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Sample records for botulinum toxin treatment

  1. Botulinum toxin for vaginismus treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Juliana Rocha; Souza, Renan Pedra

    2012-01-01

    Vaginismus is characterized by recurrent or persistent involuntary contraction of the perineal muscles surrounding the outer third of the vagina when penile, finger, tampon, or speculum penetration is attempted. Recent results have suggested the use of botulinum toxin for the treatment of vaginismus. Here, we assessed previously published data to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of botulinum toxin for vaginismus. We have carried out a systematic review followed by a meta-analysis. Our results indicate that botulinum toxin is an effective therapeutic option for patients with vaginismus (pooled odds ratio of 8.723 with 95% confidence interval limits of 1.942 and 39.162, p = 0.005). This may hold particularly true in treatment-refractory patients because most of the studies included in this meta-analysis have enrolled these subjects in their primary analysis. Botulinum toxin appears to bea reasonable intervention for vaginismus. However, this conclusion should be read carefully because of the deficiency of placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials and the quality issues presented in the existing ones.

  2. Botulinum toxin treatment of hemifacial spasm.

    OpenAIRE

    Elston, J S

    1986-01-01

    Six patients with hemifacial spasm were treated with injections of botulinum toxin A into the orbicularis oculi; the abnormal movements around the eye were relieved for an average of 15 weeks. There were no systemic or significant local side effects, and in view of the risks involved in neurosurgical treatment, a trial of botulinum toxin injections is recommended in the first instance in this condition.

  3. Botulinum toxin treatment of hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, J S

    1986-01-01

    Six patients with hemifacial spasm were treated with injections of botulinum toxin A into the orbicularis oculi; the abnormal movements around the eye were relieved for an average of 15 weeks. There were no systemic or significant local side effects, and in view of the risks involved in neurosurgical treatment, a trial of botulinum toxin injections is recommended in the first instance in this condition. PMID:3746313

  4. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinastepe, Neslihan; Küçük, Burcu Bal; Oral, Koray

    2015-10-01

    Botulinum toxin, the most potent biological toxin, has been shown to be effective for a variety of disorders in several medical conditions, when used both therapeutically and cosmetically. In recent years, there has been a rising trend in the use of this pharmacological agent to control bruxing activity, despite its reported adverse effects. The aim of this review was to provide a brief overview to clarify the underlying essential ideas for the use of botulinum toxin in bruxism based on available scientific papers. An electronic literature search was performed to identify publications related to botulinum toxin and its use for bruxism in PubMed. Hand searching of relevant articles was also made to identify additional studies. Of the eleven identified studies, only two were randomized controlled trials, compared with the effectiveness of botulinum toxins on the reduction in the frequency of bruxism events and myofascial pain after injection. The authors of these studies concluded that botulinum toxin could be used as an effective treatment for reducing nocturnal bruxism and myofascial pain in patients with bruxism. Evidence-based research was limited on this topic. More randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm that botulinum toxin is safe and reliable for routine clinical use in bruxism.

  5. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of strabismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Fiona J; Noonan, Carmel P

    2017-03-02

    The use of botulinum toxin as an investigative and treatment modality for strabismus is well reported in the medical literature. However, it is unclear how effective it is in comparison to other treatment options for strabismus. The primary objective was to examine the efficacy of botulinum toxin therapy in the treatment of strabismus compared with alternative conservative or surgical treatment options. This review sought to ascertain those types of strabismus that particularly benefit from the use of botulinum toxin as a treatment option (such as small angle strabismus or strabismus with binocular potential, i.e. the potential to use both eyes together as a pair). The secondary objectives were to investigate the dose effect and complication rates associated with botulinum toxin. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2016, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2016), Embase (January 1980 to July 2016), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2016), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 11 July 2016. We handsearched the British and Irish Orthoptic Journal, Australian Orthoptic Journal, proceedings of the European Strabismological Association (ESA), International Strabismological Association (ISA) and International Orthoptic Association (IOA) (www.liv.ac.uk/orthoptics/research/search.htm) and American Academy of Paediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus meetings (AAPOS). We contacted researchers who are active in this field for information about further

  6. Botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference on Clinical Use of Botulinum Toxin brought together neurologists, ophthalmologists, otolaryngologists, speech pathologists, and other health care professionals as well as the public to address: the mechanisms of action of botulinum toxin, the indications and contraindications for botulinum toxin treatment, the general principles of technique of injection and handling for its safe and effective use, and the short-term and long-term side effects and complications of therapy. Following 2 days of presentations by experts and discussion by the audience, a consensus panel weighed the evidence and prepared their consensus statement. Among their findings, the panel recommended that (1) botulinum toxin therapy is safe and effective for treating strabismus, blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm, adductor spasmodic dysphonia, jaw-closing oromandibular dystonia, and cervical dystonia; (2) botulinum toxin is not curative in chronic neurological disorders; (3) the safety of botulinum toxin therapy during pregnancy, breast feeding, and chronic use during childhood is unknown; (4) the long-term effects of chronic treatment with botulinum toxin remain unknown; and (5) botulinum toxin should be administered by committed interdisciplinary teams of physicians and related health care professionals with appropriate instrumentation. The full text of the consensus panel's statement follows.

  7. BOTULINUM TOXIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, P K; Nigam, Anjana

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum toxin, one of the most poisonous biological substances known, is a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. C. botulinum elaborates eight antigenically distinguishable exotoxins (A, B, C1, C2, D, E, F and G). All serotypes interfere with neural transmission by blocking the release of acetylcholine, the principal neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junction, causing muscle paralysis. The weakness induced by injection with botulinum toxin A usually lasts about three months. Botulinum toxins now play a very significant role in the management of a wide variety of medical conditions, especially strabismus and focal dystonias, hemifacial spasm, and various spastic movement disorders, headaches, hypersalivation, hyperhidrosis, and some chronic conditions that respond only partially to medical treatment. The list of possible new indications is rapidly expanding. The cosmetological applications include correction of lines, creases and wrinkling all over the face, chin, neck, and chest to dermatological applications such as hyperhidrosis. Injections with botulinum toxin are generally well tolerated and side effects are few. A precise knowledge and understanding of the functional anatomy of the mimetic muscles is absolutely necessary to correctly use botulinum toxins in clinical practice. PMID:20418969

  8. Botulinum toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigam P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin, one of the most poisonous biological substances known, is a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. C. botulinum elaborates eight antigenically distinguishable exotoxins (A, B, C 1 , C 2 , D, E, F and G. All serotypes interfere with neural transmission by blocking the release of acetylcholine, the principal neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junction, causing muscle paralysis. The weakness induced by injection with botulinum toxin A usually lasts about three months. Botulinum toxins now play a very significant role in the management of a wide variety of medical conditions, especially strabismus and focal dystonias, hemifacial spasm, and various spastic movement disorders, headaches, hypersalivation, hyperhidrosis, and some chronic conditions that respond only partially to medical treatment. The list of possible new indications is rapidly expanding. The cosmetological applications include correction of lines, creases and wrinkling all over the face, chin, neck, and chest to dermatological applications such as hyperhidrosis. Injections with botulinum toxin are generally well tolerated and side effects are few. A precise knowledge and understanding of the functional anatomy of the mimetic muscles is absolutely necessary to correctly use botulinum toxins in clinical practice.

  9. Treatment diary for botulinum toxin spasticity treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Iversen, Helle K; Frederiksen, Inge M S

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a treatment diary for patients receiving spasticity treatment including botulinum toxin injection and physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy. The diary focuses on problems triggered by skeletal muscle overactivity; agreed goals for treatment and the patient......'s self-evaluation of achievement on the Goal Attainment Scale; which skeletal muscles were injected; physiotherapists' and occupational therapists' evaluation of the patients' achievement of objectives on the Goal Attainment Scale; and proposals for optimization of treatment and changing goals....... The evaluation included a satisfaction questionnaire and the WHO-QoL BREF and WHO-5 well-being score. Overall, 10 patients were enrolled in the pilot study. The patients were generally satisfied with the diary, found that it involved them more in their treatment and made it easier to set personal goals...

  10. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of vocal fold nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jacqui E; Belafsky, Peter C

    2009-12-01

    Promising new techniques in the management of vocal fold nodules have been developed in the past 2 years. Simultaneously, the therapeutic use of botulinum toxin has rapidly expanded. This review explores the use of botulinum toxin in treatment of vocal nodules and summarizes current therapeutic concepts. New microsurgical instruments and techniques, refinements in laser technology, radiosurgical excision and steroid intralesional injections are all promising new techniques in the management of vocal nodules. Botulinum toxin-induced 'voice rest' is a new technique we have employed in patients with recalcitrant nodules. Successful resolution of nodules is possible with this technique, without the risk of vocal fold scarring inherent in dissection/excision techniques. Botulinum toxin usage is exponentially increasing, and large-scale, long-term studies demonstrate its safety profile. Targeted vocal fold temporary paralysis induced by botulinum toxin injection is a new, well tolerated and efficacious treatment in patients with persistent vocal fold nodules.

  11. Botulinum toxin for treatment of glandular hypersecretory disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Laing, T A

    2012-02-03

    SUMMARY: The use of botulinum toxin to treat disorders of the salivary glands is increasing in popularity in recent years. Recent reports of the use of botulinum toxin in glandular hypersecretion suggest overall favourable results with minimal side-effects. However, few randomised clinical trials means that data are limited with respect to candidate suitability, treatment dosages, frequency and duration of treatment. We report a selection of such cases from our own department managed with botulinum toxin and review the current data on use of the toxin to treat salivary gland disorders such as Frey\\'s syndrome, excessive salivation (sialorrhoea), focal and general hyperhidrosis, excessive lacrimation and chronic rhinitis.

  12. Women's perspective of botulinum toxin treatment for overactive bladder symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digesu, G Alessandro; Panayi, Demetri; Hendricken, Caroline; Camarata, Michelle; Fernando, Ruwan; Khullar, Vikram

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the women's' views and expectations about outcomes and complications of botulinum toxin treatment for overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms. Consecutive women with OAB symptoms and detrusor overactivity were requested to fill out a multiple choice questionnaire to assess whether they would consider botulinum and what outcomes as well as complications they would find acceptable to undergo this treatment. Two hundred sixty-one women, mean age of 58 (range, 38-78) years, were studied. Two hundred twenty-four were treatment-naive women (group A), while 37 were no responders to anticholinergics (group B). Only 49.6% of women in group A and 54% in group B would accept botulinum toxin. No significant differences were found between treatment-naive women and non-responders to anticholinergics (p > 0.05). Acceptance of botulinum toxin treatment involves a complex interaction of efficacy and possible complications. The balance of these factors changes the acceptability of the treatment.

  13. Botulinum toxin A for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Fan Hsieh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The standard treatment for overactive bladder starts with patient education and behavior therapies, followed by antimuscarinic agents. For patients with urgency urinary incontinence refractory to antimuscarinic therapy, currently both American Urological Association (AUA and European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines suggested that intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A should be offered. The mechanism of botulinum toxin A includes inhibition of vesicular release of neurotransmitters and the axonal expression of capsaicin and purinergic receptors in the suburothelium, as well as attenuation of central sensitization. Multiple randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated that botulinum toxin A to be an effective treatment for patients with refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The urinary incontinence episodes, maximum cystometric capacity, and maximum detrusor pressure were improved greater by botulinum toxin A compared to placebo. The adverse effects of botulinum toxin A, such as urinary retention and urinary tract infection, were primarily localized to the lower urinary tract. Therefore, botulinum toxin A offers an effective treatment option for patients with refractory overactive bladder.

  14. Botulinum toxin treatment of lower extremity spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Khat’kova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the current concept of lower extremity spasticity, which is a frequent disabling consequence of stroke. Gait biomechanics, step cycle and main pathologic patterns of lower extremity are described (hip adduction, knee flexion, knee extension, foot plantar flexion, equinovarus foot position, toes flexion, hallux extension, including muscles involved in the pathological process. Additionally the article contains detailed information on pathologic principles of lower extremity spasticity development. Special focus is given to sarcomeregenesis as an essential element of the development of potential conditions for muscle tissue adaptation to a new state and restoration of muscle length and strength. At present Botulinum toxin A (BTA is used in a complex spasticity management programs. The results of clinical studies performed in the last decade supporting the efficacy of Botox® (Onabotulinumtoxin A in the treatment of spasticity are reviewed. Effective BTA doses are proposed. Authors came to the conclusion that BTA as a part of complex rehabilitation in patients with poststroke spasticity of lower extremity promotes treatment efficacy due to a decrease of muscle tone and increase of range of movements in the joints. BTA should be regarded as an essential part of standard rehabilitation programs. Further studies to define optimal muscles for intervention, BTA doses and rehabilitation schemes are still needed. 

  15. Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis With Botulinum Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Jamal; Ahmad, Stacy H; Jones, Kennis

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effect of botulinum toxin upon plantar fasciitis through a randomized, controlled, and blinded trial. Between 2012 and 2015, 50 patients presented with plantar fasciitis. Twenty-five patients each randomly received an IncobotulinumtoxinA (IBTA) or saline injection of their affected foot. Pre- and postinjection function and pain were graded with the Foot and Ankle Ability Measures (FAAM) and visual analog scale (VAS), respectively. All 50 study patients who randomly received either placebo or IBTA presented at 6 and 12 months after injection. At 6 months, the mean FAAM increased from 35.9 to 40.9 of 100, and the mean pain score decreased from 8.4 to 7.9 of 10 within the placebo group. At 6 months, the mean FAAM increased from 36.3 to 73.8 of 100, and mean pain score decreased from 7.2 to 3.6 of 10 within the IBTA group. These postinjection scores were significantly better than the placebo group ( P = .01). At 12 months after injection, the IBTA group maintained significantly better function and pain than the placebo group ( P plantar fasciitis ( P plantar fasciitis resulted in significantly better improvement in foot function and pain. IBTA also lessened the need for operative treatment of plantar fasciitis. I, Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study.

  16. Botulinum toxin for treatment of blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltanzadeh A

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin produced by Clostridium butolinum in one of the most fatal toxins known. Botulism is the name given to condition produced by this toxin. In recent years the diluted form of this toxin has been produced in injection form and used for treatment of hemifacial spasm and blepharospasm. This toxin blocks neuromuscular junction and inhibits acetylcholine release. In this article we reported 36 patients suffering from hemifacial & blepharospasm treated by injections of botulinum A toxin. 85 to 90 percent of patients responded well. The common complications of this drug were ptosis, hemifacial paresis, burning of the mouth and discoloration of the injection site. Generally speaking the patients preferred this toxin to taking oral medications which were less effective.

  17. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, C; Jankovic, J

    2008-01-01

    Blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm are the two most common craniofacial movement disorders. Blepharospasm is a syndrome characterized by excessive or continuous eye closure related to overactivity of the orbicularis oculi and adjacent muscles bilaterally. Hemifacial spasm is a peripherally-induced movement disorder typically caused by vascular compression of cranial nerve VII (CN VII) leading to involuntary unilateral contractions of muscles used in facial expression. Treatment options for both conditions include medications, botulinum toxin, and various surgical interventions. This article summarizes the existing medical literature which indicates that botulinum toxin is the treatment of choice for blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm.

  18. Botulinum a toxin treatment of hemifacial spasm and blepharospasm.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Y. C.; Lim, J. K.; Lee, D. K.; Yi, S. D.

    1993-01-01

    We studied the effects of botulinum A toxin in 101 patients with hemifacial spasm and 11 patients with blepharospasm in an open trial and double blind manner. All patients in the open trial and 6 patients in the double blind trial improved after the first injection of botulinum toxin. There was no improvement with placebo. The peak effect ranged from one to 6 days after injection and mean peak effect was 3.6 days in blepharospasm, and 4 days in hemifacial spasm. Of 144 treatments, 98.6% had e...

  19. Botulinum toxin A in the treatment of anal fissure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Nebojša

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This paper presents our first experience in the treatment of primary anal fissure by injection of botulinum A toxin into the internal sphincter. Methods. The study group of the retrospective study included 12 outpatients (8 females and 4 males, mean age 42 (range 18-60. During the period 2000-2003, after unsuccessful conservative treatment, patients were treated with the injections of botulinum A toxin, 100 units on both sides of the anal fissure laterally into the internal anal sphincter (50 units on either side. The patients were clinically evaluated 3, 7, and 30 days, and 3 and 6 months after the treatment. Results. Three fissures had healed after a month, and seven after 3 months. Two remained unhealed, but asymptomatic. There was no incontinence of flatus or faeces after 3 months of the treatment. After temporary healing, two fissures relapsed after 6 months, and these patients had the adequate tonus of the anal sphincter muscles. Except for the temporary incontinence, there were neither other side-efects, nor serious complications. Conclusion. Injection of botulinum A toxin achieved good results in the treatment of anal fissure. The appropriate use makes this method safe as an alternative to surgical treatment of anal fissure.

  20. Botulinum Toxin A for Treatment of Contact Granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Taner; Kayahan, Bahar; Günaydın, Rıza Önder; Kuşçu, Oğuz; Sözen, Tevfik

    2016-11-01

    Contact granuloma has been associated with voice abuse, laryngopharyngeal reflux, and habitual throat clearing. It has a high propensity for persistence and recurrence. Treatment options included voice therapy and antireflux measures. Surgical excision has been considered in patients who do not respond to medical management. In this research, we aimed to present our experience with botulinum toxin injection only. Retrospective case series of a tertiary referral center. Our series consisted of 22 patients, who underwent botulinum toxin injection only as an office procedure to bilateral thyroarytenoid and lateral cricoarytenoid muscles in 2 × 1.25 to 2 × 2.5 U. No other treatment was applied. The cases were followed up for at least 6 months ranging between 6 and 100 months with a mean of 28. Seventeen cases (77%) were cured of their granuloma. Eleven of the cured cases had grade 2, four cases had grade 1, and two patients had grade 3 granuloma. Botulinum toxin A injection only is an efficient treatment modality in contact granuloma, especially for grade 1, 2, and 3 cases, and it can be used as a first-line treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Childhood-onset hemifacial spasm: successful treatment with botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Carlos; Papapetropoulos, Spiridon; Farronay, Oscar

    2005-09-01

    Hemifacial spasm is a disorder characterized by involuntary contractions of muscles innervated by the ipsilateral facial nerve. The majority of cases are of adult-onset. However, a few cases have been described in children. Detectable causes of pediatric hemifacial spasm include facial nerve compression by vasculature and brainstem masses. In the treatment of hemifacial spasm, surgical decompression of the facial nerve has been used with good results in both adults and children. However, surgical procedures have serious risks and should be used only in selected cases. Although injections of botulinum toxin type A have been successfully used in adult hemifacial spasm patients, to our knowledge there is no report of use of this indication in children. This report presents the first case of a pediatric patient with childhood-onset hemifacial spasm successfully treated with periorbital botulinum toxin injections. The literature on the subject is also reviewed.

  2. Botulinum toxin type A as treatment of partially accommodative esotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Reyes, E M; Castillo-López, M G; Toledo-Silva, R; Vargas-Ortega, J; Murillo-Correa, C E; Aguilar-Ruiz, A

    2016-03-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a botulinum toxin type A injection in both medial rectus muscles in patients with partially accommodative esotropia. Residual deviation and stability of strabismus were evaluated at 18 months follow up. A prospective, analytical, quasi-experimental study was conducted on a cohort of 21 patients who underwent total cycloplegic refraction and with a residual deviation of at least 14 DP. A botulinum toxin type A dose of 5 IU was injected into each medial rectus muscle for a residual deviation greater than 18 DP, with a dose of 2.5 IU being used for a deviation between 14 and 18 DP. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to relate residual deviation to variables recorded as potential predictors. A total of 21 patients were included, 33.3% (n=7) males and 66.6% (n=14) females. Mean visual acuity was -.28±.25 logMAR for right eye (range 0 to -1) and -.42±.31 logMAR for left eye (range 0 to -1.3). Mean angle of residual deviation before application of botulinum toxin was 40.95±8.6DP without spectacles correction, and 22.3±7.99 DP with full cycloplegic refraction. Adverse effects were ptosis in 14.2% (n=3), diplopia 23.8% (n=5), and vertical deviation in 33% (n=7). One patient had a poor outcome, therefore required surgical treatment. At one year follow up, 85.71% of patients showed good results with esotropia of 12 DP or less, dropping to 71.43% at 18 months of follow up. Botulinum toxin type A is an effective long-term treatment with a good response in 71.43% of patients. No predictors of good response were demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Botulinum a toxin treatment of hemifacial spasm and blepharospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y. C.; Lim, J. K.; Lee, D. K.; Yi, S. D.

    1993-01-01

    We studied the effects of botulinum A toxin in 101 patients with hemifacial spasm and 11 patients with blepharospasm in an open trial and double blind manner. All patients in the open trial and 6 patients in the double blind trial improved after the first injection of botulinum toxin. There was no improvement with placebo. The peak effect ranged from one to 6 days after injection and mean peak effect was 3.6 days in blepharospasm, and 4 days in hemifacial spasm. Of 144 treatments, 98.6% had excellent results, (below grade I). The duration of beneficial effect ranged 11 to 40 weeks (mean 16.5 weeks) in hemifacial spasm and 9 to 30 weeks (mean 14.2 weeks) in blepharospasm. Complications were encountered in 63.4% in hemifacial spasm and 72.7% in blepharospasm. The common side effects were dry eyes, mouth droop, ptosis and lid edema in order of frequency. These side effects were mild and resolved spontaneously in 1 to 3 weeks. Botulinum A toxin therapy is effective and convenient, and the treatment of choice for patients with hemifacial spasm and blepharospasm. PMID:8305141

  4. Efficacy of botulinum toxin in the treatment of intermittent exotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etezad Razavi, Mohammad; Sharifi, Mohammad; Armanfar, Fateme

    2014-12-01

    Multiple surgical interventions are burden to patients with intermittent exotropia (IXT) due to a high recurrence rate. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin injection in the treatment of intermittent exotropia (IXT). A total of 21 patients with IXT, who had a far deviation of less than 40 prism diopters (PD), were enrolled. All cases were followed for at least 6 months with non-surgical management and had decremented fusional control (increasing 3 or more scores in Newcastle Control Score [NCS]). Botulinum toxin was injected (10 units Dysport) to both lateral rectus muscles. Fusional control, sensory and motor status were evaluated at 1 day, 1 week, and 1, 3, and 6 months after injection to compare with the pre-injection values. Fusional control (based on NCS) showed a significant improvement during 6-month follow-up. Mean NCS was 4.4±0.8 SD before botulinum toxin injection and 1.4±0.4 SD after 6 months (psensorial status with Worth Four Dot Test (WFDT) also demonstrated an improvement of fusion (the percentage of patients demonstrating fusion on WFDT were 10.5% before injection and 61.5% after 6 months). The mean far and near deviations decreased during 6 months of follow-up examination. Satisfactory outcome (stable binocular alignment of the eyes to an orthophoria+/-10 PD in primary position) for far distance was achieved in 38.1% at 6 months. The percentage of satisfactory outcome at near was 86% at 6 months follow-up examination. Botulinum toxin injection to lateral rectus muscles seems to be a promising procedure in the management of fusional control, far and near deviations in patients with intermittent exotropia in short time.

  5. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of refractory vaginismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazizadeh, Shirin; Nikzad, Masoomeh

    2004-11-01

    To investigate the efficacy of botulinum toxin injection to treat women with moderate and severe vaginismus. Twenty-four women referred to our clinic from February 2002 to February 2004 (mean age 25 years; range 19-34 years) with third- to fourth-degree vaginismus were recruited for this study. These women had previous unsuccessful treatments. Botulinum toxin (150-400 mIU) was injected into the puborectalis muscles in 3 sites on each side of the vagina. Twenty-three patients (95.8%) had vaginal examinations 1 week postoperatively that showed little or no vaginismus, 18 (75%) achieved satisfactory intercourse after the first injection, 4 (16.7%) had mild pain, 1 was cured after a second injection, 1 patient refused vaginal examination and did not attempt to have coitus, and another had no coitus as a result of her husband's secondary impotence. The women were followed up for a mean of 12.3 months (range 2-24 months), and there were no cases of recurrence. In refractory cases of vaginismus when conventional therapies have failed, local injection of botulinum toxin can be considered. III.

  6. Acute deterioration of bulbar function after botulinum toxin treatment for sialorrhoea in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J.W.; Kuijk, A.A. van; Geurts, A.C.H.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Transcutaneous botulinum toxin injection in the salivary glands was introduced in 2000 as a new treatment for sialorrhoea in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We describe an ALS patient who developed serious complications of botulinum toxin treatment for sialorrhoea, and we review the relevant

  7. Muscle selection for treatment of cervical dystonia with botulinum toxin : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, S. W. R.; Koelman, J. H. T. M.; Kamphuis, D. J.; Tijssen, M. A. J.

    Rationale: Cervical dystonia, also called spasmodic torticollis, is the most common form of (primary) dystonia. Intramuscular injections with botulinum toxin are the first line of treatment for cervical dystonia. To optimise the treatment response to botulinum toxin correct muscles should be

  8. Muscle selection for treatment of cervical dystonia with botulinum toxin - A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, S. W. R.; Koelman, J. H. T. M.; Kamphuis, D. J.; Tijssen, M. A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Cervical dystonia, also called spasmodic torticollis, is the most common form of (primary) dystonia. Intramuscular injections with botulinum toxin are the first line of treatment for cervical dystonia. To optimise the treatment response to botulinum toxin correct muscles should be

  9. Long-term outcomes of Botulinum toxin in the treatment of chronic anal fissure: 5 years of follow-up

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barbeiro, Sandra; Atalaia-Martins, Catarina; Marcos, Pedro; Gonçalves, Cláudia; Canhoto, Manuela; Arroja, Bruno; Silva, Filipe; Cotrim, Isabel; Eliseu, Liliana; Santos, Antonieta; Vasconcelos, Helena

    2017-01-01

    .... The long-term efficacy of Botulinum toxin is not well known. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of Botulinum toxin in the treatment of chronic anal fissure...

  10. [Botulinum toxin for the treatment of major depressive disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawlik, A E; Freudenmann, R W; Pinkhardt, E H; Schönfeldt-Lecuona, C J; Gahr, M

    2014-02-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) plays an important role in the treatment and prophylaxis of migraine and is also used for the treatment of focal dystonia, spasm, hypersalivation, and hyperhydrosis. Recent clinical trials suggest that BTX treatment of muscles involved in the development of negative emotions may also have an antidepressant effect. This article gives a systematic review of the literature regarding BTX in the treatment of major depression. We screened the databases of Medline and Scopus using the search terms [("botulinum toxin" OR "botox") AND ("antidepressant" OR "depression" OR "depressed")]. The website www.clinicaltrials.gov was screened with the same search terms in order to detect current studies. As of April 2013, we identified 3 studies that evaluated the antidepressant effects of BTX in the treatment of major depression. An improvement in mood after treatment with BTX was seen in a case series of 10 depressed patients. In a randomised, placebo-controlled study of thirty patients assigned to a verum (BTX, n = 15) or placebo (saline, n = 15) group, treatment with BTX has also shown a positive effect on mood. Another prospective, open-label study evaluated the antidepressive effect of BTX in 25 subjects with major depression. On www.clinicaltrials.gov we identified 2 ongoing studies, which are currently investigating the antidepressant effect of BTX. Recently published studies have shown a reduction of depressive symptoms after treatment of the glabellar frown lines with BTX injections. Further clinical studies in larger patient samples are necessary to prove the efficacy and safety of BTX injections used for the treatment of depressive disorders. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Botulinum Toxin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AADA Health System Reform Principles Drug pricing and availability CVS dermatologic formulary restrictions Access to compounded medications ... Botulinum toxin therapy: Overview Also called botulinum rejuvenation Brand names: Botox® Cosmetic, Dysport®, MYOBLOC®, and XEOMIN® When ...

  12. Botulinum toxin treatment for limb spasticity in childhood cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito ePavone

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available CP is the most common cause of chronic disability in childhood occurring in 2 to 2.5/1000 births. It is a severe disorder and a significant number of patients present cognitive delay and difficulty in walking. The use of botulinum toxin (BTX has become a popular treatment for CP especially for spastic and dystonic muscles while avoiding deformity and pain. Moreover, the combination of physiotherapy, casting, orthotics and injection of BTX may delay or decrease the need for surgical intervention while reserving single-event, multi-level surgery for fixed musculotendinous contractures and bony deformities in older children. This report highlights the utility of BTX in the treatment of cerebral palsy in children. We include techniques for administration, side effects and possible resistance as well as specific use in the upper and lower limbs muscles

  13. Botulinum ToxinTreatment Of Choice For Primary Hyperhidrosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The term Botulinum toxin encompasses a group of seven (A – G) immunologically distinct Zinc-dependent endoproteases that act primarily at peripheral cholinergic synapses. By blocking synaptic vesicle trafficking they effectively block the release of Acetylcholine inducing muscle paralysis. This property is utilized in the ...

  14. Pretarsal application of botulinum toxin for treatment of blepharospasm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aramideh, M.; Ongerboer de Visser, B. W.; Brans, J. W.; Koelman, J. H.; Speelman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    The response to botulinum toxin type A was compared after two injection techniques in 45 patients with blepharospasm. Initially, patients were treated according to a triple injection technique; two injections into the upper eyelid and one injection into the lower eyelid. Subsequently, without

  15. Calf muscle volume estimates: Implications for Botulinum toxin treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Thomsen, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    An optimal botulinum toxin dose may be related to the volume of the targeted muscle. We investigated the suitability of using ultrasound and anthropometry to estimate gastrocnemius and soleus muscle volume. Gastrocnemius and soleus muscle thickness was measured in 11 cadaveric human legs, using u...

  16. The Difference of Treatment Results between Botulinum Toxin A Split Injection Sites and Botulinum Toxin A Non-Split Injection Sites for Hemifacial Spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prutthipongsit, Anuwat; Aui-aree, Nipat

    2015-11-01

    To compare hemifacial spasm treatment results between Botulinum toxin A split injection sites and Botulinum toxin A non-split injection sites. Thirty-one hemifacial spasm patients were randomly assigned into the non-split injection sites group (injecting Botulinum toxin A to the zygomaticus major and risorius each) or split injection sites group with the same amount of Botulinum toxin A as the first method (injection Botulinum toxin A to the zygomaticus major and minor and risorius two injections each) The main outcomes are onset of improvement and effective duration of treatment. Fifteen patients were assigned to non-split injection sites group and 16 patients were assigned to split injection sites group. The median onset of improvement in non-split injection sites group and split injection sites group was 4.0 and 4.5 days, respectively (p = 0.984). The effective duration of treatment in the non-split injection sites group was 60.0 days and in the split injection sites group was 54.5 days (p = 0.582). The splitting of injection sites did not signicantly improve the efficacy of Botulinum toxin A in the treatment of hemifacial spasm.

  17. Botulinum toxin for treatment of Frey's syndrome: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teive Hélio A.G.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Frey's syndrome is a phenomenon of hemifacial flushing and sweating after gustatory stimulus, usually secondary to surgical trauma over the parotid gland, although other injury mechanisms may be seen. It is accepted as a result of aberrant regeneration of facial autonomic nerve fibers. Treatment evolved from ineffective medical and surgical approaches to botulinum toxin. We evaluate the effectiveness and safety of botulinum toxin in the treatment of this complication in two patients.

  18. Botulinum Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    intercostal muscle (Hilmas, unpublished data). All serotypes showed a similar ability to produce complete muscular paralysis in ex vivo human intercostal...routes of exposure include, in order of descending frequency: dysphagia, xerostomia, diplopia, dysarthria, fatigue , ptosis of the eyelids...Medical and Public Health Manage- ment. JAMA 285: 1059-70. Bakry, N., Kamata, Y., Simpson, L. (1997). Expression of botu- linum toxin binding sites in

  19. The use of botulinum toxin as primary or adjunctive treatment for post acne and traumatic scarring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg J Goodman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Botulinum toxin has been utilised successfully in many facial and extra facial regions to limit superfluous movement. Scars, whether traumatic or disease-related, are treated with many modalities. Objective: To assess the available literature concerning the prophylactic use of botulinum toxin for the improvement in the cosmetic outcome of scars induced by surgery and to examine its role in the treatment of established scars alone, as also combined with other modalities. Material and Methods : The results of the prophylactic use of botulinum toxin to limit the resultant scarring from surgery are examined by a literature review. The primary and adjunctive use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of post acne and post surgical and traumatic scars is explored by case examples. Results : Literature review and personal experience shows good Improvement in the appearance of scars with the use of botulinum toxin alone or with other adjuvant modalities in the treatment of scars. Conclusion : Botulinum toxin would appear to be useful both in the prophylaxis and treatment of certain types of scars.

  20. Efficacy of carbamazepine combined with botulinum toxin a in the treatment of blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian Hua; Lin, Shao Chun; Hu, Yan Fei; Liu, Li Ya; Liu, Ju Bo; Hong, Yi Chun

    2012-12-01

    To observe the efficacy of the combined treatment of carbamazepine and botulinum toxin A for blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. Fifty-eight patients with either blepharospasm or hemifacial spasm were randomly divided into treatment and control groups. In the treatment group, 30 patients were administered with local intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin A and oral carbamazepine 100 mg/time, 3 times a day for 60 days. Twenty-eight subjects in the control group underwent local intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin A only. After combined treatment, the complete remission rate was 90%, which was significantly higher than that of the of the control group (67.9%, Pbotulinum toxin A had increased efficacy in the treatment of blepharospasm or hemifacial spasm, but had no significant effect in terms of the duration of the therapeutic effect.

  1. [Hemifacial spasm: over 10 years of treatment with botulinum toxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Saldaña, M T; Parkhutik, V; Boscá-Blasco, M E; Claramonte, B; Burguera-Hernández, J A

    The short-term beneficial and adverse effects of treatment with botulinum toxin (BT) in hemifacial spasm (HS) are well documented, but this is not the case with its long-term derivatives. AIMS. To describe the characteristics, the dose development, the side effects and the reason for giving up therapy in patients who have been on BT treatment for more than 10 years. We also sought to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of prolonged treatment in patients with HS. We reviewed the demographic and clinical characteristics of patients who had had HS for more than 10 years since follow-up began. We analysed the mean dose development of BT per visit and year, the number of sessions per year, side effects and reasons for dropping out. We focused our attention on cases with more than 10 years' continuous treatment. The percentage of patients who had been on treatment for over ten years was 53.7%. The mean dose of BT per year rose progressively, and was significant (p < 0.05) during the first four years of treatment. There was no significant increase in the number of sessions. Altogether 46 side effects were observed, ptosis being the most frequent. These occurred during the first years of the early stages of the technique. The most common cause of dropout was loss to follow-up in 22 patients, followed by death in 11 cases. BT is a feasible, safe treatment option (with very few benign side effects) in the prolonged treatment of patients with HS.

  2. USE OF BOTULINUM TOXIN TYPE A IN THE TREATMENT OF SPASTICITY IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Lazić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy has an incidence of about 1-2 per 1000 live births, and in spite of the progress of neonatal medicine, it seems that the incidence will not subside in the near future. The most important characteristic of cerebral palsy is movement abnormality: spasticity, chorea, athetosis, ataxia, dystonia, as well as their different combinations. About 70% of children who suffer from cerebral palsy also suffer from some form of spasticity. Spasticity is a type of muscle hypertonicity characterized by rapid increase in resistance to passive stretching of muscles. The interest for botulinum toxin application in the treatment of spasticity has dramatically increased in the last 10 years. Botulinum toxin is the most powerful neurotoxin that is found in nature. It is produced by anaerobic bacteria – clostridium botulinum. It is produced in eight serotypes of which type A is the most commonly used. Botulinum toxin blocks neuromuscular transmission and causes irreversible weakness of the treated muscle. It has been used since 1993 in the treatment of cerebral palsy in children. The toxin effect is permanent and it results in irreversible denervation. Functional recovery is possible after 2-4 months, due to sprouting of nerve endings and the formation of new synaptic contacts. Treatment with botulinum toxin is safe. Adverse effects are rare, temporary and completely reversible. Application of botulinum toxin prevents or reduces contractures and deformities, and thus delays or avoids surgical treatment. Yet, physical therapy, which prolongs and improves the effects of botulinum toxin, remains an essential and most important form of therapy in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy.

  3. Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Sections Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for ... How Does Botulinum Toxin (Botox) Work? Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Leer en Español: La toxina ...

  4. [Botulinum toxin treatment of hip adductor spasticity in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissel, J; Entner, T

    2001-01-01

    Spasticity results in a resistance to passive movement and decrease of passive mobility of the involved joints and is defined as a state of hypertonicity with exaggeration of tendon reflexes mediated by a loss of inhibitory control of upper motor neurons. In patients with severe stages of multiple sclerosis (MS) spasticity of the lower limbs often leeds to a spastic pattern with hip adduction resulting in decreased range-of-motion (ROM), increased pain, spasms, and functional disability (disturbed gait and sitting position) as well as difficulties with perineal hygiene. Local botulinum toxin type A (Btx-A) injections in spastic muscles offer a new treatment approach for managing spasticity and associated problems. Up to now Btx-A is approved for the treatment of blepharospasm and cervical dystonia and the treatment of equinous gait in children with cerebral palsy in Austria and Germany. Up to now only in Switzerland Botox is licensed for the treatment of focal spasticity. Btx-A is a neurotoxin derived from Clostridium botulinum. In most european countries Btx-A is available as Dysport (vial = 500 units) and Botox (vial = 100 units). In prospective studies a ratio of 1 unit Botox to 3-4 units Dysport was found. Following intramuscular injection Btx-A blocks the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junctions, thereby inhibiting muscle contraction, and decreases spastic muscle tone and muscle spindles afferent information to the spinal cord. The spectrum of side effects includes local weakening of the injected and adjacent muscles as well as pain and haematoma at the injection site. At therapeutic doses side effects are local and transient. According to a double blind, placebo controlled, dose ranging study published by Hyman et al. (2000, Dysport in a dose of 500, 1000 and 1500 units reduced the degree of hip adductor spasticity associated with MS, and this benefit was evident despite concomitant use of oral antispasticity medication. According to the

  5. [Essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm: characteristic of the patient, botulinum toxin A treatment and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellini, Silvana Artioli; Matai, Olívia; Igami, Thais Zamudio; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Padovani, Carlos Pereira

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the characteristics of the essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm patients and the feasible treatment with botulinum toxin A. Thirty-four essential blepharospasm or hemifacial spasm patients were evaluated according to gender, ocular complaint, time of disease, treatment outcome and complications. Age median was 63 years and the mean was 61 years, with no difference regarding sex; 66.66% of the patients had hemifacial spasm and 33.33%, essential blepharospasm. Many patients complained of dry eye associated with involuntary spasm. Botulinum toxin A showed a positive outcome in 91.30% of the treated patients and complications observed after treatment were eyelid ptosis (8.33%) and buccal angle deviation (8.33%). Essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm occurred in the elderly, of both sexes. Treatment with botulinum toxin A was useful, with very low complication rates.

  6. Acute deterioration of bulbar function after botulinum toxin treatment for sialorrhoea in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Jan-Willem G; van Kuijk, Annet A; Geurts, Alexander C H; Schelhaas, H Jurgen; Zwarts, Machiel J

    2008-04-01

    Transcutaneous botulinum toxin injection in the salivary glands was introduced in 2000 as a new treatment for sialorrhoea in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We describe an ALS patient who developed serious complications of botulinum toxin treatment for sialorrhoea, and we review the relevant literature. A 64-yr-old woman with bulbar ALS for 6 mos was treated for disabling sialorrhoea. She had moderate dysphagia, but she was able to swallow. The submandibular and parotid glands were injected transcutaneously, under ultrasound guidance, with botulinum toxin (Dysport), 80 U on each side. Four days later, her bulbar function rapidly deteriorated, resulting in complete aphagia and anarthria on the fifth day. A PEG catheter was placed. Although according to the literature this treatment can be made safer by cautiously increasing the dosage and injecting the parotid glands first, BTX should not be the first-line treatment of sialorrhoea in ALS; comparative studies of BTX, amitryptiline, scopolamine, and radiation should be performed first.

  7. A pilot study to evaluate effectiveness of botulinum toxin in treatment of androgenetic alopecia in males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehdev Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Androgenetic alopecia is a common form of alopecia with multifactorial etiology. Finasteride and minoxidil are approved by the FDA for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia. Balding scalp is believed to have relative microvascular insufficiency. Blood vessels in the scalp travel through the intramuscular plane. Intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin relaxes muscles and thereby increases blood flow in balding scalp. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin in androgenetic alopecia management. Material and Methods: The study was conducted in a tertiary care center. A total of 10 male patients with androgenetic alopecia meeting inclusion criteria of the study were included. In the scalp, 30 sites were injected with 5 U of botulinum toxin in each site. Preprocedure photograph taken and evaluation was done, which was repeated after 24 weeks. Efficacy was assessed by photography and self-assessment scoring was done by patients. Results: Of 10 patients, 8 had good to excellent response on photographic assessment. At the end of 24 weeks, 1 patient showed poor and 1 showed fair response to treatment. As per self-assessment, 7of 10 patients showed good to excellent response. Two patients had fair response and 1 patient showed poor response to treatment. Conclusion: Botulinum toxin was found to be safe and effective therapy for the management of androgenetic alopecia in this pilot study. Studies with larger sample size and randomized controlled trials are required to establish the role of botulinum toxin in the management of androgenetic alopecia.

  8. Validation of a new photogrammetric technique to monitor the treatment effect of Botulinum toxin in synkinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabvuure, N T; Hallam, M-J; Venables, V; Nduka, C

    2013-07-01

    To validate a new photogrammetric technique for quantifying eye surface area and using this to quantify the degree of improvement in symmetry in patients with oral-ocular synkinesis following Botulinum toxin injection. Feasibility study and retrospective outcomes analysis Ten patients' photographs were chosen from a photographic database. Their eye surface areas were measured independently by two raters using a graphics tablet. One rater repeated the procedure after 15 days. Bland-Altman plots were computed, ascertaining inter-rater and intra-rater variability. The eye surface areas of 19 patients were then derived from photographs taken before and after Botulinum toxin injections. Paired t-tests were used to analyse the significance of the difference in pre- and post-treatment symmetry. Ninety per cent of eye surface areas derived from the two raters were within a coefficient of variation of 0.1 (95% CI: 0.05-0.15). Similarly, 90% of eye surface areas derived from one rater had a coefficient of variation of 0.08 (95% CI: 0.04-0.12). Botulinum toxin significantly reduced synkinesis resulting from lip puckering, Mona Lisa smiling and Hollywood smiling (P<0.05). We have proposed a clinically valid tool for quantifying the effects of Botulinum toxin treatment for oral-ocular synkinesis. We recommend this method be used to monitor the response of such patients when receiving Botulinum toxin treatment.

  9. Efficacy of botulinum toxin therapy in treatment of myofascial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurand, Jorge; Pacheco-Ruíz, Laura; Orozco-Saldívar, Hector; López-Valdés, Julio

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess the efficacy of using botulinum toxin (BTX) in temporomandibular joint disorders, particularly pertaining to myofascial pain from masseter and temporal muscles. The study included 11 patients who were diagnosed with masseter and temporalis myofascial pain. Visual analog scale for pain and pressure algometry were conducted initially, after 1 month of conservative therapy (control group), and after 1 month of BTX type A injections (study group). Data were statistically analyzed (analysis of variance and Wilcoxon's test) to determine intergroup differences. Both conservative therapy and BTX injections showed reduction in pain scores and increase in pain threshold compared with baseline, and statistically significant differences were noted between both groups. Thus, BTX injections appear to be effective in management of chronic myofascial pain targeting masseter and temporalis muscles.

  10. Cost-utility analysis of botulinum toxin type A products for the treatment of cervical dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazerooni, Rashid; Broadhead, Christine

    2015-02-15

    A cost-utility analysis of botulinum toxin type A products for the treatment of cervical dystonia (CD) was conducted. A cost-utility analysis of botulinum toxin type A products was conducted from the U.S. government perspective using a decision-analysis model with a one-year time horizon. Probabilities of the model were taken from several studies using the three botulinum type A products approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of CD: onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox), abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport), and incobotulinumtoxinA (Xeomin). The main outcome measurement was successful treatment response with botulinum toxin type A, measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Response was defined as a patient who experienced improvement of CD symptoms without a severe adverse event. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was conducted to test robustness of the base-case results. All three botulinum toxin type A agents were cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000 per QALY. Xeomin was the most cost-effective with a cost-effectiveness ratio of $27,548 per QALY. Xeomin was dominant over the alternative agents with equivalent efficacy outcomes and lower costs. Dysport had the second lowest cost-effectiveness ratio ($36,678), followed by Botox ($49,337). The probabilistic sensitivity analysis supported the results of the base-case analysis. Dysport was associated with the lowest wastage (2.2%), followed by Xeomin (10%) and Botox (22.9%). A cost-utility analysis found that Xeomin was the more cost-effective botulinum toxin type A product compared with Botox and Dysport for the treatment of CD. Wastage associated with the respective products may have a large effect on the cost-effectiveness of the agents. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Safety and efficacy of intradermal injection of botulinum toxin for the treatment of oily skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Amy E; Goldberg, David J

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of intradermal injection of abobotulinumtoxinA for the treatment of oily skin. Twenty-five patients with oily skin were treated in the forehead region with intradermal injections of botulinum toxin. Baseline and post-treatment sebum production was measured using a sebometer. Photographs were taken. Patients were also asked to rate their satisfaction with the treatment in terms of improvement in their oily skin. Treatment with botulinum toxin resulted in significantly lower sebum production at 1 week and 1, 2, and 3 months after injection (p oily skin. [Correction added after online publication 7-Jan-2013: the number of satisfied patients has been updated] Intradermal injection of botulinum toxin significantly reduced sebum production in the forehead region, with a high degree of patient satisfaction. Intradermal botulinum toxin may be an effective treatment to reduce sebum production in patients with oily skin. Larger, randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled studies are warranted. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Writer′s Cramp - Treatment With Botulinum Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borgohain R

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Writer′s cramp is undoubtedly the most frustrating and difficult focal dystonia to treat. We treated 33 patients (32 males and 1 female with writer′s cramp with EMG-guided injection botulinum toxin (BTX. Muscle selection for injection was done clinically. Their mean age at presentation was 39.48+9.38 years (range 18-57 years and mean duration of symptoms was 3.84+4.15 years (range 0.3-20 years. A detailed clinical assessment and video-taping while writing was done. Fourteen (42.4% of the 33 patients received injections in forearm extensors, 10 (30.3% in flexors and 9 (27.3% in both extensors and the flexors. Mean dosage of BTX used for initial injections was 127.7+28.4 units of Dysport and 22.9+3.1 units of Botox for twenty-tow and eleven patients respectively. Functional improvement was seen in 30(93.75% and was marked to striking in 15(46.9% of 32 patients who reported for follow-up. More patients with extensor (44.4% patients with both flexor and extensor involvement had similar response. While BTX therapy is currently the most effective therapy for Writer′s cramp, it is also the most challenging indication for BTX. This is a technically demanding procedure requiring meticulous documentation.

  13. Use of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of hemifacial spasm and blepharospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, L B; Tsai, C P; Liao, K K; Kao, K P; Yuan, C L; Yen, D J; Lin, K P

    1999-01-01

    Hemifacial spasm and blepharospasm are both dystonic disorders. They may seriously affect individuals' lifestyle and social activities. In 1990, the Food and Drug Administration of the USA approved botulinum toxin A as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of hemifacial spasm and blepharospasm. We present a therapeutic review of botulinum toxin A in 80 patients in Taiwan. Fifty-eight patients with hemifacial spasm and 22 with blepharospasm. Botulinum toxin A was prepared and injected into the facial and eyelid muscles. Patients were monitored every two weeks and classified into four groups (excellent, moderate, mild and no improvement) according to the clinical improvement scale. Complications were also recorded. A total of 86.2% of hemifacial spasm patients and 81.8% of blepharospasm patients had excellent improvement on the spasm intensity scale, while 6.8% of hemifacial spasm and 9.0% of blepharospasm patients had moderate improvement. The complication rate was low and included transient mild facial weakness (5%), ptosis (3.8%), eyelid swelling and/or ecchymosis (3.8%), nausea/vomiting (2.5%) and transient severe facial weakness (1.3%). Botulinum toxin A is an excellent therapeutic agent to improve spasm intensity and has a low complication rate.

  14. Tetanus: Pathophysiology, Treatment, and the Possibility of Using Botulinum Toxin against Tetanus-Induced Rigidity and Spasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Bjørnar

    2013-01-01

    Tetanus toxin, the product of Clostridium tetani, is the cause of tetanus symptoms. Tetanus toxin is taken up into terminals of lower motor neurons and transported axonally to the spinal cord and/or brainstem. Here the toxin moves trans-synaptically into inhibitory nerve terminals, where vesicular release of inhibitory neurotransmitters becomes blocked, leading to disinhibition of lower motor neurons. Muscle rigidity and spasms ensue, often manifesting as trismus/lockjaw, dysphagia, opistotonus, or rigidity and spasms of respiratory, laryngeal, and abdominal muscles, which may cause respiratory failure. Botulinum toxin, in contrast, largely remains in lower motor neuron terminals, inhibiting acetylcholine release and muscle activity. Therefore, botulinum toxin may reduce tetanus symptoms. Trismus may be treated with botulinum toxin injections into the masseter and temporalis muscles. This should probably be done early in the course of tetanus to reduce the risk of pulmonary aspiration, involuntary tongue biting, anorexia and dental caries. Other muscle groups are also amenable to botulinum toxin treatment. Six tetanus patients have been successfully treated with botulinum toxin A. This review discusses the use of botulinum toxin for tetanus in the context of the pathophysiology, symptomatology, and medical treatment of Clostridium tetani infection. PMID:23299659

  15. Tetanus: Pathophysiology, Treatment, and the Possibility of Using Botulinum Toxin against Tetanus-Induced Rigidity and Spasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørnar Hassel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetanus toxin, the product of Clostridium tetani, is the cause of tetanus symptoms. Tetanus toxin is taken up into terminals of lower motor neurons and transported axonally to the spinal cord and/or brainstem. Here the toxin moves trans-synaptically into inhibitory nerve terminals, where vesicular release of inhibitory neurotransmitters becomes blocked, leading to disinhibition of lower motor neurons. Muscle rigidity and spasms ensue, often manifesting as trismus/lockjaw, dysphagia, opistotonus, or rigidity and spasms of respiratory, laryngeal, and abdominal muscles, which may cause respiratory failure. Botulinum toxin, in contrast, largely remains in lower motor neuron terminals, inhibiting acetylcholine release and muscle activity. Therefore, botulinum toxin may reduce tetanus symptoms. Trismus may be treated with botulinum toxin injections into the masseter and temporalis muscles. This should probably be done early in the course of tetanus to reduce the risk of pulmonary aspiration, involuntary tongue biting, anorexia and dental caries. Other muscle groups are also amenable to botulinum toxin treatment. Six tetanus patients have been successfully treated with botulinum toxin A. This review discusses the use of botulinum toxin for tetanus in the context of the pathophysiology, symptomatology, and medical treatment of Clostridium tetani infection.

  16. Botulinum Toxin Treatment of Blepharospasm, Orofacial/Oromandibular Dystonia, and Hemifacial Spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Barbara Illowsky; Alter, Katharine

    2016-02-01

    Blepharospasm is a focal dystonia characterized by involuntary, repetitive eye closure. Orofacial and oromandibular dystonia describe involuntary dystonic movements of orofacial and oromandibular musculature. Hemifacial spasm is characterized by repetitive synchronous contraction of facial nerve innervated muscles on one side of the face. In this article, the clinical presentation, epidemiology, and approaches to treatment are reviewed. Technical aspects of using botulinum toxin for treatment and reported outcomes are discussed. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Differences in improvement between patients with idiopathic versus neurovascular hemifacial spasm after botulinum toxin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunç, Tuğba; Cavdar, Leyla; Karadağ, Yeşim Sücüllü; Okuyucu, Esra; Coşkun, Ozlem; Inan, Levent E

    2008-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the differences in response to botulinum toxin treatment between patients with idiopathic versus neurovascular hemifacial spasm. A total of 69 patients with hemifacial spasm were investigated prospectively with cranial magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography. Neurovascular contact was found in 23 patients. All patients were assessed with a severity scale and a disease awareness scale. After treatment, the patients with idiopathic hemifacial spasm improved significantly in terms of both severity and awareness scores, but the patients with neurovascular hemifacial spasm improved only in the awareness scores. In conclusion, patients with idiopathic hemifacial spasm experienced a greater improvement after treatment with botulinum toxin than did patients with neurovascular hemifacial spasm.

  18. Treatment of chronic anal fissure: Botulinum toxin (Dysport versus lateral internal anal sphincterotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgari M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Botulinum toxin (Dysport is a powerful semi-biological toxin. It has proved to be a remarkable therapeutic agent for treatment of benign anal disorders. Different results have been achieved from injection of botulinum toxin in order to treatment of anal fissure since 1993. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin injection in the treatment of chronic anal fissure Comparing with lateral internal anal sphincterotomy (LIS."n"nMethods: 36 patients entered into two groups, Dysport injection and Lateral Internal Sphincterotomy, randomly. Dysport group were treated by injection of 50 units of botulinum toxin, 25 units of drugs in each side, and LIS was done in surgery group by open method in left side. Pain, recovery and incontinency were compared between two groups during six months of follow up."n"nResults: Based on this study, treatment of anal fissure does not affected by age and gender. Regarding to location of fissure, there was no difference between two different genders. Mean of age and ratio of gender were similar in both groups. The severity of pain in surgery group was lower than Dysport group six months after treatment (0.4±0.7 and 3.2±2.6 respectively, p<0.001. Recovery

  19. Treatment Efficacy of Electromyography versus Fiberscopy-Guided Botulinum Toxin Injection in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia Patients: A Prospective Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Wook Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study prospectively evaluates and compares the treatment efficacy of botulinum toxin injection under electromyography guidance (EMG group and percutaneous botulinum toxin injection under flexible fiberscopic guidance (fiberscopy group. Methods. Thirty patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD, who had never received treatment, were randomly allocated into EMG- or fiberscopy-guided botulinum toxin injections between March 2008 and February 2010. We assessed acoustic and aerodynamic voice parameters, and the voice handicap index (VHI before injection and at 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. Results. The mean total dosage of botulinum toxin was similar for both groups: 1.7 ± 0.5 U for the EMG group and 1.8 ± 0.4 U for the fiberscopy group (P>0.05. There were no significant differences in outcomes between the two groups in either the duration of effectiveness or complications such as breathy voice and aspiration. Conclusion. Botulinum toxin injection under fiberscopic guidance is a viable alternative to EMG-guided botulinum toxin injection for the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia when EMG equipment is unavailable.

  20. Cranial dystonia, blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm: clinical features and treatment, including the use of botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, S P; Lang, A E

    1988-01-01

    Blepharospasm, the most frequent feature of cranial dystonia, and hemifacial spasm are two involuntary movement disorders that affect facial muscles. The cause of blepharospasm and other forms of cranial dystonia is not known. Hemifacial spasm is usually due to compression of the seventh cranial nerve at its exit from the brain stem. Cranial dystonia may result in severe disability. Hemifacial spasm tends to be much less disabling but may cause considerable distress and embarrassment. Patients affected with these disorders are often mistakenly considered to have psychiatric problems. Although the two disorders are quite distinct pathophysiologically, therapy with botulinum toxin has proven very effective in both. We review the clinical features, proposed pathophysiologic features, differential diagnosis and treatment, including the use of botulinum toxin, of cranial dystonia and hemifacial spasm. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3052771

  1. Dynamic splinting after treatment with botulinum toxin type-A: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jenny M; Francisco, Gerard E; Willis, F Buck

    2009-02-01

    Over 1.5 million Americans are diagnosed with a stroke each year, and excessive flexion or extension (hypertonia) of upper extremity joints are common secondary conditions. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of botulinum toxin type-A and manual therapy, with the adjunct treatment of dynamic splinting on range of motion, spasticity, and elbow flexor hypertonia, in a randomized trial. Thirty-six subjects were recruited for this pilot study and all exhibited hypertonia in elbow flexion. Six patients were excluded due to noncompliance. Testing was done with pre/post active range of motion in elbow extension, and the Modified Ashworth Scale (extension) for spasticity. All patients received the current standard of care: botulinum toxin type-A injections and manual therapy. Experimental patients were randomly assigned adjunct treatment with Elbow Extension Dynasplint. Thirty patients completed the study (mean age [SD] 52+/-17 years). The percentage of change in active range of motion in elbow extension was greater for the experimental than for control subjects (33.5% vs. 18.7%). The Modified Ashworth Scale (extension) scores showed comparable changes of a mean 9.3% improvement for experimental versus 8.6% for the control subjects. This study confirmed the efficacy of botulinum toxin type-A in tone management and occupational therapy in contracture reduction. It also showed the value of dynamic splinting in maintaining gains in range of motion.

  2. Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin injections

    OpenAIRE

    S. E. Khatkova; A. A. Balbert

    2016-01-01

    One of the key conditions for achieving the desirable result during botulinum toxin therapy for muscular dystonia, spasticity, and other diseases accompanied by spasm, pain, and autonomic dysfunction (dystonias, spasticity, etc.) is the proper administration of the agent into the muscles directly involved in the pathological process. The exact entry of botulinum toxin into the target muscles is essential for successful and safe treatment because its injection into a normal muscle may cause si...

  3. Botulinum toxin injection versus lateral internal sphincterotomy in the treatment of chronic anal fissure: a non-randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulusoy Nefise B

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although lateral internal sphincterotomy is the gold-standard treatment for chronic anal fissure, intrasphincteric injection of botulinum toxin seems to be a reliable new option. The aim of this non-randomized study is to compare the effect of lateral internal sphincterotomy and botulinum toxin injection treatments on the outcome and reduction of anal sphincter pressures in patients with chronic anal fissure. Methods Patients with chronic anal fissure were treated with either botulinum toxin injection or lateral internal sphincterotomy by their own choice. Maximal resting pressure and maximal squeeze pressure measurements were performed before and 2 weeks after treatments by anal manometry. Patients were followed for fissure relapse during 14 months. Results Twenty-one consecutive outpatients with posterior chronic anal fissure were enrolled. Eleven patients underwent surgery and ten patients received botulinum toxin injection treatment. Before the treatment, anal pressures were found to be similar in both groups. After the treatment, the maximal resting pressures were reduced from 104 ± 22 mmHg to 86 ± 15 mmHg in the surgery group (p 0.05 in the surgery group, and from 117 ± 62 mmHg to 76 ± 34 (p 0.05. There were no relapses during the 14 months of follow up. Conclusion Lateral internal sphincterotomy and botulinum toxin injection treatments both seem to be equally effective in the treatment of chronic anal fissure.

  4. Agitation predicts response of depression to botulinum toxin treatment in a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Axel Wollmer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In a randomized, controlled trial (n=30 we showed that botulinum toxin injection to the glabellar region produces a marked improvement in the symptoms of major depression. We hypothesized that the mood-lifting effect was mediated by facial feedback mechanisms. Here we assessed if agitation, which may be associated with increased dynamic psychomotor activity of the facial musculature, can predict response to the treatment. To test this hypothesis we re-analyzed the data of the scales from our previous study on a single item basis and compared the baseline scores in the agitation item (item 9 of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D between responders (n=9 and participants who did not attain response (n=6 among the recipients of onabotulinumtoxinA (n=15. Results: Responders had significantly higher item 9 scores at baseline (1.56+0.88 vs. 0.33+0.52, t(13=3.04, d=1.7, p=0.01, while no other single item of the HAM-D or the Beck Depression Inventory was associated with treatment response. The agitation score had an overall precision of 78% in predicting response in a receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis (area under the curve, AUC=0.87. These data provide a link between response to botulinum toxin treatment with a psychomotor manifestation of depression and thereby indirect support of the proposed facial feedback mechanism of action. Moreover, it suggests that patients with agitated depression may particularly benefit from botulinum toxin treatment.

  5. Long-term botulinum toxin treatment of benign essential blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm, and Meige syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyz, Craig N; Burns, John A; Petrie, Thomas P; Watkins, John R; Cahill, Kenneth V; Foster, Jill A

    2013-07-01

    To report the clinical success and incidence of adverse events of repetitive botulinum toxin treatment of 15 years or greater. Retrospective cohort study. The study sample consisted of 37 patients from a clinical practice, 11 male and 26 female. Inclusion criteria consisted of patients treated a minimum of 15 consecutive years for facial dystonia. Seven patients had hemifacial spasm, 4 Meige syndrome, and 26 benign essential blepharospasm. Main outcome measures consisted of treatment efficacy and adverse events. Mean treatment duration was 19.4 years (SD 2.2) with an average of 62 (SD 22) treatments of 70.2 (SD 20.8) neurotoxin units. Mean duration of treatment efficacy was 127 days (SD 37) with a 5% physician-reported minor adverse event rate and no major adverse events over each patient's clinical course. Patients reported no major and 20% incidence of minor adverse events over the treatment course. Results suggest that long-term botulinum toxin treatment produces clinical success in the alleviation of facial dystonia symptoms. Treatment produced a low incidence of major adverse events and minor adverse events. Previous studies may under-report clinical success and over-report adverse events because of study design. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Treatment of chronic pain associated with nocturnal bruxism with botulinum toxin. A prospective and randomized clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wayli, Hessa

    2017-01-01

    Background To evaluate the role of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in the treatment of pain associated with nocturnal bruxism. Material and Methods Fifty subjects reporting nocturnal bruxism were recruited for a randomized clinical trial. Twenty five bruxers were injected with botulinum toxin in both masseters, and twenty five were treated with traditional methods of treating bruxism. Patients were evaluated at 3rd week, 2nd and 6th month and one year after injection and then used to calculate bruxism events. Bruxism symptoms were investigated using questionnaires. Results Mean pain score due to Bruxism events in the masseter muscle decreased significantly in the botulinum toxin injection group A (P =0.000, highly significant). However, in the conventional treatment group, mean pain score does not show improvement with time (p>0.05). Conclusions Our results suggest that botulinum toxin injection reduced the mean pain score and number of bruxism events, most likely by decreasing the muscle activity of masseter rather than affecting the central nervous system. Key words:Temporomandibular pain, nocturnal bruxism, botulinum toxin. PMID:28149474

  7. Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Myofascial Pain Syndromes Involving the Neck and Back: A Review from a Clinical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Climent

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Botulinum toxin inhibits acetylcholine (ACh release and probably blocks some nociceptive neurotransmitters. It has been suggested that the development of myofascial trigger points (MTrP is related to an excess release of ACh to increase the number of sensitized nociceptors. Although the use of botulinum toxin to treat myofascial pain syndrome (MPS has been investigated in many clinical trials, the results are contradictory. The objective of this paper is to identify sources of variability that could explain these differences in the results. Material and Methods. We performed a content analysis of the clinical trials and systematic reviews of MPS. Results and Discussion. Sources of differences in studies were found in the diagnostic and selection criteria, the muscles injected, the injection technique, the number of trigger points injected, the dosage of botulinum toxin used, treatments for control group, outcome measures, and duration of followup. The contradictory results regarding the efficacy of botulinum toxin A in MPS associated with neck and back pain do not allow this treatment to be recommended or rejected. There is evidence that botulinum toxin could be useful in specific myofascial regions such as piriformis syndrome. It could also be useful in patients with refractory MPS that has not responded to other myofascial injection therapies.

  8. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of myofascial pain syndromes involving the neck and back: a review from a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climent, José M; Kuan, Ta-Shen; Fenollosa, Pedro; Martin-Del-Rosario, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Botulinum toxin inhibits acetylcholine (ACh) release and probably blocks some nociceptive neurotransmitters. It has been suggested that the development of myofascial trigger points (MTrP) is related to an excess release of ACh to increase the number of sensitized nociceptors. Although the use of botulinum toxin to treat myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) has been investigated in many clinical trials, the results are contradictory. The objective of this paper is to identify sources of variability that could explain these differences in the results. Material and Methods. We performed a content analysis of the clinical trials and systematic reviews of MPS. Results and Discussion. Sources of differences in studies were found in the diagnostic and selection criteria, the muscles injected, the injection technique, the number of trigger points injected, the dosage of botulinum toxin used, treatments for control group, outcome measures, and duration of followup. The contradictory results regarding the efficacy of botulinum toxin A in MPS associated with neck and back pain do not allow this treatment to be recommended or rejected. There is evidence that botulinum toxin could be useful in specific myofascial regions such as piriformis syndrome. It could also be useful in patients with refractory MPS that has not responded to other myofascial injection therapies.

  9. Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Myofascial Pain Syndromes Involving the Neck and Back: A Review from a Clinical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climent, José M.; Fenollosa, Pedro; Martin-del-Rosario, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Botulinum toxin inhibits acetylcholine (ACh) release and probably blocks some nociceptive neurotransmitters. It has been suggested that the development of myofascial trigger points (MTrP) is related to an excess release of ACh to increase the number of sensitized nociceptors. Although the use of botulinum toxin to treat myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) has been investigated in many clinical trials, the results are contradictory. The objective of this paper is to identify sources of variability that could explain these differences in the results. Material and Methods. We performed a content analysis of the clinical trials and systematic reviews of MPS. Results and Discussion. Sources of differences in studies were found in the diagnostic and selection criteria, the muscles injected, the injection technique, the number of trigger points injected, the dosage of botulinum toxin used, treatments for control group, outcome measures, and duration of followup. The contradictory results regarding the efficacy of botulinum toxin A in MPS associated with neck and back pain do not allow this treatment to be recommended or rejected. There is evidence that botulinum toxin could be useful in specific myofascial regions such as piriformis syndrome. It could also be useful in patients with refractory MPS that has not responded to other myofascial injection therapies. PMID:23533477

  10. Combined effects of botulinum toxin and casting treatments on lower limb spasticity after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Simona; Migliorini, Claudia; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Bertolasi, L; Casarotto, Matteo; Manganotti, Paolo; Fiaschi, Antonio; Smania, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    Optimal treatment of spasticity requires a combination of pharmacotherapy and muscle lengthening. We evaluated 13 stroke patients with equinovarus foot randomized to treatment with either botulinum toxin A (BTA) injection plus ankle-foot casting (n=6) or BTA alone (n=7). The tibialis posterior and calf muscles (range of BTA injection: 190 to 320 U) were treated in each patient. Castings were worn at night for four months. Each patient was examined before, and at two and four months after BTA injection using the static and dynamic baropodometric tests, the Modified Ashworth Scale and the 10-meter walking test. At two months, therapeutic effects were observed in both groups. At four months, the study group showed further clinical improvement, while the control group returned to baseline performance. Thus, prolonged stretching of spastic muscles after BTA injection affords long-lasting therapeutic benefit, enhancing the effects of the toxin alone.

  11. Treatment of severe drooling with botulinum toxin in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease: Efficacy and possible mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Eigild; Karlsborg, Merete; Jensen, Allan Bardow

    2011-01-01

    Drooling in neurodegenerative diseases is associated with social impediment. Previous treatments of drooling have little effect or are effective but with severe side effects. Therefore, there is a need to test new methods such as the use of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A).......Drooling in neurodegenerative diseases is associated with social impediment. Previous treatments of drooling have little effect or are effective but with severe side effects. Therefore, there is a need to test new methods such as the use of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A)....

  12. Treatment with botulinum toxin improves the hyperexcitability of the facial motoneuron in patients with hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Mami; Takashima, Koichi; Kamochi, Haruna; Kusaka, Gen; Shinoda, Sohji; Watanabe, Eiju

    2010-07-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX) injection into the orbicularis oculi muscle is an effective treatment for patients with hemifacial spasm (HFS). The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of this treatment on HFS, in particular the associated hyperexcitability of the facial motor nucleus, and to discuss the potential mechanism of HFS. F waves in the mentalis muscle were examined before, 2 and 6 weeks after the BTX treatment of only the orbicularis oculi muscle in ten patients with HFS. F/M ratio, duration of F waves and frequency of F waves decreased significantly after the BTX treatment compared with those before the BTX treatment. These findings demonstrate that the excitability of the facial motonucleus decreases after BTX treatment of the orbicularis oculi muscle. From these results, we hypothesize that the trigeminal afferent input and the cortical control contribute to the hyperexcitability of the facial motor nucleus in patients with HFS. This warrants further investigation into the pathophysiology of HFS.

  13. Repeated treatments of drooling with botulinum toxin B in neurology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Eigild; Daugaard, Dorthe; Holm, Ole

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate efficacy, saliva flow, and composition in repeated BoNT-B treatments of drooling. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventeen neurological patients (median 66 years), referred for treatment of drooling participated in this observational study. Median total doses of 4000 units...

  14. Botulinum toxin treatment of cranial-cervical dystonia, spasmodic dysphonia, other focal dystonias and hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, J; Schwartz, K; Donovan, D T

    1990-01-01

    In the past five years, 477 patients with various focal dystonias and hemifacial spasm received 3,806 injections of botulinum A toxin for relief of involuntary spasms. A definite improvement with a global rating greater than or equal to 2 on a 0-4 scale, was obtained in all 13 patients with spasmodic dysphonia, 94% of 70 patients with blepharospasm, 92% of 13 patients with hemifacial spasm, 90% of 195 patients with cervical dystonia, 77% of 22 patients with hand dystonia, 73% of 45 patients with oromandibular dystonia, and in 90% of 21 patients with other focal dystonia who had adequate follow up. While the average duration of maximum improvement lasted about 11 weeks after an injection (range seven weeks in patients with hand dystonia to 15 weeks in patients with hemifacial spasm), some patients benefited for over a year. Only 16% of the 941 treatment visits with follow up were not successful. Except for transient focal weakness, there were very few complications or systemic effects attributed to the injections. This study supports the conclusion that botulinum toxin injections are a safe and effective therapy for patients with focal dystonia and hemifacial spasm. Images PMID:2213039

  15. Experience with botulinum toxin in the treatment of cerebral palsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    physically disabled. Every one was in the care of a physiotherapist experienced in the treatment of cerebral palsy. Ages ranged from 5 to 17 years. There were 5 children with hemiplegia,S with diplegia and 5 with quadriplegia. Of the total number, 5 showed a picture of dynamic spasticity (group 1) and 5 were dyskinetic with ...

  16. Primary vaginismus: treatment with botulinum toxin | Hassan | Orient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Vaginismus is a rare condition. It may result in unconsummated marriages with subsequent marital disharmony. The most severe forms of these spasms of the vaginal muscles are often refractory to a variety of conventional treatment. Case Report: The index case was a 35-year old nulligravid, civil servant who ...

  17. Role of medical thermography in treatment of Frey's syndrome with botulinum toxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Richard James; Endersby, Simon; Allen, John; Adams, James

    2014-01-01

    Frey syndrome classically causes gustatory sweating and facial flushing. We describe 2 cases in which medical thermography was used to investigate the symptoms. Images were taken after patients chewed a sialagogue and 2 weeks later they were given injections of botulinum toxin A. Images taken 4 weeks after treatment showed a considerable reduction in sweating and facial flushing, which was supported by the results of quality of life questionnaires completed before and after treatment. Medical thermography is much cleaner than the Minor's starch iodine test. It identifies areas of gustatory sweating, changes in temperature, and vascular changes, which potentially enable treatment to be targeted accurately. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Role of Botulinum Toxin A in Treatment of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataran, Rana; Bahramian, Ayla; Jamali, Zahra; Pishahang, Vahid; Sadeghi Barzegani, Homayoon; Sarbakhsh, Parvin; Yazdani, Javad

    2017-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) usually present with symptoms and signs such as pain, mandibular movement, dysfunction, or joint sounds. Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) is a biologic toxin which inhibits skeletal muscle through hindering the production of acetylcholine in the nerve endings. This toxin is used for the treatment of hyperactivity of lateral pterygoid muscle and TMD symptoms. This comprehensive review aimed to evaluate the effect of BTX-A injections in the lateral pterygoid muscle on treatment of TMDs symptoms. In this study, online databases including Scopus, Medline, Ebsco, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google scholar were searched for the keywords "pterygoid muscle" and "Onabotulinumtoxin A". Twenty-four articles were eligible to be enrolled in the study. In 4 interventional studies and 20 descriptive studies, BTX-A was used for the treatment of TMDs. The dosage and number of injections were different in each study; however, the injection methods were relatively similar. Regardless of the type, number of injections, and dosage, injection of BTX-A in lateral pterygoid seems effective in reducing the click sound and other TMJ-related muscle disorders such as pain, hyperactivity, and dysfunction.

  19. Use of botulinum toxin in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Afreen; McAndrew, Maureen

    2009-11-01

    A growing number of dentists are providing botulinum toxin to patients. The research presented here outlines potential uses of Botox related to oral health and facial problems as compared to traditional treatment methods. The administration of Botox (historically done by dermatologists and neurologists) may fall under dentists' jurisdiction, as their training and knowledge encompasses the entire head and neck. A review is made of the literature, based on Ovid and PubMed searches, selecting articles describing the injection of botulinum toxin A in areas related to the oral cavity and the face, excluding cosmetic purposes.

  20. [Treatment of spasticity in nursing homes: botulinum toxin type A as part of therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolswijk, Adrie H M; Dirkx, Anita E M

    2015-01-01

    Complications of spasticity can severely limit daily activities and care-giving. For those who treat or provide care to patients with spasticity in nursing homes, it is important to recognise complaints in order to prevent serious complications such as care-related pain, contractures and pressure sores. The involvement of a rehabilitation physician is essential to provide a high standard of care. We present two nursing home patients, a 95-year-old woman and a 63-year-old man, with severe upper limb complications following spasticity. Both patients received botulinum toxin injections in the affected muscles, combined with an appropriate splint. A treatment team consisting of a specialist in geriatric medicine, a rehabilitation physician, a physical and an occupational therapist provided consistent daily care in the institution. These efforts substantially reduced care-related pain and improved social behaviour and care options. If spasticity prohibits treatment or care, consultation of a rehabilitation physician at an early stage is indicated.

  1. Successful treatment of a postpolio tinnitus with type a botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolozzi, Paolo; Carrera, Emmanuel; Jaques, Bertrand; Kuntzer, Thierry

    2005-07-01

    Objective tinnitus is a symptom often observed in patients with chronic hyperactivity of masticatory muscles. We report here the unusual case of a 63-year-old woman who developed a distressing tinnitus related to contractions of reinnervated masticatory muscles. This reinnervation process was caused by a postpolio syndrome that gave rise to an acoustic resonance phenomenon transmitted to the middle ear as an audible sound. The tinnitus was successfully treated with electromyography-guided intramuscular injections of type A botulinum toxin. The intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin was found to be effective in relieving severe and disabling postpolio tinnitus.

  2. Successful use of botulinum toxin type a in the treatment of refractory postoperative dyspareunia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Amy J; Paraiso, Marie Fidela R

    2009-08-01

    Refractory dyspareunia presents a challenging therapeutic dilemma. A woman with defecatory dysfunction and dyspareunia presented with stage 2 prolapse. She underwent laparoscopic and vaginal pelvic floor reconstruction with excision of endometriosis. The patient experienced increased dyspareunia and de novo vaginismus postoperatively that were refractory to trigger point injections, physical therapy, and medical and surgical management. She underwent botulinum toxin type A injections into her levator ani muscles, which allowed her to have sexual intercourse again after 2 years of apareunia with no recurrence of pain for 12 months. Injecting botulinum toxin into the levator ani muscles shows promise for postoperative patients who develop vaginismus and do not respond to conservative therapy.

  3. Experience with different botulinum toxins for the treatment of refractory neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano M. Gomes

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To report our experience with the use of the botulinum toxin-A (BoNT/A formulations Botox® and Prosigne® in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO. MATERIALS AND METHODS: At a single institution, 45 consecutive patients with refractory urinary incontinence due to NDO received a single intradetrusor (excluding the trigone treatment with botulinum toxin type A 200 or 300 units. Botox was used for the first 22 patients, and Prosigne for the subsequent 23 patients. Evaluations at baseline and week 12 included assessment of continence and urodynamics. Safety evaluations included monitoring of vital signs, hematuria during the procedure, hospital stay, and spontaneous adverse event reports. RESULTS: A total of 42 patients were evaluated (74% male; mean age, 34.8 years. Significant improvements from baseline in maximum cystometric capacity (MCC, maximum detrusor pressure during bladder contraction, and compliance were observed in both groups (P < 0.05. Improvement in MCC was significantly greater with Botox versus Prosigne (+103.3% vs. +42.2%; P = 0.019. Continence was achieved by week 12 in 16 Botox recipients (76.2% and 10 Prosigne recipients (47.6%; P = 0.057. No severe adverse events were observed. Mild adverse events included 2 cases of transient hematuria on the first postoperative day (no specific treatment required, and 3 cases of afebrile urinary tract infection. CONCLUSIONS: Botox and Prosigne produce distinct effects in patients with NDO, with a greater increase in MCC with Botox. Further evaluation will be required to assess differences between these formulations.

  4. Botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of hemifacial spasm: an 11-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Takada, Leonel Tadao; Gonçalves, Lilian Regina; Costa, Rose Mary Paulo do Nascimento; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Chien, Hsin Fen

    2010-08-01

    In order to evaluate the long-term effect of botulinum toxin type A (BTX) in the treatment of hemifacial spasm (HFS), a retrospective analysis of patients treated at the Movement Disorders Unit of the Division of Neurology, Clinical Hospital, University of São Paulo, School of Medicine from 1993 to 2004 was made. A total of 808 injections with BTX were administered to 54 patients with HFS. The mean duration of improvement per application was 3.46 months and the mean rate of improvement using subjective judgement by the patient was of 83%. Adverse effects, mostly minor, were observed in 64.8% of patients at least once along the period of follow-up and the most frequent of them was orbicularis oris paralysis (38.8%). There was no decrement in response when compared the first and the last injection recorded.

  5. Botulinum toxin: treatment of self-mutilation in patients with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Cristiam; Pellene, Alejandro; Micheli, Federico

    2008-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is a rare X-linked recessive disorder involving purine metabolism caused by the congenital absence of hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase. A characteristic feature of LNS is the appearance of intractable self-injurious behavior, usually in the form of severe lip and finger biting. The mechanism behind this severe self-mutilating behavior is unknown, and is one of the main challenges in the management of this condition. We here report the case of a 30-year-old man with a confirmed diagnosis of LNS who was successfully treated for self-mutilation of his lips with repeated botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injections in the facial perioral muscles. Our findings suggest that treatment with BTX-A helped reduce self-abusive behavior in this patient. Our case illustrates that BTX-A injections can be a useful therapeutic approach in patients with self-abusive behavior.

  6. Bilateral versus posterior injection of botulinum toxin in the internal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim. Comparison of bilateral versus posterior injection of botulinum toxin into the internal anal sphincter for treatment of acute anal fissure. Methods. Forty patients with acute anal fissure were randomly divided into two equal groups. Group 1 was treated by injecting 20 units of botulinum toxin into each side of the internal ...

  7. Cosmetic use of botulinum toxin type A in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Cheng

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Christine M ChengDepartment of Clinical Pharmacy, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Botulinum toxin type A injections are one of the most popular cosmetic procedures for diminishing the appearance of facial lines caused by habitual facial muscle contractions. Although the manufacturer’s labeling recommends botulinum toxin only for the treatment of glabellar lines among adults younger than 65 years of age, there is widespread use of the toxin for other cosmetic purposes and for patients who may be older than 65. Evidence-based safety and efficacy data on botulinum toxin use in elderly patients is limited. However, given the age-related skin changes and multifactorial causes of wrinkles in the elderly, as well as the higher risk for potential side effects due to concomitant diseases and medications, a careful risk-benefit assessment should precede the decision to use botulinum toxin in the elderly patient.Keywords: Botox Cosmetic, botulinum toxin, facial wrinkles, aging

  8. [Treatment of blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm and facial synkinesis with botulinum toxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhoff, J; Laskawi, R

    2012-06-01

    Involuntary facial movements are caused by various diseases. This article describes three of these diseases: blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm and facial synkinesis following facial nerve paralysis. The different etiologies, clinical symptoms and diagnosis are discussed. A common therapeutic approach for these three diseases is presented. Involuntary facial movements can be reduced or even completely suppressed by local injections of botulinum toxin.

  9. Sialorrhea: Anatomy, Pathophysiology and Treatment with Emphasis on the Role of Botulinum Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Jabbari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sialorrhea or excessive drooling is a major issue in children with cerebral palsy and adults with neurodegenerative disorders. In this review, we describe the clinical features, anatomy and physiology of sialorrhea, as well as a review of the world literature on medical treatment using Yale University’s search engine; including but not limited to Medline and Erasmus. Level of drug efficacy is defined according to the guidelines of American Academy of Neurology. Current medical management is unsatisfactory. Topical agents (scopolamine and tropicamide and oral agents (glyccopyrolate combined render a level B evidence (probably effective; however, this treatment is associated with troublesome side effects. Double-blind and placebo-controlled studies of botulinum toxin (BoNT provide a level A evidence for type B (two class I studies; effective and established and both overall and individual B level of evidence for OnabotulinumtoxinA (A/Ona and AbobotulinumtoxinA (A/Abo; these are probably effective. For IncobotulinumtoxinA (A/Inco, the level of evidence is U (insufficient due to lack of blinded studies. Side effects are uncommon; transient and comparable between the two types of toxin. A clinical note at the end of this review comments on fine clinical points. Administration of BoNTs into salivary glands is currently the most effective way of treating sialorrhea.

  10. Botulinum toxin A treatment for primary hemifacial spasm: a 10-year multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defazio, Giovanni; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Girlanda, Paolo; Vacca, Laura; Currà, Antonio; De Salvia, Roberto; Marchese, Roberta; Raineri, Roberto; Roselli, Francesco; Livrea, Paolo; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2002-03-01

    Botulinum toxin A (BTX) is the currently preferred symptomatic treatment for primary hemifacial spasm (HFS), but its long-term efficacy and safety are not known. To assess the long-term effectiveness and safety of BTX in the treatment of primary HFS. Retrospective review of medical records of the 1st and 10th years of treatment. Outpatient clinics of 4 Italian university centers in the Italian Movement Disorders Study Group. A series of 65 patients with primary HFS who had received BTX injections regularly for at least 10 years. Mean duration of improvement and quality of the effect induced by the preceding treatment (measured using a patient self-evaluation scale) and occurrence and duration of adverse effects in the 1st and 10th years of treatment. Using a mean BTX dose per treatment session similar to that used by others, we obtained a 95% response rate and an overall mean duration of improvement of 12.6 weeks during year 1. The effectiveness of BTX in relieving the symptoms of primary HFS, as measured by the response rate and average duration of improvement, remained unchanged in the 1st and 10th years. Patients needed statistically similar BTX doses in the 1st and 10th years. The rate of local adverse effects (including upper lid ptosis, facial weakness, and diplopia) diminished significantly in the 10th year of treatment. Treatment with BTX effectively induces sustained relief from symptoms of HFS in the long term, with only minimal and transient adverse reactions.

  11. Botulinum toxin in poststroke spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcakir, Suheda; Sivrioglu, Koncuy

    2007-06-01

    Poststroke hemiparesis, together with abnormal muscle tone, is a major cause of morbidity and disability. Although most hemiparetic patients are able to reach different ambulatory levels with rehabilitation efforts, upper and lower limb spasticity can impede activities of daily living, personal hygiene, ambulation and, in some cases, functional improvement. The goals of spasticity management include increasing mobility and range of motion, attaining better hygiene, improving splint wear and other functional activities. Conservative measures, such as positioning, stretching and exercise are essential in spasticity management, but alone often are inadequate to effectively control it. Oral antispastic medications often provide limited effects with short duration and frequent unwanted systemic side effects, such as weakness, sedation and dry mouth. Therefore, neuromuscular blockade by local injections have become the first choice for the treatment of focal spasticity, particularly in stroke patients. Botulinum toxin (BTX), being one of the most potent biological toxins, acts by blocking neuromuscular transmission via inhibiting acetylcholine release. Currently, focal spasticity is being treated successfully with BTX via injecting in the spastic muscles. Two antigenically distinct serotypes of BTX are available on the market as type A and B. Clinical studies of BTX used for spastic hemiplegic patients are reviewed in this article in two major categories, upper and lower limb applications. This review addresses efficacy in terms of outcome measures, such as muscle tone reduction and functional outcome, as well as safety issues. Application modifications of dose, dilutions, site of injections and combination therapies with BTX injections are also discussed.

  12. Systematic review of adjunct therapies to improve outcomes following botulinum toxin injection for treatment of limb spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Patricia Branco; Finlayson, Heather; Sudol, Malgorzata; O'Connor, Russell

    2016-06-01

    To determine the quality of evidence from randomized controlled trials on the efficacy of adjunct therapies following botulinum toxin injections for limb spasticity. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials electronic databases were searched for English language human studies from 1980 to 21 May 2015. Randomized controlled trials assessing adjunct therapies postbotulinum toxin injection for treatment of spasticity were included. Of the 268 studies screened, 17 met selection criteria. Two reviewers independently assessed risk of bias using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale and graded according to Sackett's levels of evidence. Ten adjunct therapies were identified. Evidence suggests that adjunct use of electrical stimulation, modified constraint-induced movement therapy, physiotherapy (all Level 1), casting and dynamic splinting (both Level 2) result in improved Modified Ashworth Scale scores by at least 1 grade. There is Level 1 and 2 evidence that adjunct taping, segmental muscle vibration, cyclic functional electrical stimulation, and motorized arm ergometer may not improve outcomes compared with botulinum toxin injections alone. There is Level 1 evidence that casting is better than taping, taping is better than electrical stimulation and stretching, and extracorporeal shock wave therapy is better than electrical stimulation for outcomes including the Modified Ashworth Scale, range of motion and gait. All results are based on single studies. There is high level evidence to suggest that adjunct therapies may improve outcomes following botulinum toxin injection. No results have been confirmed by independent replication. All interventions would benefit from further study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Botulinum Toxin Treatment on Upper Limb Function in School Age Children With Bilateral Spastic Cerebral Palsy: One Year Follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jee Sun; Lee, Kyu Bum; Lee, Yu Ryun; Choi, You Nam; Park, Chul Woo; Park, Sang Duck; Jung, Dong Hwa; Lee, Chul Sang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To prospectively investigate the long-term effects of botulinum toxin treatment on the upper limb function and performance of school age children with spastic bilateral cerebral palsy, who have limitations in performing activities of daily living and school activities, due to spasticity of the upper extremities. Methods Botulinum type A toxin (BoNT-A) was injected into 24 spastic upper limbs of 15 children. We used a Modified Ashworth Scale and a Modified Tardieu Scale for the evalu...

  14. Factors that influence the urodynamic results of botulinum toxin in the treatment of neurogenic hyperactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Martín, P; Vírseda-Chamorro, M; Salinas Casado, J; Gómez-Rodríguez, A; Esteban-Fuertes, M

    2015-05-01

    To determine the urodynamic efficacy and factors that influence the urodynamic results of treatment of neurogenic detrusor hyperactivity with intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). A retrospective study was conducted with a cohort of 70 patients composed of 40 men and 30 women with stable SCI (mean age, 39 ± 13.3 years) who underwent an intradetrusor injection of 300 IUs of BTX-A. A urodynamic study was conducted prior to the injection and 6 ± 4.3 months after the treatment. New urodynamic studies were subsequently performed up to an interval of 16 ± 12.2 months. The BTX-A significantly increased (p treatment and lesion age showed no influence in terms of the increase in bladder capacity. The indwelling urinary catheter (IUC) was the only statistically significant negative factor. The urodynamic effect of BTX-A is maintained for a considerable time interval. The IUC negatively influences the result of the treatment. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Botulinum toxin type a for the treatment of spasticity in children with cerebral palsy

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    Dimitrijević Lidija

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Cerebral palsy (CP is the most common physical disability in childhood. Children have problems with motor functions as a result of limbs spasticity, which leads to severe contractures and limbs deformity. There is a growing interest in the therapeutic role of botulinum toxin type A (BTA in CP. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of BTA on spasticity, active range of motion and functional motor outcomes in children with CP. Methods. This study included 42 children of both sexes, aged 2−6 years, with spastic CP, divided into two groups: group I (21 child treated with BTA and physical therapy, and group II (21 child treated with physical therapy only. The following parameters were analyzed: spasticity; active range of motion of the hip, knee and ankle, and functional motor outcome. These parameters measurements were carried out four times in both groups: before the treatment, three, eight and 16 weeks after the beginning of the treatment. The obtained results were statistically processed and compared. Results. There was no evidence of any significant difference between the groups before the treatment. After eight weeks there was a remarkable difference concerning spasticity reducing on behalf of the group I (group I - 0.76±0.51 vs. II group - 2.17±0.64; p < 0.0001. There was statistically significant difference concerning active range of motion increasing on behalf of the group I (hip abduction: group I - 44.37±1.130 vs. group II - 32.61±8,070, p < 0,01; knee extension: group I - 0,77±1.820 vs. II group - 14.99±7.610, p < 0.01; dorsiflexion of the foot: group I - 11.50±6.080 vs. group II - 8.98±7.850, p < 0,01. A statistically significant difference was found after 16 weeks in functional motor outcome as well, on behalf of the group I: functional motor abilities level in the group I was 1.86 vs. 2.71 in the group II, p < 0.05. Conclusion. Botulinum toxin type A application leads to an important spasticity

  16. The use of botulinum toxin as a way of treatment for gingival smile: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Brum, Cristiane Romani Pedro Antônio; Coleta, Roberto Dela; Lunardi, Nadia; Boeck, Eloisa Marcantonio; Pizzol, Karina Eiras Dela Coleta

    2016-01-01

    Gingival smile is defined as excessive gum exposition. Its etiology may be related to several factors, among them a maxillary vertical excess, superior dentoalveolar protrusion, changed passive extrusion and or eruption of anterior-superior teeth and hyperactivity of superior lip lift muscle.  In cases in which the etiological factor is from muscle, the use of Botulinum toxin typo A (BTX-A) should be indicated. To highlight the benefits obtained with therapeutic use of this substance, the aut...

  17. Ultrasound and Electromyography Guidance for Injection of the Longus Colli With Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Cervical Dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Stephen K; Odderson, Ib R

    2016-09-01

    Cervical dystonia, also called spasmodic torticollis, is a painful condition in which neck muscles contract involuntarily, and may cause abnormal head position or movements. The primary (or first line of) treatment of cervical dystonia is chemodenervation with injection of botulinum toxin into the affected muscles. We report a case of a young man with idiopathic cervical dystonia who developed anterocollis (forward flexion of the neck) not responsive to prior scalene and sternocleidomastoid muscle injections. To safely access the deeper cervical musculature, ultrasound (US) was used in conjunction with electromyography, to inject the longus colli muscles bilaterally. The patient responded well and had no complications. The longus colli has been reported to be injected using electromyography, fluoroscopy, computed tomography, and, less frequently, US. We propose that US guidance is an excellent technique for botulinum toxin injection, especially for deep cervical muscles such as the longus colli.

  18. A prospective study of the use of botulinum toxin injections in the treatment of Raynaud's syndrome associated with scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, L; Dhaliwal, K; Butler, P E

    2014-10-01

    Raynaud's syndrome contributes to the pain, paraesthesia, ulceration, and gangrene of scleroderma. Botulinum toxin has been shown to improve digital perfusion in patients with Raynaud's. This is the first study to objectively assess hand function following this treatment in patients with scleroderma. Twenty patients were treated with 100 units of botulinum toxin injected into the hand. An assessment of hand function and symptoms was performed prior to injection and then 8-12 weeks later. The outcomes assessed were change in pain, appearance, cold intolerance, pinch and power grip, ranges of movement, and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score. In total, 80% of patients reported an overall improvement in their symptoms, reduction in pain, and improved DASH score and 65% reported improvement in cold intolerance. Overall, 90% showed an improvement in pinch grip and 65% an improvement in power grip. Objective parameters were statistically significantly improved; however, subjective outcomes only showed a trend. We have found botulinum toxin to be an effective treatment for Raynaud's syndrome secondary to scleroderma. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. Botulinum toxin: mechanisms of action

    OpenAIRE

    Dirk Dressler; Fereshte Adib Saberi; Egberto Reis Barbosa

    2005-01-01

    This review describes therapeutically relevant mechanisms of action of botulinum toxin (BT). BT's molecular mode of action includes extracellular binding to glycoproteine structures on cholinergic nerve terminals and intracellular blockade of the acetylcholine secretion. BT affects the spinal stretch reflex by blockade of intrafusal muscle fibres with consecutive reduction of Ia/II afferent signals and muscle tone without affecting muscle strength (reflex inhibition). This mechanism allows fo...

  20. Treatment of hemifacial spasm with botulinum toxin type a: effective, long lasting and well tolerated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Pierre Mette Batisti

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hemifacial spasm (HFS is a common movement disorder characterized by involuntary tonic or clonic contractions of the muscles innervated by the facial nerve. Objective To evaluate the long-term effect of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A in the treatment of HFS. Methods A retrospective analysis of patients treated at the Movement Disorders Outpatient Clinic in the Neurology Service, Hospital de Clínicas, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, from 2009 to 2013 was carried out. A total of 550 BTX-A injections were administered to 100 HFS patients. Results Mean duration of improvement following each injection session was 3.1 months, mean latency to detection of improvement was 7.1 days and mean success rate was 94.7%. Patients were evaluated at an interval of 5.8 months after each application. Adverse effects, which were mostly minor, were observed in 37% of the patients at least once during follow-up. The most frequent was ptosis (35.1%. Conclusion Treatment of HFS with BTX-A was effective, sustainable and safe and had minimal, well-tolerated side effects.

  1. Treatment of hemifacial spasm with botulinum toxin type a: effective, long lasting and well tolerated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batisti, Jean Pierre Mette; Kleinfelder, Alais Daiane Fadini; Galli, Natália Bassalobre; Moro, Adriana; Munhoz, Renato Puppi; Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the long-term effect of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in the treatment of HFS. A retrospective analysis of patients treated at the Movement Disorders Outpatient Clinic in the Neurology Service, Hospital de Clínicas, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, from 2009 to 2013 was carried out. A total of 550 BTX-A injections were administered to 100 HFS patients. Mean duration of improvement following each injection session was 3.1 months, mean latency to detection of improvement was 7.1 days and mean success rate was 94.7%. Patients were evaluated at an interval of 5.8 months after each application. Adverse effects, which were mostly minor, were observed in 37% of the patients at least once during follow-up. The most frequent was ptosis (35.1%). Treatment of HFS with BTX-A was effective, sustainable and safe and had minimal, well-tolerated side effects.

  2. [Botulinum toxin therapy for spasticity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masakado, Yoshihisa

    2014-09-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) administered as an adjunct to other interventions for spasticity can act as a useful and effective therapeutic tool for treating patients disabled by spasticity. Presence of other non-reflex motor disorders (muscle stiffness, shortness, and contracture) can complicate the clinical course and disturb rehabilitative process of patients with spasticity. Treatment of spasticity using BTX can improve paralysis by correcting muscular imbalance that follows these diseases. In patients with chronic severe spasticity, we also have to address unique and difficult-to-treat clinical conditions such as abnormal posture and movement disorders. The effectiveness of BTX in treating some of these conditions is discussed. Because patients with neurological disabilities can show complex dysfunctions, specific functional limitations, goals, and expected outcomes of treatment should be evaluated and discussed with the patient, family members, and caregivers, prior to initiating BTX therapy. BTX therapy might improve not only care, passive function, but also motor functions in these patients by supplementing intensive rehabilitation with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct-current stimulation, peripheral electrical stimulation, muscle stretching, and other rehabilitation strategies.

  3. [Advantages of combined therapies in cosmetic medicine for the treatment of face aging: botulinum toxin, fillers and mesotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braccini, F; Dohan Ehrenfest, D M

    2010-01-01

    Non surgical cosmetic medicine procedures for the face are developing considerably, as they deliver good results using simple, non invasive, atraumatic and reproducible techniques. Aesthetic mesotherapy, also known as anti-aging mesotherapy, uses intra-dermal injections of a nutritive and moisturizing solution to improve brightness, skin hydration and tonus, and also smooth out superficial wrinkles. Subcutaneous filler injections enable to fill wrinkles and folds; by using high density products it is also able to provide genuine facial volumetric reconstruction. Finally, botulinum toxin acts by reducing certain muscle contractions to smooth out expression lines and folds induced by facial dynamics. In this article, we explore the concept of combined therapy and describe our experience associating anti-aging mesotherapy (NCTF-135HA, Filorga, Paris, France), hyaluronic acid based fillers (X-HA3 and X-HA-Volume, Filorga, Paris, France) and botulinum toxin (Vistabel, Allergan, Irvine CA, USA). A therapy combining anti-aging mesotherapy, botulinum toxin and filler injections, offers full treatment of the 3 biological levels of the covering tissues. This non-invasive therapeutic strategy brings patient satisfaction through a global approach to facial aging.

  4. Botulinum toxin A for the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in multiple sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Deffontaines-Rufin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO is common in patients who suffer from multiple sclerosis (MS. When the usual pharmacological treatment fails, botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A injections can be proposed. The safety and efficacy of this treatment are already well known, but only a few studies focus on its use in patients with MS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-one patients with MS underwent their first BTX-A injection for refractory NDO. They had clinical and urodynamic cystometry assessment before and three months after injection. The patients were divided in three groups according to treatment efficacy: full success (total urinary continence, no overactive detrusor, improvement, or total failure (urge incontinence and overactive detrusor. RESULTS: 77% of the patients had clinical improvement or full success of the treatment with a reduction of their urgency and incontinence. Significant urodynamic improvement after treatment was shown on different parameters: volume at first involuntary bladder contraction (p = 0.0000001, maximum cystometric capacity (p = 0.0035, maximum detrusor pressure (p = 0.0000001. 46% of the patients were in the "full success" group. 31% of the patients had a partial improvement. 23% of the patients had no efficacy of the treatment. Duration of MS was a predictive factor of treatment failure (p = 0.015. CONCLUSIONS: Despite that a full success was obtained in 46% of the cases, BTX-A injection therapy failed to treat refractory NDO in 23% of patients suffering from MS. Duration of the disease was a predictive factor for an inefficient treatment. The injection therapy should be considered as soon as oral anticholinergic drugs fail to reduce NDO.

  5. Facial asymmetry in patients with hemifacial spasm before and after botulinum toxin A treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Libin; Pan, Yougui; Zhang, Xiaolong; Hu, Yong; Cai, Li; Nie, Zhiyu; Pan, Lizhen; Li, Bing; He, Yijing; Jin, Lingjing

    2016-11-01

    Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) injection is one of the most widely used methods for hemifacial spasm (HFS) with high efficacy in controlling spasm. However, it is still unknown if esthetic symmetry could be desired as the spasm was controlled by BoNT-A therapy. The purpose of this study is to clarify the facial asymmetric characteristics of HFS patients and if the asymmetry could be amended by BoNT-A injection in the abnormal side. In this prospective analysis, HFS patients were enrolled, who received hemifacial BoNT-A injection and completed follow-up at weeks 2-4. Self-reported improvement and negative influence of facial asymmetry in social life were documented. Facial asymmetry was assessed by the Sunnybrook facial grading system (SFGS) and a new scale created by our clinic-the Symmetry Scale for Hemifacial Spasm (SSHS). Thirty-eight patients were eligible for analysis. Among them, 34 patients (89 %) had marked improvement in spasm after BoNT-A injection. After BoNT-A injection, SFGS showed an improvement of synkinesis (p = 0.01). And SSHS showed an amelioration of resting symmetry in lower face after treatment (p spasm and synkinesis of HFS and improved resting symmetry in lower face, but facial symmetry of voluntary movement deteriorated after hemifacial BoNT-A injection.

  6. Intragastric injection of botulinum toxin A for the treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittermair, Reinhard; Keller, Christian; Geibel, John

    2007-06-01

    Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) is a powerful and long-acting inhibitor of muscular contractions in both striated and smooth muscles. Hypothetically, BTX-A should inhibit the acetylcholine-mediated peristalsis, which is mainly responsible for gastric motility, and thereby induce slowed gastric emptying, earlier satiety and weight loss. The aim of this study was to observe the effects of endoscopic intragastric injections of BTX-A in obese patients. After approval by the University Ethics Committee, 10 female patients with class I obesity (body mass index 30-35) were double-blind randomized into 2 groups (BTX-A and 0.9% Saline). In Group 1, 200 U BTX-A were injected endoscopically into the antrum and the distal gastric body. In Group 2, 0.9% saline was injected endoscopically into the antrum and the distal gastric body. Body weight and feeling of satiety were recorded monthly over a period of 6 months. Both groups (BTX-A and 0.9% Saline) showed no significant weight reduction (P>0.05). One patient in Group 1 and two patients in Group 2 reported a feeling of early satiety. No adverse effects related to BTX-A or complications resulting from the endoscopic procedure were observed. Intragastric injection of BTX-A for the treatment of obesity does not seem to reduce body weight.

  7. Long-term follow-up of bilateral botulinum toxin injections versus bilateral recessions of the medial rectus muscles for treatment of infantile esotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursoy, Huseyin; Basmak, Hikmet; Sahin, Afsun; Yildirim, Nilgun; Aydin, Yasemin; Colak, Ertugrul

    2012-06-01

    To compare long-term outcomes of botulinum toxin A injection with incisional surgery for the management of infantile esotropia. Medical records of infants muscle recessions (surgery group) were reviewed. Minimum follow-up was 48 months, and patients with accommodative esotropia or inferior oblique muscle overaction were excluded. Success was defined as alignment with 10(Δ) of orthophoria without surgery (botulinum group) or without reoperation (surgery group) and compared by the use of an adjusted odds ratio (aOR). The record review identified a total of 51 patients, with 25 in the botulinum group and 26 in the surgery group. Median pretreatment deviation was similar in the botulinum and surgery groups (40(Δ) vs 45(Δ); P = 0.37), but median age at treatment was earlier in the botulinum group (10 vs 12.5 months; P = 0.01). The mean number of injections in successfully treated botulinum group patients was 1.4. The success rate was similar in the botulinum (68%) and surgery (77%) groups (aOR = 0.87, P = 0.87). The median follow-up time was longer in the botulinum group (84 vs 75 months; P = 0.02). Gross stereopsis was demonstrable in 10 of 15 patients in the botulinum group and 9 of 13 in the surgery group (aOR = 3.6, P = 0.46). There was no difference in binocular alignment with botulinum toxin versus surgical treatment. Botulinum toxin injection may be considered a primary treatment for infantile esotropia. Copyright © 2012 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cosmetic Effect of Botulinum Toxin In Focal Hyperhydrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperhydrosis of axillae, palm and sole is not a very uncommon problem. It leads to great embarrassment and considerable emotional stress to the individuals. Botulinum toxins prevent the release of acetylcholine at nerve terminals, therefore, reduces sweat secretion. Six patients of axillary and 4 patients of palmer and planter hyperhydrosis were treated with botulinum toxin. All patients experienced relatively satisfactory reduction of hyperhydrosis for period ranging between 4-7 months. No adverse effects were observed. Botulinum toxin therefore can be considered as an effective treatment in focal hyperhydrosis.

  9. Best Clinical Practice in Botulinum Toxin Treatment for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Strobl

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A is considered a safe and effective therapy for children with cerebral palsy (CP, especially in the hands of experienced injectors and for the majority of children. Recently, some risks have been noted for children with Gross Motor Classification Scale (GMFCS of IV and the risks are substantial for level V. Recommendations for treatment with BoNT-A have been published since 1993, with continuous optimisation and development of new treatment concepts. This leads to modifications in the clinical decision making process, indications, injection techniques, assessments, and evaluations. This article summarises the state of the art of BoNT-A treatment in children with CP, based mainly on the literature and expert opinions by an international paediatric orthopaedic user group. BoNT-A is an important part of multimodal management, to support motor development and improve function when the targeted management of spasticity in specific muscle groups is clinically indicated. Individualised assessment and treatment are essential, and should be part of an integrated approach chosen to support the achievement of motor milestones. To this end, goals should be set for both the long term and for each injection cycle. The correct choice of target muscles is also important; not all spastic muscles need to be injected. A more focused approach needs to be established to improve function and motor development, and to prevent adverse compensations and contractures. Furthermore, the timeline of BoNT-A treatment extends from infancy to adulthood, and treatment should take into account the change in indications with age.

  10. [Costs and efficacy of type A botulinum toxin for the treatment of essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasalvia, Cintia Gomes Galvão; Pereira, Luciano de Sousa; da Cunha, Marcos Carvalho; Kitadai, Silvia Prado Smit

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the costs and efficacy of type A botulinum toxin in the treatment of essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. Pacients with essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm had their files analyzed. All patients were treated with type A botulinum toxin (Dysport) between April 2002 and May 2004 at the Oculoplastic Clinics of "Santa Casa de São Paulo". Twenty-seven patients presented essential blepharospasm and 23 presented hemifacial spasm. Information about the patient's degree of satisfaction after treatment, complaints and personal costs were recorded by a questionnaire, and information about the costs of Dysport treatment were obtained at the administration department of "Santa Casa de São Paulo". Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. 1- The annual treatment costs were R Dollars 1,239.32 for essential blepharospasm and R Dollars 661.72 for hemifacial spasm. 2- The patient's annual costs were R Dollars 145.48 for essential blepharospasm and R Dollars 6.07 for hemifacial spasm. 3- The hospital's annual costs for the treatment were R Dollars 1,095.84 for essential blepharospasm and R Dollars 535.65 for hemifacial spasm. 4- Dysport treatment is successful in both essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. The costs of essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm treatment with Dysport are high, mainly because of the toxin price. On economic analysis of health, we can conclude that this procedure has an excellent cost-benefit ratio.

  11. Botulinum toxin — therapeutic effect in cosmetology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrison A.V.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the data from published literatures and the research works conducted by the authors about mechanisms of action of botulinum toxin and its use in the practical medicine (particularly in dermatology and cosmetology. Indications and contraindications of botulinum toxin use in cosmetology are also considered in this work.

  12. Botulinum toxin — therapeutic effect in cosmetology

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison A.V.; Bocharova Y.M.; Morrison V.V.

    2016-01-01

    This review presents the data from published literatures and the research works conducted by the authors about mechanisms of action of botulinum toxin and its use in the practical medicine (particularly in dermatology and cosmetology). Indications and contraindications of botulinum toxin use in cosmetology are also considered in this work.

  13. Botulinum toxin in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Pratibha; Ray, Munni

    2004-12-01

    Botulinum toxin is a neurotoxin that blocks the synaptic release of acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve terminals mainly at the neuromuscular junction, resulting in irreversible loss of motor end plates. It is being widely tried as a targeted antispasticity treatment in children with cerebral palsy. A number of studies have shown that it reduces spasticity and increases the range of motion and is particularly useful in cases with dynamic contractures. However improvement in function has not been convincingly demonstrated. It is an expensive mode of therapy and the injections need to be repeated after 3-6 months. Whereas Botulinum toxin can be a valuable adjunct in select cases, it should not be projected as a panacea for children with spastic cerebral palsy.

  14. Blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm: long-term treatment with botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil Polo, C; Rodríguez Sanz, M F; Berrocal Izquierdo, N; Castrillo Sanz, A; Gutiérrez Ríos, R; Zamora García, M I; Mendoza Rodríguez, A; Duarte García-Luis, J

    2013-04-01

    Our purpose is to describe the demographic, clinical and therapeutic characteristics of patients with blepharospasm (BS) and hemifacial spasm (HFS) in treatment with botulinum toxin type A (BtA). Retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed with BS or HFS and treated with BtA in the Neurology Department at Complejo Asistencial de Segovia between March 1991 and December 2009. Different variables were collected from 34 patients with BS and 55 with HFS, of whom 44.1% and 32.7% respectively had been undergoing treatment with BtA for more than 10 years. Elapsed time from symptom onset to the first visit was 24 months in the BS group and 59.7 months in the HFS group. Diagnosis was given on the first visit for 76.5% of the BS patients and 90.7% of the HFS patients. Patients were referred by their primary care centres in 34.6% of the cases with BS and in 77.6% of the cases with HFS. The most commonly used BtA preparation was BOTOX(®) in both groups, and there were no cases of primary or secondary resistance. The median dose of BtA was raised gradually in both groups, and the increase was statistically significant during the early years of treatment. The most common side effect was ptosis (47.1% in BS, 32.5% in HFS). BS and HFS are the most common facial movement disorders. The demographic and clinical characteristics and therapeutic findings from this study show that treatment with BtA is both effective and safe over the long term. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Botulinum Toxin Injection for Treatment of Chronic Anal Fissure: Is There Any Dose-Dependent Efficiency? A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkiewicz, Adam; Francuzik, Wojciech; Krokowicz, Lukasz; Studniarek, Adam; Ledwosiński, Witold; Paszkowski, Jacek; Drews, Michal; Banasiewicz, Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    Chronic anal fissure (CAF) is a linear split of the anoderm. The minimally invasive management of CAF such as botulinum toxin (BT) injection is recommended. However, the exact efficient dose of BT, number of injections per session and the injection sites are still debatable. The aim of this analysis was to assess the dose-dependent efficiency of botulinum toxin injection for CAF. PubMed and Web of Science databases were searched for terms: "anal fissure" AND "botulinum toxin." Studies published between October 1993 and May 2015 were included and had to meet the following criteria: (1) chronic anal fissure, (2) prospective character of the study, (3) used simple BT injection without any other interventions and (4) no previous treatment with BT. A total of 1577 patients from 34 prospective studies used either Botox or Dysport formulations were qualified for this meta-analysis. A total number of BT units per session ranged from 5 to 150 IU, whereas the efficiency across analyzed studies ranged from 33 to 96 %. Surprisingly, we did not observe a dose-dependent efficiency (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, ρ = 0.060; p = 0.0708). Moreover, there were no BT dose-dependent postoperative complications or fecal incontinence and significant difference in healing rates compared BT injection into the anal sphincter muscles. BT injection has been an accepted method for the management of CAF. Surprisingly, there is no dose-dependent efficiency, and the postoperative incontinence rate is not related to the BT dosage regardless the type of formulation of botulinum neurotoxin used. Moreover, no difference in healing rate has been observed in regard to the site and number of injections per session.

  16. Potential Effect of Liposomes and Liposome-Encapsulated Botulinum Toxin and Tacrolimus in the Treatment of Bladder Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J. Janicki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bladder drug delivery via catheter instillation is a widely used treatment for recurrence of superficial bladder cancer. Intravesical instillation of liposomal botulinum toxin has recently shown promise in the treatment of overactive bladder and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, and studies of liposomal tacrolimus instillations show promise in the treatment of hemorrhagic cystitis. Liposomes are lipid vesicles composed of phospholipid bilayers surrounding an aqueous core that can encapsulate hydrophilic and hydrophobic drug molecules to be delivered to cells via endocytosis. This review will present new developments on instillations of liposomes and liposome-encapsulated drugs into the urinary bladder for treating lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  17. [Botulinum toxin in the treatment of adult spasticity. An interdisciplinary German 10-point consensus 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissel, J; auf dem Brinke, M; Hecht, M; Herrmann, C; Huber, M; Mehnert, S; Reuter, I; Schramm, A; Stenner, A; van der Ven, C; Winterholler, M; Kupsch, A

    2011-04-01

    Spasticity is one of the major causes of functional impairment in adults with lesions of the central nervous system. For instance, approximately 30% of post-stroke patients suffer from different degrees of spasticity with possible consecutive impairments. Numerous studies or meta-analyses showed that local injections of botulinum toxin in spastic muscles lead to dose-dependent reduction in muscle tone and improvement of passive movements (e. g. facilitated care), especially following repeated injections.However, country-specific regulations and patient-remote administration in German health care often do not allow adequate provision of this therapy. Thus, the present consensus statement based on the EBM analyses of the published international literature tries to highlight recent advances and the standard in the field of local spasticity treatment, aiming to facilitate communication between the decision makers and German reimbursement institutions in health care. Prior to initiation of BoNT-A injections, patient-oriented goals should be identified in a multiprofessional context to assure realistic goals for this specific treatment and patient expectations. In Germany for the treatment of focal spasticity following stroke three products have been approved: Botox® (Pharm Allergan, Ettlingen), Dysport® (Ipsen Pharma, Ettlingen) and Xeomin® (Merz Pharma, Frankfurt/Main). For all preparations safety has been repeatedly shown. Functional improvements have also been illustrated for selected patients concerning hand/arm function and gait. The dose per muscle and the selection of muscles to be injected have to be individualized according to the patient's symptoms and should be accompanied by modern neurorehabilitative therapies such as redression or repetitive activation of the injected and antagonistic muscles.

  18. Botulinum toxin injections for the treatment of hemifacial spasm over 16 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgun, Mine Hayriye; Yilmaz, Rezzak; Akin, Yusuf Alper; Mercan, Fatma Nazli; Akbostanci, Muhittin Cenk

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and side effects of botulinum toxin (BTX) in the treatment of hemifacial spasm (HFS). We also focused on the divergence between different injection techniques and commercial forms. We retrospectively evaluated 470 sessions of BTX injections administered to 68 patients with HFS. The initial time of improvement, duration and degree of improvement, and frequency and duration of adverse effects were analysed. Pretarsal and preseptal injections and Botox (Allergan, Irvine, CA, USA) and Dysport (Ipsen Biopharmaceuticals, Paris, France) brands were compared in terms of efficacy and side effects, accompanied by a review of papers which reported BTX treatment of HFS. An average of 34.5 units was used per patient. The first improvement was felt after 8 days and lasted for 14.8 weeks. Patients experienced a 73.7% improvement. In 79.7% of injections, no adverse effect was reported, in 4.9% erythema, ecchymosis, and swelling in the injection area, in 3.6% facial asymmetry, in 3.4% ptosis, in 3.2% diplopia, and in 2.3% difficulty of eye closure was detected. Patients reported 75% improvement on average after 314 sessions of pretarsal injections and 72.7% improvement after 156 sessions of preseptal injections (p=0.001). The efficacy and side effects of Botox and Dysport were similar. BTX is an effective and safe treatment option for HFS. No difference was determined between Botox and Dysport, and pretarsal injection is better than preseptal injection regarding the reported degree of improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Botulinum toxin injections for adults with overactive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, James B; Vincent, Michael; Herbison, G Peter; Wilson, David Iain; Wilson, Don

    2011-12-07

    Overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) is a common condition with a significant negative impact on quality of life characterised by urgency with or without urge incontinence, frequency and nocturia.  Intravesical botulinum toxin is being increasingly used to treat severe overactive bladder refractory to standard management.  An increasing body of literature is forming that supports this technique as effective, well tolerated, and safe.  This review is a substantial update of the 2007 review of the same title. The objective was to compare intravesical botulinum toxin with other treatments for neurogenic and idiopathic overactive bladder in adults. The hypothesis to be addressed were whether intravesical injection of botulinum toxin was better than placebo or no treatment; pharmacological and other non-pharmacological interventions; whether higher doses of botulinum toxin were better than lower doses; whether botulinum toxin in combination with other treatments was better than other treatments alone; whether one formulation of botulinum toxin is better than another; and whether one injection technique was better than another. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trials Register (searched 23 February 2010). The Register contains trials identified from MEDLINE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and handsearching of journals and conference proceedings. Additionally, all reference lists of selected trials and relevant review papers were searched. No limitations were placed on the searches. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of treatment for OAB in adults in which at least one management arm involved intravesical injection of botulinum toxin were included. Participants had either neurogenic OAB or idiopathic OAB with or without stress incontinence. Comparison interventions could include no intervention, placebo, lifestyle modification, bladder retraining, pharmacological treatments, surgery, bladder

  20. Clinical Practice: evidence-Based Recommendations for the Treatment of Cervical Dystonia with Botulinum Toxin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Contarino, Maria Fiorella; van den Dool, Joost; Balash, Yacov; Bhatia, Kailash; Giladi, Nir; Koelman, Johannes H.; Lokkegaard, Annemette; Marti, Maria J.; Postma, Miranda; Relja, Maja; Skorvanek, Matej; Speelman, Johannes D.; Zoons, Evelien; Ferreira, Joaquim J.; Vidailhet, Marie; Albanese, Alberto; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Cervical dystonia (CD) is the most frequent form of focal dystonia. Symptoms often result in pain and functional disability. Local injections of botulinum neurotoxin are currently the treatment of choice for CD. Although this treatment has proven effective and is widely applied worldwide, many

  1. A pilot study to investigate the combined use of Botulinum toxin type-a and ankle foot orthosis for the treatment of spastic foot in chronic hemiplegic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradon, Didier; Hutin, Emilie; Khadir, Simon; Taiar, Redha; Genet, François; Roche, Nicolas

    2011-10-01

    Botulinum toxin is commonly used to treat spastic equinus foot. This treatment seems to improve gait in hemiplegic patients when used alone or combined with an ankle-foot orthosis. However, the nature and effects of this improvement have until now rarely been studied. The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of a Botulinum toxin injection in the triceps surae of hemiplegic patients with equinus foot, used either alone or in combination with an ankle-foot orthosis, on the kinematics and dynamics of the paretic lower limb, and to determine the advantage of combining an ankle-foot orthosis with this pharmacological treatment. Patients were assessed using gait analysis to measure spatio-temporal, kinematic and dynamic parameters of the gait cycle before Botulinum toxin injection and then 3 and 6weeks after injection. Eight chronic hemiplegics following central nervous system lesion were included. Botulinum toxin injection led to an increase in velocity, peak ankle dorsiflexion during stance phase, and peak knee flexion during swing phase. It also resulted in an increased peak plantarflexion moment. Use of ankle-foot orthosis led to a specific increase in peak ankle dorsiflexion during swing phase and also increased peak plantarflexion moment. The results indicate that combined Botulinum toxin injection of the triceps surae and wearing an ankle-foot orthosis is more effective than the use of Botulinum toxin only. Use of an ankle-foot orthosis increases ankle dorsiflexion during the swing phase and does not reduce the benefits gained by the use of Botulinum toxin in stance phase. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of Botulinum toxin Type A: An arsenal in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmana B Rao; Rajashekar Sangur; S Pradeep

    2011-01-01

    An extremely effective way of preventing damage to and enhancing treatment of dental hard tissues and restorations would be to ′′de-programme′′ the muscles responsible for excessive destructive forces and other gnathological-related diseases. The new paradigm is the intramuscular injection of Botulinum toxin type A (BOTOX) into the affected muscles. It is a natural protein produced by anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium botulinum. The toxin inhibits the release of acetylcholine (ACH), a neurotra...

  3. Antibody-induced secondary treatment failure in a patient treated with botulinum toxin type A for glabellar frown lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stengel G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Gabriele Stengel, Eva Kristina Bee Hautarztpraxis Stengel and Bee, Münster, Germany Abstract: Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A preparations are widely used nonsurgical treatments for facial wrinkles. Higher doses of BTX-A are also used for therapeutic purposes in the treatment of conditions involving increased muscle tone, such as cervical dystonia. The phenomenon of antibody-induced treatment failure is well known in the therapeutic setting, but reports are also emerging following cosmetic use of BTX-A. We describe the case of a 41-year-old female nurse who developed secondary treatment failure during 6 years of BTX-A treatment for glabellar lines. After a good response to the first BTX-A injection, the intensity and duration of effect decreased after subsequent treatments. Antibody tests revealed a high titer of neutralizing anti-BTX-A antibodies. This case shows secondary treatment failure due to the production of neutralizing antibodies following administration of BTX-A formulations for cosmetic purposes and demonstrates that immunogenicity of BTX-A preparations is an important consideration, even in the cosmetic setting. Keywords: botulinum toxin type A, neutralizing antibodies, antibody-induced treatment failure

  4. Use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of chronic myofascial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Andrés, J; Cerda-Olmedo, G; Valía, J C; Monsalve, V; Lopez-Alarcón; Minguez, A

    2003-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is defined as acute or chronic pain with sensory or motor autonomic symptoms, referred from active myofascial triggering points with associated dysfunction. Previous studies have suggested the usefulness of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) in the treatment of MPS since it is capable of controlling muscular spasms, as well as other alternative mechanisms of action. To analyze the efficacy of BTX-A treatment and its effect on daily life activities assessing pain reduction using a visual analogue scale (VAS); degree of improvement in physical impairment and disability scoring in the Oswestry low back pain questionnaire; and psychologic status using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD), in patients suffering from MPS. An open-label interventional prospective trial was conducted in 77 patients diagnosed of refractory MPS (defined as the presence of muscle spasm with pain on mobilization or stretching, plus the existence of trigger points with associated referred pain), resistant to both conservative management and to physical therapy. The BTX-A dosages for the different muscles were chosen according to a standardized protocol. Electromyographic guidance was used to localize the motor end plate prior to injection in superficial muscles; while fluoroscopic guidance was employed to evidence intramyofascial spread of the contrast solution within deep muscles. The assessment of treatment efficacy was based on a pain VAS applied before enrollment, at 15, 30, and 90 days and upon completion of the study; the Lattinen test to establish a relationship between pain intensity and its corresponding impact on daily living; and the HAD scale to assess psychologic stress, performed both before treatment and at the end of the study; and the Oswestry Questionnaire was used to evaluate patients' ability to carry out daily life activities according to their degree of physical impairment and disability scores. The global analysis revealed a positive

  5. Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Myofascial Pain Syndromes Involving the Neck and Back: A Review from a Clinical Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Climent, José M.; Ta-Shen Kuan; Pedro Fenollosa; Francisco Martin-del-Rosario

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Botulinum toxin inhibits acetylcholine (ACh) release and probably blocks some nociceptive neurotransmitters. It has been suggested that the development of myofascial trigger points (MTrP) is related to an excess release of ACh to increase the number of sensitized nociceptors. Although the use of botulinum toxin to treat myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) has been investigated in many clinical trials, the results are contradictory. The objective of this paper is to identify sources o...

  6. [Advances in the research of mechanism in prevention and treatment of scar with botulinum toxin type A and its clinical application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y H; Liu, J Q; Xiao, D; Zhang, W; Hu, D H

    2017-04-20

    Scar is a common complication in wound healing process, and how to effectively prevent and treat it is a hot and difficult problem in burns and plastic surgery field. Botulinum toxin type A is a neurotoxin that has been widely and effectively used in the cosmetic surgery field such as anti-wrinkle and thin face. In recent years, botulinum toxin type A has been applied in prevention and treatment of scar, which causes a great concern. Nowadays, the relevant reports have gradually increased, and the mechanisms have been explored more deeply. This article aims to summarize the possible mechanisms and clinical reports on the prevention and treatment of scar by botulinum toxin type A to provide a new way for the prevention and treatment of scar after surgery.

  7. Epidemiologic Overview of Synkinesis in 353 Patients with Longstanding Facial Paralysis under Treatment with Botulinum Toxin for 11 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Alessandra Grassi; da Costa, Eduardo Fernandes; Ferreira, Marcus Castro; Remigio, Adelina Fatima do Nascimento; Moraes, Luciana Borsoi; Gemperli, Rolf

    2015-12-01

    Patients with longstanding facial paralysis often exhibit synkinesis. Few reports describe the prevalence and factors related to the development of synkinesis after facial paralysis. Botulinum toxin type A injection is an important adjunct treatment for facial paralysis-induced asymmetry and synkinesis. The authors assessed the clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of patients with sequelae of facial paralysis treated with botulinum toxin type A injections to evaluate the prevalence of synkinesis and related factors. A total of 353 patients (age, 4 to 84 years; 245 female patients) with longstanding facial paralysis underwent 2312 botulinum toxin type A injections during an 11-year follow-up. Doses used over the years, previous treatments (electrical stimulation, operations), and how they correlated to postparalysis and postreanimation synkinesis were analyzed. There was a significant association between cause and surgery. Most patients with facial paralysis caused by a congenital defect, trauma, or a tumor underwent reanimation. There were no sex- or synkinesis-related differences in the doses used, but the doses were higher in the reanimation group than in the no-surgery group. Synkinesis was found in 196 patients; 148 (41.9 percent) presented with postparalysis synkinesis (oro-ocular, oculo-oral) and 58 (16.4 percent) presented with postreanimation synkinesis. Ten patients presented with both types. This study determined the high prevalence (55.5 percent) of synkinesis in patients with longstanding facial paralysis. Postparalysis synkinesis was positively associated with infectious and idiopathic causes, electrical stimulation, facial nerve decompression, and no requirement for surgery. Postreanimation synkinesis was present in 28.2 percent of reanimated patients and was significantly associated with microsurgical flaps, transfacial nerve grafting, masseteric-facial anastomosis, and temporalis muscle transfers.

  8. Facial aesthetics: is botulinum toxin treatment effective and safe? A systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadhia, K; Walmsley, A D

    2009-09-12

    The use of botulinum toxin type A (BTA) in facial aesthetics for the treatment of wrinkles has recently become more popular as an alternative to surgical techniques. However, its true efficacy and potential adverse effects are still unclear. The primary objective of this study was to review the efficacy of BTA in facial aesthetics. A secondary objective was to determine whether there are any adverse effects associated with the procedure of using BTA in facial aesthetics. We conducted literature searches on Medline (1977 to January 2009), Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CENTRAL), EMBASE (1977 to January 2009) and CINAHL (1977 to January 2009). The search strategy also included reference lists of located articles and hand searching for randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We contacted authors of studies for further information where required. Randomised studies comparing BTA with placebo in facial aesthetics in a double-blind and crossover or parallel group design. Two reviewers independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. The area of face injected, assessment methods, outcome measures, duration of action of BTA and associated adverse effects were reviewed. A total of eleven RCTs involving 1,603 subjects were found, of which 1,203 were enrolled for treatment with BTA. The 11 trials were not directly comparable to each other due to differences in the areas of the face injected with BTA, length of study period, concentration of BTA used and outcome measures. The studies showed similar trends. The use of BTA showed improvements in facial wrinkles over placebo, with a peak effect reported at around one month and the effects lasting between 4-6 months. No studies reported any severe adverse effects. The incidence of blepharoptosis in glabellar lines treated with BTA was reported to be between 0-5.4%, and may be related to the technique of injection into the muscles. The incidence of other side-effects such as headache, pain at injection site and mild

  9. Botulinum toxin in hemifacial spasm: the challenge to assess the effect of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabbels, Bettina; Roggenkämper, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Hemifacial spasm is characterized by intermittent tonic or clonic contractions of the muscles supplied by the facial nerve. Although vision is less impaired than in patients with blepharospasm, the disease can impose significant psychosocial burden on patient's life. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is the well-established pharmacotherapy of choice, but evidence from controlled clinical trials is sparse. There is a broad variety of rating scales used in clinical studies with BoNT and obviously no consensus has been reached how to assess treatment outcome in hemifacial spasm. Clinical rating scales focusing on objective function were used in a couple of controlled studies with BoNT and were appropriate to discriminate between BoNTA and placebo. But it has not been shown that they would be sensitive enough to detect minor differences between several BoNT formulations. Although most of the clinical scales consist of a five-point rating, the descriptors for the ordinal numbers are not necessarily the same so that the results of different clinical studies are not comparable to each other. The main disadvantage of clinical scales is that they do not take into account patient's perspective of disability and impact on daily life. For this reason some clinical studies applied health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaires to assess efficacy, and one research group worked on the development of disease-specific tools. Although these HRQoL questionnaires have been validated and a good correlation to disease severity could be demonstrated, they are far from having become an established variable for efficacy assessment in hemifacial spasm trials. The challenge remains to establish tools which are appropriate to rate BoNT treatment effects in hemifacial spasm. Currently, it is virtually impossible to identify one rating scale which can cover all relevant aspects of the disorder. In consequence we recommend the implementation of a combination of different rating scales which address

  10. Botulinum Toxin Type A for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Neuro-Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Intiso

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a natural protective mechanism and has a warning function signaling imminent or actual tissue damage. Neuropathic pain (NP results from a dysfunction and derangement in the transmission and signal processing along the nervous system and it is a recognized disease in itself. The prevalence of NP is estimated to be between 6.9% and 10% in the general population. This condition can complicate the recovery from stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord lesions, and several neuropathies promoting persistent disability and poor quality of life. Subjects suffering from NP describe it as burning, itching, lancing, and numbness, but hyperalgesia and allodynia represent the most bothersome symptoms. The management of NP is a clinical challenge and several non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions have been proposed with variable benefits. Botulinum toxin (BTX as an adjunct to other interventions can be a useful therapeutic tool for the treatment of disabled people. Although BTX-A is predominantly used to reduce spasticity in a neuro-rehabilitation setting, it has been used in several painful conditions including disorders characterized by NP. The underlying pharmacological mechanisms that operate in reducing pain are still unclear and include blocking nociceptor transduction, the reduction of neurogenic inflammation by inhibiting neural substances and neurotransmitters, and the prevention of peripheral and central sensitization. Some neurological disorders requiring rehabilitative intervention can show neuropathic pain resistant to common analgesic treatment. This paper addresses the effect of BTX-A in treating NP that complicates frequent disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system such as spinal cord injury, post-stroke shoulder pain, and painful diabetic neuropathy, which are commonly managed in a rehabilitation setting. Furthermore, BTX-A has an effect in relief pain that may characterize less common neurological disorders

  11. Botulinum Toxin Type A for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Neuro-Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intiso, Domenico; Basciani, Mario; Santamato, Andrea; Intiso, Marta; Di Rienzo, Filomena

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a natural protective mechanism and has a warning function signaling imminent or actual tissue damage. Neuropathic pain (NP) results from a dysfunction and derangement in the transmission and signal processing along the nervous system and it is a recognized disease in itself. The prevalence of NP is estimated to be between 6.9% and 10% in the general population. This condition can complicate the recovery from stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord lesions, and several neuropathies promoting persistent disability and poor quality of life. Subjects suffering from NP describe it as burning, itching, lancing, and numbness, but hyperalgesia and allodynia represent the most bothersome symptoms. The management of NP is a clinical challenge and several non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions have been proposed with variable benefits. Botulinum toxin (BTX) as an adjunct to other interventions can be a useful therapeutic tool for the treatment of disabled people. Although BTX-A is predominantly used to reduce spasticity in a neuro-rehabilitation setting, it has been used in several painful conditions including disorders characterized by NP. The underlying pharmacological mechanisms that operate in reducing pain are still unclear and include blocking nociceptor transduction, the reduction of neurogenic inflammation by inhibiting neural substances and neurotransmitters, and the prevention of peripheral and central sensitization. Some neurological disorders requiring rehabilitative intervention can show neuropathic pain resistant to common analgesic treatment. This paper addresses the effect of BTX-A in treating NP that complicates frequent disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system such as spinal cord injury, post-stroke shoulder pain, and painful diabetic neuropathy, which are commonly managed in a rehabilitation setting. Furthermore, BTX-A has an effect in relief pain that may characterize less common neurological disorders including post

  12. Botulinum A toxin utilizations in obstetric palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atakan Aydin

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: We conclude that with the help of botulinum A toxin and physyotherapy, obstetrical palsy patient with cocontractions can significantly improve movements and may have less surgery. [Hand Microsurg 2012; 1(3.000: 89-94

  13. The use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of the consequences of bruxism on cervical spine musculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finiels, P J; Batifol, D

    2014-03-01

    Hypertonia and hyperactivity of masticatory muscles are involved in pain and contractions of the cervical spine musculature, but their pathophysiology remains nonetheless unknown and its treatment far to be codified. In this study, 8 patients, showing disabling posterior neck muscle contractures linked with bruxism were prospectively treated and followed for an average 15 months period, after having received Injections of botulinum toxin A essentially in masticatory muscles. Injections were made every 3 months, varying from 10 to 100 U Botox* by muscles, without administrating more than 300 U Botox* in the same patient. The angle of cervical lordosis were calculated on lateral sitting radiographs in neutral position, good results being considered to be achieved in the case of a 2 point diminution of VAS score as well as at least a 5° positive gain in the curve. 7 patients out of 8 showed a real improvement in their symptoms after an average of 3 injections, showing a decrease of 4.5 points on the VAS score and an average increment of 15° in cervical lordosis. Although the follow-up period of patients was relatively short and the sample quite small, the general impression, confirmed by the patients' experience, seems to suggest a potential place for the use of botulinum toxin amongst the array of treatments which can be offered in certain selected cases which associate bruxism and posterior cervical contractions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Drooling in Patients with Cerebral Palsy: The Effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin A Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Klochkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Drooling (sialorrhea is a complex medical and social problem of patients with cerebral palsy (CP. During the last decade many methods for drooling correction in CP are under active development.Aim: to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the first and repeated injections of botulinum toxin A (BTA for correcting drooling in children with CP.Methods. 13 children (2 years — 14 years 7 months with spastic forms of CP and drooling resistant to non-drug treatment. Drooling was evaluated with the Drooling Impact Scale — DIS before, 1, 3 and 6 months after the BTA injections. Parotid and submandibular salivary glands were injected under ultrasound control with Dysport — 1 group (5 children or Botox — 2 group (8 children. The total dose of Dysport for the all glands was 120–320 U (3,8–14,5 U/kg, Botox — 30–100 U (2,5–4,5 U/kg. The median of the basic DIS index was 77 (64–90 points in the first group and 58 (53–66 points in the second group.Results. One month after the BTA injections the DIS index decreased by 20 and more points in 6 (42,2% patients, by 10–19 points in 7 (53,8% children. There were no persistent side effects and no difference in the BTA effectiveness between the two groups. The mean decrease of DIS was 30% in both groups. 3 months after the injections 2 patients (15,4% kept 20 points decrease of the DIS index, 6 patients (46,2% demonstrated 10 points decrease. 6 months after injections nearly all patients returned to the basic level of drooling. Repeated injections of the BTA demonstrated the same tendency and duration of the DIS changes. There was no significant correlation between the GMFCS level and the drooling intensity.Conclusion. BTA injections into salivary glands of children with CP was an effective and safe method of drooling correction with the maximum effect taking place 2–4 weeks after the injections and a stable effect — 3 months after the injections.

  15. Factors associated with quality of life in hemifacial spasm and blepharospasm during long-term treatment with botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setthawatcharawanich, Suwanna; Sathirapanya, Pornchai; Limapichat, Kitti; Phabphal, Kanitpong

    2011-11-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the impact of hemifacial spasm (HFS) and blepharospasm (BS) on quality of life (QOL) during long-term treatment with botulinum toxin injections. Fifty-three patients with HFS and 32 patients with BS as well as two healthy age- and sex-matched control groups were included in the study. All participants independently completed the disease-specific questionnaire for QOL, the HFS-30, and the Thai Depression Inventory, and also provided a peak improvement score assessment. The disease severity in both patient groups revealed mild functional impairment. The scores of HFS-30 in HFS patients (four of 8 subscales) and BS patients (3 of 8 subscales) were significantly higher than the control groups. In both HFS and BS, depression scores were positively correlated with the HFS-30 scores, while peak improvement and educational level were inversely correlated with the HFS-30 scores. Patients with BS were more affected in Mobility and Activities of Daily Living than HFS patients. Both HFS and BS affect QOL both physically and mentally despite clinical improvement with botulinum toxin. Depression and peak improvement after injection were associated with the level of QOL.

  16. Serial Casting as an Adjunct to Botulinum Toxin Type A Treatment in Children With Cerebral Palsy and Spastic Paraparesis With Scissoring of the Lower Extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Alper I; Demiryürek, Abdullah T

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether combination therapy of serial casting and botulinum toxin type A injection can further enhance the effects of botulinum toxin type A in children with cerebral palsy with scissoring of both legs. This study was a prospective and randomized trial. The children were divided into 2 groups, one of which received serial casting after botulinum toxin type A (n = 40), and the other which only received botulinum toxin type A (n = 40). Serial casting started 3 weeks after the botulinum toxin type A. Both groups received physiotherapy. Groups were assessed at baseline then compared at 6 and 12 weeks following the intervention. Significant improvements in Gross Motor Function Measure-66 and Caregiver Health Questionnaire were recorded in both groups ( P casting group ( P casting after botulinum toxin type A can enhance the benefits of botulinum toxin type A in children with cerebral palsy.

  17. Recurrent contact granuloma: experience with excision and botulinum toxin injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Taner; Süslü, Nilda; Atay, Gamze; Özer, Serdar; Günaydin, Riza Önder; Bajin, Münir Demir

    2013-06-01

    Contact granuloma is a difficult-to-treat laryngeal disorder associated with vocal abuse, habitual throat clearing, and laryngopharyngeal reflux. It has a high propensity for persistence and recurrence despite many treatment alternatives. To present our experience with recurrent contact granuloma treated with microlaryngoscopic excision and botulinum toxin injection. Case series. The follow-up period had a mean (range) of 41 (11-88) months. Tertiary referral university clinic. Twenty patients with recurrent, grade 3 and grade 4 contact granuloma whose lesion was excised at least once after failure of conservative treatments. Microlaryngoscopic excision and botulinum toxin type A injection into the region of the bilateral thyroarytenoid and lateral cricoarytenoid muscles. Disappearance of contact granuloma. Seventeen patients were cured of their contact granuloma. Three patients experienced recurrences: 2 received botulinum toxin injection only as outpatients and recovered. The other patient required reexcision and reinjection under general anesthesia. These 3 patients were free of granuloma at their last follow-up. After failed conservative treatment, microlaryngoscopic excision and botulinum toxin type A injection is successful in the treatment of recurrent contact granuloma. Removing recurrent granulomas can result in a low recurrence rate if botulinum toxin type A is added at the time of removal.

  18. Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin injections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Khatkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key conditions for achieving the desirable result during botulinum toxin therapy for muscular dystonia, spasticity, and other diseases accompanied by spasm, pain, and autonomic dysfunction (dystonias, spasticity, etc. is the proper administration of the agent into the muscles directly involved in the pathological process. The exact entry of botulinum toxin into the target muscles is essential for successful and safe treatment because its injection into a normal muscle may cause side effects. The most common errors are the incorrect depth and incorrect direction of a needle on insertion. Therefore, the exact injection of the agent particularly into the shallow and deep muscles is a difficult task even for an experienced specialist and requires the use of controlling methods.The European Consensus on Botulinum Toxin Therapy points out that various injection techniques are needed for the better identification of necessary muscles. However, there are currently no reports on the clear advantage of any technique. In our country, injections using palpation and anatomical landmarks have been widely used in routine practice so far; electromyographic monitoring and electrostimulation have been less frequently applied. In recent years, the new method ultrasound-guided injection has continued to grow more popular. This effective, accessible, and easy-to-use method makes it possible to manage a real-time injection process and to ensure the exact entry of the agent into the muscle. This paper is dedicated to a comparative analysis of different injection methods and to a description of the ultrasound-guided technique and its advantages over others. 

  19. Isosorbide dinitrate ointment vs botulinum toxin A (Dysport®) as the primary treatment for chronic anal fissure: a randomized multicentre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkel, A.E.M.; Rosman, C.; Koop, R.; van Duijvendijk, P.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Klaase, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Nitric oxide donors, such as isosorbide dinitrate ointment (ISDN), are considered as first-choice agents in the treatment of chronic anal fissure. Injection with botulinum toxin A in the internal anal sphincter is often used as a second-line therapy, although it may give better results and fewer

  20. The course of cervical dystonia with head tremor during botulinum toxin type A treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Korenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A (BTA injections into the neck muscles to reduce dystonic postures, head tremor, and pain syndrome in patients with cervical dystonia (CD within the first 8 cycles of treatment.Patients and methods. The investigation included 76 patients (26 (34% men and 50 (66% women with CD and dystonic head tremor, who were given BTA injections into the neck muscles for the first time. All the 76 patients received at least one cycle of BTA therapy. At the same type, 18 of these patients received 4 cycles of injections and 36 patients had 8 cycles. Injections were given when the symptoms of CD recurred or increased and the patient needed to be retreated. The interval between the injection cycles was arbitrary, but not less than 12 weeks. The doses of BTA agents per treatment cycle were as follows: Dysport was 400 to 1000 U, xeomin was 50 to 300 U, and Botox 200 to 300 U. The symptoms of CD were assessed using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS and the Tsui scale before the first injection of BTA and injection cycles 4 and 8; the presence or absence of head tremor was recorded.Results. The TWSTRS severity of CD symptoms decreased from 38 [36; 41] to 30 [27; 33] scores by injection cycle 4 (p < 0.001 and to 26 [23; 27] scores by cycle 8 (p<0.01. The Tsui severity of CD reduced from 9.3 [9; 10] to 7.2 [7; 8] scores by injection cycle 4 (p<0.001 and to 6.7 [6; 7] scores by cycle 8. The Tsui tremor scores decreased from 1.9 [1.6; 2.1] to 1.4 [1.1; 1.6] scores by injection cycle 4 and to 1.1 [0.9;1.4] scores by cycle 8 (p<0.01. Tremor completely disappeared in 6 (11% of patients by injection cycle 4 and in 6 (18% patients by cycle 8. According to Section 3 of the TWSTRS, pain intensity was reduced from 9.9 [8.9; 11.0] to 5.0 [3.3; 6.6] scores by injection cycle 4 (p<0.001 and to 2.1 [0.7; 3.6] scores by cycle 8 (p < 0.01; pain regressed completely in 12 (41

  1. Botulinum toxin the poison that heals: A brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Shubha Ranjan; Passi, Deepak; Singh, Mahinder; Singh, Purnima; Sharma, Sarang; Sharma, Abhimanyu

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins, causative agents of botulism in humans, are produced by Clostridium botulinum , an anaerobic spore-former Gram-positive bacillus. Botulinum neurotoxin poses a major bioweapon threat because of its extreme potency and lethality; its ease of production, transport, and misuse; and the need for prolonged intensive care among affected persons. This paper aims at discussing botulinum neurotoxin, its structure, mechanism of action, pharmacology, its serotypes and the reasons for wide use of type A, the various indications and contraindications of the use of botulinum neurotoxin and finally the precautions taken when botulinum neurotoxin is used as a treatment approach. We have searched relevant articles on this subject in various medical databases including Google Scholar, PubMed Central, ScienceDirect, Wiley Online Library, Scopus, and Copernicus. The search resulted in more than 2669 articles, out of which a total of 187 were reviewed. However, the review has been further constricted into only 54 articles as has been presented in this manuscript keeping in mind the page limitation and the limitation to the number of references. A single gram of crystalline toxin, evenly dispersed and inhaled, can kill more than one million people. The basis of the phenomenal potency of botulinum toxin (BT) is enzymatic; the toxin is a zinc proteinase that cleaves neuronal vesicle-associated proteins responsible for acetylcholine release into the neuromuscular junction. A fascinating aspect of BT research in recent years has been the development of the most potent toxin into a molecule of significant therapeutic utility. It is the first biological toxin which is licensed for the treatment of human diseases. The present review focuses on both warfare potential as well as medical uses of botulinum neurotoxin.

  2. Ten Mistakes To Avoid When Injecting Botulinum Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Rodriguez, R; Martin-Gorgojo, A

    2015-01-01

    Injection of botulinum toxin is currently the most common cosmetic procedure in the United States, and in recent years it has become-together with dermal fillers-the mainstay of therapy for the prevention and treatment of facial aging. However, in some cases the treatment may lead to a somewhat unnatural appearance, usually caused by loss of facial expression or other telltale signs. In the present article, we review the 10 mistakes that should be avoided when injecting botulinum toxin. We also reflect on how treatment with botulinum toxin influences us through our facial expressions, both in terms of how we feel and what others perceive. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  3. Beyond Beauty : Botulinum Toxin Use in Anal Fissure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, S

    2009-07-01

    Chronic fissure in ano is a common distressing problem with high recurrence rates. Any treatment modality should be simple, effective and reversible with no permanent sequelae. Long term medical management with poor compliance or surgical therapy with risk of incontinence are both less than ideal. In this scenario chemical sphincterotomy using Botulinum toxin offers an alternative modality. A total of 30 patients of chronic fissure in ano were treated with Botulinum toxin injection in the internal sphincter. All patients had significant symptomatic relief with high rates of fissure healing. The simplicity of administration, lack of complications and cost effectiveness make it a useful alternative to the currently practiced approaches. Botulinum toxin offers a simple outpatient treatment of chronic fissure in ano, which is safe, cost effective and reversible without significant complication. It has the potential of being used as a first line treatment in chronic fissure in ano.

  4. Beyond Beauty : Botulinum Toxin Use in Anal Fissure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mehrotra, S

    2009-01-01

    .... In this scenario chemical sphincterotomy using Botulinum toxin offers an alternative modality. A total of 30 patients of chronic fissure in ano were treated with Botulinum toxin injection in the internal sphincter...

  5. Obesity Treatment with Botulinum Toxin-A Is Not Effective: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Fabio; Brunaldi, Vitor Ottoboni; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; de Moura, Diogo Turiani H; de Moura, Eduardo Turiani H; Galvão, Manoel; Santo, Marco Aurélio; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães H

    2017-10-01

    The effectiveness of gastric injections of botulinum toxin-A (BTA) as primary treatment for obesity is not well known since results in literature are discrepant. Hence, we aimed to systematically review and meta-analyze the available data to assess the real effect of BTA therapy. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane, SCOPUS, EBSCO, LILACS, and BVS. We considered eligible only randomized controlled trials enrolling obese patients comparing BTA versus saline injections. Our initial search identified 8811 records. Six studies fulfilled eligibility criteria. After critical appraisal, two articles were excluded and we meta-analyzed the remainder. The mean difference for absolute weight loss and BMI reduction were 0.12 [CI 95%, - 1.14, 1.38] and - 0.06 [95% CI, - 0.92, 0.81], respectively. Therefore, we concluded that treatment of obesity with BTA is not effective.

  6. Treatment of major depressive disorder using botulinum toxin A: a 24-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magid, Michelle; Reichenberg, Jason S; Poth, Poppy E; Robertson, Henry T; LaViolette, Amanda K; Kruger, Tillmann H C; Wollmer, M Axel

    2014-08-01

    To determine whether a single treatment of botulinum toxin A in the forehead (glabellar) region can improve symptoms of depression in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), as defined by DSM-IV criteria. Thirty participants were randomly assigned to receive either placebo or botulinum toxin A (BTA; onabotulinumtoxinA) injections in the forehead. Female participants received 29 units; male participants received 39 units. At week 12, the groups were crossed over. Participants were evaluated at weeks 0, 3, 6, 12, 15, 18, and 24 for improvement in MDD symptoms using the Patient Health Care Questionnaire-9, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and 21-Item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-21) objective measurement scales. The primary outcome was the rate of HDRS-21 response, defined as ≥ 50% score reduction from baseline. The study occurred from July 2011 to November 2012. Patients who received BTA at week 0 (BTA-first group) and at week 12 (BTA-second group) had a statistically significant reduction in MDD symptoms as compared to placebo. Improvement in MDD continued over 24 weeks in the group that received BTA first even though the cosmetic effects of BTA wore off at 12 to 16 weeks. HDRS-21 response rates were 55% (6/11) in the BTA-first group, 24% (4/17) in the BTA-second group, and 0% (0/19) in the placebo group (P < .0001). HDRS-21 remission rates (score ≤ 7) were 18% (2/11), 18% (3/17), and 0% (0/19), respectively (P = .057). HDRS-21 scores dropped -46% and -35% in the BTA-first and -second groups versus -2% in the placebo group (P < .0001). The BDI response rate (≥ 50% reduction from baseline) was 45% (5/11) in the BTA-first group, 33% (6/18) in the BTA-second group, and 5% (1/19) in the placebo group (P = .0067). BDI remission rates (score ≤ 9) were 27% (3/11), 33% (6/18), and 5% (1/19), respectively (P = .09). BDI scores dropped -42% and -35% in the BTA-first and -second groups versus -15% in the placebo group (P < .0001). Botulinum toxin A

  7. Use of botulinum toxin type A (Botox in the treatment of infantile cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Kurenkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A is used in cerebral palsy (CP for more than 20 years. Nevertheless, the unified protocol of injections and doses does not exist by now. The correct selection of target muscles for BoNT-A injections is based on the experience of the doctor, detailed analysis of neurological and orthopedic status of the patient, standard scales to evaluate motor potential of the patient. The article represents the detailed review of international clinical trials for multi-level use of BoNT-A in CP and recommendations on doses calculation. Based on our own observations of efficacy and safety of single-used doses of Botox we present the recommended dose ranges for upper and lower limb that led to clinically significant decrease of spasticity with no undesirable weakness. The review of clinical cases presents the doses per targeted muscle and total doses we used, they are advisory in nature.

  8. Botulinum toxin therapy of hemifacial spasm: comparing different therapeutic preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, K; Truong, D D; Dressler, D

    2006-02-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is characterized by involuntary irregular clonic or tonic movements of the muscles innervated by cranial nerve VII on one side of the face, and is most often a result of vascular compression of the facial nerve at the root exit zone (Muscle and Nerve 1998;21:1740). Disability associated with this disorder ranges from social embarrassment to interference with vision resulting from involuntary eye closure. Treatment of HFS most often involves botulinum toxin injections, but may also include medications and surgery. We describe treatment with the three types of botulinum toxin currently commercially available--Botox, Dysport and Myobloc/NeuroBloc.

  9. Functional effects of botulinum toxin type-A treatment and subsequent stretching of spastic calf muscles: a study in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Niet, Mark; de Bot, Susanne T; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; Geurts, Alexander C

    2015-02-01

    Although calf muscle spasticity is often treated with botulinum toxin type-A, the effects on balance and gait are ambiguous. Hereditary spastic paraplegia is characterized by progressive spasticity and relatively mild muscle weakness of the lower limbs. It is therefore a good model to evaluate the functional effects of botulinum toxin type-A. Explorative pre-post intervention study. Fifteen subjects with pure hereditary spastic paraplegia. Patients with symptomatic calf muscle spasticity and preserved calf muscle strength received botulinum toxin type-A injections in each triceps surae (Dysport®, 500-750 MU) followed by daily stretching exercises (18 weeks). Before intervention (T0), and 4 (T1) and 18 (T2) weeks thereafter, gait, balance, motor selectivity, calf muscle tone and strength were tested. Mean comfortable gait velocity increased from T0 (0.90 m/s (standard deviation (SD) 0.18)) to T1 (0.98 m/s (SD 0.20)), which effect persisted at T2, whereas balance and other functional measures remained unchanged. Calf muscle tone declined from T0 (median 2; range 1-2) to T1 (median 0; range 0-1), which effect partially persisted at T2 (median 1; range 0-2). Calf muscle strength did not change. Botulinum toxin type-A treatment and subsequent muscle stretching of the calves improved comfortable gait velocity and reduced muscle tone in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia, while preserving muscle strength. Balance remained unaffected.

  10. Botulinum toxin type A-a novel treatment for provoked vestibulodynia? Results from a randomized, placebo controlled, double blinded study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christina Damsted; Giraldi, Annamaria; Lundvall, Lene

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vestibulodynia is an increasingly recognized problem among women and is often difficult to treat. AIM: This randomized, double blinded, placebo-controlled study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Botox in the treatment of vestibulodynia. METHODS: Sixty-four women were randomized...... to receive Botox (N = 32) or saline placebo (N = 32). Botulinum toxin A (20 I.E.) diluted in 0.5 mL saline or 0.5 mL saline was injected in the musculus bulbospongiosus at baseline. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain was measured monthly on a visual analog scale (VAS) Likert scale. Sexual function was measured...... using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and the Female Sexual Distress Scale at baseline and at 3 and 6 months follow up. Quality of life was measured using the 36-item short-form (SF-36). RESULTS: Sixty women (94%) completed the 6 months follow up. Both Botox and placebo produced significantly...

  11. Application of Botulinum toxin Type A: An arsenal in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmana B Rao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An extremely effective way of preventing damage to and enhancing treatment of dental hard tissues and restorations would be to ′′de-programme′′ the muscles responsible for excessive destructive forces and other gnathological-related diseases. The new paradigm is the intramuscular injection of Botulinum toxin type A (BOTOX into the affected muscles. It is a natural protein produced by anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium botulinum. The toxin inhibits the release of acetylcholine (ACH, a neurotransmitter responsible for the activation of muscle contraction and glandular secretion, and its administration results in reduction of tone in the injected muscle. There are seven distinct serotypes of Botulinum toxin, viz., A, B, C, D, E, F, and G, which differ in their potency, duration of action, and cellular target sites. This paper describes the different applications of BOTOX in dentistry.

  12. Application of Botulinum toxin type A: an arsenal in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Lakshmana B; Sangur, Rajashekar; Pradeep, S

    2011-01-01

    An extremely effective way of preventing damage to and enhancing treatment of dental hard tissues and restorations would be to ''de-programme'' the muscles responsible for excessive destructive forces and other gnathological-related diseases. The new paradigm is the intramuscular injection of Botulinum toxin type A (BOTOX) into the affected muscles. It is a natural protein produced by anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium botulinum. The toxin inhibits the release of acetylcholine (ACH), a neurotransmitter responsible for the activation of muscle contraction and glandular secretion, and its administration results in reduction of tone in the injected muscle. There are seven distinct serotypes of Botulinum toxin, viz., A, B, C, D, E, F, and G, which differ in their potency, duration of action, and cellular target sites. This paper describes the different applications of BOTOX in dentistry.

  13. The Use of Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Muscle Spasticity in the First 2 Years of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheit, Abdel Magid

    2010-01-01

    Although there are sound theoretical reasons for the use of botulinum toxin (Btx) as early as possible in the management of severe childhood muscle spasticity, the experience with its safety in children younger than 2 years of age is limited and information about its possible effects on the development and maturation of the human motor system…

  14. Botulinum toxin A: a new option for treatment of drooling in children with cerebral palsy. Presentation of a case series.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerius, P.H.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den; Joosten, F.B.M.; Hulst, C.C.M. van; Gabreëls, F.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Drooling beyond the age of 4 years is pathological, particularly if it occurs in children with neurological and developmental impairment and disability. Considering the therapeutic spectrum of botulinum toxin A and in view of the innervation of the salivary glands, we postulated that intraglandular

  15. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation following botulinum toxin and other focal intramuscular treatment for post-stroke spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetrios, Marina; Khan, Fary; Turner-Stokes, Lynne; Brand, Caroline; McSweeney, Shane

    2013-06-05

    Spasticity may affect stroke survivors by contributing to activity limitations, caregiver burden, pain and reduced quality of life (QoL). Spasticity management guidelines recommend multidisciplinary (MD) rehabilitation programmes following botulinum toxin (BoNT) treatment for post-stroke spasticity. However, the evidence base for the effectiveness of MD rehabilitation is unclear. To assess the effectiveness of MD rehabilitation, following BoNT and other focal intramuscular treatments such as phenol, in improving activity limitations and other outcomes in adults and children with post-stroke spasticity. To explore what settings, types and intensities of rehabilitation programmes are effective. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (February 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 12), MEDLINE (1948 to December 2011), EMBASE (1980 to January 2012), CINAHL (1982 to January 2012), AMED (1985 to January 2012), LILACS (1982 to September 2012), PEDro, REHABDATA and OpenGrey (September 2012). In an effort to identify further published, unpublished and ongoing trials we searched trials registries and reference lists, handsearched journals and contacted authors. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared MD rehabilitation (delivered by two or more disciplines in conjunction with medical input) following BoNT and other focal intramuscular treatments for post-stroke spasticity with placebo, routinely available local services, or lower levels of intervention; or studies that compared MD rehabilitation in different settings, of different types, or at different levels of intensity. We excluded RCTs that assessed the effectiveness of unidisciplinary therapy (for example physiotherapy only) or a single modality (for example stretching, casting, electrical stimulation or splinting only). The primary outcomes were validated measures of activity level (active and passive function

  16. Intramural injection with botulinum toxin significantly elongates the pig esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Heidi Fhær; Jensen, Thorbjørn Søren Rønn; Rasmussen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment of long-gap esophageal atresia (LGEA) is challenging. Methods which facilitate stretching of the esophageal pouches may allow primary anastomosis. Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) blocks acetylcholine release in neuromuscular junctions, thereby causing muscle relaxation. We hypot...

  17. Botulinum toxin injection in laryngeal dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woisard, Virginie; Liu, Xuelai; Bes, Marie Christine Arné; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion

    2017-02-01

    Data, regarding the use of botulinum toxin (BT-A) in laryngeal dyspnea, are scarce, coming from some cases reports in the literature, including Vocal fold paralysis, laryngeal dystonia, vocal cord dysfunction also called paradoxical motion of the vocal fold (PMVF), and post-neuroleptic laryngeal dyskinesia. There is no consensus regarding the muscles and the doses to inject. The aim of this study is to present a retrospective review of patients treated in our ENT Department by BT-A injection in this indication. This study is a retrospective study describing patients who underwent an injection of botulinum toxin for laryngeal dyspnea in the ENT Department from 2005 to 2015 years. The inclusion criteria were a dyspnea associated with a laryngeal dysfunction, confirmed by flexible fiberoptic nasopharyngolaryngoscopy. Information concerning the causes of the dyspnea, the botulinum toxin BT-A injections procedure, post-injection follow-up, and respiratory outcome were collected for all patients included. In the group of 13 patients included, the main cause identified as principal factor linked with the short breath was: a bilateral VF paralysis (Patel et al., Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 130:686-689, 7), laryngeal dystonia (Balkissoon and Kenn, Semin Respir Crit Care Med 33:595-605, 2), Anxiety syndrome associated with unilateral vocal fold paralysis or asthma (Marcinow et al., Laryngoscope 124:1425-1430, 3), and an isolated asthma (Zwirner et al., Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 254:242-245, 1). Nine out of the thirteen patients were improved by the injections. A BT-A-induced stable benefit for four patients led them to stop the injections in the follow-up. Good outcome was observed in five other patients (main cause: bilateral VP paralysis), allowing a progressive lengthening of the delay between BT-A injections. Four patients did not report a positive risk/benefit ratio after BT-A injections; two of them (with bilateral VF paralysis), because of respiratory side effects and

  18. Review article: botulinum toxin in the therapy of gastrointestinal motility disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, D; Rossi, S; Runfola, M; Magalini, S C

    2003-07-01

    Since 1980, botulinum toxin has been employed for the treatment of various voluntary muscle spastic disorders in the fields of neurology and ophthalmology. More recently, botulinum toxin has been proved to be effective in the therapy of dyskinetic smooth muscle disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Achalasia and anal fissure are the gastrointestinal disorders in which botulinum toxin therapy has been most extensively investigated. Botulinum toxin is the best treatment option for achalasia in patients whose condition makes them unfit for pneumatic dilation or surgery. In anal fissure, botulinum toxin is highly effective and may become the treatment of choice. In the future, botulinum toxin application in the gastrointestinal tract will be extended to many other gastrointestinal disorders, such as non-achalasic motor disorders of the oesophagus, dysfunction of Oddi's sphincter, achalasia of the internal anal sphincter and others. This article describes the mechanism of action, rationale of employment, indications and side-effects of botulinum toxin application in smooth muscle disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, and compares the results of different techniques of botulinum toxin therapeutic application.

  19. Early botulinum toxin treatment for spastic pes equinovarus--a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietzek, U M; Kossmehl, P; Schelosky, L; Ebersbach, G; Wissel, J

    2014-08-01

    Spastic pes equinovarus is a frequent pathological posture of the lower extremity. Botulinum toxin (BoNT/A) has been successfully applied to treat lower limb spasticity. However, the best time to initiate treatment remains unclear. A beneficial effect of an early treatment has been suggested in previous studies. A single-centre double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial was performed to investigate the efficacy of BoNT/A to reduce muscle hypertonicity at the ankle. Fifty-two patients with unilateral or bilateral spastic pes equinovarus with a modified Ashworth score (mAS) of at least 1+ after stroke, traumatic brain injury or hypoxic encephalopathy were allocated to receive either BoNT/A or placebo treatment. A second, open injection was optional at week 12. Patients received unilateral or bilateral injections with 230 or 460 U onabotulinumtoxinA, respectively. The course of the mAS was explored during the open study phase. Patients who had received BoNT/A treatment had lower mAS compared with placebo at week 12 (P equines with BoNT/A treatment given during the first 3 months after the lesion. Exploratory analyses of the course of muscular hypertonicity during the open phase favour earlier to later treatment. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EAN.

  20. Botulinum toxin is efficient to treat obstructive symptoms in children with Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wester, Tomas; Granström, Anna Löf

    2015-03-01

    Obstructive symptoms are common after pull-through for Hirschsprung disease. Botulinum toxin injection treatment may improve the bowel function if internal sphincter achalasia is the cause of obstructive symptoms. The aim of this study was to review the outcome in patients treated with intrasphincteric botulinum toxin injections after pull-through for Hirschsprung disease. The operative records were used to identify children with Hirschsprung disease who were treated with botulinum toxin injections at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, from September 2007 to November 2014. Data on age, sex, associated syndromes, length of aganglionic segment, age at pull-through, type of pull-through, age at first botulinum toxin injection, indication for botulinum toxin injection, and effect of first botulinum toxin injection were retrieved from the case records. Bowel function at last follow-up visit or telephone contact was recorded. Nineteen patients were identified. All had biopsy-verified Hirschsprung disease. Eighteen (15 males and 3 females) children had undergone intrasphincteric botulinum toxin injection treatment for obstructive symptoms after pull-through, which was done at 127 (18-538) days of age. Four children had total colonic aganglionosis. The first botulinum toxin injection was given at 2.4 (0.53-6.9) years of age. Thirteen children (72 %) had a good response to the first injection treatment. The children underwent 3 (1-13) injection treatments. At follow-up four patients had improved and did not need treatment for obstruction, four were scheduled for further botulinum toxin injections, eight had persistent obstructive symptoms treated with laxatives or enemas, and two children had an ileostomy. Botulinum toxin injection treatment improves the obstructive symptoms in children after pull-through for Hirschsprung disease. The effect is reversible and a majority of patients need repeat injections. When injection treatment is not repeated, a large

  1. A single-blinded, randomized pilot study of botulinum toxin type A combined with non-pharmacological treatment for spastic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baricich, Alessio; Carda, Stefano; Bertoni, Michele; Maderna, Luca; Cisari, Carlo

    2008-11-01

    To explore the effect of treatment after botulinum toxin type A combined with treatments for the spastic foot. Single-blind, randomized trial, with 3-month follow-up. Twenty-three chronic hemiplegic adult patients with spastic equinus foot. Following botulinum toxin type A injection at the medial and lateral gastrocnemius, patients were assigned randomly to 3 groups, and treated with taping, electrical stimulation or stretching. They were evaluated before treatment (t0), and at 10 (t1), 20 (t2) and 90 (t3) days after treatment. Outcome measures were: Modified Ashworth Scale; passive range of motion at the ankle; measurement of muscle action potential at the gastrocnemius medialis; and measurement of maximum ankle dorsiflexion angle in stance using gait analysis. The group treated with electrical stimulation performed better at t1 on the Modified Ashworth Scale. The taping and electrical stimulation groups performed better in all outcome measures at t3. The taping group performed better mainly for maximum ankle dorsiflexion angle in stance. The stretching group showed a less durable result, with some worsening at the t3 evaluation compared with the assessment performed before treatment. This pilot study indicates that combining botulinum toxin type A administration for the ankle plantar flexors with taping and electrical stimulation might be beneficial.

  2. Treatment of Atlantoaxial Rotatory Fixation With Botulinum Toxin Muscle Block and Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hung Lin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Slippage after reduction of atlantoaxial rotatory fixation (AARF is usually treated with repeated cervical traction and brace immobilization. To date, no data have been published on the management of muscle spasm during treatment. Here, we describe the case of a 7-year-old girl with AARF for 1 month who visited our hospital for treatment. During physical examination, spasm of the sternocleidomastoid muscle was noted. The patient was treated with manipulative reduction, and slippage after reduction was managed with botulinum spasticity block of the sternocleidomastoid and splenius capitis muscles, and repeated manipulation. Cervical orthosis immobilization with a rehabilitation program of isometric contract–relax exercise for the neck was conducted for 3 months. The subject had full recovery from AARF at 1-year follow-up. This report demonstrates that, in selected cases of slippage after reduction from AARF, conservative management with manipulation under anesthesia is a good method, and the muscle components may play a crucial role in AARF.

  3. Treatment outcomes and resource use of patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity receiving botulinum toxin A (BOTOX) therapy in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefer, Björn; Ehlken, Birgit; Bremer, Jörn; Burgdörfer, Harald; Domurath, Burkhard; Hampel, Christian; Kutzenberger, Johannes; Seif, Christoph; Sievert, Karl D; Berger, Karin; Pannek, Jürgen

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate treatment outcomes and resource consumption of patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) before and after botulinum toxin A (Botox) therapy in Germany. In a multi-center, cross-sectional, retrospective cohort study, data of patients with NDO 12 months before and after the first Botox therapy were analyzed. 214 patients (mean age 38 +/- 14.8 years, 145 male, 69 female) with NDO due to spinal cord injury (81%); myelomeningocele (14%), or Multiple Sclerosis (5%) from seven hospitals were included. Mean interval between treatments was 8 months. Following treatment, mean maximum detrusor pressure, maximum cystometric capacity and detrusor compliance improved significantly. Prior to Botox therapy, 68% reported urinary tract infections (UTI), 63% had incontinence episodes, and 58% used incontinence aids. These numbers decreased significantly (p < 0.05) after treatment to 28, 33, and 28%, respectively. In patients using incontinence aids, mean costs per patient decreased from 2euro to 1euro per day, whereas the mean cost of drugs to treat UTIs per patient decreased from 163euro to 80euro per year, respectively. This is the first study demonstrating the clinical usefulness of Botox therapy in clinical practice. Successful treatment resulted in lower costs for NDO associated morbidity due to less need for incontinence aids and UTI medication.

  4. The use of botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of spasticity of the lower limbs in stroke patients. Clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Kovalenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a clinical case of spasticity and its treatment with botulinum toxin type A in a patient with the consequences of acute stroke. Given a comprehensive assessment of patterns of spasticity and muscle involved in the syndrome. Described in detail and the result is the introduction of a technique. It is concluded that the effectiveness and feasibility of using Botox to treat spasticity of the lower limb.

  5. Prospective, randomized, double-blind study, comparing botulinum toxins type a botox and prosigne for blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quagliato, Elizabeth Maria Aparecida Barasnevicius; Carelli, Edmur Franco; Viana, Maura Aparecida

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum toxin A (BTA) is considered an effective treatment of blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm, but there are few studies to permit a comparison of its different formulations. This prospective, randomized, double-blind study compared Prosigne, a BTA of Chinese origin, with Botox to establish safety, efficacy, and equivalence of doses between those 2 formulations in blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm treatment. Fifty-seven patients participated in this study: 21 blepharospasm (from whom 11 were treated with Botox; and 10, with Prosigne) and 36 hemifacial spasm patients (17 were treated with Botox; and 19, with Prosigne). All patients were similar in age, disease time span, number of previous shots, and time elapsed since the last BTA application. Pain and burning during the injection and the result of the treatment were similar in both groups. There were no systemic adverse events, and the local ones were observed with similar intensity and frequency for both groups. The mean effect time length was similar for both blepharospasm (11.3 weeks for both toxins) and hemifacial spasm patients (12.8 weeks for Botox and 12.9 weeks for Prosigne). In both blepharospasm groups, only the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey emotional aspects domain showed improvement from baseline after 16 weeks. There were no differences between the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey scores before and after the treatment of all hemifacial spasm patients. Therefore, it has been concluded that Botox and Prosigne have similar efficacy, safety, and tolerability profiles, so that a dose equivalence of 1:1 may be considered for blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm treatments.

  6. Clinical effectiveness of botulinum toxin type B in the treatment of subacromial bursitis or shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho; Song, Sun Hong

    2011-01-01

    Subacromial steroid injections are used as a treatment method in subacromial bursitis (SB) or shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). However, the steroid effect is relatively restricted to the short-term and repeated injections are frequently required, which contributes to unwanted side effects. As an alternative, botulinum toxin (BT) has recently been used for pain relief. This study aimed to investigate the clinical effectiveness of BT type B and to compare this with the effectiveness of steroids. Sixty-one patients diagnosed with SB or SIS were divided into 2 groups and treated with BT type B (BT group) and trimacinolone injection (TA group) under ultrasound guidance, respectively. Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), active shoulder abduction angle, and the Korean version of the score on the Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) were measured before the treatment, and at 1 and 3 months after the treatment. Both groups obtained a significant improvement of NRS, DASH, and active shoulder abduction at 1 and 3 months follow-up. BT group showed significantly better outcomes in terms of reduction of NRS and DASH at 3 months than TA group. BT group showed strong trend toward the larger degree of active shoulder abduction than the TA group at 3 months follow-up, as well. Whereas, no significant difference was found in NRS, DASH, and active shoulder abduction between the 2 groups at 1 month follow-up. BT type B can be a useful strategy and has great potential for replacing steroids as a treatment for SB or SIS.

  7. An MRI evaluation of changes in piriformis muscle morphology induced by botulinum toxin injections in the treatment of piriformis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Al-Shaikh, M; Michel, F; Parratte, B; Kastler, B; Vidal, C; Aubry, S

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BT) injection is a new treatment for piriformis syndrome (PS). The main purpose of our study was to use MRI to evaluate changes in piriformis muscle morphology after treatment with BT injections. Twenty patients presenting with PS who had undergone an MRI were included retrospectively: 12 patients treated with BT injections and eight untreated patients. The following parameters were assessed and compared to a normal contralateral muscle: maximum thickness, volume, and Goutallier's classification grade of fatty infiltration of the piriformis and internal obturator muscles. Pain was assessed through a visual analogue scale (VAS). The untreated patients had no significant difference in the volume (P=1.0) or thickness of the piriformis muscle (P=0.61). The treated patients showed a significant reduction in the thickness (-4.2mm; P<0.001) and volume (-74.4mm(3); P<0.001) and an increase in the fatty infiltration (P<0.001) of the piriformis muscle treated by BT injection. Muscular atrophy was correlated with the number of BT injections and with the time until an MRI was performed. There was also significant pain relief after BT treatment. BT leads to atrophy and fatty degeneration of the piriformis muscle that can be quantified by MRI and these factors explain why BT injections are effective in the treatment of PS. Copyright © 2014 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. [Safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin in hemifacial spasm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazlout, H; Kamoun Gargouri, H; Triki, W; Kéfi, S; Brour, J; El Afrit, M A; Chéour, M; Kraiem, A

    2013-03-01

    Given the failure of pharmacologic and surgical treatment in the management of hemifacial spasm, the use of botulinum toxin as first line therapy is interesting. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of type A botulinum toxin in the treatment of hemifacial spasm. We conducted a retrospective, descriptive and comparative study of 25 patients with hemifacial spasm followed in the ophthalmology department of Habib Thameur hospital in Tunis over the period from June 2003 to June 2009. All patients received injections of botulinum toxin type A (Botox). We carried out 168 Botulinum A toxin injections (Botox) with an average of 6.85 ± 4.32 injections per patient. Doses varied between 12.5 U and 28 U Botox. A good response to treatment was observed in 92% of patients with a satisfactory return to daily activities and work. Based on a subjective scale from 1 to 3, the average total functional benefit was 2.55 ± 0.56. Average total duration of therapeutic response was 9.35 ± 3.64 weeks. Local side effects observed were comparable to those described in the literature: ptosis (32.4%), diplopia (8.2%), drooping of the labial commissure (11.2%), lagophthalmos (21.3%), tearing (7%), dry eye (4%). No systemic complication was noted. Botulinum toxin type A provides effective short-term and medium-term results in the treatment of hemifacial spasm. It is well tolerated locally and systemically. This safety and efficacy make it a valuable therapeutic alternative in the management of hemifacial spasm. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. The efficiency of botulinum toxin type A for the treatment of masseter muscle pain in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction and tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihut, Malgorzata; Ferendiuk, Ewa; Szewczyk, Michal; Kasprzyk, Katarzyna; Wieckiewicz, Mieszko

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction are often accompanied by symptoms of headache such as tension-type headache which is the most frequent spontaneous primary headache. Masseter muscle pain is commonly reported in this group. The purpose of the study was to assess the efficiency of intramuscular botulinum toxin type A injections for treating masseter muscle pain in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction and tension-type headache. This prospective outcome study consisted of 42 subjects of both genders aged 19-48 years diagnosed with masseter muscle pain related to temporomandibular joint dysfunction and tension-type headache. The subjects were treated by the intramuscular injection of 21 U (mice units) of botulinum toxin type A (Botox, Allergan) in the area of the greatest cross-section surface of both masseter bellies. Pain intensity was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS) and verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS) 1 week before the treatment and 24 weeks after the treatment. The obtained data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon matched pairs test (p ≤ 0,005). The results of this study showed a decrease in the number of referred pain episodes including a decrease in pain in the temporal region bilaterally, a reduction of analgesic drugs intake as well as a decrease in reported values of VAS and VNRS after injections (p = 0,000). The intramuscular botulinum toxin type A injections have been an efficient method of treatment for masseter muscle pain in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction and tension-type headache.

  10. Global Aesthetics Consensus: Hyaluronic Acid Fillers and Botulinum Toxin Type A—Recommendations for Combined Treatment and Optimizing Outcomes in Diverse Patient Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Steven; Signorini, Massimo; Vieira Braz, André; Fagien, Steven; Swift, Arthur; De Boulle, Koenraad L.; Raspaldo, Hervé; Trindade de Almeida, Ada R.; Monheit, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Background: Combination of fillers and botulinum toxin for aesthetic applications is increasingly popular. Patient demographics continue to diversify, and include an expanding population receiving maintenance treatments over decades. Methods: A multinational panel of plastic surgeons and dermatologists convened the Global Aesthetics Consensus Group to develop updated guidelines with a worldwide perspective for hyaluronic acid fillers and botulinum toxin. This publication considers strategies for combined treatments, and how patient diversity influences treatment planning and outcomes. Results: Global Aesthetics Consensus Group recommendations reflect increased use of combined treatments in the lower and upper face, and some midface regions. A fully patient-tailored approach considers physiologic and chronologic age, ethnically associated facial morphotypes, and aesthetic ideals based on sex and culture. Lower toxin dosing, to modulate rather than paralyze muscles, is indicated where volume deficits influence muscular activity. Combination of toxin with fillers is appropriate for several indications addressed previously with toxin alone. New scientific data regarding hyaluronic acid fillers foster an evidence-based approach to selection of products and injection techniques. Focus on aesthetic units, rather than isolated rhytides, optimizes results from toxin and fillers. It also informs longitudinal treatment planning, and analysis of toxin nonresponders. Conclusions: The emerging objective of injectable treatment is facial harmonization rather than rejuvenation. Combined treatment is now a standard of care. Its use will increase further as we refine the concept that aspects of aging are intimately related, and that successful treatment entails identifying and addressing the primary causes of each. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, V. PMID:27119917

  11. Health-related quality of life outcomes from botulinum toxin treatment in hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Daniel; Sturm, Justine; Hieber, Leonhard; Börtlein, Axel; Mayr, Ingo; Appy, Matthias; Kühnler, Benedicta; Buchthal, Joachim; Dippon, Christian; Arnold, Guy; Wächter, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Although botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injections may alleviate involuntary muscle contractions in hemifacial spasm substantially, it is less clear whether the motor effect would translate into improvements of health-related quality of life (HR-QoL). In this open-label clinical observational study, we characterized outcomes on HR-QoL in terms of the EuroQol (EQ-5D-5L) from BoNT in a prospective cohort of patients with hemifacial spasm (n = 73). Additionally, we characterized appendicular motor and nonmotor signs on motor symptom improvement, depressive symptoms, pain and sleep quality. Patients were assessed at the end of a regular 3-month period from last injection (timepoint1) and 4 weeks after the reinjection of BoNT (timepoint2). Patients showed improved HR-QoL on the EQ-VAS (visual analogue scale) at timepoint2 compared with timepoint1. Moreover, we identified, that impairments in HR-QoL at timepoint1 correlated with life satisfaction and depressive symptoms, respectively. However, these associated variables did not predict the therapeutic effect. Instead, EQ-VAS at timepoint1 accounted for 34.5% of the variance of EQ-VAS improvement expressed as the difference between timepoint2 and timepoint1. Our study supports HR-QoL improvements in hemifacial spasm and the value of generic HR-QoL measures to estimate therapeutic outcome. However, the findings should be considered descriptive, and future high quality trials are needed for confirmatory purposes in order to refine treatment referral in hemifacial spasm with respect to QoL.

  12. Comparison of two different formulations of botulinum toxin A for the treatment of blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuan-Jie; Shen, Ji-Hong; Chen, Yuan; Lian, Ya-Jun

    2011-01-01

    To confirm and compare the therapeutic efficacies and adverse effects of Chinese botulinum toxin type A (CBTX-A, Lanzhou Biological Products Institute, China) and current Botox (Allergan Inc., CA, USA) in the treatment of blepharospasm (BS) and hemifacial spasm (HFS). We performed an open, prospective, comparative trial comparing CBTX-A and Botox for the treatment of BS and HFS in 273 patients since 2006. 107 patients were treated with current Botox and 166 with CBTX-A, with the age, disease durations and severity of spasm matched. The patients enrolled were followed up for 6 months. There were no significant differences in the clinical effects of the two preparations, including the onset of response, peaked effect time and duration of effects (p > 0.05). The Cohen scores showed a significant reduction after BTX-A injections. Considerable improvement of symptoms for the BS and HFS patients was observed 7 days, 4 weeks, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks after the injection with either current Botox or CBTX-A (p 0.05). No statistical differences were noted in adverse reactions between them (p > 0.05). The two preparations were both simple and effective for the patients with blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm.

  13. Characterization of Hemagglutinin Negative Botulinum Progenitor Toxins

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    Suzanne R. Kalb

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a disease involving intoxication with botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs, toxic proteins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other clostridia. The 150 kDa neurotoxin is produced in conjunction with other proteins to form the botulinum progenitor toxin complex (PTC, alternating in size from 300 kDa to 500 kDa. These progenitor complexes can be classified into hemagglutinin positive or hemagglutinin negative, depending on the ability of some of the neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs to cause hemagglutination. The hemagglutinin positive progenitor toxin complex consists of BoNT, nontoxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNH, and three hemagglutinin proteins; HA-70, HA-33, and HA-17. Hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes contain BoNT and NTNH as the minimally functional PTC (M-PTC, but not the three hemagglutinin proteins. Interestingly, the genome of hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes comprises open reading frames (orfs which encode for three proteins, but the existence of these proteins has not yet been extensively demonstrated. In this work, we demonstrate that these three proteins exist and form part of the PTC for hemagglutinin negative complexes. Several hemagglutinin negative strains producing BoNT/A, /E, and /F were found to contain the three open reading frame proteins. Additionally, several BoNT/A-containing bivalent strains were examined, and NAPs from both genes, including the open reading frame proteins, were associated with BoNT/A. The open reading frame encoded proteins are more easily removed from the botulinum complex than the hemagglutinin proteins, but are present in several BoNT/A and /F toxin preparations. These are not easily removed from the BoNT/E complex, however, and are present even in commercially-available purified BoNT/E complex.

  14. Temporomandibular Myofacial Pain Treated with Botulinum Toxin Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niv Mor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the diagnoses and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD and outlines of the role of botulinum toxin (BoNT in the treatment of myofacial TMD. This manuscript includes a brief history of the use of BoNT in the treatment of pain, the mechanism of action of BoNT, and the techniques for injections, adverse effects and contraindications when using BoNT to treat mayofacial pain caused by TMD.

  15. Increasing the area and varying the dosage of Botulinum toxin a injections for effective treatment of hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Won Joo; Kim, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Wider-area botulinum toxin (BT) injection with the dosage depending on specific pathology is a promising approach for the treatment of hemifacial spasm (HFS), resulting in effective and long-lasting control of HFS with fewer side-effects. The aim of this study was to develop a BT injection strategy that minimizes complications by considering the causes, duration, and electrophysiologic features of the disease, as well as the patient's age. From July 2011 to July 2015, 26 patients were included in the strategy. The mean age was 61.8 ± 14.6. In the case of essential HFS, 2 units/injection site was the standard dosage. If a patient was aged over 60 and had a reduced electromyogram (EMG) amplitude, the dosage was reduced by 0.5 units/site. In the case of post-paralytic and tumor-induced HFS, 1.5 units/site was the standard dosage. All cases were managed by alternating injections of Botox and Dysport with no physical therapy. Most HFS patients treated with the injection strategy had complete remission of HFS within 1 week. The average number of BT injection sites was 22.6 ± 6.7. The mean total BT dosage on the affected side was 28.6 ± 4.9 units. The mean duration of BT efficacy was 28.6 ± 7.7 weeks.

  16. Quantitative assessment of efficacy of dysport (botulinum toxin type A) in the treatment of idiopathic blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ching-Piao; Chiu, Ming-Chang; Yen, Der-Jen; Guo, Yuh-Cherng; Yuan, Chih-Lun; Lee, Tzu-Chi

    2005-06-01

    This study was a Phase IV, prospective, one arm, non-comparative open trial, to investigate the efficacy and safety of Dysport (Botulinum toxin type A) in patients with idiopathic blepharospasm or hemifacial spasm. During the treatment period, patients were evaluated at baseline (week 0), week 6, and week 8, 10, or 12. Thirty two women and 16 men completed the whole course of the study. The therapeutic efficacy of Dysport became evident from 1.5 to 15 days (mean+/- SD, 6.1 +/- 2.9 days). The maximal effect appeared 12.2+/-5.0 days later. Injection of Dysport achieved 72.9 (13.0% amelioration in the spasm symptom. Dysport significantly improved the following functions, such as reading, watching TV, house work, working, driving and outing alone. At the twelfth week after Dysport injection, it was still effective in relieving blepharospasm or hemifacial spasm. The most frequent adverse event was ptosis, which was noted in 9 cases and represented 18.7% of total patients. Other adverse events were very mild, although lagophthalmos and dry eyes occurred in some patients, but none manifested any corneal complications. In conclusion, Dysport injection appears to be a safe, and effective procedure - accompanied only by minor, and transit adverse events.

  17. Evaluation of concentrations of botulinum toxin A for the treatment of hemifacial spasm: a randomized double-blind crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y J; Huang, Y; Ding, Q; Gu, Z H; Pan, X L

    2015-02-06

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of two concentrations of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) for the treatment of hemifacial spasm. We randomly divided 20 patients with hemifacial spasm into high- and low-concentration groups; they were administered 50 and 25 U/mL BTX-A injection, respectively. Further, we compared the curative effects and the occurrence of adverse reactions in the two groups. Our results showed that both the concentrations of BTX-A were effective and no significant difference was observed in the onset time and therapeutic efficacy between the two groups; however, the duration of efficacy was longer in the high-concentration group than in the low-concentration group. Patients in both groups had no allergic reactions and systemic toxic reactions, but those in the high-concentration group had more serious adverse reactions and they lasted for longer durations. The adverse reactions in the two groups were not specifically treated, and they resolved in a relatively short time. In conclusion, local injection of BTX-A was effective in treating hemifacial spasm and each concentration of BTX-A had advantages and disadvantages, which indicated that the concentration of BTX-A can be selected according to the clinical characteristics and willingness of the patients.

  18. The effect and complication of botulinum toxin type a injection with serial casting for the treatment of spastic equinus foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook Joung; Sung, In Young; Jang, Dae Hyun; Yi, Jin Hwa; Lee, Jin Ho; Ryu, Ju Seok

    2011-06-01

    To identify the effect of serial casting combined with Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injection on spastic equinus foot. Twenty-nine children with cerebral palsy who had equinus foot were recruited from the outpatient clinic of Rehabilitation Medicine. The children were divided into 2 groups, one of which received serial casting after BTX-A injection, and the other which only received BTX-A injection. Serial casting started 3 weeks after the BTX-A injection, and was changed weekly for 3 times. Spasticity of the ankle joint was evaluated using the modified Ashworth scale (MAS), and the modified Tardieu scale (MTS). Gait pattern was measured using the physician's rating scale (PRS). The degree of ankle dorsiflexion and the MAS improved significantly until 12 weeks following the BTX-A injection in the serial casting group (pcasting. Our study demonstrated that the effect of BTX-A injection with serial casting was superior and lasted longer than the effect of BTX-A injection only in patients with spastic equinus foot. We therefore recommend BTX-A injection with serial casting for the treatment of equinus foot. However, physicians must also consider the possible complications associated with serial casting.

  19. A Review of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome and the Possible Role of Botulinum Toxin in the Treatment of This Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Travlos

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to discuss the classification, diagnosis, pathophysiology and management of Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS is a complex entity that is characterized by different neurovascular signs and symptoms involving the upper limb. TOS is defined as upper extremity symptoms due to compression of the neurovascular bundle in the area of the neck just above the first rib. Compression is thought to occur at one or more of the three anatomical compartments: the interscalene triangle, the costoclavicular space and the retropectoralis minor spaces. The clinical presentation can include both neurogenic and vascular symptoms. TOS can be difficult to diagnose because there is no standardized objective test that can be used and the clinician must rely on history and several positive findings on physical exam. The medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve conduction may be a sensitive way to detect pathology in the lower trunks of the brachial plexus which is promising for future research. Treatment options continue to be conservative and surgical. However, for those who have failed physical therapy there is research to suggest that botulinum toxin may help with symptom relief. However, given that there has been conflicting evidence, further research is required using randomized controlled trials.

  20. Botulinum Toxin Type A as Preoperative Treatment for Immediately Loaded Dental Implants Placed in Fresh Extraction Sockets for Full-Arch Restoration of Patients With Bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijiritsky, Eitan; Mortellaro, Carmen; Rudberg, Omri; Fahn, Miri; Basegmez, Cansu; Levin, Liran

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present report was to describe the use of Botulinum toxin type A as preoperative treatment for immediately loaded dental implants placed in fresh extraction sockets for full-arch restoration of patients with bruxism. Patients with bruxism who were scheduled to receive immediately loaded full-arch implant supported fixed restorations were included in this retrospective clinical report. To reduce the occlusal forces applied in patients with bruxism, Botulinum toxin type A was introduced prior to the implant placement procedure. Patients were followed and implant survival as well as peri-implant bone level was assessed in each periodic follow-up visit. Adverse effects were also recorded. A control group with no use of Botulinum toxin was evaluated as well. A total of 26 patients (13 test and 13 control), with bruxism, aged 59.15 ± 11.43 years on average were included in this retrospective report and received immediately loaded dental implants placed in fresh extraction sockets for full-arch restoration. The test group treatment preceded by Botulinum toxin type A injection. Maxillary arches were supported by 8 to 10 implants while the mandibular arch was supported by 6 implants. All surgeries went uneventfully and no adverse effects were observed. The average follow-up time was 32.5 ± 10.4 months (range, 18-51). In the test group, no implant failures were recorded. One patient presented with 1 to 2 mm bone loss around 4 of the implants; the other implants presented with stable bone level. In the control group 1 patient lost 2 implants and another demonstrated 2 mm bone loss around 3 of the implants. The preoperative use of Botulinum toxin in patients with bruxism undergoing full-arch rehabilitation using immediately loaded dental implants placed in fresh extraction sockets seems to be a technique that deserves attention. Further long-term, large-scale randomized clinical trials will help to determine the additional benefit of this suggested

  1. Treatment of severe drooling with botulinum toxin in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease: efficacy and possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Eigild; Karlsborg, Merete; Bardow, Allan; Lykkeaa, Joan; Nissen, Flemming H; Bakke, Merete

    2011-05-01

    Drooling in neurodegenerative diseases is associated with social impediment. Previous treatments of drooling have little effect or are effective but with severe side effects. Therefore, there is a need to test new methods such as the use of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A). This open, prospective study deals with treatment of drooling in 12 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and three with Parkinson's disease. Injections of BTX-A (Botox) were given into the parotid (25-40 units) and submandibular (15-30 units) glands with ultrasonographic guidance. After BTX-A treatment, the patients were followed for 2 months with evaluations every second week by means of self-assessed rating scales for drooling intensity, discomfort and treatment effect, and determination of unstimulated whole saliva (UWS) flow rate, and inorganic and organic UWS composition. The treatment was repeated up to four times, but seven patients dropped out shortly after the first treatment due to marked worsening of their disease-related condition. Drooling and flow were reduced (P side-effects. The maximal reductions during the observation period were 40% for drooling and 30% for flow. There was a systematic variation in flow during the observation period, with an initial decrease and then an increase followed by a second decrease. Amylase activity and total protein concentration generally increased with decreasing flow (P ≤ 0.03). Inhibition of acetylcholine release from postganglionic parasympathetic nerve endings by injection of BTX-A into salivary glands seemed useful for secondary sialorrhoea, although cyclic variations in flow may occur, possibly due to transitory sprouting and regeneration.

  2. Difference in response to botulinum toxin type A treatment between patients with benign essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Paul S; MacKenzie, Kenneth R; Cook, Anne E; Leatherbarrow, Brian

    2010-10-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) is the first-line treatment in managing benign essential blepharospasm (BEB) and hemifacial spasm (HFS). We wished to assess the difference in duration of effect and the number of BTX treatments required to treat patients with BEB and HFS. A prospective study of patients attending the BTX clinic in Manchester Royal Eye Hospital over 6 months. All treatments were administered by a single experienced ophthalmologist. A questionnaire was completed for each patient. In patients with BEB where the BTX was injected bilaterally, one side was randomized to compare with HFS patients. Patient demographics, cumulative dose of BTX, duration of BTX effect with patient satisfaction and the number of previous BTX injections were recorded. Sixty-four patients were included in the study. The mean age was 60.8 years. Among them, 30 patients had BEB and 34 had HFS. Patients with HFS received a lower mean dose of BTX than patients with BEB (12.23 units vs. 16.2 units). The patients with HFS had a longer duration of effect than patients with BEB, with fewer BTX treatments. Of all patients, 90% with HFS and BEB were satisfied with the effect of their last BTX injection. Three unsatisfied patients in the BEB group were referred on for surgical management of their disorder. We have shown that patients with BEB have a shorter duration of effect with BTX and require more frequent BTX treatments than patients with HFS, highlighting that facial dystonias in patients with BEB is more challenging to manage. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  3. Why Do Females Use Botulinum Toxin Injections?

    OpenAIRE

    Carter Singh; Amarjit Dulku; Ahmed Haq; Tayyab Bhatti; Aqib Bhatti

    2015-01-01

    Background: Botulinum toxin (BT) use for enhancing the facial features has become a commonly accepted form of aesthetic intervention. This study conducted a self-report survey of female BT users in order to explore the motivating factors in its use (cost-benefit analysis). Settings and Design: This is a cross-sectional exploratory pilot study. Materials and Methods: Self-report questionnaires were administered to 41 consecutive clients attending an independent medical practice for BT injectio...

  4. Long-Term Effect of Botulinum Toxin in the Treatment of Benign Essential Blepharospasm and Hemifacial Spasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Orçun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study, we evaluated the long-term effects of botulinum toxin A (BTA in patients diagnosed with benign essential blepharospasm (BEB and hemifacial spasm (HFS comparing the drug dose in early and late periods and mean duration of relief. Materials and Methods: The records of patients who were treated with BTA for BEB and HFS were analyzed retrospectively. The patients who had <10 injections and did not attend the follow-up examinations were excluded from the study. The first and last 5 injection doses and the mean duration of relief in 12 patients were compared between the groups. Results: Of the 12 patients, 6 (4 females, 2 males had treatment for BEB and 6 (5 females, 1 male for HFS. The mean follow-up was 66.17 months for all patients, 51.83 months in the BEB group and 90.33 months in the HFS group. Average treatment dose was 40.79 U for BEB group and 29.07 U for HFS group. Mean duration of relief time was 16.1 weeks after the first 5 injections and 18.9 weeks after the last 5 injections (p=0.172. In HFS group, mean duration of relief time was 23.6 weeks after the first 5 injections and 23.0 weeks after the last 5 injections (p=0.463. In BEB group, mean duration of relief after the last 5 injections was increased by 2.7 weeks compared with the first 5 injections. Conclusion: BTA injection is a safe and effective method in the treatment of BEB and HFS. With similar injection doses in long-term, the mean duration of relief time after treatment was unchanged in the HFS group and was increased in the BEB group, although the difference was not statistically significant. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2015; 45: 9-13

  5. Botulinum Toxin in Management of Limb Tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Zakin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Essential tremor is characterized by persistent, usually bilateral and symmetric, postural or kinetic activation of agonist and antagonist muscles involving either the distal or proximal upper extremity. Quality of life is often affected and one’s ability to perform daily tasks becomes impaired. Oral therapies, including propranolol and primidone, can be effective in the management of essential tremor, although adverse effects can limit their use and about 50% of individuals lack response to oral pharmacotherapy. Locally administered botulinum toxin injection has become increasingly useful in the management of essential tremor. Targeting of select muscles with botulinum toxin is an area of active research, and muscle selection has important implications for toxin dosing and functional outcomes. The use of anatomical landmarks with palpation, EMG guidance, electrical stimulation, and ultrasound has been studied as a technique for muscle localization in toxin injection. Earlier studies implemented a standard protocol for the injection of (predominantly wrist flexors and extensors using palpation and EMG guidance. Targeting of muscles by selection of specific activators of tremor (tailored to each patient using kinematic analysis might allow for improvement in efficacy, including functional outcomes. It is this individualized muscle selection and toxin dosing (requiring injection within various sites of a single muscle that has allowed for success in the management of tremors.

  6. A preliminary study of painless and effective transdermal botulinum toxin A delivery by jet nebulization for treatment of primary hyperhidrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iannitti T

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tommaso Iannitti,1,2 Beniamino Palmieri,3 Anna Aspiro,3 Alessandro Di Cerbo2,3 1School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK; 2Poliambulatorio del Secondo Parere, Modena, Italy; 3Department of Surgery and Surgical Specialties, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia Medical School, Surgical Clinic, Modena, Italy Background: Hyperhidrosis is a chronic disease characterized by increased sweat production. Local injections of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A have been extensively used for treatment of primary hyperhidrosis (idiopathic. The current treatment for this condition involves several intradermal injections, resulting in poor patient compliance due to injection-related pain. Therefore, new protocols, including an improved anesthetic regimen, are required. Aim: We designed the present study to determine whether JetPeel™-3, a medical device used for transdermal delivery of drugs by jet nebulization, could be used to deliver lidocaine prior to the standard multiple BTX-A injections or deliver lidocaine together with BTX-A in order to determine the protocol giving better results in terms of procedure-related pain, sweating, and patient satisfaction in subjects affected by primary axillary, palmar or plantar hyperhidrosis. Materials and methods: Twenty patients with a visual analog scale (VAS sweating score ≥ 8 cm were randomized to receive lidocaine 2% (5 mL delivered by JetPeel™-3 followed by multiple injections of BTX-A (100 units or lidocaine 2% (5 mL and BTX-A (50 units delivered together by JetPeel™-3. Effect of treatment on sweating was measured by VAS (0= minimum sweating; 10= maximum sweating at 3-month follow-up. Pain induced by the procedure was assessed by VAS (0= minimum pain; 10= maximum pain immediately after the procedure. Patient satisfaction was assessed at 3-month follow-up using a 5-point scale (1= not at all satisfied; 2= not satisfied; 3= partially satisfied; 4= satisfied; 5= highly satisfied. Results: Both

  7. Experience with botulinum toxin type A in medically intractable pediatric chronic daily headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Karman; Oas, Kimberly Hall; Mack, Kenneth J; Garza, Ivan

    2010-11-01

    In adults, botulinum toxin type A has been studied as a potentially effective treatment for chronic daily headache. For pediatric chronic daily headache, the literature evaluating efficacy of botulinum toxin type A is sparse, with no studies assessing tolerability. The purpose of this retrospective case series study was to assess tolerability and efficacy of botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of pediatric chronic daily headache. The series comprises 10 patients (ages 11-17 years) who received a standard 100-unit dose of onabotulinumtoxinA (trade name, Botox) for refractory chronic daily headache. Attention was given to therapeutic history, efficacy, and tolerability. The patients had attempted an average of 8.0 ± 2.40 S.D. therapies prior to botulinum toxin type A. Most patients reported adverse events from at least one of these prior medications. With botulinum toxin type A, four patients (40%) reported subjective but clinically meaningful relief, consisting of a decrease in headache intensity, and two patients additionally noted a decrease in headache frequency. The four responders noted improvements in quality of life. Three patients experienced minor adverse events from botulinum toxin type A. This case series suggests that botulinum toxin type A can be well tolerated and may be a useful therapeutic in pediatric patients with highly medically intractable chronic daily headache. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A comparative crossover study on the treatment of hemifacial spasm and blepharospasm: preseptal and pretarsal botulinum toxin injection techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolekha, Praween; Choolam, Arthita; Kulkantrakorn, Kongkiat

    2017-11-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) and benign essential blepharospasm (BEB) are chronic and disabling abnormal craniofacial movements that produce involuntary eyelid twitching and closure. The efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections have been accepted and widely used for the treatment of HFS and BEB. However, different injection sites may influence the effectiveness, doses, and side effects. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy, patient satisfaction, and complications of low-dose BoNT-A injections between injection at the preseptal (PS) and the pretarsal (PT) portion of the orbicularis oculi muscle. A total of 40 patients, 31 patients with HFS and 9 patients with BEB, participated in this study. Each patient received both PS and PT BoNT-A injections in a crossover design study. Latency to response, duration of improvement, the Jankovic Rating Scale (JRS), self-response scale, patient satisfaction scale, and complications were compared. Low-dose injections of BoNT-A at the PT portion produced a significantly higher response rate in terms of latency to response, duration of improvement, JRS, self-response scale, and patient satisfaction scale than the PS injections. Major side effects including ptosis and droopy eyelid were observed only after the PS injections. These findings confirmed that low-dose injections of BoNT-A at the PT portion provide more efficacy, patient satisfaction, and fewer complications than the PS injections for the treatment of involuntary eyelid twitching and closure in patients with HFS and BEB.

  9. Botulinum-A toxin in the treatment of urinary incontinence due to overactive bladder following spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gooran SH.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: We evaluated the efficacy of botulinum-A toxin (BTX-A injection into detrusor muscle in patients with incontinence resistant to anticholinergic drugs due to detrusor overactivity.Methods: Our prospective study included 12 male patients with detrusor overactivity and incontinence due to spinal cord injury, which had been unsuccessfully treated with anticholinergic medication. Under visual control through the cystoscope 300 units of BTX-A were injected into detrusor muscle at 30 sites, sparing the trigone. After the treatment patients continued to perform clean intermittent self-catheterization (CIC and clinical follow-up was planned for 6 weeks, 6 months and 9 months after treatment and urodynamic study was repeated after 6 weeks.Results: At the 6-week follow-up complete continence was restored in  9 of the 12 patients and after 6 months of 9 continent patients 1 patient lost his follow-up  from the study and 7 were still continent. After 9 months 3 patients remained continent. Mean cystometric bladder capacity (p<0.001, compliance (p<0.001, and mean post-void residual urine volume significantly increased (p<0.001, whereas maximal detrusor contraction pressure significantly decreased (p<0.001.Conclusions: BTX-A injections appears to be an effective and safe therapeutic option for overactive bladder in adult patients with spinal cord injury failing anticholinergic therapy even if these patients present with very low bladder compliance. Patients may require repeated injections after 6 months to remain continent.

  10. The use of botulinum toxin and epidural analgesia for the treatment of spasticity and pain in a patient with maple syrup urine disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Kaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 7-year-old boy, weighing 18 kg, was diagnosed with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD. He suffered from spasticity of the lower limbs and pain that did not respond to oral medications. Injections of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A at 10 sites and epidural analgesia with 0.125% bupivacaine were used to treat spasticity with good results. We conclude that BTX-A combined with epidural analgesia may be a useful treatment option for incapacitating, painful spasticity related to MSUD. This treatment modality allowed a comprehensive rehabilitation program to be completed and it lasted longer than 9 months.

  11. Bruxism secondary to brain injury treated with Botulinum toxin-A: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Maaytah, Mohammed; Jerjes, Waseem; Upile, Tahwinder; Swinson, Brian; Hopper, Colin; Ayliffe, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We report a successful treatment of bruxism in a patient with anoxic brain injury using botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A). On examination the mouth opening was 0 mm, no feeding was possible through the mouth. Botulinum toxin was injected into the masseter and temporalis; great improvement in trismus and bruxism was noted after 3 weeks. One further treatment improved the mouth opening on the following week and the patient was discharged from our care to be reviewed when required. PMID:17123443

  12. A preliminary study of painless and effective transdermal botulinum toxin A delivery by jet nebulization for treatment of primary hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannitti, Tommaso; Palmieri, Beniamino; Aspiro, Anna; Di Cerbo, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Hyperhidrosis is a chronic disease characterized by increased sweat production. Local injections of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) have been extensively used for treatment of primary hyperhidrosis (idiopathic). The current treatment for this condition involves several intradermal injections, resulting in poor patient compliance due to injection-related pain. Therefore, new protocols, including an improved anesthetic regimen, are required. We designed the present study to determine whether JetPeel™-3, a medical device used for transdermal delivery of drugs by jet nebulization, could be used to deliver lidocaine prior to the standard multiple BTX-A injections or deliver lidocaine together with BTX-A in order to determine the protocol giving better results in terms of procedure-related pain, sweating, and patient satisfaction in subjects affected by primary axillary, palmar or plantar hyperhidrosis. Twenty patients with a visual analog scale (VAS) sweating score ≥ 8 cm were randomized to receive lidocaine 2% (5 mL) delivered by JetPeel™-3 followed by multiple injections of BTX-A (100 units) or lidocaine 2% (5 mL) and BTX-A (50 units) delivered together by JetPeel™-3. Effect of treatment on sweating was measured by VAS (0= minimum sweating; 10= maximum sweating) at 3-month follow-up. Pain induced by the procedure was assessed by VAS (0= minimum pain; 10= maximum pain) immediately after the procedure. Patient satisfaction was assessed at 3-month follow-up using a 5-point scale (1= not at all satisfied; 2= not satisfied; 3= partially satisfied; 4= satisfied; 5= highly satisfied). Both treatment modalities reduced sweating at 3-month follow-up, if compared with baseline (all PDelivery of lidocaine and BTX-A by JetPeel™-3 resulted in lower procedure-related pain and reduced sweating, if compared with lidocaine delivered by JetPeel™-3 followed by multiple BTX-A injections (all Pdelivery by jet nebulization over standard injection therapy for treatment of primary

  13. Botulinum toxin in the management of lower urinary tract dysfunction: contemporary update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Francisco; Silva, Carlos

    2004-11-01

    To review the most recent experience concerning the application of botulinum toxin in the human lower urinary tract. Botulinum toxin was initially applied in the bladder of patients with spinal neurogenic detrusor overactivity and urinary incontinence, or in the urethra in cases of detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia. A large multicentric European study fully confirmed the initial expectancy in the former condition. In addition, the application of botulinum toxin was extended to the treatment of other urological disorders including non-neurogenic detrusor overactivity, non-relaxing urethral sphincter and detrusor underactivity. Interesting reports on the injection of botulinum toxin into the prostate of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia are also reviewed. Bladder injection of botulinum toxin is not yet an approved treatment for lower urinary tract dysfunction. Nevertheless, available data suggest that in the near future the toxin will become a standard therapeutic option in incontinent patients with neurogenic and non-neurogenic forms of overactive bladder, who do not respond to or do not tolerate anticholinergic medication. In addition, it might be expected that urethral botulinum toxin injections improve bladder emptying in patients with dysfunctional voiding problems besides detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia.

  14. Sustained improvement of reading symptoms following botulinum toxin A injection for convergence insufficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunte, Jon Peiter; Holmes, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We evaluated the use of botulinum toxin A in adults with convergence insufficiency in whom prior treatment had failed. METHODS: We studied 8 patients (median age 36 years, range 17 to 77 years) with reading symptoms due to convergence insufficiency defined as an exodeviation greater...... pharmacological effect. Botulinum toxin injection may be useful in management of adult convergence insufficiency, although repeat injections may be needed....

  15. Features of treatment of cervical dystonia associated with head tremor with botulinum toxin type A drugs under electro myographic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Korenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of injections of botulinum toxin typeA (BTA in the neck muscles under electromyographic control and without it to reduce head tremor, muscle tone and dystonic postures, as well as pain in patients with cervical dystonia (CD. 49 patients with CD and dystonic head tremor who received injections of BTA were examined. 33 (67 % patients received Dysport in an average dose of 695 (627; 762 units, 15 (31 % patients received Xeomin in an average dose of 262 (227; 297 units and 1 (2 % patient received 300 units of Botox. 16 (33 % patients received injections under EMGcontrol. The level of symptoms of CD and tremor before and 4 weeks after the treatment were measured by the TWSTRS and Tsui scales. Evaluation of the treatment efficacy was carried out using the patientreported Clinical Global Improvement (CGI scale, and the presence or absence of head tremor after injection was also recorded. The TWSTRS score decreased from 39 (36, 42 to 24 (21, 26, the TZUI score decreased from 9.8 (9, 10 to 4.9 (4, 6 in 4 weeks after injection (p <0.001. The level of tremor measured by Tsui scale decreased from 2.1 (1.7, 2.4 and 0.7 points (0,5; 0,9 (p <0.001. In 24 (49 % cases, complete disappearance of tremor was noted in 4 weeks after injection. Complete regression of tremor was observed significantly more frequently in patients with torticollis who received injections with EMG-control in 10(71 % cases vs. 8(32 % without it (p <0.05. 28(57 % patients noted moderate or significant improvement on the CGI scale. Pain decreased from 5.4 (3.9, 6.9 points to 2.4 (1.3, 3.6 (p <0.001 according to section 3 of TWSTRS scale, pain completely regressed in 15 (52 % patients. BTA injections are highly effective and safe treatment of CD symptoms such as dystonic posture, pain and dystonic tremor. BTA injections in the neck muscles under EMGcontrol can improve outcome in patients with torticollis associated with

  16. A critical appraisal of the evidence for botulinum toxin type A in the treatment for cervico-thoracic myofascial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mehul J; Shkolnikova, Tatyana; Nava, Andrew; Inwald, Danielle

    2014-02-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a musculoskeletal condition characterized by regional pain and muscle tenderness associated with the presence of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). The last decade has seen an exponential increase in the use of botulinum toxin (BTX) to treat MPS. To understand the medical evidence substantiating the role of therapeutic BTX injections and to provide useful information for the medical practitioner, we applied the principles of evidence-based medicine to the treatment for cervico-thoracic MPS. A search was conducted through MEDLINE (PubMed, OVID, MDConsult), EMBASE, SCOPUS and the Cochrane database for the period 1966 to 2012 using the following keywords: myofascial pain, muscle pain, botulinum toxin, trigger points, and injections. A total of 7 trials satisfied our inclusion criteria and were evaluated in this review. Although the majority of studies found negative results, our analysis identified Gobel et al.'s as the highest quality study among these prospectively randomized investigations. This was due to appropriate identification of diagnostic criteria, excellent study design and objective endpoints. The 6 other identified studies had significant failings due to deficiencies in 1 or more major criteria. We conclude that higher quality, rigorously standardized studies are needed to more appropriately investigate this promising treatment modality. © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  17. High dose botulinum toxin A for the treatment of lower extremity hypertonicity in children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Allison W; Crowner, Beth; Brunstrom, Janice E; Kissel, Abigail; Racette, Brad A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the safety profile of high dose (15–25 units/kg) of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and increased lower extremity muscle tone. We performed a retrospective review of 929 patient encounters at the Movement Disorders Center at Washington University. A total of 261 patients (105 females; 156 males) were treated during these visits, ages 6 months to 21 years (mean 8y 4mo [SD 4y 8mo]). Ambulatory ability at the time of BTX-A injection was independent ambulation (36.4%, n=95), ambulation with a walker (27.6%, n=72), and non-ambulatory (31.8%, n=83). A few patients (4.2%, n=11) were able to ambulate with a cane or crutch at the time of injection. Participants were characterized according to BTX-A dose, CP etiology, motor involvement pattern, muscles injected, ambulatory ability, and use of oral tone medications. Follow-up records were searched for reported adverse events (AEs), with a mean time to AE assessment of 6.5 weeks (SD 3.38). The AE occurrence was determined for doses of 0 to 4.9 units/kg, 5 to 9.9 units/kg, 10 to 14.9 units/kg, 15 to 19.9 units/kg, and 20 to 25 units/kg. The overall AE occurrence was 4.2%. Standard doses of BTX-A had side-effect occurrences of 3.9% for 5 to 10 units/kg and 7.6% for 10 to 15 units/kg. Among higher doses (15–20 units/kg and 20–25 units/kg) the AE occurrence was 3.5% and 8.6% respectively. No patient developed botulism. AEs were randomly distributed across dosing groups, CP etiologies, clinical phenotypes, ambulatory status, and treatment duration. All doses were associated with a significant increase in passive range of motion using the Tardieu scale. We conclude that higher dose BTX-A is safe in children with a spectrum of CP phenotypes and are well tolerated over time. PMID:17979859

  18. Nonsurgical treatment of chronic anal fissure: nitroglycerin and dilatation versus nifedipine and botulinum toxin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tranqui, Philippe; Trottier, Daniel C; Victor, Charles; Freeman, Joel B

    2006-01-01

    Surgical sphincterotomy for chronic anal fissure can cause fecal incontinence. This has led to the investigation of nonsurgical treatment options that avoid permanent damage to the internal anal sphincter...

  19. The potential role of Clostridium botulinum toxin in the treatment of equine laminitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardeman, L C

    2016-01-01

    Laminitis is a severe and painful disease in the horse that may lead to loosening of the attachment of the distal phalanx to the horny hoof capsule. Although a large variety of treatment options has come and gone since the first descriptions of laminitis, there is certainly a thus far unmet need for

  20. Botulinum toxin for myofascial pain syndromes in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Adriana; Andriolo, Régis B; Atallah, Alvaro N; da Silva, Edina M K

    2014-07-25

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 2012. Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a regional muscular pain syndrome characterised by the presence of trigger points, which are painful points in one or more muscles. The pain can be felt at the site where the trigger point is located or it can be felt away from that place when the muscle is pressed (referred pain). Botulinum toxin is a protein produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum and is a potent neurotoxin that eventually inhibits muscle contractions. It is capable of selectively weakening painful muscles and interrupting the pain cycle. To assess the effectiveness and safety of botulinum toxin A (BTXA) in the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), excluding MPS in neck and head muscles. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 2012. The search strategy for the update was the same as in the original review and we searched CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library (2013, Issue 11 of 12), MEDLINE (Ovid) (2012 to 29 November 2013) and EMBASE (Ovid) (2012 to 27 November 2013). The search strategy was composed of terms for myofascial pain and botulinum toxin. For the original review, we also searched the Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care (PaPaS) Review Group Specialised Register until December 2011, PubMed (from 1966 to 2011) and LILACS (from 1982 to 2011). There was no language restriction. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving botulinum toxin for treating participants with MPS. We excluded studies with MPS of the neck and head from this review as they have already been assessed in existing systematic reviews. We considered a diagnosis of MPS to be based on the identification of trigger points in the taut band through palpation of sensitive nodules, local twitch response and specific patterns of referred pain associated with each trigger point. Two review authors independently screened identified studies

  1. Neurorehabilitation with versus without resistance training after botulinum toxin treatment in children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Jensen, Bente Rona; Nielsen, Lone M

    2012-01-01

    PRT (n=7) or CON (n=7) two times per week for 12 weeks, following the BoNT-treatment. Outcome measurements were performed at baseline (pre BoNT), and 4 and 12 weeks post BoNT. They consisted of: ankle muscle function (maximal torque and submaximal torque steadiness of isometric ankle dorsi......- and plantarflexion and associated ankle muscle [EMG] activity), gait function (3-dimensional gait analysis), balance function (sway analysis), gross motor function (GMFM-66), and spasticity (modified Ashworth). Results: Submaximal torque control (torque steadiness) of isometric dorsiflexion improved similarly...... in the two groups, and the improvement was related to the reduction in antagonist (soleus) co-activity (Ptorque increased after PRT, whereas a reduction was seen after CON (P

  2. Botulinum toxin type A for the management of glabellar rhytids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marie Tremaine

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Anne Marie Tremaine, Jerry L McCulloughDepartment of Dermatology, University of California, Irvine, CA, USAAbstract: There is an increasing demand for minimally-invasive cosmetic procedures to arrest the aging process. Botulinum toxin type A injections are the most commonly used nonsurgical cosmetic procedures in the United States. There has been research spanning over two decades dedicated to safety, efficacy, dosing, and complications of botulinum toxin type A. There are now two Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved botulinum toxin type A options in the United States: Botox® and Dysport™, with new advances being made in the field.Keywords: botulinum toxin type A, glabella, Botox, Dysport, complications, dosing

  3. Quality of life in hemifacial spasm patient after treatment with botulinum toxin A; a 24-week, double-blind, randomized, cross-over comparison of Dysport and Neuronox study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsengdao, Subsai; Kritalukkul, Saksit

    2012-03-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a common movement disorder presented with unilateral, intermittent, irregular tonic or clonic contraction of facial expression muscles without any identifiable etiology. Comparison of quality of life (QoL) between Dysport and Neuronox has not been studied in HFS patients. To evaluate the QoL after treatment with botulinum toxin A (Dysport and Neuronox) injection in HFS patient. A 24-week, double-blind, randomized, cross-over comparison of QoL in HFS patients after being treated with botulinum toxin A (Dysport) and botulinum toxin A (Neuronox) was performed. Assessment of QoL composed of hemifacial spasm-30 (HFS-30), medical outcome study short form 36 items (SF-36), abnormal involuntary movement scale (AIMS) and center for epidemiologic studies-depression (CES-D) questionnaire, were performed at week 0, week 12, and week 24. The 24-hour HFS diary, recorded for 4 weeks after treatment was also evaluated. Total of 26 HFS patients were enrolled between May 2010 and January 2011. The mean HFS-30, AIMS and CES-D were reduced after treatment without any difference between the two groups. The mean SF-36 was not changed in both groups. However mean HFS-30 (p = 0.09), AIMS (p = 0.02) and CES-D (p spasm per day and duration of functional impairment per day in Dysport group were significantly lower than the Neuronox group (p botulinum toxin A injection.

  4. [Therapy of Hemifacial Spasm with Botulinum Toxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Wolfgang H; Laskawi, Rainer; Palmowski-Wolfe, Anja; Urban, Peter P

    2017-04-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a frequent disorder characterized by involuntary contractions of those muscles innervated by the facialis nerve on one side of the face. The symptoms can appear as tonic or clonic, intermittent or permanent. Diagnosis is based purely on clinical observation. Differential diagnosis should rely on cranial MRI, which can demonstrate a pathological contact between the nerves and vessels and exclude alternative causation. Often, the symptoms are not marked so that therapy may not be necessary. The therapy of choice is an injection of botulinum toxin to reduce the underlying pathological activity. As an alternative, decompression operation according to Jannetta can be considered, although it is frequently rejected by patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Mechanisms of Toxin Production of Food Bacteria (Clostridium botulinum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    found, such as in wounds or infant intestinal tracts. Another exanple may be the production of bacteriocins . Nonproteolytic B strain 17844 carries...l~ V- 9;-iC -’.1,- r, 4. •, . . . . . MECHANISMS OF TOXIN PRODUCTION OF FOOD BACTERIA (CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM) FINAL REPORT DR. H. U. EKLUND F. T...Mechanisms of Toxin Production of Food Bacteria Clostridium botulinum Final Y,’v/ ’ "D30 • ’q• 6, PERFORM G ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(.) S

  6. Toxin yet not toxic: Botulinum toxin in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana M.S.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Paracelsus contrasted poisons from nonpoisons, stating that “All things are poisons, and there is nothing that is harmless; the dose alone decides that something is a poison”. Living organisms, such as plants, animals, and microorganisms, constitute a huge source of pharmaceutically useful medicines and toxins. Depending on their source, toxins can be categorized as phytotoxins, mycotoxins, or zootoxins, which include venoms and bacterial toxins. Any toxin can be harmful or beneficial. Within the last 100 years, the perception of botulinum neurotoxin (BTX has evolved from that of a poison to a versatile clinical agent with various uses. BTX plays a key role in the management of many orofacial and dental disorders. Its indications are rapidly expanding, with ongoing trials for further applications. However, despite its clinical use, what BTX specifically does in each condition is still not clear. The main aim of this review is to describe some of the unclear aspects of this potentially useful agent, with a focus on the current research in dentistry.

  7. The innovative therapeutic application of botulinum toxin type A in urology patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysoula Belai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the history of medical science the use of botulinum toxin was impressive. In the early 18th century it was defined as the neurotoxin implicated in the deadly disease botulism. Today, despite the toxic action finds application in the treatment of various diseases in a wide range of Medicine. Its use in urology was revolutionary in the treatment of neurogenic bladder, refractory idiopathic detrusor overactivity and other painful syndromes. The purpose of this review was to describe the treatment option of intravesical injection of botulinum toxin, in diseases of the urinary tract. The review showed that after many test applications under the experimental studies, the botulinum toxin type A has already established itself as the new treatment of choice after failure of conservative drug dealing in patients with neuro-urological symptoms of lower urinary tract. Cases of application of botulinum toxin in Urology are related to overactive bladder, neurogenic or idiopathic etiology, as bladder pain syndrome and chronic pelvic pain syndrome. According to the guidelines of the European Union directives Urology, the intravesical botulinum toxin injections are the most effective, minimally invasive treatment which results in reducing neurogenic hyperactivity of detrusor. In conclusion, this is a safe, easy and effective method that can be applied by health professionals, helping improve patients’ quality of life with neuro-urological diseases.

  8. Antispastic therapy with botulinum toxin type A in patients with traumatic spinal cord lesion

    OpenAIRE

    Spiegl, Ulrich J.; Maier, Doris; Gonschorek, Oliver; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard; Bühren, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of botulinum toxin injections for the treatment of spasticity after traumatic spinal cord injury. Methods: 9 patients were included in this prospective designed study, with a follow-up of at least 2 years. All patients suffered from a massive spasticity after traumatic spinal cord lesion. Conservative treatment options did not show satisfying results. All patients were injected a maximal dose of 2,000 units of botulinum tox...

  9. Focal treatment of spasticity using botulinum toxin A in cerebral palsy cases of GMFCS level V: evaluation of adverse effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Tedesco

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To report on the experience of injections of botulinum toxin A (BTA in a series of patients with cerebral palsy of Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS level V.Methods:This was a retrospective case series study on 33 patients with cerebral palsy of GMFCS level V who received 89 sessions of BTA application (of which 84 were Botox® and five were other presentations, in which the basic aim was to look for adverse effects.Results:The mean number of application sessions per patient was three, and the mean age at the time of each injection was 4 + 6 years (range: 1.6–13 years. The muscles that most frequently received injections were the gastrocnemius, hamstrings, hip adductors, biceps brachii and finger flexors. The mean total dose was 193 U and the mean dose per weight was 12.5 U/kg. Only one patient received anesthesia for the injections and no sedation was used in any case. No local or systemic adverse effects were observed within the minimum follow-up of one month.Conclusion:The absence of adverse effects in our series was probably related to the use of low doses and absence of sedation or anesthesia. According to our data, BTA can be safely used for patients with cerebral palsy of GMFCS level V, using low doses and preferably without sedation or anesthesia.

  10. Poison as cure: a clinical review of botulinum toxin as an invaluable drug

    OpenAIRE

    Bali, J.; Thakur, R.

    2005-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is the most potent toxin known. It is readily absorbed from mucosal surfaces. If dispersed as an aerosol or mixed in the food or water it can lead to a large outbreak of botulism. The disease presents as a symmetric descending paralysis in an afebrile patient. Cranial nerve involvement with diplopia, dysarthria, dysphonia, dysphagia and respiratory paralysis is seen after a variable incubation period. The treatment is mainly supportive. The source of the toxin is Clostridium b...

  11. Poison as cure: a clinical review of botulinum toxin as an invaluable drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bali

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin is the most potent toxin known. It is readily absorbed from mucosal surfaces. If dispersed as an aerosol or mixed in the food or water it can lead to a large outbreak of botulism. The disease presents as a symmetric descending paralysis in an afebrile patient. Cranial nerve involvement with diplopia, dysarthria, dysphonia, dysphagia and respiratory paralysis is seen after a variable incubation period. The treatment is mainly supportive. The source of the toxin is Clostridium botulinum, an anaerobic gram-positive spore-forming organism. Some other species of Clostridium like C. butyricum and C. baratii also produce the toxin. The toxin is heat labile and can be inactivated by heating at 100°C for 10 minutes. The toxin acts at the peripheral cholinergic nerve terminals at the neuromuscular junctions, postganglionic parasympathetic ganglia, etc, and affects neurotransmitter release by inhibiting exocytosis. Clinical uses in various medical fields were found for it.

  12. [Development of motor functions and manual abilities in pediatric patients with spastic cerebral palsy after botulinum toxin treatment and complex rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klochkova, O A; Kurenkov, A L; Namazova-Baranova, L S; Mamed'iarov, A M; Zherdev, K V

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the dynamic of general motor function and manual abilities in children with spastic forms of cerebral palsy (CP) after complex rehabilitation combined with single and repeated injections of botulinum toxin A (BTA). The article presents 18 month followup of 52 patients with mono- and bilateral spastic forms of CP after single and multiple injections of botulinum toxin A and complex rehabilitation/ Patients received totally 74 injection sessions: 17 (32.7%) children--twice, 5 (9.6%) children--three times. Motor development assessment was done according to the GMFCS and GMFMS-88 scales and centile curves of normal motor development connected with these scales, hand function was classified according to the MACS scale. For the first time results of botulinum toxin therapy and rehabilitation were compared with the natural motor development of patients with different levels of motor disturbances according to centile tables. Patients with bilateral cerebral palsy improved slowly than hemiparetic and changes lasted for longer period. Level according to the MACS scale didn't depend on the gestational age of the patients, was higher in children with hemiparesis and changed for 1 level in 4 (7.7%) patients after the first botulinum toxin A injections.

  13. Functional effects of botulinum toxin type-A treatment and subsequent stretching of spastic calf muscles: a study in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niet, M. de; Bot, S.T. de; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although calf muscle spasticity is often treated with botulinum toxin type-A, the effects on balance and gait are ambiguous. Hereditary spastic paraplegia is characterized by progressive spasticity and relatively mild muscle weakness of the lower limbs. It is therefore a good model to

  14. An objective assessment of botulinum toxin type A injection in the treatment of post-facial palsy synkinesis and hyperkinesis using the synkinesis assessment questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Catriona; Venables, Vanessa; Aslet, Margaret; Nduka, Charles; Kannan, Ruben

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to provide reliable and valid evidence that botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) is a successful treatment for facial synkinesis in facial palsy by using the synkinesis assessment questionnaire (SAQ) tool. Fifty-one patients completed questionnaires pre- and post-BTX-A treatment over 103 cycles of treatment. Each patient was individually assessed and then treated according to their presenting symptoms with a dosage in each injection site of between 0.5 and 5 U of BTX-A. A two-tailed paired samples t-test was used to compare the scores for each question before and after treatment. A significant difference was found between all scores before and after treatment at the level of p < 0.05. There was not only an improvement in the mean score in the post-treatment group but also a smaller spread of scores in the post-treatment group than in the pre-treatment group. The study showed that SAQ scores decreased significantly for every question on the SAQ after treatment. This indicates that BTX-A is an effective treatment for synkinesis, adding further weight to current evidence. The study also indicated that BTX-A continues to be effective even after three rounds of treatment, with a significant decrease in overall scores after each treatment cycle. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Keratoconus progression is not inhibited by reducing eyelid muscular force with botulinum toxin A treatment: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adimara da Candelaria Renesto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate whether reducing eyelid muscular force through the administration of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A to the orbicularis oculi muscles of patients with keratoconus affected corneal parameters indicative of disease progression. Methods: In this prospective parallel randomized clinical trial, 40 eyes of 40 patients with keratoconus were randomized into equally sized control and BTX-A groups. Patients in the BTX-A group received subcutaneous BTX-A injections into the orbicularis muscle. The control group received no intervention. Palpebral fissure height, best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA, and corneal topographic parameters were evaluated at baseline and at 3-, 6-, 12-, and 18-month follow-ups. Results: The mean ± standard deviation vertical palpebral fissure heights were 9.74 ± 1.87 mm and 9.45 ± 1.47 mm at baseline in the control and BTX-A groups, respectively, and 10.0 ± 1.49 mm and 9.62 ± 1.73 mm at 18 months, with no significant difference between the groups (p=0.337. BSCVA values were 0.63 ± 0.56 and 0.60 ± 0.27 at baseline in the control and BTX-A groups (p=0.643, and 0.52 ± 0.59 and 0.45 ± 0.26 at 18 months, again with no significant difference between the groups (p=0.452. In addition, there were no statistical differences between the groups at 18 months for the three keratometry topographic parameters: flattest (K1, steepest (K2, and mean (Km keratometry (p=0.562. Conclusion: BTX-A inhibition of eyelid force generation did not result in detectable changes in corneal parameters in keratoconic patients during 18 months of follow-up.

  16. Botulinum toxin in the management of sialorrhoea in acquired brain injury

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, A

    2016-06-01

    Sialorrhoea as a consequence of severe acquired brain injury can significantly negatively impact on quality of life. Medications used in its management have many side effects which can cause problems in the severely disabled. Botulinum toxin is an effective treatment of sialorrhoea in a number of neurological conditions but may also have a role to play in the management of sialorrhoea following severe ABI. We report on 4 cases of sialorrhoea following acquired brain injury causing a variety of problems, whose parotid glands were injected with Botulinum toxin type A (Dysport) 50mu each, under ultrasound guidance. All cases had a clinically and statistically significant reduction in drooling as measured by the teacher drooling scale (p=0.005) and carers Visual Analogue Scale (p=0.012). There were no side effects reported. Botulinum toxin is an effective treatment for sialorrhoea associated with acquired brain injury.

  17. Use of Botulinum toxin in 55 children with cerebral palsy

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    Mohammadi M

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin A (BTA inhibits presynaptic release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction and has reportedly been successful in the treatment of spastic disorders.To evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin on cerebral palsied children with spastic or mixed type of the disease, especially those patiens having spasticity as a cardinal symptom without joint contracture, we designed the following study. Ninety-one cases (55 of referred patients to pediatic Neurology outpatient clinics of children’s Medical Center were given BTA injections in affected muscles of the lower limb. They were reevaluating 3 to 5 weeks and 3 months later for type of walking and range of affected joints’ movement. The study showed a clinically significant gait improvement in 71.2% of patients (P<0.0005 and also an overall increased range of motion in affected limbs after BTA injection (P<0.04. Side effects occurred only in two cases as transient generalized weakness, gent recurvatum and ptosis. Drug effectiveness was time-limited, lasting abot 3 months in all patients ( a golden time for rehabilitation therapists to improve the patients’ condition. Overall, BTA has improved both the type of walking as well as the range of joints motion in our patients. So its’ administration is suggested in cerebral palsied children if the spasticity is a major and disabling sign

  18. Effect of Botulinum Toxin and Surgery among Spasmodic Dysphonia Patients : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esch, Babette F; Wegner, Inge; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The effect of botulinum toxin among patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD) is temporary. To optimize long-term treatment outcome, other therapy options should be evaluated. Alternative treatment options for AdSD comprise several surgical treatments, such as thyroarytenoid

  19. Why do females use botulinum toxin injections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Botulinum toxin (BT use for enhancing the facial features has become a commonly accepted form of aesthetic intervention. This study conducted a self-report survey of female BT users in order to explore the motivating factors in its use (cost-benefit analysis. Settings and Design: This is a cross-sectional exploratory pilot study. Materials and Methods: Self-report questionnaires were administered to 41 consecutive clients attending an independent medical practice for BT injections for cosmetic purposes. All the participants were females and represented a range of age groups from the 20s to above 60s. Items in the nonstandardized questionnaire elicited questions relating to the reasons for and against BT use. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive analysis was used rather than inferential statistics, and involved ranking the responses according to the most likely reasons for using BT and disadvantages of its use. Results: In general, the primary motivating factor for BT use was to improve self-esteem, and the greatest disadvantage involved financial costs associated with the procedure. Conclusions: The main findings of this study suggest that females who use BT for aesthetic purposes are motivated by personal psychological gains (intrapersonal attributes rather than social gains (interpersonal factors. In other words, they do not believe that having BT will equate to being treated any better by other people but would rather provide them with confidence and satisfaction regarding their self-image.

  20. Quantitative reduction of saliva production with botulinum toxin type B injection into the salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk-Gonzales, Melissa; Odderson, Ib R

    2005-03-01

    Drooling is common in patients with neurological disorders. Recently, botulinum toxin type B has been shown to be effective in the treatment of drooling. The authors present a unique case of a 57-year-old man with a history of a brainstem stroke and severe drooling. The patient's parotid and submandibular glands were injected under ultra-sound guidance with botulinum toxin type B. Saliva was collected and quantified before and after the injections by 2 different collection methods: suctioning and dental rolls. Total saliva production decreased by 23.8% after injection of the parotid glands and by 85.8% after submandibular injection compared to the preinjection level. The 2 methods demonstrated similar results. In addition, the patient experienced less drooling and increased participation in therapies without any side effects. This case demonstrates that saliva secretion and drooling can effectively be treated by injections of botulinum toxin type B into the salivary glands.

  1. Applications of botulinum toxin in dentistry: A comprehensive review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sanjeev; Kharbanda, Smriti; Pal, U. S.; Shah, Vinit

    2015-01-01

    The horizons of treatment options in dentistry are broadening rapidly. In this scenario, applications of unconventional treatment options like use of botulinum toxin (BT) are gaining momentum. The use of BT has been popularly accepted in esthetic procedures like management of facial wrinkles; however, it has been documented to be successful in a variety of conditions. Of particular interest to this paper are applications of BT in the maxillofacial region, concerned to dentistry. BT offers a transient, reversible, relatively safe treatment option to many conditions of interest to a dental practitioner. Dental surgeons by their virtue of being extensively aware of the anatomy of faciomaxillary region are a potential pool of operators who can use BT in their armamentarium with minor skill enhancement and thus widen the perspective of alternative, minimally invasive options to refractory conditions or invasive protocols. PMID:27390488

  2. The use of botulinum toxin type A in cosmetic facial procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, G. W. C.; Pijpe, J.; Jansma, J.

    Over the past decade, facial cosmetic procedures have become more commonplace ill dentistry and oral and maxillofacial surgery. An increasing number of patients seek minimal invasive procedures. One of the most requested procedures is treatment with botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA). Treatment of

  3. Hemicrania continua responsive to botulinum toxin type a: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Modar; Ahmed, Fayyaz

    2013-05-01

    Hemicrania continua (HC) is a primary headache disorder with full response to indomethacin as one of its diagnostic criteria; however, indomethacin's side effects could limit its use in HC. We report a 33-year-old lady whose headache fulfilled the criteria for HC, but the patient developed gastric side effect to indomethacin and did not respond to other pharmacological treatments; however, injecting botulinum toxin type A has led to complete resolution of all of her symptoms. We hypothesize the mechanism by which botulinum toxin type A has led to our results through reviewing recent functional neuroimaging findings used to understand the pathophysiology of different primary headache disorders. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  4. “Home of Younger Skin” (HOYS program: Defining the change in apparent skin age after facial treatment with botulinum toxin and dermal fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman GJ

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Greg J Goodman, Stefania RobertsSouth Yarra, Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: Objective and subjective scales estimating improvement in both clinical studies and clinical practice are becoming more mainstream. However, the use of a system to analyze improvement in aging with a multiplicity of treatments would be useful. The purpose of this study was to use a recently developed educative and patient self-assessment program (“Home of Younger Skin”, HOYS for assessment of the effect of facial treatment with neurotoxins and filling agents in terms of decreasing apparent age.Methods: Four patients underwent facial treatments with neurotoxins and dermal fillers by an experienced blinded physician and were assessed twice utilizing an age analysis program (HOYS, once before and then 6 weeks after completion of treatment.Results: The four patients showed an average reduction in apparent facial age of 7.5 years. The individual “regions” differed in their reductions. The upper face showed a decline of 13.5 years, the periorbital region 9.25 years, the mid face 4.5 years, and the lower face 12.25 years.Conclusion: Use of this previously validated self-assessment program may prove to be a useful measure of patient-reported improvement with treatment.Keywords: HOYS, rejuvenation, botulinum toxin, fillers, laser, aging

  5. Contralateral botulinum toxin injection to improve facial asymmetry after acute facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin

    2013-02-01

    The application of botulinum toxin to the healthy side of the face in patients with long-standing facial paralysis has been shown to be a minimally invasive technique that improves facial symmetry at rest and during facial motion, but our experience using botulinum toxin therapy for facial sequelae prompted the idea that botulinum toxin might be useful in acute cases of facial paralysis, leading to improve facial asymmetry. In cases in which medical or surgical treatment options are limited because of existing medical problems or advanced age, most patients with acute facial palsy are advised to await spontaneous recovery or are informed that no effective intervention exists. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin treatment for facial asymmetry in 18 patients after acute facial palsy who could not be optimally treated by medical or surgical management because of severe medical or other problems. From 2009 to 2011, nine patients with Bell's palsy, 5 with herpes zoster oticus and 4 with traumatic facial palsy (10 men and 8 women; age range, 22-82 yr; mean, 50.8 yr) participated in this study. Botulinum toxin A (Botox; Allergan Incorporated, Irvine, CA, USA) was injected using a tuberculin syringe with a 27-gauge needle. The amount injected per site varied from 2.5 to 3 U, and the total dose used per patient was 32 to 68 U (mean, 47.5 +/- 8.4 U). After administration of a single dose of botulinum toxin A on the nonparalyzed side of 18 patients with acute facial paralysis, marked relief of facial asymmetry was observed in 8 patients within 1 month of injection. Decreased facial asymmetry and strengthened facial function on the paralyzed side led to an increased HB and SB grade within 6 months after injection. Use of botulinum toxin after acute facial palsy cases is of great value. Such therapy decreases the relative hyperkinesis contralateral to the paralysis, leading to greater symmetric function. Especially in patients with medical

  6. International consensus statement for the use of botulinum toxin treatment in adults and children with neurological impairments--introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquenazi, A; Novak, I; Sheean, G; Singer, B J; Ward, A B

    2010-08-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is most commonly used to reduce focal over-activity in skeletal muscle, although newer indications such as management of drooling, pain and tremor are emerging. Treatment of spasticity incorporating BoNT is usually part of an integrated multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme. Prior to initiating this therapy, specific functional limitations, goals and expected outcomes of treatment should be discussed with the patient/carers. Muscle selection and the order/priority of treatment should be agreed. Treatment goals may involve increasing active or passive function or the avoidance of secondary complications or impairment progression. This paper describes the basic science mechanisms of the action of BoNT and subsequent nerve recovery and introduces a supplement comprising the best available evidence and expert opinion from international panels on questions of assessment, indications, BoNT regimen, adjunctive therapy, expected outcomes and recommended monitoring. Speciality areas reviewed include Paediatric Lower Limb Hypertonicity, Paediatric Upper Limb Hypertonicity, Adult Lower Limb Hypertonicity, Adult Upper Limb Hypertonicity, Cervical Dystonia, Drooling and Pain and Niche Indications. There is good quality scientific evidence to support the efficacy of BoNT to reduce muscle over-activity in the limbs secondary to central nervous system disorders in adults and children, to address primary or secondary cervical dystonia, to reduce saliva flow and to treat some pain syndromes. There is emergent evidence for the efficacy of BoNT to reduce focal tremor, to treat other types of pain including neuropathic pain and also to improve function following treatment of focal muscle over-activity.

  7. Toxina botulínica no tratamento da dor Toxina botulínica en el tratamiento del dolor Botulinum toxin in pain treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Carlos Gomes Colhado

    2009-06-01

    indicaciones, todavía están en fase de comprobación con relación a su eficacia. El objetivo de este estudio fue revisar el historial, las propiedades farmacológicas y las aplicaciones clinicas de la TxB, cuando se usa en el tratamiento de dolores de diferentes etiologías. CONTENIDO: La TxB es el producto de la fermentación del Clostridium Botulinum, una bacteria anaerobia Gram-positiva. Comercialmente, las TxB existen bajo las formas A y B, agentes biológicos obtenidos laboratorialmente. La TxB, una neurotoxina que posee una alta afinidad por las sinapsis colinérgicas, ocasiona un bloqueo en la liberación de acetilcolina por el terminal nervioso, sin alterar la conducción neural de las señales eléctricas o la síntesis y el almacenaje de acetilcolina. Se ha comprobado que la TxB puede debilitar selectivamente la musculatura dolorosa, interrumpiendo el ciclo espasmo-dolor. Con relación a él, varias publicaciones han demostrado la eficacia y la seguridad de la TxB-A en el tratamiento de la cefalea tipo tensión, migraña, dolor lumbar crónico y dolor miofacial. CONCLUSIONES: La TxB-A es segura y se tolera muy bien en los desórdenes dolorosos crónicos, donde los regímenes de farmacoterapia pueden de hecho provocar efectos colaterales. Otra ventaja es la reducción del uso de analgésicos y el tiempo de acción de 3 a 4 meses por dosis. Sin embargo, investigaciones futuras serán necesarias para establecer la eficacia de la TxB-A en los desórdenes dolorosos crónicos y su exacto mecanismo en el alivio del dolor, como también su potencial en tratamientos multifactoriales.BACKGROOUND AND OBJECTIVES: Botulinum toxin (BTX is one of the most potent bacterial toxins known and its effectiveness in the treatment of some pain syndromes is well known. However, the efficacy of some of its indications is still in the process of being confirmed. The objective of this study was to review the history, pharmacological properties, and clinical applications of BTX in the

  8. Drooling in Parkinson's disease: A randomized controlled trial of incobotulinum toxin A and meta-analysis of Botulinum toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswami, Pushpa; Geisbush, Thomas; Tarulli, Andrew; Raynor, Elizabeth; Gautam, Shiva; Tarsy, Daniel; Gronseth, Gary

    2016-09-01

    Botulinum toxins are a therapeutic option for drooling in Parkinson's Disease (PD). The aims of this study were to: 1. evaluate the efficacy of incobotulinum toxin A for drooling in PD. 2. Perform a meta-analysis of studies of Botulinum toxins for drooling in PD. 1. Primary study: Randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, cross over trial. Incobotulinum toxin (100 units) or saline was injected into the parotid (20 units) and submandibular (30 units) glands. Subjects returned monthly for three evaluations after each injection. Outcome measures were saliva weight and Drooling Frequency and Severity Scale. 2. Systematic review of literature, followed by inverse variance meta-analyses using random effects models. 1. Primary Study: Nine of 10 subjects completed both arms. There was no significant change in the primary outcome of saliva weight one month after injection in the treatment period compared to placebo period (mean difference, gm ± SD: -0.194 ± 0.61, range: -1.28 to 0.97, 95% CI -0.71 to 0.32). Secondary outcomes also did not change. 2. Meta-analysis of six studies demonstrated significant benefit of Botulinum toxin on functional outcomes (effect size, Cohen's d: -1.32, CI -1.86 to -0.78). The other studies used a higher dose of Botulinum toxin A into the parotid glands. This study did not demonstrate efficacy of incobotulinum toxin A for drooling in PD, but lacked precision to exclude moderate benefit. The parotid/submandibular dose-ratio may have influenced results. Studies evaluating higher doses of incobotulinum toxin A into the parotid glands may be useful. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Therapeutic synergism in the treatment of post-stroke arm paresis utilizing botulinum toxin, robotic therapy, and constraint-induced movement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebayashi, Takashi; Amano, Satoru; Hanada, Keisuke; Umeji, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kayoko; Koyama, Tetsuo; Domen, Kazuhisa

    2014-11-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BtxA) injection, constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT), and robotic therapy (RT) each represent promising approaches to enhance arm motor recovery after stroke. To provide more effective treatment for a 50-year-old man with severe left spastic hemiparesis, we attempted to facilitate CIMT with adaptive approaches to extend the wrist and fingers using RT for 10 consecutive weeks after BtxA injection. This combined treatment resulted in substantial improvements in arm function and the amount of arm use in activities of daily living, and may be effective for stroke patients with severe arm paresis. However, we were unable to sufficiently prove the efficacy of combined treatment based only on a single case. To fully elucidate the efficacy of the combined approach for patients with severe hemiparesis after stroke, future studies of a larger number of patients are needed. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Botulinum toxin therapy for treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis: review and recommendations of the IAB-Interdisciplinary Working Group for Movement Disorders task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Dirk; Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Bohlega, Saeed; Chahidi, Abderrahmane; Chung, Tae Mo; Ebke, Markus; Jacinto, L Jorge; Kaji, Ryuji; Koçer, Serdar; Kanovsky, Petr; Micheli, Federico; Orlova, Olga; Paus, Sebastian; Pirtosek, Zvezdan; Relja, Maja; Rosales, Raymond L; Sagástegui-Rodríguez, José Alberto; Schoenle, Paul W; Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Timerbaeva, Sofia; Walter, Uwe; Saberi, Fereshte Adib

    2017-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BT) therapy is an established treatment of spasticity due to stroke. For multiple sclerosis (MS) spasticity this is not the case. IAB-Interdisciplinary Working Group for Movement Disorders formed a task force to explore the use of BT therapy for treatment of MS spasticity. A formalised PubMed literature search produced 55 publications (3 randomised controlled trials, 3 interventional studies, 11 observational studies, 2 case studies, 35 reviews, 1 guideline) all unanimously favouring the use of BT therapy for MS spasticity. There is no reason to believe that BT should be less effective and safe in MS spasticity than it is in stroke spasticity. Recommendations include an update of the current prevalence of MS spasticity and its clinical features according to classifications used in movement disorders. Immunological data on MS patients already treated should be analysed with respect to frequencies of MS relapses and BT antibody formation. Registration authorities should expand registration of BT therapy for spasticity regardless of its aetiology. MS specialists should consider BT therapy for symptomatic treatment of spasticity.

  11. Safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin A for the treatment of spasticity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Costa, Juan F; Máñez, Inmaculada; Alabajos, Ana; Guevara Salazar, Maricruz; Roda, Cristina; Sevilla, Teresa

    2016-10-01

    Spasticity can be a very disabling problem in some amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) phenotypes, such as upper motor neuron-dominant ALS (UMN-D ALS) and primary lateral sclerosis (PLS). Our aim is to describe the safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin A (BoTox-A) for improving gait in those ALS phenotypes. UMN-D ALS and PLS outpatients experiencing gait disturbances, secondary to moderate-to-severe spasticity despite optimized oral medication, were offered BoTox-A treatment. Stretching exercises were indicated to complement BoTox-A effect, and ankle-foot orthotics were prescribed when appropriate. Tolerance (muscle strength, disease progression rate) and efficacy (10-m walk test) were measured at baseline and after treatment. Eight out of 122 ALS outpatients were offered BoTox-A treatment. One declined and the other seven were administered BoTox-A in the lower limbs, every 5-8 months. All of them experienced improvement in the clinical outcome and all but one referred subjective improvement. Moreover, after a median follow-up of 16 months and three injections, BoTox-A effect was maintained with no adverse events. This study provides class IV evidence that BoTox-A is safe , and could be beneficial in the short term and long term in a subset of ALS patients with moderate-to-severe spasticity.

  12. Botulinum toxin a injection of the obturator internus muscle for chronic perineal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajraj, Noor M

    2005-05-01

    Chronic perineal pain is often a difficult condition to manage. Current treatments include pudendal nerve injections and pudendal nerve release surgery. The obturator internus muscle has a close relationship to the pudendal nerve and might be a potential target for therapeutic intervention. A case is presented of refractory perineal pain that was successfully treated by injecting the obturator internus muscle with botulinum toxin A.

  13. Regional disparities in botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) therapy for spasticity in Sweden: budgetary consequences of closing the estimated treatment gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertzgaard, P; Anhammer, M; Forsmark, A

    2017-03-01

    As no national treatment guidelines for spasticity have been issued in Sweden, different regional treatment practices may potentially occur. This study examines botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) treatment for spasticity on a regional level in Sweden and presents budgetary consequences of closing the estimated treatment gap. Prevalence of spasticity in Sweden was estimated from published data. Regional sales data for BoNT-A were acquired from IMS Health. A set proportion of hospital BoNT-A use was assumed to represent treatment of spasticity. Total intervention cost of BoNT-A treatment was gathered from healthcare regional tariffs, while costs associated with spasticity were derived from publications on multiple sclerosis and stroke. Results show that the regional variation in treatment of spasticity with BoNT-A is large, with approximately every fourth patient being treated in Southern healthcare region compared to every tenth in the Stockholm-Gotland or Western healthcare regions. The incremental cost of filling the reported treatment gap was also assessed and was estimated at around 9.4 million EUR. However, for the incremental cost to be offset by savings in spasticity-related costs, only a small proportion of treatment responders (defined as patients transitioning to a lower severity grade of spasticity) was required (12%). The study revealed apparent regional disparities of BoNT-A treatment for spasticity in Sweden. The results further suggest that the incremental cost of eliminating the treatment gap has a high probability of being offset by savings in direct costs, even at a low proportion of the patients reaching clinical improvement. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. No clinical or neurophysiological evidence of botulinum toxin diffusion to non-injected muscles in patients with hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzano, C; Bagnato, S; Gilio, F; Fabbrini, G; Berardelli, A

    2006-04-01

    Botulinum toxin injected into a muscle may diffuse to nearby muscles thus producing unwanted effects. In patients with hemifacial spasm, we evaluated clinically and neurophysiologically, whether botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) diffuses from the injection site (orbicularis oculi) to untreated muscles (orbicularis oris from the affected side and orbicularis oculi and oris from the unaffected side). We studied 38 patients with idiopathic hemifacial spasm. Botulinum toxin was injected into the affected orbicularis oculi muscle alone (at 3 standardized sites) at a clinically effective dose. Patients were studied before (T0) and 3-4 weeks after treatment (T1). We evaluated the clinical effects of botulinum toxin and muscle strength in the affected and unaffected muscles. We also assessed the peak-to-peak amplitude compound muscle action potential (CMAP) recorded from the orbicularis oculi and orbicularis oris muscles on both sides after supramaximal electrical stimulation of the facial nerve at the stylomastoid foramen. In all patients, botulinum toxin treatment reduced muscle spasms in the injected orbicularis oculi muscle and induced no muscle weakness in the other facial muscles. The CMAP amplitude significantly decreased in the injected orbicularis oculi muscle, but remained unchanged in the other facial muscles (orbicularis oris muscle on the affected side and contra-lateral unaffected muscles). In conclusion, in patients with hemifacial spasm, botulinum toxin, at a clinically effective dose, induces no clinical signs of diffusion and does not reduce the CMAP size in the nearby untreated orbicularis oris or contralateral facial muscles.

  15. Effect of Cultured Celery Juice, Temperature, and Product Composition on the Inhibition of Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum Toxin Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Max C; Wanless, Brandon J; David, Jairus R D; Kottapalli, Bala; Lineback, D Scott; Talley, Ryan J; Glass, Kathleen A

    2017-08-01

    Clostridium botulinum may be of concern in prepared refrigerated meals, for which strict cold chain management cannot be guaranteed. This study evaluated the effect of temperature, product composition, and cultured celery juice powder (CCJP) as a source of nitrite on the inhibition of botulinum toxin formation in two experimental (meat- and vegetable-based) prepared meals. Data obtained from the challenge study were compared with a published mathematical model to determine whether the model is fail-safe with regard to the tested meals. Treatments were inoculated with proteolytic C. botulinum, vacuum packaged, cooked at 90°C for 10 min, and assayed for botulinum toxin at appropriate intervals in samples stored at 10, 15, or 20°C for up to 8 weeks. None of the treatments stored at 10°C for 8 weeks supported toxin production by proteolytic C. botulinum. The addition of CCJP delayed toxin production by 1 and 3 weeks in cauliflower potatoes and in Dijon pork, respectively, stored at 15°C. Toxin production was delayed by 1 week at 20°C when CCJP was added to the cauliflower potatoes. This study found that the predictive model was fail-safe but was overly conservative for the experimental meals described. Finally, this study confirms that product composition, the addition of nitrite via CCJP, storage time, and temperature play important roles in the inhibition of toxin formation by proteolytic C. botulinum.

  16. Distonia laríngea: relato de caso e tratamento com toxina botulínica Laryngeal dystonia: case report and treatment with botulinum toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor José Barbosa Santos

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Distonia laríngea, ou disfonia espasmódica, é caracterizada por contrações involuntárias e inapropriadas da musculatura responsável pela fonação, sendo a do tipo adutora a mais comum. Caracteriza-se por quebras fonatórias, sendo seu diagnóstico confirmado por videolaringoestroboscopia. O tratamento de escolha é feito com a aplicação direta de toxina botulínica nos músculos responsáveis pelo movimento incoordenado. O objetivo desse trabalho é relatar o caso de uma paciente com diagnóstico de distonia laríngea do tipo adutora, tratada com toxina botulínica e discutir as vantagens e observações descritas na literatura a respeito desse tratamento.Laryngeal dystonia or spasmodic dysphonia is characterized by involuntary and innapropiate spasms of vocal muscles, having the adductor type as the most common one. It is chacterized by strain-strangled voice with pitch breaks. Diagnosis is made by means of videolaryngostroboscopic exam. The treatment of choice is done with botulinum toxin directly injected in the muscles responsible for the mismatched movement. The aim of this study is to report on an adductor- type dysphonia patient and to discuss the advantages and observations about this treatment reported in the literature.

  17. Single treatments that have lasting effects: some thoughts on the antidepressant effects of ketamine and botulinum toxin and the anxiolytic effect of psilocybin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Simon N

    2013-03-01

    Recent clinical trials suggest that 3 single biological treatments have effects that persist. Based on research showing that the muscles involved in facial expressions can feed back to influence mood, a single trial diminishing glabella frown lines with botulinum toxin demonstrated a significant antidepressant effect for 16 weeks. Based primarily on research with animal models of depression suggesting that glutamate may be involved in depression, the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist ketamine has been tested in several trials. A single dose decreased depression for up to a week. The reported effects of the use of mushrooms containing psilocybin by a number of cultures around the world has stimulated several trials showing beneficial effects of a single dose of psilocybin for over a year in healthy people, and for up to 3 months in patients with anxiety disorders who have advanced cancer. This article discusses these studies, their rationale, their possible mechanisms of action, the future clinical research required to establish these therapies and the basic research required to optimize single treatments that have lasting effects.

  18. Botulinum toxin injection: a review of injection principles and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Rapp

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the favorable outcomes seen using botulinum toxin (BTX for voiding dysfunction using BTX, a standardized technique and protocol for toxin injection is not defined. We reviewed the current literature on intravesical BTX injection for DO (detrusor overactivity. Specific attention was placed on defining optimal injection protocol, including dose, volume, and injection sites. In addition, we sought to describe a standard technique to BTX injection.

  19. Long-term efficacy of botulinum toxin A for treatment of blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm, and spastic entropion: a multicentre study using two drug-dose escalation indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillino, S; Raimondi, G; Guépratte, N; Damiani, S; Cillino, M; Di Pace, F; Casuccio, A

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the long-term effectiveness and safety of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A) treatment in patients with blepharospasm (BEB), hemifacial spasm (HFS), and entropion (EN) and to use for the first time two modified indexes, 'botulin toxin escalation index-U' (BEI-U) and 'botulin toxin escalation index percentage' (BEI-%), in the dose-escalation evaluation. All patients in this multicentre study were followed for at least 10 years and main outcomes were clinical efficacy, duration of relief, BEI-U and BEI-%, and frequency of adverse events. BEB, HFS, and EN patients received a mean BoNT-A dose with a significant inter-group difference (P<0.0005, respectively). The mean (+/-SD) effect duration was statistically different (P=0.009) among three patient groups. Regarding the BoNT-A escalation indexes, the mean (+/-SD) values of BEI-U and BEI-% were statistically different (P=0.035 and 0.047, respectively) among the three groups. In BEB patients, the BEI-% was significantly increased in younger compared with older patients (P=0.008). The most frequent adverse events were upper lid ptosis, diplopia, ecchymosis, and localized bruising. This long-term multicentre study supports a high efficacy and good safety profile of BoNT-A for treatment of BEB, HFS, and EN. The BEI indexes indicate a significantly greater BoNT-A-dose escalation for BEB patients compared with HFS or EN patients and a significantly greater BEI-% in younger vsolder BEB patients. These results confirm a greater efficacy in the elderly and provide a framework for long-term studies with a more flexible and reliable evaluation of drug-dose escalation.

  20. [Molecular mechanism of action of tetanus toxin and botulinum neurotoxins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, B

    1994-02-01

    Tetanus toxin and botulinum neurotoxins are di-chain proteins of 150 kD molecular weight. They are produced by bacteria of the Clostridium genus. These toxins act on the nervous system by inhibiting neurotransmitter release (glycine and GABA in the case of tetanus toxin; acetylcholine in the case of botulinum neurotoxins) thus inducing the spastic or flaccid paralysis that characterizes tetanus and botulism, respectively. Their cellular mechanism of action involves three main steps, namely binding to the neurone membrane, internalization and intracellular blockade of the release mechanism for neurotransmitters. Membrane acceptors for these toxins are not yet fully identified; they would consist of membrane gangliosides and proteins. The internalization step would be achieved by endocytosis. Recent findings show that both binding and internalization are mediated only by the heavy chain of the toxins whereas the intracellular blockade of neurotransmitter release involves their light chain alone. The light chain has been identified as a zinc metalloprotease and its substrates would be proteins involved in the neurotransmitter release mechanism. The target of tetanus toxin and of botulinum neurotoxin type B is VAMP/synaptobrevin, a membrane protein of the synaptic vesicles of nerve cell terminals.

  1. Botulinum toxin in cervical dystonia: low dosage with electromyographic guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brans, J. W.; de Boer, I. P.; Aramideh, M.; Ongerboer de Visser, B. W.; Speelman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    Sixty patients with idiopathic cervical dystonia were treated a total of 240 times with botulinum toxin type A (BTA). Selected muscles were injected with BTA under electromyographic (EMG) guidance. The clinical effect was measured on the Tsui scale and a 10-point anchored visual analogue scale. A

  2. Bilateral versus posterior injection of botulinum toxin in the internal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (Botox, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) were diluted in saline to a concentration of 50 U/ml immediately before injection. Patients in group 1 were treated by injection of botulinum toxin into each side of the internal sphincter with a 25G needle, under direct vision and guided by digital examination. (a total of 40 U per patient).

  3. The use of Botulinum Toxin in Cosmetic Dermatology: Implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) though a potentially lethal substance responsible for botulinism, it has however over the years found a place in cosmetic derrmatological procedures for the reduction of the tell tale signs of ageing. Locally injected BoNT has the capacity to spread to adjacent and distant tissues as well as systemic ...

  4. The use of botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of HTLV-1-associated overactive bladder refractory to conventional therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Abraão Carneiro Neto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Urinary symptoms occur in 19% of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1-infected patients who do not fulfill criteria for HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP and in almost 100% of HAM/TSP patients. Few studies have evaluated therapies for overactive bladder (OAB caused by HTLV-1 infection. This case report describes the effect of onabotulinum toxin A on the urinary manifestations of three patients with HAM/TSP and OAB symptoms. The patients were intravesically administered 200 units of Botox®. Their incontinence episodes improved, and their OAB symptoms scores (OABSS reduced significantly. These data indicate that Botox® should be a treatment option for OAB associated with HTLV-1 infection.

  5. Botulinum toxin type A in chronic plantar fasciitis: clinical effects one year after injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Llopis, Ismael V; Gómez-Gallego, Diego; Mondéjar-Gómez, Francisco J; López-García, Alfredo; Climent-Barberá, Jose M; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Carmen M

    2013-08-01

    To determine whether the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A in chronic plantar fasciitis was maintained for more than six months after treatment. Observational follow-up study. Twenty-four patients who received botulinum toxin type A injection in a previous randomized study of chronic plantar fasciitis (active treatment group) and who presented a benefit one month after treatment. A visual analogue scale for pain and the Foot Health Status Questionnaire were used to re-evaluate results 12 months after the botulinum toxin injection. No further injections of botulinum toxin had been administered during the follow-up period. Patients were also asked to give a subjective assessment of treatment outcome. At 12 months, compared with the six-month evaluation, there was a further improvement in foot pain measured using the visual analogue scale, though this did not reach significance (1.78 at 6 months versus 1.22 at 12 months; P = 0.142). However, there were significant improvements in two domains of Foot Health Status Questionnaire: foot pain (91.11 at 6 months versus 80.00 at 12 months; P = 0.001) and foot function (96.19 at 6 months versus 89.38 at 12 months; P = 0.047). There was a small, non-significant deterioration in the shoe and foot health domains. Satisfaction with the outcome was good or very good in the large majority of patients. In patients with chronic plantar fasciitis, the positive effect detected six months after treatment with botulinum toxin type A was maintained at 12 months and there was a further improvement in pain and foot function.

  6. Tetanus: Pathophysiology, Treatment, and the Possibility of Using Botulinum Toxin against Tetanus-Induced Rigidity and Spasms

    OpenAIRE

    Bjørnar Hassel

    2013-01-01

    Tetanus toxin, the product of Clostridium tetani, is the cause of tetanus symptoms. Tetanus toxin is taken up into terminals of lower motor neurons and transported axonally to the spinal cord and/or brainstem. Here the toxin moves trans-synaptically into inhibitory nerve terminals, where vesicular release of inhibitory neurotransmitters becomes blocked, leading to disinhibition of lower motor neurons. Muscle rigidity and spasms ensue, often manifesting as trismus/lockjaw, dysphagia, opistoton...

  7. Botulinum Toxin Injections Into the Lateral Cricoarytenoid Muscles for Vocal Process Granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Q; Campbell, R; Mattioni, J; Sataloff, R

    2017-08-01

    Contact granulomas are benign, exophytic inflammatory lesions of the larynx that typically arise on or near the vocal process of the arytenoid cartilage. The most common management options include voice therapy and antireflux pharmacotherapy, intralesional steroid injections, botulinum toxin injections, and surgical excision. In-office Botox injection into the lateral cricoarytenoid (LCA) muscle can be effective even for recurrent granulomas. This is a retrospective chart review and literature review. We reviewed more than 400 charts and included two patients, who underwent in-office injection with botulinum toxin A into LCA muscles bilaterally, after previously failing both conservative and surgical management. Both cases showed significant improvement of the laryngeal granulomas after 6 months and a single botulinum toxin injection. Both cases were initially grade III granuloma that improved to grade I. In-office injection of botulinum toxin A targeting the LCA muscle appears to be a safe and effective treatment modality in refractory laryngeal granuloma. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The therapeutic use of botulinum toxin in cervical and maxillofacial conditions: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihde, Stefan K A; Konstantinovic, Vitomir S

    2007-08-01

    The role of botulinum toxin as a therapeutic agent for several conditions is expanding. We sought to determine if botulinum toxin is safe and effective in treating patients with cervical dystonia and maxillofacial conditions. Our purpose was to establish a safety and efficacy profile to determine whether or not this treatment may be used prophylactically in patients undergoing dental implant therapy. We performed a systematic search of the literature to identify randomized clinical trials evaluating patients treated with botulinum toxin as an adjunct to dental implant therapy, maxillofacial conditions including temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and cervical dystonia. Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) met our search criteria in the area of cervical dystonia and chronic facial pain. No RCTs were identified evaluating dental implant therapy. Patients with cervical dystonia exhibited significant improvements in baseline functional, pain, and global assessments compared to placebo. Adverse events were mild and transient with numbers needed to harm (NNH) ranging from 12 to 17. Patients with chronic facial pain improved significantly from baseline in terms of pain compared to placebo. Rates of adverse events were less than 1%. Botulinum toxin appears relatively safe and effective in treating cervical dystonia and chronic facial pain associated with masticatory hyperactivity. No literature exists evaluating its use in dental implantology. Randomized clinical trials are warranted to determine its safety and efficacy in dental implantology and other maxillofacial conditions such as bruxism.

  9. Treatment of Chronic Migraine with Focus on Botulinum Neurotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Schaefer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is the most common neurological disorder, and contributes to disability and large healthcare costs in the United States and the world. The treatment of migraine until recently has focused on medications, both abortive and prophylactic, but treatment of chronic migraine has been revolutionized with the introduction of botulinum toxin injection therapy. In this review, we explore the current understanding of migraine pathophysiology, and the evolution of the use of botulinum toxin therapy including proposed pathophysiological mechanisms through animal data. We also discuss the similarities and differences between three injection techniques.

  10. Kinetic and Reaction Pathway Analysis in the Application of Botulinum Toxin A for Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank J. Lebeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A relatively new approach in the treatment of specific wounds in animal models and in patients with type A botulinum toxin is the focus of this paper. The indications or conditions include traumatic wounds (experimental and clinical, surgical (incision wounds, and wounds such as fissures and ulcers that are signs/symptoms of disease or other processes. An objective was to conduct systematic literature searches and take note of the reactions involved in the healing process and identify corresponding pharmacokinetic data. From several case reports, we developed a qualitative model of how botulinum toxin disrupts the vicious cycle of muscle spasm, pain, inflammation, decreased blood flow, and ischemia. We transformed this model into a minimal kinetic scheme for healing chronic wounds. The model helped us to estimate the rate of decline of this toxin's therapeutic effect by calculating the rate of recurrence of clinical symptoms after a wound-healing treatment with this neurotoxin.

  11. Long lasting benefits following the combination of static night upper extremity splinting with botulinum toxin A injections in cerebral palsy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, A D; Mavrogenis, A F; Mitsiokapa, E A; Panagopoulos, D; Skouteli, H; Vrettos, S G; Tzanos, G; Papagelopoulos, P J

    2009-12-01

    Botulinum toxin A injections and orthotics have been used to manage upper extremity spasticity in hemiplegic children. The authors performed a study to evaluate the necessity and effectiveness of a static night splint following outpatient botulinum toxin A treatment in children with upper limb spastic cerebral palsy. Twenty children with upper limb spastic cerebral palsy were treated with botulinum toxin A injections. A static night splint was applied in half of them. Objective assessment of upper limb function was performed at baseline, at 2 and 6 months after botulinum toxin A injection using the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test. After botulinum toxin A treatment, both groups showed an improvement on their previous functional level of the injected upper extremity. At 2 months, children in group A showed a 15.4% improvement, whereas children in group B improved by 12.2% from baseline; these were not statistically significant (P=0.326). At 6 months, group A still maintained a 15.9% improvement in function compared to group B which differed only by 4.2% from prebotulinum toxin A baseline; these differences were statistically significant (P=0.000). Complications related to the botulinum toxin A injection were not observed. The static Static night splinting following botulinum toxin A injections has shown a definite treatment effect in reducing spasticity and improving function in children with upper limb spastic cerebral palsy.

  12. Does Adjunctive Botulinum Toxin A Reduce Pain Scores When Combined With Temporomandibular Joint Arthroscopy for the Treatment of Concomitant Temporomandibular Joint Arthralgia and Myofascial Pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Nicholas J; Aronovich, Sharon

    2017-12-01

    Currently, there is no standard of care for the treatment of refractory myofascial pain and concomitant temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia. This comparative study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of botulinum toxin A (Btx), as an adjunct to TMJ arthroscopy, in this patient population. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of patients who underwent TMJ arthroscopy with (Btx group) or without (control group) intramuscular Btx for TMJ arthritis and refractory myofascial pain at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) from 2011 through 2014. For patients in the Btx group, intramuscular injections of Btx were administered at sites of maximal tenderness within the masseter and temporalis muscles. The primary outcome variable was pain score on the visual analog scale (VAS; 0 to 10). The secondary outcome variables included maximal interincisal opening, total score for sites of tenderness, total number of tender sites, and diet consistency tolerated. Statistical analysis included means and standard deviations, Student t test, simple regression analysis, and multiple regression analysis. The study cohort included 52 patients (30 in Btx group, 22 in control group), of which 48 (92.3%) were women. The mean follow-up was 5.56 ± 1.41 months. Patients in the Btx group had a significantly greater decrease in mean pain score (P = .04) on the VAS compared with the control group (score, 3.24 for Btx group; score, 1.13 for control group). On multivariate regression analysis, treatment with Btx trended toward significance (P = .084) and the preoperative pain score (P = .0007) was significantly correlated with the change in pain observed. The use of Btx appears to correlate with a clinically superior decrease in pain score compared with the control group. The use of Btx could be useful as an adjunctive treatment modality in the management of refractory myofascial pain. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published

  13. Randomized Controlled Trial on Effectiveness of Intermittent Serial Casting on Spastic Equinus Foot in Children with Cerebral Palsy After Botulinum Toxin-A Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Nigar; Gokbel, Tugba; Akarsu, Melike; Dursun, Erbil

    2017-04-01

    Physical therapy (PT) and botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A) injections are widely used in the treatment of spastic equinus foot due to cerebral palsy. The aim of this study was to show effects of intermittent serial casting (SC) in addition to standard treatment on spasticity, passive range of motion (PROM), and gait. Fifty-one ambulatory patients, treated by BTX-A to plantar flexor muscles, were randomly assigned to casting or control groups in a 2:1 ratio. Both groups received PT for 3 weeks. Casting group additionally received intermittent SC during 3 consecutive weekends. Assessments included Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), Tardieu Scale, Observational Gait Scale (OGS), and Physician Global Assessment at baseline and posttreatment weeks 4 and 12. Significant improvements in PROM, MAS, Tardieu Scale, and OGS were recorded in both groups (P casting group were significantly higher than those of the controls at week 4 (P = 0.006, P = 0.002, P casting group (P casting with an additional model of intermittent casting; and (3) describe the potential benefits of combined treatment modalities, including intermittent serial casting, for spastic equinus foot in children with cerebral palsy. Advanced ACCREDITATION: The Association of Academic Physiatrists is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.The Association of Academic Physiatrists designates this activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

  14. Impact of Injection-Guiding Techniques on the Effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Focal Spasticity and Dystonia: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriu, Anca-Irina; Dinomais, Mickael; Rémy-Néris, Olivier; Brochard, Sylvain

    2015-11-01

    To conduct a systematic review of the impact of different injection-guiding techniques on the effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) for the treatment of focal spasticity and dystonia. MEDLINE via PubMed, Academic Search Premier, PASCAL, The Cochrane Library, Scopus, SpringerLink, Web of Science, EM Premium, and PsycINFO. Two reviewers independently selected studies based on predetermined inclusion criteria. Data relating to the aim were extracted. Methodological quality was graded independently by 2 reviewers using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database assessment scale for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and the Downs and Black evaluation tool for non-RCTs. Level of evidence was determined using the modified Sackett scale. Ten studies were included. Seven were randomized. There was strong evidence (level 1) that instrumented guiding (ultrasonography [US], electrical stimulation [ES], electromyogram [EMG]) was more effective than manual needle placement for the treatment of spasmodic torticollis, upper limb spasticity, and spastic equinus in patients with stroke, and spastic equinus in children with cerebral palsy. Three studies provided strong evidence (level 1) of similar effectiveness of US and ES for upper and lower limb spasticity in patients with stroke, and spastic equinus in children with cerebral palsy, but there was poor evidence or no available evidence for EMG or other instrumented techniques. These results strongly recommend instrumented guidance of BoNT-A injection for the treatment of spasticity in adults and children (ES or US), and of focal dystonia such as spasmodic torticollis (EMG). No specific recommendations can be made regarding the choice of instrumented guiding technique, except that US appears to be more effective than ES for spastic equinus in adults with stroke. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a patient-initiated botulinum toxin treatment model for blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm compared to standard care: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickwar, Sadie; McBain, Hayley; Newman, Stanton P; Hirani, Shashivadan P; Hurt, Catherine; Dunlop, Nicola; Flood, Chris; Ezra, Daniel G

    2016-03-09

    Blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm are debilitating conditions that significantly impact on patient quality of life. Cyclical treatment with botulinum toxin injections offers temporary relief, but the duration of treatment efficacy is variable. The standard model of patient care defines routine fixed-time based scheduled treatment cycles which may lead to unnecessarily frequent treatment for some patients and experience of distressing symptoms in others, if symptoms return before the scheduled follow-up period. A randomised controlled trial will compare a patient-initiated model of care, where patients determine botulinum toxin treatment timing, to the standard model of care in which care is scheduled by the clinical team. A sample of 266 patients with blepharospasm or hemifacial spasm will be recruited from Moorfields Eye Hospital (MEH), London. The trial will be accompanied by a mixed-methods evaluation of acceptability of the new service. Patients who meet eligibility criteria will be assessed at baseline and those in the intervention group will be provided with instructions on how to book their own treatment appointments. Patients in both groups will be followed up 3 and 9 months into the trial and all patients will be returned to usual care after 9 months to meet safety protocols. Primary outcome measures include disease severity (questionnaire), functional disability (questionnaire) and patient satisfaction with care (questionnaire). Secondary outcomes include disease-specific quality of life (questionnaire), mood (questionnaire), illness and treatment perceptions (questionnaire and semi-structured interviews), economic impact (questionnaire) and acceptability (questionnaire and semi-structured interviews). This trial will assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a patient-led care model for botulinum toxin therapy. If the new model is shown to be effective in reducing distress and disability in these populations and is found to be acceptable to

  16. Localized myofascial pain responds better than referring myofascial pain to botulinum toxin injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, W A; Hassin-Baer, S; Joachim, M; Givol, N; Yahalom, R

    2017-11-01

    Myofascial pain of the muscles of mastication is a common temporomandibular disorder. Patients unresponsive to conservative treatment modalities pose a therapeutic challenge to the treating clinician. The efficacy of intramuscular botulinum toxin injections for recalcitrant cases is still not well established due to mixed results from clinical trials. The Diagnostic Criteria of Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) classified chronic muscle pain broadly into a localized pattern (when pain is localized to the site of palpation or the muscle palpated) and a referring pattern (when the pain spreads beyond the boundary of the muscle being palpated). The medical records of 25 consecutive patients treated with botulinum were analysed retrospectively. Significant pain reduction was achieved in 69.2% of the patients with localized myofascial pain and 16.7% of the patients with referring myofascial pain (P=0.015). Seventy-seven per cent of the patients with localized myofascial pain reported using less analgesic throughout the follow-up period, whereas only 25% of the patients with referring myofascial pain (P=0.017). The effects of botulinum toxin in responsive patients subsided after a mean of 3.21 months. Patients with localized myofascial pain benefited from botulinum toxin injections, but patients with referring myofascial pain responded poorly to this treatment. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Botulinum toxin type A for the treatment of head and neck chronic myofascial pain syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifeh, Mohammad; Mehta, Kalpesh; Varguise, Nibu; Suarez-Durall, Piedad; Enciso, Reyes

    2016-12-01

    The authors conducted a systematic review to study the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A (BoTN-A) in the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The authors identified randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled studies on June 1, 2016, from PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library. Three of the authors assessed the studies for risk of bias. Outcomes included pain reduction on a visual analog scale, the number of responders, and the posttreatment pain threshold to applied pressure using algometry. The initial search strategy yielded 253 unduplicated references, which the authors reduced to 13 relevant studies. The authors included 11 studies in the meta-analyses as the investigators of those studies had reported similar outcomes. Pooled results showed a nonsignificant improvement in the posttreatment intensity of pain in the BoTN-A group compared with the placebo group at 4 to 6 weeks (standardized difference in means [SDM], -0.110; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.344 to 0.124; P = .356) and a significant improvement at 2 to 6 months (SDM, -0.360; 95% CI, -0.623 to -0.096; P = .008). The number of study participants who responded to treatment was not statistically significantly different between the groups (risk ratio, 1.346; 95% CI, 0.922-1.964; P = .123) nor was the increase of pain threshold to pressure (algometry) at 2 months (SDM, 0.131; 95% CI, -0.178 to 0.440; P = .405). The study investigators reported no major adverse events. Pain was reduced significantly in the group that received BoTN-A compared with the placebo group at 2 to 6 months but not at 4 to 6 weeks (with moderate quality of the evidence). Additional studies with larger numbers of participants are needed to confirm these results. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Botulinum toxin type A for the treatment of non-neurogenic overactive bladder: does using onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox(®) ) or abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport(®) ) make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, Pravisha; Jackson, Benjamin L; Parkinson, Richard J

    2013-07-01

    To compare the clinical effects of two different commercially available botulinum toxin type A products, onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox(®) ; Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) and abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport(®) ; Ipsen Ltd, Slough, UK), on non-neurogenic overactive bladder (OAB). We included 207 patients, who underwent treatment with botulinum toxin type A for non-neurogenic OAB from January 2009 to June 2012 at our institution, in a prospective database that recorded details of their presentation, treatment and outcomes. In December 2009, our institution switched from using onabotulinumtoxinA to using abobotulinumtoxinA. Results from the onabotulinumtoxinA cohort (n = 101) and the abobotulinumtoxinA cohort (n = 106) were compared. Similar reductions in daytime frequency, nocturia and incontinence episodes were observed after treatment, with no difference in duration of effect. The abobotulinumtoxinA cohort had almost twice the rate of symptomatic urinary retention (23 vs 42%) requiring intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC). AbobotulinumtoxinA use was complicated by a significantly higher risk of requiring ISC. The study suggests that these two toxins are not interchangeable at the doses used. © 2013 BJU International.

  19. Botulinum toxin type A therapy for hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, J; Espírito-Santo, C; Borges, A; Ferreira, J J; Coelho, M; Moore, P; Sampaio, C

    2005-01-25

    Hemifacial spasm is characterised by unilateral involuntary contractions of muscles innervated by the facial nerve. The usual cause is a vessel touching the facial nerve near its origin from the brain stem. Although it is a benign condition it can cause significant cosmetic and functional disability. It is a chronic disease and spontaneous recovery is very rare. The two treatments routinely available are microvascular decompression and Botulinum Toxin type A (BtA) muscular injections. To determine whether botulinum toxin (BtA) is an effective and safe treatment for hemifacial spasm. We searched the Cochrane Movement Disorders Group trials register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2004), MEDLINE (1977 to December 2003), EMBASE (1977 to December 2003), and reference lists of articles. We also contacted drug manufacturers and researchers in the field. Randomised studies comparing BtA with placebo in people with hemifacial spasm. Two reviewers independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for additional information. Adverse effects information was collected from the trials. We found only one small randomised, placebo-controlled trial involving 11 people. It was a crossover trial during which patients underwent four sets of injections, comparing placebo with three different doses of BtA - formulation Botox(r) (low dose: one-half of the intermediate dose; intermediate dose; and high dose: twice the intermediate dose), and one of placebo. In this trial BtA was superior to placebo. The findings of this single eligible trial support the results of large, open, case-control studies showing a benefit rate between 76 and 100%. This effect size probably makes it very difficult to perform new large placebo controlled trials for hemifacial spasm. Despite the paucity of good quality controlled data, all the studies available suggest that BtA is effective and safe for treating hemifacial spasm

  20. The use of botulinum toxin-a in the treatment of severe bruxism in a patient with autism: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy, Phillip G; da Fonseca, Marcio A

    2006-01-01

    This case report describes an alternative method for reducing bruxism in a special needs patient who was not a candidate for an intraoral appliance. Bruxism is often seen in patients with special needs and can result in excessive dental wear, temporo-mandibular joint pain, avulsion of teeth and other problems. Current methods of management are not typically effective in this population because most require patient compliance. An 11-year-old male diagnosed with autism and Bannayan-Zonana syndrome received bilateral injections of botulinum toxin type-A (Botox Allergan Pharmaceuticals, Irvine CA) in the masseter muscle. The patient's condition was followed up via post-operative telephone interviews with the parents for 60 days. A reduction in the frequency and severity of bruxism was reported. The only side effects noted were soreness at the injection site and mild, temporary drooling. Although further research is required to determine the optimal doses and injection frequency, botulinum toxin type-A appears to be an alternative method for controlling bruxism in the special needs population.

  1. Botulinum toxin for treating muscular temporomandibular disorders: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Machado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study, through a systematic literature review, aims to analyze the effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin as a treatment for masticatory myofascial pain and muscles temporomandibular disorders (TMD. METHODS: Survey in research bases: MEDLINE, Cochrane, EMBASE, Pubmed, Lilacs and BBO, between the years of 1966 and April 2011, with focus in randomized or quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials, blind or double-blind. RESULTS: After applying the inclusion criteria, 4 articles comprised the final sample: 3 were double-blind randomized controlled clinical trials and 1 was single-blind randomized controlled clinical trial. CONCLUSIONS: According to the literature, there is lack of evidence about the real effectiveness of botulinum toxin in the treatment of masticatory myofascial pain and muscular TMD. Thus, further randomized controlled clinical trials, with representative samples and longer follow-up time, to assess the real effectiveness of the technique are needed.OBJETIVO: este trabalho, por meio de uma revisão sistemática da literatura, teve como objetivo analisar a efetividade da toxina botulínica como tratamento para dor miofascial mastigatória e disfunções temporomandibulares (DTM musculares. MÉTODOS: pesquisa nas bases de dados Medline, Cochrane, Embase, Pubmed, Lilacs e BBO, no período entre 1966 e abril de 2011, com enfoque em estudos clínicos controlados randomizados ou quase-randomizados, cegos ou duplo-cegos. RESULTADOS: após a aplicação dos critérios de inclusão, chegou-se a 4 artigos, sendo que 3 eram estudos clínicos controlados randomizados duplo-cego e 1 era estudo clínico controlado randomizado simples-cego. CONCLUSÕES: pela análise da literatura, verificou-se um número reduzido de evidências significativas sobre a real efetividade da toxina botulínica no tratamento da dor miofascial e de DTM musculares. Assim, são necessários novos estudos clínicos controlados randomizados, com amostras

  2. Botulinum toxin injection of spastic finger flexors in hemiplegic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, A A; McGinn, M; Chappell, R

    2000-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of botulinum toxin injection of spastic finger flexors followed by intensive training of finger extensors. Fourteen subjects with chronic hemiplegia spasticity of the upper limb had electromyographic-guided botulinum toxin injection into the long finger flexors. All patients presented with minimal active finger extension with the wrist flexed, sustained clonus of the finger flexors, functional proximal arm function, and absence of fixed contracture. Cadaver dissections directed selection of two injection sites: the flexor digitorum sublimis and the flexor digitorum profundus. Fifty mouse units of botulinum toxin were injected into each muscle. After injection, the subjects were instructed in a home program of stretching the long finger flexors, upper limb weight bearing with a weight-bearing splint, and exercise to improve finger extension control. Compared with preinjection measures, assessment the first week after the initial injection showed significantly reduced tone, reduced clonus, and greater active finger extension with the wrist in the neutral position. Four months later, the Ashworth scale increased to preinjection levels in the six subjects with repeated injections but was again decreased postinjection. Active finger extension with the wrist in the neutral position and clonus showed a statistically nonsignificant trend toward cumulative improvement after the second injection. The greatest change in finger extension and spasticity reduction occurred after the first injection. Continued significant improvement in finger extension was not observed.

  3. The Evaluation of the Clinical Effects of Botulinum Toxin on Nocturnal Bruxism

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    Fatih Asutay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Nocturnal bruxism can be managed by botulinum toxin (Botox® in patients who have not responded to conservative treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin A (BTXA in the treatment of nocturnal bruxism. Material and Methods. The retrospective study comprised 25 female patients, aged 23–55 years (mean 35.84±8.41 years. All patients received a single injection of BTXA in the right and left masseters. Evaluation was made by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS values, complaint duration, onset of effect, and duration of effectiveness. Results. BTXA produced significant improvements in pain scores. Only 2 adverse events (8% were recorded. Conclusion. BTX-A is effective in the treatment of nocturnal bruxism.

  4. Evaluation of the therapeutic use of botulinum toxin A in the periorbital region

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    Ahmed Tawfik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin blocks acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction causing paralysis that is reversed within 4 months. The toxin was well known for its lethal effect when ingested with food (botulism; however, it was found to be highly effective in various disorders, both cosmetic and noncosmetic. The therapeutic uses in ophthalmology include treatment of strabismus, spastic focal facial dystonias, induction of temporary ptosis in cases of lagophthalmos (chemotarsorrhaphy, temporary correction of dysthyroid upper eyelid retraction, suppression of lacrimal gland secretion to temporarily control gustatory lacrimation, some cases of obstructive epiphora and primary hyperlacrimation, and temporary correction of lower lid entropion. In this prospective study, we evaluate the results of using botulinum toxin A (botox injection in some periorbital pathologies namely, focal facial dystonias, lower lid entropion, lagophthalmos, and epiphora. Fifty patients were treated with botox (20 patients with focal facial dystonias, nine with lagophthalmos, eight with lower lid entropion, and 13 with epiphora, different techniques were used according to the pre-existing pathology, and the following data were recorded: age and sex, total dose for each injection, onset and duration of effect, degree of improvement, and the occurrence of any adverse effects. The study results supported the high efficacy of botulinum toxin for treatment of blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm, lagophthalmos, lower lid entropion, and epiphora, with marked to moderate improvement in 99, 87.5, 55.5, 75, and 92.3% of patients, respectively. Few side effects occurred but they resolved spontaneously without residues. We concluded that botulinum toxin A is a safe and effective treatment with a temporary outcome that may be desirable in certain situations.

  5. Purification and some properties of progenitor toxins of Clostridium botulinum type B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaki, S; Sakaguchi, S; Sakaguchi, G

    1974-10-01

    Purification of progenitor toxin of Clostridium botulinum type B strain Okra was undertaken by sequential steps of acid precipitation, extraction, ammonium sulfate precipitation, ribonuclease digestion, acid precipitation, protamine treatment, sulphopropyl-Sephadex chromatography, and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. Two different molecular-sized toxins, named large (L) and medium (M) toxins, were obtained. L toxin was centrifugally homogeneous but electrophoretically heterogeneous. It contained 2.5 x 10(8) to 3.0 x 10(8) mean lethal doses per mg of nitrogen, and its sedimentation constant was 16S. M toxin was centrifugally and electrophoretically homogeneous. It contained 5.5 x 10(8) to 6.0 x 10(8) mean lethal doses per mg of nitrogen, and its sedimentation constant was 12S. The presence of both L and M toxins in spent culture was demonstrated. It seems justified, therefore, to call both progenitor toxins. Both consisted of toxic and nontoxic components. The toxic components of L and M toxins appeared to be identical with each other. The nontoxic component of L toxin was 12S and possessed a hemagglutinin activity of about 0.5% that of type A crystalline toxin; that of M toxin was 7S and possessed no hemagglutinin activity. They were antigenically related but not identical.

  6. Aesthetic Applications of Botulinum Toxin A in Asians: An International, Multidisciplinary, Pan-Asian Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Hema; Huang, Po-Han; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Huh, Chang Hun; Wu, Woffles T.L.; Wu, Yan; Cassuto, Daniel; Kerscher, Martina J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Botulinum toxin type A remains the most popular nonsurgical aesthetic treatment worldwide. Previous consensus statements have focused on Caucasians and on Koreans as generally representative of Asians. However, indications and dosages vary among different ethnic groups. This publication reports the results of a multidisciplinary, pan-Asian consensus focusing on incobotulinumtoxinA. Methods: A consensus group of plastic surgeons and dermatologists from Asia, Europe, and the United States convened for a live meeting in Asia, followed by a questionnaire-based Delphi procedure. Treatment of Asians in both their native countries and countries of migration was discussed. Results: For most items, the group achieved a majority consensus. A number of treatment indications, strategies, and dosages were identified in Asians, which are distinct to those previously described for Caucasians due to differences in facial morphotypes, anatomy, and cultural expectations. The group also formulated position statements for intradermal botulinum toxin type A (“mesotoxin”), body shaping with the calves as a paradigm, and reduction of parotid glands. While Asians have previously been considered a homogeneous group for the purposes of aesthetic treatment, this publication considers regional variations. A new classification of Asian facial morphotypes is proposed to aid treatment planning and implementation. Conclusions: This is the first pan-Asian consensus for aesthetic use of botulinum toxin type A. Its unique objective is to optimize treatment safety and efficacy for patients of complete or part-Asian ancestry in all regions. The recommendations for incobotulinumtoxinA may be extended with care to other botulinum toxin formulations. PMID:28293488

  7. Botulinum toxin a can positively impact first impression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Steven H; Lieberman, Elliot D; Thakkar, Nirav N; Larimer, Karen A; Anstead, Amy

    2008-06-01

    BACKGROUND First impression is influenced by facial appearance and improved by cosmetic surgery. OBJECTIVE We wanted to determine if treatment with botulinum toxin A (BTxnA) would improve first impression. MATERIALS AND METHODS Women received BTxnA in the forehead. Photos were taken prior to, and 1 week after, final BTxnA injection in smiling and relaxed poses. Photos were divided into books with each subject represented only once. Evaluators completed a survey rating first impression on various measures of success for each photo. RESULTS No differences were seen for social skills, financial, or relationship success scales. A significant decrease in first impression scores between treatment photos was seen for academic performance and occupational success. However, analysis of between-subject effects found that "smile/relax" accounted for the decreased score in both scales. Significant increases in first impression scores were seen for dating success, attractiveness, and athletic success scales where smile/relax and BTxnA contributed significantly to the improved scores. CONCLUSIONS BTxnA improved first impression scores for dating success, attractiveness, and athletic success scales. Academic performance and occupational success scores were not affected by BTxnA when the smile/relax variable was included. The smile/relax variable was a more important predictor for academic performance and occupational success scores.

  8. Botulinum toxin in the management of facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabin, Jonathan A; Massry, Guy G; Azizzadeh, Babak

    2015-08-01

    Complete flaccid facial paralysis, as well as the synkinetic and hyperkinetic sequelae of partial recovery, has significant impact on quality of life. Patients suffer from functional deficiencies, cosmetic deformity, discomfort and social consequences leading to emotional distress. Despite an extensive and sophisticated array of available interventions for facial reanimation, most patients have persistent issues that require consistent follow-up. In long-term management, botulinum toxin (BT) injection remains a critical tool in the treatment of the facial paralysis patient, particularly in the case of synkinesis, hyperkinesis and imbalance. We review the recent scientific literature and highlight key principles and developments in the use of BT in the management of facial paralysis, including less common applications for acute facial paralysis, hyperlacrimation and pseudoptosis. We reviewed the literature for the latest advances in the use of BT in facial paralysis, including applications and technique, as well as measurement tools and adjunct exercises. We also share our experience in treating our own patient population. BT continues to be a well tolerated and effective tool in the long-term management of facial paralysis, specifically in treating synkinesis, imbalance and hyperkinesis, as well as hyperlacrimation and pseudoptosis. Consistent measurement tools and adjunct neuromuscular retraining are crucial in the successful deployment of BT. Controversy exists as to whether BT should be used to manage facial paralysis during the acute phase, and whether BT application to the nonparalyzed face can improve long-term recovery in the paralyzed side.

  9. [Spasticity must be treated by botulinum toxin with rehabilitaiton].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masakado, Yoshihisa

    2013-01-01

    In rehabilitation medicine, botulinum toxin (BTX) as adjunct to other interventions for spasticity can result in a useful and effective therapeutic tool treating disabled stroke patients with spasticity. Other than spasticity, non-reflex motor disorders (muscle stiffness, shortness and contracture) can complicate clinical course and hamper rehabilitative process of stroke patients. After treating spasticity by BTX, the paralysis might be improved by changing muscular imbalance following stroke. We also have to face unique and difficult to treat clinical conditions abnormal posture and movement disorders due to chronic severe stroke patients. The effectiveness of BTX in treating some of these conditions is also provided. Since, neurologically disabled stroke patients can show complex dysfunction, prior to initiating BTX therapy, specific functional limitations, goals and expected outcomes of treatment should be evaluated and discussed with family and caregivers. BTX also might improve not only care, passive function, but also improve active function in stroke patients with intensive rehabilitation with rTMS, tDC, electrical stimulation, stretching and other rehabilitation strategy. Therefore BTX might change rehabilitation medicine.

  10. Differences in Corneal Parameters Between Affected and Normal Contralateral Eyes in Patients With Hemifacial Spasm Treated With Botulinum Toxin-A: Outcomes During One Complete Treatment Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Teissy; Osaki, Midori H; Osaki, Tammy H; Hirai, Flavio E; Campos, Mauro

    2016-02-01

    To investigate possible temporary differences in corneal topographic parameters between affected and normal eyes in patients with hemifacial spasm (HFS) treated with botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A), over the course of 1 treatment cycle. This prospective study evaluated corneal topographic differences between affected and normal contralateral eyes during a 4-month period in patients with HFS treated with BTX-A (the duration of action of BTX-A for HFS ranges from 2 to 4 months). Corneal topographic analysis was performed using a conventional topographer (Atlas; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA). Steep K and astigmatism measurements were evaluated before BTX-A application and after 15 days and 2, 3, and 4 months. Twenty-four patients (16 women and 8 men) were evaluated. Steep K [46.9 ± 3.6 diopters (D)] and astigmatism values (2.6 ± 2.5 D) were significantly higher in affected eyes of HFS patients than in nonaffected eyes (45.0 ± 1.4 D and 0.9 ± 0.6 D) before treatment (P = 0.001 for steep K and P = 0.0003 for astigmatism). Astigmatism values also showed significant differences between the affected eye (1.4 ± 0.8 D) and nonaffected eye (0.9 ± 0.6 D) at 4 months (P = 0.006), whereas steep K showed significant differences between both eyes at 15 days (affected eye: 45.6 ± 1.5 D, nonaffected eye: 45.0 ± 1.4 D, P = 0.008), 3 months (affected eye: 45.6 ± 1.8 D, nonaffected eye: 45.1 ± 1.3 D, P = 0.03) and 4 months (affected eye: 45.8 ± 1.2 D, nonaffected eye: 45.1 ± 1.4 D, P = 0.003) after treatment. The differences in steep K, and especially in astigmatism values, between eyes tended to reduce during the period of action of BTX-A. At 4 months, when the BTX-A effect is considered to be over or very reduced, a significant difference between eyes for both parameters was noted again.

  11. Achalasia in Pregnancy: Botulinum Toxin A Injection of Lower Esophageal Sphincter

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    Nicole Hooft

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Achalasia, a rare esophageal motility disorder that may cause malnutrition during pregnancy, can result in fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Many medical treatment regimens are contraindicated or not tolerated during pregnancy, and surgery is generally avoided due to potential risks to the fetus. Case Report. Severe, medically refractory achalasia in a 23-year-old pregnant woman that caused malnutrition was successfully managed by administering a botulinum toxin A injection to the lower esophageal sphincter. The injection was performed at approximately 14 weeks’ gestation and the patient reported clinically significant relief from dysphagia. She gained weight and ultimately delivered a healthy baby girl at term, but her symptoms returned a few months postpartum. She underwent a second treatment of botulinum toxin A injection, but it offered only one month of relief. Roughly eight months after delivery, the patient underwent a laparoscopic extended Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication. The patient resumed a normal diet one week postoperatively, and her baby has had no complications. Conclusion. This is only the second reported case of botulinum toxin A injection being used to treat achalasia in pregnancy. This treatment proved to be a safe temporary alternative without the risks of surgery and anesthesia during pregnancy.

  12. The use of botulinum toxin in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Cristobal; Perez, Juan E; Herrera, Bernardo; Machuca, Francisco J; Redondo, Maximino

    2012-01-01

    The injection of Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) into the prostate is a minimally invasive alternative treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms. To summarize the action mechanisms of BoNT/A on experimental animals and to analyze its effectiveness according to published clinical studies, we located 24 papers on the treatment of HBP with BoNT/A. The doses applied ranged from 100 (OnabotA) to 600 U (OnabotA and AbobotA). The IPSS score presented a mean post-treatment reduction, for all series, of 10.8 + 2.66 points. Other significant results included the overall mean reduction in QoL score of 2.1 ± 0.62 points, and the pre and post-treatment differences in prostate volume (22.43 ± 20.2 cm(3)), post-voiding residue (76.77 + 51.72 cm(3)) and PSA (1.15 + 0.93 ng/ml). However, only two clinical trials were on sufficient quality to be selected for meta-analysis, and it was observed that the difference of the means, pre- and post-treatment of maximum flow, prostate volume, IPSS and PSA were not statistically significant (P = 0.18). Neither was there any statistically significant difference between pre- and post-treatment post-voiding residue (P = 0.65). In conclusion, BoNT/A alleviates lower urinary tract symptoms due to HBP, but different studies present considerable variations regarding the dose administered, inclusion criteria and follow-up time, as well as poorly defined retreatment, losses to follow up and, above all, a high degree of variability in the communication of results (with large standard deviations). In consequence, further clinical trials are needed. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The use of botulinum toxin in head and face medicine: An interdisciplinary field

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    Laskawi Rainer

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this review article different interdisciplinary relevant applications of botulinum toxin type A (BTA in the head and face region are demonstrated. Patients with head and face disorders of different etiology often suffer from disorders concerning their musculature (example: synkinesis in mimic muscles or gland-secretion. This leads to many problems and reduces their quality of life. The application of BTA can improve movement disorders like blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm, synkinesis following defective healing of the facial nerve, palatal tremor, severe bruxism, oromandibular dystonias hypertrophy of the masseter muscle and disorders of the autonomous nerve system like hypersalivation, hyperlacrimation, pathological sweating and intrinsic rhinitis. Conclusion The application of botulinum toxin type A is a helpful and minimally invasive treatment option to improve the quality of life in patients with head and face disorders of different quality and etiology. Side effects are rare.

  14. Autologous blood injection and botulinum toxin for resistant plantar fasciitis accompanied by spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Lynne Romeiser; Klamar, Karl; Leon, Jerry; Fedoriw, Wladislaw

    2006-08-01

    An originally ambulatory 18-yr-old woman with spastic left hemiplegic cerebral palsy developed left plantar fasciitis with a gradual loss of function requiring use of a wheelchair. Her symptoms were resistant to physical therapy. Two hundred units of botulinum toxin A was diluted in 4 mL of saline and injected into the gastrocnemius. Three milliliters of autologous blood was injected into the plantar fascia. She reported decreased pain at 3 days postinjection. At 10 days, she had no pain on walking. Dorsiflexion increased and Ashworth and Tardieu improved. A stretching program was taught and a better-fitting night splint was obtained. At 21 days, she exhibited no pain and increased dorsiflexion. Autologous blood injection combined with botulinum toxin A may be an alternative treatment for resistant plantar fasciitis accompanied by spasticity. Our hypothesis is that chronic plantar fasciitis is a degenerative condition and thus is relieved when a mild inflammatory process is created that leads to healing.

  15. Augmenting occupational therapy treatment of upper-extremity spasticity with botulinum toxin A: a case report of progress at discharge and 2 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, Susan P

    2008-01-01

    This case report summarizes occupational therapy services provided to a participant after botulinum toxin A (BTA) injections and her improvements 2 years later. The injections were performed to neutralize spasticity in the left upper extremity after a stroke. Along with BTA, the participant received occupational therapy for 12 weeks, using neurodevelopmental and biomechanical approaches and an activity-based home program. Spasticity decreased from a 4 to a 1 on the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) immediately after the injections. Two years after the injections, the MAS score ranged between 1 and 1+. Initially, the participant demonstrated functional limitations in areas of splint application, dressing, toileting, and bathing. Following BTA injections and occupational therapy, the participant demonstrated increased independence in all deficit areas. For this participant, BTA, combined with functional, activity-based occupational therapy interventions, was associated with neurological change and greater functional use of the spastic limb.

  16. Cellular Entry of Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Takehara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin are composed of two non-linked proteins, one being the enzymatic component and the other being the binding/translocation component. These latter components recognize specific receptors and oligomerize in plasma membrane lipid-rafts, mediating the uptake of the enzymatic component into the cytosol. Enzymatic components induce actin cytoskeleton disorganization through the ADP-ribosylation of actin and are responsible for cell rounding and death. This review focuses upon the recent advances in cellular internalization of clostridial binary toxins.

  17. Botulinum Toxin Therapy for Cervical Dystonia: The Science of Dosing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgilio Gerald H. Evidente

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The first‐line treatment for cervical dystonia (CD is botulinum toxin type A (BoNT‐A, which has been established as a highly effective and well‐tolerated therapy. However, this treatment is also complex and challenging to apply in clinical practice. Approximately 20% of patients discontinue therapy due to treatment failure, adverse effects, and other reasons. In addition, expert consensus recommendations are lacking to guide physicians in the optimal use of BoNT‐A for CD. Among the issues still to be clarified is the optimal dosing frequency. The generally accepted standard for intervals between BoNT‐A injections is ≥12 weeks; however, this standard is based primarily on the methodology of pivotal trials for the BoNT‐A products, rather than on evidence that it is optimal in comparison to other intervals. While some retrospective, observational studies of BoNT‐A used in clinical practice appear to support the use of ≥12‐week dosing intervals, it is often unclear in these studies how the need for reinjection was determined. In contrast, a prospective dose‐ranging trial in which patients were allowed to request reinjection as early as 8 weeks showed that about half of patients receiving abobotulinumtoxinA, at the currently recommended initial dose of 500 U, requested reinjection at 8 weeks. Moreover, results from an open‐label, 68‐week extension phase of the pivotal trial of incobotulinumtoxinA showed that 47.1% of patients had received reinjection at ≤12 weeks. Ongoing studies, such as the Cervical Dystonia Patient Registry for Observation of BOTOX® Efficacy (CD PROBE, may help clarify this question of optimal dosing intervals for BoNT‐A in CD.

  18. Evaluating the effects of Botulinum Toxin A on tear metrics in patients with hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Yasmin Poustchi; Schultze, Robert L; Wladis, Edward J

    2017-10-01

    Hemifacial spasm has been previously shown to result in dry eye and ocular surface diseases. This study was performed to assess the impact of chemodenervation with botulinum toxin on clinically-relevant metrics of tears. Tear osmolarity and lipid layer thickness were measured in patients with hemifacial spasm after they achieved relief from hemifacial spasm via botulinum toxin injections. Twelve eyes of 6 patients with hemifacial spasm (2 men and 4 women; mean age 55.5 years) were assessed in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and IRB approval. The mean tear osmolarities were 300.8 mOsm (standard deviation = 7.44 mOsm) and 293.0 mOsm (standard deviation = 7.01 mOsm) for treated and untreated eyes, respectively, and this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.097). The mean lipid layer thicknesses of the tear film were 78.7 nm (standard deviation = 18.0 nm) and 71.5 nm (standard deviation = 25.2 nm) for treated and untreated eyes, respectively, and these values were not statistically significantly different (p = 0.671). Although previous investigations have demonstrated significant dry eye disease in patients with hemifacial spasm, successful chemodenervation with botulinum toxin appears to result in tear osmolarities and lipid layer thicknesses that were comparable in treated and untreated eyes. This finding may represent an additional benefit to treatment of hemifacial spasm.

  19. Intravesical Botulinum Toxin for Persistent Autonomic Dysreflexia in a Pediatric Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Lockwood

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We present a novel case of persistent autonomic dysreflexia in a pediatric spinal cord injury patient treated successfully with intravesical botulinum toxin. Study Design. A retrospective chart review of one patient seen at the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin from 2006 to 2012 was performed. Results. A pediatric spinal cord injury patient with known neurogenic bladder presented with severe hypertension consistent with autonomic dysreflexia. His symptoms and hypertension did not improve with conservative measures, and he necessitated ICU admission and antihypertensive drips. He was taken to the operating room for intravesical botulinum toxin for refractory bladder spasms. Following this, his symptoms abated, and he was weaned off IV antihypertensives and returned to his baseline state. His symptoms were improved for greater than six months. Conclusions. There are few treatment options for the management of refractory autonomic dysreflexia. Intravesical botulinum toxin has never been reported for this use. Dedicated research is warranted to assess its efficacy, as it was used successfully to abort autonomic dysreflexia in this patient.

  20. Inferior Oblique Botulinum Toxin Injection: A Postoperative Diplopia Test for Secondary Inferior Oblique Muscle Overaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Shveta; Marsh, Ian B

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the utility of botulinum toxin injection into the inferior oblique muscle for secondary inferior oblique muscle overaction. A retrospective review of 18 patients and 23 injections performed over a 9-year period. Indications and deviations in primary position and contralateral gaze before and after injection were recorded. Functional outcomes and further management (conservative vs surgical) were observed. In 14 patients, chemodenervation resulted in a temporary improvement in symptoms. Eleven of these patients went on to have inferior oblique myectomy with resolution of their diplopia. Two patients preferred to receive regular injections of botulinum toxin as a treatment. Botulinum toxin chemodenervation of the inferior oblique muscle in cases of secondary inferior oblique muscle overaction is useful where one needs to establish a risk of overcorrection following planned inferior oblique muscle weakening. This is particularly true in cases where the primary position deviation may be small but symptoms of diplopia exist on contralateral side gaze, giving rise to a narrowed field of binocular single vision. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. The Role of Botulinum Toxin Type A in the Clinical Management of Refractory Anterior Knee Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Barbara J; Silbert, Benjamin I; Silbert, Peter L; Singer, Kevin P

    2015-08-25

    Anterior knee pain is a highly prevalent condition affecting largely young to middle aged adults. Symptoms can recur in more than two thirds of cases, often resulting in activity limitation and reduced participation in employment and recreational pursuits. Persistent anterior knee pain is difficult to treat and many individuals eventually consider a surgical intervention. Evidence for long term benefit of most conservative treatments or surgical approaches is currently lacking. Injection of Botulinum toxin type A to the distal region of vastus lateralis muscle causes a short term functional "denervation" which moderates the influence of vastus lateralis muscle on the knee extensor mechanism and increases the relative contribution of the vastus medialis muscle. Initial data suggest that, compared with other interventions for anterior knee pain, Botulinum toxin type A injection, in combination with an active exercise programme, can lead to sustained relief of symptoms, reduced health care utilisation and increased activity participation. The procedure is less invasive than surgical intervention, relatively easy to perform, and is time- and cost-effective. Further studies, including larger randomized placebo-controlled trials, are required to confirm the effectiveness of Botulinum toxin type A injection for anterior knee pain and to elaborate the possible mechanisms underpinning pain and symptom relief.

  2. In Silico Analysis for the Study of Botulinum Toxin Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Miyazaki, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play many important roles in biological function. Knowledge of protein-protein complex structure is required for understanding the function. The determination of protein-protein complex structure by experimental studies remains difficult, therefore computational prediction of protein structures by structure modeling and docking studies is valuable method. In addition, MD simulation is also one of the most popular methods for protein structure modeling and characteristics. Here, we attempt to predict protein-protein complex structure and property using some of bioinformatic methods, and we focus botulinum toxin complex as target structure.

  3. Combined Treatment Fkt-Botulinum Toxin Type A (Btx-A) in Patients with Strumpell-Lorrain Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardo, Marvulli; Angela, Lopopolo; Angela, Dantone; Vita, Palmisano; Giulio, Lancioni; Pietroq, Fiore; Giancarlo, Ianieri; Marisa, Megna

    2016-01-01

    The Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis (HSP) or Strumpell-Lorrain disease is a heterogeneous neurodegenerative disease of the spinal cord. It is genetically transmitted and characterized by a progressive muscle weakness, spasticity of the lower limbs and awkward gain. There is no specific pharmacological treatment. The pharmacological therapy decreases the muscle tone and prevents stiffening). Physiotherapy restrains the progression of muscle atrophy, delays contraction of the tendons and gives greater mobility to people affected by the disease. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the efficacy of the combined treatment Fkt and Btx-A in patients with HSP. Retrospective study was conducted recruiting ten patients with spasticity according to Asworth modified scale of at least 2 and with gait deficit. They received treatment for 5 years with incobotulinumtoxinA and physiokinesiotherapy for addressing spasticity in the lower limbs. We evaluated muscle tone with miometric measurement both at the first visit (T0), and at subsequent ones (T1 after 30 days, T2 after 3 months from the first infiltration, T3 after 4 months up to the date of the following infiltration, T4 after 5 months). Baropodometric examination has proven essential for the study of the distribution of loads in statics and dynamics. The data analysis regarding tone assessment through measurements with Myoton highlighted hypertonus reduction in all the three muscle groups examined at T1 and the maintenance of constant values up to 5 months after the first infiltration. It also showed an increase in the percentage of back foot loading in both feet up to T4 (new inoculation, p<0, 05%). Baropodometric examination in dynamics (in particular the speed of the step) showed a gradual increase in this parameter which reaches a peak at 5 months (p<0, 05%) and then declines again in conjunction with the next infiltration treatment. This study showed the benefit of combined treatment with Btx and Fkt. The use of a

  4. Functional end-plate recovery in long-term botulinum toxin therapy of hemifacial spasm: a nerve conduction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, C; Guerriero, R; Amadio, S; Ungaro, D; Tesfaghebriel, H; Bianchi, F; Comi, G; Del Carro, U

    2013-02-01

    Botulinum toxin type-A is currently thought to be effective and safe for hemifacial spasm (HFS). The pre-synaptic block of acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction induces depression of orbicularis oculi muscle compound motor action potential (CMAP). The aim of our study was to evaluate at what extent end-plate functional recovery is possible even in botulinum toxin treatments lasting up to 15 years. We examined 81 outpatients with primary HFS (mean treatment duration = 7.2 ± 4.2 years) who underwent neurophysiologic study, once clinical effect of the previous treatment had vanished. The mean CMAP amplitude, mean rectified amplitude of response 1 (R1) of the blink reflex and area of response 2 (R2) of treated orbicularis oculi muscle were measured in comparison to the controlateral side. Mean amplitude of the above mentioned parameters was slightly lower (about 20%; p botulinum toxin affects compound motor action potential and blink-reflex responses for at least 4-5 months in HFS patients. The residual block is slight and does not increase with repeated injections after several years of treatment. Our study, beside confirming the long-term efficacy of botulinum toxin treatment for HFS, provides neurophysiologic evidence that therapeutic effect may be obtained without hindering the regenerative potential of the nerve-muscle complex.

  5. Prevalence of toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum associated with the macroalga Cladophora in three Great Lakes: growth and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Chan Lan; Kahn, Chase I.; Borchert, Andrew J.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Whitman, Richard L.; Peller, Julie R.; Pier, Christina; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A.; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The reemergence of avian botulism caused by Clostridium botulinum type E has been observed across the Great Lakes in recent years. Evidence suggests an association between the nuisance algae, Cladophoraspp., and C. botulinum in nearshore areas of the Great Lakes. However, the nature of the association between Cladophora and C. botulinum is not fully understood due, in part, to the complex food web interactions in this disease etiology. In this study, we extensively evaluated their association by quantitatively examining population size and serotypes of C. botulinum in algal mats collected from wide geographic areas in lakes Michigan, Ontario, and Erie in 2011–2012 and comparing them with frequencies in other matrices such as sand and water. A high prevalence (96%) of C. botulinum type E was observed inCladophora mats collected from shorelines of the Great Lakes in 2012. Among the algae samples containing detectable C. botulinum, the population size of C. Botulinum type E was 100–104 MPN/g dried algae, which was much greater (up to 103 fold) than that found in sand or the water column, indicating thatCladophora mats are sources of this pathogen. Mouse toxinantitoxin bioassays confirmed that the putativeC. botulinum belonged to the type E serotype. Steam treatment was effective in reducing or eliminating C. botulinum type E viable cells in Cladophora mats, thereby breaking the potential transmission route of toxin up to the food chain. Consequently, our data suggest that steam treatment incorporated with a beach cleaning machine may be an effective treatment of Cladophora-borne C. botulinum and may reduce bird mortality and human health risks.

  6. Characterisation of botulinum toxins type A and B, by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation and electrospray mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, B.L.M. van; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, A.L. de; Wils, E.R.J.

    2002-01-01

    A method earlier developed for the mass spectrometric (MS) identification of tetanus toxin (TTx) was applied to botulinum toxins type A and B (BTxA and BTxB). Botulinum toxins are extremely neurotoxic bacterial toxins, likely to be used as biological warfare agent. Biologically active BTxA and BTxB

  7. Botulinum toxin for vaginismus treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferreira, Juliana Rocha; Souza, Renan Pedra

    2012-01-01

    Vaginismus is characterized by recurrent or persistent involuntary contraction of the perineal muscles surrounding the outer third of the vagina when penile, finger, tampon, or speculum penetration is attempted...

  8. Use of botulinum toxin in individuals with neurogenic detrusor overactivity: State of the art review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsenmeyer, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injection into the bladder wall has been shown to be an effective alternative to anticholinergic (antimuscarinic) medications and more invasive surgery in those with multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and urinary incontinence who are not tolerating anticholinergic medications. In August 2011, Botox® (onabotulinumtoxinA) received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for this use. Clinically, intradetrusor injection of BoNT has been found to decrease urinary incontinence and improve quality of life. Its impact on urodynamic parameters is an increase in the maximum cystometric (bladder) capacity and decrease in the maximum detrusor pressures. The most common side effects are urinary tract infections and urinary retention. There have been rare reports and a black box warning of distant spread of BoNT. BoNT has gained popularity because of its effectiveness and long duration of action, relative ease of administration, easy learning curve, reproducibility of results on repeated administration, and low incidence of complications. Objective To discuss the structure and function, mechanisms of action, clinical and urodynamic studies, injection technique, potential beneficial and adverse effects, and potential areas of research of BoNT. Methods Literature search focused on botulinum toxin in MEDLINE/PubMed. Search terms included botulinum toxin, neurogenic bladder, NDO, botox bladder, botox spinal cord injury, botox, FDA, botox side effects. All papers identified were English language, full-text papers. In addition, English abstracts of non-English papers were noted. The reference list of identified articles was also searched for further papers. Conclusion Botulinum toxin is an alternative treatment for individuals with NDO who fail to tolerate anticholinergic medications. Its popularity has increased because of the literature, which has supported its effectiveness, safety, easy

  9. Botox facial slimming/facial sculpting: the role of botulinum toxin-A in the treatment of hypertrophic masseteric muscle and parotid enlargement to narrow the lower facial width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Woffles T L

    2010-02-01

    Botulinum toxin A is a highly efficacious and cost-effective, nonsurgical option for reducing the width and shape of the lower face and jawline. The results can vary from the subtlest thinning of the face to an extremely thin, cachectic appearance. Many nuances can be achieved. The administration is simple, and the process takes barely 5 minutes in an office setting. Botulinum toxin A can also be effectively used to reduce the bulk of an enlarged parotid gland without affecting saliva production. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Botulinum Toxin Confers Radioprotection in Murine Salivary Glands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidan, Youssef H., E-mail: zeidan@miami.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Xiao, Nan; Cao, Hongbin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Kong, Christina [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu; Sirjani, Davud [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: Xerostomia is a common radiation sequela, which has a negative impact on the quality of life of patients with head and neck cancer. Current treatment strategies offer only partial relief. Botulinum toxins (BTX) have been successfully used in treating a variety of radiation sequelae such as cystitis, proctitis, fibrosis, and facial pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of BTX on radiation-induced salivary gland damage. Methods and Materials: We used a previously established model for murine salivary gland irradiation (IR). The submandibular glands (SMGs) of C5BL/6 mice (n=6/group) were injected with saline or BTX 72 hours before receiving 15 Gy of focal irradiation. Saliva flow was measured 3, 7, and 28 days after treatment. The SMGs were collected for immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, and Western blotting. A cytokine array consisting of 40 different mouse cytokines was used to evaluate cytokine profiles after radiation treatment. Results: Irradiated mice showed a 50% reduction in saliva flow after 3 days, whereas mice preinjected with BTX had 25% reduction in saliva flow (P<.05). Cell death detected by TUNEL staining was similar in SMG sections of both groups. However, neutrophil infiltrate, detected by myeloperoxidase staining, was 3-fold lower for the BTX treated mice. A cytokine array showed a 2-fold upregulation of LPS-induced chemokine (LIX/CXCL5) 3 days after IR. BTX pretreatment reduced LIX levels by 40%. At 4 weeks after IR, the saline (control) group showed a 40% reduction in basal SMG weight, compared with 20% in the BTX group. Histologically, BTX-pretreated glands showed relative preservation of acinar structures after radiation. Conclusions: These data suggest that BTX pretreatment ameliorates radiation-induced saliva dysfunction. Moreover, we demonstrate a novel role for CXCL5 in the acute phase of salivary gland damage after radiation. These results carry important clinical implications for the treatment of

  11. The Structure of the Neurotoxin- Associated Protein HA33/A from Clostridium botulinum Suggests a Reoccurring Beta-Trefoil Fold in the Progenitor Toxin Complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arndt, Joseph W; Gu, Jenny; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Hanson, Michael A; Lebeda, Frank L; Stevens, Raymond C

    2004-01-01

    The hemagglutinating protein HA33 from Clostridium botulinum is associated with the large botulinum neurotoxin secreted complexes and is critical in toxin protection, internalization, and possibly activation...

  12. Long-term efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin A injections to treat blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababneh, Osama H; Cetinkaya, Altug; Kulwin, Dwight R

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin A injections after more than 10 consecutive years of treatment for benign essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. Retrospective chart review at university-affiliated hospital. Study consisted of 64 patients treated with botulinum toxin A injections between October 2005 and May 2006. Inclusion criteria included patients treated with at least one annual botulinum toxin-A injection for more than 10 consecutive years. Data collected included diagnoses and patient characteristics, injection dates, doses administered at each visit, response scores, duration of effect, and adverse events. Included changes in doses, response scores, duration of effects, and adverse events between the first and last botulinum toxin A injections. Thirty-two of 64 patients (mean age at first injection, 57.2 ± 12.4 years; 25 women) met the inclusion criteria. The mean duration of follow up was 14.1 ± 3.1 years (range 10-20 years; mean total visits 44.4 ± 19). A higher mean injection dose per visit was administered during the last year compared with the first year (26.8 ± 10.3 vs. 22.5 ± 7.5 units, respectively) (P = 0.003). The mean durations of effect during the first and last years were 12.4 ± 7.1 and 14.6 ± 7.0 weeks, respectively (P = 0.076). There were no significant differences between genders or between benign essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm subgroups. The most common adverse events were ptosis, lagophthalmos and dry eye. Botulinum toxin A is an effective, safe, long-term treatment for patients with benign essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. Sustained treatment efficacy required higher doses; however, fewer adverse reactions developed. © 2013 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  13. Comparison of the effects of esomeprazole plus mosapride citrate and botulinum toxin A on vocal process granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lei; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Xinsheng; Ren, Jia

    Vocal process granulomas have a high tendency for persistence despite many treatment alternatives. Anti-reflux medications or botulinum toxin A injections are the main current therapies. There are no studies that compare the effects on vocal process granuloma of proton pump inhibitors plus prokinetic agents with botulinum toxin A injections. Prospective cohort study. Adult patients reporting to our outpatient department complaining of trachyphonia and/or abnormal pharyngeal sensations who were found to have contact granulomas. Patients were divided into two groups according to the treatment: esomeprazole with mosapride citrate (n=26) or botulinum toxin A injection (n=20). The reflux symptom index and reflux finding score determined by electronic fibrolaryngoscopy were utilized to assess efficacy. Forty-six patients were recruited (43 male; 3 female). The mean age (range) was 48.3years (38-69) and the body mass index was 23.51kg/m(2) (19.13-27.89). Laryngopharyngeal reflux disease diagnosed by RSI or RFS was found in 18 and 27 patients, respectively, and 18 diagnosed without laryngopharyneal reflux disease. Twenty patients (95%) were cured in the esomeprazole with mosapride citrate group and nine (45%) in the botulinum toxin A group. Eleven (55%) patients had recurrence after botulinum toxin A injection, with an average interval of 3.1months (range 1-6). The recorded symptoms after therapy resolved within 6months with a statistically significant improvement in the esomeprazole with mosapride citrate group. Combined proton pump inhibitor plus prokinetic drug therapy plays a significant role in the treatment of vocal process granulomas or after surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Botulinum toxin for treatment of cocontractions related to obstetrical brachial plexopathy Toxina botulínica para tratamento das co-contrações relacionadas à plexopatia braquial obstétrica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos O. Heise

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin type A was recently introduced for treatment of biceps - triceps muscle cocontraction, which compromises elbow function in children with obstetrical brachial plexopathy. This is our preliminary experience with this new approach. Eight children were treated with 2 - 3 U/kg of botulinum toxin injected in the triceps (4 patients and biceps (4 patients muscle, divided in 2 or 3 sites. All patients submitted to triceps injections showed a long-lasting improvement of active elbow flexion and none required new injections, after a follow-up of 3 to 18 months. Three of the patients submitted to biceps injections showed some improvement of elbow extension, but none developed anti-gravitational strength for elbow extension and the effect lasted only three to five months. One patient showed no response to triceps injections. Our data suggest that botulinum toxin can be useful in some children that have persistent disability secondary to obstetrical brachial plexopathy.A toxina botulínica do tipo A foi introduzida recentemente para o tratamento das co-contrações entre os músculos biceps e triceps, que comprometem a função do cotovelo nas crianças com plexopatia braquial obstétrica. Apresentamos nossa experiência preliminar com esta abordagem. Oito crianças foram tratadas com 2 - 3 U/kg de toxina botulínica injetada nos músculos triceps (4 pacientes e biceps (4 pacientes, divididas em 2 ou 3 sítios. Todos os pacientes submetidos a injeções no triceps apresentaram melhora persistente da flexão do cotovelo e nenhum precisou de novas aplicações após seguimento de 3 a 18 meses. Três pacientes submetidos a aplicações no biceps apresentaram melhora na extensão do cotovelo, mas nenhum adquiriu força antigravitacional e o efeito durou apenas 3 a 5 meses. Um paciente não respondeu às injeções. Nossos dados sugerem que a toxina botulínica pode ser útil no tratamento de algumas crianças com seqüelas de plexopatia braquial

  15. An evidence-based review of botulinum toxin (Botox) applications in non-cosmetic head and neck conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Persaud, Ricardo; Garas, George; Silva, Sanjeev; Stamatoglou, Constantine; Chatrath, Paul; Patel, Kalpesh

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (Botox) is an exotoxin produced from Clostridium botulinum. It works by blocking the release of acetylcholine from the cholinergic nerve end plates leading to inactivity of the muscles or glands innervated...

  16. The therapeutic usage of botulinum toxin (Botox) in non-cosmetic head and neck conditions – An evidence based review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Awan, Kamran Habib

    2017-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (Botox) is an exotoxin produced from Clostridium botulinum. It blocks the release of acetylcholine from the cholinergic nerve end plates resulting in inactivity of the muscles or glands innervated...

  17. Botulinum Toxin Suppression of CNS Network Activity In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J. Pancrazio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The botulinum toxins are potent agents which disrupt synaptic transmission. While the standard method for BoNT detection and quantification is based on the mouse lethality assay, we have examined whether alterations in cultured neuronal network activity can be used to detect the functional effects of BoNT. Murine spinal cord and frontal cortex networks cultured on substrate integrated microelectrode arrays allowed monitoring of spontaneous spike and burst activity with exposure to BoNT serotype A (BoNT-A. Exposure to BoNT-A inhibited spike activity in cultured neuronal networks where, after a delay due to toxin internalization, the rate of activity loss depended on toxin concentration. Over a 30 hr exposure to BoNT-A, the minimum concentration detected was 2 ng/mL, a level consistent with mouse lethality studies. A small proportion of spinal cord networks, but not frontal cortex networks, showed a transient increase in spike and burst activity with exposure to BoNT-A, an effect likely due to preferential inhibition of inhibitory synapses expressed in this tissue. Lastly, prior exposure to human-derived antisera containing neutralizing antibodies prevented BoNT-A induced inhibition of network spike activity. These observations suggest that the extracellular recording from cultured neuronal networks can be used to detect and quantify functional BoNT effects.

  18. Pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta following botulinum toxin injection to the esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P. Shiraev, MB, BS (Hons, BSc (Hons

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aortic pseudoaneurysms are uncommon and are usually secondary to penetrating trauma. We describe the presentation and management of an elderly woman who suffered a pseudoaneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta several days after receiving botulinum toxin injection to the esophagus. Urgent thoracic endovascular aortic repair was performed, and long-term antibiotic therapy was commenced. Despite a slow initial clinical recovery, she returned to an independent lifestyle, with radiographic resolution of the pseudoaneurysm seen at follow-up. This case illustrates that endovascular aortic repair is a suitable and safe treatment option for this unusual presentation.

  19. Efficacy of botulinum toxins on bruxism: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hu; Liao, Zhengyu; Wang, Yan; Liao, Lina; Lai, Wenli

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of botulinum toxins on bruxism. Electronic databases (PubMed, Embase and Science Citation Index), websites (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and ClinicalTrials.gov) and the literature database of SIGLE (System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe) were searched from January 1990 to April 2011 for randomised controlled trials or nonrandomised studies assessing the efficacy of botulinum toxins on bruxism. There was no language restriction. Through a predefined search strategy, we retrieved 28 studies from PubMed, 94 from Embase, 60 from the Science Citation Index, two ongoing clinical trials and two from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Of these, only four studies met our inclusion criteria and were finally included. Of the four included studies, two were randomised controlled trials and two were controlled before-and-after studies. These studies showed that botulinum toxin injections can reduce the frequency of bruxism events, decrease bruxism-induced pain levels and satisfy patients' self-assessment with regard to the effectiveness of botulinum toxins on bruxism. In comparison with oral splint, botulinum toxins are equally effective on bruxism. Furthermore, botulinum toxin injections at a dosage of bruxism and are safe to use. Therefore, they can be used clinically for otherwise healthy patients with bruxism. © 2012 FDI World Dental Federation.

  20. A double-blind, randomised, crossover trial of two botulinum toxin type a in patients with spasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Coelho Guarany

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin type A (btxA is one of the main treatment choices for patients with spasticity. Prosigne® a new released botulinum toxin serotype A may have the same effectiveness as Botox® in focal dystonia. However, there are no randomized clinical trials comparing these formulations in spasticity treatment. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of Prosigne® with Botox® in the treatment of spasticity.We performed a double-blind, randomized, crossover study consisting of 57 patients with clinically meaningful spasticity. The patients were assessed at baseline, 4 and 12 weeks after Prosigne® or Botox® administration. The main outcomes were changes in the patients' Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS, Functional Independence Measure (FIM and Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI scores and adverse effects related to the botulinum toxin. Both of the toxins were significantly effective in relieving the level of spasticity in adults and children. There were no significant differences found between the Prosigne® and Botox® treatments regarding their MAS, FIM and PEDI scores. Likewise, the incidence of adverse effects was similar between the two groups.Our results suggest that Prosigne® and Botox® are both efficient and comparable with respect to their efficacy and safety for the three month treatment of spasticity.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00819065.

  1. Rate of epithelialisation and re-operations in corneal ulcers treated with amniotic membrane transplantation combined with botulinum toxin-induced ptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsluger, Thomas; Tuerkeli, Emre; Westekemper, Henrike; Esser, Joachim; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Meller, Daniel

    2007-07-01

    To examine the efficacy of amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) and/or botulinum toxin type A-induced ptosis (Dysport) in the treatment of corneal ulcerations of different entities. Retrospective evaluation of 137 cases of corneal ulcers which have been treated with AMT, botulinum toxin type A and perforating keratoplasty (pKP). Regarding corneal ulcerations the patients were divided into three groups: group A, patients initially having received an AMT (92 eyes eventually followed by AMT or pKP as a second intervention); group B, patients initially having received an AMT (32 eyes followed by botulinum toxin type A injection in the upper lid as a second intervention); group C, patients initially treated only by botulinum toxin type A injection (13 eyes followed occasionally by AMT or pKP or additional botulinum toxin type A injection). Additionally, we analysed the complete epithelialisation rate of the ocular surface in respect to different ocular and systemic diseases and compared the frequency of re-operations in each group. The overall follow-up was 14.2 (+/-14.7 months; range from 1 to 60 months). The total frequency of re-operations was 45.3% (overall time until complete epithelialisation 12.7 (+/-6.1) days). If the patient was initially treated with an AMT (group A), the re-operation rate was 44.6%. Treating affected eyes in this group with a subsequent amniotic membrane resulted in a reduction of re-operation rate to 30.4%. In cases with induced ptosis by injecting botulinum toxin type A in the M. levator palpebrae (group B), the re-operation frequency could be reduced to 34.4% with similar times of epithelialisation [group A: 12.0 (+/-6.5) days and group B: 11.7 (+/-5.5) days]. In group C, with botulinum toxin type A alone initially, the re-operation rate of 69.2% was the highest one compared with groups A and B; this rate could be drastically reduced by a following AMT to 23.1%. Surprisingly, in the few successful cases with botulinum toxin type A alone

  2. Evidence to Use Botulinum Toxin Injections in Tension-Type Headache Management: A Systematic Review

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    Mieszko Wieckiewicz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Tension-type headache (TTH is the most common type of chronic recurring head pain. It can occur twice as often in women as in men. It is the most common type of headache. Its lifetime prevalence is 30% to 78% in the general population. TTH treatment should be multilevel. It often consists of taking pain medication, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, using biofeedback therapy, acupuncture, and attending behavioral therapy. Several clinical trials also suggest that botulinum toxin (BTX may be an effective treatment option for such patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate if BTX can be used as a treatment method in TTH in the light of current medical literature. The authors searched the PubMed, EBSCOhost, OVID, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Library and CINAHL databases to identify relevant publications. The authors finally included 11 papers—prospective and retrospective cohort studies. Among most of the selected studies, there was a significant correlation between using BTX and reduction of TTH pain intensity and severity. By analyzing qualified studies, it can be concluded that botulinum toxin seems to be effective in TTH management.

  3. Evidence to Use Botulinum Toxin Injections in Tension-Type Headache Management: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieckiewicz, Mieszko; Grychowska, Natalia; Zietek, Marek; Wieckiewicz, Gniewko; Smardz, Joanna

    2017-11-15

    Tension-type headache (TTH) is the most common type of chronic recurring head pain. It can occur twice as often in women as in men. It is the most common type of headache. Its lifetime prevalence is 30% to 78% in the general population. TTH treatment should be multilevel. It often consists of taking pain medication, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, using biofeedback therapy, acupuncture, and attending behavioral therapy. Several clinical trials also suggest that botulinum toxin (BTX) may be an effective treatment option for such patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate if BTX can be used as a treatment method in TTH in the light of current medical literature. The authors searched the PubMed, EBSCOhost, OVID, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Library and CINAHL databases to identify relevant publications. The authors finally included 11 papers-prospective and retrospective cohort studies. Among most of the selected studies, there was a significant correlation between using BTX and reduction of TTH pain intensity and severity. By analyzing qualified studies, it can be concluded that botulinum toxin seems to be effective in TTH management.

  4. Myofascial pain of the jaw muscles: comparison of short-term effectiveness of botulinum toxin injections and fascial manipulation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarda-Nardini, Luca; Stecco, Antonio; Stecco, Carla; Masiero, Stefano; Manfredini, Daniele

    2012-04-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to compare the short-term effectiveness of botulinum toxin injections and physiatric treatment provided by means of Fascial Manipulation techniques in the management of myofascial pain of jaw muscles. Thirty patients with a Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) diagnosis of myofascial pain were randomized to receive either single-session botulinum toxin injections (Group A) or multiple-session Fascial Manipulation (Group B). Maximum pain levels (VAS ratings) and jaw range of motion in millimeters (maximum mouth opening, protrusion, right and left laterotrusion) were assessed at baseline, at the end of treatment, and at a three-month follow-up. Both treatment protocols provided significant improvement over time for pain symptoms. The two treatments seem to be almost equally effective, Fascial Manipulation being slightly superior to reduce subjective pain perception, and botulinum toxin injections being slightly superior to increase jaw range of motion. Differences between the two treatment protocols as to changes in the outcome parameters at the three-months follow-up were not relevant clinically. Findings from the present investigation are in line with literature data supporting the effectiveness of a wide spectrum of conservative treatment approaches to myofascial pain of the jaw muscles. Future studies on larger samples over a longer follow-up span are needed on the way to identify tailored treatment strategies.

  5. Experiência com aplicação de toxina botulínica A em 115 pacientes Botulinum toxin A: experience in the treatment of 115 patients

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    Luiz Augusto F. Andrade

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available A toxina botulínica A é a forma mais eficaz de tratar algumas distonias focais e o espasmo hemifacial. Devido a seu custo ainda elevado no nosso país, seu uso ainda não é disseminado. Mostramos nossa experiência com a toxina botulínica A em 115 pacientes, sendo 45 com espasmo hemifacial que apresentaram melhora acentuada ou total em 100%. Em 20 pacientes com blefaroespasmo essencial houve melhora acentuada ou total em 70% . Na síndrome de Meige, representada por 14 pacientes, a melhora acentuada ou total foi observada em 71,4%. Em 23 pacientes com distonia cervical observou-se melhora acentuada em 65,2%. Distonia da mão, com 6 pacientes, apresentou o menor índice de melhora acentuada (2 pacientes, 33,3%. As complicações de caráter transitório ocorreram, sendo as mais frequentes ptose palpebral e diminuição da força palpebral e a mais grave, pneumonia aspirativa. Acreditamos que a toxina é forma eficaz e habitualmente segura de tratamento destas condições clínicas.Botulinum toxin A is the more efficient therapy of focal dystonias and hemifacial spasm. Our experience with botulinum toxin A injections in 115 patients is reported. Marked or total improvement was achieved in all 45 patients with hemifacial spasm, in 70% of 20 patients with essential blepharospasm and in 71.4% of 14 patients with Meige's syndrome. In 65.2% of 23 patients with cervical dystonia marked but no total improvement was obtained. The worse results were seen in the 6 patients with hand dystonia (writers cramp, in whom marked improvement was obtained in just two. Mild and transient complications occurred in up to 24.4%, eyelid ptosis and eyelid weakness being the most frequent. One patient with Meige's syndrome had an aspiration pneumonia following dysphagia. Our results are in agreement with others, showing that botulinun toxin A is a useful and safe treatment for these conditions.

  6. Effect of Equilibrated pH and Indigenous Spoilage Microorganisms on the Inhibition of Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum Toxin Production in Experimental Meals under Temperature Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Max C; Wanless, Brandon J; David, Jairus R D; Lineback, D Scott; Talley, Ryan J; Kottapalli, Bala; Glass, Kathleen A

    2017-08-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a foreseeable biological hazard in prepared refrigerated meals that needs to be addressed in food safety plans. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of product composition and storage temperature on the inhibition of botulinum toxin formation in nine experimental meals (meat, vegetable, or carbohydrate based). Treatments were inoculated with proteolytic C. botulinum, vacuum packaged, cooked at 90°C for 10 min, and assayed for botulinum toxin in samples stored at 25°C for up to 96 h for phase 1, or at 25°C for 12 h and then transferred to 12.5°C for up to 12 and 6 weeks in phases 1 and 2, respectively. For phase 1, none of the treatments (equilibrated pH 5.8) supported toxin production when stored at 25°C for 48 h, but toxin production was observed in all treatments at 72 h. For the remaining experiments with storage at 12.5°C, toxin production was dependent on equilibrated pH, storage time, and growth of indigenous spoilage microorganisms. In phase 1, no gross spoilage and no botulinum toxin was detected for any treatment (pH ≤5.8) stored at 12.5°C for 12 weeks. In phase 2, gross spoilage varied by commodity, with the brussels sprouts meal with pH 6.5 showing the most rapid spoilage within 2 weeks and botulinum toxin detected at 5 and 6 weeks for the control and cultured celery juice treatments, respectively. In contrast, spoilage microbes decreased the pH of a pH 5.9 beef treatment by 1.0 unit, potentially inhibiting C. botulinum through 6 weeks at 12.5°C. None of the other treatments with pH 5.8 or below supported toxin production or spoilage. This study provides validation for preventive controls in refrigerated meals. These include equilibrated product pH and storage temperature and time to inhibit toxin formation by proteolytic C. botulinum, but the impact of indigenous microflora on safety and interpretation of challenge studies is also highlighted.

  7. Uso de toxina botulínica para tratamiento de la hipertrofía del músculo masetero Use of botulinum toxin for treatment of hypetrophy of the masseter muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. González Magaña

    2012-09-01

    multiple treatments, ranging from medical to surgical; medical treatment remains the most current and the most widely accepted is botulinum toxin. The objective of this paper is to review literature and to present a clinical case with unilateral masseteric hypertrophy, as well as the technique used and so provide a tool for the physician faced with masseter muscle hypertrophy. As diagnostic method we used CT of the head and facial mass with thin slices of 1 mm and of the masseteric region in the patient, and after that we performed botulinum toxin treatment according to the safety zone proposed by Nam-Ho Kim, based on anatomical sites indicated in the same protocol, with dose of 50 U at intervals of 3 months and measurement in the postoperative with CT images to evaluate the outcome of the applied treatment. Medical treatment with botulinum toxin are variable in dosage, applications and techniques so as in the products available in the market. In our case, the result was clinically satisfactory, covering the expectations required by the patient. We propose the use of protocols with patients, right dosages, time between applications, injection in correct anatomical sites, leading to the correction of the masseter muscle hypertrophy.

  8. Botulinum toxin injections for blepharospasm prior to ocular surgeries

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    Kaydu E

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Seydi Okumus1, Erol Coskun1, İbrahim Erbagci1, M Gürkan Tatar2, Aysegul Comez1, Erdal Kaydu1, Ramazan Yayuspayi1, Bulent Gurler11Department of Ophthalmology, University of Gaziantep, 2Ophthalmology Clinic, Nizip State Hospital, Nizip, Gaziantep, TurkeyPurpose: The aim of this study was to show the efficiency of preoperative botulinum toxin A (Botox A in patients with benign essential blepharospasm who were to undergo ocular surgery with local anesthesia.Materials and methods: Twenty-eight benign essential blepharospasm patients who were administered unilateral Botox A prior to ocular surgery between January 2004 and May 2011 were included in this study. Eleven cases had pterygiums, ten had cataracts, and four had glaucomas, while the remaining three had aphakia. All cases’ severity of spasm (stage 0–4 and eyelid closing forces (stage 1–4 were evaluated according to the Jankovic scale prior to the injection, at 3 days, 14 days, 1 month, and 3 months after Botox A injection.Results: Of the patients enrolled in the study, 16 were female and 12 were male, with an average age of 55.52 ± 1.53 years (52–65. Average onset of the Botox injection's effect was 2.8 ± 0.9 (2–5 days. Its effect lingered for about 11.5 ± 3.6 (8–22 weeks. The severity of spasm and eyelid closing forces of all the patients enrolled were compared prior to the injection at 3 and 14 days and the first and third months after the injection. There were statistically significant differences between prior to the injection and 3 days (P = 0.001, 14 days (P < 0.001 and 1 month after the injection (P <0.001. There was no statistically significant difference between prior to the injection and 3 months after the injection (P = 0.513. Fourteen days following the injection, the surgeries were successfully performed.Conclusion: Botox A administered prior to ocular surgery will control both blepharospasm and lower the risks that can be encountered before and during surgery, thus

  9. Early physiotherapy after injection of botulinum toxin increases the beneficial effects on spasticity in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannelli, M; Borriello, G; Castri, P; Prosperini, L; Pozzilli, C

    2007-04-01

    To determine whether additional physiotherapy increases botulinum toxin type A effects in reducing spasticity in patients with multiple sclerosis. A single-blind, randomized, controlled pilot trial with a 12-week study period. Thirty-eight patients with progressive multiple sclerosis affected by focal spasticity and who were observed at the Multiple Sclerosis Centre operating in the S. Andrea Hospital in Rome. For intervention all patients received botulinum toxin type A; the treatment group also received additional physiotherapy to optimize management through passive or active exercise and stretching regimens. To measure objective and subjective level of spasticity, patients were assessed at baseline, 2, 4 and 12 weeks post treatment by Modified Ashworth Scale and visual analogue scale. When compared with the control group, we found a significant decrease of spasticity by Modified Ashworth Scale (P < 0.01 by t-test) in the treatment group at week 2 (2.73 versus 3.22), week 4 (2.64 versus 3.33) and week 12 (2.68 versus 3.33). The mean (%) difference in Modified Ashworth Scale score between baseline and the end of follow-up was -0.95 (26.1) in the treatment group and -0.28 (7.7) in the control group (P < 0.01). The combined treatment proved also to be more effective by visual analogue scale (P < 0.01) at week 4 (6.95 versus 5.50) and at week 12 (7.86 versus 6.56) but not at week 2 (5.18 versus 5.50; P = 0.41). Our data suggest that physiotherapy in combination with botulinum toxin type A injection can improve overall response to botulinum toxin.

  10. The Changes in Corneal Astigmatism after Botulinum Toxin-A Injection in Patients with Blepharospasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Nam Ju; Lee, Hyeon Il

    2006-01-01

    To determine if the involuntary contractions of eyelids may have any effects on the development of corneal astigmatism, we performed this prospective study which includes 19 patients with either essential blepharospasm or hemifacial spasm. In hemifacial spasm, the degree of corneal astigmatism was evaluated between two eyes. Then the topographic changes were checked using vector analysis technique before and after passively opening the eyelids. They were also measured before and at 1 and 6 months after the injection of Botulinum toxin. Resultantly, 20 eyes had the with-the-rule (group1) and 9 eyes against-the-rule (group2) astigmatism. In hemifacial spasm, significantly more astigmatism was found at spastic eyes. The corneal topographic changes after passively opening the eyelids showed 10 eyes with the astigmatic shift to the with-the-rule, while the remaining 19 to the against-the-rule. At 1 month after injection of Botulinum toxin, group 1 showed reduced average corneal astigmatism, whereas group 2 showed increased astigmatism. The astigmatic change vector showed significantly more against-the-rule. In the contrary, 6 months after treatment, corneal astigmatism again increased in group 1 and decreased in group 2. So they took on the appearance of pretreatment astigmatic status eventually. Conclusively eyelids may play an important role in corneal curvature. PMID:16479079

  11. The Change of Intrinsic Stiffness in Gastrocnemius after Intensive Rehabilitation with Botulinum Toxin A Injection in Spastic Diplegic Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Dong Rak; Park, Gi Young; Kwon, Jung Gu

    2012-01-01

    A recent study claimed that botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection into the calf muscle of cerebral palsy (CP) children did not change the intrinsic stiffness. Contrary to this recent report, in our case, decreased muscle spasticity, which was measured using a modified Ashworth scale, and increased Gross Motor Function Measure score were demonstrated at 4 weeks after intensive rehabilitation treatment (IRT) with BTX-A injection to the medial gastrocnemius muscle in a child with spastic CP. Addit...

  12. Botulinum Toxin Type a Injection, Followed by Home-Based Functional Training for Upper Limb Hemiparesis after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, Toru; Kakuda, Wataru; Taguchi, Kensuke; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Sase, Yousuke; Abo, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been reported to be an effective treatment for limb spasticity after stroke. However, the reduction in the spasticity after BoNT-A injection alone does not ensure an improvement in the active motor function of the affected limb. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical effects of a BoNT-A injection,…

  13. Botulinum toxin for subacute/chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Pierre; Peloso, Paul Michael J; Lowcock, Janet; Nolan, May; Weber, Jeff; Gross, Anita; Roberts, John; Goldsmith, Charles H; Graham, Nadine; Burnie, Stephen J; Haines, Ted

    2011-07-06

    Neck disorders are common, disabling and costly. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) intramuscular injections are often used with the intention of treating neck pain. To systematically evaluate the literature on the treatment effectiveness of BoNT for neck pain, disability, global perceived effect and quality of life in adults with neck pain with or without associated cervicogenic headache, but excluding cervical radiculopathy and whiplash associated disorder. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, AMED, Index to Chiropractic Literature, CINAHL, LILACS, and EMBASE from their origin to 20 September 2010. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials in which BoNT injections were used to treat subacute or chronic neck pain. A minimum of two review authors independently selected articles, abstracted data, and assessed risk of bias, using the Cochrane Back Review Group criteria. In the absence of clinical heterogeneity, we calculated standardized mean differences (SMD) and relative risks, and performed meta-analyses using a random-effects model. The quality of the evidence and the strength of recommendations were assigned an overall grade for each outcome. We included nine trials (503 participants). Only BoNT type A (BoNT-A) was used in these studies.High quality evidence suggests there was little or no difference in pain between BoNT-A and saline injections at four weeks (five trials; 252 participants; SMD pooled -0.07 (95% confidence intervals (CI) -0.36 to 0.21)) and six months for chronic neck pain. Very low quality evidence indicated little or no difference in pain between BoNT-A combined with physiotherapeutic exercise and analgesics and saline injection with physiotherapeutic exercise and analgesics for patients with chronic neck pain at four weeks (two trials; 95 participants; SMD pooled 0.09 (95% CI -0.55 to 0.73)) and six months (one trial; 24 participants; SMD -0.56 (95% CI -1.39 to 0.27)). Very low quality evidence from one trial (32 participants) showed little

  14. Treatment of cervical dystonia with botulinum toxin in a patient with myasthenia gravis Tratamento de distonia cervical com toxina botulínica em uma paciente com miastenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCIA RUBIA R. GONÇALVES

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 49-year-old woman who has the rare combination of myasthenia gravis and cervical dystonia. She was treated with botulinum toxin type A with good response and no evidence of deterioration of the myasthenic symptoms. We therefore conclude that it is possible to use botulinum toxin in the presence of defective neuromuscular transmission.Relatamos o caso de uma mulher de 49 anos com rara combinação de miastenia gravis e distonia cervical tratada com toxina botulínica tipo A, apresentando boa resposta e nenhuma evidência de piora do quadro miastênico. A partir dessas observações concluimos que é possível o uso de toxina botulínica na presença de doença da transmissão neuromuscular.

  15. Clostridium botulinum spores and toxin in mascarpone cheese and other milk products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciosa, G; Pourshaban, M; Gianfranceschi, M; Gattuso, A; Fenicia, L; Ferrini, A M; Mannoni, V; De Luca, G; Aureli, P

    1999-08-01

    A total of 1,017 mascarpone cheese samples, collected at retail, were analyzed for Clostridium botulinum spores and toxin, aerobic mesophilic spore counts, as well as pH, a(w) (water activity), and Eh (oxidation-reduction potential). In addition 260 samples from other dairy products were also analyzed for spores and botulinum toxin. Experiments were carried out on naturally and artificially contaminated mascarpone to investigate the influence of different temperature conditions on toxin production by C. botulinum. Three hundred and thirty-one samples (32.5%) of mascarpone were positive for botulinal spores, and 7 (0.8%) of the 878 samples produced at the plant involved in an outbreak of foodborne botulism also contained toxin type A. The chemical-physical parameters (pH, a(w), Eh) of all samples were compatible with C. botulinum growth and toxinogenesis. Of the other milk products, 2.7% were positive for C. botulinum spores. Growth and toxin formation occurred in naturally and experimentally contaminated mascarpone samples after 3 and 4 days of incubation at 28 degrees C, respectively.

  16. Does giving segmental muscle vibration alter the response to botulinum toxin injections in the treatment of spasticity in people with multiple sclerosis? A single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoloni, Marco; Giovannelli, Morena; Mangone, Massimiliano; Leonardi, Laura; Tavernese, Emanuela; Di Pangrazio, Elisabetta; Bernetti, Andrea; Santilli, Valter; Pozzilli, Carlo

    2013-09-01

    To determine if segmental muscle vibration and botulinum toxin-A injection, either alone or in combination, reduces spasticity in a sample of patients with multiple sclerosis. Single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Physical medicine and rehabilitation outpatients service. Forty-two patients affected by the secondary progressive form of multiple sclerosis randomized to group A (30 minutes of 120 Hz segmental muscle vibration over the rectus femoris and gastrocnemius medial and lateral, three per week, over a period of four weeks), group B (botulinum toxin in the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius medial and lateral and soleus, and segmental muscle vibration) and group C (botulinum toxin). Modified Ashworth Scale at knee and ankle, and Fatigue Severity Scale. All the measurements were performed at baseline (T0), 10 weeks (T1) and 22 weeks (T2) postallocation. Modified Ashworth Scale at knee and ankle significantly decreased over time (p Fatigue Severity Scale values in groups A and C were significantly higher at T0 [A: 53.6 (2.31); C: 48.5 (2.77)] than at either T1 [A: 48.6 (2.21); p = 0.03; C: 43.5 (3.22); p = 0.03] or T2 [A: 46.7 (2.75); p = 0.02; 42.5 (2.17); p = 0.02], while no differences were detected in group B [T0: 43.4 (3.10); T1: 37.3 (3.15); T2: 39.7 (2.97)]. Segmental muscle vibration and botulinum toxin-A reduces spasticity and improves fatigue in the medium-term follow-up in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  17. Adverse event reporting for botulinum toxin type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, R Sonia; Dover, Jeffrey S; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2005-12-01

    A recent article published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology reviewed adverse events regarding botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) reported to the Food and Drug Administration between 1989 and 2003. Although postmarketing surveillance is a vital mechanism to ensure drug safety, the events reported in this paper must be considered in context to be appropriately interpreted. The majority of data was related to therapeutic rather than cosmetic use. The proportion of serious adverse events was 33-fold higher for therapeutic use and no deaths were reported after cosmetic use. The data were derived from a spontaneous reporting system and do not include assessments of causality between the BTX-A and purported adverse events. The report notes that over a third of these events were related to off-label use of BTX-A, a common practice in dermatology, yet no significant differences were reported in rates of adverse events between on-label and off-label use. The report reflects a favorable safety profile for cosmetic use of BTX-A, and if misinterpreted, could lead to unreasonable conclusions regarding a product considered to be highly safe and effective.

  18. Phosphatidylcholine/deoxycholate lipolysis and hyaluronic acid augmentation to enhance nonsurgical lower facial contouring using botulinum toxin type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Garsing Roger; Chen, Wen-Pei

    2011-06-01

    Botulinum toxin type A can produce dramatic improvements in patients with benign masseteric hypertrophy but this method alone is not as effective for patients with a rounded lower face. The paper describes the effective use of selective lower jowl phosphatidylcholine/deoxycholate lipolysis and chin, cheek, and nose augmentation with hyaluronic acid to refine cosmetic lower facial contouring using botulinum toxin type A in a young Asian woman. A series of treatments was administered over 26 months. The patient's lower cheeks were slimmed and jowl definition was improved producing the patient's desired sculptured, heart-shaped face. The injection-based procedures provided much preferable alternative to surgery from the perspective of both the patient and her family. The authors believe that this is the first case report in the published literature reporting these three methods used in conjunction. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Aplicación de la toxina botulínica A para el tratamiento del síndrome de Frey Application of botulinum toxin A for the treatment of Frey’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mareque Bueno

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome Aurículo-temporal también conocido como sudoración gustativa o síndrome de Frey, es una entidad caracterizada por sudoración y enrojecimiento de la piel del territorio inervado por el nervio aurículo-temporal durante las comidas. El síndrome de Frey es probablemente una secuela inevitable en la cirugía de la glándula parótida. Una vez que se presenta se perpetua durante toda la vida si no se realiza tratamiento. Realizando el test de Minor tras cirugía sobre la glándula parótida ha sido publicado que el 100% son positivos, y que el 50% son sintomáticos percibiendo la sudoración durante las comidas, y alrededor de un 15% consideran sus síntomas graves. En el siguiente articulo presentamos los resultados de nuestro estudio que consistió en la inyección intradérmica de toxina botulínica A a nuestros pacientes con síndrome de Frey y el seguimiento. Los resultados han sido desaparición de los síntomas durante un periodo medio de 16 meses con cierta variabilidad individual. Con estos resultados podría considerarse la inyección de toxina botulínica A como ténica de elección para el síndrome de Frey ya establecido.The auriculotemporal syndrome, also known as gustatory sweating or Frey’s syndrome, is a condition characterized by sweating and flushing of the cutaneous territory innervated by the auriculotemporal nerve while eating. Frey’s syndrome is probably an inevitable sequela of parotid gland surgery. Once it appears, it persists for the rest of the patient’s life if not treated. It has been reported that performance on the Minor test after parotid gland surgery is 100% positive and 50% of patients are symptomatic, experiencing sweating during meals. About 15% consider their symptoms serious. In this article we present the results of our study of the treatment of Frey’s syndrome by intradermal injection of botulinum toxin A and the follow-up of the patients. The patients’ symptoms disappeared during

  20. Comparative effectiveness of propranolol and botulinum for the treatment of essential voice tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justicz, Natalie; Hapner, Edie R; Josephs, Joshua S; Boone, Benjamin C; Jinnah, Hyder A; Johns, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    To assess the comparative effectiveness of botulinum toxin and propranolol in patients with essential vocal tremor (EVT). Individual prospective cohort study. Study patients were recruited at the Emory Voice Center from patients seeking treatment for EVT. Exclusion criteria included current β-blocker treatment, spasmodic dysphonia, or other disease that prevented the use of propranolol therapy. A 10-week washout period from prior botulinum toxin treatment occurred before enrollment. Patients were assessed via the Voice-Related Quality-Of-Life (VRQOL) questionnaire, Quality of life in Essential Tremor questionnaire, and blinded perceptual voice assessment. These assessments were made at baseline voice 2 weeks after propranolol therapy and 4 weeks after botulinum toxin injection. Eighteen patients were enrolled. After 2 to 4 weeks of propranolol therapy (with a maximum dosage of 60 mg to 90 mg per day), patients report an average ΔVRQOL of 9.31. Six patients report significant VRQOL improvement >10, with the rest reporting changes between -7.5 and 7.5. Fifteen patients were followed for at least 4 weeks after botulinum toxin injection, reporting an average improvement in scaled VRQOL of 22.00. Blinded perceptual voice assessment demonstrates an improvement in overall severity of tremor with botulinum toxin. In some patients with EVT, propranolol led to significant vocal improvement with no major side effects. Although botulinum toxin remains the gold-standard therapy for patients with EVT, propranolol represents a possible alternative or adjuvant therapy for certain patients. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Custos e eficácia da toxina botulínica tipo A no tratamento do blefaroespasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial Costs and efficacy of type A botulinum toxin for the treatment of essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Gomes Galvão Lasalvia

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os custos do tratamento para blefaroespasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial com toxina botulínica tipo A (Dysport®, correlacionando-os com sua eficácia terapêutica. MÉTODOS: Análise de 50 prontuários de pacientes com blefaroespasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial, submetidos à terapia com Dysport®, no período de abril de 2002 a maio de 2004 no setor de Óculo-Plástica da Santa Casa de São Paulo. Dos 50 pacientes, 27 apresentavam blefaroespasmo essencial e 23 espasmo hemifacial. Informações sobre grau de satisfação, queixas e custos pessoais foram obtidas mediante questionário. Os custos do medicamento e dos materiais foram pesquisados no almoxarifado e na farmácia da Santa Casa. Quanto ao custo das consultas, utilizou-se a tabela de pagamento do SUS. Para a estatística foram utilizados os testes de Wilcoxon e Mann-Whitney. RESULTADOS: O custo total anual do tratamento foi de R$ 1.239,32 para o blefaroespasmo essencial e R$ 661,72 para o espasmo hemifacial. Para o paciente, o custo anual foi de R$ 145,48 para o blefaroespasmo essencial e R$ 126,07 para o espasmo hemifacial. Para o hospital, o custo anual foi de R$ 1.095,84 para o blefaroespasmo essencial e R$ 535,65 para o espasmo hemifacial. O tratamento com Dysport® promoveu melhora funcional significativa nos dois grupos. CONCLUSÃO: O procedimento tem custo elevado, principalmente devido ao preço da toxina. Entretanto, pela análise econômica da saúde fica demonstrado que o procedimento possui excelente relação custo-benefício.PURPOSE: To evaluate the costs and efficacy of type A botulinum toxin in the treatment of essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. METHODS: Pacients with essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm had their files analyzed. All patients were treated with type A botulinum toxin (Dysport® between April 2002 and May 2004 at the Oculoplastic Clinics of "Santa Casa de São Paulo". Twenty-seven patients presented essential

  2. Clostridium botulinum serotype D neurotoxin and toxin complex bind to bovine aortic endothelial cells via sialic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Tohru; Miyata, Keita; Chikai, Tomoyuki; Mikami, Akifumi; Suzuki, Tomonori; Hasegawa, Kimiko; Ikeda, Toshihiko; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Ohyama, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi

    2008-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is produced as a large toxin complex (L-TC) associated with nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA) and three hemagglutinin subcomponents (HA-70, -33 and -17). The binding properties of BoNT to neurons and L-TC to intestinal epithelial cells are well documented, while those to other tissues are largely unknown. Here, to obtain novel insights into the pathogenesis of foodborne botulism, we examine whether botulinum toxins bind to vascular endothelial cells. BoNT and 750 kDa L-TC (a complex of BoNT, NTNHA and HAs) of Clostridium botulinum serotype D were incubated with bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs), and binding to the cells was assessed using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot. Both BoNT and L-TC bound to BAECs, with L-TC showing stronger binding. Binding of BoNT and L-TC to BAECs was significantly inhibited by N-acetyl neuraminic acid in the cell culture medium or by treatment of the cells with neuraminidase. However, galactose, lactose or N-acetyl galactosamine did not significantly inhibit toxin binding to the cells. This is the first report demonstrating that BoNT and L-TC bind to BAECs via sialic acid, and this mechanism may be important in the trafficking pathway of BoNT in foodborne botulism.

  3. Corneal and Tear Film Changes After Botulinum Toxin-A in Blepharospasm or Hemifacial Spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunes, Alime; Demirci, Seden; Koyuncuoglu, Hasan Rifat; Tok, Levent; Tok, Ozlem

    2015-08-01

    To investigate changes in corneal parameters and the tear film after botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A) injection in patients with blepharospasm or hemifacial spasm. Twelve patients with benign essential blepharospasm and 30 with hemifacial spasm treated with BTX-A were included in this study. Disease severity was evaluated using the Jankovic scale. Corneal parameters were measured by the Pentacam. The Schirmer test score, tear breakup time, corneal fluorescein staining value, and Ocular Surface Disease Index score were also evaluated. The BTX-A treatment relieved spasms in all of the patients. There was a statistically significant difference in disease severity between pretreatment and the third week (2.7 ± 0.8 and 1.3 ± 0.6, respectively; P hemifacial spasm. However, there were no changes in corneal parameters, except corneal astigmatism, in these patients after treatment.

  4. Therapeutic use of botulinum toxin in migraine: mechanisms of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Roshni; Yaksh, Tony L

    2014-01-01

    Migraine pain represents sensations arising from the activation of trigeminal afferents, which innervate the meningeal vasculature and project to the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Pain secondary to meningeal input is referred to extracranial regions innervated by somatic afferents that project to homologous regions in the TNC. Such viscerosomatic convergence accounts for referral of migraine pain arising from meningeal afferents to particular extracranial dermatomes. Botulinum toxins (BoNTs) delivered into extracranial dermatomes are effective in and approved for treating chronic migraine pain. Aside from their well-described effect upon motor endplates, BoNTs are also taken up in local afferent nerve terminals where they cleave soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins, and prevent local terminal release. However, a local extracranial effect of BoNT cannot account for allthe effects of BoNT upon migraine. We now know that peripherally delivered BoNTs are taken up in sensory afferents and transported to cleave SNARE proteins in the ganglion and TNC, prevent evoked afferent release and downstream activation. Such effects upon somatic input (as from the face) likewise would not alone account for block of input from converging meningeal afferents. This current work suggests that BoNTs may undergo transcytosis to cleave SNAREs in second-order neurons or in adjacent afferent terminals. Finally, while SNAREs mediate exocytotic release, they are also involved in transport of channels and receptors involved in facilitated pain states. The role of such post-synaptic effects of BoNT action in migraine remains to be determined. PMID:24819339

  5. Botulinum toxin uses in strabismus: A review of the injections performed during one year in a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrín, E; Arranz Márquez, E; Yebra González, L; García Gil de Bernabé, J

    2016-03-01

    To analyse the indications, dosage and efficacy of botulinum toxin A injection performed in patients in a Strabismus Department. In this prospective study, botulinum toxin A was injected into 28 patients diagnosed with strabismus. Data was obtained from the records of patients that were evaluated during 2013 in the Strabismus Unit of Rey Juan Carlos Hospital (Móstoles, Madrid, Spain) in order to assess the indications and dosage of botulinum toxin A use in strabismus, as well as its clinical effect and differences in paediatric and adult patients. The outcomes in the last visit, at least 14 months after the injections, were analysed. An analysis was performed on the data from 11 children, 6 females (54.5%), and 17 adults, 11 males (64%). The mean age was 4.42±3.48 years and 58.71±18.07 years in the children and adult groups, respectively. The majority of cases in both groups were esotropia (81.8% in children and 47.1% in adults). However the pathologies in the adult group were quite heterogeneous, including 4 patients with exotropia (26.5%), 4 with hypertropia (26.5%), and one with isolated nystagmus (5.9%). The mean number of the botulinum toxin injections in children was 1.45±0.93, although 72.7% received a single injection. In the adult group, the mean number of injections was 3.27±1.41. There was a statistically significant difference between pre- and post-injection in the tropia and phoria measurements in children and adults group (P<.05). In both groups there was a statistically significant improvement in post-injection torticollis when compared with the pre-injection measurement (P<.05). An improvement in the stereoacuity could be detected in 4 children. Two children (18.2%) and 5 adults (29.4%) required subsequent surgical intervention. Eight adult patients (49.1%) complained of diplopia in the primary position, which was resolved in 6 cases with toxin injection, whereas 2 needed surgery for diplopia correction. Botulinum toxin is a very useful tool in

  6. Attempts to identify Clostridium botulinum toxin in milk from three experimentally intoxicated Holstein cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, R.B.; Puschner, B.; Walker, R.L.; Rocke, T.E.; Smith, S.R.; Cullor, J.S.; Ardans, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Three adult lactating Holstein cows were injected in the subcutaneous abdominal vein with 175 ng/kg of body weight of Clostridium botulinum type C toxin (451 cow median toxic doses) to determine if this botulinum toxin crosses the blood–milk barrier. Whole blood (in sodium heparin) and clotted blood serum samples were taken at 0 min, 10 min, and 3, 6, 9, and 12 h postinoculation. Milk samples were taken at 0 min and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 h postinoculation. All samples were tested for the presence of the toxin using the mouse bioassay and immunostick ELISA test. The immunostick ELISA identified the toxin in whole blood and the mouse bioassay identified the toxin in serum at all times examined in all 3 animals. Toxin was not identified by either detection method in milk samples collected from the 3 animals. From these results, it appears that Clostridium botulinum type C toxin does not cross from the blood to the milk in detectable concentrations.

  7. Endocardial botulinum toxin injection into ganglionated plexi in order to reduce atrial fibrillation inducibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. Г. Стрельников

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Prior animal studies suggest that botulinum toxin injection into the epicardial fat pads can suppress atrial fibrillation (AF inducibility. The purpose of the present study was to assess the efficacy and safety of endocardial botulinum toxin injection into epicardial fat pads and intramyocardial left atrial ganglionated plexi (GP for preventing AF.Methods. Twenty-four dogs were separated into 3 groups: endocardial approach for botulinum toxin (Xeomin, Germany injection into epicardial fat pads and intramyocardial GPs; endocardial approach for placebo injection (0.9% normal saline; control 1; n = 8 and epicardial approach for botulinum toxin injection (control 2; n = 8.Results. A mean of 6.9±1.7 intramyocardial injections (10 U/0.2 mL at each and 3 injections (50 U/1 mL at each were administered into each site exhibiting a positive vagal response and into each epicardial fat pad in all groups (p>0.05 between groups.The injections of botulinum toxin demonstrated dramatic prolongation of ERP in all PV-atrial junctions. This effect correlated with less pronounced ERP shortening in response to vagal nerve stimulation. Suppression of AF inducibility was observed at 7 days after endocardial botulinum toxin injections. The level of AF inducibility was: at 7 days – 57% (p<0.001 vs placebo; p<0.001 vs baseline; at 14 days – 61% (p<0.001 vs placebo; p<0.001 vs baseline; at 1 month – 38% (p<0.001 vs placebo; p<0.001 vs baseline; at 3 months – 23% (p = 0.003; p = 0.06 vs baseline. There were no differences between botulinum groups (p>0.05 for all. The effect of AF suppression disappeared at 3 months. No procedure-related complications occurred.Conclusion. Botulinum toxin injection into intramyocardial GPs and epicardial fat pads by an endocardial approach is feasible and safe. It provides complete removal of cardiac vagal responses and reliably reduces vulnerability to atrial fibrillation.

  8. Systematic review of the effectiveness of botulinum toxin or radiotherapy for sialorrhea in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Carol A; O'Leary, Norma

    2009-02-01

    Fifty percent of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) experience problems handling serous saliva and 20% fail to achieve adequate control of sialorrhea with anticholinergic medications, or experience intolerable adverse effects from these drugs. Both botulinum and radiotherapy have been suggested in the literature as treatments for intractable sialorrhea. In this review, we assess the evidence for the effectiveness and toxicity of botulinum toxin and radiotherapy for sialorrhea in patients with ALS. Relevant studies were retrieved from Medline, Embase and Cochrane Databases. Handsearching of Neurology, Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, and Palliative Medicine and of reference lists, was carried out. Five studies (28 patients) were included in the analysis of botulinum. Of the four studies using an intraglandular method of injection, no adverse effects occurred. Two of these had positive findings of the effect of botulinum in salivary secretion rate and quality of life. In contrast, significant adverse effects were experienced by two patients in a study of retrograde injections into the salivary ducts. Two studies were included in the analysis of radiotherapy (27 patients). Both demonstrated a positive effect of radiotherapy on salivary secretion rate. Some patients experienced mild acute side effects. Because of the small numbers of studies, small sample sizes, and poor quality of reporting, it is not possible to draw firm conclusions. There is some evidence indicating that both botulinum and radiotherapy are well tolerated, effective treatments for persistent sialorrhea in patients with ALS and that the duration of action is up to three months with botulinum and six months with radiotherapy.

  9. Effects of botulinum toxin A and/or bimanual task-oriented therapy on upper extremity activities in unilateral Cerebral Palsy: a clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speth, L.; Janssen-Potten, Y.; Rameckers, E.; Defesche, A.; Winkens, B.; Becher, J.G.; Smeets, R.; Vles, H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study reports on the effects of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) injections in the upper extremity (UE) in children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (uCP) combined with bimanual task-oriented therapy (BITT) or either treatment modality performed separately. Bimanual activities were measured

  10. Effects of leg muscle botulinum toxin A injections on walking in children with spasticity-related cerebral palsy: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryll, U.; Bastiaenen, C.; Bie, R. de; Staal, B.

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess treatment effects of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) on walking of children with leg spasticity due to cerebral palsy (CP) compared with usual care. METHOD: We systematically searched the databases CINAHL, Cochrane, PEDro, EMBASE, and PubMed from July 1993 until July 2009 and

  11. The combined effect of lower-limb multilevel botulinum toxin type A and comprehensive rehabilitation on mobility in children with cerebral palsy: A randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtes, V.A.; Dallmeijer, A.J.; Knol, D.L.; Speth, L.A.; Maathuis, C.G.; Jongerius, P.H.; Becher, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the combined effect on mobility of treatment with multilevel botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) and comprehensive rehabilitation in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Design: Randomized clinical trial using a multiple baseline design. The intervention group was treated 6 weeks

  12. The combined effect of lower-limb multilevel botulinum toxin type A and comprehensive rehabilitation on mobility in children with cerebral palsy : A randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtes, Vanessa A.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Knol, Dirk L.; Speth, Lucianne A.; Maathuis, Carel G.; Jongerius, Peter H.; Becher, Jules G.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the combined effect on mobility of treatment with multilevel botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) and comprehensive rehabilitation in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Design: Randomized clinical trial using a multiple baseline design. The intervention group was treated 6 weeks

  13. Case Report: Impact of Botulinum Toxin Injection on Function of Affected Upper Extremity in A Patient, 16 Years after Stroke

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    Malek Amini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Case report Impact of Botulinum Toxin injection on function of affected upper extremity in a patient after 16 years since stroke (CVA. Botulinum toxin injection is one the treatments in spasticity reduction and consequently in recovery of upper limb function in stroke patients. The purpose of this case study is to report the effect of Botulinum toxin injection on upper extremity function after 16 years of stroke. Materials & Methods: The patient was a 63-year-old man who has had a cerebrovascular accident that happened in the left hemisphere about 16 years ago, and as a result, a paresis in dominant hand and arm. Although the patient was able to perform simple movements but he was complaining about the slowness and stiffness in the movements. To treat spasticity the Botulinum toxin type A was used. Injection into selected muscles of hemiparetic upper limb was done by a specialist physician and was between 50-150IU based on specific volume of each muscle. After injection, the patient was monitored for 3 months and at the end of each month, the assessments were reevaluated. During this period, although research team suggested the patient to continue the rehabilitation but for personal reasons he didn’t participate in any treatment and didn`t receive any other antispasmodic medications. Results: An increase in range of motion was seen in all joints but this improvement was not significant. The greatest improvement in passive and active range of motion was seen in Metacarpophalengeal joints. At the end of each month, compared to the first month the recovery of function in upper extremity was significant. Maximum recovery of upper extremity function was related to the hand section of fugl-meyer assessment. At the end of the first month, spasticity significantly decreased so that the patient was able to extend all his joints more easily than before injection. Although spasticity never reached zero. Conclusion: Botulinum toxin injection

  14. Botulinum toxin improves quality of life in hemifacial spasm: validation of a questionnaire (HFS-30).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Eng-King; Fook-Chong, Stephanie; Lum, Sau-Ying; Lim, Erle

    2004-04-15

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) can be disabling and affect quality of life. There is a lack of a validated scale for evaluating botulinum toxin (BTX) response in HFS. We examined the validity and reliability of a self-rating health-related quality of life (HRQOL) questionnaire (HFS-30) in HFS and investigated the correlation of this questionnaire with the neurologists' assessment of severity of HFS and response to botulinum toxin (BTX) treatment. HFS patients were asked to answer a total of 30 self-rating questions divided into seven subscales: Mobility; Activities of Daily Living (ADL); Emotional Well-being; Stigma; Social support; Cognition; and Communication. All of the items were scored on a 5-point scales ranging from 0 ("never") to 4 ("always"). They were also asked to assess their response to the BTX treatment based on a similar questionnaire at 6-8 weeks after BTX. The validity, reliability and sensitivity of the questionnaire were analyzed statistically. There were 80 HFS patients with mean age of 56.3+/-11.1 (S.D.) years (range 35 to 81), consisting of 54 (67.5%) females, 26 (32.5%) males. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Cronbach's alpha were more than 0.7 for the majority of the items and subscales, respectively. There was a good positive correlation of severity of HFS with the subscale scores. Regression analysis of physicians' assessment of response to BTX on change in scores from baseline as rated by patients demonstrated a significant correlation. We demonstrated validity, reliability and sensitivity of the HFS-30 questionnaire. BTX improves quality of life in HFS.

  15. Botulinum Toxin Type a as a Therapeutic Agent against Headache and Related Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvisetto, Siro; Gazerani, Parisa; Cianchetti, Carlo; Pavone, Flaminia

    2015-09-23

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is a toxin produced by the naturally-occurring Clostridium botulinum that causes botulism. The potential of BoNT/A as a useful medical intervention was discovered by scientists developing a vaccine to protect against botulism. They found that, when injected into a muscle, BoNT/A causes a flaccid paralysis. Following this discovery, BoNT/A has been used for many years in the treatment of conditions of pathological muscle hyperactivity, like dystonias and spasticities. In parallel, the toxin has become a "glamour" drug due to its power to ward off facial wrinkles, particularly frontal, due to the activity of the mimic muscles. After the discovery that the drug also appeared to have a preventive effect on headache, scientists spent many efforts to study the potentially-therapeutic action of BoNT/A against pain. BoNT/A is effective at reducing pain in a number of disease states, including cervical dystonia, neuropathic pain, lower back pain, spasticity, myofascial pain and bladder pain. In 2010, regulatory approval for the treatment of chronic migraine with BoNT/A was given, notwithstanding the fact that the mechanism of action is still not completely elucidated. In the present review, we summarize experimental evidence that may help to clarify the mechanisms of action of BoNT/A in relation to the alleviation of headache pain, with particular emphasis on preclinical studies, both in animals and humans. Moreover, we summarize the latest clinical trials that show evidence on headache conditions that may obtain benefits from therapy with BoNT/A.

  16. Botulinum Toxin Type A as a Therapeutic Agent against Headache and Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siro Luvisetto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A is a toxin produced by the naturally-occurring Clostridium botulinum that causes botulism. The potential of BoNT/A as a useful medical intervention was discovered by scientists developing a vaccine to protect against botulism. They found that, when injected into a muscle, BoNT/A causes a flaccid paralysis. Following this discovery, BoNT/A has been used for many years in the treatment of conditions of pathological muscle hyperactivity, like dystonias and spasticities. In parallel, the toxin has become a “glamour” drug due to its power to ward off facial wrinkles, particularly frontal, due to the activity of the mimic muscles. After the discovery that the drug also appeared to have a preventive effect on headache, scientists spent many efforts to study the potentially-therapeutic action of BoNT/A against pain. BoNT/A is effective at reducing pain in a number of disease states, including cervical dystonia, neuropathic pain, lower back pain, spasticity, myofascial pain and bladder pain. In 2010, regulatory approval for the treatment of chronic migraine with BoNT/A was given, notwithstanding the fact that the mechanism of action is still not completely elucidated. In the present review, we summarize experimental evidence that may help to clarify the mechanisms of action of BoNT/A in relation to the alleviation of headache pain, with particular emphasis on preclinical studies, both in animals and humans. Moreover, we summarize the latest clinical trials that show evidence on headache conditions that may obtain benefits from therapy with BoNT/A.

  17. Cellular uptake of Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin requires oligomerization and acidification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, H; Blocker, D; Behlke, J; Bergsma-Schutter, W; Brisson, A; Benz, R; Aktories, K

    2000-01-01

    The actin-ADP-ribosylating binary Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin consists of two individual proteins, the binding/translocation component C2II and the enzyme component C2I. To elicit its cytotoxic action, C2II binds to a receptor on the cell surface and mediates cell entry of C2I via

  18. Effect of a clown's presence at botulinum toxin injections in children: a randomized, prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgaard; Kibæk, Maria; Martinussen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the presence of a hospital clown during pediatric procedures has rarely been evaluated. In a pediatric ward, botulinum toxin injection is a painful procedure and a stressful experience for the child. We undertook a study of the effect of the presence of a hospital clown on children...

  19. Thickened Saliva after Effective Management of Drooling with Botulinum Toxin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Corrie E.; van Hulst, Karen; van den Hoogen, Frank J. A.; van Limbeek, Jacques; Roeleveld, Nel; Veerman, Enno C. I.; Rotteveel, Jan J.; Jongerius, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the rheological properties of saliva after submandibular botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections. Method: We enrolled 15 children (11 males and six females; age range 3-17y, mean age 9y 10mo) diagnosed with spastic (n=9) or dyskinetic (n=6) quadriplegic cerebral palsy (CP); Gross Motor Function…

  20. Thickened saliva after effective management of drooling with botulinum toxin A.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, C.E.; Hulst, K. van; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den; Limbeek, J. van; Roeleveld, N.; Veerman, E.C.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Jongerius, P.H.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the rheological properties of saliva after submandibular botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections. METHOD: We enrolled 15 children (11 males and six females; age range 3-17 y, mean age 9 y 10 mo) diagnosed with spastic (n=9) or dyskinetic (n=6)

  1. Thickened saliva after effective management of drooling with botulinum toxin A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, C.E.; van Hulst, K.; van den Hoogen, F.J.; van Limbeek, J.; Roeleveld, N.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Jongerius, P.H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the rheological properties of saliva after submandibular botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections. Method: We enrolled 15 children (11 males and six females; age range 3-17y, mean age 9y 10mo) diagnosed with spastic (n=9) or dyskinetic (n=6) quadriplegic

  2. Effect of multilevel botulinum toxin a and comprehensive rehabilitation on gait in cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtes, V.A.; Dallmeijer, A.J.; Knol, D.L.; Speth, L.A.; Maathuis, C.G.; Jongerius, P.H.; Becher, J.G.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of multilevel botulinum toxin A and comprehensive rehabilitation on gait pattern, muscle length, and spasticity, a multicenter randomized trial was performed in 46 children with spastic cerebral palsy who walk with flexed knees. Their mean age was 8.0 years (range 4 to 11

  3. Botulinum toxin A for patients with orofacial dystonia: prospective, observational, single-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-de-León-Hernández, G; Díaz-Sánchez, R-M; Torres-Lagares, D; Hernández-Pacheco, E; González-Martín, M; Serrera-Figallo, M-A

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy of intramuscular botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) as a method of controlling the symptoms of focal facial dystonia. A prospective, longitudinal, observational, pre-post (case-series) single-centre study was conducted over a period of 3 months, involving 30 patients with focal dystonia. The patients were enrolled on a first-come, first-served basis. For all patients, the abnormal movements were evaluated using the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS). The AIMS results were recorded immediately before BTX-A injection (primary predictor variable) and after 3 months (the toxin reaches its maximum effect 2 weeks after injection, and the effect is maintained for 3 months). An improvement in AIMS score was the primary outcome variable. Treatment efficacy was evaluated using the Pearson correlation index with a level of significance of P<0.05. The average age of the study subjects was 70.9±12.7years (20 female, 10 male). The mean dose of BTX-A used was 27.4±20.5U. The mean improvement in AIMS score after treatment was 5.2±4.2. A significant correlation was found between the dose applied and the reduction in AIMS score (P<0.05). BTX-A can be used in the treatment of focal dystonia and provides reproducible results. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Use of botulinum toxin-A for musculoskeletal pain in patients with whiplash associated disorders [ISRCTN68653575

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco J

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whiplash associated disorder is commonly linked to motor vehicle accidents and sports injuries. Cervical injury is attributed to rapid extension followed by neck flexion. The exact pathophysiology of whiplash is uncertain but probably involves some degree of aberrant muscle spasms and may produce a wide range of symptoms. The most commonly prescribed pharmacological agents for initial treatment of whiplash-associated pain are oral muscle relaxants and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, potential systemic adverse effects limit these agents. Physical interventions such as mobilization, manipulation, and exercises have proved beneficial for pain and dysfunction but only on a time-limited basis. Little evidence suggests that physical therapy specifically aimed at the musculature (e.g., transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, ultrasonography, heat, ice, and acupuncture improves prognosis in acute whiplash associated disorder. A new approach to treatment is the use of botulinum toxin, which acts to reduce muscle spasms. Methods/design This is a prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial and botulinum toxin-A (Botox® injections will be compared with placebo injections. The primary objective is to determine the efficacy of Botox® in the management of musculoskeletal pain in whiplash associated disorders. Discussion Botulinum toxin type-A toxin has been studied in small trials on whiplash associated disorder patients and has generally been found to relieve pain and improve range of motion. Specifically, we seek to assess the efficacy of Botox® in reducing pain and to improve the cervical spine range of movement, during the 6-month trial period.

  5. Is an instrumented spasticity assessment an improvement over clinical spasticity scales in assessing and predicting the response to integrated botulinum toxin type a treatment in children with cerebral palsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Lynn; Van Campenhout, Anja; Desloovere, Kaat; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Huenaerts, Catherine; Vandendoorent, Britt; Nieuwenhuys, Angela; Molenaers, Guy

    2014-03-01

    To compare responsiveness and predictive ability of clinical and instrumented spasticity assessments after botulinum toxin type A (BTX) treatment combined with casting in the medial hamstrings (MEHs) in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Prospective cohort study. Hospital. Consecutive sample of children (N=31; 40 MEH muscles) with CP requiring BTX injections. Clinical and instrumented spasticity assessments before and on average ± SD 53±14 days after BTX. Clinical spasticity scales included the Modified Ashworth Scale and the Modified Tardieu Scale. The instrumented spasticity assessment integrated biomechanical (position and torque) and electrophysiological (surface electromyography) signals during manually performed low- and high-velocity passive stretches of the MEHs. Signals were compared between both stretch velocities and were examined pre- and post-BTX. Responsiveness of clinical and instrumented assessments was compared by percentage exact agreement. Prediction ability was assessed with a logistic regression and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of the baseline parameters of responders versus nonresponders. Both clinical and instrumented parameters improved post-BTX (P≤.005); however, they showed a low percentage exact agreement. The baseline Modified Tardieu Scale was the only clinical scale predictive for response (area under the ROC curve=0.7). For the instrumented assessment, baseline values of root mean square (RMS) electromyography and torque were better predictors for a positive response (area under the ROC curve=.82). Baseline RMS electromyography remained an important predictor in the logistic regression. The instrumented spasticity assessment showed higher responsiveness than the clinical scales. The amount of RMS electromyography is considered a promising parameter to predict treatment response. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  6. Factors Influencing Goal Attainment in Patients with Post-Stroke Upper Limb Spasticity Following Treatment with Botulinum Toxin A in Real-Life Clinical Practice: Sub-Analyses from the Upper Limb International Spasticity (ULIS-II Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemens Fheodoroff

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this post-hoc analysis of the ULIS-II study, we investigated factors influencing person-centred goal setting and achievement following botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A treatment in 456 adults with post-stroke upper limb spasticity (ULS. Patients with primary goals categorised as passive function had greater motor impairment (p < 0.001, contractures (soft tissue shortening [STS] (p = 0.006 and spasticity (p = 0.02 than those setting other goal types. Patients with goals categorised as active function had less motor impairment (0.0001, contracture (p < 0.0001, spasticity (p < 0.001 and shorter time since stroke (p = 0.001. Patients setting goals for pain were older (p = 0.01 with more contractures (p = 0.008. The proportion of patients achieving their primary goal was not impacted by timing of first-ever BoNT-A injection (medium-term (≤1 year vs. longer-term (>1 year post-stroke (80.0% vs. 79.2% or presence or absence of severe contractures (76.7% vs. 80.6%, although goal types differed. Earlier BoNT-A intervention was associated with greater achievement of active function goals. Severe contractures impacted negatively on goal achievement except in pain and passive function. Goal setting by patients with ULS is influenced by impairment severity, age and time since stroke. Our findings resonate with clinical experience and may assist patients and clinicians in selecting realistic, achievable goals for treatment.

  7. Regulation of Botulinum Neurotoxin Synthesis and Toxin Complex Formation by Arginine and Glucose in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, Chase M; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A

    2017-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), produced by neurotoxigenic clostridia, is the most potent biological toxin known and the causative agent of the paralytic disease botulism. The nutritional, environmental, and genetic regulation of BoNT synthesis, activation, stability, and toxin complex (TC) formation is not well studied. Previous studies indicated that growth and BoNT formation were affected by arginine and glucose in Clostridium botulinum types A and B. In the present study, C. botulinum ATCC 3502 was grown in toxin production medium (TPM) with different levels of arginine and glucose and of three products of arginine metabolism, citrulline, proline, and ornithine. Cultures were analyzed for growth (optical density at 600 nm [OD 600 ]), spore formation, and BoNT and TC formation by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation and for BoNT activity by mouse bioassay. A high level of arginine (20 g/liter) repressed BoNT production approximately 1,000-fold, enhanced growth, slowed lysis, and reduced endospore production by greater than 1,000-fold. Similar effects on toxin production were seen with equivalent levels of citrulline but not ornithine or proline. In TPM lacking glucose, levels of formation of BoNT/A1 and TC were significantly decreased, and extracellular BoNT and TC proteins were partially inactivated after the first day of culture. An understanding of the regulation of C. botulinum growth and BoNT and TC formation should be valuable in defining requirements for BoNT formation in foods and clinical samples, improving the quality of BoNT for pharmaceutical preparations, and elucidating the biological functions of BoNTs for the bacterium. IMPORTANCE Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a major food safety and bioterrorism concern and is also an important pharmaceutical, and yet the regulation of its synthesis, activation, and stability in culture media, foods, and clinical samples is not well understood. This paper provides insights into the effects of critical

  8. Binding properties of Clostridium botulinum type C progenitor toxin to mucins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Toshio; Takada, Noriko; Tonozuka, Takashi; Sakano, Yoshiyuki; Oguma, Keiji; Nishikawa, Atsushi

    2007-04-01

    It has been reported that Clostridium botulinum type C 16S progenitor toxin (C16S toxin) first binds to the sialic acid on the cell surface of mucin before invading cells [A. Nishikawa, N. Uotsu, H. Arimitsu, J.C. Lee, Y. Miura, Y. Fujinaga, H. Nakada, T. Watanabe, T. Ohyama, Y. Sakano, K. Oguma, The receptor and transporter for internalization of Clostridium botulinum type C progenitor toxin into HT-29 cells, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 319 (2004) 327-333]. In this study we investigated the binding properties of the C16S toxin to glycoproteins. Although the toxin bound to membrane blotted mucin derived from the bovine submaxillary gland (BSM), which contains a lot of sialyl oligosaccharides, it did not bind to neuraminidase-treated BSM. The binding of the toxin to BSM was inhibited by N-acetylneuraminic acid, N-glycolylneuraminic acid, and sialyl oligosaccharides strongly, but was not inhibited by neutral oligosaccharides. Both sialyl alpha2-3 lactose and sialyl alpha2-6 lactose prevented binding similarly. On the other hand, the toxin also bound well to porcine gastric mucin. In this case, neutral oligosaccharides might play an important role as ligand, since galactose and lactose inhibited binding. These results suggest that the toxin is capable of recognizing a wide variety of oligosaccharide structures.

  9. Safety of Botulinum Toxin A in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy in a Pragmatic Setting

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    George Mitsou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study aimed to examine the safety of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A treatment in a paediatric multidisciplinary cerebral palsy clinic. In a sample of 454 patients who had 1515 BoNT-A sessions, data on adverse events were available in 356 patients and 1382 sessions; 51 non-fatal adverse events were reported (3.3% of the total injections number, 8.7% of the patients. On five occasions, the adverse reactions observed in GMFCS V children were attributed to the sedation used (rectal midazolam plus pethidine; buccal midazolam and resulted in prolongation of hospitalization. Of the reactions attributed to the toxin, 23 involved an excessive reduction of the muscle tone either of the injected limb(s or generalized; others included local pain, restlessness, lethargy with pallor, disturbance in swallowing and speech production, seizures, strabismus, excessive sweating, constipation, vomiting, a flu-like syndrome and emerging hypertonus in adjacent muscles. Their incidence was associated with GMFCS level and with the presence of epilepsy (Odds ratio (OR = 2.74 − p = 0.016 and OR = 2.35 − p = 0.046, respectively but not with BoNT-A dose (either total or per kilogram. In conclusion, treatment with BoNT-A was safe; adverse reactions were mostly mild even for severely affected patients. Their appearance did not necessitate major changes in our practice.

  10. Accuracy of botulinum toxin type A injection into the forearm muscles of chronic stroke patients with spastic flexed wrist and clenched fist: manual needle placement evaluated using ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picelli, Alessandro; Roncari, Laura; Baldessarelli, Silvia; Berto, Giulia; Lobba, Davide; Santamato, Andrea; Fiore, Pietro; Smania, Nicola

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the accuracy of manual needle placement for injection of botulinum toxin type A into the forearm muscles of adults with spastic flexed wrist and clenched fist as a consequence of stroke. Prospective clinical study. A total of 41 adults with chronic stroke who were scheduled to receive botulinum toxin type A injection into the following forearm muscles: flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, flexor digitorum superficialis and flexor digitorum profundus. According to Huber & Heck's atlas suggestions on treatment of spasticity with botulinum toxin, surface identification of muscles to inject was performed by means of palpation and anatomical landmarks. Accuracy of needle placement and muscle thickness at the site of needle insertion were assessed using ultrasonography. Overall accuracy of manual needle placement evaluated using ultrasonography was 51.2%. Accuracy was significantly higher for the finger flexors than for the wrist flexors (63.4% vs 39.0%). The finger flexors were significantly thicker than the wrist flexors (mean 1.58 vs 0.49 cm). Instrumental guidance should be used in order to achieve an acceptable accuracy of needle placement when performing botulinum toxin type A injections into the forearm muscles of chronic stroke patients with spastic flexed wrist and clenched fist.

  11. Value of botulinum toxin injections preceding a comprehensive rehabilitation period for children with spastic cerebral palsy: A cost-effectiveness study

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    Fabienne Schasfoort

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Despite the widespread use of botulinum toxin in ambulatory children with spastic cerebral palsy, its value prior to intensive physiotherapy with adjunctive casting/orthoses remains unclear. Design: A pragmatically designed, multi-centre trial, comparing the effectiveness of botulinum toxin + intensive physiotherapy with intensive physiotherapy alone, including economic evaluation. Subjects/patients: Children with spastic cerebral palsy, age range 4–12 years, cerebral palsy-severity Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I–III, received either botulinum toxin type A + intensive physiotherapy or intensive physiotherapy alone and, if necessary, ankle-foot orthoses and/or casting. Methods: Primary outcomes were gross motor func-tion, physical activity levels, and health-related quality-of-life, assessed at baseline, 12 (primary end-point and 24 weeks (follow-up. Economic outcomes included healthcare and patient costs. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed with linear mixed models. Results: There were 65 participants (37 males, with a mean age of 7.3 years (standard deviation 2.3 years, equally distributed across Gross Motor Function Classification System levels. Forty-one children received botulinum toxin type A plus intensive physio-therapy and 24 received intensive physiotherapy treatment only. At primary end-point, one statistically significant difference was found in favour of intensive physiotherapy alone: objectively measured percentage of sedentary behaviour (–3.42, 95% confidence interval 0.20–6.64, p=0.038. Treatment costs were significantly higher for botulinum toxin type A plus intensive physiotherapy (8,963 vs 6,182 euro, p=0.001. No statistically significant differences were found between groups at follow-up. Conclusion: The addition of botulinum toxin type A to intensive physiotherapy did not improve the effectiveness of rehabilitation for ambulatory children with spastic cerebral palsy and was also

  12. Botulinum toxin injection causes hyper-reflexia and increased muscle stiffness of the triceps surae muscle in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Wienecke, Jacob; Lorentzen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    and attached to a muscle puller. The resistance of the muscle to stretches of different amplitudes and velocities was systematically investigated. Reflex mediated torque was normalized to the maximal muscle force (Mmax) evoked by supramaximal stimulation of the tibial nerve. Botulinum toxin injection caused......Botulinum toxin is used to diminish spasticity and reduce the risk of development of contractures. Here, we investigated changes in muscle stiffness caused by reflex activity or elastic muscle properties following botulinum toxin injection in the triceps surae muscle in rats. Forty-four rats...... received injection of botulinum toxin in the left triceps surae muscle. Control measurements were performed on the non-injected contralateral side in all rats. Acute experiments were performed 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks following injection. The triceps surae muscle was dissected free, the Achilles tendon was cut...

  13. Botulinum toxin type A combined with neurodynamic mobilization for lower limb spasticity: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Jorge H

    2013-03-01

    This case report describes a patient with severe lower limb spasticity treated with botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) and neurodynamic mobilization (NM). An 81-year-old male patient presented with a severe spastic lower limbs after total right hip replacement and severe alcoholic polyneuropathy. After the right hip replacement, he presented with generalized spasticity, crouched posture, and a large sacral pressure sore. The severe spasticity in his knees prevented walking. The patient underwent combined treatment with BoNT-A and NM of the lower limb in 4 weekly applications. Evaluations were performed pretreatment, 4 weeks after the injection, and at a follow-up session 9 months after finishing treatment. We measured the following outcomes: pain by the Numerical Rating Scale, spasticity by the Modified Ashworth Scale for Grading Spasticity, acceptance and emotional reaction to the treatment by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and functionality by ranges of motion. We found that the patient improved in all of the outcomes after treatment, and these results were maintained during the follow-up. After treatment, the patient was able to improve wound healing by properly positioning himself in bed or on his wheelchair and walking with help. At the follow-up evaluation, the results were maintained. The patient showed good acceptance and decreased anxiety/depression after treatment. For this patient, the combination of NM and BoNT-A treatment decreased pain and spasticity and improved joint ranges of motion.

  14. Study on Potential Clostridium Botulinum Growth and Toxin Production in Parma Ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merialdi, Giuseppe; Ramini, Mattia; Parolari, Giovanni; Barbuti, Silvana; Frustoli, Maria Angela; Taddei, Roberta; Pongolini, Stefano; Ardigò, Paolo; Cozzolino, Paolo

    2016-04-19

    The objective of this study was to investigate Clostridium botulinum growth and toxin production in the industrially manufactured Italian Parma ham. The study focuses on the Parma ham production phase identified as maximum risk to C. botulinum proliferation, i.e. the transition from cold phase (salting and resting) to a phase carried out at temperature between 15 and 23°C (drying). A preliminary in vitro test was carried out in order to verify the capability of 6 C. botulinum strains (1 type A, 4 type B, and 1 type E strains) to grow in conditions of temperature, pH and NaCl concentration comparable to those of the beginning stage of ham drying. Five C. botulinum strains grew at 20°C and pH 6, four strains produced toxin when inoculated at a concentration equal to 103 cfu/mL at NaCl concentration of 4%, while when the inoculum concentration was 10 cfu/mL, NaCl concentration of 3% resulted the toxin-genesis limiting factor. An experimental contamination with a mixture of the 5 C. botulinum strains selected by the preliminary in vitro test was performed on 9 thighs inoculated at the end of the resting phase. The study was designed to evaluate the potential growth and toxin production in extremely favourable conditions for the bacterium. Type B proteolytic C. botulinum toxin was produced after 14 days of incubation at 20°C in 2 thighs characterised by high weight, low number of days of resting and anomalous physiochemical characteristics [one for very low NaCl concentration (1.59%), the other for elevated pH (6.27) and both for high water activity values (>0.970)]. The results of this research confirm that the cold resting step is a critical phase in the production process of Parma ham for the investigated hazard. Based on the present study, the long resting phase adopted in the manufacturing of Parma ham is proven effective to prevent the growth of C. botulinum, an event which could not otherwise be excluded if the hams were processed under less stringent

  15. Study on potential Clostridium botulinum growth and toxin production in Parma ham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Merialdi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate Clostridium botulinum growth and toxin production in the industrially manufactured Italian Parma ham. The study focuses on the Parma ham production phase identified as maximum risk to C. botulinum proliferation, i.e. the transition from cold phase (salting and resting to a phase carried out at temperature between 15 and 23°C (drying. A preliminary in vitro test was carried out in order to verify the capability of 6 C. botulinum strains (1 type A, 4 type B, and 1 type E strains to grow in conditions of temperature, pH and NaCl concentration comparable to those of the beginning stage of ham drying. Five C. botulinum strains grew at 20°C and pH 6, four strains produced toxin when inoculated at a concentration equal to 103 cfu/mL at NaCl concentration of 4%, while when the inoculum concentration was 10 cfu/mL, NaCl concentration of 3% resulted the toxin-genesis limiting factor. An experimental contamination with a mixture of the 5 C. botulinum strains selected by the preliminary in vitro test was performed on 9 thighs inoculated at the end of the resting phase. The study was designed to evaluate the potential growth and toxin production in extremely favourable conditions for the bacterium. Type B proteolytic C. botulinum toxin was produced after 14 days of incubation at 20°C in 2 thighs characterised by high weight, low number of days of resting and anomalous physiochemical characteristics [one for very low NaCl concentration (1.59%, the other for elevated pH (6.27 and both for high water activity values (>0.970]. The results of this research confirm that the cold resting step is a critical phase in the production process of Parma ham for the investigated hazard. Based on the present study, the long resting phase adopted in the manufacturing of Parma ham is proven effective to prevent the growth of C. botulinum, an event which could not otherwise be excluded if the hams were processed under less

  16. A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial Investigating the Most Efficacious Dose of Botulinum Toxin-A for Sialorrhea Treatment in Asian Adults with Neurological Diseases

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    Mazlina Mazlan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the most efficacious dose of Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A in reducing sialorrhea in Asian adults with neurological diseases. A prospective, double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted over 24 weeks. Thirty patients with significant sialorrhea were randomly assigned to receive a BoNT-A (Dysport® injection into the submandibular and the parotid glands bilaterally via an ultrasound guidance. The total dose given per patient was either BoNT-A injection of (i 50 U; (ii 100 U; or (iii 200 U. The primary outcome was the amount of saliva reduction, measured by the differential weight (wet versus dry of intraoral dental gauze at baseline and at 2, 6, 12, and 24 weeks after injection. The secondary outcome was the subjective report of drooling using the Drooling Frequency and Severity Scale (DFS. Saliva reduction was observed in response to all BoNT-A doses in 17 patients who completed the assessments. Although no statistically significant difference among the doses was found, the measured reduction was greater in groups that received higher doses (100 U and 200 U. The group receiving 200 U of Dysport® showed the greatest reduction of saliva until 24 weeks and reported the most significant improvement in the DFS score.

  17. The change of intrinsic stiffness in gastrocnemius after intensive rehabilitation with botulinum toxin a injection in spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Dong Rak; Park, Gi Young; Kwon, Jung Gu

    2012-06-01

    A recent study claimed that botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection into the calf muscle of cerebral palsy (CP) children did not change the intrinsic stiffness. Contrary to this recent report, in our case, decreased muscle spasticity, which was measured using a modified Ashworth scale, and increased Gross Motor Function Measure score were demonstrated at 4 weeks after intensive rehabilitation treatment (IRT) with BTX-A injection to the medial gastrocnemius muscle in a child with spastic CP. Additionally, we indentified decreased muscle stiffness which was demonstrated by a decrease in the color-coded scale and shear velocity, and an increase in the strain ratio using dynamic sonoelastography.

  18. Long-term efficacy of botulinum a toxin for blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Harmeet S; Kraft, Stephen P

    2010-09-01

    To determine whether the duration of relief from symptoms in patients with essential blepharospasm (EB) or hemifacial spasm (HFS) who receive serial treatments with botulinum toxin type A (BtA) changes over the long-term. Retrospective longitudinal comparative analysis. The main outcome measure is the mean duration of relief from symptoms after an injection with BtA. Participants included 34 patients who received 30 or more serial BtA treatments for facial dyskinesia (EB or HFS). Repeated measures and linear regression analyses were used to determine trends and the mean duration of relief from symptoms was compared between early (first ten effective treatments) and late (last ten treatments) sessions in each group. In the EB group (18 patients), the mean duration of relief was 13.5 weeks for the early and 11.4 weeks for the late sessions (P = 0.04). In the HFS group (16 patients) the mean duration of relief was 12.4 weeks in both treatment periods (P = 0.91). The duration of relief had a small negative correlation with mean late session BtA dose in the EB group (P = 0.03) but no correlation in the HFS group (P = 0.12). There was a trend towards a decreased duration of relief from symptoms in patients with EB over the long-term, but no changes for HFS. The treatment remains effective in relieving symptoms and signs for both conditions.

  19. Characterisation of botulinum toxins type C, D, E, and F by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation and electrospray mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, B.L.M. van; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, A.L. de; Wils, E.R.J.

    2004-01-01

    In a follow-up of the earlier characterisation of botulinum toxins type A and B (BTxA and BTxB) by mass spectrometry (MS), types C, D, E, and F (BTxC, BTxD, BTxE, BTxF) were now investigated. Botulinum toxins are extremely neurotoxic bacterial toxins, likely to be used as biological warfare agent.

  20. An update on botulinum toxin A injections of trigger points for myofascial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jon Y; Wang, Dajie

    2014-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a common chronic pain condition that is characterized by distinct "trigger points." Despite current treatments with physical therapy, analgesics, anti-depressants and trigger-point injections, myofascial pain remains a challenging chronic pain condition in clinical practice. Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) can cause prolonged muscle relaxation through inhibition of acetylcholine release. It may offer some advantages over the current treatments for MPS by providing a longer sustained period of pain relief. Despite numerous clinical trials, the efficacy of BTX-A in alleviating MPS is not well-established due to mixed results from recent clinical trials. Active trigger points are associated with referred pain and greatly impact many aspects of activities of daily living, mood, and health status. This review is designed to analyze the clinical trials regarding the efficacy of BTX-A injection of active trigger points as a treatment for MPS. The literature referenced was obtained via a computer search with Google Scholar, Pubmed, Medline and EMbase. Our search terms included "Botulinum toxin," "myofascial pain," "trigger points," "myofascial trigger points," "chronic pain." Additional references were retrieved from the reference list of the reports found via this search. Studies were considered eligible for inclusion if they were double-blinded, randomized, controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of BTX-A injections into trigger points for pain reduction, and if the trigger point selection in the trial included referred pain and/or local twitch response. Open-label studies, case reports, and other non-randomized studies were excluded. Eight trials were found according to the above criteria and are summarized in Table 1. There are well-designed clinical trials to support the efficacy of trigger-point injections with BTX-A for MPS. However, further clinical trials with considerations of minimizing placebo effect, repeated dosing, adequate

  1. Patient Perceived Benefit in Facial Aesthetic Procedures: FACE-Q as a Tool to Study Botulinum Toxin Injection Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Brian L; Wilson, Anthony J; Taglienti, Anthony J; Chang, Catherine S; Folsom, Nancy; Percec, Ivona

    2016-07-01

    There are numerous methods of assessing patient satisfaction with botulinum toxin type A neuromodulation of the glabellar rhytids. As the use of aesthetic neuromodulation increases both in breadth and number of procedures, there is a need for more comprehensive tools to evaluate patient-reported outcomes. The FACE-Q is a recently validated patient-reported outcome instrument that can be used to measure patient perceptions of botulinum toxin type A neuromodulation. This study used the FACE-Q to assess patient satisfaction following botulinum toxin type A neuromodulation of the glabellar rhytids. 57 female patients completed the FACE-Q, a survey that evaluates patients' satisfaction with their facial appearance. After this baseline survey, the patients received injections of one of onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox, Allergan, Dublin, Ireland), abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport, Galderma, Lausanne, Switzerland), or incobotulinumtoxinA (Xeomin, Merz Pharmaceuticals, Frankfurt am Main, Germany) in the glabella. Two weeks post-injection, the patients completed the FACE-Q again. The percentage changes in patient responses were tabulated to determine how neuromodulation affects patient satisfaction with their facial appearance. The percentage changes for each of the neurotoxin groups were compared to determine if patient satisfaction with neuromodulation varies with the type of neurotoxin. Patient satisfaction with their overall facial appearance increased by 28% following neuromodulation. Patients stated that they believe they look an average of 5.6 years younger post-neuromodulation. There were no significant differences among the treatment groups. The FACE-Q demonstrates that patients are more satisfied by their overall facial appearance and age appearance following neuromodulation of their glabellar rhytids. Patients are equally satisfied with the improvement of their facial appearance regardless of which neurotoxin they received. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 2: Therapeutic. © 2016 The

  2. Avaliação do filme lacrimal de pacientes com distonia facial durante tratamento com toxina botulínica tipo A Lacrimal film evaluation of patients with facial dystonia during botulinum toxin type A treatment

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    Patricia Grativol Costa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar o efeito da toxina botulínica no filme lacrimal em pacientes com distonia facial. MÉTODOS: Foram incluídos 24 pacientes portadores de blefaroespasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial que receberam aplicação de toxina botulínica tipo A que foram submetidos à propedêutica do filme lacrimal previamente à aplicação e após, com 7 e 30 dias. RESULTADOS: Houve diminuição das queixas de olho seco trinta dias após a aplicação, entretanto, o tempo de ruptura do filme lacrimal e o teste de Schirmer não demonstraram variação significativa entre os períodos pré-tratamento e 1 mês da aplicação. Em relação ao teste de coloração com rosa bengala, todos os olhos que coraram no pré-tratamento, melhoraram na última avaliação. CONCLUSÃO: A injeção de toxina botulínica pode aliviar as queixas de olho seco nos pacientes com distonia facial pela provável ação de inibição do orbicular na sua função de bomba lacrimal.PURPOSE: To determine the effect of botulinum toxin injection in the eyelid on lacrimal film in patients with facial dystonia. METHODS: Twenty-four patients with essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm were submitted to botulinum toxin injection and lacrimal film tests were performed before the application and after seven and thirty days. RESULTS: There was improvement in symptoms of dry eye and rose bengal test, however, the breakup time and Schirmer's test did not show significant variation between pretreatment and after 1 month of follow-up. CONCLUSION: The dry eye symptoms in patients with facial dystonia may be attenuated by botulinum toxin due to its possible inhibitory effect on the orbicular muscle leading to a decrease in lacrimal pump.

  3. Combined Effect Of Botulinum Toxin And Splinting On Motor Components And Function Of People With Stroke

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    Aryan Shamili

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Spasticity is one of the problems following stroke. Due to this increase in muscle tone, patients are confronted to problems in motor control and difficulties in activities of daily living and complications such as shortness and contracture. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of Simultaneous use of both splint and botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A injection on spasticity, range of motion and upper extremity function in a 3-month period. Methods: The design of this study was a comparison between 3 groups of interventions, conducted in rehabilitation clinics in Tehran. Sixty people with chronic stroke were recruited. Based on the inclusion criteria, a total of 39 stroke patients after completing the consent forms were entered to intervention groups; splint or botulinum toxin injection or combined splint/botulinum toxin injection. They were followed up about 3 months and the evaluations were done monthly. Goniometry was the method to measure range of motion, and Modified Ashworth scale was used to examine the spasticity and the upper extremity function was scored based on Fugl-Meyer assessment.   Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 17. And ANOVAs was used for comparison between groups and times.  Significance was set at 0.05. Results: All outcome measures improved within each group but the differences between splint group and BTX-A group and the BTX-A-splint group was not significant in most outcomes during 3 periods (first evaluation until end of the first month, the end of first month until the end of second month, the end of second month until the end of the third month (p> 0 / 05. The results also showed that the changes in elbow`s spasticity {p= 0.05} and wrist`s spasticity {p= 0.007} and upper extremity function { p = 0.04} were obvious between the three groups over the 3-months and the difference in the group of combined use of botulinum toxin and splint was more than other groups. Conclusion: In this

  4. Can botulinum toxin type A injection technique influence the clinical outcome of patients with post-stroke upper limb spasticity? A randomized controlled trial comparing manual needle placement and ultrasound-guided injection techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamato, Andrea; Micello, Maria Francesca; Panza, Francesco; Fortunato, Francesca; Baricich, Alessio; Cisari, Carlo; Pilotto, Alberto; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Fiore, Pietro; Ranieri, Maurizio

    2014-12-15

    Botulinum toxin type A is a first-line treatment for post-stroke focal spasticity, and the accuracy in delivering the toxin to the target muscles may influence the treatment outcome. Our aim was to compare the reduction of spasticity and the related finger position at rest improvement in post-stroke patients treated with botulinum toxin type A in upper limb muscles using ultrasound guidance and manual needle placement. In a randomized clinical trial, two groups of 15 stroke patients were treated with botulinum toxin type A injections in the wrist and finger flexor muscles of the affected upper limb using ultrasound guidance or manual needle placement. The Modified Ashworth Scale and the finger position at rest were measured at baseline and one month after toxin injections. After one month of follow-up from toxin injections, the Modified Ashworth Scale and finger position at rest significantly improved in both treatment groups, although these clinical outcomes were significantly better in patients treated under ultrasound guidance than in patients injected using manual needle placement. Ultrasound guidance for botulinum toxin type A injections could improve clinical outcome measures better than manual needle placement in post-stroke patients with spasticity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of lower-limb spasticity in children with cerebral palsy Toxina botulínica tipo A como tratamento para espasticidade de membros inferiores em crianças com paralisia cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique F. Camargo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of botulinum toxin A (BoNT/A in the treatment of spasticity in 20 children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP. All the patients received injections in the gastrocnemius and soleus, and 15 received injections in the adductors. The total dose varied from 70 to 140 U (99.75±16.26 U, or 7.45±2.06 U/kg per patient. The treatment improved the patients' walking and gait pattern significantly. There was also a significant alteration in the heel-ground distance and increased motion of the ankle joint. These structural changes in the feet were sustained until the end of the follow-up, although the same was not observed for the functional parameters. Three patients complained of weakness in the lower limbs. In conclusion, BoNT/A is safe and effective when used in a single session of injections and produces a sustained structural modification of the lower limbs. However, functional changes are temporary and are only observed during the peak effect of the drug.Para avaliação da segurança e eficácia do tratamento com toxina botulínica A (TB-A na espasticidade na paralisia cerebral (PC, foram selecionadas 20 crianças com a forma diplegia espástica. Todos os pacientes receberam injeções nos gastrocnêmios e sóleos, 15 receberam doses nos adutores da coxa. A dose total variou de 70 a 140 Us (99,75±16,26 U, 7,45±2,06 U/Kg por paciente. O tratamento com a TB-A melhorou significativamente a deambulação e o padrão de marcha. Houve também significativa alteração da distância tornozelo-solo e aumento da amplitude de movimento da articulação do tornozelo. Essas mudanças estruturais dos pés se mantiveram até o final do acompanhamento. O mesmo não foi observado com parâmetros funcionais. Três pacientes apresentaram fraqueza em membros inferiores. Conclui-se que a TB-A, em uma única aplicação, é segura e eficaz. Há modificação sustentada da estrutura motora dos membros inferiores, por

  6. Reducing severe spasticity in cerebral palsy following meningoencephalitis by botulinum toxin

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    Prastiya I. Gunawan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old boy diagnosed with diplegic cerebral palsy had received Botulinum toxin injection to reduce severe spasticity. There was an improvement of muscles tone and motor function including better ability of limb flexion of the knees and hip, adduction of the hip, flexion of the toes, and plantar flexion of the foot. No side effect was observed after the procedure.

  7. Combined Effect Of Botulinum Toxin And Splinting On Motor Components And Function Of People With Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Aryan Shamili; Bijan Forogh; Marzieh Pashmdarfard

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective: Spasticity is one of the problems following stroke. Due to this increase in muscle tone, patients are confronted to problems in motor control and difficulties in activities of daily living and complications such as shortness and contracture. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of Simultaneous use of both splint and botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A) injection on spasticity, range of motion and upper extremity function in a 3-month period. Methods: The design ...

  8. Effect of botulinum toxin type-A in patients with focal spasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Selimoglu, Esra; Turgut, Selin Turan; Akpinar, Pinar; Yumusakhuylu, Yasemin; Haliloglu, Sema; Baklacioglu, Hatice Sule; Icagasioglu, Afitap

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of botulinum toxin type-A (BTX-A) on spasticity and function in patients with focal spasticity. METHODS: Patients attended to the outpatient clinic of physical medicine and rehabilitation department with a diagnosis of focal spasticity and had BTX-A injections because of spasticty were evaluated for the study. Demographic data, exercise status, orthoses, drugs used for spasticity, functional status, stages of spasticity of muscles before and after 1st and ...

  9. Intradermal botulinum toxin type A injection effectively reduces residual limb hyperhidrosis in amputees: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrow, Alexandra; DiFazio, Marc; Foster, Leslie; Pasquina, Paul F; Tsao, Jack W

    2008-07-01

    To study the effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) therapy for residual limb hyperhidrosis, prosthesis fit and function, and residual and phantom limb pain in patients with limb amputation. Consecutive case series. Outpatient physical medicine and rehabilitation clinic. Walter Reed Army Medical Center patients (N=8) with unilateral traumatic upper- or lower-limb amputation. BTX-A was injected transdermally in a circumferential pattern around the residual limb by using a 1-cm matrix grid. A 10-cm continuous Likert visual analog scale was used to assess residual limb sweating and pain and prosthesis fit and function before and 3 weeks after BTX-A injections. Patients reported a significant reduction in sweating and improvement in prosthesis fit and function after treatment. However, residual limb and phantom pain were unaffected by treatment. BTX-A may be an effective treatment for residual limb hyperhidrosis, resulting in subjective improvement in prosthesis fit and functioning. BTX-A should be considered as a method to manage excessive sweating in the residual limb of traumatic amputees.

  10. Botulinum toxin type A and myofascial pain syndrome: a retrospective study of 301 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño-Coy, Juan; Gómez-Soriano, Julio; Valencia, Marta; Estrada, Jesús; Leal, Francisco; Ruiz-Campa, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) intramuscular injections have been used for the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), although its efficacy remains still unknown and its safety is controversial. To analyze the effectiveness and safety of the injection protocol for BTX-A in the shoulder-scapular and lumbar-pelvic girdles combined with physiotherapy in patients with primary and secondary MPS. Retrospective descriptive study including 301 medical files of patients with persistent MPS. Positive responses to treatment were considered to be a satisfactory level of effectiveness with 50% pain relief or a fully satisfactory level of effectiveness at 80%. Overall, 58.1% of patients obtained a positive result at 6 months. Differences in effectiveness were found between primary MPS (82.9% of patients) and secondary MPS (54.9%; p=0.002). In patients with secondary MPS, differences in effectiveness arose based on pathologies associated with MPS (p=0.03). In 23.9% of cases, mild and temporary adverse effects were observed post-infiltration. BTX-A injections and physiotherapy is an alternative to conventional treatment which should be considered when treating refractory MPS. Nonetheless, the differences in effectiveness based on diagnosis suggest the need to clarify the criteria used to select patients with MPS in future clinical trials and applications.

  11. Horizontal gene transfer of toxin genes in Clostridium botulinum: Involvement of mobile elements and plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarin, Hanna; Segerman, Bo

    2011-09-01

    Intoxication with the potent botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) gives rise to the serious paralytic illness botulism. BoNT is part of a complex that consists of the neurotoxin and several associated components, all encoded by the bont gene cluster. This gene cluster has likely been subjected to horizontal gene transfer between different groups of clostridia, which has given rise to the genetically diverse species Clostridium botulinum. C. botulinum is divided into four physiological groups (I-IV), where group I and II cause disease in humans and group III in animals. Analysis of the genomes of group I, II and III has revealed that toxin genes, including the bont cluster, often are plasmid-borne. The genomes analyzed from group III contain an unusually high number of plasmids carrying different toxin genes. Some of these genes are also found in other Clostridium species and some have moved between different plasmids within the same physiological group. This indicates that horizontal transfer of toxin genes is taking place within and between species of Clostridium. The abundance of mobile elements, especially in genomes of group III, is likely connected to accelerated genome plasticity and gene transfer events.

  12. Toxina botulínica tipo A tópica con iontoforesis para el tratamiento de la hiperhidrosis axilar: Efecto y persistencia Topic type A botulinum toxin with iontophoresis in the treatment of armpit hyperhidrosis: effect and persistency

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    J.F. Silva-Gavarrete

    2011-09-01

    exocrine glands is termed Hyperhidrosis (HH and frequently become a dermatologic and social problem for humans. Nowadays, we have multiple treatments that controls the armpit HH. Botulinum toxin type A (TXB-A is known to be the best treatment to eliminate this problem but the needing of multiple injections in the armpit limits patients´ acceptance. Clinical iontophoresis method uses galvanic current to introduce many transdermal medications. We perform a simple blind clinical assay over 10 patients with armpit HH in who we apply an inert gel blended with Botulinum toxin type A (TXB-A Dysport® using one session of iontopheresis in one armpit; in the same moment the other armpit was injected with the toxin in the conventional way. The results where evaluated and compare by Minor Test (starch-iodine test in each patient at day 10th, 2 months and 5 months after the application. The same number of units and dilution of TXB-A where used in the topic and injected administration way. Results shows a diminished armpit HH in both sides over the whole study, been higher percentage of the effect in the injected way. In general a 74.67% decrease of armpit sweat for the topical way with iontopheresis and 90.33% of decrease of armpit sweat for the injected way. In the 5 months control of the persistency of the effect, both ways of administration of TXB-A reports with statistical significant results. Therefore in the present study we conclude that TXB-A apply topically with iontopheresis improves the armpit HH and shows a persistency of the effect at least for 5 months period.

  13. Association of toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum with the macroalga Cladophora in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Chan Lan; Ochsner, Urs; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Whitman, Richard L.; Tepp, William H.; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A.; Peller, Julie; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Avian botulism, a paralytic disease of birds, often occurs on a yearly cycle and is increasingly becoming more common in the Great Lakes. Outbreaks are caused by bird ingestion of neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum, a spore-forming, gram-positive, anaerobe. The nuisance, macrophytic, green alga Cladophora (Chlorophyta; mostly Cladophora glomerata L.) is a potential habitat for the growth of C. botulinum. A high incidence of botulism in shoreline birds at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SLBE) in Lake Michigan coincides with increasingly massive accumulations of Cladophora in nearshore waters. In this study, free-floating algal mats were collected from SLBE and other shorelines of the Great Lakes between June and October 2011. The abundance of C. botulinum in algal mats was quantified and the type of botulism neurotoxin (bont) genes associated with this organism were determined by using most-probable-number PCR (MPN-PCR) and five distinct bont gene-specific primers (A, B, C, E, and F). The MPN-PCR results showed that 16 of 22 (73%) algal mats from the SLBE and 23 of 31(74%) algal mats from other shorelines of the Great Lakes contained the bont type E (bont/E) gene. C. botulinum was present up to 15 000 MPN per gram dried algae based on gene copies of bont/E. In addition, genes for bont/A and bont/B, which are commonly associated with human diseases, were detected in a few algal samples. Moreover, C. botulinum was present as vegetative cells rather than as dormant spores in Cladophora mats. Mouse toxin assays done using supernatants from enrichment of Cladophora containing high densities of C. botulinum (>1000 MPN/g dried algae) showed that Cladophora-borne C. botulinum were toxin-producing species (BoNT/E). Our results indicate that Cladophora provides a habitat for C. botulinum, warranting additional studies to better understand the relationship between this bacterium and the alga, and how this interaction potentially contributes to botulism

  14. Botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of hemifacial spasm: an 11-year experience Toxina botulínica tipo A no tratamento do espasmo hemifacial: 11 anos de experiência

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    Egberto Reis Barbosa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the long-term effect of botulinum toxin type A (BTX in the treatment of hemifacial spasm (HFS, a retrospective analysis of patients treated at the Movement Disorders Unit of the Division of Neurology, Clinical Hospital, University of São Paulo, School of Medicine from 1993 to 2004 was made. A total of 808 injections with BTX were administered to 54 patients with HFS. The mean duration of improvement per application was 3.46 months and the mean rate of improvement using subjective judgement by the patient was of 83%. Adverse effects, mostly minor, were observed in 64.8% of patients at least once along the period of follow-up and the most frequent of them was orbicularis oris paralysis (38.8%. There was no decrement in response when compared the first and the last injection recorded.Para avaliar o efeito em longo prazo da toxina botulínica tipo A (TXB no tratamento do espasmo hemifacial (EHF, foi feita uma análise retrospectiva de pacientes tratados no Ambulatório de Distúrbios do Movimento da Divisão de Clínica Neurológica - Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo no período de 1993 a 2004. Um total de 808 aplicações de TXB foram administradas a 54 pacientes com EHF. A duração média de melhora foi de 3,46 meses e a taxa média de melhora segundo avaliação subjetiva do paciente foi de 83%. Efeitos adversos, em sua maioria menores, foram observados em 64,8% dos pacientes ao menos uma vez durante o seguimento e o mais freqüente foi paralisia do orbicular da boca (38,3%. Não se observou decremento na resposta quando se comparou a primeira com a última aplicação anotada.

  15. Taping versus electrical stimulation after botulinum toxin type A injection for wrist and finger spasticity. A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carda, Stefano; Molteni, Franco

    2005-09-01

    To compare results from two approaches used in conjunction with botulinum toxin type A administration in rehabilitation: the application of a taping system and the electrical stimulation of the injected muscles and splinting. Case-control study. Two tertiary care rehabilitation hospitals in Italy. Sixty-five adult subjects affected by spasticity of the wrist and finger flexors. After injection with botulinum toxin type A, the group at hospital A (n=33) was treated with adhesive taping for six days and those at hospital B (n=32) with electrical stimulation and splinting for six days. Spastic hypertonia at the injected muscles was assessed before treatment, one week and one month post injection. Modified Ashworth Scale. In group A, the mean Modified Ashworth Scale reduction was 2.76 +/- 0.94 for wrist flexors and 2.45 +/- 0.92 for finger flexors; in group B the mean Modified Ashworth Scale reduction was 2.18 +/- 1.11 for wrist flexors and 2.1 +/- 0.98 for finger flexors. The observed difference between the two groups was statistically relevant (p spastic hypertonia as measured with Modified Ashworth Scale, with less time dedicated for the treatment.

  16. Knee flexion contracture treated with botulinum toxin type A in patients with haemophilia (PWH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffunchio, C; Caviglia, H; Nassif, J; Morettil, N; Galatro, G

    2016-01-01

    Knee flexion contracture (KFC) remains a common complication of haemoarthrosis in children and young adults with haemophilia. If the KFC is not treated properly it produces disability, postural and gait abnormalities. Evaluate the effectiveness of conservative treatment of KFC with Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in PWH. Seventeen patients were treated, with 21 affected knees. Mean age was 26 years. The mean follow up was 12 months. We evaluated flexion and KFC pretreatment BTX-A and up to 12 months posttreatment. BTX-A application was in hamstring and calf muscles. To evaluate the function, a questionnaire about different activities was made, and it was checked 3, 6 and 12 months after BTX-A. According to the degree of KFC, knees were divided into 3 groups: Group 1: -10° to -30° (n = 10), Group 2: -31° to -45° (n = 6) Group 3: -46° or more (n = 5). The average KFC improved from -38° to -24°. The improvement was 14° (P < 0.001). The average KFC improvement was 9° in group 1, 17° in group 2, and 23° in group 3. There was a high correlation between the improvement in KFC and the total score of the questionnaire R = 0.77. Treatment of KFC with BTX-A improves knee-related functional activities, with the advantage of being a low-cost procedure and easy to apply. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Application of botulinum toxin to treat sialorrhea in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ademar Francisco de; Silva, Gêssyca Adryene de Menezes; Almeida, Débora Milenna Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the degeneration of motor neurons, which are the central nervous system cells that control voluntary muscle movements. The excessive salivation (sialorrhea) is present in approximately 50% of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases. Thus, some alternative therapeutic methods are sought, such as anticholinergic drugs and surgery. Recently the use of botulinum toxin applied at a midpoint of the salivary glands, often guided by ultrasound, have demonstrated positive results. The objective was to review the literature to demonstrate an alternative method to treatments of sialorrhea in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In recent studies, the efficacy of botulinum toxin is confirmed, although new applications are required. Since the side effects are negligible, this is an alternative to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and other patients with diseases that present sialorrhea. RESUMO Esclerose lateral amiotrófica é uma doença neurodegenerativa progressiva e fatal, caracterizada pela degeneração dos neurônios motores, as células do sistema nervoso central que controlam os movimentos voluntários dos músculos. A salivação excessiva (sialorreia) está presente em cerca de 50% dos casos de esclerose lateral amiotrófica. Dessa forma, surgem medidas terapêuticas alternativas como drogas anticolinérgicas e cirurgia, e recentemente, o uso da toxina botulínica, aplicada em um ponto central das glândulas salivares, muitas vezes guiado por ultrassonografia, demostrou resultados positivos. Objetivou-se revisar a literatura no intuito de demonstrar um método alternativo aos tratamentos de sialorreia em pacientes com esclerose lateral amiotrófica. Em estudos recentes, a eficácia do tratamento com toxina botulínica foi confirmada e, mesmo requerendo novas aplicações, os efeitos colaterais são ínfimos. Ela surge então como alternativa não só ao

  18. Efficacy and Safety of IncobotulinumtoxinA in Subjects Previously Treated with Botulinum Toxin versus Toxin-Naïve Subjects with Cervical Dystonia

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    Hubert Fernandez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: To determine whether botulinum toxin treatment history affected the outcomes of a study comparing the safety and efficacy of incobotulinumtoxinA with placebo in subjects with cervical dystonia (CD.Methods: This was a prospective, double‐blind, randomized, placebo‐controlled, multicenter trial in botulinum toxin‐treated or toxin‐naïve CD subjects. Subjects received a fixed dose of either 120 U or 240 U of incobotulinumtoxinA or placebo. The primary outcome measure was change from baseline to Week 4 in the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS total score. Treatment‐emergent adverse events (TEAEs were also evaluated. This report represents a subgroup analysis of botulinum toxin‐treated or toxin‐naïve subjects.Results: Participants (N = 233; 38.6% toxin‐naïve had a mean age of 52.8 years. IncobotulinumtoxinA significantly improved TWSTRS total scores from baseline to Week 4 in both dose groups versus placebo, and the improvement persisted through the end of the study (≤20 weeks. Both the previously toxin‐treated and toxin‐naïve subjects demonstrated significant improvements in TWSTRS total scores at Week 4 compared to baseline. The most frequent TEAEs in the incobotulinumtoxinA groups were dysphagia, neck pain, and muscular weakness, which were generally mild. TEAEs were more common in the 240 U group and toxin‐naïve subjects. Discussion: Overall, incobotulinumtoxinA was safe and effective in CD, regardless of toxin therapy history. A lower starting dose may be better tolerated among toxin‐naïve subjects without sacrificing efficacy.

  19. [Comparative analysis of occupational therapy benefits in spastic patients with hands involvement before and after botulinum toxin infiltration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampazo, F M; Bianchin, M A; Oliveira, F N; Lucato, R V

    Spasticity is the most difficult motor disorder to be treated after an encephalic vascular accident or stroke, which interferes in the patient's selective motor functioning. To compare the involvement type of the extrinsic muscles, the functionality degree of the hand and functional independence of patients with spastic hemiplegia due to stroke after botulinum toxin A (BTA) infiltration. They were divided into a group receiving occupational therapy treatment (group I), and other who has not received it (group II). Longitudinal study with 20 spastic hemiplegic outpatients due to stroke, both sexes, with average age of 53.1 +/- 15.3 years-old who have been attending in the botulinum toxin service. They have received BTA infiltration in the muscles responsible for the hand functional movements, and they were evaluated before and after 3-months infiltration. To collect data, these instruments were used: anamnesis questionnaire of occupational therapy, the Classification of involvement types of extrinsic muscle, according to adapted Zancolli, the adapted Hausen's Functional Classification, the Functional Independence Measure Scale, the Rivermead's Scale of Activity of Daily Life and the Barthel Index. In the classification, according to adapted Zancolli, group I presented higher improvement of involvement than group II. Statistical significance (p occupational therapy were observed in the rehabilitation of patients with spastic hemiplegia due to stroke after infiltration of BTA providing them greater abilities and functional independence in their daily life activities.

  20. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block with Botulinum Toxin Type A for Intractable Neuropathic Pain

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    Young Eun Moon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain includes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN, painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN, and trigeminal neuralgia, and so on. Although various drugs have been tried to treat neuropathic pain, the effectiveness of the drugs sometimes may be limited for chronic intractable neuropathic pain, especially when they cannot be used at an adequate dose, due to undesirable severe side effects and the underlying disease itself. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A has been known for its analgesic effect in various pain conditions. Nevertheless, there are no data of nerve block in PHN and PDN. Here, we report two patients successfully treated with ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block using BoNT-A for intractable PHN and PDN. One patient had PHN on the left upper extremity and the other patient had PDN on a lower extremity. Due to side effects of drugs, escalation of the drug dose could not be made. We injected 50 Botox units (BOTOX®, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA into brachial plexus and lumbar plexus, respectively, under ultrasound. Their pain was significantly decreased for about 4–5 months. Ultrasound-guided nerve block with BoNT-A may be an effective analgesic modality in a chronic intractable neuropathic pain especially when conventional treatment failed to achieve adequate pain relief.

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Treadmill Therapy on Neuromuscular Atrophy Induced via Botulinum Toxin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Sen-Wei; Chen, Hsiao-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) is a bacterial zinc-dependent endopeptidase that acts specifically on neuromuscular junctions. BoNT-A blocks the release of acetylcholine, thereby decreasing the ability of a spastic muscle to generate forceful contraction, which results in a temporal local weakness and the atrophy of targeted muscles. BoNT-A-induced temporal muscle weakness has been used to manage skeletal muscle spasticity, such as poststroke spasticity, cerebral palsy, and cervical dystonia. However, the combined effect of treadmill exercise and BoNT-A treatment is not well understood. We previously demonstrated that for rats, following BoNT-A injection in the gastrocnemius muscle, treadmill running improved the recovery of the sciatic functional index (SFI), muscle contraction strength, and compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude and area. Treadmill training had no influence on gastrocnemius mass that received BoNT-A injection, but it improved the maximal contraction force of the gastrocnemius, and upregulation of GAP-43, IGF-1, Myo-D, Myf-5, myogenin, and acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits α and β was found following treadmill training. Taken together, these results suggest that the upregulation of genes associated with neurite and AChR regeneration following treadmill training may contribute to enhanced gastrocnemius strength recovery following BoNT-A injection. PMID:24327926

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Treadmill Therapy on Neuromuscular Atrophy Induced via Botulinum Toxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen-Wei Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A is a bacterial zinc-dependent endopeptidase that acts specifically on neuromuscular junctions. BoNT-A blocks the release of acetylcholine, thereby decreasing the ability of a spastic muscle to generate forceful contraction, which results in a temporal local weakness and the atrophy of targeted muscles. BoNT-A-induced temporal muscle weakness has been used to manage skeletal muscle spasticity, such as poststroke spasticity, cerebral palsy, and cervical dystonia. However, the combined effect of treadmill exercise and BoNT-A treatment is not well understood. We previously demonstrated that for rats, following BoNT-A injection in the gastrocnemius muscle, treadmill running improved the recovery of the sciatic functional index (SFI, muscle contraction strength, and compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitude and area. Treadmill training had no influence on gastrocnemius mass that received BoNT-A injection, but it improved the maximal contraction force of the gastrocnemius, and upregulation of GAP-43, IGF-1, Myo-D, Myf-5, myogenin, and acetylcholine receptor (AChR subunits α and β was found following treadmill training. Taken together, these results suggest that the upregulation of genes associated with neurite and AChR regeneration following treadmill training may contribute to enhanced gastrocnemius strength recovery following BoNT-A injection.

  3. No change in calf muscle passive stiffness after botulinum toxin injection in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhusaini, Adel A A; Crosbie, Jack; Shepherd, Roberta B; Dean, Catherine M; Scheinberg, Adam

    2011-06-01

    Stiffness and shortening of the calf muscle due to neural or mechanical factors can profoundly affect motor function. The aim of this study was to investigate non-neurally mediated calf-muscle tightness in children with cerebral palsy (CP) before and after botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injection. Sixteen children with spastic CP (seven females, nine males; eight at Gross Motor Function Classification System level I, eight at level II; age range 4-10 y) and calf muscle spasticity were tested before and during the pharmaceutically active phase after injection of BoNT-A. Measures of passive muscle compliance and viscoelastic responses, hysteresis, and the gradient of the torque-angle curve were computed and compared before and after injection. Although there was a slight, but significant increase in ankle range of motion after BoNT-A injection and a small, significant decrease in the torque required to achieve plantigrade and 5° of dorsiflexion, no significant difference in myotendinous stiffness or hysteresis were detected after BoNT-A injection. Despite any effect on neurally mediated responses, the compliance of the calf muscle was not changed and the muscle continued to offer significant resistance to passive motion of the ankle. These findings suggest that additional treatment approaches are required to supplement the effects of BoNT-A injections when managing children with calf muscle spasticity. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2011 Mac Keith Press.

  4. Hemifacial Spasm due to Compression of the Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysm Treated with Botulinum Toxin Type-A: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azize Esra Gürsoy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 79-year-old female presented with five months history of progressive involuntary twitching movement on left face. Brain MR imaging revealed a heterogeneous T2 hyperintense lesion at left cerebellopontine angle. CT angiography showed a partially thrombosed saccular aneurysm of left PICA (posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient was treated with Botulinum toxin type A and almost total relief of symptoms was noticed during one month followup. Botulinium toxin injection is an effective symptomatic treatment option in nonsurgical secondary hemifacial spasm (HFS cases.

  5. Hemifacial Spasm due to Compression of the Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysm Treated with Botulinum Toxin Type-A: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Azize Esra; Babacan Yildiz, Gülsen; Gülhan, Adam Mehmet; Kolukisa, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    A 79-year-old female presented with five months history of progressive involuntary twitching movement on left face. Brain MR imaging revealed a heterogeneous T2 hyperintense lesion at left cerebellopontine angle. CT angiography showed a partially thrombosed saccular aneurysm of left PICA (posterior inferior cerebellar artery). The patient was treated with Botulinum toxin type A and almost total relief of symptoms was noticed during one month followup. Botulinium toxin injection is an effective symptomatic treatment option in nonsurgical secondary hemifacial spasm (HFS) cases.

  6. The role of the injection botulinum toxin A in cases of blepharospasm syndrome, hemifacial spasm and Meige's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastola, P; Chaudhary, M; Agrawal, J P; Shah, D N

    2010-01-01

    Benign Essential Blepharospasm Symdrome is a neuropathologic disorder. The cause of blepharospasm is multifactorial. It is unlikely that a single defect in this elusive control centre is the primary cause of this disease. To evaluate the role of botulinum toxin A in treating cases of Essential Blepharospasm Symdrome, Hemifacial Spasm and Meige's Syndrome, and to assess orbicularis oculi muscle post treatment, in the patients who attended neuro-ophthalmology clinic and the general outpatient department of BP Koirala Lions Centre for Ophthalmic studies. A prospective, interventional study was carried out on all the patients of Essential Blepharospasm Symdrome, Hemifacial Spasm and Meige's syndrome who underwent treatment with botulinum toxin A in BP Koirala Lions Centre for Ophthalmic studies during a study period of one and half years. Pre- treatment grading of the spasm was done with Jankovic spasm grading and post treatment response was seen with assessment of orbicularis oculi muscle and improvement in functional impairment scale. Relevant findings were noted. A total of 40 cases were enrolled in the study. The mean Jankovic spasm grading in cases of essential blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm and Meige's syndrome was 3.61 (+/- Standard deviation 0.50, range 3-4), 3.21 (+/- Standard deviation 0.63, range 2-4) and 3.67 (+/- Standard deviation 0.57, range 3-4) respectively. The mean value for reappearance of significant spasms (in months) in cases of essential blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm and Meige's syndrome was 4.3 (+/- Standard deviation 1.6, range 2.0-6.5), 5.8 (+/- Standard deviation 1.4, range 3-8) and 4.5 (+/- Std.deviation 2.8, range 2.5-6.5) respectively. Blepharoptosis was the commonest complication accounting for 66.6% of the complications. The movement disorders like Essential Blepharospasm, Hemifacial Hpasm and Meige's syndrome are treated by different modalities. An acceptable and effective treatment modality has been a long felt need in these cases

  7. Blefarospasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial: características dos pacientes, tratamento com toxina botulínica A e revisão da literatura Essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm: characteristic of the patient, botulinum toxin A treatment and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Artioli Schellini

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Conhecer as características dos portadores de blefarospasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial, assim como a resposta ao tratamento utilizando toxina botulínica A. MÉTODOS: Trinta e quatro portadores de blefarospasmo essencial ou espasmo hemifacial foram avaliados quanto a idade, sexo, queixas oculares, tempo de existência da doença, tipo de comprometimento, complicações e resultado do tratamento com toxina botulínica A. RESULTADOS: A mediana da idade dos pacientes foi de 63 anos e a média, de 61 anos, sem diferença quanto ao sexo; 66,66% possuíam espasmo hemifacial e 33,33%, blefarospasmo essencial. Vários pacientes apresentavam também olho seco. A melhora com a utilização da toxina botulínica A ocorreu em 91,30% dos pacientes tratados. As complicações com o tratamento foram ptose palpebral (8,33% e desvio da rima bucal (8,33%. CONCLUSÃO: O blefarospasmo essencial e o espasmo hemifacial geralmente acometem idosos, de ambos os sexos. O tratamento com a toxina botulínica A é eficiente, com índice muito baixo de complicações.PURPOSE: To evaluate the characteristics of the essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm patients and the feasible treatment with botulinum toxin A. METHODS: Thirty-four essential blepharospasm or hemifacial spasm patients were evaluated according to gender, ocular complaint, time of disease, treatment outcome and complications. RESULTS: Age median was 63 years and the mean was 61 years, with no difference regarding sex; 66.66% of the patients had hemifacial spasm and 33.33%, essential blepharospasm. Many patients complained of dry eye associated with involuntary spasm. Botulinum toxin A showed a positive outcome in 91.30% of the treated patients and complications observed after treatment were eyelid ptosis (8.33% and buccal angle deviation (8.33%. CONCLUSION: Essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm occurred in the elderly, of both sexes. Treatment with botulinum toxin A was useful, with

  8. Botulinum toxin type-B improves sialorrhea and quality of life in bulbaronset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, João; Rocha, Maria Luz; Ferreira, Joaquim; Evangelista, Teresinha; Coelho, Miguel; de Carvalho, Mamede

    2008-04-01

    Sialorrhea is a disabling problem in bulbaronset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Botulinum toxin (BTX) type A and B have been proposed as alternatives to traditional treatments. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of BTX type B in the treatment of sialorrhea in patients with bulbar-onset ALS. Open-label prospective study of BTX type B injections in parotids (1000 U) and submandibular (250 U) glands using anatomic landmarks. Primary outcome was rate of responders (improvement > 50% on visual analogue scales (VAS) of severity and disability of sialorrhea) 1 month post-treatment. Other outcomes included subjective (drooling and quality of daily living questionnaires) and objective (cotton roll weights and number of paper handkerchiefs used) evaluations. Safety evaluations included questionnaires regarding brain stem symptoms. Sixteen ALS patients were included. At 1 month the rate of responders was 75% with a mean reduction of 70% in severity and disabling VASs. Fifteen patients (94 %) reported some benefit with drooling reduction. In objective measurements there was a reduction over 60 % in saliva production and in the number of handkerchiefs used. Onset of effect occurred within 3 days. Most patients reported better quality of living. The most frequent side-effects were viscous saliva, local pain, chewing weakness and respiratory infection. There were no changes in blood pressure or cardiac rate. At 3 months, there was still a positive effect in all outcomes. All patients except one manifested their willingness to repeat treatment. Anatomic guided BTX type B injections seem effective and safe to treat sialorrhea in bulbar-onset ALS.

  9. [Molecular biology of neurosecretion and its inhibition bu tetanus and botulinum toxins (review)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veit, M

    1999-06-01

    Signal transfer between neurons and between neurons and muscle cells is mediated by the secretion of neurotransmitters. The axon of the presynaptic cell contains synaptic vesicles, the storage organelles for neurotransmitters. Arrival of an action potential causes calcium-influx into the axon and leads to fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane. Recently, the events between calcium-influx and membrane fusion were elucidated on a molecular level. The family of SNARE-proteins was identified as the key players in neurosecretion. They are located on synaptic vesicles (VAMP) or on the presynaptic plasma membrane (syntaxin, SNAP-25). Intimate protein-protein interactions between the SNARE-proteins are responsible for the attachment and merger of vesicle and the plasma membrane. Fusion is triggered by calcium-binding to synaptotagmin, another protein recently identified on synaptic vesicles. The molecular mechanism of the action of clostridial neurotoxins was also elucidated. Botulinum-as well as Tetanus toxins are proteases which cleave neuronal SNARE-proteins. This explains the long known inhibition of neurosecretion caused by these toxins. The proteolytic action of Tetanus- and Botulinum toxin occurs in different types of neurons, resulting in a stimulatory or inhibitory effect on muscle cells. This selective degradation of SNAREs explains the opposing clinical signs of tetanus (cramps) and botulismus (paralysis).

  10. Studies on growth and toxin production of C. botulinum type E on cod homogenate treated with a combination of spices, sodium chloride and gamma-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, A.K. (Atomic Energy Centre, Dacca (Bangladesh)); Ando, Y.; Karashimada, T.; Kameyama, K.

    1979-09-01

    Cod homogenates inoculated with spores of C. botulinum type E strain Erimo at 10/sup 2/ and 10/sup 4//g were treated with 1% and 2% sodium chloride, 0.25% each of mustard, garlic and turmeric and 0.3 Mrad ..gamma..-radiation either in single or combination treatments. The growth and toxin production of type E spores in the inoculated homogenates were followed at incubation temperatures of 30/sup 0/, 10/sup 0/ and 5/sup 0/C for 7, 28 and 56 days respectively. Growth and gas formation were noted in all the samples but type E toxin could not be detected. The reason for the absence of toxin in both the untreated and treated homogenates could not be ascertained. Inadequate detection method, unfavourable growth conditions in the homogenate and weak toxigenicity of the strain employed have been advanced as probable factors that contributed to the negative results on the toxin assay.

  11. Botulinum toxin vs. topical glyceryl trinitrate ointment for pain control in patients undergoing hemorrhoidectomy: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Rosalia; Almasio, Piero Luigi; Luigi, Almasio Piero; Arcara, Matteo; Matteo, Arcara; Sammartano, Sergio; Sergio, Sammartano; Romano, Pietro; Pietro, Romano; Fede, Calogero; Calogero, Fede; Di Vita, Gaetano; Gaetano, Di Vita

    2006-11-01

    The maximum resting pressure in the anal canal is greatly raised after hemorrhoidectomy. This increase is likely to be the cause of postoperative pain, which is still the most troublesome early problem after hemorrhoidectomy. This study was designed to compare, after hemorrhoidectomy, the effects of intrasphincter injection of botulinum toxin vs. application of glyceryl trinitrate ointment in improving wound healing and reducing postoperative pain at rest or during defecation. Thirty patients with hemorrhoids of third and fourth degree were included in the study and randomized in two groups. Anorectal manometry was performed preoperatively and 5 and 40 days after hemorrhoidectomy. One group received one injection containing 20 IU of botulinum toxin, whereas the other an application of 300 mg of 0.2 percent glyceryl trinitrate ointment three times daily for 30 days. Five days after hemorrhoidectomy, maximum resting pressure was significantly reduced compared with baseline values in both groups (85 +/- 15 vs. 68 +/- 11 mmHg for the group treated with botulinum toxin, 87 +/- 11 vs. 78 +/- 11 mmHg for the group treated with glyceryl trinitrate ointment). Overall analysis of postoperative pain at rest showed a significant reduction in the botulinum toxin group vs. glyceryl trinitrate group, whereas pain during defecation and time of healing were similar. Adverse effects, such as headaches, were observed only in the glyceryl trinitrate group. Forty days after hemorrhoidectomy in the glyceryl trinitrate group, maximum resting pressure values were similar to preoperative ones, whereas the values were still reduced in the botulinum toxin group. A single intrasphincter injection of botulinum toxin was more effective and safer than repeated applications of glyceryl trinitrate in reducing early postoperative pain at rest but not during defecation.

  12. A prospective crossover trial of botulinum toxin chemodenervation versus injection augmentation for essential voice tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Christine; Sadoughi, Babak; Coleman, Rachel; Sarva, Harini; Mauer, Elizabeth; Sulica, Lucian

    2018-02-01

    Botulinum toxin chemodenervation (BTX) is used to treat essential voice tremor (EVT), but results are not uniformly satisfactory. This study sought to assess the comparative utility of injection augmentation (IA) for EVT. Prospective crossover treatment study. Patients with EVT underwent BTX. After washout patients underwent IA. Multidimensional assessment carried out prior to and 30 days after each treatment included 1) videostroboscopy graded by the Vocal Tremor Scoring System (VTSS), 2) acoustic and aerodynamic assessment (cepstral peak prominence, cepstral spectral index of dysphonia, cepstral peak prominence fundamental frequency, airflow, peak air pressure and intensity, maximum phonation time, and amplitude/frequency of tremor), 3) audio-perceptual assessment via Consensus Audio-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V), and 4) patient self-assessment via Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI-10) and Percent of Normal Function (PNF) scale. Findings were analyzed via paired t tests and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Seven patients (five female and two male; mean age 67 years old; range, 46-82 years old) participated. VTSS grading showed divergent outcomes for certain individual sites of tremor, but without significant differences. Airflow increased following BTX and decreased following IA, and VHI-10 scores indicated slight improvement post-BTX (26.29-23.57), and decline post-IA (25.86-29.86), although differences were not significant. Only changes in audio-perceptual ratings of loudness achieved significance, which decreased with BTX and increased with IA. Five patients chose to resume BTX; two elected long-term IA. No findings supported patient preferences. IA demonstrated no advantage over BTX in the treatment of EVT. 2b. Laryngoscope, 128:437-446, 2018. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. Comparable Botulinum Toxin Outcomes between Primary and Secondary Blepharospasm: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Giugni, Juan C; Hastings, Erin; Wagle Shukla, Aparna; Malaty, Irene A; Okun, Michael S; Rodriguez, Ramon L

    2014-01-01

    Blepharospasm is a focal cranial dystonia, which could be idiopathic in origin or secondary to an underlying disorder that commonly impairs quality of life. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) injections have become the treatment of choice; however, a less favorable response to BoNT is expected in secondary blepharospasm. No studies have been conducted comparing outcomes between blepharospasm cohorts. We therefore aim to compare BoNT outcomes in primary and secondary blepharospasm subjects. A retrospective review of 64 blepharospasm subjects receiving BoNT therapy was conducted. Demographics, BoNT treatment schedules, duration of BoNT therapy, and side effects were recorded. Outcome measures were duration of benefit, peak-dose benefit recorded with the Clinical Global Impressions Scale (CGIS), and related side effects. No difference was found between the two cohorts regarding duration of benefit from treatment (primary 9.47 weeks vs. secondary 9.63 weeks, p = 0.88). Perceived peak-dose benefit was more commonly reported as "very much improved" in secondary patients, but this was not significant (p = 0.13). Higher BoNT dosages were required in both groups over time, with a mean increase of 20.5% in primary and 26.5% in secondary blepharospasm. Ptosis (8%) and diplopia (6%) were the most common reported side effects. Mean follow-up in years was similar between groups, 3.6 years for primary vs. 2.4 years for secondary blepharospasm (p = 0.17). BoNT injections were effective with comparable benefits seen in both primary and secondary blepharospasm populations. Clinicians should be aware of the similar benefit from BoNT reported in secondary blepharospasm patients. The average duration of benefit in this cohort was comparable with previous reports.

  14. The influence of botulinum toxin on auditory disturbances in hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzińska, Monika; Wójcik, Magdalena; Zajdel, Katarzyna; Hydzik-Sobocińska, Karolina; Malec, Michalina; Hartel, Marcin; Składzień, Jacek; Szczudlik, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is frequently accompanied by other symptoms, such as visual and auditory disturbances or pain. The aim of the study was to assess the occurrence of auditory symptoms accompanying HFS using subjective and objective methods, their relation with other HFS symptoms, and their resolution after botulinum toxin (BTX-A) treatment. The occurrence of hypoacusis, ear clicks and tinnitus was assessed by questionnaire in 126 HFS patients from an electronic database which included medical data such as severity of HFS rated by clinical scale and magnetic resonance imaging focused on the presence of vascular nerve VII and VIII conflict. Forty consecutive patients treated with BTX-A and 24 controls matched by sex and age underwent laryngological examination including audiometry, tympanometry and acoustic middle ear reflex before injection and two weeks later. About 45.2% of patients complained of auditory disturbances (31.7% hypoacusis, 30.2% ear clicks and 7.1% tinnitus) on the side of HFS. Auditory disturbances correlated with severity of HFS symptoms but not with age, disease duration, or neurovascular conflict with nerves VII and VIII. We did not find abnormalities in audiometric and tympanometric assessment in patients in comparison with controls. No abnormalities were detected in brainstem evoked potentials comparing the sides with and without HFS symptoms. Tinnitus and absence of ipsilateral acoustic middle ear reflex occurred more often in patients with auditory symptoms than those without them. BTX-A treatment caused resolution of subjective acoustic symptoms without any improvement in audiometric assessment. Auditory disturbances accompanying HFS are probably caused by dysfunction of the Eustachian tube, which improves after BTX-A treatment.

  15. Use of botulinum toxin in musculoskeletal pain [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/16j

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasvinder A Singh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic musculoskeletal pain is a common cause of chronic pain, which is associated with a total cost of $635 billion per year in the U.S. Emerging evidence suggests an anti-nociceptive action of botulinum toxin, independent of its muscle paralyzing action. This review provides a summary of data from both non-randomized and randomized clinical studies of botulinum toxin in back pain and various osteoarticular conditions, including osteoarthritis, tennis elbow, low back pain and hand pain. Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs of small sizes provide evidence of short-term efficacy of a single intra-articular injection of 100 units of botulinum toxin A (BoNT/A for the relief of pain and the improvement of both function and quality of life in patients with chronic joint pain due to arthritis. Three RCTs studied intramuscular BoNT/A for tennis elbow with one showing a significant improvement in pain relief compared with placebo, another one showing no difference from placebo, and the third finding that pain and function improvement with BoNT/A injection were similar to those obtained with surgical release. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/A for low back pain found improvement in pain and function compared to placebo. Single RCTs using local injections of BoNT in patients with either temporomandibular joint (TMJ pain or plantar fasciitis found superior efficacy compared to placebo. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/B in patients with hand pain and carpal tunnel syndrome found improvement in pain in both BoNT/B and placebo groups, but no significant difference between groups. Most evidence is based on small studies, but the use of BoNT is supported by a single, and sometimes up to three, RCTs for several chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. This indicates that botulinum toxin may be a promising potential new treatment for chronic refractory musculoskeletal pain. Well-designed large clinical trials are needed.

  16. Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Botulinum Toxin Injection Site for the Medial Approach to Tibialis Posterior Muscle in Chronic Stroke Patients with Spastic Equinovarus Foot: An Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Picelli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The tibialis posterior muscle is a frequent target for injection of botulinum toxin during the management of spastic equinovarus foot in adults with post-stroke spasticity. Although it is deep-seated, the needle insertion into the tibialis posterior muscle is usually performed using anatomical landmarks and safety information obtained from healthy subjects and cadavers. Our aim was to evaluate the botulinum toxin injection site for the medial approach to the tibialis posterior muscle in chronic stroke patients with spastic equinovarus foot. Forty-six patients were evaluated at the affected middle lower leg medial surface with ultrasonography according to the following parameters: tibialis posterior muscle depth, thickness, and echo intensity. As to the spastic tibialis posterior, we found a mean muscle depth of 26.5 mm and a mean muscle thickness of 10.1 mm. Furthermore we observed a median tibialis posterior muscle echo intensity of 3.00 on the Heckmatt scale. The tibialis posterior muscle thickness was found to be inversely associated with its depth (p < 0.001 and echo intensity (p = 0.006. Furthermore, tibialis posterior muscle depth was found to be directly associated with its echo intensity (p = 0.004. Our findings may usefully inform manual needle placement into the tibialis posterior for the botulinum toxin treatment of spastic equinovarus foot in chronic stroke patients.

  17. Injection of Botulinum Toxin a to Upper Esophageal Sphincter for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Two Patients with Inclusion Body Myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis WC Liu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion body myositis (IBM is a progressive degenerative skeletal muscle disease leading to weakening and atrophy of both proximal and distal muscles. Dysphagia is reported in up to 86% of IBM patients. Surgical cricopharyngeal myotomy may be effective for cricopharyngeal dysphagia and there is one published report that botulinum toxin A, injected into the cricopharyngeus muscle using a hypopharyngoscope under general anesthesia, relieved IBM-associated dysphagia. This report presents the first documentation of botulinum toxin A injection into the upper esophageal sphincter using a flexible esophagogastroduodenoscope under conscious sedation, to reduce upper esophageal sphincter pressure and successfully alleviate oropharyngeal dysphagia in two IBM patients.

  18. Adductor laryngeal breathing dystonia in NBIA treated with botulinum toxin-A

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    Vinod Rai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA presented with episodic inspiratory stridor. A 10-year-old boy presented with 3-year history of gradually progressive spastic gait and generalized dystonia (involving all four limbs, neck, jaw, and speech. MRI brain showed "Eye of Tiger" sign. He recently developed severe inspiratory stridor associated with almost gasping respiration. Direct video laryngoscopy showed paradoxical vocal cord closure during inspiration. He was treated with EMG-guided botulinum toxin-A injection given into bilateral thyroarytenoid muscles, resulting in dramatic response with complete disappearance of the stridor within a week. The effect lasted 18 months.

  19. Physical and occupational therapy considerations in adult patients receiving botulinum toxin injections for spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albany, K

    1997-01-01

    Physical and occupational therapists play important roles in the evaluation and management of patients receiving botulinum toxin injections for spasticity. Baseline evaluation includes areas beyond the muscles being injected, since local spasticity reduction may lead to more widespread functional changes. Because the evaluation itself influences tone, a consistent order of muscle evaluation is recommended. The range of preinjection assessments includes evaluation of tone, mobility, strength, balance, endurance, assistive devices, and others. After injection, therapeutic interventions have multiple aims, including strengthening and facilitation, increasing range of motion, retraining of ambulation and gait, improving the fit and tolerance of orthoses, and improved functioning in ADLs.

  20. Botulinum Toxin Type A Injections as Monotherapy for Upper Limb Essential Tremor Using Kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samotus, Olivia; Kumar, Niraj; Rizek, Philippe; Jog, Mandar

    2018-01-01

    There is a significant need for a targeted therapy for essential tremor (ET), as medications have not been developed specifically for ET, and the ones prescribed are often not well-tolerated, so that many patients remain untreated. Recent work has shown that, unlike previous experience, kinematically guided individualized botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections provide benefit along with minimal weakness. Ours is the first long-term (96-week) safety and efficacy study of BoNT-A as monotherapy for ET using kinematically driven injection parameters. Ten ET patients were administered six serial BoNT-A treatments every 16 weeks and were assessed at 6 weeks following treatment. During each study visit, the Fahn-Tolosa-Marin (FTM) scale, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and the Quality of Life for Essential Tremor Questionnaire (QUEST) were administered along with kinematic assessment of the treated limb. Participants performed scripted tasks with motion sensors placed over each arm joint. Dosing patterns were determined using the movement disorder neurologist's interpretation of muscles contributing to the kinematically analyzed upper limb tremor biomechanics. There was a 33.8% (pfunctional improvement (FTM part C) and a 39.8% (ptremor score was reduced by 62.9% (p=0.001) in the treated and by 44.4% (p=0.03) in the untreated arm at week 96 compared to week 48. Individualized BoNT-A dosing patterns to each individual's tremor biomechanics provided an effective monotherapy for ET as function improved without functionally limiting muscle weakness.

  1. Botulinum toxin A is effective to treat tension-type headache caused by hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuma, Atsushi; Nagata, Eiichiro; Yasuda, Takashi; Kouchi, Maiko; Nakayama, Taira; Honma, Kazunari; Tokuoka, Kentaro; Kitagawa, Yasuhisa; Nogawa, Shigeru; Takizawa, Shunya

    2017-10-01

    We examined the relationship between hemifacial spasm (HFS; a form of cranio-cervical dystonia) and chronic primary headache, including tension-type headache (TTH). We also examined whether botulinum toxin A (BoNT/A) therapy for HFS ameliorates concomitant TTH. Fifty-one HFS patients receiving BoNT/A therapy were recruited. Patients' characteristics (including age, gender, chronic headache history, exercise habits, stiff neck, cervical spondylolysis history), stress factors, worsening/new onset of headache associated with HFS, and dose of BoNT/A were examined. We diagnosed headache types according to The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition, beta. Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6) scores for headache severity were compared between the 6-week baseline before BoNT/A therapy and 6-week follow-up after BoNT/A therapy. Of 51 patients with HFS, 17 (33.3%) reported worsening or new onset of headache (especially TTH) associated with HFS (Group-S), and 34 were not aware of headache (Group-N). Twelve patients (70.6%) in group-S reported improvement of headache after BoNT/A therapy. NRS (from 7 [5-9] to 0 [0-5], p<0.01) and HIT-6 (from 55 [54-64] to 44 [36-52], p<0.001) scores were significantly improved after BoNT/A therapy. Logistic regression analysis revealed significant interaction between TTH associated with HFS and the presence of stress factors (odds ratio 43.11: 2.95-629.39, p<0.001) and history of chronic headache (odds ratio 28.53: 2.96-275.10, p<0.001). Primary headache, especially TTH, is associated with HFS. BoNT/A therapy for HFS may also be indirectly effective for treatment of TTH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Using family and staff experiences of a botulinum toxin-A service to improve service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, K L O; Bau, K; Lewis, J; Aroyan, K R; Botha, B; Botman, A G M; Stewart, K; Waugh, M-C A; Paget, S P

    2017-11-01

    The decision for families to proceed with botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) injections for managing childhood conditions involving hypertonia can be complex. Family-centred care is a service model that facilitates supporting families in this decision-making process. Understanding families' experiences of services is critical to developing family-centred care. The aim of this project was therefore to increase understanding of the experiences of families of children attending a BoNT-A service in order to improve the service and its family-centred approach to care. Sixteen staff of a BoNT-A service participated in a patient journey mapping exercise. Nine families of the service participated in in-depth interviews. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data from the staff session and interviews were analysed independently using grounded, hermeneutic thematic analysis. Staff sessions revealed 5 core themes that related to impacting on the family experience. Family interviews revealed 4 core themes, with 7 subthemes and 1 latent theme. Areas of importance identified by families relating to BoNT-A treatment included acknowledgement of individual needs, care coordination, empowerment of families and patients, consistency in service delivery, and the distressing nature of appointment and decision-making. Comparison of the data from the staff patient journey mapping and family interviews suggested that staff have a good but incomplete understanding of the factors important to families, highlighting the need for consumer engagement in establishing family-centred care. The themes identified can guide the provision of family-centred BoNT-A injection clinics. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm: a protocol for titration of botulinum toxin dose to the individual patient and for the management of refractory cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortisi, E; Henderson, H W A; Bunce, C; Xing, W; Collin, J R O

    2006-08-01

    To evaluate a protocol for the treatment of facial dystonias. A retrospective noncomparative interventional case series of all patients who attended a specialised tertiary referral clinic between January 2000 and January 2003. At the start of treatment, patients were seen and treated at weekly intervals until their symptoms were controlled or they developed complications. The sum of the weekly doses was taken as the individual patient dose and then given at 3-4 monthly intervals as required for the individual patient. Refractory cases of spasm underwent orbicularis muscle reduction. Pretarsal spasm was treated with pretarsal botulinum toxin. If the spasm was relieved but the patient could not open their eyelids, a trial of ptosis props was undertaken and the toxin injections continued, before considering a brow suspension. If patients could not see because of a spastic Bell's phenomenon, they were given centrally acting systemic medication. Of 182 new patients, 63 (35%) required two or more sets of injections to titrate their optimum dose of toxin. Symptoms improved in 169 patients (93%). Of a total 332 new patients and follow-up patients, 47 (14%) underwent surgery during their management, 36 protractor myectomy, and 13 brow suspension. Protractor myectomy improved symptoms in 23 (64%). Brow suspension improved symptoms in 12 patients (92%). The dose of botulinum toxin can be titrated to the individual patient, and the refractory cases managed satisfactorily if a logical protocol is followed.

  4. Considerations on patient-related outcomes with the use of botulinum toxins: is switching products safe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraint A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Avram Fraint,1 Padmaja Vittal,2 Cynthia Comella2 1Department of Neurological Sciences, 2Section of Movement Disorders, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA Introduction: Botulinum toxin (BoNT is the treatment of choice for many neurologic movement disorders, including blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm, and cervical dystonia. There are two serotypes approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration: three brands of serotype A and one of serotype B. Many attempts have been made at establishing dose conversion ratios between brands and serotypes. This review focuses on the existing data comparing different formulations of the same BoNT serotypes as well as that comparing different serotypes with one another. We focus on existing data regarding switching from one formulation or serotype to another and will also discuss the issue of immunogenicity of BoNT. With this information as a foundation, recommendations on safety of switching agents are addressed. Method: Literature review searching PubMed and Google Scholar using the search terms “switching botox”, “dosing equivalency in botox”, and “comparing botox”. Results/conclusion: Overall, there are many studies that demonstrate the efficacy and safety of each of the brands of BoNTs used in clinical practice. However, determination of dosing equivalencies among these brands and serotypes is complex with inconsistencies among the studies. When switching from one brand to another, the clinician should be aware of these issues, and not make the assumption that such ratios exist. Tailoring the dosage of each brand of BoNT to the clinical situation is the most prudent treatment strategy rather than focusing closely on conversion factors and concerns for immunogenicity. Keywords: botulinum toxin, BoNT, abobotulinumtoxin A, onabotulinumtoxin A, incobotulinumtoxin A, rimabotulinumtoxin B

  5. The role of kinesiotaping combined with botulinum toxin to reduce plantar flexors spasticity after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadag-Saygi, Evrim; Cubukcu-Aydoseli, Koza; Kablan, Nilufer; Ofluoglu, Demet

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of kinesiotaping as an adjuvant therapy to botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection in lower extremity spasticity. This is a single-center, randomized, and double-blind study. Twenty hemiplegic patients with spastic equinus foot were enrolled into the study and randomized into 2 groups. The first group (n=10) received BTX-A injection and kinesiotaping, and the second group (n=10) received BTX-A injection and sham-taping. Clinical assessment was done before injection and at 2 weeks and 1, 3, and 6 months. Outcome measures were modified Ashworth scale (MAS), passive ankle dorsiflexion, gait velocity, and step length. Improvement was recorded in both kinesiotaping and sham groups for all outcome variables. No significant difference was found between groups other than passive range of motion (ROM), which was found to have increased more in the kinesiotaping group at 2 weeks. There is no clear benefit in adjuvant kinesiotaping application with botulinum toxin for correction of spastic equinus in stroke.

  6. Attomolar detection of botulinum toxin type A in complex biological matrices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Bagramyan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A highly sensitive, rapid and cost efficient method that can detect active botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT in complex biological samples such as foods or serum is desired in order to 1 counter the potential bioterrorist threat 2 enhance food safety 3 enable future pharmacokinetic studies in medical applications that utilize BoNTs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a botulinum neurotoxin serotype A assay with a large immuno-sorbent surface area (BoNT/A ALISSA that captures a low number of toxin molecules and measures their intrinsic metalloprotease activity with a fluorogenic substrate. In direct comparison with the "gold standard" mouse bioassay, the ALISSA is four to five orders of magnitudes more sensitive and considerably faster. Our method reaches attomolar sensitivities in serum, milk, carrot juice, and in the diluent fluid used in the mouse assay. ALISSA has high specificity for the targeted type A toxin when tested against alternative proteases including other BoNT serotypes and trypsin, and it detects the holotoxin as well as the multi-protein complex form of BoNT/A. The assay was optimized for temperature, substrate concentration, size and volume proportions of the immuno-sorbent matrix, enrichment and reaction times. Finally, a kinetic model is presented that is consistent with the observed improvement in sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The sensitivity, specificity, speed and simplicity of the BoNT ALISSA should make this method attractive for diagnostic, biodefense and pharmacological applications.

  7. Rapid, Sensitive Detection of Botulinum Toxin on a Flexible Microfluidics Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, Marvin G.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Feldhaus, Michael J.; Anheier, Norman C.; Marks, James D.; Grate, Jay W.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2004-10-30

    In this paper we will describe how high affinity reagents and a sensor configuration enabling rapid mass transport can be combined for rapid, sensitive biodetection. The system that we have developed includes a renewable surface immunoassay, which involves on-column detection of a fluorescently labeled secondary antibody in a sandwich immunoassay. Yeast display and directed molecular evolution were used to create high affinity antibodies to the botulinum toxin heavy chain receptor binding domain, AR1 and 3D12. A rotating rod renewable surface microcolumn was used to form a microliter-sized column containing beads functionalized with the capture antibody (AR1). The column was perfused with sample, wash solutions, and a fluorescently labeled secondary antibody (3D12) while the on-column fluorescence was monitored. Detection was accomplished in less than 5 minutes, with a total processing time of about 10 minutes. On-column detection of botulinum toxin was more sensitive and much faster than flow cytometry analysis on microbeads using the same reagents.

  8. An evidence-based review of botulinum toxin (Botox) applications in non-cosmetic head and neck conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Ricardo; Garas, George; Silva, Sanjeev; Stamatoglou, Constantine; Chatrath, Paul; Patel, Kalpesh

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (Botox) is an exotoxin produced from Clostridium botulinum. It works by blocking the release of acetylcholine from the cholinergic nerve end plates leading to inactivity of the muscles or glands innervated. Botox is best known for its beneficial role in facial aesthetics but recent literature has highlighted its usage in multiple non-cosmetic medical and surgical conditions. This article reviews the current evidence pertaining to Botox use in the head and neck. A literature review was conducted using The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Medline and EMBASE databases limited to English Language articles published from 1980 to 2012. The findings suggest that there is level 1 evidence supporting the efficacy of Botox in the treatment of spasmodic dysphonia, essential voice tremor, headache, cervical dystonia, masticatory myalgia, sialorrhoea, temporomandibular joint disorders, bruxism, blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm and rhinitis. For chronic neck pain there is level 1 evidence to show that Botox is ineffective. Level 2 evidence exists for vocal tics, trigeminal neuralgia, dysphagia and post-laryngectomy oesophageal speech. For stuttering, ‘first bite syndrome’, facial nerve paresis, Frey's syndrome, oromandibular dystonia and palatal/stapedial myoclonus the evidence is level 4. Thus, the literature highlights a therapeutic role for Botox in a wide range of non-cosmetic conditions pertaining to the head and neck (mainly level 1 evidence). With ongoing research, the spectrum of clinical applications and number of people receiving Botox will no doubt increase. Botox appears to justify its title as ‘the poison that heals’. PMID:23476731

  9. The therapeutic usage of botulinum toxin (Botox in non-cosmetic head and neck conditions – An evidence based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Habib Awan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin (Botox is an exotoxin produced from Clostridium botulinum. It blocks the release of acetylcholine from the cholinergic nerve end plates resulting in inactivity of the muscles or glands innervated. The efficacy of Botox in facial aesthetics is well established; however, recent literature has highlighted its utilization in multiple non-cosmetic medical and surgical conditions. The present article reviews the current evidence pertaining to Botox use in the non-cosmetic head and neck conditions. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science and the Cochrane databases limited to English Language articles published from January 1980 to December 2014. The findings showed that there is level 1 evidence supporting the efficacy of Botox in the treatment of laryngeal dystonia, headache, cervical dystonia, masticatory myalgia, sialorrhoea, temporomandibular joint disorders, bruxism, blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm and rhinitis. For chronic neck pain there is level 1 evidence to show that Botox is ineffective. Level 2 evidence exists for vocal tics and trigeminal. For stuttering, facial nerve paresis, Frey’s syndrome and oromandibular dystonia the evidence is level 4. Thus, there is compelling evidence in the published literature to demonstrate the beneficial role of Botox in a wide range of non-cosmetic conditions pertaining to the head and neck (mainly level 1 evidence. With more and more research, the range of clinical applications and number of individuals getting Botox will doubtlessly increase. Botox appears to justify its title as ‘the poison that heals’.

  10. Differences in the multiple step process of inhibition of neurotransmitter release induced by tetanus toxin and botulinum neurotoxins type A and B at Aplysia synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, B; De Paiva, A; Deloye, F; Doussau, F; Tauc, L; Weller, U; Dolly, J O

    1996-01-01

    In order to gain insights into the steps (binding, uptake, intracellular effect) which differ in the inhibitory actions of tetanus toxin and botulinum neurotoxins types A or B, their temperature dependencies were investigated at identified cholinergic and non-cholinergic synapses in Aplysia. Upon lowering the temperature from 22 degrees C to 10 degrees C, extracellularly applied botulinum neurotoxin type A and B appeared unable to inhibit transmitter release whilst tetanus toxin exhibited a residual activity. Binding of each toxin to the neuronal membrane appeared virtually unaltered following this temperature change. By contrast, the intracellular effects of botulinum neurotoxin type B and tetanus toxin were strongly attenuated by temperature reduction whereas the inhibitory action of botulinum neurotoxin type A was only moderately reduced. Importantly, this discrepancy relates to the known proteolytic cleavage of different synaptic proteins by these two toxin groups. Since both the binding and intracellular activity of botulinum neurotoxin type A are minimally affected at 10 degrees C, its inability to inhibit neurotransmission at this low temperature when applied extracellularly indicated attenuation of its uptake. Due to the strict temperature dependence of the intracellular action of tetanus toxin and botulinum neurotoxin type B, but not A, an examination of the effects of changes in temperature on the internalization step was facilitated by the use of heterologous mixtures of the toxins' heavy and light chains. At 10 degrees C, heavy chain from tetanus toxin but not from botulinum neurotoxin type B mediated uptake of botulinum neurotoxin type A light chain. Collectively, these results provide evidence that, at least in Aplysia, the uptake mechanism for botulinum neurotoxin types A and B differs from that of tetanus toxin.

  11. Influence of Botulinum Toxin Therapy on Postural Control and Lower Limb Intersegmental Coordination in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

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    Bernard Dan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin injections may significantly improve lower limb kinematics in gait of children with spastic forms of cerebral palsy. Here we aimed to analyze the effect of lower limb botulinum toxin injections on trunk postural control and lower limb intralimb (intersegmental coordination in children with spastic diplegia or spastic hemiplegia (GMFCS I or II. We recorded tridimensional trunk kinematics and thigh, shank and foot elevation angles in fourteen 3–12 year-old children with spastic diplegia and 14 with spastic hemiplegia while walking either barefoot or with ankle-foot orthoses (AFO before and after botulinum toxin infiltration according to a management protocol. We found significantly greater trunk excursions in the transverse plane (barefoot condition and in the frontal plane (AFO condition. Intralimb coordination showed significant differences only in the barefoot condition, suggesting that reducing the degrees of freedom may limit the emergence of selective coordination. Minimal relative phase analysis showed differences between the groups (diplegia and hemiplegia but there were no significant alterations unless the children wore AFO. We conclude that botulinum toxin injection in lower limb spastic muscles leads to changes in motor planning, including through interference with trunk stability, but a combination of therapies (orthoses and physical therapy is needed in order to learn new motor strategies.

  12. Influence of Botulinum Toxin Therapy on Postural Control and Lower Limb Intersegmental Coordination in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degelaen, Marc; de Borre, Ludo; Kerckhofs, Eric; de Meirleir, Linda; Buyl, Ronald; Cheron, Guy; Dan, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum toxin injections may significantly improve lower limb kinematics in gait of children with spastic forms of cerebral palsy. Here we aimed to analyze the effect of lower limb botulinum toxin injections on trunk postural control and lower limb intralimb (intersegmental) coordination in children with spastic diplegia or spastic hemiplegia (GMFCS I or II). We recorded tridimensional trunk kinematics and thigh, shank and foot elevation angles in fourteen 3–12 year-old children with spastic diplegia and 14 with spastic hemiplegia while walking either barefoot or with ankle-foot orthoses (AFO) before and after botulinum toxin infiltration according to a management protocol. We found significantly greater trunk excursions in the transverse plane (barefoot condition) and in the frontal plane (AFO condition). Intralimb coordination showed significant differences only in the barefoot condition, suggesting that reducing the degrees of freedom may limit the emergence of selective coordination. Minimal relative phase analysis showed differences between the groups (diplegia and hemiplegia) but there were no significant alterations unless the children wore AFO. We conclude that botulinum toxin injection in lower limb spastic muscles leads to changes in motor planning, including through interference with trunk stability, but a combination of therapies (orthoses and physical therapy) is needed in order to learn new motor strategies. PMID:23344454

  13. Effects of Botulinum Toxin on Jaw Motor Events during Sleep in Sleep Bruxism Patients: A Polysomnographic Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Young Joo; Lee, Moon Kyu; Kato, Takafumi; Park, Hyung Uk; Heo, Kyoung; Kim, Seong Taek

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the effects of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injection on jaw motor episodes during sleep in patients with or without orofacial pain who did not respond to oral splint treatment. Methods: Twenty subjects with a clinical diagnosis of SB completed this study. Ten subjects received bilateral BoNT-A injections (25 U per muscle) into the masseter muscles only (group A), and the other 10 received the injections into both the masseter and temporalis muscles (group B). Video-polysomnographic (vPSG) recordings were made before and at 4 weeks after injection. Rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) and orofacial activity (OFA) were scored and analyzed for several parameters (e.g., frequency of episodes, bursts per episode, episode duration). The peak amplitude of electromyographic (EMG) activity in the two muscles was also measured. Results: BoNT-A injection did not reduce the frequency, number of bursts, or duration for RMMA episodes in the two groups. The injection decreased the peak amplitude of EMG burst of RMMA episodes in the injected muscles (p < 0.001, repeated measure ANOVA) in both groups. At 4 weeks after injection, 9 subjects self-reported reduction of tooth grinding and 18 subjects self-reported reduction of morning jaw stiffness. Conclusions: A single BoNT-A injection is an effective strategy for controlling SB for at least a month. It reduces the intensity rather than the generation of the contraction in jaw-closing muscles. Future investigations on the efficacy and safety in larger samples over a longer follow-up period are needed before establishing management strategies for SB with BoNT-A. Citation: Shim YJ; Lee MK; Kato T; Park HU; Heo K; Kim ST. Effects of botulinum toxin on jaw motor events during sleep in sleep bruxism patients: a polysomnographic evaluation. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(3):291-298. PMID:24634627

  14. Intravesical botulinum toxin a injections do not benefit patients with ulcer type interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Ling; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2013-01-01

    Ulcer type and non-ulcer type interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndromes (IC/BPS) are considered different disease entities. Thus, intravesical botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) treatment outcomes could differ for each entity. To evaluate and compare the treatment outcomes of BoNT-A injections for treatment of each IC/BPS type. Prospective interventional study. Tertiary medical center affiliated with Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital and Tzu Chi University, Taiwan. Forty-four consecutive patients with IC/BPS for whom conventional treatments failed were prospectively enrolled in this study. Patients were classified as having ulcer (n = 10) or non-ulcer (n = 30) IC/BPS based on their previous cystoscopic findings. All patients received 4 sets of intravesical BoNT-A injections (100 U in 40 suburothelial injections) every 6 months. The primary end-point was the global response assessment (GRA) 6 months after the fourth set of BoNT-A injections. Secondary end-points included the O'Leary-Sant score (OSS) including symptom indexes (ICSI) and problem indexes (ICPI), visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, voiding diary, and urodynamics variables. After 4 sets of BoNT-A injections, 15 patients with non-ulcer IC/BPS had GRA scores >= 2, while the other 15 had GRA scores ulcer IC/BPS had GRA scores ulcer IC/BPS had significantly higher daytime frequency, nocturia, smaller functional bladder capacity, smaller voided volume, greater VAS, smaller maximal bladder capacity, and greater glomerulation grade than did patients with non-ulcer IC/BPS. After 4 sets of BoNT-A injections, patients with non-ulcer IC/BPS and GRA scores >= 2 or ulcer IC/BPS showed no significant change in any clinical or urodynamic variable. After failure of repeated BoNT-A injections, all 10 patients with ulcer IC/BPS underwent transurethral electrocauterization of their ulcers, which resulted in immediate pain relief. Lack of a control arm in this study. Repeated intravesical BoNT-A injections provided effective

  15. Food safety objective approach for controlling Clostridium botulinum growth and toxin production in commercially sterile foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, N M; Larkin, J W; Cole, M B; Skinner, G E; Whiting, R C; Gorris, L G M; Rodriguez, A; Buchanan, R; Stewart, C M; Hanlin, J H; Keener, L; Hall, P A

    2011-11-01

    As existing technologies are refined and novel microbial inactivation technologies are developed, there is a growing need for a metric that can be used to judge equivalent levels of hazard control stringency to ensure food safety of commercially sterile foods. A food safety objective (FSO) is an output-oriented metric that designates the maximum level of a hazard (e.g., the pathogenic microorganism or toxin) tolerated in a food at the end of the food supply chain at the moment of consumption without specifying by which measures the hazard level is controlled. Using a risk-based approach, when the total outcome of controlling initial levels (H(0)), reducing levels (ΣR), and preventing an increase in levels (ΣI) is less than or equal to the target FSO, the product is considered safe. A cross-disciplinary international consortium of specialists from industry, academia, and government was organized with the objective of developing a document to illustrate the FSO approach for controlling Clostridium botulinum toxin in commercially sterile foods. This article outlines the general principles of an FSO risk management framework for controlling C. botulinum growth and toxin production in commercially sterile foods. Topics include historical approaches to establishing commercial sterility; a perspective on the establishment of an appropriate target FSO; a discussion of control of initial levels, reduction of levels, and prevention of an increase in levels of the hazard; and deterministic and stochastic examples that illustrate the impact that various control measure combinations have on the safety of well-established commercially sterile products and the ways in which variability all levels of control can heavily influence estimates in the FSO risk management framework. This risk-based framework should encourage development of innovative technologies that result in microbial safety levels equivalent to those achieved with traditional processing methods.

  16. Scientific skepticism and new discoveries: an analysis of a report of zinc/phytase supplementation and the efficacy of botulinum toxins in treating cosmetic facial rhytides, hemifacial spasm and benign essential blepharospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joel L

    2014-10-01

    A recent paper in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology by Koshy and colleagues (2012, 11( 4 ):507-512) report on "Effect of Dietary Zinc and Phytase Supplementation on Botulinum Toxin Treatments" and conclude by claiming the discovery of "a potentially meaningful role for zinc and/or phytase supplementation in increasing the degree and duration of botulinum toxin effect in the treatment of cosmetic facial rhytids, benign essential blepharospasm, and hemifacial spasm". The purpose of this paper is to examine these published claims for possible methodological and design errors and potential sources of bias. The authors evaluated the published results in comparison to the published literature on zinc deficiency, the role of phytase, prior reports of an effect of zinc on activity of botulinum toxin, issues of study design and execution and if the reported results of the study supported the study's conclusions. Multiple issues are present in the reported study, which appear to invalidate its conclusions. These areas include lack of direct evidence for the presence of clinical or subclinical zinc deficiency in the study population or for the level of phytate in the study population sufficient to interfere with zinc absorption in these subjects. Additionally, there is ambiguity as to the actual dose of zinc used as well as in the study design itself. Also there is a failure of the study through the "unmasking" of the crossover design. There is potential financial conflict of interest in the study execution that may have biased the reported results. Finally there is inadequate data presented to evaluate the claims made of a "new discovery" as to the three disease entities reported on and the various botulinum toxins used in each of the three treatment arms of the study. Based on this evaluation, it appears that a high level of clinical and scientific skepticism is warranted concerning any claim of a beneficial effect of zinc and phytase supplementation on the efficacy or

  17. A Single-blind, Split-face, Randomized, Pilot Study Comparing the Effects of Intradermal and Intramuscular Injection of Two Commercially Available Botulinum Toxin A Formulas to Reduce Signs of Facial Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, Priya; Demay, Shantel; Sapra, Sheetal; Khanna, Julie; Mraud, Kelli; Bonadonna, Jennifer

    2017-02-01

    Objective: To examine the effectiveness of intradermal botulinum toxin type A injection in improving skin texture and midface lift while reducing pore size and sebum production, as well as investigate the differences in effectiveness between onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA using intradermal and intramuscular injection methods. Design: A 16-week, single-blind, split-face, randomized study. Each patient served as their own control, receiving onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA randomized to either the left or right side of the face. Patients received intradermal botulinum toxin type A injections at Week 0 and intramuscular botulinum toxin type A injections at Week 2. Participants: Ten women aged 35 to 65 years who exhibited static rhytids in the glabellar and periorbital area. Measurements: The primary endpoint was efficacy of split-face treatment of intradermal and intramuscular onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA as assessed by a blinded evaluator using baseline and post-treatment photographs. The secondary endpoints included safety as assessed by adverse events and patient satisfaction measured by questionnaires completed at baseline and post-treatment. Results: Intradermal injection of botulinum toxin type A led to a statistically significant improvement in skin texture (p=0.004) while also resulting in mild midface lift (p=0.024), but did not provide a significant reduction of pore size and sebum production. There was no statistically significant difference between onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA when injected intradermally or intramuscularly. Conclusion: Intradermal injection of botulinum toxin type A appears to be a safe and effective therapy that provides an improvement in facial skin texture and midface lift. Registry: clinicaltrials.gov (ID#: NCT02907268).

  18. Risk of Clostridium botulinum type E toxin production in blue crab meat packaged in four commercial-type containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, M A; Garren, D M; Huang, Y W; Gates, K W

    1996-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine if a risk of Clostridium botulinum growth and toxin production existed in four different packaged crabmeat products. Freshly picked blue crab meat was inoculated with 10(3) to 10(4) spores per g of a mixed pool of four strains of C. botulinum type E (Beluga, Minnesota, G21-5, and 070). The lump crabmeat was packaged in four different packaging containers: (i) 12-oz copolymer polyethylene cups currently used by most crab processors; (ii) 12-oz copolymer polyethylene cups with heat-shrink, tamper-evident low-density polypropylene seals; (iii) 8-oz copolymer polyethylene cups with easy-open aluminum ends: and (iv) 8-oz copolymer polypropylene cups with integral tamper-evident pull-tabs. The packages were stored at either 4 degrees C for 21 days or 10 degrees C for 15 days. Storage at 10 degrees C was used to simulate temperature abuse. The mouse bioassay was used to detect the presence of C. botulinum toxin. Psychotrophic and anaerobic populations were enumerated and were found to increase with time regardless of packaging type. No botulinum toxin was detected in any of the four packaging types stored at 4 degrees C or 10 degrees C throughout the entire storage period.

  19. Botulinum toxin type A combined with neurodynamic mobilization for upper limb spasticity after stroke: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Jorge H; Silva, Guillermo B; Chiarotto, Alessandro; Ragusa, Orazio L F

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to report a case in which combinatory therapy of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) and neurodynamic mobilization (NM) was used as treatment for a patient with severe upper limb spasticity and pain after stroke. A 76-year-old male patient had spastic muscles in the upper limb 10 months after an ischemic stroke. The patient underwent combined treatment with BoNT-A and NM of the upper limb in 6 monthly applications. Evaluation was performed pretreatment, 3 months after the first injection, 3 months after the second injection, and at a follow-up session 9 months after starting the treatment. The following outcomes were measured: pain by using a numeric rating scale, spasticity by the Modified Ashworth Scale for Grading Spasticity, acceptance and emotional reaction to the treatment by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and functionality by ranges of motion. The patient improved in all outcomes after treatment, and results were maintained during the follow-up sessions. The combined NM and BoNT-A treatment appeared to decrease pain and improve joint ranges of motion during treatment for this patient. The patient showed decreased anxiety and depression during and after the treatment.

  20. Split-screen video demonstration of sonography-guided muscle identification and injection of botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietzek, Urban M; Schroeder, A Sebastian; Wissel, Jörg; Heinen, Florian; Berweck, Steffen

    2010-10-15

    A standardization of injection procedures for the various botulinum toxin (BoNT) indications has not been achieved to date. One established option to guide the therapist's needle is sonography guidance. It provides real-time visualization of the injection process, which is quick, allows perfect precision, and the procedure as such is painless. To demonstrate these qualities, we have recorded six split-screen video segments that show the handling of the probe and the needle during BoNT injections concurrently with the respective cross-sectional sonography recordings. The video sequences show differentiation of the pollicis longus muscle and individual finger flexor fascicles, needle tracking, and real-time sonography-guided injection of the gastrocnemius, rectus femoris, and iliopsoas muscles. We hope this short presentation will help to encourage a more widespread use of the technique as well as further research on sonography guidance for precise delivery of BoNT injections to various target muscles.

  1. The effects of botulinum toxin A on ephaptic transmission in idiopathic hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Tülay; Seçil, Yaprak; Gürgör, Nevin; Tokuçoğlu, Figen; Beckmann, Yeşim; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2009-01-01

    Lateral spreading and synkinetic responses of blink reflex are a sign of ephaptic transmission in idiopathic hemifacial spasm (HFS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin A (Btx A) on ephaptic transmission in idiopathic HFS. Thirty-three patients with idiopathic HFS were investigated. Btx A was injected only into the affected orbicularis oculi (OC) muscle. Electrophysiological studies were performed before and three weeks after the Btx A injection. After Btx A, the latencies of motor response and blink reflexes elicited from the OC muscle were significantly increased. The lateral spreading was not obtained in the OC muscle, while the orbicularis oris muscle response was not changed. There were no significant differences in the synkinetic responses of blink reflex. During needle EMG examination, positive sharp waves and fibrilation potentials were observed due to chemodenervation only in the OC muscle. Btx A affects only the neuromuscular junctions of the injected muscle and has no effect upon ephaptic transmission.

  2. Virtual trainer for intra-detrusor injection of botulinum toxin to treat urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yunhe; Vasandani, Pankaj; Iyer, Jayesh; Gunasekaran, Arjune; Zhang, Yingchun; Burke, Daniel; Dykstra, Dennis; Sweet, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Here we introduce a new virtual reality (VR) based simulation system for training the urological procedure of intra-detrusor botulinum toxin (Botox®) injections into the bladder. 6 cases with different bladder anatomy and 3 subtasks are included in the curriculum; this design is guided by several expert urologists according to clinical needs and experience. These virtual bladder models can be deformed by a cystoscope model or penetrated by a needle model. Data of location and dose per injection are collected during the training. After compared among various options, magnetic motion-tracking devices are chosen and integrated onto replicas of cystoscopic instruments as the VR interface for the specific operation. A web/database based learning management platform (LMP) is developed for online data access and validation studies of the training system.

  3. Bioimaging of botulinum toxin and hyaluronate hydrogels using zwitterionic near-infrared fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Su; Kim, Yun Seop; Bao, Kai; Wada, Hideyuki; Choi, Hak Soo; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2017-01-01

    The injection of botulinum toxin (BTX) to reduce facial wrinkles is one of the most frequently performed plastic surgery procedures. The biocompatible hydrogels are injected with BTX for effective tissue augmentation. However, it is difficult to determine the interval of injection for effective tissue augmentation. BTX and hyaluronate (HA) hydrogels were labeled with zwitterionic (ZW) near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores and visualized for 3 weeks after injection to BALB/c nude mice. BTX-ZW conjugates and diaminohexane (DAH)-HA-ZW hydrogels were successfully prepared by the conventional EDC/NHS chemistry. Using the NIR fluorescence imaging, we confirmed that approximately 10% of BTX-ZW conjugates and 50% of DAH-HA-ZW hydrogels remained 3 weeks post-injection. This bioimaging technique using invisible NIR fluorescence light can be exploited for various biomedical applications.

  4. [Tetanus and botulinum toxins are zinc metallopeptidases: molecular mechanisms and inhibition of their neurotoxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornille, F; Roques, B P

    1999-01-01

    The very high toxicity of tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) and botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) are related to their nature of zinc metallopeptidases able to selectively cleave small proteins involved in neurotransmitters exocytosis. At this time, there is no efficient and selective therapy towards tetanos and tobulism as well as protection against a possible spreading of the toxins. We have therefore investigated the minimum sequences of TeNT and BoNT substrates allowing an efficient and simple fluorescent dosage of the enzymatic activity to be developed. Using synaptobrevin (93 amino acids) as substrate of TeNT and several fragments synthesised by solid phase method, we have shown that the clostridial neurotoxins behave as allosteric-type enzymes. This is the first example in zinc metallopeptidases. Based on these results a strategy, including the use of combinatorial chemistry, was carried out issuing in the design of the first potent inhibitors of TeNT and BoNT.

  5. Effects of botulinum toxin type A on healing of injured skeletal muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokravi Ramin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: (1 Evaluation of microscopic healing of skeletal muscle fibers after injuries, especially the arrangement of new muscle fibers and scar tissue diameter in the injury region. (2 Evaluation of alterations in microscopy of the healing procedure within skeletal muscles after injury following botulinum toxin type A (BTX -A induced muscle immobilization. Materials and Methods: The study was done on 12 white lab rabbits of either sex in a 6-month period. Results: The immobilization of skeletal muscle fibers as a result of the use of BTX-A after injury caused a qualitative increase in fibrous tissue formation in the area of injury, and the BTX-A-induced immobilization for a period of 6 months led to muscle atrophy.

  6. Tetanus toxin : primary structure, expression in E. coli, and homology with botulinum toxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisel, Ulrich; Jarausch, Wolfgang; Goretzki, Karin; Henschen, Agnes; Engels, Joachim; Weller, Ulrich; Hudel, Martina; Habermann, Ernst; Niemann, Heiner; Rott, R.

    1986-01-01

    A pool of synthetic oligonucleotides was used to identify the gene encoding tetanus toxin on a 75-kbp plasmid from a toxigenic non-sporulating strain of Clostridium tetani. The nucleotide sequence contained a single open reading frame coding for 1315 amino acids corresponding to a polypeptide with a

  7. The effect of botulinum toxin A injections in the spine muscles for cerebral palsy scoliosis, examined in a prospective, randomized triple-blinded study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Christian; Pedersen, Søren Anker; Kristensen, Billy B

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A prospective, randomized triple-blinded cross-over design treating with either botulinum toxin A (BXT) or Saline (NaCl). OBJECTIVE: To examine the efficacy of BTX treatment in cerebral palsy scoliosis (CPS). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Intramuscular injections with BTX have been used...... or BTX in selected spine muscles with 6 months intervals (block randomization, sealed envelope). X-rays of the spine and clinical follow-up were captured before and 6 weeks after each injection. Primary outcome parameter was radiological change in Cobb's angle, where a seven degree change was regarded...

  8. Botox® after Botox® - a new approach to treat diplopia secondary to cosmetic botulinic toxin use: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassiano Rodrigues Isaac

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for the treatment of diplopia secondary to cosmetic botulinum toxin A use is described. In this interventional case reports, two consecutive patients who developed diplopia after periocular cosmetic use of botulinum toxin A were treated with intramuscular botulinum toxin A injection into the antagonist extraocular muscle. Diplopia resolved in both patients in less than 1 week with no side effects or complications. In conclusion, the injection of intramuscular botulinum toxin A is an encouraging option for treatment of diplopia secondary to botulinum toxin A use for facial lifting.

  9. Botulinum toxin type-A effect as a preemptive treatment in a model of acute trigeminal pain: a pre-clinical double-blind and placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio Juliato Piovesan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate if botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT/A had a preemptive antinociceptive effect in a formalin-induced orofacial pain model (FT. To test this hypothesis, male Rattus norvegicus were injected with isotonic saline solution 0.9% or BoNT/A administered as a 40 μl bolus, lateral to their nose, at 24 hours, 8, 15, 22, 29 or 36 days pre-FT. The procedures were repeated 42 days later. Influence on motor activity was assessed through the open-field test. Pain scores corresponded to the time spent rubbing and flicking the injected area. Animals pre-treated with BoNT/A at the first protocol (8 days subgroup showed reduced inflammatory scores (p=0.011. For the other groups no significant results were observed at any phase. Motor activity was similar in both groups. BoNT/A showed to be effective preventing inflammatory pain up to eight days after the first treatment, an effect not reproduced on the second dose administration.

  10. Combined effect of botulinum toxin and splinting on motor components and function of people suffering a stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Malek; Shamili, Aryan; Frough, Bijan; Pashmdarfard, Marzieh; Fallahzadeh Abarghouei, AbolGhasem

    2016-01-01

    Spasticity is one of the problems after a stroke. Due to this increase in muscle tone, patients are confronted with problems in motor control and difficulties in activities of daily living and complications such as shortness and contracture. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the simultaneous use of both splint and botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A) injection on spasticity, range of motion and upper extremity function in a 3-month period. In this study a comparison was done between three groups of interventions, conducted in rehabilitation clinics in Tehran. Sixty people with chronic stroke were recruited. Based on the inclusion criteria, a total of 39 stroke patients after completing the consent forms were entered to intervention groups; splint or botulinum toxin injection or combined splint/botulinum toxin injection. They were followed up about three months and the evaluations were done monthly. Goniometry was the method to measure the range of motion, and Modified Ashworth Scale was used to examine the spasticity and the upper extremity function was scored based on Fugl- Meyer Assessment. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 17. And ANOVAs was used for comparison between groups and times. Significance was set at 0.05. All outcome measures were improved within each group but the differences between splint group and BTX-A group and the BTX-A-splint group was not significant in most outcomes during the 3 periods (first evaluation until end of the first month, the end of first month until the end of second month, the end of second month until the end of the third month) (p>0.05). The results also showed that the changes in elbow`s spasticity (p=0.05) and wrist`s spasticity (p=0.007) and upper extremity function (p=0.04) were obvious between the three groups over the 3-months and the difference in the group of combined use of botulinum toxin, and the splint was more than other groups. In this study, the effects of botulinum toxin injection and Volar

  11. Identification of a Botulinum Neurotoxin-like Toxin in a Commensal Strain of Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sicai; Lebreton, Francois; Mansfield, Michael J; Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Zhang, Jie; Schwartzman, Julia A; Tao, Liang; Masuyer, Geoffrey; Martínez-Carranza, Markel; Stenmark, Pål; Gilmore, Michael S; Doxey, Andrew C; Dong, Min

    2018-02-14

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by various Clostridium strains, are a family of potent bacterial toxins and potential bioterrorism agents. Here we report that an Enterococcus faecium strain isolated from cow feces carries a BoNT-like toxin, designated BoNT/En. It cleaves both VAMP2 and SNAP-25, proteins that mediate synaptic vesicle exocytosis in neurons, at sites distinct from known BoNT cleavage sites on these two proteins. Comparative genomic analysis determines that the E. faecium strain carrying BoNT/En is a commensal type and that the BoNT/En gene is located within a typical BoNT gene cluster on a 206 kb putatively conjugative plasmid. Although the host species targeted by BoNT/En remains to be determined, these findings establish an extended member of BoNTs and demonstrate the capability of E. faecium, a commensal organism ubiquitous in humans and animals and a leading cause of hospital-acquired multi-drug-resistant (MDR) infections, to horizontally acquire, and possibly disseminate, a unique BoNT gene cluster. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Casting, taping or stretching after botulinum toxin type A for spastic equinus foot: a single-blind randomized trial on adult stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carda, Stefano; Invernizzi, Marco; Baricich, Alessio; Cisari, Carlo

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the effect of different adjunctive treatments after botulinum toxin type A. Single-blind, randomized trial, with three-month follow-up. Secondary rehabilitative care. Convenience sample of 69 chronic hemiplegic adult patients with spastic equinus foot. Following botulinum toxin type A injection at the plantar flexors, patients were randomly assigned to three groups and treated with either taping, casting or stretching for one week, and with stretching and gait training for the next week. Modified Ashworth Scale at plantar flexors, passive range of motion at the ankle, six-minute walking test, 10-metre walking test, Functional Ambulation Categories, ankle dorsiflexor strength were evaluated before treatment (t(0)) at 20 days (t(1)) and 90 days (t(2)) after treatment. At t(1) only the taping and casting groups showed significant improvements in Modified Ashworth Scale, six-minute walking test, 10-metre walking test and passive range of motion (P stretching groups at Modified Ashworth Scale and passive range of motion, and better than the stretching group at six-minute walking test (P stretching alone.

  13. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Botulinum Toxin A Dosage in the Upper Extremity of Children with Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Anne; Campbell, Kent; Lam-Damji, Sophie; Fehlings, Darcy

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the effects of low and high doses of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) to improve upper extremity function. Thirty-nine children (22 males, 17 females) with a mean age of 6 years 2 months (SD 2y 9mo) diagnosed with spastic hemiplegia or triplegia were enrolled into this double-blind, randomized controlled trial. The high-dose group…

  14. Comparison of different antibiotic protocols for asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with neurogenic bladder treated with botulinum toxin A

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    Ana Claudia Paradella

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Intravesical botulinum toxin A (BoNTA injection has been widely used for the treatment of detrusor overactivity in patients with neurogenic bladder due to spinal cord injury who do not respond to conventional treatment. There is no consensus about antibiotic prophylaxis for this procedure. We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of adult patients with spinal cord injury who underwent detrusor BoNTA injection between January of 2007 and December of 2013 in a rehabilitation hospital. Occurrence of symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI was assessed in 3 groups in accordance with their use of antibiotics (prophylactic dosage, 3 days, more than 3 days for the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. All patients were performing self or assisted clean intermittent bladder catheterization and underwent a rigid cystoscopy, under general or regional anesthesia with sedation, and the drug used was Botox®. A total of 616 procedures were performed during the study period. There were 11 identified cases of UTI (1.8% with a trend to a higher rate in the group that used antibiotics for longer time. This report shows that a single dose of antibiotics before the detrusor BoNTA injection is enough to prevent UTI. Randomized clinical trial should be conducted for definitive conclusions.

  15. Beneficial effects of minocycline and botulinum toxin-induced constraint physical therapy following experimental traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Tina I; Bingham, Deborah; Chang, Ting Ju; Lee, Chih Cheng; Shi, Jian; Wang, Dongmin; Massa, Stephen; Swanson, Raymond A; Liu, Jialing

    2013-01-01

    Effective recovery from functional impairments caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI) requires appropriate rehabilitation therapy. Multiple pathways are involved in secondary injury and recovery suggesting a role for multimodal approaches. Here, we examined the efficacy of the anti-inflammatory agent minocycline and botulinum toxin (botox)-induced limb constraint with structured physical therapy, delivered alone or in combination, after a severe TBI produced by a controlled cortical impact in rats. Minocycline was administered at 25 mg/kg daily for 2 weeks beginning 1 day after TBI or sham surgery. For constraint/physical therapy, botox-type A was injected into the nonaffected forearm muscle 1 day after injury and 2 weeks of physical therapy commenced at 5 days after injury. Functional evaluations were conducted 8 weeks after injury. Minocycline, either as a monotherapy or as combination treatment with botox/physical therapy significantly reduced impairments of spatial learning and memory in the water maze test, whereas botox/physical therapy reduced forelimb motor asymmetry and improved manual dexterity in the cylinder and vermicelli handling tests, A synergistic effect between the 2 treatments was observed when rats performed tasks requiring dexterity. Inflammation was attenuated in the peri-contusion cortex and hippocampus in all TBI groups receiving mono or combination therapies, though there was no significant difference in lesion size among groups. These data provide a rationale for incorporating anti-inflammatory treatment during rehabilitation therapy.

  16. Comparison of different antibiotic protocols for asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with neurogenic bladder treated with botulinum toxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Paradella

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical botulinum toxin A (BoNTA injection has been widely used for the treatment of detrusor overactivity in patients with neurogenic bladder due to spinal cord injury who do not respond to conventional treatment. There is no consensus about antibiotic prophylaxis for this procedure. We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of adult patients with spinal cord injury who underwent detrusor BoNTA injection between January of 2007 and December of 2013 in a rehabilitation hospital. Occurrence of symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI was assessed in 3 groups in accordance with their use of antibiotics (prophylactic dosage, 3 days, more than 3 days for the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. All patients were performing self or assisted clean intermittent bladder catheterization and underwent a rigid cystoscopy, under general or regional anesthesia with sedation, and the drug used was Botox®. A total of 616 procedures were performed during the study period. There were 11 identified cases of UTI (1.8% with a trend to a higher rate in the group that used antibiotics for longer time. This report shows that a single dose of antibiotics before the detrusor BoNTA injection is enough to prevent UTI. Randomized clinical trial should be conducted for definitive conclusions.

  17. Evaluation of the cost per patient per injection of botulinum toxin A in upper limb spasticity: comparison of two preparations in 19 countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine W

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Stéphane Roze,1 Hannah Kurth,2 Barnaby Hunt,3 William Valentine,3 Rémi Marty11HEVA, Lyon, France; 2Ipsen Pharma, Boulogne-Billancourt, France; 3Ossian Health Economics and Communications, Basel, SwitzerlandBackground: Botulinum toxin A injections are indicated for the management of movement disorders, including upper limb spasticity. The aim of this study was to compare the cost per patient per injection for two botulinum toxin A preparations in 19 countries.Methods: Doses of botulinum toxin A are expressed in noninterchangeable units (U, ie, Botox® in 100 Allergan units (100 U and Dysport® in 500 Speywood units (500 U. Recommended dosages were derived from country-specific summaries of product characteristics or prescribing information. Cost analysis was based on official list prices and expressed in 2011 Euros. The cost per patient per injection was calculated using the recommended dosage in upper limb spasticity combined with price per vial in each country.Results: For upper limb spasticity, the recommended dosage for Dysport in the summary of product characteristics is 1000 U per patient, whereas for Botox the recommended dosage when recommendations were made is 300 U. Allowing for different prices per vial in each country, the cost per patient per injection for upper limb spasticity was less for Dysport than for Botox in 18 (95% of the 19 countries (mean 17% less across countries. The difference was 20% or higher in nearly half (47% of the countries. Sensitivity analyses considering available "real-world" dosing showed consistent results, with Dysport being less costly than Botox in all 19 countries.Conclusion: Considering costs per patient per injection based on analysis of recommended dosages in the summary of product characteristics, Dysport remains cheaper than Botox in most countries. Thus, when extrapolated to a national level, substantial savings could be realized by using Dysport in the treatment of upper limb spasticity

  18. Botulinum Toxin to Improve Results in Cleft Lip Repair: A Double-Blinded, Randomized, Vehicle-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Shin; Wallace, Christopher Glenn; Hsiao, Yen-Chang; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting

    2014-01-01

    Background Most patients with facial scarring would value even a slight improvement in scar quality. Botulinum toxin A is widely used to alleviate facial dynamic rhytides but is also believed to improve scar quality by reducing wound tension during healing. The main objective was to assess the effect of Botulinum toxin on scars resultant from standardized upper lip wounds. Methods In this double-blinded, randomized, vehicle-controlled, prospective clinical trial, 60 consecutive consenting adults undergoing cleft lip scar revision (CLSR) surgery between July 2010 and March 2012 were randomized to receive botulinum toxin A (n = 30) or vehicle (normal saline; n = 30) injections into the subjacent orbicularis oris muscle immediately after wound closure. Scars were independently assessed at 6-months follow-up in blinded fashion using: Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and photographic plus ultrasound measurements of scar widths. Results 58 patients completed the trial. All scar assessment modalities revealed statistically significantly better scars in the experimental than the vehicle-control group. Conclusion Quality of surgical upper lip scars, which are oriented perpendicular to the direction of pull of the underlying orbicularis oris muscle, is significantly improved by its temporary paralysis during wound healing. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01429402 PMID:25541942

  19. Botulinum toxin to improve results in cleft lip repair: a double-blinded, randomized, vehicle-controlled clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Shin Chang

    Full Text Available Most patients with facial scarring would value even a slight improvement in scar quality. Botulinum toxin A is widely used to alleviate facial dynamic rhytides but is also believed to improve scar quality by reducing wound tension during healing. The main objective was to assess the effect of Botulinum toxin on scars resultant from standardized upper lip wounds.In this double-blinded, randomized, vehicle-controlled, prospective clinical trial, 60 consecutive consenting adults undergoing cleft lip scar revision (CLSR surgery between July 2010 and March 2012 were randomized to receive botulinum toxin A (n = 30 or vehicle (normal saline; n = 30 injections into the subjacent orbicularis oris muscle immediately after wound closure. Scars were independently assessed at 6-months follow-up in blinded fashion using: Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and photographic plus ultrasound measurements of scar widths.58 patients completed the trial. All scar assessment modalities revealed statistically significantly better scars in the experimental than the vehicle-control group.Quality of surgical upper lip scars, which are oriented perpendicular to the direction of pull of the underlying orbicularis oris muscle, is significantly improved by its temporary paralysis during wound healing.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01429402.

  20. Office-based Electromyography-guided Botulinum Toxin Injection to the Cricopharyngeus Muscle: Optimal Patient Selection and Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Su; Kim, Go-Woon; Rho, Young-Soo; Kwon, Kee-Hwan; Chung, Eun-Jae

    2017-05-01

    This retrospective study was carried out to investigate the effectiveness and safety of office-based electromyography-guided injection of botulinum toxin in the cricopharyngeus muscle of patients who did not show upper esophageal sphincter passage in a swallowing study in spite of maximal swallowing rehabilitation. Thirty-six patients who showed no or limited ability to oral feed after maximum swallowing rehabilitation were enrolled. Video fluoroscopic swallowing study, flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, disability rating scale, penetration aspiration score, and National Institutes of Health swallowing safety scale were used in the evaluation of dysphagia. Success was defined as nondependence on gastrostomy for patients who previously were dependent on gastrostomy and improvement in disability rating scale score after botulinum toxin injections. The total success rate was 63.9%. The complication rate was very low, with only 1 patient showing temporary unilateral vocal fold paralysis. Botulinum toxin injection was more effective in patients with cranial nerve IX or X palsy than in those without it ( P = .006). This procedure can be a simple, safe, and effective tool in patients with cricopharyngeal dysfunction after swallowing rehabilitation, especially for cranial nerve IX or X palsy.

  1. Yesterday and Today: The Impact of Research Conducted at Camp Detrick on Botulinum Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeda, Frank J; Adler, Michael; Dembek, Zygmunt F

    2018-02-06

    This review summarizes the research conducted on botulinum toxin (BoTx) from 1943 to 1956 by a small group of Camp Detrick investigators and their staff. A systematic, cross-disciplinary approach was used to develop effective vaccines against this biological warfare threat agent. In response to the potential need for medical countermeasures against BoTx during World War II, the refinement of isolation and purification techniques for BoTx successfully led to the large-scale production of botulinum toxoid vaccines. In addition, the work at Camp Detrick provided the foundation for the subsequent use of BoTx as a tool for studying the trophic regulation of skeletal muscle within motor neuron terminals and, more recently, for elucidation of the intricate details of neurotransmitter release at the molecular level. Indirectly, Camp Detrick investigators also played a significant role in studies that culminated in the use of BoTx as a pharmaceutical product that has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating movement disorders, autonomic dysfunctions, and other conditions. Online literature searches were performed with Google, Google Scholar, PubMed, the bibliography from the Camp Detrick technical library, and at the Defense Technical Information Center. Reference lists in some of the primary research publications and reviews also provided source material. Search terms included botulinum, botulinus, and Camp Detrick. References related to the subsequent impacts of the Camp Detrick results were selected and cited from reviews and primary references in the more recent literature. Notes on toxin nomenclature and potential sources of error in this study are presented. The literature searches returned 27 citations of Camp Detrick authors, 24 of which were articles in peer-reviewed journals. The publications by these investigators included several disciplines such as biochemistry, immunology, pharmacology, physiology, and toxicology. A fundamental

  2. Botulinum toxin A and physiotherapy intervention in the treatment of the painful shoulder after stroke: case report Toxina botulínica A e intervenção fisioterapêutica no tratamento do ombro doloroso pós acidente vascular cerebral: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suellen M. Marinho dos Santos Andrade

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of the painful shoulder is considered a common finding in patients who suffered stroke. Several therapeutic modalities are suggested for the improvement of the patients’ clinical condition. In this report, a case of syndrome of the painful shoulder will be discussed, whose treatment consisted of the use of botulinum toxin A associated to physiotherapy. After a four-month treatment, significant improvements occurred concerning pain, spasticity, range of motion and quality of life, suggesting that this therapeutic association is an efficient tool against the incapacitating effects related to this syndrome. A síndrome do ombro doloroso é considerada um achado comum em pacientes que sofreram acidente vascular cerebral. Várias modalidades terapêuticas são apontadas para melhoria do quadro clínico dos pacientes. Neste relato, será apresentado um caso de síndrome do ombro doloroso, cujo tratamento consistiu no emprego de toxina botulínica A associada à fisioterapia. Após quatro meses de tratamento, houve melhorias significativas quanto à dor, espasticidade, amplitude de movimento e qualidade de vida, e isso sugere ser essa associação terapêutica uma ferramenta eficaz contra os efeitos incapacitantes relacionados a esta síndrome.

  3. Effects of Botulinum Toxin-A and Goal-Directed Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy GMFCS Levels I & II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwing, Kristina; Thews, Karin; Haglund-Åkerlind, Yvonne; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate short and long-term effects of botulinum toxin-A combined with goal-directed physiotherapy in children with cerebral palsy (CP). A consecutive selection of 40 children, ages 4-12 years, diagnosed with unilateral or bilateral CP, and classified in GMFCS levels I-II. During the 24 months, 9 children received one BoNT-A injection, 10 children two injections, 11 children three injections, and 10 children received four injections. 3D gait analysis, goal-attainment scaling, and body function assessments were performed before and at 3, 12, and 24 months after initial injections. A significant but clinically small long-term improvement in gait was observed. Plantarflexor spasticity was reduced after three months and remained stable, while passive ankle dorsiflexion increased after 3 months but decreased slightly after 12 months. Goal-attainment gradually increased, reached the highest levels at 12 months, and levels were maintained at 24 months. The treatments' positive effect on spasticity reduction was identified, but did not relate to improvement in gait or goal-attainment. No long-term positive change in passive ankle dorsiflexion was observed. Goal attainment was achieved in all except four children. The clinical significance of the improved gait is unclear. Further studies are recommended to identify predictors for positive treatment outcome.

  4. The effects of Botulinum Toxin injection in an elite sportsman with Functional Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Myles; Charlesworth, Jonathon; Koh, Eamon

    2017-09-01

    Botulinum Toxin-A (BoNT-A) is an effective intervention for Functional Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome (FPAES) however, concerns with this intervention include reductions in strength and performance. This case presents an elite male athlete with FPAES who underwent BoNT-A injection and the results of testing before and after injection. The athlete experienced a decrease in strength and performance at one week post-injection however, he returned to baseline levels within four weeks. When comparing sprint distance during games, before and after injection, the athlete had an increase in his sprint distance per game post-injection. Finally on ultrasound he had visible medial gastrocnemius denervation atrophy with a decrease in arterial flow velocity at four weeks post-injection. BoNT-A may be an effective minimally invasive treatment option for FPAES however, athletes may experience a transient decrease in function following BoNT-A injection and consequently caution must be taken with regard to treatment timing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Analgesic Effect of Botulinum Toxin A in Myofascial Pain Syndrome Patients Previously Treated with Local Infiltration of Anesthetic and Steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena-Sevilla, Joaquín; García-Fernández, María R; Vicente-Villena, Juan P

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effect of botulinum toxin A (BoNTA) injections in patients with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) who were previously treated with the local infiltration of anesthetic and steroids (LIAS). The study included a retrospective phase and a longitudinal open-label prospective phase, which were conducted on consecutive patients with MPS previously treated with the local infiltration of anesthetic (levobupivacaíne 0.25%) and steroids (triamcinolone 40 mg). Eligible patients were treated with a single intramuscular injection of BoNTA (Botox; Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA). The treatment efficacy was determined according to the degree of pain relief obtained. Eighty-two patients met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were included in the study. Successful results were obtained for 32 (39.0%) and 30 (36.6%) patients, during treatment with BoNTA and LIAS, respectively. The mean (standard deviation) length of the analgesic effect was significantly longer with BoNTA (29.6 [SD = 17.7] weeks) than with LIAS (8.5 [SD = 6.4] weeks), P pain for a relatively long time.

  6. Toxina botulínica no tratamento de distonias faciais: avaliação da eficácia e da satisfação dos pacientes ao longo do tratamento Botulinum toxin in the treatment of facial dystonia: evaluation of its efficacy and patients' satisfaction along the treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Gravito Costa

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar a eficácia do tratamento com toxina botulínica nos pacientes com distonia facial e a satisfação com o tratamento ao longo do tempo. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo de 42 pacientes portadores de distonia facial acompanhados no setor de Plástica Ocular da Clínica Oftalmológica do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de São Paulo. RESULTADOS: Após as primeiras aplicações, 45,2% dos pacientes deram notas entre 9-10 para melhora do espasmo, 35,7% deram notas entre 7-8, 16,7% deram notas entre 5-6 e apenas um paciente deu nota 4. Em relação ao intervalo de reaparecimento do espasmo, 4,8% dos pacientes referiram entre 5-6 meses, 64,2% entre 3-4 meses e 31% entre 1-2 meses. Ao longo do tratamento, 76,1% dos pacientes referiram manter a mesma nota sobre a melhora do espasmo, 19,1% referiram melhora do resultado nas aplicações e apenas 4,8% referiram piora da eficácia nas aplicações atuais. Quanto ao tempo de retorno do espasmo após aplicação, 64,2% relataram não haver mudança ao longo do seguimento no serviço, 16,7% relataram aumento e 19,1% relataram diminuição do intervalo de remissão dos sintomas. Após aplicação, 19% dos pacientes apresentaram efeitos colaterais e 73,8% dos pacientes referiram desconforto apenas leve ou moderado em relação à aplicação. CONCLUSÕES: O uso da toxina botulínica foi eficaz e não houve alteração da eficácia ao longo do tempo. São poucos os efeitos colaterais e boa tolerância à administração. É boa alternativa para melhorar a qualidade de vida desses pacientes evitando a cegueira funcional causada por essas doenças.PURPOSE: To study the efficiency of botulinum toxin treatment in facial dystonia patients and their satisfaction along treatment. METHODS: Retrospective study of 42 facial dystonia cases followed at the Oculoplastic Surgery Department of the "Hospital das Clínicas" of the University of São Paulo. RESULTS: Following the first injections, 45.2% of

  7. Side effects and potential risk factors of botulinum toxin type A intramuscular injections in knee flexion contractures of hemophiliacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; De la Corte-Rodriguez, Hortensia

    2017-07-01

    Knee flexion contracture (KFC) is a common complication of recurrent hemarthrosis in children and young adults with hemophilia. If the KFC is not prevented (by means of primary prophylaxis) and treated properly and early (be means of physical medicine and rehabilitation), it will become fixed. Areas covered: The aim of this article is to review the potential role of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) intramuscular injections for the treatment of KFC in people with hemophilia (PWH). Expert commentary: Although two recent reports have mentioned the benefits of intramuscular injections of BTX-A in PWH with KFC, the data are still scant and too preliminary. The use of intramuscular injections of BTX-A in PWH today should not be recommended until more case studies/small series (ideally well-designed clinical trials) fully demonstrate that this is safe and effective. The risks of intramuscular injections to a hemophilia patient cannot be underestimated (iatrogenic muscle hematomas and pseudotumors). This paper calls the attention of hemophilia treaters on the potential risks of this apparently interesting technique. The current use of BTX-A intramuscular injections in KFC of PWH could make no sense. Raising false expectations in these patients should be avoided.

  8. Effects of botulinum toxin A therapy and multidisciplinary rehabilitation on upper and lower limb spasticity in post-stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takatoshi; Abo, Masahiro; Hara, Hiroyoshi; Kobayashi, Kazushige; Shimamoto, Yusuke; Samizo, Yuta; Sasaki, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Naoki; Niimi, Masachika

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of combined botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) and inpatient multidisciplinary (MD) rehabilitation therapy on the improvement of upper and lower limb function in post-stroke patients. In this retrospective study, a 12-day inpatient treatment protocol was implemented on 51 post-stroke patients with spasticity. Assessments were performed on the day of admission, at discharge, and at 3 months following discharge. At the time of discharge, all of the evaluated items showed a statistically significant improvement. Only the Functional Reach Test (FRT) showed a statistically significant improvement at 3 months. In subgroup analyses, the slowest walking speed group showed a significantly greater change ratio of the 10 Meter Walk Test relative to the other groups, from the time of admission to discharge. This group showed a greater FRT change ratio than the other groups from the time of admission to the 3-month follow-up. Inpatient combined therapy of simultaneous injections of BoNT-A to the upper and lower limbs and MD may improve motor function.

  9. Preoperative combination of progressive pneumoperitoneum and botulinum toxin type A in patients with loss of domain hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno-Lledó, José; Torregrosa, Antonio; Jiménez, Raquel; Pastor, Providencia García

    2018-02-15

    Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum (PPP) and botulinum toxin type A (BT) are tools in the surgical preparation of patients with loss of domain hernias (LODH). The aim of this paper is to report our experience with these preoperative techniques in 70 patients with LODH. Observational study of 70 consecutive patients with LODH was conducted between May 2010 and May 2016. Diameters of the hernia sac, incisional hernia (VIH), and abdominal cavity (VAC) volumes, and VIH/VAC ratio were measured before and after PPP and BT, using abdominal CT scan data. Combination of both techniques was performed when the VIH/VAC ratio was > 20%. Median insufflated volume of air for PPP was 8450 ± 3400 cc (4500-13,450), over a period of 11.3 ± 2.3 days (9-16). BT administration time was 38.1 ± 3.7 days (35-44). An average reduction of 16.6% of the VIH/VAC ratio after PPP and BT was obtained (p VIH/VAC ratio and hernia defect diameters, which constitutes a key factor in the treatment of LODH.

  10. Physical Therapy for an Adult with Chronic Stroke after Botulinum Toxin Injection for Spasticity: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, Chetan P.; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: In this case report, we describe the type and duration of a physical therapy and botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) intervention directed at lower limb spasticity and the gait and balance improvement in a patient post-stroke. Treatment of focal spasticity with BoNTA intramuscular injections combined with physical therapy is recommended by rehabilitation experts. However, the optimal type and duration of physical therapy intervention to optimize any functional gains that follow chemodenervation induced by BoNTA has not been established. Method: One individual with chronic stroke who received BoNTA injections for upper and lower extremity spasticity was included. Physical therapy intervention consisted of 45- to 60-min sessions twice weekly for 12 weeks, based on the Bobath–neurodevelopmental therapy approach, and an activity-based home program. Results: After BoNTA injections and physical therapy, the patient made clinically significant improvements in balance and gait speed and became more independent with his ambulation. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates that physical therapy after BoNTA injections can result in significant functional improvements for individuals with spasticity after chronic stroke that may not be possible with BoNTA injections alone. PMID:25931655

  11. Electrical Stimulation Following Botulinum Toxin A in Children With Spastic Diplegia: A Within-Participant Randomized Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudge, Anita; Harvey, Lisa A; Lancaster, Ann; Lowe, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether electrical stimulation (ES) following botulinum toxin A (BoNT/A) injection increases passive extensibility of the hamstring muscles in children with spastic diplegia. Six children undergoing bilateral BoNT/A injections to the hamstrings participated in this within-participant single blind randomized controlled trial. One leg of each child was randomised to the experimental condition and the other to the control condition. The experimental leg received daily stretch and ES to the hamstrings for 12 weeks, while the control leg received only daily stretch. The primary outcome was passive hamstring extensibility reflected by popliteal angle measured with a standardised torque. Secondary outcomes were two goniometric measures of popliteal angle using the Modified Tardieu Scale (R1 and R2), and parents' perceptions of treatment effectiveness. Outcomes were measured at baseline, 4 weeks, 12 weeks and 6 months. The mean between-group difference (95% CI) at 4 weeks was 2° (-2 to 5) for popliteal angle measured with a standardised torque, favouring the experimental leg. Tardieu results for R1 and R2 were 0° (-4 to 3) and 7° (0 to 14), respectively. ES does not improve passive extensibility of the hamstring muscles at 4 weeks over any possible effects of BoNT/A alone.

  12. Volume matters: the influence of different botulinum toxin-A dilutions for sialorrhea in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Evangelos; Evangelos, Anagnostou; Rentzos, Michael; Michael, Rentzos; Alexakis, Theodoros; Theodoros, Alexakis; Zouvelou, Vasiliki; Vasiliki, Zouvelou; Zambelis, Thomas; Thomas, Zambelis; Evdokimidis, Ioannis; Ioannis, Evdokimidis

    2013-02-01

    We aimed to determine the effect of different botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A) dilutions on the treatment efficacy and side effects for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) related sialorrhea. Ten patients were enrolled in the study. BTX-A dilution for Group A was 100 U in 1 ml of saline, whereas the dilution for Group B was 100 U in 2 ml of saline. Both groups received 20 U of BTX-A in each parotid gland, and assessments were made by means of the Drooling Impact Scale, items 1 and 3 of the ALS functional rating scale, and visual analog scales for drooling and swallowing function. Although both groups exhibited a similar improvement in drooling, Group B had a mild but significant deterioration in bulbar function that was not evident in Group A. These results suggest that BTX-A has a safer profile when reconstituted with 1 ml instead of 2 ml of saline. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Physical therapy for an adult with chronic stroke after botulinum toxin injection for spasticity: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Shannon; Phadke, Chetan P; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In this case report, we describe the type and duration of a physical therapy and botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) intervention directed at lower limb spasticity and the gait and balance improvement in a patient post-stroke. Treatment of focal spasticity with BoNTA intramuscular injections combined with physical therapy is recommended by rehabilitation experts. However, the optimal type and duration of physical therapy intervention to optimize any functional gains that follow chemodenervation induced by BoNTA has not been established. One individual with chronic stroke who received BoNTA injections for upper and lower extremity spasticity was included. Physical therapy intervention consisted of 45- to 60-min sessions twice weekly for 12 weeks, based on the Bobath-neurodevelopmental therapy approach, and an activity-based home program. After BoNTA injections and physical therapy, the patient made clinically significant improvements in balance and gait speed and became more independent with his ambulation. This case report demonstrates that physical therapy after BoNTA injections can result in significant functional improvements for individuals with spasticity after chronic stroke that may not be possible with BoNTA injections alone.

  14. Physical therapies as an adjunct to Botulinum toxin-A injection of the upper or lower limb in adults following neurological impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinnear Bianca Z

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spasticity of muscles is a common consequence of central nervous system impairment. Traditionally, neurological rehabilitation for spasticity has involved occupational and physical therapy; however, increasingly Botulinum toxin–A injections may be provided. Injection effects are temporary. Consequently, understanding the effect of adjunct physical therapies will help inform multimodal rehabilitation decisions. Presently, these effects are not known. This systematic review will identify and summarize evidence on physical therapies used after Botulinum toxin-A injection to improve motor function in adults with neurological impairments. Method Systematic searching of seven electronic databases will occur to identify relevant randomized trials. Available trial data will be extracted into a list of pre-defined primary outcomes, including range of movement, spasticity and functional limb use. Pre-defined secondary outcomes will also be reviewed where trials have these data available for reporting. Effects will be expressed as mean differences or standardized mean differences with 95% confidence intervals (CI. Where possible, comparable results will be meta-analyzed, and a summary of the available pool of evidence produced. All randomized controlled trials will be rated using the PEDro methodological quality scale. Where possible, study data will be meta-analyzed using RevMan 5 Software. The protocol was registered in PROSPERO international prosepective register of systematic reviews (PROSPERO 2011:CRD42011001491. Discussion Review results will be the most comprehensive answer available to the following question: Are physical therapies clinically effective after Botulinum toxin-A injections in adults with neurological spasticity? Results will inform healthcare providers and managers who determine who gets access to and provision of Botulinum toxin-A injection and whether this is done with or without physical therapies. Results

  15. Prospective, double-blind, randomized, parallel-group, dose-ranging study of botulinum toxin type A in men with glabellar rhytids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Alastair; Carruthers, Jean

    2005-10-01

    The effective dose for treating glabellar lines with botulinum toxin type A in men has not been studied adequately. To compare the safety, efficacy, and duration of response of four doses of botulinum toxin type A on glabellar rhytids in men. Eighty men were randomized to receive a total dose of either 20, 40, 60, or 80 U of botulinum toxin type A (BOTOX, BOTOX Cosmetic, or Vistabel, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) in the glabellar area. Glabellar lines were assessed at rest and maximum frown by a trained observer at baseline, 2 and 4 weeks, and monthly thereafter. Patients provided self-evaluations at the same visits. Adverse events were monitored throughout. The 40, 60, and 80 U doses of botulinum toxin type A were consistently more effective in reducing glabellar lines than the 20 U dose (duration, peak response rate, improvement from baseline). There was a dose-dependent increase in both the response rate at maximum frown and the duration of effect assessed by the trained observer. In addition, the participants reported a dose-dependent reduction in the ability to frown, improvement in their global assessment, and increased feelings of attractiveness, self-confidence, and satisfaction. The incidence of adverse events was not increased with higher doses. Male participants with glabellar rhytids benefit from starting doses of at least 40 U of botulinum toxin type A.

  16. Building-block architecture of botulinum toxin complex: Conformational changes provide insights into the hemagglutination ability of the complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Suzuki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum produces the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT. Previously, we provided evidence for the “building-block” model of botulinum toxin complex (TC. In this model, a single BoNT is associated with a single nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA, yielding M-TC; three HA-70 molecules are attached and form M-TC/HA-70, and one to three “arms” of the HA-33/HA-17 trimer (two HA-33 and one HA-17 further bind to M-TC/HA-70 via HA-17 and HA-70 binding, yielding one-, two-, and three-arm L-TC. Of all TCs, only the three-arm L-TC caused hemagglutination. In this study, we determined the solution structures for the botulinum TCs using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS. The mature three-arm L-TC exhibited the shape of a “bird spreading its wings”, in contrast to the model having three “arms”, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. SAXS images indicated that one of the three arms of the HA-33/HA-17 trimer bound to both HA-70 and BoNT. Taken together, these findings regarding the conformational changes in the building-block architecture of TC may explain why only three-arm L-TC exhibited hemagglutination.

  17. The use of Botulinum toxin-a injection for facial wrinkles: a histological and immunohistochemical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Domyati, Moetaz; Attia, Sameh K; El-Sawy, Ashraf E; Moftah, Noha H; Nasif, Ghada A; Medhat, Walid; Marwan, Belkais

    2015-06-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX)-A has been used for years in the reduction of facial wrinkles; however, histological and immunohistochemical changes after its use were not previously investigated. To evaluate histological and immunohistochemical changes after BTX-A injection for facial wrinkles, sixteen volunteers, with wrinkles on the upper third of the face, were subjected to single injection of BTX-A. Skin biopsy specimens were obtained from peri-orbital wrinkle site (crow's feet area) before and after 3 months of BTX-A injection. Using histological and immunohistochemical evaluation coupled with computerized morphometric analysis, measurement of epidermal thickness, wrinkle depth and width as well as quantitative evaluation of collagen types I and III and elastin was performed for skin biopsies. After BTX-A injections, there were significant increase in wrinkle width and granular layer thickness (P 0.05). However, collagen fibers showed better organization and orientation after BTX-A injection. The histological changes observed after BTX-A injection for facial wrinkles may help in better understanding of its mechanism of action. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A Pilot Study of Botulinum Toxin for Jerky, Position-Specific, Upper Limb Action Tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabish A. Saifee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: We aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin (BT injections for jerky action tremor of the upper limb.Methods: We performed an uncontrolled, prospective study of electromyography (EMG-guided BT injections for jerky, position-specific, upper limb action tremor. The primary outcome was clinical global impression at 3–6 weeks after baseline.Results: Eight patients with jerky, position-specific action tremor involving the upper limb were consecutively recruited. After a median follow-up of 4.4 weeks (interquartile range [IQR] 3.6–6 weeks, four of them rated themselves as "improved" and two as "much improved." Five of these six subjects reported improvements in specific activities of daily living (bringing liquids to mouth, feeding, shaving, and dressing. Upper limb subscore of the Fahn–Tolosa–Marin Tremor Rating Scale (FTM significantly decreased from 4.5 (4–6 to 3 (2–5 (p = 0.01.Discussion: This pilot, prospective cohort study suggests that EMG-guided BT injections may improve jerky, position-specific, upper limb action tremor. Placebo-controlled studies evaluating larger samples of patients are warranted to confirm these findings.

  19. YouTube Videos on Botulinum Toxin A for Wrinkles: A Useful Resource for Patient Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Katharine; Doong, Judy; Trang, Trinh; Joo, Sarah; Chien, Anna L

    2017-09-01

    Patients interested in botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) for wrinkles search for videos on YouTube, but little is known about the quality and reliability of the content. The authors examined the quality, reliability, content, and target audience of YouTube videos on BTX for wrinkles. In this cross-sectional study, the term "Botox" was searched on YouTube. Sixty relevant videos in English were independently categorized by 2 reviewers as useful informational, misleading informational, useful patient view, or misleading patient view. Disagreements were settled by a third reviewer. Videos were rated on the Global Quality Scale (GQS) (1 = poor, 5 = excellent). Sixty-three percent of the BTX YouTube videos were useful informational (GQS = 4.4 ± 0.7), 33% as useful patient view (GQS = 3.21 ± 1.2), 2% as misleading informational (GQS = 1), and 2% as misleading patient view (GQS = 2.5). The large number of useful videos, high reliability, and the wide range of content covered suggests that those who search for antiwrinkle BTX videos on YouTube are likely to view high-quality content. This suggests that YouTube may be a good source of videos to recommend for patients interested in BTX.

  20. Botulinum toxin therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y-W; Chiu, Y-W; Chen, C-Y; Chuang, S-K

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to undertake a systematic review to assess the efficacy of botulinum toxin therapy (BTX) for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs). A comprehensive search of major databases through PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL was conducted to locate all relevant articles published from inception to October 2014. Eligible studies were selected based on inclusion criteria and included English language, peer-reviewed publications of randomized controlled trials comparing BTX versus any alternative intervention or placebo. Quality assessment and data extraction were done according to the Cochrane risk of bias tool and recommendations. The entire systematic search and selection process was done independently by two reviewers. Five relevant study trials were identified, involving 117 participants. Two trials revealed a significant between-group difference in myofascial pain reduction, another trial that compared BTX with fascial manipulation showed equal efficacy of pain relief on TMDs, while the remaining two trials showed no significant difference between the BTX and placebo groups. Because of considerable variations in study methods and evaluation of results, a meta-analysis could not be performed. Based on this review, no consensus could be reached on the therapeutic benefits of BTX on TMDs. A more rigorous design of trials should be carried out in future studies. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy and Safety of a New Botulinum Toxin Type A Free of Complexing Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Mi Oh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available MT10107 is botulinum neurotoxin type A derived drug which utilizes the 150 kDa portion without complexing proteins and human serum albumin contents. To evaluate the efficacy and the safety of MT10107, it was compared with onabotulinumtoxinA in this double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Twenty-five healthy males received a randomly selected dose of MT10107 into the extensor digitorum brevis (EDB muscle of one foot, and an equivalent dose of onabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX was injected into the contralateral EDB muscle. While efficacy of the administered substance was determined by measuring paretic effects on the EDB, the local spread of toxin effects was evaluated by the paretic effects on the nearby abductor hallucis (AH and abductor digiti quinti (ADQ muscles. Paretic effects were defined as the percentage of reduction of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitudes, measured at 14, 30, 90 days after the injection, compared to the baseline value. Intergroup (MT10107 and onabotulinumtoxinA differences were not significant in the percentage reduction of the amplitudes in the EDB muscles. In this study, there was no significant difference in efficacy and safety between the two test drugs. MT10107 may be effective and safe as much as onabotulinumtoxinA to produce the desired paretic effect.

  2. Changes in masticatory function after injection of botulinum toxin type A to masticatory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H U; Kim, B I; Kang, S M; Kim, S T; Choi, J H; Ahn, H J

    2013-12-01

    This study examined changes in masticatory function after botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injection using objective and subjective tests during 12 weeks. Also, we compared differences in masticatory function between group in which only masseter muscle (M group) was injected and group in which masseter and temporal muscle (M-T group) were injected. Forty subjects were assigned into two groups; M group (n = 20) and the M-T group (n = 20). The Meditoxin(®) was used as BTX-A injection. The mixing ability index (MAI) was used as the objective indicator, and visual analogue scale (VAS) and food intake ability (FIA) index were used as subjective indicators. Overall, the masticatory function drastically declined after 4 weeks and gradually recovered with time. Compared with the pre-injection state, the masticatory function decreased by 89·2% (MAI), 12·2% (FIA) and 32·2% (VAS) 4 weeks after the injection (P masticatory function was significantly decreased after BTX-A injection into the masticatory muscle after 4 and 8 weeks from injection. However, masticatory efficiency measured using MAI could completely recover after 12 weeks. Furthermore, after 8 weeks from the injection, the masticatory function measured after injection into only the masseter muscle was similar to that measured after injection into both masseter and temporal muscle. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Long-term tremor therapy for Parkinson and essential tremor with sensor-guided botulinum toxin type A injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samotus, Olivia; Lee, Jack; Jog, Mandar

    2017-01-01

    Current pharmacological agents used to treat Parkinson disease (PD) tremor and essential tremor (ET) provide suboptimal benefit and are commonly associated with significant adverse effects. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been shown to be effective for wrist tremor though functionally bothersome muscle weakness frequently occurs. This is the longest study to date demonstrating that BoNT-A therapy coupled with kinematic guidance can provide efficacious outcomes for upper limb tremor with minimized unwanted weakness. A total of 28 PD and 24 ET participants with bothersome, disabling tremor, received six serial BoNT-A treatments every 16 weeks starting at week 0 with a follow-up visit 6 weeks following a treatment, totaling 96 weeks. Clinical scales, including Fahn-Tolosa-Marin tremor rating scale (FTM), and sensor-based tremor assessments were conducted at each visit. Kinematics was utilized to identify which arm muscles contributed to the tremulous movements and the experienced injector used clinical expertise in determining BoNT-A dosages. Following BoNT-A treatment, clinical ratings of tremor severity and functional ability (FTM) showed significant improvements following the first treatment which was maintained up to week 96 in PD and ET. Kinematics detected a significant reduction in PD and ET tremor amplitudes by 70% and 76% over the treatment course, respectively. By objectively distinguishing tremulous muscles and tremor severity, adverse effects were limited to mild perceived weakness by participants in injected muscles during follow-ups. Following the fourth treatment, BoNT-A dosages in flexor and extensor wrist muscles and biceps were reduced for those experiencing residual weakness which ultimately did not interfere with tremor relief or arm function. Kinematics is an objective method that can aid clinicians in assessing and determining optimal BoNT-A parameters to alleviate both PD and ET tremor. BoNT-A injections are tolerable and effective when

  4. Comparison of the efficacies of botulinum toxin A and Johnstone pressure splints against hip adductor spasticity among patients with cerebral palsy: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazneci, Bulent; Tan, Arif Kenan; Guncikan, Mustafa Nuri; Dincer, Kemal; Kalyon, Tunc Alp

    2006-07-01

    The goal was to compare the efficacies of botulinum toxin A (BTX) treatment and Johnstone pressure splint (JPS) treatment against hip adductor muscle spasticity among children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. For each patient in the BTX group, a total of 300 IU of BTX was injected into adductor and medial hamstring muscle groups. In the JPS group, long leg JPS were administered for 30 minutes 3 days per week. Bobath neurodevelopmental exercises were administered to both groups 3 days per week during the study period. All cases were assessed by using gross motor function measurements, passive hip abduction goniometric measurements, modified Ashworth Scale scores, and measurements of the distance between the knees as indicator variables. We found that there was statistically significant improvement in all indicators for both groups. BTX treatment