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Sample records for bottom lithospheric study

  1. Bottom to top lithosphere structure and evolution of western Eger Rift (Central Europe)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babuška, Vladislav; Fiala, Jiří; Plomerová, Jaroslava

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 4 (2010), s. 891-907 ISSN 1437-3254 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/07/1088; GA AV ČR IAA300120709 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515; CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : western Bohemian Massif * Eger (Ohře) Rift * lithosphere structure and development * mantle seismic anisotropy Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.980, year: 2010

  2. Thickness of the oceanic crust, the lithosphere, and the mantle transition zone in the vicinity of the Tristan da Cunha hot spot estimated from ocean-bottom and ocean-island seismometer receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Wolfram H.; Jokat, Wilfried; Jegen, Marion; Baba, Kiyoshi

    2017-10-01

    The most prominent hotspot in the South Atlantic is Tristan da Cunha, which is widely considered to be underlain by a mantle plume. But the existence, location and size of this mantle plume have not been established due to the lack of regional geophysical observations. A passive seismic experiment using ocean bottom seismometers aims to investigate the lithosphere and upper mantle structure beneath the hotspot. Using the Ps receiver function method we calculate a thickness of 5 to 8 km for the oceanic crust at 17 ocean-bottom stations deployed around the islands. Within the errors of the method the thickness of the oceanic crust is very close to the global mean. The Tristan hotspot seems to have contributed little additional magmatic material or heat to the melting zone at the mid-oceanic ridge, which could be detected as thickened oceanic crust. Magmatic activity on the archipelago and surrounding seamounts seems to have only affected the crustal thickness locally. Furthermore, we imaged the mantle transition zone discontinuities by analysing receiver functions at the permanent seismological station TRIS and surrounding OBS stations. Our observations provide evidence for a thickened (cold) mantle transition zone west and northwest of the islands, which excludes the presence of a deep-reaching mantle plume. We have some indications of a thinned, hot mantle transition zone south of Tristan da Cunha inferred from sparse and noisy observations, which might indicate the location of a Tristan mantle plume at mid-mantle depths. Sp receiver functions image the base of lithosphere at about 60 to 75 km beneath the islands, which argues for a compositionally controlled seismological lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary beneath the study area.

  3. Pipeline bottoming cycle study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of applying bottoming cycles to the prime movers that drive the compressors of natural gas pipelines was studied. These bottoming cycles convert some of the waste heat from the exhaust gas of the prime movers into shaft power and conserve gas. Three typical compressor station sites were selected, each on a different pipeline. Although the prime movers were different, they were similar enough in exhaust gas flow rate and temperature that a single bottoming cycle system could be designed, with some modifications, for all three sites. Preliminary design included selection of the bottoming cycle working fluid, optimization of the cycle, and design of the components, such as turbine, vapor generator and condensers. Installation drawings were made and hardware and installation costs were estimated. The results of the economic assessment of retrofitting bottoming cycle systems on the three selected sites indicated that profitability was strongly dependent upon the site-specific installation costs, how the energy was used and the yearly utilization of the apparatus. The study indicated that the bottoming cycles are a competitive investment alternative for certain applications for the pipeline industry. Bottoming cycles are technically feasible. It was concluded that proper design and operating practices would reduce the environmental and safety hazards to acceptable levels. The amount of gas that could be saved through the year 2000 by the adoption of bottoming cycles for two different supply projections was estimated as from 0.296 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a low supply projection to 0.734 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a high supply projection. The potential market for bottoming cycle equipment for the two supply projections varied from 170 to 500 units of varying size. Finally, a demonstration program plan was developed.

  4. Lithospheric processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldridge, W. [and others

    2000-12-01

    The authors used geophysical, geochemical, and numerical modeling to study selected problems related to Earth's lithosphere. We interpreted seismic waves to better characterize the thickness and properties of the crust and lithosphere. In the southwestern US and Tien Shari, crust of high elevation is dynamically supported above buoyant mantle. In California, mineral fabric in the mantle correlate with regional strain history. Although plumes of buoyant mantle may explain surface deformation and magmatism, our geochemical work does not support this mechanism for Iberia. Generation and ascent of magmas remains puzzling. Our work in Hawaii constrains the residence of magma beneath Hualalai to be a few hundred to about 1000 years. In the crust, heat drives fluid and mass transport. Numerical modeling yielded robust and accurate predictions of these processes. This work is important fundamental science, and applies to mitigation of volcanic and earthquake hazards, Test Ban Treaties, nuclear waste storage, environmental remediation, and hydrothermal energy.

  5. Hydrocarbons in the Bay of Bengal and Central Indian Basin bottom sediments: Indicators of geochemical processes in the lithosphere

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chernova, T.G.; Paropkari, A.L.; Pikovskii, Yu.I.; Alekseeva, T.A.

    A study on the bulk distributions and molecular structures of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in organic matter of the sediments from the Bay of Bengal and the Eastern and Central Indian Basins was underdaken. The former two...

  6. Effect of the lithospheric thermal state on the Moho interface: A case study in South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherbandi, Mohammad; Bai, Yongliang; Sjöberg, Lars E.; Tenzer, Robert; Abrehdary, Majid; Miranda, Silvia; Alcacer Sanchez, Juan M.

    2017-07-01

    Gravimetric methods applied for Moho recovery in areas with sparse and irregular distribution of seismic data often assume only a constant crustal density. Results of latest studies, however, indicate that corrections for crustal density heterogeneities could improve the gravimetric result, especially in regions with a complex geologic/tectonic structure. Moreover, the isostatic mass balance reflects also the density structure within the lithosphere. The gravimetric methods should therefore incorporate an additional correction for the lithospheric mantle as well as deeper mantle density heterogeneities. Following this principle, we solve the Vening Meinesz-Moritz (VMM) inverse problem of isostasy constrained by seismic data to determine the Moho depth of the South American tectonic plate including surrounding oceans, while taking into consideration the crustal and mantle density heterogeneities. Our numerical result confirms that contribution of sediments significantly modifies the estimation of the Moho geometry especially along the continental margins with large sediment deposits. To account for the mantle density heterogeneities we develop and apply a method in order to correct the Moho geometry for the contribution of the lithospheric thermal state (i.e., the lithospheric thermal-pressure correction). In addition, the misfit between the isostatic and seismic Moho models, attributed mainly to deep mantle density heterogeneities and other geophysical phenomena, is corrected for by applying the non-isostatic correction. The results reveal that the application of the lithospheric thermal-pressure correction improves the RMS fit of the VMM gravimetric Moho solution to the CRUST1.0 (improves ∼ 1.9 km) and GEMMA (∼1.1 km) models and the point-wise seismic data (∼0.7 km) in South America.

  7. Introduction of sub-lithospheric component into melted lithospheric base by propagating crack: Case study of migrated Quaternary volcanoes in Wudalianchi, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvashova, Irina; Sun, Yi-min

    2016-04-01

    From a long-lasted discussion on origin of mantle magmatism (i.e. Foulger, 2010), it follows that magmatic sources might belong to: (1) a plume, starting from the lower thermal boundary layer of the mantle, (2) a counterflow from the lower mantle after an avalanche of slab material from the transition layer, (3) a melting anomaly of a domain that extends above the transition layer at depths of 200-410 km, (4) a melting anomaly of a domain that occurs beneath the lithosphere at depths of 50-200 km, (5) a melting anomaly of the lithospheric base, activated due to its extension, and (6) a melting anomaly of the crust-mantle boundary originated through delamination of an orogenic root in compressional conditions. In this study, we present geological and geochemical evidence on the Quaternary volcanism related to the shallow melting anomaly at the lithospheric base. Eruptions of potassic liquids at the northern terminus of the Songliao basin, subsided from the Middle Jurassic to Paleogene, are limited to the Wudalianchi zone that is exhibited by the 230-km long north-south chain of late Cenozoic volcanic fields: Erkeshan - Wudalianchi - Keluo - Xiaogulihe. Contemporaneous eruptions of potassic-sodic melts are distributed at the western and eastern flanks of this zone, in the Nuominhe and Wuyiling volcanic fields, respectively. The melting anomaly is marked by local decreasing S-wave velocities at a depth of 100 km (Rasskazov et al., 2014). Lithospheric control of the potassic volcanism is emphasized by decreasing thickness of the crust up to 33.5 km (Wang, Chen, 2005). In the Wudalianchi field, volcanism commenced at ca. 2.3 Ma and episodically rejuvenated until AD1720-1721 (Guide book ..., 2010). From comparative geochemical study of volcanic rocks from the Wudalianchi zone and Nuominhe volcanic field, the volcanism was examined to be provided by melting of the heterogeneous lithospheric base, material of which was mixed with a common sub-lithospheric component. Due to

  8. Lithospheric mantle deformation in the Yerer-Tullu Wellel Volcanotectonic Lineament: A study of peridotite xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trestrail, K. R.; Rooney, T. O.

    2014-12-01

    Although a great deal is known about crustal extensional processes in the East African Rift System (EARS), questions remain as to the impact of extension on the continental lithospheric mantle. The northernmost portion of the EARS is the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER), which is divided into three sectors: the Northern, (NMER), Central (CMER), and the Southern Main Ethiopian Rift (SMER). The NMER-CMER transition coincides with the Yerer-Tullu Wellel volcanotectonic lineament (YTVL), and may represent a terrain boundary along which extension was directed during the Cenozoic. Here we present petrographic data from peridotite xenoliths contained within ~6 Ma lavas recovered along the western portion of the YTVL near Nekempte, Ethiopia to examine the characteristics of the lithospheric mantle, and how peridotite has responded to extensional strain. Our preliminary results show that the Nekempte xenoliths are deformed spinel-bearing lherzolites, which previous studies have constrained to the spinel lherzolites field at 1.1 GPa in the lithospheric mantle. Petrographic examination of these xenoliths reveals two generations of crystals. These generations are defined by both size and texture; the first generation (coarse crystals) being up to 4 mm in diameter and the second generation (fine crystals) being less than 1 mm in diameter. The samples contain two generations of olivine (Ol I and Ol II) and orthopyroxene (Opx I and Opx II), one generation of clinopyroxene (Cpx I), spinel (Spl I), amphibole (Amp), and many fluid inclusion trails. We compare these xenoliths to samples from Injibara, Lake Tana Province, approximately 200 km north of Nekempte on the Ethiopian Plateau, a region with less focused extensional strain. Xenoliths from Injibara are also spinel-bearing lherzolites, however they exhibit less strain and metasomatic textures in comparison to xenoliths from along the YTVL. Based on the petrographic and textural analyses performed, we propose that the larger scale

  9. Lithospheric Stress Tensor from Gravity and Lithospheric Structure Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshagh, Mehdi; Tenzer, Robert

    2017-07-01

    In this study we investigate the lithospheric stresses computed from the gravity and lithospheric structure models. The functional relation between the lithospheric stress tensor and the gravity field parameters is formulated based on solving the boundary-value problem of elasticity in order to determine the propagation of stresses inside the lithosphere, while assuming the horizontal shear stress components (computed at the base of the lithosphere) as lower boundary values for solving this problem. We further suppress the signature of global mantle flow in the stress spectrum by subtracting the long-wavelength harmonics (below the degree of 13). This numerical scheme is applied to compute the normal and shear stress tensor components globally at the Moho interface. The results reveal that most of the lithospheric stresses are accumulated along active convergent tectonic margins of oceanic subductions and along continent-to-continent tectonic plate collisions. These results indicate that, aside from a frictional drag caused by mantle convection, the largest stresses within the lithosphere are induced by subduction slab pull forces on the side of subducted lithosphere, which are coupled by slightly less pronounced stresses (on the side of overriding lithospheric plate) possibly attributed to trench suction. Our results also show the presence of (intra-plate) lithospheric loading stresses along Hawaii islands. The signature of ridge push (along divergent tectonic margins) and basal shear traction resistive forces is not clearly manifested at the investigated stress spectrum (between the degrees from 13 to 180).

  10. Nodule bottom backscattering study using multibeam echosounder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Raju, Y; Nair, R.R.

    A study is carried out to observe the angular dependence of backscattering strength at nodule area where grab sample and photographic data is available. Theoretical study along with the experimentally observed data shows that the backscattering...

  11. Water and Metasomatism in the Slave Cratonic Lithosphere (Canada): An FTIR Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, McKensie; Peslier, Anne H.; Brandon, Alan D.; Schaffer, Lillian Aurora; Pearson, D. Graham; O'Reilly, Suzanne Yvette; Kopylova, Maya G.; Griffin, William L.

    2017-01-01

    Water in the mantle influences melting, viscosity, seismic velocity, and electrical conductivity. The role played by water in the long-term stabilization of cratonic roots is currently being debated. This study focuses on water contents of mantle minerals (olivine, pyroxene and garnet) from xenoliths found in kimberlites of the Archean Slave craton. 19 mantle xenoliths from central Lac de Gras, and 10 from northern Jericho were analyzed by FTIR for water, and their equilibration depths span the several compositional layers identified beneath the region. At both locations, the shallow peridotites have lower water contents in their olivines (11-30 ppm H2O) than those from the deeper layers (28-300 ppm H2O). The driest olivines, however, are not at the base of the cratonic lithosphere (>6 GPa) as in the Kaapvaal craton. Instead, the deepest olivines are hydrous (31-72 ppm H2O at Lac de Gras and 275 ppm H2O at Jericho). Correlations of water in clinopyroxene and garnet with their other trace element contents are consistent with water being added by metasomatism by melts resembling kimberlite precursors in the mantle approx.0.35 Ga ago beneath Lac de Gras. The northern Jericho xenoliths are derived from a region of the Slave craton that is even more chemically stratified, and was affected at depth by the 1.27 Ga Mackenzie igneous events. Metasomatism at Jericho may be responsible for the particularly high olivine water contents (up to 300 ppm H2O) compared to those at Lac de Gras, which will be investigated by acquiring trace-element data on these xenoliths. These data indicate that several episodes of metasomatic rehydration occurred in the deep part of the Slave craton mantle lithosphere, with the process being more intense in the northern part beneath Jericho, likely related to a translithospheric suture serving as a channel to introduce fluids and/or melts in the northern region. Consequently, rehydration of the lithosphere does not necessarily cause cratonic root

  12. The continental lithosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina

    2009-01-01

    of the Royal Society of London. Series A, 360, 2475–2491.; Shapiro N.M., Ritzwoller M.H. 2002. Monte-Carlo inversion for a global shear velocity model of the crust and upper mantle. Geophysical Journal International 151, 1–18.] and lithospheric temperatures [Artemieva I.M., Mooney W.D., 2001. Thermal structure......The goal of the present study is to extract non-thermal signal from seismic tomography models in order to distinguish compositional variations in the continental lithosphere and to examine if geochemical and petrologic constraints on global-scale compositional variations in the mantle...... are consistent with modern geophysical data. In the lithospheric mantle of the continents, seismic velocity variations of a non-thermal origin (calculated from global Vs seismic tomography data [Grand S.P., 2002. Mantle shear-wave tomography and the fate of subducted slabs. Philosophical Transactions...

  13. Lateral heterogeneity and vertical stratification of cratonic lithospheric keels: a case study of the Siberian craton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina; Cherepanova, Yulia; Herceg, Matija

    2014-01-01

    We present geophysical models for the lithospheric mantle of the Siberian craton, with focus on its structureand thermo-compositional heterogeneity as constrained by various geophysical data. The latter include thermalstructure of the lithosphere based on surface heat flow data and supported...... constrained independently by free-board and satellite gravityshows significant lateral variations, that are well correlated with crustal structure, surface tectonics, and regionalxenolith data. Proterozoic sutures and intracratonic basins are manifested by an increase in mantle density as comparedto light...... and lateralheterogeneity of the cratonic lithospheric mantle, with a pronounced stratification in many Precambrian terranes.We discuss lateral and vertical heterogeneity of the cratonic lithosphere discussed in connection to regionaltectono-thermal evolution....

  14. Shear-wave velocity structure of young Atlantic Lithosphere from dispersion analysis and waveform modelling of Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grevemeyer, Ingo; Lange, Dietrich; Schippkus, Sven

    2016-04-01

    The lithosphere is the outermost solid layer of the Earth and includes the brittle curst and brittle uppermost mantle. It is underlain by the asthenosphere, the weaker and hotter portion of the mantle. The boundary between the brittle lithosphere and the asthenosphere is call the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, or LAB. The oceanic lithosphere is created at spreading ridges and cools and thickens with age. Seismologists define the LAB by the presence of a low shear wave velocity zone beneath a high velocity lid. Surface waves from earthquakes occurring in young oceanic lithosphere should sample lithospheric structure when being recorded in the vicinity of a mid-ocean ridge. Here, we study group velocity and dispersion of Rayleigh waves caused by earthquakes occurring at transform faults in the Central Atlantic Ocean. Earthquakes were recorded either by a network of wide-band (up to 60 s) ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) deployed at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 15°N or at the Global Seismic Network (GSN) Station ASCN on Ascension Island. Surface waves sampling young Atlantic lithosphere indicate systematic age-dependent changes of group velocities and dispersion of Rayleigh waves. With increasing plate age maximum group velocity increases (as a function of period), indicating cooling and thickening of the lithosphere. Shear wave velocity is derived inverting the observed dispersion of Rayleigh waves. Further, models derived from the OBS records were refined using waveform modelling of vertical component broadband data at periods of 15 to 40 seconds, constraining the velocity structure of the uppermost 100 km and hence in the depth interval of the mantle where lithospheric cooling is most evident. Waveform modelling supports that the thickness of lithosphere increases with age and that velocities in the lithosphere increase, too.

  15. A seismic tomography study of lithospheric structure under the Norwegian Caledonides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejrani, Babak; Jacobsen, B. H.; Balling, N.

    2012-01-01

    towards the north along the Caledonian Mountains or not? For this purpose we present new results of relative P-wave tomography for the northern SCANLIPS (SCANdinavia Lithosphere ProfileS) profile across the northern part of the Caledonides combined with data from permanent seismological stations...

  16. Lithospheric structure across the California Continental Borderland from receiver functions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reeves, Zachary; Lekić, Vedran; Schmerr, Nicholas; Kohler, Monica; Weeraratne, Dayanthie

    2015-01-01

    .... We map variations in present‐day lithospheric structure across the region using Ps and Sp receiver functions at permanent stations of the Southern California Seismic Network as well as ocean bottom seismometer (OBS...

  17. Obtaining Interpretable Receiver Functions to Study Lithospheric Structure in the Central US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, E. E.; Frassetto, A.; Lekic, V.

    2012-12-01

    Dense station coverage provided by the EarthScope USArray-Transportable Array in the central United States represents an unprecedented opportunity for imaging the crustal and lithospheric structure of relatively stable plate interiors. Conversions of teleseismic compressional (P) to shear (S) waves - and vice-versa - across velocity contrasts within the lithosphere can be detected and modeled using the receiver function (RF) approach. This method has been used to map variations in crustal and lithospheric thickness across the western US with great success. However, unconsolidated sediments characteristic of much of the central US present a technical challenge to both constructing and interpreting receiver functions. We undertake a systematic investigation of the data selection and analysis techniques used in constructing P-to-S and S-to-P receiver functions. We start by comparing results obtained from manual vs. automatic [1] data selection, and find automatic picking with loose selection criteria to outperform manual data selection. We interpret this finding to mean that even very noisy data contains structural information that can be enhanced through stacking, and that strict data selection can discard much of this information. We proceed to compare results obtained using iterative time-domain deconvolution [3] against those from damped simultaneous frequency-domain deconvolution [2]. While both methods seem to perform well for P-to-S receiver functions, frequency domain deconvolution produces much higher quality results for S-to-P. We also find that varying damping can suppress or accentuate the phase associated with an intra-lithospheric velocity drop, suggesting that the mid-lithospheric discontinuity may have a gradational character. In order to investigate the effects of station geology on receiver function quality and interpretability, we focus on the ancient Proterozoic and seismically active Reelfoot rift. We compare the results obtained for permanent

  18. Studying the structural features of the lithospheric magnetic and gravity fields with the use of parallel algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyshko, P. S.; Fedorova, N. V.; Akimova, E. N.; Gemaidinov, D. V.

    2014-07-01

    We describe the parallel algorithms for studying the structural features of the anomalies in the gravity and magnetic fields of the lithosphere, which are based on the height transformations of the data. The algorithms are numerically implemented on the Uran supercomputer. The suggested computer technology is used for constructing the maps of the regional and local anomalies of the magnetic and gravity fields for the northeastern sector of Europe within an area confined between 48°-62° E and 60°-68° N.

  19. Recovering lateral variations in lithospheric strength from bedrock motion data using a coupled ice sheet-lithosphere model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berg, J. van den; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Oerlemans, J

    2006-01-01

    A vertically integrated two-dimensional ice flow model was coupled to an elastic lithosphere-Earth model to study the effects of lateral variations in lithospheric strength on local bedrock adjustment...

  20. A Review of Recent Developments in the Study of Regional Lithospheric Electrical Structure of the Asian Continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Letian

    2017-09-01

    The Asian continent was formed through the amalgamation of several major continental blocks that were formerly separated by the Paleo-Asian and Tethyan Oceans. During this process, the Asian continent underwent a long period of continental crustal growth and tectonic deformation, making it the largest and youngest continent on Earth. This paper presents a review of the application of geophysical electromagnetic methods, mainly the magnetotelluric (MT) method, in recent investigations of the diverse tectonic features across the Asian continent. The case studies cover the major continental blocks of Asia, the Central Asian orogenic system, the Tethyan orogenic system, as well as the western Pacific subduction system. In summary, most of the major continental blocks of Asia exhibit a three-layer structure with a resistive upper crust and upper mantle and a relatively conductive mid-lower crust. Large-scale conductors in the upper mantle were interpreted as an indication of lithospheric modification at the craton margins. The electrical structure of the Central Asian orogenic system is generally more resistive than the bordering continental blocks, whereas the Tethyan orogenic system displays more conductive, with pervasive conductors in the lower crust and upper mantle. The western Pacific subduction system shows increasing complexity in its electrical structure from its northern extent to its southern extent. In general, the following areas of the Asian continent have increasingly conductive lithospheric electrical structures, which correspond to a transition from the most stable areas to the most active tectonic areas of Asia: the major continental blocks, the accretionary Central Asian orogenic system, the collisional Tethyan orogenic system, and the western Pacific subduction system. As a key part of this review, a three-dimensional (3-D) model of the lithospheric electrical structure of a large portion of the Tibetan Plateau is presented and discussed in detail

  1. Estimating lithospheric properties at Atla Regio, Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Roger J.

    1994-01-01

    Magellan spehrical harmonic gravity and topography models are used to estimate lithospheric properties at Alta Regio, Venus, a proposed hotspot with dynamic support from mantle plume(s). Global spherical harmonic and local representations of the gravity field share common properties in the Atla region interms of their spectral behavior over a wavelength band from approximately 2100 to approximately 700 km. The estimated free-air admittance spectrum displays a rather featureless long-wavelength portion followed by a sharp rise at wavelengths shorter than about 1000 km. This sharp rise requires significant flexural support of short-wavelength structures. The Bouguer coherence also displays a sharp drop in this wavelength band, indicating a finite flexural rigidity of the lithosphere. A simple model for lithospheric loading from above and below is introduced (D. W. Forsyth, 1985) with four parameters: f, the ratio of bottom loading to top loading; z(sub m), crustal thickness; z(sub l) depth to bottom loading source; and T(sub e) elastic lithosphere thickness. A dual-mode compensation model is introduced in which the shorter wavelengths (lambda approximately less than 1000 km) might be explained best by a predominance of top loading by the large shield volcanoes Maat Mons, Ozza Mons, and Sapas Mons, and the longer wavelengths (lambda approximately greater than 1500 km) might be explained best by a deep depth of compensation, possibly representing bottom loading by a dynamic source. A Monte Carlo inversion technique is introduced to thoroughly search out the four-space of the model parameters and to examine parameter correlation in the solutions. Venus either is a considerabe deficient in heat sources relative to Earth, or the thermal lithosphere is overthickened in response to an earlier episode of significant heat loss from the planet.

  2. A Study on the Environmental Standard of Sediment on the Bottom of the Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Yoo, Hye Jin [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    Sediment on the bottom of the water has been considered one of the water pollutants in the environmental management of Korea so treated as a management on pollutants, as you can see the examples in the dragging operation in the polluted sea area. To healthily maintain and conserve the water ecosystem including bottom living things in the water, sediment on the bottom of the water should be recognized as the independent medium, which should maintain the certain quality like the water, the atmosphere, and soil, rather than the source of water pollution. Such recognition means that the management of sediment on the bottom of the water should change the fragmentary goal, centered the post management focusing on the water management, to the ecosystematic goal including the bottom living things. In a point of the view, this study has a great significance to suggest not only the final goal for the management of sediment on the bottom of the water but also the necessity of developing the environmental standard of the sediment on the bottom of the water, which is a standard of the management or judgment in the actual managing the sediment on the bottom of the water - an estimation on the pollution of sediment, a removal of the polluted sediment, a purification of sediment, and an abandonment of the dragged sediment -, and the development measures. Considering the situation that even the basic scheme related to the management of sediment is not prepared in the Government level, the concept of the environmental standard of sediment, the foreign example of the environmental standard of sediment, the current state of the domestic sediment pollution, and the development scheme of the environmental standard in this study must be the important foundation to establish the management system of sediment in the Government level. 121 refs., 10 figs., 45 tabs.

  3. A geochemical study of lithospheric mantle beneath Northern Victoria Land (Antarctica): main evidences from volatile content in ultramafic xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correale, Alessandra; Pelorosso, Beatrice; Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Coltorti, Massimo; Italiano, Francesco; Bonadiman, Costanza

    2017-04-01

    A geochemical study of ultramafic xenoliths from Northern Victoria Land (Green Point, GP and Handler Ridge, HR), is carried out in order to investigate the features of the lithosphere mantle beneath the Western Antarctic Ridge System (WARS). The majority of samples is spinel anhydrous lherzolite with rare presence of secondary phases (secondary cpx and glass). Geothermobarometric calculations, based on the Fe/Mg distribution among the peridotite minerals reveal that Sub Continental Lithospheric Mantle (SCLM) beneath Handler Ridge records temperatures and redox conditions higher then Greene Point (P fixed at 15 Kbar). Moreover, geochemical models evidence that, GP mantle domain represents a residuum after ˜7 to 21 % of partial melting in the spinel stability field, which was variably affected by interaction with infiltrating melts, acting in different times, from at least Jurassic to Cenozoic (Pelorosso et al., 2016). Fluid inclusions (FI) entrapped in olivine and pyroxene crystals were investigated for elemental and isotopic contents of both, noble gases (He, Ne, Ar) and CO2. He, Ar and Ne concentrations range from 1.52×10-14 to 1.07×10-12, from 4.09×10-13 to 3.47×10-11and from 2.84×10-16 to 7.57×10-14 mol/g, respectively, while the CO2amounts are between 7.08×10-10 and 8.12×10-7 mol/g. The 3He/4He varies between 5.95 and 20.18 Ra (where Ra is the 3He/4He ratio of air), being the lowest and the highest values measured in the He-poorer samples. Post-eruptive input of cosmogenic 3He and radiogenic 4He seems to influence mainly the samples associated to a lower He concentrations, increasing and decreasing respectively their primordial 3He/4He values, that for all the other samples range between 6.76 and 7.45 Ra. This range reasonably reflects the isotope signature of mantle beneath the investigated areas. The 4He/40Ar* ratio corrected for atmospheric-derived contamination ranges between 0.004 and 0.39. The lowest 4He/40Ar* values (4He/40Ar*<0.1) are

  4. Subduction-driven recycling of continental margin lithosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, A; Bezada, M J; Niu, F; Humphreys, E D; Palomeras, I; Thurner, S M; Masy, J; Schmitz, M; Gallart, J; Carbonell, R; Miller, M S

    2014-11-13

    Whereas subduction recycling of oceanic lithosphere is one of the central themes of plate tectonics, the recycling of continental lithosphere appears to be far more complicated and less well understood. Delamination and convective downwelling are two widely recognized processes invoked to explain the removal of lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts. Here we relate oceanic plate subduction to removal of adjacent continental lithosphere in certain plate tectonic settings. We have developed teleseismic body wave images from dense broadband seismic experiments that show higher than expected volumes of anomalously fast mantle associated with the subducted Atlantic slab under northeastern South America and the Alboran slab beneath the Gibraltar arc region; the anomalies are under, and are aligned with, the continental margins at depths greater than 200 kilometres. Rayleigh wave analysis finds that the lithospheric mantle under the continental margins is significantly thinner than expected, and that thin lithosphere extends from the orogens adjacent to the subduction zones inland to the edges of nearby cratonic cores. Taking these data together, here we describe a process that can lead to the loss of continental lithosphere adjacent to a subduction zone. Subducting oceanic plates can viscously entrain and remove the bottom of the continental thermal boundary layer lithosphere from adjacent continental margins. This drives surface tectonics and pre-conditions the margins for further deformation by creating topography along the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. This can lead to development of secondary downwellings under the continental interior, probably under both South America and the Gibraltar arc, and to delamination of the entire lithospheric mantle, as around the Gibraltar arc. This process reconciles numerous, sometimes mutually exclusive, geodynamic models proposed to explain the complex oceanic-continental tectonics of these subduction zones.

  5. Transverse studies with ions at SPS flat bottom

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniou, F; Saa Hernandez, A; Huschauer, A

    2017-01-01

    The LHC injectors upgrade project (LIU) aims at con-solidating and upgrading the existing accelerator chain atCERN in view of the increased beam performance requiredfor the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project. For theion chain, the losses and emittance growth in the SPS imposepresently the main performance limitation. The significantbeam degradation encountered on the long injection plateauhas been studied during the 2016 MD runs with Pb82+. Inthis report we present the systematic measurements of emit-tance, bunch length and transmission performed along theinjection plateau for different bunch intensities. We present,as well, static and dynamic tune scans for the optimizationof the working point and measurement of the loss rate atcloseby resonances.

  6. How To Design A Triple Bottom Line Organization: A Start-Up Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Schroeder

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In today’s business environment, where success for a start-up company is measured by early revenue and profit, it can be quite challenging to design a triple bottom line organization (people/planet/profit from the very beginning. We present a case study of a U.S.-based start-up firm and discuss its early challenges, developmental processes, and current success as a triple bottom line firm. The company’s founder and CEO, with no initial product, distribution, or revenue strategy, sought to develop a company that could provide the marketplace with a valuable product while also staying true to a corporate vision of positively affecting less fortunate people. Our analysis of the case suggests that the founder’s vision, passion, transparent communication, and leveraging of partners’ resources were key elements in building the firm. We draw implications of our case study for the designers of future triple bottom line organizations.

  7. Vertically Integrated Rheology of Deforming Oceanic Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, J. K.; Gordon, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    The tectonics of the oceans have traditionally been modeled in terms of rigid plates interacting at narrow boundaries. The now well-documented existence of diffuse oceanic plate boundaries, across which relative motion is distributed over hundreds to thousands of kilometers, demonstrates the need for a different approach to understanding the tectonics and geodynamics of a substantial fraction of oceanic lithosphere. A model that has usefully been applied to diffuse zones of continental deformation is that of a thin viscous sheet of fluid obeying a power-law rheology. The model has few adjustable parameters, typically a power-law exponent, n, and the Argand number [England & McKenzie, 1982], which is a measure of the size of buoyancy forces caused by the deformation, and which can be neglected for deformation of oceanic lithosphere. In prior investigations of a thin sheet of power-law fluid for continental regions, most studies have found that the most appropriate power-law exponent is ≈3 [e.g., England & Molnar 1991, 1997], but a value as large as ≈10 has been recently suggested by Dayem et al. [2009]. Because the rheology of oceanic lithosphere differs significantly from that of continental lithosphere, the most appropriate exponent may be larger than 3, and should in some sense be an appropriately weighted average between the properties of the upper lithosphere, which deforms brittlely and semi-brittlely, and for which the power-law exponent is n → ∞, and the lower lithosphere, which deforms by dislocation glide [Goetze 1978; Evans & Goetze 1979; Ratteron et al. 2003; Dayem et al. 2009; Mei et al. 2010], which obeys an exponential law, and by dislocation creep for which n≈3 [Sonder & England, 1986]. To estimate the appropriate power-law exponent consistent with laboratory experiments we determine strain rate as a function of applied end load on the lithosphere for various ages of lithosphere. We find that a power-law fluid well approximates the

  8. Subducting Plate Breakup by Plume-Lithosphere Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koptev, A.; Gerya, T.; Jolivet, L.; Leroy, S. D.

    2016-12-01

    We use a 3D high-resolution thermo-mechanical modeling to investigate the impact of active mantle plume on a subducting lithospheric plate. Initial model setup consists of an overriding continental lithosphere and subducting lithospheric plate including oceanic and continental lithosphere. A mantle plume thermal anomaly has been initially seeded at the bottom of the model box underneath the continental segment of subducting plate. Mantle plume impingement on lithospheric bottom leads to thinning of continental lithosphere and decompressional melting of both lithospheric and sublithospheric mantle along stretched trench-parallel zone. Further continental breakup is followed by opening of an oceanic basin separating a newly formed microcontinent from the main subducting continent. Despite continuous push applied at the boundary of subducting plate, plume-induced oceanic basin opens during several Myrs reaching several hundred kilometers wide. Cooling of the mantle plume and beginning of collision between the separated microcontinent and the overriding continental plate lead to gradual closure of newly formed oceanic basin that gets further involved into subduction and collision. The final stage sees continental subduction of main body of subducting plate and simultaneous tectonic exhumation of the upper crust of the subducted microcontinent. This scenario involving a plume-induced rifting of a microcontinent away from main body of subducted plate can be compared to the Mesozoic-Cenozoic development of the African plate characterized by the consecutive separation of the Apulian microcontinent and Arabian plate (in the Jurassic and the Neogene, respectively) during subduction of Neo-Tethys oceanic lithosphere beneath the Eurasian margin.

  9. Preliminary studies of soil erosion in a valley bottom in Ibadan under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preliminary studies of soil erosion in a valley bottom in Ibadan under some tillage practices. EA Aiyelari, SO Oshunsanya. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Agricultural Sciences Vol. 7 (1) 2008: pp.221-228. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  10. Lithospheric mantle heterogeneities beneath the Zagros Mountains and the Iranian Plateau: A petrological-geophysical study

    OpenAIRE

    Tunini, Lavinia; Jiménez-Munt, Ivone; Fernandez, Manel; Vergés, Jaume; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society. We apply a combined geophysical-petrological methodology in order to study the thermal, compositional, density and seismological structure of the crust and upper mantle along two transects across the Arabia-Eurasia collision region. Results on the crustal thickness show minimum values beneath the Arabia Platform and Central Iran (42-43 km), and maximum values beneath the Sanandaj Sirjan zone ...

  11. Density and morphology studies on bottom ash and fly ash geopolymer brick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deraman, Laila Mardiah; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Ming, Liew Yun; Hussin, Kamarudin

    2017-04-01

    This paper studies the finding density and morphology analysis of geopolymer bricks using bottom ash and fly ash as a geopolymer raw material. The study has been conducted to produce bottom ash and fly ash geopolymer bricks by varying the ratio of fly ash/bottom ash, ratio solid/liquid and ratio sodium silicate (Na2SiO3)/ sodium hydroxide (NaOH) in the mix design. The compressive strength range between 3.8-4.5 Mpa was obtained in theprevious study [9]. The density and morphology analysis are done based on the optimum ratio selected from bottom ash/fly ash, solid/liquidand Na2SiO3/NaOH which is 1:2, 2.0 and 4.0 respectively for non-loading application brick. The morphology analysis of the bricks is closely related to the density recorded. The highest density shows the highest value of compressive strength and a denser microstructure of morphology.

  12. Lithospheric radial anisotropy beneath the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Risheng; Ko, Justin Yen-Ting; Wei, Shengji; Zhan, Zhongwen; Helmberger, Don

    2017-05-01

    The Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB), where a layer of low viscosity asthenosphere decouples with the upper plate motion, plays an essential role in plate tectonics. Most dynamic modeling assumes that the shear velocity can be used as a surrogate for viscosity which provides key information about mantle flow. Here, we derive a shear velocity model for the LAB structure beneath the Gulf of Mexico allowing a detailed comparison with that beneath the Pacific (PAC) and Atlantic (ATL). Our study takes advantage of the USArray data from the March 25th, 2013 Guatemala earthquake at a depth of 200 km. Such data is unique in that we can observe a direct upward traveling lid arrival which remains the first arrival ahead of the triplications beyond 18°. This extra feature in conjunction with upper-mantle triplication sampling allows good depth control of the LAB and a new upper-mantle seismic model ATM, a modification of ATL, to be developed. ATM has a prominent low velocity zone similar to the structure beneath the western Atlantic. The model contains strong radial anisotropy in the lid where VSH is about 6% faster than VSV. This anisotropic feature ends at the bottom of the lithosphere at about the depth of 175 km in contrast to the Pacific where it extends to over 300 km. Another important feature of ATM is the weaker velocity gradient from the depth of 175 to 350 km compared to Pacific models, which may be related to differences in mantle flow.

  13. Mantle Flow and Melting Beneath Young Oceanic Lithosphere: Seismic Studies of the Galapagos Archipelago and the Juan de Fuca Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Joseph Stephen

    In this dissertation, I use seismic imaging techniques to constrain the physical state of the upper mantle beneath regions of young oceanic lithosphere. Mantle convection is investigated beneath the Galapagos Archipelago and then beneath the Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate, with a focus on the JdF and Gorda Ridges before turning to the off-axis asthenosphere. In the Galapagos Archipelago, S-to-p receiver functions reveal a discontinuity in seismic velocity that is attributed to the dehydration of the upper mantle. The depth at which dehydration occurs is shown to be consistent with prior constraints on mantle temperature. A comparison between results from receiver functions, seismic tomography and petrology shows that mantle upwelling and melt generation occur shallower than the depth of the discontinuity, despite the expectation of high viscosities in the dehydrated layer. Beneath the JdF and Gorda Ridge, low Vs anomalies are too large to be explained by the cooling of the lithosphere and are attributed to partial melt. The asymmetry, large Vs gradients, and sinuosity of the anomalies beneath the JdF Ridge are consistent with models of buoyancy-driven upwelling. However, deformation zone processes appear to dominate mantle flow over seafloor spreading beneath the Explorer and Gorda diffuse plate boundaries. Finally, S-to-p receiver functions reveal a seismic discontinuity beneath the JdF plate that can only be attributed to seismic anisotropy. Synthesis of the receiver function results with prior SKS splitting results requires heterogeneous anisotropy between the crust and the discontinuity. Models of anisotropy feature increasing anisotropy before the decrease at the discontinuity, but well below the base of the lithosphere, and a clockwise rotation of the fast direction with increasing depth. In these results and even in the SKS splitting results, additional driving mechanisms for mantle flow such as density or pressure anomalies are required.

  14. A comparative study of intensive Litopenaeus vannamei culture on four bottom substrates without water change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Hongwei; Zhang, Li; Gao, Lei; Su, Yuepeng; Bao, Weiyang; Ma, Shen

    2014-08-01

    The effect of four bottom substrates, oyster shell powder (OP), sugarcane bagasse (SB), a mixture of OP and SB (OS) and fresh soil (FS), on the water quality and bacterial and zooplankton density of intensive shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) culture tanks without water change and the growth performance of cultured shrimp were compared in this study. At the end of a 110 days culturing trial, the total ammonium-N (TAN) of the water on SB and the nitrite nitrogen (NO2-N) on OS was significantly lower than that on the other substrates ( Pvannamei without water change than OP and FS. To our knowledge, this study presents the first evidence regarding the effect of different bottom substrates on intensive shrimp culture.

  15. Assessing and mitigating of bottom trawling. Final BENTHIS project Report (Benthic Ecosystem Fisheries Impact Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijnsdorp, Adriaan D; Eigaard, Ole Ritzau; Kenny, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    (high impact). Additional fishing in these core grounds have only a small impact. In the peripheral areas where fishing intensity is low, additional fishing will have a much larger impact. Hence, shifting trawling activities from the core fishing grounds to the peripheral areas will increase the overall...... to reduce the bycatch and bottom contact in the beam trawl fishery for brown shrimps. Sea trials to replace bottom trawls with pots were inconclusive. Results suggest that creels may offer an alternative for small Nephrops fishers in the Kattegat. In waters off Greece, the catch rates were very low. Sea...... studies carried out in BENTHIS revealed the critical success factors for implementing technological innovations to mitigate trawling impact. While economic investment theory predict that economic profitability should lead to investment in innovative gears, it appeared that many other factors play a role...

  16. Recovering lateral variationin lithospheric strength from bedrock motion data using a coupled ice sheet-lithosphere model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Berg, W.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831611; van de Wal, R.S.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/101899556; Oerlemans, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06833656X

    2006-01-01

    A vertically integrated two-dimensional ice flow model was coupled to an elastic lithosphere-Earth model to study the effects of lateral variations in lithospheric strength on local bedrock adjustment. We used a synthetic bedrock profile and a synthetic climate to model a characteristic ice sheet

  17. Recovering lateral variations in lithospheric strength from bedrock motion data using a coupled ice sheet-lithosphere model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, J. van den; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Oerlemans, J.

    2006-01-01

    A vertically integrated two-dimensional ice flow model was coupled to an elastic lithosphere-Earth model to study the effects of lateral variations in lithospheric strength on local bedrock adjustment. We used a synthetic bedrock profile and a synthetic climate to model a characteristic ice sheet

  18. Satellite-derived geoid for the estimation of lithospheric cooling and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lithospheric cooling and basal heat flux anomalies over the northern Indian Ocean lithosphere 1679. • To study the progressive cooling of young-aged oceanic lithosphere from the divergent Mid-Oceanic type Carlsberg Ridge through the estimation of basalt heat flux anomalies and vertical temperature structure retrieved ...

  19. SuperB: An opportunity to study baryons with beauty and bottom super-nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciello, A.

    2012-05-01

    SuperB is an INFN flagship project for a new high-luminosity heavy-flavor factory. Along with its companion detector, it is dedicated to the search for CP violation effects in the B meson sector with the aim of looking for direct and indirect signals of new physics, beyond the Standard Model. However it could offer as well the opportunity for a systematic, high-statistics study of b baryon properties and for a search for bottom super-nuclei, that is bound nuclear systems with an explicit content of beauty.

  20. Progress Report: Integrated Ecological Studies at Lisbon Bottom Unit, Big Muddy Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Fiscal Year 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been carrying out integrated ecological studies at the Lisbon Bottom Unit of the Big Muddy Fish and Wildlife Refuge since 1996. This...

  1. Thermal and metasomatic rejuvenation and dunitization in lithospheric mantle beneath Central Europe - The Grodziec (SW Poland) case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Ćwiek, Mateusz; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2017-04-01

    The 32 Ma Grodziec nephelinite (Lower Silesia, SW Poland) contains xenolith of peridotite (mostly lherzolite) and clinopyroxenite/olivine clinopyroxenite composition. The forsterite content in olivine classifies these rocks into three groups: groups A and B consist of peridotites, while group C xenoliths are pyroxenitic cumulates. Group A xenoliths contain olivine Fo 87.90-91.8% and pyroxenes with high Mg# ( 0.91-0.92); clinopyroxene is strongly LREE-enriched (LaN/LuN = 2.19-17.74) and strongly impoverished in Zr, Hf and Ti relative to primitive mantle. The group B xenoliths (dunites and wehrlite) are orthopyroxene-free, olivine and clinopyroxene are less magnesian than those in the A group (Fo = 85.2-87.2%, Mg# = 0.86-0.88), clinopyroxene is less LREE-enriched (LaN/LuN = 4.07-4.15) and only slightly impoverished in Zr, Hf and Ti. Group C xenoliths contain olivine with forsterite content from 78.6 to 86.6% and clinopyroxene of Mg# from 0.84 to 0.85, with LREE/trace element characteristics similar to those of B group (LaN/LuN = 1.96-3.10). Group A xenoliths from Grodziec record migration of mixed carbonatite-alkaline silicate melts through the subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath Lower Silesia, which preceded the migration of melts similar to the Grodziec nephelinite. The peridotitic protoliths were dunitized at the direct contacts with the migrating nephelinite melt and are now represented by group B. Group C pyroxenites originated in mantle conditions by crystal settling in places of transient nephelinite melt stagnation. The mantle section beneath Grodziec was reheated to ca 1000-1100 °C. The Grodziec scenario is similar to that of Księginki (northern extension of Eger Rift, SW Poland), which shares a similar age of xenolith entrainment. Both sites show that the processes of mantle metasomatism and thermal rejuvenation of subcontinental lithospheric mantle were more intense during the Lower Oligocene volcanic climax compared to those recorded in younger

  2. The Lithospheric Structure of Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysession, M. E.; Pratt, M. J.; Andriampenomanana Ny Ony, F. S. T.; Tsiriandrimanana, R.; Nyblade, A.; Aleqabi, G. I.; Shore, P.; Tucker, R.; Wiens, D. A.; Rambolamanana, G.

    2016-12-01

    The lithosphere of Madagascar is revealed for the first time from a combination of studies using data from the 2011-2013 MACOMO (Madagascar, the Comoros, and Mozambique) broadband seismic array from the IRIS PASSCAL program (funded by NSF, with additional data from the RHUM-RUM and Madagascar Seismic Profile projects). Methods include seismicity locations, body-wave receiver functions, Pn tomography, body-wave tomography, and ambient-noise and two-plane-wave earthquake surface-wave analyses. Madagascar's crustal thickness varies greatly, from 20 to 45 km, in good agreement with its past tectonic history of rifting from the mainland and having India break away to the north. The crust is thickest along the central spine of the island, along a ridge of mountains, but unusually high elevations suggest some amount f thermal buoyancy in the mantle. Crust is also thick along the east coast, where archean terranes were severed from India. Crust is thinnest along the west coast, where thick sedimentary basins up to 8 km thick are found on top of unusually thinned basement crust (about 12 km thick), a remnant of rifting away from Africa 130-160 Ma ago. Madagascar has an unusually high level of intraplate seismicity, with 918 earthquakes located during the 2-year period. Seismicity shows interesting correlations with paleotectonic features, but much is located in the central regions of the island, associated with normal faulting along several graben structures. This region also corresponds to the central of three regions within Madagascar (north, central, and southwest) that display strong lithospheric seismic low-velocity anomalies that underlie regions of current or recent volcanic activity. Surface waves show that these low-velocity zones (LVZs) extending down into the asthenosphere, and body-wave tomography shows them extending even deeper. Pn tomography shows that the width of the central LVZ is only about 100-200 km in diameter at the top of the mantle, indicative of

  3. Numerical Simulation Study on Steam-Assisted Gravity Drainage Performance in a Heavy Oil Reservoir with a Bottom Water Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Pikes Peak oil field near Lloydminster, Canada, a significant amount of heavy oil reserves is located in reservoirs with a bottom water zone. The properties of the bottom water zone and the operation parameters significantly affect oil production performance via the steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD process. Thus, in order to develop this type of heavy oil resource, a full understanding of the effects of these properties is necessary. In this study, the numerical simulation approach was applied to study the effects of properties in the bottom water zone in the SAGD process, such as the initial gas oil ratio, the thickness of the reservoir, and oil saturation of the bottom water zone. In addition, some operation parameters were studied including the injection pressure, the SAGD well pair location, and five different well patterns: (1 two corner wells, (2 triple wells, (3 downhole water sink well, (4 vertical injectors with a horizontal producer, and (5 fishbone well. The numerical simulation results suggest that the properties of the bottom water zone affect production performance extremely. First, both positive and negative effects were observed when solution gas exists in the heavy oil. Second, a logarithmical relationship was investigated between the bottom water production ratio and the thickness of the bottom water zone. Third, a non-linear relation was obtained between the oil recovery factor and oil saturation in the bottom water zone, and a peak oil recovery was achieved at the oil saturation rate of 30% in the bottom water zone. Furthermore, the operation parameters affected the heavy oil production performance. Comparison of the well patterns showed that the two corner wells and the triple wells patterns obtained the highest oil recovery factors of 74.71% and 77.19%, respectively, which are almost twice the oil recovery factors gained in the conventional SAGD process (47.84%. This indicates that the optimized SAGD process

  4. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Near-Bottom Sediments to Determine Geoacoustic and Geotechnical Properties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stoll, R

    1998-01-01

    .... These tools include a motorized penetrometer designed to measure quasi static cone penetration resistance up to depths of two meters into the bottom, a Love wave source and linear receiving array...

  5. Sinterability study of ceramic bodies made from a mixture of mineral coal bottom ash and soda-lime glass cullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanova, Daniela L; Bergmann, Carlos P

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the sinterability to improve the technical properties of ceramic bodies made from coal bottom ash and soda-lime glass cullet. Different mixtures of bottom ash and glass cullet were formulated. The amount of bottom ash was 100, 70, 50 and 30 wt.%. The particle size distribution was the same for all formulations. The mixture containing 50 wt.% bottom ash also had its particle size distribution changed. Samples were formed by dry pressing and then fired at 950, 1050 and 1150 degrees C. Samples were evaluated for linear shrinkage, water absorption, flexural mechanical resistance, scanning electronic microscopy, pyroplastic deformation and thermodilatometric analysis. The higher firing temperature led to a decrease in water absorption and increased linear shrinkage, mechanical resistance and pyroplastic deformation. This effect was also observed for addition of glass up to 50 wt.%. The effect of smaller particles of bottom ash was more significant for linear shrinkage and mechanical resistance of ceramic bodies fired at 1150 degrees C. The use of a finer powder contributed to increase these properties. The influence of finer particles on water absorption and mechanical resistance of ceramic bodies fired at 950 and 1050 degrees C was not significant.

  6. Three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction case study on cubical fluid cavity with flexible bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelardi, Stefano; Rizzo, Cesare; Villa, Diego

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we report our study on a numerical fluid-structure interaction problem originally presented by Mok et al. (2001) in two dimensions and later studied in three dimensions by Valdés Vazquez (2007), Lombardi (2012), and Trimarchi (2012). We focus on a 3D test case in which we evaluated the sensitivity of several input parameters on the fluid and structural results. In particular, this analysis provides a starting point from which we can look deeper into specific aspects of these simulations and analyze more realistic cases, e.g., in sails design. In this study, using the commercial software ADINA™, we addressed a well-known unsteadiness problem comprising a square box representing the fluid domain with a flexible bottom modeled with structural shell elements. We compared data from previously published work whose authors used the same numerical approach, i.e., a partitioned approach coupling a finite volume solver (for the fluid domain) and a finite element solver (for the solid domain). Specifically, we established several benchmarks and made comparisons with respect to fluid and solid meshes, structural element types, and structural damping, as well as solution algorithms. Moreover, we compared our method with a monolithic finite element solution method. Our comparisons of new and old results provide an outline of best practices for such simulations.

  7. Experimental study of properties of heavy concrete with bottom ash from power stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondar Victor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the influence of cement quantity, plasticizing additives and compaction time on the strength and water consumption of concrete during its manufacturing using bottom ash from a thermal power station. The study was carried out using three factorial experiments. Variables varied on three levels. The obtained pattern functions characterize a relationship between strength, water consumption and variable factors. These factors include cement quantity, plasticize additives and compaction time. Compilation of Pareto effect charts allowed estimation of the significance of function indexes. Analysis of surface pattern function has revealed the optimal correlation between additive quantity and compaction time, cement quantity and additive quantity, cement quantity and compaction time. Compression strength of concrete was taken as the pattern in the pattern function. When analyzing the pattern function with water consumption as a pattern, optimal correlations between additive quantity and compaction time, cement quantity and additive quantity, cement quantity and compaction time were revealed. Application of STATISTICA 12 software has specified values of factors when the maximum strength is achieved. Correlations of components which have an impact on water consumption have been determined. The conclusions contain the quantitative findings of the study.

  8. Stratified flow over complex topography: A model study of the bottom drag and associated mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Knut S.; Fer, Ilker; Avlesen, Helge

    2012-02-01

    The flow of stratified fluid over complex topography may lead to a significant drag on the fluid, exerted by the bottom obstacles. Using a 2-m resolution, three-dimensional, non-hydrostatic numerical ocean model, the drag and associated mixing on a stratified flow over real, 1-m resolution topography (interpolated to model resolution) is studied. With a typical mountain height of 12 m in 174 m water and buoyancy frequencies ranging from 0.6×10-2s-1 to 1.2×10-2s-1, resolving the topographic features leads to extensive drag exerted on the flow manifested through three different processes: (i) gravity wave drag, (ii) aerodynamic or blocked flow drag, and (iii) hydraulic drag. A parameterization of the internal wave drag based on linear, two-dimensional, hydrostatic wave solutions provides satisfactory results in terms of the turbulent kinetic energy levels. The depth of the layer where the vertical momentum flux is deposited, however, is underestimated, leading to an overestimated gravity wave drag in the layer.

  9. Lithospheric flexural strength and effective elastic thicknesses of the Eastern Anatolia (Turkey) and surrounding region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruç, Bülent; Gomez-Ortiz, David; Petit, Carole

    2017-12-01

    The Lithospheric structure of Eastern Anatolia and the surrounding region, including the northern part of the Arabian platform is investigated via the analysis and modeling of Bouguer anomalies from the Earth Gravitational Model EGM08. The effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere (EET) that corresponds to the mechanical cores of the crust and lithospheric mantle is determined from the spectral coherence between Bouguer anomalies and surface elevation data. Its average value is 18.7 km. From the logarithmic amplitude spectra of Bouguer anomalies, average depths of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), Moho, Conrad and basement in the study area are constrained at 84 km, 39 km, 16 km and 7 km, respectively. The geometries of the LAB and Moho are then estimated using the Parker-Oldenburg inversion algorithm. We also present a lithospheric strength map obtained from the spatial variations of EET determined by Yield Stress Envelopes (YSE). The EET varies in the range of 12-23 km, which is in good agreement with the average value obtained from spectral analysis. Low EET values are interpreted as resulting from thermal and flexural lithospheric weakening. According to the lithospheric strength of the Eastern Anatolian region, the rheology model consists of a strong but brittle upper crust, a weak and ductile lower crust, and a weak lower part of the lithosphere. On the other hand, lithosphere strength corresponds to weak and ductile lower crust, a strong upper crust and a strong uppermost lithospheric mantle for the northern part of the Arabian platform.

  10. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), General Electric Phase 1. Volume 3: Energy conversion subsystems and components. Part 1: Bottoming cycles and materials of construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, R. P.; Solomon, H. D.

    1976-01-01

    Energy conversion subsystems and components were evaluated in terms of advanced energy conversion systems. Results of the bottoming cycles and materials of construction studies are presented and discussed.

  11. Comparative study on the characteristics of fly ash and bottom ash geopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Chalee, Wichian; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2009-02-01

    This research was conducted to compare geopolymers made from fly ash and ground bottom ash. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium silicate (Na(2)SiO(3)) solutions were used as activators. A mass ratio of 1.5 Na(2)SiO(3)/NaOH and three concentrations of NaOH (5, 10, and 15M) were used; the geopolymers were cured at 65 degrees C for 48 h. A Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used on the geopolymer pastes. Geopolymer mortars were also prepared in order to investigate compressive strength. The results show that both fly ash and bottom ash can be utilized as source materials for the production of geopolymers. The properties of the geopolymers are dependent on source materials and the NaOH concentration. Fly ash is more reactive and produces a higher degree of geopolymerization in comparison with bottom ash. The moderate NaOH concentration of 10 M is found to be suitable and gives fly ash and bottom ash geopolymer mortars with compressive strengths of 35 and 18 MPa.

  12. A comparative study of benchmarking approaches for non-domestic buildings: Part 2 – Bottom-up approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esfandiar Burman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The bottom-up methods for energy benchmarking aim to derive a yardstick for energy performance based on a theoretical analysis of a building. While the top-down methods drive performance improvement by ranking a building against its peers, the bottom-up methods are focused on the building’s specific context. Consequently, the bottom-up methods can help identify how performance improvement could be materialised. These two complementary approaches can improve design practice and facilities’ management. Two bottom-up methods that could be used for energy benchmarking have been reviewed using UK schools as case studies: Building physics and aggregated end-use. The aim is to demonstrate how these methods could be used for benchmarking and identify their benefits and limitations. When all energy components are included in a model under expected operating conditions, the building physics method can be used to establish a baseline for energy performance. It is demonstrated that where this method is used under standardised operating conditions and is subject to minimum energy performance requirements, as prescribed by the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD, it can be used to establish a benchmark for energy performance. It is also shown how aggregated end-use methods such as CIBSE TM22 can be used to define system level benchmarks, and identify the root causes for discrepancy between measured performance and design intent in a systematic way.

  13. Segmentation and Positioning in the Brazilian Kids Market: A Case Study on the Bottom of the Pyramid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Rodriguez Veloso

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article approaches the kids market, focusing on the Bottom of the Pyramid. A case study is developed within the toy industry. Because few studies have been developed on this subject (kids marketing, the option of this study is to focus on basic marketing strategies, market segmentation and positioning. Results exemplify how can a company structure its marketing strategy in order to have a clear focus on a given segment of the kids market.

  14. Hybrid Combined Cycles with Biomass and Waste Fired Bottoming Cycle - a Literature Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Miroslav P.

    2002-02-01

    incinerators is probably the option with the greatest efficiency improvement potential, within the reasonable cost and scale limits. Furthermore, a State-of-Art report is included in the study as a separate chapter. Descriptions of existing hybrid combined cycle installations with biofuel-fired bottoming cycle in Sweden and its surrounding countries are compiled in it. The presentation shows that hybrid combined cycles are a standard technology in many respects. These specific configurations have been chosen as the most rewarding ones out of various alternatives and have proved their advantages in commercial operation. The major research project following this literature study will focus on investigation of possible efficiency improvement of biomass energy utilization by application of hybrid configurations with natural gas fired gas turbine and internal combustion engines as topping cyclesof curve fitting procedures)

  15. Integrated elemental and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic studies of Mesozoic mafic dykes from the eastern North China Craton: implications for the dramatic transformation of lithospheric mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shen; Feng, Caixia; Santosh, M.; Feng, Guangying; Coulson, Ian M.; Xu, Mengjing; Guo, Zhuang; Guo, Xiaolei; Peng, Hao; Feng, Qiang

    2018-02-01

    Evolution of the lithospheric mantle beneath the North China Craton (NCC) from its Precambrian cratonic architecture until Paleozoic, and the transformation to an oceanic realm during Mesozoic, with implications on the destruction of cratonic root have attracted global attention. Here we present geochemical and isotopic data on a suite of newly identified Mesozoic mafic dyke swarms from the Longwangmiao, Weijiazhuang, Mengjiazhuang, Jiayou, Huangmi, and Xiahonghe areas (Qianhuai Block) along the eastern NCC with an attempt to gain further insights on the lithospheric evolution of the region. The Longwangmiao dykes are alkaline with LILE (Ba and K)- and LREE-enrichment ((La/Yb) N > 4.3) and EM1-like Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic signature ((87Sr/86Sr) i > 0.706; ε Nd (t) 16.6, (207Pb/204Pb) i > 15.4, (208Pb/204Pb) i > 36.8, ε Hf (t) 3.7), and display similar EM1-like isotopic features ((87Sr/86Sr) i > 0.706; ε Nd (t) 16.7, (207Pb/204Pb) i > 15.4, (208Pb/204Pb) i > 36.9, ε Hf (t) 2.4) and EM1-like isotopic features((87Sr/86Sr) i > 0.706; ε Nd (t) 16.7, (207Pb/204Pb) i > 15.4, (208Pb/204Pb) i > 36.9, ε Hf (t) 3.7) and EM1-like Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic features ((87Sr/86Sr) i > 0.706; ε Nd(t) 16.7, (207Pb/204Pb) i > 15.4, (208Pb/204Pb) i > 36.9, ε Hf (t) 9.3) and EM1-like isotopic composition ((87Sr/86Sr) i > 0.705; ε Nd (t) 16.9, (207Pb/204Pb) i > 15.5, (208Pb/204Pb) i > 36.9, ε Hf (t) Hf isotopic signature ((87Sr/86Sr) i > 0.705; ε Nd (t) 16.9, (207Pb/204Pb) i > 15.5, (208Pb/204Pb) i > 36.9, ε Hf (t) < -8.6). Our data from the various mafic dyke suites suggest that the magmas were derived from EM1-like lithospheric mantle, corresponding to lithospheric mantle modified by the previously foundered lower crust beneath the eastern NCC. Our results suggest contrasting lithospheric evolution from Triassic (212 Ma) to Cretaceous (123 Ma) beneath the NCC. These mafic dykes mark an important phase of lithospheric thinning in the eastern North China Craton.

  16. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF HEAVY METALS IN BOTTOM ASH FROM INCINERATORS AND OPEN PIT FROM HEALTHCARE FACILITIES IN GHANA

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Amfo-Otua; Sarah Graham Kyerewaa; Emmanuel Adu Ofori; Adams Sadick

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of healthcare waste either by incinerating or open burning in a pit produces bottom ashes which contains heavy metals and other chemicals which are toxic, persistent and accumulate in the food chain resulting in adverse health effects in human and the environment. The study investigated the level of heavy metals in the ashes of thermally treated medical waste from four health care facilities in Ghana. Two batch of the ash samples were collected from two hospital incinerators and the...

  17. Bottom-linked innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Catharina Juul

    2018-01-01

    Employee-driven innovation is gaining ground as a strategy for developing sustainable organisations in the public and private sector. This type of innovation is characterised by active employee participation, and the bottom-up perspective is often emphasised. This article explores an issue that has...... hitherto been paid little explicit attention, namely collaboration between middle managers and employees in innovation processes. In contrast to most studies, middle managers and employees are here both subjects of explicit investigation. The collaboration processes explored in this article are termed...... ‘bottom-linked innovation’. The empirical analysis is based on an in-depth qualitative study of bottom-linked innovation in a public frontline institution in Denmark. By combining research on employee-driven innovation and middle management, the article offers new insights into such collaborative...

  18. A computational study of liposome logic: towards cellular computing from the bottom up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldon, James; Romero-Campero, Francisco J; Fernández Trillo, Francisco; Gheorghe, Marian; Alexander, Cameron; Krasnogor, Natalio

    2010-09-01

    In this paper we propose a new bottom-up approach to cellular computing, in which computational chemical processes are encapsulated within liposomes. This "liposome logic" approach (also called vesicle computing) makes use of supra-molecular chemistry constructs, e.g. protocells, chells, etc. as minimal cellular platforms to which logical functionality can be added. Modeling and simulations feature prominently in "top-down" synthetic biology, particularly in the specification, design and implementation of logic circuits through bacterial genome reengineering. The second contribution in this paper is the demonstration of a novel set of tools for the specification, modelling and analysis of "bottom-up" liposome logic. In particular, simulation and modelling techniques are used to analyse some example liposome logic designs, ranging from relatively simple NOT gates and NAND gates to SR-Latches, D Flip-Flops all the way to 3 bit ripple counters. The approach we propose consists of specifying, by means of P systems, gene regulatory network-like systems operating inside proto-membranes. This P systems specification can be automatically translated and executed through a multiscaled pipeline composed of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulator and Gillespie's stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA). Finally, model selection and analysis can be performed through a model checking phase. This is the first paper we are aware of that brings to bear formal specifications, DPD, SSA and model checking to the problem of modeling target computational functionality in protocells. Potential chemical routes for the laboratory implementation of these simulations are also discussed thus for the first time suggesting a potentially realistic physiochemical implementation for membrane computing from the bottom-up.

  19. Observation and study of bottom-meson decays to a charm meson, a proton-antiproton pair, and pions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Tae Min [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2010-04-27

    Bottom-meson decays with baryons show two unusual features—the branching fractions are enhanced for multibody decays and the baryon-antibaryon subsystem recoils against the other decay products—and their reasons are not yet well understood. Moreover, measurements using explicit reconstruction techniques constitute only about 1% out of about 8% of such decays. This Dissertation reports the study of ten bottom-meson decays (labeled 0– 9) to a proton-antiproton pair, a charm meson, and a system of up to two pions, using the BABAR Experiment’s 455×106 BB pairs produced with the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  20. The impact of fish predation on shallow soft bottoms in brackish waters (SW Finland); an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, J.; Bonsdorff, E.

    The impact of fish predation on shallow soft bottoms was studied by field and laboratory experiments. The field manipulations (caging experiments) were carried out in 2 shallow (1.5 m) bays in the northern Baltic Sea. An a priori hypothesis that fish do not structure macrozoobenthic communities in shallow soft-bottom areas was tested. Short-term aquarium experiments clearly showed that perch ( Perca fluviatilis L.), roach ( Rutilus rutilus L.) and ruffe ( Acerina cernua (L.)) are all effective predators on benthic macroinvertebrates ( Corophium volutator) Pallas and Nereis diversicolor O.F. Müller) under laboratory conditions. Thus fish can be considered a potential structuring force on benthic communities in shallow soft-bottom areas. Caging experiments of one to two month's duration (partial and total exclosure of fish and enclosure with perch) induced only minor changes in the benthic community. These results support the a priori hypothesis. One of our main conclusions is, however, that fish predation and other biotic interactions (competition, disturbance, etc.) together with abiotic factors play some role in the structuring processes. Multilevel testing is needed in studies on biotic interactions in the marine environment. Results from a specific environment should not automatically be applied to other kinds of habitats.

  1. Global equivalent magnetization of the oceanic lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, J.; Choi, Y.; Hamoudi, M.; Lesur, V.; Thebault, E.

    2015-11-01

    As a by-product of the construction of a new World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map over oceanic areas, we use an original approach based on the global forward modeling of seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies and their comparison to the available marine magnetic data to derive the first map of the equivalent magnetization over the World's ocean. This map reveals consistent patterns related to the age of the oceanic lithosphere, the spreading rate at which it was formed, and the presence of mantle thermal anomalies which affects seafloor spreading and the resulting lithosphere. As for the age, the equivalent magnetization decreases significantly during the first 10-15 Myr after its formation, probably due to the alteration of crustal magnetic minerals under pervasive hydrothermal alteration, then increases regularly between 20 and 70 Ma, reflecting variations in the field strength or source effects such as the acquisition of a secondary magnetization. As for the spreading rate, the equivalent magnetization is twice as strong in areas formed at fast rate than in those formed at slow rate, with a threshold at ∼40 km/Myr, in agreement with an independent global analysis of the amplitude of Anomaly 25. This result, combined with those from the study of the anomalous skewness of marine magnetic anomalies, allows building a unified model for the magnetic structure of normal oceanic lithosphere as a function of spreading rate. Finally, specific areas affected by thermal mantle anomalies at the time of their formation exhibit peculiar equivalent magnetization signatures, such as the cold Australian-Antarctic Discordance, marked by a lower magnetization, and several hotspots, marked by a high magnetization.

  2. High-velocity lid of East Antarctica: Evidence of a depleted continental lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuge, Keiko; Fukao, Yoshio

    2005-06-01

    In broadband seismograms from shallow earthquakes occurring south of New Zealand recorded at the South Pole, we found significant arrivals 40-70 s after the first SH arrivals at distances of 29°-35° and 20-50 s after the first P arrivals at distances of 28°-35°. These waves traversing beneath East Antarctica can be modeled by slightly modifying one-dimensional P and S wave velocity structures of the Canadian shield. In the obtained velocity models, a velocity reduction below the lithosphere forms a deep low-velocity zone. S waves turning below the low-velocity zone explain the SH waveforms observed at 29°-55°. The observed P waveforms, however, suggest that a corresponding reduction in P velocity is smaller. These P and S wave velocity variations are likely to be a manifestation of a depleted continental lithosphere (high concentrations of olivine and magnesium number (Mg # = 100Mg/(Mg + Fe)). For a lithospheric composition more depleted than that of the underlying mantle, the temperature profile estimated from our velocity models is smooth from the lithosphere to the underlying mantle. Lithospheric depletion can also explain that the velocity anomaly in the lithosphere is larger for S than for P waves. Were the composition to be assumed uniform throughout the upper mantle, a large temperature gradient would be required at the bottom of the lithosphere, implying a heat sink which is unlikely to be sustainable. Thus a difference in composition between the lithosphere and underlying mantle leads to a reasonable estimate of temperature profile that is consistent with the observed seismic waveforms.

  3. Lithospheric Thickness Variations from Gravity and Topography in Areas of High Crustal Remanent Magnetization on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, S. E.; Raymond, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Large regions of intense crustal re- manent magnetization were fortuitously discovered on Mars by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft. Gravity and topography admittance studies are used to examine lithospheric structure in the areas of intense magnetization. Areas with positively magnetized crust appear to have thinner crust and elastic lithosphere than negatively magnetized crust. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Robust high resolution models of the continental lithosphere: Methodology and application to Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323259170

    2013-01-01

    Asia is a key natural laboratory for the study of active intra-continental deformation in far-field response to the ongoing collision ofIndiaandEurasia. The resulting tectonic processes strongly depend on the thermo-mechanical structure of the lithosphere. This lithosphere can be separated into

  5. An experimental study on the hazard assessment and mechanical properties of porous concrete utilizing coal bottom ash coarse aggregate in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Bum; Jang, Young Il; Lee, Jun; Lee, Byung Jae

    2009-07-15

    This study evaluates quality properties and toxicity of coal bottom ash coarse aggregate and analyzes mechanical properties of porous concrete depending on mixing rates of coal bottom ash. As a result, soundness and resistance to abrasion of coal bottom ash coarse aggregate were satisfied according to the standard of coarse aggregate for concrete. To satisfy the standard pertaining to chloride content, the coarse aggregates have to be washed more than twice. In regards to the result of leaching test for coal bottom ash coarse aggregate and porous concrete produced with these coarse aggregates, it was satisfied with the environment criteria. As the mixing rate of coal bottom ash increased, influence of void ratio and permeability coefficient was very little, but compressive and flexural strength decreased. When coal bottom ash was mixed over 40%, strength decreased sharply (compressive strength: by 11.7-27.1%, flexural strength: by maximum 26.4%). Also, as the mixing rate of coal bottom ash increased, it was confirmed that test specimens were destroyed by aggregate fracture more than binder fracture and interface fracture. To utilize coal bottom ash in large quantities, it is thought that an improvement method in regards to strength has to be discussed such as incorporation of reinforcing materials and improvement of aggregate hardness.

  6. A Study on Bottom Friction Coefficient in the Bohai, Yellow, and East China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daosheng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The adjoint tidal model based on the theory of inverse problem has been applied to investigate the effect of bottom friction coefficient (BFC on the tidal simulation. Using different schemes of BFC containing the constant, different constant in different subdomain, depth-dependent form, and spatial distribution obtained from data assimilation, the M2 constituent in the Bohai, Yellow, and East China Sea (BYECS is simulated by assimilating TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data, respectively. The simulated result with spatially varying BFC obtained from data assimilation is better than others. Results and analysis of BFC in BYECS indicate that spatially varying BFC obtained from data assimilation is the best fitted one; meanwhile it could improve the accuracy in the simulation of M2 constituent. Through the analysis of the best fitted one, new empirical formulas of BFC in BYECS are developed with which the commendable simulated results of M2 constituent in BYECS are obtained.

  7. Three-dimensional finite-element modelling of Earth's viscoelastic deformation: effects of lateral variations in lithospheric thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shijie; Paulson, Archie; Wahr, John

    2003-11-01

    We have developed a 3-D spherical finite-element model to study the dynamic response to surface loads of a self-gravitating and incompressible Earth with 3-D viscoelastic structure. We have forced our model with the ICE-3G deglaciation history of Tushingham & Peltier to study the effects of laterally varying lithospheric thickness on observations of post-glacial rebound (PGR). The laterally varying lithospheric thicknesses are derived from estimates of the thermal structure of the oceanic lithosphere and from elastic thicknesses on continents as estimated from studies of long-term geological loads. Our calculations show that the effects of lithospheric structure on the relative sea level change (RSLC) depend on the locations of the observation sites and on the size of loads. The RSLC at the centre of the North American ice sheet is significantly less sensitive to lithospheric thickness, compared with the RSLC at the centre of the Fennoscandian ice sheet. At the peripheral bulges the RSLC tends to be more sensitive to lithospheric thickness. The RSLC is controlled by local lithospheric thickness. The RSLC at a given location, as predicted using models with laterally varying lithospheric thickness, can be reproduced using a 1-D model with a uniform lithospheric thickness equal to the local lithospheric thickness. Coupled with efficient parallel computing, we believe that the finite-element model that we present here can be used to address a variety of viscoelastic deformation problems in geodynamics.

  8. Evolution of the lithospheric mantle beneath Mt. Baekdu (Changbaishan): Constraints from geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic studies on peridotite xenoliths in trachybasalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Keunsu; Choi, Sung Hi; Cho, Moonsup; Lee, Der-Chuen

    2017-08-01

    Major and trace element compositions of minerals as well as Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions of clinopyroxenes from spinel peridotite xenoliths entrained in Late Cenozoic trachybasalt from Mt. Baekdu (Changbaishan) were used to elucidate lithospheric mantle formation and evolution in the eastern North China Craton (NCC). The analyzed peridotites were mainly spinel lherzolites with rare harzburgites. They consisted of olivine (Fo89.3-91.0), enstatite (Wo1-2En88-90Fs8-11), diopside (Wo45-50En45-51Fs4-6), and spinel (Cr# = 8.8-54.7). The peridotite residues underwent up to 25% partial melting in fertile mid-ocean-ridge basalt (MORB) mantle. Plots of the Cr# in spinel against the Mg# in coexisting olivine or spinel suggested an affinity with abyssal peridotites. Comparisons of Cr# and TiO2 in spinel were also compatible with an abyssal peridotite-like composition; however, harzburgites were slightly enriched in TiO2 because of the reaction with MORB-like melt. Temperatures estimated using two-pyroxene thermometry ranged from 750 to 1010 °C, reflecting their lithospheric mantle origin. The rare earth element (REE) patterns in clinopyroxenes of the peridotites varied from light REE (LREE) depleted to spoon shaped to LREE enriched, reflecting secondary overprinting effects of metasomatic melts or fluids on the residues from primordial melting. The calculated trace element pattern of metasomatic melt equilibrated with clinopyroxene in Mt. Baekdu peridotite showed strong enrichment in large-ion lithophile elements, Th and U together with slight fractionation in heavy REEs (HREEs) and considerable depletion in Nb and Ti. The Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions of clinopyroxenes separated from the peridotites varied from more depleted than present-day MORB to bulk Earth values. However, some clinopyroxene showed a decoupling between Nd and Sr isotopes, deviating from the mantle array with a high 87Sr/86Sr ratio. This sample also showed a significant Nd-Hf isotope decoupling lying

  9. Strong lateral variations of lithospheric mantle beneath cratons - Example from the Baltic Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, H. A.; Debayle, E.; Maupin, V.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding mechanisms for creation and evolution of Precambrian continental lithosphere requires to go beyond the large-scale seismic imaging in which shields often appear as laterally homogeneous, with a thick and fast lithosphere. We here present new results from a seismic experiment (POLENET-LAPNET) in the northern part of the Baltic Shield where we identify very high seismic velocities (Vs˜4.7 km/s) in the upper part of the mantle lithosphere and a velocity decrease of ˜0.2 km/s at approximately 150 km depth. We interpret this velocity decrease as refertilisation of the lower part of the lithosphere. This result is in contrast to the lithospheric structure immediately south of the study area, where the seismic velocities within the lithosphere are fast down to 250 km depth, as well as to that of southern Norway, where there is no indication of very high velocities in the lithospheric mantle (Vs of ˜4.4 km/s). While the relatively low velocities beneath southern Norway can tentatively be attributed to the opening of the Atlantic Ocean, the velocity decrease beneath northern Finland is not easily explained with present knowledge of surface tectonics. Our results show that shield areas may be laterally heterogeneous even over relatively short distances. Such variability may in many cases be related to lithosphere erosion and/or refertilisation at the edge of cratons, which may therefore be particularly interesting targets for seismic imaging.

  10. A preliminary study on puncture resistances of top and bottom layers of multi-layered needlepunched nonwoven geotextiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan, G.; Tercan, M.

    2017-10-01

    Needlepunched nonwoven textiles are commonly used as geotextiles for various applications. Considering both environmental and economical benefits, utilization of recycled fibres in nonwoven geotextiles has become an attractive issue. Within this scope, the aim of this study is to evaluate the puncture resistance performances of top and bottom layers of multi-layered needle punched nonwovens made of recycled fibres to be used as membrane protective geotextiles by comparing them with those of made from polypropylene and polyester fibres. Puncture resistance results indicated that nonwovens made of recycled fibres demonstrated good performances at this preliminary stage.

  11. Experimental studies of anomalous radon activity in the Tlamacas Mountain, Popocatepetl Volcano area, México: new tools to study lithosphere-atmosphere coupling for forecasting volcanic and seismic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Antonio Lopez Cruz Abeyro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    This study presents and discusses the results of soil radon monitoring at three different volcano sites and one reference site, from December 2007 to January 2009. This relates to the activity of the Popocatepetl Volcano and a radon survey and gamma-ray spectrometry in the area between Paso de Cortes and Tlamacas Mountain, and in the adjacent regions. The results are applied to the aspects of atmosphere electricity and lithosphere-atmosphere coupling in relation to the forecasting of volcano and earthquake activity. The monitoring of radon release reveals a decrease in radon concentration (down to total suppression with approaching moderate volcanic eruptions. The behavior of the radon activity at the Tlamacas site is more apparent, compared to other observational sites. The average level of radon release observed at the Tlamacas site is much higher, with some characteristic variations. Both the radon survey and gamma-ray spectrometry indicate intensive diffusion radon emission localized in the area of Tlamacas Mountain. The average radon concentration in the area of Tlamacas is about 10-20-fold greater than the background volcano values. The new concept of lithosphere-atmosphere coupling is presented: intensive radon release in high elevated areas shortens and modifies the Earth-to-thunderclouds electric circuit, which provokes microdischarges into the air close to the ground, attracting lightning discharges. This concept attempts to explain in a new way the noise-like geomagnetic emissions registered before major earthquakes, and it promotes interest for the study of thunderstorm activity in seismo-active zones, as a promising instrument for earthquake forecasting.

  12. Numerical study of swirling flow in a cylinder with rotating top and bottom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Michelsen, Jess

    2006-01-01

    that the S shape does exist. The S shape of the stability diagram predicted by LSA is thus confirmed by a finite-volume based Navier-Stokes solver. The additional computations at aspect ratio lambda=2 show that the curve of critical Reynolds number has a wider S shape in the co-rotating branch for xi about 0...... (xi=Omega(bottom)/Omega(top)). Earlier linear stability analysis (LSA) using the Galerkin spectral method by Gelfgat [Phys. Fluids, 8, 2614 (1996)] revealed that the curve of the critical Reynolds number behaves like an "S" around xi=0.54 in the co-rotation branch and around xi=-0.63 in the counter......-rotation branch. Additional finite volume computations, however, did not show a clear S behavior. In order to check the existence of the S shape, computations are performed using an axisymmetric finite volume Navier-Stokes code at aspect ratios (lambda=H/R) 1.5 and 2.0. Comparisons with LSA at lambda=1.5 show...

  13. Optical and electronic properties study of bottom-up graphene nanoribbons for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Cesar E. P.; Rocha, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), turn out to be serious contender for several optolectronic applications due to their physical properties. Recently, bottom-up methods, using the assembly of appropriate precursor molecules were shown to be an exciting pathway towards making precise nanoribbons. In particular, it has been demonstrated that so-called cove-shaped GNRs absorb light in the visible part of the spectrum, suggesting they could be used for photovoltaic applications. In solar cells, the key ingredient is the presence excitons and their subsequent diffusion along a donor material. This is influenced by the character of the different excitations taking place, as well as, the exciton binding energy. Thus, In this work we use many-body corrected density functional theory to simulate the optical properties of these nanoribbons. We elucidate the most important transitions occurring in these systems, and identify types of excitatiions that have not been previously observed in conventional nanoribbons. We also find that the exciton binding energies for all the structures we considered are in the eV range, which enhances the diffusion lengths for the particle-hole pairs. Finally, we estimate the potencial of these systems as solar cells by calculating the short-circuit current. The Authors thank FAPESP for financial support.

  14. Soft-bottom crustacean assemblages in Mediterranean marine caves: the cave of Cerro Gordo (Granada, Spain) as case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Barranco, C.; Guerra-García, J. M.; Sánchez-Tocino, L.; García-Gómez, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Although marine caves are priority conservation areas according to the Directive 92/43/CEE of the European Community, there is a lack of studies dealing with their soft-bottom communities. For a case study, we selected the Cerro Gordo cave at 15 m depth. Three different zones were defined: a semi-dark 25-m long entrance area, a dark intermediate area of 35 m, and the final zone at 90 m from the entrance. Sediment samples were taken from these zones as well as from outside the cave (control) by SCUBA diving. Six rectangular cores of 10 × 250 cm2 were collected in each site for macrofaunal study, and three more replicates were taken to analyze physico-chemical parameters. The granulometry showed a clear gradient from medium sands outside the cave to silt and clay in the inner zone. Measurements of the crustacean assemblages showed that the number of species and abundance were significantly higher outside the cave (30-40 species, >4,000 ind m-2) than inside (5-10 species, mediterranea and Monoculodes packardi. This is the first description of soft-bottom crustacean communities from submarine caves of southern Spain.

  15. Constraints on the Thermal and Compositional Nature of the Oceanic Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary from Seismic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghein, C.; Yuan, K.; Schmerr, N. C.; Xing, Z.

    2014-12-01

    In this study we modeled S-wave velocities, radial and azimuthal anisotropy beneath the Pacific ocean, and compared our model with detections of the Gutenberg (G) discontinuity at 40-100 km depth to evaluate its context and relation to the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). The G is often associated with the LAB, but its sharpness and the low correlation between its depth and oceanic plate age suggest a compositional origin, in contradiction with tomographic models of isotropic wave velocities. Here, we inverted fundamental and higher mode anisotropic Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps to which we applied non-linear crustal corrections. Our model defines three layers within the upper 250km of the mantle. The bottom layer is characterized by relatively low velocities, strong (3%) azimuthal anisotropy, fast seismic directions that follow the absolute plate motion (APM), and strong (5%) radial anisotropy with VSH>VSV. This suggests alignment of olivine fast axes with mantle flow direction in the asthenosphere. The middle layer has fast axes aligned with the paleospreading directions, and the boundary between the bottom and middle layers follows a half-space cooling model. This suggests a thermal origin of the LAB if we use the change in alignment of the fast axes with the APM as a proxy for the LAB. Remarkably, a change in azimuthal anisotropy is found between the two top layers at a roughly constant depth that coincides with the location of the G. The G is therefore located within the thermal lithosphere and is primarily associated with a vertical gradient in azimuthal anisotropy, which may result from compositional changes. Dehydration of the mantle underlying mid-ocean ridges offers a possible explanation for our results. It could generate a chemically depleted, viscous layer that becomes overprinted by lowered temperatures as the plate cools and migrates away from the ridge. The olivine fast axes would align with the spreading direction at the ridge in the

  16. Shear wave velocity structure in the lithosphere and asthenosphere across the Southern California continent and Pacific plate margin using inversion of Rayleigh wave data from the ALBACORE project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, A. C.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Kohler, M. D.; Rathnayaka, S.; Escobar, L., Sr.

    2015-12-01

    The North American and Pacific plate boundary is a unique example of past subduction of an oceanic spreading center which has involved oceanic plate capture and inception of a continental transform boundary that juxtaposes continental and oceanic lithosphere on a single plate. The amphibious ALBACORE seismic project (Asthenospheric and Lithospheric Broadband Architecture from the California Offshore Region Experiment) deployed 34 ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) on 15-35 Ma seafloor and offers a unique opportunity to compare the LAB in continental and oceanic lithosphere in one seismic study. Rayleigh waves were recorded simultaneously by our offshore array and 82 CISN network land stations from 2010-2011. Here we predict phase velocities for a starting shear wave velocity model for each of 5 regions in our study area and compare to observed phase velocities from our array in a least-squares sense that produces the best fit 1-D shear wave velocity structure for each region. Preliminary results for the deep ocean (seafloor 25-32 Ma) indicates high velocities reaching 4.5 km/s at depths of 50 km associated with the lithosphere for seafloor 25-32 Ma. A negative velocity gradient is observed below this which reaches a minimum of 4.0 km/s at 160 km depth. The mid-ocean region (age 13-25 Ma) indicates a slightly lower magnitude and shallower LVZ. The Inner Borderland displays the highest lithospheric velocities offshore reaching 4.8 km/s at 40 km depth indicating underplating. The base of the LVZ in the Borderland increases sharply from 4.0 km/s to 4.5 km/s at 80-150 km depth indicating partial melt and compositional changes. The LVZ displays a very gradual positive velocity gradient in all other regions such as the deep seafloor and continent reaching 4.5 km/s at 300 km depth. The deep ocean, Borderlands, and continental region each have unique lithospheric velocities, LAB depths, and LVZ character that indicate stark differences in mantle structure that occur on a

  17. Deformation in the continental lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Physical Properties of Earth Materials Committee, a technical committee of AGU's Tectonophysics Section, is organizing a dinner/colloquium as part of the Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. This event will be held Monday, December 3rd, in the Gold Rush Room of the Holiday Inn Golden Gateway Hotel at 1500 Van Ness St. There will be a no-host bar from 6:30 to 7:30 P.M., followed by dinner from 7:30 to 8:30 P.M. Paul Tapponnier will deliver the after-dinner talk, “Large-Scale Deformation Mechanisms in the Continental Lithosphere: Where Do We Stand?” It will start at 8:30 P.M. and a business meeting will follow at 9:30 P.M.

  18. The lithosphere-asthenosphere Italy and surroundings

    CERN Document Server

    Panza, G F; Chimera, G; Pontevivo, A; Raykova, R

    2003-01-01

    The velocity-depth distribution of the lithosphere-asthenosphere in the Italian region and surroundings is imaged, with a lateral resolution of about 100 km, by surface wave velocity tomography and non-linear inversion. Maps of the Moho depth, of the thickness of the lithosphere and of the shear-wave velocities, down to depths of 200 km and more, are constructed. A mantle wedge, identified in the uppermost mantle along the Apennines and the Calabrian Arc, underlies the principal recent volcanoes, and partial melting can be relevant in this part of the uppermost mantle. In Calabria a lithospheric doubling is seen, in connection with the subduction of the Ionian lithosphere. The asthenosphere is shallow in the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea. High velocity bodies, cutting the asthenosphere, outline the Adria-lonian subduction in the Tyrrhenian Sea and the deep-reaching lithospheric root in the Western Alps. Less deep lithospheric roots are seen in the Central Apennines. The lithosphere-asthenosphere properties delineat...

  19. The Magnetic Field of the Earth's Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thébault, Erwan; Purucker, Michael; Whaler, Kathryn A.; Langlais, Benoit; Sabaka, Terence J.

    2010-08-01

    The lithospheric contribution to the Earth's magnetic field is concealed in magnetic field data that have now been measured over several decades from ground to satellite altitudes. The lithospheric field results from the superposition of induced and remanent magnetisations. It therefore brings an essential constraint on the magnetic properties of rocks of the Earth's sub-surface that would otherwise be difficult to characterize. Measuring, extracting, interpreting and even defining the magnetic field of the Earth's lithosphere is however challenging. In this paper, we review the difficulties encountered. We briefly summarize the various contributions to the Earth's magnetic field that hamper the correct identification of the lithospheric component. Such difficulties could be partially alleviated with the joint analysis of multi-level magnetic field observations, even though one cannot avoid making compromises in building models and maps of the magnetic field of the Earth's lithosphere at various altitudes. Keeping in mind these compromises is crucial when lithospheric field models are interpreted and correlated with other geophysical information. We illustrate this discussion with recent advances and results that were exploited to infer statistical properties of the Earth's lithosphere. The lessons learned in measuring and processing Earth's magnetic field data may prove fruitful in planetary exploration, where magnetism is one of the few remotely accessible internal properties.

  20. Lithosphere Structure and Mantle Characterization of the Alpine-Himalayan Belt: Atlas, Zagros and Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Munt, I.; Tunini, L.; Fernandez, M.; Verges, J.; Garcia-Castellanos, D.

    2015-12-01

    terms of crust and lithospheric mantle thickness, but also in mantle density, temperature and composition. These models show that the three studied ranges (Atlas, Zagros and Himalaya-Tibet) are characterized by the presence of crustal roots, but not necessarily underlain by lithospheric mantle roots.

  1. Interaction Between Magma Fluids and Lithosphere Rocks Under Crest Zone of MAR: Mineralogical and Petrophysical Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharapov, V. N.; Mazurov, M. P.; Mysov, V. M.

    2004-12-01

    Using numerical and physical experiments dynamics of mass-change in the lithosphere under the zones joining rift valleys of MAR and transform faults was modeled. `Black smokers', methane gas flows, and bubbly carbon deposits, as products of hydrocarbon condensation, present in these zones. Numerical experiments were completed using flow-reactor scheme of PC Selector Win for gas flows of compositions: C (0.1-4), O (0-2), H (0.5-4), Cl (0.05-0.5), F (0.01-1), S (0.01-0.1), and N (0.02-0.1). Weight fraction of gas mixture in rocks was 1.5-0.01%, P from 45-10 kbar to 30-100 bar, T=1200-400° C. The fluid-rock interaction time was t=1-100 steps. Density change for new-formed rock in the lithosphere profile was estimated by virtual mineral composition recounting for each time step. Verification of physicochemical model was carried out by comparison of changed rocks and numerically obtained condensates, as well as minerals and solid, gas and liquid carbon phases, obtained experimentally using the equipment to study catalytic conversion of synthesis-gas flow (H2=65%, CO=34.8%, N2=0.2% vol.). It was shown that above the boiling boundary of basic liquids a field of convective mass transfer should form in the lithosphere. This field includes a number of zones of initial rock change with regions of solid phase depleting and condensing. The ranges of rock composition change due to `reduced' and oxidized' gas mixtures were studied. The density change for ultra-basic rock in the lithosphere is related to spatial and time change of oxygen potential, which current values at the beginning of the interaction process are buffering by rocks, and then - by the values at the system input. In the case when reduced gas mixtures exist, an oxidation roll is forming in the flow, for oxidized mixtures - a reduction roll. At the fluid output at the sea bottom their composition is the most oxidized. When fluids and initial rocks of the lithosphere interact, changed rock mixtures of anomalously

  2. Finding the last 200Ma of subducted lithosphere in tomography and incorporating it into plate reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppe, J.; Wu, J.; Chen, Y. W.

    2016-12-01

    Precise plate-tectonic reconstruction of the Earth has been constrained largely by the seafloor magnetic-anomaly record of the present oceans formed during the dispersal of the last supercontinent since 200Ma. The corresponding world that was lost to subduction has been only sketchily known. We have developed methodologies to map in 3D these subducted slabs of lithosphere in seismic tomography and unfold them to the Earth surface, constraining their initial size, shapes and locations. Slab edges are commonly formed at times of plate reorganization (for example bottom edges typically record initiation of subduction) such that unfolded slabs fit together at times of reorganization, as we illustrate for the Nazca slab at 80Ma and the western Pacific slabs between Kamchatka and New Zealand at 50Ma. Mapping to date suggests that a relatively complete and decipherable record of lithosphere subducted over the last 200Ma may exist in the mantle today, providing a storehouse for new discoveries. We briefly illustrate our procedure for obtaining slab-constrained plate-tectonic models from tomography with our recent study of the Philippine Sea plate, whose motions and tectonic history have been the least known of the major plates because it has been isolated from the global plate and hotspot circuit by trenches. We mapped and unfolded 28 subducted slabs in the mantle under East Asia and Australia/Oceania to depths of 1200km, with a subducted area of 25% of present-day global oceanic lithosphere, and incorporated them as constraints into a new globally-consistent plate reconstruction of the Philippine Sea and surrounding East Asia, leading to a number of new insights, including: [1] discovery of a major (8000 km x 2500 km) set of vanished oceans that we call the East Asia Sea that existed between the Pacific and Indian Oceans, now represented by flat slabs in the lower mantle under present-day Philippine Sea, eastern Sundaland and northern Australia and [2] the Philippine Sea

  3. The lithospheric mantle below southern West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Karina Krarup; Waight, Tod Earle; Pearson, D. Graham

    2009-01-01

    Geothermobarometry of primarily garnet lherzolitic xenoliths from several localities in southern West Greenland is applied to address the diamond potential, pressure and temperature distribution and the stratigraphy of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle ~600 Ma ago. The samples are from...

  4. Thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere as a potential trigger for mass-extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilet, S.; Müntener, O.; Jean, G.; Schoene, B.; Schaltegger, U.

    2016-12-01

    The temporal coincidence between LIPs and mass extinctions has led many to pose a causal relationship between the two. However, there is still no consensus on a mechanistic model that explains how magmatism leads to the turnover of terrestrial and marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Here, we present a synthesis of stratigraphic constraints on the Triassic-Jurassic and Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundaries combined with geochronological data demonstrating that these biotic crises are both associated with rapid change from an initial cool period to greenhouse conditions. As current hypothesis for LIPs seems unable to produce these successive climatic changes, we evaluate an alternative suggesting that the initial cooling could be due to gas release during the initial thermal erosion of the cratonic lithosphere due to emplacement of the CAMP and Karoo-Ferrar volcanic provinces. Karoo and CAMP areas were underlain by thick lithosphere (>200 km) prior to continental break up. Even in presence of abnormal potential mantle temperature, the presence of thick lithosphere excludes significant melting of the asthenospheric mantle without initial stage of thermal erosion of the cratonic lithosphere. Various studies on Kaapvaal craton have shown that sulfide minerals are enclosed in the basal part of the cratonic lithosphere. We argue that initial gas emission was dominated by sulfur liberated from sulfide-bearing cratonic lithosphere causing global cooling and eustatic regression, which was followed by warming/transgression associated with the progressive increase of CO2 in the atmosphere associated to LIPs emission. We suggest that the nature of the underlying lithosphere during large LIP eruption exerts an important control on the consequences at the Earth's surface. This model offers an explanation for why LIPs erupted through oceanic lithosphere are not associated with climatic and biotic crises comparable to LIPs emitted through cratonic lithosphere.

  5. Imaging Canary Island hotspot material beneath the lithosphere of Morocco and southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Meghan S.; O'Driscoll, Leland J.; Butcher, Amber J.; Thomas, Christine

    2015-12-01

    The westernmost Mediterranean has developed into its present day tectonic configuration as a result of complex interactions between late stage subduction of the Neo-Tethys Ocean, continental collision of Africa and Eurasia, and the Canary Island mantle plume. This study utilizes S receiver functions (SRFs) from over 360 broadband seismic stations to seismically image the lithosphere and uppermost mantle from southern Spain through Morocco and the Canary Islands. The lithospheric thickness ranges from ∼65 km beneath the Atlas Mountains and the active volcanic islands to over ∼210 km beneath the cratonic lithosphere in southern Morocco. The common conversion point (CCP) volume of the SRFs indicates that thinned lithosphere extends from beneath the Canary Islands offshore southwestern Morocco, to beneath the continental lithosphere of the Atlas Mountains, and then thickens abruptly at the West African craton. Beneath thin lithosphere between the Canary hot spot and southern Spain, including below the Atlas Mountains and the Alboran Sea, there are distinct pockets of low velocity material, as inferred from high amplitude positive, sub-lithospheric conversions in the SRFs. These regions of low seismic velocity at the base of the lithosphere extend beneath the areas of Pliocene-Quaternary magmatism, which has been linked to a Canary hotspot source via geochemical signatures. However, we find that this volume of low velocity material is discontinuous along strike and occurs only in areas of recent volcanism and where asthenospheric mantle flow is identified with shear wave splitting analyses. We propose that the low velocity structure beneath the lithosphere is material flowing sub-horizontally northeastwards beneath Morocco from the tilted Canary Island plume, and the small, localized volcanoes are the result of small-scale upwellings from this material.

  6. Lithospheric discontinuities beneath the U.S. Midcontinent - signatures of Proterozoic terrane accretion and failed rifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Gilbert, Hersh; Fischer, Karen M.; Andronicos, Christopher L.; Pavlis, Gary L.; Hamburger, Michael W.; Marshak, Stephen; Larson, Timothy; Yang, Xiaotao

    2018-01-01

    Seismic discontinuities between the Moho and the inferred lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) are known as mid-lithospheric discontinuities (MLDs) and have been ascribed to a variety of phenomena that are critical to understanding lithospheric growth and evolution. In this study, we used S-to-P converted waves recorded by the USArray Transportable Array and the OIINK (Ozarks-Illinois-Indiana-Kentucky) Flexible Array to investigate lithospheric structure beneath the central U.S. This region, a portion of North America's cratonic platform, provides an opportunity to explore how terrane accretion, cratonization, and subsequent rifting may have influenced lithospheric structure. The 3D common conversion point (CCP) volume produced by stacking back-projected Sp receiver functions reveals a general absence of negative converted phases at the depths of the LAB across much of the central U.S. This observation suggests a gradual velocity decrease between the lithosphere and asthenosphere. Within the lithosphere, the CCP stacks display negative arrivals at depths between 65 km and 125 km. We interpret these as MLDs resulting from the top of a layer of crystallized melts (sill-like igneous intrusions) or otherwise chemically modified lithosphere that is enriched in water and/or hydrous minerals. Chemical modification in this manner would cause a weak layer in the lithosphere that marks the MLDs. The depth and amplitude of negative MLD phases vary significantly both within and between the physiographic provinces of the midcontinent. Double, or overlapping, MLDs can be seen along Precambrian terrane boundaries and appear to result from stacked or imbricated lithospheric blocks. A prominent negative Sp phase can be clearly identified at 80 km depth within the Reelfoot Rift. This arrival aligns with the top of a zone of low shear-wave velocities, which suggests that it marks an unusually shallow seismic LAB for the midcontinent. This boundary would correspond to the top of a

  7. A study of chemical speciation of metals in aquatic bottom sediment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The species and total mean metal concentrations of some potentially environmental toxic metals (manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and lead (Pb)) in ... The speciation result revealed that high levels of these metals studied (Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Pb) were associated with exchangeable and carbonate bound ...

  8. Integrated experimental platforms to study blast injuries: a bottom-up approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, C.; Williams, A.; Rankin, S.; Proud, W. G.; Brown, K. A.

    2014-05-01

    We are developing experimental models of blast injury using data from live biological samples. An integrated research strategy is followed to study material and biological properties of cells, tissues and organs, that are subjected to dynamic and static pressures, relevant to those of battlefield blast. We have developed a confined Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) system, which allows cells, either in suspension or as a monolayer, to be subjected to compression waves with pressures on the order of a few MPa and durations of hundreds of microseconds. The chamber design enables recovery of biological samples for cellular and molecular analysis. The SHPB platform, coupled with Quasi-Static experiments, is used to determine stress-strain curves of soft biological tissues under compression at low, medium and high strain rates. Tissue samples are examined, using histological techniques, to study macro- and microscopic changes induced by compression waves. In addition, a shock tube enables application of single or multiple air blasts with pressures on the order of kPa and a few milliseconds duration; this platform was used for initial studies on mesenchymal stem cells responses to blast pressures.

  9. Matching Lithosphere velocity changes to the GOCE gravity signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitenberg, Carla

    2016-07-01

    Authors: Carla Braitenberg, Patrizia Mariani, Alberto Pastorutti Department of Mathematics and Geosciences, University of Trieste Via Weiss 1, 34100 Trieste Seismic tomography models result in 3D velocity models of lithosphere and sublithospheric mantle, which are due to mineralogic compositional changes and variations in the thermal gradient. The assignment of density is non-univocal and can lead to inverted density changes with respect to velocity changes, depending on composition and temperature. Velocity changes due to temperature result in a proportional density change, whereas changes due to compositional changes and age of the lithosphere can lead to density changes of inverted sign. The relation between velocity and density implies changes in the lithosphere rigidity. We analyze the GOCE gradient fields and the velocity models jointly, making simulations on thermal and compositional density changes, using the velocity models as constraint on lithosphere geometry. The correlations are enhanced by applying geodynamic plate reconstructions to the GOCE gravity field and the tomography models which places today's observed fields at the Gondwana pre-breakup position. We find that the lithosphere geometry is a controlling factor on the overlying geologic elements, defining the regions where rifting and collision alternate and repeat through time. The study is carried out globally, with focus on the conjugate margins of the African and South American continents. The background for the study can be found in the following publications where the techniques which have been used are described: Braitenberg, C., Mariani, P. and De Min, A. (2013). The European Alps and nearby orogenic belts sensed by GOCE, Boll. Bollettino di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata, 54(4), 321-334. doi:10.4430/bgta0105---- Braitenberg, C. and Mariani, P. (2015). Geological implications from complete Gondwana GOCE-products reconstructions and link to lithospheric roots. Proceedings of 5th

  10. Numerical study of natural melt convection in cylindrical cavity with hot walls and cold bottom sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmanache Abdennacer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical study of natural convection heat transfer and fluid flow in cylindrical cavity with hot walls and cold sink is conducted. Calculations are performed in terms of the cavity aspect ratio, the heat exchanger length and the thermo physical properties expressed via the Prandtl number and the Rayleigh number. Results are presented in the form of isotherms, streamlines, average Nusselt number and average bulk temperature for a range of Rayleigh number up to 106. It is observed that Rayleigh number and heat exchanger length influences fluid flow and heat transfer, whereas the cavity aspect ratio has no significant effects.

  11. Integrated Experimental Platforms to Study Blast Injuries: a Bottom-Up Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Chiara

    2013-06-01

    Developing a cellular and molecular understanding of the nature of traumatic and post-traumatic effects of blast events on live biological samples is critical for improving clinical outcomes.1 To investigate the consequences of pressure waves upon cellular structures and the underlying physiological and biochemical changes, we are using an integrated approach to study the material and biological properties of cells, tissues and organs when subjected to extreme conditions. In particular we have developed a confined Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) system, which allows us to subject cells in suspension or in a monolayer to compression waves of the order of few MPa and duration of hundreds of microseconds.2 The chamber design also enables recovery of the biological samples for cellular and molecular analysis. Specifically, cell survivability, viability, proliferation and morphological changes are investigated post compression for different cell populations. The SHPB platform, coupled with Quasi-Static experiments, is also used to determine stress-strain curves of soft biological tissues under compression at low, medium and high strain rates. Samples are also examined using histological techniques to study macro- and microscopical changes induced by compression waves. Finally, a shock tube has been developed to replicate primary blast damage on organs (i.e. mice lungs) and cell monolayers by generating single or multiple air blast of the order of kPa and few milliseconds duration. This platform allows us to visualize post-traumatic morphological changes at the cellular level as a function of the stimulus pressure and duration as well as biomarker signatures of blast injuries. Adapting and integrating a variety of approaches with different experimental platforms allows us to sample a vast pressure-time space in terms of biological and structural damage that mimic blast injuries and also to determine which physical parameters (peak pressure, stimulus duration, impulse

  12. EFFECT FOR A SINGLE ROUGHNESS E=5,63mm OF EXPERIMENTAL TO STUDY HYDRAULIC JUMP PROFILE IN A CHANNEL IN U A ROUGH BOTTOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ghomri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to study the hydraulic jump controlled by threshold, moving in a channel profile 'U' bottomed rough for a single roughness E=5,63mm. Functional relations in dimensionless terms, linking the different characteristics of the projection, showing the effect of roughness of the bottom of the channel are obtained. The hydraulic jump is the primary means used by hydraulic structures to dissipate energy. This hydraulic jump is formed at the sharp transition from a supercritical flow a stream flow.

  13. EFFECT FOR A SINGLE ROUGHNESS E=5,63mm OF EXPERIMENTAL TO STUDY HYDRAULIC JUMP PROFILE IN A CHANNEL IN U A ROUGH BOTTOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ghomri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to study the hydraulic jump controlled by threshold, moving in a channel profile 'U' bottomed rough for a single roughness E=5,63mm. Functional relations in dimensionless terms, linking the different characteristics of the projection, showing the effect of roughness of the bottom of the channel are obtained. The hydraulic jump is the primary means used by hydraulic structures to dissipate energy. This hydraulic jump is formed at the sharp transition from a supercritical flow a stream flow.

  14. Study of Low Flow Rate Ladle Bottom Gas Stirring Using Triaxial Vibration Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenus, Jaefer; Brooks, Geoffrey; Dunn, Michelle; Li, Zushu; Goodwin, Tim

    2018-02-01

    Secondary steelmaking plays a great role in enhancing the quality of the final steel product. The metal quality is a function of metal bath stirring in ladles. The metal bath is often stirred by an inert gas to achieve maximum compositional and thermal uniformity throughout the melt. Ladle operators often observe the top surface phenomena, such as level of meniscus disturbance, to evaluate the status of stirring. However, this type of monitoring has significant limitations in assessing the process accurately especially at low gas flow rate bubbling. The present study investigates stirring phenomena using ladle wall triaxial vibration at a low flow rate on a steel-made laboratory model and plant scale for the case of the vacuum tank degasser. Cold model and plant data were successfully modeled by partial least-squares regression to predict the amount of stirring. In the cold model, it was found that the combined vibration signal could predict the stirring power and recirculation speed effectively in specific frequency ranges. Plant trials also revealed that there is a high structure in each data set and in the same frequency ranges at the water model. In the case of industrial data, the degree of linear relationship was strong for data taken from a single heat.

  15. A Comparative Prospective Study of Two Different Treatment Sequences i.e. Bottom Up-Inside Out and Topdown-Outside in, in the Treatment of Panfacial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degala, Saikrishna; Sundar, S Shyam; Mamata, K S

    2015-12-01

    To compare the sequence bottom-up inside-out with top-down outside-in, in the treatment of pan facial fractures and to evaluate the outcome of these approaches. The data from 11 patients with panfacial fracture are prospectively analysed. Five cases are treated with bottom-up approach and six patients with top-down approach. There were 11 male patients (six in top-down approach and five in bottom-up approach), ranging in age from 24 to 50 years. All injuries were result of RTA (n = 11, 100 %). Final treatment outcome was excellent in 3 (50 %), 1 (16 %) good and 2 (32 %) cases were fair in topdown approach, 3 (60 %) excellent and 2 (40 %) fair in bottom up approach with contingency coefficient value (P inside-out and top-down outside-in approaches have similar clinical outcomes. Hence it could be suggestive to start fixation of least disrupted (more stable) facial half as a guide for reconstruction of the remaining. Choice of the bottom-up inside-out or top-down outside-in sequence should be according to the pattern of fractures and preference of the surgeon. However, further controlled clinical trials, comparative studies with a larger sample size would be better to evaluate the final clinical outcome of individual techniques.

  16. Lithospheric Structure of the Arabian Shield From the Joint Inversion of Receiver Function and Surface-Wave Dispersion Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    black). 13 Comparison of the Sandvol et al. (1998) crustal thicknesses (circles) and 22 the crustal thicknesses inferred from the joint inversion... lithospheric structure of that region and, therefore, originating new studies: Sandvol et al. (1998) computed receiver functions from P-wave...in the Arabian peninsula, Rodgers et al. (1999) estimated lithospheric velocity structure by modeling regional waveforms, and Mokhtar et al. (2001

  17. On the structure of the lithosphere of Mars: New insights from crustal composition and rheology of the upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Díaz, A.; Egea-González, I.; Parro, L. M.; Tasaka, M.; Ruiz, J.

    2017-09-01

    We conduct an in-depth study of the thermal structure and rheology of the lithosphere of Mars, focusing on the effects of crust composition, creep behaviour of olivine (the main mineral in the lithosphere mantle), and the abundance of iron and water in the mantle.

  18. Offshore Southern California lithospheric velocity structure from noise cross-correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, D. C.; Kohler, M. D.; Tsai, V. C.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2016-05-01

    A new shear wave velocity model offshore Southern California is presented that images plate boundary deformation including both thickening and thinning of the crustal and mantle lithosphere at the westernmost edge of the North American continent. The Asthenospheric and Lithospheric Broadband Architecture from the California Offshore Region Experiment (ALBACORE) ocean bottom seismometer array, together with 65 stations of the onshore Southern California Seismic Network, is used to measure ambient noise correlation functions and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves which are inverted for 3-D shear wave velocities. The resulting velocity model defines the transition from continental lithosphere to oceanic, illuminating the complex history and deformation in the region. A transition to the present-day strike-slip regime between the Pacific and North American Plates resulted in broad deformation and capture of the now >200 km wide continental shelf. Our velocity model suggests the persistence of the uppermost mantle volcanic processes associated with East Pacific Rise spreading adjacent to the Patton Escarpment, which marks the former subduction of Farallon Plate underneath North America. The most prominent of these seismic structures is a low-velocity anomaly underlying the San Juan Seamount, suggesting ponding of magma at the base of the crust, resulting in thickening and ongoing adjustment of the lithosphere due to the localized loading. The velocity model also provides a robust framework for future earthquake location determinations and ground-shaking simulations for risk estimates.

  19. Water in the Cratonic Mantle Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    The fact that Archean and Proterozoic cratons are underlain by the thickest (>200 km) lithosphere on Earth has always puzzled scientists because the dynamic convection of the surrounding asthenosphere would be expected to delaminate and erode these mantle lithospheric "keels" over time. Although density and temperature of the cratonic lithosphere certainly play a role in its strength and longevity, the role of water has only been recently addressed with data on actual mantle samples. Water in mantle lithologies (primarily peridotites and pyroxenites) is mainly stored in nominally anhydrous minerals (olivine, pyroxene, garnet) where it is incorporated as hydrogen bonded to structural oxygen in lattice defects. The property of hydrolytic weakening of olivine [4] has generated the hypothesis that olivine, the main mineral of the upper mantle, may be dehydrated in cratonic mantle lithospheres, contributing to its strength. This presentation will review the distribution of water concentrations in four cratonic lithospheres. The distribution of water contents in olivine from peridotite xenoliths found in kimberlites is different in each craton (Figure 1). The range of water contents of olivine, pyroxene and garnet at each xenolith location appears linked to local metasomatic events, some of which occurred later then the Archean and Proterozoic when these peridotites initially formed via melting. Although the low olivine water contents ( 6 GPa at the base of the Kaapvaal cratonic lithosphere may contribute to its strength, and prevent its delamination, the wide range of those from Siberian xenoliths is not compatible with providing a high enough viscosity contrast with the asthenophere. The water content in olivine inclusions from Siberian diamonds, on the other hand, have systematically low water contents (water contents. The olivine inclusions, however, may have been protected from metasomatism by their host diamond and record the overall low olivine water content of

  20. Modeling Geodynamic Mobility of Anisotropic Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry-Houts, J.; Karlstrom, L.

    2016-12-01

    The lithosphere is often idealized as a linear, or plastic layer overlying a Newtonian half-space. This approach has led to many insights into lithospheric foundering that include Rayligh-Taylor drips, slab-style delaminations, and small scale convection in the asthenosphere. More recent work has begun to quantify the effect of anisotropic lithosphere viscosity on these same phenomena. Anisotropic viscosity may come about due to stratigraphic deposition in the upper crust, dike/sill emplacement in the mid crust, or volcanic underplating at the Moho related to arcs or plumes. Anisotropic viscosity is also observed in the mantle, due to preferential orientation of olivine grains during flow. Here we extend the work of Lev & Hager (2008) on modeling anisotropic lithospheric foundering to investigate the effects of anisotropic regions which vary in size, magnitude, and orientation. We have extended Aspect, a modern geodynamic finite element code with a large developer and user base, to model exotic constitutive laws with an arbitrary fourth order tensor in place of the viscosity term. We further implement a material model to represent a transverse isotropic medium, such as is expected in a layered, or fractured lithosphere. We have validated our implementation against previous results, and analytic solutions, reproducing the result that horizontally oriented anisotropy tends to inhibit drips, and produce longer-wavelength instabilities. We expect that increased lateral extent of anisotropic regions will exaggerate this effect, to a limit at which the effect will plateau. Varying lithosphere thickness, and mantle anisotropy anisotropy may produce similar behavior. The implications of this effect are significant to lithospheric foundering beneath arcs and hotspots, possibly influencing the recycling of eclogite, production of silicic magmas, and dynamic topography.

  1. Olivine anisotropy suggests Gutenberg discontinuity is not the base of the lithosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Lars N.; Qi, Chao; Warren, Jessica M.

    2016-01-01

    Although plate tectonics has seen broad acceptance for Earth, the manner in which lithospheric plates are coupled to Earth’s deeper interior is still heavily debated. In particular, recent seismological observations suggest a sharp, flat base of the lithosphere, whereas thermal models suggest a gradational boundary that deepens with age. Based on laboratory experiments, we suggest that thermal models are most appropriate and that seismic studies are detecting features frozen into the lithosph...

  2. An upper mantle seismic discontinuity beneath the Galápagos Archipelago and its implications for studies of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Joseph S.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Villagómez, Darwin R.; Geist, Dennis J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-04-01

    An upper mantle seismic discontinuity (the Gutenberg or G discontinuity), at which shear wave velocity decreases with depth, has been mapped from S-to-p conversions in radial receiver functions recorded across the Galápagos Archipelago. The mean depth of the discontinuity is 91 ± 8 km beneath the southeastern archipelago and 72 ± 5 km beneath surrounding regions. The discontinuity appears deeper beneath the portion of the Nazca plate that we infer passed over the Galápagos mantle plume than elsewhere in the region. We equate the depth of the G discontinuity to the maximum depth extent of anhydrous melting, which forms an overlying layer of dehydrated and depleted mantle. We attribute areas of shallow discontinuity depth to the formation of the dehydrated layer near the Galápagos Spreading Center and areas of greater discontinuity depth to its modification over a mantle plume with an excess temperature of 115 ± 30°C. The G discontinuity lies within a high-seismic-velocity anomaly that we conclude forms by partial dehydration and a gradual but steady increase in seismic velocity with decreasing depth after upwelling mantle first encounters the solidus for volatile-bearing mantle material. At the depth of the solidus for anhydrous mantle material, removal of remaining water creates a sharp decrease in velocity with depth; this discontinuity may also mark a site of melt accumulation. Results from seismic imaging, the compositions of Galápagos lavas, and rare-earth-element concentrations across the archipelago require that mantle upwelling and partial melting occur over a broad region within the dehydrated and depleted layer. We conclude that the G discontinuity beneath the archipelago does not mark the boundary between rigid lithosphere and convecting asthenosphere.

  3. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary observed with USArray receiver functions

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, P.; Yuan, X.; Kind, R.; Mechie, J.

    2012-01-01

    The dense deployment of seismic stations so far in the western half of the United States within the USArray project provides the opportunity to study in greater detail the structure of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system. We use the S receiver function technique for this purpose, which has higher resolution than surface wave tomography, is sensitive to seismic discontinuities, and is free from multiples, unlike P receiver functions. Only two major discontinuities are observed in the entire a...

  4. Investigating the Lithospheric Structure of Southern Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmann, Frederik; Yuan, Xiaohui; Rümpker, Georg; Gerard, Rambolamana; Elisa, Rindraharisaona; Priestley, Keith

    2014-05-01

    The island of Madagascar occupies a key region in both the assembly and the multi-stage breakup of Gondwanaland, itself part of the super-continent Pangaea. Madagascar consists of an amalgamation of continental material, with the oldest rocks being of Archaean age. Its ancient fabric is characterised by several shear zones, some of them running oblique to the N-S trend, in particular in the south of the island. More recently during the Neogene, moderate volcanism has occurred in the Central and Northern part of the island, and there are indications of uplift throughout Eastern Madagascar over the last 10 Ma. Although Madagascar is now located within the interior of the African plate and far away from major plate boundaries (> 1000 km from the East African rift system and even further from the Central and South-West Indian Ridges), its seismic activity indicates that some deformation is taking place, and present-day kinematic models based on geodetic data and earthquake moment tensors in the global catalogues identify a diffuse N-S-oriented minor boundary separating two microplates, which appears to pass through Madagascar. In spite of the presence of Archaean and Proterozoic rocks continent-wide scale studies indicate a thin lithosphere (Madagascar, but are based on sparse data. We are operating a ENE-WSW oriented linear array of 25 broadband stations in southern Madagascar, extending from coast to coast and sampling the sedimentary basins in the west as well as the metamorphic rocks in the East, cutting geological boundaries seen at the surface at high angle. The array crosses the prominent Bongolava-Ranotsara shear zone which is thought to have been formed during Gondwanaland assembly, although this interpretation has recently been questioned. The array recorded the magnitude 5.3 earthquake of January 25, 2013 which occurred just off its western edge. In addition, in May 2013 we have deployed 25 short period sensors in the eastern part of the study area, where

  5. Lithospheric buoyancy and continental intraplate stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoback, M.L.; Mooney, W.D.

    2003-01-01

    Lithospheric buoyancy, the product of lithospheric density and thickness, is an important physical property that influences both the long-term stability of continents and their state of stress. We have determined lithospheric buoyancy by applying the simple isostatic model of Lachenbruch and Morgan (1990). We determine the crustal portion of lithospheric buoyancy using the USGS global database of more than 1700 crustal structure determinations (Mooney et al., 2002), which demonstrates that a simple relationship between crustal thickness and surface elevation does not exist. In fact, major regions of the crust at or near sea level (0-200 m elevation) have crustal thicknesses that vary between 25 and 55 km. Predicted elevations due to the crustal component of buoyancy in the model exceed observed elevations in nearly all cases (97% of the data), consistent with the existence of a cool lithospheric mantle lid that is denser than the asthenosphere on which it floats. The difference between the observed and predicted crustal elevation is assumed to be equal to the decrease in elevation produced by the negative buoyancy of the mantle lid. Mantle lid thickness was first estimated from the mantle buoyancy and a mean lid density computed using a basal crust temperature determined from extrapolation of surface heat flow, assuming a linear thermal gradient in the mantle lid. The resulting values of total lithosphere thickness are in good agreement with thicknesses estimated from seismic data, except beneath cratonic regions where they are only 40-60% of the typical estimates (200-350 km) derived from seismic data. This inconsistency is compatible with petrologic data and tomography and geoid analyses that have suggested that cratonic mantle lids are ??? 1% less dense than mantle lids elsewhere. By lowering the thermally determined mean mantle lid density in cratons by 1%, our model reproduces the observed 200-350+ km cratonic lithospheric thickness. We then computed

  6. Lithosphere Removal in the Central Andes: Reconciling Seismic Images and Elevation History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, O.; Currie, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Shortening of the upper crust should be accompanied by thickening of the deeper lithosphere. However, for many orogens, including the central Andes, geophysical and geological observations indicate that mantle lithosphere is spatially heterogeneous, being anomalously thin or absent. Seismic studies of the central Andes suggest that mantle lithosphere is locally removed. Also, present day elevations of the central Andean Plateau have been explained by rapid removal of mantle lithosphere over the last 10 Ma. Yet, the geological record is innately incomplete, and seismic tomography and receiver functions can offer only a present day snapshot of the subsurface. None of these techniques provides concrete insight into the physical processes responsible for current Andean elevations (3-5 km). A 2D plane-strain thermo-mechanical code, SOPALE, is used to examine the deep lithospheric dynamics connected to mantle lithosphere removal within a subduction zone setting, such as the Andes. Three models have been tested: removal by viscous dripping, by delamination, and a model with no removal. The removal models contain a high density eclogite root, creating a contrast between mantle lithosphere and mantle material. For the viscous drip models, mantle lithosphere is removed within 2.5-5 Myrs, descending subvertically through the mantle, causing subsequent surface rebound. Prior to this rebound, surface topography subsides locally over the dense root. This subsidence is influenced by crustal rheology, where weaker crustal rheologies produce deep, narrower basins (25-75 km wide, ~1 km deep), and stronger crustal rheologies produce shallow, broader basins (300-400 km wide, ~0.5 km deep). Delamination, which involves the coherent removal of mantle lithosphere along the Moho, affects a larger region, and is reflected in broader basins that extend into the back-arc. In all models, the deep lithosphere dynamics have an appreciable effect on surface topography, therefore, removal events

  7. The geomorphic record of deep lithospheric deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M. K.

    2006-12-01

    Where deformation of the upper crust is minimal or absent, a young history of topographic change can be related to active or recent processes occurring in the lower crust and mantle lithosphere. Geomorphic systems, fluvial systems in particular, are sensitive indicators of topographic change manifested by the erosional/depositional record, drainage pattern perturbations and landscape form. Evolution of landscape form over geologically relevant timescales (Myr) is commonly derived from low-temperature (form. Examples from the eastern Tibetan Plateau and the Sierra Nevada, California illustrate how geomorphic evolution of mountain ranges and plateaus may be related to lower crustal flow and mantle lithosphere removal. In these cases, a combination of multi-disciplinary data is used to delineate a holistic view of lithospheric evolution from the surface to the upper mantle that can be used to quantify rates of deformation and improve our understanding of deformation mechanisms. Future directions in linking surface and deep lithospheric processes will be aided by new thermochronometric techniques and further development of quantitative laws that govern surface processes, which will allow us to better understand landscape response to tectonic forcing. In turn, these advances may be applied for a more complete understanding of lithospheric dynamics.

  8. Search for supersymmetric partner of bottom quark at d0 at Tevatron. Studies on missing transverse energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvet, Samuel Pierre [Univ. of the Mediterranean, Marseille (France)

    2007-09-21

    Supersymmetry, extension of the Standard Model of Particle Physics (SM), is searched for by trying to observe the supersymmetric partner of bottom quark ($\\tilde{b}$). This search is performed using events with a final state comprising two acoplanar b-quark jets and missing transverse energy (MET) and coming from a sample of 992 pb-1 of data collected by the D0 detector at the Tevatron, the Fermilab p$\\bar{p}$ collider. The absence of an excess of events in comparison to MS expectations leads to exclude sb masses up to 201 GeV, neutralino masses up to 94 GeV. The MET has been studied under two points of view, because of its fundamental role in this search. First, at the level of the trigger system which allows the online selection candidate events, and then, within the framework of the ALPGEN generator, the simulation of the Z boson transverse momentum which appears as MET when the Z boson decays into neutrino.

  9. Seismic anisotropy of Precambrian lithosphere: Insights from Rayleigh wave tomography of the eastern Superior Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Laura; Darbyshire, Fiona; Bastow, Ian; Totten, Eoghan; Gilligan, Amy

    2017-05-01

    The thick, seismically fast lithospheric keels underlying continental cores (cratons) are thought to have formed in the Precambrian and resisted subsequent tectonic destruction. A consensus is emerging from a variety of disciplines that keels are vertically stratified, but the processes that led to their development remain uncertain. Eastern Canada is a natural laboratory to study Precambrian lithospheric formation and evolution. It comprises the largest Archean craton in the world, the Superior Craton, surrounded by multiple Proterozoic orogenic belts. To investigate its lithospheric structure, we construct a frequency-dependent anisotropic seismic model of the region using Rayleigh waves from teleseismic earthquakes recorded at broadband seismic stations across eastern Canada. The joint interpretation of phase velocity heterogeneity and azimuthal anisotropy patterns reveals a seismically fast and anisotropically complex Superior Craton. The upper lithosphere records fossilized Archean tectonic deformation: anisotropic patterns align with the orientation of the main tectonic boundaries at periods ≤110 s. This implies that cratonic blocks were strong enough to sustain plate-scale deformation during collision at 2.5 Ga. Cratonic lithosphere with fossil anisotropy partially extends beneath adjacent Proterozoic belts. At periods sensitive to the lower lithosphere, we detect fast, more homogenous, and weakly anisotropic material, documenting postassembly lithospheric growth, possibly in a slow or stagnant convection regime. A heterogeneous, anisotropic transitional zone may also be present at the base of the keel. The detection of multiple lithospheric fabrics at different periods with distinct tectonic origins supports growing evidence that cratonization processes may be episodic and are not exclusively an Archean phenomenon.

  10. Why lithospheric extension separated the Aegean from Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, U.; Gessner, K.; Thomson, S. N.; Markwitz, V.

    2015-12-01

    The Aegean Sea region in the eastern Mediterranean is one of the classic and best-studied extensional provinces. Inspired by recent 3D geodynamic models of laterally heterogeneous accretion during rollback we discuss the nature of the transition from the Aegean Sea basin (Hellenides) into the Anatolian plateau of west Turkey (Anatolides). The Hellenides and Anatolides experienced similar rates of convergence, but display remarkable differences in lithospheric structure. Whereas the Aegean is characterized by sustained high-pressure metamorphism followed by slab retreat since c. 60 Ma, a south verging greenschist-facies thrust-and-fold belt formed in the Anatolides since c. 45 Ma. Fission-track contour maps show that since c. 24 Ma extension in both regions evolved differently. Gravity data, earthquake locations and seismic velocity anomalies highlight a N-S oriented subvertical boundary in the upper mantle between a fast slab below the Aegean and a slow asthenospheric region below west Turkey, the West Anatolia Transfer Zone (WATZ). Our data support the hypothesis that the WATZ developed as a result of laterally inhomogeneous convergence along the boundary of the Adriatic and Anatolian lithospheres. 3D numerical simulations of laterally inhomogeneous convergence predict a similar evolution, where two distinct domains develop along strike: a region of distributed shortening where the systems gets congested by a microcontinent (Anatolides), and a region of extension associated with rollback of the active subduction zone (Hellenides). Strike-slip deformation concentrates perpendicular to the boundary of the two domains (WATZ). The numerical simulations also predict other salient features of regional geology and geodynamics, including the origin of a lithospheric window below west Turkey, local ocean floor topography, and the formation of the North Anatolian Fault zone. We argue that the seemingly complex tectonic evolution of the Aegean-Anatolian portion of the

  11. Olivine-gabbros and olivine-rich troctolites genesis through melt-rock reactions in oceanic spreading lithosphere: an experimental study up to 0.7 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francomme, Justine E.; Fumagalli, Patrizia; Borghini, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    Extensive melt-rock reaction and melt impregnation significantly affect not only the physical and chemical properties at mantle-crust transition, but also control the evolution of migrating melts. We performed reactive dissolution and crystallization experiments at pressure ≤ 0.7 GPa in a piston-cylinder apparatus to provide experimental constraints on genesis of olivine-rich troctolites and olivine-gabbros at mantle-crust transition in oceanic spreading lithosphere by melt-rock reaction. Our experiments are carried out by using Salt-Pyrex-Graphite-Magnesium assemblies and graphite-lined platinum capsules. Experimental charges are prepared with three layers: (1) basalt powder, (2) fine powder (1-10μm) of San Carlos olivine (Fo90.1), and (3) carbon spheres used as a melt trap. Three synthetic MORB-type melts have been used, two tholeiitic basalts (Mg#: 0.62, SiO2: 47.70 wt%, Na2O: 2.28 wt% and Mg#: 0.58, SiO2: 49.25 wt%, Na2O: 2.49 wt%) and a primitive one (Mg#: 0.74, SiO2: 48.25 wt%, Na2O: 1.80 wt%), in order to investigate the effect of melt composition. A rock/melt ratio of 0.7 has been kept fixed. Experiments have been conducted at temperatures from 1200 to 1300°C, at both step cooling and isothermal conditions for different run durations (from 12 to 72 hrs). They resulted in layered samples in which all the initial San Carlos olivine powder, analog of a dunitic pluton infiltrated by basaltic melt, is replaced by different lithologies from olivine-rich troctolite to olivine gabbro. In isothermal experiments, reacted melts have been successfully trapped in the carbon spheres allowing their chemical analysis; as expected the reacted melt has a higher Mg# than the initial one (e.g. from Mg#=0.62 to 0.73). Across the different lithologies Mg# of olivine is decreasing from the olivine-rich troctolite to the gabbro. Replacive olivine-rich troctolite has a poikilitic texture with rounded euhedral olivine and interstitial poikilitic plagioclase and clinopyroxene

  12. Evidence for retrograde lithospheric subduction on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwell, David T.; Schubert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Annular moats and outer rises around large Venus coronas such as Artemis, Latona, and Eithinoha are similar in arcuate planform and topography to the trenches and outer rises of terrestrial subduction zones. On earth, trenches and outer rises are modeled as the flexural response of a thin elastic lithosphere to the bending moment of the subducted slab; this lithospheric flexure model also accounts for the trenches and outer rises outboard of the major coronas on Venus. Accordingly, it is proposed that retrograde lithospheric subduction may be occurring on the margins of the large Venus coronas while compensating back-arc extension is occurring in the expanding coronas interiors. Similar processes may be taking place at other deep arcuate trenches or chasmata on Venus such as those in the Dali-Diana chasmata area of aestern Aphrodite Terra.

  13. On the Yield Strength of Oceanic Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Chhavi; Korenaga, Jun; Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2017-10-01

    The yield strength of oceanic lithosphere determines the mode of mantle convection in a terrestrial planet, and low-temperature plasticity in olivine aggregates is generally believed to govern the plastic rheology of the stiffest part of lithosphere. Because, so far, proposed flow laws for this mechanism exhibit nontrivial discrepancies, we revisit the recent high-pressure deformation data of Mei et al. (2010) with a comprehensive inversion approach based on Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. Our inversion results indicate that the uncertainty of the relevant flow law parameters is considerably greater than previously thought. Depending on the choice of flow law parameters, the strength of oceanic lithosphere would vary substantially, carrying different implications for the origin of plate tectonics on Earth. To reduce the flow law ambiguity, we suggest that it is important to establish a theoretical basis for estimating macroscopic stress in high-pressure experiments and also to better utilize marine geophysical observations.

  14. The rheological structure of the lithosphere in the Eastern Marmara region, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruç, Bülent; Sönmez, Tuba

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work is to propose the geometries of the crustal-lithospheric mantle boundary (Moho) and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) and the 1D thermal structure of the lithosphere, in order to establish a rheological model of the Eastern Marmara region. The average depths of Moho and LAB are respectively 35 km and 51 km from radially averaged amplitude spectra of EGM08 Bouguer anomalies. The geometries of Moho and LAB interfaces are estimated from the Parker-Oldenburg gravity inversion algorithm. Our results show the Moho depth varies from 31 km at the northern part of North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) to 39 km below the mountain belt in the southern part of the NAFZ. The depth to the LAB beneath the same parts of the region ranges from 45 km to 55 km. Having lithospheric strength and thermal boundary layer structure, we analyzed the conditions of development of lithosphere thinning. A two-dimensional strength profile has been estimated for rheology model of the study area. Thus we suggest that the rheological structure consists of a strong upper crust, a weak lower crust, and a partly molten upper lithospheric mantle.

  15. The application of the triple bottom line approach to sustainability assessment: The case study of the UK automotive supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Azevedo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of this paper is to assess the level of sustainability of the UK automotive supply chain considering simultaneously the three dimensions of sustainability (economic, social and environmental representing the Triple Bottom Line (TBL approach. Design/methodology/approach: The assessment of the automotive SC’ sustainability is based on the framework proposed by Salvado, Azevedo, Matias and Ferreira (2011 and uses the Simple Additive Weighting (SAW method to aggregate economic, environmental and social indicators into a unique index. A case study on the UK automotive industry is used and the data do perform this study is collected from the sustainability reports of the UK’ automotive companies. Findings and Originality/value: The proposed framework represents an important benchmarking tool, offering managers the possibility for assessing the sustainability behaviour of its supply chain and compare it with other supply chains. Once identified the dimension of sustainability where the company or the supply chain is worst performer managers can work closer to their supply chain’ partners in order to improve the performance of those dimension of sustainability. Research limitations/implications: One limitation of the suggested approach is related to the ambiguity of the sustainability’ indicators selection and the definition of weights for each sustainability dimension. Practical implications: The assessment of the SC sustainability by using the suggested framework to compute a SC sustainability index offers managers an opportunity for assessing the level of sustainability of each individual company and the corresponding SC in a very easy way. It also represents an opportunity for improving company performance. In this way managers can use the information on the sustainability index to help adjust their company's behaviour and improve their economic, social and environmental performance. Originality/value: The proposed

  16. Bottom-up and top-down processes in body representation: a study of brain-damaged and amputee patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Liana; Di Vita, Antonella; Piccardi, Laura; Traballesi, Marco; Guariglia, Cecilia

    2014-09-01

    Body representation is a complex process involving different sources of top-down and bottom-up information. Processing the position and the relations among different body parts is necessary to build up a specific body representation, that is, the visuospatial body map (or topological map of the body). Here we aimed to investigate how the loss of peripheral or central information affects this representation by testing amputee and brain-damaged patients. Thirty-two unilateral brain-damaged patients (i.e., left-brain-damaged patients and right-brain-damaged patients who were or were not affected by personal neglect), 18 lower limb amputees and 15 healthy controls took part in the study. The topological body map was assessed by means of the "Frontal body-evocation subtest" (Daurat-Hmeljiak, Stambak, & Berges, 1978), in which participants have to put tiles (each representing a body part) on a small wooden board on which a head is depicted. Group statistical analysis showed that in amputee patients the loss of peripheral information about the right lower limb affects the ability to represent relations among different body parts as much as the loss of top-down information in brain-damaged patients with personal neglect. Single case analysis of brain-damaged patients without personal neglect showed that the topological map of the body was deficient in 1 right-brain-damaged and 2 left-brain-damaged patients. Studying amputee and brain-damaged patients together allowed us to highlight the importance of visuospatial information about one's own limbs and the role of both hemispheres (not only the left one) in creating an efficient topological body representation. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Study on thermal mixing of liquid–metal free-surface flow by obstacles installed at the bottom of a channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusumi, Koji [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, C3-d2S06, Kyoto-Daigaku Katsura, Nishikyo-Ku, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Kunugi, Tomoaki, E-mail: kunugi@nucleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, C3-d2S06, Kyoto-Daigaku Katsura, Nishikyo-Ku, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Yokomine, Takehiko; Kawara, Zensaku [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, C3-d2S06, Kyoto-Daigaku Katsura, Nishikyo-Ku, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Hinojosa, Jesus A.; Kolemen, Egemen; Ji, Hantao; Gilson, Erik [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, 100 Stellarator Rd., Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Experiments of thermal mixing in liquid metal film-flow by obstacles were performed. • Delta-wing obstacle showed good thermal mixing performance. - Abstract: One of the key challenges of the liquid divertor concepts in fusion reactors is the heat removal from the surface of liquid metal film-flow to the bottom wall, because thermal radiation and particle fluxes from the fusion core are deposited on the free-surface. This study investigates the possibility of the enhancement of heat removal by using various obstacles installed at the bottom of the liquid metal free-surface flow. Cubic and delta-wing obstacles are examined in this study. The obstacles installed at the center of the flow channel, upstream of the free-surface heat source. The experiments were conducted in the range of Re from 2000 to 18,000 under constant heating. The temperature on the bottom wall increased with increase of flow rate. The delta-wing obstacle showed the better thermal performance compared to the cubic obstacle and without obstacle case. Since the delta-wing obstacle generated the strong vortex with increasing Re, thermal mixing of liquid-film enhanced, and eventually led to highly localized heat fluxes at the bottom wall. Therefore, it is possible to remove the high heat flux locally from the wall.

  18. Evaluation of the application of the triple bottom line. case study: caldeirão de SANTA CRUZ community (CEARÁ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Gomes de Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Triple Bottom Line, composed by the Environmental, Social and Economic dimensions, has been widely accepted since its implementation will involve the maintenance or development of factors that lead to sustainability. When defining this concept, Elkington (2012 quoted the director of the Environmental Management Program at the University of Michigan, Stuart Hart, who said that large corporations would be the only organizations that could achieve sustainability. The aim of this work is to verify if sustainability, at a given site, can be achieved without the aid of large organizations. Specifically, the objective is to check the status of the Caldeirão de Santa Cruz Community, located in the state of Ceará / Brazil, in the period between 1926 and 1937. For this evaluation, it was used the Triple Bottom Line model proposed by Elkington (2012. The results indicated that the concept known as Triple Bottom Line was implied in the Caldeirão de Santa Cruz community’s way of living and that was achieved through the work carried out in the community, without the help of any organization. The results also showed that the behavior and the way of living and working of the community bothered some sectors of society.  Keywords: Sustainability; Triple Bottom Line; Caldeirão de Santa Cruz; Ceará.

  19. Independent effects of bottom-up temporal expectancy and top-down spatial attention. An audiovisual study using rhythmic cueing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eJones

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective attention to a spatial location has shown enhance perception and facilitate behaviour for events at attended locations. However, selection relies not only on where but also when an event occurs. Recently, interest has turned to how intrinsic neural oscillations in the brain entrain to rhythms in our environment, and, stimuli appearing in or out of synch with a rhythm have shown to modulate perception and performance. Temporal expectations created by rhythms and spatial attention are two processes which have independently shown to affect stimulus processing but it remains largely unknown how, and if, they interact. In four separate tasks, this study investigated the effects of voluntary spatial attention and bottom-up temporal expectations created by rhythms in both unimodal and crossmodal conditions. In each task the participant used an informative cue, either colour or pitch, to direct their covert spatial attention to the left or right, and respond as quickly as possible to a target. The lateralized target (visual or auditory was then presented at the attended or unattended side. Importantly, although not task relevant, the cue was a rhythm of either flashes or beeps. The target was presented in or out of sync (early or late with the rhythmic cue. The results showed participants were faster responding to spatially attended compared to unattended targets in all tasks. Moreover, there was an effect of rhythmic cueing upon response times in both unimodal and crossmodal conditions. Responses were faster to targets presented in sync with the rhythm compared to when they appeared too early in both crossmodal tasks. That is, rhythmic stimuli in one modality influenced the temporal expectancy in the other modality, suggesting temporal expectancies created by rhythms are crossmodal. Interestingly, there was no interaction between top-down spatial attention and rhythmic cueing in any task suggesting these two processes largely influenced

  20. Bottom-up engineering of biological systems through standard bricks: a modularity study on basic parts and devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasotti, Lorenzo; Politi, Nicolò; Zucca, Susanna; Cusella De Angelis, Maria Gabriella; Magni, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Modularity is a crucial issue in the engineering world, as it enables engineers to achieve predictable outcomes when different components are interconnected. Synthetic Biology aims to apply key concepts of engineering to design and construct new biological systems that exhibit a predictable behaviour. Even if physical and measurement standards have been recently proposed to facilitate the assembly and characterization of biological components, real modularity is still a major research issue. The success of the bottom-up approach strictly depends on the clear definition of the limits in which biological functions can be predictable. The modularity of transcription-based biological components has been investigated in several conditions. First, the activity of a set of promoters was quantified in Escherichia coli via different measurement systems (i.e., different plasmids, reporter genes, ribosome binding sites) relative to an in vivo reference promoter. Second, promoter activity variation was measured when two independent gene expression cassettes were assembled in the same system. Third, the interchangeability of input modules (a set of constitutive promoters and two regulated promoters) connected to a fixed output device (a logic inverter) expressing GFP was evaluated. The three input modules provide tunable transcriptional signals that drive the output device. If modularity persists, identical transcriptional signals trigger identical GFP outputs. To verify this, all the input devices were individually characterized and then the input-output characteristic of the logic inverter was derived in the different configurations. Promoters activities (referred to a standard promoter) can vary when they are measured via different reporter devices (up to 22%), when they are used within a two-expression-cassette system (up to 35%) and when they drive another device in a functionally interconnected circuit (up to 44%). This paper provides a significant contribution to the

  1. Bottom-up engineering of biological systems through standard bricks: a modularity study on basic parts and devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Pasotti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modularity is a crucial issue in the engineering world, as it enables engineers to achieve predictable outcomes when different components are interconnected. Synthetic Biology aims to apply key concepts of engineering to design and construct new biological systems that exhibit a predictable behaviour. Even if physical and measurement standards have been recently proposed to facilitate the assembly and characterization of biological components, real modularity is still a major research issue. The success of the bottom-up approach strictly depends on the clear definition of the limits in which biological functions can be predictable. RESULTS: The modularity of transcription-based biological components has been investigated in several conditions. First, the activity of a set of promoters was quantified in Escherichia coli via different measurement systems (i.e., different plasmids, reporter genes, ribosome binding sites relative to an in vivo reference promoter. Second, promoter activity variation was measured when two independent gene expression cassettes were assembled in the same system. Third, the interchangeability of input modules (a set of constitutive promoters and two regulated promoters connected to a fixed output device (a logic inverter expressing GFP was evaluated. The three input modules provide tunable transcriptional signals that drive the output device. If modularity persists, identical transcriptional signals trigger identical GFP outputs. To verify this, all the input devices were individually characterized and then the input-output characteristic of the logic inverter was derived in the different configurations. CONCLUSIONS: Promoters activities (referred to a standard promoter can vary when they are measured via different reporter devices (up to 22%, when they are used within a two-expression-cassette system (up to 35% and when they drive another device in a functionally interconnected circuit (up to 44%. This paper

  2. Strength, strain, and structure of the Australian continental lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hilst, R. D.; Simons, F. J.

    2003-12-01

    The diverse geologic makeup of Australia makes the continent an ideal candidate to investigate the relation of lithospheric strength to the age of the overlying crust. Australia is made up from Archean cratons, Proterozoic orogens and Phanerozoic formations in a west-to-east age decrease. Surrounded by active earthquake belts, Australia is ideally suited for regional seismic tomographic studies. High-quality seismic data sets from portable SKIPPY instruments have been inverted to yield detailed models of the three-dimensional wave speed structure, including its anisotropy. Australia's topography is subdued, which makes strength measurements using traditional admittance/coherence techniques between gravity and topography rather difficult. However, the development of advanced spectral techniques has made measurements of the relative strength of the lithosphere possible. In particular, the application of multitaper techniques for cross-spectral analysis has enabled us to study elastic thickness variations with location (and thus age) as well as azimuth (measuring strength anisotropy). Using our seismic wave speed model we have estimated the thickness of the high-velocity lid underlying the Australian continent and compared it to coherence estimates of its elastic thickness. The variations in seismic thickness within broad age divisions of the Australian continent are larger than the differences between the means over the age groups. This is especially surprising for the Australian Archean, whose high-velocity lid is far less pronounced than traditional evolution models would have suggested. Following a similar pattern, the mechanical strength of the lithosphere increases with age to first order only, and substantial strength differences exist within domains of equal crustal age. Seismically thicker continental keels are not necessarily mechanically stronger, and shallow mechanical strength does not appear to control the preservation of such keels. The seismic data set

  3. Lithospheric Flexural Modeling of Iapetus' Equatorial Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, W.; Ip, W.-H.; Teng, L. S.

    2012-04-01

    Iapetus, which is one of Saturn's ball-shaped satellites, has some unique features in the Solar System. This satellite has a mean radius of 735 km, and there is an approximately 20-kilometer-high mountain lying precisely on its equator. The mountain is known as an "equatorial ridge" since it makes Iapetus appear walnut shaped. The origin of the equatorial ridge is attributed to several hypotheses, including different endogenesis and exogenesis processes. In this work, we attempted to construct a flexural model of the equatorial ridge using elastic lithosphere theory. The equatorial ridge is treated as a linear load which exerts uniform force on Iapetus' hard shell (i.e. elastic lithosphere of Iapetus). To calculate the deflection of surface, we use the Digital Terrain Model (DTM) data of Iapetus' leading side published by Giese et al. (2008). Giese et al. also pointed out that the elastic lithospheric thickness of Iapetus must exceed 100 km to support the ridge without deflecting. However, we found possible evidence in the DTM data that implied deflection. There are two sites of surface depression on the northern side of the equatorial ridge. The few-kilometer deflection implies a thinner lithosphere than previous suggested. Assume that the thickness of elastic lithosphere is only 5% below of the radius of Iapetus, so the flat-Earth and one-plate condition could adapt to the flexure model of Iapetus. Based on analysis of the distance between a bulge and the ridge, the calculated lithospheric thickness is 6-10 km. The new result seems controversial, but the modeled surface profile is highly consistent with numerical ridge DTM profile extracted from Giese et al. (2008). Thinner lithosphere also supports the contraction model proposed by Sandwell and Schubert (2010) since the bucking harmonic degree increases. In the other hand, the transformation layer between hard shell and plastic inner core may need constraint on thermal history or crystal form of ice. In

  4. Lithosphere continental rifting and necking in 3D analogue experiments: role of plate divergence rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestola, Y.; Storti, F.; Cavozzi, C.

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of lithosphere necking is a fundamental parameter controlling the structural architecture and thermal state of rifted margins. Despite a large number of analogue and numerical modelling studies on lithosphere extension are available in the literature, a quantitative experimental description of lithosphere necking evolution is still lacking. Extensional strain rate and thermal layering of the lithosphere exert a fundamental control on necking shape and evolution. We focused our experimental work on the former parameter and simulated the progression of lithosphere thinning and necking during asymmetric orthogonal rifting at different plate divergence rates. Our models involve a 4-layer mechanical continental lithosphere, which rests on a glucose syrup asthenosphere. Both the topography and the base of the lithosphere were monitored by time-lapse laser scanning. This technical approach allowed us to quantify the evolution in space and time of the thinning factors for the crust, mantle, and lithosphere as a whole. Laser-scanning monitoring provided also a detailed picture of the evolving neck shape, which shows a strong dependency on the strain-rate. At low strain-rates, necking is "boxed" with steep flanks and a flat-lying roof, and few deep basins develop at surface. At high strain-rates, more distributed thinning occurs and isolates portions of less deformed mantle. More distributed deformation affects the model topography. Despite large differences in shape, the aspect ratio (amplitude/wavelength) of the cross-sectional neck shapes converges towards very similar values at the end of the experiments.The significant differences and evolutionary pathways produced by the plate divergence rate on the lithosphere necking profile, suggest that this parameter exert a fundamental control on localization vs. distribution of deformation in the crust as in the whole mechanical lithosphere. Furthermore, it can exert a fundamental control on the time and space

  5. Sea bottom gravity survey of Osaka bay and its study; Osakawan kaitei juryoku chosa to sono kosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komazawa, M. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Ota, Y.; Shibuya, S.; Kumai, M.; Murakami, M. [Japex Geoscience Institute, Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper reports a sea bottom gravity survey conducted with an objective to identify deep underground structure in the vicinity of the epicenter of the Hyogoken-Nanbu Earthquake. The surveyed areas are the whole Osaka Bay area north of the north latitude of 34 degrees and 20 minutes, and the eastern part of the Sea of Harima east of the east longitude of 134 degrees and 40 minutes, excluding the areas difficult of performing measurements. A square lattice with sides each about 2 km was arranged with 408 measurement points. The measurement was carried out by using an observation vessel mounted with a sea bottom gravimeter made by LaCoste and Romberg Corporation, which was lowered down to the sea bottom at the measurement points. Errors in positions and water depths at the gravity measuring points were suppressed to less than 0.002 minutes and 0.1 m, respectively. The measurement data were given necessary corrections by using a unified method applicable also to land areas, and a Bouguer anomaly chart was prepared. Based on the chart, this paper summarizes features in the Bouguer anomaly in the surveyed areas (such as the low-gravity anomaly band extending the central part of the Osaka bay from north-east to south-west, and the gradient structure existing on the Awaji island side). 6 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Imaging a Precambrian Mantle Suture in the Subandean Lithosphere by Surface Wave Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, K. M.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Central Andean Plateau (CAP), as defined by the 3 km elevation contour, extends over 1,800 km along the active South American Cordilleran margin reaching a maxim width around 400 km near the Bolivian Orocline making it second only to the Tibetan Plateau in geographic extent. First-order questions about principle segments of the lithospheric structure of the northern CAP remain underdeveloped. As part of the seismological component of the Central Andean Uplift and the Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project, we image the crustal and lithospheric structure beneath the northern Central Andean Plateau by jointly inverting surface wave dispersion measured from ambient noise and two-plane wave tomography for a S-wave velocity model of the northern CAP. First-order robust features of our S-wave velocity model include a low-velocity (4.5 km/s) eastward dipping feature in contact with the Moho below the eastern-most Altiplano reaches a maximum depth of ~160 km. Previous tomography studies have interpreted this high-velocity feature as the western extent of the Brazilian Craton. Additionally, we observe a strong inverse correlation with topography and mean lithospheric Vs east of the Eastern Cordillera excluding asthenosphere inflow from a foundering lithosphere as a possible explanation for the low-velocity wedge. We combine our model with geochemical studies that delineate two lithospheric mantle blocks and suggest the transition from the eastward dipping high-velocity feature to the low-velocity wedge is the mantle signature of suturing the Arequuipa/Antofalla terrane to Amazonia during the Grenville-Sunsás Orogeny. This interpretation of an intact upper plate lithosphere is inconsistent with recent lithospheric foundering in this region.

  7. Inelastic models of lithospheric stress - I. Theory and application to outer-rise plate deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, S.; Choy, G.L.; Spence, W.

    1996-01-01

    Outer-rise stress distributions determined in the manner that mechanical engineers evaluate inelastic stress distributions within conventional materials are contrasted with those predicted using simple elastic-plate models that are frequently encountered in studies of outer-rise seismicity. This comparison indicates that the latter are inherently inappropriate for studies of intraplate earthquakes, which are a direct manifestation of lithospheric inelasticity. We demonstrate that the common practice of truncating elastically superimposed stress profiles so that they are not permitted to exceed laboratory-based estimates of lithospheric yield strength will result in an accurate characterization of lithospheric stress only under relatively restrictive circumstances. In contrast to elastic-plate models, which predict that lithospheric stress distributions depend exclusively upon the current load, inelastic plate models predict that stress distributions are also significantly influenced by the plate-loading history, and, in many cases, this influence is the dominant factor in determining the style of potential seismicity (e.g. thrust versus normal faulting). Numerous 'intuitive' interpretations of outer-rise earthquakes have been founded upon the implicit assumption that a unique relationship exists between a specified combination of plate curvature and in-plane force, and the resulting lithospheric stress distribution. We demonstrate that the profound influence of deformation history often invalidates such interpretations. Finally, we examine the reliability of 'yield envelope' representations of lithospheric strength that are constructed on the basis of empirically determined frictional sliding relationships and silicate plastic-flow laws. Although representations of this nature underestimate the strength of some major interplate faults, such as the San Andreas, they appear to represent a reliable characterization of the strength of intraplate oceanic lithosphere.

  8. Culture from the Bottom Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Dwight; Sohn, Jija

    2013-01-01

    The culture concept has been severely criticized for its top-down nature in TESOL, leading arguably to its falling out of favor in the field. But what of the fact that people do "live culturally" (Ingold, 1994)? This article describes a case study of culture from the bottom up--culture as understood and enacted by its individual users.…

  9. Winter Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Winter Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1992 and covered offshore areas from the Mid-Atlantic to Georges Bank. Inshore strata were covered...

  10. Fall Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Fall Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1963 and covered an area from Hudson Canyon, NY to Nova Scotia, Canada. Throughout the years,...

  11. The Bottom Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, John H; Lentz, Steven J

    2018-01-03

    The oceanic bottom boundary layer extracts energy and momentum from the overlying flow, mediates the fate of near-bottom substances, and generates bedforms that retard the flow and affect benthic processes. The bottom boundary layer is forced by winds, waves, tides, and buoyancy and is influenced by surface waves, internal waves, and stratification by heat, salt, and suspended sediments. This review focuses on the coastal ocean. The main points are that (a) classical turbulence concepts and modern turbulence parameterizations provide accurate representations of the structure and turbulent fluxes under conditions in which the underlying assumptions hold, (b) modern sensors and analyses enable high-quality direct or near-direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes and dissipation rates, and (c) the remaining challenges include the interaction of waves and currents with the erodible seabed, the impact of layer-scale two- and three-dimensional instabilities, and the role of the bottom boundary layer in shelf-slope exchange.

  12. Summer Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sampling the coastal waters of the Gulf of Maine using the Northeast Fishery Science Center standardized bottom trawl has been problematic due to large areas of hard...

  13. Spring Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Spring Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1968 and covered an area from Cape Hatteras, NC, to Nova Scotia, Canada, at depths >27m....

  14. Seismic images of the upper mantle velocities and structure of European mantle lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomerova, Jaroslava; Munzarova, Helena; Vecsey, Ludek; Babuska, Vladislav

    2014-05-01

    Tomography images of seismic velocities in the Earth mantle represent significant tool for recovering first order structural features. Regional studies, based on dense networks of temporary stations allow us to focus on structure of the continental upper mantle and to study variations of body-wave velocities in greater detail. However, the standard tomography exhibits only isotropic view of the Earth, whose structure is anisotropic in general, as shown by results of various studies exploiting a broad range of methods, types of waves and scales. We present results of our studies of seismic anisotropy in tectonically different provinces that clearly demonstrate the continental mantle lithosphere consists of domains with different fossil fabrics. We detect anisotropic signal both in teleseismic P-wave travel-time deviations and shear-wave splitting and show changes of the anisotropic parameters across seismic arrays, in which stations with similar characteristics form groups. The geographical variations of seismic-wave anisotropy delimit individual, often sharply bounded domains of the mantle lithosphere, each of them having a consistent fabric. The domains can be modelled in 3D by peridotite aggregates with dipping lineation a or foliation (a,c). These findings allow us to interpret the domains as micro-plate fragments retaining fossil fabrics in the mantle lithosphere, reflecting thus an olivine LPO created before the micro-plates assembled. Modelling anisotropic structure of individual domains of the continental mantle lithosphere helps to decipher boundaries of individual blocks building the continental lithosphere and hypothesize on processes of its formation (Plomerova and Babuska, Lithos 2010). Exploiting the long memory of the deep continental lithosphere fabric, we present the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) as a transition between a fossil anisotropy in the mantle lithosphere and an underlying seismic anisotropy related to the present-day flow in

  15. Lithospheric Shear Velocity Structure of South Island, New Zealand from Rayleigh Wave Tomography of Amphibious Array Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J. S.; Sheehan, A. F.; Stachnik, J. C.; Lin, F. C.; Collins, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first 3D shear velocity model extending well offshore of New Zealand's South Island, imaging the lithosphere beneath Campbell and Challenger plateaus. Our model is constructed via linearized inversion of both teleseismic (18 -70 s period) and ambient noise-based (8 - 25 s period) Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements. We augment an array of 29 ocean-bottom instruments deployed off the South Island's east and west coasts in 2009-2010 with 28 New Zealand land-based seismometers. The ocean-bottom seismometers and 4 of the land seismometers were part of the Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa (MOANA) experiment, and the remaining land seismometers are from New Zealand's permanent GeoNet array. Major features of our shear wave velocity (Vs) model include a low-velocity (Vs<4.3km/s) body extending to at least 75km depth beneath the Banks and Otago peninsulas, a high-velocity (Vs~4.7km/s) upper mantle anomaly underlying the Southern Alps to a depth of 100km, and discontinuous lithospheric velocity structure between eastern and western Challenger Plateau. Using the 4.5km/s contour as a proxy for the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, our model suggests that the lithospheric thickness of Challenger Plateau is substantially greater than that of Campbell Plateau. The high-velocity anomaly we resolve beneath the central South Island exhibits strong spatial correlation with subcrustal earthquake hypocenters along the Alpine Fault (Boese et al., 2013). The ~400km-long low velocity zone we image beneath eastern South Island underlies Cenozoic volcanics and mantle-derived helium observations (Hoke et al., 2000) on the surface. The NE-trending low-velocity zone dividing Challenger Plateau in our model underlies a prominent magnetic discontinuity (Sutherland et al., 1999). The latter feature has been interpreted to represent a pre-Cretaceous crustal boundary, which our results suggest may involve the entire mantle lithosphere.

  16. The Geodynamics of Continental Lithosphere Entering a Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steedman, C. E.; Kaus, B. J.; Becker, T. W.; Okaya, D.; Wu, F. T.

    2006-12-01

    As deformation patterns resulting from subduction of a passive continental margin are insufficiently understood, here we perform 2-D numerical simulations to explore the effects of continental lithosphere entering a subduction zone. The model setup consists of a subduction zone in which the oceanic part of a passive continental margin initially subducts beneath an oceanic plate. A particle-based 2-D visco-elasto-plastic thermo-mechanical finite element code is employed to study the dynamics of the system. A novel new feature of the code is that the resolution of the model can be significantly increased in selected parts of the domain, which allows for self-consistent modelling of mantle-lithosphere interaction. In the present study this feature is employed to study how crustal scale deformation around the subduction zone is influenced by surface processes and by flow in the upper mantle. Using systematic 2-D numerical simulations, we explore the parameters that are dominant in controlling near- surface structures, both with regards to changes in topography over time, and subsurface features such as Moho undulations. The main parameters that have been varied are: the lithospheric density structure; the strength of the lower crust; the amounts of erosion; imposed pushing versus density-driven (slab-pull and ridge- push) convergence; the upper boundary condition (free surface versus free slip); rheology (non-Newtonian versus Newtonian, viscous, visco-elasto-plastic); and finally the effect of an imposed slab breakoff. In all cases we track surface uplift, subduction evolution and rock exhumation history. The results can be compared to evidence from areas such as Taiwan where continental subduction or convergence is thought to be happening. Preliminary results indicate that a low viscosity lower crust may contribute to crustal uplift.

  17. Multidisciplinary approach to assess thermo-mechanical properties of the Asian lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk, Ward; Kaban, Mikhail; Tesauro, Magdala; Beekman, Fred; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2013-04-01

    Assessing the thermo-mechanical properties of the lithospheric mantle is a complex business and still poses many problems. Seismic studies indicate large heterogeneities within the mantle lithosphere, but cannot discern between e.g. thermal and compositional effects. Similarly, gravity field analysis can constrain density heterogeneities, but is by its nature unable to distinguish between e.g. stacked density anomalies or lateral density anomalies. A joint analysis of both data types potentially leads to an improved insight in the mantle lithosphere, though the solution to the problem at hand remains non-unique and additional constraints are required. We have combined a high resolution tomography model with a recent global gravity field model to improve our knowledge of both the compositional and thermal aspects of the mantle lithosphere in the Asian continent. The preliminary results presented here will focus on the four major cratonic areas in Asia: the East European Platform, Siberia, Northeast China and India. These regions represent two distinct types of cratonic lithosphere (deep root and shallow root). Xenolith studies help us to further constrain the trade off between temperature and compositional effects.

  18. Analisis On-Bottom Stability dan Local Buckling: Studi Kasus Pipa Bawah Laut dari Platform Ula Menuju Platform Uw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clinton Sibuea

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pipa bawah laut merupakan suatu teknologi transportasi yang digunakan untuk mengangkut produk hidrokarbon. Industri minyak dan gas telah membuktikan bahwa penggunakan pipa bawah laut merupakan cara yang paling ekonomis untuk memindahkan fluida dalam skala besar. Pada penelitian ini, dilakukan analisis on-bottom stability dan local buckling pada pipa bawah laut dari platform ULA menuju platform UW milik PT.PHE ONWJ. Analisis on-bottom stability bertujuan untuk mengetahui apakah pipa bawah laut stabil secara vertikal dan lateral di dasar laut pada saat terkena beban hidrodinamis. Analisis local buckling bertujuan untuk menentukan panjang maksimum free span yang diijinkan agar pipa tidak mengalami buckling. Besar gaya horizontal pada kondisi instalasi dan operasi masing-masing adalah 405 N/m dan 1119 N/m. Besar gaya vertikal pada kondisi instalasi dan operasi masing-masing adalah 138 N/m dan 1058 N/m. Besar gaya tahanan tanah pada kondisi instalasi dan operasi masing-masing adalah  111 N/m dan 121 N/m.  Hasil analisis absolute lateral static menunjukkan pipa bawah laut tidak stabil secara lateral pada kondisi instalasi dan operasi karena berat terendam aktual lebih kecil dari berat terendam minimum yang harus dipenuhi agar stabil. Hasil analisis generalized parameter menunjukkan pipa bawah laut tidak stabil secara lateral pada kondisi operasi, namun stabil secara lateral pada kondisi instalasi. Panjang free span pipa bawah laut maksimum yang diijinkan agar tidak terjadi local buckling adalah 50 m.

  19. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary observed with USArray receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Yuan, X.; Kind, R.; Mechie, J.

    2012-05-01

    The dense deployment of seismic stations so far in the western half of the United States within the USArray project provides the opportunity to study in greater detail the structure of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system. We use the S receiver function technique for this purpose, which has higher resolution than surface wave tomography, is sensitive to seismic discontinuities, and is free from multiples, unlike P receiver functions. Only two major discontinuities are observed in the entire area down to about 300 km depth. These are the crust-mantle boundary (Moho) and a negative boundary, which we correlate with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), since a low velocity zone is the classical definition of the seismic observation of the asthenosphere by Gutenberg (1926). Our S receiver function LAB is at a depth of 70-80 km in large parts of westernmost North America. East of the Rocky Mountains, its depth is generally between 90 and 110 km. Regions with LAB depths down to about 140 km occur in a stretch from northern Texas, over the Colorado Plateau to the Columbia basalts. These observations agree well with tomography results in the westernmost USA and on the east coast. However, in the central cratonic part of the USA, the tomography LAB is near 200 km depth. At this depth no discontinuity is seen in the S receiver functions. The negative signal near 100 km depth in the central part of the USA is interpreted by Yuan and Romanowicz (2010) and Lekic and Romanowicz (2011) as a recently discovered mid-lithospheric discontinuity (MLD). A solution for the discrepancy between receiver function imaging and surface wave tomography is not yet obvious and requires more high resolution studies at other cratons before a general solution may be found. Our results agree well with petrophysical models of increased water content in the asthenosphere, which predict a sharp and shallow LAB also in continents (Mierdel et al., 2007).

  20. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary observed with USArray receiver functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kumar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The dense deployment of seismic stations so far in the western half of the United States within the USArray project provides the opportunity to study in greater detail the structure of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system. We use the S receiver function technique for this purpose, which has higher resolution than surface wave tomography, is sensitive to seismic discontinuities, and is free from multiples, unlike P receiver functions. Only two major discontinuities are observed in the entire area down to about 300 km depth. These are the crust-mantle boundary (Moho and a negative boundary, which we correlate with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB, since a low velocity zone is the classical definition of the seismic observation of the asthenosphere by Gutenberg (1926. Our S receiver function LAB is at a depth of 70–80 km in large parts of westernmost North America. East of the Rocky Mountains, its depth is generally between 90 and 110 km. Regions with LAB depths down to about 140 km occur in a stretch from northern Texas, over the Colorado Plateau to the Columbia basalts. These observations agree well with tomography results in the westernmost USA and on the east coast. However, in the central cratonic part of the USA, the tomography LAB is near 200 km depth. At this depth no discontinuity is seen in the S receiver functions. The negative signal near 100 km depth in the central part of the USA is interpreted by Yuan and Romanowicz (2010 and Lekic and Romanowicz (2011 as a recently discovered mid-lithospheric discontinuity (MLD. A solution for the discrepancy between receiver function imaging and surface wave tomography is not yet obvious and requires more high resolution studies at other cratons before a general solution may be found. Our results agree well with petrophysical models of increased water content in the asthenosphere, which predict a sharp and shallow LAB also in continents (Mierdel et al., 2007.

  1. Westernmost Mediterranean Mantle Tomography: Slab Rollback and Delaminated Atlas Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezada, M. J.; Humphreys, E.

    2012-12-01

    We present a new velocity model for the upper mantle in the westernmost Mediterranean including the Iberian Peninsula and northern Morocco. Our imaging improves over previous efforts by taking advantage of the data generated by the PICASSO, IberArray, TopoMed and connected seismograph deployments and by using a new methodology that includes finite-frequency effects and iterative ray tracing, utilizes local earthquakes in addition to teleseismic events and includes constraints from surface wave analyses. We image a subducted slab as a high velocity anomaly located under the Alboran Sea and southern Spain that extends to the bottom of the transition zone. The anomaly has an arcuate shape at most depths and reaches the surface beneath Gibraltar but not under southern Spain. The N-S oriented Gibraltar and E-W oriented southern Spain segments of the slab appear to be separated by a vertical tear or "slab gap". Under the Atlas Mountains in northern Morocco we image low velocities to depths of over 200 km and a high-velocity body at depths of 300-450 km beneath the Middle Atlas, which we tentatively interpret as delaminated lithosphere.

  2. SOCIOECONOMIC AND ECOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS OF THE LITHOSPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Tatarkin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of the lithosphere and the biosphere with a view of socioeconomic activity by a human being has the most complete effect in the process of mineral resource utilization. It is typical of mining and metal production complexes (MMC of the Ural, which are basic for the regional economy. A research methodology related to anthropogenic transformation of environment caused by MMCs, including techniques, principles of construction, forms, means and approaches to the scientific knowledge has been developed.

  3. Staying Out of Double-Bubble and Bottoming-Out Deformities in Dual-Plane Breast Augmentation: Anatomical and Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgarello, Marzia; Visconti, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    Double-bubble and bottoming-out deformities represent the second most common reason for revision surgery in breast augmentation. Etiopathogenesis of these complications is still unclear. The aim of this paper is to report our findings in breast cadaver dissections focusing on the inframammary fold (IMF) applied anatomy and to critically review our ten-year experience in breast augmentation. A cadaveric study has been performed on four consecutive embalmed cadavers. A retrospective review of 207 consecutive women who underwent breast augmentation, using the submuscular dual-plane technique with a periareolar approach, between January 2003 and January 2013, was performed. According to our dissections, the IMF is a complex osseo-fascio-cutaneous structure in which the superficial pectoralis fascia represents a key structure in breast augmentation surgery. Hence, a critical analysis of the IMF relationship with surrounding breast structures helps to understand the etiology of double-bubble and bottoming-out deformities and gives the anatomical basis to prevent them. In our early clinical experience, we experienced 3% of double-bubble and 6% of bottoming-out deformities. Those complications were avoided later by dissection in the inferior pole according to the anatomical findings. Bottoming-out and double-bubble deformities can be avoided if an anatomical approach is used during pocket dissection at the level of the IMF, paying attention to avoid disrupting the superficial and deep attachments of the superficial pectoralis fascia at the IMF. A comprehensive understanding of IMF anatomy and the key surgical maneuvers to avoid these complications must be taken into account for each route of dissection. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  4. Cathodic protection for the bottoms of above ground storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, John P. [Tyco Adhesives, Norwood, MA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Impressed Current Cathodic Protection has been used for many years to protect the external bottoms of above ground storage tanks. The use of a vertical deep ground bed often treated several bare steel tank bottoms by broadcasting current over a wide area. Environmental concerns and, in some countries, government regulations, have introduced the use of dielectric secondary containment liners. The dielectric liner does not allow the protective cathodic protection current to pass and causes corrosion to continue on the newly placed tank bottom. In existing tank bottoms where inadequate protection has been provided, leaks can develop. In one method of remediation, an old bottom is covered with sand and a double bottom is welded above the leaking bottom. The new bottom is welded very close to the old bottom, thus shielding the traditional cathodic protection from protecting the new bottom. These double bottoms often employ the use of dielectric liner as well. Both the liner and the double bottom often minimize the distance from the external tank bottom. The minimized space between the liner, or double bottom, and the bottom to be protected places a challenge in providing current distribution in cathodic protection systems. This study examines the practical concerns for application of impressed current cathodic protection and the types of anode materials used in these specific applications. One unique approach for an economical treatment using a conductive polymer cathodic protection method is presented. (author)

  5. Reconciling the Isabella Anomaly with Lithosphere Delamination and Basin & Range Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, J.; Hu, J.; Zhou, Q.; Liu, L.

    2016-12-01

    The Isabella anomaly is a high-seismic velocity region located below the Sierra Nevada, and its presence has been explained through lithosphere delamination occurring within the past 10-15 Ma and an accreted oceanic micro-plate. Both the lack of consensus on the origin of this high velocity structure and its relation to putative lithospheric delamination and surface uplift requires more careful geodynamic studies. While earlier models of lithosphere delamination neglected the nearby subduction, we attempt to explain this anomaly in the context of delamination related to the subducted slab of the Farallon plate. We design a two-dimensional high-resolution model that extends from the west coast of the United States to the Colorado Plateau, including both the Sierra Nevada and Basin and Range regions. The Basin and Range experienced accelerated extension towards the northwest since 15 Ma, resulting in a topographical pattern with alternating subsidence and uplift; the mechanisms for both the deformation and topography of the region are presently debated. Preliminary results from our 2-D slab-lithosphere interaction model indicate that the foundering of an earlier accreted Farallon slab causes the surface to uplift and the overriding plate to extend. The model can potentially reproduce the main tectonic characteristics of the region, offering new insights on the evolution of the lithosphere-mantle system.

  6. Lithospheric Thickness Modeled from Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasyanos, M E

    2008-05-15

    The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

  7. Thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere as a potential trigger for mass-extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilet, Sebastien; Guex, Jean; Muntener, Othmar; Bartolini, Annachiara; Spangenberg, Jorge; Schoene, Blair; Schaltegger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    studies of the composition of the Kaapvaal craton have shown that sulfide minerals are enclosed in the basal part of the cratonic lithosphere. The formation of these sulfide minerals are linked to multiple refertilization/metasomatic events, which affected the base of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle from the Archean to the Proterozoic. We suggest that the transitions from an initial cool period to greenhouse conditions recorded by T-J and Pl-To sedimentary sections result of changing gas species emitted during the progressive thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere by plume activity or thermal internal heating of the lithosphere. Our petrological model for LIP magmatism argues that initial gas emission was dominated by sulfur liberated from sulfide-bearing cratonic lithosphere causing global cooling and eustatic regression, which was followed by warming/transgression associated with the progressive increase of CO2 in the atmosphere associated to LIPs emission and metamorphic reactions in sedimentary basins. We suggest that the nature of the underlying lithosphere during large LIP eruption potentially exerts an important control on the consequences at the Earth's surface. This model offers an explanation for why LIPs erupted through oceanic lithosphere are not associated with climatic and biotic crises comparable to LIPs emitted through cratonic lithosphere.

  8. Thin lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary beneath Eastern Indian craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalivahan; Bhattacharya, Bimalendu B.; Rao, N. V. Chalapathi; Maurya, V. P.

    2014-02-01

    The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) separates the hard and rigid outer layer of the earth (lithosphere) and the weaker, hotter, and deeper part of the upper mantle (asthenosphere) and plays a pivotal role in plate tectonics. However, its definitive detection, especially beneath the cratons, is proving elusive. One of the geophysical tools used to map the LAB beneath the cratons is through magnetotelluric (MT) observations. The resistivity at boundary falls in the range of 5-25 Ω-m and can be explained by the presence of a small amount of water in the asthenosphere, possibly inducing partial melt. Here, we report thickness of the LAB in one of the oldest dated ancient cratons of India-Eastern Indian Craton (EIC) of ~ 3.3 Gyr, from MT studies. The two prominent phase-sensitive strike directions, one each for crust and mantle, and the presence of resistive continental lower crust act as a window to mantle in resolving deeper electrical conductivity structures beneath EIC. Our results show that the LAB beneath the EIC is at 95 km. The region is interesting as the electrical properties of the crust and mantle and the Moho depth are similar to those of the Slave Craton, Canada (~ 4.0 Gyr) but the depth of the LAB beneath the EIC is half that of the Slave craton. As cratonic signatures, depicted by ultrapotassic rocks from Gondwana coal fields close to EIC, are preserved at least till early Cretaceous (117 Ma) it is likely that Himalayan orogeny could have played a major role in delamination of the lithospheric roots of the EIC in addition to attendant seismicity.

  9. Magmatism in Lithosphere Delamination process inferred from numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göǧüş, Oǧuz H.; Ueda, Kosuke; Gerya, Taras

    2017-04-01

    The peel away of the oceanic/continental slab from the overlying orogenic crust has been suggested as a ubiquitous process in the Alpine-Mediterranean orogenic region (e.g. Carpathians, Apennines, Betics and Anatolia). The process is defined as lithospheric delamination where a slab removal/peel back may allow for the gradual uprising of sub-lithospheric mantle, resulting in high heat flow, transient surface uplift/subsidence and varying types of magma production. Geodynamical modeling studies have adressed the surface response to the delamination in the context of regional tectonic processes and explored wide range of controlling parameters in pre-syn and post collisional stages. However, the amount and styles of melt production in the mantle (e.g. decompression melting, wet melting in the wedge) and the resulting magmatism due to the lithosphere delamination remains uncertain. In this work, by using thermomechanical numerical experiments, designed in the configuration of subduction to collision, we investigated how melting in the mantle develops in the course of delamination. Furthermore, model results are used to decipher the distribution of volumetric melt production, melt extraction and the source of melt and the style of magmatism (e.g. igneous vs. volcanic). The model results suggest that a broad region of decompression melting occurs under the crust, mixing with the melting of the hydrated mantle derived by the delaminating/subducting slab. Depending on the age of the ocean slab, plate convergence velocity and the mantle temperature, the melt production and crust magmatism may concentrate under the mantle wedge or in the far side of the delamination front (where the subduction begins). The slab break-off usually occurs in the terminal stages of the delamination process and it may effectively control the location of the magmatism in the crust. The model results are reconciled with the temporal and spatial distribution of orogenic vs. anorogenic magmatism in

  10. Interactions of multi-scale heterogeneity in the lithosphere: Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, B. L. N.; Yoshizawa, K.; Furumura, T.

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the complex heterogeneity of the continental lithosphere involves a wide variety of spatial scales and the synthesis of multiple classes of information. Seismic surface waves and multiply reflected body waves provide the main constraints on broad-scale structure, and bounds on the extent of the lithosphere-asthenosphere transition (LAT) can be found from the vertical gradients of S wavespeed. Information on finer-scale structures comes through body wave studies, including detailed seismic tomography and P-wave reflectivity extracted from stacked autocorrelograms of continuous component records. With the inclusion of deterministic large-scale structure and realistic medium-scale stochastic features fine-scale variations are subdued. The resulting multi-scale heterogeneity model for the Australian region gives a good representation of the character of observed seismograms and their geographic variations and matches the observations of P-wave reflectivity. P reflections in the 0.5-3.0 Hz band in the uppermost mantle suggest variations on vertical scales of a few hundred metres with amplitudes of the order of 1%. Interference of waves reflected or converted at sequences of such modest variations in physical properties produce relatively simple behaviour for lower frequencies, which can suggest simpler structures than are actually present. Vertical changes in the character of fine-scale heterogeneity can produce apparent discontinuities. In Central Australia a 'mid-lithospheric discontinuity' can be tracked via changes in frequency content of station reflectivity, with links to the broad-scale pattern of wavespeed gradients and, in particular, the gradients of radial anisotropy. Comparisons with xenolith results from southeastern Australia indicate a strong tie between geochemical stratification and P-wave reflectivity.

  11. Insights for the melt migration, the volcanic activity and the ultrafast lithosphere delamination related to the Yellowstone plume (Western USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, A.; Adam, C.; Grégoire, M.; Gerbault, M.; Meyer, R.; Rabinowicz, M.; Fontaine, F.; Bonvalot, S.

    2015-11-01

    The Yellowstone-East Snake River Plain hotspot track has been intensely studied since several decades and is widely considered to result from the interaction of a mantle plume with the North American plate. An integrated conclusive geodynamic interpretation of this extensive data set is however presently still lacking, and our knowledge of the dynamical processes beneath Yellowstone is patchy. It has been argued that the Yellowstone plume has delaminated the lower part of the thick Wyoming cratonic lithosphere. We derive an original dynamic model to quantify delamination processes related to mantle plume-lithosphere interactions. We show that fast (˜300 ka) lithospheric delamination is consistent with the observed timing of formation of successive volcanic centres along the Yellowstone hotspot track and requires (i) a tensile stress regime within the whole lithosphere exceeding its failure threshold, (ii) a purely plastic rheology in the lithosphere when stresses reach this yield limit, (iii) a dense lower part of the 200 km thick Wyoming lithosphere and (iv) a decoupling melt horizon inside the median part of the lithosphere. We demonstrate that all these conditions are verified and that ˜150 km large and ˜100 km thick lithospheric blocks delaminate within 300 ka when the Yellowstone plume ponded below the 200 km thick Wyoming cratonic lithosphere. Furthermore, we take advantage of the available extensive regional geophysical and geological observation data sets to design a numerical 3-D upper-mantle convective model. We propose a map of the ascending convective sheets contouring the Yellowstone plume. The model further evidences the development of a counter-flow within the lower part of the lithosphere centred just above the Yellowstone mantle plume axis. This counter-flow controls the local lithospheric stress field, and as a result the trajectories of feeder dykes linking the partial melting source within the core of the mantle plume with the crust by

  12. Structure of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system in the vicinity of the Tristan da Cunha hot spot as seen by surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadio, Raffaele; Geissler, Wolfram H.; Ravenna, Matteo; Lebedev, Sergei; Celli, Nicolas L.; Jokat, Wilfried; Jegen, Marion; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Baba, Kiyoshi

    2017-04-01

    Tristan da Cunha is a volcanic island located above a hotspot in the South Atlantic. The deep mantle plume origin of the hotspot volcanism at the island is supported by anomalous geochemical data (Rohde et al., 2013 [1]) and global seismological evidences (French and Romanovicz, 2015 [2]). However, until recently, due to lack of local geophysical data in the South Atlantic and especially around Tristan da Cunha, the existence of a plume has not yet been confirmed. Therefore, an Ocean Bottom Seismometer experiment was carried out in 2012 and 2013 in the vicinity of the archipelago, with the aim of obtaining geophysical data that may help to get some more detailed insights into the structure of the upper mantle, possibly confirming the existence of a plume. In this work we study the shear wave velocity structure of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system beneath the Island. Rayleigh surface wave phase velocity dispersion curves have been obtained using a recent powerful implementation of the inter-station cross-correlation method (Meier et al., 2004 [3]; Soomro et al., 2016 [4]). The measured dispersion curves are used to invert for the 1D shear wave velocity structure beneath the study area and to obtain phase velocity tomographic maps. Our results show a pronounced low shear wave velocity anomaly between 70 and 120 km depth beneath the area; the lid shows high velocity, suggesting a cold, depleted and dehydrated shallow lithosphere, while the deeper lithosphere shows a velocity structure similar to young or rejuvenated Pacific oceanic lithosphere (Laske et al., 2011 [5]; Goes et al., 2012 [6]). Below the base of the lithosphere, shear wave velocities appear to be low, suggesting thermal effects and partial melting (as confirmed by petrological data). Decreasing velocities within the lithosphere south-westward reflect probably a thermal imprint of an underlying mantle plume. References [1] J.K. Rohde, P. van den Bogaard, K. Hoernle, F. Hauff, R. Werner, Evidence for an

  13. Numerical Study on Flow, Temperature, and Concentration Distribution Features of Combined Gas and Bottom-Electromagnetic Stirring in a Ladle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method of combined argon gas stirring and bottom-rotating electromagnetic stirring in a ladle refining process is presented in this report. A three-dimensional numerical model was adopted to investigate its effect on improving flow field, eliminating temperature stratification, and homogenizing concentration distribution. The results show that the electromagnetic force has a tendency to spiral by spinning clockwise on the horizontal section and straight up along the vertical section, respectively. When the electromagnetic force is applied to the gas-liquid two phase flow, the gas-liquid plume is shifted and the gas-liquid two phase region is extended. The rotated flow driven by the electromagnetic force promotes the scatter of bubbles. The temperature stratification tends to be alleviated due to the effect of heat compensation and the improved flow. The temperature stratification tends to disappear when the current reaches 1200 A. The improved flow field has a positive influence on decreasing concentration stratification and shortening the mixing time when the combined method is imposed. However, the alloy depositing site needs to be optimized according to the whole circulatory flow and the region of bubbles to escape.

  14. Case studies of the application of enhanced steel alloys for bottom hole assembly components for sour service conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Alvaro [Nov Grant Prideco, Navasota (United States); Moura, Carlos [ASPEN Assesoria Tecnica e Comercial, Cascavel, PR (Brazil); Johnson, Charles; Landriault, Alain [Weatherford Canda Partnership, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The new more modern drilling programs require the drill string to travel across sour formations in order to reach the hydrocarbon reservoirs. Traditional materials have been employed in the manufacture of HWDP components along with basic heat treatment processes. Standard HWDP tools have started to show their operational as well as environmental limitations when subjected to sour service applications. The advanced, more complex drilling programs require for the HWDP tools to be put in service under different configurations. Either at the bottom of the drill string near the drill bit for vertical well configurations or on top of the drill string for weight application on horizontal or extended reach applications. An operator in northwestern Canada has replaced standard HWDP with enhanced sour service HWDP in order to complete the programmed wells. These enhanced tools offer higher tensile and torque capabilities and improved toughness than standard HWDP tools and in addition, provide protection against sour service conditions. The use of second-generation double shoulder connections (2nd-Gen. DSC) has also provided added torque and tensile capacities to these versatile HWDP tools. For over a year more than a dozen wells have been drilled employing these enhanced BHA tools and have helped the operator reach its targets through sour service formations and produce wells in a safe and cost effective manner. (author)

  15. Tectonic implications of tomographic images of subducted lithosphere beneath northwestern South America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilst, R.D. van der; Mann, P.

    1994-01-01

    We used seismic tomography to investigate the complex structure of the upper mantle below northwestern South America. Images of slab structure not delineated by previous seismicity studies help us to refine existing tectonic models of subducted Caribbean-Pacific lithosphere beneath the study area.

  16. Global model for the lithospheric strength and effective elastic thickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesauro, M.; Kaban, M.K.; Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.

    2013-01-01

    Global distribution of the strength and effective elastic thickness (Te) of the lithosphere are estimated using physical parameters from recent crustal and lithospheric models. For the Te estimation we apply a new approach, which provides a possibility to take into account variations of Young

  17. Lysine conjugation properties in human IgGs studied by integrating high-resolution native mass spectrometry and bottom-up proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Violette; Boumeester, Anja J; Lössl, Philip; Heck, Albert J R

    2015-08-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are a novel class of biopharmaceuticals several of which are now being investigated in clinical studies. In ADCs, potent cytotoxic drugs are coupled via a linker to reactive residues in IgG monoclonal antibodies. Linkage to lysine residues in the IgGs, using N-hydroxysuccinimide ester based chemistry, is one of the possible options. To control drug load and specificity, proper knowledge is required about which lysine residues are most accessible and reactive. Here, we combine native MS and bottom-up proteomics to monitor the overall drug load and site-specific lysine reactivity, using N-hydroxysuccinimide-based tandem mass tags. High-resolution Orbitrap native MS enables us to monitor and quantify, due to the achieved baseline resolution, the sequential incorporation of up to 69 tandem mass tag molecules into human IgGs. Complementary, bottom-up proteomics facilitates the identification of some very reactive "hot-spot" conjugation sites. However, we also identify lysine residues that are highly resistant to chemical labeling. Our integrated approach gives insight into the conjugation properties of IgGs at both the intact protein and residue levels, providing fundamental information for controlling drug load and specificity in lysine-linked ADCs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. A Bottom-Up Building Stock Model for Tracking Regional Energy Targets—A Case Study of Kočevje

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjana Šijanec Zavrl

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the development of a bottom-up building stock energy model (BuilS for identification of the building stock renovation potential by considering energy performance of individual buildings through cross-linked data from various public available databases. The model enables integration of various EE and RES measures on the building stock to demonstrate long-term economic and environmental effects of different building stock refurbishment strategies. In the presented case study, the BuilS model was applied in the Kočevje city area and validated using the measured energy consumption of the buildings connected to the city district heating system. Three strategies for improving the building stock in Kočevje towards a more sustainable one are presented with their impact on energy use and CO2 emission projections up to 2030. It is demonstrated that the BuilS bottom-up model enables the setting of a correct baseline regarding energy use of the existing building stock and that such a model is a powerful tool for design and validation of the building stock renovation strategies. It is also shown that the accuracy of the model depends on available information on local resources and local needs, therefore acceleration of the building stock monitoring on the level of each building and continually upgrading of databases with building renovation information is of the utmost importance.

  19. Lithosphere destabilization by melt percolation during pre-oceanic rifting: Evidence from Alpine-Apennine ophiolitic peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccardo, Giovanni; Ranalli, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    Orogenic peridotites from Alpine-Apennine ophiolite Massifs (Lanzo, Voltri, External and Internal Ligurides, - NW Italy, and Mt. Maggiore - Corsica) derive from the mantle lithosphere of the Ligurian Tethys. Field/structural and petrologic/geochemical studies provide constraints on the evolution of the lithospheric mantle during pre-oceanic passive rifting of the late Jurassic Ligurian Tethys ocean. Continental rifting by far-field tectonic forces induced extension of the lithosphere by means of km-scale extensional shear zones that developed before infiltration of melts from the asthenosphere (Piccardo and Vissers, 2007). After significant thinning of the lithosphere, the passively upwelling asthenosphere underwent spinel-facies decompression melting along the axial zone of the extensional system. Silica-undersaturated melt fractions percolated through the lithospheric mantle via diffuse/focused porous flow and interacted with the host peridotite through pyroxenes-dissolving/olivine-precipitating melt/rock reactions. Pyroxene dissolution and olivine precipitation modified the composition of the primary silica-undersaturated melts into derivative silica-saturated melts, while the host lithospheric spinel lherzolites were transformed into pyroxene-depleted/olivine-enriched reactive spinel harzburgites and dunites. The derivative liquids interacted through olivine-dissolving/orthopyroxene+plagioclase-crystallizing reactions with the host peridotites that were impregnated and refertilized (Piccardo et al., 2015). The saturated melts stagnated and crystallized in the shallow mantle lithosphere (as testified by diffuse interstitial crystallization of euhedral orthopyroxene and anhedral plagioclase) and locally ponded, forming orthopyroxene-rich/olivine-free gabbro-norite pods (Piccardo and Guarnieri, 2011). Reactive and impregnated peridotites are characterized by high equilibration temperatures (up to 1250 °C) even at low pressure, plagioclase-peridotite facies

  20. Geodynamics and The Evolution of Continental Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, W. B.

    R.L. ArmstrongSs (1991) posthumous paper demonstrated that, contrary to conven- tional (and still dominant) geochemical assumption, isotopic data require most con- tinental material to have been fractionated into crust early in Earth history and to have been variably recycled since through the mantle. Recent information confirms predictions implicit in his recycling model. Archean cratonic crust mostly lacks a thick, mafic basal layer and is in bulk more felsic than Proterozoic and younger crust, whereas Archean lithospheric mantle is much more refractory than younger litho- sphere, which becomes markedly more enriched in fusible components with decreas- ing age. The oldest rocks in all Archean cratons are felsic migmatites, plus abundant but subordinate ultramafic, mafic, and anorthositic rocks. Ion-microprobe ages of zir- cons in these gneisses typically scatter from a maximum (currently 4.4 Ga in Yilgarn, and 4.1-3.6 Ga in other cratons) to minima near ages of overlying supracrustal rocks or of remobilization into late domiform batholiths. The gneisses were near wet-solidus temperature for long periods, the felsic protolith may have been mostly fractionated into crust by 4.4 Ga, and these ancient gneisses may dominate middle and lower Archean crust. Setting of formation is unknown, although steep REE patterns sug- gest derivation, by hydrous magmatic fractionation or partial melting, complementary to garnet-rich rocks that comprise geophysical mantle. Waterlaid supracrustal rocksU-° first quartzite, then mostly mafic and ultramafic lavaUwere deposited on the basement ° rocks after 3.5 Ga, and were deformed by gravitational rise of domiform batholiths and sinking of dense synclines. Indicators of plate-tectonic rifting and convergence are widespread in terrains younger than 2 Ga but are wholly lacking in the Archean. Plate tectonics is driven by subduction, which is enabled by top-down cooling of light asthenosphere to form dense oceanic lithosphere. Hinges

  1. Investigating and Imaging the Lithospheric Structure of the Westernmost Mediterranean Using S Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Meghan S.; Butcher, Amber

    2013-04-01

    The Alboran System was created during the Neogene at the western edge of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt, as the result of convergence between the European and African plates. This system includes the Gibraltar Arc, Rif-Betic chain, Atlas Mountains, and Alboran Sea. The evolution from ocean subduction to continental collision, particularly in complex three-dimensional settings such as this, is poorly understood. Advances in this subject are likely to come from multidisciplinary projects, such as PICASSO (Program to Investigate Convective Alboran Sea System Overturn): a study of the Alboran Sea, Atlas Mountains, and Gibraltar arc. Several models have been suggested to explain the tectonics of this system including: continental lithospheric delamination and drips, slab breakoff, and subducting slab rollback. Advances in defining the lithosphere - asthenosphere boundary (LAB) are crucial to understanding the geochemical and geodynamic evolution of the region. Seismic data from ~85 broadband instruments deployed in Morocco and Spain as part of the PICASSO project are being utilized to constrain lithospheric structure beneath this part of the Western Mediterranean via identification of S-to-p conversions from S receiver functions. A previous study indicates that the lithospheric thinning beneath the Atlas High may be the result of mantle upwelling induced thermal erosion, while a more recent imaging study suggests that the LAB could be at depths >200 km, tens of kilometers thicker than previous models. Our preliminary results indicate LAB depths down to ~100 - 110 km near the Straight of Gibraltar and as shallow as ~65 - 80 km under the Atlas High. The primary purpose of this project is to advance our understanding of the structure and evolution of the lithosphere - asthenosphere boundary (LAB) of the Atlas Mountains and surrounding areas.

  2. Variability of lithospheric structure in the Baltic Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Helle; Debayle, Eric; Maupin, Valérie

    2013-04-01

    We present the shear velocity structure down to 250km depth beneath the dense LAPNET array in northern Finland, located at the northern end of the Baltic Shield. We analysed phase velocity dispersion of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves, using data from 46 seismic broadband stations and almost 200 magnitude >6 events. The inversion of the dispersion curve shows a well resolved low velocity zone starting at approximately 150km depth, while the shear velocities above are typical for cratonic lithosphere. The comparison to other parts of the Baltic Shield show strong variability of the lithospheric structure. Immediately south of LAPNET, in an area dominated by paleaproterozoic rocks at surface, the lithosphere is fast to a depth of 225-250km, while cratonic lithosphere seems to be absent beneath southern Norway, in spite of Proterozoic age tectonic ages. The low velocity zone beneath northern Finland indicates that the lithosphere in this area is either modified at depth, for example through metasomatism, or that it is thinner than the more internal part of the Baltic shield. We suggest that the modification of the cratonic lithosphere beneath northern Finland is not related to continental breakup at the opening of the Atlantic Ocean, as the continental shelf continues north, beneath the Barents Sea. We rather favour the hypothesis that subduction and/or collision could potentially modify (by fluid injection) or remove (by erosion/dripping) otherwise stable cratonic lithosphere.

  3. What can we learn from lithosphere-scale models of passive margins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Maystrenko, Yuriy; Hirsch, Katja K.

    2010-05-01

    To understand the present day structure and the mechanisms of subsidence at passive margins we assess first-order heterogeneities in the sediments, crust and upper mantle. Thus, we explore how far a good knowledge of the sedimentary and upper crustal configuration can provide constraints for the deeper parts of the system and how far the preserved record of deposits holds the key to unravel margin history. The present-day geometry and distribution of physical properties within the upper and middle crust is integrated into data-based, 3D structural models, which, in turn, provide the base for the analysis of the deep crust and the lithospheric mantle. Different configurations of the deep lithosphere can be tested against two independent observables: gravity and temperature, using isostatic, 3D gravity and 3D thermal modelling. Results from the 55 mio year old Norwegian passive volcanic margin indicate that there, the oceanic lithospheric mantle is less dense than the continental lithospheric mantle (Maystrenko and Scheck-Wenderoth, 2009), that this is mainly due to thermal effects (Scheck-Wenderoth and Maystrenko, 2008) and that the transition between continental and oceanic lithosphere thickness is sharp (Maystrenko and Scheck-Wenderoth, 2009). Furthermore, the thickness of the young oceanic lithosphere in the North Atlantic is smaller than predicted by plate cooling models but consistent with seismologically derived estimates. We also find that the oceanic lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary strongly influences the shallow thermal field of the margin and that surface heat flow increases from the continent to the ocean. In contrast, at the South Atlantic margin offshore South Africa, a thicker and older (~130 mio years) oceanic lithosphere is present. Based on previous studies of the crustal configuration (Hirsch et al., 2009), first lithosphere configurations have been tested. There the transition between continent and ocean appears equilibrated and surface heat

  4. Impact of lithosphere deformation on stratigraphic architecture of passive margin basins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouby, Delphine; Huismans, Ritske; Braun, Jean; Robin, Cécile; Granjeon, Didier

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to revise our view of the long-term stratigraphic trends of passive margins to include the impact of the coupling between the lithosphere deformation and the surface processes. To do this, we developed a new numerical procedure simulating interactions between lithosphere deformation and (un)loading effects of surface processes (erosion/sedimentation) in 3D with a special attention to the stratigraphic architecture of the associated sedimentary basins. We first simulate the syn-rift phase of lithosphere stretching by thermo-mechanical modeling. We then use the resulting lithosphere geometry as input of a 3D flexural modeling including coupling with surface processes to simulate the post-rift evolution of the margin. We then use the resulting accumulation and subsidence histories as input of the stratigraphic simulation to model the detailed stratigraphic architecture of the basin. We tested this procedure using synthetic examples of lithosphere stretching based on different rheologies of the lithosphere (i.e. strength of the lower crust) in the cases of narrow or ultrawide rifting. We determined the stratigraphic expression of the conjugate margins and show that they differ in terms of long-term stratigraphic trends, erosion/accumulation and lithological distribution in space and time. In all cases, uplift/subisdence rates decrease with time while the flexure wavelength increases as isotherms are re-equilibrated. Some areas show displacement inversion over time from uplift to subsidence (or vice-versa). As expected, the amplitude of vertical motion of the wide margin cases is very limited with respect to the narrow margin case. Vertical motions are very asymetric on conjugate margins. Accordingly, the stratigraphic architectures and the sedimentation/erosion patterns of the conjugate simulated margins are significantly different mostly because the duration and length of progradation and retrogradation differ. We evaluated the sensitivity of

  5. Lithospheric thinning in the Eastern Indian Craton: Evidence for lithospheric delamination below the Archean Singhbhum Craton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Prantik

    2017-02-01

    We herein present shear velocity structure extending down to 300 km depth below the Archean Singhbhum-Odisha Craton (SOC) and Proterozoic Chotanagpur granitic-gneissic terrain (CGGT), which has been obtained through the inversion modeling of P-receiver functions. We use three-component broadband recordings of 200 teleseismic earthquakes (30° ≤ ∆ ≤ 90°) from a 15 station seismic network that has been operational in the Eastern Indian shield since February 2013. We obtain the thinnest crust of 35 km overlying a thin lithosphere of 78 km, below the region near south Singhbhum shear zone, which could be attributed to the 1.6 Ga plume activity associated with Dalma volcanic. However, the thickest crust of 47 km overlying a thin lithosphere of 81 km is noticed below the region near the Singhbhum granite of 3.6 Ga. This thinning of lithosphere could be attributed to the delamination of lithospheric root due to the Himalayan orogeny with a shortening rate of 2 cm/year. This delamination model in SOC gets further support from the densification of the lower crust, which could result from repeated episodes of basaltic underplating associated with episodes related to Dalma ( 1.6 Ga) and Rajmahal ( 117 Ma) volcanisms. This led to relatively more mafic, heterogeneous and deformed crustal structure in SOC as well as EGMB (with an average crustal Vs of 4.0 km/s) in comparison to that in CGGT (with an average crustal Vs of 3.9 km/s), as seen through our modeling results. The thickest lithosphere of 100 km is observed in the southwestern SOC as well as northeastern CGGT. We also notice that a sharp and flat Moho in CGGT, which could be attributed to thermal reactivation and large volume melting of the mafic cratonic crust during the late Archean subduction process and associated volcanism episodes. This model gets further support from the estimated 169 km thick lower Vs zone in the upper mantle below CGGT. Our modeling results also support a northward subduction of Archean

  6. Evolution of soil and vegetation cover on the bottom of drained thermokarst lake (a case study in the European Northeast of Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaverin, Dmitry; Pastukhov, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The evolution of soils and landscapes has been studied in a lake bed of former thermokarst lake, which was totally drained in 1979. Melioration of thermokarst lakes was conducted experimentally and locally under Soviet economics program during 1970-s. The aim of the program was to increase in biomass productivity of virgin tundra permafrost-thermokarst sites under agricultural activities. The former thermokarst lake "Opytnoe" located in the Bolshezemelskaya Tundra, Russian European Northeast. The lake bed is covered by peat-mineral sediments, which serves as soil-forming sediments favoring subsequent permafrost aggradation and cryogenic processes as well. Initially, after drainage, swampy meadows had been developed almost all over the lake bed. Further on, succession of landscape went diversely, typical and uncommon tundra landscapes formed. When activated, cryogenic processes favored the formation of peat mounds under dwarf shrub - lichen vegetation (7% of the area). Frost cracks and peat circles affected flat mounds all over the former lake bottom. On drained peat sites, with no active cryogenic processes, specific grass meadows on Cryic Sapric Histosols were developed. Totally, permafrost-affected soils occupy 77% of the area (2011). In some part of the lake bed further development of waterlogging leads to the formation of marshy meadows and willow communities where Gleysols prevail. During last twenty years, permafrost degradation has occurred under tall shrub communities, and it will progress in future. Water erosion processes in the drained lake bottom promoted the formation of local hydrographic network. In the stream floodplain grassy willow-stands formed on Fluvisols (3% of the area). The study has been conducted under Clima-East & RFBR 14-05-31111 projects.

  7. Understanding lithospheric stresses: systematic analysis of controlling mechanisms with applications to the African Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Sergei

    2016-10-01

    Many mechanisms control the state of stress within Earth plates. First-order well-known mechanisms include stresses induced by lateral variations of lithospheric density structure, sublithospheric tractions, ridge push and subduction pull. In this study, we attempt to quantify the influence of these mechanisms to understand the origin of stresses in the lithosphere, choosing the African plate (TAP) as an example. A finite-element based suite, Proshell, was developed to combine several data sets, to estimate the gravitational potential energy (GPE) of the lithosphere and to calculate stresses acting on the real (non-planar) geometry of TAP. We introduce several quantitative parameters to measure the degree of fit between the model and observations. Our modelling strategy involves nine series of numerical experiments. We start with the simplest possible model and then, step by step, build it up to be a more physically realistic model, all the while discussing the influence of each additional component. The starting (oversimplified) model series (1) is based on the CRUST2 data set for the crust and a half-space-cooling approximation of the lithospheric mantle. We then describe models (series 2-5) that account for lithospheric mantle density heterogeneities to build a more reliable GPE model. The consecutive series involve basal traction from the convective mantle (series A, C) and the rheological heterogeneity of the TAP via variations in its effective elastic thickness (series B, C). The model quality reflects the increase in complexity between series with an improving match to observed stress regimes and directions. The most complex model (series D) also accounts for the bending stresses in the elastic lithosphere and achieves a remarkably good fit to observations. All of our experiments were based on the iteration of controlling parameters in order to achieve the best fit between modelled and observed stresses, always considering physically feasible values. This

  8. Highly CO2-supersaturated melts in the Pannonian lithospheric mantle - A transient carbon reservoir?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Créon, Laura; Rouchon, Virgile; Youssef, Souhail; Rosenberg, Elisabeth; Delpech, Guillaume; Szabó, Csaba; Remusat, Laurent; Mostefaoui, Smail; Asimow, Paul D.; Antoshechkina, Paula M.; Ghiorso, Mark S.; Boller, Elodie; Guyot, François

    2017-08-01

    Subduction of carbonated crust is widely believed to generate a flux of carbon into the base of the continental lithospheric mantle, which in turn is the likely source of widespread volcanic and non-volcanic CO2 degassing in active tectonic intracontinental settings such as rifts, continental margin arcs and back-arc domains. However, the magnitude of the carbon flux through the lithosphere and the budget of stored carbon held within the lithospheric reservoir are both poorly known. We provide new constraints on the CO2 budget of the lithospheric mantle below the Pannonian Basin (Central Europe) through the study of a suite of xenoliths from the Bakony-Balaton Highland Volcanic Field. Trails of secondary fluid inclusions, silicate melt inclusions, networks of melt veins, and melt pockets with large and abundant vesicles provide numerous lines of evidence that mantle metasomatism affected the lithosphere beneath this region. We obtain a quantitative estimate of the CO2 budget of the mantle below the Pannonian Basin using a combination of innovative analytical and modeling approaches: (1) synchrotron X-ray microtomography, (2) NanoSIMS, Raman spectroscopy and microthermometry, and (3) thermodynamic models (Rhyolite-MELTS). The three-dimensional volumes reconstructed from synchrotron X-ray microtomography allow us to quantify the proportions of all petrographic phases in the samples and to visualize their textural relationships. The concentration of CO2 in glass veins and pockets ranges from 0.27 to 0.96 wt.%, higher than in typical arc magmas (0-0.25 wt.% CO2), whereas the H2O concentration ranges from 0.54 to 4.25 wt.%, on the low end for estimated primitive arc magmas (1.9-6.3 wt.% H2O). Trapping pressures for vesicles were determined by comparing CO2 concentrations in glass to CO2 saturation as a function of pressure in silicate melts, suggesting pressures between 0.69 to 1.78 GPa. These values are generally higher than trapping pressures for fluid inclusions

  9. A lithospheric perspective on structure and evolution of Precambrian cratons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide a summary of geophysical data on the structure of the stable continental lithosphere and its evolution since the Archean. Here, the term lithosphere is used to define the outer layer of the Earth which includes the crust and uppermost mantle, forms...... the roots of the continents, and moves together with continental plates. Depending on geophysical techniques (and physical properties measured), the lithosphere has different practical definitions. Most of them (i.e., seismic, electrical) are on the basis of a sharp change in temperature-dependent physical...

  10. Crossing the Iberian Plate from the Bay of Biscay to the Alboran Sea: a lithospheric geotransect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo, Alberto; Fernandez, Manel; Torne, Montserrat; Jiménez-Munt, Ivone; Vergés, Jaume; Pedreira, David; Díaz, Jordi; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    A ~1000-km-long lithospheric transect running from the North-Iberian Margin to the Neogene Alboran Basin (W- Mediterranean) is investigated. The main goal is to image the lateral changes in the crustal and lithospheric structure occurring in: i) the North-Iberian margin, whose deformation in Alpine times gave rise to the uplift of the Cantabrian Mountains related to incipient subduction; ii) the Spanish Meseta, characterized by the presence of Cenozoic basins on top of a Variscan basement with weak Alpine deformation in the Spanish Central System and localized Neogene-Quaternary deep volcanism; and iii) the Betic-Alboran system related to the roll-back of the Ligurian-Tethyan domain. The modeling approach based on the LitMod package combines potential fields, elevation, thermal, seismic and petrological data under a self-consistent scheme. The crustal structure is mainly constrained by active and passive seismic experiments whereas the upper mantle is constrained by tomography models. The results highlight the lateral variations in the topography of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), suggesting a strong lithospheric mantle strain below the Cantabrian and Betic mountain belts. The LAB depth ranges from 160 km beneath the Cantabrian Mountains to 110-90 km beneath Iberia Meseta deepenly again to values of 190 km beneath Betic Mountain. The Spanish Central System, with elevations higher than 1400 m, has no noticeable signature on the LAB depth. We have considered three lithospheric mantle compositions: a predominantly average Phanerozoic in the continental mainland, and two more fertile PUM (primitive upper mantle) compositions in the oceanic domains of Cantabrian and Mediterranean seas, and in the Calatrava volcanic field. These compositional differences allowed us to reproduce the main trends of the geophysical observables as well as the inferred P-, Pn- and S-wave seismic velocities from tomography models and seismic experiments available in the study

  11. Compositions and processes of lithospheric mantle beneath the west Cathaysia block, southeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zheng, Jianping; Pan, Shaokui; Lu, Jianggu; Li, Yihe; Xiang, Lu; Lin, Abing

    2017-08-01

    Knowledge about the nature and history of the lithospheric mantle beneath the west Cathaysia block (South China) is still sparse. The major- and trace-element compositions and H2O contents of minerals from peridotite xenoliths entrained in the Cenozoic lamprophyres of the Anyuan area (SE China), were conducted to investigate the nature and evolution of the lithospheric mantle, as well as the factors controlling the distribution of water. The xenoliths including spinel harzburgites and lherzolites are moderately refractory (Mg# Olivine = 90.2-91.2) with minor fertile lherzolites (Mg# Olivine = 89.1-89.9). Clinopyroxenes in lherzolites show variable REE patterns from LREE-depleted to LREE-enriched patterns, and commonly exhibit negative anomalies of U, Pb and Ti. The mantle represented by the xenoliths mostly experienced 1-10% partial melting and obvious subsequent silicate metasomatism. H2O contents of clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, and olivine in the peridotites are 320-404 ppm, 138-200 ppm, and 11-33 ppm, respectively. The whole-rock H2O contents range from 63 to 120 ppm, similar to that estimated for the MORB source. The negative correlations of H2O contents with Mg# in olivine and lack of correlation correlations with (La/Yb)N in clinopyroxene suggest that the H2O contents are mainly controlled by the partial melting process rather than mantle metasomatism. The fertile and moderately refractory peridotite xenoliths have similar equilibrium temperatures, implying that the lithospheric mantle is not compositionally stratified. Integrated with published data, we suggest that the widespread fertile and moderately refractory lithospheric mantle beneath the studied area (west Cathaysia), even the whole South China, might be eroded or melt-rock reacted by upwelling asthenospheric materials. Finally, the cooling of the upwelled asthenospheric materials resulted in the formation of the accreted lithospheric mantle mixed with pre-existing moderately refractory volumes.

  12. Modelling of compression and extension of the continental lithosphere: Towards rehabilitation of the necking-level model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, Valentin; Stephenson, Randell; Diament, Michel

    2010-12-01

    We present a dynamic model of continental lithosphere deformation under extension or compression, focusing on the role of an effective mechanical parameter called "necking level" or "necking depth", a widely used concept in basin modelling studies. Though it has generally been assumed that "necking depth" depends strongly upon the rheological structure of the lithosphere (especially the depth distribution of its strong layers), such a dependency has never been demonstrated. Our model, which accommodates small deformations of a thin inhomogeneous plate induced by in-plane as well as by mantle boundary forces (applied to the model sides and base, respectively), shows that "necking depth" is a function of the horizontal position and depends mainly on the relative thicknesses and strengths of the rigid layers in the uppermost crust and below the Moho. Using different yield strength envelopes we demonstrate that the final structure of the lithosphere formed as a result of deformation and its consequent isostatic adjustment can be closely approximated by a model with a flat necking level. In the process of extension and compression of the continental lithosphere all boundaries, including the topographic surface and the Moho, deform. As a result, the total disturbance of the isostatic equilibrium state (specified as a load) is only a part of the topographic weight. Estimates of the correct load can be made using the depth to the necking level inferred from lithosphere structure, composition and thermal state. The final topography of lithospheric interfaces depends on both necking depth and effective flexural rigidity. Any attempt to estimate simultaneously strain distribution, necking depth and effective flexural rigidity, however, represents an ill-posed problem and is not possible without reliance upon strong independent assumptions constraining lithosphere structure.

  13. Imaging the Italian Lithosphere based on Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnoni, F.; Casarotti, E.; Komatitsch, D.; Melini, D.; Michelini, A.; Piersanti, A.; Tape, C.; Tromp, J.

    2016-12-01

    We exploit the powerful European computational resources awarded to our PRACE project IMAGINE_IT ("3D full-wave tomographic IMAGINg of the Entire ITalian lithosphere") to develop a reference, high-resolution 3D seismic wavespeed model for the Italian lithosphere. The inversion procedure consists of iterative improvements of an initial 3D traveltime tomographic model of the region constrained by a large number of full, high-quality observed seismic waveforms. The final model images the regional structure at unprecedented resolution ( 10 s) minimizing the misfit between recorded and synthetic data. Numerical wavefield simulations at high frequency are performed using a spectral-element method (code SPECFEM3D) that allows us to implement all complexities that characterize the studied region (lateral heterogeneity, topography, attenuation). This method is then efficiently combined with an adjoint technique to perform the 3D full-wave tomographic inversion. The Italian peninsula is characterized by very heterogeneous features resulting from complex tectonic evolution of the region mainly dominated by the interaction of Tyrrhenian, Adria and European plates. Our inversion includes 163 earthquakes that occurred in Italy and neighboring areas between 2005 and 2014, and a dense seismological network of 400 seismic recording stations. We perform 25 iterations of our iterative tomographic inversion process, as well as moment tensor inversions for the considered events. The resolution capabilities of our model are also explored based on point spread function analyses and calculation of the approximate Hessian. Thanks to our project IMAGINE_IT, at present the first application of adjoint tomography for the whole Italian region, we are able to constrain Vp as well as Vs at unprecedented resolution; the complex plate relationships start to be accurately modeled, and other inferences on the Italian geodynamical evolution or on fluid (such as CO2) distribution become possible.

  14. Surface and tectonic consequences of plume-lithosphere interactions in continents: insights from modelling approach based on realistic representation of lithosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, E.; Guillou-Frottier, L.

    2008-12-01

    surface extension above the centre of the plume and in compression (pushing), down-thrusting and magmatic events at the cratonic margin (down-thrusting is also produced at the opposite border of the younger plate); these processes may result in continental growth at the 'craton side'; (5) the negative Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in the lithosphere above the plume head provide a mechanism for crustal delamination. This study suggests also that the absence of magmatic events should not be always interpreted as evidence for the absence of plume event, as the hot source plume material stalls below Moho and forms a long-lasting (10-100 Myr) sub-Moho reservoir. This should induce strong crustal melting that may overprint deep geochemical signatures, since this melting yields light low-viscosity rapidly ascending magmas. Drip-like down-sagging of lithospheric mantle and crustal material inside the plume head may contaminate the latter and thus alter the geochemical signature of plume-related magmas.

  15. Getting to the bottom of nappy rash. ALSPAC Survey Team. Avon Longitudinal Study of Pregnancy and Childhood.

    OpenAIRE

    Philipp, R; Hughes, A; Golding, J

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nappy rash accounts for 20% of dermatology consultations in childhood, but its causes are poorly understood. AIM: To determine the incidence of nappy rash during the first four weeks of life in a geographically defined United Kingdom (UK) population, and to study the factors associated with developing the rash. METHOD: The data are derived from self-completed questionnaires of parents in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Pregnancy and Childhood (ALSPAC). The response rate to a questi...

  16. Evidence for multiphase folding of the central Indian Ocean lithosphere

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.; Bull, J.M.; Scrutton, R.A.

    Long-wavelength (100-300 km) folding in the central Indian Ocean associated with the diffuse plate boundary separating the Indian, Australian, and Capricorn plates is Earth's most convincing example of organized large-scale lithospheric deformation...

  17. Characterization of Humic Acid from the River Bottom Sediments of Burigonga: Complexation Studies of Metals with Humic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Arifur Rahman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to characterize and study of the complexation of humic acid with metal ions, sediment samples were collected from five different places in the Buriganga River. The Humic Acids were extracted with the standard procedure provided by the International Humic Substance Society (IHSS. The extracted Humic Acids were characterized with FTIR, EDX and CHNS analyzer and a comparison between the standard and extracted HA was carried out. High C/N ratios (71.48-87.36 are observed in the CHNS analysis. A complexation study of the Humic Acid with iron (III and cadmium (II was also carried out using EDX, UV-Visible spectrophotometer and AAS techniques. The coagulation behavior was observed with Jar test. From the study, it was found that iron and cadmium could make a complex at pH 6.0 which was confirmed by EDX (Electron Dispersive x-ray.

  18. Isothiazolone Volatility Study of a Water Bottom from Fuel Treated with Kathon(trade name) FP1.5 Biocide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    pas clans l’espace habitable au-dessus du fond de cale, pour donner des constituants toxiques qui pourraient alors 8tre inhales par les personnes...accumulation and elimination of isothiazolone compounds in rats and fish, as well as in river waters, sludge, plants and soil. Dissipation studies in Delaware

  19. Getting to the bottom of nappy rash. ALSPAC Survey Team. Avon Longitudinal Study of Pregnancy and Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, R; Hughes, A; Golding, J

    1997-08-01

    Nappy rash accounts for 20% of dermatology consultations in childhood, but its causes are poorly understood. To determine the incidence of nappy rash during the first four weeks of life in a geographically defined United Kingdom (UK) population, and to study the factors associated with developing the rash. The data are derived from self-completed questionnaires of parents in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Pregnancy and Childhood (ALSPAC). The response rate to a questionnaire about the child administered four weeks after delivery among parents of singleton infants was 87% (12103/13902). The incidence of nappy rash was 25%. Fourteen highly significant possible causal factors emerged, of which 10 were retained in a logistic regression model: dirtying of nappy, contact with doctor about other problems, history of rashes in joints or skin creases, type of nappy worn, being fed cereal, taken to mother's bed when waking at night, history of cradle cap, general state of health, previous stomach upset, and being only breast-fed. However, the relative risks were generally small. The likelihood of nappy rash increases with intercurrent illness and early introduction of cereals. Disposable nappies give little protection, and this finding helps to endorse a recently introduced hospital scheme arising from environmental concerns that encourages parents to use cotton nappies instead of disposables. For many babies, however, the causes of nappy rash remain unknown.

  20. On studying protein phosphorylation patterns using bottom-up LC-MS/MS: the case of human alpha-casein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Frank; Savitski, Mikhail M; Nielsen, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    -LC-MS/MS. The occupancy rates of phosphosites in proteins may differ by orders of magnitude, and thus the occupancy rate must be reported for each occupied phosphosite. To highlight potential pitfalls in quantifying the occupancy rates, alpha(s1)-casein from human milk was selected as a model molecule representing...... moderately phosphorylated proteins. For this purpose, human milk from one Caucasian woman in the eighth month of lactation was used. The phosphorylation level of caseins is believed to have major implications for the formation of micelles that are involved in delivering valuable calcium phosphate and other...... minerals to the new-born. Human alpha(s1)-casein has been reported to be much less phosphorylated than ruminant caseins, which may indicate a different function of caseins in humans. Revealing the phosphorylation pattern in human casein can thus shed light on its function. The current study found...

  1. The FOBIMO (FOraminiferal BIo-MOnitoring) initiative—Towards a standardised protocol for soft-bottom benthic foraminiferal monitoring studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Joachim; Alve, Elisabeth; Geslin, Emmanuelle; Jorissen, Frans; Korsun, Sergei; Spezzaferri, Silva; Abramovich, Sigal; Almogi-Labin, Ahuva; Armynot du Chatelet, Eric; Barras, Christine; Bergamin, Luisa; Bicchi, Erica; Bouchet, Vincent; Cearreta, Alejandro; Di Bella, Letizia; Dijkstra, Noortje; Trevisan Disaro, Sibelle; Ferraro, Luciana; Frontalini, Fabrizio; Gennari, Giordana; Golikova, Elena; Haynert, Kristin; Hess, Silvia; Husum, Katrine; Martins, Virginia; McGann, Mary; Oron, Shai; Romano, Elena; Mello Sousa, Silvia; Tsujimoto, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The European Community Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) was established to provide guidelines for monitoring the quality of marine ecosystems. Monitoring the status of marine environments is traditionally based on macrofauna surveys, for which standardised methods have been established. Benthic foraminifera are also good indicators of environmental status because of their fast turnover rates, high degree of specialisation, and the preservation of dead assemblages in the fossil record. In spite of the growing interest in foraminiferal bio-monitoring during the last decades, no standardised methodology has been proposed until today. The aim of the FOraminiferal BIo-MOnitoring (FOBIMO) expert workshop, held in June 2011 at Fribourg, Switzerland, which assembled 37 scientists from 24 research groups and 13 countries, was to develop a suite of standard methods. This paper presents the main outcome of the workshop, a list of motivated recommendations with respect to sampling devices, sample storage, treatment, faunal analysis and documentation. Our recommendations fulfil the criteria imposed both by scientific rigour and by the practical limitations of routine studies. Hence, our aim is to standardise methodologies used in bio-monitoring only and not to limit the use of different methods in pure scientific studies. Unless otherwise stated, all recommendations concern living (stained) benthic foraminiferal assemblages. We have chosen to propose two types of recommendations. Mandatory recommendations have to be followed if a study wants to qualify as sound and compatible to the norms. The most important of these recommendations are the interval from 0 to 1 cm below the sediment surface has to be sampled, and an interface corer or box corer that keeps the sediment surface intact is to be used for offshore surveys. A grab sampler must not be deployed in soft sediments. Three replicate samples are to be taken and analysed separately. Samples are to be washed on a

  2. In-shoe pressure distribution in "unstable" (MBT) shoes and flat-bottomed training shoes: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, L; Gibson, J N A; Thomson, C E

    2007-04-01

    Footwear comfort in many clinical situations is dependent on the ability of the 'shoe' to redistribute plantar pressure. Offloading the metatarsal heads may be achieved by fitting an insole, but recently a new design of shoe with a curved under sole (Masai Barefoot Technology or "MBT shoe") has been advocated. The aim of this study was to directly assess the effect of such shoes on gait pattern. Normal subjects were recruited and asked to walk sequentially in (a) flat-soled training shoes and (b) midfoot bearing shoes (MBT shoe). Mean and peak pressures in four anatomically defined areas of the foot, and the total area of sole contact were measured electronically by an in-shoe system (Pedar Ltd., UK). Standing in the Masai shoes resulted in a 21% lesser peak pressure under the midfoot and an 11% lesser peak pressure under the heel in comparison to the figures found when patients wore their training shoes. There was a 76% compensatory increase in pressure under the toes. In essence there was a significant shift in pressure towards the front of the foot.

  3. Bottom hole blowout preventer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lineham, D.H.

    1991-04-24

    An automatically controlled ball-valve type bottom-hole blowout preventer is provided for use in drilling oil or gas wells. The blowout preventer of the invention operates under normal drilling conditions in a fully open position with an unrestricted bore. This condition is maintained by a combination of spring and mud flow pressure acting against the upper surfaces of the valve. In the event of a well kick or blowout, pressures from gas or fluid volumes acting against the lower surfaces of the valve force it into the fully closed position. A system of ports and check valves within the blowout preventer forces hydraulic fluid from one chamber to another. The metering effect of these ports determines the rate of closure of the valve, thereby allowing normal running and pulling of the drill string or tubing, without interference to pipe fill-up or drainage, from valve closure. The blowout preventer is placed in a subassembly that is an integral part of the drill string and can be incorporated in a string in any location. 3 figs.

  4. Can We Probe the Conductivity of the Lithosphere and Upper Mantle Using Satellite Tidal Magnetic Signals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, N. R.; Kuvshinov, A.; Sabaka, T.

    2015-01-01

    A few studies convincingly demonstrated that the magnetic fields induced by the lunar semidiurnal (M2) ocean flow can be identified in satellite observations. This result encourages using M2 satellite magnetic data to constrain subsurface electrical conductivity in oceanic regions. Traditional satellite-based induction studies using signals of magnetospheric origin are mostly sensitive to conducting structures because of the inductive coupling between primary and induced sources. In contrast, galvanic coupling from the oceanic tidal signal allows for studying less conductive, shallower structures. We perform global 3-D electromagnetic numerical simulations to investigate the sensitivity of M2 signals to conductivity distributions at different depths. The results of our sensitivity analysis suggest it will be promising to use M2 oceanic signals detected at satellite altitude for probing lithospheric and upper mantle conductivity. Our simulations also suggest that M2 seafloor electric and magnetic field data may provide complementary details to better constrain lithospheric conductivity.

  5. Channel morphology changes and their relationship to valley bottom geology and human interventions; a case study from the Vistula Valley in Warsaw, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowski, Tomasz; Ostrowski, Piotr; Siwicki, Piotr; Brach, Michał

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the role of the geological setting of channel zone in the morphological variability of a river reach situated between engineered and seminatural channel sections. Investigations were carried out in the Vistula River channel in Warsaw. The study included the drilling of 60 geological boreholes in the river channel and the registering of sedimentary structures of modern river-channel sediments. The morphology of the channel was defined based on a series of bathymetric measurements of different river levels. To identify the reasons for the variation in the channel-bed morphology, numerical modelling of river flow was performed. Calculations were made using the FLUENT CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) model. The stabilization of bottom erosion along the engineered reach of the river was found to be associated with a shallow depth to the top of the basement of modern alluvial sediments, composed of erosion-resistant glacial deposits. The suballuvial basement in this part of the river channel also serves as a local base level in relation to the river reach upstream.

  6. Coal Bottom Ash for Portland Cement Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Argiz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of industrialization growth, the amount of coal power plant wastes has increased very rapidly. Particularly, the disposal of coal bottom ash (CBA is becoming an increasing concern for many countries because of the increasing volume generated, the costs of operating landfill sites, and its potential hazardous effects. Therefore, new applications of coal bottom ash (CBA have become an interesting alternative to disposal. For instance, it could be used as a Portland cement constituent leading to more sustainable cement production by lowering energy consumption and raw material extracted from quarries. Coal fly and bottom ashes are formed together in the same boiler; however, the size and shape of these ashes are very different, and hence their effect on the chemical composition as well as on the mineralogical phases must be studied. Coal bottom ash was ground. Later, both ashes were compared from a physical, mechanical, and chemical point of view to evaluate the potential use of coal bottom ash as a new Portland cement constituent. Both ashes, produced by the same electrical power plant, generally present similar chemical composition and compressive strength and contribute to the refill of mortar capillary pores with the reaction products leading to a redistribution of the pore size.

  7. Imaging the Lithospheric - Asthenosphere Boundary Structure of the Westernmost Mediterranean Using S Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, A.; Miller, M. S.; Diaz Cusi, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Iberian microcontinent, in the westernmost portion of the Mediterranean is comprised of the Betic Cordillera Zone, the South Portuguese Zone, the Ossa-Morena Zone, the Central Iberian Zone, the Galicia-Tras Os Montes Zone, the West Asturian-Leonese Zone, and the Cantabrian Zone. These zones were created as a result of three primary stages of Iberian evolution, with the last being the collision of Iberia with in the Late Cretaceous. In northeastern Africa, Neogene convergence between the European and African plates created the Alboran System: comprised of the Gibraltar Arc, Rif-Betics, Atlas Mountains, and Alboran Sea. The primary purpose of this study is to advance our understanding of the structure and evolution of the lithosphere, as well as the lithosphere - asthenosphere boundary (LAB) of the Iberian microcontinent and surrounding areas. Of particular interest is improving our understanding of the evolution from ocean subduction to continental collision that has been taking place in the late stage convergence of this part of the Mediterranean., The region is a particularly complex three-dimensional settings and, several models have been suggested to explain the tectonics of this system including: continental lithospheric delamination and drips, slab breakoff, and subducting slab rollback. Here we use broadband seismic data from 272 broadband instruments deployed in Morocco and Spain as part of the PICASSO and IBERArray (Díaz, J., et al., 2009) projects to constrain lithospheric structure via identification of S-to-p conversions from S receiver functions (SRF). We use SRFs to image the characteristics and structure in terms of seismic velocity discontinuities, including the crust-mantle boundary (Moho) and the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) beneath the region. Our SRFs agree with previous work that suggests that the lithospheric thickness is shallow (~65 km) beneath the Atlas and thickest (~120 km) beneath the Rif. Additionally, LAB structures

  8. Incidental capture of sea turtles by longlines in the Gulf of Gabès (South Tunisia: A comparative study between bottom and surface longlines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imed Jribi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Longlines are a fishing gear that have traditionally been used world-wide. Surface longlines are mainly used to fish swordfish, albacore, tuna and some species of sharks, while bottom longlines are used to fish large bottom-dwelling fish such as groupers. Longlines are widely known to interact with several species of sea turtles, and there is increasing concern about the impact of by-catch on these species. However, there is a paucity of data on sea turtle interactions with bottom longlines. In this paper we analyse the interaction of sea turtles with both bottom and surface longlines in the zone of Zarzis in the south of the gulf of Gabès, which is considered to be an important Mediterranean wintering and foraging area for the loggerhead turtle, Caretta caretta. Results show an important interaction with both types of longlines. Catch rates were estimated to be 0.823 per 1000 hooks for surface longline and 0.278 per 1000 hooks for bottom longline. Direct mortalities were estimated to be 0% (n=33 captures and 12.5% (n=24 captures, respectively.

  9. Global model for the lithospheric strength and effective elastic thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Magdala; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Cloetingh, Sierd A. P. L.

    2013-08-01

    Global distribution of the strength and effective elastic thickness (Te) of the lithosphere are estimated using physical parameters from recent crustal and lithospheric models. For the Te estimation we apply a new approach, which provides a possibility to take into account variations of Young modulus (E) within the lithosphere. In view of the large uncertainties affecting strength estimates, we evaluate global strength and Te distributions for possible end-member 'hard' (HRM) and a 'soft' (SRM) rheology models of the continental crust. Temperature within the lithosphere has been estimated using a recent tomography model of Ritsema et al. (2011), which has much higher horizontal resolution than previous global models. Most of the strength is localized in the crust for the HRM and in the mantle for the SRM. These results contribute to the long debates on applicability of the "crème brulée" or "jelly-sandwich" model for the lithosphere structure. Changing from the SRM to HRM turns most of the continental areas from the totally decoupled mode to the fully coupled mode of the lithospheric layers. However, in the areas characterized by a high thermal regime and thick crust, the layers remain decoupled even for the HRM. At the same time, for the inner part of the cratons the lithospheric layers are coupled in both models. Therefore, rheological variations lead to large changes in the integrated strength and Te distribution in the regions characterized by intermediate thermal conditions. In these areas temperature uncertainties have a greater effect, since this parameter principally determines rheological behavior. Comparison of the Te estimates for both models with those determined from the flexural loading and spectral analysis shows that the 'hard' rheology is likely applicable for cratonic areas, whereas the 'soft' rheology is more representative for young orogens.

  10. Effects of bottom-up and top-down intervention principles in emergent literacy in children at risk of developmental dyslexia: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helland, Turid; Tjus, Tomas; Hovden, Marit; Ofte, Sonja; Heimann, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study focused on the effects of two different principles of intervention in children at risk of developing dyslexia from 5 to 8 years old. The children were selected on the basis of a background questionnaire given to parents and preschool teachers, with cognitive and functional magnetic resonance imaging results substantiating group differences in neuropsychological processes associated with phonology, orthography, and phoneme-grapheme correspondence (i.e., alphabetic principle). The two principles of intervention were bottom-up (BU), "from sound to meaning", and top-down (TD), "from meaning to sound." Thus, four subgroups were established: risk/BU, risk/TD, control/BU, and control/TD. Computer-based training took place for 2 months every spring, and cognitive assessments were performed each fall of the project period. Measures of preliteracy skills for reading and spelling were phonological awareness, working memory, verbal learning, and letter knowledge. Literacy skills were assessed by word reading and spelling. At project end the control group scored significantly above age norm, whereas the risk group scored within the norm. In the at-risk group, training based on the BU principle had the strongest effects on phonological awareness and working memory scores, whereas training based on the TD principle had the strongest effects on verbal learning, letter knowledge, and literacy scores. It was concluded that appropriate, specific, data-based intervention starting in preschool can mitigate literacy impairment and that interventions should contain BU training for preliteracy skills and TD training for literacy training.

  11. Réunion (Indian Ocean) Oceanic Island Volcanism: Seismic Structure and Heterogeneity of the Upper Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirn, A.

    2002-12-01

    Réunion island in the Indian Ocean is commonly considered as the recent and active expression of the hotspot that formed the Deccan traps, although both the hypothesis of recent small hotspots for both Reunion and Mauritius, or of relation with the plate heterogeneity have been proposed. Structural studies by seismic methods, from the scale of the upper cone of the active Fournaise volcano to that of the crust 100 km around, have been carried out. At this scale significant departures appear from the Hawaiian case to which it is traditionally compared, with the seismic signature of active volcanism showing differences too. Refraction-reflection seismics do not see a geometry of the top of the underlying plate towards the island, expected in plate flexure modelling by analogy with other hotspot island. Where it is sampled, doming is suggested instead. There appears to be less magmatic products than if there was a large amount buried in a flexural depression. The velocity structure resolved for the volcanic island, apart from high velocity cores under the volcanoes leads to smaller overall density than usually considered in flexure modelling. The same appears to hold for the material of the cone of about 120 km radius rising above the regional sea-bottom level to the 30 km radius island, from coincident reflection and refraction seismics on several lines radial to the southeastern half of the island. At the crust-mantle level, there is evidence from reflection-refraction line extending 150 km either side of the island for a layer of velocity intermediate between normal crust and mantle values. Two radial reflection line to the SSW, close to each other detect a differences in depth of the oceanic basement. This may coincide with a fracture zone suggested from the reconstruction of the sea-floor spreading history from the magnetic anomaly pattern. The latter has been interpreted previously to indicate that the western part of Réunion developed atop a Paleogene fossil

  12. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary observed with USArray receiver functions and comparison with other regions

    OpenAIRE

    Rainer Kind; P. Kumar; Xiaohui Yuan; James Mechie; Forough Sodoudi; Benjamin Heit

    2012-01-01

    The dense deployment of seismic stations so far in the western half of the United States within the USArray project provides the opportunity to study in greater detail the structure of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system. We use the S receiver function technique for this purpose which has higher resolution than surface wave tomography, is sensitive to seismic discontinuities and has no problems with multiples like P receiver functions. Only two major discontinuities are observed in the entir...

  13. Crustal Thickness and Lithospheric Structure in Northwestern Namibia from the WALPASS experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin Heit; Xiaohui Yuan; W. Geissler; B. Lushetile; Michael Weber; Jokat, W.

    2013-01-01

    An amphibian passive-source seismic network (WALPASS) have been deployed for a period of two years in the area where theWalvis Ridge intersects with the continental margin of northwestern Namibia. The deployment was intended to study and map the lithospheric and upper mantle structure in the ocean-continent transition beneath the passive continental margin. The main idea is to find seismic anomalies related to the postulated hotspot track from the continent to the ocean along the Walvis Ridge...

  14. Modelling air―water flows in bottom outlets of dams

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ting

    2014-01-01

    If air is entrained in a bottom outlet of a dam in an uncontrolled way, the resulting air pockets may cause problems such as blowback, blowout and loss of discharge capacity. In order to provide guidance for bottom outlet design and operation, this study examines how governing parameters affect air entrainment, air-pocket transport and de-aeration and the surrounding flow structure in pipe flows. Both experimental and numerical approaches are used. Air can be entrained into the bottom outlet ...

  15. Stability of leadership in bottom-up hierarchical organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Galam, Serge

    2007-01-01

    The stability of a leadership against a growing internal opposition is studied in bottom-up hierarchical organizations. Using a very simple model with bottom-up majority rule voting, the dynamics of power distribution at the various hierarchical levels is calculated within a probabilistic framework. Given a leadership at the top, the opposition weight from the hierarchy bottom is shown to fall off quickly while climbing up the hierarchy. It reaches zero after only a few hierarchical levels. I...

  16. The investigation of the lithosphere by geophysical methods: Electromagnetic methods, geothermy, and complex interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnitskii, V. A.; Sollogub, V. B.; Starostenko, V. I.

    The book discusses the methodology used in studies of the geophysical and geodynamical features of the lithosphere of central and eastern Europe, which were conducted between 1981 and 1984 by the Academies of Sciences of socialist European states. Consideration is given to the computer-aided interpretation of geophysical (gravimetric) data, techniques used in electromagnetic and geothermic investigations, quantitative methods used in the interpretation of complex geophysical data, and qualitative methods used in the development of a complex geophysical model of the lithosphere. Special attention is given to the use of a computer system for the solution of inverse problems of contact surfaces, the prediction of earthquakes from variations in electrical resistance, the calculation of temperatures in the earth's crust and upper mantle, and correlational methods for integrating geophysical fields.

  17. Comparative study of predatory responses in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) produced in suspended long line cultures or collected from natural bottom mussel beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Helle Torp; Dolmer, Per; Petersen, Jens Kjerulf

    2011-01-01

    is the availability of seed mussels collected with minimum impact on the benthic ecosystem. To examine whether mussels collected in suspended cultures can be used for bottom culture production and as tool in habitat improvement, the differences in predatory defence responses between suspended and bottom mussels...... exposed to the predatory shore crab (Carcinus maenas L.) were tested in laboratory experiments and in the field. Predatory defence responses (byssal attachment and aggregation) and morphological traits were tested in laboratory, while growth and mortality were examined in field experiments. Suspended...

  18. The Vaendoera test road, Sweden: A case study of long-term properties of roads constructed with MSWI bottom ash; Projekt Vaendoera: En studie av laangtidsegenskaper hos vaegar anlagda med bottenaska fraan avfallsfoerbraenning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendz, David; Arm, Maria; Westberg, Gunnar; Sjoestrand, Karin; Lyth, Martin; Wik, Ola [Swedish Geotechnical Inst., Linkoeping (Sweden); Flyhammar, Peter [Lund Inst. of Technology (Sweden). Dept. of Water Resources Engineering

    2006-03-15

    The accumulated effects of leaching and aging in a subbase layer of bottom ash were investigated in this study. The paved test road were constructed in 1987 in Linkoeping, Sweden, and has been used until the start of this study. The objective of this study was to investigate: (i) the accumulated effects of leaching and aging (ii) the accumulated effects of load and aging on the geotechnical properties (iii) the prerequisites for separate excavation of the bottom ash for possible reuse. The study started in September 2003 and included tests with falling weight deflectometer, triax testing on undisturbed core samples of bottom ash, sampling for chemical analysis. Three trenches were excavated in the test road, samples of the subbase layer and the subgrade were taken in the shaft walls and brought to the laboratory for leaching tests (EN 12457-2) and extraction, respectively. The extraction procedure was used to estimate extractable and chemically available fractions. It was found that the steady increase of stiffness which had been detected by falling weight deflectometer during the first years after construction had ceased. The undisturbed samples showed stiffness comparable with recently produced bottom ash from the same incineration plant, but lower stiffness if compared with the reference material of crushed rock. The permanent deformation was significantly larger for the samples compared with the crushed rock and recent (1999-2001) bottom ash from other incineration plants. The spatial distribution patterns of leachable easily soluble constituents reveal the existence of horizontal gradients, directed from the center of the road towards the shoulders of the road. This implies that horizontal transport by diffusion is the rate limiting leaching process for all easily soluble constituents underneath the pavement in a road. The bottom ash that was used in the sub-base layer was fresh at the time of the construction of the test road with a pH of about 11. Measured p

  19. Seismological Insights on the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    The paradigm of plate tectonics is fundamental to our understanding of the Earth, yet the question of what makes the lithosphere "plate-like" remains unanswered. As Earth's outer thermal boundary layer, the lithosphere derives its high viscosity largely from its cold temperatures, relative to the warmer asthenosphere. However, the roles of partial melt and volatiles in further reducing asthenospheric viscosity are still debated, even 90 years after Beno Gutenberg identified a widespread velocity decrease at 80 km depth which he later attributed to the top of a layer containing partial melt. Seismic phase conversions generated by a velocity gradient within the lithosphere-asthenosphere transition, combined with surface wave tomography, provide key constraints. At the base of thick, stable cratonic lithosphere, the absence of clear Sp conversions (except at the longest periods) is consistent with a shear velocity decrease over >60 km and a lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) that reflects an increase in temperature alone. In contrast, strong Sp conversions from the LAB in tectonically active continental regions indicate a vertically-localized negative velocity gradient (discontinuities likely represent the remains of past plate collisions. The most widespread cratonic feature is a sub-horizontal negative velocity gradient, typically at depths of 70-90 km, that is explained by the volatile-rich products of now-solid partial melt that once ponded beneath the carbonated peridotite solidus.

  20. Evidence for metasomatic enrichment in the oceanic lithosphere and implication for the generation of intraplate basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilet, S.; Buchs, D.; Cosca, M. A.; Baumgartner, P.

    2011-12-01

    Petrological studies play a significant role in the debate regarding the origin of intraplate magmas by providing unequivocal constraints about the source(s) composition and melting processes related to basalt formation. Two major hypotheses are currently in debate: first, intraplate magmas are produced at depth (i.e. within the asthenosphere) by low-degrees melting of an enriched peridotitic source in the presence of CO2 [1]; second, alkaline magmas are produced by the melting of metasomatic hydrous veins present within the lithospheric mantle [2]. If the existence of metasomatic veins in the continental lithospheric mantle is well documented, their existence and the mechanism of their formation in an oceanic setting are still mostly unconstrained. Here we report new petrological data demonstrating that metasomatic veins can be produced within the oceanic lithosphere by percolation and differentiation of low-degree melts initially located in the low velocity zone [3]. The existence of metasomatic veins in the oceanic lithosphere is documented by cpx xenocrysts in accreted basaltic sills from northern Costa Rica. New field observations, 40Ar-39Ar radiometric dating, biostratigraphic ages and geochemical analyses indicate that the sills represent a possible, ancient analogue of petit-spot volcanoes produced off Japan by oceanic plate flexure [4]. The cpx xenocrysts are interpreted as a relic of metasomatic veins based on their composition, which is similar to that of cpx from metasomatic veins observed in mantle outcrops and xenoliths. The major and trace element contents of the studied cpx xenocrysts indicate that they crystallized at high pressure in a differentiated liquid. This liquid represents the last stage of a fractional crystallization process that produced early anhydrous cumulates followed by later hydrous cumulates, a mechanism similar to that proposed by Harte et al. [5] for the formation of metasomatic veins in the continental lithosphere. Monte Carlo

  1. Insights into the lithospheric architecture of Iberia and Morocco from teleseismic body-wave attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezada, Maximiliano J.

    2017-11-01

    The long and often complicated tectonic history of continental lithosphere results in lateral strength heterogeneities which in turn affect the style and localization of deformation. In this study, we produce a model for the attenuation structure of Iberia and northern Morocco using a waveform-matching approach on P-wave data from teleseismic deep-focus earthquakes. We find that attenuation is correlated with zones of intraplate deformation and seismicity, but do not find a consistent relationship between attenuation and recent volcanism. The main features of our model are low to moderate Δt* in the undeformed Tertiary basins of Spain and high Δt* in areas deformed by the Alpine orogeny. Additionally, low Δt* is found in areas where the Alboran slab is thought to be attached to the Iberian and African lithosphere, and high Δt* where it has detached. These features are robust with respect to inversion parameters, and are consistent with independent data. Very mild backazimuthal dependence of the measurements and comparison with previous results suggest that the source of the attenuation is sub-crustal. In line with other recent studies, the range of Δt* we observe is much larger than can be expected from lithospheric thickness or temperature variations.

  2. Studies of Cd, Pb and Cr distribution characteristics in bottom ash following agglomeration/defluidization in a fluidized bed boiler incinerating artificial waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhen-Shu [Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, 84 Gungjuan Rd., Taishan, Taipei, 243 (China); Lin, Chiou-Liang [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung, 811 (China); Chou, Jing-Dong [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, 402 (China)

    2010-06-15

    This study focused on the effects of agglomeration/defluidization on the Cd, Pb and Cr distribution in bottom ash particles of different sizes. In this study we have incinerated artificial waste, which was a mixture of sawdust, polypropylene, selected metal solutions, and polyethylene. The experimental parameters included Na concentration, addition of Ca and Mg and operating temperature. The results indicated that particle size decreased by attrition and thermal impact in the absence of added Na. When Na was added to the system, this metal reacted with silica sand to form eutectics, which increased particle size. Further addition of Ca and Mg was found to prolong the operating time, with greater amounts of liquid eutectic accumulating, leading to increase particle size. The heavy metal concentrations in coarse and fine particles were greater than those present in particles of intermediate sizes over a range of experimental conditions. As the particle size decreased below 0.59 mm or increased above 0.84 mm, the heavy metal concentrations increased. As Ca and Mg were added, the heavy metal concentrations in particles of all sizes increased relative to those present in identical particles when no metals or only Na were added. Additionally, the ratio of Cd sorption to silica sand decreased with increasing Na concentration, but Cr sorption had the opposite tendency. Therefore, while the addition of Na tended to increase agglomeration, it also increased the tendency for heavy metals to remain in the sand bed of fluidized bed incinerators. Addition of Ca and Mg not only inhibited the agglomeration/defluidization process, resulting in increased operating time, but also enhanced the removal of heavy metals by silica sand, decreasing the concentration of heavy metals in reactor exhaust. (author)

  3. DEFORMATION WAVES AS A TRIGGER MECHANISM OF SEISMIC ACTIVITY IN SEISMIC ZONES OF THE CONTINENTAL LITHOSPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Sherman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deformation waves as a trigger mechanism of seismic activity and migration of earthquake foci have been under discussion by researchers in seismology and geodynamics for over 50 years. Four sections of this article present available principal data on impacts of wave processes on seismicity and new data. The first section reviews analytical and experimental studies aimed at identification of relationships between wave processes in the lithosphere and seismic activity manifested as space-and-time migration of individual earthquake foci or clusters of earthquakes. It is concluded that with a systematic approach, instead of using a variety of terms to denote waves that trigger seismic process in the lithosphere, it is reasonable to apply the concise definition of ‘deformation waves’, which is most often used in fact.The second section contains a description of deformation waves considered as the trigger mechanism of seismic activity. It is concluded that a variety of methods are applied to identify deformation waves, and such methods are based on various research methods and concepts that naturally differ in sensitivity concerning detection of waves and/or impact of the waves on seismic process. Epicenters of strong earthquakes are grouped into specific linear or arc-shaped systems, which common criterion is the same time interval of the occurrence of events under analysis. On site the systems compose zones with similar time sequences, which correspond to the physical notion of moving waves (Fig. 9. Periods of manifestation of such waves are estimated as millions of years, and a direct consideration of the presence of waves and wave parameters is highly challenging. In the current state-of-the-art, geodynamics and seismology cannot provide any other solution yet.The third section presents a solution considering record of deformation waves in the lithosphere. With account of the fact that all the earthquakes with М≥3.0 are associated with

  4. DEFORMATION WAVES AS A TRIGGER MECHANISM OF SEISMIC ACTIVITY IN SEISMIC ZONES OF THE CONTINENTAL LITHOSPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Sherman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Deformation waves as a trigger mechanism of seismic activity and migration of earthquake foci have been under discussion by researchers in seismology and geodynamics for over 50 years. Four sections of this article present available principal data on impacts of wave processes on seismicity and new data. The first section reviews analytical and experimental studies aimed at identification of relationships between wave processes in the lithosphere and seismic activity manifested as space-and-time migration of individual earthquake foci or clusters of earthquakes. It is concluded that with a systematic approach, instead of using a variety of terms to denote waves that trigger seismic process in the lithosphere, it is reasonable to apply the concise definition of ‘deformation waves’, which is most often used in fact.The second section contains a description of deformation waves considered as the trigger mechanism of seismic activity. It is concluded that a variety of methods are applied to identify deformation waves, and such methods are based on various research methods and concepts that naturally differ in sensitivity concerning detection of waves and/or impact of the waves on seismic process. Epicenters of strong earthquakes are grouped into specific linear or arc-shaped systems, which common criterion is the same time interval of the occurrence of events under analysis. On site the systems compose zones with similar time sequences, which correspond to the physical notion of moving waves (Fig. 9. Periods of manifestation of such waves are estimated as millions of years, and a direct consideration of the presence of waves and wave parameters is highly challenging. In the current state-of-the-art, geodynamics and seismology cannot provide any other solution yet.The third section presents a solution considering record of deformation waves in the lithosphere. With account of the fact that all the earthquakes with М≥3.0 are associated with

  5. Nanoelectronics from the bottom up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Lieber, Charles M

    2007-11-01

    Electronics obtained through the bottom-up approach of molecular-level control of material composition and structure may lead to devices and fabrication strategies not possible with top-down methods. This review presents a brief summary of bottom-up and hybrid bottom-up/top-down strategies for nanoelectronics with an emphasis on memories based on the crossbar motif. First, we will discuss representative electromechanical and resistance-change memory devices based on carbon nanotube and core-shell nanowire structures, respectively. These device structures show robust switching, promising performance metrics and the potential for terabit-scale density. Second, we will review architectures being developed for circuit-level integration, hybrid crossbar/CMOS circuits and array-based systems, including experimental demonstrations of key concepts such lithography-independent, chemically coded stochastic demultipluxers. Finally, bottom-up fabrication approaches, including the opportunity for assembly of three-dimensional, vertically integrated multifunctional circuits, will be critically discussed.

  6. Role of Effective Density in improving the accuracy of bottom pressure based sea level measurements - A case study from Gulf of Guinea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Mehra, P.; Desai, R.G.P.; Dotse, J.; Odametey, J.T.; Nkebi, E.K.; Vijaykumar, K.; Prabhudesai, S.P.

    Seasonal observations of a set of bottom pressures and concurrent tide-staff measurements from Takoradi harbour located in the Gulf of Guinea indicated that the effective depth-mean density value, rho sub(eff) of this clear water body is less than...

  7. The lithospheric structure beneath southeast Tibet revealed by P and S receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiyan; Peng, Hengchu; Hu, Jiafu

    2017-05-01

    Yunnan is located at the margin of southeast Tibet, where dramatic tectonic activities occur. In this study, we calculated the P and S receiver functions by the deconvolution of three-component seismic data from 48 permanent broad-band stations deployed in Yunnan region. In order to improve signal-noise ratios of the receiver functions, we move-out corrected receiver functions to a reference epicentral distance of 67°, and then stacked them to one trace for each station. Finally, the stacked traces were converted to the depth domain to obtain the crustal and lithospheric thicknesses beneath each station. In southwestern Yunnan (at the west side of the Jinshajiang-Red River Fault), the crustal thicknesses from the P-wave receiver functions (PRFs) and from the S-wave receiver functions (SRFs) are in the ranges of 30-36 km, and of 33-39 km, respectively. But in northwestern Yunnan, the crustal thicknesses from PRFs and SRFs are from 66 to 69 km and from 63 to 66 km, respectively. Our results show that the crustal thicknesses in Yunnan from PRFs and SRFs are consistent, with a maximum deviation of 3 km; and increase gradually from ∼30 km in the south to ∼68 km in the northwest. Besides, the lithospheric thickness from PRFs is also similar to that from SRFs, with the largest difference of 15-20 km in southeastern Yunnan. At the west side of the Jinshajiang-Red River Fault in western Yunnan, it is only about 80-100 km, and increases to 140-150 km regionally in northern and southeastern Yunnan. The thinned lithosphere extends eastward from western Yunnan to eastern Yunnan. We attribute the thinned lithosphere to the upwelling of hot upper mantle materials associated with the eastward subduction of the Indian plate.

  8. Lithospheric Structure in Central California: Towards Identifying the Tectonic Origin of the Isabella Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, S. L.; Clayton, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    The tectonic origin of the Isabella high-velocity anomaly in the upper mantle beneath California's southern Great Valley is unclear. Previous low-resolution seismic imaging studies of the region have been unable to identify the structural connection between this upper mantle anomaly and the overlying lithosphere. The two dominant hypotheses attribute the Isabella anomaly to a fossil slab or the foundered lithospheric root of the Sierra Nevada batholith. The Central California Seismic Experiment (CCSE) is designed to distinguish between these hypotheses. We present results from the CCSE, which consists of 44 broadband seismometers currently deployed in a quasi-linear array spanning from the Pacific coast, across the Great Valley, to the Sierra Nevada foothills, at an approximate latitude of 36°N. Forward modeling of the 2D structure of the crust is performed using local earthquakes recorded by the CCSE and a finite-difference algorithm to provide constraints on the geometry and velocity of the seismic structure of the Great Valley. This sedimentary basin is suggested to be filled with very low velocity material at shallow depths and partially underlain by a high-velocity ophiolite body. Hence, a well-constrained basin structure will be important in correcting surface wave tomography and receiver function images. The impact of the Great Valley basin structure on body waves is evident by an observed delay in P-wave arrival times on the radial component relative to the vertical component for stations located within the basin. Surface waves along the CCSE array also show a distinct slowing by the valley at periods <10 sec. Data from teleseismic events recorded by the CCSE reveal scattered waves arriving tens of seconds after the S-wave, which we will interpret in terms of the lithospheric structure of the region by identifying the source location(s) of the scatterer(s). We may also gain insights into the structural connection between the Isabella anomaly and the

  9. Lithospheric structure models applied for locating the Romanian seismic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Oancea

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents our attempts made for improving the locations obtained for local seismic events, using refined lithospheric structure models. The location program (based on Geiger method supposes a known model. The program is run for some seismic sequences which occurred in different regions, on the Romanian territory, using for each of the sequences three velocity models: 1 7 layers of constant velocity of seismic waves, as an average structure of the lithosphere for the whole territory; 2 site dependent structure (below each station, based on geophysical and geological information on the crust; 3 curves deseribing the dependence of propagation velocities with depth in the lithosphere, characterizing the 7 structural units delineated on the Romanian territory. The results obtained using the different velocity models are compared. Station corrections are computed for each data set. Finally, the locations determined for some quarry blasts are compared with the real ones.

  10. Radiogenic heat production variability of some common lithological groups and its significance to lithospheric thermal modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilà, M.; Fernández, M.; Jiménez-Munt, I.

    2010-07-01

    Determining the temperature distribution within the lithosphere requires the knowledge of the radiogenic heat production (RHP) distribution within the crust and the lithospheric mantle. RHP of crustal rocks varies considerably at different scales as a result of the petrogenetic processes responsible for their formation and therefore RHP depends on the considered lithologies. In this work we address RHP variability of some common lithological groups from a compilation of a total of 2188 representative U, Th and K concentrations of different worldwide rock types derived from 102 published studies. To optimize the use of the generated RHP database we have classified and renamed the rock-type denominations of the original works following a petrologic classification scheme with a hierarchical structure. The RHP data of each lithological group is presented in cumulative distribution plots, and we report a table with the mean, the standard deviation, the minimum and maximum values, and the significant percentiles of these lithological groups. We discuss the reported RHP distribution for the different igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic lithological groups from a petrogenetic viewpoint and give some useful guidelines to assign RHP values to lithospheric thermal modeling.

  11. Heterogeneity of Water Concentrations in the Mantle Lithosphere Beneath Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizimis, M.; Peslier, A. H.; Clague, D.

    2017-01-01

    The amount and distribution of water in the oceanic mantle lithosphere has implications on its strength and of the role of volatiles during plume/lithosphere interaction. The latter plays a role in the Earth's deep water cycle as water-rich plume lavas could re-enrich an oceanic lithosphere depleted in water at the ridge, and when this heterogeneous lithosphere gets recycled back into the deep mantle. The main host of water in mantle lithologies are nominally anhydrous minerals like olivine, pyroxene and garnet, where hydrogen (H) is incorporated in mineral defects by bonding to structural oxygen. Here, we report water concentrations by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) on olivine, clino- and orthopyroxenes (Cpx & Opx) from spinel peridotites from the Pali vent and garnet pyroxenite xenoliths from Aliamanu vent, both part of the rejuvenated volcanism at Oahu (Hawaii). Pyroxenes from the Aliamanu pyroxenites have high water concentrations, similar to the adjacent Salt Lake Crater (SLC) pyroxenites (Cpx 400-500 ppm H2O, Opx 200 ppm H2O). This confirms that pyroxenite cumulates form water-rich lithologies within the oceanic lithosphere. In contrast, the Pali peridotites have much lower water concentrations than the SLC ones (10% modal Cpx and low spinel Cr# (0.09-0.10). The contrast between the two peridotite suites is also evident in their trace elements and radiogenic isotopes. The Pali Cpx are depleted in light REE, consistent with minimal metasomatism. Those of SLC have enriched light REE patterns and Nd and Hf isotopes consistent with metasomatism by alkaline melts. These observations are consistent with heterogeneous water distribution in the oceanic lithosphere that may be related to metasomatism, as well as relatively dry peridotites cross-cut by narrow (?) water-rich melt reaction zones.

  12. Heavy Metal Contamination in the Surface Layer of Bottom Sediments in a Flow-Through Lake: A Case Study of Lake Symsar in Northern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Kuriata-Potasznik

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available River-lake systems most often behave as hydrographic units, which undergo complex interactions, especially in the contact zone. One such interaction pertains to the role of a river in the dispersal of trace elements carried into and out of a lake. In this study, we aimed to assess the impact of rivers on the accumulation of heavy metals in bottom sediments of natural lakes comprised in postglacial river-lake systems. The results showed that a river flowing through a lake is a key factor responsible for the input of the majority of available fraction of heavy metals (Zn, Mn, Cd and Ni into the water body and for their accumulation along the flow of river water in the lake. The origin of other accumulated elements were the linear and point sources in catchments. In turn, the Pb content was associated with the location of roads in the direct catchment, while the sediment structure (especially size of fraction and density could have affected the accumulation of Cr and Zn, which indicated correlations between these metals and fine fraction. Our results suggest that lakes act as filters and contribute to the self-purification of water that flows through them. As a result, the content of most metals in lake sediments showed a decrease by approx. 75% between the upstream (inflow and downstream (outflow sections. The increased content of two metals only, such as chromium and cadmium (higher by 2.0 and 2.5 times, respectively, after passing through the lake, was due to the correlation of the metals with fine sand. Both the content and distribution pattern of heavy metals in lake sediments are indicative of the natural response of aquatic ecosystems to environmental stressors, such as pollutant import with river water or climate change. The complex elements creating the water ecosystem of each lake can counteract stress by temporarily removing pollutants such as toxic metals form circulation and depositing them mostly around the delta.

  13. Revisiting the Ridge-Push Force Using the Lithospheric Geoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. M.; Coblentz, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    The geoid anomaly and driving force associated with the cooling oceanic lithosphere ("ridge push") are both proportional to dipole moment of the density-depth distribution, and allow a reevaluation of the ridge push force using the geoid. The challenge with this approach is to isolate the "lithospheric geoid" from the full geoid signal. Our approach is to use a band-pass spherical harmonic filter on the full geoid (e.g., EGM2008-WGS84, complete to spherical harmonic degree and order 2159) between orders 6 and 80. However, even this "lithospheric geoid" is noisy, and thus we average over 100 profiles evenly spaced along the global ridge system to obtain an average geoid step associated with the mid-ocean ridges. Because the positive ridge geoid signal is largest near the ridge (and to capture fast-spreading ridges), we evaluate symmetrical profiles extending ±45 m.y. about the ridge. We find an average ridge geoid anomaly of 4.5m, which is equivalent to a 10m anomaly for 100 m.y. old oceanic lithosphere. This geoid step corresponds to a ridge push force of ~2.4 x1012N/m for old oceanic lithosphere of 100 m.y., very similar to earlier estimates of ~2.5 x1012N/m based on simple half-space models. This simple half-space model also predicts constant geoid slopes of about 0.15 m/m.y. for cooling oceanic lithosphere. Our observed geoid slopes are consistent with this value for ages up to 40-50 m.y., but drop off to lower values at greater ages. We model this using a plate cooling model (with a thickness of the order of 125km) to fit the observation that the geoid anomaly and ridge driving force only increase slowly for ages greater than 40 m.y. (in contrast to the half-space model where the linear dependence on age holds for all ages). This reduction of the geoid slope results in a 20% decrease in the predicted ridge push force. This decrease is due to the combined effects of treating the oceanic lithosphere as a cooling plate (vs. a half-space), and the loss of geoidal

  14. The principal characteristics of the lithosphere of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingdong Li

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The lithospheric structure of China and its adjacent area is very complex and is marked by several prominent characteristics. Firstly, China’s continental crust is thick in the west but thins to the east, and thick in the south but thins to the north. Secondly, the continental crust of the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau has an average thickness of 60–65 km with a maximum thickness of 80 km, whereas in eastern China the average thickness is 30–35 km, with a minimum thickness of only 5 km in the center of the South China Sea. The average thickness of continental crust in China is 47.6 km, which greatly exceeds the global average thickness of 39.2 km. Thirdly, as with the crust, the lithosphere of China and its adjacent areas shows a general pattern of thicker in the west and south, and thinner in the east and north. The lithosphere of the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau and northwestern China has an average thickness of 165 km, with a maximum thickness of 180–200 km in the central and eastern parts of the Tarim Basin, Pamir, and Changdu areas. In contrast, the vast areas to the east of the Da Hinggan Ling–Taihang–Wuling Mountains, including the marginal seas, are characterized by lithospheric thicknesses of only 50–85 km. Fourthly, in western China the lithosphere and asthenosphere behave as a “layered structure”, reflecting their dynamic background of plate collision and convergence. The lithosphere and asthenosphere in eastern China display a “block mosaic structure”, where the lithosphere is thin and the asthenosphere is very thick, a pattern reflecting the consequences of crustal extension and an upsurge of asthenospheric materials. The latter is responsible for a huge low velocity anomaly at a depth of 85–250 km beneath East Asia and the western Pacific Ocean. Finally, in China there is an age structure of “older in the upper layers and younger in the lower layers” between both the upper and lower crusts and between the

  15. Formation and temporal evolution of the Kalahari sub-cratonic lithospheric mantle: Constraints from Venetia xenoliths, South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hin, R.C.; Morel, M.L.A.; Nebel, O.; Mason, P.R.D.; van Westrenen, W.; Davies, G.R.

    2009-01-01

    The ~533 Ma Venetia Diamond Mine is located between the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons and the study of selected xenoliths provides the opportunity to investigate the temporal evolution of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) underneath southern Africa, as well as the extent and potentially

  16. Preservation of an Archaean whole rock Re-Os isochron for the Venetia lithospheric mantle: Evidence for rapid crustal recycling and lithosphere stabilisation at 3.3 Ga

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Quinten H. A.; Klaver, Martijn; Reisberg, Laurie; Riches, Amy J. V.; Davies, Gareth R.

    2017-11-01

    Re-Os and platinum group element analyses are reported for peridotite xenoliths from the 533 Ma Venetia kimberlite cluster situated in the Limpopo Mobile Belt, the Neoarchaean collision zone between the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons. The Venetian xenoliths provide a rare opportunity to examine the state of the cratonic lithosphere prior to major regional metasomatic disturbance of Re-Os systematics throughout the Phanerozoic. The 32 studied xenoliths record Si-enrichment that is characteristic of the Kaapvaal lithospheric mantle and can be subdivided into five groups based on Re-Os analyses. The most pristine group I samples (n = 13) display an approximately isochronous relationship and fall on a 3.28 ± 0.17 Ga (95 % conf. int.) reference line that is based on their mean TMA age. This age overlaps with the formation age of the Limpopo crust at 3.35-3.28 Ga. The group I samples derive from ∼50 to ∼170 km depth, suggesting coeval melt depletion of the majority of the Venetia lithospheric mantle column. Group II and III samples have elevated Re/Os due to Re addition during kimberlite magmatism. Group II has otherwise undergone a similar evolution as the group I samples with overlapping 187Os/188Os at eruption age: 187Os/188OsEA, while group III samples have low Os concentrations, unradiogenic 187Os/188OsEA and were effectively Re-free prior to kimberlite magmatism. The other sample groups (IV and V) have disturbed Re-Os systematics and provide no reliable age information. A strong positive correlation is recorded between Os and Re concentrations for group I samples, which is extended to groups II and III after correction for kimberlite addition. This positive correlation precludes a single stage melt depletion history and indicates coupled remobilisation of Re and Os. The combination of Re-Os mobility, preservation of the isochronous relationship, correlation of 187Os/188Os with degree of melt depletion and lack of radiogenic Os addition puts tight constraints on

  17. Deformation Patterns and Subduction Behavior of Continental Lithosphere Entering a Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steedman, C. E.; Kaus, B. J.; Becker, T. W.; Okaya, D.

    2007-05-01

    We perform 2-D numerical simulations of continental lithosphere entering a subduction zone, to better understand deformation patterns resulting from subduction of a continental margin. The model consists of a subduction zone in which an attached slab drives subduction of a passive continental margin beneath an oceanic plate. A particle-based 2-D visco-elasto-plastic thermo-mechanical finite element code is employed to study the dynamics of the system. A novel feature of the code is that the resolution of the model can be significantly increased in selected parts of the domain, which allows for self-consistent modelling of mantle-lithosphere interaction. In the present study we employ this feature to study how lithospheric-scale deformation around and within the subduction zone is influenced by surface processes such as erosion, and by flow in the upper mantle. Using systematic 2-D numerical simulations, we explore the parameters that are dominant in controlling near- surface structures, both with regards to changes in topography and trench location, and subsurface features such as Moho undulations. The main parameters that have been varied are: the lithospheric density structure; the lithospheric age and temperature structure; the strength of the lower crust; the presence of a weak zone at the plate interface; the amounts of erosion; the upper boundary condition (free surface versus free slip); rheology (non-Newtonian versus Newtonian, viscous, visco-elasto-plastic); and finally the effect of an imposed slab breakoff. In all cases we track surface uplift, subduction evolution and rock exhumation history. We find that the strength of the overriding plate influences surface uplift and the shape of subsurface deformation, and that the density and thermal structure of the subducting plate affects trench motion. Denser slab roll back, and younger, lighter slabs advance, while neither slab rheology nor the presence of erosion greatly affect trench location. For all cases

  18. The lithospheric stress field from joint modeling of lithosphere and mantle circulation using constraints from the latest global tomography models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Holt, W. E.; Ghosh, A.

    2013-12-01

    An understanding of the lithospheric stress field is important because these stresses are one indication of processes within the Earth's interior. In order to calculate the lithosphere stress field it is necessary to take into account the effects of lithosphere structure and topography along with coupling with 3-D mantle flow. We separate these effects into two parts: (1) contributions from topography and lithosphere structure are calculated by computing the stresses associated with gravitational potential energy (GPE) differences, and (2) stresses associated with mantle tractions are computed using the latest tomography models. The contributions from GPE and tractions are then combined to obtain model estimates of the lithospheric stress field, strain rate field, and surface velocity field. We simultaneously use the World Stress Map, the Global Strain Rate Model, and the No-Net-Rotation (NNR) surface velocity vectors to constrain models. We systematically test the latest global tomography models (SEMum [Lekic and Romanowicz, 2011], S40RTS [Ritsema et al., 2011], and S362ANI_PREM [Kustowski et al., 2008]) and the composite tomography model (SMEAN [Becker and Boschi, 2002]), along with the influence of different mantle radial viscosity models. We find that a coupled model with a weak viscosity channel, sandwiched between a strong lithosphere and strong lower mantle is best able to match the observational constraints, although there is a slight difference in stress field among the different tomography models. There is considerable evidence that the contributions from shallow versus deeper sources vary dramatically over the surface of the globe. We quantify these relative contributions as a function of position on the globe and systematically compare the results of different tomography models. Subduction zones are dominated by the effects of GPE differences, whereas within many of the plate interiors the contributions from mantle flow dominate.

  19. Triple bottom line assessment of raw water treatment: methodology and application to a case study in the municipality of Oppegård in south-eastern Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, G; Azrague, Kamal; Bell, Stig; Eikebrokk, Bjørnar

    2015-01-01

    There could be several options a water treatment plant (WTP) can select from, if an improvement in treated water quality (WQ) is desired. This paper outlines a methodology to test a variety of approaches to accomplish pre-set goals as regards WQ, while adopting a triple bottom line approach. This approach, in a nutshell, takes into consideration economic, environmental and social aspects in decision-making. The methodology has been applied to the Stangasen WTP in the town of Oppegård in south-eastern Norway. Among the seven alternative approaches compared were the use, as coagulant, of five different dosages of granulated aluminium sulphate, liquid aluminium sulphate (48%) and liquid ferric chloride (40%). Using the set of weighting factors obtained from experts, it was determined that increasing the dosage of granulated aluminium sulphate by 20% over the current one would be the most sustainable option from a triple bottom line point of view.

  20. Seismic evidence of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary beneath Izu-Bonin area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, H.; Gao, Y.; Zhou, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), separating the rigid lithosphere and the ductile asthenosphere layers, is the seismic discontinuity with the negative velocity contrast of the Earth's interior [Fischer et al., 2010]. The LAB has been also termed the Gutenberg (G) discontinuity that defines the top of the low velocity zone in the upper mantle [Gutenberg, 1959; Revenaugh and Jordan, 1991]. The seismic velocity, viscosity, resistivity and other physical parameters change rapidly with the depths across the boundary [Eaton et al., 2009]. Seismic detections on the LAB in subduction zone regions are of great help to understand the interactions between the lithosphere and asthenosphere layers and the geodynamic processes related with the slab subductions. In this study, the vertical broadband waveforms are collected from three deep earthquake events occurring from 2000 to 2014 with the focal depths of 400 600 km beneath the Izu-Bonin area. The waveform data is processed with the linear slant stack method [Zang and Zhou, 2002] to obtain the vespagrams in the relative travel-time to slowness domain and the stacked waveforms. The sP precursors reflected on the LAB (sLABP), which have the negative polarities with the amplitude ratios of 0.17 0.21 relative to the sP phases, are successfully extracted. Based on the one-dimensional modified velocity model (IASP91-IB), we obtain the distributions for six reflected points of the sLABP phases near the source region. Our results reveal that the LAB depths range between 58 and 65 km beneath the Izu-Bonin Arc, with the average depth of 62 km and the small topography of 7 km. Compared with the results of the tectonic stable areas in Philippine Sea [Kawakatsu et al., 2009; Kumar and Kawakatsu, 2011], the oceanic lithosphere beneath the Izu-Bonin Arc shows the obvious thinning phenomena. We infer that the lithospheric thinning is closely related with the partial melting, which is caused by the volatiles continuously released

  1. Existence, morphology and persistence of intrusions as a probe for lithosphere rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massmeyer, Anna; Davaille, Anne; Di Giuseppe, Erika

    2013-04-01

    The development of intrusions in the lithosphere depends strongly on its rheology. Less viscous mushroom-shaped plumes or more viscous finger-shaped diapirs, depending on the viscosity ratio between the rising and the matrix materials, are known to migrate through ductile, quasi-newtonian lithosphere; while dikes fracture and propagate through a solid matrix. However, the lithosphere presents solid as well as viscous properties. To determine what happens in this complex case, we performed a combined study of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations on the development of thermal plumes in aqueous solutions of Carbopol, a polymer gel suspension forming a continuous network of micrometric sponges. This fluid is shear thinning and presents a yield-stress, whereby flow occurs only if the local stress exceeds a critical value ?0. Below this value, the fluid acts as an elastic solid. The rheological properties of the solutions can be systematically varied by varying the Carbopol concentration. Our experimental setup consists of a localized heat-source of constant power, placed in the center of a squared plexiglas tank. Two conditions must be fulfilled for an instability to develop and rise: 1) the Yield number 0 comparing the buoyancy-induced stress to the yield stress, should be greater than a critical value c ~ 6; and 2) the Bingham number Bi, comparing the yield stress to the viscous stresses, needs to be locally smaller than 1. Then, a plug flow develops inside the plume thermal anomaly, producing a rising finger-shape with strong shear zones confined along its edges. Moreover, the instability halts its ascent as soon as 0 1. Those finger-shaped diapirs show strong similarities with an off-axis diapir in Oman emplaced in a ridge context. This geological object, a few kilometers in diameter, presents strong shear localization along its edges. Our fluid dynamical analysis places constraints on the parameter range within which such an object may be emplaced. It

  2. Global thermochemical imaging of the lithosphere using satellite and terrestrial observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullea, Javier; Lebedev, Sergei; Martinec, Zdenek; Celli, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    Conventional methods of seismic tomography, topography, gravity and electromagnetic data analysis and geodynamic modelling constrain distributions of seismic velocity, density, electrical conductivity, and viscosity at depth, all depending on temperature and composition of the rocks within the Earth. However, modelling and interpretation of multiple data sets provide a multifaceted image of the true thermochemical structure of the Earth that needs to be appropriately and consistently integrated. A simple combination of gravity, electromagnetic, geodynamics, petrological and seismic models alone is insufficient due to the non-uniqueness and different sensitivities of these models, and the internal consistency relationships that must connect all the intermediate parameters describing the Earth involved. Thermodynamic and petrological links between seismic velocities, density, electrical conductivity, viscosity, melt, water, temperature, pressure and composition within the Earth can now be modelled accurately using new methods of computational petrology and data from laboratory experiments. The growth of very large terrestrial and satellite (e.g., Swarm and GOCE ESA missions) geophysical data sets over the last few years, together with the advancement of petrological and geophysical modelling techniques, now present an opportunity for global, thermochemical and deformation 3D imaging of the lithosphere and underlying upper mantle with unprecedented resolution. This project combines state-of-the-art seismic waveform tomography (using both surface and body waves), newly available global gravity satellite data (geoid and gravity anomalies and new gradiometric measurements from ESA's GOCE mission) and surface heat flow and elevation within a self-consistent thermodynamic framework. The aim is to develop a method for detailed and robust global thermochemical image of the lithosphere and underlying upper mantle. In a preliminary study, we convert a state-of-the-art global

  3. Global Lithospheric Apparent Susceptibility Distribution Converted from Geomagnetic Models by CHAMP and Swarm Satellite Magnetic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jinsong; Chen, Chao; Xiong, Xiong; Li, Yongdong; Liang, Qing

    2016-04-01

    Recently, because of continually accumulated magnetic measurements by CHAMP satellite and Swarm constellation of three satellites and well developed methodologies and techniques of data processing and geomagnetic field modeling etc., global lithospheric magnetic anomaly field models become more and more reliable. This makes the quantitative interpretation of lithospheric magnetic anomaly field possible for having an insight into large-scale magnetic structures in the crust and uppermost mantle. Many different approaches have been utilized to understand the magnetized sources, such as forward, inversion, statistics, correlation analysis, Euler deconvolution, signal transformations etc. Among all quantitative interpretation methods, the directly converting a magnetic anomaly map into a magnetic susceptibility anomaly map proposed by Arkani-Hamed & Strangway (1985) is, we think, the most fast quantitative interpretation tool for global studies. We just call this method AS85 hereinafter for short. Although Gubbins et al. (2011) provided a formula to directly calculate the apparent magnetic vector distribution, the AS85 method introduced constraints of magnetized direction and thus corresponding results are expected to be more robust especially in world-wide continents. Therefore, in this study, we first improved the AS85 method further considering non-axial dipolar inducing field using formulae by Nolte & Siebert (1987), initial model or priori information for starting coefficients in the apparent susceptibility conversion, hidden longest-wavelength components of lithospheric magnetic field and field contaminations from global oceanic remanent magnetization. Then, we used the vertically integrated susceptibility model by Hemant & Maus (2005) and vertically integrated remanent magnetization model by Masterton et al. (2013) to test the validity of our improved method. Subsequently, we applied the conversion method to geomagnetic field models by CHAMP and Swarm satellite

  4. Constraints on the mantle and lithosphere dynamics from the observed geoid with the effect of visco-elasto-plastic rheology in the upper 300 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei Tutu, Anthony; Steinberger, Bernhard; Rogozhina, Irina; Sobolev, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decades rheological properties of the Earth's mantle and lithosphere have been extensively studied using numerical models calibrated versus a range of surface observations (e.g., free-air-gravity anomaly/geoid, dynamic topography, plate velocity, etc.).The quality of model predictions however strongly depends on the simplifying assumptions, spatial resolution and parameterizations adopted by numerical models. The geoid is largely (Hager & Richards, 1989) determined by both the density anomalies driving the mantle flow and the dynamic topography at the Earth surface and the core-mantle boundary. This is the effect of the convective processes within the Earth's mantle. The remainder is mostly due to strong heterogeneities in the lithospheric mantle and the crust, which also need to be taken into account. The surface topography caused by density anomalies both in the sub-lithospheric mantle and within the lithosphere also depends on the lithosphere rheology. Here we investigate the effects of complex lithosphere rheology on the modelled dynamic topography, geoid and plate motion using a spectral mantle flow code (Hager & O'Connell, 1981) considering radial viscosity distribution and a fully coupled code of the lithosphere and mantle accounting for strong heterogeneities in the upper mantle rheology in the 300 km depths (Popov & Sobolev, 2008). This study is the first step towards linking global mantle dynamics with lithosphere dynamics using the observed geoid as a major constraint. Here we present the results from both codes and compare them with the observed geoid, dynamic topography and plate velocities from GPS measurements. This method allows us to evaluate the effects of plate rheology (e.g., strong plate interiors and weak plate margins) and stiff subducted lithosphere on these observables (i.e. geoid, topography, plate boundary stresses) as well as on plate motion. This effort will also serve as a benchmark of the two existing numerical methods

  5. A trawl-resistant ocean bottom seismometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, A. H.; Gassier, D.; Webb, S. C.; Koczynski, T.; Oletu, V.; Gaherty, J. B.; Tolstoy, M.

    2010-12-01

    Long-term ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) deployments are difficult on continental shelves and other shallow regions because of the hazard from bottom trawling. Seafloor instruments can be damaged, destroyed, or prematurely released by a trawl net that is weighted with rollers and dragged across the seafloor. Bottom trawling is extensive in many areas and past instrument losses have led the U. S. OBS Instrument Pool (OBSIP) to avoid long-duration deployments in water depths shallower than 1000 m. This restriction is particularly limiting for passive-source seismic studies at active continental margins. We report on the development and testing of a new trawl-resistant OBS. The seismometer and datalogger are protected within a heavy (450 kg) eight-sided steel shield that has a low, smooth profile (2 m basal diameter and a central peak height of 50 cm) and is designed to resist and deflect bottom-trawling equipment. The sides of the shield are closed in order to protect the seismometer from seafloor currents that can cause tilt-related low-frequency seismic noise. Shield-generated noise (from mechanical resonance or from interaction with seafloor currents) is reduced by decoupling the sensor from the shield and by maximizing the distance between the seismometer and the shield’s bottom rim. The heavy weight and low profile of the instrument preclude the use of dropweights for deployment and recovery. The OBS is instead lowered to the seafloor and recovered by attaching a lifting line using a remotely-operated vehicle. Twenty trawl-resistant OBSs, equipped with Trillium Compact seismometers and absolute pressure gauges, are being constructed and will be deployed as a component of the NSF Cascadia Initiative in the summer of 2011.

  6. Satellite tidal magnetic signals constrain oceanic lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grayver, Alexander V.; Schnepf, Neesha R.; Kuvshinov, Alexey V.

    2016-01-01

    , there are no reports that these signals have been used to infer subsurface structure. We use satellite-detected tidal magnetic fields to image the global electrical structure of the oceanic lithosphere and upper mantle down to a depth of about 250 km. Themodel derived from more than 12 years of satellite data reveals...

  7. Upper mantle viscosity and lithospheric thickness under Iceland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnhoorn, A.; Wal, W. van der; Drury, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Deglaciation during the Holocene on Iceland caused uplift due to glacial isostatic adjustment. Relatively low estimates for the upper mantle viscosity and lithospheric thickness result in rapid uplift responses to the deglaciation cycles on Iceland. The relatively high temperatures of the upper

  8. Project Skippy explores the lithosphere and mantle beneath Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilst, R.D. van der; Kennett, Brian; Christie, Doug; Grant, John

    1994-01-01

    A new project is probing the seismic structure of the lithosphere and mantle beneath Australia. The Skippy Project, named after the bush kangaroo, exploits Australia's regional seismicity and makes use of recent advances in digital recording technology to collect three-component broadband

  9. Lithospheric strength variations in Mainland China : Tectonic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, Yangfan; Tesauro, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new thermal and strength model for the lithosphere of Mainland China. To this purpose, we integrate a thermal model for the crust, using a 3-D steady state heat conduction equation, with estimates for the upper mantle thermal structure, obtained by inverting a S wave tomography model.

  10. A new thermal and rheological model of the European lithosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesauro, M.; Kaban, M.; Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new thermal and rheological model of the European lithosphere (10°W-35°E; 35°N-60°N), which is based on a combination of recently obtained geophysical models. To determine temperature distribution we use a new tomography model, which is principally improved by an a-priori correction of

  11. Lithospheric and atmospheric interaction on the planet Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Vladislav P.

    1991-01-01

    Lithospheric and atmospheric interaction in the planet Venus are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) manifestation of exogenic processes using photogeological data; (2) the chemical composition and a chemical model of the troposphere of Venus; (3) the mineral composition of surface rock on Venus; and (4) the cycles of volatile components.

  12. Gravity anomalies and lithospheric flexure around the Longmen Shan deduced from combinations of in situ observations and EGM2008 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Yawen; Fu, Guangyu; Wang, Zhuohua; Liu, Tai; Xu, Changyi; Jin, Honglin

    2016-10-01

    The current work describes the combined data of three field campaigns, spanning 2009-2013. Their joint gravity and GPS observations thoroughly cover the sites of lithospheric flexure between the Sichuan Basin and the Eastern Tibetan Plateau. The study area's free-air gravity anomalies (FGAs) are updated by using a remove-and-restore algorithm which merges EGM2008 data with in situ observations. These new FGAs show pairs of positive and negative anomalies along the eastern edges of the Tibetan Plateau. The FGAs are used to calculate effective elastic thickness ( T e) and load ratios ( F) of the lithosphere. Admittance analysis indicates the T e of Longmen Shan (LMS) to be 6 km, and profile analysis indicates that the T e of the Sichuan Basin excesses 30 km. The load ratio ( F 1 = 1) confirms that the lithospheric flexure of the LMS area can be attributed solely to the surface load of the crust. [Figure not available: see fulltext. Caption: The current work describes the combined data of three field campaigns, spanning 2009-2013. Their joint gravity and GPS observations thoroughly cover the sites of lithospheric flexure between the Sichuan Basin and the Eastern Tibetan Plateau. The study area's free-air gravity anomalies (FGAs) are updated by using a remove-and-restore algorithm which merges EGM2008 data with in situ observations. With the new FGAs data, the lithospheric strength of the study area is studied by the authors, and they also give a combined model to illustrate the uplift mechanism of this area.

  13. Constraining the near-surface response to lithospheric reorientation: Structural thermochronology along the TRANSALP geophysical transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotzbach, Christoph; Büttner, Lukas; Ehlers, Todd

    2017-04-01

    Tomographic analyses of the lithosphere structure underneath the Alps suggest a complex geodynamic history (e.g. Lippitsch et al. 2003), indicating, among other things, switches in the direction of subduction. A subduction polarity switch is proposed to have occurred in Miocene times between the Central and Eastern Alps (e.g. Lippitsch et al. 2003; Handy et al. 2015). In the Western and Central Alps SE-directed subduction of European continental lithosphere occurs, whereas NW-directed subduction of Adriatic lithosphere occurs further east (e.g. Kissling et al. 2006). The subducted slab steepens at the transition to the Eastern Alps, roughly at the position of the TRANSALP geophysical profile (S. Germany to N. Italy). This lithospheric reorientation was pre-dated by slab breakoff and also involves the delamination of the lower lithosphere, both processes producing distinct long-wavelength deformation (e.g. Gerya et al. 2004). Thermochronological data can be used to study the surface response to such a long-wavelength deformation. We present new apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He ages of 23 samples collected along 210 km of the TRANSALP profile. The samples were collected along a balanced cross section the TRANSALP profile (e.g. Lüschen et al. 2004) across individual structures that can be tied to deeper, seismically imaged, structures. The thermochronometer ages provide a record of exhumation related to both crustal shortening and post deformation erosional exhumation. Interpretation of the data is in progress and being used to discriminate between competing kinematic/geometric models, and the timing of major fault activity. Variations in exhumation along the section will also unravel the timing and shape of possible long-wavelength rock uplift event(s). References Gerya, T.V., Yuen, D.A., Maresch, W.V. 2004. Thermomechanical modelling of slab detachment. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 226, 101-116. Handy, M.R., Ustaszewski, K., Kissling, E. 2015. Reconstructing the Alps

  14. 137Cs and plutonium isotopes accumulation/retention in bottom sediments and soil in Lithuania: A case study of the activity concentration of anthropogenic radionuclides and their provenance before the start of operation of the Belarusian Nuclear Power Plant (NPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marčiulionienė, D; Lukšienė, B; Montvydienė, D; Jefanova, O; Mažeika, J; Taraškevičius, R; Stakėnienė, R; Petrošius, R; Maceika, E; Tarasiuk, N; Žukauskaitė, Z; Kazakevičiūtė, L; Volkova, M

    2017-11-01

    Knowledge of the background activity concentrations of anthropogenic radionuclides before the start of operations of the new nuclear facilities in Belarus is of great value worldwide. Inland water bodies in Lithuania (specifically the Neris River, the Nemunas River and the Curonian Lagoon) are near the site of the Belarusian NPP under construction and, for this reason, sediments and flooded soils from these sensitive areas were analysed for radiocesium and plutonium isotopes (macrophytes were analysed only for 137Cs) in 2011-2012. The 137Cs and 239+240Pu activity concentrations in bottom sediments from the Nemunas River, sampled in 1995-1996 and re-calculated to the year 2016, were compared with those of 2011-2012. The obtained activity of 137Cs in bottom sediments of the Nemunas River and Curonian Lagoon varied from 1 Bq/kg to 47.0 Bq/kg. The activity of 137Cs in the tested soils ranged from 5.3 B g/kg to 32.9 Bq/kg. The 239+240Pu activity in bottom sediments of the studied sampling sites varied between 0.016 and 0.34 Bq/kg and in flooded soils from 0.064 to 0.55 Bq/kg. The 238Pu activity values were very low or lower than the detection limit. The activity of 137Cs in macrophytes varied from values lower than the detection limit to 6 Bq/kg. A strong positive linear correlation for bottom sediments was calculated between: 239+240Pu and total organic carbon (TOC), r = 0.86, p-value 0.01; 239+240Pu and silt, r = 0.80, p-value 0.029; 137Cs and silt, r = 0.78, p-value 0.04; and 137Cs and TOC, r = 0.85, p-value 0.015. The similar peculiarities of 137Cs and 239+240Pu accumulation in bottom sediments and flooded soil allow us to assume that 137Cs can be used as a tracer for 239+240Pu in the initial stage of searching for radionuclide accumulation zones. A remaining impact of the Chernobyl fallout in average comprised: in the Lower Nemunas River and Curonian Lagoon sediments - 51%, in the Middle Nemunas River -90% and in the floodplains of the Nemunas River - 59

  15. Deep scientific drilling results from Koyna and Killari earthquake regions reveal why Indian shield lithosphere is unusual, thin and warm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.P. Pandey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The nature of crustal and lithospheric mantle evolution of the Archean shields as well as their subsequent deformation due to recent plate motions and sustained intraplate geodynamic activity, has been a subject of considerable interest. In view of this, about three decades ago, a new idea was put forward suggesting that out of all shield terrains, the Indian shield has an extremely thin lithosphere (∼100 km, compared to 250–350 km, elsewhere, apart from being warm, non-rigid, sheared and deformed. As expected, it met with scepticism by heat flow and the emerging seismic tomographic study groups, who on the contrary suggested that the Indian shield has a cool crust, besides a coherent and thick lithosphere (as much as 300–400 km like any other shield. However, recently obtained integrated geological and geophysical findings from deep scientific drillings in 1993 Killari (Mw: 6.3 and 1967 Koyna (Mw: 6.3 earthquake zones, as well as newly acquired geophysical data over other parts of Indian shield terrain, have provided a totally new insight to this debate. Beneath Killari, the basement was found consisting of high density, high velocity mid crustal amphibolite to granulite facies rocks due to exhumation of the deeper crustal layers and sustained granitic upper crustal erosion. Similar type of basement appears to be present in Koyna region too, which is characterized by considerably high upper crustal temperatures. Since, such type of crust is depleted in radiogenic elements, it resulted into lowering of heat flow at the surface, increase in heat flow contribution from the mantle, and upwarping of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. Consequently, the Indian shield lithosphere has become unusually thin and warm. This study highlights the need of an integrated geological, geochemical and geophysical approach in order to accurately determine deep crust-mantle thermal regime in continental areas.

  16. Grounding experiments on soft bottoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sterndorff, M.J.; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    To verify a theoretical analysis procedure for calculation of the hull girder response of ships running aground, a series of large-scale ship grounding experiments was performed on an artificial island made of engineered fill. The tests were conducted by running a condemned fishing vessel up...... for grounding on soft bottoms....

  17. The story of a craton from heart to margins: illuminating cratonic lithosphere with Rayleigh wave phase velocities in Eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, L.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Gilligan, A.; Bastow, I. D.; Totten, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Cratons are Precambrian continental nuclei that are geologically distinct from modern continental regions and are typically underlain by seismically fast lithospheric roots (keels) to at least 200 km depth. Both plate and non-plate tectonic origin theories such as stacking of subducted slabs or multiple mantle plume underplating have been proposed to explain keel growth.Eastern Canada is an ideal continental region to investigate cratonization processes and the onset of plate tectonics. It comprises part of the largest Archean craton in the world, the Superior Province, flanked by a ~1.1 Ga Himalayan-scale orogenic belt, the Grenville Province, and the 500-300 Ma old Appalachian orogenic province, following the same general SW-NE axial trend. The region is also cross-cut by the Great Meteor Hotspot track, providing an excellent opportunity to study the interaction of hotspot tectonism with progressively younger lithospheric domains.We investigate the lithospheric structure of Precambrian Eastern Canada using teleseismic earthquake data recorded at permanent and temporary networks. We measure interstation dispersion curves of Rayleigh wave phase velocities between ~15 and 220 s, and compare the results to standard continental and cratonic reference models. We combine the dispersion curves via a tomographic inversion which solves for isotropic phase velocity heterogeneity and azimuthal anisotropy across the region at a range of periods. The phase velocity maps indicate variations in lithospheric properties from the heart of the Superior craton to the SE Canadian coast.The new regional-scale models will help to understand the processes that generated, stabilized and reworked the cratonic roots through their billion-year tectonic history. We investigate how surface tectonic boundaries relate to deeper lithospheric structural changes, and consider the effects of the multiple Wilson cycles that affected Laurentia.

  18. New Research initiatives for Imaging the Iberian Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, R.

    2006-12-01

    Topo-Iberia is a research program that involves more than 100 PhD researchers from 10 different groups and institutions in Spain. It corresponds to the willingness and interest of the Spanish scientific community to establish an integrated framework to develop multidisciplinary geoscientific studies in our country with an unprecedented resolution. The ˜micro-continent" formed by the Iberian Peninsula and its margins constitutes a most suitable natural laboratory, well identified by the international scientific community, to develop innovative, frontier research on its topography and 4-D evolution. The objective of Topo-Iberia is to understand the interaction between deep, surficial and atmospheric processes, by integrating research on geology, geophysics, geodesy and geotechnology. The knowledge on the relief changes and its causes is of great social impact concerning the climate change and the evaluation of natural resources and hazards. A major aim of this programme is to significantly increase the high-quality information available, by deploying a technological observatory platform, IberArray, of high resolution multisampling. With this programme, our community could join the leading edge of international research, marked by similar initiatives, such as TopoEurope/EuroArray in Europe or the ongoing US programme Earthscope. Three major domains of research have been identified: the southern and northern borders of the Iberian plate (the Betic-Rif system and the Pyrenean-Cantabrian system) and its central core (Meseta and Central-Iberian systems). It is intended to build up a comprehensive, multidisciplinary base of data and results to tackle the key existing questions by developing novel interpretation strategies. In the southern Iberia domain, this project will provide a back bone seismic array of Broad-Band stations in the Peninsula, actively contributing to the on going multidisciplinary/multiproject PICASSO research initiative. PICASSO aims to understand the

  19. Probing magnetic bottom and crustal temperature variations along the Red Sea margin of Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravat, D.; Salem, A.; Abdelaziz, A.M.S.; Elawadi, E.; Morgan, P.

    2011-01-01

    Over 50 magnetic bottom depths derived from spectra of magnetic anomalies in Eastern Egypt along the Red Sea margin show variable magnetic bottoms ranging from 10 to 34. km. The deep magnetic bottoms correspond more closely to the Moho depth in the region, and not the depth of 580??C, which lies significantly deeper on the steady state geotherms. These results support the idea of Wasilewski and coworkers that the Moho is a magnetic boundary in continental regions. Reduced-to-pole magnetic highs correspond to areas of Younger Granites that were emplaced toward the end of the Precambrian. Other crystalline Precambrian units formed earlier during the closure of ocean basins are not strongly magnetic. In the north, magnetic bottoms are shallow (10-15. km) in regions with a high proportion of these Younger Granites. In the south, the shoaling of the magnetic bottom associated with the Younger Granites appears to be restricted to the Aswan and Ras Banas regions. Complexity in the variation of magnetic bottom depths may arise due to a combination of factors: i) regions of Younger (Precambrian) Granites with high magnetite content in the upper crust, leaving behind low Curie temperature titanomagnetite components in the middle and lower crust, ii) rise in the depth of 580??C isotherm where the crust may have been heated due to initiation of intense magmatism at the time of the Red Sea rifting (~. 20. Ma), and iii) the contrast of the above two factors with respect to the neighboring regions where the Moho and/or Curie temperature truncates lithospheric ferromagnetism. Estimates of fractal and centroid magnetic bottoms in the oceanic regions of the Red Sea are significantly below the Moho in places suggesting that oceanic uppermost mantle may be serpentinized to the depth of 15-30 km in those regions. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Deformation and hydration state of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Styrian Basin (Pannonian Basin, Eastern Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradi, L. E.; Hidas, K.; Kovács, I. J.; Klébesz, R.; Szabo, C.

    2016-12-01

    In the Carpathian-Pannonian Region, Neogene alkali basaltic volcanism occurred in six volcanic fields, from which the Styrian Basin Volcanic Field (SBVF) is the westernmost one. In this study, we present new petrographic and crystal preferred orientation (CPO) data, and structural hydroxyl ("water") contents of upper mantle xenoliths from 12 volcanic outcrops across the SBVF. The studied xenoliths are mostly coarse granular lherzolites, amphiboles are present in almost every sample and often replace pyroxenes and spinels. The peridotites are highly annealed, olivines and pyroxenes do not show significant amount of intragranular deformation. Despite the annealed texture of the peridotites, olivine CPO is unambiguous, and varies between [010]-fiber, orthogonal and [100]-fiber symmetry. The CPO of pyroxenes is coherent with coeval deformation with olivine, showing [100]OL distributed subparallel to [001]OPX. The CPO of amphiboles suggest postkinematic epitaxial overgrowth on the precursor pyroxenes. The "water" content of the studied xenoliths exhibit rather high values, up to 10, 290 and 675 ppm in olivine, ortho- and clinopyroxene, respectively. Ortho- and clinopyroxene pairs show equilibrium in all samples, however "water" loss in olivines is observed in several xenoliths. The xenoliths show equilibrium temperatures from 850 to 1100 °C, which corresponds to lithospheric mantle depths between 30 and 60 km. Equilibrium temperatures show correlation with the varying CPO symmetries and grain size: coarser grained xenoliths with [100]-fiber and orthorhombic symmetry appear in the high temperature (>1000 °C) xenoliths, which is characteristic for asthenospheric origin. Most of the samples display transitional CPO symmetry between [010]-fiber and orthogonal, which indicate extensive lithospheric deformation under varying stress field from transtensional to transpressional settings. Based on the estimated seismic properties of the studied samples, a significant part of

  1. POLARIS: Portable Observatories for Lithospheric Analysis and Research Investigating Seismicity - New Opportunities in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, J. F.; Adams, J.; Asudeh, I.; Atkinson, G.; Bostock, M. G.; Eaton, D. W.; Ferguson, I. J.; Snyder, D.; Unsworth, M.

    2003-04-01

    POLARIS is a multi-institutional 10M project recently funded by the Canadian Foundation for Innovation, Provincial Governments and Universities, and private industry across Canada. This project is providing new, state-of-the-art portable geophysical observatories for research into lithospheric structure, continental dynamics, and earthquake hazards in Canada. When completed, POLARIS infrastructure will comprise 90 three-component broadband seismographs and 30 magnetotelluric (MT) mobile field systems and complementary satellite telemetry data acquistion. Over the initial four year installation of this project, the seismograph network will be deployed as three subarrays of 30 instruments each. The MT instruments will be used in shorter-term deployments at each of the three seismic subarrays for lithospheric imaging, and continuous recording at selected elements for deep-mantle imaging. The initial scientific objectives include: 1) three-dimensional detailed mapping of the asthenosphere and upper mantle of the Slave Province in Canada's north to assist the emerging diamond industry; 2) mapping lithospheric structure and earthquake hazards in the heavily populated area of southern Ontario (identifying zones of crustal weakness, obtaining accurate earthquake parameters, and ground motion attenuation studies). 3) mapping the structure and earthquake hazards over the Cascadia subduction zone in southwest British Columbia (subducting oceanic plate, site-response in urban areas, identifying active crustal faults, and seismic attenuation studies). The latter array will provide new opportunities into research involving slab seismicity, including focal mechanisms, attenuation studies, and detailed structural studies. Further research initiatives that will be possible include: testing Rapid Warning Systems for ground shaking in the urban areas of Canada; developing new fine-scale imaging techniques using the scattered wavefield; and investigating geomagnetically induced

  2. Surface Waves from the Hawaiian PLUME Project Trace Anomalously Slow Lithosphere and Asthenosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laske, G.; Markee, A.; Orcutt, J. A.; Collins, J. A.; Wolfe, C. J.; Solomon, S. C.; Detrick, R. S.; Bercovici, D. A.; Hauri, E. H.

    2009-04-01

    During the two-stage Hawaiian PLUME (Plume-Lithosphere Undersea Melt Experiment) deployment, we collected continuous seismic data at ten land stations and nearly 70 ocean bottom sites from 2005 through mid-2007. In the first stage from January 2005 through January 2006, 35 sites were occupied in an elongated array centered on the island of Hawaii, with a station spacing of roughly 75 km and an aperture of 500 km. In the second stage from May 2006 through June 2007, 37 sites were occupied in a larger array with a station spacing of roughly 200 km. Most of the sites were occupied with broad-band seismometers. This allows for an analysis of surface waves in a broad frequency band. Our current analysis concentrates on long-period teleseismic Rayleigh waves. During the first stage, we collected records from upward of 95 suitable shallow earthquakes (source depth less than 200 km) with surface wave magnitudes of 5.6 or larger. We also identified and analyzed 70 smaller events. The initial data set of the second stage is quite a bit larger, and our initial analysis concentrates on 163 larger earthquakes. Our set of 5000 unique single-station phase measurements for the first stage and 3100 for the second form the basis to obtain two-station path-averaged phase velocity curves. Each curve is well constrained by many earthquakes (typically 10-20). The data are internally consistent between 15 and 80 s, allowing us to image the lithosphere and upper asthenosphere. Some larger events provide constraints beyond 100 s which allows us to reach deeper. Using these dispersion curves we invert for phase velocity maps at fixed frequency but also for path-averaged depth profiles, and ultimately for a full 3D model. For the two deployment stages, we currently have over 300 and 200 two-station paths respectively. Compared to 100-million year old upper mantle, our analysis reveals a roughly 30 km thick low-velocity anomaly in the lower lithosphere, surrounding the island of Hawaii, that

  3. Investigating bottom-up auditory attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Merve Kaya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bottom-up attention is a sensory-driven selection mechanism that directs perception towards a subset of the stimulus that is considered salient, or attention-grabbing. Most studies of bottom-up auditory attention have adapted frameworks similar to visual attention models whereby local or global contrast is a central concept in defining salient elements in a scene. In the current study, we take a more fundamental approach to modeling auditory attention; providing the first examination of the space of auditory saliency spanning pitch, intensity and timbre; and shedding light on complex interactions among these features. Informed by psychoacoustic results, we develop a computational model of auditory saliency implementing a novel attentional framework, guided by processes hypothesized to take place in the auditory pathway. In particular, the model tests the hypothesis that perception tracks the evolution of sound events in a multidimensional feature space, and flags any deviation from background statistics as salient. Predictions from the model corroborate the relationship between bottom-up auditory attention and statistical inference, and argues for a potential role of predictive coding as mechanism for saliency detection in acoustic scenes.

  4. South China Sea crustal thickness and lithosphere thinning from satellite gravity inversion incorporating a lithospheric thermal gravity anomaly correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusznir, Nick; Gozzard, Simon; Alvey, Andy

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of ocean crust and lithosphere within the South China Sea (SCS) are controversial. Sea-floor spreading re-orientation and ridge jumps during the Oligocene-Miocene formation of the South China Sea led to the present complex distribution of oceanic crust, thinned continental crust, micro-continents and volcanic ridges. We determine Moho depth, crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning (1- 1/beta) for the South China Sea using a gravity inversion method which incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction (Chappell & Kusznir, 2008). The gravity inversion method provides a prediction of ocean-continent transition structure and continent-ocean boundary location which is independent of ocean isochron information. A correction is required for the lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly in order to determine Moho depth accurately from gravity inversion; the elevated lithosphere geotherm of the young oceanic and rifted continental margin lithosphere of the South China Sea produces a large lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly which in places exceeds -150 mGal. The gravity anomaly inversion is carried out in the 3D spectral domain (using Parker 1972) to determine 3D Moho geometry and invokes Smith's uniqueness theorem. The gravity anomaly contribution from sediments assumes a compaction controlled sediment density increase with depth. The gravity inversion includes a parameterization of the decompression melting model of White & McKenzie (1999) to predict volcanic addition generated during continental breakup lithosphere thinning and seafloor spreading. Public domain free air gravity anomaly, bathymetry and sediment thickness data are used in this gravity inversion. Using crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning factor maps with superimposed shaded-relief free-air gravity anomaly, we improve the determination of pre-breakup rifted margin conjugacy, rift orientation and sea-floor spreading trajectory. SCS conjugate margins

  5. Shallow and deep lithosphere slabs beneath the Dinarides from teleseismic tomography as the result of the Adriatic lithosphere downwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šumanovac, Franjo; Markušić, Snježana; Engelsfeld, Tihomir; Jurković, Klaudia; Orešković, Jasna

    2017-08-01

    The study area covers the Dinarides and southwestern part of the Pannonian basin as the marginal zone between the Adriatic microplate (African plate) and the Pannonian tectonic segment (Eurasian plate). We created a three-dimensional seismic velocity model to 450 km depth using teleseismic tomography. Our travel-time dataset was collected by means of 40 seismic stations from the ORFEUS database and Croatian Seismological Survey database. A set of 90 teleseismic earthquakes were selected in the time range 2014-2015, and relative P-wave travel-time residuals were calculated. For the first time the seismic P-wave velocity model of a relatively high resolution on the entire Dinaridic mountain belt was obtained. Based on this model, a more reliable insight in the relations of the lithosphere plates has been achieved. We imaged a fast velocity anomaly extending underneath the entire Dinaridic mountain belt which indicates cold, rigid materials. The anomaly is steeply sloping towards the northeast and directly indicates the sinking of the Adriatic microplate underneath the Pannonian tectonic segment. In the Northern Dinarides the anomaly extends to the depth of 250 km, whereas in the Southern Dinarides it covers greater depths, up to 450 km. The shallow Adriatic slab extends along the External Dinarides, while the deep Adriatic slab extends beneath the Internal Dinarides and ophiolite zones in the area of central and southern Dinarides. Different slab depths are interpreted as the faster convergence of the plate in the southern Dinarides than in the northern, or the convergence of the plates had started in the southern part and systematically developed to the north.

  6. The Gutenberg Discontinuity: Melt at the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerr, Nicholas

    2012-03-01

    The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) beneath ocean basins separates the upper thermal boundary layer of rigid, conductively cooling plates from the underlying ductile, convecting mantle. The origin of a seismic discontinuity associated with this interface, known as the Gutenberg discontinuity (G), remains enigmatic. High-frequency SS precursors sampling below the Pacific plate intermittently detect the G as a sharp, negative velocity contrast at 40- to 75-kilometer depth. These observations lie near the depth of the LAB in regions associated with recent surface volcanism and mantle melt production and are consistent with an intermittent layer of asthenospheric partial melt residing at the lithospheric base. I propose that the G reflectivity is regionally enhanced by dynamical processes that produce melt, including hot mantle upwellings, small-scale convection, and fluid release during subduction.

  7. Imaging and Interpreting Lithospheric Structure in the Southern Appalachians using the SESAME Broadband Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verellen, D.; Alberts, E.; Parker, H., Jr.; Hawman, R. B.; Fischer, K. M.; Wagner, L. S.

    2016-12-01

    The Southeastern Suture of the Appalachian Margin Experiment (SESAME) was designed to investigate the role of crustal and subcrustal deformation associated with Alleghanian collision and Mesozoic extension of the lithosphere across the southeastern United States. It involved the deployment of three profiles with a total length of 1300 kilometers. In this study, we use zero-offset reflections generated by the global seismic phase PKIKP as a virtual source to image structure within the lithosphere. Together with Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling (COCORP) surveys, these data allow us to study the nature of the Moho and other discontinuities over a wide range of scales. A major objective of this work is to track variations in the detailed structure of the crust-mantle transition from Grenville basement beneath the Valley & Ridge to accreted terranes beneath the Coastal Plain and across the boundary between Laurentian and Gondwanan lithosphere. We also investigate the scale of layering in the uppermost mantle and its possible relation to contrasts in anisotropy in relation to shearing. Preliminary findings for a single earthquake (mb=6.1) recorded along a profile trending northwest across the Carolina Terrane, Inner Piedmont, and Blue Ridge show dipping reflectors at a depth of approximately 15-20 km in the crust, and layered, relatively flat-lying reflectors at a depth of roughly 70 km in the upper mantle. Ongoing work includes stacking of waveforms for multiple events in order to enhance signal-to-noise levels and construction of images for two additional north-south trending profiles across the Coastal Plain, where deep structure is more difficult to image due to reverberations within low-velocity sediments. The resulting broadband images of P-wave reflectivity will be used in combination with models of S-wave reflectivity derived by other methods to provide insight into the complex deformational history of the southern Appalachian system.

  8. Low heat flow from young oceanic lithosphere at the Middle America Trench off Mexico [rapid communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshull, Timothy A.; Bartolomé, Rafael; Byrne, Siobhán; Dañobeitia, Juanjo

    2005-10-01

    Seismic reflection profiles across the Middle America Trench at 20°N show a high amplitude bottom simulating reflector interpreted as marking a phase transition between methane hydrate and free gas in the pore space of both accreted and trench sediments. We determine the depth of the hydrate-gas phase boundary in order to estimate the geothermal gradient and hence the heat flow beneath the trench and the frontal part of the accretionary wedge which overlies the downgoing plate. After correction for sedimentation, heat flow values in the trench and through the accretionary wedge are only about half of the values predicted by plate cooling models for the 10 Ma subducting lithosphere. There is no systematic correlation between heat flow in the accretionary wedge and distance from the trench. A comparison with heat flow predicted by a simple analytical model suggests that there is little shear heating from within or beneath the wedge, despite the high basal friction suggested by the large taper angle of the wedge. The geothermal gradient varies systematically along the margin and is negatively correlated with the frontal slope of the wedge. Some local peaks may be attributed to channelised fluid expulsion.

  9. Relaxation of continental lithosphere: An explanation for Late Cretaceous reactivation of the Sabine Uplift of Louisiana-Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Jeffrey A.

    1990-04-01

    With few unconstrained assumptions, a simple quantitative model for flexural isostasy between two crustal blocks of different thickness that subsequently undergoes partial relaxation of accumulated stress can explain reactivation of the Sabine Uplift in the mid-Cretaceous. Thin salt over the Sabine Uplift indicates that it was a positive area in the Middle Jurassic but began to subside during the Late Jurassic. During the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, the Sabine Uplift had no topographic expression and was the center of a large, flat bottomed basin covering most of east Texas and north Louisiana. Reactivation of the Sabine Uplift in the mid-Cretaceous caused a minimum of 150 m of uplift and extensive erosion of Lower Cretaceous rocks. During the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary, the Sabine Uplift resumed subsiding but at a slower rate than the adjacent basins. Since the mid-Cretaceous, the Sabine Uplift has risen more than 1 km relative to the East Texas Basin. We suggest that this structural history is consistent with the following simple quantitative model for flexural isostasy. During formation of the Gulf of Mexico in the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic by rifting and extension of the lithosphere, brittle deformation of the crust created small-scale wavelength of tens of kilometers, lateral variations in crustal thickness. Initially, the newly formed margin was in point-wise Airy isostatic equilibrium. Thus synrift and/or early postrift subsidence was characterized by a series of rift valleys or half grabens separated by uplifts. However, as the margin cooled and contracted, the lithosphere became stronger, and subsequent loading was regionally compensated. Thus postrift subsidence was characterized by a broad regional downwarp. If, at some later point in time, the rigid portion of the lithosphere was weakened or relaxed, then lateral density variations would have been recompensated at shorter wavelengths. Thus areas of little or no crustal extension would have

  10. Monitoring changes in stream bottom sediments and benthic invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine whether the analysis of stream bottom sediments could be used to assess sediment pollution generated by highway construction. Most of the work completed to date has involved testing and refining methods for the co...

  11. Bottom Production, Spectroscopy and Lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Argiro, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution, I give a brief overview of the latest results related to the production, spectroscopy and lifetimes of bottom and charm hadrons. Several interesting experimental results were presented in this field in 2012. The focus will be on the findings of experiments performed at hadron colliders, since the LHC is taking up most of the stage this year, with a brief mention about electron-proton collider results.

  12. Lithospheric Flexure and Sedimentary Basin Evolution: the Steer's Head Model Re-visited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. D. P.; Watts, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Backstripping studies of biostratigraphic data from deep wells show that sediment loading is one of the main factors controlling the subsidence and uplift history of sedimentary basins. Previous studies based on single layer models of elastic and viscoelastic plates overlying an inviscid fluid have shown that sediment loading, together with a tectonic subsidence that decreases exponentially with time, can explain the large-scale 'architecture' of rift-type basins and, in some cases, details of their internal stratigraphy such as onlap and offlap patterns. One problem with these so-called 'steer's head' models is that they were based on a simple rheological model in which the long-term strength of the lithosphere increased with thermal age. Recent oceanic flexure studies, however, reveal that the long-term strength of the lithosphere depends not only on thermal age, but also load age. We have used the thermal structure based on plate cooling models, together with recent experimentally-derived flow laws, to compute the viscosity structure of the lithosphere and a new analytical model to compute the flexure of a multilayer viscoelastic plate by a trapezoid-shaped sediment load at different times since basin initiation. If we define the nondimensional number Dw = τm/τt, where τm is the Maxwell time constant and τt is the thermal time constant, we find that for Dw > 1 the flexure approximates that of a viscoelastic plate and an offlap pattern develops (Fig. 2). Interestingly Dw ~ 1 produces a basin in which onlap dominates its early evolution while offlap dominates its later evolution and an unconformity separates the two different stratal patterns (Fig. 3). Therefore, when consideration is given to the fact that the long-term strength of the lithosphere depends on both thermal and load age we are able to produce stratal geometries that not only closely resemble stratigraphic observations, but do not require either long-term sea-level or sediment flux changes in

  13. Lithospheric expression of cenozoic subduction, mesozoic rifting and the Precambrian Shield in Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masy, Jeniffer; Niu, Fenglin; Levander, Alan; Schmitz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We have combined surface wave tomography with Ps and Sp receiver-function images based on common-conversion-point (CCP) stacking to study the upper mantle velocity structure, particularly the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), beneath eastern and central Venezuela. Rayleigh phase velocities in the frequency range of 0.01-0.05 Hz (20-100 s in period) were measured using the two-plane-wave method and finite-frequency kernels, and then inverted on a 0.5° × 0.5° grid. The phase velocity dispersion data at grid points were inverted for 1D shear velocity profiles using initial crust-mantle velocity models constructed from previous studies. The 3D velocity model and receiver-function images were interpreted jointly to determine the depth of the LAB and other upper mantle features. The tomographic images revealed two high velocity anomalies extending to more than ∼200 km depth. One corresponds to the top of the subducting Atlantic plate beneath the Serrania del Interior. The other anomaly is a highly localized feature beneath the Maturin Basin. The LAB depth varies significantly in the study region: It is located at ∼110 km depth beneath the Guayana Shield, and reaches ∼130 km at the northern edge of the Maturin Basin, which might be related to the downward flexural bending due to thrust loading of the Caribbean plate and pull from the subducting Atlantic plate. Immediately to the west, the lithosphere is thin (∼50-60 km) along the NE-SW trending Espino Graben from the Cariaco basin to the Orinoco River at the northern edge of the craton. The LAB in this region is the top of a pronounced low velocity zone. Westward, the lithosphere deepens to ∼80 km depth beneath the Barinas Apure Basin, and to ∼90 km beneath the Neogene Merida Andes and Maracaibo block. Both upper mantle velocity structure and lithosphere thickness correlate well with surface geology and are consistent with northern South American tectonics.

  14. Rupture characteristics of the 2003 Mw 7.6 mid-Indian Ocean earthquake: Implications for seismic properties of young oceanic lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolik, Michael; Abercrombie, Rachel E.; Pan, Jianfeng; EkströM, GöRan

    2006-04-01

    Analysis of broadband seismograms from the 15 July 2003 large earthquake (M 7.6) in the central Indian Ocean reveals an unusual source process. The source duration of longer than a minute is more than twice as long as expected from earthquake scaling relations, yet ˜80% of the moment release occurred in two energetic asperities near the end of the rupture. These two asperities were located in lithosphere with an age of 7 Ma or greater. A previous study has suggested that strike-slip earthquakes in oceanic lithosphere having much longer than expected source durations also have a slow, dissipative rupture process characterized by low radiated seismic energy (and therefore low apparent stress). We find no evidence for a slow rupture process to the 2003 earthquake. Instead, the long duration appears to be due only to nucleation close to the actively spreading Carlsberg Ridge, in lithosphere younger than 7 Ma. Younger oceanic lithosphere may be able to generate small to moderate earthquakes but be unable to sustain slip in a large event due to steady release of strain in aseismic creep events. Large strike-slip earthquakes within oceanic lithosphere may occur only in the central portions of long transform faults or in intraplate regions, rupturing energetic asperities like those that failed in the mid-Indian Ocean earthquake and leading to the observation that oceanic strike-slip earthquakes have the largest apparent stresses among the global population of shallow earthquakes.

  15. A modeling study of the role that bottom topography plays in Gulf Stream dynamics and in influencing the tilt of mean sea level along the US East Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezer, Tal

    2017-05-01

    Two aspects of the interactions between the Gulf Stream (GS) and the bottom topography are investigated: 1. the spatial variations associated with the north-south tilt of mean sea level along the US East Coast and 2. the high-frequency temporal variations of coastal sea level (CSL) that are related to Gulf Stream dynamics. A regional ocean circulation model is used to assess the role of topography; this is done by conducting numerical simulations of the GS with two different topographies-one case with a realistic topography and another case with an idealized smooth topography that neglects the details of the coastline and the very deep ocean. High-frequency oscillations (with a 5-day period) in the zonal wind and in the GS transport are imposed on the model; the source of the GS variability is either the Florida Current (FC) in the south or the Slope Current (SC) in the north. The results demonstrate that the abrupt change of topography at Cape Hatteras, near the point where the GS separates from the coast, amplifies the northward downward mean sea level tilt along the coast there. The results suggest that idealized or coarse resolution models that do not resolve the details of the coastline may underestimate the difference between the higher mean sea level in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB) and the lower mean sea level in the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB). Imposed variations in the model's GS transport can generate coherent sea level variability along the coast, similar to the observations. However, when the bottom topography in the model is modified (or not well resolved), the shape of the coastline and the continental shelf influence the propagation of coastal-trapped waves and impact the CSL variability. The results can explain the different characteristics of sea level variability in the SAB and in the MAB and help understand unexpected water level anomalies and flooding related to remote influence of the GS.

  16. Bottom-up Initiatives for Photovoltaic: Incentives and Barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Reinsberger

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available When facing the challenge of restructuring the energy system, bottom-up initiatives can aid the diffusion of decentralized and clean energy technologies. We focused here on a bottom-up initiative of citizen-funded and citizen-operated photovoltaic power plants. The project follows a case study-based approach and examines two different community initiatives. The aim is to investigate the potential incentives and barriers relating to participation or non-participation in predefined community PV projects. Qualitative, as well as quantitative empirical research was used to examine the key factors in the further development of bottom-up initiatives as contributors to a general energy transition.

  17. Lithosphere rheology and active tectonics in Mongolia: relations between earthquake source parameters, gravity and GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayasgalan, Amgalan; Jackson, James; McKenzie, Dan

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, we use observations of earthquake source parameters and gravity to investigate the mechanical properties and the active faulting of the lithosphere in Mongolia. Well-determined earthquake centroid depths, including 10 from inversions of P and SH waveforms that are presented here for the first time, show that the seismogenic thickness (Ts) within Mongolia itself is less than 20 km. However, to both the east, in parts of the Lake Baikal rift system, and the west, adjacent to the Junggar basin and Kazakhstan platform, the seismogenic thickness is considerably greater, and includes essentially the whole crust. From the admittance between the free-air gravity and the topography, and also from profiles across a flexural foreland basin, we determine the effective elastic thickness (Te) in central Mongolia to be Kazakhstan platform, the same techniques show that Te > 30 km. In both Mongolia and its surroundings, Te is comparable with Ts and, where it is well determined, Te Ts. These data are consistent with the view that the strength of the continental lithosphere resides in its seismogenic part, which in Mongolia is the upper crust, but to both the east and west appears to be the whole crust. The earthquake source parameters also allow us to ask how the active faulting in Mongolia accommodates the velocity field revealed by GPS measurements. It is likely that the entire Mongolian Altay range in the west rotates counter-clockwise relative to stable Asia, and is responsible for the distributed E-W left-lateral shear seen further east in central Mongolia. The admittance observations show no evidence at the present day for convective mantle support, or a `hotspot', responsible for the elevated region of the Hangay dome in central Mongolia, even though the geochemical data from nodules in late Cenozoic basalts and seismic tomography studies suggest elevated temperatures at shallow depths (<125 km) and probably thinned lithosphere.

  18. A fictitious domain method for fluid/solid coupling applied to the lithosphere/asthenosphere interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerpa, Nestor; Hassani, Riad; Gerbault, Muriel

    2014-05-01

    A large variety of geodynamical problems can be viewed as a solid/fluid interaction problem coupling two bodies with different physics. In particular the lithosphere/asthenosphere mechanical interaction in subduction zones belongs to this kind of problem, where the solid lithosphere is embedded in the asthenospheric viscous fluid. In many fields (Industry, Civil Engineering,etc.), in which deformations of solid and fluid are "small", numerical modelers consider the exact discretization of both domains and fit as well as possible the shape of the interface between the two domains, solving the discretized physic problems by the Finite Element Method (FEM). Although, in a context of subduction, the lithosphere is submitted to large deformation, and can evolve into a complex geometry, thus leading to important deformation of the surrounding asthenosphere. To alleviate the precise meshing of complex geometries, numerical modelers have developed non-matching interface methods called Fictitious Domain Methods (FDM). The main idea of these methods is to extend the initial problem to a bigger (and simpler) domain. In our version of FDM, we determine the forces at the immersed solid boundary required to minimize (at the least square sense) the difference between fluid and solid velocities at this interface. This method is first-order accurate and the stability depends on the ratio between the fluid background mesh size and the interface discretization. We present the formulation and provide benchmarks and examples showing the potential of the method : 1) A comparison with an analytical solution of a viscous flow around a rigid body. 2) An experiment of a rigid sphere sinking in a viscous fluid (in two and three dimensional cases). 3) A comparison with an analog subduction experiment. Another presentation aims at describing the geodynamical application of this method to Andean subduction dynamics, studying cyclic slab folding on the 660 km discontinuity, and its relationship

  19. Geodynamical evolution of the Southern Carpathians: inferences from computational models of lithospheric gravitational instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorinczi, Piroska; Houseman, Gregory

    2010-05-01

    The Carpathians are a geologically young mountain chain which, together with the Alps and the Dinarides, surround the extensional Pannonian and Transylvanian basins of Central Europe. The tectonic evolution of the Alpine-Carpathian-Pannonian system was controlled by convergence between the Adriatic and European plates, by the extensional collapse of thickened Alpine crust and by the retreat of the Eastern Carpathians driven by either a brief episode of subduction or by gravitational instability of the continental lithospheric mantle. The Southeast corner of the Carpathians has been widely studied due to its strong seismic activity. The distribution and rate of moment release of this seismic activity provides convincing evidence of a mantle drip produced by gravitational instability of the lithospheric mantle developing beneath the Vrancea region now. The question of why gravitational instability is strongly evident beneath Vrancea and not elsewhere beneath the Southern Carpathians is unresolved. Geological and geophysical interpretations of the Southern Carpathians emphasise the transcurrent deformation that has dominated recent tectonic evolution of this mountain belt. We use computational models of gravitational instability in order to address the question of why the instability appears to have developed strongly only at the eastern end of this mountain chain. We use a parallelised 3D Lagrangean-frame finite deformation algorithm, which solves the equations of momentum and mass conservation in an incompressible viscous fluid, assuming a non-linear power-law that relates deviatoric stress and strain-rate. We consider a gravitationally unstable system, with a dense mantle lithosphere overlying a less dense asthenosphere, subject to boundary conditions which simulate the combination of shear and convergence that are thought to have governed the evolution of the South Carpathians. This program (OREGANO) allows 3D viscous flow fields to be computed for spatially

  20. Secular Changes in Lithospheric Diamonds from the Archean to the Proterozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey, S. B.; Richardson, S. H.; Aulbach, S.; Pearson, G.

    2010-12-01

    Geochronologic study of lithospheric diamonds uses the Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr systems on silicate inclusions of peridotitic (harzbugitic and lherzolitic) and eclogitic parageneses and Re-Os on sulfide inclusions also of peridotitic (pentlendite-rich) and eclogitic (pyrrhotite-rich) parageneses. While sulfide and silicate inclusions rarely occur in the same diamond, they usually occur in the diamond population of each kimberlite. More than 20 kimberlites on 4 cratons have geochronology on both their sulfide and silicate inclusion-bearing diamonds. This global dataset shows interesting systematic differences with age from the Archean to Proterozoic and can be used to test for secular changes in deep mantle processes and geodynamics. With few exceptions, harzburgitic silicate and sulfide inclusions are Paleo- to Mesoarchean and rare in the Proterozoic, in accord with the xenolith record. This suggests that the depletion registered in the harzburgitic diamonds was associated with the igneous processes that created or at least followed closely on the creation of stable cratonic lithosphere. The evidence for relatively shallow final equilibration of many mantle peridotite suites [1,2] indicates that early tectonic forces had enough lateral component to be capable of thickening the lithosphere into the diamond stability field regardless of the initial depletion of the mantle in a plume or a subduction wedge. Eclogitic sulfide inclusions are common from the Archean throughout the Proterozoic. Given the diverse surficial geochemical signatures present in these inclusions, in their diamond hosts, and in the diamond-hosting lithologies, this suggests that subduction-accretion was a major tectonic process operating on Earth at least since the Mesoarchean. The Re/Os of some Archean eclogitic sulfides is lower than Re/Os of Proterozoic eclogitic sulfides which potentially links the creation of Archean sulfides to the creation of more primitive, higher MgO oceanic lithosphere typical of

  1. Formation of cement mortar with incineration municipal solid waste bottom ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ng Hooi; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Hussin, Kamarudin; Jin, Tan Soo

    2017-04-01

    Product of incineration municipal solid waste bottom ash was substitute to Portland cement in construction industry. This study investigated the changes of bottom ash in Portland cement by chemical and mineralogical testing. Various substitution of bottom ash (10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%) to Portland cement was investigated. The main purpose was to clarify the mechanisms behind the formation of the cement mortar with bottom ash particles. The result indicated that the chemical and mineralogical of the cement mortar incorporating bottom ash was not significantly changed with the substitution of 10-40% bottom ash. However, the use of bottom ash minimizes the main composition of cement mortar. Overall, it was found that there is significant potential to increase the utilization of bottom ash.

  2. CHARACTERISTICS OF SLUDGE BOTTOM MESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Szydłowski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the study was to assess the selected heavy metals pollution of bottom sediments of small water bodies of different catchment management. Two ponds located in Mostkowo village were chosen for investigation. The first small water reservoir is surrounded by the cereal fields, cultivated without the use of organic and mineral fertilizers (NPK. The second reservoir is located in a park near rural buildings. Sediment samples were collected by the usage of KC Denmark sediments core probe. Samples were taken from 4 layers of sediment, from depth: 0–5, 5–10, 10–20 and 20–30 cm. Sampling was made once during the winter period (2014 year when ice occurred on the surface of small water bodies, from three points. The material was prepared for further analysis according to procedures used in soil science. The content of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry by usage of ASA ICE 3000 Thermo Scientific after prior digestion in the mixture (5: 1 of concentrated acids (HNO3 and HClO4. Higher pH values ​​were characteristic for sediments of pond located in a park than in pond located within the agricultural fields. In both small water bodies the highest heavy metal concentrations occurred in the deepest points of the research. In the sediments of the pond located within crop fields the highest concentration of cadmium, copper, lead and zinc were observed in a layer of 0–5 cm, wherein the nickel and chromium in a layer of 20–30 cm. In the sediments of the pond, located in the park the highest values ​​occurred at the deepest sampling point in the layer taken form 10–20 cm. Sediments from second reservoir were characterized by the largest average concentrations of heavy metals, except the lead content in sediment form the layer of 10–20 cm. According to the geochemical evaluation of sediments proposed by Bojakowska and Sokołowska [1998], the majority of samples belongs to Ist

  3. Lithospheric Stress and Geodynamics: History, Accomplishments and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    The kinematics of plate tectonics was established in the 1960s, and shortly thereafter the Earth's stress field was recognized as an important constraint on the dynamics of plate tectonics. Forty years ago the 1976 Chapman Conference on the Stress in the Lithosphere, which I was fortunate to attend as a graduate student, and the ensuing 1977 PAGEOPH Stress in the Earth publication's 28 articles highlighted a range of datasets and approaches that established fertile ground for geodynamic research ever since. What are the most useful indicators of stress? Do they measure residual or tectonic stresses? Local or far field sources? What role does rheology play in concentrating deformation? Great progress was made with the first World Stress Map in 1991 by Zoback and Zoback, and the current version (2016 release with 42,348 indicators) remains a tremendous resource for geodynamic research. Modeling sophistication has seen significant progress over the past 40 years. Early applications of stress to dynamics involved simple lithospheric flexure, particularly at subduction zones, Hawaii, and continental foreland basin systems. We have progressed to full 3-D finite element models for calculating the flexure and stress associated with loads on a crust and mantle with realistic non-linear viscoelastic rheology, including frictional sliding, low-temperature plasticity, and high-temperature creep. Initial efforts to use lithospheric stresses to constrain plate driving forces focused on a "top-down" view of the lithosphere. Such efforts have evolved to better include asthenosphere-lithosphere interactions, have gone from simple to complicated rheologies, from 2-D to 3-D, and seek to obtain a fully thermo-mechanical model that avoids relying on artificial boundary conditions to model plate dynamics. Still, there are a number of important issues in geodynamics, from philosophy (when are more complicated models necessary? can one hope to identify "the" answer with modeling, or only

  4. Characterizing Offshore Earthquakes at Hawaii Recorded by the First PLUME Temporary Ocean-Bottom Seismometer Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchieta, M. C.; Wolfe, C. J.; Laske, G.; Collins, J. A.; Solomon, S. C.; Detrick, R. S.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bercovici, D. A.; Hauri, E. H.; Pavlis, G. L.; Eakins, J. A.; Vernon, F. L.

    2007-12-01

    In 2005-2006 and again in 2006-2007, the Plume-Lithosphere Undersea Melt Experiment (PLUME) deployed successive networks of ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) around the Hawaiian Islands. The experiment consisted of a 2-year deployment of broadband land seismometers and two year-long deployments of broadband OBSs, the first with a station spacing of about 75 km centered on the island of Hawaii and the second with larger spacing of about 200 km. PLUME's major objective was to determine the mantle structure beneath the Hawaiian hotspot and swell; however, these unique data are also potentially valuable to the study of small offshore earthquakes. The Hawaiian Islands are marked by significant and continuous seismic activity. In addition to the thousands of microearthquakes that are detected and located by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) seismic network each year, Hawaii also experiences occasional large, damaging earthquakes. Several of these large events occurred in Hawaii's offshore region (e.g., the 1871 Lanai earthquake, the 1938 Maui earthquake, and the 2006 Kiholo Bay earthquake), and such events pose a significant seismic hazard for the state. We assess whether data from the first PLUME OBS deployment and land data can improve the detection and location of offshore microearthquakes around Hawaii. We are particularly interested in whether the PLUME data set may reveal offshore fault zones not detected to date by the HVO seismic network. Initial tests indicate that many offshore earthquakes already in the HVO catalog produce detectable P and S waves on the PLUME three- component seismometers, and earthquake detection rates are improved when seismograms are high-pass filtered above about 5 Hz to reduce the seismic noise from wind-generated waves. Differential pressure gauge data yield far fewer detectable events (with the exception of a swarm of Loihi earthquakes in December 2005) and appear less promising for improving our knowledge of offshore

  5. Lithosphere deformation methods and models constrained by surface fault data on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Lada L.

    Models of lithospheric deformation tie observed field measurements of gravity and topography with surface observations of tectonic features. An understanding of the sources of stress, and the expected style, orientation, and magnitudes of stress and associated elastic strain is important for understanding the evolution of faulting on Mars and its relationship to loading. At the same time, theoretical models of deformation mechanisms and forces, when tied to tectonic observations, can be interpreted in terms of major tectonic events and allow insights into the planet's history and evolution as well as its internal structure and processes. This is particularly important for understanding solid planetary bodies other than Earth where the seismic data is either sparse, e.g. the Moon, or non-existent, e.g. Mars. This kind of research has implications for, and benefits from, an understanding of the petrology and surface processes. In this work, I use MGS MOLA and Radio Science data products (topography and gravity) to systematically test new geodynamic models and evaluate lithosphere dynamics on Mars as a function of time, while satisfying geologic surface observations (surface features) that have been and are being catalogued and studied from Viking, MOLA, MOC, and THEMIS IR images. I investigate (1) the role of internal loads (internal body force effects), (2) loading from the surface and base of lithosphere, and the effects of this loading on membrane and flexural strains and stresses, and (3) the role of global contraction, all viewed in the context of how the surface elastic layer has changed as the planet has evolved. I show that deviatoric stresses associated with gravitational potential differences do a good job at matching the normal faults; however, fitting all the surface-breaking faults is more difficult. I argue that global planetary contraction is an unlikely source of significant deformation. Instead, the simplest inverse models show that small lateral

  6. Lithospheric Structure Beneath Various Tectonic Units of Northwestern Deccan Volcanic Province from Surface Wave Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, J.

    2016-12-01

    The northwestern portion of the Indian subcontinent evoked a lot of scientific interest due to its geological and tectonic evolution since 140 Ma, after breakup of India from the Gondwanaland and collision with the Asian plate. During the northward movement of the Indian plate, it passed over mantle plumes, resulting in massive outpouring of basalts seen in regions like the Deccan Volcanic province (DVP). The DVP region is one of the most seismically active intraplate regions in the world and has witnessed large earthquakes in the past including the 1819 Allah Bund earthquake (M 7.8) and 2001 Bhuj earthquake (M 7.7). Moreover, this region has been continuously active since the Bhuj earthquake (Mw 7.7). Since the entire lithosphere is involved in the deformation of continents, knowledge of the structure of the crust and upper mantle of tectonically active areas is very much important for understanding the tectonic framework and evolve possible models of geodynamic evolution. In the present study, we obtained the shear wave velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle by inverting the 1o by 1o regionalized group velocity dispersion curves. The 2-D surface wave dispersion maps have been prepared at various periods (6 to 100 s) and then inverted down to a depth of 220 km using the Genetic Algorithm (GA) technique. Our results reveal distinct sedimentary and upper crustal layers, Moho, lithospheric mantle lid (LID) and an asthenospheric low velocity zone (LVZ). We observed a variation in the crustal thickness, with the Moho depths varying from 35.4 to 40.7 km in the Kachchh rift, 32.1 to 36 km in the Cambay rift, 33.4 to 37 km in the Narmada Rift, and 35.3 to 42.6 km in the Saurashtra and other parts of DVP. Large values of Moho depth (40.7 km) with a Vs value of 4.0 km/s in the Kachchh Seismic Zone (KSZ) indicates presence of high-velocity lower crust with a mafic/ultramafic composition. A thin lithosphere of 82.5 km, 115 km and 93.2 km has been identified in the 3

  7. A study of the influence of noise from offshore wind power plants on the marine bottom fauna; En studie om hur bottenlevande fauna paaverkas av ljud fraan vindkraftverk till havs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikstroem, Andreas; Granmo, Aake

    2009-09-15

    The aim of this study was to examine changes of behaviour and activity patterns in marine soft bottom fauna under the influence of low frequent noise. Controlled experiments were performed at Kristineberg Marine Research Station in Fiskebaeckskil. The experiments were performed utilizing generator and vibrator techniques producing frequencies of 61, 178 and 721 Hz with an average sound pressure around 99 dB re 1 muPa. The selection of frequencies was based upon the sound profile measured at Utgrunden offshore wind farm in Kalmarsund (Ingemansson Technology, 2003) with the aim of recreating natural conditions. In order to quantify the sound exposure, measurements on both sound pressure and water particle acceleration in the test tanks were performed. In total four different marine soft bottom species were studied: a common little white mussel (Abra nitida), brittle star (Amphiura filiformis), brown shrimp (Crangon crangon) and juvenile plaice (Pleuronectes platessa). For the white mussel its burrowing ability was studied. First the speeds of burrowing down into the sediment and thereafter, the burrowing activity in the surface layer of the sediment for the duration of 96 hours were registered. During the experiments with the brittle star Amphiura filiformis the number of arms active in gathering food were observed shortly after the sound had started and for a period of 72 hours. When the brown shrimp was exposed for sound the number of prey items consumed during one day and after 4 days were observed. The study on juvenile plaice was only a shorter pilot study where the fish were exposed for sound during 15 minutes. During this restricted time swimming activity and burrowing activity were observed and after the initial 15 minutes also the respiration frequency during measurement for one minute were documented. The study showed that the burrowing activity increased for the white mussel compared to the controls during exposure of frequencies around 178 Hz after 24

  8. Development of Crashworthy Bottom and Side Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naar, H.; Kujala, P.; Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    2002-01-01

    structures. The first structure is a conventional double bottom. In the second structure (presently protected through a patent) the bottom plating is stiffened with hat-profiles instead of bulb profiles. In the third structure the outer shell is an all-steel sandwich panel. In the fourth structure the bottom...

  9. A Stakeholder Approach to Triple Bottom Line Accounting: Nigerian Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Okenwa Cy Ogbodo

    2015-01-01

    The broad objective of this study is to determine whether triple bottom line reports has been able to deliver stakeholders with the needed satisfaction when compared to conventional financial reports. To achieve the above objective three research questions were raised, to address the issue of triple bottom line report and stakeholder satisfaction. From these hypotheses were formulated. The descriptive method of research design was employed to generate the required data. The population of were...

  10. Spatial Patterns in Distribution of Kimberlites: Relationship to Tectonic Processes and Lithosphere Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemia, Zurab; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of diamonds in kimberlite-type rocks more than a century ago, a number of theories regarding the processes involved in kimberlite emplacement have been put forward to explain the unique properties of kimberlite magmatism. Geological data suggests that pre-existing lithosphere ...... broad limits and are, apparently controlled, by the past structure of the lithosphere and a "vigor" of lithosphere-mantle interaction, which caused kimberlite emplacements....

  11. A Comparison Study of the Oxygen-Rich Side Blow Furnace and the Oxygen-Rich Bottom Blow Furnace for Liquid High Lead Slag Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Hao, Zhandong; Yang, Tianzu; Liu, Weifeng; Zhang, Duchao; Zhang, Li; Bin, Shu; Bin, Wanda

    2015-05-01

    This work investigates the characteristics of the oxygen-rich side blow furnace (OSBF) and the oxygen-rich bottom blow furnace (OBBF) as the reductive smelting reactor for molten high lead slag. The slags were collected from different sampling points of these furnaces during a regular high lead slag reduction process and analyzed. It is disclosed that lead content of the melt in the OSBF shows dramatic fluctuations, while melt from different sampling points of the furnace behave similarly, exhibiting the characteristics of batch reactor. An obvious axial lead content gradient is detected in the OBBF, showing the characteristics of a plug flow reactor. The industrial performances of these furnaces are also compared. The results indicate that 1.38% higher lead recovery can be achieved by using the OSBF instead of the OBBF. Unit energy consumptions of the OBBF-OSBF and OBBF-OBBF processes can be reduced to 230 kgce/ t crude lead, which is 70 kgce/ t crude lead less than that of the tradition Shuikoushan (SKS) process.

  12. Microevents produced by gas migration and expulsion at the seabed: a study based on sea bottom recordings from the Sea of Marmara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tary, J. B.; Géli, L.; Guennou, C.; Henry, P.; Sultan, N.; ćaǧatay, N.; Vidal, V.

    2012-08-01

    Different types of 4-component ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) were deployed for variable durations ranging from 1 week to about 4 months in 2007, over soft sediments covering the seafloor of the Tekirdag Basin (western part of the Sea of Marmara, Turkey). Non-seismic microevents were recorded by the geophones, but generally not by the hydrophones, except when the hydrophone is located less than a few tens of centimetres above the seafloor. The microevents are characterized by short durations of less than 0.8 s, by frequencies ranging between 4 and 30 Hz, and by highly variable amplitudes. In addition, no correlation between OBSs was observed, except for two OBSs, located 10 m apart. Interestingly, a swarm of ˜400 very similar microevents (based on principal component analysis) was recorded in less than one day by an OBS located in the close vicinity of an active, gas-prone fault cutting through the upper sedimentary layers. The presence of gas in superficial sediments, together with analogies with laboratory experiments, suggest that gas migration followed by the collapse of fluid-filled cavities or conduits could be the source of the observed microevents. This work shows that OBSs may provide valuable information to improve our understanding of natural degassing processes from the seafloor.

  13. GOCE gravity gradient data for lithospheric modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, J.; Ebbing, J.; Meekes, S.; Fattah, R.A.; Fuchs, M.; Gradmann, S.; Haagmans, R.; Lieb, V.; Schmidt, M.; Dettmering, D.; Bosch, W.

    2015-01-01

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) is the European Space Agency's (ESA)satellite gravity mission to determine the Earth's mean gravity field. GOCE delivers gravity gradients, anew type of satellite data. We study how these data can improve modeling of the Earth's

  14. GENETIC SOURCES AND TECTONOPHYSICAL REGULARITIES OF DIVISIBILITY OF THE LITHOSPHERE INTO BLOCKS OF VARIOUS RANKS AT DIFFERENT STAGES OF ITS FORMATION: TECTONOPHYSICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semen I. Sherman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the first tectonophysical reconstruction of initial divisibility of the protolithosphere as a result of convection in the cooling primitive mantle. Initial division of the protolithosphere into separate masses, i.e. prototypes of the blocks, and their size are predetermined by the emerging Rayleigh-Benard convection cells. In studies of geology and geodynamics, the Rayleigh-Benard convection cells were first referred to as a factor to explain the formation of initial continental cores. Considering the Rayleigh-Benard cells and their structural relics can help clarify initial divisibility of the protolithosphere and the origin of the major lithospheric plates, i.e. prototypes of continents. In our opinion, the initial mega-scale block structure of the protolithosphere and the emerging lithosphere were predetermined by the Rayleigh-Benard cells as they were preserved in the emerging lithosphere and their lower boundaries corresponded to the core-mantle boundary, i.e. one of the major discontinuities of the planet. Our theoretical estimations are in good agreement with the number and sizes of the Earth's theorized first supercontinents, Vaalbara and Ur. In our tectonophysical discussion of the formation of the lithospheric block structure, we analyze in detail the map of modern lithospheric plates [Bird, 2003] in combination with the materials from [Sherman et al., 2000]. In the hierarchy of the blocks comprising the contemporary lithosphere, which sizes are widely variable, two groups of blocks are clearly distinguished. The first group includes megablocks with the average geometric size above 6500 km. Their formation is related to convection in the Earth mantle at the present stage of the geodynamic evolution of the Earth, as well as at all the previous stages, including the earliest one, when the protolithosphere emerged. The second group includes medium-sized blocks with the average geometric size of less than 4500 km and

  15. GENETIC SOURCES AND TECTONOPHYSICAL REGULARITIES OF DIVISIBILITY OF THE LITHOSPHERE INTO BLOCKS OF VARIOUS RANKS AT DIFFERENT STAGES OF ITS FORMATION: TECTONOPHYSICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semen I. Sherman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the first tectonophysical reconstruction of initial divisibility of the protolithosphere as a result of convection in the cooling primitive mantle. Initial division of the protolithosphere into separate masses, i.e. prototypes of the blocks, and their size are predetermined by the emerging Rayleigh-Benard convection cells. In studies of geology and geodynamics, the Rayleigh-Benard convection cells were first referred to as a factor to explain the formation of initial continental cores. Considering the Rayleigh-Benard cells and their structural relics can help clarify initial divisibility of the protolithosphere and the origin of the major lithospheric plates, i.e. prototypes of continents. In our opinion, the initial mega-scale block structure of the protolithosphere and the emerging lithosphere were predetermined by the Rayleigh-Benard cells as they were preserved in the emerging lithosphere and their lower boundaries corresponded to the core-mantle boundary, i.e. one of the major discontinuities of the planet. Our theoretical estimations are in good agreement with the number and sizes of the Earth's theorized first supercontinents, Vaalbara and Ur. In our tectonophysical discussion of the formation of the lithospheric block structure, we analyze in detail the map of modern lithospheric plates [Bird, 2003] in combination with the materials from [Sherman et al., 2000]. In the hierarchy of the blocks comprising the contemporary lithosphere, which sizes are widely variable, two groups of blocks are clearly distinguished. The first group includes megablocks with the average geometric size above 6500 km. Their formation is related to convection in the Earth mantle at the present stage of the geodynamic evolution of the Earth, as well as at all the previous stages, including the earliest one, when the protolithosphere emerged. The second group includes medium-sized blocks with the average geometric size of less than 4500 km and

  16. Chimeric types of chromosome X in bottom-fermenting yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, T; Izumikawa, M; Tadami, H

    2009-10-01

    To determine the structure of the chimeric chromosome X of bottom-fermenting yeasts. Eight cosmid clones carrying DNA from chromosome X of bottom-fermenting yeasts were selected by end-sequencing. Four of the cosmid clones had Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SC)-type and Saccharomyces bayanus (SB)-type chimeric ends, two had SC-type ends and two had SB-type ends. Sequencing revealed that the bottom-fermenting yeast strains in this study had four types of chromosome X: SC-SC, SC-SB, SB-SC and SB-SB. The translocation site in the chimeric chromosome is conserved among bottom-fermenting yeast strains, and was created by homologous recombination within a region of high sequence identity between the SC-type sequence and the SB-type sequence. Existing bottom-fermenting yeast strains share a common ancestor in which the chimeric chromosome X was generated. The knowledge gained in this study sheds light on the evolution of bottom-fermenting yeasts.

  17. Western Central Asia - Uzbekistan:new insights into the basin architecture and lithosphere structures from geophysical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorova, Irina

    2014-05-01

    This report was prepared as one part of joint Uzbekistan's Working Group results by DARIUS programme, provided in Uzbekistan during the 2009-2013 years. The special attention is devoted to potential geophysical fields and results of interpretation of seismic profiles, which was the base for conclusions about deep lithosphere structure of the DARIUS domains in Uzbekistan.For four last years 12 field expeditions in Uzbekistan were organized by the DARIUS projects - were studied new geological sections and now the new ideas developing about geodynamical evolution in Western Central Asia. The state of art reveals a very heterogeneous set of data. These data commonly deal either with particular basins or mountain belts, or specific basin investigations. Our aim was to combine all available seismic, magnetic and geothermal data with the revealed of the tectonically objects, geological structures, and to show their interrelated temporal and spatial development for general understanding of the inner structure of lithosphere and upper layers of Earth's crust. In link of this, the detailed studying structure of Paleozoic crystal basement on representative basic sites and the crossing faults, accompained by drawing up of level-by-level and summary sections, large-scale geological and geophysical mapping was conducted. Our study elucidated the lithosphere-scale processes driving forces for kinematic of blocks between southern Tien Shan and Pamir. All our data were integrated in the DARIUS database GEOLIS.

  18. What drives farmers to make top-down or bottom-up adaptation to climate change and fluctuations? A comparative study on 3 cases of apple farming in Japan and South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Mariko; Kobayashi, Kazuhiko; Johnston, Peter; New, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Agriculture is one of the most vulnerable sectors to climate change. Farmers have been exposed to multiple stressors including climate change, and they have managed to adapt to those risks. The adaptation actions undertaken by farmers and their decision making are, however, only poorly understood. By studying adaptation practices undertaken by apple farmers in three regions: Nagano and Kazuno in Japan and Elgin in South Africa, we categorize the adaptation actions into two types: farmer initiated bottom-up adaptation and institution led top-down adaptation. We found that the driver which differentiates the type of adaptation likely adopted was strongly related to the farmers' characteristics, particularly their dependence on the institutions, e.g. the farmers' cooperative, in selling their products. The farmers who rely on the farmers' cooperative for their sales are likely to adopt the institution-led adaptation, whereas the farmers who have established their own sales channels tend to start innovative actions by bottom-up. We further argue that even though the two types have contrasting features, the combinations of the both types of adaptations could lead to more successful adaptation particularly in agriculture. This study also emphasizes that more farm-level studies for various crops and regions are warranted to provide substantial feedbacks to adaptation policy.

  19. What drives farmers to make top-down or bottom-up adaptation to climate change and fluctuations? A comparative study on 3 cases of apple farming in Japan and South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Fujisawa

    Full Text Available Agriculture is one of the most vulnerable sectors to climate change. Farmers have been exposed to multiple stressors including climate change, and they have managed to adapt to those risks. The adaptation actions undertaken by farmers and their decision making are, however, only poorly understood. By studying adaptation practices undertaken by apple farmers in three regions: Nagano and Kazuno in Japan and Elgin in South Africa, we categorize the adaptation actions into two types: farmer initiated bottom-up adaptation and institution led top-down adaptation. We found that the driver which differentiates the type of adaptation likely adopted was strongly related to the farmers' characteristics, particularly their dependence on the institutions, e.g. the farmers' cooperative, in selling their products. The farmers who rely on the farmers' cooperative for their sales are likely to adopt the institution-led adaptation, whereas the farmers who have established their own sales channels tend to start innovative actions by bottom-up. We further argue that even though the two types have contrasting features, the combinations of the both types of adaptations could lead to more successful adaptation particularly in agriculture. This study also emphasizes that more farm-level studies for various crops and regions are warranted to provide substantial feedbacks to adaptation policy.

  20. Magsat to CHAMP: Magnetic Satellite Explorations of Lithospheric Anomalies over Kursk, Bangui and the Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Taylor, Patrick T.; vonFrese, R. R.; Kim, J. W.

    2004-01-01

    We compare crustal magnetic anomaly maps over the Kursk (Russia) and Bangui (Central African Republic) isolated anomalies and the Antarctic derived from the Magsat, \\Orsted and CHAMP satellite fields. We wish to demonstrate how progress in satellite magnetic missions has improved the recovery of the crustal magnetic field. The 6-month long Magsat mission of 25 years ago generated two major methods of processing satellite magnetic anomaly data for lithospheric studies. The first was a global perspective using spherical harmonics that emphasize the more regional and global lithospheric fields. However, these fields commonly do not resolve local anomaly features in any detail. Therefore a second procedure involved the use of the individual satellite orbit or track data to recover small-scale anomalies on a regional scale. We present results over prominent magnetic anomalies such as Kursk, Bangui and the large Antarctic continent that demonstrate how the various analysis methods affect the recovery of crustal anomalies. The more recent \\Orsted and CHAMP missions are successfully recording data with an improved accuracy and with full spatial and temporal coverage. We show and interpret the total magnetic intensity anomaly maps over these areas from all three satellite magnetometer data sets.

  1. Implications of a-priori constraints in transdimensional Bayesian inversion for continental lithospheric layering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Corinna; Calo, Marco; Bodin, Thomas; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2017-04-01

    Competing hypotheses for the formation and evolution of continents are highly under debate, including the theory of underplating by hot plumes or accretion by shallow subduction in continental or arc settings. In order to support these hypotheses, documenting structural layering in the cratonic lithosphere becomes especially important. Studies of seismic-wave receiver function data have detected a structural boundary under continental cratons at 100-140 km depths, which is too shallow to be consistent with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, as inferred from seismic tomography and other geophysical studies. This leads to the conclusion that 1) the cratonic lithosphere may be thinner than expected, contradicting tomographic and other geophysical or geochemical inferences, or 2) that the receiver function studies detect a mid-lithospheric discontinuity rather than the LAB. Recent studies (Bodin et al., 2015, Calò et al. 2016) confirmed the presence of a structural boundary under the North American craton at 100-140 km depths by taking advantage of the power of a trans-dimensional Monte Carlo Markov chain (TMCMC). They generated probabilistic 1D radially shear wave velocity profiles for selected stations in North America by jointly inverting 2 different data types (PS Receiver Functions, surface wave dispersion for Love and Rayleigh waves), which sample different volumes of the Earth and have different sensitivities to 
structure. In fact, they found at least one, and in some cases several additional mid-lithospheric discontinuities (MLD) at intermediate depths in the stable part of the craton. Such discontinuities are not present in the active western part of the US. However, in their Bayesian approach, they made two major assumptions: First, they fixed the Vp/Vs ratio to a constant, averaged value for crust and mantle. Second, they added constraints on the crustal discontinuity depths in the prior distribution of the shear wave velocity. Given these strong

  2. Modeling Plume-Triggered, Melt-Enabled Lithospheric Delamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry-Houts, J.; Humphreys, G.

    2015-12-01

    It has been suggested that arrival of the Yellowstone plume below North America triggered a lithospheric foundering event which aided the eruption of the Columbia River flood basalts. This hypothesis potentially accounts for some of the biggest mysteries related to the CRB's including their location as "off-track" plume volcanism; and the anomalous chemical signatures of the most voluminous units. The foundered lithosphere appears to be a remnant chunk of Farallon slab, which had been stranded beneath the Blue Mountains terrain since the accretion of Siletzia. If this is the case then the mechanisms by which this slab stayed metastable between Siletzia accretion and CRB time, and then so suddenly broke loose, is unclear. The addition of heat and mantle buoyancy supplied by the Yellowstone plume provides a clue, but the geodynamic process by which the slab was able to detach remains unclear.Efforts to model numerically the underlying processes behind delamination events have been gaining popularity. Typically, such models have relied on drastically weakened regions within the crust, or highly non-linear rheologies to enable initiation and propagation of lithosphere removal. Rather than impose such a weak region a priori, we investigated the role of mantle and crustal melt, generated by the addition of plume heat, as the source of such a rheologic boundary.We track melt generation and migration though geodynamic models using the Eulerian finite element code, ASPECT. Melt moves relative to the permeable, compacting, and viscously-deforming mantle using the approach of (Keller, et al. 2013) with the notable exception that ASPECT currently cannot model elasticity. Dike and sill emplacement is therefore still a work in progress. This work is still in the preliminary stages and results are yet inconclusive.

  3. Search for the supersymmetric partner of bottom quark at DO at Tevatron. Studies on missing transverse energy; Recherche du partenaire supersymetrique du quark bottom au sein de l'experience DO aupres du TeVatron. Etudes sur l'energie transverse manquante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvet, S

    2007-09-15

    Supersymmetry, the extension of the Standard Model of particle physics, is searched for, by trying to observe the supersymmetric partner of the bottom quark (b-bar). This search is performed by using events with a final state comprising 2 coplanar b-quark jets and missing transverse energy and coming from a sample of 992 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the D0 detector at the Tevatron, the Fermilab pp-bar collider. The absence of an excess of events in comparison to Standard Model expectations leads to exclude sb masses up to 201 GeV and neutralino masses up to 94 GeV. The missing transverse energy has been studied carefully under 2 points of view, because of its fundamental role in this search. First, at the level of the trigger system which allows the online selection candidate events, and then during the process Z {yields} {nu}{nu} + jets that is an important background noise and in which the transverse momentum of Z turns into missing energy because of the no-detection of the neutrinos. (author)

  4. Surface waves in an heterogeneous anisotropic continental lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, V.

    2003-04-01

    At global as well as at regional scale, the lithosphere appears usually faster to Love waves than to Rayleigh waves. This Love-Rayleigh discrepancy can be modelled by introducing transverse isotropy in the mantle. In continental structures, the amount of transverse isotropy necessary to explain the discrepancy is however often quite large and not compatible with results of SKS-splitting analysis and azimuthal variation of surface wave velocities, at least in the simple framework of large scale uniform olivine orientation in the continental lithosphere. Models where the orientation of the olivine is incoherent at the scale of a few hundred km have been proposed to reconcile the different datasets, but the surface wave characteristics in such anisotropic heterogeneous models have not yet been analysed in detail. Using a mode-coupling scheme for calculating surface wave propagation in heterogeneous anisotropic structures, we analyse the characteristics of Rayleigh and Love waves in such laterally varying anisotropic models. We generate 3-D stochastic models of olivine orientation with different characteristics: preferred orientation dominantly horizontal, vertical or equally distributed in all directions, and use different correlation lengths in the horizontal and vertical directions to constrain the scale at which the anisotropy is coherent. We analyse the apparent Love-Rayleigh discrepancy and the phase velocity azimuthal variation these models generate and the mode-coupling and polarisation anomalies they produce.

  5. A finite amplitude necking model of rifting in brittle lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Parmentier, E. M.

    1990-04-01

    We formulate a mechanical model describing the formation of rifts as finite amplitude necking of an elastic-plastic layer overlying a fluid substrate. A perfectly plastic rheology is a continuum description of faulting in rift zones. Two important aspects of rift evolution are illustrated by this model: the evolution of the rift width as extension proceeds and the finite strain that occurs. A region at yield initially develops with a width determined by the thickness of the brittle layer, and the internal deformation within this yield zone is proportional to the topographic slope. As extension proceeds, the surface within the rift subsides, and the width of the subsiding yield zone decreases. At any stage of rifting, material in regions just outside the yield zone is deformed but no longer deforming. The width of these deformed regions increases with increasing extension. Vertical forces due to the mass deficit of the rift depression will flex the elastic layer outside the yield zone, creating flanking uplifts. The external force required to maintain active rifting increases with the amount of lithospheric stretching, indicating that rifting is a quasi-static, stable process. Because the yield zone will revert to elastic behavior if the external force causing extension is removed, the model predicts that the rift depression and flanking uplifts will be preserved after extension stops. Our simple mechanical model demonstrates the inherent relationship among graben formation, lithospheric thinning, and rift shoulder uplift in rift zones.

  6. Uplift of the Colorado Plateau due to lithosphere attenuation during Laramide low-angle subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The Colorado Plateau is blanketed by Phanerozoic marine and nonmarine strata as young as Cretaceous that are now exposed at elevations of about 2 km. Crustal thickening due to magmatism and horizontal crustal shortening was far less than necessary to cause this uplift, which is commonly attributed to the consequences of mantle lithosphere thinning and heating. The Colorado Plateau and the midcontinent region around Iowa consist of Precambrian bedrock overlain by a similar amount of Paleozoic platformal strata, and thus both regions once had similar lithospheric buoyancy. Mesozoic sedimentation increased the crustal thickness and lithospheric buoyancy of the Colorado Plateau relative to the midcontinent region. Backstripping calculations yield elevation without these sediments and lead to a calculated elevation difference between the two areas of about 1200 m, which represents unexplained plateau uplift. Review of constraints on uplift timing finds little support for a late Cenozoic uplift age and allows early to middle Cenozoic uplift, which is consistent with uplift mechanisms related to low-angle subduction that ended in the middle Cenozoic. Finite element heat flow calculations of low-angle subduction and lithosphere attenuation, using a range of initial lithosphere thicknesses and degree of attenuation, indicate that required uplift can result from tectonic removal of about 120 km of mantle lithosphere from an initially 200-km-thick lithosphere. This allows for partial preservation of North American mantle lithosphere with its distinctive isotopic signature in some late Cenozoic volcanic rocks and is consistent with normal Pn velocities in the uppermost mantle beneath the plateau.

  7. Lithosphere-mantle coupling and the dynamics of the Eurasian Plate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warners-Ruckstuhl, K.N.; Govers, R.; Wortel, R.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical equilibrium of tectonic plates implies that lithospheric edge and body forces are balanced by forces arising from interaction with the underlying mantle. We use this quantitative physical relation to integrate existing modelling approaches of lithosphere dynamics and mantle flow into a

  8. Strain localization at the margins of strong lithospheric domains: insights from analogue models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calignano, Elisa; Sokoutis, Dimitrios; Willingshofer, Ernst; Gueydan, Frederic; Cloetingh, Sierd

    The lateral variation of the mechanical properties of continental lithosphere is an important factor controlling the localization of deformation and thus the deformation history and geometry of intra-plate mountain belts. A series of three-layer lithospheric-scale analog models, with a strong domain

  9. Earth's lithospheric magnetic field determined to spherical harmonic degree 90 from CHAMP satellite measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maus, S.; Rother, M.; Hemant, K.

    2006-01-01

    The CHAMP magnetic field mission is providing highly reliable measurements from which the global lithospheric magnetic field can be determined in unprecedented resolution and accuracy. Using almost 5 yr of data, we derive our fourth generation lithospheric field model termed MF4, which is expanded...

  10. Convective Removal of Continental Margin Lithosphere at the Edges of Subducting Oceanic Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, A.; Bezada, M. J.; Palomeras, I.; Masy, J.; Humphreys, E.; Niu, F.

    2013-12-01

    Although oceanic lithosphere is continuously recycled to the deeper mantle by subduction, the rates and manner in which different types of continental lithospheric mantle are recycled is unclear. Cratonic mantle can be chemically reworked and essentially decratonized, although the frequency of decratonization is unclear. Lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts can be lost to the deeper mantle by convective downwellings and delamination phenomena. Here we describe how subduction related processes at the edges of oceanic plates adjacent to passive continental margins removes the mantle lithosphere from beneath the margin and from the continental interior. This appears to be a widespread means of recycling non-cratonic continental mantle. Lithospheric removal requires the edge of a subducting oceanic plate to be at a relatively high angle to an adjacent passive continental margin. From Rayleigh wave and body wave tomography, and receiver function images from the BOLIVAR and PICASSO experiments, we infer large-scale removal of continental margin lithospheric mantle from beneath 1) the northern South American plate margin due to Atlantic subduction, and 2) the Iberian and North African margins due to Alboran plate subduction. In both cases lithospheric mantle appears to have been removed several hundred kilometers inland from the subduction zones. This type of ';plate-edge' tectonics either accompanies or pre-conditions continental margins for orogenic activity by thinning and weakening the lithosphere. These processes show the importance of relatively small convective structures, i.e. small subducting plates, in formation of orogenic belts.

  11. Global map of lithosphere thermal thickness on a 1 deg x 1 deg grid - digitally available

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina

    2014-01-01

    than 250 km) lithosphere is restrictedsolely to young Archean terranes (3.0–2.6 Ga), while in old Archean cratons (3.6–3.0 Ga) lithospheric roots donot extend deeper than 200–220 km.The TC1 model is presented by a set of maps, which show significant thermal heterogeneity within continentalupper mantle...

  12. Variation of olivine composition in the volcanic rocks in the Songliao basin, NE China: lithosphere control on the origin of the K-rich intraplate mafic lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.-Y.; Prelević, D.; Li, N.; Mertz-Kraus, R.; Buhre, S.

    2016-10-01

    Lithospheric thickness and the heterogeneity of the mantle lithosphere are two major parameters that play a role in determining the final composition of the mafic melts and their minerals. The Songliao basin in northeast China represents an ideal natural laboratory to study the effect of these two parameters on early Pliocene to Holocene K-rich mafic lavas (K2O > 4 wt.%; K2O/Na2O > 1). A series of Cenozoic volcanic edifices (Erkeshan, Wudalianchi, Keluo and Xiaogulihe) are tentatively divided into three groups (Group 1 - thin, Group 2 - middle, and Group 3 - thick) according to the lithosphere thickness. They are located in the northern region of the Songliao basin extending in a near north-south direction along a broad zone where the lithosphere thickness increases gradually. We present a detailed petrographical and geochemical study on olivine macrocrysts in combination with new geochemical data on their host lavas, including major and trace element abundances as well as Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic signatures. Our ultimate aim is to quantitatively and qualitatively determine the role of lithospheric mantle thickness (named as ;lid effect;) and composition in the variation of mafic lavas and olivine composition. When corrected to Mg# = 0.72, a number of major elements in the lavas correlate with increasing lithospheric thickness (L): Si72 and Al72 decrease, whereas Mg72, Fe72, Ti72 and P72 increase. Sm/Yb ratios in the lavas increase, implying that lithospheric thickness exerts an important control. Group 3 mafic lavas are ultrapotassic (showing lamproite affinity) with K2O/Na2O > 4: their La/Sm and Pb isotope ratios deviate from the above correlations, indicating that the lavas from the thickest part of the basin exhibit the highest extent of metasomatic enrichment of the mantle source. Several parameters (e.g. [Ni], Ni/Mg, Ni/(Mg/Fe), Mn/Fe and Ca/Fe) in melt-related olivine from Group 1 and Group 2 lavas are controlled by variable lithosphere thickness. Olivine

  13. Landfilling: Bottom Lining and Leachate Collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Manfredi, Simone; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    from entering the groundwater or surface water. The bottom lining system should cover the full footprint area of the landfill, including both the relatively flat bottom and the sideslopes in the case of an excavated configuration. This prevents the lateral migration of leachate from within the landfill......The critical element of a landfill, which is essential for the protection of the environment in general, and prevention of contamination of the underlying soils and groundwater in particular, is the bottom lining system. The major focus of the bottom lining system development is to prevent leachate......, as well as the migration of landfill gas, preventing contact between gas and groundwater. The bottom lining system is composed of a relatively impermeable liner or lining system. This very low hydraulic conductivity system controls the movement of the leachate out of the landfill. The bottom lining system...

  14. Coal liquefaction with subsequent bottoms pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walchuk, George P.

    1978-01-01

    In a coal liquefaction process wherein heavy bottoms produced in a liquefaction zone are upgraded by coking or a similar pyrolysis step, pyrolysis liquids boiling in excess of about 1000.degree. F. are further reacted with molecular hydrogen in a reaction zone external of the liquefaction zone, the resulting effluent is fractionated to produce one or more distillate fractions and a bottoms fraction, a portion of this bottoms fraction is recycled to the reaction zone, and the remaining portion of the bottoms fraction is recycled to the pyrolysis step.

  15. Amagmatic Lithospheric Rifting as Expressed in the Red Sea (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    The Red Sea is an active analog for the rifting that produced most of the non-magmatic passive continental margins of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Specifically, it cuts through old (Pre-Cambrian) lithosphere well away from other plate boundaries and rifting is within 30° of orthogonal to the trend of the rift. Observations in the Red Sea therefore provide insights that can be applied to older, relict non-magmatic margins Although rifting in the Red Sea has been basically amagmatic, magmatism at two crucial times was important in defining the location of the rift and of initiating active extension and rifting. The onset of rifting was preceded by massive volcanism in Ethiopia and southern Yemen. The major volume of lava was erupted over a short period from 31-29.5 Ma. This event appears to have defined the location of the triple junction between the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden and Ethiopian rifts. Although rifting along the Gulf of Aden may have initiated at the time of the Afar volcanism, this magmatic episode was not accompanied by significant extension in the region that was to become the Red Sea and there is no sign of continuing extension in the Red Sea beginning at that time. The onset of rifting and extension in the Red Sea immediately follows a massive episode of dike intrusion that occurred over a short period of time at 24-21 Ma. Diking extended for 1700 km along the entire length of the Red Sea with no discernable temporal pattern. The diking event coincides with deposition of the first clearly syn-rift sediments at locations from the Gulf of Suez to Eritrea as well as the beginning of uplift and denudation. The diking event may have enabled rifting and extension in the Red Sea. There is no evidence of additional volcanism within the Red Sea rift from 21 Ma to the initiation of seafloor spreading. Seismic reflection and potential field data from the northern Red Sea show that large, rotated fault blocks of continental crust underlie the basin. Rifting is

  16. Controls of mantle plumes and lithospheric folding on modes of intra-plate continental tectonics: differences and similarities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burov, E.; Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.

    2009-01-01

    Mantle plume activity and lithospheric folding by far-field stresses exerted from plate boundaries are two important end-members as mechanisms for continental intraplate deformation. The topographic expression of mantle plume impingement on continental lithosphere and lithospheric folding has some

  17. Formation of cratonic lithosphere: An integrated thermal and petrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Claude; Rudnick, Roberta

    2012-09-01

    The formation of cratonic mantle peridotite of Archean age is examined within the time frame of Earth's thermal history, and how it was expressed by temporal variations in magma and residue petrology. Peridotite residues that occupy the lithospheric mantle are rare owing to the effects of melt-rock reaction, metasomatism, and refertilization. Where they are identified, they are very similar to the predicted harzburgite residues of primary magmas of the dominant basalts in greenstone belts, which formed in a non-arc setting (referred to here as "non-arc basalts"). The compositions of these basalts indicate high temperatures of formation that are well-described by the thermal history model of Korenaga. In this model, peridotite residues of extensive ambient mantle melting had the highest Mg-numbers, lowest FeO contents, and lowest densities at ~ 2.5-3.5 Ga. These results are in good agreement with Re-Os ages of kimberlite-hosted cratonic mantle xenoliths and enclosed sulfides, and provide support for the hypothesis of Jordan that low densities of cratonic mantle are a measure of their high preservation potential. Cratonization of the Earth reached its zenith at ~ 2.5-3.5 Ga when ambient mantle was hot and extensive melting produced oceanic crust 30-45 km thick. However, there is a mass imbalance exhibited by the craton-wide distribution of harzburgite residues and the paucity of their complementary magmas that had compositions like the non-arc basalts. We suggest that the problem of the missing basaltic oceanic crust can be resolved by its hydration, cooling and partial transformation to eclogite, which caused foundering of the entire lithosphere. Some of the oceanic crust partially melted during foundering to produce continental crust composed of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG). The remaining lithosphere gravitationally separated into 1) residual eclogite that continued its descent, and 2) buoyant harzburgite diapirs that rose to underplate cratonic nuclei

  18. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary observed with USArray receiver functions and comparison with other regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, R.; Kumar, P.; Yuan, X.; Mechie, J.; Sodoudi, F.; Heit, B.

    2012-04-01

    The dense deployment of seismic stations so far in the western half of the United States within the USArray project provides the opportunity to study in greater detail the structure of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system. We use the S receiver function technique for this purpose which has higher resolution than surface wave tomography, is sensitive to seismic discontinuities and has no problems with multiples like P receiver functions. Only two major discontinuities are observed in the entire area down to about 300km depth. These are the crust-mantle boundary (Moho) and a negative boundary which we correlate with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) since a low velocity zone is the classical definition of the seismic observation of the asthenosphere by Gutenberg (1926). Our S receiver function LAB is at a depth of 70-80km in large parts of westernmost North America. East of the Rocky Mountains its depth is generally between 90 and 110km. Regions with LAB depths down to about 140km occur in a stretch from northern Texas over the Colorado Plateau to the Columbia Basalts. These observations agree well with tomography results in the westernmost USA and at the east coast. However, in the central cratonic part of the USA the tomography LAB is near 200km depth. At this depth no discontinuity is seen in the S receiver functions. The negative signal near 100km depth in the central part of the USA is interpreted by Yuan and Romanowicz (2010) or Lekic and Romanowicz (2011) as a recently discovered mid lithospheric discontinuity (MLD). A solution for the discrepancy between receiver function imaging and surface wave tomography is not yet obvious and requires more high resolution studies at other cratons before a general solution may be found. Our results agree well with petrophysical models of increased water content in the asthenosphere, which predict a sharp and shallow LAB also in continents (Mierdel et al. 2007). We are comparing our results from North America

  19. The Oceanic Lithosphere as Reactive Filter: Implications for MORB and Abyssal Peridotite Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luffi, P. I.; Lee, C.; Antoshechkina, P. M.

    2010-12-01

    Melt-rock reaction in the lithosphere is, as suggested by textural observations and compositional data, a ubiquitous phenomenon capable of generating locally diverse peridotite series, such as those observed at oceanic spreading centers and transform faults, and may represent an important mechanism of creating compositional diversity in MORBs [1]. Whereas our understanding of the principles governing reactive melt transport is supported by basic theories and models, studies that attempt to quantify the physical conditions and mechanisms creating heterogeneities in the oceanic lithosphere are still limited in number [e.g. 2]. Using Adiabat_1ph 3.0 [3] in combination with the pMELTS algorithm [4], we have previously shown that reactive percolation of basaltic melts through depleted harzburgites can generate the dunite-(wehrlite)-harzburgite-lherzolite spectrum observed in the abyssal mantle and ophiolites, and that the amplitude of transformations is a function of thermal boundary layer thickness and amount of available melt [5]. To gain further insight into how melt-rock reactions shape the oceanic lithosphere, here we extend our study to show that the major and trace element variability in the oceanic mantle and rising melts are also significantly influenced by the mechanism of melt transport. If associated with cooling, distributed porous melt percolation (simulated by incremental addition of the same amount of melt) more efficiently converts harzburgites into fertile lherzolites and creates more pronounced compositional gradients in the abyssal mantle than imparted during channelized melt influx (simulated as batch addition of large amounts of melt) under otherwise identical circumstances. To remain within the tholeiitic trend observed in MORB, reacted melts must be released before clinopyroxene precipitation peaks. Further reaction with harzburgite causes liquids to evolve toward boninite-like compositions. As reaction progresses with decreasing temperature, the

  20. Structure of the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary Onshore and Offshore the California Continental Margin from Three-Dimensional Seismic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, C. D.; Escobar, L., Sr.; Rathnayaka, S.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Kohler, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    The California continental margin, a major transform plate boundary in continental North America, is the locus of complex tectonic stress fields that are important in interpreting both remnant and ongoing deformational strain. Ancient subduction of the East Pacific Rise spreading center, the rotation and translation of tectonic blocks and inception of the San Andreas fault all contribute to the dynamic stress fields located both onshore and offshore southern California. Data obtained by the ALBACORE (Asthenospheric and Lithospheric Broadband Architecture from the California Offshore Region Experiment) and the CISN (California Integrated Seismic Network) seismic array are analyzed for azimuthal anisotropy of Rayleigh waves from 80 teleseismic events at periods 16 - 78 s. Here we invert Rayleigh wave data for shear wave velocity structure and three-dimensional seismic anisotropy in the thee regions designated within the continental margin including the continent, seafloor and California Borderlands. Preliminary results show that seismic anisotropy is resolved in multiple layers and can be used to determine the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) in offshore and continental regions. The oldest seafloor in our study at age 25-35 Ma indicates that the anisotropic transition across the LAB occurs at 73 km +/- 25 km with the lithospheric fast direction oriented WNW-ESE, consistent with current Pacific plate motion direction. The continent region west of the San Andreas indicates similar WNW-ESE anisotropy and LAB depth. Regions east of the San Andreas fault indicate NW-SE anisotropy transitioning to a N-S alignment at 80 km depth north of the Garlock fault. The youngest seafloor (15 - 25 Ma) and outer Borderlands indicate a more complex three layer fabric where shallow lithospheric NE-SW fast directions are perpendicular with ancient Farallon subduction arc, a mid-layer with E-W fast directions are perpendicular to remnant fossil fabric, and the deepest layer

  1. Detailed study of selenium and selected constituents in water, bottom sediment, soil, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the San Juan River area, New Mexico, 1991-95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Carole L.; Wilson, R.M.; Lusk, J.D.; Bristol, R.S.; Shineman, A.R.

    1998-01-01

    In response to increasing concern about the quality of irrigation drainage and its potential effects on fish, wildlife, and human health, the U.S. Department of the Interior began the National Irrigation Water Quality Program (NIWQP) to investigate these concerns at irrigation projects sponsored by the Department. The San Juan River in northwestern New Mexico was one of the areas designated for study. Study teams composed of scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Reclamation, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs collected water, bottom-sediment, soil, and biological samples at 61 sites in the San Juan River area during 1993-94. Supplemental data collection conducted during 1991-95 by the Bureau of Indian Affairs and its contractor extended the time period and sampling sites available for analysis. Analytical chemistry performed on samples indicated that most potentially toxic elements other than selenium generally were not high enough to be of concern to fish, wildlife, and human health. Element concentrations in some water, bottom-sediment, soil, and biological samples exceeded applicable standards and criteria suggested by researchers in current literature. Selenium concentrations in water samples from 28 sites in the study area exceeded the 2-microgram-per-liter wildlife-habitat standard. Vanadium concentrations in water exceeded the 100-microgram-per-liter standard for livestock-drinking water at one site. In biota, selenium and aluminum concentrations regularly equaled or exceeded avian dietary threshold concentrations. In bottom sediment and soil, element concentrations above the upper limit of the baseline range for western soils were: selenium, 24 exceedances; lead, 2 exceedances; molybdenum, 2 exceedances; strontium, 4 exceedances; and zinc, 4 exceedances. Concentrations of total selenium in bottom-sediment and soil samples were significantly greater for Cretaceous than for non-Cretaceous soil types in the

  2. Response of ocean bottom dwellers exposed to underwater shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S. H. R.; Kaiho, Kunio; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports results of experiments to estimate the mortality of ocean bottom dwellers, ostracoda, against underwater shock wave exposures. This study is motivated to verify the possible survival of ocean bottom dwellers, foraminifera, from the devastating underwater shock waves induced mass extinction of marine creatures which took place at giant asteroid impact events. Ocean bottom dwellers under study were ostracoda, the replacement of foraminifera, we readily sampled from ocean bottoms. An analogue experiment was performed on a laboratory scale to estimate the domain and boundary of over-pressures at which marine creatures' mortality occurs. Ostracods were exposed to underwater shock waves generated by the explosion of 100mg PETN pellets in a chamber at shock over-pressures ranging up to 44MPa. Pressure histories were measured simultaneously on 113 samples. We found that bottom dwellers were distinctively killed against overpressures of 12MPa and this value is much higher than the usual shock over-pressure threshold value for marine-creatures having lungs and balloons.

  3. FAULTING IN THE LITHOSPHERE: THE 35TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE IRKUTSK SCHOOL OF TECTONOPHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Sherman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The history of tectonophysical studies in Irkutsk began in the 1950s at the initiative of Prof. V.N. Danilovich. Tectonophysics as a new scientific field in geology was enthusiastically supported by research institutes of the actively develo­ping Siberian Branch of the USSR Academy of Sciences, including the Institute of the Earth's Crust (IEC. In late 1950s, V.N. Danilovich, G.V. Charushin, O.V. Pavlov, P.M. Khrenov, S.I. Sherman and other scientists began to conduct large-scale studies of faults and rock fracturing with application of methods of structural analysis of fault tectonics and taking into account types of physical and mechanical destruction of the crust. In 1979, the IEC Scientific Council reviewed the initiative of Prof. S.I. Sherman, who was supported by Academician N.A. Logachev and Doctor of Geology and Mineralogy O.V. Pavlov, and approved the decision to establish the Laboratory of Tectonophysics, that has been and is the only scientific research team of the kind in the territory of Russia eastward of the Urals and, in fact, the second in the Russian Federation. Its studies are based on concepts dealing with physical regularities of crustal faulting that are described in the monograph published by S.I. Sherman [Sherman, 1977], three co-authored volumes of Faulting in the Lithosphere [Sherman et al., 1991, 1992, 1994] and other scientific papers. These publications have consolidated results of studies conducted by the team of researchers from the Laboratory, which can be called the Irkutsk school of tectonophysics. On the eve of the 21st century, the Laboratory successfully extended application of physics of destruction of materials and mathematical methods of analysis to studies of structural patterns of faults varying in ranks in the crust and the upper lithosphere.We conducted comprehensive studies of tectonophysical regularities of formation of large crustal faults, pioneered in establishing quantitative relationships

  4. FAULTING IN THE LITHOSPHERE: THE 35TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE IRKUTSK SCHOOL OF TECTONOPHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Sherman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The history of tectonophysical studies in Irkutsk began in the 1950s at the initiative of Prof. V.N. Danilovich. Tectonophysics as a new scientific field in geology was enthusiastically supported by research institutes of the actively develo­ping Siberian Branch of the USSR Academy of Sciences, including the Institute of the Earth's Crust (IEC. In late 1950s, V.N. Danilovich, G.V. Charushin, O.V. Pavlov, P.M. Khrenov, S.I. Sherman and other scientists began to conduct large-scale studies of faults and rock fracturing with application of methods of structural analysis of fault tectonics and taking into account types of physical and mechanical destruction of the crust. In 1979, the IEC Scientific Council reviewed the initiative of Prof. S.I. Sherman, who was supported by Academician N.A. Logachev and Doctor of Geology and Mineralogy O.V. Pavlov, and approved the decision to establish the Laboratory of Tectonophysics, that has been and is the only scientific research team of the kind in the territory of Russia eastward of the Urals and, in fact, the second in the Russian Federation. Its studies are based on concepts dealing with physical regularities of crustal faulting that are described in the monograph published by S.I. Sherman [Sherman, 1977], three co-authored volumes of Faulting in the Lithosphere [Sherman et al., 1991, 1992, 1994] and other scientific papers. These publications have consolidated results of studies conducted by the team of researchers from the Laboratory, which can be called the Irkutsk school of tectonophysics. On the eve of the 21st century, the Laboratory successfully extended application of physics of destruction of materials and mathematical methods of analysis to studies of structural patterns of faults varying in ranks in the crust and the upper lithosphere.We conducted comprehensive studies of tectonophysical regularities of formation of large crustal faults, pioneered in establishing quantitative relationships

  5. On the nature and origin of highly-refractory Archean lithosphere: Petrological and geophysical constraints from the Tanzanian craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S. A.; McMahon, S. C.; Day, J. A.; Dawson, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    surface by ascending melts, which tend to sample their source regions. Pressure and temperature estimates derived from the chemistry of fully-equilibrated mineral phases in Lashaine peridotites -- and an upper and lower crustal thickness of 10 and 30 km, respectively (Julia et al., 2005) -- indicate a geothermal gradient of ~41 mWm2 and a mechanical boundary layer thickness of ~160 km. These findings are consistent with estimates of surface heat flux and lithospheric thickness based on geophysical studies of the eastern margin of the Tanzanian craton [Nyblade, 1990; Ritsema & van Heijst, 2000; Weeraratne et al., 2003]. Subcalcic low-Cr garnets are also found as megacrysts sampled by kimberlite pipes close to the core of the Tanzanian craton [Tainton et al., 1999]. The presence of refractory mantle beneath both the core and eastern margin of the Tanzanian Craton may account for the steep gradient in lithospheric thickness relative to other regions of thick stable Archean lithosphere, where geophysical studies indicate that thinning beneath cratonic margins is more gradual. Furthermore, preservation of widespread highly-refractory, low-density and high-viscosity lithospheric mantle at shallow depths (above the graphite-diamond transition) beneath the Tanzanian Craton may have ensured its long-term stability and resistance to delamination.

  6. Wet physical separation of MSWI bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muchova, L.

    2010-01-01

    Bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) has high potential for the recovery of valuable secondary materials. For example, the MSWI bottom ash produced by the incinerator at Amsterdam contains materials such as non-ferrous metals (2.3%), ferrous metals (8-13%), gold (0.4 ppm),

  7. Wet physical separation of MSWI bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Breugel, K.; Muchova, L.

    Bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) has high potential for the recovery of valuable secondary materials. For example, the MSWI bottom ash produced by the incinerator at Amsterdam contains materials such as non-ferrous metals (2.3%), ferrous metals (8-13%), gold (0.4 ppm),

  8. Perspectives on Geoacoustic Inversion of Ocean Bottom Reflectivity Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ross Chapman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on acoustic reflectivity of the ocean bottom, and describes inversion of reflection data from an experiment designed to study the physical properties and structure of the ocean bottom. The formalism of Bayesian inference is reviewed briefly to establish an understanding of the approach for inversion that is in widespread use. A Bayesian inversion of ocean bottom reflection coefficient versus angle data to estimate geoacoustic model parameters of young oceanic crust is presented. The data were obtained in an experiment to study the variation of sound speed in crustal basalt with age of the crust at deep water sites in the Pacific Ocean where the sediment deposits overlying the basalt are very thin. The inversion results show that sound speed of both compressional and shear waves is increasing with crustal age over the track of the experiment where age increased from 40 to 70 million years.

  9. Bottom-linked innovation: Collaboration between middle managers and employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Catharina Juul

    2018-01-01

    Employee-driven innovation is gaining ground as a strategy for developing sustainable organisations in the public and private sector. This type of innovation is characterised by active employee participation, and the bottom-up perspective is often emphasised. This article explores an issue that has...... hitherto been paid little explicit attention, namely collaboration between middle managers and employees in innovation processes. In contrast to most studies, middle managers and employees are here both subjects of explicit investigation. The collaboration processes explored in this article are termed...... ‘bottom-linked innovation’. The empirical analysis is based on an in-depth qualitative study of bottom-linked innovation in a public frontline institution in Denmark. By combining research on employee-driven innovation and middle management, the article offers new insights into such collaborative...

  10. Sulphidation of the oceanic lithosphere: an experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, Catharina; Hansen, Christian; Bach, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Newly formed oceanic lithosphere close to spreading centers can be influenced by fluids that feed hydrothermal vents. These fluids often carry high amounts of dissolved gases such as H2S, which can trigger precipitation of sulphide minerals in the interacting rock during percolation. This process occurs equally in exposed mantle rock, serpentinised mantle rock, troctolite or gabbro and basalt, the lithology depending on the spreading rate at the ridge where hydrothermal activity is present. These later-stage fluid-rock interactions can develop different types of sulphide mineralization in the lithosphere. In order to better understand these sulphidation reactions, we have conducted several batch experiments that placed different oceanic lithologies in contact with an H2S saturated, iron-free solution. The mixture was heated to 250°C at 400 bars and kept under these conditions for 2-8 weeks. In situ fluid and gas sampling was used to monitor reaction progress. REM-analysis of the solid products has shown the growth of euhedral pyrite and magnetite crystals as well as dissolution textures in feldspar and olivine. The presence of pyrite (gabbro experiment) and magnetite (troctolite and serpentinite) is in agreement with the measured H2- and H2S-content in the analysed fluids. These Fe-bearing minerals grew although no iron was added to the fluid, showing the replacive nature of the reaction. Geochemical modeling can be used to extend the application of these observations to different PT-conditions. Using this technique, we can start tackling the problem of replacive sulphide formation within hydrothermal discharge zones in oceanic basement of variable composition.

  11. Lithospheric Evolution of Magmas from the Northern Galapagos Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M.; Geist, D.; Harpp, K. S.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanoes of the Northern Galapagos Providence (NGP) are crucial to understanding the interaction between the Galapagos Plume and the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC). The NGP consists of five islands and nine volcanic lineaments, all located south of the GSC. Major and trace element compositions of seamounts within the NGP provide insight into the lithospheric evolution of magma within the province. The FLAMINGO cruise (June, 2010) dredged forty-seven localities in the NGP. Major element compositions were determined by XRF and microprobe analysis of submarine rocks and glasses. Crystallization as a function of pressure and temperature is modeled with MELTS and projections into ternary phase diagrams. The Wolf-Darwin Lineament (WDL) is divided into three groups for evaluation of the lavas’ petrology: Northern Wolf-Darwin lineament (that closest to the GSC including Darwin Island), Middle Wolf-Darwin lineament (MWDL, which includes Wolf Island), and Southern Wolf-Darwin lineament (that closest to the Galapagos Platform). Lavas from two other lineaments to the east of the WDL and around Pinta Island are assessed as well. Two parental compositions are modeled, one enriched and one depleted (K2O/TiO2 >0.23 as enriched and K2O/TiO2 =0.04 as depleted). CaO/Al2O3 and Al2O3 variations with Mg# vary considerably as a function of pressure. Magmas from most of the subregions of the NGP evolved by crystallization of olivine and plagioclase, with little CPX crystallization. This indicates that crystallization beneath these volcanoes is limited to pressures 16.5% could be from very low extents of partial melting. The dominantly shallow crystallization depths within the NGP contrast with the deep crustal crystallization that characterizes magmas from the Galapagos Platform. We attribute the rarity of deep crustal fractionation as due to the relatively thin lithosphere south of the GSC as well as the extensional tectonic regime.

  12. The crust and lithospheric mantle beneath SE Tibet and Sichuan Province (SW China) (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hilst, R. D.; Yao, H.; Huang, H.; Liu, Q.

    2009-12-01

    Studying the crust and upper mantle beneath SE Tibet and Sichuan Province, SW China, is important for (at least) two reasons. First, this region has been central in discussions about the mechanisms of the formation and (eastward) expansion of the Tibetan plateau and, in particular, about the role of lower crustal flow. Second, as the southern part of the Trans China Seismic Belt the region is often struck by powerful earthquakes - such as the devastating 12 May 2008 Wenchuan earthquake and its countless aftershocks along the Longmenshan fault system that separates the (mechanically rigid) Sichuan basin from the actively deforming and slowly eastward moving (eastern) Tibetan plateau (Burchfiel et al., GSA Today, 2008). In 2003-04, MIT and Lehigh University deployed (in separate experiments) a total of 75 broadband seismograph stations in western Sichuan and SE Tibet, and in 2006 the Institute of Geology of the Chinese Earthquake Administration (CEA), installed 300 temporary stations in west Sichuan. Data from these arrays have been used for a wide range of studies of the crust and upper mantle, including shear wave splitting (Lev et al., EPSL, 2006; Sol et al, Geology, 2007), receiver function analysis (Xu et al., PEPI, 2007), surface wave array tomography (Yao et al., 2006, 2008), and travel time tomography (Li et al., 2006, 2008). These analyses reveal substantial 3D heterogeneity as well as complex spatial variations of (azimuthal and radial) anisotropy in the crust and lithospheric mantle. Both the surface wave inversions and the receiver function analyses suggest the existence of low shear velocity (and, presumably, mechanically weak) zones in the middle and lower crust, and the inferred 3D variations in anisotropy are inconsistent with vertically coherent deformation. We will review and summarize the findings of these studies and present the latest results of our ongoing investigation of the lithosphere in this region.

  13. Mapping the Traces of the Assembly and Multistage Breakup of Gondwanaland in the Lithosphere of Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindraharisaona, E. J.; Tilmann, F. J.; Yuan, X.; Rumpker, G.; Heit, B.; Rambolamanana, G.; Priestley, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Madagascar is an ideal place to study the multistage assembly and break up of Gondwanaland, the supercontinent whose breakup also gave rise to most of present day continental regions. At the end of the Proterozoic the assembly of Gondwanaland has placed the Malagasy basement between the Antarctic, Dharwar, Arabo-Nubian and Nubian-Tanzanian cratons. The continental collision processes accompanying the assembly left their mark on the Malagasy basement, currently exposed in the Eastern two thirds of the island, in the form of metamorphic and mineral belts as well as massive ductile shear zones. During the Jurassic Madagascar, India and Seychelles were breaking up from African. Long after the breakaway of India and the Seychelles from Madagascar (Cretaceous time), volcanic activation has occurred in several locations of Madagascar mostly in the central and northern part (Neogene period). The surface traces of assembly and breakup processes have been studied extensively using geological methods in Madagascar but the imprint on the deep structure has so far not been studied in much detail. Between 2012 and 2014, 25 broadband stations were operated in the Southern Madagascar extending from East coast (Mananjary) to West coast (Toliary). The array crosses the Bongolava-Ranontsara shear zone, which is one of the major shear zones in Madagascar. In addition, between 2013 and 2014, 25 short period stations were deployed in the southeastern part of Madagascar. We will present preliminarily results of the lithosphere structure in the southern part of Madagascar based on surface wave dispersion analysis from both earthquakes and ambient noise combine with receiver function analysis. We will focus mostly on the contrast between the lithosphere structure in the eastern (Precambrian rocks) and the western (Sedimentary basins) parts of Madagascar.

  14. Getting to the bottom of L2 listening instruction: Making a case for bottom-up activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Siegel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues for the incorporation of bottom-up activities for English as a foreign language (EFL listening. It discusses theoretical concepts and pedagogic options for addressing bottom-up aural processing in the EFL classroom as well as how and why teachers may wish to include such activities in lessons. This discussion is augmented by a small-scale classroom-based research project that investigated six activities targeting learners’ bottom-up listening abilities. Learners studying at the lower-intermediate level of a compulsory EFL university course were divided into a treatment group (n = 21 and a contrast group (n = 32. Each group listened to the same audio material and completed listening activities from an assigned textbook. The treatment group also engaged in a set of six bottom-up listening activities using the same material. This quasi-experimental study used dictation and listening proficiency tests before and after the course. Between-group comparisons of t-test results of dictation and listening proficiency tests indicated that improvements for the treatment group were probably due to the BU intervention. In addition, results from a posttreatment survey suggested that learners value explicit bottom-up listening instruction.

  15. Role of magmatism in continental lithosphere extension: an introduction to tectnophysics special issue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Wijk, Jolante W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics and evolution of rifts and continental rifted margins have been the subject of intense study and debate for many years and still remain the focus of active investigation. The 2006 AGU Fall Meeting session 'Extensional Processes Leading to the Formation of Basins and Rifted Margins, From Volcanic to Magma-Limited' included several contributions that illustrated recent advances in our understanding of rifting processes, from the early stages of extension to breakup and incipient seafloor spreading. Following this session, we aimed to assemble a multi-disciplinary collection of papers focussing on the architecture, formation and evolution of continental rift zones and rifted margins. This Tectonophysics Special Issue 'Role of magmatism in continental lithosphere extension' comprises 14 papers that present some of the recent insights on rift and rifted margins dynamics, emphasising the role of magmatism in extensional processes. The purpose of this contribution is to introduce these papers.

  16. Silicothermal fluid: A novel medium for mass transport in the lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, J. J.; Nolan, J.; Rankin, A. H.

    1996-12-01

    New experimental data from synthetic fluid-inclusion studies in the system K2O-CO2-SiO2-H2O (KCSH) show that a potassic, silica-rich (≈ 90 wt% SiO2) fluid can coexist immiscibly with a supercritical, alkaline, aqueo-carbonic fluid and quartz from temperatures as low as 300 °C to more than 750 °C at relatively low geologic pressures (<200 MPa). This type of fluid phase may form in a range of geologic environments, including carbonatite complexes, alkaline subvolcanic-plutonic systems, and subduction zones. With a probable polymerized (silica-rich, melt-like) structure, such SiO2-rich fluids, if they form in the lithosphere, are likely to be important in the mobilization and transport of silica and large ion lithophile elements (e.g., K, Cs, Ba) and metals of economic significance (e.g., Au, Ag, U).

  17. Bottom friction. A practical approach to modelling coastal oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolanos, Rodolfo; Jensen, Palle; Kofoed-Hansen, Henrik; Tornsfeldt Sørensen, Jacob

    2017-04-01

    Coastal processes imply the interaction of the atmosphere, the sea, the coastline and the bottom. The spatial gradients in this area are normally large, induced by orographic and bathymetric features. Although nowadays it is possible to obtain high-resolution bathymetry, the details of the seabed, e.g. sediment type, presence of biological material and living organisms are not available. Additionally, these properties as well as bathymetry can also be highly dynamic. These bottom characteristics are very important to describe the boundary layer of currents and waves and control to a large degree the dissipation of flows. The bottom friction is thus typically a calibration parameter in numerical modelling of coastal processes. In this work, we assess this process and put it into context of other physical processes uncertainties influencing wind-waves and currents in the coastal areas. A case study in the North Sea is used, particularly the west coast of Denmark, where water depth of less than 30 m cover a wide fringe along the coast, where several offshore wind farm developments are being carried out. We use the hydrodynamic model MIKE 21 HD and the spectral wave model MIKE 21 SW to simulate atmosphere and tidal induced flows and the wind wave generation and propagation. Both models represent state of the art and have been developed for flexible meshes, ideal for coastal oceanography as they can better represent coastlines and allow a variable spatial resolution within the domain. Sensitivity tests to bottom friction formulations are carried out into context of other processes (e.g. model forcing uncertainties, wind and wave interactions, wind drag coefficient). Additionally, a map of varying bottom properties is generated based on a literature survey to explore the impact of the spatial variability. Assessment of different approaches is made in order to establish a best practice regarding bottom friction and coastal oceanographic modelling. Its contribution is also

  18. A ocean bottom vector magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaomei; Teng, Yuntian; Wang, Chen; Ma, Jiemei

    2017-04-01

    The new development instrument with a compact spherical coil system and Overhauser magnetometer for measuring the total strength of the magnetic field and the vectors of strength, Delta inclination - Delta declination, meanwhile we also use a triaxial fluxgate instrument of the traditional instrument for geomagnetic vector filed measurement. The advantages of this method are be calibrated by each other and get good performances with automatic operation, good stability and high resolution. Firstly, a brief description of the instrument measurement principles and the key technologies are given. The instrument used a spherical coil system with 34 coils to product the homogeneous volume inside the coils which is large enough to accommodate the sensor of Overhauser total field sensor; the rest of the footlocker-sized ocean-bottom vector magnetometer consists of equipment to run the sensors and records its data (batteries and a data logger), weight to sink it to the sea floor, a remote-controlled acoustic release and flotation to bring the instrument back to the surface. Finally, the accuracy of the instrument was tested in the Geomagnetic station, and the measurement accuracies of total strength and components were better than 0.2nT and 1nT respectively. The figure 1 shows the development instrument structure. it includes six thick glass spheres which protect the sensor, data logger and batteries from the pressures of the deep sea, meanwhile they also provide recycling positive buoyancy; To cushion the glass, the spheres then go inside yellow plastic "hardhats". The triaxial fluxgate is inside No.1 glass spheres, data logger and batteries are inside No.2 glass spheres, the new vector sensor is inside No.3 glass spheres, acoustic communication unit is inside No.4 glass spheres, No.5 and No.6 glass spheres are empty which only provide recycling positive buoyancy. The figure 2 shows the development instrument Physical photo.

  19. High-Resolution Lithosphere Viscosity and Dynamics Revealed by Magnetotelluric Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Hasterok, D. P.

    2016-12-01

    An accurate viscosity structure is critical to truthfully modeling continental lithosphere dynamics, especially at spatial scales of factors including strain rate, plastic failure, composition, and grain size. Current efforts on inferring the detailed lithosphere viscosity structure are sparse and large uncertainties and discrepancies still exist. Here we report an attempt to infer the effective lithospheric viscosity from a high-resolution magnetotelluric (MT) survey across the western United States. The high sensitivity of MT fields to the presence of electrically conductive fluids makes it a promising proxy for determining mechanical strength variations throughout the lithosphere. We demonstrate how a viscosity structure, approximated from electrical resistivity, results in a geodynamic model that successfully predicts short-wavelength surface topography, lithospheric deformation, and mantle upwelling beneath recent volcanism. The results indicate that lithosphere viscosity structure rather than the buoyancy structure is the dominant controlling factor for short-wavelength topography and intra-plate deformation in tectonically active regions. We further show that this viscosity is consistent with and more effective than that derived from laboratory-based rheology. We therefore propose that MT imaging provides a practical observational constraint for quantifying the dynamic evolution of the continental lithosphere.

  20. Neotectonic fault detection and lithosphere structure beneath SW of High Atlas (Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoulali, Youssef; Radi, Said; Azguet, Roumaissae; Bachaoui, Mostapha

    2016-08-01

    The High Atlas is a 100 km wide zone defined by E-W to NE-SW trending folds nearly orthogonal to the Atlantic coastline. The major compressional structures in the High Atlas consist of large-scale fold systems which affect Mesozoic and Cainozoic formations. The extreme West of the High Atlas including the region of Agadir is defined as an earthquake Zone. Historical seismicity data shows that the Agadir region was hit by two destructive earthquakes in 1731 and 1960 with magnitude 6.4 and 6.0, respectively. The present study has two main goals: 1) to use remote sensing techniques to detect and map the surface geological structures including faults; 2) to use the local earthquake tomography for imaging the lithosphere (subsurface) and detect deep structures. For the remote sensing techniques we used ETM + Landsat7 images and the SRTM 90 m image as a Digital Terrane Elevation Model. This study focuses on the computerized identification, feature extraction and quantitative interpretation of lineaments over the SW High Atlas. The analysis developed here is based on the numerical enhancement of a Landsat image and on the statistical processing of data generated through enhancement. The results generated by the numerical enhancement and statistical analysis are presented on fault maps, lineament maps, polar diagrams and lineament density maps. The lineaments have a high concentration of orientations around the directions N40E, N80W and N-S. For the subsurface study, seismic data sets were used to define the 3-D velocity structures. We also used local earthquake tomography to obtain the velocity map and crustal structure of the SW High Atlas region. The tomography results show a new and detailed lithosphere structure defined by a high velocity body in the northern of SW High Atlas from 15 to 45 Km depth, dipping to the north beneath the Essaouira basin in the western Meseta with P velocity variations from 6.5 to 7.8 km/s. This anomaly can be interpreted as an old

  1. Mantle plumes & lithospheric foundering: Determining the timing and amplitude of post-Miocene uplift in the Wallowa mountains, north-east Oregon with low-temperature thermochronometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoettle-Greene, P.; Duvall, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    The foundering of gravitationally unstable lithosphere, while frequently invoked to explain anomalous topography, proves difficult to verify from an Earth surface perspective. Theoretically, direct observables like sudden uplift associated with extension and mantle-sourced volcanism should help identify affected regions but these markers are often obscured by background stresses and heterogeneous lithosphere. To better understand topographic evolution following the removal of mantle lithosphere, we present new apatite U-Th/He thermocrhonometry data and field observations from the Wallowa mountains adjacent to Hells Canyon in the northwestern United States. The granodiorite-cored Wallowa are increasingly recognized as a type locality for the process of lithospheric foundering, as they are bound by extensional structures and were presumably uplifted contemporaneous with the intrusion of feeder dikes for the mantle-sourced Columbia River Basalts at 16 Ma. Cretaceous and early Cenozoic cooling ages from our study imply that in spite of the presumed 1-2 km of basalt flows eroded from the Wallowa and heating associated with the intrusion of the Chief Joseph dike swarm, and 2 km of proposed rapid post-foundering uplift, there has been little exhumation. We attempt to reconcile these conflicting observations with field mapping of folded basalt flows at the margins of the Wallowa mountains, modeling of geothermal response times following a thermal perturbation, and further study using the 4He/3He thermochronometer on a subset of samples to reveal more recent cooling histories. Our findings will improve our understanding of the landscape evolution of the Wallowa mountains, information pertinent to the geodynamics of lithosphere removal and the eruption of Columbia River Basalts.

  2. Seismic and Thermal Structure of the Arctic Lithosphere, From Waveform Tomography and Thermodynamic Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, S.; Schaeffer, A. J.; Fullea, J.; Pease, V.

    2015-12-01

    Thermal structure of the lithosphere is reflected in the values of seismic velocities within it. Our new tomographic models of the crust and upper mantle of the Arctic are constrained by an unprecedentedly large global waveform dataset and provide substantially improved resolution, compared to previous models. The new tomography reveals lateral variations in the temperature and thickness of the lithosphere and defines deep boundaries between tectonic blocks with different lithospheric properties and age. The shape and evolution of the geotherm beneath a tectonic unit depends on both crustal and mantle-lithosphere structure beneath it: the lithospheric thickness and its changes with time (these determine the supply of heat from the deep Earth), the crustal thickness and heat production (the supply of heat from within the crust), and the thickness and thermal conductivity of the sedimentary cover (the insulation). Detailed thermal structure of the basins can be modelled by combining seismic velocities from tomography with data on the crustal structure and heat production, in the framework of computational petrological modelling. The most prominent lateral contrasts across the Arctic are between the cold, thick lithospheres of the cratons (in North America, Greenland and Eurasia) and the warmer, non-cratonic blocks. The lithosphere of the Canada Basin is cold and thick, similar to old oceanic lithosphere elsewhere around the world; its thermal structure offers evidence on its lithospheric age and formation mechanism. At 150-250 km depth, the central Arctic region shows a moderate low-velocity anomaly, cooler than that beneath Iceland and N Atlantic. An extension of N Atlantic low-velocity anomaly into the Arctic through the Fram Strait may indicate an influx of N Atlantic asthenosphere under the currently opening Eurasia Basin.

  3. The influence of triple bottom line on international operations management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Sperotto Flores

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper takes a triple bottom line perspective to analyze how the international operations literature integrates economic, social, and environmental issues. Additionally, it shows the main drivers of and barriers to the adoption of triple bottom line practices by companies in an international context. We conducted a literature review in English language journals which publish research of production and operations management and sustainability, resulting in a final sample of 29 papers. Results show that social and legal pressure for companies to adopt a responsible behavior prompts an isomorphic process that leads them to conduct their operations on behalf of triple bottom line goals. Behavioral differences between spin-offs in various countries caused institutions to create mechanisms that can press and change private standards through regulation and enforcement. There is room for progress in studies that seek to analyze the company’s relationships in its international experience and its multi-institutional relations.

  4. Bottom quark contribution to spin-dependent dark matter detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinmian Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a previously overlooked bottom quark contribution to the spin-dependent cross section for Dark Matter (DM scattering from the nucleon. While the mechanism is relevant to any supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model, for illustrative purposes we explore the consequences within the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM. We study two cases, namely those where the DM is predominantly Gaugino or Higgsino. In both cases, there is a substantial, viable region in parameter space (mb˜−mχ≲O(100 GeV in which the bottom contribution becomes important. We show that a relatively large contribution from the bottom quark is consistent with constraints from spin-independent DM searches, as well as some incidental model dependent constraints.

  5. Modeling of melt-coolant mixing by bottom injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazachkov, I.V.; Paladino, D.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, the flow characteristics during the coolant injection, with submerged nozzles, at the bottom of a molten pool are studied. The flow pattern developed by the rising coolant is considered for the case of complete coolant vaporization, and the pool-coolant phase distributions are assessed by a modeling approach delivered from literature for a heterogeneous turbulent jet. To calculate the basic characteristics of such flow, integral relationships are proposed for the two-phase boundary layer. The results of numerical computations and approximate solution are compared with the experimental data obtained in the low temperature experiments, conducted in the DECOBI (debris coolability by bottom injection) facility. (authors)

  6. Characterisation of MSWI bottom ash for potential use as subbase in Greenlandic road construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Jørgensen, Anders Stuhr; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    of infrastructure due to increased oil and mineral exploitation. Thus, in this study MSWI bottom ash from a Greenlandic incinerator was tested for possible reuse as subbase in road construction. The mechanical properties (grain size distribution, wear resistance and bearing capacity) showed that the bottom ash...... grain sizes and could be reduced by removing some of these smaller grain sizes to obtain the stability requirement of the bottom ash. All in all, this study showed that the Greenlandic bottom ash has potential for being reused in road construction....

  7. The combined inversion of seismological and GOCE gravity data: New insights into the current state of the Pacific lithosphere and upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondi, Rosaria; Gilardoni, Maddalena; Reguzzoni, Mirko

    2017-05-01

    In this study we combine seismological and GOCE satellite gravity information by using a Bayesian-like technique, with the aim of inferring the density structure of the Pacific (90°N 90°S) (121°E 60°W) lithosphere and upper mantle. We recover a 1° × 1° 3-D density model, down to 300 km depth, which explains gravity observations with a variance reduction of 67.41%. The model, with an associated a posteriori standard deviation, provides a significant contribution to understanding the evolution of the Pacific lithosphere and answers to some debated geodynamic questions. Our methodology enables us to combine the recovery of density parameters with the optimum density-vSV scalings. The latter account for both seismological and gravity observations in order to identify the regions characterized by chemically-induced density heterogeneities which add to the thermally-induced anomalies. Chemically-modified structures are found west of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) and are of relevant amplitude both below the north-western side of the Pacific Plate, at the base of the lithosphere, and up to 100 km depth beneath the Hawaiian and Super Swell regions, thus explaining the anomalous shallow regions without invoking the thermal buoyancy as the sole justification. Coherently with the chemically modified structures, our results a) support a lighter and more buoyant lithosphere than that predicted by the cooling models and b) are in favor of the hypothesized crustal underplating beneath the Hawaiian chain and beneath the volcanic units in the southern branch of the Super Swell region. The comparison between calculated mantle gravity residuals and residual topography a) suggests a lateral viscosity growth associated with the increasing thickness and density of the Plate and b) correlates well with sub-lithospheric mantle flow from the EPR towards west, up to the Kermadec and Tonga Trench in the south and the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench in the north.

  8. Geochemical and Textural Constraints on Wehrlite Formation by Melt-rock Reaction in the Shallow Subcontinental Lithospheric Mantle (Oran, Tell Atlas, N-Algeria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidas, Károly; Garrido, Carlos J.; Marchesi, Claudio; Bodinier, Jean-Louis; Louni-Hacini, Amina; Azzouni-Sekkal, Abla; Konc, Zoltán; Dautria, Jean-Marie; Varas-Reus, Maria Isabel

    2017-04-01

    As a result of the Miocene collision between the Alborán domain and the south Iberian and Maghrebian passive margins, the Betic and the Rif-Tell mountains form an arc-shaped orogenic belt in the westernmost Mediterranean (e.g. [1]). This belt is characterized by the presence of subcontinental lithospheric mantle exhumed as orogenic peridotites [2-4], and entrained by basaltic magmatism. Mantle xenoliths entrained in Plio-Pleistocene alkali basalts in the innermost Betics in South Spain provided invaluable data to study the structure and composition of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath the northern limb of this mountain belt [5-7]. In contrast, information from the southern limb is scarce, even though alkali basalts of the same age (Journal of the Geological Society 170, 47-55. 3. Frets, E.C., Tommasi, A., Garrido, C.J., Vauchez, A., Mainprice, D., Targuisti, K., Amri, I., 2014. The Beni Bousera peridotite (Rif Belt, Morocco): an oblique-slip low-angle shear zone thinning the Subcontinental Mantle Lithosphere. Journal of Petrology 55, 283-313. 4. Rampone, E., Vissers, R.L.M., Poggio, M., Scambelluri, M., Zanetti, A., 2010. Melt migration and intrusion during exhumation of the Alboran lithosphere: the Tallante mantle xenolith record (Betic Cordillera, SE Spain). Journal of Petrology 51, 295-325. 5. Hidas, K., Konc, Z., Garrido, C.J., Tommasi, A., Vauchez, A., Padrón-Navarta, J.A., Marchesi, C., Booth-Rea, G., Acosta-Vigil, A., Szabó, C., Varas-Reus, M.I., Gervilla, F., 2016. Flow in the western Mediterranean shallow mantle: Insights from xenoliths in Pliocene alkali basalts from SE Iberia (eastern Betics, Spain). Tectonics 35, 2657-2676. 6. Marchesi, C., Konc, Z., Garrido, C.J., Bosch, D., Hidas, K., Varas-Reus, M.I., Acosta-Vigil, A., 2017. Multi-stage evolution of the lithospheric mantle beneath the westernmost Mediterranean: Geo

  9. Thermochronology of the Sulu ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic terrane: Implications for continental collision and lithospheric thinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Ping; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Danišík, Martin; Li, Sanzhong; Evans, Noreen; Jourdan, Fred; Tao, Ni

    2017-08-01

    The thermal history of the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt provides important constraints on the collision process between the South China and North China blocks during the Mesozoic, and possible lithospheric thinning event(s) in the eastern North China Block. This study reports on the thermal evolution of the Sulu ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic (UHP) terrane using zircon U-Pb geochronology and multiple thermochronology methods such as mica and hornblende 40Ar/39Ar, zircon and apatite fission track, and zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He dating. 40Ar/39Ar and zircon (U-Th)/He data show that the UHP terrane experienced accelerated cooling during 180-160 Ma. This cooling event could be interpreted to have resulted from extensional unroofing of an earlier southward thrusting nappe, or, more likely, an episode of northward thrusting of the UHP rocks as a hanging wall. A subsequent episode of exhumation took place between ca. 125 Ma and 90 Ma as recorded by zircon (U-Th)/He data. This event was more pronounced in the northwest section of the UHP terrane, whereas in the southeast section, the zircon (U-Th)/He system retained Jurassic cooling ages of ca. 180-160 Ma. The mid-Cretaceous episode of exhumation is interpreted to have resulted from crustal extension due to the removal of thickened, enriched mantle. A younger episode of exhumation was recorded by apatite fission track and apatite (U-Th)/He ages at ca. 65-40 Ma. Both latter events were linked to episodic thinning of lithosphere along the Sulu UHP terrane in an extensional environment, likely caused by the roll-back of the Western Pacific subduction system.

  10. Continental strike slip fault zones in geologically complex lithosphere: the North Anatolian Fault, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, David; Thompson, David; Papaleo, Elvira; Rost, Sebastian; Houseman, Gregory; Kahraman, Metin; Turkelli, Niyazi; Teoman, Ugur; Altuncu Poyraz, Selda; Gulen, Levent; Utkucu, Murat

    2016-04-01

    As part of the multi-disciplinary Faultlab project, we present new detailed images in a geologically complex region where the crust and upper mantle is bisected by a major continental strike-slip fault system. Our study region samples the north Anatolian fault zone (NAFZ) near the epicentres of two large earthquakes that occurred in 1999 at Izmit (M7.5) and Düzce (M7.2) and where estimates of present day slip rate are 20-25 mm/yr. Using recordings of teleseismic earthquakes from a rectangular seismometer array spanning the NAFZ with 66 stations at a nominal inter-station spacing of 7 km and 7 additional stations further afield, we build a detailed 3-D image of structure and anisotropy using receiver functions, tomography and shear wave splitting and illuminate major changes in the architecture and properties of the upper crust, lower crust and upper mantle, both across and along the two branches of the NAFZ, at length scales of less than 20 km. We show that the northern NAFZ branch depth extent varies from the mid-crust to the upper mantle and it is likely to be less than 10 km wide. A high velocity lower crust and a region of crustal underthrusting appear to add strength to a heterogeneous crust and play a role in dictating the variation in faulting style and postseismic deformation. Sharp changes in lithospheric mantle velocity and anisotropy are constrained as the NAFZ is crossed, whereas crustal structure and anisotropy vary considerably both parallel and perpendicular to the faulting. We use our observations to test current models of the localisation of strike-slip deformation and develop new ideas to explain how narrow fault zones develop in extremely heterogeneous lithosphere.

  11. Meso–Cenozoic lithospheric thermal structure in the Bohai Bay Basin, eastern North China Craton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongxing Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Bohai Bay Basin is a region where part of the North China Craton has been thinned and destroyed. It has experienced two periods of crustal thinning that occurred during the Cretaceous and Paleogene, but investigations of its Mesozoic and Cenozoic lithospheric thermal structure are limited. Therefore, in this study, the distributions of mantle heat flow, crustal heat flow, and Moho temperatures during the Meso–Cenozoic are calculated based on analyses of the thermal history of the Bohai Bay Basin. The results indicate that the ratio of mantle heat flow to surface heat flow peaked during the late stages of the early Cretaceous and during the middle to late Paleogene. The corresponding mantle heat flow was more than 65% of the surface heat flow. Moho temperatures reached three peaks: 900–1100 °C in the late stages of the early Cretaceous; 820–900 °C in the middle to late Paleogene; and (in the Linqing Depression, Cangxian Uplift, and Jizhong Depression 770–810 °C during the early Neogene. These results reveal that the Bohai Bay Basin experienced significant geological change during the Cretaceous, including the transformation of lithospheric thermal structure from “cold mantle and hot crust” before the Cretaceous to “hot mantle and cold crust” after the Cretaceous. The results also indicate that the basin experienced two large-scale rifting events. Therefore, this work may provide the thermal parameters for further investigations of the geodynamic evolution of eastern China.

  12. Tsunami Energy, Ocean-Bottom Pressure, and Hydrodynamic Force from Stochastic Bottom Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Khaled T.; Omar, M. A.; Allam, Allam A.

    2017-03-01

    Tsunami generation and propagation due to a randomly fluctuating of submarine earthquake modeled by vertical time-dependent of a stochastic bottom displacement are investigated. The increase in oscillations and amplitude in the free surface elevation are controlled by the noise intensity parameter of the stochastic bottom displacement. Evolution of kinetic and potential energy of the resulting waves by the stochastic bottom displacement is examined. Exchange between potential and kinetic energy was achieved in the propagation process. The dynamic ocean-bottom pressure during tsunami generation is investigated. As the vertical displacement of the stochastic bottom increases, the peak amplitude of the ocean-bottom pressure increases through the dynamic effect. Time series of the maximum tsunami wave amplitude, kinetic and potential energy, wave and ocean-bottom pressure gauges and the hydrodynamic force caused by the stochastic source model under the effect of the water depth of the ocean are investigated.

  13. Speciation of Chromium in Bottom Ash Obtained by the Incineration of the Leather Waste Shavings

    OpenAIRE

    k. louhab; H. Assas

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of bottom ash morphology and chromium metals behavior during incineration of a leather waste shavings at different incineration temperature have been studied. The Cr, Ca, Mg, Cl rates in bottom ashes, flay ashes and emitted gases in different incineration temperature of the tannery wastes are also determined. The morphology of the bottom ashes obtained by incineration at different temperature from the leather waste shavings was examined by MEB. The result sho...

  14. Geodynamic inversion to constrain the rheology of the lithosphere: What is the effect of elasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Tobias; Kaus, Boris; Thielmann, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    The concept of elastic thickness (T_e) is one of the main methods to describe the integrated strength of oceanic lithosphere (e.g. Watts, 2001). Observations of the Te are in general agreement with yield strength envelopes estimated from laboratory experiments (Burov, 2007, Goetze & Evans 1979). Yet, applying the same concept to the continental lithosphere has proven to be more difficult (Burov & Diament, 1995), which resulted in an ongoing discussion on the rheological structure of the lithosphere (e.g. Burov & Watts, 2006, Jackson, 2002; Maggi et al., 2000). Recently, we proposed a new approach, which constrains rheological properties of the lithosphere directly from geophysical observations such as GPS-velocity, topography and gravity (Baumann & Kaus, 2015). This approach has the advantage that available data sets (such as Moho depth) can be directly taken into account without making the a-priori assumption that the lithosphere is thin elastic plate floating on the mantle. Our results show that a Bayesian inversion method combined with numerical thermo-mechanical models can be used as independent tool to constrain non-linear viscous and plastic parameters of the lithosphere. As the rheology of the lithosphere is strongly temperature dependent, it is even possible to add a temperature parameterisation to the inversion method and constrain the thermal structure of the lithosphere in this manner. Results for the India-Asia collision zone show that existing geophysical data require India to have a quite high effective viscosity. Yet, the rheological structure of Tibet less well constrained and a number of scenarios give a nearly equally good fit to the data. Yet, one of the assumptions that we make while doing this geodynamic inversion is that the rheology is viscoplastic, and that elastic effects do not significantly alter the large-scale dynamics of the lithosphere. Here, we test the validity of this assumption by performing synthetic forward models and retrieving

  15. Utilization of power plant bottom ash as aggregates in fiber-reinforced cellular concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H K; Kim, H K; Hwang, E A

    2010-02-01

    Recently, millions tons of bottom ash wastes from thermoelectric power plants have been disposed of in landfills and coastal areas, regardless of its recycling possibility in construction fields. Fiber-reinforced cellular concrete (FRCC) of low density and of high strength may be attainable through the addition of bottom ash due to its relatively high strength. This paper focuses on evaluating the feasibility of utilizing bottom ash of thermoelectric power plant wastes as aggregates in FRCC. The flow characteristics of cement mortar with bottom ash aggregates and the effect of aggregate type and size on concrete density and compressive strength were investigated. In addition, the effects of adding steel and polypropylene fibers for improving the strength of concrete were also investigated. The results from this study suggest that bottom ash can be applied as a construction material which may not only improve the compressive strength of FRCC significantly but also reduce problems related to bottom ash waste.

  16. Baseline study of the distribution of marine debris on soft-bottom habitats associated with trawling grounds in the northern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Sánchez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to analyse the local and regional variability in the density and typology of marine debris on fishing grounds on the northern Mediterranean continental shelf, and to test relationships between marine litter and trawl fishing activity. Moreover, the colonization of plastics was examined in order to study the importance of plastics as a source of impact on marine communities and their further environmental implications. This study surveyed 11 sites, associated with trawling grounds and subjected to different levels of fishing intensity, located in four areas of the Mediterranean: one in Italy, the Central Tyrrhenian coast, one in Greece, the eastern Ionian coast, and two in Spain, the Murcian and Catalan coasts. Samples were collected during an oceanographic cruise undertaken from the 21 May to the 24 June 2009. Results showed geographical variation in the density of marine debris which ranged from 0 to 405 pieces per hectare in the surveyed areas, plastics being the dominant components. Variability within sites was higher than between areas, indicating small-scale patchiness in the distribution of the debris over the seafloor. Though the study areas were within trawling grounds, the density of debris was not significantly correlated with fishing effort. More than 30% of plastics were between 10 and 20 cm width/length, and more than 40% of the plastics were colonized by a biofilm of microorganisms, suggesting indirect effects on benthic communities.

  17. Application of solidified sea bottom sediments into environmental bioremediation materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed H.A. Dabwan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Since dredged sea bottom sediments normally give off a horrible smell, the limitation of disposal places has become a serious problem in Japan. Hence, development of an alternative system to readily treat dredged sea bottom sediments is therefore needed. The development of “value-added” reused products from these sediments offers particular benefits both in terms of resource recovery and protection of the environment. We developed an in situ solidification system for the treatment of sea bottom sediments, the “Hi-Biah-System (HBS”. Firstly, this review deals with solidified sea bottom sediments for the construction of an artificial tidal flat in Ago Bay, Japan. The environmental conditions (pH, oxidation–reduction potential (ORP, acid volatile sulphide (AVS, loss on ignition (LOI, water content (WC, chemical oxygen demand (COD, total organic carbon (TOC, total nitrogen (T-N, chlorophyll a and particle size were then monitored in the constructed tidal flat. The number of benthos individuals and growth of short-necked clams (Ruditapes philippinarum in the artificial tidal flat were also evaluated. The environmental conditions, number of benthos individuals and growth of short-necked clams in the artificial tidal flat were shown to be similar to those observed in a natural tidal flat. Next, the potential use of solidified sea bottom sediments as soil parent material in the germination/growth of seagrass is presented. The soil parent material consisting of solidified sediments obtained using HBS plus soil conditioner and hardener seems to be effective for the germination of Zostera marina. The best growth after six months was observed in plants grown in soil parent material consisting of a mixture of solidified sediments and the sand by weight ration 70:30. The present study may suggest the possible application of solidified sea bottom sediments into growth of other plants.

  18. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 7: Metal vapor Rankine topping-steam bottoming cycles. [energy conversion efficiency in electric power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, P. B.

    1976-01-01

    Adding a metal vapor Rankine topper to a steam cycle was studied as a way to increase the mean temperature at which heat is added to the cycle to raise the efficiency of an electric power plant. Potassium and cesium topping fluids were considered. Pressurized fluidized bed or pressurized (with an integrated low-Btu gasifier) boilers were assumed. Included in the cycles was a pressurizing gas turbine with its associated recuperator, and a gas economizer and feedwater heater. One of the ternary systems studied shows plant efficiency of 42.3% with a plant capitalization of $66.7/kW and a cost of electricity of 8.19 mills/MJ (29.5 mills/kWh).

  19. ATTENUATION OF SEISMIC WAVES IN THE LITHOSPHERE OF THE NORTHERN PART OF THE BASIN AND RANGE PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Dobrynina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of the study of attenuation of seismic waves in the lithosphere and upper mantle of the northern part of the Basin and Range Province (BRP (Fig. 1. In this study, the coda-wave method [Aki, Chouet, 1975] is applied to process data collected in the seismic experiment conducted in 1988–1989, PASSCAL Basin and Range Passive Seismic Experiment [Owens, Randall, 1989], including records of 66 earthquakes and explosions (Mb=1.1–5.0 which occurred in BRP (Fig. 2.The effective seismic quality factor by the coda is calculated using the single-backscattering model [Aki, Chouet, 1975]. The QC values are calculated for 18 values of the lapse time window W from 10 to 95 sec with the step of 5 sec at six (6 central frequencies (0.3, 0.75, 1.5, 3.0, 6.0, and 12.0 Hz. In total, 7776 individual measurements of QC were done. It is observed that the quality factor QC is strongly dependent on the frequency and the lapse time window W: QC increases from 12±6 to 359±17 for the central frequencies of 0.3 and 12.0 Hz when the lapse time window is W=10 sec and from 87±6 to 1177±87 for the same frequencies when W=95 sec (Fig. 6. On the basis of the QС values obtained for all the lapse time windows W empirical relationships of quality factors and frequencies are calculated according to [Mitchell, 1981], and values of quality factor Q0 at reference frequency f0 (f0=1 Hz and frequency parameter n (which is close to 1 and varies depending on the heterogeneity of the medium [Aki, 1981] are obtained. In this study, Q0 varies from 60±8 to 222±17, the frequency parameter ranges from 0.57±0.04 to 0.84±0.05, and the attenuation coefficient δ varies from 0.015 to 0.004 km–1, depending on W (Fig. 8; similar values of attenuation parameters are typical of regions with high tectonic activity [Mak et al., 2004].In the single-backscattering model, the dependence of the attenuation parameters from the lapse time window can be explained in terms

  20. Influence of surface geometry on the culture of human cell lines: A comparative study using flat, round-bottom and v-shaped 96 well plates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Shafaie

    Full Text Available In vitro cell based models have been invaluable tools for studying cell behaviour and for investigating drug disposition, toxicity and potential adverse effects of administered drugs. Within this drug discovery pipeline, the ability to assess and prioritise candidate compounds as soon as possible offers a distinct advantage. However, the ability to apply this approach to a cell culture study is limited by the need to provide an accurate, in vitro-like, microenvironment in conjunction with a low cost and high-throughput screening (HTS methodology. Although the geometry and/or alignment of cells has been reported to have a profound influence on cell growth and differentiation, only a handful of studies have directly compared the growth of a single cell line on different shaped multiwell plates the most commonly used substrate for HTS, in vitro, studies. Herein, the impact of various surface geometries (flat, round and v-shaped 96 well plates, as well as fixed volume growth media and fixed growth surface area have been investigated on the characteristics of three commonly used human cell lines in biopharmaceutical research and development, namely ARPE-19 (retinal epithelial, A549 (alveolar epithelial and Malme-3M (dermal fibroblastic cells. The effect of the surface curvature on cells was characterised using a combination of a metabolic activity assay (CellTiter AQ/MTS, LDH release profiles (CytoTox ONE and absolute cell counts (Guava ViaCount, respectively. In addition, cell differentiation and expression of specific marker proteins were determined using flow cytometry. These in vitro results confirmed that surface topography had a significant effect (p < 0.05 on cell activity and morphology. However, although specific marker proteins were expressed on day 1 and 5 of the experiment, no significant differences were seen between the different plate geometries (p < 0.05 at the later time point. Accordingly, these results highlight the impact of

  1. The use of case studies to drive bottom-up leadership in community-oriented integrated care and health promotion (COIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfey, John

    2017-01-01

    London Journal of Primary Care is supporting a collaborative network of multidisciplinary colleagues with an interest in community-oriented health care and health promotion (COIC). Case study methodology is well suited to generating knowledge from the frontline of health and social care service delivery and is a much under-developed resource. It is most effective when dealing with wicked problems, namely, the sort of complex, entangled and multi-faceted problems that successful COIC programmes must overcome. Used collaboratively, it supports effective networking across professional and community boundaries.

  2. Transport and bottom accumulation of fine river sediments under typhoon conditions and associated submarine landslides: case study of the Peinan River, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchiev, Alexander; Korotenko, Konstantin; Zavialov, Peter; Chiang, Wen-Son; Liu, Cheng-Chi

    2016-04-01

    A combination of a three-dimensional Eulerian ocean circulation model (POM) and a Lagrangian particle-tracking model (STRiPE) is used to study the fate of fine river sediments discharged by the Peinan River at the south-eastern coast of the Taiwan Island. The composite model is verified against in situ measurements and applied to simulate primary sediment deposition under freshet and typhoon discharge conditions of the Peinan River. It is shown that local wind plays a crucial role in sediment transport and settling at the coastal area through its influence on the river plume dynamics and turbulent mixing in the upper layer. Wind forcing conditions generally determine the location of the sediment deposit area, while its final pattern is defined by coastal circulation as modulated by the geometry of the coast and local bathymetry. In the study, region river-born sediments are deposited to the sea floor mainly in the shallow shelf areas. A significant portion of discharged fine sediments is moved offshore to the deeper ocean where it is further advected and dispersed by strong coastal circulation mainly governed by the Kuroshio Current. The performed numerical experiments showed that sediment accumulation rate under typhoon conditions is about two orders of magnitude greater comparing to freshet condition. Basing on the simulation results, we identified areas of continental shelf and continental slope adjacent to the Peinan River estuary which exhibit high risk of formation of submarine landslides during and shortly after the typhoon events.

  3. Detailed study of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Klamath Basin, California and Oregon, 1990-92

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileanis, P.D.; Schwarzbach, S.E.; Bennett, Jewel

    1996-01-01

    The effect of irrigation drainage on the water quality and wildlife of the Klamath Basin in California and Oregon was evaluated during 1990-92 as part of the National Irrigation Water Quality Program of the U.S. Department of the Interior. The study focused on land serviced by the Bureau of Reclamation Klamath Project, which supplies irrigation water to agricultural land in the Klamath Basin and the Lost River Basin. The Tule Lake and Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuges, managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, are in the study area. These refuges provide critical resting and breeding habitat for waterfowl on the Pacific flyway and are dependent on irrigation drainwater from upstream agriculture for most of their water supply. Water-quality characteristics throughout the study area were typical of highly eutrophic systems during the summer months of 1991 and 1992. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations and pH tended to fluctuate each day in response to diurnal patterns of photosynthesis, and frequently exceeded criteria for protection of aquatic organisms. Nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were generally at or above threshold levels characteristic of eutrophic lakes and streams. At most sites the bulk of dissolved nitrogen was organically bound. Elevated ammonia concentrations were common in the study area, especially down- stream of drain inputs. High pH of water increased the toxicity of ammonia, and concentrations exceeded criteria at sites upstream and downstream of irrigated land. Concentrations of ammonia in samples from small drains on the Tule Lake refuge leaseland were higher than those measured in the larger, integrating drains at primary monitoring sites. The mean ammonia concentration in leaseland drains [1.21 milligrams per liter (mg/L)] was significantly higher than the mean concentration in canals delivering water to the leaseland fields (0.065 mg/L) and higher than concentrations reported to be lethal to Daphnia magna (median lethal

  4. Planning from the bottom up : Democratic decentralisation in action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, A.

    2010-01-01

    This research highlights the gap between the official rhetoric and the political reality of democratic decentralisation and bottom-up planning using an indepth study of the metropolitan planning process in Kolkata, India. The key question that I address here is: how do elected officials at different

  5. Bottom Raking Damage to High-Speed Craft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of the raking damage to high speed craft (HSC) and conventional ships. The analysis is based on a detailed theoretical model for the raking resistance of an assembled ship bottom structure and on the idea that the impact conditions for various ship types have...

  6. Contribution to the study of deep coastal detritic bottoms: the algal communities of the continental shelf off the Balearic Islands, Western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. JOHER

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Three main algal-dominated coastal detritic communities from the continental shelf off Mallorca and Menorca (Balearic Islands, Western Mediterranean are described herein: maërl beds dominated by Spongites fruticulosus and forests of Laminaria rodriguezii located in the Menorca channel, and Peyssonnelia inamoena beds found along the Southern coast of Menorca. There seems to be a gradient of disturbance from the highly disturbed Peyssonnelia beds to the almost undisturbed L. rodriguezii forests. Whether this gradient is the result of current and past anthropogenic pressure (e.g. trawling intensity or is driven by natural environmental factors needs further assessment. Finally, the location of the target communities by means of ROV dives combined with the use of a Box-Corer dredge and beam trawl proved to be a good methodology in the study of the composition and structure of these deep water detritic communities.

  7. Lithospheric discontinuity structure in Alaska, thickness variations determined by Sp receiver functions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Driscoll, Leland J; Miller, Meghan S

    2015-01-01

    We present the first broad‐scale image of lithospheric thickness across the major tectonic domains of Alaska based on S wave receiver functions and joint interpretation with the potential field, seismic velocity, and heat flow measurements...

  8. Lateral heterogeneity and vertical stratification of cratonic lithospheric keels: examples from Europe, Siberia, and North America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina; Cherepanova, Yulia; Herceg, Matija

    of the Precambrian lithosphere based on surface heat flow data, (ii) non-thermal part of upper mantle seismic velocity heterogeneity based on a joint analysis of thermal and seismic tomography data, and (iii) lithosphere density heterogeneity as constrained by free-board and satellite gravity data. The latter...... is compared with xenolith data from the Siberian kimberlite provinces. An analysis of surface heat flow indicates that many Precambrian cratons (particularly the cratons of Laurasia) are characterized by extremely low surface heat flow (... compilation of cratonic xenolith P-T arrays, which are usually consistent with surface heat flow of around 40 mW/m2. In regions with very low heat flow, the depth extent of the lithospheric keels locally may reach the depth of 300-350 km. In contrast, the lithosphere of the cratons which were a part...

  9. The Changing Lithosphere: formation of minerals and dissapearance of rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignola, Teresa; Floriano, Michele A.

    2014-05-01

    Earth Science teaching/learning is based on the idea that lithosphere is subject to changes that continuously modify its aspect. In order to demonstrate one of the causes of these changes, simple laboratory experiments have been used for first year high school students allowing simulating the formation of minerals by precipitation from a saturated solution and their solubility due to chemical reaction with acid substances. In the first stage, solubility, saturated and unsaturated solution concepts have been clarified by using sugar candies thatdissolveat different times by putting them in water containing increasing amounts of added sugar. Afterwards, by inspection of data tables, students have verified that different substances have different solubilities at the same temperature. At this point the solubility CuSO4. 5 H2O was considered and students prepared saturated aqueous solutions by adding 31.6 g of the salt in 100 ml of water. On further addition of salt for a total of 40 g, students have verified the presence of an undissolvedresidue that dissolved on heating. The obtained solution was transferred to a crystallization dish. Subsequent cooling and solvent evaporation produced a supersaturated solution where the precipitation process started allowing the formation, in 5-6 days, of CuSO4. 5 H2O bluecrystals. One of the minerals that can form by precipitation from a saturated solution is calcite that can originate from precipitation of calcium carbonate saturated solutions or from deposition of marine organisms inorganic residues containing calcium carbonate in their shells. However, when a mineral is formed, it will not remain unchanged forever. In order to show that some minerals and carbonaterocks, in addition to erosion phenomena, may also be subject to chemical attacks by atmospheric agents leading to their dissolution. Several rock samples were treated with an acid solution, and the bubbles forming in some of the samples demonstrated that even rocks could

  10. Bottom Scour Observed Under Hurricane Ivan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teague, William J; Jarosz, Eva; Keen, Timothy R; Wang, David W; Hulbert, Mark S

    2006-01-01

    Observations that extensive bottom scour along the outer continental shelf under Hurricane Ivan resulted in the displacement of more than 100 million cubic meters of sediment from a 35x15 km region...

  11. Lithospheric thermal evolution and dynamic mechanism of destruction of the North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zian; Zhang, Lu; Lin, Ge; Zhao, Chongbin; Liang, Yingjie

    2017-09-01

    The dynamic mechanism for destruction of the North China Craton (NCC) has been extensively discussed. Numerical simulation is used in this paper to discuss the effect of mantle upward throughflow (MUT) on the lithospheric heat flux of the NCC. Our results yield a three-stage destruction of the NCC lithosphere as a consequence of MUT variation. (1) In Late Paleozoic, the elevation of MUT, which was probably caused by southward and northward subduction of the paleo-Asian and paleo-Tethyan oceans, respectively, became a prelude to the NCC destruction. The geological consequences include a limited decrease of the lithospheric thickness, an increase of heat flux, and a gradual enhancement of the crustal activity. But the tectonic attribute of the NCC maintained a stable craton. (2) During Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous, the initial velocity of the MUT became much faster probably in response to subduction of the Pacific Ocean; the conductive heat flux at the base of the NCC lithosphere gradually increased from west to east; and the lithospheric thickness was significantly decreased. During this stage, the heat flux distribution was characterized by zonation and partition, with nearly horizontal layering in the lithosphere and vertical layering in the underlying asthenosphere. Continuous destruction of the NCC lithosphere was associated with the intense tectono-magmatic activity. (3) From Late Cretaceous to Paleogene, the velocity of MUT became slower due to the retreat of the subducting Pacific slab; the conductive heat flux at the base of lithosphere was increased from west to east; the distribution of heat flux was no longer layered. The crust of the western NCC is relatively hotter than the mantle, so-called as a `hot crust but cold mantle' structure. At the eastern NCC, the crust and the mantle characterized by a `cold crust but hot mantle.' The western NCC (e.g., the Ordos Basin) had a tectonically stable crust with low thermal gradients in the lithosphere; whereas

  12. Collapse of passive margins by lithospheric damage and plunging grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyukova, Elvira; Bercovici, David

    2018-02-01

    The collapse of passive margins has been proposed as a possible mechanism for the spontaneous initiation of subduction. In order for a new trench to form at the junction between oceanic and continental plates, the cold and stiff oceanic lithosphere must be weakened sufficiently to deform at tectonic rates. Such rates are especially hard to attain in the cold ductile portion of the lithosphere, at which the mantle lithosphere reaches peak strength. The amount of weakening required for the lithosphere to deform in this tectonic setting is dictated by the available stress. Stress in a cooling passive margin increases with time (e.g., due to ridge push), and is augmented by stresses present in the lithosphere at the onset of rifting (e.g., due to drag from underlying mantle flow). Increasing stress has the potential to weaken the ductile portion of the lithosphere by dislocation creep, or by decreasing grain size in conjunction with a grain-size sensitive rheology like diffusion creep. While the increasing stress acts to weaken the lithosphere, the decreasing temperature acts to stiffen it, and the dominance of one effect or the other determines whether the margin might weaken and collapse. Here, we present a model of the thermal and mechanical evolution of a passive margin, wherein we predict formation of a weak shear zone that spans a significant depth-range of the ductile portion of the lithosphere. Stiffening due to cooling is offset by weakening due to grain size reduction, driven by the combination of imposed stresses and grain damage. Weakening via grain damage is modest when ridge push is the only source of stress in the lithosphere, making the collapse of a passive margin unlikely in this scenario. However, adding even a small stress-contribution from mantle drag results in damage and weakening of a significantly larger portion of the lithosphere. We posit that rapid grain size reduction in the ductile portion of the lithosphere can enable, or at least

  13. Constraints on the depth and thermal history of cratonic lithosphere from peridotite xenoliths, xenocrysts and seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Kathy A.; Pearson, D. Graham; McKenzie, Dan; Kjarsgaard, Bruce A.; Priestley, Keith

    2011-07-01

    Despite the relatively long-standing availability of numerical approaches for estimating palaeogeotherms using peridotite xenolith Pressure-Temperature (P-T) data, the practise of fitting xenolith P-T arrays to simple models of lithospheric heat generation, in a non-quantitative manner, remains widespread. The lack of quantification in both the magnitude and uncertainty of heat flow and lithosphere thickness estimates leads to difficulty in evaluating proposed models for lithosphere evolution on a local and regional scale. Here, we explore the advantages of using a numerical approach to palaeogeotherm fitting, in terms of the ability to make objective comparisons of the effect that differing thermobarometer combinations and varying states of mineral and textural equilibrium have on the shape of the palaeogeotherm, and the resulting estimates of lithospheric thickness and heat flow. We also make quantitative comparisons between lithospheric mantle properties estimated using peridotite xenoliths versus single mineral xenocrysts. Using two reference peridotite xenolith databases from Bultfontein (S. Africa) and Somerset Island (Canada) we show that the same lithospheric mantle properties are predicted using harzburgite versus lherzolite thermobarometry methods. Filtering mineral data for the effects of inter-mineral disequilibrium does not produce significantly different palaeogeotherms but does increase the quality of fit of the palaeogeotherm to the P-T data, allowing more confidence to be placed in comparisons between locations. Palaeogeotherms calculated using xenocryst data, screened for peridotitic affinities, show misfits that are 2-3 times greater than those obtained using xenoliths. Lithospheric properties calculated from the Somerset Island xenocryst-based geotherm yield results that are within error of the xenolith estimate. A mutually consistent and quantitative palaeogeotherm fitting approach is used to evaluate existing hypotheses for the evolution of

  14. Thermo-mechanical characterization of the lithosphere : Implications for geothermal resources

    OpenAIRE

    Limberger, Jon

    2018-01-01

    The two key ingredients needed to commercially exploit a geothermal energy system are (1) sufficiently high subsurface temperatures and (2) presence of rock formations suitable to act as a geothermal reservoir at reachable depths. Subsurface temperatures are controlled by the heat flowing from deep inside the Earth to its surface with the heat transfer in the lithosphere primarily marked by conduction. The thermal structure of the lithosphere itself depends on its thickness, thermal propertie...

  15. The role of hydrothermal cooling of the oceanic lithosphere for ocean floor bathymetry and heat flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeling, Harro; Marquart, Gabriele; Nawa, Viktor

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the influence of hydrothermal circulation on cooling of oceanic lithosphere. We include hydrothermal convection in a 1-D lithosphere cooling model by using a scaling law which relates the Rayleigh to the Nusselt number. This law allows calculating an effective thermal conductivity accounting for the extra heat transport. Based on a global data set for bathymetry and surface heat flow for ocean floor ages between 0.7 and 160 Ma, we perform a joint inversion based on a downhill simplex algorithm to constrain characteristic parameters for hydrothermal cooling (beside the classical parameter mantle temperature, thickness of the lithosphere, and thermal expansivity of lithosphere rocks). Hydrothermal cooling parameters are crack aspect ratio which controls the hydrothermal penetrations depth, characteristic cementation time at which cracks become closed and hydrothermal circulation ceases, and sealing time when enough sedimentary cover on top of the lithosphere has accumulated to prevent hydrothermal fluid escaping into the ocean. Best fitting parameter sets predict mantle temperatures between 1350 and 1450°C and lithosphere thickness between 70 and 90 km and further suggest that (1) the fit to the data is strongly improved if hydrothermal cooling effects are considered, (2) hydrothermal cooling is important for up to 10 Ma old lithosphere and leads to a significant deviation from the 1/square root—law with an exponent closer to 1/3, (3) sedimentary sealing is completed for 1.5 Ma old lithosphere, and (4) fitting of the data is improved for an apparently 1.4 times higher value of thermal expansivity which may account for effects of melt solidification.

  16. Anisotropic Lithospheric layering in the North American craton, revealed by Bayesian inversion of short and long period data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, C.; Calo, M.; Bodin, T.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    Competing hypotheses for the formation and evolution of continents are highly under debate, including the theory of underplating by hot plumes or accretion by shallow subduction in continental or arc settings. In order to support these hypotheses, documenting structural layering in the cratonic lithosphere becomes especially important. Studies of seismic-wave receiver function data have detected a structural boundary under continental cratons at 100-140 km depths, which is too shallow to be consistent with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, as inferred from seismic tomography and other geophysical studies. This leads to the conclusion that 1) the cratonic lithosphere may be thinner than expected, contradicting tomographic and other geophysical or geochemical inferences, or 2) that the receiver function studies detect a mid-lithospheric discontinuity rather than the LAB. Recent studies (Bodin et al., 2015, Calo et al. 2016) confirmed the presence of a structural boundary under the north American craton at 100-140 km depths by taking advantage of the power of a trans-dimensional Monte Carlo Markov chain (TMCMC). They generated probabilistic 1D radially shear wave velocity profiles for selected stations in North America by jointly inverting 2 different data types (PS Receiver Functions, surface wave dispersion for Love and Rayleigh waves), which sample different volumes of the Earth and have different sensitivities to structure. The resulting 1D profiles include both isotropic and anisotropic discontinuities in the upper mantle (above 350 km depth). Here we extend this approach and include the vp/vs ratio as an unknown in the TMCMC algorithm to avoid artificial layers induced by multiples of the receiver functions. Additionally, we include SKS waveforms in the joint inversion and invert for azimuthal anisotropy to verify if layering in the anisotropic structure of the stable part of the North American continent involves significant changes in the direction of

  17. Review article: the false-bottom ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, D. V.; Jouzel, J.; Nizovtseva, I.; Ryashko, L. B.

    2013-11-01

    Nansen from his observations in the Beaufort Sea published in 1897 noted that heat transfer from the fresh water (with a~temperature of 0 °C) to the arctic salt water (with a temperature of -1.6 °C) is the only source of ice accretion during the polar summer. This transfer mechanism, unusual at first sight, is responsible for the initiation and evolution of a false bottom ice, changing ice properties to a great extent and affecting various processes while interacting with the ocean and the atmosphere. The processes of false bottom ice growth from below (i.e. from the ocean to the atmosphere) become of prime importance in the era of global warming and climate change. In this review, we summarize the theoretical approaches, field and laboratory observations, conducted during more than 100 yr, in order to address the problem of false bottoms to a broad community of readers. We also discuss the recent modeling advances to which we have contributed. A "false bottom" is a thin layer of ice which forms in summer underneath the floe, where fresh water lies between the salt water and the ice. Such false bottoms represent the only significant source of ice growth in the Arctic during the spring-summer period. Their evolution influences the mass balance of the Arctic sea-ice cover, which is recognized as an indicator of climate change. However, the quantity, aerial extent and other properties of false bottoms are difficult to measure because coring under the surface melt ponds leads to direct mixing of surface and under-ice water. This explains why their aerial extent and overall volume is still not known despite the fact that the upper limit of the present-day estimate of the false bottom ice coverage is approximately half of the sea ice surface. The growth of false bottoms also leads to other important consequences for various physical, chemical and biological processes associated with their dynamics.

  18. Gravity and magnetic modelling of North Sea basins[Marine and Onshore North Sea Acquisition for Lithospheric Seismic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyngsie, S.B.; Thybo, H. [Copenhagen Univ., Geological Inst. (Denmark)

    2003-07-01

    One of the primary sources of information for interpretation of subsurface geology and large scale tectonic features is potential field data. Gravity and magnetic data may reveal large and small scale features such as basement type, intrusions into the crust, volcanic roks, basement furface, faults and salt structures. As such, this type of data provides an invaluable source of information, which is cimplimentary to seismic data. We are currently conducting a project on interpretation of basins in the North Sea Based on potential field data, constrained by the wealth of existing seismic data. High resolution modelling of gravimetric and magnetic anomalies constrained by seismic P-wave velocity models and normal incidence reflection seismic data may reveal intrinsic details of upper- and lower Palaeozoic basin formation and changes in crustal domains in the Danish North Sea area. The MONA LISA (Marine and Onshore North Sea Acquisition for Lithospheric Seismic Analysis) data set from the south-eastern North Sea (MONA LISA Working Group, 1997) consists of four deep seismic normal incidence reflection profiles recorded to 26 s (twt) and coincident wide-angle reflection/refraction data recorded on 26 onshore mobile seismometers and 29 ocean bottom hydrophones (OBH's) placed along profiles 1,2 and 3. The east-west trending MONA LISA profile 3 traverses the basement high of the Mid North Sea - Ringkoebing Fyn High (MSRFH) and crosses the N-S striking Central Graben (CG) and Horn Graven (HG). (au)

  19. The GITEWS ocean bottom sensor packages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Boebel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS aims at reducing the risks posed by events such as the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. To minimize the lead time for tsunami alerts, to avoid false alarms, and to accurately predict tsunami wave heights, real-time observations of ocean bottom pressure from the deep ocean are required. As part of the GITEWS infrastructure, the parallel development of two ocean bottom sensor packages, PACT (Pressure based Acoustically Coupled Tsunameter and OBU (Ocean Bottom Unit, was initiated. The sensor package requirements included bidirectional acoustic links between the bottom sensor packages and the hosting surface buoys, which are moored nearby. Furthermore, compatibility between these sensor systems and the overall GITEWS data-flow structure and command hierarchy was mandatory. While PACT aims at providing highly reliable, long term bottom pressure data only, OBU is based on ocean bottom seismometers to concurrently record sea-floor motion, necessitating highest data rates. This paper presents the technical design of PACT, OBU and the HydroAcoustic Modem (HAM.node which is used by both systems, along with first results from instrument deployments off Indonesia.

  20. The Two Subduction Zones of the Southern Caribbean: Lithosphere Tearing and Continental Margin Recycling in the East, Flat Slab Subduction and Laramide-Style Uplifts in the West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, A.; Bezada, M. J.; Niu, F.; Schmitz, M.

    2015-12-01

    The southern Caribbean plate boundary is a complex strike-slip fault system bounded by oppositely vergent subduction zones, the Antilles subduction zone in the east, and a currently locked Caribbean-South American subduction zone in the west (Bilham and Mencin, 2013). Finite-frequency teleseismic P-wave tomography images both the Atlanic (ATL) and the Caribbean (CAR) plates subducting steeply in opposite directions to transition zone depths under northern South America. Ps receiver functions show a depressed 660 discontinuity and thickened transition zone associated with each subducting plate. In the east the oceanic (ATL) part of the South American (SA) plate subducts westward beneath the CAR, initiating the El Pilar-San Sebastian strike slip system, a subduction-transform edge propagator (STEP) fault (Govers and Wortel, 2005). The point at which the ATL tears away from SA as it descends into the mantle is evidenced by the Paria cluster seismicity at depths of 60-110 km (Russo et al, 1993). Body wave tomography and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) thickness determined from Sp and Ps receiver functions and Rayleigh waves suggest that the descending ATL also viscously removes the bottom third to half of the SA continental margin lithospheric mantle as it descends. This has left thinned continental lithosphere under northern SA in the wake of the eastward migrating Antilles subduction zone. The thinned lithosphere occupies ~70% of the length of the El Pilar-San Sebastian fault system, from ~64oW to ~69oW, and extends inland several hundred kilometers. In northwestern SA the CAR subducts east-southeast at low angle under northern Colombia and western Venezuela. The subducting CAR is at least 200 km wide, extending from northernmost Colombia as far south as the Bucaramanga nest seismicity. The CAR descends steeply under Lake Maracaibo and the Merida Andes. This flat slab is associated with three Neogene basement cored, Laramide-style uplifts: the Santa Marta

  1. The lithosphere structure beneath the central Mediterranean from S receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Irene; Miller, Meghan; Piana Agostinetti, Nicola; O'Driscoll, Leland

    2017-04-01

    The last piece of Mesozoic oceanic lithosphere from the Neo-Tethys Ocean is being consumed beneath Eurasia in the Central Mediterranean area, squeezed by the continuing convergence of Africa with the Eurasian plate. Convergence between Africa and Eurasia has been ongoing since the Cenozoic, forming a series of arcuate shaped subduction zones, and producing the current complex plate boundary that strikes across the Mediterranean area. Moreover, geophysical imaging depicts a variable lithospheric structure related to remnants of both oceanic and continental lithosphere within this convergent margin, which contributes to its complexity. In fact, the subduction/collision of blocks with different rheologies and thicknesses (e.g. continental or oceanic) has resulted in complex setting that includes accretionary wedges, orogenesis, and formation of an intricate back-arc/fore-arc/trench system. In order to shed light on these tectonic structures, we provide observations and interpretations of the lithospheric structure of the central Mediterranean via S receiver functions analysis. Teleseismic observations recorded at permanent and temporary seismic stations have been employed to produce images of the lithospheric discontinuities with tens of kilometers lateral resolution. We illustrate the feasibility of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary detection on a regional scale, and detect the occurrence of deeper seismic discontinuities due both to positive and negative seismic velocity jumps.

  2. A Magma Accretion Model for the Formation of Oceanic Lithosphere: Implications for Global Heat Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiya M. Hamza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A magma accretion model of oceanic lithosphere is proposed and its implications for understanding its thermal field examined. The new model (designated Variable Basal Accretion—VBA assumes existence of lateral variations in magma accretion rates and temperatures at the boundary zone between the lithosphere and the asthenosphere. However, unlike the previous thermal models of the lithosphere, the ratio of advection to conduction heat transfer is considered a space dependent variable. The results of VBA model simulations reveal that the thickness of the young lithosphere increases with distance from the ridge axis, at rates faster than those predicted by Half-Space Cooling models. Another noteworthy feature of the new model is its ability to account for the main features in the thermal behavior of oceanic lithosphere. The improved fits to bathymetry have been achieved for the entire age range and without the need to invoke the ad-hoc hypothesis of large-scale hydrothermal circulation. Also, use of VBA model does not lead to artificial discontinuities in the temperature field of the lithosphere, as is the case with GDH (Global Depth Heat Flow reference models. The results suggest that estimates of global heat loss need to be downsized by at least 25%.

  3. Lithospheric topography, tilted plumes, and the track of the Snake River-Yellowstone hot spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervais, John W.; Hanan, Barry B.

    2008-10-01

    The trace of the Snake River-Yellowstone hot spot is the world's best example of a mantle plume that has been overridden by continental lithosphere. The "standard model" calls for the plume head to rise under northern Nevada and be forced northward to form basalts of the Columbia Plateau; subsequent movement of North America to the southwest over the plume tail created a hot spot trace on the surface. We present a new conceptual model for the origin of this feature that resolves inconsistencies in the current standard model and explains the recent documentation of a thermal anomaly in the mantle below Yellowstone today that plunges ˜65° WNW. Our model implies that the plume tail was forced beneath thinned cratonic lithosphere to the SE along with part of the plume head and has remained in this orientation for the last 12 Ma. We infer that almost all of the volcanism in SE Oregon and SW Idaho prior to 12 Ma results from overriding the southern extension of the plume head, not the plume tail, and that a distinct plume tail hot spot track was not established until formation of the Bruneau-Jarbidge eruptive center around 12 Ma. The plume tail track may also be controlled by a preexisting structural boundary in lithosphere that is thinner than adjacent lithosphere. This model demonstrates the potential importance of lithospheric topography on controlling the surface manifestation of plume volcanism and the complexity that may arise when lithospheric thickness is nonuniform.

  4. Three-dimensional lithospheric density distribution of China and surrounding regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuantao Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyze lithospheric density distribution of China and surrounding regions on the basis of 30′ × 30′ gravity data and 1° × 1° P-wave velocity data. Firstly, we used the empirical equation between the density and the P-wave velocity difference as the base of the initial model of the Asian lithospheric density. Secondly, we calculated the gravity anomaly, caused by the Moho discontinuity and the sedimentary layer discontinuity, by the Parker formula. Thirdly, the gravity anomaly of the spherical harmonics with 2–40 order for the anomalous body below the lithosphere is calculated based on the model of EGM96. Finally, by using Algebra Reconstruction Techniques (ART, the inversion of 30′ × 30′ residual lithospheric Bouguer gravity anomaly caused by the lithosphere yields a rather detailed structural model. The results show that the lithospheric density distribution of China and surrounding regions has a certain connection with the tectonic structure. The density is relatively high in the Philippine Sea plate, Japan Sea, the Indian plate, the Kazakhstan shield and the Western Siberia plain, whereas the Tibetan Plateau has low-density characteristics. The minimum value of density lies in the north of Philippines, in the Taiwan province and in the Ryukyu island arc.

  5. Hydrosphere, Atmosphere, Lithosphere, Biosphere: A Global Geophysical Union

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milly, P.

    2009-05-01

    Water moves freely among the major spheres of the earth system, and, in so doing, it unites them. The atmosphere is driven, moistened and clouded by water in its changing phases, with ubiquitous climatic consequences. The biosphere's organisms depend on the "universal solvent" for access to and internal transport of nutrients, so much so that water availability defines the very geography of photosynthesis and life. The lithosphere is variously loaded, inflated, lubricated and eroded by water, with geodynamic consequences of all sorts. The ever-changing gravitational pull of earth's wandering waters is felt even in the exosphere. The movement of water among the spheres is partially regulated by, and has enormous consequences for, the anthroposphere. The influence of the hydrosphere on the other spheres creates interesting opportunities (indeed, necessities) for hydrologists to play with puzzles and problems beyond their own traditional sphere. In the experience of the speaker, the American Geophysical Union has been a playground that promotes such play, and the future promises more interdisciplinary fun; we have nothing to fear but spheres by themselves.

  6. Risk and Geodynamically active areas of Carpathian lithosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubomil Pospíšil

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates an application of multidisciplinary data analysis to the Carpathian–Pannonian region and presents a verification of a Complex model of the Carpathian - Pannonian lithosphere by recent data sets and geophysical data analyses and its utilization for the determination of risk and active geodynamic and tectonic zones of Ist order . This model can be used for the analysing any Carpathian area from the point of view of the seismic risk, hazards and geodynamic activity, which is important to know for the building of a repository for the radioactive wasted material. Besides the traditionally used geological (sedimentological and volcanological data and geomorphological data (Remote Sensing, an emphasis was laid on geodetic, grav/mag data, seismic, seismological and other geophysical data (magnetotelluric, heat flow, paleomagnetic etc.. All available geonomic (geologic, geodetic, geophysical, geomorphological data were verified and unified on the basis of the same scale and in the Western Carpathians on the Remote Sensing data. The paper concentrates on two problematic areas – the so call “rebounding area” in the Eastern Carpathians and the Raba – Muran - Malcov tectonic systems.

  7. A common Pan-African Lithospheric Mantle (PALM) source for HIMU-like Pb-isotope signatures in circum-Mediterranean magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, H. P.; Wang, Z.; Brandon, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    Isotopic compositions of widely distributed basaltic rocks of Europe and North Africa are clustered around a point that is displaced from modern MORB in 208Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb, pointing to the 'HIMU' component proposed by Zindler and Hart (1986). This observation was originally highlighted in an abstract by Cebria and Wilson (1995), who suggested that a reservoir of unknown origin exists in the convecting upper mantle of the Mediterranean and coin it the 'European asthenospheric reservoir' or EAR in order to distinguish it from the apparent influence of an additional 'lithospheric' component having a Sr-Nd isotope composition similar to continental crust that is observed in some, but not all, Cenozoic igneous rocks. While this study and most authors agree that the 'lithospheric' component in the model of Cebria and Wilson (1995) is crustal material associated with Cenozoic subduction, explanations for the origin of the HIMU-like EAR reservoir, however, are diverse, ranging from deep plumes to recently subducted slabs. These explanations are problematic. For example, neither plumes nor recent subduction are spatially broad enough to explain all of the EAR occurrences. Alternatively, we argue that both components (lithospheric and EAR) observed by Cebria and Wilson are lithospheric in origin. We propose that the origin of the HIMU-like Pb component is metasomatized sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM). Comparison with synthetic evolution models of a veined mantle show the HIMU-like composition of European Cenozoic igneous rocks can be generated after ~500 Ma (Pilet et al., 2011). Major and trace element compositions of the European alkalic-basalts are similar to experimental melts of amphibole-pyroxenite veins in peridotite (a common feature of the SCLM) (Médard et al., 2006). A likely candidate for a veined 500 Ma SCLM in this region is the 'Pan-African' age terrane that is currently widely distributed from England to the Sahara as well as on the

  8. Lithospheric structure beneath the northeastern Tibetan Plateau and the western Sino-Korea Craton revealed by Rayleigh wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yonghua; Pan, Jiatie; Wu, Qingju; Ding, Zhifeng

    2017-08-01

    A new 3-D shear wave velocity model of the northeastern (NE) Tibetan Plateau and western Sino-Korea Craton is presented. The model is based on Rayleigh waves recorded at 650 portable stations deployed in the region. Interstation phase and group velocity dispersions for more than 18 000 paths were estimated using the two-station method and then inverted to produce phase velocity maps for 10-80 s period and group velocity maps for 10-60 s period. Local 1-D shear wave velocity profiles for each 0.5° × 0.5°grid node were obtained by inverting Rayleigh wave dispersions obtained in this study together with previously published Rayleigh wave group velocities between 60 and 145 s and then assembled into a 3-D shear wave velocity model. The images obtained reveal an obvious mid-crustal low-velocity zone (LVZ) and low-velocity anomaly in the upper mantle beneath the Songpan-Ganzi terrane. The mid-crustal LVZ can be explained by the presence of partial melting, most likely from asthenospheric upwelling. The existence of a relatively weak mid-crustal LVZ beneath the Qilian orogeny is also confirmed. This LVZ is likely caused by the presence of deep crustal fluids. The Yinchuan-Hetao graben is characterized by relatively low velocities that extend to at least 200 km below the Earth's surface, strongly contrasting with the seismically fast lithosphere of the Ordos and Alax blocks. The model presented here shows the presence of a relatively thick and high-velocity lithosphere beneath the Ordos and NE Alxa blocks, as well as evidence of thinning of the lithosphere beneath the southwestern Alxa and Qilian blocks, indicating that the Alxa block is not subducting beneath NE Tibet.

  9. 3D isotropic shear wave velocity structure of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system underneath the Alpine-Mediterranean Mobile belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawy, Amr; Weidle, Christian; Christiano, Luigia; Lebedev, Sergei; Meier, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The Alpine-Mediterranean mobile belt is, tectonically, one of the most complicated and active regions in the world. Since the Mesozoic, collisions between Gondwana-derived continental blocks and Eurasia, due to the closure of a number of rather small ocean basins, have shaped the Mediterranean geology. During the late Mesozoic, it was dominated by subduction zones (e.g., in Anatolia, the Dinarides, the Carpathians, the Alps, the Apennines, and the Betics), which inverted the extensional regime, consuming the previously formed oceanic lithosphere, the adjacent passive continental margins and presumably partly also continental lithosphere. The location, distribution, and evolution of these subduction zones were mainly controlled by the continental or oceanic nature, density, and thickness of the lithosphere inherited from the Mesozoic rift after the European Variscan Orogeny. Despite the numerous studies that have attempted to characterize the lithosphere-asthenosphere structure in that area, details of the lithospheric structure and dynamics, as well as flow in the asthenosphere are, however, poorly known. A 3D shear-wave velocity structure of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system in the Mediterranean is investigated using new tomographic images obtained from surface wave tomography. An automated algorithm for inter-station phase velocity measurements is applied here to obtain both Rayleigh and Love fundamental mode phase velocities. We utilize a database consisting of more than 4000 seismic events recorded by more than 2000 broadband seismic stations within the area, provided by the European Integrated Data Archive (WebDc/EIDA) and IRIS. Moreover, for the first time, data from the Egyptian National Seismological Network (ENSN), recorded by up to 25 broad band seismic stations, are also included in the analysis. For each station pair, approximately located on the same great circle path, the recorded waveforms are cross correlated and the dispersion curves of

  10. A lithospheric cross-section in the eastern Iberian Peninsula and its margins. Modelling the physical properties of the upper mantle; Corte litosferico al Este de la Peninsula Iberica y sus margenes. Modelizacion de las propiedades fisicas del manto superior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carballo, A.; Fernandez, M.; Jimenez-Munt, I.

    2011-07-01

    We study the lithosphere structure along a 1700 km transect crossing the Aquitaine basin, Pyrenees, Ebro basin, Catalan Costal Ranges, Valencia Trough, Balearic Promontory, and Sudbalearic basin, and Kabyles, Tell, Atlas, and Saharan Platform in Africa. The objective is to characterize the structure and composition of the lthospheric mantle in the region, using a method (LitMod) that combines elevation, gravity, geoid, surface heat flow, seismic and petrological data. Using this method we can identify along the profile different mantle composition, derived from geochemical analysis and age. This is the main different with the previous model done in the same area, where lithospheric mantle density just varied with temperature. The results obtained with the LitMod methodology show important differences in geometry and depth of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary with the previous model. In the present study we had to consider four different lithopheric mantle compositions in order to fit all the observables. (Author) 18 refs.

  11. To fractionate municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash: Key for utilisation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sormunen, Laura Annika; Rantsi, Riina

    2015-11-01

    For the past decade, the Finnish waste sector has increasingly moved from the landfilling of municipal solid waste towards waste incineration. New challenges are faced with the growing amounts of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash, which are mainly landfilled at the moment. Since this is not a sustainable or a profitable solution, finding different utilisation applications for the municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash is crucial. This study reports a comprehensive analysis of bottom ash properties from one waste incineration plant in Finland, which was first treated with a Dutch bottom ash recovery technique called advanced dry recovery. This novel process separates non-ferrous and ferrous metals from bottom ash, generating mineral fractions of different grain sizes (0-2 mm, 2-5 mm, 5-12 mm and 12-50 mm). The main aim of the study was to assess, whether the advanced bottom ash treatment technique, producing mineral fractions of different grain sizes and therefore properties, facilitates the utilisation of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash in Finland. The results were encouraging; the bottom ash mineral fractions have favourable behaviour against the frost action, which is especially useful in the Finnish conditions. In addition, the leaching of most hazardous substances did not restrict the utilisation of bottom ash, especially for the larger fractions (>5 mm). Overall, this study has shown that the advanced bottom ash recovering technique can be one solution to increase the utilisation of bottom ash and furthermore decrease its landfilling in Finland. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Flowable Backfill Materials from Bottom Ash for Underground Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Joong Lee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between strength and strain in manufacturing controlled low strength materials to recycle incineration bottom ash. Laboratory tests for controlled low strength materials with bottom ash and recycled in-situ soil have been carried out. The optimum mixing ratios were 25%–45% of in-situ soil, 30% of bottom ash, 10%–20% of fly ash, 0%–3% of crumb rubber, 3% of cement, and 22% of water. Each mixture satisfied the standard specifications: a minimum 20 cm of flowability and 127 kPa of unconfined compressive strength. The average secant modulus (E50 was (0.07–0.08 qu. The ranges of the internal friction angle and cohesion for mixtures were 36.5°–46.6° and 49.1–180 kPa, respectively. The pH of all of the mixtures was over 12, which is strongly alkaline. Small-scale chamber tests for controlled low strength materials with bottom ash and recycled in-situ soil have been carried out. Vertical deflection of 0.88–2.41 mm and horizontal deflection of 0.83–3.72 mm were measured during backfilling. The vertical and horizontal deflections of controlled low strength materials were smaller than that of sand backfill.

  13. Achieving a ‘top-down’ change agenda by driving and supporting a collaborative ‘bottom-up’ process: case study of a large-scale enhanced recovery programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunlayi, Fatai; Britton, Philip

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that organisations need to look beyond their boundaries for new innovations. However, the introduction and implementation of best practice that has been developed externally may need different processes of implementation if a successful change process is going to be achieved. Using an enhanced recovery programme as an example, we report a case study that combines the best of a top-down approach with the principles of bottom-up collaborative working to successfully embed a large-scale quality improvement programme that was commissioned to improve the adoption of enhanced recovery in elective surgery. We describe a large-scale change programme that was established, coordinated and driven from within a central ‘top’ organisation but delivered and owned locally by individual organisations working collaboratively across southeast region of England. We discuss why we believe our methodology of implementing this programme was successful, the important triggers for success and the lessons we learned from the programme. PMID:29450260

  14. From the North-Iberian Margin to the Alboran Basin: A lithosphere geo-transect across the Iberian Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo, A.; Fernandez, M.; Jiménez-Munt, I.; Torne, M.; Vergés, J.; Melchiorre, M.; Pedreira, D.; Afonso, J. C.; Garcia-Castellanos, D.; Díaz, J.; Villaseñor, A.; Pulgar, J. A.; Quintana, L.

    2015-11-01

    A ~ 1000-km-long lithospheric transect running from the North-Iberian Margin to the Alboran Basin (W-Mediterranean) is investigated. The main goal is to image the changes in the crustal and upper mantle structure occurring in: i) the North-Iberian margin, whose deformation in Alpine times gave rise to the uplift of the Cantabrian Mountains related to Iberia-Eurasia incipient subduction; ii) the Spanish Meseta, characterized by the presence of Cenozoic basins on top of a Variscan basement with weak Alpine deformation in the Central System, and localized Neogene-Quaternary deep volcanism; and iii) the Betic-Alboran system related to Africa-Iberia collision and the roll-back of the Ligurian-Tethyan domain. The modeling approach, combines potential fields, elevation, thermal, seismic, and petrological data under a self-consistent scheme. The crustal structure is mainly constrained by seismic data whereas the upper mantle is constrained by tomographic models. The results highlight the lateral variations in the topography of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), suggesting a strong lithospheric mantle strain below the Cantabrian and Betic mountain belts. The LAB depth ranges from 180 km beneath the Cantabrian Mountains to 135-110 km beneath Iberia Meseta deepening again to values of 160 km beneath the Betic Cordillera. The Central System, with a mean elevation of 1300 m, has a negligible signature on the LAB depth. We have considered four lithospheric mantle compositions: a predominantly average Phanerozoic in the continental mainland, two more fertile compositions in the Alboran Sea and in the Calatrava Volcanic Province, and a hydrated uppermost mantle in the North-Iberian Margin. These compositional differences allowed us to reproduce the main trends of the geophysical observables as well as the inferred P- and S-wave seismic velocities from tomography models and seismic experiments available in the study transect. The high mean topography of Iberia can be

  15. Charge transport in bottom-up inorganic-organic and quantum-coherent nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makarenko, K.S.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is based on results obtained from experiments designed for a consistent study of charge transport in bottom-up inorganic-organic and quantum-coherent nanostructures. New unconventional ways to build elements of electrical circuits (like dielectrophoresis, wedging transfer and bottom-up

  16. Area-intensive bottom culture of blue mussels Mytilus edulis in a micro-tidal estuary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per; Christensen, Helle Torp; Hansen, Benni Winding

    2012-01-01

    Dredge fishery for blue mussels Mytilus edulis (L.) impacts the benthic ecosystem, and substitution by area-intensive bottom culture production may reduce adverse effects on the ecosystem. Two different field studies in 2007 and 2009 tested the productivity of bottom culture of blue mussels...

  17. Top-Down Beta Enhances Bottom-Up Gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Craig G; Thompson, William H; Bosman, Conrado A; Fries, Pascal

    2017-07-12

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that the bottom-up signaling of a visual stimulus is subserved by interareal gamma-band synchronization, whereas top-down influences are mediated by alpha-beta band synchronization. These processes may implement top-down control of stimulus processing if top-down and bottom-up mediating rhythms are coupled via cross-frequency interaction. To test this possibility, we investigated Granger-causal influences among awake macaque primary visual area V1, higher visual area V4, and parietal control area 7a during attentional task performance. Top-down 7a-to-V1 beta-band influences enhanced visually driven V1-to-V4 gamma-band influences. This enhancement was spatially specific and largest when beta-band activity preceded gamma-band activity by ∼0.1 s, suggesting a causal effect of top-down processes on bottom-up processes. We propose that this cross-frequency interaction mechanistically subserves the attentional control of stimulus selection.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Contemporary research indicates that the alpha-beta frequency band underlies top-down control, whereas the gamma-band mediates bottom-up stimulus processing. This arrangement inspires an attractive hypothesis, which posits that top-down beta-band influences directly modulate bottom-up gamma band influences via cross-frequency interaction. We evaluate this hypothesis determining that beta-band top-down influences from parietal area 7a to visual area V1 are correlated with bottom-up gamma frequency influences from V1 to area V4, in a spatially specific manner, and that this correlation is maximal when top-down activity precedes bottom-up activity. These results show that for top-down processes such as spatial attention, elevated top-down beta-band influences directly enhance feedforward stimulus-induced gamma-band processing, leading to enhancement of the selected stimulus. Copyright © 2017 Richter, Thompson et al.

  18. Geothermal structure of the eastern Black Sea basin and the eastern Pontides orogenic belt: Implications for subduction polarity of Tethys oceanic lithosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiz Maden

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The numerical results of thermal modeling studies indicate that the lithosphere is cold and strong beneath the Black Sea basin. The thermal lithospheric thickness increases southward from the eastern Pontides orogenic belt (49.4 km to Black Sea basin (152.2 km. The Moho temperature increases from 367 °C in the trench to 978 °C in the arc region. The heat flow values for the Moho surface change between 16.4 mW m−2 in the Black Sea basin and 56.9 mW m−2 in the eastern Pontides orogenic belt. Along the southern Black Sea coast, the trench region has a relatively low geothermal potential with respect to the arc and back-arc region. The numerical studies support the existence of southward subduction beneath the Pontides during the late Mesozoic–Cenozoic.

  19. Constraining lithosphere deformation modes during continental breakup for the Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate rifted margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanniot, Ludovic; Kusznir, Nick; Mohn, Geoffroy; Manatschal, Gianreto; Cowie, Leanne

    2016-06-01

    A kinematic model of lithosphere and asthenosphere deformation has been used to investigate lithosphere stretching and thinning modes during continental rifting leading to breakup and seafloor spreading. The model has been applied to two conjugate profiles across the Iberia-Newfoundland rifted margins and quantitatively calibrated using observed present-day water loaded subsidence and crustal thickness, together with observed mantle exhumation, subsidence and melting generation histories. The kinematic model uses an evolving prescribed flow-field to deform the lithosphere and asthenosphere leading to lithospheric breakup from which continental crustal thinning, lithosphere thermal evolution, decompression melt initiation and subsidence are predicted. We explore the sensitivity of model predictions to extension rate history, deformation migration and buoyancy induced upwelling. The best fit calibrated models of lithosphere deformation evolution for the Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate margins require; (1) an initial broad region of lithosphere deformation with passive upwelling, (2) lateral migration of deformation, (3) an increase in extension rate with time, (4) focussing of the deformation and (5) buoyancy induced upwelling. The model prediction of exhumed mantle at the Iberia-Newfoundland margins, as observed, requires a critical threshold of melting to be exceeded before melt extraction. The preferred calibrated models predict faster extension rates and earlier continental crustal separation and mantle exhumation for the Iberia Abyssal Plain-Flemish Pass conjugate margin profile than for the Galicia Bank-Flemish Cap profile to the north. The predicted N-S differences in the deformation evolution give insights into the 3D evolution of Iberia-Newfoundland margin crustal separation.

  20. Lithospheric thickness jumps at the S-Atlantic continental margins from satellite gravity data and modelled isostatic anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahraki, Meysam; Schmeling, Harro; Haas, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Isostatic equilibrium is a good approximation for passive continental margins. In these regions, geoid anomalies are proportional to the local dipole moment of density-depth distributions, which can be used to constrain the amount of oceanic to continental lithospheric thickening (lithospheric jumps). We consider a five- or three-layer 1D model for the oceanic and continental lithosphere, respectively, composed of water, a sediment layer (both for the oceanic case), the crust, the mantle lithosphere and the asthenosphere. The mantle lithosphere is defined by a mantle density, which is a function of temperature and composition, due to melt depletion. In addition, a depth-dependent sediment density associated with compaction and ocean floor variation is adopted. We analyzed satellite derived geoid data and, after filtering, extracted typical averaged profiles across the Western and Eastern passive margins of the South Atlantic. They show geoid jumps of 8.1 m and 7.0 m for the Argentinian and African sides, respectively. Together with topography data and an averaged crustal density at the conjugate margins these jumps are interpreted as isostatic geoid anomalies and yield best-fitting crustal and lithospheric thicknesses. In a grid search approach five parameters are systematically varied, namely the thicknesses of the sediment layer, the oceanic and continental crusts and the oceanic and the continental mantle lithosphere. The set of successful models reveals a clear asymmetry between the South Africa and Argentine lithospheres by 15 km. Preferred models predict a sediment layer at the Argentine margin of 3-6 km and at the South Africa margin of 1-2.5 km. Moreover, we derived a linear relationship between, oceanic lithosphere, sediment thickness and lithospheric jumps at the South Atlantic margins. It suggests that the continental lithospheres on the western and eastern South Atlantic are thicker by 45-70 and 60-80 km than the oceanic lithospheres, respectively.

  1. Lithospheric Structure and Dynamics: Insights Facilitated by the IRIS/PASSCAL Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, A.

    2002-12-01

    Through the development of community-based facilities in portable array seismology, a wide-range of seismic methods are now standard tools for imaging the Earth's interior, extending geologic observations made at the surface to depth. The IRIS/PASSCAL program provides the seismological community with the ability to routinely field experimental programs, from high-resolution seismic reflection profiling of the near surface to lithospheric scale imaging with both active and passive source arrays, to understand the tectonic evolution of continents, how they are assembled, disassembled, and modified through time. As our ability to record and process large volumes of data has improved we have moved from simple 1-D velocity models and 2-D structural cross sections of the subsurface to 3-D and 4-D images to correlate complex surface tectonics to processes in the Earth's interior. Data from individual IRIS/PASSCAL experiments has fostered multidisciplinary studies, bringing together geologists, geochemists, and geophysicists to work together on common problems. As data is collected from a variety of tectonic environments around the globe common elements begin to emerge. We now recognize and study the inherent lateral and vertical heterogeneity in the crust and mantle lithosphere and its role in controlling deformation, the importance of low velocity mobile mantle in supporting topography, and the importance of fluids and fluid migration in magmatic and deformational processes. We can image and map faults, fault zones, and fault networks to study them as systems rather than isolated planes of deformation to better understand earthquake nucleation, rupture, and propagation. An additional benefit of these community-based facilities is the pooling of resources to develop effective and sustainable education and outreach programs. These programs attract new students to pursue careers in earth science, engage the general public in the scientific enterprise, raise the profile of

  2. In search of the Higgs boson: H -> bottom bottom

    CERN Multimedia

    Cortada, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    In Geneva, FIU artist Xavier Cortada and physicist Pete Markowitz delivered an Art-Science talk during the CERN CMS Week Conference, created a site-specific installation at the CMS experiment venue and engaged 300 scientists from around the world in a performance art piece that transformed them into the very subatomic particles they research. In the piece, they invite scientists to participate by wearing a cap with LED lights, showing one of the 6 colors which represent the flavors of the quarks. The physicists themselves then take the role of the quarks inside a proton with the building serving as the confining (proton) walls. Through their social interactions each scientist will mimic the natural interactions studied in the experiment below. Working together, Cortada and Markowitz developed a permanent art installation to be unveiled at the vernissage. The installation's five banners give the different strategies to sift through the voluminous collisions recorded by the CMS experiment in the search for the...

  3. Crustal and Lithospheric Structure of the Western Mediterranean: Pds Receiver Function Results from the PICASSO Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, S.; Palomeras, I.; Levander, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Betic Mountains in southern Spain, the Gibraltar Arc, the Alboran Sea, and the Rif and Atlas Mountains in northern Africa comprise the western Mediterranean tectonic region, which has been affected by simultaneous extension and compression throughout the Cenozoic. Multiple geodynamic models have been invoked to explain the coeval compressional and extensional tectonic processes, including slab roll-back (Royden, 1993; Lonergan and White, 1997; Gutscher et al., 2002), accompanied and followed by lithospheric convective downwelling (Seber et al., 1996; Calvert et al., 2000), and delamination (Platt et al., 1996). We use Ps teleseismic receiver functions to investigate the crustal and lithospheric structure throughout this region. PICASSO (Program to Investigate Convective Alboran Sea System Overturn) is a multi-disciplinary, international investigation seeking to improve our understanding of the geodynamics of the western Mediterranean. The PICASSO deployment includes 89 broadband stations distributed linearly from central Spain to the Morocco-Algeria border. For this study we supplemented the PICASSO dataset with data from six other Moroccan, Spanish, Portuguese, and German networks in the region. Using 167 events (M > 6.0) recorded at a total of 240 stations we calculated 1 Hz and 2Hz receiver functions. The receiver functions were then CCP stacked to create a 3D image volume of the region. The Pds receiver functions indicate crustal thicknesses between ~42-47 km in southern Spain beneath the Betic Mountains and ~35-45 km across the Gibraltar Strait. Beneath both the Rif and Betic Mountains we observe complex crustal structures, including two strong positive arrivals around Moho depth (~50 km). A number of models can explain this feature, including those associated thrust systems in each region. In Morocco, along a NW-SE transect from the Gibraltar Strait across the Atlas Mountains, we observe thick crust in the north beneath the Rif Mountains and to the south

  4. Detailed study of selenium and other constituents in water, bottom sediment, soil, alfalfa, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Uncompahgre Project area and in the Grand Valley, west-central Colorado, 1991-93

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, D.L.; Wright, W.G.; Stewart, K.C.; Osmundson, B.C.; Krueger, R.P.; Crabtree, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    In 1985, the U.S. Department of the Interior began a program to study the effects of irrigation drainage in the Western United States. These studies were done to determine whether irrigation drainage was causing problems related to human health, water quality, and fish and wildlife resources. Results of a study in 1991-93 of irrigation drainage associated with the Uncompahgre Project area, located in the lower Gunnison River Basin, and of the Grand Valley, located along the Colorado River, are described in this report. The focus of the report is on the sources, distribution, movement, and fate of selenium in the hydrologic and biological systems and the effects on biota. Generally, other trace- constituent concentrations in water and biota were not elevated or were not at levels of concern. Soils in the Uncompahgre Project area that primarily were derived from Mancos Shale contained the highest concentrations of total and watrer-extractable selenium. Only 5 of 128\\x11alfalfa samples had selenium concentrations that exceeded a recommended dietary limit for livestock. Selenium data for soil and alfalfa indicate that irrigation might be mobilizing and redistributing selenium in the Uncompahgre Project area. Distribution of dissolved selenium in ground water is affected by the aqueous geochemical environment of the shallow ground- water system. Selenium concentrations were as high as 1,300\\x11micrograms per liter in water from shallow wells. The highest concentrations of dissolved selenium were in water from wells completed in alluvium overlying the Mancos Shale of Cretaceous age; selenium concentrations were lower in water from wells completed in Mancos Shale residuum. Selenium in the study area could be mobilized by oxidation of reduced selenium, desorption from aquifer sediments, ion exchange, and dissolution. Infiltration of irrigation water and, perhaps nitrate, provide oxidizing conditions for mobilization of selenium from alluvium and shale residuum and for

  5. Wet physical separation of MSWI bottom ash

    OpenAIRE

    Muchova, L.

    2010-01-01

    Bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) has high potential for the recovery of valuable secondary materials. For example, the MSWI bottom ash produced by the incinerator at Amsterdam contains materials such as non-ferrous metals (2.3%), ferrous metals (8-13%), gold (0.4 ppm), silver (10 ppm), stainless steel (0.1%) and minerals that can be converted into building products such as aggregates utilized for concrete, asphalt, etc. Since the composition of BA varies from cou...

  6. Lithospheric magma dynamics beneath the El Hierro Volcano, Canary Islands: insights from fluid inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglialoro, E.; Frezzotti, M. L.; Ferrando, S.; Tiraboschi, C.; Principe, C.; Groppelli, G.; Villa, I. M.

    2017-10-01

    At active volcanoes, petrological studies have been proven to be a reliable approach in defining the depth conditions of magma transport and storage in both the mantle and the crust. Based on fluid inclusion and mineral geothermobarometry in mantle xenoliths, we propose a model for the magma plumbing system of the Island of El Hierro (Canary Islands). The peridotites studied here were entrained in a lava flow exposed in the El Yulan Valley. These lavas are part of the rift volcanism that occurred on El Hierro at approximately 40-30 ka. The peridotites are spinel lherzolites, harzburgites, and dunites which equilibrated in the shallow mantle at pressures between 1.5 and 2 GPa and at temperatures between 800 and 950 °C (low-temperature peridotites; LT), as well as at higher equilibration temperatures of 900 to 1100 °C (high-temperature peridotites; HT). Microthermometry and Raman analyses of fluid inclusions reveal trapping of two distinct fluid phases: early type I metasomatic CO2-N2 fluids ( X N2 = 0.01-0.18; fluid density (d) = 1.19 g/cm3), coexisting with silicate-carbonate melts in LT peridotites, and late type II pure CO2 fluids in both LT (d = 1.11-1.00 and 0.75-0.65 g/cm3) and HT ( d = 1.04-1.11 and 0.75-0.65 g/cm3) peridotites. While type I fluids represent metasomatic phases in the deep oceanic lithosphere (at depths of 60-65 km) before the onset of magmatic activity, type II CO2 fluids testify to two fluid trapping episodes during the ascent of xenoliths in their host mafic magmas. Identification of magma accumulation zones through interpretation of type II CO2 fluid inclusions and mineral geothermobarometry indicate the presence of a vertically stacked system of interconnected small magma reservoirs in the shallow lithospheric mantle between a depth of 22 and 36 km (or 0.67 to 1 GPa). This magma accumulation region fed a short-lived magma storage region located in the lower oceanic crust at a depth of 10-12 km (or 0.26-0.34 GPa). Following our model

  7. Investigation of Lithospheric Structure in Mongolia: Insights from Insar Observations and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Z.; Bihong, F.; Pilong, S.; Qiang, G.

    2017-09-01

    The western Mongolia is a seismically active intracontinental region, with ongoing tectonic deformation and widespread seismicity related to the far-field effects of India-Eurasia collision. During the 20th century, four earthquakes with the magnitude larger than 8 occurred in the western Mongolia and its surrounding regions, providing a unique opportunity to study the geodynamics of intracontinental tectonic deformations. The 1957 magnitude 8.3 Gobi-Altai earthquake is one of the largest seismic events. The deformation pattern of rupture zone associated with this earthquake is complex, involving left-lateral strike-slip and reverse dip-slip faulting on several distinct geological structures in a 264 × 40 km wide zone. To understand the relationship between the observed postseismic surface deformation and the rheological structure of the upper lithosphere, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data are used to study the 1957 earthquake. Then we developed a postseismic model in a spherical, radially layered elastic-viscoelastic Earth based on InSAR results, and further analysed the dominant contribution to the surface deformation. This work is important for understanding not only the regional tectonics, but also the structure and dynamics of the lithosphere. SAR data were acquired from the ERS1/2 and Envisat from 1996 to 2010. Using the Repeat Orbit Interferometry Package (ROI_PAC), 124 postseismic interferograms are produced on four adjacent tracks. By stacking these interferograms, the maximum InSAR line-of-sight deformation rate along the Gobi-Altai fault zone is obtained. The main results are as follows: (1) The maximum InSAR line-of-sight deformation velocity along this large fault zone is about 6 mm/yr; (2) The modelled surface deformation suggests that the viscoelastic relaxation is the most reasonable mechanism to explain the observed surface motion; (3) The optimal model cover the Gobi-Altai seismogenic thickness is 10 km; (4) The

  8. Magnetolluric Imaging of the Lithosphere beneath the Tibetan Plateau: A Synoptic View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, H.; Wei, W.; Jin, S.; Ye, G.; Jing, J.; Zhang, L.; Jones, A. G.; Xie, C.; Yin, Y.

    2016-12-01

    To better understand the collision and convergence process between India and Asia continent, magnetotelluric (MT) data have been used to image crustal electrical resistivity and to estimate the rheological structure in the south, east and north margin of Tibetan Plateau in the last decades. However, most of these MT data were collected as isolated profiles and insufficient to convey a synoptic view of the Plateau. Recently, the MT data coverage is greatly improved from the 1 by 1 degree SINOPROBE MT array data from 2011-2013. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) geo-electrical model of the crust and uppermost mantle is derived from the combined broadband and long period array dataset. The resulting model features broadly resistive structure in the upper crust, with the exception of small scale conductors lining along the Yarlung-Zangbo Suture (YZS) and Bangong-Nujiang Suture (BNS). The lower crust consists of widely spread high conductive structures beneath Lhasa and Qiangtang Block except for the southeast part of Tibetan Plateau. Instead of the previous proposed homogenous high conductive layer, these lower crustal conductors are generally N-S directed and perpendicular to the above Cenozoic and Mesozoic sutures. While the lower crustal structures probably indicate partial melts induced by radiogenic heat from the thickened crust, the conductor along the suture zones in the upper crust might imply pathways for deep fluids into the shear zones of YZS and BNS. One of the most prominent feature revealed is the upper mantle conductive sturcture in the central part of Tibet Plateau (85-92°E) accompanied by two resistive regions in the southeast and southwest part of the Plateau. While the southwest resistive zone is broadly consistent with the "flat subduction" region of Indian lithosphere revealed by seismic receiver function study, the conductive middle part of Tibetan Plateau might represent the upper mantle melts induced by the water carried by the steeper

  9. Seismic anisotropy of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system beneath southern Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Miriam Christina; Rümpker, Georg; Tilmann, Frederik; Yuan, Xiaohui; Josiane Rindraharisaona, Elisa

    2015-04-01

    Madagascar is considered as a key region with respect to the assembly and break-up of the supercontinent Gondwana. Following the collision between East- and West-Gondwana (~700-650 Ma), its position was central to the Panafrican orogenesis. Madagascar then separated from East Africa and later from the Indian and Antarctic plates until these processes came to a halt about 69 Ma ago. Today, Madagascar consists of different tectonic units; the eastern parts (two thirds of the island) are composed mainly of Precambian rocks, whereas the western part is dominated by sedimentary deposits. Furthermore, southern Madagascar is characterized by several NS to NW-SE trending shear zones. Madagascar has been the target of a number of geological studies, but seismological investigations of the presumed complex lithosphere-asthenosphere system and of deeper upper-mantle structures are sparse. To increase our understanding of these structures and related tectonic processes, we installed a dense temporary seismic network in southern Madagascar. It consisted of 25 broadband and 25 short-period stations, which were in operation for up to 2 years between 2012 and 2014. The broadband stations crossed the island along an east-west profile; the eastern section was supplemented by a network of short-period stations. Here we present results from shear-wave splitting analyses to infer the seismic anisotropy of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system in response to deformational processes. The polarization of the fast shear wave and the delay time between the fast and slow waves provide constraints on the anisotropic fabric. For our study, we use SKS-phases from up to 12 events recorded at the temporary stations and from 10 events at the permanent GEOFON station VOI. We first apply a single-event splitting analysis by minimizing the transverse component. For stations that do not show a significant azimuthal dependence of the splitting parameters, we also apply a joint inversion involving all

  10. INVESTIGATION OF LITHOSPHERIC STRUCTURE IN MONGOLIA: INSIGHTS FROM INSAR OBSERVATIONS AND MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Jing

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The western Mongolia is a seismically active intracontinental region, with ongoing tectonic deformation and widespread seismicity related to the far-field effects of India-Eurasia collision. During the 20th century, four earthquakes with the magnitude larger than 8 occurred in the western Mongolia and its surrounding regions, providing a unique opportunity to study the geodynamics of intracontinental tectonic deformations. The 1957 magnitude 8.3 Gobi-Altai earthquake is one of the largest seismic events. The deformation pattern of rupture zone associated with this earthquake is complex, involving left-lateral strike-slip and reverse dip-slip faulting on several distinct geological structures in a 264 × 40 km wide zone. To understand the relationship between the observed postseismic surface deformation and the rheological structure of the upper lithosphere, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR data are used to study the 1957 earthquake. Then we developed a postseismic model in a spherical, radially layered elastic-viscoelastic Earth based on InSAR results, and further analysed the dominant contribution to the surface deformation. This work is important for understanding not only the regional tectonics, but also the structure and dynamics of the lithosphere. SAR data were acquired from the ERS1/2 and Envisat from 1996 to 2010. Using the Repeat Orbit Interferometry Package (ROI_PAC, 124 postseismic interferograms are produced on four adjacent tracks. By stacking these interferograms, the maximum InSAR line-of-sight deformation rate along the Gobi-Altai fault zone is obtained. The main results are as follows: (1 The maximum InSAR line-of-sight deformation velocity along this large fault zone is about 6 mm/yr; (2 The modelled surface deformation suggests that the viscoelastic relaxation is the most reasonable mechanism to explain the observed surface motion; (3 The optimal model cover the Gobi-Altai seismogenic thickness is 10

  11. 49 CFR 178.811 - Bottom lift test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bottom lift test. 178.811 Section 178.811... Testing of IBCs § 178.811 Bottom lift test. (a) General. The bottom lift test must be conducted for the... bottom lift test. The IBC must be loaded to 1.25 times its maximum permissible gross mass, the load being...

  12. 49 CFR 178.970 - Bottom lift test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bottom lift test. 178.970 Section 178.970... Testing of Large Packagings § 178.970 Bottom lift test. (a) General. The bottom lift test must be...) Special preparation for the bottom lift test. The Large Packaging must be loaded to 1.25 times its maximum...

  13. CRM and the Bottom Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josiassen, Alexander; Assaf, A. George; Cvelbar, Ljubica Knezevic

    2014-01-01

    Successful firms often endeavour to assure competitive advantages through the relationships with their customers. Consequently, customer relationship management (CRM) has become of pivotal importance to many firms. This study investigates the effect of each CRM dimension on the performance of hot...

  14. The nature of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary from laboratory investigations of olivine anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lars; Qi, Chao; Warren, Jessica; Kohlstedt, David; Holtzman, Benjamin; Wallis, David

    2017-04-01

    The nature of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) determines the mechanical coupling between rigid plates and the underlying convecting mantle. Seismological studies reveal distinct reflectors (G discontinuity) in the uppermost oceanic mantle that are sometimes interpreted as the LAB. The discontinuity in seismic velocity is suggested to arise from abrupt changes in composition, including the melt fraction. Interestingly, these reflectors roughly correlate with the location of discontinuities in radial seismic anisotropy, but do not correlate with the location of discontinuities in azimuthal anisotropy. To investigate the correlation between these datasets, we draw on recent laboratory measurements of crystallographic texture development in olivine-rich rocks. The textural evolution of dry olivine aggregates has been well described in recent experiments, while micromechanical models are available for incorporating these observations into larger-scale models of upper-mantle flow. Unfortunately, the systematics of textural evolution in melt-bearing olivine aggregates have not been similarly described. Here we present a new experimental data set detailing the evolution of anisotropy during deformation of partially molten peridotite. Torsion experiments were conducted on samples composed of San Carlos olivine and basaltic melt at a temperature of 1473 K and a confining pressure of 300 MPa. Seismically fast axes of olivine tend to lie at a high angle to the flow direction in a manner similar to previous experiments. The anisotropy in these samples is weak compared to that in dry, melt-free olivine deformed to similar strains. The anisotropy also exhibits relatively little change in strength and orientation with progressive deformation. Detailed microstructural analyses allow us to distinguish between competing models for the grain-scale deformation processes, favoring one in which crystallographically controlled grain shapes govern grain rotations. We

  15. Teleseismic P wave tomography of South Island, New Zealand upper mantle: Evidence of subduction of Pacific lithosphere since 45 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietlow, Daniel W.; Molnar, Peter H.; Sheehan, Anne F.

    2016-06-01

    A P wave speed tomogram produced from teleseismic travel time measurements made on and offshore the South Island of New Zealand shows a nearly vertical zone with wave speeds that are 4.5% higher than the background average reaching to depths of approximately 450 km under the northwestern region of the island. This structure is consistent with oblique west-southwest subduction of Pacific lithosphere since about 45 Ma, when subduction beneath the region began. The high-speed zone reaches about 200-300 km below the depths of the deepest intermediate-depth earthquakes (subcrustal to ~200 km) and therefore suggests that ~200-300 km of slab below them is required to produce sufficient weight to induce the intermediate-depth seismicity. In the southwestern South Island, high P wave speeds indicate subduction of the Australian plate at the Puysegur Trench to approximately 200 km depth. A band with speeds ~2-3.5% lower than the background average is found along the east coast of the South Island to depths of ~150-200 km and underlies Miocene or younger volcanism; these low speeds are consistent with thinned lithosphere. A core of high speeds under the Southern Alps associated with a convergent margin and mountain building imaged in previous investigations is not well resolved in this study. This could suggest that such high speeds are limited in both width and depth and not resolvable by our data.

  16. Distribution of Polychaeta in soft-bottoms of a Galician Ria (NW Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Cacabelos

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrobenthic polychaete distributions were studied along the soft-bottoms of the Ensenada de San Simón (Galicia, NW Spain. Results suggest that the distribution and abundance of polychaetes in the inlet were highly dependent on depth, sediment characteristics (grain size, organic matter and calcium carbonate content and bottom water temperature. In the inner area of the inlet, intertidal bottoms colonised by the seagrasses Zostera marina and Z. noltii were dominated by spionids and capitellids, and showed low species number and diversity. Shallow muddy bottoms of central areas were mostly dominated by ampharetids, terebellids and cirratullids. These families along with paraonids, maldanids and syllids were the most abundant families in the deeper subtidal muddy bottoms at the mouth of the inlet. These sediments also showed the highest number of species, diversity and density of individuals.

  17. Analysis of hydrodynamic characteristics of unmanned underwater vehicle moving close to the sea bottom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-xu Du

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The accurate research on the hydrodynamics of unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV, which moves close to the sea bottom, has a great significance for its maneuverability. The structured grid of the computational models with different distances to the sea bottom and attack angles is generated by Ansys ICEM, and the flow field near the sea bottom is simulated using CFX. The characteristics of the drag, lift, pitching moment influenced by the distance to sea bottom and the attack angle are studied. The result shows that the drag coefficient increases with the decrease of distance, while it increases with the increase of attack angle. There exists attraction force when UUV moves close to the sea bottom, and the attraction force increases with the decrease in distance. The lift coefficient increases with the increase in attack angle. The absolute value of the pitching moment coefficient increases with the decrease in distance and the increase in attack angle.

  18. Olivine anisotropy suggests Gutenberg discontinuity is not the base of the lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lars N.; Qi, Chao; Warren, Jessica M.

    2016-09-01

    Tectonic plates are a key feature of Earth’s structure, and their behavior and dynamics are fundamental drivers in a wide range of large-scale processes. The operation of plate tectonics, in general, depends intimately on the manner in which lithospheric plates couple to the convecting interior. Current debate centers on whether the transition from rigid lithosphere to flowing asthenosphere relates to increases in temperature or to changes in composition such as the presence of a small amount of melt or an increase in water content below a specified depth. Thus, the manner in which the rigid lithosphere couples to the flowing asthenosphere is currently unclear. Here we present results from laboratory-based torsion experiments on olivine aggregates with and without melt, yielding an improved database describing the crystallographic alignment of olivine grains. We combine this database with a flow model for oceanic upper mantle to predict the structure of the seismic anisotropy beneath ocean basins. Agreement between our model and seismological observations supports the view that the base of the lithosphere is thermally controlled. This model additionally supports the idea that discontinuities in velocity and anisotropy, often assumed to be the base of the lithosphere, are, instead, intralithospheric features reflecting a compositional boundary established at midocean ridges, not a rheological boundary.

  19. Dripping or delamination? A range of mechanisms for removing the lower crust or lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Adam P.; Moresi, Louis; Stern, Tim

    2017-08-01

    switching to dripping. Common lithospheric viscosities and observed timescales indicate that both instability transitions are feasible. Overall, the timescale and persistence of delamination depends on three parameter groups, which characterize the properties of the anomalously dense material, weak lower crustal layer and relative rate of thermal diffusion. These scalings appear to unify the varying results of previous delamination studies.

  20. Seismic anisotropy of the lithosphere/asthenosphere system beneath southern Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, M. C.; Rumpker, G.; Tilmann, F. J.; Yuan, X.; Rindraharisaona, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Madagascar is considered as a key region with respect to the assembly and break-up of the supercontinent Gondwana. Following the collision between East- and West-Gondwana (~700-650 Ma), its position was central to the Pan-African orogeny and later to the break-up between East-Africa, India and Antarctica. Today, Madagascar consists of different tectonic units; the eastern two thirds of the island are composed mainly of Precambian rocks, whereas the western part is dominated by sedimentary deposits. Southern Madagascar is characterized by several NS to NW-SE trending shear zones. To increase our understanding of these structures and related tectonic processes, we installed a dense temporary seismic network in southern Madagascar. It consisted of 50 stations, which were in operation for up to 2 years between 2012 and 2014. We present results from shear-wave splitting analyses to infer the seismic anisotropy of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system in response to deformational processes. The polarization of the fast shear wave and the delay time between the fast and slow waves provide constraints on the anisotropic fabric. For our study, we use core phases from up to 22 events. We first apply a conventional single-event splitting analysis by minimizing the transverse component. For stations that do not show a significant azimuthal dependence of the splitting parameters, we also apply a joint inversion involving all recorded waveforms from several events. Our results exhibit delay times between 0.4 and 1.5 s. In the center of the E-W profile, fast axes are mainly oriented NNW-SSE, whereas east of the Ranotsara zone, fast axes are oriented NE-SW. We apply full-waveform FD modeling to examine the effects of various anisotropic models of the crust and mantle. Our results indicate that recently proposed mantle flow models are insufficient to explain the small scale variations of splitting parameters observed along our profile. Our observations are best characterized by

  1. How inheritance, geochemical and geophysical properties of the lithospheric mantle influence rift development and subsequent collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picazo, Suzanne; Chenin, Pauline; Müntener, Othmar; Manatschal, Gianreto; Karner, Garry; Johnson, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    In magma-poor rifted margins, the rift structures, width of necking zones and overall geometry are controlled by the heterogeneities of geochemical and geophysical properties of the crust and mantle. In this presentation we focus on the mantle heterogeneities and their major implications on the closure of a hyper-extended rifted system. In our study, we review the clinopyroxene and spinel major element composition from the Liguria-Piemonte domain, the Pyrenean domain, the Dinarides and Hellenides ophiolites and the Iberia-Newfoundland rifted margins (Picazo et al, 2016). It would seem that during an extensional cycle i.e., from post-orogenic collapse to polyphase rifting to seafloor spreading, the mineral compositions of mantle peridotites are systematically modified. The initially heterogeneous subcontinental mantle cpx (inherited mantle type 1) equilibrated in the spinel peridotite field and is too enriched in Na2O and Al2O3 to be a residue of syn-rift melting. The heterogeneous inherited subcontinental mantle becomes progressively homogenized due to impregnation by MORB-type melts (refertilized mantle-type 2) during extensional thinning of the lithosphere. At this stage, cpx equilibrate with plagioclase and display lower Na2O and Al2O3 and high Cr2O3 contents. The system might evolve into breakup and oceanization (mantle type 3) i.e., self-sustained steady-state seafloor spreading. The different mantle-types are present in various reconstructed sections of magma-poor margins and display a systematic spatial distribution from mantle type 1 to 3 going oceanwards in Western and Central Europe. We estimated the density of the three identified mantle types using idealized modal peridotite compositions using the algorithm by Hacker et al, (2003). The density of the refertilized plagioclase peridotite is predicted to be lower than that of inherited subcontinental and depleted oceanic mantle. This has some interesting consequences on the reactivation of rifted margins

  2. Bottom fauna of the Malacca Strait

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parulekar, A.H.; Ansari, Z.A.

    Bottom fauna of Malacca Strait (connecting the Indian Ocean with Pacific) in the depth range of 80 to 1350 m, is dominated by meiofauna which exceeds macrofauna by 12.5 times in weight and by more than 780 times in population density. Standing crop...

  3. Police reform from the bottom up

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The title of this volume, Police reform from the bottom up, is bound to create expectations amongst those concerned with the challenges confronting institutional change in public police agencies. It is an interest shared by police scholars and practitioners across the usual North-South divide. Few police agencies today can ...

  4. Coil in bottom part of splitter magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    Radiation-resistant coil being bedded into the bottom part of a splitter magnet. This very particular magnet split the beam into 3 branches, for 3 target stations in the West-Area. See Annual Report 1975, p.176, Figs.14 and 15.

  5. Spectroscopy and decays of charm and bottom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-10-01

    After a brief review of the quark model, we discuss our present knowledge of the spectroscopy of charm and bottom mesons and baryons. We go on to review the lifetimes, semileptonic, and purely leptonic decays of these particles. We conclude with a brief discussion B and D mixing and rare decays.

  6. Bottomonia: open bottom strong decays and spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santopinto E.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We present our results for the bottomonium spectrum with self energy corrections. The bare masses used in the calculation are computed within Godfrey and Isgur’s relativized quark model. We also discuss our results for the open bottom strong decay widths of higher bottomonia in the 3P0 pair-creation model.

  7. There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 9. There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom. Richard P Feynman. Classics Volume 16 Issue 9 September 2011 pp 890-905. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/016/09/0890-0905 ...

  8. Succeeding at the Bottom-of-the-Pyramid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boxenbaum, Eva; Olsen, Mette

    initiative to build a social impact venture at the interface of a multi-national corporation and a hybrid organization that is operating on the Bottom-of-the-Pyramid market. Our study identifies how corporate social entrepreneurs dynamically use framing and organizational anchoring strategies to build...... internal support and external legitimacy for a radically new social venture initiative. Our findings point to the challenges, opportunities, and strategies associated with straddling global events and internal corporate priorities when engaging in corporate social entrepreneurship....

  9. Bottom Sediment Chemistry, Nutrient Balance, and Water Birds in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water bird characteristics, nutrient loadings, and the levels of bottom sediment silicon oxide (SiO2), aluminium oxide (Al2O3), ferric oxide (Fe2O3), calcium oxide (CaO), copper (Cu), phosphorus (P) and organic carbon (C) was studied in eight high altitude (2040-2640m) small shallow (0.065-0.249 km2; 0.9-3.1 m) ...

  10. Lithospheric deformation inferred from teleseismic shear wave splitting observations in the Scottish Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastow, I. D.; Owens, T. J.; Helffrich, G.; Knapp, J. H.

    2006-05-01

    The Scottish Highlands is an area that has experienced intense tectonic deformation over a recorded geological history that dates back to the Precambrian. Evidence for large scale deformation during the Caledonian orogeny is evident, for example, at the Great Glen and Highland Boundary faults, which have been investigated by field based studies of surface geology. The RUSH (Reflections Under the Scottish Highlands) broadband seismic network of 24 stations recorded continuously for 2 years in 2001-3 and traversed several of the major tectonic terrane boundaries in Scotland. Here we employ the method of Silver and Chan (1991) to estimate splitting parameters (dt, phi) using teleseismic shear waves recorded by these stations. The problem of large amounts of microseismic noise in our data is overcome by stacking individual results using the approach of Restivo and Helffrich (1999); high signal-to-noise ratio results are given more weight in the stack. We explore the relationship between splitting and structural fabric and find that fast polarisation directions are most commonly parallel to geological features such as the NE-SW trending Great Glen and Highland Boundary faults. In the north west part of the study area, towards the Moine thust zone, a change from NE- SW to E-W oriented polarisation direction is noted but dt is unchanged. dt increases markedly towards the NE-SW terrane boundaries. The results confirm that lithospheric scale deformation in Scotland has a preserved "fossil" anisotropic signature, up to hundreds of millions of years after the last tectonic episode.

  11. Thrust fault modeling and Late-Noachian lithospheric structure of the circum-Hellas region, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea-Gonzalez, Isabel; Jiménez-Díaz, Alberto; Parro, Laura M.; López, Valle; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Ruiz, Javier

    2017-05-01

    The circum-Hellas area of Mars borders Hellas Planitia, a giant impact ∼4.0-4.2 Ga old making the deepest and broadest depression on Mars, and is characterized by a complex pattern of fracture sets, lobate scarps, grabens, and volcanic plains. The numerous lobate scarps in the circum-Hellas region mainly formed in the Late Noachian and, except Amenthes Rupes, have been scarcely studied. In this work, we study the mechanical behavior and thermal structure of the crust in the circum-Hellas region at the time of lobate scarp formation, through the modeling of the depth of faulting beneath several prominent lobate scarps. We obtain faulting depths between ∼13 and 38 km, depending on the lobate scarp and accounting for uncertainty. These results indicate low surface and mantle heat flows in Noachian to Early Hesperian times, in agreement with heat flow estimates derived from lithospheric strength for several regions of similar age on Mars. Also, faulting depth and associate heat flows are not dependent of the local crustal thickness, which supports a stratified crust in the circum-Hellas region, with heat-producing elements concentrated in an upper layer that is thinner than the whole crust.

  12. Ecological Dynamics of Wetlands at Lisbon Bottom, Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Missouri

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The study documented the interaction between hydrology and the biological dynamics within a single spring season at Lisbon Bottom in 1999. The study goal was to...

  13. Characterization of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle beneath the Cameroon volcanic line inferred from alkaline basalt hosted peridotite xenoliths from Barombi Mbo and Nyos Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintér, Zsanett; Patkó, Levente; Tene Djoukam, Joëlle Flore; Kovács, István; Tchouankoue, Jean Pierre; Falus, György; Konc, Zoltán; Tommasi, Andréa; Barou, Fabrice; Mihály, Judith; Németh, Csaba; Jeffries, Teresa

    2015-11-01

    We carried out detailed petrographic, major and trace element geochemical, microstructural and FTIR analyses on eight characteristic ultramafic xenoliths from Nyos and Barombi Mbo Lakes in the continental sector of the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL). The studied xenoliths are spinel lherzolites showing lithologies similar to the other xenoliths reported previously along the CVL. They have protogranular and porphyroclastic textures. One of the Barombi xenolith contains amphibole, which had not been previously reported in this locality. Amphibole is common in the Nyos xenoliths suite. Peridotite xenoliths from both localities show some chemical heterogeneity, but Barombi xenoliths generally are less depleted in basaltic elements with respect to Nyos xenoliths. Trace element compositions of Nyos spinel lherzolites show a moderately depleted initial (premetasomatic) composition and variable enrichment in REE. Evidence for both modal and cryptic metasomatism is present in Nyos xenoliths. Rare earth element patterns of clinopyroxene suggest that interaction between mafic melts and the upper mantle occurred beneath the Nyos locality. Barombi Mbo xenoliths, on the other hand, record a small degree of partial melting. The Barombi Mbo xenoliths have weak, dominantly orthorhombic olivine crystal preferred orientations, whereas Nyos ones have strong axial-[010] patterns, which may have formed in response to transpression. Nominally anhydrous mantle minerals (NAMs) of the Barombi Mbo xenoliths show generally higher bulk concentrations of 'water' (70-127 ppm) than Nyos xenoliths (32-81 ppm). The Barombi Mbo xenoliths could originate from a juvenile segment of the lithospheric mantle, which had been originally part of the asthenosphere. It became a part of the lithosphere in response to thermal relaxation following the extension, forming a weakly deformed lower lithospheric mantle region along the CVL. The Nyos xenoliths, however, represent a shallow lithospheric mantle bearing

  14. METASOMATIC AND MAGMATIC PROCESSES IN THE MANTLE LITHOSPHERE OF THE BIREKTE TERRAIN OF THE SIBERIAN CRATON AND THEIR EFFECT ON THE LITHOSPHERE EVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia V. Solov’eva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The area of studies covers the north-eastern part of the Siberian craton (the Birekte terrain, Russia. The influence of metasomatic and magmatic processes on the mantle lithosphere is studied based on results of analyses of phlogopite- and phlogopite-amphibole-containing deep-seated xenoliths from kimberlites of the Kuoika field. In the kimberlitic pipes, deep-seated xenoliths with mantle phlogopite- and phlogopite-amphibole mineralization are developed in two genetically different rock series: magnesian (Mg pyroxenite-peridotite series (with magnesian composition of rocks and minerals and phlogopite-ilmenite (Phl-Ilm hyperbasite series (with ferrous types of rocks and minerals. This paper is focused on issues of petrography and mineralogy of the xenoliths and describes the evidence of metasomatic / magmatic genesis of phlogopite and amphibole. We report here the first data set of 40Ar/39Ar age determinations for phlogopite from the rocks of the magnesian pyroxenite-peridotite series and the ferrous Phl-Ilm hyperbasite series.The Mg series is represented by a continuous transition of rocks from Sp, Sp-Grt, Grt clinopyroxenite and ortopyroxenite to websterite and lherzolite. Many researchers consider it as a layered intrusion in the mantle [Ukhanov et al., 1988; Solov’eva et al., 1994]. The mantle metasomatic phlogopite and amphibole are revealed in all petrographic types of the rocks in this series and compose transverse veins and irregular patchs at grain boundaries of primary minerals. At contacts of xenolith and its host kimberlite, grains of phlogopite and amphibole are often cut off, which gives an evidence of the development of metasomatic phlogopite-amphibole mineralization in the rocks before its’ entraiment into the kimberlite. In the xenoliths with exsolution pyroxene megacrystalls, comprising parallel plates of clino- and orthopyroxene ± garnet ± spinel (former high-temperature pigeonite [Solov’eva et al., 1994], the

  15. Oriented grain growth and modification of 'frozen anisotropy' in the lithospheric mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneh, Yuval; Wallis, David; Hansen, Lars N.; Krawczynski, Mike J.; Skemer, Philip

    2017-09-01

    Seismic anisotropy throughout the oceanic lithosphere is often assumed to be generated by fossilized texture formed during deformation at asthenospheric temperatures close to the ridge. Here we investigate the effect of high-temperature and high-pressure static annealing on the texture of previously deformed olivine aggregates to simulate residence of deformed peridotite in the lithosphere. Our experiments indicate that the orientation and magnitude of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) will evolve due to the preferential growth of grains with low dislocation densities. These observations suggest that texture and stored elastic strain energy promote a style of grain growth that modifies the CPO of a deformed aggregate. We demonstrate that these microstructural changes alter the orientation distributions and magnitudes of seismic wave velocities and anisotropy. Therefore, static annealing may complicate the inference of past deformation kinematics from seismic anisotropy in the lithosphere.

  16. The role of lithospheric stress in the support of the Tharsis rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemann, R. J.; Turcotte, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the Tharsis rise can be approximated as an axisymmetrical igneous construct. Linear theory for the deflection of planetary lithospheres is used to demonstrate that the lithospheric stresses required partially to support the construct are reasonable and consistent with the observed radial grabens around Tharsis. The computed thickness of the elastic lithosphere is between 110 and 260 km, depending of the values assumed for crustal thickness and crustal density. The computed thickness of the Tharsis load ranges from 40 to 70 km. Since in this model the height of the geoid is not specified a priori, the agreement between the observed and computed geoid is evidence for the validity of the model. The tectonics of the Tharsis region are briefly reviewed, and it is contended that all observations are consistent with the loading model.

  17. Lithosphere-asthenosphere system in the Mediterranean region in the framework of polarized plate tectonics

    CERN Document Server

    Raykova, Reneta Blagoeva; Doglioni, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Velocity structure of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system, to the depth of about 350 km, is obtained for almost 400 cells, sized 1 degree by 1 degree in the Mediterranean region. The models are obtained by the following sequence of methods and tools: surface-wave dispersion measurements and collection; 2D tomography of dispersion relations; non-linear inversion of cellular dispersion relations; smoothing optimization method to select a preferred model for each cell. The 3D velocity model, that satisfies Occam razor principle, is obtained as a juxtaposition of selected cellular models. The reconstructed picture of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system evidences the, globally well known, asymmetry between the W- and E-directed subduction zones, attributed to the westward drift of the lithosphere relative to the mantle. Different relationship between slabs and mantle dynamics cause strong compositional differences in the upper mantle, as shown by large variations of seismic waves velocity, consistent with Polari...

  18. A Magma Accretion Model for the Formation of Oceanic Lithosphere: Implications for Global Heat Loss

    CERN Document Server

    Hamza, V M; Alexandrino, C H

    2010-01-01

    A simple magma accretion model of the oceanic lithosphere is proposed and its implications for understanding the thermal field of oceanic lithosphere examined. The new model (designated VBA) assumes existence of lateral variations in magma accretion rates and temperatures at the boundary zone between the lithosphere and the asthenosphere. Heat flow and bathymetry variations calculated on the basis of the VBA model provide vastly improved fits to respective observational datasets. The improved fits have been achieved for the entire age range and without the need to invoke the ad-hoc hypothesis of large-scale hydrothermal circulation in stable ocean crust. The results suggest that estimates of global heat loss need to be downsized by at least 25%.

  19. Use of along-track magnetic field differences in lithospheric field modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that first differences of polar orbiting satellite magnetic data in the along-track direction can be used to obtain high resolution models of the lithospheric field. Along-track differences approximate the north–south magnetic field gradients for non-polar latitudes. In a test case......, using 2 yr of low altitude data from the CHAMP satellite, we show that use of along-track differences of vector field data results in an enhanced recovery of the small scale lithospheric field, compared to the use of the vector field data themselves. We show that the along-track technique performs....... Experiments in modelling the Earth's lithospheric magnetic field with along-track differences are presented here as a proof of concept. We anticipate that use of such along-track differences in combination with east–west field differences, as are now provided by the Swarm satellite constellation...

  20. Spectra of charmed and bottom baryons with hyperfine interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Yang; Qi, Jing-Juan; Guo, Xin-Heng; Wei, Ke-Wei

    2017-09-01

    Up to now, the excited charmed and bottom baryon states have still not been well studied experimentally or theoretically. In this paper, we predict the mass of , the only L = 0 baryon state which has not been observed, to be 6069.2 MeV. The spectra of charmed and bottom baryons with the orbital angular momentum L = 1 are studied in two popular constituent quark models, the Goldstone boson exchange (GBE) model and the one gluon exchange (OGE) hyperfine interaction model. Inserting the latest experimental data from the “Review of Particle Physics", we find that in the GBE model, there exist some multiplets (Σc(b), and Ωc(b)) in which the total spin of the three quarks in their lowest energy states is 3/2, but in the OGE model there is no such phenomenon. This is the most important difference between the GBE and OGE models. These results can be tested in the near future. We suggest more efforts to study the excited charmed and bottom baryons both theoretically and experimentally, not only for the abundance of baryon spectra, but also for determining which hyperfine interaction model best describes nature. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175020, 11575023, U1204115)

  1. Multi-dimensional Crustal and Lithospheric Structure of the Atlas Mountains of Morocco by Magnetotelluric Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyan, D.; Jones, A. G.; Fullea, J.; Ledo, J.; Siniscalchi, A.; Romano, G.

    2014-12-01

    The PICASSO (Program to Investigate Convective Alboran Sea System Overturn) project and the concomitant TopoMed (Plate re-organization in the western Mediterranean: Lithospheric causes and topographic consequences - an ESF EUROSCORES TOPO-EUROPE project) project were designed to collect high resolution, multi-disciplinary lithospheric scale data in order to understand the tectonic evolution and lithospheric structure of the western Mediterranean. The over-arching objectives of the magnetotelluric (MT) component of the projects are (i) to provide new electrical conductivity constraints on the crustal and lithospheric structure of the Atlas Mountains, and (ii) to test the hypotheses for explaining the purported lithospheric cavity beneath the Middle and High Atlas inferred from potential-field lithospheric modeling. We present the results of an MT experiment we carried out in Morocco along two profiles: an approximately N-S oriented profile crossing the Middle Atlas, the High Atlas and the eastern Anti-Atlas to the east (called the MEK profile, for Meknes) and NE-SW oriented profile through western High Atlas to the west (called the MAR profile, for Marrakech). Our results are derived from three-dimensional (3-D) MT inversion of the MT data set employing the parallel version of Modular system for Electromagnetic inversion (ModEM) code. The distinct conductivity differences between the Middle-High Atlas (conductive) and the Anti-Atlas (resistive) correlates with the South Atlas Front fault, the depth extent of which appears to be limited to the uppermost mantle (approx. 60 km). In all inverse solutions, the crust and the upper mantle show resistive signatures (approx. 1,000 Ωm) beneath the Anti-Atlas, which is the part of stable West African Craton. Partial melt and/or exotic fluids enriched in volatiles produced by the melt can account for the high middle to lower crustal and uppermost mantle conductivity in the Folded Middle Atlas, the High Moulouya Plain and the

  2. Drag reduction of a miniature boat with superhydrophobic grille bottom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Jiang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Water strider can slide on water surface with a very small drag force using its long superhydrophobic legs. Inspired by the water strider legs, we report here a novel design of superhydrophobic grille structure for drag reduction. A miniature boat covered with a superhydrophobic grille at the bottom is fabricated and compared with a normal boat with flat bottom in the same size, and a significant drag reduction is obtained by the former. Experiments also reveal that the grille structure exhibits a remarkable loading capacity supplied by the water surface tension. It is found that the optimal design of such a miniature boat with a considerable loading capacity and a small drag can be realized through controlling the length and the spacing of the grilles. This study shows a new idea to reduce the fluid drag in microfluidics, micro electromechanical system and other engineering areas.

  3. Cochlear implant/Deaf World dispute: different bottom elephants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsoulin, T P

    2001-11-01

    To examine the controversy between the proponents of cochlear implantation in children and the Deaf World opponents with the hope of offering a method for decreasing the acrimony of opposing positions. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING (METHODS): The opposing arguments will be presented from a review of pertinent literature. The systemic philosophic process of bottom elephant analysis will be elucidated. Contrasting models of power will be described. The application of the bottom elephant analysis of each group's position plus a paradigm shift in the utilization of power offers possibilities for the implementation of mutually respectful dialogue that does not undermine each group's stature. Philosophic analysis and paradigm shift could lead to improvement in the interaction of cochlear implant proponents and Deaf World opponents.

  4. Microplastics in Baltic bottom sediments: Quantification procedures and first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobkov, M; Esiukova, E

    2017-01-30

    Microplastics in the marine environment are known as a global ecological problem but there are still no standardized analysis procedures for their quantification. The first breakthrough in this direction was the NOAA Laboratory Methods for quantifying synthetic particles in water and sediments, but fibers numbers have been found to be underestimated with this approach. We propose modifications for these methods that will allow us to analyze microplastics in bottom sediments, including small fibers. Addition of an internal standard to sediment samples and occasional empty runs are advised for analysis quality control. The microplastics extraction efficiency using the proposed modifications is 92±7%. Distribution of microplastics in bottom sediments of the Russian part of the Baltic Sea is presented. Microplastic particles were found in all of the samples with an average concentration of 34±10 items/kg DW and have the same order of magnitude as neighbor studies reported. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia: Young volcanism in an old shield

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Zheng

    2016-05-11

    We investigate the lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia by conducting H-κ stacking analysis and jointly inverting teleseismic P-receiver functions and fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave group velocities at 56 broadband stations deployed by the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS). The study region, the Arabian plate, is traditionally divided into the western Arabian shield and the eastern Arabian platform: The Arabian shield itself is a complicated mélange of crustal material, composed of several Proterozoic terrains separated by ophiolite-bearing suture zones and dotted by outcropping Cenozoic volcanic rocks (locally known as harrats). The Arabian platform is primarily covered by 8 to 10 km of Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks. Our results reveal high Vp/Vs ratios in the region of Harrat Lunayyir, which are interpreted as solidified magma intrusions from old magmatic episodes in the shield. Our results also indicate slow velocities and large upper mantle lid temperatures below the southern and northern tips of the Arabian shield, when compared with the values obtained for the central shield. We argue that our inferred patterns of lid velocity and temperature are due to heating by thermal conduction from the Afar plume (and, possibly, the Jordan plume), and that volcanism in western Arabia may result from small-scale adiabatic ascent of magma diapirs.

  6. Regional variations in subsidence rate of lithospheric plates: implication for thermal cooling models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Bernard; Cazenave, Anny; Marty, Jean-Charles

    Although simple thermal models of lithospheric cooling predict to first order the general behaviour of observed seafloor depth with increasing age, important regional variations in seafloor subsidence, in the range 250-400 m Ma1/2, are reported for several lithospheric plates. Such variations cannot be accounted for by classical cooling models unless implausible variations in asthenospheric temperature of ˜550°C are assumed. Here we present an alternative cooling model, which assumes that at the ridge axis the temperature may deviate from the mean asthenospheric temperature. Such a model satisfactorily explains the data provided that the temperature deviation is ±100°C only.

  7. PICASSO: Lithosphere Structure in the Western Mediterranean from Ps Receiver Functions and Rayleigh Wave Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomeras, I.; Thurner, S.; Levander, A.; Humphreys, E.; Miller, M. S.; Carbonell, R.; Gallart, J.

    2012-04-01

    The western Mediterranean is a diffuse plate boundary separating the African and Eurasian plates. Cenozoic deformation is centered on the Gibraltar arc and Alboran Sea, and occupies a wide area from the southern Iberian Massif in Spain to the Atlas Mountains in Morocco. We present a model of the lithospheric structure of this region derived from Rayleigh wave tomography and Ps receiver functions, using data from the PICASSO (Program to Investigate Convective Alboran Sea System Overturn) linear broadband array of ~100 seismographs. This array is deployed from central Spain to the Morocco-Algerian border. We complement these data with some of that recorded by IberArray, an areal broadband array, operated by the Spanish seismological community, covering the same region with a uniform 50 km x 50 km grid of stations. Rayleigh phase velocities have been measured from 20-167s period using the two-plane-wave method to remove complications due to multi-pathing, and finite-frequency kernels to improve lateral resolution. The phase velocities were inverted for 1D structure on a 0.25 by 0.25 degree grid. Ps receiver functions at 1Hz and 2Hz were calculated for the same area using water-level and time-domain iterative deconvolution, and were then CCP stacked. The Rayleigh wave shear velocity model, jointly interpreted with the discontinuity structure from the CCP stack, shows the first-order lithospheric structure, and the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). From north to south along the PICASSO profile: The lithosphere is ~120 km thick beneath the Iberian Massif, where it has the highest shear velocity, 4.45 km/s. To the south the lithosphere thins dramatically beneath the Betic Mountains to ~85 km, and then varies in thickness and decreases in velocity beneath the Alboran Sea and Gibraltar Arc. The thinnest lithosphere, ~60 km, is observed beneath the Rif mountains and Middle Atlas, with a low velocity feature (4.2 km/s) at ~60 km depth beneath a site of Late Cenozoic

  8. Paleoproterozoic Collisional Structures in the Hudson Bay Lithosphere Constrained by Multi-Observable Probabilistic Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbyshire, F. A.; Afonso, J. C.; Porritt, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Paleozoic Hudson Bay intracratonic basin conceals a Paleoproterozoic Himalayan-scale continental collision, the Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO), which marks an important milestone in the assembly of the Canadian Shield. The geometry of the THO is complex due to the double-indentor geometry of the collision between the Archean Superior and Western Churchill cratons. Seismic observations at regional scale show a thick, seismically fast lithospheric keel beneath the entire region; an intriguing feature of recent models is a 'curtain' of slightly lower wavespeeds trending NE-SW beneath the Bay, which may represent the remnants of more juvenile material trapped between the two Archean continental cores. The seismic models alone, however, cannot constrain the nature of this anomaly. We investigate the thermal and compositional structure of the Hudson Bay lithosphere using a multi-observable probabilistic inversion technique. This joint inversion uses Rayleigh wave phase velocity data from teleseismic earthquakes and ambient noise, geoid anomalies, surface elevation and heat flow to construct a pseudo-3D model of the crust and upper mantle. Initially a wide range of possible mantle compositions is permitted, and tests are carried out to ascertain whether the lithosphere is stratified with depth. Across the entire Hudson Bay region, low temperatures and a high degree of chemical depletion characterise the mantle lithosphere. Temperature anomalies within the lithosphere are modest, as may be expected from a tectonically-stable region. The base of the thermal lithosphere lies at depths of >250 km, reaching to ~300 km depth in the centre of the Bay. Lithospheric stratification, with a more-depleted upper layer, is best able to explain the geophysical data sets and surface observables. Some regions, where intermediate-period phase velocities are high, require stronger mid-lithospheric depletion. In addition, a narrow region of less-depleted material extends NE-SW across the Bay

  9. Workability and strength of lignite bottom ash geopolymer mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathonsaowaphak, Apha; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Pimraksa, Kedsarin

    2009-08-30

    In this paper, the waste lignite bottom ash from power station was used as a source material for making geopolymer. Sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were used as liquid for the mixture and heat curing was used to activate the geopolymerization. The fineness of bottom ash, the liquid alkaline/ash ratio, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratio and the NaOH concentration were studied. The effects of the additions of water, NaOH and napthalene-based superplasticizer on the workability and strength of the geopolymer mortar were also studied. Relatively high strength geopolymer mortars of 24.0-58.0 MPa were obtained with the use of ground bottom ash with 3% retained on sieve no. 325 and mean particle size of 15.7 microm, using liquid alkaline/ash ratios of 0.429-0.709, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratios of 0.67-1.5 and 7.5-12.5M NaOH. The incorporation of water improved the workability of geopolymer mortar more effectively than the use of napthalene-based superplasticizer with similar slight reduction in strengths. The addition of NaOH solution slightly improves the workability of the mix while maintaining the strength of the geopolymer mortars.

  10. Geodynamic models of continental subduction and obduction of overriding plate forearc oceanic lithosphere on top of continental crust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwards, Sarah J.; Schellart, Wouter P.; Duarte, Joao C.

    2015-01-01

    Continental subduction takes place in the final stage of subduction when all oceanic lithosphere is consumed and continental passive margin is pulled into the mantle. When the overriding plate is oceanic, dense forearc oceanic lithosphere might be obducted onto light continental crust forming an

  11. Lithospheric stretching and the long wavelength free-air gravity anomaly of the Eastern Continental margin of India and the 85 degree E Ridge, Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajesh, S.; Majumdar, T.J.; Krishna, K.S.

    overcompensation of the ridge due to overburden sediment load. In this work we attempted to know; whether, the present day oceanic lithosphere, juxtaposed to the Eastern Continental Margin of India (ECMI), holds the vestiges of lithospheric stretching due...

  12. COMPOSITIONAL AND THERMAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN LITHOSPHERIC AND ASTHENOSPHERIC MANTLE AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON CONTINENTAL DELAMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Kiselev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The lower part of lithosphere in collisional orogens may delaminate due to density inversion between the asthenosphere and the cold thickened lithospheric mantle. Generally, standard delamination models have neglected density changes within the crust and the lithospheric mantle, which occur due to phase transitions and compositional variations upon changes of P-T parameters. Our attention is focused on effects of phase and density changes that may be very important and even dominant when compared with the effect of a simple change of the thermal mantle structure. The paper presents the results of numerical modeling for eclogitization of basalts of the lower crust as well as phase composition changes and density of underlying peridotite resulted from tectonic thickening of the lithosphere and its foundering into the asthenosphere. As the thickness of the lower crust increases, the mafic granulite (basalt passes into eclogite, and density inversion occurs at the accepted crust-mantle boundary (P=20 kbar because the newly formed eclogite is heavier than the underlying peridotite by 6 % (abyssal peridotite, according to [Boyd, 1989]. The density difference is a potential energy for delamination of the eclogitic portion of the crust. According to the model, P=70 kbar and T=1300 °C correspond to conditions at the lower boundary of the lithosphere. Assuming the temperature adiabatic distribution within the asthenosphere, its value at the given parameters ranges from 1350 °C to 1400 °C. Density inversion at dry conditions occurs with the identical lithospheric and asthenospheric compositions at the expense of the temperature difference at 100 °C with the density difference of only 0.0022 %. Differences of two other asthenospheric compositions (primitive mantle, and lherzolite KH as compared to the lithosphere (abyssal peridotite are not compensated for by a higher temperature. The asthenospheric density is higher than that of the lithospheric base

  13. COMPOSITIONAL AND THERMAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN LITHOSPHERIC AND ASTHENOSPHERIC MANTLE AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON CONTINENTAL DELAMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Kiselev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The lower part of lithosphere in collisional orogens may delaminate due to density inversion between the asthenosphere and the cold thickened lithospheric mantle. Generally, standard delamination models have neglected density changes within the crust and the lithospheric mantle, which occur due to phase transitions and compositional variations upon changes of P-T parameters. Our attention is focused on effects of phase and density changes that may be very important and even dominant when compared with the effect of a simple change of the thermal mantle structure. The paper presents the results of numerical modeling for eclogitization of basalts of the lower crust as well as phase composition changes and density of underlying peridotite resulted from tectonic thickening of the lithosphere and its foundering into the asthenosphere. As the thickness of the lower crust increases, the mafic granulite (basalt passes into eclogite, and density inversion occurs at the accepted crust-mantle boundary (P=20 kbar because the newly formed eclogite is heavier than the underlying peridotite by 6 % (abyssal peridotite, according to [Boyd, 1989]. The density difference is a potential energy for delamination of the eclogitic portion of the crust. According to the model, P=70 kbar and T=1300 °C correspond to conditions at the lower boundary of the lithosphere. Assuming the temperature adiabatic distribution within the asthenosphere, its value at the given parameters ranges from 1350 °C to 1400 °C. Density inversion at dry conditions occurs with the identical lithospheric and asthenospheric compositions at the expense of the temperature difference at 100 °C with the density difference of only 0.0022 %. Differences of two other asthenospheric compositions (primitive mantle, and lherzolite KH as compared to the lithosphere (abyssal peridotite are not compensated for by a higher temperature. The asthenospheric density is higher than that of the lithospheric base

  14. Sediment transport in the presence of large reef bottom roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Andrew W. M.; Lowe, Ryan J.; Ghisalberti, Marco; Storlazzi, Curt; Symonds, Graham; Roelvink, Dano

    2017-02-01

    The presence of large bottom roughness, such as that formed by benthic organisms on coral reef flats, has important implications for the size, concentration, and transport of suspended sediment in coastal environments. A 3 week field study was conducted in approximately 1.5 m water depth on the reef flat at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, to quantify the cross-reef hydrodynamics and suspended sediment dynamics over the large bottom roughness (˜20-40 cm) at the site. A logarithmic mean current profile consistently developed above the height of the roughness; however, the flow was substantially reduced below the height of the roughness (canopy region). Shear velocities inferred from the logarithmic profile and Reynolds stresses measured at the top of the roughness, which are traditionally used in predictive sediment transport formulations, were similar but much larger than that required to suspend the relatively coarse sediment present at the bed. Importantly, these stresses did not represent the stresses imparted on the sediment measured in suspension and are therefore not relevant to the description of suspended sediment transport in systems with large bottom roughness. Estimates of the bed shear stresses that accounted for the reduced near-bed flow in the presence of large roughness vastly improved the relationship between the predicted and observed grain sizes that were in suspension. Thus, the impact of roughness, not only on the overlying flow but also on bed stresses, must be accounted for to accurately estimate suspended sediment transport in regions with large bottom roughness, a common feature of many shallow coastal ecosystems.

  15. Sediment transport in the presence of large reef bottom roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Andrew; Lowe, Ryan J.; Ghisalberti, Marco; Storlazzi, Curt; Symonds, Graham; Roelvink, Dano

    2017-01-01

    The presence of large bottom roughness, such as that formed by benthic organisms on coral reef flats, has important implications for the size, concentration, and transport of suspended sediment in coastal environments. A 3 week field study was conducted in approximately 1.5 m water depth on the reef flat at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, to quantify the cross-reef hydrodynamics and suspended sediment dynamics over the large bottom roughness (∼20–40 cm) at the site. A logarithmic mean current profile consistently developed above the height of the roughness; however, the flow was substantially reduced below the height of the roughness (canopy region). Shear velocities inferred from the logarithmic profile and Reynolds stresses measured at the top of the roughness, which are traditionally used in predictive sediment transport formulations, were similar but much larger than that required to suspend the relatively coarse sediment present at the bed. Importantly, these stresses did not represent the stresses imparted on the sediment measured in suspension and are therefore not relevant to the description of suspended sediment transport in systems with large bottom roughness. Estimates of the bed shear stresses that accounted for the reduced near-bed flow in the presence of large roughness vastly improved the relationship between the predicted and observed grain sizes that were in suspension. Thus, the impact of roughness, not only on the overlying flow but also on bed stresses, must be accounted for to accurately estimate suspended sediment transport in regions with large bottom roughness, a common feature of many shallow coastal ecosystems.

  16. Lithospheric structure in the Baikal–central Mongolia region from integrated geophysical-petrological inversion of surface-wave data and topographic elevation

    OpenAIRE

    Fullea, J.; Lebedev, S.; Agius, M. R.; Jones, A. G.; Afonso, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in computational petrological modeling provide accurate methods for computing seismic velocities and density within the lithospheric and sub-lithospheric mantle, given the bulk composition, temperature, and pressure within them. Here, we test an integrated geophysical-petrological inversion of Rayleigh- and Love-wave phase-velocity curves for fine-scale lithospheric structure. The main parameters of the grid-search inversion are the lithospheric and crustal thicknesses, mantle...

  17. Lithospheric structure in the Baikal-central Mongolia region from integrated geophysical-petrological inversion of surface-wave data and topographic elevation

    OpenAIRE

    Fullea, J.; Lebedev, S.; Agius, M. R.; Jones, A. G.; Afonso, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in computational petrological modeling provide accurate methods for computing seismic velocities and density within the lithospheric and sub-lithospheric mantle, given the bulk composition, temperature, and pressure within them. Here, we test an integrated geophysical-petrological inversion of Rayleigh- and Love-wave phase-velocity curves for fine-scale lithospheric structure. The main parameters of the grid-search inversion are the lithospheric and crustal thicknesses, mantle...

  18. Bottom friction and wave-induced roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepesqueur, J.; Ardhuin, F.; Bennis, A.-C.

    2012-04-01

    The parameterization of the interaction of waves with a sandy bottom including ripple generation and relict ripple roughness (Ardhuin et al. 2003) using the sub-grid roughness algorithm by Tolman (1995) has been implemented in the WAVEWATCH III model and generalized to take into account the variability of the bottom nature, including rock and cohesive sediments. The model is applied with a triangle-based mesh to both the U.S. East-Coast and the French Atlantic to North Sea coasts. The hindcast wave heights over the North Carolina continental shelf during the SHOaling Waves EXperiment reproduce the results of Ardhuin et al. (2003). The new application in the English Channel and Southern North see shows a general better result that with the JONSWAP parameterization. In particular the use of realistic roughness is important with gravel in the central Channel and sand or sand/silt mixtures in the southern North Sea.

  19. Stabilization of bottom sediments from Rzeszowski Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koś Karolina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of stabilization of bottom sediments from Rzeszowski Reservoir. Based on the geotechnical characteristics of the tested sediments it was stated they do not fulfill all the criteria set for soils in earth embankments. Therefore, an attempt to improve their parameters was made by using two additives – cement and lime. An unconfined compressive strength, shear strength, bearing ratio and pH reaction were determined on samples after different time of curing. Based on the carried out tests it was stated that the obtained values of unconfined compressive strength of sediments stabilized with cement were relatively low and they did not fulfill the requirements set by the Polish standard, which concerns materials in road engineering. In case of lime stabilization it was stated that the tested sediments with 6% addition of the additive can be used for the bottom layers of the improved road base.

  20. Constructing bottom barriers with met grouting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibazaki, M.; Yoshida, H. [Chemical Grouting Company, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Installing a bottom barrier using conventional high pressure jetting technology and ensuring barrier continuity is challenging. This paper describes technology that has been developed and demonstrated for the emplacement of bottom barriers using pressures and flow rates above the conventional high pressure jetting parameters. The innovation capable of creating an improved body exceeding 5 meters in diameter has resulted in the satisfying connection and adherence between the treated columns. Besides, the interfaces among the improved bodies obtain the same strength and permeability lower than 1 x 10{sup -7} cm/sec as body itself. A wide variety of the thickness and the diameter of the improved mass optimizes the application, and the method is nearing completion. The paper explains an aspect and briefs case histories.

  1. Deformation and fluid-enhanced annealing in subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath the Pannonian Basin (Styrian Basin, Eastern Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradi, Laszlo; Hidas, Károly; János Kovács, István; Tommasi, Andrea; Garrido, Carlos; Szabó, Csaba

    2017-04-01

    In the Carpathian-Pannonian region, xenolith-bearing Neogene alkali basaltic volcanism occurred in five volcanic fields [1], from which the Styrian Basin Volcanic Field (SBVF) is the westernmost one. In this study, we present new petrographic and crystal preferred orientation (CPO) data, and structural hydroxyl ("water") contents of upper mantle xenoliths from 12 volcanic outcrops across the SBVF. The studied xenoliths are mostly coarse granular hydrous spinel lherzolites. Amphiboles, replacing pyroxenes and spinels, are present in almost every sample. The peridotites are highly annealed, olivines and pyroxenes show no significant amount of intragranular deformation. Despite the annealed texture of the peridotites, olivine CPO is unambiguous and varies between [010]-fiber, orthogonal and [100]-fiber symmetry. The CPO of pyroxenes is coherent with coeval deformation with olivine. The fabric and CPO of amphiboles suggest postkinematic epitaxial overgrowth on the precursor pyroxenes. The structural hydroxyl content of the studied xenoliths exhibits rather high, equilibrium values, up to 10, 290 and 675 ppm in olivine, ortho- and clinopyroxene, respectively. The olivines contain more structural hydroxyl in the annealed xenoliths than in the more deformed ones. The xenoliths show equilibrium temperatures from 850 to 1100 °C, which corresponds to lithospheric mantle depths between 30 and 60 km. Equilibrium temperatures show correlation with the varying CPO symmetries and grain size: coarser grained xenoliths with [100]-fiber and orthorhombic symmetry appear in the high temperature (>1000 °C) xenoliths, which is characteristic for asthenospheric environments [2]. Most of the samples display transitional CPO symmetry between [010]-fiber and orthogonal, which indicate lithospheric deformation under varying stress field from transtensional to transpressional settings [3], probably related to the Miocene evolution of the Pannonian Basin, during which varying compressive and

  2. Development of Bottom Oil Recovery Systems. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    important to have a backup unit with the same capabilities. • The heading sensor is essential for effective ROV operation. • The tending vessel can...debris/bottom type/weather effects 5. Logistics a. Equipment requirements b. Equipment availability c. Backup equipment/spares availability d...Southeast Florida Mystery Spill SE Florida HFO X 2001 T/V Baltic Carrier Baltic Sea, Denmark Intermediate fuel oil (IFO) 380 X 2002 T/V Prestige

  3. Growth and energetics in Spisula subtruncata (Da Costa) and the effect of suspended bottom material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhlenberg, F.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    1981-01-01

    The influence of suspended bottom material (0-25 mg/l) and algal cells (Phaeodactylum tricornutum) (0-500 .mu.g dry org wt[organic weight]/l) on clearance, growth and energetics in S. subtruncata (da Costa) was studied. Clearance and respiration rate were independent of concentrations of algae...... bottom material on growth is due to a higher efficiency of assimilation of the ingested algae and/or the utilization of organic matter in the suspended bottom material. The efficiency of algal assimilation decreased from 76% at a low (150 .mu.g dry org wt/l) to 33% at a high (500 .mu.g) algal...

  4. Where to start? Bottom-up attention improves working memory by determining encoding order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravizza, Susan M; Uitvlugt, Mitchell G; Hazeltine, Eliot

    2016-12-01

    The present study aimed to characterize the mechanism by which working memory is enhanced for items that capture attention because of their novelty or saliency-that is, via bottom-up attention. The first experiment replicated previous research by corroborating that bottom-up attention directed to an item is sufficient for enhancing working memory and, moreover, generalized the effect to the domain of verbal working memory. The subsequent 3 experiments sought to determine how bottom-up attention affects working memory. We considered 2 hypotheses: (1) Bottom-up attention enhances the encoded representation of the stimulus, similar to how voluntary attention functions, or (2) It affects the order of encoding by shifting priority onto the attended stimulus. By manipulating how stimuli were presented (simultaneous/sequential display) and whether the cue predicted the tested items, we found evidence that bottom-up attention improves working memory performance via the order of encoding hypothesis. This finding was observed across change detection and free recall paradigms. In contrast, voluntary attention improved working memory regardless of encoding order and showed greater effects on working memory. We conclude that when multiple information sources compete, bottom-up attention prioritizes the location at which encoding should begin. When encoding order is set, bottom-up attention has little or no benefit to working memory. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Interactions of top-down and bottom-up mechanisms in human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMains, Stephanie; Kastner, Sabine

    2011-01-12

    Multiple stimuli present in the visual field at the same time compete for neural representation by mutually suppressing their evoked activity throughout visual cortex, providing a neural correlate for the limited processing capacity of the visual system. Competitive interactions among stimuli can be counteracted by top-down, goal-directed mechanisms such as attention, and by bottom-up, stimulus-driven mechanisms. Because these two processes cooperate in everyday life to bias processing toward behaviorally relevant or particularly salient stimuli, it has proven difficult to study interactions between top-down and bottom-up mechanisms. Here, we used an experimental paradigm in which we first isolated the effects of a bottom-up influence on neural competition by parametrically varying the degree of perceptual grouping in displays that were not attended. Second, we probed the effects of directed attention on the competitive interactions induced with the parametric design. We found that the amount of attentional modulation varied linearly with the degree of competition left unresolved by bottom-up processes, such that attentional modulation was greatest when neural competition was little influenced by bottom-up mechanisms and smallest when competition was strongly influenced by bottom-up mechanisms. These findings suggest that the strength of attentional modulation in the visual system is constrained by the degree to which competitive interactions have been resolved by bottom-up processes related to the segmentation of scenes into candidate objects.

  6. Bottom Reflectance in Ocean Color Satellite Remote Sensing for Coral Reef Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Reichstetter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Most ocean color algorithms are designed for optically deep waters, where the seafloor has little or no effect on remote sensing reflectance. This can lead to inaccurate retrievals of inherent optical properties (IOPs in optically shallow water environments. Here, we investigate in situ hyperspectral bottom reflectance signatures and their separability for coral reef waters, when observed at the spectral resolutions of MODIS and SeaWiFS sensors. We use radiative transfer modeling to calculate the effects of bottom reflectance on the remote sensing reflectance signal, and assess detectability and discrimination of common coral reef bottom classes by clustering modeled remote sensing reflectance signals. We assess 8280 scenarios, including four IOPs, 23 depths and 45 bottom classes at MODIS and SeaWiFS bands. Our results show: (i no significant contamination (Rrscorr < 0.0005 of bottom reflectance on the spectrally-averaged remote sensing reflectance signal at depths >17 m for MODIS and >19 m for SeaWiFS for the brightest spectral reflectance substrate (light sand in clear reef waters; and (ii bottom cover classes can be combined into two distinct groups, “light” and “dark”, based on the modeled surface reflectance signals. This study establishes that it is possible to efficiently improve parameterization of bottom reflectance and water-column IOP retrievals in shallow water ocean color models for coral reef environments.

  7. Geophysical modelling of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary beneath the Atlantic-Mediterranean Transition Region: integrating potential field, surface heat flow, elevation, seismological and petrological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullea, J.; Fernàndez, M.; Afonso, J.; Verges, J.; Zeyen, H. J.

    2009-12-01

    In this work we study the present-day thermal and compositional 3D structure of the lithosphere beneath the Atlantic-Mediterranean Transition Region (AMTR) and the lithosphere-asthenosphere interaction from Jurassic times to present. The AMTR comprises the western segment of the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary, encompassing two main large-scale tectonic domains: the Gibraltar Arc System and the Atlas Mountains. We apply an integrated and self-consistent geophysical-petrological methodology (LitMod3D) that combines elevation, gravity, geoid, surface heat flow, and seismic data and allows modelling of compositional heterogeneities within the lithospheric mantle. Our results reveal large variations in the depth of the Moho and the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) as well as a lack of spatial correlation between the thicknesses of these two boundaries. The Moho essentially mimics the topography with depths ranging from ~10 km beneath the oceanic domains of the Atlantic abyssal plains and the Algerian Basin to >34 km in the Eastern Betics and Rif, the High Atlas mountains, and the Sahara Platform. In contrast, the LAB is shallower beneath the central and eastern Alboran Basin (~70 km) and all along the High, Middle and Anti Atlas (140 km) with values exceeding 230 km beneath the Rif and the Sahara Platform. We find that the average bulk composition of the lithospheric mantle corresponds to that of a typical Tecton (i.e. Phanerozoic) domain, with the exceptions of the Sahara Platform, the Alboran Basin, and Atlas Mountains. Distinct mantle compositions are required in these areas to make model predictions and geophysical observables compatible. We propose that the highly irregular LAB topography is the result of the superposition of three different geodynamic mechanisms, which include shortening and thickening related to NW-SE Iberia-Africa convergence lasting from Late Cretaceous to Recent; impingement of a baby-like mantle plume or small-scale convection beneath

  8. Bottom-Line Mentality as an Antecedent of Social Undermining and the Moderating Roles of Core Self-Evaluations and Conscientiousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Rebecca L.; Mawritz, Mary Bardes; Eissa, Gabi

    2012-01-01

    We propose that an employee's bottom-line mentality may have an important effect on social undermining behavior in organizations. Bottom-line mentality is defined as 1-dimensional thinking that revolves around securing bottom-line outcomes to the neglect of competing priorities. Across a series of studies, we establish an initial nomological…

  9. Bottom depth and type for shallow waters: Hyperspectral observations from a blimp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, ZhongPing; Carder, K.; Steward, R. [Univ. of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    In a study of a blimp transect over Tampa Bay (Florida), hyperspectral upwelling radiance over the sand and seagrass bottoms was measured. These measurements were converted to hyperspectral remote-sensing reflectances. Using a shallow-water remote-sensing-reflectance model, in-water optical properties, bottom depths and bottom albedos were derived analytically and simultaneously by an optimization procedure. In the process, curvatures of sand and seagrass albedos were used. Also used was a model of absorption spectrum of phytoplankton pigments. The derived bottom depths were compared with bathymetry charts and found to agree well. This study suggests that a low-flying blimp is a useful platform for the study and mapping of coastal water environments. The optical model as well as the data-reduction procedure used are practical for the retrieval of shallow water optical properties.

  10. Heterogeneity of the composition of the lithosphere and consanguinity of mineral deposits in eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingyu, Chen

    The distribution of mineral deposits in eastern China is heterogeneous. Principally, Au deposits are concentrated in northeast China, Fe deposits in northern China, Cu deposits in the Lower Yangzi River Valley, W deposits in the Nanling and surrounding regions, and Sn deposits in the area of Guangdong and Guangxi. This heterogeneity might reflect the nature of the primordial lithosphere of our planet.

  11. Using open sidewalls for modelling self-consistent lithosphere subduction dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chertova, M.V.; Geenen, T.; van den Berg, A.; Spakman, W.

    2012-01-01

    Subduction modelling in regional model domains, in 2-D or 3-D, is commonly performed using closed (impermeable) vertical boundaries. Here we investigate the merits of using open boundaries for 2-D modelling of lithosphere subduction. Our experiments are focused on using open and closed (free

  12. Dynamics and stress field of the Eurasian plate: A combined lithosphere-mantle approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruckstuhl, K.N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304848743

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents a new combined lithosphere-mantle modeling approach to the dynamics of individual tectonic plates. This approach incorporates tractions from convective mantle flow modeling into a detailed analysis of the forces acting on a tectonic plate. Mechanical equilibrium of the plate is

  13. Major element composition of the lithospheric mantle under the North Atlantic craton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizzarro, Martin; Stevenson, R.K.

    2003-01-01

    , and East Greenland (Wiedemann Fjord) peridotites. The Sarfartoq peridotites have equilibrated at temperatures and pressures ranging from 660 to 1,280 °C and from 2.2 to 6.3 GPa, and define a relatively low mantle heat flow of 13.2 ± 1 mW/m. In addition, the lithospheric mantle underneath the Sarfartoq area...

  14. Influence of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary on the stress field northwest of the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, J.; Cornet, F. H.; Cara, M.

    2014-11-01

    In 1356, a magnitude 6-7 earthquake occurred near Basel, in Switzerland. But recent compilations of GPS measurements reveal that measured horizontal deformation rates in northwestern continental Europe are smaller than error bars on the measurements, proving present tectonic activity, if any, is very small in this area. We propose to reconcile these apparently antinomic observations with a mechanical model of the lithosphere that takes into account the geometry of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, assuming that the only loading mechanism is gravity. The lithosphere is considered to be an elastoplastic material satisfying a Von Mises plasticity criterion. The model, which is 400 km long, 360 km wide and 230 km thick, is centred near Belfort in eastern France, with its width oriented parallel to the N145°E direction. It also takes into account the real topography of both the ground surface and that of the Moho discontinuity. Not only does the model reproduce observed principal stress directions orientations, it also identifies a plastic zone that fits roughly the most seismically active domain of the region. Interestingly, a somewhat similar stress map may be produced by considering an elastic lithosphere and an ad-hoc horizontal `tectonic' stress field. However, for the latter model, examination of the plasticity criterion suggests that plastic deformation should have taken place. It is concluded that the present-day stress field in this region is likely controlled by gravity and rheology, rather than by active Alpine tectonics.

  15. LITHO1.0: An Updated Crust and Lithosphere Model of the Earth (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    Zhitu Ma1 , Gabi Laske1, and Michael E. Pasyanos2 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 1010 5e. TASK NUMBER PPM00005947 5f. WORK...LITHOSPHERE MODEL OF THE EARTH T. Guy Masters1, Zhitu Ma1 , Gabi Laske1, and Michael E. Pasyanos2 University of California San Diego1, and Lawrence

  16. First scalar magnetic anomaly map from CHAMP satellite data indicates weak lithospheric field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maus, S.; Rother, M.; Holme, R.

    2002-01-01

    Satellite magnetic anomaly maps derived by different techniques from Magsat/POGO data vary by more than a factor of 2 in the deduced strength of the lithospheric magnetic field. Here, we present a first anomaly map from new CHAMP scalar magnetic field data. After subtracting a recent Ørsted main...

  17. Structure and evolution of subducted lithosphere beneath the Sunda arc, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widiyantoro, Sri; Hilst, R.D. van der

    1996-01-01

    Tomographic imaging reveals seismic anomalies beneath the Sunda island arc, Indonesia, that suggest that the lithospheric slab penetrates to a depth of at least 1500 kilometers. The Sunda slab forms the eastern end of a deep anomaly associated with the past subduction of the plate underlying the

  18. Shallow and buoyant lithospheric subduction : causes and implications from thermo-chemical numerical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunen, Jeroen van

    2001-01-01

    Where two lithospheric plates converge on the Earth, one of them disappears into the mantle. The dominant driving mechanism for plate motion is regarded to be `slab pull': the subducted plate, the slab, exerts a pulling force on the attached plate at the surface. However, what has been puzzling

  19. An Equivalent Source Method for Modelling the Global Lithospheric Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kother, Livia Kathleen; Hammer, Magnus Danel; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    are also employed to minimize the influence of the ionospheric field. The model for the remaining lithospheric magnetic field consists of magnetic equivalent potential field sources (monopoles) arranged in an icosahedron grid at a depth of 100 km belowthe surface. The corresponding model parameters...

  20. An Equivalent Source Method for Modelling the Lithospheric Magnetic Field Using Satellite and Airborne Magnetic Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kother, Livia Kathleen; Hammer, Magnus Danel; Finlay, Chris

    for the remaining lithospheric magnetic field consists of magnetic point sources (monopoles) arranged in an icosahedron grid with an increasing grid resolution towards the airborne survey area. The corresponding source values are estimated using an iteratively reweighted least squares algorithm that includes model...

  1. An Equivalent Source Method for Modelling the Global Lithospheric Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kother, Livia Kathleen; Hammer, Magnus Danel; Finlay, Chris

    2014-01-01

    are also employed to minimize the influence of the ionospheric field. The model for the remaining lithospheric magnetic field consists of magnetic point sources (monopoles) arranged in an icosahedron grid. The corresponding source values are estimated using an iteratively reweighted least squares algorithm...

  2. Lithospheric Velocity Structure of the Anatolain plateau-Caucasus-Caspian Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gok, R; Mellors, R J; Sandvol, E; Pasyanos, M; Hauk, T; Yetirmishli, G; Teoman, U; Turkelli, N; Godoladze, T; Javakishvirli, Z

    2009-04-15

    Anatolian Plateau-Caucasus-Caspian region is an area of complex structure accompanied by large variations in seismic wave velocities. Despite the complexity of the region little is known about the detailed lithospheric structure. Using data from 29 new broadband seismic stations in the region, a unified velocity structure is developed using teleseismic receiver functions and surface waves. Love and Rayleigh surface waves dispersion curves have been derived from event-based analysis and ambient-noise correlation. We jointly inverted the receiver functions with the surface wave dispersion curves to determine absolute shear wave velocity and important discontinuities such as sedimentary layer, Moho, lithospheric-asthenospheric boundary. We combined these new station results with Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment results (29 stations). Caspian Sea and Kura basin underlained by one of the thickest sediments in the world. Therefore, short-period surface waves are observed to be very slow. The strong crustal multiples in receiver functions and the slow velocities in upper crust indicate the presence of thick sedimentary unit (up to 20 km). Crustal thickness varies from 34 to 52 km in the region. The thickest crust is in Lesser Caucasus and the thinnest is in the Arabian Plate. The lithospheric mantle in the Greater Caucasus and the Kura depression is faster than the Anatolian Plateau and Lesser Caucasus. This possibly indicates the presence of cold lithosphere. The lower crust is slowest in the northeastern part of the Anatolian Plateau where Holocene volcanoes are located.

  3. A Seismic Transmission System for Continuous Monitoring of the Lithosphere : A Proposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unger, R.

    2002-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to enhance earthquake prediction feasibility. We present the concept and the design layout of a novel seismic transmission system capable of continuously monitoring the Lithosphere for changes in Earth physics parameters governing seismic wave propagation.

  4. Spatial patterns in the distribution of kimberlites: relationship to tectonic processes and lithosphere structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemia, Zurab; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of diamonds in kimberlite-type rocks more than a century ago, a number of theories regarding the processes involved in kimberlite emplacement have been put forward to explain the unique properties of kimberlite magmatism. Geological data suggests that pre-existing lithosphere ...

  5. Spatial patterns in the distribution of kimberlites: relationship to tectonic processes and lithosphere structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemia, Zurab; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    Since the discovery of diamonds in kimberlite-type rocks more than a century ago, a number of theories regarding the processes involved in kimberlite emplacement have been put forward to explain the unique properties of kimberlite magmatism. Geological data suggests that pre-existing lithosphere ...

  6. Estimation of the Lithospheric Component Share in the Earth Natural Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshkov, S. Y.; Gordeev, V. F.; Polyvach, V. I.; Shtalin, S. G.; Pustovalov, K. N.

    2017-04-01

    Article describes the results of the atmosphere and Earth’s crust climatic and ecological parameters integrated monitoring. The estimation is made for lithospheric component share in the Earth natural pulsed electromagnetic field structure. To estimate lithospheric component we performed a round-the-clock monitoring of the Earth natural pulsed electromagnetic field background variations at the experiment location and measured the Earth natural pulsed electromagnetic field under electric shields. Natural materials in a natural environment were used for shielding, specifically lakes with varying parameters of water conductivity. Skin effect was used in the experiment - it is the tendency of electromagnetic waves amplitude to decrease with greater depths in the conductor. Atmospheric and lithospheric component the Earth natural pulsed electromagnetic field data recorded on terrain was compared against the recorded data with atmosphere component decayed by an electric shield. In summary we have demonstrated in the experiment that thunderstorm discharge originating electromagnetic field decay corresponds to the decay calculated using Maxwell equations. In the absence of close lightning strikes the ratio of field intensity recorded on terrain to shielded field intensity is inconsistent with the ratio calculated for atmospheric sources, that confirms there is a lithospheric component present to the Earth natural pulsed electromagnetic field.

  7. Surface wave imaging of the weakly extended Malawi Rift from ambient-noise and teleseismic Rayleigh waves from onshore and lake-bottom seismometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, N. J.; Gaherty, J. B.; Shillington, D. J.; Ebinger, C. J.; Nyblade, A. A.; Mbogoni, G. J.; Chindandali, P. R. N.; Ferdinand, R. W.; Mulibo, G. D.; Kamihanda, G.; Keir, D.; Scholz, C.; Selway, K.; O'Donnell, J. P.; Tepp, G.; Gallacher, R.; Mtelela, K.; Salima, J.; Mruma, A.

    2017-06-01

    Located at the southernmost sector of the Western Branch of the East African Rift System, the Malawi Rift exemplifies an active, magma-poor, weakly extended continental rift. To investigate the controls on rifting, we image crustal and uppermost mantle structure beneath the region using ambient-noise and teleseismic Rayleigh-wave phase velocities between 9 and 100 s period. Our study includes six lake-bottom seismometers located in Lake Malawi (Nyasa), the first time seismometers have been deployed in any of the African rift lakes. Noise levels in the lake are lower than that of shallow oceanic environments and allow successful application of compliance corrections and instrument orientation determination. Resulting phase-velocity maps reveal slow velocities primarily confined to Lake Malawi at short periods (T thick sediments in the border-fault bounded rift basin. The slowest velocities occur within the Central Basin where Malawi Rift sedimentary strata may overlie older (Permo-Triassic) Karoo group sediments. At longer periods (T > 25 s), a prominent low-velocity anomaly exists beneath the Rungwe Volcanic Province at the northern terminus of the rift basin. Estimates of phase-velocity sensitivity indicates these low velocities occur within the lithospheric mantle and potentially uppermost asthenosphere, suggesting that mantle processes may control the association of volcanic centres and the localization of magmatism. Beneath the main portion of the Malawi Rift, a modest reduction in velocity is also observed at periods sensitive to the crust and upper mantle, but these velocities are much higher than those observed beneath Rungwe.

  8. Towards seismic waveform inversion of long-offset Ocean-Bottom Seismic data for deep crustal imaging offshore Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, S.; Lumley, D. E.; Kamei, R.; Goncharov, A.; Shragge, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Ocean Bottom Seismic datasets have become increasingly used in recent years to develop high-resolution, wavelength-scale P-wave velocity models of the lithosphere from waveform inversion, due to their recording of long-offset transmitted phases. New OBS surveys evolve towards novel acquisition geometries involving longer offsets (several hundreds of km), broader frequency content (1-100 Hz), while receiver sampling often remains sparse (several km). Therefore, it is critical to assess the effects of such geometries on the eventual success and resolution of waveform inversion velocity models. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of waveform inversion on the Bart 2D OBS profile acquired offshore Western Australia, to investigate regional crustal and Moho structures. The dataset features 14 broadband seismometers (0.01-100 Hz) from AuScope's national OBS fleet, offsets in excess of 280 km, and a sparse receiver sampling (18 km). We perform our analysis in four stages: (1) field data analysis, (2) 2D P-wave velocity model building, synthetic data (3) modelling, and (4) waveform inversion. Data exploration shows high-quality active-source signal down to 2Hz, and usable first arrivals to offsets greater than 100 km. The background velocity model is constructed by combining crustal and Moho information in continental reference models (e.g., AuSREM, AusMoho). These low-resolution studies suggest a crustal thickness of 20-25 km along our seismic line and constitute a starting point for synthetic modelling and inversion. We perform synthetic 2D time-domain modelling to: (1) evaluate the misfit between synthetic and field data within the usable frequency band (2-10 Hz); (2) validate our velocity model; and (3) observe the effects of sparse OBS interval on data quality. Finally, we apply 2D acoustic frequency-domain waveform inversion to the synthetic data to generate velocity model updates. The inverted model is compared to the reference model to investigate the

  9. Lithospheric architecture of the South-Western Alps revealed by multiparameter teleseismic full-waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, S.; Monteiller, V.; Operto, S.; Nolet, G.; Paul, A.; Zhao, L.

    2018-02-01

    The Western Alps, although being intensively investigated, remains elusive when it comes to determining its lithospheric structure. New inferences on the latter are important for the understanding of processes and mechanisms of orogeny needed to unravel the dynamic evolution of the Alps. This situation led to the deployment of the CIFALPS temporary experiment, conducted to address the lack of seismological data amenable to high-resolution seismic imaging of the crust and the upper mantle. We perform a 3-D isotropic full-waveform inversion (FWI) of nine teleseismic events recorded by the CIFALPS experiment to infer 3-D models of both density and P- and S-wave velocities of the Alpine lithosphere. Here, by FWI is meant the inversion of the full seismograms including phase and amplitude effects within a time window following the first arrival up to a frequency of 0.2 Hz. We show that the application of the FWI at the lithospheric scale is able to generate images of the lithosphere with unprecedented resolution and can furnish a reliable density model of the upper lithosphere. In the shallowest part of the crust, we retrieve the shape of the fast/dense Ivrea body anomaly and detect the low velocities of the Po and SE France sedimentary basins. The geometry of the Ivrea body as revealed by our density model is consistent with the Bouguer anomaly. A sharp Moho transition is followed from the external part (30 km depth) to the internal part of the Alps (70-80 km depth), giving clear evidence of a continental subduction event during the formation of the Alpine Belt. A low-velocity zone in the lower lithosphere of the S-wave velocity model supports the hypothesis of a slab detachment in the western part of the Alps that is followed by asthenospheric upwelling. The application of FWI to teleseismic data helps to fill the gap of resolution between traditional imaging techniques, and enables integrated interpretations of both upper and lower lithospheric structures.

  10. 46 CFR 173.058 - Double bottom requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.058 Double bottom requirements. Each new sailing school vessel... service must comply with the double bottom requirements in §§ 171.105 through 171.109, inclusive, of this...

  11. Bottom Trawl Survey Protocol Development (HB0706, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Cruise objectives include: 1) Investigate performance characteristics of new research bottom trawl; 2) Develop standard operating procedures for the NEFSC Bottom...

  12. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary beneath the South Island of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Junlin; Fischer, Karen M.; Savage, Martha K.

    2018-02-01

    Lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) properties beneath the South Island of New Zealand have been imaged by Sp receiver function common-conversion point stacking. In this transpressional boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates, dextral offset on the Alpine fault and convergence have occurred for the past 20 My, with the Alpine fault now bounded by Australian plate subduction to the south and Pacific plate subduction to the north. Using data from onland seismometers, especially the 29 broadband stations of the New Zealand permanent seismic network (GeoNet), we obtained 24,971 individual receiver functions by extended-time multi-taper deconvolution, and mapped them to three-dimensional space using a Fresnel zone approximation. Pervasive strong positive Sp phases are observed in the LAB depth range indicated by surface wave tomography. These phases are interpreted as conversions from a velocity decrease across the LAB. In the central South Island, the LAB is observed to be deeper and broader to the northwest of the Alpine fault. The deeper LAB to the northwest of the Alpine fault is consistent with models in which oceanic lithosphere attached to the Australian plate was partially subducted, or models in which the Pacific lithosphere has been underthrust northwest past the Alpine fault. Further north, a zone of thin lithosphere with a strong and vertically localized LAB velocity gradient occurs to the northwest of the fault, juxtaposed against a region of anomalously weak LAB conversions to the southeast of the fault. This structure could be explained by lithospheric blocks with contrasting LAB properties that meet beneath the Alpine fault, or by the effects of Pacific plate subduction. The observed variations in LAB properties indicate strong modification of the LAB by the interplay of convergence and strike-slip deformation along and across this transpressional plate boundary.

  13. Continental collision slowing due to viscous mantle lithosphere rather than topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Marin Kristen

    2012-02-29

    Because the inertia of tectonic plates is negligible, plate velocities result from the balance of forces acting at plate margins and along their base. Observations of past plate motion derived from marine magnetic anomalies provide evidence of how continental deformation may contribute to plate driving forces. A decrease in convergence rate at the inception of continental collision is expected because of the greater buoyancy of continental than oceanic lithosphere, but post-collisional rates are less well understood. Slowing of convergence has generally been attributed to the development of high topography that further resists convergent motion; however, the role of deforming continental mantle lithosphere on plate motions has not previously been considered. Here I show that the rate of India's penetration into Eurasia has decreased exponentially since their collision. The exponential decrease in convergence rate suggests that contractional strain across Tibet has been constant throughout the collision at a rate of 7.03 × 10(-16) s(-1), which matches the current rate. A constant bulk strain rate of the orogen suggests that convergent motion is resisted by constant average stress (constant force) applied to a relatively uniform layer or interface at depth. This finding follows new evidence that the mantle lithosphere beneath Tibet is intact, which supports the interpretation that the long-term strain history of Tibet reflects deformation of the mantle lithosphere. Under conditions of constant stress and strength, the deforming continental lithosphere creates a type of viscous resistance that affects plate motion irrespective of how topography evolved.

  14. Isabella Anomaly: Lithospheric drip, delamination or fragment of the Farallon plate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, D. W.; Rau, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Isabella Anomaly or Central Valley Anomaly in California is perhaps the best known example of a high seismic velocity anomaly that has been interpreted as a lithospheric instability. High P and S velocities extend to a depth of at least 150 km and perhaps to several hundred km in a nearly cylindrical region 100-150 km across. The amplitude of the anomaly in the upper 200 km is similar to that of the subducted Gorda plate. This anomaly has been variously interpreted as a convective drip or as a remnant of the lithosphere delaminated from beneath the eastern Sierra Nevada. We suggest instead that the Isabella anomaly may represent a fragment of the subducted Farallon plate that is still attached to the Pacific lithosphere. Directly seaward of the anomaly is the fossil Monterrey microplate, which is a remnant of the Farallon plate that was left when subduction ceased before the spreading center itself subducted. The microplate was then incorporated into the Pacific plate, but it is not clear how much of the subducting slab remained attached to the surface microplate. New Rayleigh wave tomographic images of Baja California show that there are still fragments of the Farallon plate remaining attached to the unsubducted Guadelupe and Magdelena microplate remnants, with anomalies extending down to at least 150 km. The geometry of these anomalies in relationship to the microplates is very similar to that of the Isabella anomaly. A major question with this interpretation is whether a bit of oceanic lithosphere extending down into the asthenosphere could be dragged along with the surface microplate/Pacific plate for 20 Ma since subduction ceased. Another anomaly similar to the Isabella anomaly begins in the shallow mantle beneath the northern end of San Francisco bay and dips to the west - another candidate for a lithospheric drip or convective instability?

  15. Application of the electrical characterization to the study of the hydrated phases of the cement with coal bottom ash; Aplicacion de la caracterizacion electrica al estudio de las fases hidratadas de cemento con adicion de escorias de centrales termicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menendez, E.; Frutos, J. de; Alvaro, A. M.

    2014-02-01

    The present paper investigates the influence of using Bottom and Fly Ash as partial replacement of cement in the hydration process. Through measurements of electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X -ray diffraction (XRD), we analyze from the early stages to the hydration process to the end. Values of EIS, XRD and its relation, are used to determine transformation of hydrated phases, and for each of the substitutions, is indicated as modified the hydrated phase as a function of time and compared it with the reference material. It also proves the relevance of using EIS measures in real time, and as non destructive testing to characterize the hydration process of these materials. (Author)

  16. Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopes of ultramafic xenoliths in volcanic rocks of Eastern China: enriched components EMI and EMII in subcontinental lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumoto, M.; Basu, A.R.; Wankang, H.; Junwen, W.; Guanghong, X.

    1992-01-01

    The UThPb, SmNd, and RbSr isotopic systematics of mafic and ultramafic xenolithic rocks and associated megacrystic inclusions of aluminous augite and garnet, that occur in three alkalic volcanic suites: Kuandian in eastern Liaoning Province, Hanluoba in Hebei Province, and Minxi in western Fujian Province, China are described. In various isotopic data plots, the inclusion data invariably fall outside the isotopic ranges displayed by the host volcanic rocks, testifying to the true xenolithic nature of the inclusions. The major element partitioning data on Ca, Mg, Fe, and Al among the coexisting silicate minerals of the xenoliths establish their growth at ambient mantle temperatures of 1000-1100??C and possible depths of 70-80 km in the subcontinental lithosphere. Although the partitioning of these elements reflects equilibrium between coexisting minerals, equilibria of the Pb, Nd, and Sr isotopic systems among the minerals were not preserved. The disequilibria are most notable with respect to the 206Pb 204Pb ratios of the minerals. On a NdSr isotopic diagram, the inclusion data plot