic studies can help dissect causal directions of epidemiologi...

  2. 6-methylprednisolone does not impair anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) immunosuppressive activity in non-human primates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preville, [No Value; Sick, E; Beauchard, S; Ossevoort, M; Tiollier, J; Revillard, JP; Jonker, Margreet

    2001-01-01

    Background: Induction treatments with anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) in solid organ transplantation may enhance the efficacy of maintenance immunosuppressive therapy. Since ATG can trigger Fas (CD95) mediated T cell apoptosis, a process antagonized in vitro by corticosteroids, an important issue is

  3. Immunization Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be given as part of a combination vaccine so that a child gets fewer shots. Talk with your doctor about ... Kids Teens Frequently Asked Questions About Immunizations Your Child's Immunizations Is the Flu Vaccine a Good Idea for Your Family? Word! Immunizations ...

  4. The biomarker sex hormone-binding globulin - from established applications to emerging trends in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Markus A; Seifert-Klauss, Vanadin; Luppa, Peter B

    2015-10-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a serum glycoprotein exhibiting the unique feature of binding sex steroids with high affinity and specificity. Its serum levels are regulated not only by androgens and estrogens but also by thyroid hormones and other metabolic factors. Several disease conditions are accompanied by altered SHBG levels such as hyper- and hypoandrogenism, thyroid disorders, pituitary diseases, liver disorders, and breast as well as prostate cancer. Additionally, several drugs and alcohol consumption influence serum concentrations of SHBG. In some cases, altered SHBG levels are a specific result of the underlying pathology. In others, they merely constitute an epiphenomenon, which still might offer the possibility of using serum measurements of SHBG as surrogate marker. This review article portrays the different disorders associated with altered SHBG levels and discusses the usefulness of SHBG as disease biomarker from a clinicians as well as from an endocrinological researchers point of view. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dissociation, aggregation and denaturation of sesame alpha-globulin in urea and guanidine hydrochloride solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, V; Nandi, P K

    1977-01-01

    The effect of urea and GuHCl on the major protein of sesame seed (Sesamum indicum L.), alpha-globulin, has been investigated by turbidity, sedimentation velocity, viscosity, difference spectra and fluorescence spectral measurements. The protein undergoes dissociation, aggregation and denaturation in the presence of the above denaturants. There is a critical concentration of the denaturant where aggregation is maximum. Both denaturation and aggregation are lower in buffers of high ionic strength. Dissociation and aggregation have been explained by considering two types of subunits present in the protein molecule, one leading to smaller sedimenting component and the other producing the aggregate. The amino acid analysis shows that the aggregated fraction is rich in aliphatic amino acid residues. The endothermic nature of the aggregation process has been considered to arise from hydrophobic interaction of aliphatic side chains of the relevant subunits. The protein exists in a more denatured state in GuHCl than in urea solution.

  6. Severe Refractory Immune Thrombocytopenia Successfully Treated with High-Dose Pulse Cyclophosphamide and Eltrombopag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiz Anwer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe refractory ITP is clinically challenging and a variety of single or combination chemotherapies have been tried with limited outcome. We report a case of ITP that was unresponsive to multiple agents including high-dose steroid, IVIG, Rho(D immune globulin, rituximab, cyclosporine, azathioprine, vincristine, mycophenolate mofetil, romiplostim, and eltrombopag; however, it achieved complete remission with combination treatment of cyclophosphamide and eltrombopag.

  7. Comparison of Two Soy Globulins on the Dynamic-Mechanical Properties of the Dough and the Quality of Steamed Bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Li Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of the soy protein concentrate (CSP and 7S and 11S soy globulin on wheat dough and steamed bread (SB, mixing properties of the dough were assessed by farinograph and dynamic-mechanical analyzer (DMA. The quality attributes of SB were assessed by texture profile analyzer (TPA, sensory analysis, and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The results showed that CSP, 7S, or 11S (each from 2.0 to 4.0% significantly decreased gluten content (from 29.4 to 26.0, 36.7 to 31.8, and 31.6 to 30.7%, when those were added to wheat flour. The CSP/wheat dough stability was increased (from 6.5 to 8.4, 6.5 to 8.5, and 6.5 to 8.3 min and the degree of softening was decreased (from 71.0 to 68.0, 71.0 to 64.0, and 71.0 to 62.0 min, but 7S or 11S had the opposite result. Moreover, the ratio of 7S and 11S has a significant effect on the quality of the dough. The storage modulus and loss modulus of soy/wheat dough decreased in the order of CSP, control, 11S soy globulin, and 7S soy globulin. The hardness, chewiness, and cohesiveness of SB decreased in the order of control, CSP, 11S soy globulin, and 7S soy globulin. Microstructure demonstrated that gluten network was interfered by SPC, 7S, and 11S soy protein, which was in agreement with the texture analysis index. The quality of SB with 3% 11S was the best in texture, microstructure, and sensory. These findings indicate that 11S has the potential to be used as a special soy protein for SB making.

  8. Immunizing Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Jody Macdonald

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the complex contexts within which Canadian health professionals engage in immunizing children and focuses on the Canadian practice guidelines and current scientific evidence that direct Canadian health professional competencies. The article begins by presenting two current global vaccine initiatives and links these to immunization in Canada. A selected literature review identifies current best immunization practices. With the purpose of promoting quality improvement, three key Canadian immunization competencies for health professional are highlighted: communication with parents, including those who are experiencing vaccine hesitancy; administration of immunizing agents; and documentation of immunizations. Health professionals are encouraged to reflect on immunization competencies and ensure evidence-based practices underpin vaccine delivery in their primary care settings.

  9. Alpha-1-acute phase globulin in the blood of tunicamycin-injected rats. Isolation of the non-glycosylated form, its inhibitory properties and synthesis in liver slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koj, A; Bereta, J; Dubin, A; Kurdowska, A; Chindemi, P; Regoeczi, E

    1986-01-01

    Plasma of rats injected with tunicamycin (2 micrograms/g body wt) shows on crossed immunoelectrophoresis the presence of an additional, slowly migrating component of alpha 1-acute-phase globulin (alpha 1-AP-globulin). The native and modified forms of alpha 1-AP-globulin were jointly isolated on the column of immobilized antibodies and then separated by chromatofocusing on polybuffer exchanger. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate demonstrated that tunicamycin-induced form of rat alpha 1-AP-globulin has Mr of 50,000 and is devoid of carbohydrates as inferred from the lack of staining with Schiff reagent. However, during incubation with papain in vitro it is only slightly less effective than mature glycosylated alpha 1-AP-globulin (Mr 68 000) in inhibiting hydrolysis of CBZ-Lys-ONp. Incubation of liver slices from control and tunicamycin-injected rats with 14C-leucine demonstrated that tunicamycin reduces synthesis and release to the medium of alpha 1-AP-globulin and some other plasma proteins, but the proportion of aglyco-alpha 1-AP-globulin is higher than in plasma.

  10. Qualidade de vida e custos diretos em pacientes com blefaroespasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial, tratados com toxina botulínica-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osaki Midori Hentona

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os custos e a qualidade de vida dos pacientes com blefaroespasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial, submetidos à terapia com a toxina botulínica-A. MÉTODOS: Vinte e oito pacientes, sendo 16 com blefaroespasmo essencial e 12 com espasmo hemifacial, tratados com toxina botulínica-A, foram avaliados por meio de dois instrumentos: o SF-36 e a Escala de Disfunção de Blefaroespasmo. Os custos foram calculados segundo o número de unidades da toxina utilizadas por cada paciente no período de um ano. RESULTADOS: O custo total direto foi estimado em 1081,62 reais por ano (±89,39 para blefaroespasmo essencial e 618,06 reais por ano (±60,06 para espasmo hemifacial, para tratamento ambulatorial (p<0,001. Antes do tratamento, todos os domínios do SF-36 foram significantemente piores em ambas as doenças. Sob tratamento efetivo com toxina botulínica-A, os aumentos nos índices do SF-36 evidenciaram mudanças nas taxas de saúde geral da população em estudo, com diferença estatisticamente significante entre as respostas pré e pós-tratamento (p<0,05. Relacionando-se o SF-36 com Escala de Disfunção de Blefaroespasmo, foram observadas nos casos de blefaroespasmo essencial, relações significantes positivas (capacidade funcional, estado geral, aspecto emocional e aspectos sociais, ao passo que nos pacientes com espasmo hemifacial não foi encontrada nenhuma correlação. CONCLUSÃO: Este estudo demonstra notável impacto negativo das doenças na qualidade de vida desses pacientes, e uma significante melhora em ambas as doenças após tratamento com toxina botulínica-A. Além disso, os dados fornecem subsídios para justificar o alto custo da aquisição da toxina botulínica-A, devido a seus consideráveis benefícios para a qualidade de vida.

  11. Recombinant anti-monkey CD3 immunotoxin depletes peripheral lymph node T lymphocytes more effectively than rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin in naïve baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamala, Isaac; Matar, Abraham J; Farkash, Evan; Wang, Zhirui; Huang, Christene A; Sachs, David H

    2013-12-01

    T cell depletion is an important procedure for both experimental and therapeutic immune modulation. Rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), which is a commonly used T cell depletion antibody in clinical organ and cell transplantation protocols, is effective in temporarily depleting peripheral blood T lymphocytes but only moderately effective in depleting peripheral lymph node T cells which comprise the majority of T lymphocytes. A recombinant anti-CD3 immunotoxin, A-dmDT390-scfbDb (C207), has been developed and shown in an initial study to retain the lymph node depleting properties of conjugated CD3 immunotoxin. This agent could potentially be used synergistically with or as a replacement for rabbit ATG in preclinical primate models of transplantation. We directly compared the peripheral blood and lymph node depleting abilities of this recombinant anti-CD3 immunotoxin and rabbit ATG in naïve animals at clinically tolerated doses. Baboons were treated with a full course of either rabbit ATG (n=2) or CD3 immunotoxin (n=3). Peripheral blood and lymph node T lymphocytes were measured before and following treatment. Peripheral blood CD3+ cells fell below 100cells/μL in every animal. In the two animals receiving ATG, CD3+ cells represented 53% and 68% of lymph node cells two days following a full course of rabbit ATG. In contrast, CD3+ cells represented 3%, 5%, and 38% in lymph nodes following a full course of CD3-IT. Thus, recombinant anti-monkey CD3 immunotoxin showed improved peripheral lymph node T lymphocyte depletion to rabbit ATG and spared other immune cells. © 2013.

  12. Paw preference in dogs: relations between lateralised behaviour and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, A; Siniscalchi, M; Frate, A; Vallortigara, G

    2004-08-31

    Paw use in a task consisting of the removal of a piece of adhesive paper from the snout was investigated in 80 mongrel and pure-bred domestic dogs (Canis familiaris). Population lateralisation was observed, but in opposite directions in the two sexes (animals were not desexed): males preferentially used their left paw, females their right paw. The relationship between immune function and paw preference was then investigated. Some immune parameters (total number of white blood cells including lymphocytes, granulocytes and monocytes; leukocyte formula; total proteins; gamma-globulins) were investigated in a sample of left-pawed (n = 6), right-pawed (n = 6) and ambidextrous (n = 6) dogs. The results showed that the percentage of lymphocytes was higher in left-pawed than in right-pawed and ambidextrous dogs, whereas granulocytes percentage was lower in left-pawed than in right-pawed and ambidextrous dogs. Moreover, total number of lymphocytes cells was higher in left-pawed than in right-pawed and ambidextrous dogs, whereas the number of gamma-globulins was lower in left-pawed than in right-pawed and ambidextrous dogs. These findings represent the first evidence that brain asymmetry modulates immune responses in dogs.

  13. Efecto protector de la toxina botulínica en colgajos cutáneos The protective effect of botulinum toxin on skin flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.X. Astudillo Carrera

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Los colgajos cutáneos de patrón vascular randomizado son de gran utilidad en Cirugía Reconstructiva; un aporte vascular adecuado es el factor más importante para la supervivencia de los mismos. Realizamos un estudio experimental levantando un total de 36 colgajos en el dorso de 9 conejos (4 en cada conejo: a 9 controles, b 9 con aplicación de toxina botulínica tipo A transoperatoria a lo largo del colgajo, c 9 con toxina botulínica tipo A aplicada 7 días antes del procedimiento quirúrgico, y, d 9 con aplicación de toxina botulínica tipo A transoperatoria más epinefrina. El análisis de los colgajos se realizó a través de imágenes digitales que se examinaron con el programa ImageJ. Efectuamos el análisis estadístico con la prueba T de Student. La evaluación final de los colgajos se realizó al séptimo día, tiempo en el cual se obtuvo: a una media de área necrótica en los controles del 72.17 ± 3.9% ; b en los que se aplicó toxina botulínica transoperatoria el porcentaje de aérea necrótica fue del 5.09 ± 1.2% p = 0.032; c en aquellos en los que la toxina botulínica se aplicó 7 días antes del procedimiento se reportó necrosis del 24.97 ± 2.7% p = 0.041 y d en los que se aplicó toxina botulínica transoperatoria más epinefrina el porcentaje de necrosis fue del 23.90 ± 3.9% p = 0.045. Concluimos que la toxina botulínica tipo A actúa como protector contra el proceso de sufrimiento-isquemia de los tejidos, debido a su acción vasodilatadora, recomendando su aplicación al inicio del procedimiento quirúrgico.Random-pattern cutaneous flaps are very useful in Reconstructive Surgery; an adequate vascular contribution is an important factor for the survival of the flaps. We designed an experimental study elevating a total of 36 dorsal flaps, divided in 4 groups: a 9 were controls, to which 0.9% physiological solution was applied, b 9 with a transoperatory application of type A botulinum toxin throughout the length of

  14. Mosquito immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, Julián F

    2010-01-01

    Throughout their lifetime, mosquitoes are exposed to pathogens during feeding, through breaks in their cuticle and following pathogen-driven cuticular degradation. To resist infection, mosquitoes mount innate cellular and humoral immune responses that are elicited within minutes of exposure and can lead to pathogen death via three broadly defined mechanisms: lysis, melanization and hemocyte-mediated phagocytosis. This chapter reviews our current understanding of the mosquito immune system, with an emphasis on the physical barriers that prevent pathogens from entering the body, the organs and tissues that regulate immune responses and the mechanistic and molecular bases of immunity.

  15. Fasting induces the generation of serum thyronine-binding globulin in Zucker rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, R.A.; Rajatanavin, R.; Moring, A.F.; Braverman, L.E.

    1985-04-01

    Five-month-old lean and obese Zucker rats were fasted for up to 7 days (lean rats) or 28 days (obese rats), and serum total and free T4 and T3 concentrations, percent free T4 and T3 by equilibrium dialysis, and the binding of (/sup 125/I) T4 to serum proteins by gel electrophoresis were measured. In the lean rats, a 4- or 7-day fast resulted in significant decreases in serum total and free T4 and T3 concentrations. There was a decrease in the percent free T3 after 7 days of starvation. In contrast, a 4- or 7-day fast did not alter any of these variables in the obese rats. However, after 14 or more days of starvation, serum total T4 and T3 concentrations increased, and the percent free T4 and T3 decreased, resulting in no change in the serum free T4 or T3 concentrations in the obese rats. The percent of (/sup 125/I)T4 bound to serum thyronine-binding globulin increased and the percent bound to thyronine-binding prealbumin decreased with the duration of the fast in both the lean and obese rats. The increase in serum thyronine-binding globulin binding of T4 can explain the increase in serum total T4 and T3 concentrations, the decrease in percent free T4 and T3, and the normal free hormone concentration in the long term fasted obese rats. The findings in the lean rats appear to be due to a combination of the known central hypothyroidism that occurs during 4-7 days of fasting and the fasting-induced changes in T4 binding in serum. Changes in T4 and T3 binding in serum during fasting in the rat must be considered when the effects of fasting on serum concentrations of the thyroid hormones, thyroid hormone kinetics, and the peripheral action of the thyroid hormones are evaluated.

  16. Immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... viruses, and substances that appear foreign and harmful. Information The immune system protects the body from possibly harmful substances by ... reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Immune System and Disorders Read more Latest Health News Read ...

  17. Effect of weight reduction on insulin sensitivity, sex hormone-binding globulin, sex hormones and gonadotrophins in obese children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkebaek, N H; Lange, Aksel; Holland-Fischer, P

    2010-01-01

    Obesity in men is associated with reduced insulin sensitivity and hypoandrogenism, while obesity in women is associated with reduced insulin sensitivity and hyperandrogenism. In children, the effect of obesity and weight reduction on the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis is rarely investigated....... The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of weight reduction in obese Caucasian children on insulin sensitivity, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), DHEAS and the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis....

  18. Retrospective diagnosis of Q fever in a country abattoir by the use of specific IgM globulin estimations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, A.M.; Hunt, J.G.

    1981-10-03

    Twenty-two cases of pyrexial illness which occurred amongst workers in a country abattoir were investigated retrospectively for Q fever, brucellosis, and leptospirosis. In 18, the illness was shown to be Q fever. No diagnoses were established for the other four. The demonstration of circulating Q-fever-specific IgM globulin was instrumental in establishing the diagnosis in many of the cases.

  19. Botulism in Brazil, 2000-2008: epidemiology, clinical findings and laboratorial diagnosis Botulismo no Brasil, 2000-2008: epidemiologia, achados clínicos e diagnóstico laboratorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Estela Gravato Rowlands

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a rare and potentially lethal illness caused by Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin. We describe the findings of a laboratorial investigation of 117 suspected cases of botulism reported to the surveillance system in Brazil from January 2000 to October 2008. Data on the number and type of samples analyzed, type of toxins identified, reporting of the number of botulism cases and transmission sources are discussed. A total of 193 clinical samples and 81 food samples were analyzed for detection and identification of the botulism neurotoxin. Among the clinical samples, 22 (11.4% presented the toxin (nine type A, five type AB and eight with an unidentified type; in food samples, eight (9.9% were positive for the toxin (five type A, one type AB and two with an unidentified type. Of the 38 cases of suspected botulism in Brazil, 27 were confirmed by a mouse bioassay. Laboratorial botulism diagnosis is an important procedure to elucidate cases, especially food-borne botulism, to confirm clinical diagnosis and to identify toxins in food, helping sanitary control measures.Botulismo é uma doença rara e potencialmente letal, resultante da ação de uma neurotoxina produzida pelo Clostridium botulinum. No presente estudo, estão descritos os resultados da investigação laboratorial de 117 casos suspeitos de botulismo notificados ao sistema de vigilância, ocorridos no Brasil no período de janeiro de 2000 a outubro de 2008. Os dados obtidos sobre as fontes de transmissão, os tipos de toxina identificados e de amostras analisadas serão discutidos. Foram analisadas 193 amostras clínicas e 81 amostras de alimentos para detecção e identificação de neurotoxina botulínica. Entre as amostras clínicas, 22 (11,4% amostras apresentaram resultado positivo para toxina (nove do tipo A, cinco do tipo AB e em oito o tipo não foi identificado e entre as amostras de alimentos, oito (9,9% foram positivas (cinco do tipo A, uma do tipo AB e em duas o tipo n

  20. Efeito da terapia miofuncional em pacientes com paralisia facial de longa duração associada à aplicação de toxina botulínica

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Nunes Toledo

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUÇÃO: A paralisia facial é constrangedora tanto do ponto de vista funcional quanto estético. Esta pesquisa teve por objetivo verificar o efeito da terapia miofuncional em pacientes com paralisia facial de longa duração associada à aplicação de toxina botulínica. MÉTODOS: Foram tratados vinte e cinco pacientes, divididos em dois grupos. Os pacientes do grupo A receberam quatro sessões de terapia miofuncional antes da aplicação de toxina botulínica e os pacientes do grupo B simultaneament...

  1. Physicochemical and structural characterisation of protein isolate, globulin and albumin from soapnut seeds (Sapindus mukorossi Gaertn.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shou-Wei; Chen, Ji-Cheng; Sun, Shang-De; Tang, Chuan-He; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Wen, Qi-Biao; Qi, Jun-Ru

    2011-09-15

    The amino acid (AA) composition and physicochemical and conformational properties of protein isolate (SNPI), globulin (SNG) and albumin (SNA) fractions from soapnut seeds were evaluated. The essential AA of SNG, SNA and SNPI (except sulfur-containing AA) are sufficient for the FAO/WHO suggested requirements for 2-5year old infants. SNG and SNPI showed similar electrophoresis patterns and AA compositions, the subunit of those proteins consisted of two polypeptides linked by disulfide bonds. In contrast, SNA showed a different AA compositions and SDS-PAGE pattern. Both SNG and SNPI presented a typical U-shape protein solubility (PS)-pH profile, SNA showed a completely different PS-pH profile, especially at pH 2.0-4.0. The near-UV circular dichroism (CD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and tryptophan fluorescence spectra analyses indicated that the flexibility in tertiary conformations decreased in the order: SNA>SNPI>SNG, while soapnut proteins had a similar secondary conformation, with a highly ordered structure (the β-types), as evidenced by far-UV CD spectra. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of a sex hormone-binding globulin automated chemiluminescent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittadi, Ruggero; Fabricio, Aline S C; Michilin, Silvia; Gion, Massimo

    2013-09-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is the main transport protein of sex steroids. This study evaluated the analytical performance of the recently developed Access SHBG assay (Beckman Coulter) and compared it with other commercial methods for the determination of serum SHBG. Clinical validation was also performed. Analytical performance including within-run and between-run imprecision was assessed for Access SHBG assay on the automated Beckman UniCel DxI800 analyzer. Linearity was assessed using five dilutions of the serum samples. For methods comparison, SHBG levels were determined also with Immulite 2000 analyzer (Siemens Healthcare) using clinical serum samples (n = 104). For clinical validation 135 specimens from healthy subjects, pregnant women, hypothyroid and hyperthyroid patients were analyzed. Total coefficients of variation were 90% recovery for all samples and for all dilution rates. Comparison analysis (Bland-Altman difference analysis and Passing-Bablock regression) showed an acceptable agreement between selected methods. SHBG values measured by Access SHBG assay in different groups of subjects were in agreement with other clinical evidence. Automated Access SHBG assay appears to be a reliable and easy to perform assay, as necessary for application in routine diagnostics.

  3. Rabbit antithymocyte globulin and donor-specific antibodies in kidney transplantation--A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Julio; Zuckermann, Andreas; Djamali, Arjang; Hertig, Alexandre; Naesens, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    The mode of action of rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) includes preferential inhibition of pre-existing donor-reactive memory T-cell reconstitution and possibly apoptosis of plasma cells, the source of donor specific antibodies (DSAs). In kidney transplant patients with low-strength preformed DSAs, non-comparative data have shown a low incidence of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) and graft survival using rATG even without desensitization procedures. For high strengths of preformed DSAs, rATG induction with more aggressive desensitization appears effective, with mixed results concerning the addition of B-cell specific agents. Regarding production of de novo DSA (dnDSA), interpretation of retrospective analyses is limited by selective use of rATG in higher-risk patients. Observational data in moderately sensitized kidney transplant patients suggest that the incidence of dnDSA and ABMR is significantly lower with rATG versus basiliximab. A randomized pilot study has suggested that addition of rituximab or bortezomib may not further inhibit dnDSA production in rATG-treated patients. Overall, rATG appears to inhibit DSA production, with a potential role in reducing the risk of ABMR in kidney transplant patients with high-strength preformed DSA, or lowering dnDSA in moderately sensitized patients. Randomized trials are awaited. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Self-Assembly of Rice Bran Globulin Fibrils in Electrostatic Screening: Nanostructure and Gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of various ionic strengths and protein concentrations on the fibrils structure and gel properties of rice bran globulin (RBG at pH 2.0 were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM, rheometer, and scanning electron microscope (SEM. AFM images showed the morphology of assembling RBG fibrils from strand beads to becoming branch clustered, when electrostatic repulsive forces attenuated gradually with increasing ionic strength. NaCl seems to accelerate the kinetics of fibrils formation, resulting in a significant increase in Th T fluorescence intensity. The increased ionic strengths promote particle size increasing and zeta potential decreasing synchronously. The percolation model G'~C-Cpn be used to calculate theoretical RBG gels concentration at various ionic strengths (0–500 mM, which decreased from 15.17 ± 0.63 to 2.26 ± 0.27 wt%. SEM images exhibited a granular mesh-like gel structure. A more homogenous structure occurred in low ionic strength. This study elucidates properties of RBG fibrils and gels as a bioactive material.

  5. Female hyperandrogenemia and normal serum levels of testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Danilowicz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the reference values usually employed for endocrine biochemical measurements are those suggested by the suppliers of commercial kits despite their advice that each laboratory should set its own reference values. Our objectives were to (i determine reference ranges for serum testosterone (T and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG appropriate to our laboratory and population, and (ii to analyze their influence on evaluating hyperandrogenemia. SHBG and T were measured, and free and bioavailable testosterone calculated, in (a 30 selected non-hyperandrogenic women, (b 87 non-selected healthy female blood donors, (c 53 women with hyperandrogenism, and (d 38 women with hyperandrogenic disorders but without biochemical hyperandrogenemia according to normal ranges suggested by the kit manufacturer. Mean serum SHBG concentrations were significantly different among all four groups. SHBG levels were significantly higher in selected normal women (group a. Using our results for this selected control group as new reference values, 12 out of 38 (31.6% women with hyperandrogenic disorders without apparent hyperandrogenemia (group d were recategorized as hyperandrogenemic. Similarly, 4 out of 63 (6.4% non-selected, normal weight, women (group b, were recategorized as hyperandrogenic. Therefore, the diagnosis of hyperandrogenemia would improve accuracy by using customized reference SHBG values instead of those suggested by the suppliers.

  6. Inhibition of corticosteroid-binding globulin gene expression by glucocorticoids involves C/EBPβ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolette Verhoog

    Full Text Available Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG, a negative acute phase protein produced primarily in the liver, is responsible for the transport of glucocorticoids (GCs. It also modulates the bioavailability of GCs, as only free or unbound steroids are biologically active. Fluctuations in CBG levels therefore can directly affect GC bioavailability. This study investigates the molecular mechanism whereby GCs inhibit the expression of CBG. GCs regulate gene expression via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, which either directly binds to DNA or acts indirectly via tethering to other DNA-bound transcription factors. Although no GC-response elements (GRE are present in the Cbg promoter, putative binding sites for C/EBPβ, able to tether to the GR, as well as HNF3α involved in GR signaling, are present. C/EBPβ, but not HNF3α, was identified as an important mediator of DEX-mediated inhibition of Cbg promoter activity by using specific deletion and mutant promoter reporter constructs of Cbg. Furthermore, knockdown of C/EBPβ protein expression reduced DEX-induced repression of CBG mRNA, confirming C/EBPβ's involvement in GC-mediated CBG repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP after DEX treatment indicated increased co-recruitment of C/EBPβ and GR to the Cbg promoter, while C/EBPβ knockdown prevented GR recruitment. Together, the results suggest that DEX repression of CBG involves tethering of the GR to C/EBPβ.

  7. Corticosterone and corticosteroid binding globulin in birds: relation to urbanization in a desert city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokidis, H Bobby; Orchinik, Miles; Deviche, Pierre

    2009-02-01

    As cities expand worldwide, understanding how species adapt to novel urban habitats will become increasingly important to conservation. The adrenocortical stress response enables vertebrates to cope with novel environmental challenges to homeostasis. We examined total and estimates of free baseline and stress-induced corticosterone (CORT) concentrations and CORT binding globulin (CBG) levels in five passerine species within and around Phoenix, Arizona. We tested whether baseline and stress-induced CORT patterns differed among species living at varying densities in Phoenix and tested the hypothesis that, for species capable of successfully colonizing cities, individuals living in urban areas have a decreased acute stress response compared to individuals living in native desert. Baseline total CORT levels were generally similar in urban and rural birds. Capture and handling stress typically produced greater total CORT responses in urban birds than in rural birds, although these responses differed as a function of the life history stage (non-breeding, breeding or molt). CBG binding capacity did not change with life history stage or locality. Estimated free CORT concentrations differed less between groups than total CORT concentrations. Urban birds showed less variability in stress responses across life history stages than rural birds. We propose that more predictable resources in the city than in rural areas may decrease the need to vary stress responsiveness across life history stages. The results highlight the species-specific effects of urbanization on stress physiology and the difficulty to predict how urbanization impacts organisms.

  8. Proteolytic cleavage at twin arginine residues affects structural and functional transitions of lupin seed 11S storage globulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Capraro

    Full Text Available The 11S storage globulin of white lupin seeds binds to a metal affinity chromatography matrix. Two unusual stretches of contiguous histidine residues, reminiscent of the multiple histidines forming metal binding motifs, at the C-terminal end of 11S globulin acidic chains were hypothesized as candidate elements responsible for the binding capacity. To prove this, the protein was incubated with a lupin seed endopeptidase previously shown to cleave at twin arginine motifs, recurrent in the sequence region of interest. Upon incubation with this enzyme, the loss of metal binding capacity paralleled that of the anti-his-tag reactive polypeptides. The recovered small proteolytic fragment was analyzed by mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing and found to correspond to the 24-mer region cleaved off at twin arginine residues and containing the natural his-tag-like region. Similarly, when lupin seeds were germinated for a few days, the his-tag containing 11S globulin chain was converted to a form devoid of such region, suggesting that this mechanism is a part of the natural degradatory process of the protein. The hypothesis that the ordered and controlled dismantling of storage proteins may generate peptide fragments with potential functional roles in plant ontogenesis is presented and discussed.

  9. Proteolytic cleavage at twin arginine residues affects structural and functional transitions of lupin seed 11S storage globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capraro, Jessica; Sessa, Fabio; Magni, Chiara; Scarafoni, Alessio; Maffioli, Elisa; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Croy, Ron R D; Duranti, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    The 11S storage globulin of white lupin seeds binds to a metal affinity chromatography matrix. Two unusual stretches of contiguous histidine residues, reminiscent of the multiple histidines forming metal binding motifs, at the C-terminal end of 11S globulin acidic chains were hypothesized as candidate elements responsible for the binding capacity. To prove this, the protein was incubated with a lupin seed endopeptidase previously shown to cleave at twin arginine motifs, recurrent in the sequence region of interest. Upon incubation with this enzyme, the loss of metal binding capacity paralleled that of the anti-his-tag reactive polypeptides. The recovered small proteolytic fragment was analyzed by mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing and found to correspond to the 24-mer region cleaved off at twin arginine residues and containing the natural his-tag-like region. Similarly, when lupin seeds were germinated for a few days, the his-tag containing 11S globulin chain was converted to a form devoid of such region, suggesting that this mechanism is a part of the natural degradatory process of the protein. The hypothesis that the ordered and controlled dismantling of storage proteins may generate peptide fragments with potential functional roles in plant ontogenesis is presented and discussed.

  10. Surface characterization of 7S and 11S globulin powders from soy protein examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Qingjun; Du, Fangling; Ao, Qiang; Liu, Jie

    2011-09-01

    In this study the surface composition of 7S and 11S globulin powders from soybean proteins by aqueous buffer and reverse micelle extractions had been examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Analysis by XPS revealed that the O and N atomic percentage of 7S and 11S globulin surfaces from bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelle was higher than from aqueous buffer, but the C atomic percentage was lower. The O/C ratio of the 7S globulin powder from aqueous buffer and reverse micelle was similar while significant differences were obtained in the O/C ratio of the 11S globulin powder, N/C atom ratios of the 7S and 11S globulin powders and high-resolution XPS C 1s, N 1s, O 1s spectra. Powder microstructure after reverse micelle treatment showed the presence of small pores, indicating the effect of reverse micelle on the 7S and 11S globulin structure. The obtained results indicated that the reverse micelle could affect the C, O and N components on the surface of soybean proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Uso de toxina botulínica en neurología: Experiencia en el Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, EsSalud

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    Édgard Rojas

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Identificar las principales utilidades de la toxina botulínica en las enfermedades neurológicas. Lugar: Hospital Nacional Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, EsSalud, Lima,Perú. Periodo 2001-2003. Material y Métodos: Se estudió 122 pacientes a quienes se les infiltró toxina botulínica tipo A a nivel de los músculos comprometidos, según el tipo de patología. Se les hizo una evaluación posterior a la aplicación de la toxina. Resultados: El espasmo hemifacial fue el diagnóstico más frecuente de uso (63,1% seguido de la espasticidad (16,4% y distonía cervical (11,5%. El espasmo hemifacial se presentó con más frecuencia entre los 60 y 69 años y en el lado izquierdo. En la distonía cervical, el tipo más frecuente de uso fue en la tortícolis y laterocolis. La evolución fue favorable, según el puntaje de la escala de TWSTRS aplicada antes y 3 meses después del tratamiento. Los efectos secundarios encontrados con más frecuencia fueron el ojo seco (15,6%, equimosis (9,1% y dolor en el sitio de aplicación (7,8%, de naturaleza reversible. Conclusión: La toxina botulínica tipo A tiene múltiples aplicaciones en las enfermedades neurológicas, con buen resultado y pocos efectos secundarios.

  12. Expression of achaete-scute homologue 2 and its correlation with serum globulin in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Jieru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the correlation between peripheral CD4+CXCR5+PD-1+T cells and serum globulin in chronic hepatitis C (CHC patients and health volunteers, and to clarify the role of the expression of achaete-scute homologue 2 (Ascl2, the transcription factor in peripheral follicular helper T (Tfh cells, in the process of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. MethodsA total of 46 previously untreated CHC patients who were admitted to Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, from October 2015 to May 2016 were enrolled, and 32 healthy laboratory technicians and persons who underwent physical examination in our hospital were enrolled as healthy control group. Flow cytometry was used to measure the percentage of Tfh cells in CD4+ T cells and the change in its subset (CD4+CXCR5+PD-1+ T cells in peripheral blood, an automatic biochemical analyzer was used to measure the serum globulin level, and real-time PCR was used to measure the mRNA expression of Ascl2 in Tfh cells. The association between the changes in these parameters and HCV infection was analyzed. The independent samples t-test was used for the comparison of continuous data between groups, and the Pearson correlation analysis was also performed. ResultsIn CHC patients, peripheral Tfh cells were positively correlated with B lymphocytes (r=0.582 3, P=0.011 2, peripheral B lymphocytes were positively correlated with globulin (r=0.450 9, P=0.031 6, and Tfh cells were positively correlated with globulin (r=0.583 5, P=0.038 3. CHC patients had significantly higher mRNA expression of Ascl2 in peripheral Tfh cells than the healthy control group (1.019±0.666 vs 6.437±5.776, t=4.552, P=0.001 9. ConclusionTfh cells may be involved in the production of serum globulin in CHC patients, and the transcription factor Ascl2 may participate in the differentiation and development of Tfh cells in the process of HCV infection.

  13. Toxina botulínica en parálisis cerebral infantil: resultados en 27 sujetos a lo largo de un año

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez-Carpintero, R.; Narbona, J. (Juan)

    1997-01-01

    Introducción y objetivos. Resultados positivos en el tratamiento de la parálisis cerebral infantil espástica con toxina botulínica, en estudios anglosajones de los últimos años, nos han llevado a iniciar este trabajo, cuyo objetivo es mostrar nuestra experiencia con la toxina en el tratamiento de esta enfermedad, establecer sus indicaciones, analizar los resultados obtenidos y plantear posibles aplicaciones futuras. Material y métodos. Incluimos 10 pacientes hemipléficos y 17 dipl...

  14. STUDIES IN IMMUNITY AND ANAPHYLAXIS : THE PROTEINS OF THE KIDNEY AND LIVER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, R M; Karsner, H T; Eisenbrey, A B

    1911-07-01

    1. The sera of rabbits injected repeatedly with the nucleoproteins, globulins, and albumins of the liver and kidney of the dog give no evidence in vitro or in vivo experiments of organ affinity. The precipitin test offers no proof of the specificity of these sera for the proteins employed as antigens. 2. The anaphylaxis reaction applied to the same proteins indicates a slight relative organ affinity but no specificity as far as the respective protein fractions are concerned. The relative organ affinity resides, rather, in the globulin and albumin fractions than in the nucleoprotein fraction. Dog serum used both as a sensitizing and an intoxicating agent gives rise to very active cross reactions with organ proteins, thus failing to support the theory of organ or of protein specificity. 3. These results do not support the view put forward that nucleoproteins play an important part in the course of production of cytotoxic immune sera.

  15. Elevated myeloid: plasmacytoid dendritic cell ratio associates with late, but not early liver rejection in children induced with, anti-human thymocyte globulin1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankit; AshokKumar, Chethan; Ningappa, Mylarappa; Sun, Qing; Higgs, Brandon W; Snyder, Sara; Zeevi, Adriana; Thomson, Angus W; Mazariegos, George V; Sindhi, Rakesh

    2009-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DC) play an important role in the induction and regulation of immune responses. Methods Myeloid CD11c+DC (MDC), which may have inflammatory functions, and plasmacytoid CD123+ DC (PDC), which may have tolerogenic potential, were measured by flow cytometric analysis, cross-sectionally, once, in 48 children, and longitudinally (pre-transplant, and at days 1–60, 61–200, 201–400 post transplant) in 30 children following liver transplantation (LTx). All children received 53/25 cadaveric/live donor liver allografts with rabbit anti-human thymocyte globulin (rATG) induction, and steroid-free Tacrolimus therapy. Rejectors in both groups were those children (n=35), who experienced biopsy-proven acute cellular rejection (ACR) within 60 days of DC monitoring. Results Among rejectors in the longitudinal and cross-sectional cohorts, the MDC: PDC ratio was higher, and was associated with decreased PDC frequencies. Logistic regression analysis, leave-one out cross-validation, and receiver operating characteristic analysis applied to 30 cross-sectional subjects revealed that an MDC:PDC ratio 1.78 was associated with rejector status with sensitivity/specificity of 76.9/88.2%. Sensitivity and specificity were replicated in the 18 remaining cross-sectional subjects (88.8 and 78.8%, respectively), but not in longitudinally-monitored subjects, during the early, 60-day period after LTx (30.76 and 62.50%, respectively). A significant negative correlation was observed between Tacrolimus whole blood concentrations and PDC frequencies (Spearman r = −0.370, p=0.005) in 48 cross-sectional subjects in whom DC subsets were monitored 1–3 years after LTx, but not during the early post-LTx period. Conclusion We conclude that an elevated MDC: PDC ratio associates with liver graft rejection, which occurs after first year in children induced with rATG. PMID:19696644

  16. Endocrine Disruption: Computational Perspectives on Human Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin and Phthalate Plasticizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Ishfaq A.; Turki, Rola F.; Abuzenadah, Adel M.; Damanhouri, Ghazi A.; Beg, Mohd A.

    2016-01-01

    Phthalates are a class of high volume production chemicals used as plasticizers for household and industrial use. Several members of this chemical family have endocrine disrupting activity. Owing to ubiquitous environmental distribution and exposure of human population at all stages of life, phthalate contamination is a continuous global public health problem. Clinical and experimental studies have indicated that several phthalates are associated with adverse effects on development and function of human and animal systems especially the reproductive system and exposures during pregnancy and early childhood are by far of utmost concern. Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a plasma carrier protein that binds androgens and estrogens and represents a potential target for phthalate endocrine disruptor function in the body. In the present study, the binding mechanism of the nine phthalates i.e. DMP, DBP, DIBP, BBP, DNHP, DEHP, DNOP, DINP, DIDP with human SHBG was delineated by molecular docking simulation. Docking complexes of the nine phthalates displayed interactions with 15–31 amino acid residues of SHBG and a commonality of 55–95% interacting residues between natural ligand of SHBG, dihydrotestosterone, and the nine phthalate compounds was observed. The binding affinity values were more negative for long chain phthalates DEHP, DNOP, DINP, and DIDP compared to short chain phthalates such as DMP and DBP. The Dock score and Glide score values were also higher for long chain phthalates compared to short chain phthalates. Hence, overlapping of interacting amino acid residues between phthalate compounds and natural ligand, dihydrotestosterone, suggested potential disrupting activity of phthalates in the endocrine homeostasis function of SHBG, with long chain phthalates expected to be more potent than the short chain phthalates. PMID:26963243

  17. Human sex hormone-binding globulin gene expression- multiple promoters and complex alternative splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosner William

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG regulates free sex steroid concentrations in plasma and modulates rapid, membrane based steroid signaling. SHBG is encoded by an eight exon-long transcript whose expression is regulated by a downstream promoter (PL. The SHBG gene was previously shown to express a second major transcript of unknown function, derived from an upstream promoter (PT, and two minor transcripts. Results We report that transcriptional expression of the human SHBG gene is far more complex than previously described. PL and PT direct the expression of at least six independent transcripts each, resulting from alternative splicing of exons 4, 5, 6, and/or 7. We mapped two transcriptional start sites downstream of PL and PT, and present evidence for a third SHBG gene promoter (PN within the neighboring FXR2 gene; PN regulates the expression of at least seven independent SHBG gene transcripts, each possessing a novel, 164-nt first exon (1N. Transcriptional expression patterns were generated for human prostate, breast, testis, liver, and brain, and the LNCaP, MCF-7, and HepG2 cell lines. Each expresses the SHBG transcript, albeit in varying abundance. Alternative splicing was more pronounced in the cancer cell lines. PL- PT- and PN-derived transcripts were most abundant in liver, testis, and prostate, respectively. Initial findings reveal the existence of a smaller immunoreactive SHBG species in LNCaP, MCF-7, and HepG2 cells. Conclusion These results extend our understanding of human SHBG gene transcription, and raise new and important questions regarding the role of novel alternatively spliced transcripts, their function in hormonally responsive tissues including the breast and prostate, and the role that aberrant SHBG gene expression may play in cancer.

  18. Non-protein bound oestradiol, sex hormone binding globulin, breast cancer and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruning, P. F.; Bonfrèr, J. M.; Hart, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    It has recently been found by various authors that despite a normal serum concentration of oestradiol (E2), the percentage of non-protein-bound or free E2 is abnormally high in breast cancer patients. Since it is the free E2 which is considered to be biologically active, confirmation of this finding would be most relevant to the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Using Hammond's centrifugal ultrafiltration dialysis method we have measured free E2 in heparinized plasma from 68 premenopausal women (a) at high familial risk of breast cancer (n = 18), (b) with benign breast disease (n = 17), (c) cured of T1N0M0 breast cancer at least 6 months previously (n = 17) and (d) normal controls matched for age, parity and Quetelet index (n = 16). Sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) was measured as [3H]-dihydrotestosterone binding capacity. Free E2 and SHBG were also measured in the serum of (e) postmenopausal patients having breast cancer (n = 38) and (f) matched control cancer patients (n = 67). We confirmed a very good inverse correlation between log free E2 per cent and log SHBG (P less than 0.0001). The regression lines for groups (a)-(d) were not statistically different. The regression lines for groups (e) and (f) were identical and ran nearly parallel to those for groups (a)-(d) though somewhat lower. This small difference may be ascribed to menopausal status. Therefore, we found no difference in free E2 percentage, calculated free E2 concentration or SHBG between premenopausal women at risk, women with benign breast disease, patients cured for early breast cancer or having breast cancer and matched controls. However, postmenopausal breast cancer patients had a significantly higher total serum E2 concentration and, by consequence a higher calculated free E2 concentration compared to the carefully matched control group. PMID:4038881

  19. Gamma-globulin treatment of acute myocarditis in the pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, N A; Colan, S D; Lewis, A B; Beiser, A S; Wessel, D L; Takahashi, M; Baker, A L; Perez-Atayde, A R; Newburger, J W

    1994-01-01

    Myocardial damage in myocarditis is mediated, in part, by immunological mechanisms. High-dose intravenous gamma-globulin (IVIG) is an immunomodulatory agent that is beneficial in myocarditis secondary to Kawasaki disease, as well as in murine myocarditis. Since 1990, the routine management of presumed acute myocarditis at Children's Hospital, Boston, and Children's Hospital, Los Angeles, has included administration of high-dose IVIG. We treated 21 consecutive children presenting with presumed acute myocarditis with IVIG, 2 g/kg, over 24 hours, in addition to anticongestive therapies. A comparison group comprised 25 recent historical control patients meeting identical eligibility criteria but not receiving IVIG therapy. Left ventricular function was assessed during five time intervals: 0 to 7 days, 1 to 3 weeks, 3 weeks to 3 months, 3 to 6 months, and 6 to 12 months. At presentation, the IVIG and non-IVIG groups had comparable left ventricular enlargement and poor fractional shortening. Compared with the non-IVIG group, those treated with IVIG had a smaller mean adjusted left ventricular end-diastolic dimension and higher fractional shortening in the periods from 3 to 6 months (P = .008 and P = .033, respectively) and 6 to 12 months (P = .072 and P = .029, respectively). When adjusting for age, biopsy status, intravenous inotropic agents, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, patients treated with IVIG were more likely to achieve normal left ventricular function during the first year after presentation (P = .03). By 1 year after presentation, the probability of survival tended to be higher among IVIG-treated patients (.84 versus .60, P = .069). We observed no adverse effects of IVIG administration. These data suggest that use of high-dose IVIG for treatment of acute myocarditis is associated with improved recovery of left ventricular function and with a tendency to better survival during the first year after presentation.

  20. Association between sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG and metabolic syndrome among men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuela Quental Callou de Sá

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Metabolic syndrome consists of a set of factors that imply increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. The objective here was to evaluate the association between sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG, sex hormones and metabolic syndrome among men. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective analysis on data from the study "Endogenous oestradiol but not testosterone is related to coronary artery disease in men", conducted in a hospital in São Paulo. METHODS: Men (aged 40-70 who underwent coronary angiography were selected. The age, weight, height, waist circumference, body mass index and prevalence of dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes of each patient were registered. Metabolic syndrome was defined in accordance with the criteria of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (NCEP-ATPIII. Serum samples were collected to assess the levels of glucose, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol (high density lipoprotein, triglycerides, albumin, SHBG, estradiol and total testosterone (TT. The levels of LDL-cholesterol (low density lipoprotein were calculated using Friedewald's formula and free testosterone (FT and bioavailable testosterone (BT using Vermeulen's formula. RESULTS: 141 patients were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was significantly higher in the first SHBG tercile than in the second and third terciles. A statistically significant positive association between the SHBG and TT values was observed, but no such association was seen between SHBG, BT and FT. CONCLUSION: Low serum levels of SHBG are associated with higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome among male patients, but further studies are required to confirm this association.

  1. The association between sex hormone-binding globulin and type 2 diabetes in Nigerian men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayefori M. Abbiyesuku

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidemiological studies have shown that sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG has a role in glucose homeostasis in both men and women. However, a prospective study on Japanese-American subjects concluded that SHBG was not a significant risk factor in either men or women, suggesting ethnic differences. We were not aware of any evaluation of SHBG in subjects of African ancestry. Objectives: We investigated the association between SHBG and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic diabetic men in a hospital in Nigeria. Method: Forty-eight male subjects with type 2 diabetes and 20 non-diabetic male subjects were recruited in this cross-sectional hospital-based study by the convenient sampling method.Height and circumferences around the waist and hip were measured to the nearest 0.5 cm and the waist–hip ratio was calculated from this measurement. Weight was measured and body mass index was calculated. Fasting plasma glucose concentration was measured by the glucose oxidase method with a between-run coefficient of variation of 3%. Insulin and SHBG were measured by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results: There was a statistically-significant difference between test results for the diabetic and non-diabetic patients. The mean SHBG concentration was higher in the non-diabetic group (42.2 nmol/L than the diabetic group (30.5 nmol/L. A significant inverse association between insulin resistance and SHBG was observed (r = 0.353, p < 0.015. Conclusion: This study supported earlier observations that a significant inverse correlation exists between SHBG and insulin resistance and provides evidence that the relationship may extend to type 2 diabetic men of African ancestry in Nigeria.

  2. Emerging Role of Corticosteroid Binding Globulin in Glucocorticoid-driven Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pierre Moisan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid hormones (GCs are critical for survival since they ensure energy supply necessary to the body in an ever challenging environment. GCs are known to act on appetite, glucose metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and storage. However, in order to be beneficial to the body, GC levels should be maintained in an optimal window of concentrations. Not surprisingly, conditions of GC excess or deficiency, e.g. Cushing’s syndrome or Addison’s disease are associated with severe alterations of energy metabolism. Corticosteroid Binding Globulin (CBG, through its high specific affinity for GCs, plays a critical role in regulating plasma GC levels. Genetic studies in various species including humans have revealed that CBG is the major factor influencing inter-individual genetic variability of plasma GC levels, both in basal and stress conditions. Some, but not all of these genetic studies have also provided data linking CBG levels to body composition. The examination of CBG-deficient mice submitted to hyperlipidic diets unveiled specific roles for CBG in lipid storage and metabolism. The importance of CBG is even more striking when animals are submitted to high-fat diet combined to chronic stress, mimicking our occidental lifestyle. An influence of CBG on appetite has not been reported but remains to be more finely analyzed. Overall, a role of CBG in GC-driven metabolic disorders is emerging in recent studies. Although subtle, the influence of CBG in these diseases could open the way to new therapeutic interventions since CBG is easily accessible in the blood.

  3. Gene amplification as a cause of inherited thyroxine-binding globulin excess in two Japanese families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Yuichi; Miura, Yoshitaka; Saito, Hidehiko [Toyota Memorial Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    T{sub 4}-binding globulin (TBG) is the major thyroid hormone transport protein in man. Inherited abnormalities in the level of serum TBG have been classified as partial deficiency, complete deficiency, and excess. Sequencing analysis of the TBG gene, located on Xq21-22, has uncovered the molecular defects causing partial and complete deficiency. However, the mechanism leading to inherited TBG excess remains unknown. In this study, two Japanese families, F-A and F-T, with inherited TBG excess were analyzed. Serum TBG levels in hemizygous males were 58 and 44 {mu}g/mL, 3- and 2-fold the normal value, respectively. The molecule had normal properties in terms of heat stability and isoelectric focussing pattern. The sequence of the coding region and the promoter activity of the TBG gene were also indistinguishable between hemizygotes and normal subjects. The gene dosage of TBG relative to that of {beta}-globin, which is located on chromosome 11, and Duchenne muscular dystropy, which is located on Xp, was evaluated by coamplification of these target genes using polymerase chain reaction and subsequent quantitation by HPLC. The TBG/{beta}-globin ratios of the affected male and female of F-A were 3.13 and 4.13 times, respectively, that in the normal males. The TBG/Duchenne muscular dystrophy ratios were 2.92 and 2.09 times the normal value, respectively. These results are compatible with three copies of TBG gene on the affected X-chromosome. Similarly, a 2-fold increase in gene dosage was demonstrated in the affected hemizygote of F-T. A 3-fold tandem amplification of the TBG gene was shown by in situ hybridization of prometaphase and interphase chromosomes from the affected male with a biotinylated genomic TBG probe, confirming the gene dosage results. Gene amplification of TBG is the cause of inherited TBG excess in these two families. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Eficácia do resfriamento da pele no alívio da dor desencadeada pela injeção de toxina botulínica tipo A nas distonias faciais

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paula Barros Bandeira de Mello Monteiro; Nilson Lopes da Fonseca Júnior; José Ricardo Carvalho Lima Rehder

    2012-01-01

    ... A na região periocular em pacientes portadores de distonia facial. MÉTODOS: Neste estudo prospectivo, 13 pacientes receberam injeção de toxina botulínica tipo A em região glabelar (m. prócero) e periocular (m. orbicular...

  5. Avaliação da fenda palpebral após aplicação de toxina botulínica tipo A em pacientes com distonias faciais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Eleonora Pereira Cunial

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a medida da fenda palpebral em pacientes com blefaroespasmo essencial benigno (BEB e espasmo hemifacial (EHF após a aplicação periocular de toxina botulínica tipo A. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados pacientes portadores de BEB e EHF submetidos à injeção periocular de toxina botulínica tipo A pela técnica inner orbital de aplicação. Os pacientes foram fotografados em PPO antes da aplicação e catorze dias depois dela. A fenda palpebral foi mensurada nestas imagens por meio de processamento computadorizado de imagens, utilizando o programa ImageJ. As alterações da fenda palpebral foram observadas comparando-se as medidas obtidas no pré e pós-aplicação. RESULTADOS: Comparando-se as imagens obtidas com o programa ImageJ, houve aumento estatisticamente significante (p<0,001 da fenda palpebral em 14 olhos (51,8% após a aplicação de injeção periocular da toxina botulínica e nenhuma das imagens analisadas apresentou diminuição da fenda palpebral. CONCLUSÃO: No presente estudo, os pacientes portadores de distonias faciais apresentaram aumento de fenda palpebral estatisticamente significante após aplicação periocular de toxina botulínica tipo A.

  6. Immunization for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... immunization for the entire family. Diseases & Vaccines Overview Immunization Schedules Talk to you doctor about your immunization ... years Immunization Schedule for Children, 7-18 years Immunization News September 29, 2017 CDC released a new ...

  7. Wound Botulism in Injection Drug Users: Time to Antitoxin Correlates with Intensive Care Unit Length of Stay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Offerman, Steven R

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We sought to identify factors associated with need for mechanical ventilation (MV, length of intensive care unit (ICU stay, length of hospital stay, and poor outcome in injection drug users (IDUs with wound botulism (WB.Methods: This is a retrospective review of WB patients admitted between 1991-2005. IDUs were included if they had symptoms of WB and diagnostic confirmation. Primary outcome variables were the need for MV, length of ICU stay, length of hospital stay, hospital-related complications, and death.Results: Twenty-nine patients met inclusion criteria. Twenty-two (76% admitted to heroin use only and seven (24% admitted to heroin and methamphetamine use. Chief complaints on initial presentation included visual changes, 13 (45%; weakness, nine (31%; and difficulty swallowing, seven (24%. Skin wounds were documented in 22 (76%. Twenty-one (72% patients underwent mechanical ventilation (MV. Antitoxin (AT was administered to 26 (90% patients but only two received antitoxin in the emergency department (ED. The time from ED presentation to AT administration was associated with increased length of ICU stay (Regression coefficient = 2.5; 95% CI 0.45, 4.5. The time from ED presentation to wound drainage was also associated with increased length of ICU stay (Regression coefficient = 13.7; 95% CI = 2.3, 25.2. There was no relationship between time to antibiotic administration and length of ICU stay.Conclusion: MV and prolonged ICU stays are common in patients identified with WB. Early AT administration and wound drainage are recommended as these measures may decrease ICU length of stay.[West J Emerg Med. 2009;10(4:251-256.

  8. Distonia laríngea: relato de caso e tratamento com toxina botulínica Laryngeal dystonia: case report and treatment with botulinum toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor José Barbosa Santos

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Distonia laríngea, ou disfonia espasmódica, é caracterizada por contrações involuntárias e inapropriadas da musculatura responsável pela fonação, sendo a do tipo adutora a mais comum. Caracteriza-se por quebras fonatórias, sendo seu diagnóstico confirmado por videolaringoestroboscopia. O tratamento de escolha é feito com a aplicação direta de toxina botulínica nos músculos responsáveis pelo movimento incoordenado. O objetivo desse trabalho é relatar o caso de uma paciente com diagnóstico de distonia laríngea do tipo adutora, tratada com toxina botulínica e discutir as vantagens e observações descritas na literatura a respeito desse tratamento.Laryngeal dystonia or spasmodic dysphonia is characterized by involuntary and innapropiate spasms of vocal muscles, having the adductor type as the most common one. It is chacterized by strain-strangled voice with pitch breaks. Diagnosis is made by means of videolaryngostroboscopic exam. The treatment of choice is done with botulinum toxin directly injected in the muscles responsible for the mismatched movement. The aim of this study is to report on an adductor- type dysphonia patient and to discuss the advantages and observations about this treatment reported in the literature.

  9. Improvement in laboratory diagnosis of wound botulism and tetanus among injecting illicit-drug users by use of real-time PCR assays for neurotoxin gene fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, D; Grant, K A; McLauchlin, J

    2005-09-01

    An upsurge in wound infections due to Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani among users of illegal injected drugs (IDUs) occurred in the United Kingdom during 2003 and 2004. A real-time PCR assay was developed to detect a fragment of the neurotoxin gene of C. tetani (TeNT) and was used in conjunction with previously described assays for C. botulinum neurotoxin types A, B, and E (BoNTA, -B, and -E). The assays were sensitive, specific, rapid to perform, and applicable to investigating infections among IDUs using DNA extracted directly from wound tissue, as well as bacteria growing among mixed microflora in enrichment cultures and in pure culture on solid media. A combination of bioassay and PCR test results confirmed the clinical diagnosis in 10 of 25 cases of suspected botulism and two of five suspected cases of tetanus among IDUs. The PCR assays were in almost complete agreement with the conventional bioassays when considering results from different samples collected from the same patient. The replacement of bioassays by real-time PCR for the isolation and identification of both C. botulinum and C. tetani demonstrates a sensitivity and specificity similar to those of conventional approaches. However, the real-time PCR assays substantially improves the diagnostic process in terms of the speed of results and by the replacement of experimental animals. Recommendations are given for an improved strategy for the laboratory investigation of suspected wound botulism and tetanus among IDUs.

  10. Retargeting Clostridium difficile Toxin B to Neuronal Cells as a Potential Vehicle for Cytosolic Delivery of Therapeutic Biomolecules to Treat Botulism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greice Krautz-Peterson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs deliver a protease to neurons which can cause a flaccid paralysis called botulism. Development of botulism antidotes will require neuronal delivery of agents that inhibit or destroy the BoNT protease. Here, we investigated the potential of engineering Clostridium difficile toxin B (TcdB as a neuronal delivery vehicle by testing two recombinant TcdB chimeras. For AGT-TcdB chimera, an alkyltransferase (AGT was appended to the N-terminal glucosyltransferase (GT of TcdB. Recombinant AGT-TcdB had alkyltransferase activity, and the chimera was nearly as toxic to Vero cells as wild-type TcdB, suggesting efficient cytosolic delivery of the AGT/GT fusion. For AGT-TcdB-BoNT/A-Hc, the receptor-binding domain (RBD of TcdB was replaced by the equivalent RBD from BoNT/A (BoNT/A-Hc. AGT-TcdB-BoNT/A-Hc was >25-fold more toxic to neuronal cells and >25-fold less toxic to Vero cells than AGT-TcdB. Thus, TcdB can be engineered for cytosolic delivery of biomolecules and improved targeting of neuronal cells.

  11. Cholecystokinin octapeptide immunization: effect on growth of barrows and gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekas, J C; Trout, W E

    1993-09-01

    A study was conducted to validate the previously reported growth response to cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) immunization in barrows and was extended to include gilts. Group-penned barrows and gilts were used to represent conditions in the swine industry. Thirty-two animals, 19 barrows and 13 gilts, were randomly assigned by sex to four pens and two treatments. The control groups were immunized with human serum globulin (hSG). The treated groups (CCK) were immunized with the C-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin conjugated to human serum globulin. Specific binding of CCK-8 was confirmed at 29 d after the primary inoculation. Antisera titers were highly variable throughout. The mean titer reached a peak on d 57 and then declined. Body weight gains during the last 49 d, the period during which titers were expressed, were compared by ANOVA. The treatment effect on gain was significant (P = .018); the sex effect approached significance (P = .071); the treatment x sex interaction effect was not significant (P = .82). Least squares mean gain of the CCK group was 8.4% greater than of the hSG group, 41.4 vs 38.2 kg, respectively. A significant linear regression coefficient for gain vs antisera titer was obtained for barrows (P = .03; r2 = .44) but not for gilts. Several carcass variables showed trends similar to that of BW gain, but the treatment effects were less robust (P immunization stimulated growth of barrows by 7.5% in the present and by 10.8% in the previous study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Candida Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian R. Naglik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans is the predominant cause of both superficial and invasive forms of candidiasis. C. albicans primarily infects immunocompromised individuals as a result of either immunodeficiency or intervention therapy, which highlights the importance of host immune defences in preventing fungal infections. The host defence system utilises a vast communication network of cells, proteins, and chemical signals distributed in blood and tissues, which constitute innate and adaptive immunity. Over the last decade the identity of many key molecules mediating host defence against C. albicans has been identified. This review will discuss how the host recognises this fungus, the events induced by fungal cells, and the host innate and adaptive immune defences that ultimately resolve C. albicans infections during health.

  13. Effect of feeding Lipopolysaccharide as an immunostimulant on immune response and immune gene expression of Labeo bata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Lopamudra; Parhi, Janmejay; Debnath, Chandan; Prasad, Kurcheti Pani

    2017-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of dietary lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an immunostimulant on hematology, innate immunity, immune gene expression and protection against Edwardsiella tarda on Labeo bata. A basal diet supplemented with 0, 50, 100 and 150mg LPS kg(-1)diet was fed to the four different groups for 30days. The haematological (total erythrocyte count, total leukocyte count, total serum protein, albumin and globulin), innate immune parameters (respiratory burst, serum lysozyme, myeloperoxidase and serum bactericidal activity), immune gene expression (C3, β-2 microglobulin, lysozyme g, transferrin, IFN-1, IFN-γ) were monitored at 7th, 15th, 30th day and one day post challenge (DPC) with E. tarda. All the studied haematological, innate immune parameters and expression of immune gene increased significantly (p≤0.05) in LPS fed group in comparison with control. However the group fed 100mgkg(-1) LPS in feed showed highest activity on 7th day and 1DPC. The group fed 100mgkg(-1) LPS also recorded highest relative percent survivability after challenge with E. tarda. Therefore this study suggests that LPS at 100mgkg(-1) could be used as an immunostimulant in feed to enhance the protection of bata during periods of increased disease risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Botulismo em bovinos de corte e leite alimentados com cama de frango Botulism in beef and dairy cattle fed with poultry litter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveraldo S. Dutra

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Surtos de botulismo causados pelos tipos C e D da toxina botulínica são freqüentes no país, estando originalmente associados à osteofagia e à ingestão de alimentos e água contaminados. No presente trabalho são descritos os aspectos epidemiológicos, clínico-patológicos e laboratoriais de sete surtos da intoxicação em bovinos de corte e leite alimentados com cama de frango, ocorridos nos estados de São Paulo e Minas Gerais entre 1989 e 2000. Cinco surtos ocorreram em rebanhos de corte confinados ou criados extensivamente e suplementados com o subproduto, e dois em propriedades leiteiras. De um total de 1.535 animais alimentados regularmente com a cama de frango, 455 (29,64% morreram em um período que variou de 2 a 4 semanas. A morbidade nos sete surtos estudados variou de 3,47 a 100%, da mesma forma que a mortalidade. Em uma das propriedades a letalidade foi de 60,52%, e em todos os outros surtos ela foi acima de 88,43%; em três propriedades o coeficiente foi de 100%. Os sinais clínicos de paralisia progressiva, dificuldade na locomoção, decúbito e estado mental aparentemente normal, diminuição do tônus da musculatura da língua e cauda, sialorréia e dificuldade respiratória caracterizaram o quadro clínico. À necropsia de 30 animais não foi observada qualquer alteração macroscópica digna de nota. A presença de esporos de Clostridium botulinum foi detectada em amostras de cama de frango colhidas nas sete propriedades. Nas amostras de fígado, líquido ruminal e intestinal, provenientes dos 30 animais necropsiados, foi possível detectar toxinas botulínicas tipos C (5 ou D (9, ou classificada como pertencente ao complexo CD (1, em pelos menos um dos materiais provenientes de 15 animais, confirmando assim o diagnóstico clínico-patológico e epidemiológico de botulismo.Outbreaks of botulism caused by type C and D of the botulinum toxin are frequent in Brazil, and are associated with bone chewing and ingestion of

  15. Use of the Vettest 8008 and refractometry for determination of total protein, albumin, and globulin concentrations in feline effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasouliotis, Kostas; Murphy, Kate; Dodkin, Steve; Torrance, Andy G

    2002-01-01

    Pleural and peritoneal effusion is a common clinical finding in feline practice. Determination of fluid albumin (ALB) and globulin (GLOB) concentrations in addition to total protein (TP) concentration can be helpful in diagnosing or ruling out certain diseases in cats, especially feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). The objective of this study was to compare effusion TP, ALB, and GLOB results obtained by a refractometer and a bench-top dry chemistry analyzer with those results obtained by a reference method. Twenty-six pleural and 14 peritoneal effusion samples were analyzed from 40 cats with various diseases. TP and ALB concentrations were determined by a reference automated wet chemistry analyzer (Kone Specific, Kone Instruments, Espoo, Finland), a bench-top dry chemistry analyzer (Vettest 8008, IDEXX Laboratories Ltd, Chalfont St Peter, UK), and a refractometer (Atago SPR-T2, Atago Co, Tokyo, Japan). GLOB, albumin to globulin (A/G) ratio, and globulins as a percentage of total proteins (GLOB%) were calculated. Results were analyzed by paired t tests, difference plots, and Deming s regression analysis. Correlation coefficients (r) for TP with Vettest versus Kone and refractometer versus Kone methods were.97 and.94, respectively. GLOB and GLOB% values were significantly higher and A/G ratios were significantly lower with Vettest versus Kone methods. Correlation coefficients for ALB, GLOB, GLOB% and A/G ratio with Vettest versus Kone methods were.86,.93,.82, and.73, respectively. Although correlation with other methods was good, the refractometer underestimated TP concentrations in 3 samples. The refractometer is an acceptable method for determination of TP concentration in feline effusions. The Vettest 8008 also is an acceptable method for the determination of TP and ALB concentrations, however, calculated A/G ratios obtained with the Vettest are unacceptable.

  16. Effects of Storage Time on Total Protein and Globulin Concentrations in Bovine Fresh Frozen Plasma Obtained for Transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Proverbio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effects of storage conditions on total protein (TP and globulin fractions in fresh frozen bovine plasma units prepared and stored for transfusion, TP and globulin fractions were evaluated in fresh plasma and at 1 month and 6 and 12 months after blood collection in plasma stored at −20°C. Significant differences in concentrations were found in the median concentration of total protein (P=0.0336, between 0 months and 1 month (P=0.0108, 0 and 6 months (P=0.0023, and 0 and 12 months (P=0.0027, in mean concentration (g/dL of albumin (P=0.0394, between 0 months and 1 month (P=0.0131, 0 and 6 months (P=0.0035, and 0 and 12 months (P=0.0038, and beta-2 fraction (P=0.0401, between 0 and 6 months (P=0.0401 and 0 and 12 months (P=0.0230. This study suggests that total gamma globulin concentration in bovine frozen plasma is stable for 12 months at −20°C. Total protein, ALB, and beta-2 fraction have significantly different concentrations (g/dL when compared to prestorage. This study has shown IgG protein fraction stability in bovine fresh frozen plasma collected for transfusion; therefore, bovine fresh frozen plasma seems to be suitable for the treatment of hypogammaglobulinemia (failure of passive transfer in calves when stored for 12 months at −20°C.

  17. Rabbit antithymocyte globulin induces rapid expansion of effector memory CD8 T cells without accelerating acute graft versus host disease ?

    OpenAIRE

    Wittenbecher, Friedrich; Rieger, Kathrin; Dziubianau, Mikalai; Herholz, Anne; Mensen, Angela; Blau, Igor Wolfgang; Uharek, Lutz; Dörken, Bernd; Thiel, Andreas; Na, Il-Kang

    2013-01-01

    Rabbit antithymocyte globulin (Thymoglobulin(®)) is commonly used as graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) prophylaxis. Since we found similar total CD8 T cell numbers in patients with and without Thymoglobulin(®) therapy within the first six months after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, we have analyzed the reconstitution of the CD8 T cell compartment in detail. After T cell-depletion, higher and more sustained proliferative capacity of memory CD8 T cells resulted in their rapi...

  18. Leukogram and serum globulin values in two dogs with systemic Xylohypha bantiana infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobetti, R G

    1996-06-01

    Phaeohyphomycosis is a rare fungal disease of animals and man, generally thought to occur in compromised or debilitated hosts, although in man the majority of infections have occurred in otherwise healthy patients. To investigate the possible role of immune suppression in systemic phaeohyphomycosis, certain aspects of the immune system of 2 dogs with systemic Xylohypha bantiana infection were investigated. White cell and differential cell counts, serum protein electrophoresis and serum immunoglobulin fractions were determined. The only consistent finding was lymphopaenia. Although there is no specific evidence for it, a lymphopaenic state might predispose to systemic phaeohyphomycosis.

  19. Role of corticosteroid binding globulin in emotional reactivity sex differences in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minni, A M; de Medeiros, G F; Helbling, J C; Duittoz, A; Marissal-Arvy, N; Foury, A; De Smedt-Peyrusse, V; Pallet, V; Moisan, M P

    2014-12-01

    Sex differences exist for stress reactivity as well as for the prevalence of depression, which is more frequent in women of reproductive age and often precipitated by stressful events. In animals, the differential effect of stress on male's and female's emotional behavior has been well documented. Crosstalk between the gonadal and stress hormones, in particular between estrogens and glucocorticoids, underlie these sex differences on stress vulnerability. We have previously shown that corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) deficiency in a mouse model (Cbg k.o.) leads, in males, to an increased despair-like behavior caused by suboptimal corticosterone stress response. Because CBG displays a sexual dimorphism and is regulated by estrogens, we have now investigated whether it plays a role in the sex differences observed for emotional reactivity in mice. By analyzing Cbg k.o. and wild-type (WT) animals of both sexes, we detected sex differences in despair-like behavior in WT mice but not in Cbg k.o. animals. We showed through ovariectomy and estradiol (E2) replacement that E2 levels explain the sex differences found in WT animals. However, the manipulation of E2 levels did not affect the emotional behavior of Cbg k.o. females. As Cbg k.o. males, Cbg k.o. females have markedly reduced corticosterone levels across the circadian cycle and also after stress. Plasma free corticosterone levels in Cbg k.o. mice measured immediately after stress were blunted in both sexes compared to WT mice. A trend for higher mean levels of ACTH in Cbg k.o. mice was found for both sexes. The turnover of a corticosterone bolus was increased in Cbg k.o. Finally, the glucocorticoid-regulated immediate early gene early growth response 1 (Egr1) showed a blunted mRNA expression in the hippocampus of Cbg k.o. mutants while mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors presented sex differences but equivalent mRNA expression between genotypes. Thus, in our experimental conditions, sex differences for

  20. [Comparison of two types of antithymocyte globulin in the treatment of children with aplastic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X T; He, W; Shi, W; Zhou, X X; Qiao, X H

    2016-04-01

    This study was designed to compare the effects of the anti-human T lymphocyte globulin (Fresenius, ATG-F)and rabbit anti-human thymocyte immunoglobulin (Genzyme, R-ATG)in the treatment of childhood aplastic anemia (AA) and their effects. A total of 59 children with aplastic anemia were analyzed in the present study, including 34 cases of severe aplastic anemia (SAA), 12 cases of very severe aplastic anemia (VSAA) and 13 cases of transfusion-dependent non-severe aplastic anemia (NSAA). While receiving immunosuppressive therapy (IST), 30 and 29 patients, with long-term oral supplement with cyclosporin A (CSA), androgen and Chinese traditional medicines, were treated with ATG-F and R-ATG, respectively. When it was necessary, some supportive cares such as component transfusion and infection control were also employed. Absolute counts of peripheral blood lymphocyte (ALC) at various time points were dynamically detected after ATG therapy. According to the International Aplastic Anemia Treatment and Effect standards. There were no statistically significant differences in the overall response rate (67%(20/30)vs. 69%(20/29), χ(2)=0.036, P=0.676) and the survival rate (87%(26/30)vs. 83%(24/29), χ(2)=0.173, P=0.676) between the ATG-F and R-ATG groups. There were significant and long-term ALC decrease after ATG therapy, the rate of ALC decrease in ATG-F and R-ATG group, the ALC only recovered to 47.8% (ATG-F group) and 47.4% (R-ATG group) of the pre-treatment level respectively. ATG-F 5 mg/(kg·d) and R-ATG 3.75 mg/(kg·d)could achieve similar effects in the treatment of childhood AA, through similar significant clearance of T cells. Therefore, all of these suggest that ATG-F and R-ATG might serve as the drugs of front-line choice for IST in childhood AA patients who do not have an available human leukocyte antigen identical related donor.

  1. Innate immunity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    not listed in Table 1, epithelial cells and endothelial cells, and to a lesser extent other types of structural cells such as fibroblasts and smooth-muscle cells, are critically involved in promoting both innate and adaptive immune responses. In the case of epithelial cells, this is achieved via production of pro-inflammatory.

  2. Vaccines (immunizations) - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations; Immunizations; Immunize; Vaccine shots; Prevention - vaccine ... of the vaccine. VACCINE SCHEDULE The recommended vaccination (immunization) schedule is updated every 12 months by the ...

  3. Molecular characterization of a genetic variant of the steroid hormone-binding globulin gene in heterozygous subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, D.O.; Catterall, J.F. [Population Council, New York, NY (United States); Carino, C. [Instituto National de la Nutricion, Mexico City, MX (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    Steroid hormone-binding globulin in human serum displays different isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns among individuals, suggesting genetic variation in the gene for this extracellular steroid carrier protein. Analysis of allele frequencies and family studies suggested the existence of two codominant alleles of the gene. Subsequent determination of the molecular basis of a variant of the gene was carried out using DNA from homozygous individuals from a single Belgian family. It was of interest to characterize other variant individuals to determine whether all variants identified by IEF phenotyping were caused by the same mutation or whether other mutations occurred in the gene in different populations. Previous studies identified Mexican subjects who were heterozygous for the variant IEF phenotype. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to localize the mutation in these subjects and to purify the variant allele for DNA sequence analysis. The results show that the mutation in this population is identical to that identified in the Belgian family, and no other mutations were detected in the gene. These data represent the first analysis of steroid hormone-binding globulin gene variation in heterozygous subjects and further support the conclusion of biallelism of the gene worldwide. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Thyroid hormones and thyroxine-binding globulin in relation to liver function and serum testosterone in men with alcoholic cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, U; Gluud, C; Bennett, Patrick

    1988-01-01

    In 73 euthyroid male patients with histologically verified alcoholic cirrhosis, thyroid hormones, thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) and testosterone concentrations (total, non-protein- and non-SHBG-bound) were studied in relation to each other and to the degree of liver dysfunction. Serum concentr......In 73 euthyroid male patients with histologically verified alcoholic cirrhosis, thyroid hormones, thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) and testosterone concentrations (total, non-protein- and non-SHBG-bound) were studied in relation to each other and to the degree of liver dysfunction. Serum...... concentrations of triiodothyronine (T3) decreased significantly (p less than 0.05) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) increased with progressing liver dysfunction. Serum concentrations of tetraiodothyronine (T4), TBG and T4/TBG ratio did not correlate significantly with liver function. Serum T3 concentrations...... correlated significantly (Kendall Tau-beta = -0.33, p = 0.001) with total serum testosterone concentrations, while there was a negative correlation (Kendall Tau-beta = -0.20, p = 0.025) between testosterone and TSH values. No correlation was found between testosterone concentrations and serum levels of TBG...

  5. Estimating age-specific trends in circulating testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin in males and females across the lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelsman, David J; Sikaris, Ken; Ly, Lam P

    2016-05-01

    Age-specific trends of serum testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin across the full lifespan have not been reported. We deduced age-specific trends in serum testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin in males and females between ages 10 and 90 from a large sample of consecutive results from a single large pathology laboratory. Coded results of 110,712 consecutive blood samples requesting serum testosterone over seven years (2007-2013) comprising blood testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin and calculated free testosterone together with gender and age were analysed create smoothed age-specific centiles (2.5%, 5%, 25%, 50%, 75%, 95%, 97.5%) for males and females. These identified the pubertal increases in serum testosterone in males peaking at 20 years of age and remaining stable thereafter until the eighth decade. In females, circulating testosterone peaked in late adolescence and declined gradually over the next two decades but remained stable across menopause and beyond. After early childhood, serum sex hormone-binding globulin declines to a nadir in males at the age of 20 years and remains stable till the sixth decade with a gradual, progressive rise thereafter. In females, the sex hormone-binding globulin nadir is reached earlier with levels rising gradually and progressively with age thereafter and accelerating after the age of 70 years. Females also exhibit a second sex hormone-binding globulin peak during reproductive ages reflected only in upper centiles due to effects of pregnancy and oral contraceptive use in a significant minority of females. This large sample of clinical data provides a comprehensive profile of androgen status across the lifespan from early adolescence to late old age. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Adult Immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Coskun

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the many advances in modern medicine, each year thousands of people in the world die from diseases that are easily prevented by safe and effective vaccines. Few measures in preventive medicine are of such proven value and as easy to implement as routine immunization against infectious diseases. Prevention of infection by immunization is a lifelong process. There are a number of vaccines that all adults (¡I18 years require. There are also other vaccines that need to be tailored to meet individual variations in risk resulting from occupation, foreign travel, underlying illness, lifestyle and age. In this study, we tried to review this important subject. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(2.000: 159-166

  7. Uso de toxina botulínica paravertebral para detener la progresión de escoliosis en pollos pinealectomizados: la columna vertebral como sistema de tensegridad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro González-Miranda

    Full Text Available Antecedentes y Objetivos. La escoliosis idiopática infantil no tiene un tratamiento satisfactorio que permita reducir la importante morbilidad y mortalidad asociada a los casos más severos y progresivos de la enfermedad. El desarrollo de procedimientos que puedan ralentizar la progresión de la enfermedad durante el desarrollo del niño puede influir favorablemente en el crecimiento y retrasar el tratamiento definitivo de la deformidad al momento de la madurez músculoesquelética. Presentamos un estudio sobre la influencia de la toxina botulínica en el desarrollo de deformidad en un modelo animal de escoliosis progresiva. Material y método. Utilizamos 52 pollos Broiler hembra, en los que se practicó pinealectomía para producir escoliosis. Comparamos la evolución de la deformidad entre un grupo control y un grupo intervención asignado a recibir toxina botulínica paravertebral en la concavidad de la curva, bajo control electromiográfico. Realizamos estudios radiográficos y anatomopatológicos de los animales para evaluar los resultados. El grado de escoliosis se midió utilizando el método del ángulo de Cobb. Resultados. Cinco animales no sobrevivieron al estudio (1 en el grupo control y 4 en el de intervención. En el grupo control observamos una deformidad media de 32.9º (n= 25 y en el grupo intervención de 18.8º (n=22, encontrando diferencias estadísticamente significativas (p < 0.05. Por tanto, la aplicación de toxina botulínica en la concavidad de la deformidad de pollos pinealectomizados frena la progresión de escoliosis. Conclusiones. La consideración de la columna vertebral y sus tejidos blandos asociados como una estructura de tensegridad puede explicar el fenómeno mediante el desequilibrio generado entre los componentes de tensión (músculos y ligamentos y compresión (vértebras que conforman el sistema. Estos resultados justifican nuevos estudios en investigación clínica para explorar una nueva alternativa

  8. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  9. Immune System (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Immune System KidsHealth > For Parents > Immune System Print A A ... lead to illness and infection. About the Immune System The immune system is the body's defense against ...

  10. Passive immunity transfer and serum constituents of crossbred calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís G. Rocha

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Passive immunity transfer (PIT evaluation is an essential tool for the maintenance of healthy calves during the first months of life. Since lactation number and breed have been proven to influence immunoglobulin levels in colostrum, the aim of this study was to evaluate PIT from primiparous and multiparous Canchim cows to their calves. Blood samples were collected from the calves before colostrum intake and 1, 2, 7, 15 and 30 days thereafter, while colostrum samples from the cows were taken immediately after parturition. Activities of gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, and concentrations of total protein, albumin, globulins, immunoglobulin A (IgA, immunoglobulin G (IgG, total and ionized calcium, inorganic phosphorus, magnesium, sodium and potassium were evaluated in calves' serum and activities of GGT and ALP and concentrations of total protein, IgA and IgG were assessed in cow's colostrum whey. Immunoglobulins concentrations were evaluated by electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels. Serum biochemistry evaluations revealed an increase in gamma-glutamyl transferase and alkaline phosphatase activities and in total protein, globulins, immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin G levels in calves' serum after colostrum intake. Only total protein and light chain immunoglobulin G levels in colostrum whey were affected by the cows' lactation number. Phosphorus and magnesium levels in blood serum increased after colostrum intake, while sodium and potassium levels oscillated in the experimental period. PIT was influenced by the cows' lactation number but was efficient in both groups.

  11. Effect of poly(amidoamine) dendrimers on the structure and activity of immune molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiansheng; Hua, Wenxi; Zhang, Yi; Li, Chenghua; Xue, Wei; Yin, Jian; Liu, Zonghua; Qiu, Xiaozhong

    2015-02-01

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers are widely used biomedical polymers, which are extensively applied in drug delivery, gene delivery, contrast agent, etc. In these biomedical applications, the bio-safety of the PAMAM dendrimers is a critical issue, which affects not only their toxicity to the host but also the expected in vivo biofunctions of the materials. To clarify the bio-safety of PAMAM dendrimers, the effects of generation 5 PAMAM dendrimers with amine, hydroxyl or carboxyl groups on immune molecules were explored in this work. Specifically, the effect of the PAMAM dendrimers on the secondary structure and conformation of immune molecule γ-globulin was studied by using ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopies. The effect of the PAMAM dendrimers on complement activation was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Further, the effect of the PAMAM dendrimers on antigen-antibody reaction was studied by using human red blood cell agglutination assay. The results showed that, the PAMAM dendrimers could affect the secondary structure and conformation of γ-globulin, and inhibited complement activation. Generation 5 PAMAM dendrimer with carboxyl group at 10mg/mL impaired red blood cell (RBC) antigen-antibody reaction. From these results, the effects of the PAMAM dendrimers on immune molecules depend on their bulk structure and surface groups. This work provides important information for the immunocompatibility evaluation, preclinical design, and clinical applications of PAMAM dendrimers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of a major androgen-dependent urinary protein,. alpha. 2u-globulin on the pituitary-gonadal axis and hypothalamic monoamines in adult male mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, P.K.; Chandrashekar, V.; Steger, R. Bartke, A. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of alpha-2u-globulin, a sex-dependent male rat urinary protein on pituitary-gonadal functions and hypothalamic monamine contents in male mice. Adult male mice, maintained under standardized laboratory conditions were injected subcutaneously with alpha-2u-globulin or with vehicle daily for 14 days and killed 16 h after the last injection. Plasma levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), testosterone (T) and testicular levels of T were measured by radioimmunoassays. The concentrations of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) in medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) and anterior hypothalamus (AH) were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Administration of alpha-2u-globulin led to a significant increase in plasma FSH and LH levels. In the MBH of alpha-2u-globulin treated mice, there were significant elevations of NE, DA and 5-HT contents. In the AH, both DA and 5-HT contents were decreased while NE content remained unaltered.

  13. Expression of globulin-2, a member of the cupin superfamily of proteins with similarity to known food allergens, is increased under high temperature regimen during wheat grain development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty-three expressed sequence tags (ESTs)from the US spring wheat Butte 86 were identified that encode proteins similar to a globulin-2 protein from maize embryos. The ESTs assembled into three contigs, two of which include the entire coding region for the mature protein. The encoded proteins co...

  14. Treatment of cervical dystonia with botulinum toxin in a patient with myasthenia gravis Tratamento de distonia cervical com toxina botulínica em uma paciente com miastenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCIA RUBIA R. GONÇALVES

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 49-year-old woman who has the rare combination of myasthenia gravis and cervical dystonia. She was treated with botulinum toxin type A with good response and no evidence of deterioration of the myasthenic symptoms. We therefore conclude that it is possible to use botulinum toxin in the presence of defective neuromuscular transmission.Relatamos o caso de uma mulher de 49 anos com rara combinação de miastenia gravis e distonia cervical tratada com toxina botulínica tipo A, apresentando boa resposta e nenhuma evidência de piora do quadro miastênico. A partir dessas observações concluimos que é possível o uso de toxina botulínica na presença de doença da transmissão neuromuscular.

  15. Rabbit antithymocyte globulin induces rapid expansion of effector memory CD8 T cells without accelerating acute graft versus host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenbecher, Friedrich; Rieger, Kathrin; Dziubianau, Mikalai; Herholz, Anne; Mensen, Angela; Blau, Igor Wolfgang; Uharek, Lutz; Dörken, Bernd; Thiel, Andreas; Na, Il-Kang

    2013-01-01

    Rabbit antithymocyte globulin (Thymoglobulin(®)) is commonly used as graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) prophylaxis. Since we found similar total CD8 T cell numbers in patients with and without Thymoglobulin(®) therapy within the first six months after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, we have analyzed the reconstitution of the CD8 T cell compartment in detail. After T cell-depletion, higher and more sustained proliferative capacity of memory CD8 T cells resulted in their rapid expansion, whereas the fraction of naive CD8 T cells decreased. Importantly, this shift towards effector memory CD8 T cells did not accelerate the incidence of GvHD.

  16. Binding of Ochratoxin A to a Urinary Globulin: A New Concept to Account for Gender Difference in Rat Nephrocarcinogenic Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Nagy

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available SDS-gradient mini-gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting of urine of rats given ochratoxin A (OTA, showed OTA binding to an α2u-globulin. Perceived potential internalised delivery of OTA to proximal tubule epithelia by the carrier, specific only to adult male rats and augmenting other uptake mechanisms, suggests that some experimental nephrotoxicological data may not be appropriate for human risk assessment. Reexamination of female rat renal tumour histopathology of the NTP high dose OTA study showed all carcinomas were solitary, unilateral, microscopic and clinically insignificant at the 2-year end-stage. The novel concept, when consolidated further from our archived material, may moderate current perceptions of the human risk of traces of dietary OTA.

  17. Differential representation of albumins and globulins during grain development in durum wheat and its possible functional consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Simona; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Vitale, Monica; Mazzeo, Fiorella; Mamone, Gianfranco; Di Stasio, Luigia; Maccaferri, Marco; Curci, Pasquale Luca; Sonnante, Gabriella; Zambrano, Nicola; Scaloni, Andrea

    2017-06-06

    Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum (Desf.) Husn.) is an economically important crop used for the production of semolina, which is the basis of pasta and other food products. Its grains provide proteins and starch for human consumption. Grain development is a key process in wheat physiology; it is highly affected by a number of enzymes that control the metabolic processes governing accumulation of starch and storage proteins and ultimately grain weight. Most of these enzymes are present in the albumin/globulin grain fraction, which represents about a quarter of total seed proteins. With the aim to describe the dynamic profile of the albumin/globulin fraction during durum wheat grain development, we performed a proteomic analysis of this subproteome using a two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE)-based approach and compared six developmental stages. A total of 285 differentially (237 over- and 48 under-) represented spots was identified by nanoLC-ESI-LIT-MS/MS, which were associated with 217 non-redundant Triticum sequence entries. Quantitative protein dynamics demonstrated that carbon metabolism, energy, protein destination/storage, disease/defense and cell growth/division functional categories were highly affected during grain development, concomitantly with progressive grain size increase and starch/protein reserve accumulation. Bioinformatic interaction prediction revealed a complex network of differentially represented proteins mainly centered at enzymes involved in carbon and protein metabolism. A description of 18 proteins associated with wheat flour human allergies was also obtained; these components showed augmented levels at the last developmental stages. By providing a comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of durum wheat grain development, yield and quality formation, this study provides the foundation and reveals potential biomarkers for further investigations of durum wheat breeding and semolina quality. A 2D

  18. Sex hormone binding globulin - an important biomarker for predicting PCOS risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deswal, Ritu; Yadav, Arun; Dang, Amita Suneja

    2018-02-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a glycoprotein which regulates bioavailability of sex steroid hormones. Interest in SHBG has escalated in recent years because of its inverse association with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), obesity, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes type II. This meta-analysis was performed to examine the associations of SHBG with PCOS and to correlate serum SHBG levels with various PCOS associated endocrine and metabolic dysregulation as well as to determine the effects of various therapeutic agents on serum SHBG levels in PCOS patients in order to assess the true accuracy of SHBG in the prediction of PCOS. A literature search was performed using Pub-Med, Science direct, google scholar, EMBASE, and Cochrane library. A total of 675 relevant records were identified, of which 62 articles were included. Meta-analysis using a random-effects model was performed using STATA version 13 to calculate standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (95 % CIs). SHBG levels in controls were significantly higher than that of PCOS patients (SMD= -0.83, 95%CI = -1.01, -0.64), with significant heterogeneity across studies (I 2 = 93.9% and p=0.000). Our results suggest that the lower serum SHBG levels are associated with the risk of PCOS. SHBG may also play an important role in various metabolic disturbances in PCOS patients. Therapeutic interventions improved SHBG levels in PCOS women which further reduced PCOS associated complications. Therefore, SHBG levels may prove to be a useful biomarker for the diagnosis and treatment of PCOS. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42017057972 Abbreviations: PCOS: polycystic ovary syndrome; SHBG: sex hormone-binding globulin.

  19. Integrated Circuit Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sketoe, J. G.; Clark, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a DOD E3 program overview on integrated circuit immunity. The topics include: 1) EMI Immunity Testing; 2) Threshold Definition; 3) Bias Tee Function; 4) Bias Tee Calibration Set-Up; 5) EDM Test Figure; 6) EMI Immunity Levels; 7) NAND vs. and Gate Immunity; 8) TTL vs. LS Immunity Levels; 9) TP vs. OC Immunity Levels; 10) 7805 Volt Reg Immunity; and 11) Seventies Chip Set. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  20. Outbreak of type C botulism in chickens in Pancas city, Espírito Santo state, Brazil
    Surto de botulismo tipo C em frangos na cidade de Pancas, Espírito Santo, Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Otávio Silveira Silva; Prhiscylla Sadanã Pires; Felipe Masiero Salvarani; Carlos Augusto de Oliveira Júnior; Gustavo Xavier Wassita de Souza; Fernanda Celano de Minas Santos; Rogério Pinheiro Caldas; Ronnie Antunes de Assis; Francisco Carlos Faria Lobato; Guilherme Guerra Alves

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to describe an outbreak of botulism in poultry (Gallus gallus domesticus), in Pancas City, Espírito Santo State, Brazil. The birds were derived from a subsistence property with approximately 150 domestic fowls. The owner reported finding some birds lying on the floor and others exhibiting limited mobility. Ten animals in agony were euthanized, necropsied and had their blood serum collected. About 72 hours after the onset of clinical signs, 144 (96%) animals of the creation had ...

  1. Botulinum toxin: mechanisms of action Toxina botulínica: mecanismos de ação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Dressler

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This review describes therapeutically relevant mechanisms of action of botulinum toxin (BT. BT's molecular mode of action includes extracellular binding to glycoproteine structures on cholinergic nerve terminals and intracellular blockade of the acetylcholine secretion. BT affects the spinal stretch reflex by blockade of intrafusal muscle fibres with consecutive reduction of Ia/II afferent signals and muscle tone without affecting muscle strength (reflex inhibition. This mechanism allows for antidystonic effects not only caused by target muscle paresis. BT also blocks efferent autonomic fibres to smooth muscles and to exocrine glands. Direct central nervous system effects are not observed, since BT does not cross the blood-brain-barrier and since it is inactivated during its retrograde axonal transport. Indirect central nervous system effects include reflex inhibition, normalisation of reciprocal inhibition, intracortical inhibition and somatosensory evoked potentials. Reduction of formalin-induced pain suggests direct analgesic BT effects possibly mediated through blockade of substance P, glutamate and calcitonin gene related peptide.O propósito deste artigo é uma revisão dos mecanismos de ação da toxina botulínica (TB relevantes para a compreensão do seu uso terapêutico. A ação da TB a nível molecular consiste na sua ligação extracelular a estruturas glicoprotéicas em terminais nervosos colinérgicos e no bloqueio intracelular da secreção de acetilcolina. A TB interfere no reflexo espinal de estiramento através do bloqueio de fibras musculares intrafusais causando redução da sinalização aferente veiculada por fibras Ia e II e do tono muscular. Portanto, o efeito da TB pode estar relacionado não somente à paresia muscular mas também à inibição reflexa espinal. A TB promove ainda o bloqueio de fibras autonômicas para músculos lisos e glândulas exócrinas. Apesar de ocorrer alguma difusão sistêmica após a aplica

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  1. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  13. Immunizations and African Americans

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    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Immunizations Immunizations and African Americans African American adults are less ... 19 to 35 months had comparable rates of immunization. African American women are as likely to have ...

  14. Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule

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    ... Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Get ... date. See Disclaimer for additional details. Based on Immunization Schedule for Children 0 through 6 Years of ...

  15. Immune System Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Special Needs Glasses and Contact Lenses Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System Print A A A How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About KidsHealth ...

  16. The 11S globulin Sin a 2 from yellow mustard seeds shows IgE cross-reactivity with homologous counterparts from tree nuts and peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirvent Sofía

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 11S globulin Sin a 2 is a marker to predict severity of symptoms in mustard allergic patients. The potential implication of Sin a 2 in cross-reactivity with tree nuts and peanut has not been investigated so far. In this work, we studied at the IgG and IgE level the involvement of the 11S globulin Sin a 2 in cross-reactivity among mustard, tree nuts and peanut. Methods Eleven well-characterized mustard-allergic patients sensitized to Sin a 2 were included in the study. A specific anti-Sin a 2 serum was obtained in rabbit. Skin prick tests (SPT, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, immunoblotting and IgG or IgE-inhibition immunoblotting experiments using purified Sin a 2, Sin a 1, Sin a 3, mustard, almond, hazelnut, pistachio, walnut or peanut extracts were performed. Results The rabbit anti-Sin a 2 serum showed high affinity and specificity to Sin a 2, which allowed us to demonstrate that Sin a 2 shares IgG epitopes with allergenic 11S globulins from tree nuts (almond, hazelnut, pistachio and walnut but not from peanut. All the patients included in the study had positive skin prick test to tree nuts and/or peanut and we subdivided them into two different groups according to their clinical symptoms after ingestion of such allergenic sources. We showed that 11S globulins contain conserved IgE epitopes involved in cross-reactivity among mustard, tree nuts and peanut as well as species-specific IgE epitopes. Conclusions The allergenic 11S globulin Sin a 2 from mustard is involved in cross-reactivity at the IgE level with tree nuts and peanut. Although the clinical relevance of the cross-reactive IgE epitopes present in 11S globulins needs to be investigated in further detail, our results contribute to improve the diagnosis and management of mustard allergic patients sensitized to Sin a 2.

  17. Immunization Action Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IAC | Contact | A-Z Index | Donate | Shop | SUBSCRIBE Immunization Action Coalition Favorites ACIP Recommendations Package Inserts Additional Immunization Resources Photos Adult Vaccination Screening Checklists Ask the ...

  18. The effect of Euglena viridis on immune response of rohu, Labeo rohita (Ham.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Basanta Kumar; Pradhan, Jyotirmayee; Sahu, Swagatika

    2009-06-01

    The study evaluated the effect of dietary doses of Euglena viridis on the immune response and disease resistance of Labeo rohita fingerlings against infection with the bacterial pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila. L. rohita fingerlings were fed with diet containing 0 (Control), 0.1 g, 0.5 g, 1.0 g Euglena powder kg(-1) dry diet for 90 days. Biochemical (serum total protein, albumin, globulin, albumin:globulin ratio), haematological (WBC, RBC, haemoglobin content) and immunological (superoxide anion production, lysozyme, serum bactericidal activity) parameters of fish were examined after 30, 60 and 90 days of feeding. Fish were challenged with A. hydrophila 90 days post-feeding and mortalities were recorded over 10 days post-infection. The results demonstrate that fish fed with Euglena showed increased levels of superoxide anion production, lysozyme, serum bactericidal activity, serum protein and albumin (P Euglena kg(-1) dry diet showed the highest percentage survival (75%). These results indicate that Euglena stimulates the immunity and makes L. rohita more resistant to A. hydrophila infection.

  19. Serum protein changes in immune and nonimmune pigeons infected with various strains of Trichomonas gallinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocan, R M; Herman, C M

    1970-01-01

    Serum protein changes were studied in immune and nonimmune pigeons infected with three different strains of Trichomonas gallinae. Strain I (nonvirulent) produced no change in the relative concentration of serum components. Strains II (oral canker) and III (Jones' Barn) produced decreases in albumin and alpha globulins, and increases in beta and gamma globulins between the 7th and 20th days post infection. Birds infected with strain II began to return to normal by the 20th day, while all those infected with strain III were dead between 10 and 14 days post infection. Two serum protein patterns resulted from infection of immune birds with the Jones' Barn strain. One showed no change in relative protein concentrations and no tissue invasion by the parasite while the other was similar to that seen in nonimmune birds infected with a strain producing oral canker. These also showed evidence of tissue invasion by the parasite. It was concluded that tissue invasion was necessary to evoke a quantitative change in serum protein concentrations.

  20. Administration of Antithymocyte Globulin (Rabbit) to Treat a Severe, Mixed Rejection Episode in a Pregnant Renal Transplant Recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzler, Heather L; Ye, Xiaoyi; Rochon, Caroline; Martin, Spencer T

    2016-04-01

    Pregnancy in solid organ transplant recipients carries numerous risks to the mother such as increased risk of rejection, gestational diabetes mellitus, and preeclampsia. The developing fetus is subjected to risks such as birth defects, preterm delivery, and low birth weight. Typically, these risks can be managed through intensive, multidisciplinary prenatal care and a proper immunosuppressive regimen. In the setting of rejection, however, little data are available to suggest safe and effective treatment of acute cellular rejection, antibody-mediated rejection, or mixed rejection episodes in the pregnant solid organ transplant recipient. We describe the first case, to our knowledge, in which antithymocyte globulin (rabbit) was used to successfully treat a pregnant renal transplant recipient who experienced a mixed rejection episode. A 22-year-old, African American woman with stage 6 chronic kidney disease received a deceased donor renal transplant after undergoing hemodialysis for 3 years. Her maintenance immunosuppressive regimen at the time of transplantation consisted of tacrolimus, prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil. Despite counseling efforts on the importance of having a planned pregnancy after kidney transplantation so that her immunosuppressive medications could be optimized, the patient became pregnant 12 months later; her mycophenolate mofetil was changed to azathioprine to reduce the risk of fetal deformities or death. Three months later, the patient was admitted for biopsy of her transplanted kidney and was evaluated for possible kidney rejection. After confirmation of a mixed 1B acute cellular rejection and antibody-mediated rejection episode, the patient decided to pursue resolution of her rejection episode and continue the pregnancy despite the potential risks to the fetus. She was treated with high-dose corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis, and antithymocyte globulin (rabbit). Twenty-nine months after transplantation, the

  1. Immune and hormonal activity in adults suffering from depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.O.V. Nunes

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available An association between depression and altered immune and hormonal systems has been suggested by the results of many studies. In the present study we carried out immune and hormonal measurements in 40 non-medicated, ambulatory adult patients with depression determined by CID-10 criteria and compared with 34 healthy nondepressed subjects. The severity of the condition was determined with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Of 40 depressed patients, 31 had very severe and 9 severe or moderate depression, 29 (72.5% were females and 11 (27.5% were males (2.6:1 ratio. The results revealed a significant reduction of albumin and elevation of alpha-1, alpha-2 and ß-globulins, and soluble IL-2 receptor in patients with depression compared to the values obtained for nondepressed subjects (P<0.05. The decrease lymphocyte proliferation in response to a mitogen was significantly lower in severely or moderately depressed patients when compared to control (P<0.05. These data confirm the immunological disturbance of acute phase proteins and cellular immune response in patients with depression. Other results may be explained by a variety of interacting factors such as number of patients, age, sex, and the nature, severity and/or duration of depression. Thus, the data obtained should be interpreted with caution and the precise clinical relevance of these findings requires further investigation.

  2. Botulismo em ruminantes causado pela ingestão de cama-de-frango Botulism in ruminants being fed with poultry litter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carlos Faria Lobato

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Botulismo é uma intoxicação causada pela ingestão das toxinas produzidas pelo Clostridium botulinum, que acomete mamíferos e aves. Neste trabalho é descrito um surto de botulismo em ruminantes, ocorrido em duas propriedades localizadas no município de Patos, no Estado da Paraíba, Brasil. Em uma das propriedades, de um total de 88 bovinos, 85 (96,6% vieram a óbito. Na segunda, morreram 145 ovinos (96,7%, 233 caprinos (57,8% e 30 bovinos (96,8%. Os animais acometidos apresentavam paralisia progressiva, dificuldade de locomoção, sialorréia e dispnéia. A morte ocorreu entre 24 e 48 horas após o início dos sinais, por parada cardio-respiratória. Nenhuma alteração significativa foi observada no exame post-mortem. O diagnóstico de botulismo foi confirmado pela demonstração das toxinas C e D no conteúdo intestinal e na cama-de-frango utilizada na alimentação dos animais, pela técnica de soroneutralização em camundongos.Botulism is a poisoning caused by the ingestion of toxins produced by Clostridium botulinum, that infects mammals and birds. This article reports an outbreak of botulism in two different flocks of ruminants at Paraíba, Brazil. In one, 85 out of 88 (96.6% cattles died. In the other, 145 (96.7% sheeps, 233 (57.8% goats and 30 (96.8% cattles died. Clinical signs were progressive paralysis, difficulties in moving, sialorrhoe and dyspnoe. Death occurred 24 to 48 hours after the beginning of clinic signs and at post-mortem examination no noteable changes were observed. Type C and D toxins were demonstrated in the intestinal contents and poultry litter by neutralization test in mice.

  3. Evidence for T cell-dependent immunity to Bacteroides fragilis in an intraabdominal abscess model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onderdonk, A B; Markham, R B; Zaleznik, D F; Cisneros, R L; Kasper, D L

    1982-01-01

    It has been shown that active immunization of rats with the capsular polysaccharide of Bacteroides fragilis protects these animals against abscess development following intraperitoneal challenge with this species. Passive transfer of hyperimmune globulin from immunized animals to nonimmune recipients provided protection against B. fragilis bacteremia in challenged animals, but did not confer protection against abscess development. On the other hand, adoptive transfer of spleen cells from immunized animals to nonimmunized recipients resulted in protection against abscesses following challenge with B. fragilis. These data suggested that a T cell-dependent immune response was involved in protection against abscess development after immunization with B. fragilis capsular antigen. To determine the possible role of cell-mediated immunity prompted by the capsular antigen, inbred congenitally athymic OLA/Rnu rats and their phenotypically normal littermates were actively immunized. Despite the development of high titers of anti-B. fragilis capsular antibody, 100% of actively immunized athymic rats developed abscesses, as did 100% of unimmunized athymic control rats. However, no phenotypically normal littermate control rats that were actively immunized developed abscesses, while 100% of phenotypically normal unimmunized rats developed abscesses. Additional studies showed that adoptive transfer of T cell-enriched spleen cell preparations from Wistar/Lewis rats immunized with the capsular polysaccharide to nonimmune recipients also resulted in protection against B. fragilis-induced abscesses. We conclude that the protection afforded by immunization with B. fragilis capsule against intraabdominal abscesses caused by that organism is T cell-mediated and does not require the presence of serum antibody.

  4. Preferential interaction of β-globulin from sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum L.) with cosolvents is accompanied by the protein structural reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, P M Guna; Yadav, Jay Kant

    2013-05-01

    The effect of a cosolvent on the structure and stability of a protein depends upon the nature of preferential protein- water, protein-cosolvent or cosolvent-water interactions. The preferential interaction parameters of glycerol, sorbitol and sucrose with β-globulin (from Sesamum indicum L. seeds) were evaluated and the results showed the exclusion of cosolvents and preferential hydration of the protein. Data from fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and thermal stability measurements inferred that the preferential hydration had a considerable effect on the structure of protein under native conditions. Such cosolvent-protein interactions bring out a previously unnoticed, but outstanding phenomenon of cosolvent induced structural effects on the protein. This study reveals that these cosolvents interact with β-globulin in such a way that they induce a structural reshuffling to enhance the protein stability, mostly by intensifying intra-molecular hydrophobic interactions.

  5. Knockdown of the 7S globulin subunits shifts distribution of nitrogen sources to the residual protein fraction in transgenic soybean seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Mori, Yoshihiro; Yasue, Kazuho; Maruyama, Nobuyuki; Kitamura, Keisuke; Abe, Jun

    2014-12-01

    A platform of gene silencing by amiRNA had been established in fertile transgenic soybean. We demonstrated that knockdown of storage protein shifted the distribution of nitrogen sources in soybean seeds. Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) were designed using the precursor sequence of the endogenous soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) miRNA gma-miR159a and expressed in transgenic soybean plants to suppress the biosynthesis of 7S globulin, which is one of the major storage proteins. Seed-specific expression of these amiRNAs (amiR-7S) resulted in a strong suppression of 7S globulin subunit genes and decreased accumulation of the 7S globulin subunits in seeds. Thus, the results demonstrate that a platform for gene silencing by amiRNA was first developed in fertile transgenic soybean plants. There was no difference in nitrogen, carbon, and lipid contents between amiR-7S and control seeds. Four protein fractions were collected from defatted mature seeds on the basis of solubility at different pH to examine the distribution of nitrogen sources and compensatory effects. In the whey and lipophilic fractions, nitrogen content was similar in amiR-7S and control seeds. Nitrogen content was significantly decreased in the major soluble protein fraction and increased in the residual fraction (okara) of the amiR-7S seeds. Amino acid analysis revealed that increased nitrogen compounds in okara were proteins or peptides rather than free amino acids. Our study indicates that the decrease in 7S globulin subunits shifts the distribution of nitrogen sources to okara in transgenic soybean seeds.

  6. Our Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our Immune System A story for children with primary immunodeficiency diseases Written by Sara LeBien IMMUNE DEFICIENCY FOUNDATION A note from ... are immune deficient to better understand their immune system. What is a “ B-cell, ” a “ T-cell, ” ...

  7. Heat-denaturation and aggregation of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) globulins as affected by the pH value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Outi E; Zannini, Emanuele; Koehler, Peter; Arendt, Elke K

    2016-04-01

    The influence of heating (100 °C; 0-15 min) on the relative molecular mass, protein unfolding and secondary structure of quinoa globulins was studied at pH 6.5 (low solubility), 8.5 and 10.5 (high solubility). The patterns of denaturation and aggregation varied with pH. Heating triggered the disruption of the disulfide bonds connecting the acidic and basic chains of the chenopodin subunits at pH 8.5 and 10.5, but not at pH 6.5. Large aggregates unable to enter a 4% SDS-PAGE gel were formed at pH 6.5 and 8.5, which became soluble under reducing conditions. Heating at pH 10.5 lead to a rapid dissociation of the native chenopodin and to the disruption of the subunits, but no SDS-insoluble aggregates were formed. No major changes in secondary structure occurred during a 15 min heating, but an increase in hydrophobicity indicated unfolding of the tertiary structure in all samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies to the reactive centre loop (RCL) of human corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) can protect against proteolytic cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John G; Elder, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) binds most of the cortisol in circulation and is a non-functional member of the family of serine protease inhibitors (serpins) with an exposed elastase sensitive reactive centre loop (RCL). The RCL can be cleaved by human neutrophil elastase, released from activated neutrophils, and can also be cleaved at nearby site(s) by elastase released by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and at two further sites, also within the RCL, by bovine chymotrypsin. Cleavage of the RCL results in a conformational change accompanied by a marked decrease in affinity for cortisol and hence its release at the site of proteolysis. These cleavages are irreversible and the similar half-lives of cleaved and intact CBG could mean that there may be some advantage in slowing the rate of CBG cleavage in acute inflammation thereby increasing the proportion of intact CBG in circulation. Here we show, for the first time, that pre-incubation of tethered human CBG with two monoclonal antibodies to the RCL of CBG protects against cleavage by all three enzymes. Furthermore, in plasma, pre-incubation with both RCL monoclonal antibodies delays neutrophil elastase cleavage of the RCL and one of these RCL monoclonal antibodies also delays bovine chymotrypsin cleavage of the RCL. These findings may provide a basis and rationale for the concept of the use of RCL antibodies as therapeutic agents to effectively increase the proportion of intact CBG in circulation which may be of benefit in acute inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Differential expression and elution behavior of basic 7S globulin among cultivars under hot water treatment of soybean seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Keigo; Cabanos, Cerrone; Toyota, Kenji; Kobayashi, Yasunori; Maruyama, Nobuyuki

    2014-06-01

    Basic 7S globulin (Bg7S), which accumulates in mature soybean (Glycine max) seeds, is an extracellular matrix protein. A large amount of Bg7S is synthesized de novo and is eluted from soybean seeds when immersed in 50-60°C water (hot water treatment, HWT). However, the Bg7S elution mechanism remains unclear. Under HWT, the seeds probably undergo heat stress and flooding stress. To obtain fundamental knowledge related to how Bg7S is eluted from hot-water-treated seeds, this study compared Bg7S elution among soybean cultivars having different flooding tolerance during pre-germination. The amounts of Bg7S eluted from seeds varied significantly among cultivars. Elution was suppressed by seed coats regarded as preventing the leakage of seed contents by rapid water imbibition. Furthermore, Bg7S expression levels differed among cultivars, although the difference did not result from any variation in Bg7S promoter sequences. However, the expression levels of Bg7S under HWT were not associated with the flooding tolerance level. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that the Bg7S accumulated in the intercellular space of hot-water-treated seeds. Plasma membrane shrinkage was observed. The main proteins eluted from seeds under HWT were located in the extracellular space. This study clarified the mechanism of Bg7S elution from seeds under HWT. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Induction of suppressive allogeneic regulatory T cells via rabbit antithymocyte polyclonal globulin during homeostatic proliferation in rat kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez-Ortiz, Rafael; Bestard, Oriol; Llaudó, Inés; Franquesa, Marcella; Cerezo, Gema; Torras, Joan; Herrero-Fresneda, Inmaculada; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Grinyó, Josep M

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that rabbit antithymocyte polyclonal globulin (ATG) can expand human CD4+CD25++Foxp3+ cells (Tregs). We investigated the major biological effects of a self-manufactured rabbit polyclonal anti-rat thymoglobulin (rATG) in vitro, as well as its effects on different peripheral T-cell subsets. Moreover, we evaluated the allogeneic suppressive capacity of rATG-induced Tregs in an experimental rat renal transplant model. Our results show that rATG has the capacity to induce apoptosis in T lymphocyte lymphocytes as a primary mechanism of T-cell depletion. Our in vivo studies demonstrated a rapid but transient cellular depletion of the main T cell subsets, directly proportional to the rATG dose used, but not of the effector memory T cells, which required significantly higher rATG doses. After rATG administration, we observed a significant proliferation of Tregs in the peripheral blood of transplanted rats, leading to an increase in the Treg/T effector ratio. Importantly, rATG-induced Tregs displayed a strong donor-specific suppressive capacity when assessed in an antigen-specific allogeneic co-culture. All of these results were associated with better renal graft function in rats that received rATG. Our study shows that rATG has the biological capacity immunomodulatory to promote a regulatory alloimmune milieu during post-transplant homeostatic proliferation. © 2014 Steunstichting ESOT.

  11. Low Levels of Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin Constitute an Independent Risk Factor for Arterial Stiffness in Korean Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunhee Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG and arterial stiffness in women is not conclusive. In addition, obesity might also be involved in the relationship between SHBG and atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between SHBG and arterial stiffness in association with central obesity in women. This cross-sectional study included 381 women who participated in the health checkup programs in one hospital. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV was measured as a marker for arterial stiffness. A negative correlation was observed between SHBG levels and baPWV (rho = −0.281. The relationship was significant even after adjusting for potential confounders (beta = −0.087 in fully adjusted model. After considering the interaction between central obesity and SHBG levels, the significant association was evident only in obese women (P for interaction = 0.025. Adjustment for a 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD risk scores, instead of each cardiovascular risk factor individually, did not affect the significance of the relationship between SHBG levels and baPWV. Serum levels of SHBG were negatively associated with arterial stiffness independent of cardiovascular risk factors or 10-year ASCVD risk scores in Korean women. The relationship may be potentiated by central obesity.

  12. Cross-sectional association of coffee and caffeine consumption with sex hormone-binding globulin in healthy nondiabetic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihan-Le Bars, Florence; Gusto, Gaëlle; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fagherazzi, Guy; Bonnet, Fabrice

    2017-11-01

    Low sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a consistent risk factor for type 2 diabetes, particularly in women. Coffee consumption has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, but its effects on SHBG are less known. This was a cross-sectional study of 2377 nondiabetic pre- and postmenopausal women from the E3N cohort study whose baseline SHBG was measured. Information on diet (including coffee and caffeine consumption), lifestyle and medical conditions was collected through questionnaires. The relationship between coffee and caffeine consumption and SHBG was modelled, with adjustment for covariates and stratification by body mass index (BMI) categories (caffeine (≥265 mg/day) intakes were associated with a reduced risk of being in the 1st quartile of the SHBG level distribution (consumption and SHBG levels. In multivariate models stratified on BMI categories and menopausal status, associations were restricted to women with a BMI ≥25 kg/m2 or being postmenopausal. The association with SHBG was consistently noted with consumption of both caffeinated coffee and caffeine, but not decaffeinated coffee. Consumption of high coffee and caffeine is associated with a reduced risk of low SHBG, an established risk marker for T2DM, which might contribute to the protective effects of coffee for type 2 diabetes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Characterization and quantification of corticosteroid-binding globulin in a southern toad, Bufo terrestris, exposed to coal-combustion-waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, C.K.; Fontes, C.; Breuner, C.W.; Mendonca, M.T. [Auburn University, Auburn, AL (USA). Dept. of Biological Science

    2007-05-15

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is a plasma protein that binds corticosterone and may regulate access of hormone to tissues. The role of CBG during a stress response is not clear. In this study, southern toads, Bufo terrestris, were exposed to a chronic pollutant (coal-combustion-waste), to determine changes in CBG and free corticosterone levels. Since toads exposed to chronic pollutants in previous studies did not exhibit the predicted changes in metabolic rate and mass, but did experience a significant elevation in total corticosterone, we hypothesized that CBG would likewise increase and thus, mitigate the effects of a chronic (i.e. 2 months) pollutant stressor. To conduct this study, we first characterized the properties of CBG in southern toads. After characterization, we monitored the changes in CBG, total corticosterone, and free corticosterone in male toads that were exposed to either coal-combustion-waste or control conditions. CBG increased in all groups throughout the experiment. Total corticosterone, on the other hand, was only significantly elevated at four weeks of exposure to coal-combustion-waste. The increase in CBG did not parallel the increase in total corticosterone; as a result, free corticosterone levels were not buffered by CBG, but showed a peak at four weeks similar to total corticosterone. This finding indicates that, in this species, CBG may not provide a protective mechanism during long-term pollution exposure.

  14. Association of sex hormone-binding globulin and free testosterone with mortality in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tint, Aye N; Hoermann, Rudolf; Wong, Henry; Ekinci, Elif I; MacIsaac, Richard J; Jerums, George; Zajac, Jeffrey D; Grossmann, Mathis

    2016-01-01

    Low circulating testosterone levels have been associated with increased mortality in men. We hypothesized that the prognostic role of testosterone in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is influenced by its carrier protein sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). We conducted a prospective cohort study at a tertiary referral centre. In total, 531 men with T2DM presenting to a diabetes clinic in 2004-2005 were followed prospectively until death, or July 31, 2014, and a survival analysis was performed. The main outcome measure was all cause mortality. Over a mean (S.D.) follow up of 7.6 years (2.6) 175 men (33%) died. In Cox proportional hazard models both higher SHBG (Hazard Ratio (HR) 1.012 (95% CI 1.002-1.022), P=0.02) and lower calculated free testosterone (cFT) (HR 0.995 (95% CI 0.993-0.998), P=0.001) were risk factors for all cause mortality independently of age, BMI, presence of macro- and microvascular disease, duration of T2DM, hemoglobin, renal function, insulin use, C-reactive protein and homeostatic model of insulin resistance. By contrast, the inverse association of total testosterone (TT) with mortality weakened after these adjustments (P=0.11). SHBG remained associated with mortality (Ptestosterone, has intrinsic biological roles, or is a marker of poor health requires further study. © 2016 European Society of Endocrinology.

  15. Sex Hormones, Gonadotropins, and Sex Hormone-binding Globulin in Infants Fed Breast Milk, Cow Milk Formula, or Soy Formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xin; Wang, Lei; Wu, Chunhua; Shi, Huijing; Zhou, Zhijun; Montgomery, Scott; Cao, Yang

    2017-06-28

    Measurement of endogenous hormones in early life is important to investigate the effects of hormonally active environmental compounds. To assess the possible hormonal effects of different feeding regimens in different sample matrices of infants, 166 infants were enrolled from two U.S hospitals between 2006 and 2009. The children were classified into exclusive soy formula, cow milk formula or breast milk regimens. Urine, saliva and blood samples were collected over the first 12 months of life. Estradiol, estrone, testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels were measured in the three matrices. Lower estradiol and LH levels were found in urine and saliva samples of soy formula-fed boys compared to cow formula-fed boys. Higher LH level was found in urine samples of soy formula-fed girls compared to cow formula-fed girls. However, we found neither a neonatal testosterone rise in the boys nor a gender-specific difference in testosterone levels, which suggests that urinary testosterone levels may not accurately reflect blood levels during mini-puberty. Nevertheless, our study shows that blood, urine and saliva samples are readily collectible and suitable for multi-hormone analyses in children and allow examination of hypotheses concerning endocrine effects from dietary compounds.

  16. Low Levels of Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin Constitute an Independent Risk Factor for Arterial Stiffness in Korean Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kunhee; Chun, Hyejin; Kim, Moon-Jong; Cho, Doo-Yeoun; Lee, Soo-Hyun; Won, Bo Youn; Kim, Kwang-Min; Joo, Nam-Seok; Kim, Young-Sang

    2017-01-01

    The association between sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and arterial stiffness in women is not conclusive. In addition, obesity might also be involved in the relationship between SHBG and atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between SHBG and arterial stiffness in association with central obesity in women. This cross-sectional study included 381 women who participated in the health checkup programs in one hospital. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) was measured as a marker for arterial stiffness. A negative correlation was observed between SHBG levels and baPWV (rho = -0.281). The relationship was significant even after adjusting for potential confounders (beta = -0.087 in fully adjusted model). After considering the interaction between central obesity and SHBG levels, the significant association was evident only in obese women (P for interaction = 0.025). Adjustment for a 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk scores, instead of each cardiovascular risk factor individually, did not affect the significance of the relationship between SHBG levels and baPWV. Serum levels of SHBG were negatively associated with arterial stiffness independent of cardiovascular risk factors or 10-year ASCVD risk scores in Korean women. The relationship may be potentiated by central obesity.

  17. Vitamin D is significantly associated with total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin in Malaysian men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Kok-Yong; Ima-Nirwana, Soelaiman; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah

    2015-01-01

    Cross-sectional studies in the Caucasian population have shown a significant relationship between vitamin D and testosterone levels, but data in the Asian population are limited. This study aimed to determine the association between vitamin D and testosterone levels in Malaysian men. Chinese and Malay men (n = 382) aged 20 years or above residing in the Klang Valley, Malaysia were recruited. Their fasting blood was collected for serum testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) assays. Relationship between 25(OH)D and testosterone levels was analyzed using multiple regression analysis. Testosterone and SHBG levels among subjects with different vitamin D status were compared using univariate analysis. Confounders such as age, ethnicity and body mass index (BMI) were adjusted. 25(OH)D was significantly and positively associated with total testosterone and SHBG levels before and after adjustment for age and ethnicity (p  0.05). 25(OH)D is significantly associated with total testosterone and SHBG in Malaysian men but this association is BMI-dependent.

  18. The half-lives of intact and elastase cleaved human corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) are identical in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John G; Saunders, Katie; Dyer, Arron; Elder, Peter A

    2015-05-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is a non-inhibitory member of the serpin superfamily of serine protease inhibitors and carries the majority of cortisol in circulation. It can be cleaved by neutrophil elastase at its exposed reactive centre loop which decreases its affinity for cortisol allowing the release of most of the cortisol at sites of inflammation. Intact and elastase cleaved CBG can be distinguished from each other and can coexist in circulation but with unknown half-lives. Here we treated a portion of purified human CBG with elastase, terminated the digestion and then combined this portion with intact human CBG and measured their respective half-lives in rabbits by ELISA. This investigation shows for the first time that the half-lives of intact and elastase cleaved CBG are identical (∼10h). This is an important finding as it implies that in conditions such as sepsis and septic shock where levels of intact CBG are low and the proportion of cleaved CBG is high that this is likely sustained which may affect the CBG mediated targeted delivery of cortisol to sites of inflammation. Furthermore the residual binding of cortisol to cleaved CBG may alter the overall buffering capacity of CBG for cortisol resetting the baseline concentration of free cortisol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Integrated Immune Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's Integrated Immune Experiment. The objectives include: 1) Address significant lack of data regarding immune status during flight; 2) Replace several recent immune studies with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling; 3) Determine the in-flight status of immunity, physiological stress, viral immunity/reactivation; 4) Determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight; and 5) Determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  20. Immune suppression and immune activation in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D; Evans, Dwight L

    2011-02-01

    Depression has been characterized as a disorder of both immune suppression and immune activation. Markers of impaired cellular immunity (decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity) and inflammation (elevated IL-6, TNFα, and CRP) have been associated with depression. These immunological markers have been associated with other medical illnesses, suggesting that immune dysregulation may be a central feature common to both depression and to its frequent medical comorbidities. Yet the significant associations of findings of both immune suppression and immune activation with depression raise questions concerning the relationship between these two classes of immunological observations. Depressed populations are heterogeneous groups, and there may be differences in the immune profiles of populations that are more narrowly defined in terms of symptom profile and/or demographic features. There have been few reports concurrently investigating markers of immune suppression and immune activation in the same depressed individuals. An emerging pre-clinical literature suggests that chronic inflammation may directly contribute to the pathophysiology of immune suppression in the context of illnesses such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. This literature provides us with specific immunoregulatory mechanisms mediating these relationships that could also explain differences in immune disturbances between subsets of depressed individuals We propose a research agenda emphasizing the assessment of these immunoregulatory mechanisms in large samples of depressed subjects as a means to define the relationships among immune findings (suppression and/or activation) within the same depressed individuals and to characterize subsets of depressed subjects based on shared immune profiles. Such a program of research, building on and integrating our knowledge of the psychoneuroimmunology of depression, could lead to innovation in the assessment and treatment of depression and its medical

  1. BOTULISM. STUDIES ON THE MANNER IN WHICH THE TOXIN OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM ACTS UPON THE BODY : I. THE EFFECT UPON THE AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, E C; Shevky, R

    1923-04-30

    A survey of the results of these experiments shows, we believe conclusively, that in botulinus intoxication in cats, dogs, and rabbits there is a specific effect upon the portions of the autonomic nervous system which Gaskell (14) described as the bulbosacral and prosomatic outflows of connector fibers respectively, which results in a blocking of the nerve impulses of these nerves. The experimental as well as the clinical evidence indicates that there is no damage to the nerves of the thoracicolumbar outflow. The exact location of the damage has not been ascertained nor has the mechanism by which the nerve impulse is blocked been determined. The experiments show, however, that the lesions in these portions of the nervous system are not of central distribution but are peripheral, and that the block cannot be due to an organic break in the conduction apparatus but must be due to some derangement which is relatively unstable. If it were otherwise it would not be possible to induce a physiological response even by massive stimulation, nor could the response be subsequently repeated by stimuli which lie within the limits of normal intensity. The application of the results of these experiments to the clinical manifestations of botulism will be discussed in a later report after the effect of the toxin upon the skeletal motor nerves has been described.

  2. Phenotypic characterization of Clostridium botulinum strains isolated from infant botulism cases in Argentina Caracterización fenotípica de cepas de Clostridium botulinum aisladas de casos de botulismo del lactante en Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Sagua

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Infant botulism is the most common form of human botulism; however, its transmission has not been completely explained yet. Some of the most recognized potential sources of Clostridium botulinum spores are the soil, dust, honey and medicinal herbs. In Argentina, 456 cases of infant botulism were reported between 1982 and 2007. C. botulinum type A was identified in 455 of these cases whereas type B was identified in just one case. However, in Argentina, types A, B, E, F, G, and Af have been isolated from environmental sources. It is not clearly known if strains isolated from infant botulism cases have different characteristics from strains isolated from other sources. During this study, 46 C. botulinum strains isolated from infant botulism cases and from environmental sources were typified according to phenotypic characteristics. Biochemical tests, antimicrobial activity, and haemagglutinin-negative botulinum neurotoxin production showed uniformity among all these strains. Despite the variability observed in the botulinum neurotoxin's binding to cellular receptors, no correlation was found between these patterns and the source of the botulinum neurotoxin. However, an apparent geographical clustering was observed, since strains isolated from Argentina had similar characteristics to those isolated from Italy and Japan, but different to those isolated from the United States.El botulismo del lactante es la forma más común del botulismo humano; sin embargo, su forma de transmisión no ha sido totalmente explicada. El suelo, el polvo ambiental, la miel y algunas hierbas medicinales son potenciales fuentes de esporas de Clostridium botulinum. Entre 1982 y 2007 se informaron en Argentina 456 casos de botulismo del lactante, 455 casos debidos al serotipo A y uno al serotipo B. Sin embargo, los serotipos A, B, E, F, G y Af han sido aislados de suelos y otras fuentes en Argentina. No se conoce si las cepas aisladas de casos de botulismo del lactante

  3. Efectos de la toxina botulínica tipo A y electroestimulación en la espasticidad flexora distal de la extremidad superior en el ictus. Ensayo clínico aleatorizado

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duarte, E; Marco, E; Cervantes, C; Díaz, D; Chiarella, S.C; Escalada, F

    2011-01-01

    ... la extensión activa de muñeca y dedos, así como la capacidad para la prensión y la manipulación 3 . Las diferentes guías de práctica clínica para la rehabilitación de los pacientes con espasticidad tras un ictus recomiendan valorar el uso de la toxina botulínica (TB) como un elemento más del programa rehabilitador 4,5 . Respecto al MS, la mayoría de estu...

  4. Uso de toxina botulínica para tratamiento de la hipertrofía del músculo masetero Use of botulinum toxin for treatment of hypetrophy of the masseter muscle

    OpenAIRE

    F. González Magaña; L.M. Miranda; H. Malagón Hidalgo; V. González Amesquita

    2012-01-01

    Definimos la hipertrofia del músculo masetero como el crecimiento excesivo de la masa muscular de dicho músculo, de presentación subclínica y de etiología multifactorial. Presenta una incidencia entre los 20 a 40 años sin predilección de sexo. Desde que en 1880 Legg la describiera por primera vez, se han intentado múltiples tratamientos, desde los médicos hasta los quirúrgicos, siendo el tratamiento con toxina botulínica el de mayor aceptación en la actualidad. El objetivo del presente artícu...

  5. Usos prácticos de la toxina botulínica en niños y adolescentes en medicina física y rehabilitación

    OpenAIRE

    Susana lillo, S.; Mariana Haro, D.

    2014-01-01

    La toxina botulínica tipo A (BoNT-A) es una herramienta terapéutica ampliamente aceptada para la espasticidad y distonía, con buen nivel de evidencia respecto a efectividad y seguridad en su uso. En el último tiempo se ha ampliado notablemente el espectro de indicaciones a diversas patologías con resultados bastante prometedores. Destacan los beneficios del efecto relajante muscular y anti nociceptivo de la BoNT-A en el tratamiento del dolor musculoesquelético, síndromes miofasciales, síndrom...

  6. Administração de toxina botulínica A e a orquiectomia no tratamento da hiperplasia prostática benigna do cão

    OpenAIRE

    Mostachio, Giuliano Queiroz [UNESP; Apparício, Maricy [UNESP; Motheo, Tathiana Ferguson; Alves,Aracélle Elisane; Vicente, Wilter Ricardo Russiano [UNESP

    2015-01-01

    A fisiopatologia da hiperplasia prostática benigna (HPB) não está totalmente compreendida, no entanto, a diidrotestosterona é o principal hormônio envolvido. Recentemente, o efeito da toxina botulínica A (TB-A) foi investigado, mostrando que esta induz atrofia do parênquima e redução do volume prostático. Com base nisso, este estudo teve como objetivos comparar os efeitos da administração da TB-A com a orquiectomia no tratamento da HPB, além de avaliar os efeitos da TB-A sobre a libido e qual...

  7. Tratamiento de epicondilitis refractaria con neurotoxina botulínica tipo A libre de complejo proteínico Treament of refractory epicondilitis with botulin neurotoxin type A free of protein complex

    OpenAIRE

    B. Santos; E. Calderón; P. Ordóñez; R. García-Hernández; L. M. Torres

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: La epicondilitis o "codo de tenista" es un cuadro que se caracteriza por dolor en la inserción proximal del músculo extensor radial corto del carpo. El tratamiento de este cuadro clásicamente se ha basado en fisioterapia e infiltración con corticoides, así como el uso de ortesis. La cirugía se recomienda cuando las estrategias conservadoras no controlan los síntomas después de 6-12 meses de tratamiento. La toxina botulínica es una opción terapéutica cuando fracasan medidas conse...

  8. Efectividad de la técnica DNHS® en comparación con la infiltración de toxina botulínica para el tratamiento de la espasticidad.

    OpenAIRE

    Bachiller González, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    ¿El tratamiento mediante la técnica DNHS® tiene mayor eficacia para disminuir la espasticidad que la infiltración de Toxina Botulínica tipo A? Objetivos: Comprobar la efectividad de la técnica DNHS® en cuanto a la disminución de la espasticidad en el músculo braquiorradial, así como verificar cambios en el tono muscular y analizar la mejora de la calidad de vida, la funcionalidad y el rango articular tanto a corto como a medio y medio-largo plazo. Metodología: Ensayo clínico controlado ...

  9. Efectividad del tratamiento conservador y/o toxina botulínica en la displasia de cadera en parálisis cerebral infantil espástica. Revisión sistemática

    OpenAIRE

    Busto Ruiz, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Objetivo: Estudiar la efectividad del tratamiento conservador y/o toxina botulínica tipo A en la prevención o tratamiento de la displasia o dislocación de la cadera en PCI espástica. Material y métodos: Se realizó una búsqueda bibliográfica en las bases de datos de Pubmed, Web of Science (WOS), PEDro y Cochrane Library. Las palabras clave utilizadas fueron hip dysplasia, hip dislocation, hip subluxation, cerebral palsy, treatment, management, child. Se incluyeron todo tipo d...

  10. Sequential Immune Responses: The Weapons of Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Charles D; Ley, Klaus; Buchmann, Kurt; Canton, Johnathan

    2015-01-01

    Sequential immune responses (SIR) is a new model that describes what 'immunity' means in higher animals. Existing models, such as self/nonself discrimination or danger, focus on how immune responses are initiated. However, initiation is not protection. SIR describes the actual immune responses that provide protection. SIR resulted from a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of immune systems that revealed that several very different types of host innate responses occur (and at different tempos) which together provide host protection. SIR1 uses rapidly activated enzymes like the NADPH oxidases and is present in all animal cells. SIR2 is mediated by the first 'immune' cells: macrophage-like cells. SIR3 evolved in animals like invertebrates and provides enhanced protection through advanced macrophage recognition and killing of pathogens and through other innate immune cells such as neutrophils. Finally, in vertebrates, macrophages developed SIR4: the ability to present antigens to T cells. Though much slower than SIR1-3, adaptive responses provide a unique new protection for higher vertebrates. Importantly, newer SIR responses were added on top of older, evolutionarily conserved functions to provide 'layers' of host protection. SIR transcends existing models by elucidating the different weapons of immunity that provide host protection in higher animals. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Genome wide association identifies common variants at the SERPINA6/SERPINA1 locus influencing plasma cortisol and corticosteroid binding globulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Bolton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Variation in plasma levels of cortisol, an essential hormone in the stress response, is associated in population-based studies with cardio-metabolic, inflammatory and neuro-cognitive traits and diseases. Heritability of plasma cortisol is estimated at 30-60% but no common genetic contribution has been identified. The CORtisol NETwork (CORNET consortium undertook genome wide association meta-analysis for plasma cortisol in 12,597 Caucasian participants, replicated in 2,795 participants. The results indicate that <1% of variance in plasma cortisol is accounted for by genetic variation in a single region of chromosome 14. This locus spans SERPINA6, encoding corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG, the major cortisol-binding protein in plasma, and SERPINA1, encoding α1-antitrypsin (which inhibits cleavage of the reactive centre loop that releases cortisol from CBG. Three partially independent signals were identified within the region, represented by common SNPs; detailed biochemical investigation in a nested sub-cohort showed all these SNPs were associated with variation in total cortisol binding activity in plasma, but some variants influenced total CBG concentrations while the top hit (rs12589136 influenced the immunoreactivity of the reactive centre loop of CBG. Exome chip and 1000 Genomes imputation analysis of this locus in the CROATIA-Korcula cohort identified missense mutations in SERPINA6 and SERPINA1 that did not account for the effects of common variants. These findings reveal a novel common genetic source of variation in binding of cortisol by CBG, and reinforce the key role of CBG in determining plasma cortisol levels. In turn this genetic variation may contribute to cortisol-associated degenerative diseases.

  12. Low Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin Levels Associate with Prediabetes in Chinese Men Independent of Total Testosterone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhu

    Full Text Available The association ns between prediabetes and androgens have been rarely reported, especially in Chinese men. We aimed to investigate whether androgens were associated with the prevalence of prediabetes diagnosed with new American Diabetes Association criteria in Chinese men and then to assess which androgen value was the most relevant factor.A total of 2654 men (52.6±13.4 years old were selected. Serum total testosterone (TT, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG and free testosterone (FT were measured. Covariance analysis of different androgen values were performed in age subgroups. Multinomial logistic regression was used for the association of TT, SHBG and FT with prediabetes and diabetes, as well as prediabetes in age subgroups.According to ADA new criteria, normoglycemia, prediabetes, and diabetes were diagnosed in 1405, 907 and 342 men, respectively. In covariance analysis, SHBG of prediabetes were found lower than that of normoglycemia but higher than that of diabetes (P <0.05. In multinomial logistic regression, serum TT and SHBG were inversely associated with prediabetes and diabetes. While, after full adjustment for age, residence area, economic status, waist circumference, metabolic factors, other two androgen values and HOMA-IR, only the associations of SHBG with prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes persisted statistically significant, especially in the elderly with prediabetes (all P for trend <0.05.Serum androgen was inversely associated with prediabetes and diabetes in Chinese men. Low serum SHBG was the most relevant factor for prediabetes and diabetes. Whether it is an independent predictor for incident prediabetes in Chinese men needs further explorations.

  13. Two different corticosteroid-binding globulin variants that lack cortisol-binding activity in a greek woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, L A; Vassiliadi, D A; Simard, M; Pavlaki, A; Perogamvros, I; Hadjidakis, D; Hammond, G L

    2012-11-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), encoded by SERPINA6, is the principal plasma binding protein for cortisol. Most nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms that alter the production or function of CBG occur rarely, and their clinical significance remains obscure. Serum and DNA were obtained from a Greek woman with low morning cortisol levels and from family members. SERPINA6 exons were sequenced, and serum CBG was measured by ELISA and cortisol-binding capacity assay. Recombinant CBG variants were produced for detailed functional studies. A novel heterozygous c.1282G>C transversion in exon 5 of SERPINA6, resulting in a p.Trp393Ser (W371S) substitution, was identified in the proband, who was also heterozygous for single-nucleotide polymorphisms encoding the CBG Lyon (D367N) and CBG A224S variants. The proband had no measurable plasma cortisol-binding activity despite a CBG level of 273 nm by ELISA. She inherited CBG W371S from her mother whose plasma cortisol-binding capacity was approximately 50% lower than the CBG measurements by ELISA (314 nm). The proband's father and four children were heterozygous for CBG D367N; their CBG levels by ELISA were normal, but corresponding cortisol-binding capacity measurements were 50% lower. Pedigree analysis revealed that W371S segregates with A224 and that D367N and W371S segregate separately. Recombinant CBG D367N and CBG W371S had no measureable cortisol-binding activity. A new CBG Athens (W371S) variant that lacks cortisol-binding activity has been identified in a carrier of the cortisol-binding deficient CBG Lyon (D367N) variant. Analyses of CBG levels in this pedigree illustrate how immunoassays fail to accurately reflect cortisol-binding activity.

  14. Retrospective evaluation of alpha 2u-globulin accumulation in male rat kidneys following high doses of diisononyl phthalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, D J; Eldridge, S R; Lington, A W; McKee, R H

    1999-09-01

    Diisononyl phthalate (DINP), a widely used plasticizer, has been evaluated in two chronic studies in rats and one in mice. In the early 1980s, Exxon found no carcinogenic potential at the estimated maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of 0.6% (307 mg/kg/ day for male rats) administered in the diet of rats for 2 years. A recent study conducted at dietary levels up to 1.2% DINP (733 mg/kg/d for male rats) reported kidney tumors in male rats at the high treatment level, but not in female rats nor mice of either sex. Because these tumors occurred only in male rats, and only at high doses, the male rat-specific alpha 2u-globulin (alpha2UG) mechanism of action was investigated. Technological advances in immunohistochemical staining and computerized image analysis techniques permitted measuring the accumulation of alpha2UG in archived kidneys from the earlier Exxon study. Using archived tissue obtained at the 12-month interim sacrifice, we identified a dose-dependent accumulation of alpha2UG in specific regions of male rat kidneys only. An increase in cell proliferation was confirmed by immunohistochemical detection of proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and was confined to the areas of alpha2UG accumulation. H and E-stained sections revealed tubular epithelial hypertrophy and regeneration, consistent with the immunohistopathology findings. These findings are consistent with the alpha2UG mechanism of tumorigenesis, which is not regarded as relevant for humans. Thus, exposure to DINP produced a dose-dependent alpha2UG accumulation in male rat kidneys, significant at a dietary level of 0.6% and a likely mechanism for the kidney tumors seen only in male rats administered higher dietary levels of DINP.

  15. A Novel Mutation in the TBG Gene Producing Partial Thyroxine-Binding Globulin Deficiency (Glencoe) Identified in 2 Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, Theodora; Moeller, Lars C; Edidin, Deborah V; Pannain, Silvana; Refetoff, Samuel

    2017-07-01

    Thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) is the major thyroid hormone transport protein in serum. Located on the long arm of the X chromosome, TBG (SERPINA7) gene mutations most commonly produce inherited partial TBG deficiency (TBG-PD). We report a novel TBG variant associated with TBG-PD identified in 2 different families of Ashkenazi origin residing in greater Chicago. Family 1: The proband was 12.6 years old when she presented for delayed puberty and was placed on L-T4. Although her serum TSH normalized, her serum T4 remained low. Affected family members had low total T4 and T3, but a normal free T4 index, even when serum TSH concentrations were normal. Family 2: A 71-year-old male presented with a history of a nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma and normal pituitary axes except for low total T4 and T3. His brother had a similar thyroid phenotype. Following direct DNA sequencing, both index patients were found to carry a missense mutation in the TBG gene (c.751T>G) producing p.V215G. The proposita of family 1 was heterozygous and the proband in family 2 was hemizygous for the mutation. Isoelectric focusing showed no alteration in the TBG isoforms and in vitro expression demonstrated a TBG with reduced affinity for T4. We report a novel mutation in the TBG gene in 2 unrelated families that produces a molecule with reduced affinity for T4 resulting in low serum T4. However, the physical properties of the mutant molecule remained unaltered as determined by isoelectric focusing.

  16. Low-dose rabbit antithymocyte globulin induction therapy results in prolonged selective lymphocyte depletion irrespective of maintenance immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankewycz, O; Leca, N; Kohli, R; Wallace, P K; Said, M; Feng, L; Alnimri, M; Patel, S; Laftavi, M R

    2011-03-01

    Rabbit antithymocyte globulin therapy (rATG) is a potent lymphocyte-depleting agent commonly used following renal transplantation to reduce the risk of acute rejection. Standard doses (7-10 mg/kg) of rATG result in profound lymphopenia and predispose patients to infection and malignancy. The effects of lower doses of rATG (LoD-rATG, 3-5 mg/kg) on peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) are as yet unknown. In this prospective clinical trial, PBL subsets were characterized by flow cytometry over 12 months following LoD-rATG therapy. All patients were initially treated with standard doses of tacrolimus, mycophenolic acid, and prednisone. At 3 months, patients were randomized to either lower doses of tacrolimus or sirolimus to examine the effects of maintenance immunosuppression on PBL reemergence. LoD-rATG therapy resulted in prolonged suppression of CD19+ B cells, total CD3+ T cells, as well as naïve and memory CD4+ T cell and CD4/CD25/Foxp3+ T-regulatory subsets irrespective of chronic immunosuppressive therapy. Selective depletion was only noted in the CD4CD45RA+ naïve T-cell subset resulting in an altered memory/naïve CD4+ ratio. LoD-rATG failed to deplete CD8+ T cells, which increased their relative contribution to the total CD3+ pool. All other lymphocyte subsets maintained near normal proportions. Thus, LoD-rATG therapy may lessen the adverse effects of full dose rATG while maintaining overall efficacy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic evidence that raised sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, John R.B.; Weedon, Michael N.; Langenberg, Claudia; Jackson, Anne U.; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Sparsø, Thomas; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Grallert, Harald; Ferrucci, Luigi; Maggio, Marcello; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Walker, Mark; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Payne, Felicity; Young, Elizabeth; Herder, Christian; Narisu, Narisu; Morken, Mario A.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Owen, Katharine R.; Shields, Beverley; Knight, Beatrice; Bennett, Amanda; Groves, Christopher J.; Ruokonen, Aimo; Jarvelin, Marjo Riitta; Pearson, Ewan; Pascoe, Laura; Ferrannini, Ele; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Stringham, Heather M.; Scott, Laura J.; Kuusisto, Johanna; Nilsson, Peter; Neptin, Malin; Gjesing, Anette P.; Pisinger, Charlotta; Lauritzen, Torsten; Sandbaek, Annelli; Sampson, Mike; Zeggini, MAGIC, Ele; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Hansen, Torben; Schwarz, Peter; Illig, Thomas; Laakso, Markku; Stefansson, Kari; Morris, Andrew D.; Groop, Leif; Pedersen, Oluf; Boehnke, Michael; Barroso, Inês; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Frayling, Timothy M.

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies consistently show that circulating sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels are lower in type 2 diabetes patients than non-diabetic individuals, but the causal nature of this association is controversial. Genetic studies can help dissect causal directions of epidemiological associations because genotypes are much less likely to be confounded, biased or influenced by disease processes. Using this Mendelian randomization principle, we selected a common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) near the SHBG gene, rs1799941, that is strongly associated with SHBG levels. We used data from this SNP, or closely correlated SNPs, in 27 657 type 2 diabetes patients and 58 481 controls from 15 studies. We then used data from additional studies to estimate the difference in SHBG levels between type 2 diabetes patients and controls. The SHBG SNP rs1799941 was associated with type 2 diabetes [odds ratio (OR) 0.94, 95% CI: 0.91, 0.97; P = 2 × 10−5], with the SHBG raising allele associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. This effect was very similar to that expected (OR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88, 0.96), given the SHBG-SNP versus SHBG levels association (SHBG levels are 0.2 standard deviations higher per copy of the A allele) and the SHBG levels versus type 2 diabetes association (SHBG levels are 0.23 standard deviations lower in type 2 diabetic patients compared to controls). Results were very similar in men and women. There was no evidence that this variant is associated with diabetes-related intermediate traits, including several measures of insulin secretion and resistance. Our results, together with those from another recent genetic study, strengthen evidence that SHBG and sex hormones are involved in the aetiology of type 2 diabetes. PMID:19933169

  18. Phthalate exposure and reproductive hormones and sex-hormone binding globulin before puberty - Phthalate contaminated-foodstuff episode in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hui-Ju; Chen, Chu-Chih; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Chen, Mei-Lien; Sun, Chien-Wen; Wu, Wen-Chiu; Huang, I-Wen; Huang, Po-Chin; Yu, Tzu-Yun; Hsiung, Chao A; Wang, Shu-Li

    2017-01-01

    In May 2011, a major incident involving phthalates-contaminated foodstuffs occurred in Taiwan. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was added to foodstuffs, mainly juice, jelly, tea, sports drink, and dietary supplements. Concerns arose that normal pubertal development, especially reproductive hormone regulation in children, could be disrupted by DEHP exposure. To investigate the association between phthalate exposure and reproductive hormone levels among children following potential exposure to phthalate-tainted foodstuffs. A total of 239 children aged <12 years old were recruited from 3 hospitals in north, central, and south Taiwan after the episode. Structured questionnaires were used to collect the frequency and quantity of exposures to 5 categories of phthalate-contaminated foodstuffs to assess phthalate exposure in children. Urine samples were collected for the measurement of phthalate metabolites. The estimated daily intake of DEHP exposure at the time of the contamination incident occurred was calculated using both questionnaire data and urinary DEHP metabolite concentrations. Multiple regression analyses were applied to assess associations between phthalate exposure and reproductive hormone levels in children. After excluding children with missing data regarding exposure levels and hormone concentrations and girls with menstruation, 222 children were included in the statistical analyses. After adjustment for age and birth weight, girls with above median levels of urinary mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate, mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate, and sum of mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate concentrations had higher odds of above median follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations. Girls with above median estimated average daily DEHP exposures following the contamination episode also had higher odds of sex hormone-binding globulin above median levels. Phthalate exposure was associated with alterations of reproductive hormone levels in girls.

  19. Cloning, expression and patient IgE reactivity of recombinant Pru du 6, an 11S globulin from almond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willison, LeAnna N; Tripathi, Pallavi; Sharma, Girdhari; Teuber, Suzanne S; Sathe, Shridhar K; Roux, Kenneth H

    2011-01-01

    IgE-reactive proteins have been identified in almond; however, few have been cloned and tested for specific patient IgE reactivity. Here, we clone and express prunin 1 and prunin 2, isoforms of the major almond protein prunin, an 11S globulin, and assay each for IgE reactivity. Prunin isoforms were PCR-amplified from an almond cDNA library, sequenced, cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Reactivity to the recombinant (r) allergens, Pru du 6.01 and Pru du 6.02, was screened by dot blot and immunoblot assays using sera from almond-allergic patients and murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Sequential IgE-binding epitopes were identified by solid-phase overlapping peptide analysis. Epitope stability was assessed by assaying denatured recombinant proteins by immunoblot. IgE reactivity to rPru du 6.01 and rPru du 6.02 was found in 9 of 18 (50%) and 5 of 18 patients (28%), respectively. Four patients (22%) demonstrated reactivity to both isoforms. Murine anti-almond IgG mAbs also showed greater reactivity to rPru du 6.01 than to rPru du 6.02. Both stable and labile epitopes were detected. Six IgE-binding sequential epitope-bearing peptide segments on Pru du 6.01 and 8 on Pru du 6.02 were detected using pooled almond-allergic sera. rPru du 6.01 is more widely recognized than rPru du 6.02 in our patient population. The identification of multiple sequential epitopes and the observation that treatment with denaturing agents had little effect on IgE-binding intensity in some patients suggests an important role for sequential epitopes on prunins. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Genome-wide association study of circulating estradiol, testosterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin in postmenopausal women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Prescott

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have successfully identified common genetic variants that contribute to breast cancer risk. Discovering additional variants has become difficult, as power to detect variants of weaker effect with present sample sizes is limited. An alternative approach is to look for variants associated with quantitative traits that in turn affect disease risk. As exposure to high circulating estradiol and testosterone, and low sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG levels is implicated in breast cancer etiology, we conducted GWAS analyses of plasma estradiol, testosterone, and SHBG to identify new susceptibility alleles. Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS data from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS, and Sisters in Breast Cancer Screening data were used to carry out primary meta-analyses among ~1600 postmenopausal women who were not taking postmenopausal hormones at blood draw. We observed a genome-wide significant association between SHBG levels and rs727428 (joint β = -0.126; joint P = 2.09 × 10(-16, downstream of the SHBG gene. No genome-wide significant associations were observed with estradiol or testosterone levels. Among variants that were suggestively associated with estradiol (P<10(-5, several were located at the CYP19A1 gene locus. Overall results were similar in secondary meta-analyses that included ~900 NHS current postmenopausal hormone users. No variant associated with estradiol, testosterone, or SHBG at P<10(-5 was associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk among CGEMS participants. Our results suggest that the small magnitude of difference in hormone levels associated with common genetic variants is likely insufficient to detectably contribute to breast cancer risk.

  1. Predictors of early mortality after rabbit antithymocyte globulin as first-line treatment in severe aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta, Elias H; Lima, Carlos B L; Dias, Danielle S P; Clé, Diego V; Bonduel, Mariana M; Sciuccati, Gabriela B; Medeiros, Larissa A; Oliveira, Michel M; Salvino, Marco A; Garanito, Marlene P; Blum Fonseca, Patricia B; Saad, Sara Teresinha O; Calado, Rodrigo T; Scheinberg, Phillip

    2017-11-01

    Despite being recommended as first-line immunosuppressive therapy in severe aplastic anemia (SAA), horse antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is still unavailable in many countries outside the USA. Rabbit ATG is more lymphocytoxic than horse ATG, and this might result in a higher incidence of severe infections and early mortality. This study was designed to identify the risk factors for early mortality and overall survival (OS) after rabbit ATG in patients with SAA. We retrospectively reviewed 185 patients with SAA who underwent rabbit ATG and cyclosporine. The incidence of death in 3 months following rabbit ATG therapy was 15.1% (28/185). Early mortality was mainly related to infectious complications, despite adequate antibiotic and/or antifungal treatment. Age > 35 years (odds ratio [OR] 5.06, P = 0.001) and baseline absolute neutrophil count (ANC) ≤ 0.1 × 109/L (OR 7.64, P mortality after immunosuppressive therapy with this agent. Hematological response at 6 months was observed in only 29.7% of all patients. OS at 1 year after rabbit ATG was 75.3%; and age > 35 years (OR 1.88, P = 0.03), baseline ANC ≤ 0.1 × 109/L (OR 2.65, P mortality. Alternative strategies are needed for the treatment of SAA patients in countries were horse ATG is unavailable, particularly for those at high risk for early mortality after rabbit ATG due to a higher age and very low pre-treatment neutrophil count.

  2. Genetics of Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin and Testosterone Levels in Fertile and Infertile Men of Reproductive Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorova, Marina; Punab, Margus; Poolamets, Olev; Adler, Mart; Vihljajev, Vladimir; Laan, Maris

    2017-06-01

    Testosterone (T) is a central androgenic hormone, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is the major determinant of its bioactivity. There are no acknowledged genetic variants with clear-cut clinical implications, modulating T levels in men. To confirm genetic associations of top loci (SHBG, GCKR, SLCO1B1, and JMJD1C) from genome-wide association (GWA) studies for serum SHBG and T. Groups differing in general and reproductive parameters: young men (n = 540; 19.3 ± 1.8 years), severe idiopathic male infertility patients (n = 641; 31.6 ± 6.0 years), and male partners of pregnant women (n = 324; 31.9 ± 6.6 years). All patients were recruited at the Andrology Centre, Tartu University Hospital, Estonia. Genetic associations with reproductive hormones, testicular and sperm parameters (linear regression, additive model); intergroup allele/genotype distribution comparisons. Associations with serum SHBG levels were robust for SHBG -68 G>A [rs1799941; meta-analysis: P = 3.7 × 10-14; allelic effect (standard error) = 4.67 (0.62) nmol/L], SHBG +1091 C>T [rs727428; P = 7.3 × 10-11; -3.74 (0.57)], SHBG Pro185Leu [rs6258; P = 1.2 × 10-4, -12.2 (3.17)], and GCKR Pro446Leu [rs1260326; P = 1.5 × 10-4; -2.2 (0.59)]. Measured T concentrations correlated with genetically modulated levels of SHBG (r = 0.48 to 0.74, P rs4149056), and JMJD1C intronic variant rs7910927. Claims were replicated and additional associations were detected for four of seven tested GWAS top loci. Perspective clinical investigations of these variants are hypotestosteronemia among aging men and pharmacogenetics of hormone replacement therapy.

  3. Imbalanced immune homeostasis in immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-04-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder resulting from low platelet counts caused by inadequate production as well as increased destruction by autoimmune mechanisms. As with other autoimmune disorders, chronic ITP is characterized by perturbations of immune homeostasis with hyperactivated effector cells as well as defective regulatory arm of the adaptive immune system, which will be reviewed here. Interestingly, some ITP treatments are associated with restoring the regulatory imbalance, although it remains unclear whether the immune system is redirected to a state of tolerance once treatment is discontinued. Understanding the mechanisms that result in breakdown of immune homeostasis in ITP will help to identify novel pathways for restoring tolerance and inhibiting effector cell responses. This information can then be translated into developing therapies for averting autoimmunity not only in ITP but also many autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Aging changes in immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004008.htm Aging changes in immunity To use the sharing features ... cells and antibodies that destroy these harmful substances. AGING CHANGES AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE IMMUNE SYSTEM ...

  5. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arisya Agita; M Thaha Alsagaff

    2017-01-01

    The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage...

  6. FastStats: Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Immunization Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... 2015 Related Links National Health Interview Survey National Immunization Survey Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Vaccines ...

  7. Immune System and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It helps ... to find and destroy them. If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be ...

  8. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carinii) pneumonia Pneumonia - cytomegalovirus Pneumonia Viral pneumonia Walking pneumonia Causes People whose immune system is not working well ... people. They are also more vulnerable to regular causes of pneumonia , which can affect anyone. Your immune system may ...

  9. The Immune System Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Kirsten A.; Gibbs, Melissa A.; Friedman, Erich J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a card game that helps introductory biology students understand the basics of the immune response to pathogens. Students simulate the steps of the immune response with cards that represent the pathogens and the cells and molecules mobilized by the immune system. In the process, they learn the similarities and differences between the…

  10. Ovulatory and endocrine responses after active immunization of gilts against a synthetic fragment of bovine inhibin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, B F; Britt, J H; Esbenshade, K L; Flowers, W L; Sesti, L A; Martin, T L; Ireland, J J

    1993-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether neutralizing endogenous inhibin would affect ovulation rate and serum concentrations of FSH, LH, estradiol-17 beta, and progesterone in gilts. At wk 0, during their second postpubertal estrous cycle, gilts (195 +/- 2.4 d of age) were given a primary immunization against the 1-26 gly-tyr NH-terminal amino acid sequence of bovine inhibin-alpha conjugated to human alpha globulin (INH; n = 10) or against human alpha globulin alone (control; n = 10). The primary immunization mixed with Freund's complete adjuvant contained .915 mg of the inhibin peptide. Booster immunizations in Freund's incomplete adjuvant contained .3 and .183 mg of the inhibin peptide and were given at wk 8 and 12, respectively. Free, unconjugated inhibin was given to INH gilts at 16 wk. Blood samples for determination of hormones were collected every 4 h beginning on d 15 of the first estrous cycle beyond wk 16 (first cycle) and continuing until d 5 of the second estrous cycle following wk 16 (second cycle). Ovulation rate was estimated by laparoscopy during the second cycle. Antibody titers were estimated by determining the percentage of [125I]-INH bound by serum diluted 1:4,000. The antibody titers were 17 +/- 2, 22 +/- 3, and 9 +/- 1% at wk 9, 17, and 23 for INH gilts, respectively, and 0% at all times for control gilts. Duration of three consecutive estrous cycles terminating with the first experimental cycle did not differ between treatments (INH, 20.7 +/- .3 vs control, 20.4 +/- .3 d).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Kidney and innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Gen

    2017-03-01

    Innate immune system is an important modulator of the inflammatory response during infection and tissue injury/repair. The kidney as a vital organ with high energy demand plays a key role in regulating the disease related metabolic process. Increasing research interest has focused on the immune pathogenesis of many kidney diseases. However, innate immune cells such as dendritic cells, macrophages, NK cells and a few innate lymphocytes, as well as the complement system are essential for renal immune homeostasis and ensure a coordinated balance between tissue injury and regeneration. The innate immune response provides the first line of host defense initiated by several classes of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as membrane-bound Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs), together with inflammasomes responsible for early innate immune response. Although the innate immune system is well studied, the research on the detailed relationship between innate immunity and kidney is still very limited. In this review, we will focus on the innate immune sensing system in renal immune homeostasis, as well as the corresponding pathogenesis of many kidney diseases. The pivotal roles of innate immunity in renal injury and regeneration with special emphasis on kidney disease related immunoregulatory mechanism are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification, characterization and expression of novel Sex Hormone Binding Globulin alternative first exons in the human prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Torres Inés

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG gene, located at 17p13.1, comprises, at least, two different transcription units regulated by two different promoters. The first transcription unit begins with the exon 1 sequence and is responsible for the production of plasma SHBG by the hepatocytes, while the second begins with an alternative exon 1 sequence, which replaces the exon 1 present in liver transcripts. Alternative exon 1 transcription and translation has only been demonstrated in the testis of transgenic mice containing an 11-kb human SHBG transgene and in the human testis. Our goal has been to further characterize the 5' end of the SHBG gene and analyze the presence of the SHBG alternative transcripts in human prostate tissue and derived cell lines. Results Using a combination of in silico and in vitro studies, we have demonstrated that the SHBG gene, along with exon 1 and alternative exon 1 (renamed here exon 1A, contains four additional alternative first exons: the novel exons 1B, 1C, and 1E, and a previously identified exon 1N, which has been further characterized and renamed as exon 1D. We have shown that these four alternative first exons are all spliced to the same 3' splice site of SHBG exon 2, and that exon 1A and the novel exon 1B can be spliced to exon 1. We have also demonstrated the presence of SHBG transcripts beginning with exons 1B, 1C and 1D in prostate tissues and cell lines, as well as in several non-prostatic cell lines. Finally, the alignment of the SHBG mammalian sequences revealed that, while exons 1C, 1D and 1E are very well conserved phylogenetically through non-primate mammal species, exon 1B probably aroused in apes due to a single nucleotide change that generated a new 5' splice site in exon 1B. Conclusion The identification of multiple transcription start sites (TSS upstream of the annotated first exon of human SHBG, and the detection of the alternative transcripts in human prostate

  13. First Trimester Maternal Glycated Hemoglobin and Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin Do Not Predict Third Trimester Glucose Intolerance of Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Erica K; Boggess, Kim A; Mathew, Leny; Culhane, Jennifer

    2017-04-01

    Early pregnancy prediction of third trimester glucose intolerance may identify a population of women whose trajectory toward gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is modifiable. We assessed whether first trimester glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), markers of insulin resistance, predicted third trimester glucose intolerance. Nondiabetic women with singleton pregnancies enrolled in a prospective observational study, 11 0/7 to 14 6/7 weeks. At enrollment, maternal characteristics, medical history, and blood samples were collected for HbA1c and SHBG. Two-step GDM screening was performed, 22 0/7 to 33 6/7 weeks. A 50 g oral glucose tolerance test ≥130 mg/dL defined screen positive, or glucose intolerance. Carpenter-Coustan criteria diagnosed GDM. Means HbA1c and SHBG were compared between glucose-intolerant versus normoglycemic women, and GDM versus no GDM women. We report unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (OR; 95% confidence interval [CI]) of regression analyses. Adjusted models include race, enrollment body mass index, and history of GDM. Among 250 women, 29% were glucose intolerant and 6% had GDM. Among glucose-intolerant women, HbA1c was higher (5.3 ± 0.3 vs. 5.1 ± 0.3, P = .01) and associated with glucose intolerance in unadjusted, but not adjusted, models (OR: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.2-7.1; adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.0, 95% CI: 0.7-5.4). Among GDM women, HbA1c was higher (5.4 ± 0.4 vs 5.2 ± 0.3, P = .002) and SHBG was lower (228 ± 72 vs 288 ± 93 mmol/L, P = .02). The HbA1c predicted GDM in unadjusted (OR: 13.2, 95% CI: 2.6-68.0) but not adjusted (aOR: 6.7, 95% CI: 0.8-55.2) models. Although metabolic alterations may well precede third trimester glucose intolerance, neither HbA1c of SHBG remained an independent predictor of glucose intolerance or GDM in adjusted models.

  14. Long-term outcome of aplastic anemia in adults treated with antithymocyte globulin: comparison with bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, R L; Tebyani, N; Frane, M; Ireland, P; Ho, W G; Champlin, R E; Nimer, S D

    1995-01-01

    The outcome of 155 adult aplastic anemia (AA) patients treated with antithymocyte globulin (ATG, Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI) at University of California, Los Angeles from 1977 to 1988 was evaluated. The median survival of the 146 patients who did not undergo bone marrow transplantation was 5.6 years, with 49% +/- 4% surviving more than 6 years. The most important predictor of survival was positive response to ATG (P < 0.001), which was observed in 48% of patients. Among pretreatment variables, disease severity was the best predictor of survival. Patients with moderate AA (MAA) had significantly better survival than those with severe (SAA) or very severe (VSAA) disease (P = 0.04). The 6-year actuarial survival rates of the three groups were 71% +/- 9%, 48% +/- 7% and 38% +/- 7%, respectively. Cox regression analysis found disease severity to be the only pretreatment variable significantly associated with survival (P = .02). Patient age, sex, disease etiology, concurrent treatment with androgens, or duration of ATG therapy were not associated with differences in survival or response to ATG. Late clonal hematologic complications (ie, myelodysplasia, acute myelogenous leukemia) were observed in 5 of the 77 patients followed for more than 2 years after ATG treatment. In addition, one case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and three solid tumors occurred in the ATG-treated patients. The survival of 56 ATG-treated patients with SAA or VSAA between the ages of 16 and 43 did not differ significantly from that of 55 adult AA patients who underwent bone marrow transplant (BMT) during the same time period (P = 0.6). However, 6-year survival rates improved from 43% for patients transplanted before 1984, to 72% for those who underwent BMT between 1984 and 1989. In contrast, there was no difference in the survival rates of patients treated with ATG during these two time periods (46% v 45%, respectively). The results suggest a superior long-term outcome for adult patients with SAA treated with

  15. Sequential Immune Responses: The Weapons of Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Charles D.; Ley, Klaus; Buchmann, Kurt; Canton, Johnathan

    2016-01-01

    Sequential immune responses (SIR) is a new model that describes what ‘immunity’ means in higher animals. Existing models, such as self/nonself discrimination or danger, focus on how immune responses are initiated. However, initiation is not protection. SIR describes the actual immune responses that provide protection. SIR resulted from a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of immune systems that revealed that several very different types of host innate responses occur (and at different tempos) which together provide host protection. SIR1 uses rapidly activated enzymes like the NADPH oxidases and is present in all animal cells. SIR2 is mediated by the first ‘immune’ cells: macrophage-like cells. SIR3 evolved in animals like invertebrates and provides enhanced protection through advanced macrophage recognition and killing of pathogens and through other innate immune cells such as neutrophils. Finally, in vertebrates, macrophages developed SIR4: the ability to present antigens to T cells. Though much slower than SIR1–3, adaptive responses provide a unique new protection for higher vertebrates. Importantly, newer SIR responses were added on top of older, evolutionarily conserved functions to provide ‘layers’ of host protection. SIR transcends existing models by elucidating the different weapons of immunity that provide host protection in higher animals. PMID:25871013

  16. Simultaneous immunization against tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elma Z Tchilian

    Full Text Available BCG, the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis, provides some protection against disseminated disease in infants but has little effect on prevention of adult pulmonary disease. Newer parenteral immunization prime boost regimes may provide improved protection in experimental animal models but are unproven in man so that there remains a need for new and improved immunization strategies.Mice were immunized parenterally, intranasally or simultaneously by both routes with BCG or recombinant mycobacterial antigens plus appropriate adjuvants. They were challenged with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb and the kinetics of Mtb growth in the lungs measured. We show that simultaneous immunization (SIM of mice by the intranasal and parenteral routes is highly effective in increasing protection over parenteral BCG administration alone. Intranasal immunization induces local pulmonary immunity capable of inhibiting the growth of Mtb in the early phase (the first week of infection, while parenteral immunization has a later effect on Mtb growth. Importantly, these two effects are additive and do not depend on priming and boosting the immune response. The best SIM regimes reduce lung Mtb load by up to 2 logs more than BCG given by either route alone.These data establish SIM as a novel and highly effective immunization strategy for Mtb that could be carried out at a single clinic visit. The efficacy of SIM does not depend on priming and boosting an immune response, but SIM is complementary to prime boost strategies and might be combined with them.

  17. Human immunity to rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneaux, P J

    1995-12-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important cause of severe gastro-enteritis in infants and young children. However, the determinants of protective immunity are poorly understood. Human immunity to rotavirus can be acquired passively or actively. It may be humoral or cell-mediated, protective or non-protective, homotypic or heterotypic and mucosal or systemic, or any combination of these. Mucosal immunity is protective against rotavirus illness, but not against infection, whereas systemic immunity reflects exposure, but probably has little if any role in protection. Both local and cell-mediated immunity are likely to be important in protection. However, there is no agreement as to a reliable surrogate marker of small intestinal protective immunity, and little is known about small intestinal cell-mediated immunity in man, especially infants. Passive mucosal immunity, but not systemic immunity, may contribute to protection in breast-fed infants, and in those at increased risk of serious illness who have been given oral immunoglobulin, either as prophylaxis or therapeutically. Animal and adult studies may have only limited relevance to those who are at greatest risk of serious illness. However, it is probably from such studies that hypotheses about small intestinal cell-mediated immunity in the protection of infants against rotavirus infection in man remain unclear, and this continues to hinder vaccine research.

  18. Gene duplication and an accelerated evolutionary rate in 11S globulin genes are associated with higher protein synthesis in dicots as compared to monocots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seed storage proteins are a major source of dietary protein, and the content of such proteins determines both the quantity and quality of crop yield. Significantly, examination of the protein content in the seeds of crop plants shows a distinct difference between monocots and dicots. Thus, it is expected that there are different evolutionary patterns in the genes underlying protein synthesis in the seeds of these two groups of plants. Results Gene duplication, evolutionary rate and positive selection of a major gene family of seed storage proteins (the 11S globulin genes, were compared in dicots and monocots. The results, obtained from five species in each group, show more gene duplications, a higher evolutionary rate and positive selections of this gene family in dicots, which are rich in 11S globulins, but not in the monocots. Conclusion Our findings provide evidence to support the suggestion that gene duplication and an accelerated evolutionary rate may be associated with higher protein synthesis in dicots as compared to monocots.

  19. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity.

  20. Mammalian gut immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassaing, Benoit; Kumar, Manish; Baker, Mark T; Singh, Vishal; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian intestinal tract is the largest immune organ in the body and comprises cells from non-hemopoietic (epithelia, Paneth cells, goblet cells) and hemopoietic (macrophages, dendritic cells, T-cells) origin, and is also a dwelling for trillions of microbes collectively known as the microbiota. The homeostasis of this large microbial biomass is prerequisite to maintain host health by maximizing beneficial symbiotic relationships and minimizing the risks of living in such close proximity. Both microbiota and host immune system communicate with each other to mutually maintain homeostasis in what could be called a "love-hate relationship." Further, the host innate and adaptive immune arms of the immune system cooperate and compensate each other to maintain the equilibrium of a highly complex gut ecosystem in a stable and stringent fashion. Any imbalance due to innate or adaptive immune deficiency or aberrant immune response may lead to dysbiosis and low-grade to robust gut inflammation, finally resulting in metabolic diseases.

  1. Normal cellular uptake of thyroxine from serum of patients with familial dysalbuminemic hyperthyroxinemia or elevated thyroxine-binding globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarne, D H; Refetoff, S

    1988-12-01

    To determine whether thyroid hormone-binding proteins in serum, particularly albumin, facilitate the transfer of T4 into human tissues, we studied cellular T4 uptake (CT4) by human liver (Hep G2) cells from medium containing serum from subjects with familial dysalbuminemic hyperthyroxinemia (FDH) and acquired and familial T4-binding globulin (TBG) excess and patients with normal T4-binding to albumin and normal TBG concentrations. Serum from nine subjects with FDH whose mean serum total T4 (TT4) concentration was 203 +/- 27 nmol/L were matched for TT4 concentrations with serum from nine subjects with acquired TBG excess (TT4, 201 +/- 23 nmol/L) and nine subjects with thyrotoxicosis and normal TBG concentrations (TT4, 205 +/- 28 nmol/L). The subjects' CT4 results were compared to their serum free T4 concentration, measured by equilibrium dialysis (DT4), and their serum free T4 index (FT4I) value. The mean serum DT4 value for the subjects with FDH (23 +/- 5 fmol/L) and those with TBG excess (23 +/- 3 fmol/L) were normal, whereas it was elevated (44 +/- 9 fmol/L; P less than 0.001) for the thyrotoxic patients with normal TBG concentrations. The mean CT4 value also was normal for the subjects with FDH (37.7 +/- 4.9 fmol/plate) and those with TBG excess (36.6 +/- 4.6 fmol/plate), but was elevated for the thyrotoxic patients (62.3 +/- 11.2 fmol/plate; P less than 0.001). In all three groups studied, the relationship between individual CT4 and DT4 values was similar to that previously found in subjects with no T4-binding protein abnormalities. The mean serum FT4I value was lower for the subjects with acquired TBG excess (111 +/- 22) than for the subjects with FDH (133 +/- 22; P less than 0.05), and it was much higher for the subjects with thyrotoxicosis (221 +/- 31; P less than 0.001). In the subjects with FDH and those with thyrotoxicosis the normal relationship between CT4 and FT4I was maintained, while in the subjects with acquired TBG excess, FT4I values were lower

  2. Outbreak of type C botulism in chickens in Pancas city, Espírito Santo state, BrazilSurto de botulismo tipo C em frangos na cidade de Pancas, Espírito Santo, Brasil

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    Rodrigo Otávio Silveira Silva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to describe an outbreak of botulism in poultry (Gallus gallus domesticus, in Pancas City, Espírito Santo State, Brazil. The birds were derived from a subsistence property with approximately 150 domestic fowls. The owner reported finding some birds lying on the floor and others exhibiting limited mobility. Ten animals in agony were euthanized, necropsied and had their blood serum collected. About 72 hours after the onset of clinical signs, 144 (96% animals of the creation had already died. No postmortem changes were found at necropsies. Clostridium botulinum type C toxins were detected in the sera of euthanized chickens by mice neutralization tests. The observation of clinical signs, absence of post-mortem lesions and the result of mouse neutralization tests confirmed the diagnosis of botulism caused by C. botulinum type C. Unfortunately, the source of toxins was not found. O presente trabalho tem como objetivo descrever um surto de botulismo em aves domésticas (Gallus gallus domesticus, ocorrido na cidade de Pancas, estado do Espírito Santo, Brasil. As aves eram oriundas de uma propriedade de subsistência com aproximadamente 150 frangos domésticos. O proprietário relatou encontrar algumas aves caídas no chão e outras apresentando dificuldade de locomoção. Dez animais em estado agônico foram eutanasiados, submetidos à necropsia e coleta de soro sanguíneo. Em 72 horas após o início dos sinais clínicos, 144 (96% animais da criação já haviam vindo a óbito. Nenhuma alteração post-mortem foi encontrada durante a necropsia. Foi possível detectar a toxina botulínica tipo C por soroneutralização em camundongos no soro dos animais eutanasiados. A observação da sintomatologia clínica, ausência de lesões à necropsia e o resultado da soroneutralização permitem confirmar o diagnóstico de botulismo por Clostridium botulinum tipo C.

  3. Botulinum toxin for treatment of cocontractions related to obstetrical brachial plexopathy Toxina botulínica para tratamento das co-contrações relacionadas à plexopatia braquial obstétrica

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    Carlos O. Heise

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin type A was recently introduced for treatment of biceps - triceps muscle cocontraction, which compromises elbow function in children with obstetrical brachial plexopathy. This is our preliminary experience with this new approach. Eight children were treated with 2 - 3 U/kg of botulinum toxin injected in the triceps (4 patients and biceps (4 patients muscle, divided in 2 or 3 sites. All patients submitted to triceps injections showed a long-lasting improvement of active elbow flexion and none required new injections, after a follow-up of 3 to 18 months. Three of the patients submitted to biceps injections showed some improvement of elbow extension, but none developed anti-gravitational strength for elbow extension and the effect lasted only three to five months. One patient showed no response to triceps injections. Our data suggest that botulinum toxin can be useful in some children that have persistent disability secondary to obstetrical brachial plexopathy.A toxina botulínica do tipo A foi introduzida recentemente para o tratamento das co-contrações entre os músculos biceps e triceps, que comprometem a função do cotovelo nas crianças com plexopatia braquial obstétrica. Apresentamos nossa experiência preliminar com esta abordagem. Oito crianças foram tratadas com 2 - 3 U/kg de toxina botulínica injetada nos músculos triceps (4 pacientes e biceps (4 pacientes, divididas em 2 ou 3 sítios. Todos os pacientes submetidos a injeções no triceps apresentaram melhora persistente da flexão do cotovelo e nenhum precisou de novas aplicações após seguimento de 3 a 18 meses. Três pacientes submetidos a aplicações no biceps apresentaram melhora na extensão do cotovelo, mas nenhum adquiriu força antigravitacional e o efeito durou apenas 3 a 5 meses. Um paciente não respondeu às injeções. Nossos dados sugerem que a toxina botulínica pode ser útil no tratamento de algumas crianças com seqüelas de plexopatia braquial

  4. Avaliação do filme lacrimal de pacientes com distonia facial durante tratamento com toxina botulínica tipo A Lacrimal film evaluation of patients with facial dystonia during botulinum toxin type A treatment

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    Patricia Grativol Costa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar o efeito da toxina botulínica no filme lacrimal em pacientes com distonia facial. MÉTODOS: Foram incluídos 24 pacientes portadores de blefaroespasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial que receberam aplicação de toxina botulínica tipo A que foram submetidos à propedêutica do filme lacrimal previamente à aplicação e após, com 7 e 30 dias. RESULTADOS: Houve diminuição das queixas de olho seco trinta dias após a aplicação, entretanto, o tempo de ruptura do filme lacrimal e o teste de Schirmer não demonstraram variação significativa entre os períodos pré-tratamento e 1 mês da aplicação. Em relação ao teste de coloração com rosa bengala, todos os olhos que coraram no pré-tratamento, melhoraram na última avaliação. CONCLUSÃO: A injeção de toxina botulínica pode aliviar as queixas de olho seco nos pacientes com distonia facial pela provável ação de inibição do orbicular na sua função de bomba lacrimal.PURPOSE: To determine the effect of botulinum toxin injection in the eyelid on lacrimal film in patients with facial dystonia. METHODS: Twenty-four patients with essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm were submitted to botulinum toxin injection and lacrimal film tests were performed before the application and after seven and thirty days. RESULTS: There was improvement in symptoms of dry eye and rose bengal test, however, the breakup time and Schirmer's test did not show significant variation between pretreatment and after 1 month of follow-up. CONCLUSION: The dry eye symptoms in patients with facial dystonia may be attenuated by botulinum toxin due to its possible inhibitory effect on the orbicular muscle leading to a decrease in lacrimal pump.

  5. Pulmonary immunity to viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allie, S Rameeza; Randall, Troy D

    2017-07-15

    Mucosal surfaces, such as the respiratory epithelium, are directly exposed to the external environment and therefore, are highly susceptible to viral infection. As a result, the respiratory tract has evolved a variety of innate and adaptive immune defenses in order to prevent viral infection or promote the rapid destruction of infected cells and facilitate the clearance of the infecting virus. Successful adaptive immune responses often lead to a functional state of immune memory, in which memory lymphocytes and circulating antibodies entirely prevent or lessen the severity of subsequent infections with the same virus. This is also the goal of vaccination, although it is difficult to vaccinate in a way that mimics respiratory infection. Consequently, some vaccines lead to robust systemic immune responses, but relatively poor mucosal immune responses that protect the respiratory tract. In addition, adaptive immunity is not without its drawbacks, as overly robust inflammatory responses may lead to lung damage and impair gas exchange or exacerbate other conditions, such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Thus, immune responses to respiratory viral infections must be strong enough to eliminate infection, but also have mechanisms to limit damage and promote tissue repair in order to maintain pulmonary homeostasis. Here, we will discuss the components of the adaptive immune system that defend the host against respiratory viral infections. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  6. HETEROLOGOUS IMMUNITY BETWEEN VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Raymond M.; Che, Jenny; Brehm, Michael A.; Selin, Liisa K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Immune memory responses to previously encountered pathogens can sometimes alter the immune response to and the course of infection of an unrelated pathogen by a process known as heterologous immunity. This response can lead to enhanced or diminished protective immunity and altered immunopathology. Here we discuss the nature of T-cell cross-reactivity and describe matrices of epitopes from different viruses eliciting cross-reactive CD8+ T-cell responses. We examine the parameters of heterologous immunity mediated by these cross-reactive T cells during viral infections in mice and humans. We show that heterologous immunity can disrupt T-cell memory pools, alter the complexity of the T-cell repertoire, change patterns of T-cell immunodominance, lead to the selection of viral epitope-escape variants, alter the pathogenesis of viral infections, and, by virtue of the private specificity of T-cell repertoires within individuals, contribute to dramatic variations in viral disease. We propose that heterologous immunity is an important factor in resistance to and variations of human viral infections and that issues of heterologous immunity should be considered in the design of vaccines. PMID:20536568

  7. Epigenetics and Trained Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Charlotte D C C; Noz, Marlies P; Joosten, Leo A B; Netea, Mihai G; Riksen, Niels P; Keating, Samuel T

    2017-11-21

    A growing body of clinical and experimental evidence has challenged the traditional understanding that only the adaptive immune system can mount immunological memory. Recent findings describe the adaptive characteristics of the innate immune system, underscored by its ability to remember antecedent foreign encounters and respond in a nonspecific sensitized manner to reinfection. This has been termed trained innate immunity. Although beneficial in the context of recurrent infections, this might actually contribute to chronic immune-mediated diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Recent Advances: In line with its proposed role in sustaining cellular memories, epigenetic reprogramming has emerged as a critical determinant of trained immunity. Recent technological and computational advances that improve unbiased acquisition of epigenomic profiles have significantly enhanced our appreciation for the complexities of chromatin architecture in the contexts of diverse immunological challenges. Key to resolving the distinct chromatin signatures of innate immune memory is a comprehensive understanding of the precise physiological targets of regulatory proteins that recognize, deposit, and remove chemical modifications from chromatin as well as other gene-regulating factors. Drawing from a rapidly expanding compendium of experimental and clinical studies, this review details a current perspective of the epigenetic pathways that support the adapted phenotypes of monocytes and macrophages. We explore future strategies that are aimed at exploiting the mechanism of trained immunity to improve the prevention and treatment of infections and immune-mediated chronic disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  8. Behavioral Immunity in Insects

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    Thierry Lefèvre

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Parasites can dramatically reduce the fitness of their hosts, and natural selection should favor defense mechanisms that can protect hosts against disease. Much work has focused on understanding genetic and physiological immunity against parasites, but hosts can also use behaviors to avoid infection, reduce parasite growth or alleviate disease symptoms. It is increasingly recognized that such behaviors are common in insects, providing strong protection against parasites and parasitoids. We review the current evidence for behavioral immunity in insects, present a framework for investigating such behavior, and emphasize that behavioral immunity may act through indirect rather than direct fitness benefits. We also discuss the implications for host-parasite co-evolution, local adaptation, and the evolution of non-behavioral physiological immune systems. Finally, we argue that the study of behavioral immunity in insects has much to offer for investigations in vertebrates, in which this topic has traditionally been studied.

  9. Evolving meningococcal immunization strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáfadi, Marco Aurélio; Bettinger, Julie A; Maturana, Gabriela Moreno; Enwere, Godwin; Borrow, Ray

    2015-04-01

    Meningococcal disease is a major public health problem and immunization is considered the best strategy for prevention. The introduction of meningococcal C conjugate immunization schedules that targeted adolescents, with catch-up programs in several European countries, Australia and Canada proved to be highly effective, with dramatic reduction in the incidence of serogroup C disease, not only in vaccinated, but also in unvaccinated individuals. Meningococcal quadrivalent (A, C, W, Y) conjugate vaccines are now licensed and are being used in adolescent programs in North America and to control serogroup W disease in South America. In the African meningitis belt, a mass immunization campaign against serogroup A disease using a meningococcal A conjugate vaccine is now controlling the devastating epidemics of meningococcal disease. After introducing new immunization programs, it is of importance to maintain enhanced surveillance for a better understanding of the changing nature of disease epidemiology. This information is crucial for identifying optimal immunization policies.

  10. Acquired immune demyelinating neuropathies.

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    Dimachkie, Mazen M; Saperstein, David S

    2014-10-01

    Acquired immune demyelinating neuropathies refer to a group of disorders that share overlapping sensory, motor, and autonomic clinical, laboratory, and electrodiagnostic features. It is important to recognize acquired immune demyelinating neuropathies as they are generally responsive to immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory therapies. This article reviews recently developed early prognostic tools in Guillain-Barré syndrome and discusses the evolving understanding of chronic demyelinating phenotypes with differing treatment responsiveness. While weakness and numbness progress over 2 to 4 weeks in Guillain-Barré syndrome, they continue to evolve beyond 8 weeks in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and over 4 to 8 weeks in subacute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Acquired immune demyelinating neuropathies present uncommonly as variants with predominance of ocular, bulbar, sensory, autonomic, or motor manifestations in addition to regional variants, such as paraparetic acquired immune demyelinating neuropathies. Establishing the correct diagnosis is important as these immune disorders differ in response to corticosteroids and other immunosuppressive therapies.

  11. Cytokines in Drosophila immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanha-Aho, Leena-Maija; Valanne, Susanna; Rämet, Mika

    2016-02-01

    Cytokines are a large and diverse group of small proteins that can affect many biological processes, but most commonly cytokines are known as mediators of the immune response. In the event of an infection, cytokines are produced in response to an immune stimulus, and they function as key regulators of the immune response. Cytokines come in many shapes and sizes, and although they vary greatly in structure, their functions have been well conserved in evolution. The immune signaling pathways that respond to cytokines are remarkably conserved from fly to man. Therefore, Drosophila melanogaster, provides an excellent platform for studying the biology and function of cytokines. In this review, we will describe the cytokines and cytokine-like molecules found in the fly and discuss their roles in host immunity. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of supplementation of different levels of selenium as nanoparticles/sodium selenite on blood biochemical profile and humoral immunity in male Wistar rats

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    S. J. Bunglavan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the effect of supplementation of different levels of selenium as nanoparticles/sodium selenite on blood biochemical profile and humoral immunity in male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: The experimental research was conducted at Division of Animal Nutrition, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar. 63 male Wistar rats were divided into 9 equal groups on the basis of their mean body weight (BW (124.3±3.1 g BW following completely randomized design. Experimental feeding was similar in all the groups except for the source and level of selenium (Se in the diet. While Group 1 (control was fed a basal diet with no Se supplementation, in Groups 2 and 3, 150 ppb Se was supplemented either as sodium selenite or Se nanoparticles, respectively. In Groups 4, 5, 6 and 7, Se was supplemented as its nanoparticles at 50%, 25%, 12.5% and 6.25% levels respectively i.e. at 75 ppb, 37.5 ppb, 18.75 ppb and 9.375 ppb levels respectively. In Groups 8 and 9, 300 ppb Se was supplemented either as Se nanoparticles or sodium selenite, respectively. Experimental feeding was conducted for a period of 91 days. At the end of the experimental trial, blood samples were collected to analyze the blood serum biochemical profile (serum glucose, serum total protein (TP, serum albumin, serum globulin, serum albumin: globulin ratio [A:G ratio], serum total cholesterol and humoral immunity. Results: The levels of serum glucose, serum TP and serum albumin were comparable (p>0.05 among the nine groups of male Wistar rats. The mean serum total cholesterol was significantly (p<0.001 lowered in all the Se supplemented Wistar rats compared to the control group. The mean serum globulin level was significantly (p<0.05 higher and A:G ratio was significantly (p<0.05 lowered in Group 3 (supplemented with 150 ppb selenium nanoparticles followed by Groups 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 as compared to the control group. The mean serum antibody titer was significantly (p<0.001 higher

  13. Síndrome de Frey por submaxilectomía y tratamiento con toxina botulínica Frey syndrome secondary to submaxillectomy and botulinic treatment

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    Alejandra Baéz

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de Frey (SF se caracteriza por rubor, calor y sudación en la región maseterina y geniana durante las comidas. El SF se observa en el 20-60% de los pacientes sometidos a parotidectomía. Presentamos un caso con SF secundario a la ablación de la glándula submaxilar en un varón de 30 años de edad, sin antecedentes patológicos, que consultó en el año 2000 por adenopatía cervical izquierda. La misma fue biopsiada y la anatomía patológica informó carcinoma medular de tiroides. El paciente presentaba múltiples metástasis hepáticas y pulmonares, motivo por el cual recibió tratamiento quimioterápico con cisplatino plus doxorrubicina (seis ciclos con respuesta completa, finalizando dicho esquema en marzo del 2002. En julio del 2002 se realizó tiroidectomía total más vaciamiento ganglionar izquierdo con resección de la glándula submaxilar. Durante la cirugía se lesionó la rama mentoniana del nervio cervicofacial, rama del VII par craneal. En septiembre del 2004 consultó por episodios de sudación durante las comidas en la región submaxilar izquierda. Se realizó prueba de Minor y luego se procedió a aplicar toxina botulínica tipo A en la región afectada, a razón de 2.5 UI por punto (cm², a un total de 17 puntos. El control a los 21 días demostró más de un 95% de efectividad en la resolución del SF. El efecto duró un año, y una segunda reinfiltración mostró similar respuesta. No hallamos descripciones anteriores de SF en región submaxilar; se presenta su tratamiento satisfactorio con toxina botulínica tipo A.A case of Frey syndrome (FS secondary to submaxillar gland exeresis is presented and the results of the treatment with botulinum toxin (BTX type A. FS is a condition of sweating cheek and preauricular area during mealtime as a sequel detected in about 20-60% of patients after parotidectomy. The clinical symptoms include swelling, flushing and hyperhidrosis. The treatment choice for this condition is

  14. Hericium caput-medusae (Bull.:Fr.) Pers. polysaccharide enhance innate immune response, immune-related genes expression and disease resistance against Aeromonas hydrophila in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Changlong; Wang, Jiazhen; Wang, Yuqiong; Dong, Wenlong; Shan, Xiaofeng; Lou, Yujie; Gao, Yunhang

    2018-01-01

    The objective was to add 0, 400, 800 or 1200 mg/kg of Hericium caput-medusae polysaccharide (HCMP) to the basal diet of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) and determine effects on humoral innate immunity, expression of immune-related genes and disease resistance. Adding HCMP enhanced (P < 0.05) bactericidal activity at 1, 2 and 3 weeks and also lysozyme activity, complement C3, and SOD activity at 2 and 3 weeks. Supplementing 800 or 1200 mg/kg of HCMP for 2 or 3 weeks increased (P < 0.05) serum concentrations of total protein, albumin and globulin. Two immune-related genes (IL-1β and TNF-α) were up-regulated (P < 0.05) in HCMP supplemented groups given 800 or 1200 mg/kg HCMP after 2 and 3 weeks of feeding. Expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was down-regulated (P < 0.05) after receiving 800 or 1200 mg/kg HCMP for 2 or 3 weeks. Fish fed 800 mg/kg HCMP had maximal disease resistance against Aeromonas hydrophila (65.4%). In conclusion, HCMP enhanced immune response and expression of immune-related genes and increased disease resistance against Aeromonas hydrophila in grass carp, with greatest effects in fish given 800 mg/kg HCMP for 3 weeks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: immune thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Immune thrombocytopenia Immune thrombocytopenia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Immune thrombocytopenia is a disorder characterized by a blood abnormality ...

  16. Correção de estrabismo paralítico por injeção de toxina botulínica Management of paralytic strabismus by injection of botulinum toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Wattiez

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Avaliar a ação da toxina botulínica em paralisias adquiridas de VI e III nervos. Pacientes e métodos: Foram tratados com toxina botulínica 15 pacientes, com diagnóstico de paralisia de VI e III nervos, aguda ou crônica. Foram estudados de forma prospectiva, durante os meses de agosto de 1998 a maio de 1999. O estudo incluiu, além da avaliação do estrabismo, avaliação oftalmológica completa. Os pacientes foram acompanhados por um período de 2 a 7 meses após a última aplicação. Resultados: Onze pacientes (73% apresentaram paralisias do VI nervo e 4 pacientes (27%, paralisias de III nervo. Seis casos foram agudos (40% e 9 casos (60%, crônicos. Cinco dos 6 casos agudos (83% conseguiram controlar o desvio com a toxina botulínica como único tratamento e obter fusão. Dos 9 casos crônicos, 2 casos (22% corrigiram o desvio só com a toxina, os outros 7, além da aplicação, foram submetidos à cirurgia, dos quais 4 casos (46% foram corrigidos e os outros 3 casos (32% não. Conclusão: Concluímos que nos casos em que houve força muscular residual, após a paralisia, e bom potencial de fusão, a toxina botulínica foi o melhor tratamento, pois foi possível controlar o desvio e obter fusão, sem cirurgia.Purpose: To evaluate the treatment by injection of botulinum toxin in acquired sixth and third nerve palsies. Methods: Fifteen patients were treated with botulinum toxin. They were studied prospectively during nine months, between August, 1998 and May, 1999. In addition to the strabismus examination, a complete ophthalmological evaluation was performed. The patients were followed for 2 to 7 months after the last injection or surgical procedure. Results: Eleven patients (73% presented with sixth nerve palsy and four (27% with third nerve palsy. Six cases were acute (40% and 9 cases (60% were chronic. Five acute cases (83% obtained ocular alignment and controlled the deviation with toxin. Two of nine chronic cases (22

  17. Production of antigen-specific contrasuppressor cells and factor, and their use in augmentation of cell-mediated immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, W; Bereta, M; Marcinkiewicz, J; Gershon, R K; Green, D R

    1984-08-01

    A single injection of TNP-labeled mouse gamma-globulin (TNP-IgG) can render the contact sensitivity response of mice resistant to suppressor cells (Tsc) and their biologically active cellfree products (TsF). Lyt-1 T cells of mice treated with TNP-IgG can protect the adoptive contact sensitivity response of immune cells from the antigen-specific suppressive effect produced by the addition of antigen-specific TsF or Tsc. When T cells of TNP-IgG-treated mice are put into culture, they produce an antigen-specific contrasuppressor factor (TcsF) that can replace the activity of the cells. When immune cells are preincubated in vitro with TcsF, they become refractory to Tsc and TsF added subsequently. The TcsF, however, has no ability to restore responsiveness to immune cells that had been previously exposed to TsF. The TcsF binds specifically to TNP, expresses an I-J-controlled determinant, and does not express standard determinants found on mouse Ig. The treatment that primes the contrasuppressor system to protect the contact sensitivity response also reportedly renders the antibody-producing system tolerant, (i.e., produces so called "split tolerance"). These results are discussed in light of the possibility that the contrasuppressor system can be responsible for so called isotype-specific immunity by rendering one arm of the immune system resistant to generalized suppressive mechanisms.

  18. Immunity in urogenital protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, N; Goyal, K; Dhanda, R S; Yadav, M

    2014-09-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity play a significant role in urogenital infections. Innate immunity is provided by the epithelial cells and mucus lining along with acidic pH, which forms a strong physical barrier against the pathogens in female reproductive tract. Cells of innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, chemokines and adaptive immunity in the reproductive tract are evolved during infection, and a pro-inflammatory response is generated to fight against the invading pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis, a primary urogenital protozoa, the etiological agent of human trichomoniasis, a curable sexually transmitted infection. The involvement of the urogenital tract by other protozoal infections such as P. falciparum, Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Toxoplasma, Entamoeba histolytica and Acanthamoeba infection is rarely reported. Trichomonas induce pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive responses in infected subjects. Multifactorial pathogenic mechanisms including parasite adherence, cysteine proteases, lipophosphoglycan, free radical, cytokine generation and Toll-like receptors appear to interplay with the induction of local and systemic immune responses that ultimately determine the outcome of the infection. However, the involvement of urogenital pathogen-specific immune mechanisms and effect of normal local resident flora on the outcome (symptomatic vs. asymptomatic) of infection are poorly understood. Moreover, immune interactions in trichomoniasis subjects co-infected with bacterial and viral pathogens need to be elucidated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Adaptive Immune Response to Model Antigens Is Impaired in Murine Leukocyte-Adhesion Deficiency-1 Revealing Elevated Activation Thresholds In Vivo

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    Thorsten Peters

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Absence of β2 integrins (CD11/CD18 leads to leukocyte-adhesion deficiency-1 (LAD1, a rare primary immunodeficiency syndrome. Although extensive in vitro work has established an essential function of β2 integrins in adhesive and signaling properties for cells of the innate and adaptive immune system, their respective participation in an altered adaptive immunity in LAD1 patients are complex and only partly understood in vivo. Therefore, we investigated adaptive immune responses towards different T-dependent antigens in a murine LAD1 model of β2 integrin-deficiency (CD18−/−. CD18−/− mice generated only weak IgG responses after immunization with tetanus toxoid (TT. In contrast, robust hapten- and protein-specific immune responses were observed after immunization with highly haptenated antigens such as (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl21 acetyl chicken γ globulin (NP21-CG, even though regularly structured germinal centers with specificity for the defined antigens/haptens in CD18−/− mice remained absent. However, a decrease in the hapten/protein ratio lowered the efficacy of immune responses in CD18−/− mice, whereas a mere reduction of the antigen dose was less crucial. Importantly, haptenation of TT with NP (NP-TT efficiently restored a robust IgG response also to TT. Our findings may stimulate further studies on a modification of vaccination strategies using highly haptenated antigens in individuals suffering from LAD1.

  20. [Levels of testosterone-estradiol-binding globulin TeBG and of testosterone in pregnancy with relation to the sex of the foetus (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafurt, C A; De Estrada, R; García, J

    1976-01-01

    A practical and economic method for the quantification of testosterone-estradiol-binding globulin TeBG is described. The procedure premits the differentiation without overlap of the TeBP levels in males, non-pregnant females and during pregnancy. Mean titles were 1/5, 1/93 and 1/360 respectively. During pregnancy, we found high levels of TeBG and increased plasma testosterone, with mean values of 143.4 nanograms/100 ml. We have found no significant differences in TeBG levels, or in maternal blood testosterone levels in relation to fetal sex; however, plasma testosterone levels were significantly different among new born of different sex, with mean values of 96.25 nanograms per cent for males and 78.21 nanograms per cent for females.